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Sample records for culotte stenting procedure

  1. A Pilot Study on Culottes versus Crossover Single Stenting for True Coronary Bifurcation Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linlin; Zhong, Wenliang; Luo, Yukun; Chen, Lianglong

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to compare clinical and angiographic outcomes of planned culottes technique with that of provisional crossover single stenting in the treatment of true coronary bifurcation lesions (CBL) with drug-eluting stent (DES). Methods True CBL patients (n = 104) were randomly assigned to either the provisional stenting of the side branch (crossover group) or the culottes group. Additional side branch (SB) stenting in the crossover group was required if there was thrombolysis in myocardial infarction flow ≤ 1 flow). The primary end point was the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at nine months, including cardiac death, myocardial infarction, target lesion/vessel revascularization and in-stent thrombosis. The secondary end point was angiographic in-segment restenosis at nine months. Results The rate of MACE at nine months was similar between the crossover and culottes groups (7.7% vs. 7.7%, p = 1.000). Additional SB stenting in the crossover group was required in 3.8% of patients. There was one procedural occlusion of SB in the crossover group. At nine months, the rate of in-segment restenosis was similar in the parent main vessel (0% vs. 1.9%, p = 1.000), main branch (1.9% vs. 7.7%, p = 0.363) and SB (17.3% vs. 9.6%, p = 0.250) between the crossover and culottes groups, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrated that there is no significant difference in cumulative MACE or in-segment restenosis between crossover and culottes groups. Larger randomized clinical trials are warranted to re-evaluate the outcomes of the provisional crossover stenting versus the culottes stenting techniques utilizing DES for true CBL. PMID:27471358

  2. Randomized Comparison of the Crush Versus the Culotte Stenting for Coronary Artery Bifurcation Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xu-Wei; Zhao, Dong-Hui; Peng, Hong-Yu; Fan, Qian; Ma, Qin; Xu, Zhen-Ye; Fan, Chao; Liu, Li-Yu; Liu, Jing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background: The crush and the culotte stenting were both reported to be effective for complex bifurcation lesion treatment. However, their comparative performance remains elusive. Methods: A total of 300 patients with coronary bifurcation lesions were randomly assigned to crush (n = 150) and culotte (n = 150) treatment. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) at 12 months including cardiac death, myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis, and target vessel revascularization. Index lesion restenosis at 12 months was a secondary endpoint. The surface integrals of time-averaged wall shear stress at bifurcation sites were also be quantified. Results: There were no significant differences in MACE rates between the two groups at 12-month follow-up: Crush 6.7%, culotte 5.3% (P = 0.48). The rates of index lesion restenosis were 12.7% versus 6.0% (P = 0.047) in the crush and the culotte groups, respectively. At 12-month follow-up, the surface integrals of time-averaged wall shear stress at bifurcation sites in the crush group were significantly lower than the culotte group ([5.01 ± 0.95] × 10−4 Newton and [6.08 ± 1.16] × 10−4 Newton, respectively; P = 0.003). Conclusions: Both the crush and the culotte bifurcation stenting techniques showed satisfying clinical and angiographic results at 12-month follow-up. Bifurcation lesions treated with the culotte technique tended to have lower restenosis rates and more favorable flow patterns. PMID:26904982

  3. Drug delivery patterns for different stenting techniques in coronary bifurcations: a comparative computational study.

    PubMed

    Cutrì, Elena; Zunino, Paolo; Morlacchi, Stefano; Chiastra, Claudio; Migliavacca, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    The treatment of coronary bifurcation lesions represents a challenge for the interventional cardiologists due to the lower rate of procedural success and the higher risk of restenosis. The advent of drug-eluting stents (DES) has dramatically reduced restenosis and consequently the request for re-intervention. The aim of the present work is to provide further insight about the effectiveness of DES by means of a computational study that combines virtual stent implantation, fluid dynamics and drug release for different stenting protocols currently used in the treatment of a coronary artery bifurcation. An explicit dynamic finite element model is developed in order to obtain realistic configurations of the implanted devices used to perform fluid dynamics analysis by means of a previously developed finite element method coupling the blood flow and the intramural plasma filtration in rigid arteries. To efficiently model the drug release, a multiscale strategy is adopted, ranging from lumped parameter model accounting for drug release to fully 3-D models for drug transport to the artery. Differences in drug delivery to the artery are evaluated with respect to local drug dosage. This model allowed to compare alternative stenting configurations (namely the Provisional Side Branch, the Culotte and the Inverted Culotte techniques), thus suggesting guidelines in the treatment of coronary bifurcation lesions and addressing clinical issues such as the effectiveness of drug delivery to lesions in the side branch, as well as the influence of incomplete strut apposition and overlapping stents.

  4. Clinical, angiographic and procedural characteristics of longitudinal stent deformation.

    PubMed

    Guler, A; Guler, Y; Acar, E; Aung, S M; Efe, S C; Kilicgedik, A; Karabay, C Y; Barutcu, S; Tigen, M K; Pala, S; İzgi, A; Esen, A M; Kirma, C

    2016-08-01

    Recently, longitudinal stent deformation (LSD) has been reported increasingly. Even though the reported cases included almost all stent designs, most cases were seen in the Element™ stent design (Boston Scientific, Natick, MA, USA). It is considered that stent design, lesion and procedural characteristics play a role in the etiology of LSD. Yet, the effect of LSD on long-term clinical outcomes has not been studied well. Element stents implanted between January 2013 and April 2015 in our hospital were examined retrospectively. Patients were grouped into two according to the presence of LSD, and their clinical, lesion and procedural characteristics were studied. Twenty-four LSD's were detected in 1812 Element stents deployed in 1314 patients (1.83 % of PCI cases and 1.32 % of all Element stents). LMCA lesions (16.7 % vs 1.6 %, p < 0.001), complex lesions (75 % vs 35.1 %, p < 0.001), bifurcation lesions (37.5 % vs 18.3 %, p = 0.017), ostial lesions (33.3 % vs 12.8 %, p = 0.003), using of extra-support guiding catheter (54.2 % vs 22.3 %, p < 0.001) and extra-support guidewire (37.5 % vs 16.2 %, p = 0.005) were found to be more frequent in cases with LSD than in cases without it. In addition, the number of stents, stent inflation pressure and the use of post-dilatation were significantly different between the two groups. Two patients had an adverse event during the follow-up period. LSD is a rarely encountered complication, and is more common in complex lesions such as ostial, bifurcation and LMCA lesions. The use of extra-support guiding catheter, extra-support guidewires and low stent inflation pressure increases the occurrence of LSD. Nevertheless, with increased awareness of LSD and proper treatment, unwanted long-term outcomes can be successfully prevented. PMID:27198891

  5. Patient-specific simulations of stenting procedures in coronary bifurcations: two clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Morlacchi, Stefano; Colleoni, Sebastian George; Cárdenes, Rubén; Chiastra, Claudio; Diez, Jose Luis; Larrabide, Ignacio; Migliavacca, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Computational simulations of stenting procedures in idealized geometries can only provide general guidelines and their use in the patient-specific planning of percutaneous treatments is inadequate. Conversely, image-based patient-specific tools that are able to realistically simulate different interventional options might facilitate clinical decision-making and provide useful insights on the treatment for each individual patient. The aim of this work is the implementation of a patient-specific model that uses image-based reconstructions of coronary bifurcations and is able to replicate real stenting procedures following clinical indications. Two clinical cases are investigated focusing the attention on the open problems of coronary bifurcations and their main treatment, the provisional side branch approach. Image-based reconstructions are created combining the information from conventional coronary angiography and computed tomography angiography while structural finite element models are implemented to replicate the real procedure performed in the patients. First, numerical results show the biomechanical influence of stents deployment in the coronary bifurcations during and after the procedures. In particular, the straightening of the arterial wall and the influence of two overlapping stents on stress fields are investigated here. Results show that a sensible decrease of the vessel tortuosity occurs after stent implantation and that overlapping devices result in an increased stress state of both the artery and the stents. Lastly, the comparison between numerical and image-based post-stenting configurations proved the reliability of such models while replicating stent deployment in coronary arteries.

  6. Repeat Procedures Within 30 days in Patients Stented for Malignant Distal Biliary Strictures: Experience of 508 Patients at a Tertiary Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Michael F; Chan, Calvin HY; Branch, Malcolm S; Jowell, Paul S; Baillie, John

    2012-01-01

    Background Stent related occlusion and migration remains a problem despite attempts to improve stent design over this time period. Flanged polyethylene plastic stents (FPS) remains the stent of choice in most centers. Early failure of stents placed for malignant extrahepatic biliary strictures (MEBS) has not previously been studied in detail. We set out to determine the incidence and reasons for biliary stent change within 30 days of the index procedure in a large tertiary center population during a period where (FPS) was the sole plastic stent used. Methods Retrospective analysis of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) was undertaken in patients who were stented for presumed or known MEBS between 1993 and 2001. Patients who required repeat stenting within 30 days were identified. Results All 508 patients were stented for MEBS. 5.7% of patients had a total of 34 repeat stenting procedures within 30 days of the index procedure; 27of 29 index stents were plastic, 2 were self-expandable metal stents (SEMS), 20 (3.9%) patients had stent failure as the reason for a stent exchange (plastic stent occlusion n = 15, mean time to stent change 14 ± 8.3 days; metal stent occlusion n = 2, mean time to stent change 24.5 ± 7.8 days; plastic stent migration n = 3, mean time to stent change 25 ± 5.3 days). There was a statistically significant difference in the time to stent change between the occluded plastic stent and migrated plastic stent cases (P = 0.045, 95% CI -21.7 to -0.29). 6 patients spent at least 2 additional days in hospital as a result of stent failure. Conclusions Early stent failure is an uncommon problem, especially in patients with SEMS. Early plastic stent failure appears to occur sooner with stent occlusion than with stent migration. Early stent failure is associated with significant morbidity and bears an economic impact in additional procedures and hospital stay.

  7. J-tube technique for double-j stent insertion during laparoscopic upper urinary tract surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Suk; Lee, Byung Ki; Jung, Jin-Woo; Lee, Jung Keun; Byun, Seok-Soo; Lee, Sang Eun; Jeong, Chang Wook

    2014-11-01

    Double-J stent insertion has been generally performed during laparoscopic upper urinary tract (UUT) surgical procedures to prevent transient urinary tract obstruction and postoperative flank pain from ureteral edema and blood clots. Several restrictive conditions that make this procedure difficult and time consuming, however, include the coiled distal ends of the flexible Double-J stent and the limited bending angle of the laparoscopic instruments. To overcome these limitations, we devised a Double-J stent insertion method using the new J-tube technique. Between July 2011 and May 2013, Double-J stents were inserted using the J-tube technique in 33 patients who underwent a laparoscopic UUT surgical procedure by a single surgeon. The mean stent placement time was 4.8±2.7 minutes, and there were no intraoperative complications. In conclusion, the J-tube technique is a safe and time-saving method for Double-J stent insertion during laparoscopic surgical procedures.

  8. Covered Stents in the Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Aneurysms: Procedural Results and Midterm Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Beregi, Jean-Paul; Prat, Alain; Willoteaux, Serge; Vasseur, Marc-Antoine; Boularand, Valerie; Desmoucelle, Frederic

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate initial and midterm results of percutaneous treatment of peripheral aneurysms using covered stents. Methods: Between June 1994 and December 1997 we used covered stents (EndoPro System or Passager) on 19 patients with peripheral aneurysms (7 iliac, 5 subclavian, 3 femoral, 3 popliteal, 1 carotid). Results: Successful aneurysm exclusion was achieved in 18 of 19 patients (95%). In the short term (<30 days), one patient died of puncture site hemorrhage complicated by myocardial infarction; two femoral stents were surgically removed because of leakage. At subsequent follow-up (mean 20 months) two further unrelated deaths occurred. At 1 year (intention-to-treat) the stent was patent in 13 of 19 patients (68%) and the aneurysm was excluded in 17 of 19 (89%). Conclusion: Treatment of peripheral aneurysms with covered stents has a high rate of immediate procedural success. Continued exclusion of the aneurysms is achieved in a large proportion of patients but there is a relatively high rate of stent thrombosis.

  9. Endovascular Stent-Graft Repair as a Late Secondary Procedure After Previous Aortic Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Matsagas, Miltiadis I. Anagnostopoulos, Constantine E.; Papakostas, John C.; DeRose, Joseph J.; Siminelakis, Stavros; Katsouras, Christos S.; Toumpoulis, Ioannis K.; Drossos, George E.; Michalis, Lampros K.

    2006-08-15

    Thoracic and abdominal aortic endovascular procedures as alternatives to aortic reoperations were studied in three different cases. An anastomotic aneurysm after previous thoracic aortic graft for coarctation, a second-stage elephant trunk repair (descending thoracic aortic aneurysm), and a secondary aneurysm proximal to a previous abdominal aortic graft were successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafts. During the follow-up period no lethal events or major aortic or graft-related complications were observed, except a type II endoleak in the anastomotic aortic aneurysm case. An endovascular stent-graft can be safely deployed into a previously implanted vascular graft, avoiding repeat surgery.

  10. Endoscopic multiple metal stenting for the treatment of enteral leaks near the biliary orifice: A novel effective rescue procedure

    PubMed Central

    Mutignani, Massimiliano; Dioscoridi, Lorenzo; Dokas, Stefanos; Aseni, Paolo; Carnevali, Pietro; Forti, Edoardo; Manta, Raffaele; Sica, Mariano; Tringali, Alberto; Pugliese, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Between April 2013 and October 2015, 6 patients developed periampullary duodenal or jejunal/biliary leaks after major abdominal surgery. In all patients, percutaneous drainage of the collection or re-operation with primary surgical repair was attempted at first but failed. A fully covered enteral metal stent was placed in all patients to seal the leak. Subsequently, we cannulated the common bile duct and, in some cases, and the main pancreatic duct inserting hydrophilic guidewires through the stent after dilating the stent mesh with a dilatation balloon or breaking the meshes with Argon Plasma Beam. Finally, we inserted a fully covered biliary metal stent to drain the bile into the lumen of the enteral stent. In cases of normal proximal upper gastrointestinal anatomy, a pancreatic plastic stent was also inserted. Oral food intake was initiated when the abdominal drain outflow stopped completely. Stent removal was scheduled four to eight weeks later after a CT scan to confirm the complete healing of the fistula and the absence of any perilesional residual fluid collection. The leak resolved in five patients. One patient died two days after the procedure due to severe, pre-existing, sepsis. The stents were removed endoscopically in four weeks in four patients. In one patient we experienced stent migration causing small bowel obstruction. In this case, the stents were removed surgically. Four patients are still alive today. They are still under follow-up and doing well. Bilio-enteral fully covered metal stenting with or without pancreatic stenting was feasible, safe and effective in treating postoperative enteral leaks near the biliopancreatic orifice in our small series. This minimally invasive procedure can be implemented in selected patients as a rescue procedure to repair these challenging leaks.

  11. Endoscopic multiple metal stenting for the treatment of enteral leaks near the biliary orifice: A novel effective rescue procedure

    PubMed Central

    Mutignani, Massimiliano; Dioscoridi, Lorenzo; Dokas, Stefanos; Aseni, Paolo; Carnevali, Pietro; Forti, Edoardo; Manta, Raffaele; Sica, Mariano; Tringali, Alberto; Pugliese, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Between April 2013 and October 2015, 6 patients developed periampullary duodenal or jejunal/biliary leaks after major abdominal surgery. In all patients, percutaneous drainage of the collection or re-operation with primary surgical repair was attempted at first but failed. A fully covered enteral metal stent was placed in all patients to seal the leak. Subsequently, we cannulated the common bile duct and, in some cases, and the main pancreatic duct inserting hydrophilic guidewires through the stent after dilating the stent mesh with a dilatation balloon or breaking the meshes with Argon Plasma Beam. Finally, we inserted a fully covered biliary metal stent to drain the bile into the lumen of the enteral stent. In cases of normal proximal upper gastrointestinal anatomy, a pancreatic plastic stent was also inserted. Oral food intake was initiated when the abdominal drain outflow stopped completely. Stent removal was scheduled four to eight weeks later after a CT scan to confirm the complete healing of the fistula and the absence of any perilesional residual fluid collection. The leak resolved in five patients. One patient died two days after the procedure due to severe, pre-existing, sepsis. The stents were removed endoscopically in four weeks in four patients. In one patient we experienced stent migration causing small bowel obstruction. In this case, the stents were removed surgically. Four patients are still alive today. They are still under follow-up and doing well. Bilio-enteral fully covered metal stenting with or without pancreatic stenting was feasible, safe and effective in treating postoperative enteral leaks near the biliopancreatic orifice in our small series. This minimally invasive procedure can be implemented in selected patients as a rescue procedure to repair these challenging leaks. PMID:27606045

  12. Endoscopic multiple metal stenting for the treatment of enteral leaks near the biliary orifice: A novel effective rescue procedure.

    PubMed

    Mutignani, Massimiliano; Dioscoridi, Lorenzo; Dokas, Stefanos; Aseni, Paolo; Carnevali, Pietro; Forti, Edoardo; Manta, Raffaele; Sica, Mariano; Tringali, Alberto; Pugliese, Francesco

    2016-08-10

    Between April 2013 and October 2015, 6 patients developed periampullary duodenal or jejunal/biliary leaks after major abdominal surgery. In all patients, percutaneous drainage of the collection or re-operation with primary surgical repair was attempted at first but failed. A fully covered enteral metal stent was placed in all patients to seal the leak. Subsequently, we cannulated the common bile duct and, in some cases, and the main pancreatic duct inserting hydrophilic guidewires through the stent after dilating the stent mesh with a dilatation balloon or breaking the meshes with Argon Plasma Beam. Finally, we inserted a fully covered biliary metal stent to drain the bile into the lumen of the enteral stent. In cases of normal proximal upper gastrointestinal anatomy, a pancreatic plastic stent was also inserted. Oral food intake was initiated when the abdominal drain outflow stopped completely. Stent removal was scheduled four to eight weeks later after a CT scan to confirm the complete healing of the fistula and the absence of any perilesional residual fluid collection. The leak resolved in five patients. One patient died two days after the procedure due to severe, pre-existing, sepsis. The stents were removed endoscopically in four weeks in four patients. In one patient we experienced stent migration causing small bowel obstruction. In this case, the stents were removed surgically. Four patients are still alive today. They are still under follow-up and doing well. Bilio-enteral fully covered metal stenting with or without pancreatic stenting was feasible, safe and effective in treating postoperative enteral leaks near the biliopancreatic orifice in our small series. This minimally invasive procedure can be implemented in selected patients as a rescue procedure to repair these challenging leaks. PMID:27606045

  13. Risk Factors for Coronary Drug-Eluting Stent Thrombosis: Influence of Procedural, Patient, Lesion, and Stent Related Factors and Dual Antiplatelet Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hermiller, James B.; Ferguson, Joanne M.; Simonton, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    The complication of stent thrombosis (ST) emerged at a rate of 0.5% annually for first-generation drug-eluting stents (DES), often presenting as death or myocardial infarction. Procedural factors such as stent underexpansion and malapposition are risk factors for ST in patients. The type of lesion being treated and lesion morphology also influence healing after treatment with DES and can contribute to ST. Second-generation DES such as the XIENCE V everolimus-eluting stent differ from the first-generation stents with respect to antiproliferative agents, coating technologies, and stent frame. Improvements in stent structure have resulted in a more complete endothelialization, thereby decreasing the incidence of ST. Bioresorbable scaffolds show promise for restoring vasomotor function and minimizing rates of very late ST. Post-PCI treatment with aspirin and clopidogrel for a year is currently the standard of care for DES, but high-risk patients may benefit from more potent antiplatelet agents. The optimal duration of DAPT for DES is currently unclear and will be addressed in large-scale randomized clinical trials. PMID:23862074

  14. Stents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Aneurysm Carotid Artery Disease Coronary Heart Disease Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Peripheral Artery Disease Send a link to NHLBI ... an artery as part of a procedure called percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), also known as coronary angioplasty. PCI restores ...

  15. Detailed Analysis of Peri-Procedural Strokes in Patients Undergoing Intracranial Stenting in SAMMPRIS

    PubMed Central

    Fiorella, David; Derdeyn, Colin P; Lynn, Michael J; Barnwell, Stanley L; Hoh, Brian L.; Levy, Elad I.; Harrigan, Mark R.; Klucznik, Richard P.; McDougall, Cameron G.; Pride, G. Lee; Zaidat, Osama O.; Lutsep, Helmi L.; Waters, Michael F.; Hourihane, J. Maurice; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Chiu, David; Clark, Joni M.; Johnson, Mark D.; Torbey, Michel T.; Rumboldt, Zoran; Cloft, Harry J.; Turan, Tanya N.; Lane, Bethany F.; Janis, L. Scott; Chimowitz, Marc I.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Enrollment in the SAMMPRIS trial was halted due to the high risk of stroke or death within 30 days of enrollment in the percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) arm relative to the medical arm. This analysis focuses on the patient and procedural factors that may have been associated with peri-procedural cerebrovascular events in the trial. Methods Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate whether patient and procedural variables were associated with cerebral ischemic or hemorrhagic events occurring within 30 days of enrollment (termed peri-procedural) in the PTAS arm. Results Of 224 patients randomized to PTAS, 213 underwent angioplasty alone (n=5) or with stenting (n=208). Of these, 13 had hemorrhagic strokes (7 parenchymal, 6 subarachnoid), 19 had ischemic stroke, and 2 had cerebral infarcts with temporary signs (CITS) within the peri-procedural period. Ischemic events were categorized as perforator occlusions (13), embolic (4), mixed perforator and embolic (2), and delayed stent occlusion (2). Multivariate analyses showed that higher percent stenosis, lower modified Rankin score, and clopidogrel load associated with an activated clotting time above the target range were associated (p ≤ 0.05) with hemorrhagic stroke. Non-smoking, basilar artery stenosis, diabetes, and older age were associated (p ≤ 0.05) with ischemic events. Conclusions Peri-procedural strokes in SAMMPRIS had multiple causes with the most common being perforator occlusion. Although risk factors for peri-procedural strokes could be identified, excluding patients with these features from undergoing PTAS to lower the procedural risk would limit PTAS to a small subset of patients. Moreover, given the small number of events, the present data should be used for hypothesis generation rather than to guide patient selection in clinical practice. PMID:22984008

  16. The financial impact of an endoluminal stenting procedure.

    PubMed

    Mackey, L G; Merriel, R B; Myers, K A

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that examined the financial impact of an endoluminal grafting procedure for an abdominal aortic aneurysm using the Mialhe Endoluminal Aortic Stentor. Clinical outcomes were not a focus of this study. The results of the study suggest that financial impacts of new clinical procedures can be understood and addressed through planning and greater liaison between clinicians, coding professionals and clinical costing staff. PMID:10181667

  17. Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of Vertebrobasilar Dissecting Aneurysms: Procedural Outcomes and Factors for Recanalization

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jin Pyeong; Rhim, Jong Kook; Park, Jeong Jin; Cho, Won-Sang; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Hwang, Gyojun; Kwon, O-Ki; Han, Moon Hee

    2016-01-01

    Objective Outcomes of stent-assisted coil embolization (SACE) have not been well established in the setting of vertebrobasilar dissecting aneurysms (VBDAs) due to the low percentage of cases that need treatment and the array of available therapeutic options. Herein, we presented clinical and radiographic results of SACE in patients with VBDAs. Materials and Methods A total of 47 patients (M:F, 30:17; mean age ± SD, 53.7 ± 12.6 years), with a VBDA who underwent SACE between 2008 and 2014 at two institutions were evaluated retrospectively. Medical records and radiologic data were analyzed to assess the outcome of SACE procedures. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine the factors that were associated with aneurysmal recanalization after SACE. Results Stent-assisted coil embolization technically succeeded in all patients. Three cerebellar infarctions occurred on postembolization day 1, week 2, and month 2, but no other procedure-related complications developed. Immediately following SACE, 25 aneurysms (53.2%) showed no contrast filling into the aneurysmal sac. During a mean follow-up of 20.2 months, 37 lesions (78.7%) appeared completely occluded, whereas 10 lesions showed recanalization, 5 of which required additional embolization. Overall recanalization rate was 12.64% per lesion-year, and mean postoperative time to recanalization was 18 months (range, 3–36 months). In multivariable analysis, major branch involvement (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.28; p = 0.013) and the presence of residual sac filling (HR: 8.49, p = 0.044) were identified as statistically significant independent predictors of recanalization. No bleeding was encountered in follow-up monitoring. Conclusion Stent-assisted coil embolization appears feasible and safe for treatment of VBDAs. Long-term results were acceptable in a majority of patients studied, despite a relatively high rate of incomplete occlusion immediately after SACE. Major branch involvement and coiled

  18. Symptomatic stent cast.

    PubMed

    Keohane, John; Moore, Michael; O'Mahony, Seamus; Crosbie, Orla

    2008-02-01

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  19. iStent as a Solo Procedure for Glaucoma Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Malvankar-Mehta, Monali S.; Chen, Yufeng Nancy; Iordanous, Yiannis; Wang, Wan Wendy; Costella, John; Hutnik, Cindy M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness. It is firmly entrenched in the traditional treatment paradigm to start with pharmacotherapy. However, pharmacotherapy is not benign and has been well documented to have a number of significant challenges. Minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) that targets the outflow pathway with minimal to no scleral dissection has resulted in the need to reconsider the glaucoma treatment paradigm. Purpose To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate and quantify the effect on post-operative intraocular pressure (IOP) and number of topical glaucoma medications, in patients receiving the iStent MIGS device as the solo procedure without concurrent cataract surgery. Methods A systematic review was conducted by searching various databases between January 1, 2000, and June 30, 2014. Studies reporting up to a maximum follow-up period of 24 months were retrieved and screened using the EPPI-Reviewer 4 gateway. Percentage reduction in IOP (IOPR%), and mean reduction in topical glaucoma medications after surgery were computed. Meta-analysis was performed using STATA v. 13.0. The standardized mean difference (SMD) was calculated as the effect size for continuous scale outcomes. Heterogeneity was determined using the I2 statistics, Z-value, and χ2 statistics. Fixed-effect and random-effect models were developed based on heterogeneity. Sub-group analysis was performed based on the number of iStents implanted and the follow-up period. The outcome measures were changes in the IOP and number of glaucoma medications. Results The search strategy identified 105 records from published literature and 9 records from the grey literature. Five studies with 248 subjects were included for quantitative synthesis. A 22% IOP reduction (IOPR%) from baseline occurred at 18-months after one iStent implant, 30% at 6-months after two iStents implantations, and 40% at 6-months after implantation of three iStents. A mean

  20. Impact on in-hospital outcomes with drug-eluting stents versus bare-metal stents (from 665,804 procedures).

    PubMed

    Badheka, Apurva O; Arora, Shilpkumar; Panaich, Sidakpal S; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Patel, Nilay; Chothani, Ankit; Mehta, Kathan; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Singh, Vikas; Savani, Ghanshyambhai T; Agnihotri, Kanishk; Grover, Peeyush; Lahewala, Sopan; Patel, Achint; Bambhroliya, Chirag; Kondur, Ashok; Brown, Michael; Elder, Mahir; Kaki, Amir; Mohammad, Tamam; Grines, Cindy; Schreiber, Theodore

    2014-12-01

    Contemporary large-scale data, regarding in-hospital outcomes depending on the types of stent used for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is lacking. We queried the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2006 to 2011 using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure code 36.06 (bare-metal coronary artery stent, BMS) or 36.07 (drug-eluting coronary artery stent, DES) for PCI. All analyses were performed using the designated weighting specified to the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database to minimize bias. Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Wald's chi-square test was used for categorical variables. We built a hierarchical 2 level model adjusted for multiple confounding factors, with hospital identification incorporated as random effects in the model and propensity match analyses were used to adjust confounding variables. A total of 665,804 procedures were analyzed, which were representative of 3,277,884 procedures in the United States. Use of bare-metal stents (BMS) was associated with greater occurrence of in-hospital mortality compared with that of drug-eluting stents (DES; 1.4% vs 0.5%, p <0.001). The association stayed significant after adjustment of various possible confounding factors (odds ratio for DES versus BMS 0.59 [0.54 to 0.64, p <0.001]) and also in propensity matched cohorts (1.2% vs 0.7%, p <0.001). The results continued to be similar in the following high-risk subgroups: diabetes (0.57 [0.50 to 0.64, <0.001]), acute myocardial infarction and/or shock (0.53 [0.49 to 0.57, <0.001]), age >80 (0.66 [0.58 to 0.74, <0.001]), and multivessel PCI (0.55 [0.46 to 0.66, <0.001]). In conclusion, DES use was associated with lesser in-hospital mortality compared with BMS. This outcome benefit was seen across subgroups in various subgroups including elderly, diabetics, and acute myocardial infarction as well as multivessel interventions. PMID:25439448

  1. [Two cases of acute large bowel obstruction caused by advanced cancer treated with stenting "bridge to surgery" procedure].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Aya; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Ohta, Mitsuhiko; Sumida, Yorinobu; Kimura, Yasue; Tsutsumi, Norifumi; Yamashita, Yo-Ichi; Saeki, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Kawanaka, Hirofumi; Morita, Masaru; Sakaguchi, Yoshihisa; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Kusumoto, Tetsuya; Harada, Naohiko; Ikejiri, Koji; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2013-12-01

    Obstructive colorectal cancer accounts for 3.1-15.8% of total colorectal cancer cases, therefore it is not a rare condition. Formerly, it has been often treated with emergent operation such as colostomy or trans-anal tube decompression. Since 2012, revision of the medical payment system, it has become possible to be treated with elective operation when using endoscopic metal stent placement that enable to decompress enlarged intestine by transanal approach. This procedure provides safe elective surgery with sufficient preoperative inspection and conventional bowel preparation. We report two cases of acute large bowel obstruction due to colon cancer treated with endoscopic stent placement as a "bridge to surgery".

  2. Percutaneous Placement of Metallic Stents in Malignant Biliary Obstruction: One-Stage or Two-Stage Procedure? Pre-Dilate or Not?

    SciTech Connect

    Inal, Mehmet; Aksungur, Erol; Akguel, Erol; Oguz, Mahmut; Seydaoglu, Guelsah

    2003-02-15

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the necessity of percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage and balloon dilation procedures performed before stent insertion. One hundred and twenty-six patients with unresectable malignant biliary obstruction underwent palliative therapy by means of percutaneous transhepatic placement of 183 metallic biliary endoprotheses. Forty-four (35%) patients underwent metallic stent insertion in a one-stage procedure and 82(65%) had undergone percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage before stent insertion. Balloon dilation of the stenosis before stent placement (pre-dilation) was performed in 53 (42%) of 126 patients. The rate of the 30-day mortality was 11%, with no procedure-related deaths. The total rate of early complications was 29%, and 84% of these complications were due to percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage and pre-dilation procedures. Percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage and pre-dilation had no clinical or statistically significant effect on the patients' survival and stent patency rate. Percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage and balloon dilation increased the cost of stent placement 18% and 19%, respectively. Palliation of malignant biliary obstruction with percutaneous transhepatic stent insertion should be done directly, in the simplest way, without performing percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage and balloon dilation before stent placement. It is more useful, safe, and cost-effective.

  3. Prone split-leg position to manage encrusted ureteral stents in a single-stage procedure in women: Step-by-step surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Marchini, Giovanni Scala; Torricelli, Fábio César Miranda; Mazzucchi, Eduardo; Srougi, Miguel; Monga, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    The management of encrusted ureteral stents is costly, time consuming and may be risky for the patient and challenging for the urologist. Treatment modalities for encrusted stents include extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, cystolithopaxy, rigid or flexible ureteroscopy with intracorporeal lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, open surgery, and a combination of those methods. In this study we describe the management of severe forgotten encrusted ureteral stents in 3 female patients using a prone split-leg position. This position allows us to effectively treat any site and degree of stent encrustation in a single-session approach with the patient in the same position during the whole procedure. All patients were rendered stent and stone free. No complications occurred. PMID:26279723

  4. Computational replication of the patient-specific stenting procedure for coronary artery bifurcations: From OCT and CT imaging to structural and hemodynamics analyses.

    PubMed

    Chiastra, Claudio; Wu, Wei; Dickerhoff, Benjamin; Aleiou, Ali; Dubini, Gabriele; Otake, Hiromasa; Migliavacca, Francesco; LaDisa, John F

    2016-07-26

    The optimal stenting technique for coronary artery bifurcations is still debated. With additional advances computational simulations can soon be used to compare stent designs or strategies based on verified structural and hemodynamics results in order to identify the optimal solution for each individual's anatomy. In this study, patient-specific simulations of stent deployment were performed for 2 cases to replicate the complete procedure conducted by interventional cardiologists. Subsequent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were conducted to quantify hemodynamic quantities linked to restenosis. Patient-specific pre-operative models of coronary bifurcations were reconstructed from CT angiography and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Plaque location and composition were estimated from OCT and assigned to models, and structural simulations were performed in Abaqus. Artery geometries after virtual stent expansion of Xience Prime or Nobori stents created in SolidWorks were compared to post-operative geometry from OCT and CT before being extracted and used for CFD simulations in SimVascular. Inflow boundary conditions based on body surface area, and downstream vascular resistances and capacitances were applied at branches to mimic physiology. Artery geometries obtained after virtual expansion were in good agreement with those reconstructed from patient images. Quantitative comparison of the distance between reconstructed and post-stent geometries revealed a maximum difference in area of 20.4%. Adverse indices of wall shear stress were more pronounced for thicker Nobori stents in both patients. These findings verify structural analyses of stent expansion, introduce a workflow to combine software packages for solid and fluid mechanics analysis, and underscore important stent design features from prior idealized studies. The proposed approach may ultimately be useful in determining an optimal choice of stent and position for each patient.

  5. Computational replication of the patient-specific stenting procedure for coronary artery bifurcations: From OCT and CT imaging to structural and hemodynamics analyses.

    PubMed

    Chiastra, Claudio; Wu, Wei; Dickerhoff, Benjamin; Aleiou, Ali; Dubini, Gabriele; Otake, Hiromasa; Migliavacca, Francesco; LaDisa, John F

    2016-07-26

    The optimal stenting technique for coronary artery bifurcations is still debated. With additional advances computational simulations can soon be used to compare stent designs or strategies based on verified structural and hemodynamics results in order to identify the optimal solution for each individual's anatomy. In this study, patient-specific simulations of stent deployment were performed for 2 cases to replicate the complete procedure conducted by interventional cardiologists. Subsequent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were conducted to quantify hemodynamic quantities linked to restenosis. Patient-specific pre-operative models of coronary bifurcations were reconstructed from CT angiography and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Plaque location and composition were estimated from OCT and assigned to models, and structural simulations were performed in Abaqus. Artery geometries after virtual stent expansion of Xience Prime or Nobori stents created in SolidWorks were compared to post-operative geometry from OCT and CT before being extracted and used for CFD simulations in SimVascular. Inflow boundary conditions based on body surface area, and downstream vascular resistances and capacitances were applied at branches to mimic physiology. Artery geometries obtained after virtual expansion were in good agreement with those reconstructed from patient images. Quantitative comparison of the distance between reconstructed and post-stent geometries revealed a maximum difference in area of 20.4%. Adverse indices of wall shear stress were more pronounced for thicker Nobori stents in both patients. These findings verify structural analyses of stent expansion, introduce a workflow to combine software packages for solid and fluid mechanics analysis, and underscore important stent design features from prior idealized studies. The proposed approach may ultimately be useful in determining an optimal choice of stent and position for each patient. PMID:26655589

  6. Reverse frozen elephant trunk procedure for rescue of a thoracic stent-graft in the false lumen.

    PubMed

    Isabella, Monica A; Roselli, Eric E

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is now a common treatment for patients with descending aortic disease, including aortic dissection. As the indications for TEVAR have expanded, so has the complexity of complications. Retrograde aortic dissection may occur in 1% to 2% of patients after TEVAR. We present a patient who initially underwent TEVAR for a degenerative aneurysm followed by a proximal stent-graft extension for retrograde dissection that failed because of malposition within the false lumen. We performed a hybrid reverse frozen elephant trunk (RFET) operation as a salvage procedure for these complications. PMID:25841834

  7. Experimental Comparison of the Hemodynamic Effects of Bifurcating Coronary Stent Implantation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindise, Melissa; Vlachos, Pavlos; AETheR Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Stent implantation in coronary bifurcations imposes unique effects to the blood flow patterns and currently there is no universally accepted stent deployment approach. Despite the fact that stent-induced changes can greatly alter clinical outcomes, no concrete understanding exists regarding the hemodynamic effects of each implantation method. This work presents an experimental evaluation of the hemodynamic differences between implantation techniques. We used four common stent implantation methods including the currently preferred one-stent provisional side branch (PSB) technique and the crush (CRU), Culotte (CUL), and T-stenting (T-PR) two-stent techniques, all deployed by a cardiologist in coronary models. Particle image velocimetry was used to obtain velocity and pressure fields. Wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index, residence times, and drag and compliance metrics were evaluated and compared against an un-stented case. The results of this study demonstrate that while PSB is preferred, both it and T-PR yielded detrimental hemodynamic effects such as low WSS values. CRU provided polarizing and unbalanced results. CUL demonstrated a symmetric flow field, balanced WSS distribution, and ultimately the most favorable hemodynamic environment.

  8. Trans aqueductal, third ventricle – Cervical subarachnoid stenting: An adjuvant cerebro spinal fluid diversion procedure in midline posterior fossa tumors with hydrocephalus: The technical note and case series

    PubMed Central

    Teegala, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Persistent or progressive hydrocephalus is one of the complex problems of posterior fossa tumors associated with hydrocephalus. The author evaluated the effectiveness of single-stage tumor decompression associated with a stent technique (trans aqueductal third ventricle – Cervical subarachnoid stenting) as an adjuvant cerebro spinal fluid (CSF) diversion procedure in controlling the midline posterior fossa tumors with hydrocephalus. Materials and Methods: Prospective clinical case series of 15 patients was evaluated from July 2006 to April 2012. Fifteen clinicoradiological diagnosed cases of midline posterior fossa tumors with hydrocephalus were included in this study. All the tumors were approached through the cerebello medullary (telo velo tonsilar) fissure technique. Following the excision of the posterior fossa tumor, a sizable stent was placed across the aqueduct from the third ventricle to the cervical subarachnoid space. Results: There were nine male and six female patients with an average age of 23 years. Complete tumor excision could be achieved in 12 patients and subtotal excision with clearance of aqueduct in remaining three patients. Hydrocephalus was controlled effectively in all the patients. There were no stent-related complications. Conclusions: This study showed the reliability of single-stage tumor excision followed by placement of aqueductal stent. The success rate of this technique is comparable to those of conventional CSF diversion procedures. This is a simple, safe, and effective procedure for the management of persistent and or progressive hydrocephalus. This technique may be very useful in situations where the patient's follow-up is compromised and the patients who are from a poor economic background. Long-term results need further evaluation to assess the overall functioning of this stent technique. PMID:27366254

  9. Comparison of procedural success and long-term outcomes of stent thrombosis in coronary bypass grafts versus native coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Waldo, Stephen W; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Yeo, Khung Keong; Mahmud, Ehtisham; Patel, Mitul; Reeves, Ryan; MacGregor, John S; Low, Reginald I; Rogers, Jason H; Shunk, Kendrick A

    2013-03-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention within bypass grafts accounts for a significant percentage of total interventions. Bypass graft interventions are associated with an increased risk for stent thrombosis (ST), a condition that leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Despite this, the procedural characteristics and long-term outcomes of patients with bypass-graft ST have not been reported. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the procedural success and long-term outcomes of patients presenting with ST of coronary bypass grafts. Clinical and procedural characteristics of 205 ST cases at 5 academic hospitals were reviewed. Long-term mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events (stroke, reinfarction, and revascularization) were ascertained through review of medical records and the Social Security Death Index. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to determine the association between ST in a bypass graft and long-term outcomes. Thirteen patients (6%) in the cohort presented with ST of a coronary bypass graft. Patients with bypass-graft ST had less severe presentations with a lower proportion of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (23% vs 69%, p <0.001). Despite this, ST of a bypass graft was associated with a trend toward reduced postprocedural Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) flow grade (p = 0.09), leading to lower angiographic (58% vs 92%, p <0.001) and procedural (62% vs 92%, p <0.001) success. After multivariate adjustment, bypass-graft ST was associated with increased long-term mortality (hazard ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 10.7) and major adverse cardiovascular events (hazard ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 6.9). In conclusion, ST in coronary bypass grafts is associated with reduced angiographic and procedural success as well as increased long-term major adverse cardiovascular events compared to ST in native coronary vessels. PMID:23261000

  10. The "Lantern" Procedure to Simplify Treatment of Retrograde Type A Dissection After Thoracic Endograft Stenting.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Lin

    2016-04-01

    The emergency repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection after thoracic endovascular aortic repair is a complex and challenging surgical procedure and carries a surgical challenge. Previous studies have reported a significant mortality in the complex repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. We devised a simplified hybrid method-the "Lantern" procedure-to solve this retrograde type A aortic dissection complication.

  11. Percutaneous valved stent repair of a failed homograft: implications for the Ross procedure.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Victor; Jones, Alan; Taylor, Dylan; Coe, Yashu; Ross, David B

    2008-08-01

    A case of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation following a failed homograft in the pulmonary position is reported. A 16-year-old boy developed infective endocarditis of his pulmonary homograft, which was implanted four years earlier during a Ross procedure for congenital aortic stenosis. Following successful medical therapy, the boy was symptomatic due to pulmonary stenosis and regurgitation. A 22 mm Melody valve (Medtronic, USA) was successfully implanted percutaneously. His symptoms resolved and he was discharged home one day after the procedure. Echocardiography at the six-month follow-up demonstrated a normally functioning pulmonary valve. Percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement may make the Ross procedure a more attractive option for patients with aortic stenosis, particularly in the pediatric population.

  12. Overlap stenting for in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting

    PubMed Central

    Nishihori, Masahiro; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Yamamoto, Taiki; Goto, Shunsaku; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Izumi, Takashi; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our aim was to assess the clinical safety and efficacy of overlap stenting for in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting. The study was conducted between July 2008 and February 2015. A database of consecutive carotid artery stenting procedures was retrospectively assessed to identify the cases of in-stent restenosis that were treated with overlap stenting under proximal or distal protection. The clinical and radiological records of the patients were then reviewed. Of the 155 CAS procedures in 149 patients from the database, 6 patients met the inclusion criteria. All the 6 patients were initially treated with moderate dilatation because of the presence of an unstable plaque. The technical success rate of the overlap stenting was 100%, with no 30-day mortality or morbidity. In addition, there was no further in-stent restenosis during a follow-up period of over 12 months. These results indicated that overlap stenting for in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting was both safe and effective in our cohort. PMID:27303101

  13. Overlap stenting for in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Nishihori, Masahiro; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Yamamoto, Taiki; Goto, Shunsaku; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Izumi, Takashi; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-05-01

    Our aim was to assess the clinical safety and efficacy of overlap stenting for in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting. The study was conducted between July 2008 and February 2015. A database of consecutive carotid artery stenting procedures was retrospectively assessed to identify the cases of in-stent restenosis that were treated with overlap stenting under proximal or distal protection. The clinical and radiological records of the patients were then reviewed. Of the 155 CAS procedures in 149 patients from the database, 6 patients met the inclusion criteria. All the 6 patients were initially treated with moderate dilatation because of the presence of an unstable plaque. The technical success rate of the overlap stenting was 100%, with no 30-day mortality or morbidity. In addition, there was no further in-stent restenosis during a follow-up period of over 12 months. These results indicated that overlap stenting for in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting was both safe and effective in our cohort. PMID:27303101

  14. Stent Graft in Managing Juxta-Renal Aortoiliac Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhudesai, V. Mitra, K.; West, D. J.; Dean, M. R. E.

    2003-09-15

    Endovascular procedures are frequently used as an alternative to surgical bypass in aortic and iliac occlusion. Stents have revolutionized the scope of such endovascular procedures, but there are few reports of stents or stent grafts in occlusive juxta-renal aortic occlusion. We present a case where such occlusion was managed by use of a stent graft with successful outcome.

  15. Fluoroscopy Guided Transurethral Placement of Ureteral Metallic Stents

    PubMed Central

    Myung Gyu, Song; Seo, Tae Seok; Park, Cheol Min; Choi, Jae Woong; Lee, Jong Mee; Park, Yang Shin

    2015-01-01

    Ureteral stent exchange is usually performed under both fluoroscopic and cystoscopic guidance. We experienced two cases with retrograde placement of metallic ureteral stent via urethra under fluoroscopic guidance. When patients with double-J ureteral stent (DJUS)have symptom and want to change DJUS to metallic stent, fluoroscopic guided transurethral placement of ureteral metallic stent is a good option as alternative of cystoscopic procedure or percutaneous procedure through percutaneous nephrostomy tract. PMID:26557281

  16. Nephroureteral Stents: Principles and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Makramalla, Abouelmagd; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Nephroureteral stents including antegrade, retrograde, or internal (double-J) stents are routinely placed by interventional radiologists. The purpose of this review is to provide a detailed and comprehensive description of indications, contraindications, technique, and various technical challenges of these procedures. Also pre- and postprocedure management of patients will be discussed including routine follow-up and dealing with potential complications. PMID:23204635

  17. [Stent Grafting for Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of stent graft for aortic dissection is to terminate antegrade blood flow into the false lumen through primary entry. Early intervention for primary entry makes excellent aortic remodeling and emergent stent grafting for complicated acute type B aortic dissection is supported as a class I. On the other hand stent grafting for chronic aortic dissection is controversial. Early stent grafting is considered with in 6 months after on-set if the diameter of the descending aorta is more than 40 mm. Additional interventions for residual false lumen on the downstream aorta are still required. Stent graft for re-entry, candy-plug technique, and double stenting, other effective re-interventions were reported. Best treatment on the basis of each anatomical and physical characteristics should be selected in each institution. Frozen elephant trunk is alternative procedure for aortic dissection without the need to take account of proximal anatomical limitation and effective for acute type A aortic dissection. PMID:27440026

  18. The link between heightened thrombogenicity and inflammation: pre-procedure characterization of the patient at high risk for recurrent events after stenting.

    PubMed

    Gurbel, Paul A; Bliden, Kevin P; Kreutz, Rolf P; Dichiara, Joseph; Antonino, Mark J; Tantry, Udaya S

    2009-03-01

    Heightened thrombogenicity and biomarker evidence of inflammation have been independently associated with ischemic risk in patients with coronary artery disease. However, a study examining their relation has not been reported. We analysed the relation between measurements of thrombogenicity and biomarkers in patients undergoing stenting and followed for 24 months recurrent ischemic events. In 84 consecutive patients undergoing stenting, pre-procedure thrombogenicity was measured by thrombelastography (TEG) and conventional aggregometry whereas biomarkers were measured by fluorokine multi-analyte profiling. Patients were stratified into quartiles based on platelet-fibrin clot strength (MA) by TEG and correlated with ischemic event occurrence. Patients in the highest MA quartile (high MA) had greater ADP-induced platelet aggregation (57.5 +/- 15.0% vs. 47.9 +/- 17.6%, p = 0.05), C-reactive protein (25.0 +/- 5.6 vs. 4.2 +/- 1.0 microg/mL, p = 0.006) and interleukin-8 (23.8 +/- 2.8 vs. 14.1 +/- 1.6 pg/mL, p < 0.001) than patients within the lowest MA quartile (low MA). Epidermal growth factor (7.7 +/- 2.2 vs. 1.2 +/- 0.3 pg/mL, p = 0.006) and vascular endothelial growth factor (296 +/- 35 vs. 190 +/- 10 pg/mL, p = 0.05) were also higher. Patients with high-MA had an ischemic event more often than patients with low-MA (48% vs. 13%, p = 0.02). Our study suggests that a link is present between inflammation and heightened thrombogenicity measured pre-procedurally in the patient at high risk for recurrent ischemic events after stenting. Larger studies are required to solidify these observations and their clinical relevance.

  19. iStent® Trabecular Microbypass Stent: An Update.

    PubMed

    Resende, Arthur Fernandes; Patel, Neal Sanjay; Waisbourd, Michael; Katz, L Jay

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high rates of complications and failure experienced with current glaucoma procedures, there is a continuous search for a safer and more effective glaucoma surgery. A new class of procedures termed minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries (MIGS) aim to fill this void by offering an alternative method of IOP reduction associated with markedly reduced complication rates and shorter recovery times. The iStent, a trabecular microbypass stent, is a MIGS device that has quickly gained popularity. The device allows aqueous humor to directly drain from the anterior chamber into Schlemm's canal by bypassing an obstructed trabecular meshwork. This review examines publications about the iStent, focusing on the device's efficacy, safety, and cost when a single iStent or multiple iStents are implanted in combination with cataract surgery or as a solo procedure. Current data suggest that the iStent is a safe and effective tool in the management of mild-to-moderate glaucoma, notable for its limited complications and absence of serious adverse events following implantation. As valuable experience is gained performing ab interno MIGS, increasing familiarity with angle anatomy and iStent placement, and as newer stent designs are developed, there is promise of continual improvement in the surgical management of glaucoma.

  20. iStent® Trabecular Microbypass Stent: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Arthur Fernandes; Patel, Neal Sanjay; Waisbourd, Michael; Katz, L. Jay

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high rates of complications and failure experienced with current glaucoma procedures, there is a continuous search for a safer and more effective glaucoma surgery. A new class of procedures termed minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries (MIGS) aim to fill this void by offering an alternative method of IOP reduction associated with markedly reduced complication rates and shorter recovery times. The iStent, a trabecular microbypass stent, is a MIGS device that has quickly gained popularity. The device allows aqueous humor to directly drain from the anterior chamber into Schlemm's canal by bypassing an obstructed trabecular meshwork. This review examines publications about the iStent, focusing on the device's efficacy, safety, and cost when a single iStent or multiple iStents are implanted in combination with cataract surgery or as a solo procedure. Current data suggest that the iStent is a safe and effective tool in the management of mild-to-moderate glaucoma, notable for its limited complications and absence of serious adverse events following implantation. As valuable experience is gained performing ab interno MIGS, increasing familiarity with angle anatomy and iStent placement, and as newer stent designs are developed, there is promise of continual improvement in the surgical management of glaucoma. PMID:27413541

  1. Analysis of the stent expansion in a stenosed artery using finite element method: application to stent versus stent study.

    PubMed

    Imani, S Misagh; Goudarzi, A M; Ghasemi, S E; Kalani, A; Mahdinejad, J

    2014-10-01

    In this article, finite element method is used to investigate the mechanical behavior of a stent and to determine the biomechanical interaction between the stent and the artery in a stenting procedure. The main objective of this study is to reach to a model close to a real condition of coronary stent placement. Unlike most of the models proposed in the literature, all the steps of the deployment of a stent in the stenotic vessel (i.e. pressure increasing, constant load pressure and pressure decreasing) are simulated in this article to show the behavior of the stent in different stages of implantation. The results indicate that the first step of deployment, that is, pressure increasing, plays a main role in the success of stent implantation. So that, in order to compare the behavior of different types of stents, it is sufficient to compare their behavior at the end of pressure increasing step. In order to show the application of the findings in stent versus stent studies, three commercially available stents (the Palmaz-Schatz, Multi-Link and NIR stents) are modeled and their behavior is compared at the end of pressure increasing step. The effect of stent design on the restenosis rate is investigated. According to the findings, the possibility of restenosis is lower for Multi-Link and NIR stents in comparison with Palmaz-Schatz stent which is in good agreement with clinical results. Therefore, the testing methodology outlined here is proposed as a simple and economical alternative for "stent versus stent" complicated clinical trials.

  2. A new removable airway stent

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Tore; Sørhaug, Sveinung; Leira, Håkon Olav; Tyvold, Stig Sverre; Langø, Thomas; Hammer, Tommy; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Mattsson, Erney

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant airway obstruction is a feared complication and will most probably occur more frequently in the future because of increasing cancer incidence and increased life expectancy in cancer patients. Minimal invasive treatment using airway stents represents a meaningful and life-saving palliation. We present a new removable airway stent for improved individualised treatment. Methods To our knowledge, the new airway stent is the world's first knitted and uncovered self-expanding metal stent, which can unravel and be completely removed. In an in vivo model using two anaesthetised and spontaneously breathing pigs, we deployed and subsequently removed the stents by unravelling the device. The procedures were executed by flexible bronchoscopy in an acute and a chronic setting – a ‘proof-of-principle’ study. Results The new stent was easily and accurately deployed in the central airways, and it remained fixed in its original position. It was easy to unravel and completely remove from the airways without clinically significant complications. During the presence of the stent in the chronic study, granulation tissue was induced. This tissue disappeared spontaneously with the removal. Conclusions The new removable stent functioned according to its purpose and unravelled easily, and it was completely removed without significant technical or medical complications. Induced granulation tissue disappeared spontaneously. Further studies on animals and humans are needed to define its optimal indications and future use. PMID:27608269

  3. Predictive Factors of In-Stent Restenosis in Renal Artery Stenting: A Retrospective Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vignali, Claudio Bargellini, Irene; Lazzereschi, Michele; Cioni, Roberto; Petruzzi, Pasquale; Caramella, Davide; Pinto, Stefania; Napoli, Vinicio; Zampa, Virna; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To retrospectively evaluate the role of clinical and procedural factors in predicting in-stent restenosis in patients with renovascular disease treated by renal artery stenting. Methods. From 1995 to 2002, 147 patients underwent renal artery stenting for the treatment of significant ostial atherosclerotic stenosis. Patients underwent strict clinical and color-coded duplex ultrasound follow-up. Ninety-nine patients (111 stents), with over 6 months of continuous follow-up (mean 22{+-}12 months, range 6-60 months), were selected and classified according to the presence (group A, 30 patients, 32 lesions) or absence (group B, 69 patients, 79 lesions) of significant in-stent restenosis. A statistical analysis was performed to identify possible preprocedural and procedural predictors of restenosis considering the following data: sex, age, smoking habit, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, serum creatinine, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, renal artery stenosis grade, and stent type, length and diameter. Results. Comparing group A and B patients ({chi}{sup 2} test), a statistically significant relation was demonstrated between stent diameter and length and restenosis: the risk of in-stent restenosis decreased when the stent was {>=}6 mm in diameter and between 15 and 20 mm in length. This finding was confirmed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Stent diameter and length were proved to be significantly related to in-stent restenosis also when evaluating only patients treated by Palmaz stent (71 stents). Conclusion. Although it is based on a retrospective analysis, the present study confirms the importance of correct stent selection in increasing long-term patency, using stents of at least 6 mm in diameter and with a length of approximately 15-20 mm.

  4. Subintimal Double-Barrel Restenting of an Occluded Primary Stented Superficial Femoral Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Duterloo, Dirk Lohle, Paul N.M.; Lampmann, Leo E.H.

    2007-06-15

    In-stent re-stenosis is a frequent complication of endovascular stents, especially in the superficial femoral artery (SFA). Endovascular re-intervention of in- or peri-stent occlusive disease consists of recanilization through the occluded stent. In our case report, we describe the endovascular treatment of a previously placed stent in the SFA. We unintentionally passed the affected stent subintimally, in a double barrel fashion next to the first stent. The procedure was without any complications and with a successful angiographic result. At one year follow-up the patient still has no complaints and the stent is still patent.

  5. Patient Dose During Carotid Artery Stenting With Embolic-Protection Devices: Evaluation With Radiochromic Films and Related Diagnostic Reference Levels According to Factors Influencing the Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ercole, Loredana; Quaretti, Pietro; Cionfoli, Nicola; Klersy, Catherine; Bocchiola, Milena; Rodolico, Giuseppe; Azzaretti, Andrea; Lisciandro, Francesco; Cascella, Tommaso; Zappoli Thyrion, Federico

    2013-04-15

    To measure the maximum entrance skin dose (MESD) on patients undergoing carotid artery stenting (CAS) using embolic-protection devices, to analyze the dependence of dose and exposure parameters on anatomical, clinical, and technical factors affecting the procedure complexity, to obtain some local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), and to evaluate whether overcoming DRLs is related to procedure complexity. MESD were evaluated with radiochromic films in 31 patients (mean age 72 {+-} 7 years). Five of 33 (15 %) procedures used proximal EPD, and 28 of 33 (85 %) procedures used distal EPD. Local DRLs were derived from the recorded exposure parameters in 93 patients (65 men and 28 women, mean age 73 {+-} 9 years) undergoing 96 CAS with proximal (33 %) or distal (67 %) EPD. Four bilateral lesions were included. MESD values (mean 0.96 {+-} 0.42 Gy) were <2 Gy without relevant dependence on procedure complexity. Local DRL values for kerma area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT), and number of frames (N{sub FR}) were 269 Gy cm{sup 2}, 28 minutes, and 251, respectively. Only simultaneous bilateral treatment was associated with KAP (odds ratio [OR] 10.14, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1-102.7, p < 0.05) and N{sub FR} overexposures (OR 10.8, 95 % CI 1.1-109.5, p < 0.05). Type I aortic arch decreased the risk of FT overexposure (OR 0.4, 95 % CI 0.1-0.9, p = 0.042), and stenosis {>=} 90 % increased the risk of N{sub FR} overexposure (OR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.1-7.4, p = 0.040). At multivariable analysis, stenosis {>=} 90 % (OR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.1-7.4, p = 0.040) and bilateral treatment (OR 10.8, 95 % CI 1.1-109.5, p = 0.027) were associated with overexposure for two or more parameters. Skin doses are not problematic in CAS with EPD because these procedures rarely lead to doses >2 Gy.

  6. Stenting of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Sabharwal, Tarun Adam, Andreas

    2010-08-15

    Minimally invasive image-guided insertion of self-expanding metal stents in the upper gastrointestinal tract is the current treatment of choice for palliation of malignant esophageal or gastroduodenal outlet obstructions. A concise review is presented of contemporary stenting practice of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and the procedures in terms of appropriate patient evaluation, indications, and contraindications for treatment are analyzed, along with available stent designs, procedural steps, clinical outcomes, inadvertent complications, and future technology. Latest developments include biodegradable polymeric stents for benign disease and radioactive or drug-eluting stents for malignant obstructions.

  7. Spontaneous Subcapsular Renal Hematoma: Strange Case in an Anticoagulated Patient with HWMH after Aortic and Iliac Endovascular Stenting Procedure.

    PubMed

    Greco, Michele; Butticè, Salvatore; Benedetto, Filippo; Spinelli, Francesco; Traxer, Olivier; Tefik, Tzevat; Pappalardo, Rosa; Magno, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous subcapsular renal hematoma is a rare condition in clinical practice. It is caused by renal cysts, benign and malignant renal tumors, vascular lesions, and antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy. In this paper we report an unusual case of rupture of a renal cyst of a 66-year-old male patient during an aortic and iliac endovascular procedure for a massive calcified atheroma above the iliac bifurcation. We suspected that the bolus of high weight molecular heparin given during the procedure caused the rupture of the cyst. According to the literature, this is the first case of renal cyst rupture during an endovascular aortic procedure after administering a high weight molecular heparin bolus. PMID:27579210

  8. Spontaneous Subcapsular Renal Hematoma: Strange Case in an Anticoagulated Patient with HWMH after Aortic and Iliac Endovascular Stenting Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Michele; Benedetto, Filippo; Spinelli, Francesco; Traxer, Olivier; Tefik, Tzevat; Pappalardo, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous subcapsular renal hematoma is a rare condition in clinical practice. It is caused by renal cysts, benign and malignant renal tumors, vascular lesions, and antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy. In this paper we report an unusual case of rupture of a renal cyst of a 66-year-old male patient during an aortic and iliac endovascular procedure for a massive calcified atheroma above the iliac bifurcation. We suspected that the bolus of high weight molecular heparin given during the procedure caused the rupture of the cyst. According to the literature, this is the first case of renal cyst rupture during an endovascular aortic procedure after administering a high weight molecular heparin bolus. PMID:27579210

  9. A review of the iStent® trabecular micro-bypass stent: safety and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Wellik, Sarah R; Dale, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    There is a significant demand for procedures that can effectively treat glaucoma with low risk and good visual outcomes. To fill this void, procedures termed “minimally invasive glaucoma surgery”, are gaining in popularity. This review will focus on the safety and efficacy of one such minimally invasive glaucoma surgery procedure, the trabecular micro-bypass stent. This stent is intended to lower intraocular pressure by directly cannulating Schlemm’s canal and thereby enhancing aqueous outflow. Recent randomized controlled trials and case series have demonstrated the micro-bypass stent to be a relatively safe procedure, with limited complications and no serious adverse sequelae. The most common complication across all studies was stent obstruction or malposition, which generally did not result in any adverse outcome in vision or pressure control. In addition, increased rates of hypotony, choroidal hemorrhage, or infection were not seen with the micro-bypass stent in comparison to cataract surgery alone. PMID:25931808

  10. A review of the iStent(®) trabecular micro-bypass stent: safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Wellik, Sarah R; Dale, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    There is a significant demand for procedures that can effectively treat glaucoma with low risk and good visual outcomes. To fill this void, procedures termed "minimally invasive glaucoma surgery", are gaining in popularity. This review will focus on the safety and efficacy of one such minimally invasive glaucoma surgery procedure, the trabecular micro-bypass stent. This stent is intended to lower intraocular pressure by directly cannulating Schlemm's canal and thereby enhancing aqueous outflow. Recent randomized controlled trials and case series have demonstrated the micro-bypass stent to be a relatively safe procedure, with limited complications and no serious adverse sequelae. The most common complication across all studies was stent obstruction or malposition, which generally did not result in any adverse outcome in vision or pressure control. In addition, increased rates of hypotony, choroidal hemorrhage, or infection were not seen with the micro-bypass stent in comparison to cataract surgery alone.

  11. Trimming a Metallic Biliary Stent Using an Argon Plasma Coagulator

    SciTech Connect

    Rerknimitr, Rungsun Naprasert, Pisit; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2007-06-15

    Background. Distal migration is one of the common complications after insertion of a covered metallic stent. Stent repositioning or removal is not always possible in every patient. Therefore, trimming using an argon plasma coagulator (APC) may be a good alternative method to solve this problem. Methods. Metallic stent trimming by APC was performed in 2 patients with biliary Wallstent migration and in another patient with esophageal Ultraflex stent migration. The power setting was 60-100 watts with an argon flow of 0.8 l/min. Observations. The procedure was successfully performed and all distal parts of the stents were removed. No significant collateral damage to the nearby mucosa was observed. Conclusions. In a patient with a distally migrated metallic stent, trimming of the stent is possible by means of an APC. This new method may be applicable to other sites of metallic stent migration.

  12. Nitinol Esophageal Stents: New Designs and Clinical Indications

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Ernst-Peter; Boos, Irene; Vetter, Sylvia; Strohm, Michael; Domschke, Sigurd

    1996-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical use of covered and noncovered, knitted nitinol stents in patients presenting new stent indications. Methods: Self-expandable, knitted nitinol stents were implanted in four patients for treatment of dysphagia. In two patients who had malignant strictures and had esophago-respiratory fistulae and in one patient with an esophagocutaneous fistula, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stents were implanted. One patient received a noncovered stent, but a retrograde approach through a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) fistula had to be chosen for recanalization of an esophageal occlusion. Two patients received stents for treatment of benign strictures. Results: Recanalization of the stricture and stent implantation were performed under fluoroscopic control without any procedure-related morbidity or mortality. Dysphagia improved in all patients and the esophageal fistulae could be sealed off by covered stents. During a maximum follow-up of 18 months, there was no stent migration or esophageal perforation. Complications observed were stent stenosis due to food impaction (1/4) and benign stent stenosis (2/2). Most complications could be treated by the interventional radiologist. Conclusion: Self-expandable, covered Nitinol stents provide an option for the treatment of dysphagia combined with esophageal fistulae. In combination with interventional radiology techniques, even complex strictures are accessible. For benign strictures, the value of stent treatment has not yet been proven.

  13. Longitudinal stent deformation during coronary bifurcation stenting.

    PubMed

    Vijayvergiya, Rajesh; Sharma, Prafull; Gupta, Ankush; Goyal, Praveg; Panda, Prashant

    2016-03-01

    A distortion of implanted coronary stent along its longitudinal axis during coronary intervention is known as longitudinal stent deformation (LSD). LSD is frequently seen with newer drug eluting stents (DES), specifically with PROMUS Element stent. It is usually caused by impact of guide catheter tip, or following passage of catheters like balloon catheter, IVUS catheter, guideliner, etc. We hereby report a case of LSD during coronary bifurcation lesion intervention, using two-stents technique. Patient had acute stent thrombosis as a complication of LSD, which was successfully managed. PMID:26811144

  14. Evaluation of Polyurethane Nasolacrimal Duct Stents: In Vivo Studies in New Zealand Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, K.E. Grabolle, B.; Urbach, H.; Tolba, R.; Schild, H.; Paulsen, F.

    2006-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic and biological effects of different polyurethane nasolacrimal duct stents in an animal model. Fifteen polyurethane nasolacrimal duct stents (n = 5 mushroom-type stents, n = 5 newly designed S-shaped TearLeader stents without hydrophilic coating, and n = 5 S-shaped TearLeader stents with hydrophilic coating) were implanted in the nasolacrimal ducts of eight unaffected New Zealand rabbits. One nasolacrimal system served as control. Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed at 1-, 2-, and 4-week intervals, then after a 3-month interval, after which the animals were euthanized. All stents were implanted without major periprocedural complications. The stents proved to be patent by the end of the procedure. During follow-up, all mushroom-type stents were occluded at 4 weeks. None of these stents opened to forced irrigation. Clinically, all rabbits demonstrated severe dacryocystitis. Three out of five TearLeader stents without hydrophilic coating were blocked at 4 weeks; one out of five was open to irrigation. Best results were observed in the stent group with hydrophilic coating. Follow-up dacryocystography demonstrated patent stents in nasolacrimal ducts of all animals after 4 weeks. In only one of five cases, the coated stent became partially occluded after 2 months. These animals were free of clinical symptoms. After 3 months, at least three out of five stents still opened to forced irrigation and only one stent was completely blocked. Dislocation of the stents was not observed. Refinement of the stent surface and stent design improves the results of nasolacrimal duct stenting in this animal model. Implantation of hydrophilic-coated S-shaped stents is highly superior to conventional mushroom-type stents and noncoated stent types. Hydrophilic coating seems to prevent foreign-body reactions, resulting in maximized stent patency.

  15. Comparison between Solitaire™ AB and Enterprise stent-assisted coiling for intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    YE, HUA-WEI; LIU, YA-QI; WANG, QIU-JING; ZHENG, TAO; CUI, XU-BO; GAO, YU-YUAN; LAI, LING-FENG; ZHANG, XIN; LI, XI-FENG; SU, SHI-XING; HE, XU-YING; DUAN, CHUAN-ZHI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the feasibility, rate of procedure-related complications and midterm angiographic follow-up outcomes using the Enterprise (EP) and Solitaire™ AB (ST) stents in the stent-assisted coiling of intracranial aneurysms. In total, 81 patients with 90 aneurysms were included in the study, with the aim to treat 43 aneurysms with the EP stent (47.8%) and 47 aneurysms with the ST stent (52.2%). The 90 aneurysms were successfully stented and subsequently coiled; however, in four patients undergoing treatment with the EP stent, the stent was not navigable; thus, treatment with the ST stent was employed (EP, n=39, 43.3%; ST, n=51, 56.7%). Of the 90 aneurysms, 44 cases were ruptured aneurysms, with 74 located in the anterior circulation and 16 located in the posterior circulation. The stenting success rate of the ST stent was significantly higher compared with the EP stent. However, no statistically significant differences were observed with regard to the packing density, complete occlusion, progressive occlusion, recurrence rate, procedure-related complications, in-stent stenosis and stent migration rates between the two groups. In conclusion, the two common medical devices used for intracranial aneurysms are relatively safe and effective for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. However, due to the higher stenting success rate of the ST stent, this medical devise was demonstrated to be more flexible and feasible compared with the EP stent. PMID:26170926

  16. Carotid stenting and endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Yip, Hon-Kan; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2016-07-01

    Stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic, remains the second commonest cause of death worldwide in the last decade. Etiologies for ischemic stroke (IS) vary widely. Atherothrombotic occlusion is an essential cause to which carotid artery stenosis (CAS) is a major contributor. Administration of anti-platelet agent to patients with CAS has been shown to reduce incidence of long-term IS. In additional, in patients with symptomatic CAS, clinical trials have demonstrated that carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is superior to medical therapy for prevention of future CAS-related IS. However, CEA is not suitable for CAS post-radiotherapy or those located at higher level of the internal carotid artery; and major complications of this procedure including cranial nerve injuries have stimulated the interest of using percutaneous transfemoral carotid stenting as an alternative approach. Although transfemoral arterial approach of carotid stenting is not inferior to CEA in improving clinical outcomes, it has been reported to be associated with vascular complication and has its limitations in patients with athero-occlusive disease of abdominal aorta or bilateral iliac arteries, level II or III aortic arch, or bovine type carotid arterial anatomy. Therefore, transradial/transbrachial arterial approach has emerged as a novel method for carotid stenting. This article provides a critical review on interventional approaches for the treatment of CAS.

  17. Stenting in Malignant Biliary Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Almadi, Majid A; Barkun, Jeffrey S; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-10-01

    Decompression of the biliary system in patients with malignant biliary obstruction has been widely accepted and implemented as part of the care. Despite a wealth of literature, there remains a significant amount of uncertainty as to which approach would be most appropriate in different clinical settings. This review covers stenting of the biliary system in cases of resectable or palliative malignant biliary obstruction, potential candidates for biliary drainage, technical aspects of the procedure, as well as management of biliary stent dysfunction. Furthermore, periprocedural considerations including proper mapping of the location of obstruction and the use of antibiotics are addressed.

  18. Carotid Artery Stenting versus Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gahremanpour, Amir; Perin, Emerson C.; Silva, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    For about 2 decades, investigators have been comparing carotid endarterectomy with carotid artery stenting in regard to their effectiveness and safety in treating carotid artery stenosis. We conducted a systematic review to summarize and appraise the available evidence provided by randomized trials, meta-analyses, and registries comparing the clinical outcomes of the 2 procedures. We searched the MEDLINE, SciVerse Scopus, and Cochrane databases and the bibliographies of pertinent textbooks and articles to identify these studies. The results of clinical trials and, consequently, the meta-analyses of those trials produced conflicting results regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety of carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. These conflicting results arose because of differences in patient population, trial design, outcome measures, and variability among centers in the endovascular devices used and in operator skills. Careful appraisal of the trials and meta-analyses, particularly the most recent and largest National Institutes of Healthsponsored trial (the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial [CREST]), showed that carotid stenting and endarterectomy were associated with similar rates of death and disabling stroke. Within the 30-day periprocedural period, carotid stenting was associated with higher risks of stroke, especially for patients aged >70 years, whereas carotid endarterectomy was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction. The slightly higher cost of stenting compared with endarterectomy was within an acceptable range by cost-effectiveness standards. We conclude that carotid artery stenting is an equivalent alternative to carotid endarterectomy when patient age and anatomy, surgical risk, and operator experience are considered in the choice of treatment approach. PMID:22949763

  19. Iliocaval Confluence Stenting for Chronic Venous Obstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Graaf, Rick de; Wolf, Mark de; Sailer, Anna M.; Laanen, Jorinde van Wittens, Cees; Jalaie, Houman

    2015-10-15

    PurposeDifferent techniques have been described for stenting of venous obstructions. We report our experience with two different confluence stenting techniques to treat chronic bi-iliocaval obstructions.Materials and MethodsBetween 11/2009 and 08/2014 we treated 40 patients for chronic total bi-iliocaval obstructions. Pre-operative magnetic resonance venography showed bilateral extensive post-thrombotic scarring in common and external iliac veins as well as obstruction of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Stenting of the IVC was performed with large self-expandable stents down to the level of the iliocaval confluence. To bridge the confluence, either self-expandable stents were placed inside the IVC stent (24 patients, SECS group) or high radial force balloon-expandable stents were placed at the same level (16 patients, BECS group). In both cases, bilateral iliac extensions were performed using nitinol stents.ResultsRecanalization was achieved for all patients. In 15 (38 %) patients, a hybrid procedure with endophlebectomy and arteriovenous fistula creation needed to be performed because of significant involvement of inflow vessels below the inguinal ligament. Mean follow-up was 443 ± 438 days (range 7–1683 days). For all patients, primary, assisted-primary, and secondary patency rate at 36 months were 70, 73, and 78 %, respectively. Twelve-month patency rates in the SECS group were 85, 85, and 95 % for primary, assisted-primary, and secondary patency. In the BECS group, primary patency was 100 % during a mean follow-up period of 134 ± 118 (range 29–337) days.ConclusionStenting of chronic bi-iliocaval obstruction shows relatively high patency rates at medium follow-up. Short-term patency seems to favor confluence stenting with balloon-expandable stents.

  20. Use of a New Hybrid Heparin-Bonded Nitinol Ring Stent in the Popliteal Artery: Procedural and Mid-term Clinical and Anatomical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Parthipun, Aneeta; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Kitrou, Panagiotis; Padayachee, Soundrie; Karunanithy, Narayan; Ahmed, Irfan; Zayed, Hany; Katsanos, Konstantinos E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo report the immediate and mid-term clinical and anatomical outcomes of a novel, hybrid, heparin-bonded, nitinol ring stent (TIGRIS; Gore Medical) when used for the treatment of lesions located in the popliteal artery.Materials and MethodsThis was a prospective single-centre registry. Patients eligible for inclusion were individuals suffering from symptomatic popliteal arterial occlusive disease (Rutherford–Becker stage 3–6; P1–P3 segments) and treated with placement of the TIGRIS stent(s). Patients were prospectively scheduled for clinical review and duplex ultrasound follow-up after 6 and 12 months. Outcome measures included immediate technical success, primary vessel patency, in-stent binary restenosis (evaluable by Duplex at 50 % threshold; PSVR > 2.0), freedom from target lesion revascularization (TLR) and amputation-free survival (AFS) estimated by Kaplan–Meier (K–M) survival analysis. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis was also performed to adjust for confounders and search for independent predictors of outcomes.ResultsFrom August 2012 to March 2014, a total of 54 popliteal TIGRIS stents were implanted in 50 limbs of 48 patients (27 men and 21 women; mean age 76.0 ± 1.7 years). Median Rutherford–Becker stage was five at baseline and 37/50 (74.0 %) were chronic total occlusions. Technical success was achieved in all cases (100 %). Stented lesion length was 114.2 ± 36.9 mm (range 6–20 cm). Median follow-up was 11.8 ± 0.8 months. After 12 months, primary patency of the TIGRIS stent was 69.5 ± 10.2 % with an 86.1 ± 5.9 % freedom from TLR and 87 ± 5.0 % AFS (K–M estimates).ConclusionThe TIGRIS hybrid heparin-bonded nitinol ring stent is a safe and effective endovascular option for complex occlusive disease of the popliteal artery.

  1. Geometrical deployment for braided stent.

    PubMed

    Bouillot, Pierre; Brina, Olivier; Ouared, Rafik; Yilmaz, Hasan; Farhat, Mohamed; Erceg, Gorislav; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Kulcsar, Zsolt; Pereira, Vitor Mendes

    2016-05-01

    The prediction of flow diverter stent (FDS) implantation for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) is being increasingly required for hemodynamic simulations and procedural planning. In this paper, a deployment model was developed based on geometrical properties of braided stents. The proposed mathematical description is first applied on idealized toroidal vessels demonstrating the stent shortening in curved vessels. It is subsequently generalized to patient specific vasculature predicting the position of the filaments along with the length and local porosity of the stent. In parallel, in-vitro and in-vivo FDS deployments were measured by contrast-enhanced cone beam CT (CBCT) in idealized and patient-specific geometries. These measurements showed a very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the virtual deployments and provided experimental validations of the underlying geometrical assumptions. In particular, they highlighted the importance of the stent radius assessment in the accuracy of the deployment prediction. Thanks to its low computational cost, the proposed model is potentially implementable in clinical practice providing critical information for patient safety and treatment outcome assessment. PMID:26891065

  2. A Case of Late Femoral Pseudoaneurysm Caused by Stent Disconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Rivolta, Nicola; Fontana, Federico; Piffaretti, Gabriele Tozzi, Matteo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2010-10-15

    We present the case of a late superficial femoral artery stent disconnection causing an asymptomatic pseudoaneurysm successfully treated with a stent-graft. A 67-year-old female was referred to our department for evaluation of claudication of the left lower limb and was diagnosed to have a total occlusion of the superficial femoral artery. Three nitinol stents were used to revascularize this artery. At 48 months, duplex-ultrasonography control revealed the presence of a 45-mm saccular femoral dilatation; X-rays and CT angiography showed fractures of the proximal stents and the presence of a pseudoaneurysm at the site of the distal stents disconnection. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded using two stent-grafts. We conclude that patients and surgeons should be aware of structural complications with all stents. Rigorous follow-up controls should be mandatory. Endovascular repair proved to be feasible and durable to manage a previous endovascular procedure.

  3. Carotid Artery Stenting Using a Novel Self-Expanding Braided Nickel-Titanium Stent: Feasibility and Safety Porcine Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlhelm, Frank Kaufmann, Ralf; Ahlhelm, Dirk Ong, Mai Fang; Roth, Christian Reith, Wolfgang

    2009-09-15

    We studied the deliverability and safety of a braided, self-expanding, closed-cell nickel-titanium (NiTi) stent (E-volution, Jotec GmbH, Hechingen, Germany) especially designed for the endovascular treatment of carotid artery bifurcation stenosis with special regard to in-stent stenosis and thrombosis compared with a laser-cut reference nitinol stent in a porcine model of percutaneous vascular interventions. We aimed to assess histopathologic response in minipig carotid and subclavian arteries. Eight minipigs received a total of 42 stents: 14 reference stents and 28 E-volution stents. Eleven of the E-volution stents were additionally coated with heparin. Control angiography was obtained immediately before and after vascular intervention as well as 4 weeks after the procedure. Primary endpoints were 28 days of angiographic analyses as well as histomorphometric analysis, including injury score, inflammation score, luminal diameter, vessel diameter, maximal neointimal thickness, and area of in-stent stenosis. Secondary end points were procedural success, 28-day mortality, and stent thrombosis. All stents could be delivered successfully without procedural complications, morbidity, or mortality during our observation time. As confirmed by histology, no in-stent thrombosis was observed. Compared with common carotid arteries, subclavian arteries are significantly more vulnerable to developing in-stent stenosis caused by neointima proliferation (p < 0.05). Compared with the use of 1 single stent/artery, serial application of two stents leads to a more excessive but not significantly different neointimal proliferation (p > 0.05). The E-volution stent, especially when heparin coated, is in line with the comparison to the laser-cut reference stent displaying similar results of angiographic, histologic, and histomorphometric analyses (p > 0.05). Compared with the reference laser-cut stent, the self-expanding nitinol stent (E-volution) with its advanced braiding technology is

  4. Intracranial Stenting in the Treatment of Wide-Necked Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, M.; Dall'olio, M.; Cenni, P.; Raffi, L.; Simonetti, L.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We positioned the following self-expanding stents certified for intracranial application: 16 Neuro form (Boston Scientific), three INX (Medtronic), one Leo (Balt). 6F calibre femoral introducers and guiding catheters were used for stent placement changing to 5F calibre introducers and guiding catheters (Envoy, Cordis) for the Neuroform 2 and 3 stents. All procedures were carried out under general anaesthesia and heparinization. Our pharmacological protocol consisted of adjunctive treatment with anti-aggregants during the interventional procedure and for the following six months, without premedication. From November 2000 to August 2006 we treated 28 patients (27 F/1M) with giant wide-necked aneurysms and one dissecting basilar artery aneurysm requiring the placement of 29 stents. We successfully positioned 20 stents: 11 stents combined with coils (8 immediate; 3 late) with complete exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation in seven cases and subtotal exclusion in four; nine stents not followed by embolization with complete exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation in six cases and subtotal exclusion in three. Stenting was not possible in nine cases due to extreme vessel tortuosity and the poor flexibility of release systems for the first stents. No late stent occlusion or subarachnoid haemorrhage were encountered after treatment. PMID:20566126

  5. Coronary artery stents: advances in technology.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Sameer D; Giugliano, Robert P

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the late 1970s revolutionized the management of stable and unstable coronary artery disease, providing an effective, quick, safe, and increasingly widely available method for coronary revascularization for many patients. Rapid development in this field led to the introduction of a number of new technologies, including intracoronary stents that have resulted in improved efficacy and long-term safety. In this manuscript we review the experience with the 2 major available classes of stents (bare metal [BMS], drug-eluting [DES]) and describe the delivery systems for these stents. An evidence review of the large trial data comparing balloon angioplasty, BMS, and DES demonstrates the incremental advances over time, with the latest generation of DES achieving the lowest rates of restenosis, stent thrombosis, and recurrent myocardial infarction. In addition, we provide an overview of the latest developments in stent technology, including the introduction of bioresorbable stents and new stent delivery systems. These latest advances are hoped to further improve outcomes while reducing costs due to a reduction in the need for future procedures and hospitalizations due to recurrent coronary disease.

  6. Bioresorbable Stents in PCI.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Daniel; James, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of percutaneous coronary intervention has been considerable. Coronary stents were introduced to avoid vessel recoil and reduce acute and late vessel complications. Later, drug-eluting stents were developed to decrease the neointimal hyperplasia associated with bare metal stents in order to reduce restenosis. However, very late stent thrombosis remains problematic, and the permanent presence of a metal stent could be associated with local inflammation and impaired vascular physiology. Thus, bioresorbable stents have been developed, to prevent recoil initially when this risk is the highest, with subsequent degradation over time, to avoid long-term complications of the presence of stents in the coronary vasculature. Here, we review the current status of bioresorbable stents in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), with focus on the platforms that have been studied the most: ABSORB, DESolve, and DREAMS. In terms of clinical outcomes, bioresorbable stents have not yet shown superiority compared with current generation drug-eluting stents, but rather a signal of increased stent thrombosis. Further development and longer-term studies are needed before the routine implementation of bioresorbable stents in clinical practice. PMID:27312934

  7. Indications for stenting during thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Bækgaard, N; Broholm, R; Just, S

    2013-03-01

    The most important vein segment to thrombolyse after deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is the outflow tract meaning the iliofemoral vein. Iliofemoral DVT is defined as DVT in the iliac vein and the common femoral vein. Spontaneous recanalization is less than 50%, particularly on the left side. The compression from adjacent structures, predominantly on the left side is known as the iliac vein compression syndrome. Therefore, it is essential that supplementary endovenous procedures have to be performed in case of persistent obstructive lesions following catheter-directed thrombolysis. Insertion of a stent in this position is the treatment of choice facilitating the venous flow into an unobstructed outflow tract either from the femoral vein or the deep femoral vein or both. The stent, made of stainless steel or nitinol, has to be self-expandable and flexible with radial force to overcome the challenges in this low-pressure system. The characteristics of the anatomy with external compression and often a curved vein segment with diameter difference make stent placement necessary. Ballooning alone has no place in this area. The proportion of inserted stents varies in the published materials with catheter-directed thrombolysis of iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis. PMID:23482545

  8. Pancreatitis-Associated Splenic Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Endovascular Treatment with Self-Expandable Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Brountzos, Elias N.; Vagenas, Kostantinos; Apostolopoulou, Sotiria C.; Panagiotou, Irene; Lymberopoulou, Dimitra; Kelekis, Dimitrios A.

    2003-02-15

    We present a patient with a splenic arterypseudoaneurysm (SAPA) treated with placement of self-expandable stent-grafts. The procedure was complicated by stent-graft migration,but successful management resulted in lasting exclusion of the SAPA,while the patency of the splenic artery was preserved. This is the first report of self-expandable stent-graft treatment of SAPA.

  9. iStent trabecular micro-bypass stent for open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Le, Kim; Saheb, Hady

    2014-01-01

    Trabecular micro-bypass stents, commonly known as iStents, are micro-invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) devices used to treat open-angle glaucoma. Like other MIGS procedures that enhance trabecular outflow, the iStent lowers intraocular pressure (IOP) by creating a direct channel between the anterior chamber and Schlemm’s canal. iStents are typically implanted at the time of phacoemulsification for patients with open-angle glaucoma and visually significant cataracts. This review summarizes the published data regarding the efficacy, safety, and cost considerations of trabecular micro-bypass stents. Most studies found statistically significant reductions in mean IOP and ocular medication use after combined phacoemulsification with single or double iStent implantation. The devices were found to be very safe, with a safety profile similar to that of cataract surgery. Complications were infrequent, with the most common complications being temporary stent obstruction or malposition, which resolved with observation or secondary procedures. Future studies are needed to evaluate long-term outcomes, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and expanded indications. PMID:25284980

  10. iStent trabecular micro-bypass stent for open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Le, Kim; Saheb, Hady

    2014-01-01

    Trabecular micro-bypass stents, commonly known as iStents, are micro-invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) devices used to treat open-angle glaucoma. Like other MIGS procedures that enhance trabecular outflow, the iStent lowers intraocular pressure (IOP) by creating a direct channel between the anterior chamber and Schlemm's canal. iStents are typically implanted at the time of phacoemulsification for patients with open-angle glaucoma and visually significant cataracts. This review summarizes the published data regarding the efficacy, safety, and cost considerations of trabecular micro-bypass stents. Most studies found statistically significant reductions in mean IOP and ocular medication use after combined phacoemulsification with single or double iStent implantation. The devices were found to be very safe, with a safety profile similar to that of cataract surgery. Complications were infrequent, with the most common complications being temporary stent obstruction or malposition, which resolved with observation or secondary procedures. Future studies are needed to evaluate long-term outcomes, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and expanded indications.

  11. Pulmonary Arterial Stent Implantation in an Adult with Williams Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Reesink, Herre J.; Henneman, Onno D. F.; Delden, Otto M. van; Biervliet, Jules D.; Kloek, Jaap J.; Reekers, Jim A.; Bresser, Paul

    2007-07-15

    We report a 38-year-old patient who presented with pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular dysfunction due to pulmonary artery stenoses as a manifestation of Williams syndrome, mimicking chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The patient was treated with balloon angioplasty and stent implantation. Short-term follow-up showed a good clinical result with excellent patency of the stents but early restenosis of the segments in which only balloon angioplasty was performed. These stenoses were subsequently also treated successfully by stent implantation. Stent patency was observed 3 years after the first procedure.

  12. Aortic stenting.

    PubMed

    Droc, Ionel; Calinescu, Francisca Blanca; Droc, Gabriela; Blaj, Catalin; Dammrau, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The approach to aortic pathology is nowadays more and more endovascular at both thoracic and abdominal levels. Thoracic stenting has gained worldwide acceptance as first intention to treat pathologies of the descending thoracic aorta. Indications have been extended to aortic arch aneurysms and also to diseases of the ascending aorta. The current devices in use for thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR) are Medtronic Valiant, Gore TAG, Cook Tx2 and Jotec. The choice of the endograft depends on the thoracic aortic pathology and the anatomical suitability. The technological evolution of the abdominal aortic endografts was very rapid, arriving now at the fourth generation. We report the results of 55 elective cases of endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR) performed in two vascular surgical centers in Romania and Germany. The prostheses used were 16 E-vita Abdominal XT, 12 Excluder, eight Talent, seven PowerLink, three Endurant and nine custom-made, fenestrated or branched from Jotec. The mean follow-up was 18 months with CT-scan, duplex ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. The mortality was 2%. EVAR tends to become the gold standard for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Technological development of the devices with lowest profile introduction systems will permit to extend the anatomical indications to new frontiers. PMID:26200430

  13. Nasolacrimal Polyurethane Stent: Complications with CT Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Isabel T.; Paul, Laura; Grande, Carlos

    1998-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate initial results in patients with epiphora secondary to obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct treated by placement of a polyurethane stent, and to discuss the technical problems and complications arising during the procedure, with visualization of the anatomy of the drainage apparatus using computed tomography (CT). Methods: We inserted 20 polyurethane Song stents under fluoroscopic guidance after dacryocystography in 19 patients with grade 3-4 epiphora caused by idiopathic obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct. CT scans were obtained following stent placement in all patients. Results: We focus on the technical problems and complications that arose during these procedures. During negotiation of the guidewire past the obstruction at the level of the junction of the duct with the lacrimal sac, the guidewire created a false passage in a posterior suborbital direction in two cases and towards the posterior midline in another. In all cases the guidewire was withdrawn and reinserted through the proper anatomic route without further difficulty or complications. In two cases the stent was improperly positioned wholly or partially outside the nasolacrimal system (one medially, one posteriorly). In one case the stent was removed and reinserted; in the other it remains in place and functional. CT was performed in all these cases to ensure proper anatomic alignment and determine what had gone wrong. The epiphora was completely resolved in 13 cases and partially relieved in four; there were three cases of stent obstruction. Epistaxis of short duration (1 hr) occurred in seven patients and headache in one. Conclusions: Treatment of epiphora with polyurethane stents is a technique that is well tolerated by patients and achieves a high success rate, yet problems in placement may be encountered. Though no major consequences for patients are involved, cognizance of such difficulties is important to avoid incorrect positioning of stents.

  14. Nasolacrimal Stenting: Toward Improving Outcomes with a Simple Modification of the Song Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Lanciego, Carlos Miguel, Silvia De; Padilla, Manuel; Perea, Miguel; Rodriguez-Merlo, Rufo; Garcia-Garcia, Lorenzo

    2006-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in a prospective, single-center study, the effectiveness of Song's polyurethane stents, modified 'in-house,' in the percutaneous management of epiphora. Patients (n = 170; age range 18-83, mean = 64; 50 male, 120 female) with severe epiphora had the modified stents inserted (183 eyes/195 stents) to treat unilateral/bilateral and complete/partial obstruction of the nasolacrimal system. The etiology of the obstruction was idiopathic in 119 cases (61%) and chronic dacryocystitis in 76 (39%). The set designed by Song was used in all patients but modified by us such that the extreme end is cone-shaped. The original technique was slightly modified by us and the procedure was conducted on an outpatient basis. The initial technical success rate of stent placement was 97%. Resolution of epiphora was complete in 180 eyes and partial in 3. On follow-up (mean = 18 months; range: 2 days to 24 months), 165 of 195 stents (85%) remained patent. Primary patency rates at follow-up were 86%, 84%, 84%, and 79% in the first 6 months, second and third 6 months, and the present (24 months), respectively. Stents became obstructed in 30 patients, but all but 2 were easily withdrawn and 20 of these patients remained asymptomatic for a mean of 14 months (secondary patency of 67%). Following stent removal, the withdrawn stent was replaced with a new stent in the same intervention on 14 occasions. In another six cases, patency was re-established without the need of a second stent. The procedure is simple and safe, both in stent insertion as well as in mechanical de-blocking and withdrawal when occluded. Success was >80 % in the short term (1-year follow-up). Stenting failure does not preclude other treatment because with the modification that we had introduced, the extreme end of the stent becomes more accessible to mechanical de-blocking, withdrawal, and relocation. The levels of primary and secondary patencies are promising and warrant more

  15. Fluoroscopic management of complications after colorectal stent placement.

    PubMed

    Lopera, Jorge E; De Gregorio, Miguel Angel

    2010-09-01

    Colorectal self-expanding metal stents have been widely used as a bridge to surgery in patients with acute malignant colonic obstruction by allowing a single-stage operation, or as a definitive palliative procedure in patients with inoperable tumors. Colonic stents are placed under either fluoroscopic or combined endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance, with similar technical-success and complication rates. Placement of colonic stents is a very safe procedure with a low procedure-related mortality rate, but serious complications can develop and reinterventions are not uncommon. Most of the complications can be treated by minimally invasive or conservative techniques, while surgical interventions are required for most patients with perforation.

  16. Stenting of the Lower Gastrointestinal Tract: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Sabharwal, Tarun Adam, Andreas

    2011-06-15

    Colon obstruction due to colorectal cancer is a major surgical emergency. Patients with acute bowel obstruction are usually poor surgical candidates with 10-20% operative mortality and 40-50% operative morbidity rates. Colorectal stenting is an image-guided, minimally invasive procedure, and typical indications include either palliation of inoperable malignant disease or temporary bowel decompression as a bridge to surgery. Colorectal stenting allows the patient to recover before definite elective surgical resection, reducing perioperative morbidity and mortality, overall hospital stay, and associated health care costs. Palliative stenting improves quality of life compared to surgery. A concise review is provided of contemporary stenting practice of the lower gastrointestinal tract, the colon in particular, and both palliative and preoperative adjuvant procedures are evaluated in terms of relevant patient oncology, insertion technique, available stent designs, technical and clinical outcomes, associated complications, and cost-benefit analysis.

  17. Comparison of Devices Used for Stent-Assisted Coiling of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Izar, Benjamin; Rai, Ansaar; Raghuram, Karthikram; Rotruck, Jill; Carpenter, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Two self-expandable stents, the Neuroform and the Enterprise stent, are widely used for stent-assisted coiling (SAC) of complex shaped intracranial aneurysms. However, comparative knowledge about technical feasibility, peri- and post-procedural morbidity and mortality, packing densities as well as follow-up data is limited. Material and Methods We conducted a retrospective study to investigate differences in aneurysms stented with the Enterprise or Neuroform stents. Angiographic follow-up (mean 19.42 months) was available in 72.6% (61/84) of aneurysms treated with stent-assisted coiling. We further sought to compare stent-assisted coiling to a matched patient population with aneurysms treated by conventional coil embolization. Results The stenting success rate of the Enterprise was higher compared to the Neuroform stent (46/48 and 42/51, respectively). In 5 of 9 cases in which the Neuroform stent was not navigable to the landing zone, we successfully deployed an Enterprise stent instead. Eventually, 42 aneurysms were coiled after stenting in each group. We observed no significant differences in peri-procedural complication rate, post-procedural hospital stay, packing density, recurrence rate or number of in-stent stenosis. Strikingly, 36.1% of followed aneurysms in the SAC group showed progressive occlusion on angiographic follow-up imaging. The packing density was significantly higher in aneurysms treated by SAC as compared to conventionally coiled aneurysms, while recanalization rate was significantly lower in the SAC group. Conclusion The procedural success rate is higher using the Enterprise, but otherwise both stents exhibited similar characteristics. Lower recurrence frequency and complication rates comparable to conventional coil embolization emphasize the importance of stent-assisted coiling in the treatment of complex aneurysms. Progressive occlusion on angiographic follow-up was a distinct and frequent observation in the SAC group and may in

  18. Treatment of Intra- and Extracranial Arterial Dissections Using Stents and Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Jin Yang; Ahn, Jung Yong Chung, Young Sun; Han, In Bo; Chung, Sang Sup; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Kim, Sang Heum; Choi, Eun Wan

    2005-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stent placement for extracranial and intracranial arterial dissections. Methods. Eighteen patients underwent endovascular treatment of carotid and vertebral dissections using intraluminal stent placement. Five patients with arterial dissection were treated, 2 using one insertion of a single stent and 3 using placement of two stents. Patients with a dissecting aneurysm were treated as follows: 7 patients with insertion of one stent, 4 with placement of two stents, and 2 by stent-assisted Guglielmi detachable coil embolization. In the 18 patients in whom stenting was attempted, the overall success in reaching the target lesion was 94.4%. Of the 17 patients treated with stents, stent release and positioning were considered optimal in 16 (94%) and suboptimal in one (6%). In patients who underwent a successful procedure, all parent arteries were preserved. There were no instances of postprocedural ischemic attacks, new neurologic deficits, or new minor or major strokes prior to patient discharge. In follow up, all patients were assessed, using the modified Rankin scale, as functionally improved or of stable clinical status. The reduction in dissection-induced stenosis or pseudoaneurysm, the patency rate obtained at follow-up, and the lack of strokes (ischemic or hemorrhagic) suggest that stent placement offers a viable alternative to complex surgical bypass or reconstructive procedures. The long-term efficacy and durability of stent placement for arterial dissection remain to be determined in a larger series.

  19. Metallic Stents for Tracheobronchial Pathology Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, Carolina; Laborda, Alicia; Lozano, Juan M.; Caballero, Hugo; Sebastian, Antonio; Lopera, Jorge; Gregorio, Miguel Angel de

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present the 7-year experience of the treatment of benign and malignant tracheobronchial stenoses using metallic stents. Patients and Methods: One hundred twenty-three stents were inserted in 86 patients (74 benign and 12 malignant stenoses). Ninety-seven stents were placed in the trachea and 26 in the bronchi. The procedures were performed under fluoroscopic and flexible bronchoscopic guidance with the patient under light sedation. In cases of severe stenotic lesions or obstructions, laser resection was performed before stent placement. Clinical and functional pulmonary data were recorded before and 3 months after the procedure. Follow-up involved clinical data and radiographic techniques at 48 h and at 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12-month intervals. Results: The technical success was 100 %. Dyspnea disappearance, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and pulmonary functional data improvement was observed in all patients (p < 0.001). Complications were detected in 23 patients (26.7 %). Mean follow-up time was 6.3 {+-} 1.2 months in patients with malignant lesions and 76.2 {+-} 2.3 months patients with in benign lesions. By the end of the study, 100 % of patients with malignant pathology and 6.7 % of patients with benign lesions had died. Conclusion: Endoluminal treatment of tracheobronchial stenosis with metallic stents is a therapeutic alternative in patients who are poor candidates for surgery. In unresectable malignant lesions, the benefit of metallic stenting is unquestionable. In benign lesions, the results are satisfactory, but sometimes other interventions are required to treat complications. New stent technology may improve these results.

  20. Double-Layered PTFE-Covered Nitinol Stents: Experience in 32 Patients with Malignant Esophageal Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jung Gu; Jung, Gyoo-Sik Oh, Kyung Seung; Park, Seon-Ja

    2010-08-15

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a double-layered polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered nitinol stent in the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal strictures. A double-layered PTFE-covered nitinol stent was designed to reduce the propensity to migration of conventional covered stent. The stent consists of an inner PTFE-covered stent and an outer uncovered nitinol stent tube. With fluoroscopic guidance, the stent was placed in 32 consecutive patients with malignant esophageal strictures. During the follow-up period, the technical and clinical success rates, complications, and cumulative patient survival and stent patency were evaluated. Stent placement was technically successful in all patients, and no procedural complications occurred. After stent placement, the symptoms of 30 patients (94%) showed improvement. During the mean follow-up of 103 days (range, 9-348 days), 11 (34%) of 32 patients developed recurrent symptoms due to tumor overgrowth in five patients (16%), tumor ingrowth owing to detachment of the covering material (PTFE) apart from the stent wire in 3 (9%), mucosal hyperplasia in 2 (6%), and stent migration in 1 (3%). Ten of these 11 patients were treated by means of placing a second covered stent. Thirty patients died, 29 as a result of disease progression and 1 from aspiration pneumonia. The median survival period was 92 days. The median period of primary stent patency was 190 days. The double-layered PTFE-covered nitinol stent seems to be effective for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal strictures. We believe that the double-layer configuration of this stent can contribute to decreasing the stent's migration rate.

  1. Exclusion of Atherosclerotic Plaque from the Circulation Using Stent-Grafts: Alternative to Carotid Stenting with a Protection Device?

    SciTech Connect

    Peynircioglu, Bora Geyik, Serdar; Yavuz, Kivilcim; Cil, Barbaros E.; Saatci, Isil; Cekirge, Saruhan

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. To retrospectively assess the feasibility, safety, and clinical mid-term outcome of patients undergoing carotid artery stenting with stent-grafts. Methods. Over a 4 year period stent-grafts were used in the endovascular treatment of symptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis in 12 patients (2 women, 10 men, aged 47-83 (mean 64) years). Protection devices were not used. Possible microembolic complications were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of the brain before and the day after the procedure in all patients. Mean follow-up was 22 months (range 1-42 months), by Doppler ultrasonography and conventional angiography as well as clinical examination .Results. The technical success rate was 100%. A total of 13 coronary stent-grafts were used. The mean stenosis rate (in terms of diameter) was 85% and the mean length of stent-grafts used was 20.9 mm. The mean diameter to which the stent-grafts were dilated was 4.66 mm. In-hospital complications occurred in 1 patient who suffered a minor femoral access hematoma that did not require transfusion or surgical decompression. Post-stenting diffusion-weighted MRI revealed several ipsilateral silent microemboli in only 1 case, which was completely asymptomatic. Two patients had a major stroke after 2 years of follow-up. Restenosis was found in 2 patients who underwent successful balloon dilatation followed by placement of a self-expandable bare stent within the stent-grafts. Conclusions. Stent-grafts may prevent microembolic complications during stenting of atherosclerotic carotid lesions in selected cases, offering immediate exclusion of the atherosclerotic lesion from the circulation by pressing the plaque against the vessel wall. Comparative, randomized studies in larger series of patients are needed with carotid-dedicated stent-graft designs.

  2. Temporary Strecker Stent for Management of Acute Dissection in Popliteal and Crural Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Manke, Christoph; Geissler, Angela; Seitz, Johannes; Lenhart, Markus; Kasprzak, Piotr; Gmeinwieser, Josef; Feuerbach, Stefan

    1999-03-15

    Stent placement is a widely used bail-out treatment for dissection of peripheral arteries. Below the level of the superficial femoral artery permanent stenting is complicated by a high incidence of subacute thrombosis and restenosis. We present two cases of arterial occlusion due to acute iatrogenic dissection of the popliteal and distal fibular arteries. Successful treatment was achieved with a new bail-out procedure. Strecker stents were implanted to seal off the dissection flap. Stents were retrieved easily after 24 hr using a myocardial biopsy forceps. After stent retrieval the temporarily stented segments were patent and showed a larger lumen compared with segments treated by balloon dilatation alone. Temporary stenting is a simple and safe procedure and offers the advantage of tacking up dissection membranes and preventing recoil. Persistent presence of a metallic implant as a source of continued injury and stimulus for intimal proliferation is avoided.

  3. High-resolution CT and angiographic evaluation of NexStent wall adaptation.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Balázs; Lukács, Levente; Balázs, György; Dósa, Edit; Bérczi, Viktor; Hüttl, Kálmán

    2009-05-01

    Carotid stenting is a minimally invasive treatment for extracranial carotid artery stenosis. Stent design may affect technical success and complications in a certain subgroup of patients. We examined the wall adaptability of a new closed-cell carotid stent (NexStent), which has a unique rolled sheet design. Forty-one patients had 42 carotid arteries treated with angioplasty and stenting for internal carotid artery stenosis. The mean patient age was 65 +/- 10 years. All patients underwent high-resolution computed tomographic angiography after the stent implantation. Data analysis included pre- and postprocedural stenosis, procedure complications, plaque calcification, and stent apposition. We reviewed the angiographic and computed tomographic images for plaque coverage and stent expansion. All procedures were technically successful. Mean stenosis was reduced from 84 +/- 8% before the procedure to 15.7 +/- 7% after stenting. Two patients experienced transient ischemic attack; one patient had bradycardia and hypotension. Stent induced kinking was observed in one case. Good plaque coverage and proper overlapping of the rolled sheet was achieved in all cases. There was weak correlation between the residual stenosis and the amount of calcification. The stent provides adequate expansion and adaptation to the tapering anatomy of the bifurcation. PMID:19159971

  4. High-Resolution CT and Angiographic Evaluation of NexStent Wall Adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemes, Balazs Lukacs, Levente; Balazs, Gyoergy; Dosa, Edit; Berczi, Viktor; Huettl, Kalman

    2009-05-15

    Carotid stenting is a minimally invasive treatment for extracranial carotid artery stenosis. Stent design may affect technical success and complications in a certain subgroup of patients. We examined the wall adaptability of a new closed-cell carotid stent (NexStent), which has a unique rolled sheet design. Forty-one patients had 42 carotid arteries treated with angioplasty and stenting for internal carotid artery stenosis. The mean patient age was 65 {+-} 10 years. All patients underwent high-resolution computed tomographic angiography after the stent implantation. Data analysis included pre- and postprocedural stenosis, procedure complications, plaque calcification, and stent apposition. We reviewed the angiographic and computed tomographic images for plaque coverage and stent expansion. All procedures were technically successful. Mean stenosis was reduced from 84 {+-} 8% before the procedure to 15.7 {+-} 7% after stenting. Two patients experienced transient ischemic attack; one patient had bradycardia and hypotension. Stent induced kinking was observed in one case. Good plaque coverage and proper overlapping of the rolled sheet was achieved in all cases. There was weak correlation between the residual stenosis and the amount of calcification. The stent provides adequate expansion and adaptation to the tapering anatomy of the bifurcation.

  5. Surgical Management of Vascular Stents in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: Clues for a Staged Partnership.

    PubMed

    Gil-Jaurena, Juan-Miguel; Zunzunegui, José-Luis; Pérez-Caballero, Ramón; Pita, Ana; González-López, María-Teresa; Ballesteros, Fernando; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Medrano, Constancio

    2015-12-01

    Complex cases undergo step surgical and percutaneous procedures, including stent deployment. Concerns arise on stent removal at latest surgery. Our initial experience is presented. Forty-six stents in 35 patients were partially or totally removed at surgery. Univentricular heart was diagnosed in 20 patients. Stents were previously deployed in: ductus (6), right ventricle outflow tract (12), atrial septal defect (4), right pulmonary artery (4), left pulmonary artery (16), inferior vena cava (2), superior vena cava (1) and ascending aorta (1). Surgical procedures performed: 9 transplants, 6 Fontan, 4 Glenn, 1 comprehensive repair (Norwood + Glenn), 1 Glenn takedown, 8 conduit replacement, 2 Fallot, 2 Rastelli, 1 ventricular septal defect closure and 1 iatrogenic aortopulmonary window. Five ductal stents were clipped. Eleven stents in right ventricle, four ones in atrial septal defect, two in right pulmonary artery, seven in the left pulmonary artery and two in inferior vena cava were completely removed. Two stents in right pulmonary artery, one in superior vena cava, one in ascending aorta and nine in the left pulmonary artery were partially retrieved. Handling the stents in ductus, right ventricle and atrial septal defect was straightforward. On the contrary, stent removal in the ductus (comprehensive case), pulmonary branches, both vena cavae or aorta required short periods of deep hypothermia with circulatory arrest. Surgery over stents is increasing in complex, step procedures. Univentricular hearts are most prevalent. Congenital transplant surgery faces new challenges. Stent removal at the time of surgery may require deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.

  6. Colonic stenting in malignant large bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Rajadurai, Vinita A; Levitt, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In patients who are surgical candidates, colonic stenting is beneficial for preoperative decompression in large bowel obstruction, as it can convert a surgical procedure from an emergent two-step approach into an elective one-step resection with a primary anastomosis. PMID:27398210

  7. Outcomes of Prosthetic Hemodialysis Grafts after Deployment of Bare Metal versus Covered Stents at the Venous Anastomosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Charles Y. Tandberg, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Michael D.; Miller, Michael J.; Suhocki, Paul V.; Smith, Tony P.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare postintervention patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents across the venous anastomosis of prosthetic arteriovenous (AV) grafts. Methods: Review of our procedural database over a 6 year period revealed 377 procedures involving stent deployment in an AV access circuit. After applying strict inclusion criteria, our study group consisted of 61 stent deployments in 58 patients (median age 58 years, 25 men, 33 women) across the venous anastomosis of an upper extremity AV graft circuit that had never been previously stented. Both patent and thrombosed AV access circuits were retrospectively analyzed. Within the bare metal stent group, 20 of 32 AV grafts were thrombosed at initial presentation compared to 18 of 29 AV grafts in the covered stent group. Results: Thirty-two bare metal stents and 29 covered stents were deployed across the venous anastomosis. The 3, 6, and 12 months primary access patency rates for bare metal stents were not significantly different than for covered stents: 50, 41, and 22 % compared to 59, 52, and 29 %, respectively (p = 0.21). The secondary patency rates were also not significantly different: 78, 78, and 68 % for bare metal stents compared to 76, 69, and 61 % for covered stents, respectively (p = 0.85). However, covered stents demonstrated a higher primary stent patency rate than bare metal stents: 100, 85, and 70 % compared to 75, 67, and 49 % at 3, 6, and 12 months (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The primary and secondary access patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents at the venous anastomosis were not significantly different. However, bare metal stents developed in-stent stenoses significantly sooner.

  8. Coronary artery stent (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open. ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open.

  9. Palliative Airway Stenting Performed Under Radiological Guidance and Local Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Profili, Stefano; Manca, Antonio; Feo, Claudio F. Padua, Guglielmo; Ortu, Riccardo; Canalis, Giulio C.; Meloni, Giovanni B.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To assess the effectiveness of airway stenting performed exclusively under radiological guidance for the palliation of malignant tracheobronchial strictures. Methods. We report our experience in 16 patients with malignant tracheobronchial stricture treated by insertion of 20 Ultraflex self-expandable metal stents performed under fluoroscopic guidance only. Three patients presented dysphagia grade IV due to esophageal malignant infiltration; they therefore underwent combined airway and esophageal stenting. All the procedures were performed under conscious sedation in the radiological room; average procedure time was around 10 min, but the airway impediment never lasted more than 40 sec. Results. We obtained an overall technical success in 16 cases (100%) and clinical success in 14 patients (88%). All prostheses were successfully placed without procedural complications. Rapid clinical improvement with symptom relief and normalization of respiratory function was obtained in 14 cases. Two patients died within 48 hr from causes unrelated to stent placement. Two cases (13%) of migration were observed; they were successfully treated with another stent. Tumor overgrowth developed in other 2 patients (13%); however, no further treatment was possible because of extensive laryngeal infiltration. Conclusions. Tracheobronchial recanalization with self-expandable metal stents is a safe and effective palliative treatment for malignant strictures. Airway stenting performed exclusively under fluoroscopic view was rapid and well tolerated.

  10. [Problems with Ureteral Stents – a Never-Ending Story].

    PubMed

    Betschart, Patrick; Schmid, Hans-Peter; Abt, Dominik

    2016-03-16

    Temporary drainage of the upper urinary tract by internal ureteral stents is a common procedure to assure renal function and to treat pain caused by ureteral obstruction. Ureteral stents are frequently associated with side effects like urinary symptoms, pain or hematuria resulting in frequent medical consultations. In addition to good patient education, symptomatic drug therapy of stent-associated symptoms is often indicated and sufficient. However, complications like stent dysfunction or significant urinary tract infections have to be kept in mind, as they require further diagnostics and treatment. Therefore, especially general practitioners as a primary point of contact for the patients should be familiar with common ureteral stent-associated problems, their treatment and indications for patient referrals.

  11. Treatment of Carotid Siphon Aneurysms with a Microcell Stent

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, M.; Dall’Olio, M.; Princiotta, C.; Simonetti, L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The treatment of giant, large, multiple or wide-necked carotid siphon aneurysms has always represented a challenge for neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists. Very recently the use of stents with tiny holes has been proposed by two companies: Balt Silk Stent in Europe and Pi-peline in America. We have used the Silk stent on a few patients and describe our first case who now has an eleven month follow-up. The carotid siphon presented three converging aneurysms sharing a very large common neck. The Silk stent (Balt Extrusion, Montmorency, France) was deployed through a 4F Balt introducer. The procedure was uneventful and very quick. As soon as the stent was positioned contrast medium stagnation was displayed within the aneur-ysm. The patient’s post-operative course was normal and she was discharged three days later in good health. PMID:20557742

  12. In vivo assessment of coronary artery angioplasty and stent deployment from balloon pressure-volume data.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, T; Williams, D O; Doig, J C; Murray, A

    2006-03-01

    This study assessed the clinical and practical value of angioplasty balloon pressure-volume data, obtained by a computer-controlled balloon inflation device, during standard percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures. Stent deployment was studied for 57 lesions in 34 patients. Angiographic predilation data were available in 9 patients. Vessel lumen improvement with pre-dilation was determined using the area difference under the pressure-volume curves of two consecutive inflations and compared to the angiographically determined lumen improvement. Stent opening pressure, the inflation volume needed to unfold the stent and the shape of the pressure-volume curve were assessed for differences between stent sizes (diameter, length) and manufacturer types. A Pearson correlation of 0.8 between the pressure-volume area difference and the angiographic lumen improvement was significant (p = 0.01), confirming that pressure-volume curves are useful in assessing lumen improvement after pre-dilation. There was a significant difference in stent opening pressure between stent types but not between different stent sizes (length, diameter). The inflation volume measured during the unfolding process of the stent correlated with the calculated stent lumen when deployed (Pearson correlation: 0.65, p = 0.001). The shape of the pressure-volume curve during stent deployment illustrated differences between different stent sizes (length, diameter) during inflation. Pressure-volume curves obtained from an automatic balloon inflation device have shown their usefulness in providing additional feedback about lumen improvement and the mechanical characteristics and quality of stent deployment.

  13. Role of metallic stents in benign esophageal stricture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Chan Sup

    2012-10-01

    Simple esophageal strictures, which are focal, straight, and large in diameter, usually require 1 - 3 dilation sessions to relieve symptoms. However, complex strictures, which are long, tortuous, or associated with a severely compromised luminal diameter, are usually more difficult to treat with conventional bougie or balloon dilation techniques, and often have high recurrence rates. Although the permanent placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) has been used to manage refractory benign esophageal strictures, this procedure is associated with additional problems, such as stricture from tissue hyperplasia, stent migration, and fistula formation. Thus, several new types of stents have been developed, including temporary SEMS, self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS), and biodegradable stents. The use of these new products has produced varied results. Temporary SEMS that have been used to relieve benign esophageal conditions have caused granulation tissue at both ends of the stent because of contact between the mucosa and the exposed metal components of the stent, thus hindering stent removal. We examined the tissue response to two new types of SEMS, a flange-type and a straighttype, each coated with a silicone membrane on the outside of the metal mesh. These two SEMS were evaluated individually and compared with a conventional control stent in animal experiments. Although the newly designed stents resulted in reduced tissue hyperplasia, and were thus more easily separated from the esophageal tissue, some degree of tissue hyperplasia did occur. We suggest that newly designed DES (drug-eluting stents) may provide an alternative tool to manage refractory benign esophageal stricture.

  14. Intraarterial Pressure Gradients After Randomized Angioplasty or Stenting of Iliac Artery Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Tetteroo, Eric; Haaring, Cees; Graaf, Yolanda van der; Schaik, Jan P.J. van; Engelen, A.D. van; Mali, Willem P.T.M.

    1996-11-15

    Purpose: To determine initial technical results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stent procedures in the iliac artery, mean intraarterial pressure gradients were recorded before and after each procedure. Methods: We randomly assigned 213 patients with typical intermittent claudication to primary stent placement (n= 107) or primary PTA (n= 106), with subsequent stenting in the case of a residual mean pressure gradient of > 10 mmHg (n= 45). Eligibility criteria included angiographic iliac artery stenosis (> 50% diameter reduction) and/or a peak systolic velocity ratio > 2.5 on duplex examination. Mean intraarterial pressures were simultaneously recorded above and below the lesion, at rest and also during vasodilatation in the case of a resting gradient {<=} 10 mmHg. Results: Pressure gradients in the primary stent group were 14.9 {+-} 10.4 mmHg before and 2.9 {+-} 3.5 mmHg after stenting. Pressure gradients in the primary PTA group were 17.3 {+-} 11.3 mmHg pre-PTA, 4.2 {+-} 5.4 mmHg post-PTA, and 2.5 {+-} 2.8 mmHg after selective stenting. Compared with primary stent placement, PTA plus selective stent placement avoided application of a stent in 63% (86/137) of cases, resulting in a considerable cost saving. Conclusion: Technical results of primary stenting and PTA plus selective stenting are similar in terms of residual pressure gradients.

  15. Stent-graft and multilayer stent for treatment of type II thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm in a high-risk patient.

    PubMed

    Pane, B; Spinella, G; Salcuni, M; Palombo, D

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present article was to present an alternative endovascular treatment for type II thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm that would have the advantage of limiting the duration of the procedure and the use of contrast. A high-risk patient was admitted to our Vascular Unit for type II thoracoabdominal aneurysm according to Crawford's classification. Two thoracic stent-grafts (Valiant Captivia, Medtronic, Pewaukee, WI, USA), a bifurcated stent-graft (Endurant Medtronic) and two multilayer stents (Cardiatis SA, Isnes, Belgium) were deployed. No postoperative major complications were observed. Operative time and use of contrast material were 45 min and 80 mL, respectively. Computed angiography tomography at 1 and 6 months showed patency of visceral and renal arteries and progressive thrombosis of the aneurysmal sac. This stent-graft treatment in combination with multilayer stent could be an alternative treatment for thoracoabdominal aneurysm in high-risk patients. PMID:24013540

  16. Can we prevent in-stent restenosis?

    PubMed

    Garza, Luis; Aude, Y Wady; Saucedo, Jorge F

    2002-09-01

    Nowadays stent placement has replaced balloon angioplasty as the most commonly performed percutaneous coronary interventional procedure, mainly because of its better acute and chronic outcome. As a result, in-stent restenosis (ISR) has become a widespread problem. The incidence of ISR varies from 10% to 50% and depends on the absence or presence of several risk factors, such as small vessel size, longer lesions, and diabetes. Intravascular ultrasound studies have demonstrated that ISR is mainly caused by neointimal proliferation; consequently, this pathologic process has become the target of many preventive and therapeutic approaches. This article provides an overview of such management strategies, highlighting the rather disappointing experiences with mechanical and systemic drug therapies; the relative merits and disadvantages of intracoronary radiation; and the exciting yet realistic promise, embodied by the recent advancements in drug-eluting stent technology, of potentially eradicating ISR in the near future.

  17. Stent thrombosis in real-world patients: a comparison of drug-eluting with bare metal stents

    PubMed Central

    de Man, F.H.; Stella, P.R.; Nathoe, H.; Kirkels, H.; Hamer, B.; Meijburg, H.W.; Doevendans, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Although the introduction of drugeluting stents (DES) has been associated with an impressive reduction in target vessel revascularisation, there has been concern about the safety profile. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of stent thrombosis in real-world patients and evaluate the contribution of drug-eluting stents. Methods A prospective observational cohort study was conducted at a high-volume centre in Utrecht, the Netherlands. All patients who underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) between 1 January and 31 December 2005 were evaluated. The patients were pretreated with aspirin and clopidogrel, which was continued for six months in bare metal stents (BMS) and 12 months in DES. Results In 2005, 1309 patients underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention procedure with stent implantation. After a median follow-up of nine months, 1.8% (n=23) of the patients had suffered from stent thrombosis. Two cases could be attributed to incorrect use of antiplatelet agents. In 8/23 cases, a technical reason was found such as an unrecognised dissection or stent underexpansion. The timing of stent thrombosis was acute in 1/23 patients, subacute in 20/23 patients and late in 2/23 patients. In both cases of late stent thrombosis, a BMS had been used. There were no differences in stent thrombosis rates between DES and BMS (1.4 vs. 1.9%, ns.). This is remarkable since DES were used in more complex and longer lesions. Conclusion The use of DES in routine daily practice does not appear to be associated with a higher rate of stent thrombosis than BMS. (Neth Heart J 2007;15:382-6.18176640Neth Heart J 2007;15:382-6). PMID:18176640

  18. Primary Stenting in Infrarenal Aortic Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, Ulf; Uher, Petr; Lindh, Mats; Lindblad, Bengt; Ivancev, Krasnodar

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of primary stenting in aortic occlusive disease.Methods: Thirty patients underwent primary stenting of focal concentric (n = 2) and complex aortic stenoses (n = 19), and aortic or aorto-iliac occlusions (n = 9). Sixteen patients underwent endovascular outflow procedures, three of whom also had distal open surgical reconstructions. Median follow-up was 16 months (range 1-60 months).Results: Guidewire crossing of two aorto-biiliac occlusions failed, resulting in a 93% (28/30) technical success. Major complications included one access hematoma, one myocardial infarction, one death (recurrent thromboembolism) in a patient with widespread malignancy, and one fatal hemorrhage during thrombolysis of distal emboli from a recanalized occluded iliac artery. One patient did not improve his symptoms, resulting in a 1-month clinical success of 83% (25/30). Following restenting the 26 stented survivors changed their clinical limb status to +3 (n = 17) and +2 (n = 9). During follow-up one symptomatic aortic restenosis occurred and was successfully restented.Conclusions: Primary stenting of complex aortic stenoses and short occlusions is an attractive alternative to conventional surgery. Larger studies with longer follow-up and stratification of lesion morphology are warranted to define its role relative to balloon angioplasty. Stenting of aorto-biiliac occlusions is feasible but its role relative to bypass grafting remains to be defined.

  19. Inadvertent intracoronary stent extraction 10 months after implantation complicating cutting balloon angioplasty for in-stent restenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Almeda, Francis Q.; Billhardt, Roger A

    2003-09-01

    We report the case of an unusual complication for Cutting Balloon Angioplasty (CBA) during treatment for instent restenosis (ISR), which resulted in inadvertent intracoronary stent extraction 10 months after implantation. In this case report, CBA was utilized to treat an ISR lesion in the distal right coronary artery (RCA). Due to difficulty in withdrawing the cutting balloon into the guide after treatment of the lesion, the entire system (guide, cutting balloon, and guidewire) was removed as a unit from the body. Upon examination of the system, the previously placed stent in the distal RCA was attached to the microtomes of the cutting balloon. Although the precise mechanisms for stent extraction in this case remain speculative, the initial stent used in the distal RCA may have been undersized, and this may have played a major role in this complication. Although there is limited data regarding the optimal strategy to treat the site of the inadvertent stent extraction, we opted to re-stent the area with a properly-sized coronary stent. Following the intervention, there was no residual stenosis with TIMI 3 flow through the vessel. The patient remained asymptomatic and a serum troponin drawn 18 hours after the procedure was normal, and he was discharged the next day. The interventionist must be vigilant about this rare but serious complication when applying CBA in the treatment of ISR, particularly when an undersized or underdeployed stent is suspected.

  20. Microwave Spectrometry for the Assessment of the Structural Integrity and Restenosis Degree of Coronary Stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arauz-Garofalo, Gianluca; Lopez-Dominguez, Victor; Garcia-Santiago, Antoni; Tejada, Javier; O'Callaghan, Joan; Rodriguez-Leor, Oriol; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Gmag Team; Hugtp Team; Upc Team

    2013-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death worldwide. Coronary stents are one of the most important improvements to reduce deaths from cardiovascular disorders. Stents are prosthetic tube-shaped devices which are used to rehabilitate obstructed arteries. Despite their obvious advantages, reocclusion occurs in some cases arising from restenosis or structural distortions, so stented patients require chronic monitoring (involving invasive or ionizing procedures). We study microwave scattering spectra (between 2.0 - 18.0 GHz) of metallic stents in open air, showing that they behave like dipole antennas in terms of microwave scattering. They exhibit characteristic resonant frequencies in their microwave absorbance spectra that are univocally related to their length and diameter. This fact allows one to detect stent fractures or collapses. We also investigate the ``dielectric shift'' in the frequency of the resonances mentioned above due to the presence of different fluids along the stent lumen. This shift could give us information about the restenosis degree of implanted stents.

  1. Endovascular Gene Delivery from a Stent Platform: Gene- Eluting Stents

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Ilia; Chorny, Michael; Adamo, Richard F; Forbes, Scott P; Corrales, Ricardo A; Alferiev, Ivan S; Levy, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    A synergistic impact of research in the fields of post-angioplasty restenosis, drug-eluting stents and vascular gene therapy over the past 15 years has shaped the concept of gene-eluting stents. Gene-eluting stents hold promise of overcoming some biological and technical problems inherent to drug-eluting stent technology. As the field of gene-eluting stents matures it becomes evident that all three main design modules of a gene-eluting stent: a therapeutic transgene, a vector and a delivery system are equally important for accomplishing sustained inhibition of neointimal formation in arteries treated with gene delivery stents. This review summarizes prior work on stent-based gene delivery and discusses the main optimization strategies required to move the field of gene-eluting stents to clinical translation. PMID:26225356

  2. Bare Metal Stenting for Endovascular Exclusion of Aortic Arch Thrombi

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hoffman, Andras; Autschbach, Ruediger; Damberg, Anneke L. M.

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundAortic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch are rare but are associated with a relevant risk of major stroke or distal embolization. Although stent grafting is commonly used as a treatment option in the descending aorta, only a few case reports discuss stenting of the aortic arch for the treatment of a thrombus. The use of bare metal stents in this setting has not yet been described.MethodsWe report two cases of ascending and aortic arch thrombus that were treated by covering the thrombus with an uncovered stent. Both procedures were performed under local anesthesia via a femoral approach. A femoral cutdown was used in one case, and a total percutaneous insertion was possible in the second case.ResultsBoth procedures were successfully performed without any periprocedural complications. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. In both cases, no late complications or recurrent embolization occurred at midterm follow-up, and control CT angiography at 1 respectively 10 months revealed no stent migration, freely perfused supra-aortic branches, and no thrombus recurrence.ConclusionTreating symptomatic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch with a bare metal stent is feasible. This technique could constitute a minimally invasive alternative to a surgical intervention or complex endovascular therapy with fenestrated or branched stent grafts.

  3. Bioabsorbable Stent Quo Vadis: A Case for Nano-Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Gundogan, Buket; Tan, Aaron; Farhatnia, Yasmin; Alavijeh, Mohammad S.; Cui, Zhanfeng; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is one of the most commonly performed invasive medical procedures in medicine today. Since the first coronary balloon angioplasty in 1977, interventional cardiology has seen a wide array of developments in PCI. Bare metal stents (BMS) were soon superseded by the revolutionary drug-eluting stents (DES), which aimed to address the issue of restenosis found with BMS. However, evidence began to mount against DES, with late-stent thrombosis (ST) rates being higher than that of BMS. The bioabsorbable stent may be a promising alternative, providing vessel patency and support for the necessary time required and thereafter degrade into safe non-toxic compounds which are reabsorbed by the body. This temporary presence provides no triggers for ST, which is brought about by non-endothelialized stent struts and drug polymers remaining in vivo for extended periods of time. Likewise, nano-theranostics incorporated into a bioabsorbable stent of the future may provide an incredibly valuable single platform offering both therapeutic and diagnostic capabilities. Such a stent may allow delivery of therapeutic particles to specific sites thus keeping potential toxicity to a minimum, improved ease of tracking delivery in vivo by embedding imaging agents, controlled rate of therapy release and protection of the implanted therapy. Indeed, nanocarriers may allow an increased therapeutic index as well as offer novel post-stent implantation imaging and diagnostic methods for atherosclerosis, restenosis and thrombosis. It is envisioned that a nano-theranostic stent may well form the cornerstone of future stent designs in clinical practice. PMID:24672583

  4. Deployment of self-expandable stents in aneurysmatic cerebral vessels: comparison of different computational approaches for interventional planning.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, A; Larrabide, I; Petrini, L; Pennati, G; Flore, E; Kim, M; Frangi, A F

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, there has been a growing focus on faster computational methods to support clinicians in planning stenting procedures. This study investigates the possibility of introducing computational approximations in modelling stent deployment in aneurysmatic cerebral vessels to achieve simulations compatible with the constraints of real clinical workflows. The release of a self-expandable stent in a simplified aneurysmatic vessel was modelled in four different initial positions. Six progressively simplified modelling approaches (based on Finite Element method and Fast Virtual Stenting--FVS) have been used. Comparing accuracy of the results, the final configuration of the stent is more affected by neglecting mechanical properties of materials (FVS) than by adopting 1D instead of 3D stent models. Nevertheless, the differences showed are acceptable compared to those achieved by considering different stent initial positions. Regarding computational costs, simulations involving 1D stent features are the only ones feasible in clinical context.

  5. In situ cooling with ice water for the easier removal of self-expanding nitinol stents

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, Daniel; Brinkmann, Eckhard; Wiens, Daniel; Derwahl, Karl-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is yet to be determined what effects temperature has on the properties of nitinol in order to simplify the process of removing nitinol self-expanding metal stents (SEMS). Materials and methods: We describe the procedure for removal of SEMS in a total of 11 cases with 9 patients. A study involving cooling of nitinol stents in situ with ice water just before their removal was attempted. Results: All stents were removed successfully. In partially covered and in fully covered stents, the stent rigidity was noticeably reduced following cooling. Stent removal was performed by inversion, which was achieved by pulling on the stent from its distal end. No adverse events were observed during this trial. Conclusion: The higher pliability of the stents after ice-water cooling facilitates stent removal. With this method, a mobilization of all stents by the invagination technique was achieved. The separation of the uncoated stent ends from the intestinal wall by the invagination technique, as well as the mucosal vasoconstriction resulting from the cooling, lead to an easier SEMS removal and may serve to prevent severe bleeding of the mucosal wall during this process. PMID:26134772

  6. State of the Art: Which Stent for Which Lesion in Peripheral Interventions?

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Michel; Klonaris, Christos; Amor, Max; Henry, Isabelle; Tzvetanov, Kiril

    2000-01-01

    Applications of endovascular procedures have been expanded dramatically throughout the human body for both occlusive and aneurysmal disease; arteries at the aortoiliac and femoropopliteal levels are no exception. Currently, interventional procedures are the 1st treatment option for most patients who have peripheral artery disease. Although balloon angioplasty alone offers good immediate and long-term results, the addition of stents has been proposed to improve the procedural success of angioplasty and extend its application to more patients with vascular disease. Stenting, however, is controversial. Its use is considered acceptable in the aortoiliac vessels but is more in dispute for the femoro-popliteal vessels. Moreover, the rapid development of endovascular stents for peripheral applications has made stent selection a complicated task for clinical practitioners. Many factors influence the type of stent selected; therefore, knowledge of the stents available—including various designs and individual properties—is mandatory. Appropriate selection depends on adequate preprocedural evaluation of the lesion; the choice of approach; the choice of primary versus selective stent placement; the location and characteristics of the lesion; the availability of stents in the intervention suite; and the experience of the operator. Several stents are now available, but they are not equivalent; it is important to select the stent that is best suited to the lesion. On the basis of our experience using different types of stents, as well as our review of the world medical literature, we summarize the properties of various stents and specific indications for their application. This report is intended for use as a practical guide to stent selection. PMID:10928499

  7. Spectral Imaging for Intracranial Stents and Stent Lumen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, David Yen-Ting; Chen, Chi-Jen; Hsu, Hui-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Application of computed tomography for monitoring intracranial stents is limited because of stent-related artifacts. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of gemstone spectral imaging on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. Materials and Methods In vitro, we scanned Enterprise stent phantom and a stent–cheese complex using the gemstone spectral imaging protocol. Follow-up gemstone spectral images of 15 consecutive patients with placement of Enterprise from January 2013 to September 2014 were also retrospectively reviewed. We used 70-keV, 140-keV, iodine (water), iodine (calcium), and iodine (hydroxyapatite) images to evaluate their effect on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. Two regions of interest were individually placed in stent lumen and adjacent brain tissue. Contrast-to-noise ratio was measured to determine image quality. The maximal diameter of stent markers was also measured to evaluate stent-related artifact. Two radiologists independently graded the visibility of the lumen at the maker location by using a 4-point scale. The mean of grading score, contrast/noise ratio and maximal diameter of stent markers were compared among all modes. All results were analyzed by SPSS version 20. Results In vitro, iodine (water) images decreased metallic artifact of stent makers to the greatest degree. The most areas of cheese were observed on iodine (water) images. In vivo, iodine (water) images had the smallest average diameter of stent markers (0.33 ± 0.17mm; P < .05) and showed the highest mean grading score (2.94 ± 0.94; P < .05) and contrast/noise ratio of in-stent lumen (160.03 ±37.79; P < .05) among all the modes. Conclusion Iodine (water) images can help reduce stent-related artifacts of Enterprise and enhance contrast of in-stent lumen. Spectral imaging may be considered a noninvasive modality for following-up patients with in-stent stenosis. PMID:26731534

  8. Elastic Deformation Properties of Implanted Endobronchial Wire Stents in Benign and Malignant Bronchial Disease: A Radiographic In Vivo Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hautmann, Hubert; Rieger, Johannes; Huber, Rudolf M.; Pfeifer, Klaus J.

    1999-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term mechanical behavior in vivo of expandable endobronchial wire stents, we imaged three different prostheses in the treatment of tracheobronchial disease. Methods: Six patients with bronchial stenoses (three benign, three malignant) underwent insertion of metallic stents. Two self-expandable Wallstents, two balloon-expandable tantalum Strecker stents and two self-expandable nitinol Accuflex stents were used. Measurements of deformation properties were performed during voluntary cough by means of fluoroscopy, at 1 month and 7-10 months after implantation. The procedures were videotaped, their images digitized and the narrowing of stent diameters calculated at intervals of 20 msec. Results: After stent implantation all patients improved with respect to ventilatory function. Radial stent narrowing during cough reached 53% (Wallstent), 59% (tantalum Strecker stent), and 52% (nitinol Accuflex stent) of the relaxed post-implantation diameter. Stent compression was more marked in benign compared with malignant stenoses. In the long term permanent deformation occurred with the tantalum Strecker stents; the other stents were unchanged. Conclusion: Endobronchial wire stents can be helpful in the treatment of major airway collapse and obstructing bronchial lesions. However, evidence of material fatigue as a possible effect of exposure to recurrent mechanical stress on the flexible mesh tube may limit their long-term use. This seems to be predominantly important in benign bronchial collapse.

  9. Process for making electroformed stents

    DOEpatents

    Hines, Richard A.

    2000-02-01

    This invention is directed to an expandable stent useful for implantation into an artery or the like. The stents are made using electroforming techniques in which an electrically-conductive mandrel is coated with a suitable resist material, after which the resist is exposed to an appropriate light pattern and frequency so as to form a stent pattern in the resist. The mandrel is then electroplated with a suitable stent material. The mandrel is etched away once a sufficient layer of stent material is deposited, leaving a completed stent.

  10. A stent for a split-thickness skin graft vestibuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Firtell, D N; Oatis, G W; Curtis, T A; Sugg, W E

    1976-08-01

    Accepting the requirement that there must be intimate contact between a split-thickness skin graft and the underlying periosteum in a vestibuloplasty, a method of forming a stent to meet this.criterion is presented. The procedure uses an overextended impression and a custom-made acrylic resin base. Two methods of modifying the base with a secondary impression to form a stent at the time of the operation are described. PMID:789867

  11. A stent for a split-thickness skin graft vestibuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Firtell, D N; Oatis, G W; Curtis, T A; Sugg, W E

    1976-08-01

    Accepting the requirement that there must be intimate contact between a split-thickness skin graft and the underlying periosteum in a vestibuloplasty, a method of forming a stent to meet this.criterion is presented. The procedure uses an overextended impression and a custom-made acrylic resin base. Two methods of modifying the base with a secondary impression to form a stent at the time of the operation are described.

  12. Inflammation and In-Stent Restenosis: The Role of Serum Markers and Stent Characteristics in Carotid Artery Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Wasser, Katrin; Schnaudigel, Sonja; Wohlfahrt, Janin; Psychogios, Marios-Nikos; Knauth, Michael; Gröschel, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Background Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) may currently be recommended especially in younger patients with a high-grade carotid artery stenosis. However, evidence is accumulating that in-stent restenosis (ISR) could be an important factor endangering the long-term efficacy of CAS. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of inflammatory serum markers and procedure-related factors on ISR as diagnosed with duplex sonography. Methods We analyzed 210 CAS procedures in 194 patients which were done at a single university hospital between May 2003 and June 2010. Periprocedural C-reactive protein (CRP) and leukocyte count as well as stent design and geometry, and other periprocedural factors were analyzed with respect to the occurrence of an ISR as diagnosed with serial carotid duplex ultrasound investigations during clinical long-term follow-up. Results Over a median of 33.4 months follow-up (IQR: 14.9–53.7) of 210 procedures (mean age of 67.9±9.7 years, 71.9% male, 71.0% symptomatic) an ISR of ≥70% was detected in 5.7% after a median of 8.6 months (IQR: 3.4–17.3). After multiple regression analysis, leukocyte count after CAS-intervention (odds ratio (OR): 1.31, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02–1.69; p = 0.036), as well as stent length and width were associated with the development of an ISR during follow-up (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.05–1.65, p = 0.022 and OR: 0.28, 95% CI: 0.09–0.84, p = 0.010). Conclusions The majority of ISR during long-term follow-up after CAS occur within the first year. ISR is associated with periinterventional inflammation markers and influenced by certain stent characteristics such as stent length and width. Our findings support the assumption that stent geometry leading to vessel injury as well as periprocedural inflammation during CAS plays a pivotal role in the development of carotid artery ISR. PMID:21829478

  13. Stent-grafts for the treatment of TIPS dysfunction: Fluency stent vs Wallgraft stent

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xue-Feng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Liu, Ling-Jun; Yu, Yang; Zhou, Biao; Tang, Cheng-Wei; Li, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of an expanded polytetrafluoro-ethylene-covered Fluency stent compared with that of a polyethylene terephthalate-covered Wallgraft stent for the management of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) dysfunction. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients who underwent TIPS revision with stent-grafts between May 2007 and June 2011 was conducted. The patients were divided into two groups according to the stent-grafts implanted: the Fluency stent (Bard Incorporated, Karlsruhe, Germany) and the Wallgraft stent (Boston Scientific, Galway, Ireland). The primary patency rates were calculated and compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: A total of 73 patients were evaluated in this study: 33 with Fluency stents and 40 with Wallgraft stents. The primary patency rates at 12 and 24 mo were 91% and 85%, respectively, in the Fluency stent group and 78% and 63%, respectively, in the Wallgraft stent group. The primary shunt patency rates after TIPS revision were significantly better with the Fluency stent than with the Wallgraft stent (P = 0.033). CONCLUSION: TIPS revision with the Fluency stent has higher medium-term patency rates than that with the Wallgraft stent. PMID:23946607

  14. Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Placement in Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction: A Comparison Between 2 Brands of Stents.

    PubMed

    Ye, Bing-Wei; Lee, Kuei-Chuan; Hsieh, Yun-Cheng; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Han-Chieh

    2015-07-01

    Malignant gastric outlet obstruction is a late complication of intraabdominal malignancy. Self-expandable metallic stent placement has been a safe palliative treatment to relieve obstructive symptoms. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of metallic stents in our patients and analyzed the clinical outcome of different brands. Seventy-one patients with inoperable gastric outlet obstruction receiving WallFlex enteral stents (WallFlex group) or Bonastents (Bonastent group) since April 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. The overall technical and clinical success rates of stent placement were 100% and 93%, respectively. The baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes including procedure-related complications, restenosis, and reintervention rates were comparable between the 2 groups. However, the Bonastent group had a higher rate of stent fracture than the WallFlex group (13.3% vs 0%, P = 0.03). The mean duration of overall stent patency was 132.7 days. The mean duration of survival was 181.9 days. Resumption of regular diet or low residual diet at day 7 after stent insertion predicted stent patency (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.28, P = 0.01). Cancer with gastric origin (HR: 0.25, P = 0.045) and poststent chemotherapy (HR: 0.38, P = 0.006) predicted lower mortality; however, peritoneal carcinomatosis (HR: 3.09, P = 0.04) correlated with higher mortality. Metallic stent placement is a safe and effective method for relieving gastric outlet obstruction. Except higher rate of stent fracture in the Bonastent group, there is no significant difference in clinical outcomes between the Bonastent group and the WallFlex group.

  15. Stent-Protected Carotid Angioplasty Using a Membrane Stent: A Comparative Cadaver Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan Guehne, Albrecht; Tsokos, Michael; Huesler, Erhard J.; Schaffner, Silvio R.; Paulsen, Friedrich; Hedderich, Juergen; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the performance of a prototype membrane stent, MembraX, in the prevention of acute and late embolization and to quantify particle embolization during carotid stent placement in human carotid explants in a proof of concept study. Methods. Thirty human carotid cadaveric explants (mild stenoses 0-29%, n = 23; moderate stenoses 30-69%, n = 3; severe stenoses 70-99%, n = 2) that included the common, internal and external carotid arteries were integrated into a pulsatile-flow model. Three groups were formed according to the age of the donors (mean 58.8 years; sample SD 15.99 years) and randomized to three test groups: (I) MembraX, n 9; (II) Xpert bare stent, n = 10; (III) Xpert bare stent with Emboshield protection device, n = 9. Emboli liberated during stent deployment (step A), post-dilatation (step B), and late embolization (step C) were measured in 100 {mu}m effluent filters. When the Emboshield was used, embolus penetration was measured during placement (step D) and retrieval (step E). Late embolization was simulated by compressing the area of the stented vessel five times. Results. Absolute numbers of particles (median; >100 {mu}m) caught in the effluent filter were: (I) MembraX: A = 7, B = 9, C = 3; (II) bare stent: A 6.5, B = 6, C = 4.5; (III) bare stent and Emboshield: A = 7, B = 7, C.=.5, D = 8, E = 10. The data showed no statistical differences according to whether embolic load was analyzed by weight or mean particle size. When summing all procedural steps, the Emboshield caused the greatest load by weight (p 0.011) and the largest number (p = 0.054) of particles. Conclusions. On the basis of these limited data neither a membrane stent nor a protection device showed significant advantages during ex vivo carotid angioplasty. However, the membrane stent seems to have the potential for reducing the emboli responsible for supposed late embolization, whereas more emboli were observed when using a protection device. Further studies are necessary

  16. Drug-eluting stents to prevent stent thrombosis and restenosis.

    PubMed

    Im, Eui; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Although first-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have significantly reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis, they have also increased the long-term risk of stent thrombosis. This safety concern directly triggered the development of new generation DES, with innovations in stent platforms, polymers, and anti-proliferative drugs. Stent platform materials have evolved from stainless steel to cobalt or platinum-chromium alloys with an improved strut design. Drug-carrying polymers have become biocompatible or biodegradable and even polymer-free DES were introduced. New limus-family drugs (such as everolimus, zotarolimus or biolimus) were adopted to enhance stent performances. As a result, these new DES demonstrated superior vascular healing responses on intracoronary imaging studies and lower stent thrombotic events in actual patients. Recently, fully-bioresorbable stents (scaffolds) have been introduced, and expanding their applications. In this article, the important concepts and clinical results of new generation DES and bioresorbable scaffolds are described. PMID:26567863

  17. Drug-eluting stents to prevent stent thrombosis and restenosis.

    PubMed

    Im, Eui; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Although first-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have significantly reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis, they have also increased the long-term risk of stent thrombosis. This safety concern directly triggered the development of new generation DES, with innovations in stent platforms, polymers, and anti-proliferative drugs. Stent platform materials have evolved from stainless steel to cobalt or platinum-chromium alloys with an improved strut design. Drug-carrying polymers have become biocompatible or biodegradable and even polymer-free DES were introduced. New limus-family drugs (such as everolimus, zotarolimus or biolimus) were adopted to enhance stent performances. As a result, these new DES demonstrated superior vascular healing responses on intracoronary imaging studies and lower stent thrombotic events in actual patients. Recently, fully-bioresorbable stents (scaffolds) have been introduced, and expanding their applications. In this article, the important concepts and clinical results of new generation DES and bioresorbable scaffolds are described.

  18. Spontaneous knotting of a pigtail ureteric stent in the ureter requiring percutaneous removal.

    PubMed

    Braslis, K G; Joyce, G

    1992-10-01

    Insertion of a ureteric stent is a common procedure in urologic practice. Ureteric stenting may be performed for: ureteric obstruction, benign or malignant: to prevent ureteric obstruction from stone fragments after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL); or to prevent leakage from the upper urinary tract. A case of spontaneous knotting of a ureteric stent in situ is reported. Although this complication has been reported previously it is rare.

  19. Influence of Vessel Size and Tortuosity on In-stent Restenosis After Stent Implantation in the Vertebral Artery Ostium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Zhiming; Yin Qin; Xu Gelin; Yue Xuanye; Zhang Renliang; Zhu Wusheng; Fan Xiaobing; Ma Minmin; Liu Xinfeng

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting is emerging as an alternative for treating atherosclerotic stenosis in the vertebral artery ostium. However, in-stent restenosis (ISR) still remains a critical issue to be addressed. Little is known about the relationship between anatomic characteristics of the artery and ISR after stent implantation. In this study, we have evaluated influential factors for ISR in a cohort of the patients with stenting in the vertebral artery ostium. Methods: Sixty-one patients with 63 symptomatic lesions in vertebral artery ostium treated with stenting were enrolled onto this study. An average of 12.5 months' clinical and angiographic follow-up results were analyzed retrospectively. The possible influential factors for ISR, including conventional risk factors of cerebrovascular diseases and morphological characteristics of target lesions, were evaluated by univariate and multivariate regression analysis. Results: Technical success was achieved in all 63 interventional procedures. Stenosis was reduced from (mean {+-} standard deviation) 75.5 {+-} 12% before to 1 {+-} 3.6% after the procedure. During the mean 12.5-month angiographic follow-up, ISR was detected in 17 treated vessels (27.0%), with 2 treated arteries (3.2%) resulting in occlusion, and a stent fracture in 1 case (1.6%). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the tortuosity of V1 (hazard ratio 3.54, P = 0.01) and smaller diameter of the stent (hazard ratio 3.8, P = 0.04) were independent predictors of ISR. Conclusions: Angioplasty and stenting for symptomatic stenosis in the vertebral artery ostium stenosis seem to be feasible and effective. Tortuosity and smaller diameter may affect ISR after stent implantation.

  20. Stent sizing strategies in renal artery stenting: the comparison of conventional invasive renal angiography with renal computed tomographic angiography

    PubMed Central

    Michalowska, Ilona; Pregowski, Jerzy; Janaszek-Sitkowska, Hanna; Lech, Katarzyna; Kabat, Marek; Staruch, Adam; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Witkowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Randomized trials comparing invasive treatment of renal artery stenosis with standard pharmacotherapy did not show substantial benefit from revascularization. One of the potential reasons for that may be suboptimal procedure technique. Aim To compare renal stent sizing using two modalities: three-dimensional renal computed tomography angiography (CTA) versus conventional angiography. Material and methods Forty patients (41 renal arteries), aged 65.1 ±8.5 years, who underwent renal artery stenting with preprocedural CTA performed within 6 months, were retrospectively analyzed. In CTA analysis, reference diameter (CTA-D) and lesion length (CTA_LL) were measured and proposed stent diameter and length were recorded. Similarly, angiographic reference diameter (ANGIO_D) and lesion length (ANGIO_LL) as well as proposed stent dimensions were obtained by visual estimation. Results The median CTA_D was 0.5 mm larger than the median ANGIO_D (p < 0.001). Also, the proposed stent diameter in CTA evaluation was 0.5 mm larger than that in angiography (p < 0.0001). The median CTA_LL was 1 mm longer than the ANGIO_LL (p = NS), with significant correlation of these variables (r = 0.66, p < 0.0001). The median proposed stent length with CTA was equal to that proposed with angiography. The median diameter of the implanted stent was 0.5 mm smaller than that proposed in CTA (p < 0.0005) and identical to that proposed in angiography. The median length of the actual stent was longer than that proposed in angiography (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Renal CTA has potential advantages as a tool adjunctive to angiography in appropriate stent sizing. Careful evaluation of the available CTA scans may be beneficial and should be considered prior to the planned procedure. PMID:27279870

  1. Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Antegrade Stenting in an Occluded Biliary Self-expandable Metal Stent

    PubMed Central

    Almadi, Majid A.; Eltayeb, Mohanned; Thaniah, Salem

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) is an attractive option for patients who cannot undergo conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and do not want surgery or percutaneous drainage procedures. We present the use of EUS-antegrade (EUS-AG) insertion of a self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) in a patient with a common hepatic duct cholangiocarcinoma, as well as a huge gastric lipoma, after recurrent biliary obstruction of a prior SEMS inserted via ERCP in the same session as a duodenal stent insertion for gastric outlet obstruction. PMID:27488330

  2. Nanomaterial coatings applied on stent surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Mahsa; Mohammadi, Marzieh; Steele, Terry Wj; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    The advent of percutaneous coronary intervention and intravascular stents has revolutionized the field of interventional cardiology. Nonetheless, in-stent restenosis, inflammation and late-stent thrombosis are the major obstacles with currently available stents. In order to enhance the hemocompatibility of stents, advances in the field of nanotechnology allow novel designs of nanoparticles and biomaterials toward localized drug/gene carriers or stent scaffolds. The current review focuses on promising polymers used in the fabrication of newer generations of stents with a short synopsis on atherosclerosis and current commercialized stents, nanotechnology's impact on stent development and recent advancements in stent biomaterials is discussed in context.

  3. Improved bioresorbable microporous intravascular stents for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ye, Y W; Landau, C; Meidell, R S; Willard, J E; Moskowitz, A; Aziz, S; Carlisle, E; Nelson, K; Eberhart, R C

    1996-01-01

    Drug imbibing microporous stents are under development at a number of centers to enhance healing of the arterial wall after balloon coronary angioplasty procedures. The authors improved the mechanical strength and reservoir properties of a biodegradable microporous stent reported to this Society in 1994. A combined tubular/helical coil stent is readily fabricated by flotation/precipitation and casting/ winding techniques. A two stage solvent swelling technique allows precise adjustment of the surface hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance. These developments permit seven-fold improvement in drug capacity without significantly altering mechanical properties. Stents modified in this manner retain tensile and compressive strength and are suitable for remote deployment. Elution kinetics of these modified stents suggest they are suitable for gene delivery. Successful gene transfer and transmural expression have been demonstrated after implantation of stents impregnated with a recombinant adenovirus carrying a nuclear localizing beta-galactosidase reporter gene into rabbit carotid arteries. These studies suggest that surface modified, bioresorbable polymer stents ultimately may be useful adjunctive devices for gene transfer during percutaneous transluminal revascularization.

  4. Renal Artery Stenting in Patients with a Solitary Functioning Kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Cioni, Roberto; Vignali, Claudio; Petruzzi, Pasquale; Neri, Emanuele; Caramella, Davide; Vagli, Paola; Bargellini, Irene; Napoli, Vinicio; Pinto, Stefania; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2001-12-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the results of renal artery stenting in patients with renovascular disease and a solitary functioning kidney.Methods: Palmazstents were placed in 16 patients with a solitary functioning kidney,renal artery stenosis, hypertension and renal failure. Stenoses were evaluated with color Doppler ultrasound, MR angiography and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Indications for stenting were: recoil after percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) (63%),arterial dissection after PTRA (13%) and primary stenting (25%).Immediate results were evaluated by DSA. On follow-up (6-36 months),patients underwent periodical evaluation of clinical conditions (blood pressure and serum creatinine level) and stent patency, by means of color Doppler ultrasound.Results: Stent placement was successful in all patients (100%). Cumulative primary patency rate was: 100% at 1 day, 93.75% at 6 months, 81.25% at 12 months and 75% at 24 months. A significant reduction in diastolic blood pressure occurred (mean {+-} SD 104 {+-} 6 vs 92 {+-} 3;p < 0.05); renal function improved or stabilized in over 80% of patients. However, there was no significant difference in the creatinine values before and after treatment (mean {+-} SD 200 {+-} 142 mmol/l vs 197 {+-} 182 mmol/l; p> 0.05).Conclusion: Renal artery stenting, both after PTRA and as primary stenting, represents a safe procedure, able to preserve renal function in patients with a solitary functioning kidney.

  5. In-stent thrombosis after 68 months of implantation inspite of continuous dual antiplatelet therapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Lately, there has been an increased incidence of late stent thrombosis; especially following Drug eluting stent (DES) implantation. Several factors are associated with an increased risk of stent thrombosis, including the procedure itself, patient and lesion characteristics, stent design, and premature cessation of anti-platelet drugs. We present a case of late stent thrombosis (LST) following DES implantation after a period of 68 months, making it the longest reported case of LST reported in the literature, despite the use of dual anti-platelet therapy. PMID:20178570

  6. Percutaneous stent placement in children weighing less than 10 kilograms.

    PubMed

    Ashwath, Ravi; Gruenstein, Daniel; Siwik, Ernest

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and outcomes of palliative percutaneous stent placement in infants with congenital heart disease (CHD). There is interest in improving outcomes of infants with CHD through interventional/surgical collaboration. Small, high-risk patients may benefit from delayed open operations, and endovascular stents may provide a means to defer surgery to more advantageous times in select infants. Patients weighing < or =10 kg in whom stent placement was attempted during 2003-2006 were identified. Diagnoses, indications, angiographic and hemodynamic data, complications, and outcomes were reviewed. Seventeen stents were successfully placed in 15 patients. The mean age was 10.21 months; the mean weight was 6.08 kg. Indications were branch pulmonary artery stenosis, coarctation, total anomalous pulmonary venous return with obstructed venous egress, right ventricle-pulmonary artery conduit, and shunt stenosis. Premounted Palmaz Genesis and Driver Mx stents were used. Average vessel diameter increased from 3.65 to 6.72 mm (p < 0.001). The pressure gradient fell from 24 to 15 mm Hg (p < 0.01). Two stents migrated. One was recaptured and implanted at the target site and one implanted away from the target site. None needed surgical intervention. Mean follow-up was 270 days. Five patients have had additional surgery; seven patients underwent 10 additional stent dilations. There was no procedural-related mortality. Five patients (33%) died during the follow-up period, none attributable to the stent placement. We conclude that stent placement can be successfully accomplished in select, small, high-risk patients. A collaborative interventional/surgical paradigm is important to ensure that the risk-benefit ratio is properly evaluated during the patient selection. PMID:18046599

  7. Memokath Metallic Stent in the Treatment of Transplant Kidney Ureter Stenosis or Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Boyvat, Fatih E-mail: boyvatf@yahoo.com; Aytekin, Cuneyt; Colak, Turan; Firat, Ali; Karakayali, Hamdi; Haberal, Mehmet

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of the Memokath 051 stent (Engineers and Doctors, Hornbaek, Denmark) in the treatment of recurrent ureteral stenosis or occlusion in transplant kidneys. Methods. From October 1985 through January 2004, 1,131 renal transplantations were performed at our center. Four patients who developed recurrent renal transplant ureter obstruction had nephrostomy catheters placed. Antegrade pyelography showed ureteral stenosis in three cases and complete occlusion in one patient. In each case, a Memokath 051 stent was inserted via an antegrade approach. Mean follow-up was 20 months (range 18-21 months). Creatinine levels were measured and ultrasonography was performed during follow-up. Results. All stent procedures were technically successful. During follow-up, one stent migrated within 10 days after stent insertion and was removed cystoscopically. Another stent had to be removed in the 14th month due to resistant infection, and was replaced with a new Memokath 051 stent which remained patent for another 8 months. The other two stents were fully patent at the 18th and 21st month of follow-up, respectively. Conclusion. Placement of a Memokath 051 stent appears to be a promising treatment alternative to balloon dilation, double-J stents and open surgical intervention for ureteral stenosis or occlusion in kidney transplant recipients. Further study of larger series is necessary.

  8. Simulation of bifurcated stent grafts to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, J.; Großkopf, S.; Freisleben, B.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper a method is introduced, to visualize bifurcated stent grafts in CT-Data. The aim is to improve therapy planning for minimal invasive treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Due to precise measurement of the abdominal aortic aneurysm and exact simulation of the bifurcated stent graft, physicians are supported in choosing a suitable stent prior to an intervention. The presented method can be used to measure the dimensions of the abdominal aortic aneurysm as well as simulate a bifurcated stent graft. Both of these procedures are based on a preceding segmentation and skeletonization of the aortic, right and left iliac. Using these centerlines (aortic, right and left iliac) a bifurcated initial stent is constructed. Through the implementation of an ACM method the initial stent is fit iteratively to the vessel walls - due to the influence of external forces (distance- as well as balloonforce). Following the fitting process, the crucial values for choosing a bifurcated stent graft are measured, e.g. aortic diameter, right and left common iliac diameter, minimum diameter of distal neck. The selected stent is then simulated to the CT-Data - starting with the initial stent. It hereby becomes apparent if the dimensions of the bifurcated stent graft are exact, i.e. the fitting to the arteries was done properly and no ostium was covered.

  9. Carbon coating of stents has no effect on inflammatory response to primary stent deployment.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Mehmet Emin; Tayfun, Egemen; Müderrisoglu, Haldun; Yildirir, Aylin; Ozin, Bülent; Uluçam, Melek; Turan, Münire

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of stent carbon coating on inflammatory response. The authors serially measured plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and several cytokines (tumor necrosis factor, interleukin [IL]-1-beta, IL-6, and IL-8) in patients with single-vessel coronary stenosis who underwent primary stent implantation. None of the subjects had inflammatory or infectious disease at the time of the procedure. Forty-six patients (38 males; mean age 55 +/-9 years) were studied. Blood samples were collected before and at 2, 4, 6, 24, and 48 hours after stent implantation. Patients were randomly assigned 1 of 2 different stent types, an uncoated MAC (AMG Raesfeld-Erle, Germany) (UC-MAC) or a carbon-coated MAC (CC-MAC) stent. Implantations were performed without predilatation, and stents were deployed at a maximum pressure of 6 atmospheres for 90 seconds. Of the 46 patients, 14 had stable, 27 had unstable, and 5 had atypical angina. According to ACC/AHA classification, 35 lesions (76.1%) were type A, 10 (21.7%) were type B, and 1 (2.2%) was type C. Single stenosis of 28 left anterior descending, 12 circumflex, and 6 right coronary arteries were treated. Serum IL-6 increased in both the UC-MAC and CC-MAC groups, with concentrations significantly elevated above baseline at 6 hours, and then decreasing after 24 hours (baseline, 6-hour, and 24-hour values = 3.1 +/-2.3, 5.7 +/-3.8, and 6.3 +/-4.6 pg/mL, respectively, in UC-MAC; 3.7 +/-2.6, 6.2 +/-6.0, and 4.6 +/-3.7 pg/mL, respectively, in CC-MAC [p=0.002]). Plasma fibrinogen, CRP, and leukocyte concentrations also increased in both groups over the 24 hours (p < 0.05). The elevations of IL-6, CRP, and fibrinogen were similar in the 2 groups. The percent increases in IL-6, fibrinogen, and CRP were not associated with stent length, size, or clinical presentation (all p > 0.05). The results showed that stent implantation increases plasma IL-6, fibrinogen, and CRP concentrations

  10. Self-expanding metallic stent placement with an exaggerated 5-cm proximal tumor covering for palliation of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tahiri, Mehdi; Ferraro, Pasquale; Duranceau, André; Berthiaume, Melanie; Thiffault, Vicky; Liberman, Moishe

    2015-01-01

    Background The study aimed to evaluate the short- and long-term outcomes with a technique of self-expanding metallic stent insertion in palliative esophageal cancer patients. We hypothesized that a systematic attempt at exaggerated (5 cm) proximal tumor covering could prevent both stent migration and tumor overgrowth/undergrowth. Methods We reviewed retrospectively all patients who underwent esophageal stenting for palliation of malignant dysphagia over a 24-month period. Consecutive patients were identified from a prospective thoracic surgery interventional endoscopy database. This technique consisted of endoscopic stent insertion with the aim of landing the proximal portion of the stent 5 cm cephalad to the proximal extent of the tumor. All patients were followed at one month post-procedure and every three months thereafter, until death. Short- and long-term complications associated with the procedure and mortality were evaluated. Results Forty seven patients underwent endoscopic insertion of an esophageal stent in the context of an inoperable esophageal cancer using this technique over a 24-month period. The mean age was 70.4±9.6 years. Four (8.5%) patients underwent re-stenting due to proximal tumor overgrowth. No stent migration, perforation, tumor ingrowth or stent occlusion was reported. The mean patient survival was 146±26.5 days. Conclusions Esophageal stent insertion under endoscopic guidance with proximal tumor covering of 5 cm is effective and safe. No cases of stent migration and a low incidence of tumor overgrowth/undergrowth were observed with this technique. PMID:26126578

  11. The Usefulness of External Marking in Stenting for Ml Segment of Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Y.S.; Kim, S.Y.; Yoon, S.H.; Cho, K.H.; Ahn, Y.H.; Cho, K.G.

    2002-01-01

    Summary In intracranial stenting procedures, especially for a focal stenosis on the M1 portion of the middle cerebral artery, the anatomical configuration of the middle cerebral artery is changed with the advance of a rigid stent catheter. Therefore, the location of the stenotic portion where the stent is supposed to be deployed, according to pre-measurements on the roadmapping image, could be changed to some degrees. To prevent this error, we put a 30 gauge needle with cap at the orbital rim on the same preliminary vertical line of the distal end of the stenotic portion where the distal end of the stent is supposed to be deployed and the stent deployment is performed under guidance of the external marking on the fluoroscopic image not under roadmapping image. We report our experience of successful elective stenting of middle cerebral artery stenosis using the aid of external marking. PMID:20594530

  12. Surgical management for retained distal embolic protection device and fractured guidewire after carotid artery stenting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongxun; Zha, Yuanting; Bo, Liyang; Wirthlin, Douglas J.; Zhang, Qinyi

    2016-01-01

    Entrapment and fracture of carotid angioplasty and stenting hardware is a rare complication of percutaneous stenting procedures. We describe a case of a retained distal filter embolic protection device and guidewire in a 57-year-old male in Beijing, China. After unsuccessful attempts at removal via interventional methods, a second stent was deployed to secure the original hardware in situ, and the patient was discharged. He later experienced guidewire fragmentation in the carotid artery and aortic arch, with subsequent thrombus formation. We report partial removal of the guidewire and stent via carotid artery cutdown and open thoracotomy without complication. When efforts to retrieve stenting hardware are unsuccessful, it is never a suitable choice to leave them within the artery. We advocate for early surgical management of retained materials after unsuccessful carotid artery stenting. Furthermore, improved quality monitoring and assurance programs are needed to prevent such complications in the future. PMID:27316621

  13. [The role of non-angiographic observations (IVUS, angioscopy, doppler) in coronary stenting].

    PubMed

    Alfonso, F; Goicolea, J; Segovia, J; Hernández, R; Fernández-Ortiz, A; Bañuelos, C; Macaya, C

    1997-01-01

    Coronary stenting is increasingly used during transcatheter coronary therapy. Coronary angiography, mainly since the advent of quantitative angiography, provides an effective tool to obtain excellent clinical results with coronary stenting. However, during this procedure some limitations inherent to the angiographic techniques may become apparent. Accordingly, great enthusiasm has been generated regarding the potential value of alternative diagnostic techniques to guide coronary stenting. Intravascular ultrasound is able to study the arterial wall and provides a unique tool to assess stent expansion, apposition and symmetry. Therefore, this technique is increasingly used to optimize stent deployment. Coronary angioscopy directly visualizes stent expansion and is able to precisely recognize protrusion of redundant fronds of tissue or residual dissections within the stent struts. In addition, this technique is the procedure of choice to identify intracoronary thrombus. Intracoronary Doppler permits the application in the catheterization laboratory of sophisticated methods of functional assessment of lesion severity. Coronary stenting allows a faster and complete normalization of coronary flow reserve than balloon angioplasty. Thus, all these new techniques of intracoronary diagnosis provide unique and useful information, which is complementary to that obtained with angiography, potentially useful during coronary stenting.

  14. Nitinol Stent Oversizing in Patients Undergoing Popliteal Artery Revascularization: A Finite Element Study.

    PubMed

    Gökgöl, Can; Diehm, Nicolas; Nezami, Farhad Rikhtegar; Büchler, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Nitinol stent oversizing is frequently performed in peripheral arteries to ensure a desirable lumen gain. However, the clinical effect of mis-sizing remains controversial. The goal of this study was to provide a better understanding of the structural and hemodynamic effects of Nitinol stent oversizing. Five patient-specific numerical models of non-calcified popliteal arteries were developed to simulate the deployment of Nitinol stents with oversizing ratios ranging from 1.1 to 1.8. In addition to arterial biomechanics, computational fluid dynamics methods were adopted to simulate the physiological blood flow inside the stented arteries. Results showed that stent oversizing led to a limited increase in the acute lumen gain, albeit at the cost of a significant increase in arterial wall stresses. Furthermore, localized areas affected by low Wall Shear Stress increased with higher oversizing ratios. Stents were also negatively impacted by the procedure as their fatigue safety factors gradually decreased with oversizing. These adverse effects to both the artery walls and stents may create circumstances for restenosis. Although the ideal oversizing ratio is stent-specific, this study showed that Nitinol stent oversizing has a very small impact on the immediate lumen gain, which contradicts the clinical motivations of the procedure.

  15. Biodegradable stents with elastic memory.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Subbu S; Tan, Lay Poh; Joso, Joe Ferry D; Boey, Yin Chiang Freddy; Wang, Xintong

    2006-03-01

    This work reports, for the first time, the development of a fully biodegradable polymeric stent that can self-expand at body temperatures (approximately 37 degrees C), using the concept of elastic memory. This self-expansion is necessary in fully polymeric stents, to overcome the problem of elastic recoil following balloon expansion in a body vessel. Bi-layered biodegradable stent prototypes were produced from poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) and poly glycolic acid (PLGA) polymers. Elastic memory was imparted to the stents by temperature conditioning. The thickness and composition of each layer in the stents are critical parameters that affect the rate of self-expansion at 37 degrees C, as well as the collapse strengths of the stents. The rate of self-expansion of the stents, as measured at 37 degrees C, exhibits a maximum with layer thickness. The Tg of the outer layer is another significant parameter that affects the overall rate of expansion.

  16. Long-term effects of forgotten biliary stents: a case series and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Odabasi, Mehmet; Arslan, Cem; Akbulut, Sami; Abuoglu, Haci Hasan; Ozkan, Erkan; Yildiz, Mehmet Kamil; Eris, Cengiz; Gunay, Emre; Tekesin, Kemal; Muftuoglu, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    There are many studies about the biliary stents, however there is a little information about the long-term stayed forgotten biliary stents except a few case reports. We have reported the results of a number of cases with biliary stents that were forgotten or omitted by the patient and the endoscopist. During February 2010 to May 2013, five patients were referred to the general surgery clinic of Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul Turkey. Past history and medical documents submitted by the patient did not indicate a replacement of the biliary stent in 3 patients. Two patients knew that they had biliary stents. We also conducted a literature review via the PubMed and Google Scholar databases of English language studies published until March 2014 on forgotten biliary stent. There were 3 men and 2 women ranging in age from 22 to 68 years (mean age 41.6 years). Patients presented with pain in the upper abdomen, jaundice, fever, abnormal liver function tests or dilatation of the biliary tract alone or in combination. Patients’ demographic findings are presented in Table 1. A review of three cases reported in the English medical literature also discussed. The mean duration of the patency of the stent is about 12 months. The biliary stenting is performed either with plastic or metal stents, studies recommending their replacement after 3-6 months. Patients with long stayed forgotten biliary stents are inevitably treated with surgical intervention. We recommend for all endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography units provide a stent registry system that the stents placed for various therapeutic procedures are not forgotten both by the patient as well as the physician. There should be a deadline for biliary stents in the registry system for each patient. PMID:25232385

  17. Stent selection in patients with myocardial infarction: drug eluting, biodegradable polymers or bare metal stents?

    PubMed

    Mieres, Juan; Rodríguez, Alfredo E

    2012-08-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been increasingly used in the last years during interventional procedures in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) including ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). In patients with either STEMI, NSTEMI, high risk ACS with EKG changes or cardiac enzymes rises; PCI with bare metal stent (BMS) implantation has been associated with a significant improvement in clinical outcome. Therefore, BMS implantation during primary PCI in STEMI has become a standard of practice. With the introduction of drug eluting stents (DESs) in this decade, the use of these new devices instead of BMSs in patients with STEMI has emerged as a rational PCI alternative in this particular subgroup of patients. In spite of the unquestionable benefits of DESs in terms of reduction of restenosis and TVR, specific concerns have arisen with regard to their long-term safety. High incidence of very late stent thrombosis has been described with these devices, and special attention should be paid in patients with unstable coronary lesions, in which plaque composition and remodeling may play a main role in their safety and long-term outcome. Intraluminal thrombus caused by plaque rupture is the most frequent mechanism of STEMI, in which the necrotic core and thin fibrous cap play a major role. In this context, the use of first DESs designs may be futile or even unsafe because delayed healing may further contribute to plaque instability. Adjunctive invasive imaging tools can improve stent deployment and safety outcome in these lesions with intravascular findings of plaque instability. Recently, other players such as new dedicated antithrombotic BMS designs, including selfexpanding stents or drug-eluting coated balloons, are exploring their potential indications in patients with ACS and myocardial infarction. This paper reports and discusses new stent devices and adjunctive pharmacologic agents. It

  18. Virtual optimization of self-expandable braided wire stents.

    PubMed

    De Beule, Matthieu; Van Cauter, Sofie; Mortier, Peter; Van Loo, Denis; Van Impe, Rudy; Verdonck, Pascal; Verhegghe, Benedict

    2009-05-01

    At present, the deployment of self-expandable braided stents has become a common and widely used minimally invasive treatment for stenotic lesions in the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and respiratory system. To improve these revascularization procedures (e.g. increase the positioning accuracy) the optimal strategy lies in the further development of the stent design. In the context of optimizing braided stent designs, computational models can provide an excellent research tool complementary to analytical models. In this study, a finite element based modelling strategy is proposed to investigate and optimize the mechanics of braided stents. First a geometrical and finite element model of a braided Urolume endoprosthesis was built with the open source pyFormex design tool. The results of the reference simulation of the Urolume stent are in close agreement with both analytical and experimental data. Subsequently, a simplex-based design optimization algorithm automatically adjusts the reference Urolume geometry to facilitate precise positioning by reducing the foreshortening with 20% while maintaining the radial stiffness. Therefore, the proposed modelling strategy appears to be a promising optimization methodology in braided stent design.

  19. Combined biliary and duodenal stenting for palliation of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Profili, S; Feo, C F; Meloni, G B; Strusi, G; Cossu, M L; Canalis, G C

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this case report was to evaluate the usefulness of combined biliary and duodenal stenting in the palliation of pancreatic cancer. We report a series of 4 consecutive patients (2 men and 2 women, mean age 58.5 years, range 38-77 years) who underwent combined biliary and duodenal stenting in our department between March 2000 and April 2001. All patients had cancer of the head of the pancreas causing stricture of the common bile duct and second portion of the duodenum. Biliary and duodenal stents were successfully positioned, with relief of symptoms in all cases. No early complications were observed, except for a transient increase in serum lipase and amylase in one case. Mean follow-up was 7.5 months (range 5-14 months). One patient presenting recurrence of vomiting after 4 months because of tumour overgrowth at the distal edge of the prosthesis was successfully treated by insertion of a partially overlapping second coaxial stent. Combined biliary and duodenal stenting for the palliation of pancreatic cancer was performed safely and successfully. Stents allowed effective re-canalization of the biliary tract and duodenum, relieving both jaundice and vomiting. This procedure should be considered as an alternative to palliative surgery, especially in critically ill patients.

  20. Distal Embolization After Stenting of the Vertebral Artery: Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Canyigit, Murat; Arat, Anil Cil, Barbaros E.; Turkbey, Baris; Saatci, Isil; Cekirge, Saruhan; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. We retrospectively evaluated our experience with stenting of the vertebral artery in an effort to determine the risk of distal embolization associated with the procedure. Methods. Between June 2000 and May 2005, 35 patients with 38 stenting procedures for atherosclerotic disease of the vertebral origin in our institution were identified. The average age of the patients was 60.3 years (range 32-76 years). Sixteen of these patients (with 18 stents) had MR imaging of the brain with diffusion-weighted imaging and an apparent diffusion coefficient map within 2 days before and after procedure. Results. On seven of the 16 postprocedural diffusion-weighted MR images, a total of 57 new hyperintensities were visible. All these lesions were focal in nature. One patient demonstrated a new diffusion-weighted imaging abnormality in the anterior circulation without MR evidence of posterior circulation ischemia. Six of 16 patients had a total of 25 new lesions in the vertebrobasilar circulation in postprocedural diffusion-weighted MR images. One patient in this group was excluded from the final analysis because the procedure was complicated by basilar rupture during tandem stent deployment in the basilar artery. Hence, new diffusion-weighted imaging abnormalities were noted in the vertebrobasilar territory in 5 of 15 patients after 17 stenting procedures, giving a 29% rate of diffusion-weighted imaging abnormalities per procedure. No patient with bilateral stenting had new diffusion-weighted imaging abnormalities. Conclusion. Stenting of stenoses of the vertebral artery origin may be associated with a significant risk of asymptomatic distal embolization. Angiography, placement of the guiding catheter, inflation of the stent balloon, and crossing the lesion with guidewires or balloon catheters may potentially cause distal embolization. Further studies to evaluate measures to increase the safety of vertebral artery stenting, such as the use of distal protection devices or

  1. Acute Cholecystitis Caused by Malignant Cystic Duct Obstruction: Treatment with Metallic Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Yamashiro, Masashi; Takeda, Taro; Aburano, Hiroyuki; Komatsu, Tetsuya; Sanada, Taku; Kosaka, Shotaro; Toya, Daisyu; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-07-15

    We report the successful management of acute cholecystitis using cystic duct stent placement in 3 patients with inoperable malignant cystic duct obstruction (2 cholangiocarcinoma and 1 pancreatic carcinoma). All patients underwent stent placement in the bile duct, using an uncovered stent in 2 and a covered stent in 1, to relieve jaundice occurring 8-184 days (mean 120 days) before the development of acute cholecystitis. The occluded cystic duct was traversed by a microcatheter and a stent was implanted 4-17 days (mean 12 days) after cholecystostomy. Acute cholecystitis was improved after the procedure in all patients. Two patients died 3 and 10 months later, while 1 has survived without cholecystitis for 22 months after the procedure to date.

  2. Direct Primary or Secondary Percutaneous Ureteral Stenting: What Is the Most Compliant Option in Patients with Malignant Ureteral Obstructions?

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Lagana, Domenico; Lumia, Domenico; Giorgianni, Andrea; Mangini, Monica; Santoro, Domenico; Cuffari, Salvatore; Marconi, Alberto; Novario, Raffaele; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2007-09-15

    The objective of this study was to analyze three ureteral stenting techniques in patients with malignant ureteral obstructions, considering the indications, techniques, procedural costs, and complications. In the period between June 2003 and June 2006, 45 patients with bilateral malignant ureteral obstructions were evaluated (24 males, 21 females; average age, 68.3; range, 42-87). All of the patients were treated with ureteral stenting: 30 (mild strictures) with direct stenting (insertion of the stent without predilation), 30 (moderate/severe strictures) with primary stenting (insertion of the stent after predilation in a one-stage procedure), and 30 (mild/moderate/severe strictures with infection) with secondary stenting (insertion of the stent after predilation and 2-3 days after nephrostomy). The incidence of complications and procedural costs were compared by a statistical analysis. The primary technical success rate was 98.89%. We did not observe any major complications. The minor complication rate was 11.1%. The incidence of complications for the various techniques was not statistically significantly. The statistical analysis of costs demonstrated that the average cost of secondary stenting ( Euro 637; SD, Euro 115) was significantly higher than that of procedures which involved direct or primary stenting ( Euro 560; SD, Euro 108). We conclude that one-step stenting (direct or primary) is a valid option to secondary stenting in correctly selected patients, owing to the fact that when the procedure is performed by expert interventional radiologists there are high technical success rates, low complication rates, and a reduction in costs.

  3. Stent-Induced Esophageal Perforation: Treatment by Means of Placing a Second Stent After Removal of the Original Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Gyoo-Sik Park, Sung-Dal; Cho, Young Duk

    2008-05-15

    A case of esophageal perforation caused by a retrievable covered stent is presented. The distal end of the stent was protruding into the mediastinum, which made it impossible to negotiate a guidewire through the stent into the distal esophagus. The stent was successfully removed with use of a stent retrieval set, and esophageal perforation was treated with a second, covered stent with a good result. Fatality associated with this complication might be prevented by virtue of the retrievability of the stent we used. This result points to the effectiveness of a retrievable stent for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal stricture.

  4. Outcomes of thrombosed arteriovenous grafts: comparison of stents vs angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Maya, I D; Allon, M

    2006-03-01

    The usual radiologic approach to thrombosed grafts is a combination of thrombectomy and angioplasty of the underlying lesion. However, the primary (unassisted) graft patency after thrombectomy is quite poor. We evaluated whether graft patency following thrombectomy is improved by placement of a stent in the stenotic lesion. Using a prospective, computerized vascular access database, we identified 14 patients with thrombosed arteriovenous (A-V) grafts treated with a stent at the venous anastomosis (stent group). The outcomes of these grafts was compared to those observed in 34 sex, age-, and date-matched control patients whose thrombosed A-V grafts were angioplastied (control group). Both groups were comparable in age, sex, race, diabetic status, graft age, and number of previous graft interventions. The immediate technical success, as indicated by the post-procedure graft to systemic pressure ratio, was similar in the stent and control groups (0.33+/-0.16 vs 0.41+/-0.17, P=0.14). The primary graft patency (time from thrombectomy to next intervention) was significantly longer for the stent group (median survival, 85 vs 27 days, P=0.02). Assisted or secondary patency (time from thrombectomy to permanent graft failure) was also longer for the stent group (median survival, 1215 vs 46 days, P=0.049). In conclusion, treatment of thrombosed grafts with a stenosis at the venous anastomosis with a stent results in longer primary and secondary graft survival, as compared to treatment with angioplasty. Stent placement may be a useful treatment modality in a subset of patients with thrombosed A-V grafts and stenosis at the venous anastomosis.

  5. Mechanical Characteristics of Composite Knitted Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuda, Takanori Shomura, Yuzo; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Satoshi

    2009-09-15

    We used metal wires and fibers to fabricate a composite knitted stent and then compare the mechanical characteristics of this stent with those of a pure metallic stent of the same construction in order to develop a stent that offers a comparable degree of expandability as metallic stents but can be used for highly curved lesions that cannot be treated using metallic stents. We fabricated two types of composite knitted stent (N-Z stents), using nitinol wire with a diameter of 0.12 mm and polypara-phenylene-benzobisoxazole (PBO) multifilament fiber (Zyron AS; Toyobo, Osaka, Japan). Stents were knitted into a cylindrical shape using the same textile pattern as a Strecker stent. Two loop lengths (L) of nitinol wire were used in the N-Z stents: L = 1.84 mm (N-Z stent L = 1.84) and L = 2.08 mm (N-Z stent L = 2.08). For the sake of comparison, we fabricated a metallic stent of nitinol using the same textile pattern (N-N stent L = 1.92). We applied a radial compression force diametrically to each stent and applied a bending force diametrically at the free end of a stent with one end fixed in order to evaluate the relationship between stent elasticity and load values. In addition, we macroscopically evaluated the generation of kinks when the stent was bent 180{sup o}. The radial compressive force when the stent diameter was reduced by 53% was 6.44 N in the case of N-Z stent L = 1.84, 6.14 N in the case of N-Z stent L = 2.08, and 4.96 N in the case of N-N stent L = 1.92 mm. The composite stent had a radial compressive force higher than that of a metallic stent. The restoring force to longitudinal direction at a 90{sup o} bending angle was 0.005 N for N-Z stent L = 1.84, 0.003 N for N-Z stent L = 2.08, and 0.034 N for N-N stent L = 1.92. The restoring force of the composite stent was significantly lower. Finally, the composite stent generated no definitive kinks at a bending angle of 180{sup o}, regardless of loop length. However, the N-N stent clearly produced kinks, causing

  6. Delayed complications after flow-diverter stenting: reactive in-stent stenosis and creeping stents.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John Moshe; Moscovici, Samuel; Leker, Ronen R; Itshayek, Eyal

    2014-07-01

    We assessed the frequency and severity of changes in stent configuration and location after the treatment of intracranial aneurysms, and patterns of in-stent stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed data for consecutive aneurysm patients managed with endovascular implantation of flow-diverter stents (Silk Flow Diverter [Balt Extrusion, Montmorency, France] and Pipeline Embolization Device [ev3/Coviden, Minneapolis, MN, USA]) from October 2011 to July 2012. Routine 2, 6, 9-12, and 16-20 month follow-up angiograms were compared, with a focus on changes in stent configuration and location from immediately after deployment to angiographic follow-up, and the incidence and development of in-stent stenosis. Thirty-four patients with 42 aneurysms met inclusion criteria. The Silk device was implanted in 16 patients (47%, single device in 15), the Pipeline device in 18 (53%, single device in 16). On first follow-up angiography, in-stent stenosis was observed in 38% of Silk devices and 39% of Pipeline devices. In-stent stenosis was asymptomatic in 12 of 13 patients. One woman presented with transient ischemic attacks and required stent angioplasty due to end tapering and mild, diffuse in-stent stenosis. Configuration and location changes, including stent creeping and end tapering were seen in 2/16 patients (13%) with Silk devices, and 0/18 patients with Pipeline devices. We describe stent creeping and end tapering as unusual findings with the potential for delayed clinical complications. In-stent stenosis, with a unique behavior, is a frequent angiographic finding observed after flow-diverter stent implant. The stenosis is usually asymptomatic; however, close clinical and angiographic monitoring is mandatory for individualized management. PMID:24524952

  7. Delayed complications after flow-diverter stenting: reactive in-stent stenosis and creeping stents.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John Moshe; Moscovici, Samuel; Leker, Ronen R; Itshayek, Eyal

    2014-07-01

    We assessed the frequency and severity of changes in stent configuration and location after the treatment of intracranial aneurysms, and patterns of in-stent stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed data for consecutive aneurysm patients managed with endovascular implantation of flow-diverter stents (Silk Flow Diverter [Balt Extrusion, Montmorency, France] and Pipeline Embolization Device [ev3/Coviden, Minneapolis, MN, USA]) from October 2011 to July 2012. Routine 2, 6, 9-12, and 16-20 month follow-up angiograms were compared, with a focus on changes in stent configuration and location from immediately after deployment to angiographic follow-up, and the incidence and development of in-stent stenosis. Thirty-four patients with 42 aneurysms met inclusion criteria. The Silk device was implanted in 16 patients (47%, single device in 15), the Pipeline device in 18 (53%, single device in 16). On first follow-up angiography, in-stent stenosis was observed in 38% of Silk devices and 39% of Pipeline devices. In-stent stenosis was asymptomatic in 12 of 13 patients. One woman presented with transient ischemic attacks and required stent angioplasty due to end tapering and mild, diffuse in-stent stenosis. Configuration and location changes, including stent creeping and end tapering were seen in 2/16 patients (13%) with Silk devices, and 0/18 patients with Pipeline devices. We describe stent creeping and end tapering as unusual findings with the potential for delayed clinical complications. In-stent stenosis, with a unique behavior, is a frequent angiographic finding observed after flow-diverter stent implant. The stenosis is usually asymptomatic; however, close clinical and angiographic monitoring is mandatory for individualized management.

  8. Impact of ureteric stent on outcome of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: A propensity score analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gołąb, Adam; Słojewski, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is one of the most frequently performed procedures in patients with urolithiasis. For ureter-localized stones, SWL is often preceded by a double J stent insertion. However, fear of serious complications, including sepsis associated with stents, is often expressed. The following study assessed the impact of stent insertions on the results of SWL in patients with ureteric stones. Material and methods The study group consisted of 411 ureteric stone patients who were treated with SWL from January 2010 to December 2014. In 60 cases, treatment was preceded by ureteric stent insertion. A propensity scoring system was used to pair non-stented patients with the stented group. Success rates were assessed and compared using the chi-squared test. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the influence of particular variables on the stone-free rate. Results The overall success rate was 82.2%. After matching, the success rate of the stented group was not significantly different from the control group (85.0% vs. 83.3% respectively, p = 0.80). The mean number of sessions was higher in the stented group (1.88 per patient). Stones located in the lower part of the ureter have the greatest chance of being successfully treated. Conclusions The double J stent has no influence on the outcome of SWL treatment. In view of the greater likelihood of having additional sessions, this approach should be reserved for selected cases. PMID:27551556

  9. Vertebral artery origin angioplasty and primary stenting: safety and restenosis rates in a prospective series

    PubMed Central

    Cloud, G; Crawley, F; Clifton, A; McCabe, D; Brown, M; Markus, H

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To report a single centre ongoing experience of endovascular treatment for atherosclerotic vertebral artery origin stenosis in a series of symptomatic patients, with follow up imaging to determine the incidence of restenosis. Methods: 14 patients with vertebral artery origin stenosis on catheter angiography were treated. Angioplasty without stenting was undertaken in the first four patients, all of whom had follow up catheter angiography at one year. Subsequently, patients were treated by primary stenting and followed up with colour Doppler ultrasound examination. Results: The procedure was technically successful in all treated arteries, with no immediate complications. The degree of stenosis was reduced from (mean (SD)) 73 (18)% before treatment to 21 (26)% immediately after treatment in the angioplasty alone group (p = 0.059). In the primary stenting patients, the severity of stenosis was reduced from 82 (8)% to 13 (13)% immediately after treatment (p < 0.001). Restenosis to 70% or greater occurred at one year in all four patients initially treated by angioplasty without stenting. One patient subsequently developed further symptoms and was retreated by stenting. One of the 10 patients treated by primary stenting developed restenosis. None of the remaining patients had further posterior circulation ischaemic symptoms during a mean follow up period of 33.6 months (range 1 to 72 months). Conclusions: Restenosis occurs often after vertebral artery origin balloon angioplasty without stenting but is uncommon after stenting. Primary stenting is therefore recommended to maintain patency at this site, and had a low complication rate in this series. PMID:12700299

  10. A novel method of coronary stent sizing using intravascular ultrasound: Safety and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Christopher B; Hansen, Norman D

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The use of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in guiding coronary stenting has increased in recent years. The feasibility, safety and clinical outcomes of a novel method of sizing coronary stents using IVUS have not been established. The main end points of the current study are the incidence of acute and short-term complications, and the need for target vessel revascularization at six months. METHODS Eighty-six patients underwent coronary stenting using IVUS imaging during the procedure. The optimal size of the stents was determined by using a novel method (the ‘aggressive IVUS method’), ie, measuring the media-to-media dimensions of the coronary vessels at the site of the lesions using IVUS. A six-month follow-up chart review was performed following the initial stenting. RESULTS At six months, there were two noncardiac deaths in the group. There were no acute, subacute or late stent thromboses. Target vessel revascularization and major adverse cardiac event rates remained low – at 5.8% and 9.3%, respectively. The mean (± SD) IVUS-derived coronary stent size (3.89±0.98 mm) using the aggressive IVUS method was significantly different from the mean IVUS-derived coronary stent size (3.46±0.96 mm) using the ‘traditional IVUS method’. CONCLUSION Aggressive sizing of the coronary stents by IVUS guidance is feasible and safe, and is associated with a favourable clinical outcome. PMID:22477471

  11. Image-based dosimetry of an implanted radioactive stent using intravascular ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Stephen W.

    Angioplasty has become an increasingly popular and effective treatment for heart disease. Unfortunately, restenosis, a cellular and biological reaction to the procedure, has hindered its effectiveness. Two of the most successful methods of inhibiting restenosis are radiation and stents. The combination of these two components, radioactive stents, is not as common as some of the other methods, yet still has potential of slowing restenosis. Investigation into source characteristics and artery wall radiobiology may illuminate some possible solutions to the problems of restenosis. This work has developed a calculational method to look at in-vivo images of implanted stents and determine the dose to the artery walls in order to test different source characteristics. The images are Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) cross-sectional slices of the stent and the artery. From these images, it is possible to determine the implanted stent structure. The pieces of the stent are identified in the images and modeled in a Monte Carlo simulation, using MCNP4c3. The simulation results were combined with the images to give three-dimensional absolute dose contours of the stent. The absolute dose values were verified using radiochromic film and 198Au-plated stents. This work was able to successfully verify the dose results and create a three-dimensional dose map of the implanted stent.

  12. Development of Biliary and Enteral Stents by the Korean Gastrointestinal Endoscopists

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Chan Sup; Kim, Jin Hong; Bok, Gene Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Stenting in the gastrointestinal tract is a common procedure used for palliation of obstruction in the enteral and biliary tract. Today, stenting of malignant and benign strictures is performed at almost every major tertiary hospital in Korea. Moreover, Korea has become a major global supplier of cutting edge technology in the field of self-expanding metal stents. However, the history of stenting in Korea is relatively short and was far behind that of other nations such as Japan and Germany. The authors are humbled and gratified to have been able to observe the development and application of these stents in Korea, first hand. In this article, the authors review the overall history of stenting with a specific focus on the development of stenting in Korea. The development of esophageal, gastroduodenal, biliary, and colonic stents in Korea are reviewed in this article from a chronological and historical point of view, and a personal account of some of the significant moments of stent development in Korea are described. PMID:26956192

  13. Primary Stenting for Complex Atherosclerotic Plaques in Aortic and Iliac Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Onal, Baran; Ilgit, Erhan T.; Yuecel, Cem; Ozbek, Erdal; Vural, Murat; Akpek, Sergin

    1998-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of primary stenting for complex atherosclerotic plaques in aortic and iliac stenoses that are not amenable to balloon angioplasty alone. Methods: Nineteen patients with complex atherosclerotic plaques were treated with a Palmaz stent (n= 19), Wallstent (n= 1), Strecker stent (n= 1), or Memotherm stent (n= 1). A total of 22 stenoses presenting with complex plaque morphology including ulcerated plaques, ulcerated plaques with focal aneurysms, plaques with heavy calcification, severely eccentric plaques, plaques with overhanging edge, and plaques with spontaneous dissection were stented. The lesions were in the aorta (n= 1), common iliac artery (n= 19), or external iliac artery (n= 2). Results: Immediate angiography after stent placement revealed restoration of patency of the stented segment. Focal aneurysms and ulcerated areas were occluded in the follow-up angiographies obtained 4-12 weeks after the procedure. In one case with poor distal runoff and multiple complex lesions of the iliac artery, subacute occlusion occurred. Clinical and angiographic follow-up (3-46 months) revealed patency of all other stented segments. Conclusion: Primary stenting is an effective and reliable approach for complex plaques in stenoses. Patency of the arterial segment with a smooth lumen can be created without the risk of acute complications such as distal embolization, dissection, or occlusion.

  14. Computational fluid dynamic simulations of image-based stented coronary bifurcation models.

    PubMed

    Chiastra, Claudio; Morlacchi, Stefano; Gallo, Diego; Morbiducci, Umberto; Cárdenes, Rubén; Larrabide, Ignacio; Migliavacca, Francesco

    2013-07-01

    One of the relevant phenomenon associated with in-stent restenosis in coronary arteries is an altered haemodynamics in the stented region. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) offers the possibility to investigate the haemodynamics at a level of detail not always accessible within experimental techniques. CFD can quantify and correlate the local haemodynamics structures which might lead to in-stent restenosis. The aim of this work is to study the fluid dynamics of realistic stented coronary artery models which replicate the complete clinical procedure of stent implantation. Two cases of pathologic left anterior descending coronary arteries with their bifurcations are reconstructed from computed tomography angiography and conventional coronary angiography images. Results of wall shear stress and relative residence time show that the wall regions more prone to the risk of restenosis are located next to stent struts, to the bifurcations and to the stent overlapping zone for both investigated cases. Considering a bulk flow analysis, helical flow structures are generated by the curvature of the zone upstream from the stent and by the bifurcation regions. Helical recirculating microstructures are also visible downstream from the stent struts. This study demonstrates the feasibility to virtually investigate the haemodynamics of patient-specific coronary bifurcation geometries.

  15. Association of Coronary Stent Indication With Postoperative Outcomes Following Noncardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, Carla N.; Hollis, Robert H.; Graham, Laura A.; Richman, Joshua S.; Valle, Javier A.; Itani, Kamal M.; Maddox, Thomas M.; Hawn, Mary T.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Current guidelines for delaying surgery after coronary stent placement are based on stent type. However, the indication for the stent may be an important risk factor for postoperative major adverse cardiac events (MACE). OBJECTIVE To determine whether the clinical indication for a coronary stent is associated with postoperative MACE. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study in patients at US Veterans Affairs hospitals who had a coronary stent placed between January 1,2000, and December 31, 2010, and underwent noncardiac surgery within the following 24 months. The association between the indication for stent and postoperative MACE rates was examined using logistic regression to control for patient and procedure factors. EXPOSURES Three subgroups of stent indication were examined: (1) myocardial infarction (MI); (2) unstable angina; and (3) revascularization not associated with acute coronary syndrome (non-ACS). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Composite 30-day postoperative MACE rates including all-cause mortality, MI, or revascularization. RESULTS Among 26 661 patients (median [IQR] age, 68 [61.0–76.0] years; 98.4% male; 88.1% white) who underwent 41 815 surgical procedures within 24 months following coronary stent placement, the stent indication was MI in 32.8% of the procedures, unstable angina in 33.8%, and non-ACS in 33.4%. Postoperative MACE rates were significantly higher in the MI group (7.5%) compared with the unstable angina (2.7%) and non-ACS (2.6%) groups (P < .001). When surgery was performed within 3 months of percutaneous coronary intervention, adjusted odds of MACE were significantly higher in the MI group compared with the non-ACS group (odds ratio [OR] = 5.25; 95% CI, 4.08–6.75). This risk decreased over time, although it remained significantly higher at 12 to 24 months from percutaneous coronary intervention (OR = 1.95; 95% CI, 1.58–2.40). The adjusted odds of MACE for the unstable angina group were similar to those

  16. Wave reflection at a stent.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Antonio; García, Javier; Manuel, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    A simple analytical expression has been derived to calculate the characteristics of a wave that reflects at a stent implanted in a uniform vessel. The stent is characterized by its length and the wave velocity in the stented region. The reflected wave is proportional to the time derivative of the incident wave. The reflection coefficient is a small quantity of the order of the length of the stent divided by the wavelength of the unstented vessel. The results obtained coincide with those obtained numerically by Charonko et al. The main simplifications used are small amplitude of the waves so that equations can be linearized and that the length of the stent is small enough so that the values of the wave functions are nearly uniform along the stent. Both assumptions hold in typical situations. PMID:23516957

  17. Wave reflection at a stent.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Antonio; García, Javier; Manuel, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    A simple analytical expression has been derived to calculate the characteristics of a wave that reflects at a stent implanted in a uniform vessel. The stent is characterized by its length and the wave velocity in the stented region. The reflected wave is proportional to the time derivative of the incident wave. The reflection coefficient is a small quantity of the order of the length of the stent divided by the wavelength of the unstented vessel. The results obtained coincide with those obtained numerically by Charonko et al. The main simplifications used are small amplitude of the waves so that equations can be linearized and that the length of the stent is small enough so that the values of the wave functions are nearly uniform along the stent. Both assumptions hold in typical situations.

  18. Preliminary report on a new concept stent prototype designed for venous implant.

    PubMed

    Lugli, M; Maleti, O

    2015-08-01

    Venous obstruction at iliocaval level in both forms, primary and secondary, is a significant cause of severe chronic venous insufficiency. A new therapeutic approach to this pathology emerged with the introduction of stenting procedures that proved effective, leading to good long-term results. However, at present, the majority of implanted stents have been designed for arterial implant and this can pose a limit in particular districts. The purpose of this preliminary acute study was to verify the deliverability and safety of a new stent specially designed for venous-vessel implant. We assess the safety and deliverability of two braided, self-expanding, nickel-titanium stents (Jotec GmbH, Hechingen, Germany) specially designed for endovascular implant in veins. The two stents, despite being based on the same concept, have a different design: stent A presents a proximal tapering shape specially designed to reduce migration, while stent B does not. Both of them are enlarged at their distal extremity and present variable radial force the length of the stent itself, the said force becoming very high in the intermediate segment. Stents were implanted in the internal jugular vein of a sheep, showing optimal deliverability. The completion venography showed the migration of stent B into the right atrium. Stent A maintained its location, confirmed by intravascular ultrasound examination. No scaffolding effect was detected and an adequate adherence and adaptability to the vein wall was obtained. In conclusions, the stent A design matches the characteristics required by vein implants. Stability is achieved even where difficult anatomical conditions apply, such as in the jugular vein. Deployment is easy and precise in a given landing zone. Radial resistive force is very high, as required in specific vein districts, but is also associated with good flexibility. Following this preliminary acute report, further studies are required. PMID:24920424

  19. Effect of ureteric stents on urological infection and graft function following renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Akoh, Jacob A; Rana, Tahawar

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To compare urological infections in patients with or without stents following transplantation and to determine the effect of such infections on graft function. METHODS: All 285 recipients of kidney transplantation at our centre between 2006 and 2010 were included in the study. Detailed information including stent use and transplant function was collected prospectively and analysed retrospectively. The diagnosis of urinary tract infection was made on the basis of compatible symptoms supported by urinalysis and/or microbiological culture. Graft function, estimated glomerular filtration rate and creatinine at 6 mo and 12 mo, immediate graft function and infection rates were compared between those with a stent or without a stent. RESULTS: Overall, 196 (183 during initial procedure, 13 at reoperation) patients were stented following transplantation. The overall urine leak rate was 4.3% (12/277) with no difference between those with or without stents - 7/183 vs 5/102, P = 0.746. Overall, 54% (99/183) of stented patients developed a urological infection compared to 38.1% (32/84) of those without stents (P = 0.0151). All 18 major urological infections occurred in those with stents. The use of stent (Wald χ2 = 5.505, P = 0.019) and diabetes mellitus (Wald χ2 = 5.197, P = 0.023) were found to have significant influence on urological infection rates on multivariate analysis. There were no deaths or graft losses due to infection. Stenting was associated with poorer transplant function at 12 mo. CONCLUSION: Stents increase the risks of urological infections and have a detrimental effect on early to medium term renal transplant function. PMID:24175202

  20. Outcomes of AV Fistulas and AV Grafts after Interventional Stent-Graft Deployment in Haemodialysis Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelter, Christopher Raab, Udo; Lazarus, Friedrich; Ruppert, Volker; Vorwerk, Dierk

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe study was designed to assess outcomes of arteriovenous (AV) accesses after interventional stent-graft deployment in haemodialysis patients.Materials and Methods63 haemodialysis patients with 66 AV fistulas and AV grafts were treated by interventional stent-graft deployment from 2006 to 2012 at our hospital. Data of these patients were retrospectively analysed for location of deployed stent-grafts, occurrence and location of (re-)stenosis and (re-)thrombosis. Complex stenosis was the most frequent indication for stent-graft deployment (45.5 %), followed by complications of angioplasty with vessel rupture or dissection (31.8 %).ResultsA high rate of procedural success was achieved (98.5 %). The most frequent location of the deployed stent-graft was the draining vein (66.7 %). Stent-graft deployment was more frequent in AV grafts than in AV fistulas. Primary patency was 45.5 % at 6 month, 31.3 % at 12 month and 19.2 % at 24 month. Primary patency was significantly better for AV fistulas than for AV grafts with deployed stent-grafts. Patency of the deployed stent-graft was much better than overall AV access primary patency with deployed stent-graft. Re-stenosis with thrombosis was the most frequent indication for re-intervention. Most frequent location of re-stenosis was the draining vein (37.1 %), followed by stenosis at the AV access (29.5 %) and the deployed stent-graft (23.5 %).ConclusionRe-stenosis and re-thrombosis remain frequent in AV fistulas and AV grafts in haemodialysis patients despite stent-graft deployment. Re-stenosis of the deployed stent-graft is, only in the minority of the cases, responsible for AV access dysfunction.

  1. Endovascular stent placement for nutcracker phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Li, Heping; Sun, Xiangzhou; Liu, Guihua; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Chu, Jianping; Deng, Chunhua; Zhou, Bo; Chen, Wei; Yang, Jianyong

    2013-01-01

    The nutcracker syndrome is a rare clinic condition associated with severe hematuria and left flank pain due to the entrapment of the left renal vein between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta. Its diagnostic criteria are not well defined, often causing delayed or misdiagnosis. Although surgical repair has been the standard of care, more recently endovascular stenting of the renal vein has been proposed. We presented six patients (aged 7 to 31 years old; median age, 16.5 years old) with nutcracker syndrome who were endovascularly managed from June 2002 to July 2011. All patients underwent laboratory test and computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound examination before and after endovascular procedures. Self-expandable stents were successfully placed in all cases. The diameter of the left renal vein at aorto-superior mesenteric artery portion significantly increased from 1.88 ± 0.95 mm pre-procedure to 5.24 ± 0.61 mm post-procedure (p< 0.01). Left renal vein pressure significantly decreased from 11.00 ± 4.34 mmHg pre-procedure to 6.00 ± 2.55 mmHg post-procedure (p< 0.01). Severe gross hematuria completely subsided within 2 months to 6 months and left flank pain completely subsided within 7 days to 1 month after treatment. Endovascular therapy provides an alternative therapy with satisfactory long-term clinical and imaging results for symptomatic patients with nutcracker syndrome.

  2. Common bile duct perforation sealed with a metal fully-covered stent.

    PubMed

    García-Cano, Jesús; Ferri-Bataller, Ramón; Gómez-Ruiz, Carmen Julia

    2016-08-01

    A common bile duct perforation due to sphincteroplasty is reported. It was managed by temporary insertion of a metal fully covered stent with good outcomes. Images from the procedure are provided. PMID:27554382

  3. Carotid stenting using tapered and nontapered stents: associated neurological complications and restenosis rates.

    PubMed

    Brown, Katherine E; Usman, Asad; Kibbe, Melina R; Morasch, Mark D; Matsumura, Jon S; Pearce, William H; Amaranto, Daniel J; Eskandari, Mark K

    2009-01-01

    Self-expanding stent design systems for carotid artery stenting (CAS) have morphed from nontapered (NTS) to tapered (TS); however, the impact of this change is unknown. We reviewed the outcomes of CAS with these two broad categories of stents in a single-center retrospective review of 308 CAS procedures from May 2001 to July 2007. Nitinol self-expanding TS or NTS coupled with cerebral embolic protection devices were used to treat extracranial carotid occlusive disease. Data analysis included demographics, procedural records, duplex exams, and conventional arteriography. Mean follow-up was 18 months (range 1-69). Restenosis was defined as >or=80% in-stent carotid artery stenosis by angiography. The mean age of the entire cohort was 71.3 years (75% men, 25% women). Of the 308 cases, 233 were de novo lesions and 75 had a prior ipsilateral carotid endarterectomy (n = 44) or external beam radiation exposure (n = 31). Preprocedure neurological symptoms were present in 30% of patients. TS were used in 156 procedures and NTS in 152 procedures. The 30-day ipsilateral stroke and death rates were 1.3% and 0.3%, respectively. An additional three (1.0%) posterior circulation strokes occurred. There was no statistically significant difference in the 30-day total stroke rates between TS (3.2%, n = 5) and NTS (1.3%, n = 2) (p = 0.5). At midterm follow-up, restenosis or asymptomatic occlusion was detected in eight cases (2.6%). All occurred in arteries treated with NTS, and this was statistically different when compared to arteries treated with TS (p = 0.03). Furthermore, a post-hoc subgroup analysis revealed significant correlation (chi(2) = 0.02) for restenosis in "hostile necks" when separated by TS vs. NTS. Early CAS outcomes between TS and NTS are comparable. In contrast, self-expanding nitinol TS may have a lower incidence of significant restenosis or asymptomatic occlusion when compared to NTS.

  4. Carotid stenting using tapered and nontapered stents: associated neurological complications and restenosis rates.

    PubMed

    Brown, Katherine E; Usman, Asad; Kibbe, Melina R; Morasch, Mark D; Matsumura, Jon S; Pearce, William H; Amaranto, Daniel J; Eskandari, Mark K

    2009-01-01

    Self-expanding stent design systems for carotid artery stenting (CAS) have morphed from nontapered (NTS) to tapered (TS); however, the impact of this change is unknown. We reviewed the outcomes of CAS with these two broad categories of stents in a single-center retrospective review of 308 CAS procedures from May 2001 to July 2007. Nitinol self-expanding TS or NTS coupled with cerebral embolic protection devices were used to treat extracranial carotid occlusive disease. Data analysis included demographics, procedural records, duplex exams, and conventional arteriography. Mean follow-up was 18 months (range 1-69). Restenosis was defined as >or=80% in-stent carotid artery stenosis by angiography. The mean age of the entire cohort was 71.3 years (75% men, 25% women). Of the 308 cases, 233 were de novo lesions and 75 had a prior ipsilateral carotid endarterectomy (n = 44) or external beam radiation exposure (n = 31). Preprocedure neurological symptoms were present in 30% of patients. TS were used in 156 procedures and NTS in 152 procedures. The 30-day ipsilateral stroke and death rates were 1.3% and 0.3%, respectively. An additional three (1.0%) posterior circulation strokes occurred. There was no statistically significant difference in the 30-day total stroke rates between TS (3.2%, n = 5) and NTS (1.3%, n = 2) (p = 0.5). At midterm follow-up, restenosis or asymptomatic occlusion was detected in eight cases (2.6%). All occurred in arteries treated with NTS, and this was statistically different when compared to arteries treated with TS (p = 0.03). Furthermore, a post-hoc subgroup analysis revealed significant correlation (chi(2) = 0.02) for restenosis in "hostile necks" when separated by TS vs. NTS. Early CAS outcomes between TS and NTS are comparable. In contrast, self-expanding nitinol TS may have a lower incidence of significant restenosis or asymptomatic occlusion when compared to NTS. PMID:19128933

  5. Accidental Stenting Out of Stent: A Lesson from No-Reflow after New Stent Deployment Outside the Prior Stent

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chih-Hung; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Lee, Wen-Lieng; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Chang, Szu-Ling; Lu, Tse-Min

    2016-01-01

    An operator can be unaware that the guide wire has accidentally advanced into space outside the previous stent, which can result in deformation of the previous stent when a new stent is deployed outside the prior stent. We herein have reported a case of accidental guide wire advancement into a previously dissected lumen of right coronary artery (RCA), resulting in a new stent deploying outside the prior stent, resulting in deformity of the prior stent. Thrombus and friable atheromatous plaques dislodged and migrated to occlude distal RCA when attempting to restore the proximal luminal diameter by balloon inflation, resulting in profound shock with asystole. IVUS was successful in identifying the cause, and the thrombus was removed successfully by manual aspiration. Due to the poor endothelization of a recent stenting, clinicians should be particularly careful of possible wire advancing outside the stent structure, which can result in prominent thrombus or atheromatous debris occluding the distal vessel, and IVUS may be useful in confirming the cause of no-reflow. PMID:27274180

  6. Nasal packing and stenting

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.

    2011-01-01

    Nasal packs are indispensable in ENT practice. This study reviews current indications, effectiveness and risks of nasal packs and stents. In endoscopic surgery, nasal packs should always have smooth surfaces to minimize mucosal damage, improve wound healing and increase patient comfort. Functional endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery allows the use of modern nasal packs, since pressure is no longer required. So called hemostatic/resorbable materials are a first step in this direction. However, they may lead to adhesions and foreign body reactions in mucosal membranes. Simple occlusion is an effective method for creating a moist milieu for improved wound healing and avoiding dryness. Stenting of the frontal sinus is recommended if surgery fails to produce a wide, physiologically shaped drainage path that is sufficiently covered by intact tissue. PMID:22073095

  7. Zotarolimus-eluting stent fracture at initial implantation diagnosed with StentBoost

    PubMed Central

    Arat Ozkan, Alev; Sinan, Umit Yasar; Gurmen, Aziz T

    2016-01-01

    Stent fracture is a rare complication of drug-eluting stent implantation with a reported rate of 0.84%–3.2% in various clinical studies with first-generation drug-eluting stents and 29% in autopsy studies. Sirolimus-eluting stents with their closed cell design were reported to be more prone to fracture compared to paclitaxel-eluting stents. Other risk factors for stent fracture are multiple stenting, longer stent length, chronic renal failure, right coronary artery intervention, and a higher maximal inflation pressure. The role of angiography in diagnosing stent fracture is limited, a fact also questioning the reliability of angiographic data. Image enhancement techniques like StentBoost are widely available in new-generation angiography systems and are used to assess stent expansion, overlap size, or to localize the postdilation balloon. Here, we report a case of zotarolimus-eluting stent fracture at initial implantation diagnosed with StentBoost. PMID:27489714

  8. Zotarolimus-eluting stent fracture at initial implantation diagnosed with StentBoost.

    PubMed

    Arat Ozkan, Alev; Sinan, Umit Yasar; Gurmen, Aziz T

    2016-01-01

    Stent fracture is a rare complication of drug-eluting stent implantation with a reported rate of 0.84%-3.2% in various clinical studies with first-generation drug-eluting stents and 29% in autopsy studies. Sirolimus-eluting stents with their closed cell design were reported to be more prone to fracture compared to paclitaxel-eluting stents. Other risk factors for stent fracture are multiple stenting, longer stent length, chronic renal failure, right coronary artery intervention, and a higher maximal inflation pressure. The role of angiography in diagnosing stent fracture is limited, a fact also questioning the reliability of angiographic data. Image enhancement techniques like StentBoost are widely available in new-generation angiography systems and are used to assess stent expansion, overlap size, or to localize the postdilation balloon. Here, we report a case of zotarolimus-eluting stent fracture at initial implantation diagnosed with StentBoost. PMID:27489714

  9. Hemodynamics in Idealized Stented Coronary Arteries: Important Stent Design Considerations.

    PubMed

    Beier, Susann; Ormiston, John; Webster, Mark; Cater, John; Norris, Stuart; Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Young, Alistair; Cowan, Brett

    2016-02-01

    Stent induced hemodynamic changes in the coronary arteries are associated with higher risk of adverse clinical outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of stent design on wall shear stress (WSS), time average WSS, and WSS gradient (WSSG), in idealized stent geometries using computational fluid dynamics. Strut spacing, thickness, luminal protrusion, and malapposition were systematically investigated and a comparison made between two commercially available stents (Omega and Biomatrix). Narrower strut spacing led to larger areas of adverse low WSS and high WSSG but these effects were mitigated when strut size was reduced, particularly for WSSG. Local hemodynamics worsened with luminal protrusion of the stent and with stent malapposition, adverse high WSS and WSSG were identified around peak flow and throughout the cardiac cycle respectively. For the Biomatrix stent, the adverse effect of thicker struts was mitigated by greater strut spacing, radial cell offset and flow-aligned struts. In conclusion, adverse hemodynamic effects of specific design features (such as strut size and narrow spacing) can be mitigated when combined with other hemodynamically beneficial design features but increased luminal protrusion can worsen the stent's hemodynamic profile significantly.

  10. Mechanical thrombectomy using Rotarex system and stent-in-stent placement for treatment of distal femoral artery occlusion secondary to stent fracture – a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dys, Krzysztof; Drelichowska-Durawa, Justyna; Dołega-Kozierowski, Bartosz; Lis, Michał; Sokratous, Kyriakos; Iwanowski, Wojciech; Drelichowski, Stanisław; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background: Treatment of peripheral arterial diseases may be distinguished into conservative and interventional management; the latter is divided into surgical and endovascular procedures. Management of peripheral artery stenosis and occlusion with vascular stents is associated with the risk of late complications such as restenosis, stent fracture or dislocation. Case Report: A 62-year-old woman with generalized atherosclerosis, particularly extensive in lower limb arteries, was admitted to the Department of Angiology 11 months after having an endovascular procedure performed due to critical ischemia of left lower limb. Because of stent occlusion, a decision to perform angiographic examination of lower limb arteries was made. Examination revealed occlusion of the superficial femoral artery along its entire length, including previously implanted stents. Distal stent was fractured with slight dislocation of the proximal segment. A decision was made to perform mechanical thrombectomy using a Rotarex system followed by a stent-in-stent placement procedure. Follow-up angiography and ultrasound scan performed 24 hours after the procedure revealed a patent vessel with satisfactory blood flow. Discussion: Nowadays, imaging diagnostics of peripheral artery stenosis involves non-invasive examinations such as ultrasound, minimally invasive examinations such as angio-MRI and MDCT, or invasive examinations such as DSA and IVUS. DSA examinations are used to confirm significant stenosis or occlusion of a vessel, particularly when qualifying a patient for endovascular treatment. Due to their anatomic location, the superficial femoral artery and the popliteal artery are subject to various forces e.g. those exerted by the working muscles. Mechanical thrombectomy and atherectomy are efficient methods of arterial recanalization used in the treatment of acute, subacute or even chronic occlusions or stenosis of peripheral vessels. Conclusions: Frequency of angioplasty and

  11. Successful Management of Coronary Artery Rupture with Stent-Graft: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Erkan, Aycan Fahri; Kütük, Utku; Töre, Hasan Fehmi

    2014-01-01

    Perforation of coronary arteries is a relatively rare yet life-threatening complication of percutaneus coronary interventions and is encountered in approximately 0.5% of these procedures. According to the type of coronary perforation, various methods of correction are employed, ranging from conservative approach to emergency cardiac surgery. Coronary stent-grafts are composed of two metal stents and a polytetrafluoroethylene layer between them. Advent of such stents enabled efficient endovascular repair of coronary artery perforation. We present a case of coronary artery perforation which had occurred during stent implantation for the treatment of a bridged segment in the distal portion of the left anterior descending artery. This perforation was successfully managed by implanting a stent-graft. PMID:25126095

  12. A predictive study of the mechanical behaviour of coronary stents by computer modelling.

    PubMed

    Migliavacca, Francesco; Petrini, Lorenza; Montanari, Valeria; Quagliana, Isabella; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Dubini, Gabriele

    2005-01-01

    Intravascular stents are small tube-like structures expanded into stenotic arteries to restore blood flow perfusion to the downstream tissues. The stent expansion is an important factor to define the effectiveness of the surgical procedure: it depends on the stent geometry and includes large displacements and deformations, geometric and material non-linearity. Numerical analyses seem appropriate to study such a complex behaviour after a free stent expansion. In this study the finite element method (FEM) was applied to a new generation coronary stent. Results from computations were compared with those from a laboratory experiment in terms of radial expansion and elastic recoil. By means of a scanning electronic microscopy the area of plastic deformation were also detected and compared with those obtained in the numerical simulation. Matching between the different measurements was quite satisfactory even if some discrepancies were present due to the absence of the balloon in the numerical model. PMID:15604000

  13. Are Aortic Stent Grafts Safe in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Khandanpour, Nader; Mehta, Tapan A.; Adiseshiah, M.; Meyer, Felicity J.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stent grafts are increasingly used to treat aortic aneurysms and also other aortic pathologies. The safety of aortic stent grafts in pregnancy has never been studied or reported. We report on two cases of aortic stent grafts in pregnant women and discuss the effect of pregnancy on these aortic stent grafts. PMID:26229702

  14. Carotid Artery Stenting: Single-Center Experience Over 11 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Nolz, Richard Schernthaner, Ruediger Egbert; Cejna, Manfred; Schernthaner, Melanie Lammer, Johannes Schoder, Maria

    2010-04-15

    This article reports the results of carotid artery stenting during an 11-year period. Data from 168 carotid artery stenting procedures (symptomatic, n = 55; asymptomatic, n = 101; symptoms not accessible, n = 12) were retrospectively collected. Primary technical success rate, neurological events in-hospital, access-site complications, and contrast-induced nephropathy (n = 118) were evaluated. To evaluate the influence of experience in carotid artery stenting on intraprocedural neurologic complications, patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included the first 80 treated patients, and group 2 the remainder of the patients (n = 88). In-stent restenoses at last-follow-up examinations (n = 89) were assessed. The overall primary technical success rate was 95.8%. The in-hospital stroke-death rate was 3.0% (n = 5; symptomatic, 5.4%; asymptomatic, 2.0%; p = 0.346). Neurologic complications were markedly higher in group 1 (4.2%; three major strokes; symptomatic, 2.8%, asymptomatic, 1.4%) compared to group 2 (2.4%; one major and one minor stroke-symptomatic, 1.2%, asymptomatic 1.2%), but this was not statistically significant. Further complications were access-site complications in 12 (7.1%), with surgical revision required in 1 (0.6%) and mild contrast-induced nephropathy in 1 (0.85%). Twenty-one (23.6%) patients had >50% in-stent restenosis during a mean follow-up of 28.2 months. In conclusion, advanced experience in carotid artery stenting leads to an acceptable periprocedural stroke-death rate. In-stent restenosis could be a critical factor during the follow-up course.

  15. Carotid artery stenting versus endarterectomy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gahremanpour, Amir; Perin, Emerson C; Silva, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    For about 2 decades, investigators have been comparing carotid endarterectomy with carotid artery stenting in regard to their effectiveness and safety in treating carotid artery stenosis. We conducted a systematic review to summarize and appraise the available evidence provided by randomized trials, meta-analyses, and registries comparing the clinical outcomes of the 2 procedures. We searched the MEDLINE, SciVerse Scopus, and Cochrane databases and the bibliographies of pertinent textbooks and articles to identify these studies. The results of clinical trials and, consequently, the meta-analyses of those trials produced conflicting results regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety of carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. These conflicting results arose because of differences in patient population, trial design, outcome measures, and variability among centers in the endovascular devices used and in operator skills. Careful appraisal of the trials and meta-analyses, particularly the most recent and largest National Institutes of Health-sponsored trial (the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial [CREST]), showed that carotid stenting and endarterectomy were associated with similar rates of death and disabling stroke. Within the 30-day periprocedural period, carotid stenting was associated with higher risks of stroke, especially for patients aged >70 years, whereas carotid endarterectomy was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction. The slightly higher cost of stenting compared with endarterectomy was within an acceptable range by cost-effectiveness standards. We conclude that carotid artery stenting is an equivalent alternative to carotid endarterectomy when patient age and anatomy, surgical risk, and operator experience are considered in the choice of treatment approach. PMID:22949763

  16. BIODEGRADABLE BILIARY STENTS: A NEW APPROACH FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HEPATICOJEJUNOSTOMY STRICTURES FOLLOWING BILE DUCT INJURY. PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    GIMÉNEZ, Mariano E.; PALERMO, Mariano; HOUGHTON, Eduardo; ACQUAFRESCA, Pablo; FINGER, Caetano; VERDE, Juan M.; CÚNEO, Jorge Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Once a biliary injury has occurred, repair is done by a hepaticojejunostomy. The most common procedure is to perform a dilatation with balloon with a success of 70 %. Success rates range using biodegradable stents is from 85% to 95%. Biodegradable biliary stents should change the treatment of this complication. Aim: To investigate the use of biodegradable stents in a group of patients with hepaticojejunonostomy strictures. Methods: In a prospective study 16 biodegradable stents were placed in 13 patients with hepaticojejunostomy strictures secondary to bile duct repair of a biliary surgical injury. Average age was 38.7 years (23-67), nine were female and four male. All cases had a percutaneous drainage before at the time of biodegradable stent placement. Results: In one case, temporary haemobilia was present requiring blood transfusion. In another, pain after stent placement required intravenous medication. In the other 11 patients, hospital discharge was the next morning following stent placement. During the patient´s follow-up, none presented symptoms during the first nine months. One patient presented significant alkaline phosphatase elevation and stricture recurrence was confirmed. One case had recurrence of cholangitis 11 months after the stent placement. 84.6% continued asymptomatic with a mean follow-up of 20 months. Conclusion: The placement of biodegradable stents is a safe and feasible technique. Was not observed strictures caused by the stent or its degradation. It could substitute balloon dilation in strictures of hepaticojejunostomy. PMID:27438039

  17. Biodegradable tocopherol acetate as a drug carrier to prevent ureteral stent-associated infection.

    PubMed

    Elayarajah; Rajendran, R; Venkatrajah; Sreekumar, Sweda; Sudhakar, Asa; Janiga; Sreekumar, Soumya

    2011-03-01

    Biomaterial-centred bacterial infections present common and challenging complications with medical implants like ureteral stent which provide substratum for the biofilm formation. Hence the purpose of this study is to make antibacterial stent surface with biodegradable polymer (tocopherol acetate) and anti-infective agents (norfloxacin and metronidazole) using a modified dip-coating procedure. This is done by impregnating the stent pieces in the anti-infective solution (a mixture of norfloxacin-metronidazole and polymer) for uniform surface coating (drug-carrier-coated stents). After coating, agar diffusion test was performed as qualitative test to find out the sensitivity of coated stents against the clinical isolates, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli. Quantitative test was measured by calculating the numbers of adhered bacteria on coated and uncoated stents by incubating the stent pieces in artificial urine. Difference in the number of viable bacteria adhered on the surface of coated and uncoated stents were statistically calculated using chi square test with p < 0.05 considered significant. The stent colonising ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli in a controlled environment chamber was determined using two-challenge dose of the isolates by in vitro challenge test. In qualitative test, the zone of inhibition around the coated stents showed sensitivity against the clinical isolates. In quantitative test, the number of adhered bacteria on the surface of coated stents was reduced to a significant level (p < 0.05). The polymer, tocopherol acetate is highly biodegradable in nature. Due to its degrading ability in body tissues, it releases the anti-infective drugs at a constant and sustained rate.

  18. Coronary stent technology: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daniel; Jepson, Nigel

    2016-09-19

    Coronary angioplasty and coronary artery stents have revolutionised interventional cardiology. Contemporary coronary stent technology continues to seek to improve on the outcomes of the preceding generation of devices by refining their design, structure and component materials. These technologies include new generations of drug-eluting stents, non-polymeric stents, bioresorbable polymer-coated stents, and fully bioresorbable scaffolds. This review discusses the evolution of coronary stent technology, the efficacy and safety of currently available devices, and the rationale for new generation platforms as efforts continue to design the ideal coronary stent technology. PMID:27627940

  19. Combined Arterial Infusion and Stent Implantation Compared with Metal Stent Alone in Treatment of Malignant Gastroduodenal Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhongmin; Chen Kemin; Gong Ju; Zheng Yunfeng; Wang Tianxiang

    2009-09-15

    .38 to 1.48 (p < 0.01). There were no short-term complications. Late complications including hematemesis (n = 3), migration (n = 12), and stent occlusion due to tumor overgrowth (n = 5) were evenly distributed between the groups. In the DIT group chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and transient renal dysfunction were detected in six patients, which improved after symptomatic management. Mean survival time after the procedure was 5.9 and 11.1 months for MSI and DIT, respectively (P < 0.001). In conclusion, both MSI and DIT offer effective palliation for malignant gastroduodenal obstruction, but DIT appears to offer superior survival over MSI alone. Ideally, a prospective randomized trial comparing these two techniques should be carried out to validate this result.

  20. Ureteral stents: new ideas, new designs

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aown, Abdulrahman; Kyriazis, Iason; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Kraniotis, Pantelis; Rigopoulos, Christos; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Petsas, Theodore; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2010-01-01

    Ureteral stents represent a minimally invasive alternative to preserve urinary drainage whenever ureteral patency is deteriorated or is under a significant risk to be occluded due to extrinsic or intrinsic etiologies. The ideal stent that would combine perfect long-term efficacy with no stent-related morbidity is still lacking and stent usage is associated with several adverse effects that limit its value as a tool for long-term urinary drainage. Several new ideas on stent design, composition material and stent coating currently under evaluation, foreseen to eliminate the aforementioned drawbacks of ureteral stent usage. In this article we review the currently applied novel ideas and new designs of ureteral stents. Moreover, we evaluate potential future prospects of ureteral stent development adopted mostly by the pioneering cardiovascular stent industry, focusing, however, on the differences between ureteral and endothelial tissue. PMID:21789086

  1. Recommendations for Carotid Stenting in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hyuk Won; Suh, Sang-il; Jeong, Hae Woong; Suh, Dae Chul

    2015-01-01

    Carotid artery angioplasty with stenting (CAS) is being performed in many hospitals in Korea. Most of the guidelines which are being used are similar, but the practical aspects such as techniques are different between hospitals. For example, usage of various protective devices, the oral antiplatelet regimen prior to procedure and placing of temporary pacemaker to prevent bradycardia are different between hospitals. In this article, we summarize and propose the guidelines for CAS which is currently being accepted in Korea. These guidelines may be helpful in providing protocol to neurointerventionalist who perform CAS and to standardize the process including reporting of CAS in the future comparative trials in Korea. PMID:25763292

  2. Self-expanding metal stenting for obstructing left colon cancer: A district hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Harilingam, Mohan Raj; Khushal, Amjad; Aikoye, Abdulmalik

    2016-07-01

    Stenting of malignant colonic obstructions using self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) is commonly used for palliation and can be used as an interim procedure prior to definitive surgery. We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data from all consecutive colonic stenting procedures undertaken between September 2007 and December 2014 at a district general hospital. Technical and clinical success rates, mortality, colonic perforation, and other complications were documented and analyzed. Sixty-four colonic stenting procedures were undertaken. Fifty-three (83 %) were for palliation and eleven (17 %) were performed as a bridge to definitive surgery. Technical (98.4 %) and clinical (89.9 %) success rates were excellent. The single documented failure was secondary to complete luminal obstruction. Three stent occlusions (4.6 %), one colonic perforation (1.5 %), and one migration were encountered. There were no procedure-related deaths. Colonic stenting for obstructing left-sided colon cancer is a safe and effective procedure, even in the district general hospital setting. The use of SEMS as a bridge to elective surgery balances surgical and oncological considerations and, therefore, is most appropriate for high surgical risk patients in this setting. PMID:27448435

  3. Colonic Stents for Colorectal Cancer Are Seldom Used and Mainly for Palliation of Obstruction: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Borowiec, Anna M; Wang, Charlie S K; Yong, Elaine; Law, Calvin; Coburn, Natalie; Sutradhar, Rinku; Baxter, Nancy; Paszat, Lawrence; Tinmouth, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Self-expandable stents for obstructing colorectal cancer (CRC) offer an alternative to operative management. The objective of the study was to determine stent utilization for CRC obstruction in the province of Ontario between April 1, 2000, and March 30, 2009. Colonic stent utilization characteristics, poststent insertion health outcomes, and health care encounters were recorded. 225 patients were identified over the study period. Median age was 69 years, 2/3 were male, and 2/3 had metastatic disease. Stent use for CRC increased over the study period and gastroenterologists inserted most stents. The median survival after stent insertion was 199 (IQR, 69-834) days. 37% of patients required an additional procedure. Patients with metastatic disease were less likely to go on to surgery (HR 0.14, 95% CI 0.06-0.32, p < 0.0001). There were 2.4/person-year emergency department visits (95% CI 2.2-2.7) and 2.3 hospital admissions/person-year (95% CI 2.1-2.5) following stent insertion. Most admissions were cancer or procedure related or for palliation. Factors associated with hospital admissions were presence of metastatic disease, lack of chemotherapy treatment, and stoma surgery. Overall the use of stents for CRC obstruction remains low. Stents are predominantly used for palliation with low rates of postinsertion health care encounters. PMID:27446826

  4. Colonic Stents for Colorectal Cancer Are Seldom Used and Mainly for Palliation of Obstruction: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Borowiec, Anna M.; Wang, Charlie S. K.; Yong, Elaine; Law, Calvin; Coburn, Natalie; Sutradhar, Rinku; Baxter, Nancy; Paszat, Lawrence; Tinmouth, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Self-expandable stents for obstructing colorectal cancer (CRC) offer an alternative to operative management. The objective of the study was to determine stent utilization for CRC obstruction in the province of Ontario between April 1, 2000, and March 30, 2009. Colonic stent utilization characteristics, poststent insertion health outcomes, and health care encounters were recorded. 225 patients were identified over the study period. Median age was 69 years, 2/3 were male, and 2/3 had metastatic disease. Stent use for CRC increased over the study period and gastroenterologists inserted most stents. The median survival after stent insertion was 199 (IQR, 69–834) days. 37% of patients required an additional procedure. Patients with metastatic disease were less likely to go on to surgery (HR 0.14, 95% CI 0.06–0.32, p < 0.0001). There were 2.4/person-year emergency department visits (95% CI 2.2–2.7) and 2.3 hospital admissions/person-year (95% CI 2.1–2.5) following stent insertion. Most admissions were cancer or procedure related or for palliation. Factors associated with hospital admissions were presence of metastatic disease, lack of chemotherapy treatment, and stoma surgery. Overall the use of stents for CRC obstruction remains low. Stents are predominantly used for palliation with low rates of postinsertion health care encounters. PMID:27446826

  5. Juxtarenal Modular Aortic Stent Graft Infection Caused by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Novotný, Róbert; Mitáš, Petr; Hlubocký, Jaroslav; Hrubý, Ján; Slautin, Andrey; Špunda, Rudolf; Lindner, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We are presenting a case report of an infected modular abdominal stent graft. Case Presentation. A 67-year-old male patient three years after Cook's modular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) graft implantation for juxtarenal AAA with an implantation of a stent extension into the right common iliac artery for type Ib endoleak. The patient was admitted into our center in severe condition with suspected retroperitoneal bleeding. Computed tomography angiography (CTAG) confirmed retroperitoneal bleeding in the right common iliac artery. An urgent surgical revision was indicated; destructed arterial wall around the stent extension in the right common iliac artery was discovered. Due to the severe state of health of the patient, a resection of the infected stent and affected arterial wall was performed, followed by an iliac-femoral crossover bypass. The patient was transported to the intensive care unit with hepatic and renal failure, with maximal catecholamine support. Combined antibiotic treatment was started. The patient died five hours after the procedure. The cause of death was multiorgan failure caused by sepsis. Hemocultures and perioperative microbiological cultures showed the infection agent to be Staphylococcus aureus methicillin sensitive. Conclusion. Stent graft infection is a rare complication. Treatment is associated with high mortality and morbidity. PMID:26904354

  6. Helical CT Angiography of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with Suprarenal Stent Grafting: A Pictorial Essay

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Zhonghua

    2003-06-15

    The endovascular repair of abdominal aorticaneurysm (AAA) with stent grafts is rapidly becoming an important alternative to open repair. Suprarenal stent grafting, recently modified from conventional infrarenal stent grafting, is a technique for the purpose of treating patients with inappropriate aneurysm necks.Unlike open repair, the success of endoluminal repair cannot be ascertained by means of direct examination and thus relies on imaging results. The use of conventional angiography for arterial imaging has become less dominant, while helical computed tomography angiography(CTA) has become the imaging modality of choice for both preoperative assessment and postoperative followup after treatment with stent graft implants. There is an increasing likelihood that radiologists will become more and more involved in the procedure of aortic stent grafting and in giving the radiological report on these patients treated with stent grafts. It is necessary for radiologists to be familiar with the imaging findings, including common and uncommon appearances following aortic stent grafting. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to describe and present normal and abnormal imaging appearances following aortic stent grafting based on helical CTA.

  7. Angioplasty or Primary Stenting for Infrapopliteal Lesions: Results of a Prospective Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Randon, C. Jacobs, B.; De Ryck, F.; Vermassen, F.

    2010-04-15

    Excellent results with small stents in coronary arteries have led endovascular therapists to their use in infrapopliteal vessels. However, to date no level I evidence exists to recommend primary stenting over infrapopliteal angioplasty alone. The aim of this randomized single-center trial was to compare their 1-year outcome. A total of 38 limbs in 35 patients with critical limb ischemia were randomized to angioplasty (22 pts) or primary stenting (16 pts). Target lesions were infrapopliteal occluded (36) or stenotic (20) lesions ranging from <2 to >15 cm in length. The mean age was 72 years. At 12 months, there was no statistical difference in survival (angioplasty, 69.3%; primary stenting, 74.7%), in limb salvage (angioplasty, 90%; primary stenting, 91.7%), or in primary and secondary patency (angioplasty, 66 and 79.5%; primary stenting, 56 and 64%) between the groups Renal insufficiency was the only significant negative predicting factor for limb salvage in both groups. In conclusion, the 1-year results for both groups were broadly similar. Stenting has its place in infrapopliteal angioplasty if the procedure is jeopardized by a dissection or recoil, but our results do not support primary stenting in all cases.

  8. The role of stents in the treatment of congenital heart disease: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Bjoern; Ewert, Peter; Berger, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Intravascular or intracardiac stenoses occur in many forms of congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, the implantation of stents has become an accepted interventional procedure for stenotic lesions in pediatric cardiology. Furthermore, stents are know to be used to exclude vessel aneurysm or to ensure patency of existing or newly created intracardiac communications. With the further refinement of the first generation of devices, a variety of “modern” stents with different design characteristics have evolved. Despite the tremendous technical improvement over the last 20 years, the “ideal stent” has not yet been developed. Therefore, the pediatric interventionalist has to decide which stent is suitable for each lesion. On this basis, currently available stents are discussed in regard to their advantages and disadvantages for common application in CHD. New concepts and designs developed to overcome some of the existing problems, like the failure of adaptation to somatic growth, are presented. Thus, in the future, biodegradable or growth stents might replace the currently used generation of stents. This might truly lead to widening indications for the use of stents in the treatment of CHD. PMID:20300265

  9. Outcomes of Stent-assisted Coil Embolization of Wide-necked Intracranial Aneurysms Using the Solitaire™ AB Neurovascular Remodeling Device

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hae Woong

    2015-01-01

    Objective This retrospective study presents our experience with respect to the clinical and angiographic outcomes of patients treated with stent-assisted coil embolization using Solitaire™ AB stents. Materials and Methods From March 2011 to December 2014, 50 patients with 55 wide-necked and/or complex intracranial aneurysms were evaluated. Four patients presented with an acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. Stent deployment was performed with a standard coiling procedure in 49 aneurysms. Three patients underwent bailout stenting, 2 patients were treated by temporary stenting and one patient was treated only by stenting without coiling for dissecting aneurysm. Results Successful placement of the Solitaire AB stent was achieved in all the cases. Based on the postprocedural angiographic results, a Raymond 1 was obtained in 32 (59%) of 54 aneurysms, excluded by one case of dissecting aneurysm, and a Raymond 2 in 13 (24%), and a Raymond 3 in 9 (17%). There was one thromboembolic (2%) and three hemorrhagic complications (6%). However, procedure-related morbidity or mortality was not found. Annual follow-up angiographic results from the embolization were obtained in 40 (74.1%) of 54 cases. These results were represented as Raymond 1 in 27 (67.5%), class 2 in 9 (22.5%), and class 3 in 4 (10%) cases. Angiographic improvement associated with progressive thrombosis of the aneurysm was obtained in 10 aneurysms. Four aneurysms were recanalized without requiring additional treatment. In-stent stenosis was found in one aneurysm, but stent migration was not seen on follow-up angiography. Conclusion Stent-assisted coil embolization using the Solitaire AB stent for treating wide-necked and/or complex intracranial aneurysms was found to be safe and effective immediately post-embolization and after follow-up. Long-term follow-up will be required to identify the effect of the Solitaire AB stent on recanalization rates. PMID:27066440

  10. Angioplasty or Stenting of Extra- and Intracranial Vertebral Artery Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, Elke A.M.; Gissler, H. Martin; Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian; Jaeger, Horst J.; Mathias, Klaus D.

    2004-01-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and safety of angioplasty or angioplasty and stenting of extra- and intracranial vertebral artery (VA) stenosis. Methods: In 16 consecutive patients (9 men, 7 women; mean age 61 years, range 49-74 years) 16 stenotic VAs were treated with angioplasty orangioplasty and stenting. Eleven stenoses were localized in V1 segment,1 stenosis in V2 segment and 4 stenoses in V4 segment of VA. Fourteen VA stenoses were symptomatic, 2 asymptomatic. The etiology of the stenoses was atherosclerotic in all cases. Results:Angioplasty was performed in 8 of 11 V1 and 2 of 4 V4 segments of the VA. In 3 of 11 V1 segments and 2 of 4 V4 segments of the VA we combined angioplasty with stenting. The procedures were successfully performed in 14 of 16 VAs (87%). Complications were asymptomatic vessel dissection resulting in vessel occlusion in 1 of 11 V1 segments and asymptomatic vessel dissection in 2 of 4 V4 segments of the VA. One patient died in the 24-hr period after the procedure because of subarachnoid hemorrhage as a complication following vessel perforation of the treated V4 segment. Conclusion: Angioplasty orangioplasty and stenting of extracranial VA stenoses can be performed with a high technical success rate and a low complication rate. In intracranial VA stenosis the procedure is technically feasible but complications can be life-threatening. The durability and procedural complication rates of primary stenting without using predilation in extra- and intracranial VA stenosis should be defined in the future.

  11. Intravascular stenting for the treatment of coarctation of the aorta in adolescent and adult patients.

    PubMed

    Godart, François

    2011-12-01

    In the past 10 years, stent implantation has become a real alternative to surgery in the management of both native and recurrent coarctation of the aorta in adolescents and adults. The purpose of this report is to provide a detailed review of stent implantation techniques, including pre-procedure imaging, technical aspects and results. The success rate is usually high (around 90%), and the procedure results in an increase in the diameter of the coarcted segment, a decrease in the transisthmic systolic gradient and a better control of systemic hypertension. The most serious complication, rupture of the aorta, can be fatal, but is rare (< 2%). Aneurismal dilatation is another potential problem that occurs in around 5-9% of cases, and may be related to overstretching and pre-stent dilatation, so these should be avoided. It is necessary to point out that most of these aneurysms are small and conservatively managed. Restenosis is another complication that may result from neointimal proliferation, stent recoil and stent fracture. Balloon dilatation with a higher inflating pressure or repeat stent implantation is proposed herein. A comparison with surgery is also discussed, and a follow-up protocol is proposed to capture late complications. Owing to good initial and intermediate results, stent implantation is nowadays considered as a first-line therapy in most adolescents and adults with (re)coarctation of the aorta.

  12. Use of the Memokath Urethral Stent in the management of ileal conduit stomal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tzong-Yang; Al-Sameraaii, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Intoduction Ileal conduit stomal stenosis is a difficult complication to manage. Definitive treatment usually requires refashioning or a reconstruction of the conduit. There remains a need for minimally invasive procedures that can restore function to the stoma while avoiding the risks associated with a significant surgical procedure. This case illustrates a novel approach to the management of this complication. Presentation of case An 84 year old female with muscle-invasive bladder cancer underwent cystectomy with formation of an ileal conduit urinary diversion system. Her recovery was complicated by stomal stenosis leading to recurrent urinary tract infections. The Memokath Stent 045 is a thermo-expandable nickel–titanium stent designed for treatment of urethral strictures. The stent was inserted into the stoma under direct vision without the need for general anaesthesia or intraoperative radiography. The conduit remains patent 12 months after insertion and the metal stent showed no evidence of migration, calcification, oxidation or degradation. Discussion The use of a thermo-expandable nickel–titanium stent is able to provide the patency required to treat ileal conduit stomal stenosis. In this case, insertion of the stent was a simple procedure and no adverse events or degradation of the stent was identified at 12 months after insertion. The need for a significant surgical procedure such as a refashioning or reconstruction was avoided and general anaesthesia was not required to perform the procedure. Conclusion This case report highlights the possibility of using the thermo-expandable Memokath Stent 045 as an alternative to the long-term management of ileal conduit stomal stenosis. PMID:26745318

  13. Stenting for malignant ureteral obstruction: Tandem, metal or metal-mesh stents.

    PubMed

    Elsamra, Sammy E; Leavitt, David A; Motato, Hector A; Friedlander, Justin I; Siev, Michael; Keheila, Mohamed; Hoenig, David M; Smith, Arthur D; Okeke, Zeph

    2015-07-01

    Extrinsic malignant compression of the ureter is not uncommon, often refractory to decompression with conventional polymeric ureteral stents, and frequently associated with limited survival. Alternative options for decompression include tandem ureteral stents, metallic stents and metal-mesh stents, though the preferred method remains controversial. We reviewed and updated our outcomes with tandem ureteral stents for malignant ureteral obstruction, and carried out a PubMed search using the terms "malignant ureteral obstruction," "tandem ureteral stents," "ipsilateral ureteral stents," "metal ureteral stent," "resonance stent," "silhouette stent" and "metal mesh stent." A comprehensive review of the literature and summary of outcomes is provided. The majority of studies encountered were retrospective with small sample sizes. The evidence is most robust for metal stents, whereas only limited data exists for tandem or metal-mesh stents. Metal and metal-mesh stents are considerably more expensive than tandem stenting, but the potential for less frequent stent exchanges makes them possibly cost-effective over time. Urinary tract infections have been associated with all stent types. A wide range of failure rates has been published for all types of stents, limiting direct comparison. Metal and metal-mesh stents show a high incidence of stent colic, migration and encrustation, whereas tandem stents appear to produce symptoms equivalent to single stents. Comparison is difficult given the limited evidence and heterogeneity of patients with malignant ureteral obstruction. It is clear that prospective, randomized studies are necessary to effectively scrutinize conventional, tandem, metallic ureteral and metal-mesh stents for their use in malignant ureteral obstruction.

  14. Biodegradable stents in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente; Moreno-de-Vega, Vicente; Marín, Ingrid; Boix, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable stents (BDSs) are an attractive option to avoid ongoing dilation or surgery in patients with benign stenoses of the small and large intestines. The experience with the currently the only BDS for endoscopic placement, made of Poly-dioxanone, have shown promising results. However some aspects should be improved as are the fact that BDSs lose their radial force over time due to the degradable material, and that can cause stent-induced mucosal or parenchymal injury. This complication rate and modest clinical efficacy has to be carefully considered in individual patients prior to placement of BDSs. Otherwise, the price of these stents therefore it is nowadays an important limitation. PMID:24605020

  15. Pancreatitis-Induced Extrahepatic Portal Vein Stenosis Treated by Percutaneous Transhepatic Stent Placement: a Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Maleux, G. Vaninbroukx, J.; Verslype, C.; Vanbeckevoort, D.; Hootegem, P. van; Nevens, F.

    2003-08-15

    One month after onset of an acute biliary pancreatitis, a 75-year-old man developed refractory ascites. Duplex ultrasound and CT scan revealed a focal stenosis of the extrahepatic portal vein as confirmed by transhepatic direct portography. In the same session, this stenosis, responsible for symptomatic prehepaticportal hypertension, was successfully dilated and stented and afterwards a residual pressure gradient of 1 mmHg over the stented segment was measured. One week after the stenting procedure the patient was free of ascites and control physical and biochemical examination one year later is completely normal.

  16. Retrieval of the Protection Filter with a Soft Coaxial Catheter After Carotid Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Thomas E.; Holtmannspoetter, Markus; Mueller-Schunk, Stefanie

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to shorten and simplify the procedure of filter retrieval after carotid stenting with cerebral protecting devices. We propose a retrieval method with a soft-tip guiding catheter, which eliminates the step of balloon exchange and introduction of a retriever catheter for the protection filter. The technique was successfully used in our last 60 consecutive patients. One transient deficit occurred. In conclusion, retrieval of the filter with a soft coaxial catheter after carotid stenting is a feasible and safe method and may simplify cerebrovascular protection during stenting.

  17. Stent graft exclusion of a pseudoaneurysm in a Blalock-Taussig shunt.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Recalde, Angel; Garzón, Gonzalo; Oliver, José M

    2010-08-01

    This case is the first report of slow-growing pseudoaneurysm after vessel dissection secondary to two stents implantation into classic Blalock Taussig shunt in a patient with pulmonary atresia and ventricular septal defect. Pseudoaneurysm was successfully excluded by a percutaneous approach with self-expandable stent graft deployment from the aorta to the middle of the Blalock Taussig shunt. Nearly 3 years after the procedure, the classic BT is patent, and there were no restenosis or thrombosis in spite of the very long length of the stented segment.

  18. Limitations of Endovascular Treatment with Stent-Grafts for Active Mycotic Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Masaki; Kato, Noriyuki; Hirano, Tadanori; Shimono, Takatsugu; Yasuda, Fuyuhiko; Tanaka, Kuniyoshi; Yada, Isao; Takeda, Kan

    2002-06-15

    An 81-year-old woman with ruptured mycotic thoracic aortic aneurysm was treated with endovascular placement of stent-grafts fabricated from expanded polytetrafluoroethylene and Z-stents. Although exclusion of the aneurysm was achieved at the end of the procedure, a type I endoleak developed on the following day.Despite emergent surgical resection of the aneurysm and extra-anatomical reconstruction, the patient died 2 days later. Stent-graft repair may not be a suitable method for the treatment of ruptured mycotic aneurysm in the presence of active infection.

  19. Endovascular Stents and Stent-Grafts: Is Heparin Coating Desirable?

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Stephen R.; Souza, Nandita M. de; Allison, David J.

    2000-07-15

    Heparins are glycosaminoglycans that, in addition to their anticoagulant activity, have interactions with growth factors and other glycoproteins. These interactions may stimulate neointimal hyperplasia when heparin is delivered locally on stents and stent-grafts. Modifying the structure of heparin to retain anticoagulant activity while minimizing these stimulatory effects on the vascular endothelium is desirable and may be achieved by understanding the relationships between the structure and function of the various parts of the heparin molecule.

  20. Stenting of vertical vein in an infant with obstructed supracardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Lim, W K; Leong, M C; Samion, H

    2016-01-01

    A 1.7 kg infant with obstructed supracardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage (TAPVD) presented with severe pulmonary hypertension secondary to vertical vein obstruction. The child, in addition, had a large omphalocele that was being managed conservatively. The combination of low weight, unoperated omphalocele, and severe pulmonary hypertension made corrective cardiac surgery very high-risk. Therefore, transcatheter stenting of the stenotic vertical vein, as a bridge to corrective surgery was carried out. The procedure was carried out through the right internal jugular vein (RIJ). The stenotic segment of the vertical vein was stented using a coronary stent. After procedure, the child was discharged well to the referred hospital for weight gain and spontaneous epithelialization of the omphalocele. Stenting of the vertical vein through the internal jugular vein can be considered in very small neonates as a bridge to repair obstructed supracardiac total anomalous venous drainage. PMID:27212859

  1. Stenting of vertical vein in an infant with obstructed supracardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage

    PubMed Central

    Lim, WK; Leong, MC; Samion, H

    2016-01-01

    A 1.7 kg infant with obstructed supracardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage (TAPVD) presented with severe pulmonary hypertension secondary to vertical vein obstruction. The child, in addition, had a large omphalocele that was being managed conservatively. The combination of low weight, unoperated omphalocele, and severe pulmonary hypertension made corrective cardiac surgery very high-risk. Therefore, transcatheter stenting of the stenotic vertical vein, as a bridge to corrective surgery was carried out. The procedure was carried out through the right internal jugular vein (RIJ). The stenotic segment of the vertical vein was stented using a coronary stent. After procedure, the child was discharged well to the referred hospital for weight gain and spontaneous epithelialization of the omphalocele. Stenting of the vertical vein through the internal jugular vein can be considered in very small neonates as a bridge to repair obstructed supracardiac total anomalous venous drainage. PMID:27212859

  2. Enteral metallic stenting by balloon enteroscopy for obstruction of surgically reconstructed intestine.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Kazunari; Okuse, Chiaki; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Suetani, Keigo; Morita, Ryo; Michikawa, Yosuke; Ozawa, Shun-ichiro; Hosoya, Kosuke; Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Otsubo, Takehito; Itoh, Fumio

    2015-06-28

    We present three cases of self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) placement using a balloon enteroscope (BE) and its overtube (OT) for malignant obstruction of surgically reconstructed intestine. A BE is effective for the insertion of an endoscope into the deep bowel. However, SEMS placement is impossible through the working channel, because the working channel of BE is too small and too long for the stent device. Therefore, we used a technique in which the BE is inserted as far as the stenotic area; thereafter, the BE is removed, leaving only the OT, and then the stent is placed by inserting the stent device through the OT. In the present three cases, a modification of this technique resulted in the successful placement of the SEMS for obstruction of surgically reconstructed intestine, and the procedures were performed without serious complications. We consider that the present procedure is extremely effective as a palliative treatment for distal bowel stenosis, such as in the surgically reconstructed intestine.

  3. Palliation of Malignant Biliary and Duodenal Obstruction with Combined Metallic Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Akinci, Devrim Akhan, Okan; Ozkan, Fuat; Ciftci, Turkmen; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay; Ozmen, Mustafa N.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of palliation of malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction with combined metallic stenting under fluoroscopy guidance. Materials and Methods. A retrospective analysis of 9 patients (6 men and 3 women) who underwent biliary and duodenal stenting was performed. The mean age of patients was 61 years (range: 42-80 years). The causes of obstruction were pancreatic carcinoma in 7 patients, cholangiocellular carcinoma in one, and duodenal carcinoma in the other. Biliary and duodenal stents were placed simultaneously in 4 patients. In other 5 patients dudodenal stents were placed after biliary stenting when the duodenal obstruction symptoms have developed. In two patients duodenal stents were advanced via transgastric approach. Results. Technical success rate was 100 %. After percutaneous biliary drainage and stenting bilirubin levels decreased to normal levels in 6 patients and in remaining 3 patients mean reduction of 71% in bilirubin levels was achieved. Tumoral ingrowth occurred in one patient and percutaneous biliary restenting was performed 90 days after the initial procedure. Of the 9 patients, 6 patients were able to tolerate solid diet, whereas 2 patients could tolerate liquid diet and one patient did not show any improvement. Mean survival periods were 111 and 73 days after biliary and duodenal stenting, respectively. Conclusion. Combined biliary and duodenal stent placement which can be performed under fluoroscopic guidance without assistance of endoscopy is feasible and an effective method of palliation of malignant biliary and duodenal obstructions. If transoral and endoscopic approaches fail, percutaneous gastrostomy route allows duodenal stenting.

  4. Nonstented versus routine stented ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy: a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yi; Zhuo, Jian; Sun, Xiao-Wen; Wen, Wei; Liu, Hai-Tao; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2008-10-01

    We conducted a prospective, randomized study to evaluate whether postoperative ureteral stenting is necessary after ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy. A total of 115 consecutive patients with distal or middle ureteral calculi amenable to ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy were prospectively randomized into stented group (n = 58) and nonstented group (n = 57). The stent was routinely placed in the treated ureter for 2 weeks. The outcomes were measured with postoperative patient symptoms, stone-free rates, early and late postoperative complications, and cost-effectiveness. The postoperative symptoms were measured with Ureteral Stent Symptom Questionnaire (USSQ). All patients completed a 12-week follow-up. There was no significant difference between two groups with respect to the patient age, stone size, stone location and mean operative time. According to the USSQ, the symptoms of the stented group were significantly worse compared to the nonstented group (P = 0.0001). In the stented group, two patients had high fever for 1 week after the operation, stent migration was found in two patients, and the stents had to be removed earlier in five patients because of severe pain or hematuria. The cost of the stented group was significantly higher than the nonstented group. The stone-free rate was 100% in both groups. No hydronephrosis or ureteral stricture was detected by intravenous pyelogram in the 12th week postoperative follow-up. In conclusion, we believe that routine stenting after ureteroscopic intracorporeal lithotripsy with the holmium laser is not necessary as long as the procedure is uncomplicated for distal or middle ureteral calculis less than 2 cm.

  5. Self expandable stent application to prevent limb occlusion in external iliac artery during endovascular aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Iliac extension of stent-graft during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) increases the incidence of limb occlusion (LO). Hypothetically, adjunctive iliac stent (AIS) could offer some additional protection to overcome this anatomic hostility. But still there is no consensus in terms of effective stent characteristics or configuration. We retrospectively reviewed our center's experience to offer a possible answer to this question. Methods Our study included 30 patients (38 limbs) with AIS placed in the external iliac artery (EIA) from January 2010 to December 2013. We classified iliac tortuosity based on anatomic characteristics. AIS's were deployed in EIA with a minimum 5-mm stick-out configuration from the distal edge of the stent-graft. Results According to the iliac artery tortuosity index, grade 0, grade 1, and grade 2 were 5 (13.2%), 30 (78.9%), and 3 (7.9%), respectively. The diameter of all AIS was 12 mm, which was as large as or larger than the diameter of the stent-graft distal limb. SMART stents were preferred in 34 limbs (89.5%) and stents with 60-mm length were usually used (89.5%). During a mean follow-up of 9.13 ± 10.78 months, ischemic limb pain, which could be the sign of LO, was not noticed in any patients. There was no fracture, kinking, migration, in-stent restenosis, or occlusion of AIS. Conclusion The installation of AIS after extension of stent-graft to EIA reduced the risk of LO without any complications. AIS should be considered as a preventive procedure of LO if stent-graft needs to be extended to EIA during EVAR.

  6. Self expandable stent application to prevent limb occlusion in external iliac artery during endovascular aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Iliac extension of stent-graft during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) increases the incidence of limb occlusion (LO). Hypothetically, adjunctive iliac stent (AIS) could offer some additional protection to overcome this anatomic hostility. But still there is no consensus in terms of effective stent characteristics or configuration. We retrospectively reviewed our center's experience to offer a possible answer to this question. Methods Our study included 30 patients (38 limbs) with AIS placed in the external iliac artery (EIA) from January 2010 to December 2013. We classified iliac tortuosity based on anatomic characteristics. AIS's were deployed in EIA with a minimum 5-mm stick-out configuration from the distal edge of the stent-graft. Results According to the iliac artery tortuosity index, grade 0, grade 1, and grade 2 were 5 (13.2%), 30 (78.9%), and 3 (7.9%), respectively. The diameter of all AIS was 12 mm, which was as large as or larger than the diameter of the stent-graft distal limb. SMART stents were preferred in 34 limbs (89.5%) and stents with 60-mm length were usually used (89.5%). During a mean follow-up of 9.13 ± 10.78 months, ischemic limb pain, which could be the sign of LO, was not noticed in any patients. There was no fracture, kinking, migration, in-stent restenosis, or occlusion of AIS. Conclusion The installation of AIS after extension of stent-graft to EIA reduced the risk of LO without any complications. AIS should be considered as a preventive procedure of LO if stent-graft needs to be extended to EIA during EVAR. PMID:27617255

  7. Transpulmonary echocardiography to guide stent implantation into coarctation of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Teramachi, Yozo; Suda, Kenji; Yoshimoto, Hironaga; Kishimoto, Shintaro; Kudo, Yoshiyuki; Iemura, Motofumi

    2015-05-01

    Although stent implantation into aortic coarctation has been performed solely under fluoroscopy, we successfully applied intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) to guide this procedure in a 13-year-old patient. Placing an intracardiac echocardiographic catheter in the left pulmonary artery facing upward, we readily visualized the precise anatomy of coarctation, measured the pressure gradient, and monitored the stent inflation process. This report suggests a new application of ICE for intervention with structural and vascular diseases other than interatrial septum.

  8. Ketoprofen-eluting biodegradable ureteral stents by CO2 impregnation: In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Barros, Alexandre A; Oliveira, Carlos; Reis, Rui L; Lima, Estevão; Duarte, Ana Rita C

    2015-11-30

    Ureteral stents are indispensable tools in urologic practice. The main complications associated with ureteral stents are dislocation, infection, pain and encrustation. Biodegradable ureteral stents are one of the most attractive designs with the potential to eliminate several complications associated with the stenting procedure. In this work we hypothesize the impregnation of ketoprofen, by CO2-impregnation in a patented biodegradable ureteral stent previously developed in our group. The biodegradable ureteral stents with each formulation: alginate-based, gellan gum-based were impregnated with ketoprofen and the impregnation conditions tested were 100 bar, 2 h and three different temperatures (35 °C, 40 °C and 50 °C). The impregnation was confirmed by FTIR and DSC demonstrated the amorphization of the drug upon impregnation. The in vitro elution profile in artificial urine solution (AUS) during degradation of a biodegradable ureteral stent loaded with ketoprofen was evaluated. According to the kinetics results these systems have shown to be very promising for the release ketoprofen in the first 72 h, which is the necessary time for anti-inflammatory delivery after the surgical procedure. The in vitro release studied revealed an influence of the temperature on the impregnation yield, with a higher impregnation yield at 40 °C. Higher yields were also obtained for gellan gum-based stents. The non-cytotoxicity characteristic of the developed ketoprofen-eluting biodegradable ureteral stents was evaluated in L929 cell line by MTS assay which demonstrated the feasibility of this product as a medical device.

  9. The Asymmetric Vascular Stent: Efficacy in a rabbit aneurysm model

    PubMed Central

    Ionita, Ciprian N; Paciorek, Ann M; Dohatcu, Andreea; Hoffmann, Kenneth R; Bednarek, Daniel R; Kolega, John; Levy, Elad I; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Rudin, Stephen; Mocco, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Development of hemodynamic modifying devices to treat intracranial aneurysms (IAs) is an active area of research. The asymmetric vascular stent (AVS), a stent containing a low porosity patch, is such device. We evaluate AVS efficacy in an in vivo IA model. Methods We created twenty-four elastase rabbit model aneurysms: thirteen treated with the AVS, five treated with standard coronary stents, and six untreated controls. Four weeks following treatment, aneurysms underwent follow-up angiography, cone-beam micro-CT, histologic evaluation, and selective electron microscopy scanning. Results Four rabbits died early in the study: three during AVS treatment and one control (secondary to intra-procedural vessel injury and an unrelated tumor, respectively). AVS-treated aneurysms exhibited very weak or no aneurysm flow immediately after treatment and no flow in all aneurysms at follow-up. Stent-treated aneurysms showed flow both after treatment (5/5) and at follow-up (3/5). All control aneurysms remained patent during the study. Micro-CT scans showed: 9/9 of scanned AVS aneurysms were occluded, (6/9) AVSs were ideally placed and (3/9) the low porosity region partially covered the aneurysm neck; stent-treated aneurysms were 1/5 occluded, 2/5 patent, and 2/5 partially-patent. Histology results demonstrated: for AVS-treated aneurysms, advanced thrombus organization in the (9/9); for stent-treated aneurysms (1/4) no thrombus, (2/4) partially-thrombosed and (1/4) fully-thrombosed; for control aneurysms (4/4) no thrombus. Conclusion The use of AVSs shows promise as a viable new therapeutic in intracranial aneurysm treatment. These data encourage further investigation and provide substantial support to the AVS concept. PMID:19131663

  10. Modification of an endovascular stent graft for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloye, Olajompo Busola

    Endovascular surgery is currently used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). A stent graft is deployed to exclude blood flow from the aneurysm sac. It is an effective procedure used in preventing aneurysm rupture, with reduced patient morbidity and mortality compared to open surgical repair. Migration and leakage around the device ("endoleak") due to poor sealing of the stent graft to the aorta have raised concerns about the long-term durability of endovascular repair. A preliminary study of cell migration and proliferation is presented as a prelude to a more extensive in vivo testing. A method to enhance the biological seal between the stent graft and the aorta is proposed to eliminate this problem. This can be achieved by impregnating the stent graft with 50/50 poly (DL-lactide co glycolic acid) (PLGA) and growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), at the proximal and distal ends. It is hypothesized that as PLGA degrades it will release the growth factors that will promote proliferation and migration of aortic smooth muscle cells to the coated site, leading to a natural seal between the aorta and the stent graft. In addition, growth factor release should promote smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction that will help keep the stent graft in place at the proximal and distal ends. It is shown that a statistically significant effect of increased cell proliferation and migration is observed for CTGF release. Less of an effect is noted for bFGF or just the PLGA. The effect is estimated to be large enough to be clinically significant in a future animal study. The long term goal of this study is to reduce migration encounter after graft deployment and to reduce secondary interventions of EVAR especially for older patients who are unfit for open surgical treatment.

  11. Mechanical Interaction of an Expanding Coiled Stent with a Plaque-Containing Arterial Wall: A Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Welch, Tré R; Eberhart, Robert C; Banerjee, Subhash; Chuong, Cheng-Jen

    2016-03-01

    Wall injury is observed during stent expansion within atherosclerotic arteries, related in part to stimulation of the inflammatory process. Wall stress and strain induced by stent expansion can be closely examined by finite element analysis (FEA), thus shedding light on procedure-induced sources of inflammation. The purpose of this work was to use FEA to examine the interaction of a coiled polymer stent with a plaque-containing arterial wall during stent expansion. An asymmetric fibrotic plaque-containing arterial wall model was created from intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images of a diseased artery. A 3D model for a coil stent at unexpanded state was generated in SolidWorks. They were imported into ANSYS for FEA of combined stent expansion and fibrotic plaque-distortion. We simulated the stent expansion in the plaqued lumen by increasing balloon pressure from 0 to 12 atm in 1 atm step. At increasing pressure, we examined how the expanding stent exerts forces on the fibrotic plaque and vascular wall components, and how the latter collectively resist and balance the expansive forces from the stent. Results show the expanding coiled stent creates high stresses within the plaque and the surrounding fibrotic capsule. Lower stresses were observed in adjacent medial and adventitial layers. High principal strains were observed in plaque and fibrotic capsule. The results suggest fibrotic capsule rupture might occur at localized regions. The FEA/IVUS method can be adapted for routine examination of the effects of the expansion of selected furled stents against IVUS-reconstructed diseased vessels, to improve stent deployment practices.

  12. Percutaneous cholangioscopy in obstructed biliary metal stents

    SciTech Connect

    Hausegger, Klaus A.; Mischinger, Hans J.; Karaic, Radenko; Klein, Guenther E.; Kugler, Cristian; Kern, Robert; Uggowitzer, Martin; Szolar, Dieter

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To reevaluate the reasons for the occlusion of self-expanding biliary metal stents, on the basis of cholangioscopic findings. Methods. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) was performed in 15 patients with obstructed biliary Wallstents. The reason for stent insertion was a malignant obstruction in 14 patients; 1 had a benign biliary stricture. Conventional noncovered stents had been inserted in 12 patients; in 3 cases a polyurethane-covered prototype Wallstent had been used. Stent occlusions occurred after 1-55 months. PTCS was performed with a 2.3-mm endoscope through an 11 Fr sheath. Biopsies were taken via the working channel of the endoscope. Results. In all patients with noncovered stents the inner surface of the stent was highly irregular with seaweed-like protrusions (biopsy-proven granulation tissue). Stent incorporation varied from absent (n=1) to subtotal (n=8), but was always incomplete, no matter how long the stent had been in place. Tumor ingrowth was histologically proven in 2 patients. One patient had a large occluding concrement at the proximal end of the stent. In patients with covered stents, the inner surface appeared more regular; however, viable granulation tissue was found inside two stents and tumor ingrowth in one of them. Conclusion. PTCS showed that incorporation of the stent is virtually always incomplete. The factors contributing most to stent occlusion are the buildup of granulation tissue, bile sludge, and tumor overgrowth. Stone formation and tumor ingrowth can also be important, although less common causes of occlusion. A polyurethane stent covering could not prevent tumor ingrowth in one patient and the buildup of viable granulation tissue inside the stent in two further patients; mean stent patency in the three patients with such a stent was 3 months.

  13. Development of a dynamic in vitro model of a stented blood vessel to evaluate the effects of stent strut material selection and surface coating on smooth muscle cell response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, Bradley Huegh

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in The United States and Europe, accounting for approximately half of all deaths. The most common form of cardiovascular disease is atherosclerosis, which is characterized by the formation of fatty atheromatous plaques that can grow to occlude the vessel lumen, thus causing ischemia distal to the occlusion. This is commonly treated using balloon angioplasty, which is usually done in conjunction with the deployment of a stent. Stent deployment helps hold the vessel open following the local injury caused by balloon inflation and prevents elastic recoil and subsequent negative remodeling. Stenting has been shown to significantly reduce restenosis rates from approximately 20-50% without a stent to about 10-30% with stent deployment. However, restenosis still remains the main cause of long-term stent failure. In basic terms, a balloon angioplasty procedure is a forceful displacement of an atherosclerotic lesion serving to widen the vessel lumen to increase blood flow. This procedure causes stretching of the vessel wall, tears in the atherosclerotic plaques, and general damage to the vessel in turn signaling a complex cascade of thrombosis, inflammation, intimal thickening, and vascular remodeling. Stent deployment also further complicates the immunological response by triggering a foreign body response from the implantation of a biomaterial into the body. When performing an angioplasty procedure, particularly in conjunction with stent deployment, a certain degree of vascular injury is inevitable. However, the initial injury can be further complicated by the body's local reaction to the implanted biomaterial, the severity of which can ultimately dictate the degree of restenosis and subsequently affect procedural success. The proliferative response of VSMCs to the various afore mentioned stimuli results in the formation of often copious amounts of neointimal tissue, generally known as intimal hyperplasia. The

  14. Randomized clinical trial comparing abluminal biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents with durable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Xiangfei; Deng, Wei; Wang, Shenguo; Ge, Junbo; Toft, Egon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The biodegradable polymer drug-eluting stents (DES) were developed to improve vascular healing. However, further data and longer-term follow-up are needed to confirm safety and efficacy of these stents. This randomized clinical trial aimed to compare safety and efficacy of 2 sirolimus-eluting stents (SES): Cordimax—a novel abluminal biodegradable polymer SES and Cypher Select—a durable polymer SES, at 9 months angiographic and 5-year clinical follow-up. Methods: We randomized 402 patients with coronary artery disease to percutaneous coronary intervention with Cordimax (n = 202) or Cypher select (n = 200). Angiographic follow-up was performed at 9 months after the index procedure and clinical follow-up annually up to 5 years. The primary endpoint was angiographic in-stent late luminal loss (LLL). Secondary endpoints included angiographic restenosis rate, target vessel revascularization (TVR), and major adverse cardiac events (MACEs; defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or TVR) at 5-year follow-up. Results: Cordimax was noninferior to Cypher select for in-stent LLL (0.25 ± 0.47 vs 0.18 ± 0.49 mm; P = 0.587) and in-stent mean diameter stenosis (22.19 ± 12.21% vs 19.89 ± 10.79%; P = 0.064) at 9 months angiographic follow-up. The MACE rates were not different at 1 year (5.9% vs 4.0%, P = 0.376); however, MACE rates from 2 to 5 years were lower in the Cordimax group (6.8% vs 13.1%; P = 0.039). Conclusion: Abluminal biodegradable polymer SES is noninferior to durable polymer SES at 9-month angiographic and 1-year clinical follow-up. However, MACE rates from 2 to 5 years were less in the abluminal biodegradable polymer group. PMID:27661023

  15. Forgotten Reminders: an Experience with Managing 28 Forgotten Double-J Stents and Management of Related Complications.

    PubMed

    Sohrab, Arora; Aneesh, Srivastava; Sureka, Sanjoy Kumar; Varun, Mittal; Nitesh, Patidar; Manoj, Kumar; Rakesh, Kapoor

    2015-12-01

    Combinations of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) and endourological and open surgery have been used for management of forgotten double-J (DJ) stents; however, there are only a few case reports or case series in literature. We present our experience of managing 28 cases of forgotten ureteric stents of whom three patients died because of complications after intervention. We retrospectively reviewed the hospital records of 28 cases of forgotten DJ stents from 2000 to 2013. The details reviewed included indications for stent placement, indwelling time, presenting complaints, laboratory, radiographic, nuclear scan findings, management techniques, and complications. Extensive review of literature was done. Mean patient age was 37.7 ± 14 years. Mean indwelling time was 102.9 months. The commonest presenting complaints were irritative voiding symptoms and hematuria. Nineteen (67.8 %) of the stents were complicated. The complicated stents were managed by a combination of endourological techniques and ESWL. Six (21.5 %) patients presented with renal failure. Three patients died of complications. Forgotten DJ stent can be a lethal yet entirely preventable complication. Preoperative imaging with a noncontrast CT is essential especially in long indwelling time, especially to evaluate stone burden at the upper end of the stent. A stepwise approach should be used for management. Where long operative times are expected, the procedure must be staged. Combined endourological procedures are almost always successful in managing these challenging cases.

  16. Endoscopic management of unresectable malignant gastroduodenal obstruction with a nitinol uncovered metal stent: A prospective Japanese multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Reina; Sakai, Yuji; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Nishikawa, Takao; Fujimoto, Tatsuya; Mikami, Shigeru; Sugiyama, Harutoshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the safety and efficacy of endoscopic duodenal stent placement in patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction. METHODS: This prospective, observational, multicenter study included 39 consecutive patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction. All patients underwent endoscopic placement of a nitinol, uncovered, self-expandable metal stent. The primary outcome was clinical success at 2 wk after stent placement that was defined as improvement in the Gastric Outlet Obstruction Scoring System score relative to the baseline. RESULTS: Technical success was achieved in all duodenal stent procedures. Procedure-related complications occurred in 4 patients (10.3%) in the form of mild pneumonitis. No other morbidities or mortalities were observed. The clinical success rate was 92.3%. The mean survival period after stent placement was 103 d. The mean period of stent patency was 149 d and the patency remained acceptable for the survival period. Stent dysfunction occurred in 3 patients (7.7%) on account of tumor growth. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic management using duodenal stents for patients with incurable malignant gastric outlet obstruction is safe and improved patients’ quality of life. PMID:27076769

  17. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  18. Evolution of covered stents in the contemporary era: clinical application, materials and manufacturing strategies using nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Farhatnia, Yasmin; Tan, Aaron; Motiwala, Aamir; Cousins, Brian G; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular stents have revolutionised the field of interventional cardiology. Despite their excellent clinical outcome complications associated with percutaneous stent implantation following the procedure have remained a major drawback in their widespread use. To overcome such limitations, a number of novel endovascular stents have emerged including a covered stent wrapped in a thin membrane sleeve. As well as prevention of complications associated with stenting, covered stents owing to their physical barrier are used as the treatment option of choice for trauma devices during emergency situations and to treat a number of pathological disease states. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with an overall objective outlook in the use of covered stents as a treatment option in a number of vascular complications and addresses their design and materials used in the manufacturing process. In addition, new strategies are highlighted and future prospects with the emergence of novel smart alloys for 3D scaffolds and the use of nanotechnology in the development of nanocomposite materials. PMID:23305892

  19. Role of adjunct pharmacologic therapy in the era of drug-eluting stents.

    PubMed

    Douglas, John S

    2005-12-15

    The success of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has historically been limited by a relatively high rate of restenosis, a response of the coronary artery to trauma induced during PCI. Bare-metal stents, by providing a supportive intravascular scaffolding, have significantly reduced the incidence of restenosis compared with traditional balloon PCI. However, significant loss of lumen within the bare-metal device (in-stent restenosis) occurs in 10-30% of patients within 6 months of the procedure. The recent introduction of drug-eluting stents, permitting local delivery of high concentrations of immunosuppressive or anti-proliferative agents, promises to prevent the processes underlying restenosis. Although these devices have been successful in providing an incremental reduction in rates of restenosis, they are expensive. To date, clinical trials of pharmacologic treatment have failed to demonstrate a clinically significant impact on restenosis. Recently, results of the Cilostazol for Restenosis (CREST) trial, a randomized, double-blind study, show that cilostazol reduces the risk of restenosis in patients who receive bare-metal stents, including high-risk patients. Effective adjunct pharmacologic therapy to prevent in-stent restenosis, therefore, remains desirable, particularly in patients receiving bare-metal stents, and potentially in patients receiving drug-eluting stents who are at high risk for restenosis (i.e., those with diabetes, long lesions, and small vessels).

  20. Shortening and Migration of Wallstents after Stenting of Central Venous Stenoses in Hemodialysis Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Verstandig, Anthony G.; Bloom, Allan I.; Sasson, Talia; Haviv, Y.S.; Rubinger, D.

    2003-02-15

    Purpose: To report our results for the placement of central venous stents in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Methods: Ten Wallstents (Schneider,Buelach, Switzerland) were placed in 10 patients with shunt thrombosis, shunt dysfunction or arm swelling associated with central vein stenosis or occlusion. Technical success, patency and complications were evaluated. Results: Stent deployment was successful in all cases. In seven cases (70%) there was significant delayed stent shortening. In two of these cases there was also stent migration. All these cases required additional stents.Primary patency rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 66%, 25% and 0.Twenty-three additional procedures (percutaneous transluminal angioplasty or stenting) were required to achieve secondary patency rates at 6, 12 and 24 months of 100%, 75% and 57%. Conclusion: Stent placement in the central veins of dialysis patients has a high technical success rate resulting in symptomatic relief and preservation of access. Repeat interventions are required to maintain patency. Significant delayed shortening of the Wallstent occurred in 70% of patients which may have affected the patency rates.Strategies are suggested to avoid this problem.

  1. Usefulness of biodegradable polydioxanone stents in the treatment of postsurgical colorectal strictures and fistulas.

    PubMed

    Pérez Roldán, F; González Carro, P; Villafáñez García, M C; Aoufi Rabih, S; Legaz Huidobro, M L; Sánchez-Manjavacas Múñoz, N; Roncero García-Escribano, O; Ynfante Ferrús, M; Bernardos Martín, E; Ruiz Carrillo, F

    2012-03-01

    Benign colonic strictures and fistulas are a growing problem presenting most commonly after bowel resection. Standard treatment is with endoscopic bougies or, more usually, balloon dilation. When these approaches are not successful, other solutions are available and different endoscopic and surgical approaches have been used to treat fistulas. We present an additional option--biodegradable stents--for the treatment of colonic strictures and fistulas that have proven refractory to other endoscopic interventions. We analyzed the results from 10 patients with either a postsurgical colorectal stricture (n =7) or rectocutaneous fistula (n =3) treated with the biodegradable SX-ELLA esophageal stent (covered or uncovered). Stents were successfully placed in nine patients, although early migration subsequently occurred in one. Placement was impossible in one patient due to deformity of the area and the fact that the stricture was approximately 30cm from the anus. The fistulas were successfully closed in all patients, although symptoms reappeared in one patient. In the six patients who received stents for strictures, symptoms resolved in five; in the remaining patient, the stent migrated shortly after the endoscopy. Treatment of colonic strictures and rectocutaneous fistulas with biodegradable stents is an effective alternative in the short-to-medium term. The stent does not have to be removed and is subject to very few complications. The drawbacks of this approach are the need to repeat the procedure in some patients and the lack of published series on efficacy.

  2. The Development of Carotid Stent Material

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongsheng; Liu, Wenhua; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular angioplasty with stenting is a promising option for treating carotid artery stenosis. There exist a rapidly increasing number of different stent types with different materials. The bare-metal stent is the most commonly used stent with acceptable results, but it leaves us with the problems of thrombosis and restenosis. The drug-eluting stent is a breakthrough as it has the ability to reduce the restenosis rate, but the problem of late thrombosis still has to be addressed. The biodegradable stent disappears after having served its function. However, restenosis and degradation rates remain to be studied. In this article, we review every stent material with its characteristics, clinical results and complications and point out the standards of an ideal carotid stent. PMID:26019710

  3. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting; CAS; Angioplasty - carotid artery; Carotid artery stenosis - angioplasty; ... Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is done using a small surgical cut. Your surgeon will make a surgical cut ...

  4. Effectiveness of medical treatment in overcoming the ureteral double-J stent related symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuyumcuoglu, Ugur; Eryildirim, Bilal; Tuncer, Murat; Faydaci, Gokhan; Tarhan, Fatih; Ozgül, Aydin

    2012-01-01

    Background: We investigated whether the frequency of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) increased in patients in whom double-J stents were applied. We also evaluated several medical therapy protocols to treat symptoms related with ureteral stents. Materials and Methods: A total of 108 patients, in whom unilateral double-j stent was applied during ureteral stone treatment, were included. Before the double-J stent was applied, all patients completed storage components of the “International Prostate Symptom Score” (IPSSs), quality of life components of the IPSS (IPSS-QOL) and “Overactive Bladder Questionnaire” (OABq) forms and scores were calculated. After the procedure, cases were randomized into 5 groups, an antiinflammatory was given to Group 1, spasmolytic to Group 2, anticholinergic to Group 3 and α-blocker to Group 4. No additional drug was given to Group 5 as this control group. During the fourth week of the procedure, IPSSs, IPSS-QOL and OABq forms were again completed and scores were compared with the previous ones. Results: When all the cases were evaluated, the IPSSs, IPSS-QOL and OABq scores of patients in whom the double-J stent was applied were statistically significantly higher the procedure. Compared to the control group, the cases where the double-J stent was applied showed a higher IPSSs, IPSS-QOL and OABq scores and none of the medical therapies could prevent this increase. Interpretation: The frequency of LUTS increased in cases where the ureteral stent was applied and discomfort continued as long as the stent stayed in the body. PMID:21914427

  5. A Safe Method of Tracheal Polyflex Stent Placement: A Review of 20 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pejhan, Saviz; Javaherzadeh, Mojtaba; Daneshvar, Abolghasem; Farzanegan, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgery is an appropriate therapeutic approach for tracheal stenosis due to various benign and malignant conditions. When surgery is postponed for certain reasons, other options are chosen for airway patency. One alternative is using airway stents. Objectives: We aimed to introduce a safe method of tracheal polyflex stent placement in patients with tracheal stenoses. Patients and Methods: During a 7-year period (2002 - 2008), polyflex stents were used 29 times among 20 patients for various indications. After encountering many difficulties in earlier cases, we gradually developed our new method and used it in most of our patients. In this method, without using large rigid bronchoscopes, the introducer tube could be used as a bronchoscope with the aid of a zero-degree lens and ventilating apparatus. In this method, the rate of possible trauma to the airway can be minimized by avoiding the use of thick rigid bronchoscopies and the stent can be placed faster and more accurately. Results: Polyflex stents were used in 11 men (55%) and 9 women with a mean age of 38.5 years. Stents were removed and changed in 12 cases and replaced with another type of stent in 3 patients. Indications were recurrence of tracheal stenosis (7), multisegmental tracheal stenosis (3), anesthesia limitations (3), tracheal tumors (2), dehiscence of tracheal anastomosis (1), severe inflammation of the tracheal mucosa (1), esophagobronchial fistula (1), and external pressure on the left main bronchus (1). In one patient, a stent was used to open a kinked Dumon stent as a temporary life-saving procedure. We found 6 cases of stent migration, 3 cases of granulation tissue formation, 1 case of infection, and 1 case of surgical site dehiscence. Conclusions: Stents would be regarded as a temporary means of reaching the ideal condition for resection and reconstruction in most patients with tracheal stenoses. Although an optimal stent has not been introduced yet, we used polyflex stents in most

  6. Impact of Stent Design on In-Stent Stenosis in a Rabbit Iliac Artery Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M. Grenacher, L.; Stampfl, U.; Arnegger, F. U.; Rehnitz, C.; Thierjung, H.; Stampfl, S.; Berger, I.; Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of stent design on in-stent stenosis in rabbit iliac arteries. Four different types of stent were implanted in rabbit iliac arteries, being different in stent design (crown or wave) and strut thickness (50 or 100 {mu}m). Ten stents of each type were implanted. Each animal received one crown and one wave stent with the same strut thickness. Follow-up was either 12 weeks (n = 10 rabbits) or 24 weeks (n = 10 rabbits). Primary study end points were angiographic and microscopic in-stent stenosis. Secondary study end points were vessel injury, vascular inflammation, and stent endothelialization. Average stent diameter, relative stent overdilation, average and minimal luminal diameter, and relative average and maximum luminal loss were not significantly different. However, a trend to higher relative stent overdilation was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents. A trend toward higher average and minimal luminal diameter and lower relative average and maximum luminal loss was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents with a strut thickness of 100 {mu}m. Neointimal height, relative luminal area stenosis, injury score, inflammation score, and endothelialization score were not significantly different. However, a trend toward higher neointimal height was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents with a strut thickness of 50 {mu}m and a follow-up of 24 weeks. In conclusion, in this study, crown stents seem to trigger neointima. However, the optimized radial force might equalize the theoretically higher tendency for restenosis in crown stents. In this context, also more favorable positive remodeling in crown stents could be important.

  7. Metallic stent in the endoscopic treatment of pancreatic fluid collections

    PubMed Central

    Tozlu, M.; Kocaman, O.; Baysal, B.; Ince, A.; Danalioglu, A.; Kayar, Y.; Senturk, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: The endoscopic treatment of pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) has become the preferred first-line approach. Fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMS) were considered as an alternative to multiple double pigtail stents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of the endosonography guided drainage (EUS-GD) of PFCs with FCEMS. Materials and Methods: A total of 33 consecutive patients were included. Cystogastrostomy and cystoduodenostomy were created with a linear echoendoscope under endosonographic and fluoroscopic control. Procedures were performed in a standard way of, puncture with a 19 gauge needle, bougie dilation and insertion of FCSEMS. Results: A total of 33 patients (mean age 52 years, 21 men, range: 18-77 years), were included. PFCs were 22 non-infected symptomatic pseudocyst and 11 walled-off necrosis or abscess. EUS-GD was successful in 30 (90.9%) patients. Stent insertion failed in one patient. Two patients needed surgery. Complications were observed in 8 (25%) patients (stent dislocation in 3, perforation in 2, bleeding in 2 and pneumoperitoneum in 1 patient). Procedure related mortality was not seen. The mean cyst size was 11.3 cm (5-22). FCSEMS were successful in the treatment of pseudocysts (after 1 month mean cyst size is 6.2 cm, range: 0-15 cm, with 54.8% decrement rate). During a mean follow-up of 15 months complete resolution was 66.6% (20 patients) and recurrence due to stent malfunction was 10%. All these cases were submitted to a new session of endoscopic drainage. Conclusions: EUS-GD, FCSEMS insertion provides an effective, minimally invasive, and safe approach in the management of PFCs. PMID:26425505

  8. Fluid mechanics in stented arterial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, S. I.; Totorean, A.; Bosioc, A.; Crainic, N.; Hudrea, C.; Bernad, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    Local hemodynamic factors are known affect the natural history of the restenosis critically after coronary stenting of atherosclerosis. Stent-induced flows disturbance magnitude dependent directly on the strut design. Strut shape, strut thickness and the distance between consecutive struts have been associated clinically with the with post-intervention clinical outcomes. Hemodynamically favorable designs according to computational modeling can reduced in-stent restenosis after coronary stenting intervention.

  9. Repositioning of Covered Stents: The Grip Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, John Martin; Guo Xiaofeng; Midia, Mehran

    2011-06-15

    Introduction: Retrieval and repositioning of a stent deployed beyond its intended target region may be a difficult technical challenge. Materials and Methods: A balloon-mounted snare technique, a variant of the coaxial loop snare technique, is described. Results: The technique is described for the repositioning of a covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent and a covered biliary stent. Conclusion: The balloon-mounted snare technique is a useful technique for retrieval of migrated stents.

  10. A Comprehensive Review of Esophageal Stents

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jinwha; Lam-Tsai, Yvette; Gress, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal stents are important tools for palliative treatment of inoperable esophageal malignancies. With the development of multiple self-expandable stents, there are now several therapeutic options for managing benign and malignant esophageal diseases. This paper discusses the various types of esophageal stents currently available, indications for their placement, challenges and complications that gastroenterologists face when placing these stents, and some of the innovations that will become available in the near future. PMID:23293566

  11. Knotted stents: Case report and outcome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha Na; Hwang, Hokyeong

    2015-01-01

    A knotted ureteral stent is an extremely rare condition, with fewer than 20 cases reported in the literature; however, it is difficult to treat. We report a case in which a folded Terumo guidewire was successfully used to remove a knotted stent percutaneously without anesthesia. We also review the current literature on predisposing factors and management strategies for knotted ureteral stents. PMID:25964843

  12. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  13. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  14. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  15. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  16. Mechanical properties of different airway stents.

    PubMed

    Ratnovsky, Anat; Regev, Noa; Wald, Shaily; Kramer, Mordechai; Naftali, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Airway stents improve pulmonary function and quality of life in patients suffering from airway obstruction. The aim of this study was to compare main types of stents (silicone, balloon-dilated metal, self-expanding metal, and covered self-expanding metal) in terms of their mechanical properties and the radial forces they exert on the trachea. Mechanical measurements were carried out using a force gauge and specially designed adaptors fabricated in our lab. Numerical simulations were performed for eight different stent geometries, inserted into trachea models. The results show a clear correlation between stent diameter (oversizing) and the levels of stress it exerts on the trachea. Compared with uncovered metal stents, metal stents that are covered with less stiff material exert significantly less stress on the trachea while still maintaining strong contact with it. The use of such stents may reduce formation of mucosa necrosis and fistulas while still preventing stent migration. Silicone stents produce the lowest levels of stress, which may be due to weak contact between the stent and the trachea and can explain their propensity for migration. Unexpectedly, stents made of the same materials exerted different stresses due to differences in their structure. Stenosis significantly increases stress levels in all stents.

  17. Rotational Atherectomy of Three Overlapping Stent Layers.

    PubMed

    Frisoli, Tiberio M; Friedman, Harold; O'Neill, William W

    2016-09-01

    A patient was referred to us for Canadian Cardiovascular Society class III refractory angina. He was found to have in-stent restenosis within three layers of underexpanded stents implanted in 2004, 2011, and 2014. Rotational atherectomy safely yielded stent strut ablation (reduced to one layer), lesion expansion, and very good angiographic and physiologic results. PMID:27591692

  18. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  19. Therapies targeting inflammation after stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Okura, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Since the introduction of coronary vessel scaffold by metallic stent, percutaneous coronary intervention has become widely performed all over the world. Although drug-eluting stent technology has further decrease the incidence of in-stent restenosis, there still remaining issues related to stent implantation. Vessel inflammation is one of the causes that may be related to stent restenosis as well as stent thrombosis. Therefore, systemic therapies targeting inflammation emerged as adjunctive pharmacological intervention to improve outcome. Statins, corticosteroids, antiplatelets, and immunosuppresive or anti-cancer drugs are reported to favorably impact outcome after bare-metal stent implantation. In type 2 diabetic patients, pioglitazone may be the most promising drug that can lower neointimal proliferation and, as a result, lower incidence of restenosis and target lesion revascularization. On the other hand, several new stent platforms that might decrease inflammatory response after drug-eluting stent implantation have been introduced. Because durable polymer used in the first generation drug-eluting stents are recognized to be responsible for unfavorable vessel response, biocompatible or bioabsorbable polymer has been introduce and already used clinically. Furthermore, polymer-free drug-eluting stent and bioresorbable scaffold are under investigation. Although vessel inflammation may be reduced by using these new drug-eluting stents or scaffold, long-term impact needs to be investigated further. PMID:23905635

  20. Hemodynamics in coronary arteries with overlapping stents.

    PubMed

    Rikhtegar, Farhad; Wyss, Christophe; Stok, Kathryn S; Poulikakos, Dimos; Müller, Ralph; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-01-22

    Coronary artery stenosis is commonly treated by stent placement via percutaneous intervention, at times requiring multiple stents that may overlap. Stent overlap is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcome. While changes in local blood flow are suspected to play a role therein, hemodynamics in arteries with overlapping stents remain poorly understood. In this study we analyzed six cases of partially overlapping stents, placed ex vivo in porcine left coronary arteries and compared them to five cases with two non-overlapping stents. The stented vessel geometries were obtained by micro-computed tomography of corrosion casts. Flow and shear stress distribution were calculated using computational fluid dynamics. We observed a significant increase in the relative area exposed to low wall shear stress (WSS<0.5 Pa) in the overlapping stent segments compared both to areas without overlap in the same samples, as well as to non-overlapping stents. We further observed that the configuration of the overlapping stent struts relative to each other influenced the size of the low WSS area: positioning of the struts in the same axial location led to larger areas of low WSS compared to alternating struts. Our results indicate that the overlap geometry is by itself sufficient to cause unfavorable flow conditions that may worsen clinical outcome. While stent overlap cannot always be avoided, improved deployment strategies or stent designs could reduce the low WSS burden.

  1. Endoluminal stenting of obstructed colorectal tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Boorman, P.; Soonawalla, Z.; Sathananthan, N.; MacFarlane, P.; Parker, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    A series of patients were selected to evaluate the clinical efficacy of a new self expanding metallic endoprosthesis in the management of left-sided colonic obstruction. The aim was to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with the surgical management of patients with distal colonic obstruction. Six patients with complete sigmoid colon obstruction were managed with the Wallstent Enteral Endoprosthesis [Schneider (USA) Inc.]. Four underwent subsequent elective colonic resection, while two were placed for palliation. Stent placement was successful in all cases with resulting bowel decompression and there were no procedural complications. All four patients with resectable tumours avoided emergency surgery. Stenting allowed time for medical improvement and staging investigations in this group. Two patients with advanced metastatic colonic carcinoma were successfully palliated. We found the Wallstent Enteral Endoprosthesis to be safe and effective in relieving obstruction in patients with resectable colonic tumours, permitting elective surgery and avoiding a temporary stoma. It can also be used to palliate those patients with advanced disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:10615192

  2. Prospective, randomized study of one, two, or three trabecular bypass stents in open-angle glaucoma subjects on topical hypotensive medication

    PubMed Central

    Katz, L Jay; Erb, Carl; Carceller, Guillamet Amadeu; Fea, Antonio M; Voskanyan, Lilit; Wells, Jeffrey M; Giamporcaro, Jane Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the safety and efficacy of one, two, or three trabecular microbypass stents in eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma (OAG) not controlled on ocular hypotensive medication. A total of 119 subjects were followed for 18 months postoperatively. Materials and methods Subjects with medicated intraocular pressure (IOP) 18–30 mmHg and postmedication-washout baseline IOP 22–38 mmHg were randomized to implantation of one, two, or three stents. Ocular hypotensive medication was to be used if postoperative IOP exceeded 18 mmHg. Results A total of 38 subjects were implanted with one stent, 41 subjects with two stents, and 40 subjects with three stents. Both month 12 IOP reduction ≥20% without ocular hypotensive medication vs baseline unmedicated IOP and month 12 unmedicated IOP ≤18 mmHg were achieved by 89.2%, 90.2%, and 92.1% of one-, two-, and three-stent eyes, respectively. Furthermore, 64.9%, 85.4%, and 92.1% of the three respective groups achieved unmedicated IOP ≤15 mmHg. Over the 18-month follow-up period, medication was required in seven one-stent subjects, four two-stent subjects, and three three-stent subjects. At 18 months, mean unmedicated IOP was 15.9±0.9 mmHg in one-stent subjects, 14.1±1.0 mmHg in two-stent subjects, and 12.2±1.1 mmHg in three-stent subjects. Month 18 IOP reduction was significantly greater (P<0.001) with implantation of each additional stent, with mean differences in reduction of 1.84 mmHg (95% confidence interval 0.96–2.73) for three-stent vs two-stent groups and 1.73 mmHg (95% confidence interval 0.83–2.64) for two-stent vs one-stent groups. Adverse events through 18 months were limited to cataract progression with best-corrected visual acuity loss and subsequent cataract surgery. Conclusion In this series, implantation of each additional stent resulted in significantly greater IOP reduction with reduced medication use. Titratability of stents as a sole procedure was shown to be effective and safe, with

  3. The virtual histology intravascular ultrasound appearance of newly placed drug-eluting stents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Wook; Mintz, Gary S; Hong, Young-Joon; Pakala, Rajbabu; Park, Kyung-Sook; Pichard, Augusto D; Satler, Lowell F; Kent, Kenneth M; Suddath, William O; Waksman, Ron; Weissman, Neil J

    2008-11-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is used before and after intervention and at follow-up to assess the quality of the acute result as well as the long-term effects of stent implantation. Virtual histology (VH) IVUS classifies tissue into fibrous and fibrofatty plaque, dense calcium, and necrotic core. Although most interventional procedures include stent implantation, VH IVUS classification of stent metal has not been validated. In this study, the VH IVUS appearance of acutely implanted stents was assessed in 27 patients (30 lesions). Most stent struts (80%) appeared white (misclassified as "calcium") surrounded by red (misclassified as "necrotic core"); 2% appeared just white, and 17% were not detectable (compared with grayscale IVUS because of the software-imposed gray medial stripe). The rate of "white surrounded by red" was similar over the lengths of the stents; however, undetectable struts were mostly at the distal edges (31%). Quantitatively, including the struts within the regions of interest increased the amount of "calcium" from 0.23 +/- 0.35 to 1.07 +/- 0.66 mm(2) (p <0.0001) and the amount of "necrotic core" from 0.59 +/- 0.65 to 1.31 +/- 0.87 mm(2) (p <0.0001). Most important, because this appearance occurs acutely, it is an artifact, and the red appearance should not be interpreted as peristrut inflammation or necrotic core when it is seen at follow-up. In conclusion, acutely implanted stents have an appearance that can be misclassified by VH IVUS as "calcium with or without necrotic core." It is important not to overinterpret VH IVUS studies of chronically implanted stents when this appearance is observed at follow-up. A separate classification for stent struts is necessary to avoid these misconceptions and misclassifications.

  4. Non-polymeric coatings to control drug release from metallic coronary stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Celia Edith Macias

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angiography (PTCA) is a procedure used to re-open narrowed coronary arteries. During PTCA, a coronary stent is expanded inside a diseased vessel and serves as a scaffold to keep the artery open. The major drawback of stenting is restenosis---a re-narrowing of the vessel resulting from the hyperproliferation of smooth muscle cells. Drug eluting stents (DES) reduce the rate of restenosis compared to bare metal stents. Paclitaxel (PAT) is commonly used in DES for its ability to prevent restenosis. However, DES have been associated with thrombosis due to the polymer carrier that controls drug delivery. Therefore, there is a need to change the drug delivery mechanisms to eliminate the need of polymers. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a novel polymer-free drug eluting stent that controls drug release using nanoscale metal coatings. The coating was designed to release PAT as the metal slowly degrades in biological conditions. Once all the Paclitaxel has eluted from the surface, the coating will continue to degrade until the final result is a bare metal stent. The results of this study include a novel non-polymeric drug delivery system using nanoscale coatings that release Paclitaxel at a rate similar to commercial stents, as well as the biocompatibility and efficacy of these coatings. The non-polymeric drug delivery system described here achieved a Paclitaxel release profile equivalent to clinically available Paclitaxel-eluting stents and effectively inhibits smooth muscle cell proliferation, thereby completely eliminating the need for polymers to control drug release from coronary stents.

  5. Percutaneous coronary angioscopy and stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuser, Richard R.

    1994-05-01

    With the expanding array of therapies available for coronary intervention, the invasive cardiologist has many choices for treating a specific lesion in an individual patient. Certain types of lesions might respond more effectively with stents, particularly the rigid Palmax- Schatz device. Thrombus and dissection immediately following stent placement are associated with early occlusion, and the interventionist must be able to assess their presence pre- and post-stenting. Angiography is deficient in quantifying minimal disease and in defining lesion architecture and composition, as well as the plaque rupture and thrombosis associated with unstable angina. It is also imprecise in detecting dissection and thrombus. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) provides high-resolution images that delineate irregularities and other structures inside the lumen and within the vessel wall and surrounding tissues. Like angiography, IVUS has limited specificity for thrombus differentiation. Angioscopy is superior to angiography and IVUS in detecting thrombus and dissection. Angioscopy allows the clinician to assess the appearance of stent struts after deployment and at follow-up. This may aid in reducing acute complications as well as restenosis. Follow-up angioscopy of stents to detect thrombus or exposed struts may guide therapy in a patient who has clinical symptoms of restenosis.

  6. Changes in the Distribution of Hepatic Arterial Blood Flow Following TIPS with Uncovered Stent and Stent-Graft: An Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Keussen, Inger; Song, Ho-Young; Bajc, Marika; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2002-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate changes in distribution of hepatic arterial blood flow in the liver following insertion of an uncovered stent and subsequently a stent-graft in the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) channel.Methods: The experiments were performed in eight healthy pigs under general anesthesia. In a pilot study in one pig, scintigraphic evaluation of arterial perfusion to the liver was done before and after inflation of a balloon in the right hepatic vein. In the other pigs, outflow from the right liver vein was checked repeatedly by contrast injection through a percutaneously inserted catheter. The arterial perfusion through the liver was examined by scintigraphy, following selective injection of macro-aggregate of 99Tcm-labeled human serum albumin 99Tcm-HSA) into the hepatic artery. This examination was done before and after creation of a TIPS with an uncovered stent and subsequently after insertion of a covered stent-graft into the cranial portion of the shunt channel. Results: In the pilot study changes in the arterial perfusion to the liver were easily detectable by scintigraphy. One pig died during the procedure and another pig was excluded due to dislodgement of the hepatic artery catheter. The inserted covered stent obstructed venous outflow from part of the right liver lobe. The 99Tcm-HSA activity in this part remained unchanged after TIPS creation with an uncovered stent. A reduction in activity was seen after insertion of a stent-graft (p0.06).Conclusion: The distribution of the hepaticarterial blood flow is affected by creation of a TIPS with a stent-graft, in the experimental pig model.

  7. Clinical Results of Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty and Stenting for Intracranial Vertebrobasilar Atherosclerotic Stenoses and Occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Tsuura, M.; Terada, T.; Masuo, O.; Tsumoto, T.; Yamaga, H.; Itakura, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Hyoutani, G.; Hayashi, S.

    2004-01-01

    Summary Eighteen patients with intracranial vertebrobasilar stenosis and occlusion were treated by PTA or stenting. In 11 of 18 cases, only PTA was performed and in seven of 18 cases, we used stents. The mean stenosis before and after PTA/stenting was 82.8% and 22.3%, respectively. In 11 cases of PTA only, the stenotic rate decreased from 81.8% to 29.6%, while 85.0% of the stenotic rate remarkably reduced to 6.0% in seven cases of stenting. The 30 days morbidity and 30 days mortality rate were 5.5% and 5.5%, respectively. There was only one haemorrhagic complication (cerebellar haemorrhage) in cases of stenting, and no ischemic events during or after the procedures. Restenosis (more than 50% stenosis) occurred in four of 18 cases(22.2%) during mean follow-up period of 12 months. Two patients with VA occlusion before treatment, developed restenosis and reocclusion. Complete total occlusion seems to be a high-risk lesion and strict follow-up is required. In this study, PTA/stenting for intracranial vertebrobasilar artery stenosis or occlusion is an effective treatment, but strict indications may be required because procedure-related 30 days morbidity rate was 5.5% in addition to unclear natural history. PMID:20587244

  8. Aortic Stent-Graft Infection Following Septic Complications of a Kidney Stone

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, H. Rogier van den Leijdekkers, Vanessa J.; Vahl, Anco

    2006-06-15

    A 73-year-old man was treated because of a renal pelvis blowout of the left kidney for which he received a nephrostomy catheter without antibiotic prophylaxis. Almost a year previously this patient had undergone endovascular repair of a symptomatic infrarenal abdominal aorta aneurysm. Four weeks after the diagnosis and treatment of the ruptured renal pelvis, a new computed tomography scan and ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the diagnosis of infected aortic stent-graft. An extra-anatomic axillo-uniiliac bypass and graft excision was performed. Two weeks after discharge the patient returned to the hospital with an occlusion of his left renal artery and died of renal failure. This is the first time an infected aortic stent-graft after a renal pelvis blowout has been reported. Although infections of aortic stent-grafts occur rarely, one should be aware of the possibility in aortic stent-graft patients undergoing abdominal procedures without antibiotic prophylaxis.

  9. Venous Covered Stent: Successful Occlusion of a Symptomatic Internal Iliac Arteriovenous Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, P.; McPherson, S.; Meaney, J.F.; Mavor, A.

    2002-08-15

    We report the placement of a covered stent within the internal iliac vein (IIV) to occlude a symptomatic iatrogenic internal iliac arteriovenous fistula following an abdominal aortic graft. Angiography revealed a direct communication between an internal iliac graft to artery anastomosis and the right IIV with rapid shunting into the inferior vena cava and a small associated pseudoaneurysm. Femoral, brachial or axillary arterial access was precluded. The fistula was successfully occluded by a stent-graft placed in the IIV. Arteriovenous fistula can be treated in a number of ways including covered stent placement on the arterial side. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time placement in a vein has been described. Where access is difficult or the procedure carries a high risk of complication, avenous covered stent may offer an alternative.

  10. Inadvertent Stent Retriever Detachment: A Multicenter Case Series and Review of Device Experience FDA Reports

    PubMed Central

    Masoud, Hesham; Nguyen, Thanh N.; Martin, Coleman O.; Holloway, William E.; Ambekar, Sudheer; Yavagal, Dileep R.; Haussen, Diogo C.; Nogueira, Raul; Lozano, Diego J.; Puri, Ajit; Quateen, Ayman; Iancu, Daniela; Abraham, Michael G.; Chen, Michael; Mehta, Sonal; Malisch, Tim; Marden, Franklin; Novakovic, Robin; Roy, Daniel; Weill, Alain; Norbash, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical thrombectomy using retrievable stents or stent retriever devices has become the mainstay of intra-arterial therapy for acute ischemic stroke. The recent publication of a series of positive trials supporting intra-arterial therapy as standard of care for the treatment of large vessel occlusion will likely further increase stent retriever use. Rarely, premature stent detachment during thrombectomy may be encountered. In our multicenter case series, we found a rate of detachment of less than 1% (n = 7/1,067), and all were first-generation Solitaire FR devices. A review of the US Food and Drug Administration database of device experience yielded 90 individual adverse reports of detachment. There were 82, 1 and 7 detachments of Solitaire FR (first generation), Solitaire FR2 (second generation) and Trevo devices, respectively. We conclude with a brief overview of the technical and procedural considerations which may be helpful in avoiding this rare complication. PMID:27051402

  11. [Stent dilatation of pulmonary artery stenosis in the adult patient with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Benito, F; Oliver, J M

    2000-04-01

    Stents have been previously used to resolve stenoses of branch pulmonary arteries in children. We report 3 patients, with mean age of 22.7 +/- 4.7 years and pulmonary artery stenosis after palliative surgery in whom we implanted seven stents in four procedures. Six P308 Palmaz, overlapped two by two, were implanted by venous femoral approach in two patients, receiving four in the first case and the other two in the third case. In the second case, a NIR type stent was implanted through femoral artery in the right pulmonary artery. Stenosis diameter enlarged from 5.3 +/- 2.3 to 14.4 +/- 4.2 mm and the pressure gradient through stenosis fell from 40.6 +/- 15.3 to 6. 5 +/- 5 mmHg. All stents are well deployed and there are two patients waiting for total correction (previously not feasible) during a follow-up of 30.6 +/- 6.1 months.

  12. Endoscopic placement of pancreatic stents and drains in the management of pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kozarek, R A; Patterson, D J; Ball, T J; Traverso, L W

    1989-01-01

    Although widely used in the biliary tree, little data is available on endoscopic placement of stents or drains within the pancreas. This report describes 17 patients, nine with acute relapsing pancreatitis and eight with chronic pancreatitis, who had drain or stent placement for hypertensive pancreatic duct (PD) sphincter, dominant ductal stenosis, duct disruption, or pseudocyst. Two patients have subsequently undergone surgery, and six other patients continue long-term stent placement with marked reduction of chronic pain or attacks of recurrent pancreatitis. All six pseudocysts resolved, although one recurred and required surgery. It is concluded that pancreatic drains or stents may obviate the need for surgery, temporize before definitive therapy, or direct a subsequent surgical procedure. Images Figs. 1A and B. Figs. 2A-C. Figs. 2A-C. Fig. 3. Figs. 4A-D. Figs. 5A and B. PMID:2923512

  13. Inadvertent Stent Retriever Detachment: A Multicenter Case Series and Review of Device Experience FDA Reports.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Hesham; Nguyen, Thanh N; Martin, Coleman O; Holloway, William E; Ambekar, Sudheer; Yavagal, Dileep R; Haussen, Diogo C; Nogueira, Raul; Lozano, Diego J; Puri, Ajit; Quateen, Ayman; Iancu, Daniela; Abraham, Michael G; Chen, Michael; Mehta, Sonal; Malisch, Tim; Marden, Franklin; Novakovic, Robin; Roy, Daniel; Weill, Alain; Norbash, Alexander M

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical thrombectomy using retrievable stents or stent retriever devices has become the mainstay of intra-arterial therapy for acute ischemic stroke. The recent publication of a series of positive trials supporting intra-arterial therapy as standard of care for the treatment of large vessel occlusion will likely further increase stent retriever use. Rarely, premature stent detachment during thrombectomy may be encountered. In our multicenter case series, we found a rate of detachment of less than 1% (n = 7/1,067), and all were first-generation Solitaire FR devices. A review of the US Food and Drug Administration database of device experience yielded 90 individual adverse reports of detachment. There were 82, 1 and 7 detachments of Solitaire FR (first generation), Solitaire FR2 (second generation) and Trevo devices, respectively. We conclude with a brief overview of the technical and procedural considerations which may be helpful in avoiding this rare complication. PMID:27051402

  14. Real time assistance for stent positioning and assessment by self-initialized tracking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Terrence; Wang, Yu; Durlak, Peter; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    Detailed visualization of stents during their positioning and deployment is critical for the success of an interventional procedure. This paper presents a novel method that relies on balloon markers to enable real-time enhanced visualization and assessment of the stent positioning and expansion, together with the blood flow over the lesion area. The key novelty is an automatic tracking framework that includes a self-initialization phase based on the Viterbi algorithm and an online tracking phase implementing the Bayesian fusion of multiple cues. The resulting motion compensation stabilizes the image of the stent and by compounding multiple frames we obtain a much better stent contrast. Robust results are obtained from more than 350 clinical data sets. PMID:23285577

  15. Three-dimensional reconstruction of coronary stents in vivo based on motion compensated X-ray angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Dirk; Movassaghi, Babak; Grass, Michael; Schoonenberg, Gert; Florent, Raoul; Wink, Onno; Klein, Andrew J. P.; Chen, James Y.; Garcia, Joel; Messenger, John C.; Carroll, John D.

    2007-03-01

    The complete expansion of the stent during a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) procedure is essential for treatment of a stenotic segment of a coronary artery. Inadequate expansion of the stent is a major predisposing factor to in-stent restenosis and acute thrombosis. Stents are positioned and deployed by fluoroscopic guidance. Although the current generation of stents are made of materials with some degree of radio-opacity to detect their location after deployment, proper stent expansion is hard to asses. In this work, we introduce a new method for the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the coronary stents in-vivo utilizing two-dimensional projection images acquired during rotational angiography (RA). The acquisition protocol consist of a propeller rotation of the X-ray C-arm system of 180°, which ensures sufficient angular coverage for volume reconstruction. The angiographic projections were acquired at 30 frames per second resulting in 180 projections during a 7 second rotational run. The motion of the stent is estimated from the automatically tracked 2D coordinates of the markers on the balloon catheter. This information is used within a motion-compensated reconstruction algorithm. Therefore, projections from different cardiac phases and motion states can be used, resulting in improved signal-to-noise ratio of the stent. Results of 3D reconstructed coronary stents in vivo, with high spatial resolution are presented. The proposed method allows for a comprehensive and unique quantitative 3D assessment of stent expansion that rivals current X-ray and intravascular ultrasound techniques.

  16. Stent grafts for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Diethrich, Edward B

    2003-01-01

    Stent grafting for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) has been a major advance in endovascular surgery. Initial success with the original endoluminal stent graft encouraged worldwide study of the technology. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) insisted on considerable experience with the devices before approval because of early problems with device rupture, stent fracture, fabric perforation, graft migration, and modular separation. Complications associated with the endovascular graft technology led many to recommend its use only in patients who were considered at "high risk" for the standard, open procedure. Further study and device improvements have led to results that indicate the procedure has the potential to reduce operating time and blood loss and shorten intensive care unit and hospital stays compared with open surgical intervention. At present, there are three FDA-approved devices available for use, and a fourth is expected in 2003. The ultimate decision by the individual practitioner or the institutional team regarding which patients should be treated with endovascular technology is still not entirely straightforward. Patient selection should be based on vascular anatomy, the availability of a suitable device, the patient's desire for a minimally invasive procedure, and a commitment to what is likely to be a lifetime of device surveillance. PMID:15785178

  17. Impact of Hospital Volume on Outcomes of Endovascular Stenting for Adult Aortic Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Parth; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Patel, Achint; Sonani, Rajesh; Patel, Aashay; Panaich, Sidakpal S; Thakkar, Badal; Savani, Chirag; Jhamnani, Sunny; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Nish; Pant, Sadip; Patel, Samir; Arora, Shilpkumar; Dave, Abhishek; Singh, Vikas; Chothani, Ankit; Patel, Jay; Ansari, Mohammad; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Bhimani, Ronak; Grines, Cindy; Cleman, Michael; Mangi, Abeel; Forrest, John K; Badheka, Apurva O

    2015-11-01

    Use of transcatheter endovascular stenting has been increasing in the treatment of coarctation of aorta (CoA). The present study was undertaken on adults with CoA who underwent stent placement from 2000 to 2011 to analyze the relation of hospital volumes to the outcomes of stenting in adults with CoA. It was a retrospective study based on Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2000 to 2011 and identified subjects using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure code of 747.10 (CoA). Annual hospital volume was calculated using unique hospital identifiers. Weights provided by the Nationwide Inpatient Sample were used to generate national estimates. A total of 105 (weighted 521) subjects were identified with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code of 39.90 (Endovascular stent). Hospital volumes were divided into tertiles. We compared the highest tertile (≥3 procedures annually) with other tertiles (<3 procedure annually). The composite outcomes of the analysis were procedure-related complications, length of stay (LOS), and cost in relation to the hospital volume. No inhospital death was reported in either group. Hospitals with ≥3 procedures annually had significantly lower incidence of complications (9.5% vs 23.0%) compared to the hospitals with <3 procedures annually (p-value 0.002). Similar results were obtained after multivariate regression analysis in relation to hospital volume. Shorter LOS and lower cost were observed with annual hospital volume of ≥3 procedures. In conclusion, stenting adults for CoA is remarkably safe, and the outcomes of the procedure have improved in centers with annual hospital volume of ≥3 procedures. There is also decreasing trend of procedure-related complications, shorter LOS, and lower costs compared to centers with annual volume <3 procedures.

  18. Impact of Hospital Volume on Outcomes of Endovascular Stenting for Adult Aortic Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Parth; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Patel, Achint; Sonani, Rajesh; Patel, Aashay; Panaich, Sidakpal S; Thakkar, Badal; Savani, Chirag; Jhamnani, Sunny; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Nish; Pant, Sadip; Patel, Samir; Arora, Shilpkumar; Dave, Abhishek; Singh, Vikas; Chothani, Ankit; Patel, Jay; Ansari, Mohammad; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Bhimani, Ronak; Grines, Cindy; Cleman, Michael; Mangi, Abeel; Forrest, John K; Badheka, Apurva O

    2015-11-01

    Use of transcatheter endovascular stenting has been increasing in the treatment of coarctation of aorta (CoA). The present study was undertaken on adults with CoA who underwent stent placement from 2000 to 2011 to analyze the relation of hospital volumes to the outcomes of stenting in adults with CoA. It was a retrospective study based on Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2000 to 2011 and identified subjects using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure code of 747.10 (CoA). Annual hospital volume was calculated using unique hospital identifiers. Weights provided by the Nationwide Inpatient Sample were used to generate national estimates. A total of 105 (weighted 521) subjects were identified with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code of 39.90 (Endovascular stent). Hospital volumes were divided into tertiles. We compared the highest tertile (≥3 procedures annually) with other tertiles (<3 procedure annually). The composite outcomes of the analysis were procedure-related complications, length of stay (LOS), and cost in relation to the hospital volume. No inhospital death was reported in either group. Hospitals with ≥3 procedures annually had significantly lower incidence of complications (9.5% vs 23.0%) compared to the hospitals with <3 procedures annually (p-value 0.002). Similar results were obtained after multivariate regression analysis in relation to hospital volume. Shorter LOS and lower cost were observed with annual hospital volume of ≥3 procedures. In conclusion, stenting adults for CoA is remarkably safe, and the outcomes of the procedure have improved in centers with annual hospital volume of ≥3 procedures. There is also decreasing trend of procedure-related complications, shorter LOS, and lower costs compared to centers with annual volume <3 procedures. PMID:26471501

  19. Use of cystourethroscopy to remove an indwelling double-J ureteral stent 6 years following simultaneous radical sigmoid colon cancer and partial bladder resection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    GU, YAN; ZHANG, JING; WANG, GUOZENG

    2016-01-01

    Ureteral stents are widely used to ensure good urinary drainage and to relieve obstruction, pain and infection during urologic procedures. However, long-term indwelling ureteral stents can cause various complications, such as encrustation, hematuria and infection. Here, the case of an 88-year-old man who had undergone simultaneous radical resection of sigmoid colon cancer and partial resection of the bladder 6 years prior is presented. The patient complained of urinary frequency and urgency, dysuria and intermittent fever. A kidney ureter bladder X-ray examination revealed the presence of an entire coiled double-J stent with calculi from the kidney to the bladder. A computed tomography scan revealed mild hydronephrosis of the left kidney and one J end of the stent in the bladder. The stent was removed successfully by cystourethroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy. This report describes the clinical experience of the removal of a long-term stent by endoscopic manipulation. PMID:27313675

  20. "Virtual" in-vivo bench test for bifurcation stenting with "StentBoost".

    PubMed

    Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Verheye, Stefan; Vermeersch, Paul; Cornelis, Kristoff; Van Langenhove, Glenn

    2009-04-01

    "StentBoost" is a new angiographic technique that allows improved angiographic visualization of stents deployed in coronary arteries, by enhancing the X-ray focus of the region where the stent is placed. Using this technique we were able to assess the deformation and the expansion of a stent deployed to treat a bifurcation lesion between the mid-left anterior descending (LAD) artery and a big second diagonal branch, during sequential inflations of: (1) the stent per se in the LAD, (2) the ostium of the diagonal branch through the stent struts, (3) the stent again with a non compliant balloon, and (4) both branches with the kissing balloon technique. "StentBoost" guided our clinical and angiographic decision-making process and allowed us to create a "virtual" bench test of the stent deployed at the level of the bifurcation treated.

  1. Prevention of Intracranial In-stent Restenoses: Predilatation with a Drug Eluting Balloon, Followed by the Deployment of a Self-Expanding Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Vajda, Zsolt Guethe, Thomas Perez, Marta Aguilar Kurre, Wiebke; Schmid, Elisabeth Baezner, Hansjoerg; Henkes, Hans

    2013-04-15

    Stenting in intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) is increasingly debated, due to issues of procedural safety, technical efficacy, and in-stent recurrent stenoses (ISR). In the present study, feasibility, safety, and efficacy of angioplasty using a drug-eluting balloon (DEB) followed by the implantation of a self-expanding stent (Enterprise) were evaluated for the treatment of ICAD lesions. Fifty-two patients (median age: 71 years; range: 54-86 years; male/female ratio 37:15) underwent stenting of high-grade ICAD lesions between February 2010 and November 2011 in a single center. Angioplasty using a paclitaxel coated SeQuent Please (B. Braun, Germany) or DIOR (Eurocor, Germany) coronary PTCA balloon, followed by the implantation of a self-expanding stent (Enterprise, Codman, USA) was performed in 54 lesions. Angiographic and clinical follow-up was performed at 6 and 12 weeks, 6 and 12 months, and yearly thereafter. Technical success rate, periprocedural complications, occurrence of recurrent ischemic symptoms, and the development of an ISR were analyzed. Angioplasty using a DEB followed by stent implantation was successfully performed in 44 (81 %) cases. DEB insertion failed in 19 % of the cases and angioplasty was finally performed using a conventional PTCA balloon. The combined procedure related permanent neurologic morbidity and mortality rate (stroke, ICH, and subarachnoid hemorrhage) at 30 days and beyond was 5 %. Angiographic and clinical follow-up were obtained in 33 (61 %) lesions in 32 patients. Recurrent stenosis was seen in one (3 %) lesion. Angioplasty and stenting using a DEB is safe and yields encouragingly low ISR rates. Further technical developments to improve lesion accessibility are, nevertheless, mandatory.

  2. A Double-Layered Covered Biliary Metal Stent for the Management of Unresectable Malignant Biliary Obstruction: A Multicenter Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Seok; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Don Haeng; Moon, Jong Ho; Lee, Kyu Taek; Dong, Seok Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The covered self-expandable metal stent (CMS) was developed to prevent tumor ingrowth-induced stent occlusion during the treatment of malignant biliary obstruction. However, complications such as cholecystitis, pancreatitis, and stent migration can occur after the endoscopic insertion of CMSs. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy and safety of a double-layered CMS (DCMS) for the management of malignant bile duct obstruction. Methods DCMSs were endoscopically introduced into 59 patients with unresectable malignant extrahepatic biliary obstruction at four tertiary referral centers, and the patient medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Results Both the technical and functional success rates were 100%. Procedure-related complications including pancreatitis, cholangitis, stent migration, and liver abscess occurred in five patients (8.5%). The median follow-up period was 265 days (range, 31 to 752 days). Cumulative stent patency rates were 68.2% and 40.8% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. At the final follow-up, the rate of stent occlusion was 33.9% (20/59), and the median stent patency period was 276 days (range, 2 to 706 days). Conclusions The clinical outcomes of DCMSs were comparable to the outcomes previously reported for CMSs with respect to stent patency period and complication rates. PMID:27172927

  3. Quantitative analysis of 3D stent reconstruction from a limited number of views in cardiac rotational angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrenot, Béatrice; Vaillant, Régis; Prost, Rémy; Finet, Gérard; Douek, Philippe; Peyrin, Françoise

    2007-03-01

    Percutaneous coronary angioplasty consists in conducting a guidewire carrying a balloon and a stent through the lesion and deploying the stent by balloon inflation. A stent is a small 3D complex mesh hardly visible in X-ray images : the control of stent deployment is difficult although it is important to avoid post intervention complications. In a previous work, we proposed a method to reconstruct 3D stent images from a set of 2D cone-beam projections acquired in rotational acquisition mode. The process involves a motion compensation procedure based on the position of two markers located on the guidewire in the 2D radiographic sequence. Under the hypothesis that the stent and markers motions are identical, the method was shown to generate a negligible error. If this hypothesis is not fulfilled, a solution could be to use only the images where motion is weakest, at the detriment of having a limiter number of views. In this paper, we propose a simulation based study of the impact of a limited number of views in our context. The chain image involved in the acquisition of X-ray sequences is first modeled to simulate realistic noisy projections of stent animated by a motion close to cardiac motion. Then, the 3D stent images are reconstructed using the proposed motion compensation method from gated projections. Two gating strategies are examined to select projection in the sequences. A quantitative analysis is carried out to assess reconstruction quality as a function of noise and acquisition strategy.

  4. Ureteral Stent Coatings: What's Here and What's Coming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razvi, Hassan

    2008-09-01

    Ureteral stents have become an indispensable tool to the urologist in the management of various disorders afflicting the urinary tract. While the ideal stent remains elusive, novel technical advances in stent coating technology offer the potential of enhancing stent biocompatibility and clinical application. Currently available stent coatings as well as new and emerging devices will be reviewed.

  5. Drug eluting biliary stents to decrease stent failure rates: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shatzel, Joseph; Kim, Jisoo; Sampath, Kartik; Syed, Sharjeel; Saad, Jennifer; Hussain, Zilla H; Mody, Kabir; Pipas, J Marc; Gordon, Stuart; Gardner, Timothy; Rothstein, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting is clinically effective in relieving both malignant and non-malignant obstructions. However, there are high failure rates associated with tumor ingrowth and epithelial overgrowth as well as internally from biofilm development and subsequent clogging. Within the last decade, the use of prophylactic drug eluting stents as a means to reduce stent failure has been investigated. In this review we provide an overview of the current research on drug eluting biliary stents. While there is limited human trial data regarding the clinical benefit of drug eluting biliary stents in preventing stent obstruction, recent research suggests promise regarding their safety and potential efficacy. PMID:26839648

  6. Stent-graft repair for acute traumatic thoracic aortic rupture.

    PubMed

    Neuhauser, B; Czermak, B; Jaschke, W; Waldenberger, P; Fraedrich, G; Perkmann, R

    2004-12-01

    Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta is potentially life-threatening and leads to death in 75 to 90 per cent of cases at the time of injury. In high-risk patients, as traumatic injuries of the aorta combine with multiple associated injuries, endoluminal repair is now reported as a promising therapeutic strategy with encouraging results. This study determined the outcome of patients with traumatic thoracic aortic injury treated endovascularly during the past 7 years at our institution. Thirteen patients, 11 males and 2 females (mean age, 39 years; range, 19-82), with traumatic rupture of the otherwise unremarkable descending aorta (10 acute, 3 chronic), out of a series of 64 endovascular thoracic stent-graft procedures, were treated by implantation of Talent (n = 8), Vanguard (n = 5), and Excluder (n = 2) self-expanding devices between January 1996 and August 2003. The immediate technical success rate was 92 per cent (12/13). One patient showed a proximal endoleak type I, which was treated successfully by an additional stent-graft procedure. Secondary success rate was 100 per cent. The mortality rate was 0 per cent. Two additional stent-graft procedures were performed due to type I endoleaks after 18 and 28 months. There was no other intervention-related morbidity or mortality during the mean follow-up time of 26.4 months' (range, 6-86). Endovascular stent-graft repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries is a safe, effective, and low-morbidity alternative to open thoracic surgery and has promising midterm results.

  7. Subintimal Recanalization of Occluded Stents: The Substent Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Diamantopoulos, Athanasios Katsanos, Konstantinos; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Siablis, Dimitris

    2013-08-01

    PurposeApplication of metal stents is complicated by neointimal hyperplasia leading to vessel restenosis and reocclusion. Treatment options in cases presenting with complete occlusion of the stented segment and recurrent critical limb ischemia (CLI) are limited. We present the option of the subintimal/substent technique in dealing with occluded stents.MethodsThe study included patients presenting with recurrent CLI due to impaired blood flow as a result of complete occlusion of previously inserted metal stents and unsuccessful intraluminal crossing of the lesion via either the antegrade or retrograde approach. In these cases, crossing the occlusion through the subintimal/substent plane was attempted. Primary end points included technical success, safety of the procedure, clinical improvement, and limb salvage, while secondary end points were patient survival, primary patency, and vessel restenosis rates at 1-year follow-up. Study end points were calculated by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis.ResultsBetween July 2006 and October 2011, a total of 14 patients (mean age 69.14 {+-} 12.59 years, 12 men) were treated with the substent technique and included in the analysis. Technical success rate was 85.71 % (12 of 14), with a total lesion length of 193.57 {+-} 90.78 mm. The mean occluded stented segment length was 90.21 {+-} 44.34 mm. In 10 (83.33 %) of 12 cases, a new stent had to be placed by the side of the old occluded one, while the remaining two cases (16.67 %) were treated only with balloon angioplasty. No serious adverse events were noted during the immediate postprocedural period. All successfully treated patients improved clinically. Estimated limb salvage was 90.9 %, and patient survival rate was 90.0 % at 1 year's follow-up. Primary patency was 45.50 % and vessel restenosis 77.30 %.ConclusionSubintimal recanalization of occluded metal stents through the substent plane is a valuable alternative treatment option, especially in patients with recurrent CLI with few

  8. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Infrapopliteal Drug-Eluting Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Katsanos, Konstantinos Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Siablis, Dimitris

    2013-02-15

    IntroductionThere are no cost-utility data about below-the-knee placement of drug-eluting stents. The authors determined the cost-effectiveness of infrapopliteal drug-eluting stents for critical limb ischemia (CLI) treatment. The event-free individual survival outcomes defined by the absence of any major events, including death, major amputation, and target limb repeat procedures, were reconstructed on the basis of two published infrapopliteal series. The first included spot Bail-out use of Sirolimus-eluting stents versus bare metal stents after suboptimal balloon angioplasty (Bail-out SES).The second was full-lesion Primary Everolimus-eluting stenting versus plain balloon angioplasty and bail-out bare metal stenting as necessary (primary EES). The number-needed-to-treat (NNT) to avoid one major event and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated for a 3-year postprocedural period for both strategies. Overall event-free survival was significantly improved in both strategies (hazard ratio (HR) [confidence interval (CI)]: 0.68 [0.41-1.12] in Bail-out SES and HR [CI]: 0.53 [0.29-0.99] in Primary EES). Event-free survival gain per patient was 0.89 (range, 0.11-3.0) years in Bail-out SES with an NNT of 4.6 (CI: 2.5-25.6) and a corresponding ICER of 6,518 Euro-Sign (range 1,685-10,112 Euro-Sign ). Survival gain was 0.91 (range 0.25-3.0) years in Primary EES with an NNT of 2.7 (CI: 1.7-5.8) and an ICER of 11,581 Euro-Sign (range, 4,945-21,428 Euro-Sign ) per event-free life-year gained. Two-way sensitivity analysis showed that stented lesion length >10 cm and/or DES list price >1000 Euro-Sign were associated with the least economically favorable scenario in both strategies. Both strategies of bail-out SES and primary EES placement in the infrapopliteal arteries for CLI treatment exhibit single-digit NNT and relatively low corresponding ICERs.

  9. History of Ureteral Stenting Negatively Affects the Outcomes of Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy. Results of a Matched-pair Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sfoungaristos, Stavros; Gofrit, Ofer N; Pode, Dov; Landau, Ezekiel H; Yutkin, Vladimir; Latke, Arie; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of ureteral stenting history to the outcomes of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, we retrospectively analysed patients who underwent shockwave lithotripsy with Dornier Gemini lithotripter between September 2010 and August 2012. Forty seven patients (group A) who had a double J stent which was removed just before the procedure were matched-paired with another 47 patients (group B) who underwent shockwave lithotripsy having no stent history. The correlation between ureteral stenting history and stone-free rates was assessed. Stone-free rates were 68.1% and 87.2% for patients of group A and B, respectively (p=0.026). Postoperative complications were not different between groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that stone size (p=0.007), stone location (p=0.044) and history of ureteral stenting (p=0.046) were independent predictors for stone clearance after shockwave lithotripsy. Ureteral stents adversely affect shockwave lithotripsy outcome, even if they are removed before the procedure. Stenting history should divert treatment plan towards intracorporeal lithotripsy.

  10. History of Ureteral Stenting Negatively Affects the Outcomes of Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy. Results of a Matched-pair Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sfoungaristos, Stavros; Gofrit, Ofer N; Pode, Dov; Landau, Ezekiel H; Yutkin, Vladimir; Latke, Arie; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of ureteral stenting history to the outcomes of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, we retrospectively analysed patients who underwent shockwave lithotripsy with Dornier Gemini lithotripter between September 2010 and August 2012. Forty seven patients (group A) who had a double J stent which was removed just before the procedure were matched-paired with another 47 patients (group B) who underwent shockwave lithotripsy having no stent history. The correlation between ureteral stenting history and stone-free rates was assessed. Stone-free rates were 68.1% and 87.2% for patients of group A and B, respectively (p=0.026). Postoperative complications were not different between groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that stone size (p=0.007), stone location (p=0.044) and history of ureteral stenting (p=0.046) were independent predictors for stone clearance after shockwave lithotripsy. Ureteral stents adversely affect shockwave lithotripsy outcome, even if they are removed before the procedure. Stenting history should divert treatment plan towards intracorporeal lithotripsy. PMID:26445394

  11. [The treatment of intra-stent restenosis. The current situation and future outlook].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hospital, J A; Cequier, A; Fernández-Nofrerías, E; Mauri, J; García del Blanco, B; Iráculis, E; Jara, F; Esplugas, E

    1999-12-01

    In-stent restenosis is an increasing problem due to the frequent use of coronary stent as a form of percutaneous revascularization. The global incidence is near to 28%, and it is well document that a neointimal hyperplasia is its principal mechanism. The most commonly related factors for its appearance are diabetes mellitus, a longer length of the original lesion, a smaller diameter of the reference vessel, the left anterior descending artery location and a smaller luminal diameter at the end of the procedure. Due to a different long term evolution in-stent restenosis has been classified as focal or diffuse, according to the length of the restenotic lesion (focal < 10 mm and diffuse > or = 10 mm). Some strategies have been proven for its treatment, but no randomized-controlled trials have been published comparing these different treatments. In focal in-stent restenosis the practice of a conventional balloon angioplasty is associated with high initial clinical success with a favourable long term evolution (target lesion revascularization between 11-15%). But on the contrary, in diffuse in-stent restenosis, in spite of a high initial success rate, an elevated target lesion revascularization has been detected at the follow-up (up to 43%). Other proved such as atherectomy or excimer laser are associated with a significant procedural non-Q-wave infarction (near to 9%) and a long term target lesion revascularization during follow-up (23-31%). The implantation of an additional stent has been performed with low procedural complications and with a long term target lesion revascularization near to 27%. Patients treated with intracoronary radiation as a complementary technique seem to have a better long term evolution than those having had the other strategies alone. In conclusion, in-stent-restenosis is a new and progressively more frequent problem, requiring complex treatment and of which as been established. Comparative controlled studies need to be performed in order to

  12. Impact of pre-procedural cardiopulmonary instability in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (from the Harmonizing Outcomes With Revascularization and Stents in Acute Myocardial Infarction Trial).

    PubMed

    Brener, Sorin J; Brodie, Bruce R; Guerchicoff, Alejandra; Witzenbichler, Bernhard; Guagliumi, Giulio; Xu, Ke; Mehran, Roxana; Stone, Gregg W

    2014-10-01

    Rapid reperfusion with primary percutaneous coronary intervention improves survival in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Preprocedural cardiopulmonary instability and adverse events (IAE) may delay reperfusion time and worsen prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between preprocedural cardiopulmonary IAE, door-to-balloon time (DBT), and outcomes in the Harmonizing Outcomes With Revascularization and Stents in AMI (HORIZONS-AMI) trial. Preprocedural cardiopulmonary IAE included sustained ventricular or supraventricular tachycardia or fibrillation requiring cardioversion or defibrillation, heart block or bradycardia requiring pacemaker implantation, severe hypotension requiring vasopressors or intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Three-year outcomes of patients with and without IAE according to DBT were compared. Among 3,602 patients, 159 (4.4%) had ≥1 IAE. DBT did not differ significantly in patients with and without IAE; however, patients with IAE were less likely to have Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) grade 3 flow after percutaneous coronary intervention. Mortality at 3 years was significantly higher in patients with versus those without IAE (17.0% vs 6.3%, p<0.0001), and IAE was an independent predictor of mortality, whereas DBT was not. However, a significant interaction was present such that 3-year mortality was reduced in patients with DBT<99 minutes (the median) versus ≥99 minutes to a greater extent in patients with IAE (9.9% vs 20.7%, hazard ratio 0.43, 95% confidence interval 0.16 to 1.16) compared with those without IAE (5.0% vs 7.2%, hazard ratio 0.69, 95% confidence interval 0.50 to 0.95) (p for interaction=0.004). In conclusion, IAE before PCI is an independent predictor of death and identifies a high-risk group in whom faster reperfusion may be particularly important to improve survival.

  13. Comparison of a New Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Metallic Stent to a Noncovered Stent in Canine Ureters

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hwan-Hoon Lee, Seung Hwa; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Hong Suk; Kim, Young Sik; Kang, Byung Chul; Frisoli, Joan K.; Razavi, Mahmood K.

    2008-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a newly designed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered metallic stent in the ureter by comparing its effectiveness with that of the noncovered stent in a canine model. We placed 14 stents in the ureters of seven mongrel dogs that weighed 30-40 kg each. The covered and noncovered stents were deployed in the right and left ureters, respectively, of six dogs. In the seventh dog, a covered stent and a double-J catheter were inserted in the right ureter, and a covered stent only was inserted in the left ureter. The first six dogs were sacrificed at 5, 10, and 15 weeks after deployment of the stents (two for each follow-up period), and the seventh dog was sacrificed at 30 weeks. There was no migration or poor expansion of any of the stents observed on plain radiography. On intravenous pyelogram and retrograde pyelogram, all of the covered stents at each follow-up period had patent lumens at the stented segments without hydronephrosis, and the passage of contrast material through it was well preserved. The noncovered stents in the dogs sacrificed at 5 and 10 weeks and one of the two dogs sacrificed at 15 weeks showed near-complete occlusion of the stent lumen due to ingrowth of the soft tissue, and severe hydronephrosis was also noted. The noncovered stent in the other dog sacrificed at 15 weeks showed the passage of contrast material without hydronephrosis, but the lumen of the stent was still nearly occluded by the soft tissue. There was no evidence of hydronephrosis or passage disturbance of the contrast material in both ureters of the dog sacrificed at 30 weeks. We conclude that the newly designed PTFE-covered stent effectively prevented the luminal occlusion caused by urothelial hyperplasia compared to the near-total occlusion of the noncovered stents, and no migration of the covered stents was noted.

  14. MR Angiography of Peripheral Arterial Stents: In Vitro Evaluation of 22 Different Stent Types.

    PubMed

    Burg, Matthias C; Bunck, Alexander C; Seifarth, Harald; Buerke, Boris; Kugel, Harald; Hesselmann, Volker; Köhler, Michael; Heindel, Walter; Maintz, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate stent lumen visibility of a large sample of different peripheral arterial (iliac, renal, carotid) stents using magnetic resonance angiography in vitro. Materials and Methods. 21 different stents and one stentgraft (10 nitinol, 7 316L, 2 tantalum, 1 cobalt superalloy, 1 PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1 platinum alloy) were examined in a vessel phantom (vessel diameters ranging from 5 to 13 mm) filled with a solution of Gd-DTPA. Stents were imaged at 1.5 Tesla using a T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence. Image analysis was performed measuring three categories: Signal intensity in the stent lumen, lumen visibility of the stented lumen, and homogeneity of the stented lumen. The results were classified using a 3-point scale (good, intermediate, and poor results). Results. 7 stents showed good MR lumen visibility (4x nitinol, 2x tantalum, and 1x cobalt superalloy). 9 stents showed intermediate results (5x nitinol, 2x 316L, 1x PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1x platinum alloy) and 6 stents showed poor results (1x nitinol, and 5x 316L). Conclusion. Stent lumen visibility varies depending on the stent material and type. Some products show good lumen visibility which may allow the detection of stenoses inside the lumen, while other products cause artifacts which prevent reliable evaluation of the stent lumen with this technique. PMID:22091380

  15. MR Angiography of Peripheral Arterial Stents: In Vitro Evaluation of 22 Different Stent Types

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Matthias C.; Bunck, Alexander C.; Seifarth, Harald; Buerke, Boris; Kugel, Harald; Hesselmann, Volker; Köhler, Michael; Heindel, Walter; Maintz, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate stent lumen visibility of a large sample of different peripheral arterial (iliac, renal, carotid) stents using magnetic resonance angiography in vitro. Materials and Methods. 21 different stents and one stentgraft (10 nitinol, 7 316L, 2 tantalum, 1 cobalt superalloy, 1 PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1 platinum alloy) were examined in a vessel phantom (vessel diameters ranging from 5 to 13 mm) filled with a solution of Gd-DTPA. Stents were imaged at 1.5 Tesla using a T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence. Image analysis was performed measuring three categories: Signal intensity in the stent lumen, lumen visibility of the stented lumen, and homogeneity of the stented lumen. The results were classified using a 3-point scale (good, intermediate, and poor results). Results. 7 stents showed good MR lumen visibility (4x nitinol, 2x tantalum, and 1x cobalt superalloy). 9 stents showed intermediate results (5x nitinol, 2x 316L, 1x PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1x platinum alloy) and 6 stents showed poor results (1x nitinol, and 5x 316L). Conclusion. Stent lumen visibility varies depending on the stent material and type. Some products show good lumen visibility which may allow the detection of stenoses inside the lumen, while other products cause artifacts which prevent reliable evaluation of the stent lumen with this technique. PMID:22091380

  16. Stent-Assisted Clip Placement for Complex Internal Carotid Artery Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Chughtai, Morad; Khan, Asif A.; Suri, M. Fareed K.; Sherr, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We report two procedures using a stent-assisted microsurgical clip placement to treat complex intracranial aneurysms originating from supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery. CASE DESCRIPTIONS In both procedures, primary clip placement was considered technically difficult due to either complex morphology or inferior protrusion of aneurysm fundus within the interclinoid space. A nitinol self-expanding stent was placed across the neck of the aneurysm either preoperatively or intraoperatively. Obliteration of aneurysm and patency of the artery was confirmed by angiography after clip placement. CONCLUSION Description of an integrated open microsurgical and endovascular approach and review of literature pertaining to considerations for treatment approach are discussed. PMID:26958150

  17. Emergency Renal Ablation for Life-Threatening Hemorrhage from Multiple Capsular Branches During Renal Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Aytekin, Cuneyt Yildirim, Utku M.; Ozyer, Umut; Harman, Ali; Boyvat, Fatih

    2010-06-15

    A 55-year-old woman underwent bilateral renal artery stent placement with good angiographic result. After the procedure, the patient complained of left flank pain secondary to subcapsular hematoma. Retrospective evaluation of images taken during stent implantation favored the diagnosis of guidewire perforation. Three hours after the procedure, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and subsequent renal angiography showed multifocal extravasations. We performed emergent renal ablation for the treatment of massive bleeding. To our knowledge, this is the first use of transcatheter renal ablation technique for this purpose.

  18. Chemical etching of nitinol stents.

    PubMed

    Katona, Bálint; Bognár, Eszter; Berta, Balázs; Nagy, Péter; Hirschberg, Kristóf

    2013-01-01

    At present the main cause of death originates from cardiovascular diseases. Primarily the most frequent cause is vessel closing thus resulting in tissue damage. The stent can help to avoid this. It expands the narrowed vessel section and allows free blood flow. The good surface quality of stents is important. It also must have adequate mechanical characteristics or else it can be damaged which can easily lead to the fracture of the implant. Thus, we have to consider the importance of the surface treatment of these implants. In our experiments the appropriate design was cut from a 1.041 mm inner diameter and 0.100 mm wall thickness nitinol tube by using Nd:YAG laser device. Then, the stent was subjected to chemical etching. By doing so, the burr created during the laser cutting process can be removed and the surface quality refined. In our research, we changed the time of chemical etching and monitored the effects of this parameter. The differently etched stents were subjected to microscopic analysis, mass measurement and in vivo environment tests. The etching times that gave suitable surface and mechanical features were identified.

  19. Iliac Artery Stent Placement Relieves Claudication in Patients with Iliac and Superficial Femoral Artery Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihashi, Shigeo Higashiura, Wataru; Itoh, Hirofumi; Sakaguchi, Shoji; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of iliac artery stent placement for relief of claudication in patients with both iliac and superficial femoral artery (SFA) lesions. Methods. Stent placement for only iliac artery occlusive disease was performed in 94 limbs (74 patients) with both iliac and SFA occlusive disease on the same limb. All procedures were performed because intermittent claudication did not improve after continuation of antiplatelet medication therapy and home-based exercise for 3 months. Rutherford classification was 2 in 20 limbs and 3 in 74 limbs. Patients with critical limb ischemia were excluded. Median duration of follow-up was 40 months. Primary patency rates of the iliac stent, clinical improvement rates, and risk factors for requiring additional SFA procedures were evaluated. Results. Primary patency rates of the iliac stent at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 97, 93, 79, and 79 %, respectively. The initial clinical improvement rate was 87 %. Continued clinical improvement rates at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 87, 81, 69, and 66 %, respectively. SFA Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) II C/D lesion was a significant risk factor for requiring additional SFA procedures. Conclusion. Intermittent claudication was relieved by iliac stent placement in most patients with both iliac and SFA lesions. Thus, the indications for treatment of the SFA intended for claudicants should be evaluated after treatment of the iliac lesion.

  20. Impact of bifurcation dual stenting on endothelial shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Henry Y.; Koo, Bon-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in percutaneous coronary interventions and the introduction of drug eluding stents, in-stent restenosis and stent thrombosis remain a clinically significant problem for bifurcations. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of dual bifurcation stenting on hemodynamic parameters known to influence restenosis and thrombosis. We hypothesized that double stenting, especially with a longer side branch (SB) stent, likely has a negative effect on wall shear stress (WSS), WSS gradient (WSSG), and oscillatory shear index (OSI). To test this hypothesis, we developed computational models of dual stents at bifurcations and non-Newtonian blood simulations. The models were then interfaced, meshed, and solved in a validated finite-element package. Longer and shorter stents at the SB and provisional stenting were compared. It was found that stents placed in the SB at a bifurcation lowered WSS, but elevated WSSG and OSI. Dual stenting with longer SB stent had the most adverse impact on SB endothelial WSS, WSSG, and OSI, with low WSS region up to 50% more than the case with shorter SB stent. The simulations also demonstrated flow disturbances resulting from SB stent struts protruding into the main flow field near the carina, which may have implications on stent thrombosis. The simulations predict a negative hemodynamic role for SB stenting, which is exaggerated with a longer stent, consistent with clinical trial findings that dual-stenting is comparable or inferior to provisional stenting. PMID:26183473

  1. Covered stent in the superior gluteal artery in a hybrid approach to treat internal iliac artery aneurysm: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Noël-Lamy, Maxime; Teng Tan, Kong; Lindsay, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    This brief report describes a hybrid endovascular and open procedure to treat internal iliac artery (IIA) aneurysms and preserve pelvic blood flow. A covered stent was deployed before surgery in the superior gluteal artery, extending across the IIA aneurysm, with the proximal end in the common iliac artery lumen. During open aortoiliac aneurysm repair, the stent graft was anastomosed in an end-to-side manner to the surgical graft. Four aneurysms were treated in 3 patients. Technical success was achieved in all cases. There were no complications or repeat interventions. Stents were all patent at imaging follow-up (range, 6-25 mo). Patients were free from buttock claudication. PMID:26095271

  2. Stent-Grafts for Unruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, John

    2006-06-15

    Aortic stent-grafts were introduced at the beginning of the 1990s as a less invasive method of dealing with aortic aneurysms in patients with poor cardiovascular reserve. The numbers of procedures performed worldwide has increased exponentially despite the current lack of any substantial evidence for long-term efficacy in comparison with the gold standard of open surgical grafting. This review summarizes the evolution of the abdominal aortic stent-graft, the techniques used for assessment and deployment, and the effect of the procedure on both the patient and the device. The recent publication of two national multicenter trials has confirmed that the endovascular technique confers a 2.5-fold reduction in 30-day mortality in comparison with open surgery. However, over 4 years of follow-up, there is a 3-fold increase in the risk of reintervention and the overall costs are 30% greater with endovascular repair. Although the improvement in aneurysm-related mortality persists in the mid-term, because of the initial reduction in perioperative mortality, the all-cause mortality rate at 4 years is actually no better than for open surgery. Longer-term data from the randomized trials are awaited as well as results from the latest trials utilizing state-of-the-art devices. Whilst the overall management of abdominal aortic aneurysms has undoubtedly benefited from the introduction of stent-grafts, open repair currently remains the gold standard treatment.

  3. Efficacy of Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Inserted for Refractory Hemorrhage of Duodenal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Orii, Takashi; Karasawa, Yukihiko; Kitahara, Hiroe; Yoshimura, Masaki; Okumura, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Because of advances in the technology of gastrointestinal endoscopy and improvements in the quality of stents, it has become routine to place a stent as palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal obstruction. On the other hand, stent placement for malignant gastrointestinal hemorrhage has scarcely been reported, although it may be performed for hemorrhage of the esophageal varicose vein. We recently experienced a patient with refractory hemorrhage from an unresectable duodenal cancer who underwent placement of a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) and thereafter had no recurrence of the hemorrhage. A 46-year-old man underwent laparotomy to radically resect a cancer in the third portion of the duodenum, which invaded widely to the superior mesenteric vein and its branches and was considered unresectable. After stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy was performed, chemotherapy was initiated according to the regimen of chemotherapy of far advanced gastric cancer. One year and 4 months after induction of chemotherapy, gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurred. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the hemorrhage oozing from the duodenal cancer, and endoscopic hemostasis, such as injection of hypertonic saline epinephrine and argon plasma coagulation, was unsuccessful. Twenty days after emergence of the hemorrhage, an endoscopic covered SEMS was placed with confirmation by fluoroscopy. Immediately after placement of the stent, the tarry stool stopped and the anemia ceased to progress. The recurrence of the hemorrhage has not been confirmed without migration of the stent. SEMS is an effective hemostatic procedure for malignant refractory hemorrhage. PMID:27403118

  4. A Newly Designed Stent for Management of Malignant Distal Duodenal Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wei-Zhong Yang, Zheng-Qiang Liu, Sheng Zhou, Chun-Gao Xia, Jin-Guo Zhao, Lin-Bo Shi, Hai-Bin

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a newly designed stent for the treatment of malignant distal duodenal stenosis.MethodsFrom March 2011 to May 2013, six patients with malignant duodenal stenosis underwent fluoroscopically guided placement of the new duodenal stent consisting of braided, nested stent wires, and a delivery system with a metallic mesh inner layer. Primary diseases were pancreatic cancer in three patients, gastric cancer in two patients, and endometrial stromal sarcoma in one patient. Duodenal obstructions were located in the horizontal part in two patients, the ascending part in two patients, and the duodenojejunal flexure in two patients. Technical success, defined as the successful stent deployment, clinical symptoms before and after the procedure, and complications were evaluated.ResultsTechnical success was achieved in all patients. No major complications were observed. Before treatment, two patients could not take any food and the gastric outlet obstruction scoring system (GOOSS) score was 0; the other four patients could take only liquids orally (GOOSS score = 1). After treatment, five patients could take soft food (GOOSS score = 2) and one patient could take a full diet (GOOSS score = 3). The mean duration of primary stent patency was 115.7 days.ConclusionsThe newly designed stent is associated with a high degree of technical success and good clinical outcome and may be clinically effective in the management of malignant distal duodenal obstruction.

  5. Efficacy of Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Inserted for Refractory Hemorrhage of Duodenal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orii, Takashi; Karasawa, Yukihiko; Kitahara, Hiroe; Yoshimura, Masaki; Okumura, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Because of advances in the technology of gastrointestinal endoscopy and improvements in the quality of stents, it has become routine to place a stent as palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal obstruction. On the other hand, stent placement for malignant gastrointestinal hemorrhage has scarcely been reported, although it may be performed for hemorrhage of the esophageal varicose vein. We recently experienced a patient with refractory hemorrhage from an unresectable duodenal cancer who underwent placement of a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) and thereafter had no recurrence of the hemorrhage. A 46-year-old man underwent laparotomy to radically resect a cancer in the third portion of the duodenum, which invaded widely to the superior mesenteric vein and its branches and was considered unresectable. After stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy was performed, chemotherapy was initiated according to the regimen of chemotherapy of far advanced gastric cancer. One year and 4 months after induction of chemotherapy, gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurred. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the hemorrhage oozing from the duodenal cancer, and endoscopic hemostasis, such as injection of hypertonic saline epinephrine and argon plasma coagulation, was unsuccessful. Twenty days after emergence of the hemorrhage, an endoscopic covered SEMS was placed with confirmation by fluoroscopy. Immediately after placement of the stent, the tarry stool stopped and the anemia ceased to progress. The recurrence of the hemorrhage has not been confirmed without migration of the stent. SEMS is an effective hemostatic procedure for malignant refractory hemorrhage. PMID:27403118

  6. Reflections by contrarians on the post-CREST evaluation of carotid stenting for stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Henry J M; Pelz, David M; Lownie, Stephen P

    2010-12-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting has become a popular alternative to carotid endarterectomy for the treatment of carotid stenosis in stroke. Evidence from early randomized controlled trials comparing these interventions revealed mixed results. The largest such trial, the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial recently showed equivalence of the procedures in a mixed cohort of both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. These results have been heralded in North America as definitively demonstrating the safety and efficacy of carotid angioplasty and stenting, making it an attractive alternative to carotid endarterectomy. It is therefore probable that many more asymptomatic patients will be subjected to Carotid angioplasty and stenting, perceived by many to be less invasive than carotid endarterectomy. The authors argue that the design of Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial was flawed by the mixture of two dissimilar patient groups, thus violating the principle of ceteris paribus, essential for the validity of a randomized controlled trials. The evidence for any invasive treatment of asymptomatic carotid disease is weak, with recent data favouring purely medical management. The authors believe that carotid angioplasty and stenting in asymptomatic patients should cease until better evidence is available. PMID:21050401

  7. Metallic stent and flexible bronchoscopy without fluoroscopy for acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Lin, S-M; Lin, T-Y; Chou, C-L; Chen, H-C; Liu, C-Y; Wang, C-H; Lin, H-C; Yu, C-T; Lee, K-Y; Kuo, H-P

    2008-05-01

    Stent implantation has been reported to facilitate liberation from mechanical ventilation in patients with respiratory failure due to central airway disease. The present retrospective cohort study sought to evaluate the risk and benefit of stent implantation via bronchoscopy without fluoroscopic guidance in mechanically ventilated patients. From July 2001 to September 2006, 26 patients with acute respiratory failure were recruited. A bronchoscope was inserted through a mouth guard into the space between the tracheal wall and the endotracheal tube. A guide wire was inserted via the flexible bronchoscope to the lesion site. The bronchoscope was reintroduced through the endotracheal tube. Under bronchoscopic visualisation, the delivery catheter was advanced over the guide wire to deploy the stent. These procedures were successfully performed in 26 patients, with 22 stents placed in the trachea and seven in the main bronchus. Of the 26 patients, 14 (53.8%) became ventilator independent during their stay in the intensive care unit. Severe pneumonia was the most common cause, in seven (58.3%) out of 12 patients, for continued ventilator dependence after stenting. Granulation tissue formation was found in seven patients during the follow-up period. It is concluded that metallic stents can be safely implanted without fluoroscopic guidance in patients with respiratory failure, to facilitate ventilator independence.

  8. Primary Self-Expandable Nitinol Stent Placement in Focal Lesions of Infrarenal Abdominal Aorta: Long Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lastovickova, Jarmila Peregrin, Jan H.

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the technical and clinical success, safety and long term results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty/self-expandable nitinol stent placement of infrarenal abdominal aorta focal lesions. Materials and Methods. Eighteen patients underwent PTA of focal atherosclerotic occlusive disease of distal abdominal aorta. Two symptomatic occlusions and 16 stenoses in 10 male and 8 female patients (mean age 68.2 years) were treated with primary self-expandable nitinol stent placement. Results. Primary self-expandable nitinol stent placement was technically successful in all 18 procedures; clinical success was achieved in 100% of patients. No complications associated with the procedure occurred. During the 49.4 months of mean follow up (range 3-96, 4 months) all treated aortic segments remained patent. Conclusions. Endovascular treatment (primary self-expandable nitinol stent placement) of focal atherosclerotic lesions of distal abdominal aorta is a safe method with excellent primary technical and clinical success rates and favourable Long term results.

  9. A Budget Impact Model for Paclitaxel-eluting Stent in Femoropopliteal Disease in France

    SciTech Connect

    De Cock, Erwin; Sapoval, Marc; Julia, Pierre; Lissovoy, Greg de; Lopes, Sandra

    2013-04-15

    The Zilver PTX drug-eluting stent (Cook Ireland Ltd., Limerick, Ireland) represents an advance in endovascular treatments for atherosclerotic superficial femoral artery (SFA) disease. Clinical data demonstrate improved clinical outcomes compared to bare-metal stents (BMS). This analysis assessed the likely impact on the French public health care budget of introducing reimbursement for the Zilver PTX stent. A model was developed in Microsoft Excel to estimate the impact of a progressive transition from BMS to Zilver PTX over a 5-year horizon. The number of patients undergoing SFA stenting was estimated on the basis of hospital episode data. The analysis from the payer perspective used French reimbursement tariffs. Target lesion revascularization (TLR) after primary stent placement was the primary outcome. TLR rates were based on 2-year data from the Zilver PTX single-arm study (6 and 9 %) and BMS rates reported in the literature (average 16 and 22 %) and extrapolated to 5 years. Net budget impact was expressed as the difference in total costs (primary stenting and reinterventions) for a scenario where BMS is progressively replaced by Zilver PTX compared to a scenario of BMS only. The model estimated a net cumulative 5-year budget reduction of Euro-Sign 6,807,202 for a projected population of 82,316 patients (21,361 receiving Zilver PTX). Base case results were confirmed in sensitivity analyses. Adoption of Zilver PTX could lead to important savings for the French public health care payer. Despite higher initial reimbursement for the Zilver PTX stent, fewer expected SFA reinterventions after the primary stenting procedure result in net savings.

  10. Experimental Evaluation of a New Tubular Coronary Stent (V-Flexª).

    PubMed

    Shun; Wang; Zhou; Verbeken; Ping; Szilard; Yanming; Jianhua; De Scheerder IK

    1998-11-01

    The safety, efficacy, angiographic and histological effects of a new 316 L, SS seamless stainless steel tubular stent (V-Flexª, Global Therapeutics, Broomfield, Colorado) was evaluated in a porcine coronary and peripheral artery model. Implantation in the right coronary artery was successful in all 16 pigs. Eight pigs were angiographically controlled after 6 weeks and then sacrificed for morphometric analysis. All stented coronary vessels were widely patent at this moment and morphometric analysis showed only a mild fibromuscular neointimal hyperplasia resulting in a neointimal hyperplasia of 1.15 +/- 0.38 mm2. The remaining 8 pigs were controlled and sacrificed at 12 weeks. At that time, all stented vessels were patent and neointimal hyperplasia was 1.22 +/- 0.34 mm2. Comparison with the Palmaz-Schatzª coronary stent (Cordis, Miami, Florida) in a porcine peripheral artery model demonstrated significantly less neointimal hyperplasia at 6 weeks (1.11 +/- 0.73 vs. 2.40 +/- 0.36, p = 0.001) and at 12 weeks (1.53 +/- 0.42 vs. 2.47 +/- 0.63, p = 0.003) for the V-Flex stent. In conclusion, V-Flex coronary stent implantation in a porcine coronary and peripheral arteries results in a high procedural success rate without subacute thrombotic occlusions, despite no further anticoagulation nor antiplatelet therapy. Six and 12 week histopathological and morphometric evaluation demonstrated only a mild fibromuscular neointimal hyperplasia. Comparison with the Palmaz-Schatz coronary stent in a peripheral artery model showed significantly less neointimal hyperplasia in the V-Flex stent. PMID:10762839

  11. An Assessment of Radiologically Inserted Transoral and Transgastric Gastroduodenal Stents to Treat Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Bethany H. T.; Griffiths, Ewen A.; Pursnani, Kishore G. Ward, Jeremy B.; Stockwell, Robert C.

    2013-12-15

    IntroductionSelf-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) are used to palliate malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) and are useful in patients with limited life expectancy or severe medical comorbidity, which would preclude surgery. Stenting can be performed transorally or by a percutaneous transgastric technique. Our goal was to review the outcome of patients who underwent radiological SEMS insertion performed by a single consultant interventional radiologist. Methods: Patients were identified from a prospectively collected database held by one consultant radiologist. Data were retrieved from radiological reports, multidisciplinary team meetings, and the patients' case notes. Univariate survival analysis was performed. Results: Between December 2000 and January 2011, 100 patients (63 males, 37 females) had 110 gastroduodenal stenting procedures. Median age was 73 (range 39-89) years. SEMS were inserted transorally (n = 66) or transgastrically (n = 44). Site of obstruction was the stomach (n = 37), duodenum (n = 50), gastric pull-up (n = 10), or gastroenterostomy (n = 13). Seven patients required biliary stents. Technical success was 86.4 %: 83.3 % for transoral insertion, 90.9 % for transgastric insertion. Eleven patients developed complications. Median GOO severity score: 1 pre-stenting, 2 post-stenting (p = 0.0001). Median survival was 54 (range 1-624) days. Post-stenting GOO severity score was predictive of survival (p = 0.0001). Conclusions: The technical success rate for insertion of palliative SEMS is high. Insertional technique can be tailored to the individual depending on the location of the tumor and whether it is possible to access the stomach percutaneously. Patients who have successful stenting and return to eating a soft/normal diet have a statistically significant increase in survival.

  12. Is the Routine Check Nephrostogram Following Percutaneous Antegrade Ureteric Stent Placement Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Soh, Keng Chuan; Tay, Kiang Hiong Tan, Bien Soo; MM Htoo, Austin; HG Lo, Richard; Lin, Shueh En

    2008-05-15

    Our aim was to review our experience with percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent (PAUS) placement and to determine if the routinely conducted check nephrostogram on the day following ureteric stent placement was necessary. Retrospective review of patients who had undergone PAUS placement between January 2004 and December 2005 was performed. There were 83 subjects (36 males, 47 females), with a mean age of 59.9 years (range, 22-94 years). Average follow-up duration was 7.1 months (range, 1-24 months). The most common indications for PAUS placement were ureteric obstruction due to metastatic disease (n = 56) and urinary calculi (n = 34). Technical success was 93.2% (96/103 attempts), with no major immediate procedure-related complications or mortalities. The Bard 7Fr Urosoft DJ Stent was used in more than 95% of the cases. Eighty-one of 89 (91.0%) check nephrostograms demonstrated a patent ureteric stent with resultant safety catheter removal. Three check nephrostograms revealed distal stent migration requiring repositioning by a goose-snare, while five others showed stent occlusion necessitating permanent external drainage by nephrostomy drainage catheter reinsertion. Following PAUS placement, the serum creatinine level improved or stabilized in 82% of patients. The serum creatinine outcome difference between the groups with benign and malignant indications for PAUS placement was not statistically significant (p = 0.145) but resolution of hydronephrosis was significantly better (p = 0.008) in patients with benign indications. Percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent placement is a safe and effective means of relief for ureteric obstruction. The check nephrostogram following ureteric stent placement was unnecessary in the majority of patients.

  13. On the necessity of modelling fluid-structure interaction for stented coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Chiastra, Claudio; Migliavacca, Francesco; Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Malvè, Mauro

    2014-06-01

    Although stenting is the most commonly performed procedure for the treatment of coronary atherosclerotic lesions, in-stent restenosis (ISR) remains one of the most serious clinical complications. An important stimulus to ISR is the altered hemodynamics with abnormal shear stresses on endothelial cells generated by the stent presence. Computational fluid dynamics is a valid tool for studying the local hemodynamics of stented vessels, allowing the calculation of the wall shear stress (WSS), which is otherwise not directly possible to be measured in vivo. However, in these numerical simulations the arterial wall and the stent are considered rigid and fixed, an assumption that may influence the WSS and flow patterns. Therefore, the aim of this work is to perform fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analyses of a stented coronary artery in order to understand the effects of the wall compliance on the hemodynamic quantities. Two different materials are considered for the stent: cobalt-chromium (CoCr) and poly-l-lactide (PLLA). The results of the FSI and the corresponding rigid-wall models are compared, focusing in particular on the analysis of the WSS distribution. Results showed similar trends in terms of instantaneous and time-averaged WSS between compliant and rigid-wall cases. In particular, the difference of percentage area exposed to TAWSS lower than 0.4Pa between the CoCr FSI and the rigid-wall cases was about 1.5% while between the PLLA cases 1.0%. The results indicate that, for idealized models of a stented coronary artery, the rigid-wall assumption for fluid dynamic simulations appears adequate when the aim of the study is the analysis of near-wall quantities like WSS.

  14. Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Treatment of Malignant Biliary Strictures due to Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Samie, Ahmed Abdel; Stumpf, Michael; Theilmann, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    Background Transpapillary stents are used to treat malignant biliary strictures. However, there are different stent types and data are controversial in respect to success and complications. Recently, completely covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMS) have become available. The aim of this study is to present a consecutive series of CSEMS placed to decompress the bile duct in malignant stenosis due to pancreatic carcinoma and to evaluate the effectiveness, complication rate and extractability of these devices. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the courses of 27 consecutive patients who received CSEMS due to malignant biliary strictures because of pancreatic carcinoma regardless of presumed resectability between January 2010 and May 2012 in our endoscopic unit. Results A total of 27 patients (12 male and 15 female) were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 75 years. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) and stent placement were successful at first attempt in all cases. The mean length of the stenosis was 20 mm. In 24 patients (89%) a stent length of 4 cm was sufficient to bridge the stenosis. In three cases a stent length of 6 cm was necessary. Drainage was achieved as monitored by a significant decrease or normalization of bilirubin in all cases (mean bilirubin 8.5 mg/dL and 1.5 mg/dL before and after stent placement respectively), 15 patients underwent surgery with pylorus preserving duodenopancreatectomy. In all patients who underwent surgery stents could be removed during the operation without difficulties. Leakage of the biliodigestive anastomosis occurred in one patient (6.6%). Four (15%) of the 27 patients developed complications related to the endoscopic procedure and/or stent placement respectively (cholecystitis in two patients, stent occlusion in one patient, and post-sphincterotomy bleeding in one patient). Conclusion The prolonged patency, extractability, and low complication rate

  15. Comparison between superficial femoral artery stenting and bypass surgery in severe lower-limb ischaemia: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Islam, J; Robbs, JV

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Symptomatic femoro-popliteal disease is treated by bypass surgery or angioplasty with or without stenting. The aim of this study was to compare the results of stenting and bypass surgery with regard to limb salvage in patients with severe leg ischaemia. Methods A total of 213 patients with femoro-popliteal disease presenting with severe claudication or critical limb ischaemia between January 2009 and December 2013 were evaluated; 118 patients (139 limbs) had stents placed and 95 patients (104 limbs) had bypass surgery. Most (60%) presented with critical limb ischaemia (rest pain 40%, tissue necrosis 20%), and the remainder with severe claudication. The treatment groups had matching risk factors. Results The average age was 66 years and 73% were male. Tissue necrosis was found in 26% of the stent group and 12% of the bypass group (p = 0.009). In the stent group 26% had adjunctive procedures, compared to 16% in the bypass group (p = 0.138). During the one-year follow up, there were 30 stent occlusions (22%) and 18 graft occlusions (17%) (p = 0.42). There were 14 major amputations (10%) in the stent group, and 13 (13%) in the bypass group (p = 0.68). Limb salvage rate was 90% in the stent group, and 88% in the bypass group (p = 0.68). There were no peri-operative deaths in the stent group, but one in the bypass group (1%). One-year mortality rate was equal (8%) in both groups (p = 1.00). Conclusion One-year outcome was comparable in both groups with regard to mortality, stent or graft patency and limb salvage rates. PMID:25784315

  16. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. Methods The International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) is a multicentre, international, randomised controlled trial with blinded adjudication of outcomes. Patients with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive carotid artery stenting or carotid endarterectomy. Randomisation was by telephone call or fax to a central computerised service and was stratified by centre with minimisation for sex, age, contralateral occlusion, and side of the randomised artery. Patients and investigators were not masked to treatment assignment. Patients were followed up by independent clinicians not directly involved in delivering the randomised treatment. The primary outcome measure of the trial is the 3-year rate of fatal or disabling stroke in any territory, which has not been analysed yet. The main outcome measure for the interim safety analysis was the 120-day rate of stroke, death, or procedural myocardial infarction. Analysis was by intention to treat (ITT). This study is registered, number ISRCTN25337470. Findings The trial enrolled 1713 patients (stenting group, n=855; endarterectomy group, n=858). Two patients in the stenting group and one in the endarterectomy group withdrew immediately after randomisation, and were not included in the ITT analysis. Between randomisation and 120 days, there were 34 (Kaplan-Meier estimate 4·0%) events of disabling stroke or death in the stenting group compared with 27 (3·2%) events in the endarterectomy group (hazard ratio [HR] 1·28, 95% CI 0·77–2·11). The incidence of stroke, death, or procedural myocardial infarction was 8·5% in the stenting group compared with 5·2% in the endarterectomy group (72 vs 44 events

  17. Anatomical and Technical Factors Influence the Rate of In-Stent Restenosis following Carotid Artery Stenting for the Treatment of Post-Carotid Endarterectomy Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Bartoli, Jean-Michel; Bal, Laurence; Giorgi, Roch; De Masi, Mariangela; Magnan, Pierre-Edouard; Piquet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Carotid artery stenting (CAS) has been advocated as an alternative to redo surgery for the treatment of post-carotid endarterectomy (CEA) stenosis. This study analyzed the efficacy of CAS for post-CEA restenosis, focusing on an analysis of technical and anatomical predictive factors for in-stent restenosis. Methods We performed a retrospective monocentric study. We included all patients who underwent CAS for post-CEA restenosis at our institution from July 1997 to November 2013. The primary endpoints were the technical success, the presence of in-stent restenosis >50% or occlusion, either symptomatic or asymptomatic, during the follow-up period, and risk factors for restenosis. The secondary endpoints were early and late morbidity and mortality (TIA, stroke, myocardial infarction, or death). Results A total of 153 CAS procedures were performed for post-CEA restenosis, primarily because of asymptomatic lesions (137/153). The technical success rate was 98%. The 30-day perioperative stroke and death rate was 2.6% (two TIAs and two minor strokes), and rates of 2.2% (3/137) and 6.2% (1/16) were recorded for asymptomatic and symptomatic patients, respectively. The average follow-up time was 36 months (range, 6–171 months). In-stent restenosis or occlusion was observed in 16 patients (10.6%). Symptomatic restenosis was observed in only one patient. We found that young age (P = 0.002), stenosis > 85% (P = 0.018), and a lack of stent coverage of the common carotid artery (P = 0.006) were independent predictors of in-stent restenosis. Conclusion We identified new risk factors for in-stent restenosis that were specific to this population, and we propose a technical approach that may reduce this risk. PMID:27611997

  18. Influence of strut cross-section of stents on local hemodynamics in stented arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yongfei; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Wanhua

    2016-05-01

    Stenting is a very effective treatment for stenotic vascular diseases, but vascular geometries altered by stent implantation may lead to flow disturbances which play an important role in the initiation and progression of restenosis, especially in the near wall in stented arterial regions. So stent designs have become one of the indispensable factors needed to be considered for reducing the flow disturbances. In this paper, the structural designs of strut cross-section are considered as an aspect of stent designs to be studied in details. Six virtual stents with different strut cross-section are designed for deployments in the same ideal arterial model. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are performed to study how the shape and the aspect ratio (AR) of strut cross-section modified the local hemodynamics in the stented segments. The results indicate that stents with different strut cross-sections have different influence on the hemodynamics. Stents with streamlined cross-sectional struts for circular arc or elliptical arc can significantly enhance wall shear stress (WSS) in the stented segments, and reduce the flow disturbances around stent struts. The performances of stents with streamlined cross-sectional struts are better than that of stents with non-streamlined cross-sectional struts for rectangle. The results also show that stents with a larger AR cross-section are more conductive to improve the blood flow. The present study provides an understanding of the flow physics in the vicinity of stent struts and indicates that the shape and AR of strut cross-section ought to be considered as important factors to minimize flow disturbance in stent designs.

  19. Angioplasty or Stenting in Adult Coarctation of the Aorta? A Retrospective Single Center Analysis Over a Decade

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, Sumaira Thomas, Steven M.; Cleveland, Trevor J.; Gaines, Peter A.

    2003-08-15

    For over 11 years, endovascular treatment by angioplasty (PTA) alone or stenting of adult coarctation at a single center was evaluated. We retrospectively reviewed 28 consecutive patients (31 interventions), median age 25 years, treated between 1991 and 2002, 20 of whom had native coarctation. Thirteen patients had PTA alone (16 procedures) (10 'kissing balloon' angioplasty comprising 12 interventions, and 3 single balloon angioplasty comprising 4 interventions) and 15 patients were stented(15 procedures), including 6 secondary and 9 primary stents. There were no procedural or 30-day complications. For the whole group, the median follow-up was 6.6 years (range 1-10 years). In the PTA group, median follow-up was 9 years (range 3-10) and in the stenting group it was 3 years (range 1-5). There were 9 restenoses in the PTA group (6 after 'kissing balloons' and 3 after single balloon) comprising 56% of the angioplasties (9/16 procedures). There was 1 restenosis in the stenting group diagnosed at computed tomography (CT). The patient was clinically well. For the whole group there were significant reductions in systolic blood pressure (BP) (p 0.0003), diastolic BP (p = 0.004) and number of drugs per patient (p = 0.045) at latest follow-up post-treatment. Five patients discontinued therapy.Analysis of the groups revealed that the reduction of systolic and diastolic BP and number of drugs did not reach statistical significance in the PTA group but were significant in the stent group. The endovascular management of adult coarctation is safe. Stents may be more effective than PTA alone but longer-term follow-up of stents is required.

  20. [Retrograde type A dissection after endovascular stent grafting of type B dissection].

    PubMed

    Misfeld, M; Nötzold, A; Geist, V; Richardt, G; Sievers, H H

    2002-03-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a disease with high mortality. Whereas acute dissection of the ascending aorta (Standford type A) is treated surgically, acute dissection of Stanford type B (descending aorta) is principally treated conservatively, but surgically in case of complications. Recently, another therapeutical option for the treatment of type B dissection has been developed using endovascular stent-grafts. We report on a 64-year-old woman with typical signs of acute aortic dissection. Computer tomography and transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated Stanford type B dissection. The patient was treated with an endovascular stent-graft, because of malperfusion of the right leg and chest pain. After successful closure of the entry by the stent, the patient developed acute right-sided hemiplegia one day after the intervention due to retrograde dissection into the aortic arch and ascending aorta. Upon immediate operation, the origin of the initially type B dissection was still sufficiently occluded by the endovascular stent-graft; however, there was another entry between the innominate artery and the left carotic artery near one proximal end of the stent's strut. Using deep hypothermia and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion, the ascending aorta and proximal arch were replaced with a 28 mm Dacron-Velour tube and the aortic root was remodelled with a tongue-shaped Dacron graft preserving the valve cusps according to a modified Yacoub procedure. After the operation, neurological symptoms diminished and the patient could walk on the ward on day eleven. This case demonstrates retrograde type A dissection as a complication after interventional treatment of type B dissection using an endovascular stent-graft. The reason for this delayed complication is speculative. Aortic wall damage during stent inserting could be a possible cause. It is also likely that the patient initially had type B dissection with retrograde dissection of the distal part of the aortic arch

  1. Compression, distortion and dislodgement of large caliber stents in congenital heart defects caused by cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Haas, Nikolaus A; Happel, Christoph M; Jategaonkar, Smita; Moysich, Axel; Hanslik, Andreas; Kececioglu, Deniz; Sandica, Eugen; Laser, Kai Thorsten

    2014-09-01

    Stenting of vascular, extracardiac or lately intracardiac stenosis has become an established interventional treatment for a variety of problems in congenital or acquired heart disease. Most stent procedures are completed successfully and the long-term outcome is favorable in the majority of cases. Stent collapse or deformation is a well recognized entity in peripheral stents and can be attributed to insufficient radial force; it can also be attributed to excessive external forces, like deformation of stents in the right ventricular outflow tract, where external compression is combined with continuous movement caused by the beating heart. The protection of the thoracic cage may prove to be insufficient in extraordinary circumstances, such as chest compression in trauma or cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In this case series, we describe three patients in whom large endovascular stents were placed to treat significant stenosis of the aorta, the aortic arch or the venous system of the inferior vena cava close to the atrium. In all patients, CPR was necessary during their clinical course for various reasons; after adequate CPR, including appropriate chest compression all patients survived the initial resuscitation phase. Clinical, echocardiographic as well as radiologic re-evaluation after resuscitation revealed significant stent distortion, compression, displacement or additional vascular injury. The possibility of mechanical deformation of large endovascular stents needs to be considered and recognized when performing CPR; if CPR is successful, immediate re-evaluation of the implanted stents--if possible by biplane fluoroscopy--seems mandatory.

  2. Rapid virtual stenting for intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-03-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient.

  3. Rapid Virtual Stenting for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient. PMID:27346910

  4. Prevention of stent thrombosis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Reejhsinghani, Risheen; Lotfi, Amir S

    2015-01-01

    Stent thrombosis is an uncommon but serious complication which carries with it significant mortality and morbidity. This review analyzes the entity of stent thrombosis from a historical and clinical perspective, and chronicles the evolution of this condition through the various generations of stent development, from bare metal to first-generation, second-generation, and third-generation drug-eluting stents. It also delineates the specific risk factors associated with stent thrombosis and comprehensively examines the literature related to each of these risks. Finally, it highlights the preventative strategies that can be garnered from the existing data, and concludes that a multifactorial approach is necessary to combat the occurrence of stent thrombosis, with higher risk groups, such as patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, meriting further research. PMID:25657588

  5. Feasibility and Safety of Transradial Arterial Approach for Simultaneous Right and Left Vertebral Artery Angiographic Studies and Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, H.-K.; Youssef, Ali A.; Chang, W.-N.; Lu, C.-H.; Yang, C.-H.; Chen, S.-M.; Wu, C.-J.

    2007-09-15

    Objectives. This study investigated whether the transradial artery (TRA) approach using a 6-French (F) Kimny guiding catheter for right vertebral artery (VA) angiographic study and stenting is safe and effective for patients with significant VA stenosis. Background. The TRA approach is commonly performed worldwide for both diagnostic cardiac catheterization and catheter-based coronary intervention. However, to our knowledge, the safety and feasibility of left and right VA angiographic study and stenting, in the same procedure, using the TRA approach for patients with brain ischemia have not been reported. Methods. The study included 24 consecutive patients (22 male, 2 female; age, 63-78 years). Indications for VA angiographic study and stenting were (1) prior stroke or symptoms related to vertebrobasilar ischemia and (2) an asymptomatic but vertebral angiographic finding of severe stenosis (>70%). A combination of the ipsilateral and retrograde-engagement technique, which involved a looping 6-F Kimny guiding catheter, was utilized for VA angiographic study. For VA stenting, an ipsilateral TRA approach with either a Kimny guiding catheter or a left internal mammary artery guiding catheter was utilized in 22 patients and retrograde-engagement technique in 2 patients. Results. A technically successful procedure was achieved in all patients, including left VA stenting in 15 patients and right VA stenting in 9 patients. The mean time for stenting (from engagement to stent deployment) was 12.7 min. There were no vascular complications or mortality. However, one patient suffered from a transient ischemic attack that resolved within 3 h. Conclusion. We conclude that TRA access for both VA angiographic study and VA stenting is safe and effective, and provides a simple and useful clinical tool for patients unsuited for femoral arterial access.

  6. Mechanical behavior of peripheral stents and stent-vessel interaction: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dottori, Serena; Flamini, Vittoria; Vairo, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    In this paper stents employed to treat peripheral artery disease are analyzed through a three-dimensional finite-element approach, based on a large-strain and large-displacement formulation. Aiming to evaluate the influence of some stent design parameters on stent mechanics and on the biomechanical interaction between stent and arterial wall, quasi-static and dynamic numerical analyses are carried out by referring to computational models of commercially and noncommercially available versions of both braided self-expandable stents and balloon-expandable stents. Addressing isolated device models, opening mechanisms and flexibility of both opened and closed stent configurations are numerically experienced. Moreover, stent deployment into a stenotic peripheral artery and possible postdilatation angioplasty (the latter for the self-expandable device only) are simulated by considering different idealized vessel geometries and accounting for the presence of a stenotic plaque. Proposed results highlight important differences in the mechanical response of the two types of stents, as well as a significant influence of the vessel shape on the stress distributions arising upon the artery-plaque system. Finally, computational results are used to assess both the stent mechanical performance and the effectiveness of the stenting treatment, allowing also to identify possible critical conditions affecting the risk of stent fracture, tissue damage, and/or pathological tissue response.

  7. One Year Clinical Outcomes of Renal Artery Stenting: The Results of ODORI Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Sapoval, M.; Tamari, I.; Goffette, P.; Downes, M.; Senechal, Q.; Fanelli, F.; Reimer, P.; Negaiwi, Z.; Cassin, P. De; Heye, S.; Korobov, V.; Tsetis, D.; Abada, H.

    2010-06-15

    The safety, efficacy and long term clinical benefits of renal artery revascularization by stenting are still a matter of debate. The aim of our study was to define the safety and efficacy of renal artery stenting with the Tsunami peripheral stent (Terumo Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). The ODORI was a prospective, multicentre registry which enrolled 251 consecutive patients, (276 renal arteries) in 36 centres across Europe. The primary endpoint was acute procedural success defined as <30% residual stenosis after stent placement. Secondary endpoints included major adverse events, blood pressure control, serum creatinine level, and target lesion revascularization (TLR) at 6 and 12 months. Patients were 70 {+-} 10 years old, 59% were male, 33% had diabetes, and 96% hypertension. The main indications for renal stent implantation were hypertension in 83% and renal salvage in 39%. Direct stent implantation was performed in 76% of the cases. Acute success rate was 100% with residual stenosis of 2.5 {+-} 5.4%. Systolic/diastolic blood pressure decreased from a mean of 171/89 at baseline to 142/78 mmHg at 6 months (p < 0.0001 vs. baseline), and 141/80 mmHg at 12 months (p < 0.0001 vs. baseline). Mean serum creatinine concentration did not change significantly in the total population. However, there was significant improvement in the highest tercile (from 283 {mu}mol/l at baseline to 205 and 209 {mu}mol/l at 6 and 12 months respectively). At 12-months, rates of restenosis and TLR were 6.6 and 0.8% respectively. The 12 month cumulative rate of all major clinical adverse events was 6.4% while the rate of device or procedure related events was 2.4%. In hypertensive patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis Tsunami peripheral balloon-expandable stent provides a safe revascularization strategy, with a potential beneficial impact on hypertension control and renal function in the highest risk patients.

  8. Peripheral Stent Placement in Hemodialysis Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Kariya, Shuji Tanigawa, Noboru; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Komemushi, Atsushi; Shomura, Yuzo; Shiraishi, Tomokuni; Kawanaka, Toshiaki; Sawada, Satoshi

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of peripheral stent placement after failed balloon angioplasty in patients with grafts who are on hemodialysis. We examined 30 Wallstents that were placed in 26 patients because balloon angioplasty failed or early restenosis (<3 months) occurred within 3 months. We retrospectively reviewed 267 consecutive balloon angioplasties performed in 71 patients with graft access between August 2000 and March 2007. Stent placements accounted for 30 (11.2%) of the 267 balloon angioplasties. The clinical success rate of stent placement was 93.3% (28 of 30 stent placements). The 3-, 6-, and 12-month primary patency rates were 73.3%, 39.3%, and 17.7%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year secondary patency rates were 90.2%, 83.8%, and 83.8%, respectively. Primary patency was significantly prolonged by stent placement after early restenosis compared with previous balloon angioplasty alone (P = 0.0059). Primary patency after stent placement was significantly lower than after successful balloon angioplasty without indications for stent placement (P = 0.0279). Secondary patency rates did not significantly differ between stent placement and balloon angioplasty alone. The mean number of reinterventions required to maintain secondary patency after stent placement was significantly larger than that after balloon angioplasty alone (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.0419). We concluded that peripheral stent placement for graft access is effective for salvaging vascular access after failed balloon angioplasty and for prolonging patency in early restenosis after balloon angioplasty. However, reinterventions are required to maintain secondary patency after stent placement. Furthermore, peripheral stent placement for graft access cannot achieve the same primary patency as balloon angioplasty alone.

  9. Stent implantation influence wall shear stress evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, S. I.; Totorean, A. F.; Bosioc, A. I.; Petre, I.; Bernad, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    Local hemodynamic factors are known affect the natural history of the restenosis critically after coronary stenting of atherosclerosis. Stent-induced flows disturbance magnitude dependent directly on the strut design. The impact of flow alterations around struts vary as the strut geometrical parameters change. Our results provide data regarding the hemodynamic parameters for the blood flow in both stenosed and stented coronary artery under physiological conditions, namely wall shear stress and pressure drop.

  10. Stent Retriever-Based Thrombectomy in Octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jose E.; Gomori, John M.; Leker, Ronen. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Stent retriever-based thrombectomy (SRT) may be beneficial in patients with large hemispheric stroke. Previous studies concluded that favorable outcomes are far less frequent after endovascular therapy in older patients but have not explored outcomes in the era of newer-generation stent retrievers. Materials and Methods Consecutive patients with large hemispheric stroke treated with SRT were included. We compared neurological and functional outcomes between patients younger and older than 80. Results We included 16 patients older than 80 (22.5%, mean age 84.1 ± 4.4, 56% females) and compared them to 55 patients that were younger than 80 (77.5%, mean age 63.1 ± 12.5, 51% females). Risk factor profile, admission neurological severity, stroke etiology and procedure-related variables including excellent target vessel recanalization did not differ between the groups. Favorable outcome at 90 days (modified Rankin score ≤2) was more common in younger patients (77 vs. 23%; p = 0.031). In contrast, mortality rates were higher in octogenarians (40 vs. 7%; p = 0.01). Logistic regression analysis adjusting for neurological severity and collateral state identified age over 80 (odds ratio, OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.03–0.75; p = 0.02) and reperfusion state (OR 7.4, 95% CI 1.1–49.9; p = 0.04) as significant modifiers of favorable outcome. Similarly, age over 80 was identified as a positive predictor of mortality (OR 8.1, 95% CI 1.8–36.7; p = 0.007). Conclusions Octogenarians have higher chances of mortality and lower probability of achieving functional independence even after SRT. Nevertheless, because some elderly patients do achieve favorable outcomes, the cost-effectiveness of SRT in this population needs to be further studied. PMID:27781038

  11. The importance of annealing 316 LVM stents.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Kobbe, C; Hinrichs, B H

    2003-01-01

    The annealing process is an important key step in the manufacture of high quality and reliable 316 LVM stents. [figure: see text] The methods commonly applied for verifying the outcome of the annealing process such as microhardness testing are inappropriate and should not be used. The tension testing of tubes, processed together with stents, provides reliable results of the final material properties of stents. During the course of the investigation the grain size was reduced significantly and the break elongation improved. The surface of the strain-tested material shows substantial improvements. All results are particularly important for thin-wall stents with filigree struts.

  12. New stent delivery balloon: a technical note.

    PubMed

    di Mario, C; Reimers, B; Reinhardt, R; Ferraro, M; Moussa, I; Colombo, A

    1997-12-01

    This study reports the first clinical application of a new noncompliant balloon composed of a middle polyurethane layer sandwiched between an inner layer of polyethylene terephtalate and an outer membrane that provides for consistent even expansion. With this balloon design, the very low compliance and high pressure resistance of polyethylene terephthalate are associated with the high elasticity of polyurethane, preventing balloon damage from stent crimping and expansion and allowing a firm embedding of the stent struts. Palmaz-Schatz stent implantation was successful in 33/35 stents (94%), and the two stents that could not be advanced up to the lesion were successfully withdrawn. High pressure expansion of the stent was obtained during deployment with no balloon ruptures at inflation pressures equal or lower than 16 atmospheres (atm). Accurate positioning of the stent was facilitated by the two markers at the balloon ends and by the optimal visualization after contrast injection, even with 6 Fr guiding catheters. This new delivery system maintains the advantages of hand-crimped stents on noncompliant balloons, reducing the risk of stent loss. PMID:9408637

  13. Triple, simultaneous, very late coronary stent thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Miguel Silva; Luz, André; Anjo, Diana; Antunes, Nuno; Santos, Mário; Carvalho, Henrique; Torres, Severo

    2013-03-01

    Coronary artery stent thrombosis is an uncommon but potentially catastrophic complication. The risk of very late stent thrombosis (VLST) raises important safety issues regarding the first generation of drug-eluting stents (DES). Although several complex mechanisms for VLST have been suggested and various predictors have been described, its pathophysiology is not completely understood and it is not known whether longer-term dual antiplatelet therapy reduces the risk. We present a rare case of simultaneous very late DES thrombosis in the three vascular territories, following discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy seven years after stent placement, presenting as cardiogenic shock.

  14. Sequential Stenting for Extensive Malignant Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Tei, Keiko; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Malignant airway stenosis extending from the bronchial bifurcation to the lower lobar orifice was treated with airway stenting. We herein examine the effectiveness of airway stenting for extensive malignant airway stenosis. Methods: Twelve patients with extensive malignant airway stenosis underwent placement of a silicone Dumon Y stent (Novatech, La Ciotat, France) at the tracheal bifurcation and a metallic Spiral Z-stent (Medico’s Hirata, Osaka, Japan) at either distal side of the Y stent. We retrospectively analyzed the therapeutic efficacy of the sequential placement of these silicone and metallic stents in these 12 patients. Results: The primary disease was lung cancer in eight patients, breast cancer in two patients, tracheal cancer in one patient, and thyroid cancer in one patient. The median survival period after airway stent placement was 46 days. The Hugh–Jones classification and performance status improved in nine patients after airway stenting. One patient had prolonged hemoptysis and died of respiratory tract hemorrhage 15 days after the treatment. Conclusion: Because the initial disease was advanced and aggressive, the prognosis after sequential airway stent placement was significantly poor. However, because respiratory distress decreased after the treatment in most patients, this treatment may be acceptable for selected patients with extensive malignant airway stenosis. PMID:25273272

  15. Stent enhancement using a locally adaptive unsharp masking filter in digital x-ray fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuhao; Ekanayake, Eranda

    2014-03-01

    Low exposure X-ray fluoroscopy is used to guide some complicate interventional procedures. Due to the inherent high levels of noise, improving the visibility of some interventional devices such as stent will greatly benefit those interventional procedures. Stent, which is made up of tiny steel wires, is also suffered from contrast dilutions of large flat panel detector pixels. A novel adaptive unsharp masking filter has been developed to improve stent contrast in real-time applications. In unsharp masking processing, the background is estimated and subtracted from the original input image to create a foreground image containing objects of interest. A background estimator is therefore critical in the unsharp masking processing. In this specific study, orientation filter kernels are used as the background estimator. To make the process simple and fast, the kernels average along a line of pixels. A high orientation resolution of 18° is used. A nonlinear operator is then used to combine the information from the images generated from convolving the original background and noise only images with orientation filters. A computerized Monte Carlo simulation followed by ROC study is used to identify the best nonlinear operator. We then apply the unsharp masking filter to the images with stents present. It is shown that the locally adaptive unsharp making filter is an effective filter for improving stent visibility in the interventional fluoroscopy. We also apply a spatio-temporal channelized human observer model to quantitatively optimize and evaluate the filter.

  16. Neointimal Hyperplasia in Low-Profile Nitinol Stents, Palmaz Stents, and Wallstents: A Comparative Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schuermann, Karl; Vorwerk, Dierk; Kulisch, Arthur; Stroehmer-Kulisch, Eva; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Stopinski, Tadeusz; Guenther, Rolf W.

    1996-04-15

    Purpose: To compare neointima formation following insertion of low-profile Nitinol stents, Palmaz stents, and Wallstents. Methods: Nitinol stents, Palmaz stents, and Wallstents similar in size were transfemorally inserted into the iliac arteries of 12 sheep. Four stents per sheep were deployed; the position of the stents was varied so that each type of stent was placed in each position (right or left, proximal or distal) with equal frequency. Stent patency was followed by angiography. Six sheep were euthanized after 1 month, and the remaining six after 6 months. Iliac arteries were removed en bloc and prepared for histological examination. Neointimal and medial thickness were measured by light microscopy, and measurements were analyzed statistically. Results: Mean neointimal thickness both over (NO) and between (NB) the stent struts was greater in Wallstents (NO = 0.341 mm, NB = 0.368 mm) than in the Nitinol (NO = 0.260 mm, NB = 0.220 mm) and Palmaz stents (NO = 0.199 mm, NB = 0.204 mm), but differences were not significant (p> 0.05). Medial atrophy in the area between the stent struts was greater in Wallstents compared with Nitinol and Palmaz stents (p < 0.007 and p < 0.02, respectively); in the area under the stent struts there was a significant difference only between Palmaz stents and Wallstents (p < 0.02). Conclusion: Under defined experimental conditions, none of the three types of stent appears to be preferable to the others regarding neointima formation in the short- to mid-term follow-up period.

  17. Angioplasty and Stenting of Symptomatic Vertebral Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadian, R.; Sharifipour, E.; Mansourizadeh, R.; Sohrabi, B.; Nayebi, A.R; Haririan, S.; Farhoudi, M.; Charsouei, S.; Najmi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) has recently become a noteworthy treatment option for significant stenosis involving the vertebral artery (VA) in selected patients. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the efficacy, safety and mid-term follow up results of 206 cases received PTA with or without stent implant to treat their symptomatic atherosclerotic VA stenosis in all segments (V1-V4). In a prospective mono-arm trial from October 2008 to July 2012 in a single center, 239 lesions affecting the intra or extracranial VA (171 in V1, 17 in V2, 14 in V3, 21 in V4 and 16 in combined segments) were treated by PTA with or without stent implant. Non-disabling stroke patients who had failed conservative medical treatment and had angiographic evidence of >50% stenosis in the dominant VA with clinical signs and symptoms of VB stenosis were included in this study. They were mean followed for 13.15±5.24 months after treatment. Overall, 206 patients underwent the procedure. A stent was implemented in 199 patients (96.6%). The periprocedural complication rate was 7.2%. The procedural (technical) success rate was 97.6%. Of the total 239 lesions, 223 were treated with stent implant. Clinical success was achieved in all 206 symptomatic patients after the procedure. Restenosis occurred in 15.9% after a mean 10.8 (6-24) months. Of those, 63.1% and 34.2% had mild and moderate stenosis that was treated medically, whereas one case (2.6%) with severe restenosis underwent balloon angioplasty. No deaths occurred during the follow-up period. The follow-up complication rate was 6.3%. TIA occurred in 4.4%, a minor stroke in 1.4% and a major stroke in one patient. The overall patient event-free survival was 92.4%. These results demonstrate the safety and feasibility of PTA with or without stent implant, with a high technical success rate, a low complication rate, a low restenosis rate and durable clinical success in patients with symptomatic VA stenosis. This

  18. Access-Related Venous Stenoses and Occlusions: Treatment with Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty and Dacron-Covered Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Farber, Alexander; Barbey, Mark-Michael; Grunert, Jens-Holger; Gmelin, Ekkechardt

    1999-05-15

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of using Dacron-covered stents to treat access-related venous stenoses and occlusions. Methods: Twenty-two Dacron-covered stents were placed in 20 patients: in the basilic or axillary vein (n = 2), cephalic vein (n = 3), subclavian vein (n = 5), and at the venous anastomosis of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) implant graft (n 10). Results: Initial technical success was 100%. The cumulative primary and secondary patency rates were 57% and 83% at 6 months, 29% and 64% at 12 months, and 29% and 53% at 18 months. A statistically significant difference in the stent patency was revealed by comparing the patients with stents in the subclavian vein and patients with upper arm stents. The secondary patency rates of the upper arm stents were 73% after 6, 12, and 18 months. Conclusions: Percutaneous placement of Dacron-covered stents is a safe and effective procedure for salvage of a dialysis fistula. First results are promising, with a tendency to prolongation of the time interval between reinterventions.

  19. The long-term results of temporary urethral stent placement for the treatment of recurrent bulbar urethral stricture disease

    PubMed Central

    Temeltas, Gokhan; Ucer, Oktay; Yuksel, Mehmet Bilgehan; Gumus, Bilal; Tatli, Volkan; Muezzinoglu, Talha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To evaluate the long term outcomes of temporary urethral stent placement for the treatment of recurrent bulbar urethral stricture. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight patients who underwent temporary polymer coated urethral stent placement due to recurrent bulbar urethral stricture between 2010 and 2014 were enrolled in the study. The long term outcomes of the patients were analyzed. Results: The mean age of the patients was 62.3±6.4 (44–81). The overall clinical success was achieved in 18 (64.2%) of the 28 patients at a median (range) follow-up of 29 (7–46) months. No patient reported discomfort at the stent site. Stone formation was observed at the urethral stent implantation area only in one patient. Stenosis occurred in the distal end of the stents in two patients and took place in bulbar urethra in seven patients after removed the stents. The mean maximum urine flow rates were 6.24±2.81mL/sec and 19.12±4.31mL/sec before and at 3 months after the procedure, respectively. Conclusion: In this study, the success rate of temporary urethral stent placement has remained at 64.2% at a median follow-up of 29 months. Therefore, our outcomes have not achieved desired success rate for the standard treatment of recurrent bulbar urethral stricture. PMID:27256191

  20. Coronary stenting in 1000 consecutive patients. Long-term clinical and angiographic results.

    PubMed

    Colombo, A; Di Mario, C; Reimers, B; Blengino, S; Akiyama, T; Ferraro, M; Martini, G; Di Francesco, L; Finci, L

    1997-01-01

    Coronary stent implantation has become an accepted treatment for selected patients but the long-term outcome after stent implantation has not been investigated in a large unselected population. This study reports clinical and angiographic results after coronary stent implantation in a consecutive group of 1000 patients treated between November 1989 and June 1994. A total of 2012 stents were implanted in 1216 lesions. The anticoagulation regimen after successful stenting was abolished in the last 499 patients, treated with aspirin and ticlopidina. Complex lesions (type B2, type C lesions and chronic total occlusions) were less frequent in the group with anticoagulation (67%, 355/529 lesions) than in the group without anticoagulation (76%, 485/641; p < 0.01). Vessel size was also significantly smaller in the group with no anticoagulation (3.21 +/- 0.50 mm vs 2.89 +/- 0.70 mm; p < 0.001). Procedural success was achieved in 96% of cases. Major complications occurred in 49 pts, including death (1%), emergency bypass surgery (2.7%), and myocardial infarction (2.1%). Subacute stent thrombosis, observed in 2.6% of the patients treated with anticoagulation, decreased to 1% in the last 499 patients receiving only antiplatelet drugs after high pressure stent expansion controlled with intravascular ultrasound (p < 0.05). Angiographic follow-up was obtained at a mean interval of 6.6 +/- 3.0 months in 718 patients (75% of the eligible candidates). The global restenosis rate (greater than 50% diameter stenosis) was 22%, with no statistically significant difference in patients with and without anticoagulation after stenting. Clinical follow-up was available in 890 patients at a mean interval of 14 +/- 17 months. Late cardiac events occurred in 251 patients and included: 159 repeat coronary angioplasties for restenosis (20%), 114 coronary angioplasties for de novo lesions (10%), 33 elective by-pass surgery operations (3.7%) and 42 late deaths (4.7%). At the most recent follow

  1. Acute Carotid Artery Stent Thrombosis Due to Dual Antiplatelet Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Köklü, Erkan Arslan, Şakir; Yüksel, İsa Öner; Bayar, Nermin; Koç, Pınar

    2015-08-15

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is a revascularization modality that is an alternative to carotid endarterectomy. The efficacy of CAS in primary and secondary prevention from ischemic stroke has been demonstrated in various trials. Acute thrombosis of CAS is a rare complication that can lead to dramatic and catastrophic consequences. We discuss a case of acute CAS thrombosis in a patient who had previously undergone successful CAS. CAS was performed in a 73-year-old man who had had dysarthria lasting 2 weeks with 95 % stenosis in his left internal carotid artery. An acute cerebrovascular event resulting in right-sided hemiplegia developed 24 h after the procedure. Computed tomographic carotid angiography revealed complete occlusion of the stent with thrombus. The cause of stent thrombosis was thought to be antiaggregant resistance to both acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel. The most important cause of acute CAS thrombosis is inadequate or ineffective antiaggregant therapy. Evaluating patients who are candidates for CAS for acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel resistance may preclude this complication.

  2. Successful Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty and Stenting in Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gartenschlaeger, Soeren Bender, Siegfried; Maeurer, Juergen; Schroeder, Ralf J.

    2008-03-15

    Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a life-threatening emergency. The complications are high by the time of diagnosis in most cases and therefore only few data on primary percutaneous intervention with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stenting in AMI are available. We present the case of an 84-year-old woman who presented to our emergency department complaining of an acute worsening of pre-existing abdominal periumbilical pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. She had previously undergone percutaneous transluminal embolectomy for an acute occlusion of the left common femoral artery. Due to suspicion of intestinal infarction, conventional angiography of the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was performed and confirmed a proximal occlusion of the SMA. Percutaneous SMA recanalization with balloon dilation and subsequent stent implantation was carried out successfully. The abdominal symptoms subsided after this procedure. In AMI that is diagnosed early, endovascular stenting should be considered as an alternative treatment to the surgical approach that avoids the need for surgical bowel resection.

  3. Angioplasty and stent treatment of transplant renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Del Pozo, Maitane; Martí, Jordi; Guirado, Lluís; Facundo, Carme; Canal, Cristina; de la Torre, Pablo; Ballarín, José; Díaz, Joan M

    2012-07-17

    Transplant renal artery stenosis is a major complication that requires a therapeutic approach involving surgery or angioplasty. The aim of this study was to analyse the evolution of renal transplant patients with renal allograft artery stenosis treated by angioplasty and stent placement. Thirteen patients were diagnosed with transplant renal artery stenosis. Clinical suspicion was based on deterioration of renal function and/or poorly controlled hypertension with compatible Doppler ultrasound findings. The diagnosis was confirmed by arteriography, performing an angioplasty with stent placement during the same operation. A progressive improvement in renal function was observed during the first 3 months after the angioplasty, and renal function then remained stable over 2 years. In addition, blood pressure improved during the first 2 years, and as a consequence there was no need to increase the average number of anti-hypertensive drugs administered (2.5 drugs per patient). In conclusion, angioplasty with stent placement is a safe and effective procedure for the treatment of transplant renal artery stenosis.

  4. Carotid artery stenting: current and emerging options

    PubMed Central

    Morr, Simon; Lin, Ning; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2014-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting technologies are rapidly evolving. Options for endovascular surgeons and interventionists who treat occlusive carotid disease continue to expand. We here present an update and overview of carotid stenting devices. Evidence supporting carotid stenting includes randomized controlled trials that compare endovascular stenting to open surgical endarterectomy. Carotid technologies addressed include the carotid stents themselves as well as adjunct neuroprotective devices. Aspects of stent technology include bare-metal versus covered stents, stent tapering, and free-cell area. Drug-eluting and cutting balloon indications are described. Embolization protection options and new direct carotid access strategies are reviewed. Adjunct technologies, such as intravascular ultrasound imaging and risk stratification algorithms, are discussed. Bare-metal and covered stents provide unique advantages and disadvantages. Stent tapering may allow for a more fitted contour to the caliber decrement between the common carotid and internal carotid arteries but also introduces new technical challenges. Studies regarding free-cell area are conflicting with respect to benefits and associated risk; clinical relevance of associated adverse effects associated with either type is unclear. Embolization protection strategies include distal filter protection and flow reversal. Though flow reversal was initially met with some skepticism, it has gained wider acceptance and may provide the advantage of not crossing the carotid lesion before protection is established. New direct carotid access techniques address difficult anatomy and incorporate sophisticated flow-reversal embolization protection techniques. Carotid stenting is a new and exciting field with rapidly advancing technologies. Embolization protection, low-risk deployment, and lesion assessment and stratification are active areas of research. Ample room remains for further innovations and developments. PMID:25349483

  5. Bioresorbable ureteral stents from natural origin polymers.

    PubMed

    Barros, Alexandre A; Rita, Ana; Duarte, C; Pires, Ricardo A; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Ludovico, Paula; Lima, Estevão; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L

    2015-04-01

    In this work, stents were produced from natural origin polysaccharides. Alginate, gellan gum, and a blend of these with gelatin were used to produce hollow tube (stents) following a combination of templated gelation and critical point carbon dioxide drying. Morphological analysis of the surface of the stents was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. Indwelling time, encrustation, and stability of the stents in artificial urine solution was carried out up to 60 days of immersion. In vitro studies carried out with simulated urine demonstrated that the tubes present a high fluid uptake ability, about 1000%. Despite this, the materials are able to maintain their shape and do not present an extensive swelling behavior. The bioresorption profile was observed to be highly dependent on the composition of the stent and it can be tuned. Complete dissolution of the materials may occur between 14 and 60 days. Additionally, no encrustation was observed within the tested timeframe. The ability to resist bacterial adherence was evaluated with Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and two Gram-negatives Escherichia coli DH5 alpha and Klebsiella oxytoca. For K. oxytoca, no differences were observed in comparison with a commercial stent (Biosoft(®) duo, Porges), although, for S. aureus all tested compositions had a higher inhibition of bacterial adhesion compared to the commercial stents. In case of E. coli, the addition of gelatin to the formulations reduced the bacterial adhesion in a highly significant manner compared to the commercial stents. The stents produced by the developed technology fulfill the requirements for ureteral stents and will contribute in the development of biocompatible and bioresorbable urinary stents.

  6. Interlocking Stents for Improving Stent Fixation at Graft-Venous Anastomosis

    SciTech Connect

    Eyal, Abraham; Hebron, Dan

    1998-03-15

    To lower the risk of stent migration in a graft-venous anastomosis stenosis following failed percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, two Strecker stents of different caliber were placed in partly overlapping fashion across the stenosis. In contrast to other methods, stent 'floating' on the venous side was eliminated by using a stent with a caliber matching the tapering postanastomotic vein and anchoring it to both the venous wall and the second stent. Using this method we believe we accomplished better fixation of the stent placed mostly in the venous side of the anastomosis, thus lowering its risk of migration. At 6 months follow-up the stents are in place and the anastomosis is patent.

  7. The 10-year Trend of Periprocedural Complication Following Carotid Artery Stenting; Single Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Jeong-Ho; Kang, Jihoon; Yeo, Min-Ju; Kim, Beom Joon; Jang, Min Uk; Bae, Hee-Joon; Kwon, O-Ki; Hwang, Gyo Jun; Oh, Chang Wan; Jung, Cheolkyu; Lee, Ji Sung; Han, Moon-Ku

    2015-04-15

    PurposeCarotid endarterectomy and stenting are used to treat carotid stenosis, with the volume of carotid artery procedures increasing over the past decade. We investigated the 10-year trend of periprocedural complications with an increasing procedure volume of carotid stenting at a single tertiary hospital.MethodsWe collected 416 consecutive cases (384 patients) of carotid artery stenting performed for either symptomatic (231 cases, 55.5 %) or asymptomatic (185 cases, 44.5 %) internal carotid artery stenosis at a single center. Periprocedural complication was defined as any stroke, myocardial infarction, or death. Procedure-related outcome included any dissection, hemodynamic event, or periprocedural complication.ResultsThe mean age was 68.8 years (82.8 % males; range of 20–89 years); 23.9 % were older than 75 years. Before the procedure, 99.3 and 56.0 % of patients received antiplatelet and lipid-lowering medication, respectively. The overall periprocedural complication rate was 3.6 % (1.6 and 5.2 % in the asymptomatic and symptomatic group, respectively). The composite outcome of any stroke or death was 3.4 %. Periprocedural complication and procedure-related outcome showed a decremental trend with increasing procedure volume, and this trend remained after adjusting for confounders.ConclusionsOur study suggests that carotid stenting at an experienced center might reduce the periprocedural complications. Our periprocedural complication rate of carotid artery stenting may be comparable to, or somewhat lower than, that reported in other clinical trials.

  8. Initial Experience with the Resonance Metallic Stent for Antegrade Ureteric Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, Tze M. Irving, Henry C.; Cartledge, Jon

    2007-07-15

    Background and purpose. We describe our initial experience with a new metallic ureteric stent which has been designed to provide long-term urinary drainage in patients with malignant ureteric strictures. The aim is to achieve longer primary patency rates than conventional polyurethane ureteric stents, where encrustation and compression by malignant masses limit primary patency. The Resonance metallic double-pigtail ureteric stent (Cook, Ireland) is constructed from coiled wire spirals of a corrosion-resistant alloy designed to minimize tissue in-growth and resist encrustation, and the manufacturer recommends interval stent change at 12 months. Methods. Seventeen Resonance stents were inserted via an antegrade approach into 15 patients between December 2004 and March 2006. The causes of ureteric obstruction were malignancies of the bladder (n = 4), colon (n = 3), gynecologic (n = 5), and others (n = 3). Results. One patient had the stent changed after 12 months, and 3 patients had their stents changed at 6 months. These stents were draining adequately with minimal encrustation. Four patients are still alive with functioning stents in situ for 2-10 months. Seven patients died with functioning stents in place (follow-up periods of 1 week to 8 months). Three stents failed from the outset due to bulky pelvic malignancy resulting in high intravesical pressure, as occurs with conventional plastic stents. Conclusion. Our initial experience with the Resonance metallic ureteric stent indicates that it may provide adequate long-term urinary drainage (up to 12 months) in patients with malignant ureteric obstruction but without significantly bulky pelvic disease. This obviates the need for regular stent changes and would offer significant benefit for these patients with limited life expectancy.

  9. Simplified fistula dilation technique and modified stent deployment maneuver for EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Woo Hyun; Park, Do Hyun; Choi, Jun-Ho; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Lee, Jung Bok

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the success rates, procedural time and adverse event rates of the modified methods in endoscopic ultrasonography-guided hepaticogastrostomy (EUS-HGS). METHODS: Twenty-eight patients in a prospective case series who underwent EUS-HGS (phase I). Forty-six patients in a matched case-control study (phase II). The simplified technique for fistula dilation was the primary use of a 4 mm balloon catheter with a stainless steel stylet. The stent deployment was modified by deploying the metal stent inside a bile duct (half of the stent) under EUS and fluoroscopic guidance and gently pulling the echoendoscope after full deployment of the stent inside the echoendoscope channel (remaining portion of the stent) under fluoroscopic guidance. This cohort was compared with a matched historical cohort. RESULTS: In phase I, the technical and clinical success with the modified method was 96% (27/28) and 89% (24/27 as per-protocol analysis). The overall adverse event rate was 7%. In phase II, there was no difference in technical and clinical success, stent patency and overall adverse events in each group. However, the procedural time (15.3 ± 5.2 min vs 22.3 ± 6.0 min, P < 0.001) and early adverse events (0% vs 26%, P = 0.02) were statistically improved in case cohort compared with control cohort. CONCLUSION: Compared with the conventional EUS-HGS technique, the procedural time was shorter and early adverse events were less frequent with our simplified and modified technique. PMID:24803818

  10. A computational study of the hemodynamic impact of open- versus closed-cell stent design in carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Gianluca; Trachet, Bram; Conti, Michele; De Beule, Matthieu; Morbiducci, Umberto; Mortier, Peter; Segers, Patrick; Verdonck, Pascal; Verhegghe, Benedict

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the shape and flow changes of a patient-specific carotid artery after carotid artery stenting (CAS) performed using an open-cell (stent-O) or a closed-cell (stent-C) stent design. First, a stent reconstructed from micro-computed tomography (microCT) is virtually implanted in a left carotid artery reconstructed from CT angiography. Second, an objective analysis of the stent-to-vessel apposition is used to quantify the lumen cross-sectional area and the incomplete stent apposition (ISA). Third, the carotid artery lumen is virtually perfused in order to quantify its resistance to flow and its exposure to atherogenic or thrombogenic hemodynamic conditions. After CAS, the minimum cross-sectional area of the internal carotid artery (ICA) (external carotid artery [ECA]) changes by +54% (-12%) with stent-O and +78% (-17%) with stent-C; the resistance to flow of the ICA (ECA) changes by -21% (+13%) with stent-O and -26% (+18%) with stent-C. Both stent designs suffer from ISA but the malapposed stent area is larger with stent-O than stent-C (29.5 vs. 14.8 mm(2) ). The untreated vessel is not exposed to atherogenic flow conditions whereas an area of 67.6 mm(2) (104.9) occurs with stent-O (stent-C). The area of the stent surface exposed to thrombogenic risk is 5.42 mm(2) (7.7) with stent-O (stent-C). The computer simulations of stenting in a patient's carotid artery reveal a trade-off between cross-sectional size and flow resistance of the ICA (enlarged and circularized) and the ECA (narrowed and ovalized). Such a trade-off, together with malapposition, atherogenic risk, and thrombogenic risk is stent-design dependent. PMID:23578331

  11. Primary Stenting of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Straube, T. Stingele, Robert; Jansen, Olav

    2005-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and safety of stenting intracranial atherosclerotic stenoses.Methods: In 12 patients the results of primary intracranial stenting were evaluated retrospectively. Patient ages ranged from 49 to 79 years (mean 64 years). Six patients presented with stenoses in the anterior circulation, and six had stenosis in the posterior circulation. One patient presented with extra- and intracranial tandem stenosis of the left internal carotid artery. Three patients presented with acute basilar thrombosis, caused by high-grade basilar stenoses.Results: Intracranial stenoses were successfully stented in 11 of 12 patients. In one patient the stent could not be advanced over the carotid siphon to reach the stenosis of the ophthalmic internal carotid artery. Follow-up digital subtraction angiographic studies were obtained in two patients who had presented with new neurologic signs or symptoms. In both cases the angiogram did not show any relevant stenotic endothelial hyperplasia. In one patient, after local thrombolysis the stenosis turned out to be so narrow that balloon angioplasty had to be performed before stent deployment. All three patients treated for stenosis-related basilar thrombosis died due to brainstem infarction that had ensued before the intervention.Conclusions: Prophylactic primary stenting of intracranial stenoses of the anterior or posterior cerebral circulation can be performed with a low complication rate; technical problems such as stent flexibility must still be solved. Local thrombolysis followed by stenting in stenosis-related thrombotic occlusion is technically possible.

  12. Recurrent coronary stent thromboses and myocardial infarctions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jack; Rajeev, Angampally

    2007-11-01

    Although stent thrombosis is a recognized complication of coronary intervention, recurrent stent thrombosis is rarely reported. We present a patient who suffered 3 ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions associated with repeated stent thromboses within a month and a half. Although a potentially mechanical cause of thrombosis was identified in the only baremetal stent implanted in this case, no predisposing factors were seen for the 2 drug-eluting stents (DES). While recent worrisome data have suggested a slight increase in the incidence of late angiographic stent thrombosis (defined as occurring beyond 30 days) with drug-eluting stents (DES), their risk of subacute thrombosis (from 1 to 30 days) is reported to be equivalent to that of BMS. Therefore, this rare occurrence serves as a sobering reminder of the risks of subacute thrombosis with both BMS and DES. Marked neointimal inhibition, allergic reactions, as well as thienopyridine resistance, may all contribute to the pathophysiology of DES thrombosis. The Food and Drug Administration advisory panel has concluded that when these devices are used for "on-label" indications, the counterbalance of dramatic target lesion revascularization reduction versus rare incidence of late angiographic stent thrombosis results in no overall increase in DES myocardial infarction or mortality risk. Furthermore, a minimum of 1 year of dual antiplatelet therapy is recommended for all recipients of DES at low risk of bleeding.

  13. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  14. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  15. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  16. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  17. Rescue coronary stenting in acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Enrico; Meneghetti, Paolo; Molinari, Gionata; Zardini, Piero

    1996-01-01

    Failed rescue coronary angioplasty is a high risk situation because of high mortality. Coronary stent has given us the chance of improving and maintaining the patency of the artery. We report our preliminary experience of rescue stenting after unsuccessful coronary angioplasty.

  18. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  19. Microfabrication and Nanotechnology in Stent Design

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Adam W.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2012-01-01

    Intravascular stents were first introduced in the 1980s as an adjunct to primary angioplasty for management of early complications, including arterial dissection, or treatment of an inadequate technical outcome due to early elastic recoil of the atherosclerotic lesion. Despite the beneficial effects of stenting, persistent high rates of restenosis motivated the design of drug eluting stents for delivery of agents to limit the proliferative and other inflammatory responses within the vascular wall that contribute to the development of a restenotic lesion. These strategies have yielded a significant reduction in the incidence of restenosis, but challenges remain, including incomplete repair of the endothelium at the site of vascular wall injury that may be associated with a late risk of thrombosis. A failure of vessel wall healing has been attributed to primarily to the use of polymeric stent coatings, but the effects of the eluted drug and other material properties or design features of the stent cannot be excluded. Improvements in stent microfabrication, as well as the introduction of alternative materials may help to address those limitations that inhibit stent performance. This review describes the application of novel microfabrication processes and the evolution of new nanotechnologies that hold significant promise in eliminating existing shortcomings of current stent platforms. PMID:21462356

  20. Chronic Total Occlusion and Successful Drug-Eluting Stent Placement in Takayasu Arteritis–Induced Renal Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Guarav; Vats, Hemender S.; Raval, Amish N.; Yevzlin, Alexander S.; Chan, Micah R.; Gimelli, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Takayasu arteritis-induced renal artery stenosis (TARAS) is a condition rarely described in the literature. Although percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting has been well-described in the treatment of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis, its role has not been established in non-atherosclerotic TARAS. We report a case of a female, age 17 years, with Takayasu arteritis who presented to the hospital with seizures and hypertensive crisis. A renal angiogram showed chronic total occlusion (CTO) of the left renal artery. Renal angioplasty and stenting was successfully performed after multiple attempts to deliver a wire distal to the CTO. After sequential balloon predilation, a drug-eluting stent was deployed, resulting in full reperfusion of the kidney. The patient’s blood pressure improved dramatically, and patency of the stent was demonstrated with magnetic resonance angiography over 9 months after the procedure. PMID:23656802

  1. Simultaneous kissing stent in a patient with severe bifurcation pulmonary vein stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cubeddu, Roberto J; Gulati, Vishal K

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is a late and rare complication of pulmonary vein isolation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. The ideal approach to the management of PVS has not yet been established, however, corrective procedures may include both surgical and percutaneous techniques. We describe the case of a complex bifurcation lesion involving the left superior pulmonary vein. The condition required percutaneous intervention using a modified kissing stent technique with bare metal stents that resulted in an excellent post-operative course, sustained symptomatic relief, and uncomplicated 1-year follow-up. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24905444

  2. Five factors and three characteristics of coronary in-stent restenosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the field of interventional cardiology, several patient subsets still present with poor clinical and angiographic outcomes after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. The author of this editorial comment supports the idea that in-stent restenosis (ISR) includes three characteristics (severity and extent of stenosis, and tissue characteristics) that are caused by five factors (device, patient, anatomy, procedure, and history). To reduce further revascularization, a tailor-made strategy may be considered in accordance with the factors and characteristics of the individual ISR lesion. PMID:26793374

  3. Transjugular Insertion of Biliary Stents (TIBS) in Two Patients with Malignant Obstruction, Ascites, and Coagulopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Amygdalos, Michael A.; Haskal, Ziv J.; Cope, Constantin; Kadish, Steven L.; Long, William B.

    1996-03-15

    Two patients with pancreatic malignancies presented with biliary obstruction which could not be treated from an endoscopic approach. Standard transhepatic biliary drainage was relatively contraindicated because of moderate ascites and coagulopathy related to underlying liver disease. In one patient, a transjugular, transvenous approach was used to deliver a Wallstent endoprosthesis across the distal common bile duct obstruction in a single step procedure. In the second case, a previously placed biliary Wallstent was revised with an additional stent from a similar approach. Transjugular biliary catheterization offers a valuable alternative approach for primary stent placement or revision in patients with contraindication to standard transhepatic drainage.

  4. [Stenting and redilatation of the ductus arteriosus in univentricular heart with pulmonary atresia. A case report].

    PubMed

    Hernández-González, Martha; Solorio, Sergio; Martínez-Sánchez, Arturo; Abundes, Arturo; Ledesma, Mariano; Alva, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Complex congenital heart disease with pulmonary atresia is ductus arteriosus-dependent. Two palliative treatments have been available for years: a systemic pulmonary shunt and prostaglandin E1 infusion. Recently, interventional cardiology has offered a new procedure for these patients: stenting of the patent arterial duct. We report a case with univentricular heart and pulmonary atresia in which percutaneous balloon angioplasty and stenting of the arterial ductus were performed successfully. Nineteen months later the patient is in good clinical conditions with 75% of oxygen saturation.

  5. Misplacement or migration? Extremely rare case of cardiac migration of a ureteral j stent.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Nam; Lee, Chan Ho; Kong, Do Hoon; Shin, Dong Kil; Lee, Jeong Zoo

    2014-05-01

    A 29-year-old woman with mild back pain when coughing and suprapubic discomfort after voiding was admitted to Pusan National University Hospital. Two weeks earlier, she had undergone a hysterectomy and right-sided ureteroneocystostomy for uterine atony and right ureteral injury with bladder rupture. Computed tomography showed that a ureteral J stent extended from the right ovarian vein to the right cardiac chamber. The stent was retrieved via both femoral veins with a snare loop and pigtail catheter. Computed tomography showed that the urinary and vascular tracts were normal 5 months after the procedure. PMID:24868342

  6. Stent-Graft Treatment for Bleeding Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm After Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kojiro Mori, Yoshine; Komada, Tomohiro; Matsushima, Masaya; Ota, Toyohiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2009-07-15

    We report two cases of intraperitoneal bleeding from superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pseudoaneurysm after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic head carcinoma. In both cases, a stent-graft was deployed on the main SMA to exclude pseudoaneurysm and to preserve blood flow to the bowel. Bleeding stopped after the procedure. One patient was able to be discharged but died from carcinoma recurrence 4 months later. The other patient died of sepsis and stent-graft infection 5 months later. These patients remained free of intraperitoneal rebleeding during the follow-up period.

  7. A case of an occlusive right coronary artery dissection after stent implantation: dilemmas and challenges.

    PubMed

    Panoulas, Vasileios F; Figini, Filippo; Giustino, Gennaro; Carlino, Mauro; Chieffo, Alaide; Latib, Azeem; Colombo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old man with stable angina had a staged percutaneous coronary intervention to a critical focal stenosis of the mid-segment of the right coronary artery (RCA). Two hours after successful RCA stent implantation, the patient re-presented with inferior ST elevation secondary to acute dissection originating at the distal edge of the stent, causing subtotal occlusion of the distal RCA. The patient had TIMI-2 flow in the posterolateral branch and occlusion of the posterior descending artery. This case describes the procedural challenges the operators were faced with and successful use of the "rescue STAR" technique as a last resort. PMID:25589705

  8. Kissing stenting of aorto-ostial lesions in juxtaposed renal arteries

    PubMed Central

    Hasija, Pradeep; Chadha, Davinder; Kalra, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous angioplasty with or without stenting has become an established procedure for treatment of renal artery stenosis for control of hypertension or progressive renal dysfunction. Anatomic variation of renal arteries is common with dual blood supply of unilateral kidney noted in almost 25% of the general population. Renal angioplasty of these anatomic variants of renal arteries is challenging. We present an unusual case of juxtaposed renal arteries with aorto-ostial lesion where direct kissing stenting was done with excellent technical and clinical outcome. PMID:25199194

  9. Persistent High Restenosis After Local Intrawall Delivery of Long-Acting Steroids Before Coronary Stent Implantation.

    PubMed

    Reimers; Moussa; Akiyama; Kobayashi; Albiero; Di Francesco L; Di Mario C; Colombo

    1998-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: This pilot study was performed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of intrawall delivery of long acting steroids before stent implantation, testing the efficacy of this treatment in reducing intimal hyperplasia in lesions at high risk for restenosis. METHODS: In 24 patients (40 lesions) local intrawall drug delivery of methylprednisolone acetate, using a new catheter device, was attempted before elective stent implantation. Treated lesions were compared to a matched control group. RESULTS: Lesions were classified AHA/ACC type C in 47% of cases, had a mean lesion length of 13.6 +/- 9.1 mm, and a mean vessel diameter of 2.85 +/- 0.44 mm. In 9 cases (25%) chronic total occlusions were treated. Methylprednisolone acetate (mean 60 +/- 23 mg) was delivered in 36 lesions (21 patients; delivery success 90%) in the remaining 4 lesions (10%) the delivery device did not cross the lesion. After drug delivery 46 stents were implanted (1.2 stent/lesion; stented segment length 30.1 +/- 18.8 mm) using high pressure for stent expansion (mean 16.4 +/- 3.1 atm). Intracoronary ultrasound guidance was used in 64% of cases. Procedural and in-hospital complications were: Two non Q wave myocardial infarctions (8%) and one (3%) subacute stent thrombosis. Angiographic follow-up was obtained in all 36 treated lesions (100%) and the angiographic restenosis rate (³ 50% diameter stenosis) was 39%. A reduction of the incidence of restenosis compared to the matched control group was not observed. CONCLUSIONS: Long acting steroids could be delivered locally with high success and low complication rates. The restenosis rate remained high in a subset of unfavorable lesions with high risk for restenosis.

  10. Development of a static bioactive stent prototype and dynamic aneurysm-on-a-chip(TM) model for the treatment of aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, Lisa M.

    Aneurysms are pockets of blood that collect outside blood vessel walls forming dilatations and leaving arterial walls very prone to rupture. Current treatments include: (1) clipping, and (2) coil embolization, including stent-assisted coiling. While these procedures can be effective, it would be advantageous to design a biologically active stent, modified with magnetic stent coatings, allowing cells to be manipulated to heal the arterial lining. Further, velocity, pressure, and wall shear stresses aid in the disease development of aneurysmal growth, but the shear force mechanisms effecting wound closure is elusive. Due to these factors, there is a definite need to cultivate a new stent device that will aid in healing an aneurysm in situ. To this end, a static bioactive stent device was synthesized. Additionally, to study aneurysm pathogenesis, a lab-on-a-chip device (a dynamic stent device) is the key to discovering the underlying mechanisms of these lesions. A first step to the reality of a true bioactive stent involves the study of cells that can be tested against the biomaterials that constitute the stent itself. The second step is to test particles/cells in a microfluidic environment. Therefore, biocompatability data was collected against PDMS, bacterial nanocellulose (BNC), and magnetic bacterial nanocellulose (MBNC). Preliminary static bioactive stents were synthesized whereby BNC was grown to cover standard nitinol stents. In an offshoot of the original research, a two-dimensional microfluidic model, the Aneurysm-on-a-ChipTM (AOC), was the logical answer to study particle flow within an aneurysm "sac" - this was the dynamic bioactive stent device. The AOC apparatus can track particles/cells when it is coupled to a particle image velocimetry software (PIV) package. The AOC fluid flow was visualized using standard microscopy techniques with commercial microparticles/cells. Movies were taken during fluid flow experiments and PIV was utilized to monitor.

  11. Basic Knowledge about Metal Stent Development.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seok

    2016-03-01

    Biliary self-expandable metal stents (SEMS), a group of non-vascular stents, have been used in the palliative management of biliary obstruction around the world. However, there are still unmet needs in the clinical application of biliary SEMS. Comprehensive understanding of the SEMS is required to resolve the drawbacks and difficulties of metal stent development. The basic structure of SEMS, including the materials and knitting methods of metal wires, covering materials, and radiopaque markers, are discussed in this review. What we know about the physical and mechanical properties of the SEMS is very important. With an understanding of the basic knowledge of metal stents, hurdles such as stent occlusion, migration, and kinking can be overcome to develop more ideal SEMS.

  12. Basic Knowledge about Metal Stent Development

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seok

    2016-01-01

    Biliary self-expandable metal stents (SEMS), a group of non-vascular stents, have been used in the palliative management of biliary obstruction around the world. However, there are still unmet needs in the clinical application of biliary SEMS. Comprehensive understanding of the SEMS is required to resolve the drawbacks and difficulties of metal stent development. The basic structure of SEMS, including the materials and knitting methods of metal wires, covering materials, and radiopaque markers, are discussed in this review. What we know about the physical and mechanical properties of the SEMS is very important. With an understanding of the basic knowledge of metal stents, hurdles such as stent occlusion, migration, and kinking can be overcome to develop more ideal SEMS. PMID:27000423

  13. Foreign body contamination during stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Whelan, D M; van Beusekom, H M; van der Giessen, W J

    1997-03-01

    The treatment of coronary artery disease using stents has become a widely accepted technique. However, the inadvertent co-implantation of contaminating factors with the stent has received little attention. We studied histological cross-sections of stented porcine coronary arteries and observed contamination of some vessels with surgical glove powder and textile fibres. The contaminating particles were associated with a foreign body reaction. Such a reaction could delay the wound-healing response of a stented vessel and thereby prolong the period in which subacute thrombosis could occur. It is also proposed that air contamination could affect the thrombogenicity of the stent. Appropriate measures should be followed to reduce the chance of contamination occurring.

  14. Call for standards in technical documentation of intracoronary stents.

    PubMed

    Lanzer, Peter; Gijsen, Frank J H; Topoleski, L D Timmie; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2010-01-01

    At present, the product information of intracoronary stents provided by the industry contains only limited technical data restricting judgments on the in vivo performance of individual products. Available experimental and clinical evidence suggests that interventional target sites display highly heterogeneous biomechanical behavior needed to be matched by specific stent and stent delivery system characteristics. To allow individualized stent-lesion matching, both, understanding of biomechanical properties of the atherosclerotic coronary artery lesions and expert knowledge of the intracoronary stent systems, are required. Here, the authors review some of the initial data on mechanical properties of coronary artery lesions potentially relevant to stenting and suggest standards for technical documentation of intracoronary stents. PMID:20140786

  15. Temporary placement of fully covered self-expandable metal stents for the treatment of benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Ulriikka; Vienne, Ariane; Audureau, Etienne; Bauret, Paul; Bichard, Philippe; Coumaros, Dimitri; Napoléon, Bertrand; Ponchon, Thierry; Duchmann, Jean-Christophe; Laugier, René; Lamouliatte, Hervé; Védrenne, Bruno; Gaudric, Marianne; Chaussade, Stanislas; Robin, Françoise; Leblanc, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Background Endoscopic treatment of benign biliary strictures (BBS) can be challenging. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMS) in BBS. Methods Ninety-two consecutive patients with BBS (chronic pancreatitis (n = 42), anastomotic after liver transplantation (n = 36), and post biliary surgical procedure (n = 14)) were included. FCSEMS were placed across strictures for 6 months before endoscopic extraction. Early success rate was defined as the absence of biliary stricture or as a minimal residual anomaly on post-stent removal endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Secondary outcomes were the final success and stricture recurrence rates as well as procedure-related morbidity. Results Stenting was successful in all patients. Stenting associated complications were minor and occurred in 22 (23.9%) patients. Migration occurred in 23 (25%) patients. Stent extraction was successful in all but two patients with proximal stent migration. ERCP after the 6 months stenting showed an early success in 84.9% patients (chronic pancreatitis patients: 94.7%, liver transplant: 87.9%, post-surgical: 61.5%) (p = 0.01). Final success was observed in 57/73 (78.1%) patients with a median follow-up of 12 ± 3.56 months. Recurrence of biliary stricture occurred in 16/73 (21.9%) patients. Conclusions FCSEMS placement is efficient for patients with BBS, in particular for chronic pancreatitis patients. Stent extraction after 6 months indwelling, although generally feasible, may fail in a few cases. PMID:27403307

  16. Biliary stenting: indications, choice of stents and results: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) clinical guideline.

    PubMed

    Dumonceau, J-M; Tringali, A; Blero, D; Devière, J; Laugiers, R; Heresbach, D; Costamagna, G

    2012-03-01

    This article is part of a combined publication that expresses the current view of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy about endoscopic biliary stenting. The present Clinical Guideline describes short-term and long-term results of biliary stenting depending on indications and stent models; it makes recommendations on when, how, and with which stent to perform biliary drainage in most common clinical settings, including in patients with a potentially resectable malignant biliary obstruction and in those who require palliative drainage of common bile duct or hilar strictures. Treatment of benign conditions (strictures related to chronic pancreatitis, liver transplantation, or cholecystectomy, and leaks and failed biliary stone extraction) and management of complications (including stent revision) are also discussed. A two-page executive summary of evidence statements and recommendations is provided. A separate Technology Review describes the models of biliary stents available and the stenting techniques, including advanced techniques such as insertion of multiple plastic stents, drainage of hilar strictures, retrieval of migrated stents and combined stenting in malignant biliary and duodenal obstructions.The target readership for the Clinical Guideline mostly includes digestive endoscopists, gastroenterologists, oncologists, radiologists, internists, and surgeons while the Technology Review should be most useful to endoscopists who perform biliary drainage.

  17. The effects of stent interaction on porcine urinary bladder matrix employed as stent-graft materials.

    PubMed

    Callanan, A; Davis, N F; McGloughlin, T M; Walsh, M T

    2014-06-01

    Deployment of stent-grafts, derived from synthetic biomaterials, is an established minimally invasive approach for effectively treating abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). However, a notable disadvantage associated with this surgical technique is migration of the deployed stent-graft due to poor biocompatibility and inadequate integration in vivo. Recently, tissue-engineered extracellular matrices (ECMs) have shown early promise as integrating stabilisation collars in this setting due to their ability to induce a constructive tissue remodelling response after in vivo implantation. In the present study the effects of stent loading on an ECM׳s mechanical properties were investigated by characterising the compression and loading effects of endovascular stents on porcine urinary bladder matrix (UBM) scaffolds. Results demonstrated that the maximum stress was induced when the stent force was 8-times higher than a standard commercially available stent-graft and this represented about 20% of the failure strength of the UBM material. In addition, the influence of stent shape was also investigated. Findings demonstrated that the stress induced was higher for circular stents at low forces and a higher stress was induced on square stents when increased force was applied. Our findings demonstrate that porcine UBM possesses sufficient mechanical strength to withstand the compression and loading effects of commercially available stent-grafts in the setting of endovascular aneurysm repair.

  18. Hybrid stent device of flow-diverting effect and stent-assisted coil embolization formed by fractal structure.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masahiro; Irie, Keiko; Masunaga, Kouhei; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Nakajima, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Masaru; Fukuda, Toshio; Arai, Fumihito; Negoro, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a novel hybrid medical stent device. This hybrid stent device formed by fractal mesh structures provides a flow-diverting effect and stent-assisted coil embolization. Flow-diverter stents decrease blood flow into an aneurysm to prevent its rupture. In general, the mesh size of a flow-diverter stent needs to be small enough to prevent blood flow into the aneurysm. Conventional flow-diverter stents are not available for stent-assisted coil embolization, which is an effective method for aneurysm occlusion, because the mesh size is too small to insert a micro-catheter for coil embolization. The proposed hybrid stent device is capable of stent-assisted coil embolization while simultaneously providing a flow-diverting effect. The fractal stent device is composed of mesh structures with fine and rough mesh areas. The rough mesh area can be used to insert a micro-catheter for stent-assisted coil embolization. Flow-diverting effects of two fractal stent designs were composed to three commercially available stent designs. Flow-diverting effects were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiment. Based on the CFD and PIV results, the fractal stent devices reduce the flow velocity inside an aneurism just as much as the commercially available flow-diverting stents while allowing stent-assisted coil embolization. PMID:26438390

  19. Hybrid stent device of flow-diverting effect and stent-assisted coil embolization formed by fractal structure.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masahiro; Irie, Keiko; Masunaga, Kouhei; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Nakajima, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Masaru; Fukuda, Toshio; Arai, Fumihito; Negoro, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a novel hybrid medical stent device. This hybrid stent device formed by fractal mesh structures provides a flow-diverting effect and stent-assisted coil embolization. Flow-diverter stents decrease blood flow into an aneurysm to prevent its rupture. In general, the mesh size of a flow-diverter stent needs to be small enough to prevent blood flow into the aneurysm. Conventional flow-diverter stents are not available for stent-assisted coil embolization, which is an effective method for aneurysm occlusion, because the mesh size is too small to insert a micro-catheter for coil embolization. The proposed hybrid stent device is capable of stent-assisted coil embolization while simultaneously providing a flow-diverting effect. The fractal stent device is composed of mesh structures with fine and rough mesh areas. The rough mesh area can be used to insert a micro-catheter for stent-assisted coil embolization. Flow-diverting effects of two fractal stent designs were composed to three commercially available stent designs. Flow-diverting effects were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiment. Based on the CFD and PIV results, the fractal stent devices reduce the flow velocity inside an aneurism just as much as the commercially available flow-diverting stents while allowing stent-assisted coil embolization.

  20. Y-Shaped Bilateral Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Placement for Malignant Hilar Biliary Obstruction: Data from a Referral Center for Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Di Mitri, R.; Mocciaro, F.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. Malignant hilar strictures are a clinical challenge because of the current therapeutic approach and the poor prognosis. In recent years, self-expandable metallic stents have proven more effective than plastic stents for palliation of malignant hilar strictures, with the bilateral stent-in-stent technique registering a high success rate. We report our experience with Y-shaped endoscopic self-expandable metallic stents placement for treatment of advanced malignant hilar strictures. Methods. From April 2009 to August 2012, we prospectively collected data on patients treated with Y-shaped SEMS placement for advanced malignant hilar carcinoma. Data on technical success, clinical success, and complications were collected. Results. Twenty patients (9 males) were treated (mean age 64.2 ± 15.3 years). The grade of malignant hilar strictures according to the Bismuth classification was II in 5 patients (25%), IIIa in 1 (5%), and IV in 14 (70%). The mean bilirubin level was 14.7 ± 4.9 mg/dL. Technical success was achieved in all patients, with a significant reduction in bilirubin levels (2.9 ± 1.7 mg/dL). One patient experienced cholangitis as early complication, while in 2 patients stent ingrowth was observed. No stents migration was recorded. There was no procedure-related mortality. At the end of the follow-up (7.1 ± 3.1 months), 13 of the 20 patients (65%) had died. Conclusions. Our experience confirms endoscopic bilateral self-expandable metallic stents placement with stent-in-stent technique (Y-shaped configuration) as a feasible, effective, and safe procedure for palliation of unresectable malignant hilar strictures. PMID:24790548

  1. Stent thrombosis and restenosis: what have we learned and where are we going? The Andreas Grüntzig Lecture ESC 2014.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Robert A; Joner, Michael; Kastrati, Adnan

    2015-12-14

    Modern-day stenting procedures leverage advances in pharmacotherapy and device innovation. Patients treated with contemporary antiplatelet agents, peri-procedural antithrombin therapy and new-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have excellent outcomes over the short to medium term. Indeed, coupled with the reducing costs of these devices in most countries there remain very few indications where patients should be denied treatment with standard-of-care DES therapy. The two major causes of stent failure are stent thrombosis (ST) and in-stent restenosis (ISR). The incidence of both has reduced considerably in recent years. Current clinical registries and randomized trials with broad inclusion criteria show rates of ST at or <1% after 1 year and ∼0.2-0.4% per year thereafter; rates of clinical ISR are 5% respectively. Angiographic surveillance studies in large cohorts show rates of angiographic ISR of ∼10% with new-generation DES. The advent of high-resolution intracoronary imaging has shown that in many cases of late stent failure neoatherosclerotic change within the stented segment represents a final common pathway for both thrombotic and restenotic events. In future, a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this process may translate into improved late outcomes. Moreover, the predominance of non-stent-related disease as a cause of subsequent myocardial infarction during follow-up highlights the importance of lifestyle and pharmacological interventions targeted at modification of the underlying disease process. Finally, although recent developments focus on strategies which circumvent the need for chronically indwelling stents--such as drug-coated balloons or fully bioresorbable stents-more data are needed before the wider use of these therapies can be advocated. PMID:26417060

  2. Endovascular Aortic Stenting in Patients with Chronic Traumatic Aortocaval Fistula

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to present the treatment of a case of delay presenting of traumatic aortocaval fistula (ACF) and its effect on hemodynamic problem. A 59-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with heart failure due to a 41-year-old traumatic ACF. ACF closure was performed by endovascular aortic stenting. His hospital course after procedure was complicated by severe bradycardia and torsades de pointes and excessive diuresis. We concluded the endovascular technique provided an attractive alternative to open surgical methods for repair of chronic ACF. However, in chronic cases, complications such as severe bradycardia (Nicoladoni-Branham sign) and excessive diuresis must be anticipated. PMID:24386026

  3. Dialysis access pseudoaneurysm: endovascular treatment with a covered stent

    PubMed Central

    Centola, Marco; Ferraresi, Roberto; Danzi, Gian B

    2010-01-01

    Iatrogenic pseudoaneurysms of the brachial artery are rare complications of haemodialysis access procedures and can lead to substantial morbidity and mortality if not managed promptly; however, surgery is also associated with the potential risk of severe complications. We describe the clinical and radiological findings relating to a dialysed patient who developed a huge iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm of the brachial artery (due to an inadvertent artery puncture), which was successfully treated by means of the percutaneous implantation of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stent. PMID:22778110

  4. Late Stent Expansion and Neointimal Proliferation of Oversized Nitinol Stents in Peripheral Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hugh Q. Nikanorov, Alexander; Virmani, Renu; Jones, Russell; Pacheco, Erica; Schwartz, Lewis B.

    2009-07-15

    For peripheral endovascular intervention, self-expanding (SE) stents are commonly oversized in relation to target arteries to assure optimal wall apposition and prevent migration. However, the consequences of oversizing have not been well studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of SE stent oversizing (OS) with respect to the kinetics of late stent expansion and the long-term histological effects of OS. Pairs of overlapped 8 x 28-mm Nitinol SE stents were implanted into the iliofemoral arteries of 14 Yucatan swine. Due to variations in target artery size, the stent-to-artery ratio ranged from 1.2:1 to 1.9:1. Lumen and stent diameters were assessed by quantitative angiography at the time of implantation. Following angiographic assessment at 6 months, stented arteries were perfusion-fixed, sectioned, and stained for histological analysis. Immediately following implantation, the stents were found to be expanded to a range of 4.7-7.1 mm, largely conforming to the diameter of the recipient target artery. The stents continued to expand over time, however, and all stents had enlarged to nearly their 8-mm nominal diameter by 6 months. The histological effects of OS were profound, with marked increases in injury and luminal area stenosis, including a statistically significant linear correlation between stent-to-artery ratio and area stenosis. In this experimental model of peripheral endovascular intervention, oversized Nitinol SE stents are constrained by their target artery diameter upon implantation but expand to their nominal diameter within 6 months. Severe OS (stent-to-artery ratio >1.4:1) results in a profound long-term histological response including exuberant neointimal proliferation and luminal stenosis.

  5. Haemodynamic impact of stent-vessel (mal)apposition following carotid artery stenting: mind the gaps!

    PubMed

    De Santis, G; Conti, M; Trachet, B; De Schryver, T; De Beule, M; Degroote, J; Vierendeels, J; Auricchio, F; Segers, P; Verdonck, P; Verhegghe, B

    2013-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) has emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to endarterectomy but its use in clinical treatment is limited due to the post-stenting complications. Haemodynamic actors, related to blood flow in the stented vessel, have been suggested to play a role in the endothelium response to stenting, including adverse reactions such as in-stent restenosis and late thrombosis. Accessing the flow-related shear forces acting on the endothelium in vivo requires space and time resolutions which are currently not achievable with non-invasive clinical imaging techniques but can be obtained from image-based computational analysis. In this study, we present a framework for accurate determination of the wall shear stress (WSS) in a mildly stenosed carotid artery after the implantation of a stent, resembling the commercially available Acculink (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois, USA). Starting from angiographic CT images of the vessel lumen and a micro-CT scan of the stent, a finite element analysis is carried out in order to deploy the stent in the vessel, reproducing CAS in silico. Then, based on the post-stenting anatomy, the vessel is perfused using a set of boundary conditions: total pressure is applied at the inlet, and impedances that are assumed to be insensitive to the presence of the stent are imposed at the outlets. Evaluation of the CAS outcome from a geometrical and haemodynamic perspective shows the presence of atheroprone regions (low time-average WSS, high relative residence time) colocalised with stent malapposition and stent strut interconnections. Stent struts remain unapposed in the ostium of the external carotid artery disturbing the flow and generating abnormal shear forces, which could trigger thromboembolic events.

  6. Secondary aorto-esophageal fistula after thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascular repair treated by covered esophageal stenting.

    PubMed

    Tao, Mary; Shlomovitz, Eran; Darling, Gail; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2016-08-16

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms is an accepted alternative to open surgery, especially in patients with significant comorbidities. The procedure itself has a low risk of complications and fistulas to surrounding organs are rarely reported. An 86-year-old patient was admitted to our hospital with gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding and a suspected aortoesophageal fistula. Eight months prior, the patient had undergone a stent graft repair of a mycotic thoracic aneurysm. Computerized tomography angiography and upper GI endoscopy confirmed an aortoesophageal fistula, which was treated by esophageal stenting. With early recognition, esophageal stenting may have a role in the initial emergency control of bleeding from and palliation of aortoesophageal fistula. PMID:27574612

  7. Optical coherence tomography of the intracranial vasculature and Wingspan stent in a patient

    PubMed Central

    Given, Curtis Alden; Ramsey, Christian Norman; Attizzani, Guilherme Ferragut; Jones, Michael R; Brooks, William H; Bezerra, Hiram G; Costa, Marco A

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 67-year-old man with medically refractory vertebrobasilar insufficiency and short segment occlusions of the intracranial vertebral arteries was treated with angioplasty and stent placement. Fifteen hours after the procedure the patient developed symptoms of posterior fossa ischemia and repeat angiography showed thrombus formation within the stent which was treated with thrombolytic and aggressive antiplatelet therapy. Angiography revealed lysis of the clot, but concerns regarding the mechanism of the thrombotic phenomenon prompted frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) assessment. FDOCT provided excellent visualization of the stent and vessel wall interactions, as well as excluding residual flow-limiting stenosis, obviating the need for further intervention. The potential utility of FDOCT in the evaluation of intracranial atherosclerotic disease and additional intracranial applications are discussed. PMID:24835808

  8. Stenting of the right ventricular outflow tract in symptomatic neonatal tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Haas, Nikolaus A; Laser, Thorsten K; Moysich, Axel; Blanz, Ute; Sandica, Eugen

    2014-04-01

    There is ongoing debate regarding the initial management of symptomatic neonates with tetralogy of Fallot. Although neonatal repair can be performed with low mortality, it is associated with increased morbidity and long-term impact on right ventricular performance. Traditionally, the modified Blalock-Taussig shunt remains the palliative procedure of choice. Differential pulmonary artery flow may occur and subsequently result in underdevelopment and distortion of pulmonary vessels. Transcatheter therapy was previously limited to balloon valvulotomy when the obstruction is predominantly at the pulmonary valve level. Stenting of the right ventricular outflow tract can enable adequate forward flow; however, pulmonary regurgitation may impact on right ventricular performance and cardiac output. Stenting of the right ventricular outflow tract with valve sparing placement of the stent thus treating the underlying pathophysiology of the hypercyanotic spells provides a safe and effective management strategy, improving arterial oxygen saturation, avoiding pulmonary regurgitation and encouraging pulmonary artery growth. PMID:23534437

  9. [Migration of a stent implanted in the pulmonary artery of a patient with tetralogy of Fallot].

    PubMed

    Palomero Rodríguez, M A; Gabaldón Rivilla, M; Cabestrero Alonso, D; Gonzalez Cibrián, C; Abelleira Pardeiro, C; Centella Hernánez, T; Collado Gutierrez, R; Asuero de Lis, M S; Gómez González, R

    2014-05-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot is a congenital heart disease that accounts for 11-13% of the congenital cardiomyopathies. Stenosis and hyperplasia of the pulmonary arteries occur in a high proportion of them as this disease causes a native stenosis of the pulmonary branch, which can be surgically repaired with a stent. The use of balloon expandable intravascular stents is an alternative technique to further surgery in patients with congenital heart diseases. However, despite the gradual increase in their use, the limited number of procedures, combined with the wide anatomical variability and different characteristics of these patients, even in expert hands, stent implants are associated with a not inconsiderable incidence of complications. These are not always obvious and often require performing surgery in patients who have already had multiple interventions, thus increasing the complexity and the risk.

  10. Secondary aorto-esophageal fistula after thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascular repair treated by covered esophageal stenting

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Mary; Shlomovitz, Eran; Darling, Gail; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms is an accepted alternative to open surgery, especially in patients with significant comorbidities. The procedure itself has a low risk of complications and fistulas to surrounding organs are rarely reported. An 86-year-old patient was admitted to our hospital with gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding and a suspected aortoesophageal fistula. Eight months prior, the patient had undergone a stent graft repair of a mycotic thoracic aneurysm. Computerized tomography angiography and upper GI endoscopy confirmed an aortoesophageal fistula, which was treated by esophageal stenting. With early recognition, esophageal stenting may have a role in the initial emergency control of bleeding from and palliation of aortoesophageal fistula. PMID:27574612

  11. Coronary artery stenting for spontaneous coronary artery dissection: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vale, P R; Baron, D W

    1998-11-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of acute coronary syndromes. It occurs in three major groups: in young women in the peripartum period, in patients with atherosclerotic disease, and in an idiopathic group. There are a number of associated conditions, but the pathogenesis remains unclear. Diagnosis can only be made at angiography. Treatments include medical therapy, coronary artery bypass grafts, and newer interventional procedures. We report on a case of spontaneous coronary artery dissection involving the left circumflex artery in a young adult male presenting with a myocardial infarction after exercise. There were no risk factors for coronary artery disease and no evidence of atherosclerosis on angiography. The dissection was treated with primary coronary artery stenting without predilation, achieving an excellent result. To our knowledge, this is the third known case of successful coronary artery stenting for this condition and the first case of primary stenting without prior angioplasty.

  12. Cephalic Arch Stenosis in Autogenous Haemodialysis Fistulas: Treatment With the Viabahn Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Shawyer, Andrew; Fotiadis, Nicos I.; Namagondlu, Girish; Iyer, Arun; Blunden, Mark Raftery, Martin Yaqoob, Magdi

    2013-02-15

    Cephalic arch stenosis (CAS) is an important and common cause of dysfunction in autogenous haemodialysis fistulas that requires multiple reinterventions and aggressive surveillance. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of the Viabahn stent-graft for the management of CAS. Between April 2005 and October 2011, 11 consecutive patients [four men and seven women (mean age 56.7 years)] with CAS and dysfunctional fistulas were treated with insertion of 11 Viabahn stent-grafts. Six stent-grafts were inserted due to residual stenosis after angioplasty and five for fistuloplasty-induced rupture. No patient was lost to follow-up. The technical and clinical success rate was 100 %. Primary access patency rates were 81.8 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.482-0.977] at 6 months and 72.7 % (95 % CI 0.390-0.939) at 12 months. Secondary access patency rates were 90.9 % at 6 months (95 % CI 0.587-0.997). There were no procedure-related complications. Mean follow-up was 543.8 days (range 156-2,282). The use of the Viabahn stent-graft in the management of CAS is technically feasible and, in this small series, showed patency rates that compare favorably with historical data of angioplasty and bare stents.

  13. Patient-specific computer modelling of coronary bifurcation stenting: the John Doe programme.

    PubMed

    Mortier, Peter; Wentzel, Jolanda J; De Santis, Gianluca; Chiastra, Claudio; Migliavacca, Francesco; De Beule, Matthieu; Louvard, Yves; Dubini, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    John Doe, an 81-year-old patient with a significant distal left main (LM) stenosis, was treated using a provisional stenting approach. As part of an European Bifurcation Club (EBC) project, the complete stenting procedure was repeated using computational modelling. First, a tailored three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the bifurcation anatomy was created by fusion of multislice computed tomography (CT) imaging and intravascular ultrasound. Second, finite element analysis was employed to deploy and post-dilate the stent virtually within the generated patient-specific anatomical bifurcation model. Finally, blood flow was modelled using computational fluid dynamics. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated the feasibility of such patient-specific simulations for bifurcation stenting and has provided unique insights into the bifurcation anatomy, the technical aspects of LM bifurcation stenting, and the positive impact of adequate post-dilatation on blood flow patterns. Potential clinical applications such as virtual trials and preoperative planning seem feasible but require a thorough clinical validation of the predictive power of these computer simulations.

  14. Solitaire AB Stent-Assisted Coiling of Wide-Neck Micro Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-dong; Qin, Jun; Xiao, Zhen-yong; Feng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Solitaire AB stent-assisted coiling facilitates the endovascular treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. We present our experience of coiling the micro-aneurysms of wide-neck with Solitaire AB stent assisting in a single center. Methods Thirty-one Solitaire AB stents were used to treat via endovascular approach patients with 31 wide-neck micro aneurysms in a single center in China. Technical and clinical complications were recorded. Modified Rankin Scale was used to evaluate the patients' conditions via clinic and telephone follow-up. Results The mean width of aneurysm sac was 2.30±0.42 mm, and the mean diameter of aneurysm neck was 2.83±0.48 mm. Complete occlusion was achieved in 28 aneurysms (90.32%); neck remnant was seen in 3 aneurysms (9.68%). Technical and clinical complications related to the procedure were encountered in four patients (12.5%). Two patients died (6.25%). No patient had a permanent deficit. Conclusion Solitaire AB stent was a safe and efficiency tool in assisting coiling of micro aneurysms with wide neck, but may be not suitable for a blaster-like one. Mid- and long-term follow-up will be required to elucidate the impact of the Solitaire AB stent on recanalization rate. PMID:27446513

  15. Computational Modeling to Predict Fatigue Behavior of NiTi Stents: What Do We Need?

    PubMed Central

    Dordoni, Elena; Petrini, Lorenza; Wu, Wei; Migliavacca, Francesco; Dubini, Gabriele; Pennati, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    NiTi (nickel-titanium) stents are nowadays commonly used for the percutaneous treatment of peripheral arterial disease. However, their effectiveness is still debated in the clinical field. In fact a peculiar cyclic biomechanical environment is created before and after stent implantation, with the risk of device fatigue failure. An accurate study of the device fatigue behavior is of primary importance to ensure a successful stenting procedure. Regulatory authorities recognize the possibility of performing computational analyses instead of experimental tests for the assessment of medical devices. However, confidence in numerical methods is only possible after verification and validation of the models used. For the case of NiTi stents, mechanical properties are strongly dependent on the device dimensions and the whole treatments undergone during manufacturing process. Hence, special attention should be paid to the accuracy of the description of the device geometry and the material properties implementation into the numerical code, as well as to the definition of the fatigue limit. In this paper, a path for setting up an effective numerical model for NiTi stent fatigue assessment is proposed and the results of its application in a specific case study are illustrated. PMID:26011245

  16. Comparison of angiographic and clinical outcomes of coronary stenting of chronic total occlusions versus subtotal occlusions.

    PubMed

    Moussa, I; Di Mario, C; Moses, J; Reimers, B; Di Francesco, L; Blengino, S; Colombo, A

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the short- and long-term outcome of patients undergoing coronary stenting for chronic total occlusions compared with a control patient population with nonocclusive stenoses. A total of 789 consecutive patients (1,043 lesions) underwent coronary stenting using a high-pressure stent optimization technique. The study population was divided into total occlusion group (94 consecutive patients [95 lesions] with chronic total occlusions) and subtotal occlusion group (695 consecutive patients [948 lesions] with nonocclusive stenoses). There was no difference in post-procedure angiographic minimum lumen diameter (3.13 +/- 0.48 vs 3.15 +/- 0.57 mm, p = 0.72) and minimum intrastent cross-sectional area by intravascular ultrasound (7.31 +/- 2.06 vs 7.64 +/- 2.53 mm2, p = 0.26) between the total and subtotal groups, respectively. Subacute thrombosis occurred in 2 patients (2.1%) in the total group compared with 9 patients (1.3%) in the subtotal group (p = 0.63). Angiographic restenosis occurred in 27% vs 22% (p = 0.40) and repeat angioplasty in 15% vs 13% (p = 0.62) in the total and subtotal groups, respectively. Thus, coronary stenting of chronic total occlusions after successful recanalization could be performed with a high success rate. In addition, the incidence of stent thrombosis, angiographic restenosis, and the need for target lesion revascularization is comparable to that of an unselected cohort of patients with nonocclusive stenoses.

  17. Colonic perforation after stent placement for malignant colorectal obstruction--causes and contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Datye, Arundhati; Hersh, Jeff

    2011-05-01

    Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) are used to manage malignant colorectal obstruction. Colonic perforation is the most worrisome complication from colonic stenting. We reviewed causes and contributing factors of perforation with colonic stent placement in patients with malignant colorectal obstruction. Articles from both English and foreign language publications were identified from Medline. Data were collected on causes, timing, treatment and mortality related to perforation. A total of 2287 patients from 82 articles were included in this analysis, which showed an overall perforation rate of 4.9%. Perforation rates for palliation and bridge to surgery (BTS) were not significantly different (4.8% vs. 5.4%, p = 0.66); over 80% occurred within 30 days of stent placement (half during or within one day of the procedure). The mortality rate related to perforation was 0.8% per stented patient, but the mortality of patients experiencing perforation was 16.2%. There was no significant difference (p = 0.78) in the mortality rates between the palliation and the BTS group and concomitant chemotherapy, steroids, and radiotherapy are risk factors of perforation. The overall perforation related mortality is far less than that of patients undergoing emergency surgery for bowel obstruction. PMID:20929424

  18. Endovascular stenting of an extracranial–intracranial saphenous vein high-flow bypass graft: Technical case report

    PubMed Central

    Maselli, Giuliano; Tommasi, Claudio De; Ricci, Alessandro; Gallucci, Massimo; Galzio, Renato J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The authors describe a case of endovascular stenting of an extracranial–intracranial saphenous vein high-flow bypass graft in the management of a complex bilateral carotid aneurysm case. Case Description: A 43-year-old woman was admitted with progressive visual field restriction and headache. Imaging studies revealed bilateral supraclinoid carotid aneurysms. The right carotid aneurysm was clipped and the left one was treated by an endovascular procedure, after performing an internal carotid artery–middle cerebral artery (ICA-MCA) saphenous vein bypass graft. A few months following the bypass procedure, a 70–80% stenosis of the graft was discovered and treated endovascularly with a stenting procedure. Follow-up at 36 months after the first operation showed the patency of the venous graft and no neurological deficits. Conclusions: Endovascular stenting of the extracranial–intracranial saphenous vein high-flow bypass graft is technically feasible when postoperative graft occlusion is discovered. PMID:21660272

  19. The Supralimus sirolimus-eluting stent.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Pedro A; Bienert, Igor

    2013-05-01

    The use of biodegradable polymeric coatings has emerged as a potential bioengineering target to improve the vascular compatibility of coronary drug-eluting stents (DESs). This review summarizes the main features and scientific facts about the Supralimus sirolimus-eluting stent (Sahajanand Medical Technologies Ltd, Surat, India), which is a biodegradable polymer-based, sirolimus-eluting metallic stent that was recently introduced for routine use in Europe. The novel stent is built on a stainless steel platform, coated with a blend of biodegradable polymers (poly-l-lactide, poly-dl-lactide-co-glycolide and polyvinyl pyrrolidone; coating thickness is 4-5 µm). The active agent is the antiproliferative sirolimus in a dose load of 1.4 µg/mm(2), which is released within 48 days. The Supralimus stent was initially evaluated in the single-arm SERIES-I study, which showed binary angiographic restenosis rates of 0% (in-stent) and 1.7% (in-segment) and an in-stent late lumen loss of 0.09 ± 0.28 mm. The multicenter randomized PAINT trial compared two DESs with identical metallic platforms and biodegradable polymer carriers, but different agents (Infinnium [Sahajanand Medical Technologies Pvt Ltd] paclitaxel-eluting stent or Supralimus sirolimus-eluting stent) against bare stents. After 3 years, the pooled DES population had similar rates of cardiac death or myocardial infarction (9 vs 7.1%; p = 0.6), but a lower risk of repeat interventions (10 vs 29.9%; p < 0.01) than controls with bare stents. The incidence of definite or probable stent thrombosis in the pooled DES group was 2.3% (1st year: 1.8%; 2nd year: 0.4% and 3rd year: 0%). These results demonstrate that the novel Supralimus stents are effective in reducing reintervention, while potentially improving the safety profile by decreasing the risk of late-term thrombosis, even though further studies would be necessary to confirm these findings.

  20. The Supralimus sirolimus-eluting stent.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Pedro A; Bienert, Igor

    2013-05-01

    The use of biodegradable polymeric coatings has emerged as a potential bioengineering target to improve the vascular compatibility of coronary drug-eluting stents (DESs). This review summarizes the main features and scientific facts about the Supralimus sirolimus-eluting stent (Sahajanand Medical Technologies Ltd, Surat, India), which is a biodegradable polymer-based, sirolimus-eluting metallic stent that was recently introduced for routine use in Europe. The novel stent is built on a stainless steel platform, coated with a blend of biodegradable polymers (poly-l-lactide, poly-dl-lactide-co-glycolide and polyvinyl pyrrolidone; coating thickness is 4-5 µm). The active agent is the antiproliferative sirolimus in a dose load of 1.4 µg/mm(2), which is released within 48 days. The Supralimus stent was initially evaluated in the single-arm SERIES-I study, which showed binary angiographic restenosis rates of 0% (in-stent) and 1.7% (in-segment) and an in-stent late lumen loss of 0.09 ± 0.28 mm. The multicenter randomized PAINT trial compared two DESs with identical metallic platforms and biodegradable polymer carriers, but different agents (Infinnium [Sahajanand Medical Technologies Pvt Ltd] paclitaxel-eluting stent or Supralimus sirolimus-eluting stent) against bare stents. After 3 years, the pooled DES population had similar rates of cardiac death or myocardial infarction (9 vs 7.1%; p = 0.6), but a lower risk of repeat interventions (10 vs 29.9%; p < 0.01) than controls with bare stents. The incidence of definite or probable stent thrombosis in the pooled DES group was 2.3% (1st year: 1.8%; 2nd year: 0.4% and 3rd year: 0%). These results demonstrate that the novel Supralimus stents are effective in reducing reintervention, while potentially improving the safety profile by decreasing the risk of late-term thrombosis, even though further studies would be necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:23597097

  1. iStent with Phacoemulsification versus Phacoemulsification Alone for Patients with Glaucoma and Cataract: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Malvankar-Mehta, Monali S.; Iordanous, Yiannis; Chen, Yufeng Nancy; Wang, Wan Wendy; Patel, Sangita Shantilal; Costella, John; Hutnik, Cindy M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries (MIGS) have attracted significant attention, as they have been reported to lower intra-ocular pressure (IOP) and have an excellent safety profile. The iStent is an example of a minimally invasive glaucoma device that has received particular attention due to its early and wide spread utilization. There is a growing body of evidence supporting its use at the time of phacoemulsification to help lower IOP. However, it is still not clear how much of the IOP lowering effect can be attributed to the iStent, the crystalline lens extraction or both when inserted concurrently at the time of phacoemulsification. This has been an important issue in understanding its potential role in the glaucoma management paradigm. Purpose To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing the IOP lowering effect of iStent insertion at the time of phacoemulsification versus phacoemulsification alone for patients with glaucoma and cataracts. Methods A systematic review was conducted utilizing various databases. Studies examining the IOP lowering effect of iStent insertion in combination with phacoemulsification, as well as studies examining the IOP lowering effect of phacoemulsification alone were included. Thirty-seven studies, reporting on 2495 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The percentage reduction in IOP (IOPR%) and mean reduction in topical glaucoma medications after surgery were determined. The standardized mean difference (SMD) was computed as a measure of the treatment effect for continuous outcomes taking into account heterogeneity. Fixed-effect and random-effect models were applied. Results A 4% IOP reduction (IOPR%) from baseline occurred following phacoemulsification as a solo procedure compared to 9% following an iStent implant with phacoemulsification, and 27% following 2 iStents implants with phacoemulsification. Compared with cataract extraction alone, iStent with phacoemulsification resulted in significant

  2. Long-term Results of Endovascular Stent Graft Placement of Ureteroarterial Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takuya Yamaguchi, Masato; Muradi, Akhmadu Nomura, Yoshikatsu; Uotani, Kensuke; Idoguchi, Koji; Miyamoto, Naokazu Kawasaki, Ryota; Taniguchi, Takanori; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimoto, Koji

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety, efficacy, and long-term results of endovascular stent graft placement for ureteroarterial fistula (UAF).MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed stent graft placement for UAF performed at our institution from 2004 to 2012. Fistula location was assessed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and angiography, and freedom from hematuria recurrence and mortality rates were estimated.ResultsStent graft placement for 11 UAFs was performed (4 men, mean age 72.8 {+-} 11.6 years). Some risk factors were present, including long-term ureteral stenting in 10 (91 %), pelvic surgery in 8 (73 %), and pelvic radiation in 5 (45 %). Contrast-enhanced CT and/or angiography revealed fistula or encasement of the artery in 6 cases (55 %). In the remaining 5 (45 %), angiography revealed no abnormality, and the suspected fistula site was at the crossing area between urinary tract and artery. All procedures were successful. However, one patient died of urosepsis 37 days after the procedure. At a mean follow-up of 548 (range 35-1,386) days, 4 patients (36 %) had recurrent hematuria, and two of them underwent additional treatment with secondary stent graft placement and surgical reconstruction. The hematuria recurrence-free rates at 1 and 2 years were 76.2 and 40.6 %, respectively. The freedom from UAF-related and overall mortality rates at 2 years were 85.7 and 54.9 %, respectively.ConclusionEndovascular stent graft placement for UAF is a safe and effective method to manage acute events. However, the hematuria recurrence rate remains high. A further study of long-term results in larger number of patients is necessary.

  3. Biodegradable stent or balloon dilatation for benign oesophageal stricture: Pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Anjan; Close, Helen; Viswanath, Yirupaiahgari K; Rees, Colin J; Hancock, Helen C; Dwarakanath, A Deepak; Maier, Rebecca H; Wilson, Douglas; Mason, James M

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To undertake a randomised pilot study comparing biodegradable stents and endoscopic dilatation in patients with strictures. METHODS: This British multi-site study recruited seventeen symptomatic adult patients with refractory strictures. Patients were randomised using a multicentre, blinded assessor design, comparing a biodegradable stent (BS) with endoscopic dilatation (ED). The primary endpoint was the average dysphagia score during the first 6 mo. Secondary endpoints included repeat endoscopic procedures, quality of life, and adverse events. Secondary analysis included follow-up to 12 mo. Sensitivity analyses explored alternative estimation methods for dysphagia and multiple imputation of missing values. Nonparametric tests were used. RESULTS: Although both groups improved, the average dysphagia scores for patients receiving stents were higher after 6 mo: BS-ED 1.17 (95%CI: 0.63-1.78) P = 0.029. The finding was robust under different estimation methods. Use of additional endoscopic procedures and quality of life (QALY) estimates were similar for BS and ED patients at 6 and 12 mo. Concomitant use of gastrointestinal prescribed medication was greater in the stent group (BS 5.1, ED 2.0 prescriptions; P < 0.001), as were related adverse events (BS 1.4, ED 0.0 events; P = 0.024). Groups were comparable at baseline and findings were statistically significant but numbers were small due to under-recruitment. The oesophageal tract has somatic sensitivity and the process of the stent dissolving, possibly unevenly, might promote discomfort or reflux. CONCLUSION: Stenting was associated with greater dysphagia, co-medication and adverse events. Rigorously conducted and adequately powered trials are needed before widespread adoption of this technology. PMID:25561787

  4. Flexibility and trackability of laser cut coronary stent systems.

    PubMed

    Szabadíts, Péter; Puskás, Zsolt; Dobránszky, János

    2009-01-01

    Coronary stents are the most important supports in present day cardiology. Flexibility and trackability are two basic features of stents. In this paper, four different balloon-expandable coronary stent systems were investigated mechanically in order to compare their suitability. The coronary stent systems were assessed by measurements of stent flexibility as well as by comparison of forces during simulated stenting in a self-investigated coronary vessel model. The stents were cut by laser from a single tube of 316L stainless steel or L-605 (CoCr) cobalt chromium alloy. The one-and four-point bending tests were carried out to evaluate the stent flexibility E x I (Nmm(2)), under displacement control in crimped and expanded configurations. The flexibility of stents would be rather dependent on the design than on raw material. In general a more flexible stent needs lower tracking force during the implantation. The L-605 raw material stents need lower track force to pass through in the vessel model than the 316L raw material stents. The sort and long stents passed through the curved vessel model in different ways. The long stents nestled to the vessel wall at the outer arc and bent, while the short stents did not bend in the curve, only the delivery systems bent.

  5. Degradation Model of Bioabsorbable Cardiovascular Stents

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qiyi; Liu, Xiangkun; Li, Zhonghua; Huang, Chubo; Zhang, Wen; Meng, Juan; Chang, Zhaohua; Hua, Zezhao

    2014-01-01

    This study established a numerical model to investigate the degradation mechanism and behavior of bioabsorbable cardiovascular stents. In order to generate the constitutive degradation material model, the degradation characteristics were characterized with user-defined field variables. The radial strength bench test and analysis were used to verify the material model. In order to validate the numerical degradation model, in vitro bench test and in vivo implantation studies were conducted under physiological and normal conditions. The results showed that six months of degradation had not influenced the thermodynamic properties and mechanical integrity of the stent while the molecular weight of the stents implanted in the in vivo and in vitro models had decreased to 61.8% and 68.5% respectively after six month's implantation. It was also found that the degradation rate, critical locations and changes in diameter of the stents in the numerical model were in good consistency in both in vivo and in vitro studies. It implies that the numerical degradation model could provide useful physical insights and prediction of the stent degradation behavior and evaluate, to some extent, the in-vivo performance of the stent. This model could eventually be used for design and optimization of bioabsorbable stent. PMID:25365310

  6. Stent Placement on Fresh Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.; Schuermann, Karl

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To report on the efficacy of fixing fresh venous thrombus to the venous wall by stent placement. Methods: Seven patients underwent stenting to treat acute venous thrombosis. In two patients, the hemodialysis fistula was thrombosed with the thrombus extending into the brachial veins. In three patients, the hemodialysis fistula was patent but massive swelling of the ipsilateral arm was caused by proximal venous thrombosis. Two patients presented with iliac venous thrombosis within stented pelvic veins. Stent placement was preceded by other mechanical thrombectomy methods in all cases. Results: Attachment of thrombus to the venous wall was successful in all cases treated. Acute rethrombosis did not occur. Follow-up patency in dialysis patients was 7.2 {+-} 2.1 months. One patient had rethrombosis of the dialysis graft 3 months after primary treatment. Three patients developed restenosis within a mean period of 7.7 months. One shunt remained patent for 10 months with no event of reobstruction during follow-up. In both patients with iliac stent placement, the vein remained patent over a follow-up period of 8 and 12 months respectively. Conclusion: Stenting fresh venous thrombus can achieve immediate venous patency. It may be used as an alternative approach when all other percutaneous methods fail. Frequent restenosis within stented veins limits its use to very selected cases.

  7. Long-term complications of JJ stent and its management: A 5 years review

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Rajendra Prasad; Mahapatra, Rajkumar Singha; Mondal, Partha Pratim; Pal, Dilip Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the long term complications of JJ stent, the management of complications and the role of endoscopic approach to manage these complications. Materials and Methods: Nineteen patients with indwelling JJ stent for a duration of more than 6 months were included in this study. Patients were assessed with X-ray KUB, USG KUB, blood urea, creatinine and DTPA renogram. Data were analyzed by Microsoft excel 2007. Results: Out of 19 patients 12 (63.16%) were male and 7 (36.84%) were female. The mean age was 39.78 ± 13.69 years., Mean duration for which the stent was in situ was 29.56 months. The most common complication was broken stent, in 11 cases (57.89%). Other complications were migration in 5 (26.32%), encrustation in 2 (10.52%) and 1 case of (5.26%) stone formation. Eighteen cases were managed by endoscopic approaches. A total of 22 procedures were performed to treat the complications. Eleven cases were managed by a single procedure and 8 patients required multiple procedures. All were managed successfully with no death reported. Post-operative complications were seen in eight cases (42.11%). Conclusions: JJ stent related long-term complications are not uncommon and are usually seen after 6 months of indwelling time. Endourological procedure should be the initial approach with a high success rate. Coordinated use multimodality and technology helps in management of difficult cases. Open surgery is rarely required. Prevention of the complication by judicious use and early removal is the cornerstone. PMID:25657542

  8. The incidence of stent-edge spasm after stent implantation in patients with or without vasospastic angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Bunji; Honin, I Kanaya; Horita, Yhuki; Uno, Yoshihide; Yamazaki, Tsukasa; Funada, Akira; Ohka, Takio

    2005-01-01

    Although several investigations have reported that stent implantation is an option for the treatment of vasospastic angina (VSA) that is resistant to medical treatment, we are concerned about the occurrence of new stent-edge spasms after stenting. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of new stent-edge spasms after stenting. Twenty-seven patients with VSA and 23 patients without VSA were enrolled. About 6 months after stent implantaion, a spasm provocation test was performed by intracoronary infusion of acetylcholine or ergonovine in 26 patients with VSA and all patients without VSA, and the induced stent-edge spasms were classified as either moderate (stent-edge spasm > 75% and < 95% reduction in coronary artery diameter) or severe (stent-edge spasm > 95% reduction in coronary artery diameter). In one patient with VSA, stent-edge spasm and acute thrombosis occurred several hours after stent implantation. The remaining 26 patients with VSA had no complications during or after stent implantation. However, during the chronic phase, severe stent-edge spasm was provoked in 5 patients with VSA (19.2%) and in 2 patients without VSA (8.7%). Moderate stent-edge spasm was provoked in 5 patients with VSA (19.2%) and 5 patients without VSA (21.7%). The results suggest new onset stent-edge spasm in patients either with or without VSA should not be neglected.

  9. Are Carotid Stent Fractures Clinically Significant?

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Toca, Manuel; Rodriguez, Heron E.; Naughton, Peter A.; Keeling, Aiofee; Phade, Sachin V.; Morasch, Mark D.; Kibbe, Melina R.; Eskandari, Mark K.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Late stent fatigue is a known complication after carotid artery stenting (CAS) for cervical carotid occlusive disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and clinical significance of carotid stent fractures. Materials and Methods: A single-center retrospective review of 253 carotid bifurcation lesions treated with CAS and mechanical embolic protection from April 2001 to December 2009 was performed. Stent integrity was analyzed by two independent observers using multiplanar cervical plain radiographs with fractures classified into the following types: type I = single strut fracture; type II = multiple strut fractures; type III = transverse fracture; and type IV = transverse fracture with dislocation. Mean follow-up was 32 months. Results: Follow-up imaging was completed on 106 self-expanding nitinol stents (26 closed-cell and 80 open-cell stents). Eight fractures (7.5%) were detected (type I n = 1, type II n = 6, and type III n = 1). Seven fractures were found in open-cell stents (Precise n = 3, ViVEXX n = 2, and Acculink n = 2), and 1 fracture was found in a closed-cell stent (Xact n = 1) (p = 0.67). Only a previous history of external beam neck irradiation was associated with fractures (p = 0.048). No associated clinical sequelae were observed among the patients with fractures, and only 1 patient had an associated significant restenosis ({>=}80%) requiring reintervention. Conclusions: Late stent fatigue after CAS is an uncommon event and rarely clinically relevant. Although cell design does not appear to influence the occurrence of fractures, lesion characteristics may be associated risk factors.

  10. Targeting In-Stent-Stenosis with RGD- and CXCL1-Coated Mini-Stents in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Weinandy, Stefan; Schreiber, Fabian; Megens, Remco T. A.; Theelen, Wendy; Smeets, Ralf; Jockenhövel, Stefan; Gries, Thomas; Möller, Martin; Klee, Doris; Weber, Christian; Zernecke, Alma

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions that critically narrow the artery can necessitate an angioplasty and stent implantation. Long-term therapeutic effects, however, are limited by excessive arterial remodeling. We here employed a miniaturized nitinol-stent coated with star-shaped polyethylenglycole (star-PEG), and evaluated its bio-functionalization with RGD and CXCL1 for improving in-stent stenosis after implantation into carotid arteries of mice. Nitinol foils or stents (bare metal) were coated with star-PEG, and bio-functionalized with RGD, or RGD/CXCL1. Cell adhesion to star-PEG-coated nitinol foils was unaltered or reduced, whereas bio-functionalization with RGD but foremost RGD/CXCL1 increased adhesion of early angiogenic outgrowth cells (EOCs) and endothelial cells but not smooth muscle cells when compared with bare metal foils. Stimulation of cells with RGD/CXCL1 furthermore increased the proliferation of EOCs. In vivo, bio-functionalization with RGD/CXCL1 significantly reduced neointima formation and thrombus formation, and increased re-endothelialization in apoE-/- carotid arteries compared with bare-metal nitinol stents, star-PEG-coated stents, and stents bio-functionalized with RGD only. Bio-functionalization of star-PEG-coated nitinol-stents with RGD/CXCL1 reduced in-stent neointima formation. By supporting the adhesion and proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells, RGD/CXCL1 coating of stents may help to accelerate endothelial repair after stent implantation, and thus may harbor the potential to limit the complication of in-stent restenosis in clinical approaches. PMID:27192172

  11. Targeting In-Stent-Stenosis with RGD- and CXCL1-Coated Mini-Stents in Mice.

    PubMed

    Simsekyilmaz, Sakine; Liehn, Elisa A; Weinandy, Stefan; Schreiber, Fabian; Megens, Remco T A; Theelen, Wendy; Smeets, Ralf; Jockenhövel, Stefan; Gries, Thomas; Möller, Martin; Klee, Doris; Weber, Christian; Zernecke, Alma

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions that critically narrow the artery can necessitate an angioplasty and stent implantation. Long-term therapeutic effects, however, are limited by excessive arterial remodeling. We here employed a miniaturized nitinol-stent coated with star-shaped polyethylenglycole (star-PEG), and evaluated its bio-functionalization with RGD and CXCL1 for improving in-stent stenosis after implantation into carotid arteries of mice. Nitinol foils or stents (bare metal) were coated with star-PEG, and bio-functionalized with RGD, or RGD/CXCL1. Cell adhesion to star-PEG-coated nitinol foils was unaltered or reduced, whereas bio-functionalization with RGD but foremost RGD/CXCL1 increased adhesion of early angiogenic outgrowth cells (EOCs) and endothelial cells but not smooth muscle cells when compared with bare metal foils. Stimulation of cells with RGD/CXCL1 furthermore increased the proliferation of EOCs. In vivo, bio-functionalization with RGD/CXCL1 significantly reduced neointima formation and thrombus formation, and increased re-endothelialization in apoE-/- carotid arteries compared with bare-metal nitinol stents, star-PEG-coated stents, and stents bio-functionalized with RGD only. Bio-functionalization of star-PEG-coated nitinol-stents with RGD/CXCL1 reduced in-stent neointima formation. By supporting the adhesion and proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells, RGD/CXCL1 coating of stents may help to accelerate endothelial repair after stent implantation, and thus may harbor the potential to limit the complication of in-stent restenosis in clinical approaches.

  12. Treatment of Acute Aortic Type B Dissection with Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Hausegger, K.A.; Tiesenhausen, K.; Schedlbauer, P.; Oberwalder, P.; Tauss, J.; Rigler, B.

    2001-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of endoluminal stent-grafts in the treatment of acute type B aortic dissections.Methods: In five patients with acute aortic type B dissections, sealing of the primary intimal tear with an endoluminal stent-graft was attempted. Indication for treatment was aneurysm formation in two patients and persistent pain in three patients. One of the latter also had an unstable dissection flap compromising the ostium of the superior mesenteric artery. The distance from the intimal tear to the left subclavian artery was <0.5 cm in four patients, who had typical type B dissections. In one patient with an atypical dissection the distance from the primary tear to the left subclavian artery was 4 cm. This patient had no re-entry tear. Talent tube grafts (World Medical Manufacturing Cooperation, Sunrise, FL, USA) were used in all patients.Results: Stent-graft insertion with sealing of the primary tear was successful in all patients. The proximal covered portion of the stent-graft was placed across the left subclavian artery in four patients (1x transposition of the left subclavian artery). Left arm perfusion was preserved via a subclavian steal phenomenon in the patients in whom the stent-graft covered the orifice of the left subclavian artery. The only procedural complication we observed was an asymptomatic segmental renal infarction in one patient. In the thoracic aorta thrombosis of the false aortic lumen occurred in all patients. In one patient the false lumen of the abdominal aorta thrombosed after 4 weeks; in the other three patients the status of the abdominal aorta remained unchanged compared with the situation prior to stent-graft insertion. As a late complication formation of a secondary aneurysm of the thoracic aorta was observed at the distal end of the stent-graft 3 months after the primary intervention. This aneurysm was treated by coaxial insertion of an additional stent-graft without complications.Conclusion: Endoluminal treatment

  13. Physiologic Effect of Stent Therapy for Inferior Vena Cava Obstruction Due to Malignant Liver Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Kazushi Sonomura, Tetsuo; Fujimoto, Hisashi; Kimura, Masashi; Yamada, Katsuya; Sato, Morio; Juri, Masanobu

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To understand systemic the influence of stent therapy for inferior vena cava (IVC) obstruction due to advanced liver tumor. Methods. Seven patients with symptomatic IVC obstruction due to advanced primary (n 4) or secondary (n = 3) liver tumor were subjected to stent therapy. Enrollment criteria included high IVC pressure over 15 mmHg and the presence of edema and ascites. Z-stents were deployed using coaxial sheath technique via femoral venous puncture. Physiologic and hematobiochemical parameters were analyzed. Results. All procedures were successful, and the stents remained patent until patient death. Promptly after stent placement, the IVC flow recovered, and the venous blood pressure in the IVC below the obstruction level showed a significant decrease from 20.8 {+-} 1.2 mmHg (mean {+-} SE) to 10.7 {+-} 0.7 mmHg (p < 0.01). Transient mild increase of right atrial pressure was observed in 1 patient. During the following week prominent diuresis was observed in all patients. Mean urine output volume in the 3 days before the stent therapy was 0.81 {+-} 0.09 l/day compared with 2.1 {+-} 0.2 l/day (p < 0.01) in the 3 days after. The edema and ascites decreased in all patients. The caval pressure change correlated well (r > 0.6) with the urine volume increase, and with the decreased volume of edema and ascites. The urine volume increase correlated well with the decrement of edema, but not with that of ascites. Improvements for various durations in the levels of blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, fibrinogen, and platelet count were found (p < 0.05). These hematobiochemical changes were well correlated with each other and with the decrement of ascites. Two patients showed a low blood sodium level of 128.5 mEq/l after intensive natriuresis, and one of them died on day 21 with hepatic failure, which was interpreted as maladaptation aggravation. The mean survival time was 94.1 {+-} 34.1 days (mean {+-} SD), ranging from 21 to 140 days

  14. Carotid Stent Fracture from Stylocarotid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Jeffrey D; Joyner, David A; Farley, Edward P; Khan, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Eagle syndrome is a rare condition resulting from elongation of the temporal styloid process or calcification of its associated stylohyoid ligaments. Although usually presenting with pain or odynophagia, Eagle syndrome has been reported to cause a multitude of neurologic symptoms or vascular complications, some of which can be life-threatening. We present a case in which an endovascularly placed internal carotid artery stent in close proximity to a calcified stylohyoid ligament resulted in stent fracture with subsequent stent and vessel occlusion. We review and discuss the presentation, diagnosis, etiology, complications and treatment options of the syndrome. PMID:27761179

  15. Endovascular Techniques in Limb Salvage: Stents

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Hosam F.

    2013-01-01

    In patients with critical limb ischemia, the first-line approach for limb salvage has shifted over the past decade from bypass surgery to endovascular intervention. Stenting for the treatment of lower-extremity arterial occlusive disease is an important tool and continues to evolve, with new stent designs and technologies that have been developed to provide superior patency rates and limb salvage. In this article, we discuss the role of peripheral stenting in the treatment of patients with critical limb ischemia, including a review of the relevant current literature and the future directions of such interventions. PMID:23805339

  16. Manual Replacement of Double J Stent Without Fluoroscopy (Double j stent replacement).

    PubMed

    Kose, Osman; Gorgel, Sacit Nuri; Ozbir, Sait; Yenigurbuz, Sekan; Kara, Cengiz

    2015-02-01

    It is not always possible to replace a ureteric stent with a new one due to the fact that tumoral effect increases in ureter with time. We present our experience of manual replacement of double J stent without fluoroscopy. The data from 23 female patients who underwent double J stent replacement with a total of 110 times was retrospectively analyzed. The steps of technique are as follows: take out distal end of the double J stent through urethra to external urethral meatus cystoscopically, insert a 0.035-inch guide wire through double J stent to the renal pelvis or intra pelvicaliceal system, take out old double J stent over guide wire, slide new stent over guide wire and at external meatus level take out guide wire while gently sliding distal end of double J stent over guide wire into urethra. The mean age was 58.39 ± 9.21 years. Cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancer were diagnosed in 16, 4, and 3 patients respectively. The mean follow-up and indwelling period were 13.8 ± 5.2, 3.8 ± 0.6 months, respectively. Increased pelvicaliceal dilatation, serum creatinine level, or renal parenchymal loss was not observed. Replacement of double J stents with this technique is easy and can be used successfully in distal ureteral obstructions.

  17. Hemopericardium After Superior Vena Cava Stenting for Malignant SVC Obstruction: The Importance of Contrast-Enhanced CT in the Assessment of Postprocedural Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Brant, Jonathan; Peebles, Charles; Kalra, Paul; Odurny, Allan

    2001-09-15

    We report the complication of hemopericardium following superior vena cava (SVC) stenting with an uncovered Wallstent in a patient with malignant SVC obstruction. The patient collapsed acutely 15 min following stent placement with hypoxemia and hypotension. A CT scan demonstrated a hemopericardium which was successfully treated with a pericardial drain. The possible complications of SVC stenting, including hemopericardium, pulmonary embolism, mediastinal hematoma, and pulmonary edema from increased venous return resulting from improved hemodynamics, ensure a wide differential diagnosis in the post procedural collapsed patient and this case emphasizes the important role of contrast-enhanced CT in the peri-resuscitation assessment of these patients.

  18. Coronary artery stents: evaluating new designs for contemporary percutaneous intervention.

    PubMed

    Kandzari, David E; Tcheng, James E; Zidar, James P

    2002-08-01

    Intracoronary stents have markedly improved the short- and long-term safety and efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention by improving acute gains in luminal dimensions, decreasing abrupt vessel occlusion, and reducing restenosis. At present, nearly 90% of all coronary interventions involve stenting. A variety of advances in stent technology and design have expanded the clinical application of stenting to include complex coronary lesions, multivessel disease, and small-diameter vessels. In addition, the development of stents as drug delivery systems for antithrombotic or antiproliferative agents has the potential to expand the role of coronary stenting, and early clinical experience appears promising. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments in stent design, examine the results of clinical trials of contemporary stents, and present future directions for investigation of new stent technologies. PMID:12124974

  19. Stent Fracture and Reocclusion After Placement of a Single Self-Expanding Stent in the Common Iliac Artery and Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiura, Wataru Sakaguchi, Shoji; Morimoto, Kengo; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2008-09-15

    We present a case of fracture of a single self-expanding stent placed in the common iliac artery (CIA). An 80-year-old woman underwent placement of a self-expanding stent for CIA occlusion. Stent fracture and reocclusion were detected after 18 months. Successful revascularization was achieved using a stent-in-stent maneuver. The possibility of stent fracture with reocclusion should be considered following treatment with a single self-expanding stent for CIA occlusion.

  20. Very late stent thrombosis following the placement of a crossing Y-stent with dual closed-cell stents for the coiling of a wide-necked aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Young; Kim, Chang-Hyun

    2015-02-01

    The crossing Y-stent technique is a viable option for coiling of wide-necked bifurcation aneurysms. However, little is known about the long-term impact of this technique. Very late (>1 year) stent thrombosis following the placement of a crossing Y-stent with dual closed-cell stents for the coiling of a wide-necked basilar tip aneurysm, which has not been reported to date, is described.

  1. Severe symptomatic intracranial internal carotid artery stenosis treated with intracranial stenting: a single center study with 58 patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-Liang; Gao, Bu-Lang; Li, Tian-Xiao; Cai, Dong-Yang; Zhu, Liang-Fu; Xue, Jiang-Yu; Bai, Wei-Xing; Li, Zhao-Shuo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of intracranial stenting in a population with severe (≥70%) symptomatic intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) atherosclerotic stenosis. METHODS Fifty-eight patients with severe intracranial ICA atherosclerotic stenosis were prospectively enrolled. The baseline data, cerebral angiography, success rate, perioperative complications, clinical and imaging follow-up were prospectively analyzed. RESULTS All patients had successful intracranial stenting (100%), and the mean degree of stenosis was improved from 84.3%±7.5% to 23.5%±5.1% after the stent procedure. During the 30-day perioperative period, only one patient (1.7%) had ischemic stroke. Seven patients (12.1%) had headache and dysphoria. Thirty-six patients (62.1%) had clinical follow-up for 6–68 months after stenting. Five female patients (13.9%) had ipsilateral stroke including one death, but no disabling stroke, while three other patients (8.3%) had ipsilateral temporary ischemic attack (TIA). The recurrent stroke rate was higher in patients presenting with stroke (4/17, 23.5%) than in patients presenting with TIA (1/19, 5.3%), with no statistical significance (P = 0.33). Thirteen patients (22.4%) had imaging follow-up of 5–12 months following stenting, five of whom (38.5%) had in-stent restenosis. CONCLUSION Intracranial stenting for patients with intracranial ICA atherosclerotic stenosis has a low perioperative stroke rate and decent outcome on long-term follow-up, despite a relatively high in-stent restenosis rate. PMID:26809831

  2. Double J stenting: A rewarding option in the management of emphysematous pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debiprasad; Pal, Dilip Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is an acute necrotizing inflammation of renal parenchyma and peri-nephric tissue characterized by gas formation. In this study, we evaluated the outcome of EPN cases by medical management with or without renal decompression. Materials and Methods: We have observed prospectively 15 cases of EPN admitted in our institute in respect to age, sex, mode of presentation, presence of comorbidity, laboratory profile, urine-analysis, and outcome after medical management and drainage procedures. Results: All patients improved on medical management and drainage procedure such as JJ stenting and percutaneous nephrostomy. No mortality noted in our 15 cases of EPN. Conclusion: Emphysematous pyelonephritis can be managed conservatively by DJ stenting, wcich is a less morbid procedure or percutaneous nephrostomy with proper antibiotics and adequate glycemic control. PMID:27453644

  3. Combined use of videoendoscopy and X-ray imaging for improved monitoring of stenting application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cysewska-Sobusiak, A. R.; Sowier, A.; Skrzywanek, P.

    2005-09-01

    The subject of this paper concerns advanced techniques of procedures and imaging used in minimally invasive surgery and in non-operable cases of the alimentary tract tumor therapy. Examples of videoendoscopy and X-ray imaging used for the application of stents (prostheses) and catheters allowing for the performance of diagnostic and endo-therapeutic procedures are described. The possibility was indicated to elaborate a new method of proceeding in tumor therapy in the patients for whom the methods used so far were ineffective. In the paper examples of combined imaging the application of metallic stents and plastic catheters allowing for the performance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are presented. The cases shown refer to tumor located in the esophagus and in the bile and pancreatic ducts.

  4. Valve-Like and Protruding Calcified Intimal Flap Complicating Common Iliac Arteries Kissing Stenting.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, George S; Georgakarakos, Efstratios I; Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos; Argyriou, Christos C; Antoniou, George A; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular therapy for iliac artery chronic total occlusions is nowadays associated with low rates of procedure-related complications and improved clinical outcomes, and it is predominantly used as first-line therapy prior to aortobifemoral bypass grafting. Herein, we describe the case of a patient presenting with an ischemic left foot digit ulcer and suffering complex aortoiliac lesions, who received common iliac arteries kissing stents, illustrating at final antegrade and retrograde angiograms the early recognition of a blood flow obstructing valve-like calcified intimal flap protruding through the stent struts, which was obstructing antegrade but not retrograde unilateral iliac arterial axis blood flow. The problem was resolved by reconstructing the aortic bifurcation at a more proximal level. Completion angiogram verified normal patency of aorta and iliac vessels. Additionally, a severe left femoral bifurcation stenosis was also corrected by endarterectomy-arterioplasty with a bovine patch. Postintervention ankle brachial pressure indices were significantly improved. At the 6-month and 2-year follow-up, normal peripheral pulses were still reported without intermittent claudication suggesting the durability of the procedure. Through stent-protruding calcified intimal flap, is a very rare, but existing source of antegrade blood flow obstruction after common iliac arteries kissing stents. PMID:26783493

  5. Valve-Like and Protruding Calcified Intimal Flap Complicating Common Iliac Arteries Kissing Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, George S.; Georgakarakos, Efstratios I.; Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos; Argyriou, Christos C.; Antoniou, George A.; Lazarides, Miltos K.

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular therapy for iliac artery chronic total occlusions is nowadays associated with low rates of procedure-related complications and improved clinical outcomes, and it is predominantly used as first-line therapy prior to aortobifemoral bypass grafting. Herein, we describe the case of a patient presenting with an ischemic left foot digit ulcer and suffering complex aortoiliac lesions, who received common iliac arteries kissing stents, illustrating at final antegrade and retrograde angiograms the early recognition of a blood flow obstructing valve-like calcified intimal flap protruding through the stent struts, which was obstructing antegrade but not retrograde unilateral iliac arterial axis blood flow. The problem was resolved by reconstructing the aortic bifurcation at a more proximal level. Completion angiogram verified normal patency of aorta and iliac vessels. Additionally, a severe left femoral bifurcation stenosis was also corrected by endarterectomy-arterioplasty with a bovine patch. Postintervention ankle brachial pressure indices were significantly improved. At the 6-month and 2-year follow-up, normal peripheral pulses were still reported without intermittent claudication suggesting the durability of the procedure. Through stent-protruding calcified intimal flap, is a very rare, but existing source of antegrade blood flow obstruction after common iliac arteries kissing stents. PMID:26783493

  6. Nanoparticle Drug- and Gene-eluting Stents for the Prevention and Treatment of Coronary Restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Rui-Xing; Yang, De-Zhai; Wu, Jin-Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has become the most common revascularization procedure for coronary artery disease. The use of stents has reduced the rate of restenosis by preventing elastic recoil and negative remodeling. However, in-stent restenosis remains one of the major drawbacks of this procedure. Drug-eluting stents (DESs) have proven to be effective in reducing the risk of late restenosis, but the use of currently marketed DESs presents safety concerns, including the non-specificity of therapeutics, incomplete endothelialization leading to late thrombosis, the need for long-term anti-platelet agents, and local hypersensitivity to polymer delivery matrices. In addition, the current DESs lack the capacity for adjustment of the drug dose and release kinetics appropriate to the disease status of the treated vessel. The development of efficacious therapeutic strategies to prevent and inhibit restenosis after PCI is critical for the treatment of coronary artery disease. The administration of drugs using biodegradable polymer nanoparticles as carriers has generated immense interest due to their excellent biocompatibility and ability to facilitate prolonged drug release. Despite the potential benefits of nanoparticles as smart drug delivery and diagnostic systems, much research is still required to evaluate potential toxicity issues related to the chemical properties of nanoparticle materials, as well as to their size and shape. This review describes the molecular mechanism of coronary restenosis, the use of DESs, and progress in nanoparticle drug- or gene-eluting stents for the prevention and treatment of coronary restenosis. PMID:24465275

  7. Percutaneous Treatment of Iliac Aneurysms and Pseudoaneurysms with Cragg Endopro System 1 Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparini, Daniele; Lovaria, Andrea; Saccheri, Silvia; Nicolini, Antonio; Favini, Giorgio; Inglese, Luigi; Giorgetti, Pier Luigi; Basadonna, Pier Tommaso

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and short-term follow-up results of treating iliac aneurysms by the Cragg Endopro System 1 stent-graft. Methods: Nine lesions (two pseudoaneurysms and seven atherosclerotic aneurysms) were treated in eight patients by percutaneous implantation of a total of 10 stent-grafts. The procedure was followed by anticoagulation with heparin for 6 days, then antiplatelet therapy. Follow-up was by color Doppler ultrasound scan at 2 days and 3 months after the procedure for all patients, and by venous digital subtraction angiography and/or angio-CT up to 12 months later for four patients. Results: Initial clinical success rate was 100% and there were two minor complications. In one case the delivery system was faulty resulting in failure to deploy the stent-graft. An additional device had to be used. At 3-12 months all prostheses were patent but one patient (12.5%) had a minimal pergraft leak. Conclusion: Percutaneous stent-grafting with this device is a safe and efficacious treatment of iliac artery aneurysms.

  8. FDA Approves First Fully Dissolvable Stent

    MedlinePlus

    ... newly approved stent is made from a biodegradable polymer that's commonly used in medical devices designed to ... the views of MedlinePlus, the National Library of Medicine, the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department ...

  9. Focal stent collapse in a patient with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, L; Finci, L; Reimers, B; Di Mario, C; Colombo, A

    1998-05-01

    We report a patient with systemic sclerosis having implantation of a 35 mm beStent with immediate success but developing angina at follow-up. A focal stent collapse with focal hyperplasia in and outside the stent was documented by ultrasound after 2 mos. A 14mm Palmaz-Schatz stent was successfully deployed into the collapsed beStent, with good 6-mo angiographic result. The stent collapse was probably due to unequal distribution of radial forces and possibly reactive hyperplasia in this unique patient with systemic sclerosis.

  10. Stenting in Acute Lower Limb Arterial Occlusions

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Jowad; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2008-07-15

    Management of critical limb ischemia of acute onset includes surgical embolectomy, bypass grafting, aspiration thrombectomy, thrombolysis, and mechanical thrombectomy followed by treatment of the underlying cause. We present our experience with the use of stents to treat acute embolic/thrombotic occlusions in one iliac and three femoropopliteal arteries. Although this is a small case series, excellent immediate and midterm results suggest that stenting of acute occlusions of the iliac, superficial femoral, and popliteal arteries is a safe and effective treatment option.

  11. Biomimicry, vascular restenosis and coronary stents.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R S; van der Giessen, W J; Holmes, D R

    1998-01-01

    Biomimicry is in its earliest stages and is being considered in the realm of tissue engineering. If arterial implants are to limit neointimal thickening, purely passive structures cannot succeed. Bioactivity must be present, either by pharmacologic intervention or by fabricating a 'living stent' that contains active cellular material. As tissue engineering evolves, useful solutions will emerge from applying this knowledge directly to vascular biologic problems resulting from angioplasty, stenting, and vascular prosthesis research.

  12. Extracranial Carotid Artery Stenting in Surgically High-Risk Patients Using the Carotid Wallstent Endoprosthesis:Midterm Clinical and Ultrasound Follow-Up Results

    SciTech Connect

    Maleux, Geert Bernaerts, Pauwel; Thijs, Vincent; Daenens, Kim; Vaninbroukx, Johan; Fourneau, Inge; Nevelsteen, Andre

    2003-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and midterm outcome of elective implantation of the Carotid Wallstent (registered) in patients considered to be at high surgical risk. In a prospective study, 54 carotid artery stenoses in 51 patients were stented over a 24-month period. Three patients underwent bilateral carotid artery stenting. Institutional inclusion criteria for invasive treatment of carotid occlusive disease (carotid endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting) are patients presenting with a 70% or more symptomatic stenosis and those with an 80% or more asymptomatic stenosis having a life-expectancy of more than 1 year. All patients treated by carotid artery stenting were considered at high risk for carotid endarterectomy because of a hostile neck (17 patients-31.5%) or because of severe comorbidities (37 patients-68.5%). No cerebral protection device was used. Of the 54 lesions, 33 (61.1%) were symptomatic and 21 (38.8%) were asymptomatic. Follow-up was performed by physical examination and by duplex ultrasonography at 1 month, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years after the procedure. All 54 lesions could be stented successfully without periprocedural stroke. Advert events during follow-up (mean 13.9 {+-} 5.7 months) were non-stroke-related death in 6 patients (11.1%), minor stroke in 4 stented hemispheres(7.4%), transient ipsilateral facial pain in 1 patient (1.8%),infection of the stented surgical patch in 1 patient (1.8%) and asymptomatic in stent restenosis in 4 patients (7.4%). The percutaneous implantation of the Carotid Wallstent (registered) , even without cerebral protection device, appears to be a safe procedure with acceptable clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up results in patients at high surgical risk. But some late adverse events such as ipsilateral recurrence of non-disabling (minor) stroke or in stent restenosis still remain real challenging problems.

  13. Wingspan Stent for High-Grade Symptomatic Vertebrobasilar Artery Atherosclerotic Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jian Zhao Zhenwei Gao Guodong Deng Jianping; Yu Jia; Gao Li; Yuan Yang; Qv Youzhi

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to present the treatment outcomes with Wingspan stent angioplasty of high-grade intracranial vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stenosis in symptomatic patients. Methods: Between 2007 and 2010, the records of 30 patients with 31 intracranial high-grade VBA stenoses (all{>=}70%) who underwent elective stenting due to the failure of medical therapy were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical evaluation was performed based on the modified Rankin scale and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Results: In all cases, the stent deployment was technically successful. The mean stenosis decreased significantly from 82.28 {+-} 8.02% (range, 72-99%) to 11.18 {+-} 7.28% (range, 0-25%) after stent-assisted angioplasty (P < 0.05). Periprocedure complications occurred in 3 (10%) of 30 patients; there were 2 cases of perforator strokes and 1 case of transient flow insufficiency with stent overlap. Clinical follow-up (mean, 17.81 {+-} 11.49 months; range, 5-40 months) was available for 27 patients, and angiographic follow-up (mean, 9.95 {+-} 5.74 months, range, 5-20 months) was available for 19 patients. Only one case demonstrated recurrent symptoms with restenosis ({>=}50%). There were no recurrent ischemic events and no cases of restenosis in the other patients. Conclusions: According to our data, the Wingspan stent for symptomatic intracranial VBA stenoses is a safe and efficacious treatment alternative in cases with recurrent symptoms despite medical therapy. However, the improvement of outcome requires the reduction in the rate of procedure-related complications and long-term outcomes still have to be demonstrated.

  14. Resolution of Pulsatile Tinnitus after Venous Sinus Stenting in Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dinkin, Marc; Suurna, Maria; Hannsgen, Kelly; Bui, Xem

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the role of venous sinus stenting in the treatment of pulsatile tinnitus among patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) and significant venous sinus stenosis. Subjects and Methods A written informed consent approved by the Weill Cornell institutional review board was signed and obtained from the study participants. Thirty-seven consecutive patients with IIH and venous sinus stenosis who were treated with venous sinus stenting between Jan.2012-Jan.2016 were prospectively evaluated. Patients without pulsatile tinnitus were excluded. Tinnitus severity was categorized based on “Tinnitus Handicap Inventory” (THI) at pre-stent, day-0, 1-month, 3-month, 6-month, 12-month, 18-month and 2-year follow-up. Demographics, body-mass index (BMI), pre and post VSS trans-stenotic pressure gradient were documented. Statistical analysis performed using Pearson’s correlation, Chi-square analysis and Fischer’s exact test. Results 29 patients with a mean age of 29.5±8.5 years M:F = 1:28. Median (mean) THI pre and post stenting were: 4 (3.7) and 1 (1) respectively. Median time of tinnitus resolution post VSS was 0-days. There was significant improvement of THI (Δ Mean: 2.7 THI [95% CI: 2.3–3.1 THI], p<0.001) and transverse-distal sigmoid sinus gradient (Δ Mean: -15.3 mm Hg [95% CI: 12.7–18 mm Hg], p<0.001) post-stenting. Mean follow-up duration of 26.4±9.8 months (3–44 months). VSS was feasible in 100% patients with no procedural complications. Three-patients (10%) had recurrent sinus stenosis and tinnitus at mean follow-up of 12 months (6–30 months). Conclusion Venous sinus stenting is an effective treatment for pulsatile tinnitus in patients with IIH and venous sinus stenosis. PMID:27768690

  15. Bioactive coronary stent coating based on layer-by-layer technology for siRNA release.

    PubMed

    Hossfeld, S; Nolte, A; Hartmann, H; Recke, M; Schaller, M; Walker, T; Kjems, J; Schlosshauer, B; Stoll, D; Wendel, H-P; Krastev, R

    2013-05-01

    One procedure to treat stenotic coronary arteries is the percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). In recent years, drug-eluting stents (DESs) have demonstrated elaborate ways to improve outcomes of intravascular interventions. To enhance DESs, the idea has evolved to design stents that elute specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) for better vascular wall regeneration. Layer-by-layer (LbL) technology offers the possibility of incorporating siRNA nanoplexes (NPs) to achieve bioactive medical implant coatings. The LbL technique was used to achieve hyaluronic acid/chitosan (HA/Chi) films with incorporated Chi-siRNA NPs. The multilayer growth was monitored by quartz crystal microbalance. The coating on the stents and its thickness were analyzed using fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. All stents showed a homogeneous coating, and the polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) were not disrupted after ethylene oxide sterilization or expansion. The in vitro uptake of fluorescent-labeled NPs from PEMs in primary human endothelial cells (ECs) was analyzed by flow cytometry for 2, 6 and 9 days. Furthermore, stents coated with HA/Chi and Chi-siRNA NPs were expanded into porcine arteries and showed ex vivo delivery of NPs. The films showed no critical results in terms of hemocompatibility. This study demonstrates that Chi-siRNA NPs can be incorporated into PEMs consisting of HA and Chi. We conclude that the NPs were delivered to ECs under in vitro conditions. Furthermore, under ex vivo conditions, NPs were transferred into porcine artery walls. Due to their good hemocompatibility, they might make an innovative tool for achieving bioactive coatings for coronary stents.

  16. A prospective evaluation of the safety and efficacy of the TAXUS Element paclitaxel-eluting coronary stent system for the treatment of de novo coronary artery lesions: Design and statistical methods of the PERSEUS clinical program

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Paclitaxel-eluting stents decrease angiographic and clinical restenosis following percutaneous coronary intervention compared to bare metal stents. TAXUS Element is a third-generation paclitaxel-eluting stent which incorporates a novel, thinner-strut, platinum-enriched metal alloy platform. The stent is intended to have enhanced radiopacity and improved deliverability compared to other paclitaxel-eluting stents. The safety and efficacy of the TAXUS Element stent are being evaluated in the pivotal PERSEUS clinical trials. Methods/Design The PERSEUS trials include two parallel studies of the TAXUS Element stent in single, de novo coronary atherosclerotic lesions. The PERSEUS Workhorse study is a prospective, randomized (3:1), single-blind, non-inferiority trial in subjects with lesion length ≤28 mm and vessel diameter ≥2.75 mm to ≤4.0 mm which compares TAXUS Element to the TAXUS Express2 paclitaxel-eluting stent system. The Workhorse study employs a novel Bayesian statistical approach that uses prior information to limit the number of study subjects exposed to the investigational device and thus provide a safer and more efficient analysis of the TAXUS Element stent. PERSEUS Small Vessel is a prospective, single-arm, superiority trial in subjects with lesion length ≤20 mm and vessel diameter ≥2.25 mm to <2.75 mm that compares TAXUS Element with a matched historical bare metal Express stent control. Discussion The TAXUS PERSEUS clinical trial program uses a novel statistical approach to evaluate whether design and metal alloy iterations in the TAXUS Element stent platform provide comparable safety and improved procedural performance compared to the previous generation Express stent. PERSEUS trial enrollment is complete and primary endpoint data are expected in 2010. PERSEUS Workhorse and Small Vessel are registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, identification numbers NCT00484315 and NCT00489541. PMID:20059766

  17. Role of Animal Models in Coronary Stenting.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Javaid; Chamberlain, Janet; Francis, Sheila E; Gunn, Julian

    2016-02-01

    Coronary angioplasty initially employed balloon dilatation only. This technique revolutionized the treatment of coronary artery disease, although outcomes were compromised by acute vessel closure, late constrictive remodeling, and restenosis due to neointimal proliferation. These processes were studied in animal models, which contributed to understanding the biology of endovascular arterial injury. Coronary stents overcome acute recoil, with improvements in the design and metallurgy since then, leading to the development of drug-eluting stents and bioresorbable scaffolds. These devices now undergo computer modeling and benchtop and animal testing before evaluation in clinical trials. Animal models, including rabbit, sheep, dog and pig are available, all with individual benefits and limitations. In smaller mammals, such as mouse and rabbit, the target for stenting is generally the aorta; whereas in larger animals, such as the pig, it is generally the coronary artery. The pig coronary stenting model is a gold-standard for evaluating safety; but insights into biomechanical properties, the biology of stenting, and efficacy in controlling neointimal proliferation can also be gained. Intra-coronary imaging modalities such as intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography allow precise serial evaluation in vivo, and recent developments in genetically modified animal models of atherosclerosis provide realistic test beds for future stents and scaffolds.

  18. Recent Advances in Drug Eluting Stents

    PubMed Central

    Puranik, Amey S.; Dawson, Eileen R.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most common medical interventions to reopen an occluded vessel is the implantation of a coronary stent. While this method of treatment is effective initially, restenosis, or the re-narrowing of the artery frequently occurs largely due to neointimal hyperplasia of smooth muscle cells. Drug eluting stents were developed in order to provide local, site-specific, controlled release of drugs that can inhibit neointima formation. By implementing a controlled release delivery system it may be possible to control the time release of the pharmacological factors and thus be able to bypass some of the critical events associated with stent hyperplasia and prevent the need for subsequent intervention. However, since the advent of first-generation drug eluting stents, long-term adverse effects have raised concerns regarding their safety. These limitations in safety and efficacy have triggered considerable research in developing biodegradable stents and more potent drug delivery systems. In this review, we shed light on the current state-of-the-art in drug eluting stents, problems related to them and highlight some of the ongoing research in this area. PMID:23117022

  19. Computational micromechanics of bioabsorbable magnesium stents.

    PubMed

    Grogan, J A; Leen, S B; McHugh, P E

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium alloys are a promising candidate material for an emerging generation of absorbable metal stents. Due to its hexagonal-close-packed lattice structure and tendency to undergo twinning, the deformation behaviour of magnesium is quite different to that of conventional stent materials, such as stainless steel 316L and cobalt chromium L605. In particular, magnesium exhibits asymmetric plastic behaviour (i.e. different yield behaviours in tension and compression) and has lower ductility than these conventional alloys. In the on-going development of absorbable metal stents it is important to assess how the unique behaviour of magnesium affects device performance. The mechanical behaviour of magnesium stent struts is investigated in this study using computational micromechanics, based on finite element analysis and crystal plasticity theory. The plastic deformation in tension and bending of textured and non-textured magnesium stent struts with different numbers of grains through the strut dimension is investigated. It is predicted that, unlike 316L and L605, the failure risk and load bearing capacity of magnesium stent struts during expansion is not strongly affected by the number of grains across the strut dimensions; however texturing, which may be introduced and controlled in the manufacturing process, is predicted to have a significant influence on these measures of strut performance.

  20. Temporary duodenal stenting as a bridge to ERCP for inaccessible papilla due to duodenal obstruction: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Donatelli, Gianfranco; Cereatti, Fabrizio; Dumont, Jean-Loup; Dhumane, Parag; Tuszynski, Thierry; Derhy, Serge; Meduri, Alexandre; Vergeau, Bertrand Marie; Meduri, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Duodenal obstruction may prevent performance of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or Endoscopic ultrasonograhy-guided biliary access (EUS-BD) are alternative treatments but are associated with a higher morbidity and mortality rate. The aim of the study is to report overall technical success rate and clinical outcome with deployment of temporary fully or partially covered self-expanding duodenal stent (pc/fcSEMS) as a bridge to ERCP in case of inaccessible papilla due to duodenal strictures. Patients and methods: This retrospective study included 66 consecutive patients presenting with a duodenal stricture impeding the ability to perform an ERCP. Provisional duodenal stenting was performed as a bridge to ERCP. A second endoscopic session was performed to remove the provisional stent and to perform an ERCP. Afterward, a permanent duodenal stent was delivered if necessary. Results: Sixty-six duodenal stents (17 pcSEMS and 49 fcSEMS) were delivered with a median indwelling time of 3.15 (1 – 7) days. Two migrations occurred in the pcSEMS group, 1 of which required lower endoscopy for retrieval. No other procedure-related complications were observed. At second endoscopy a successful ERCP was performed in 56 patients (85 %); 10 patients (15 %) with endoscopic failure underwent PTBD or EUS-BD. Forty patients needed permanent duodenal stenting. Conclusions: Provisional removable covered duodenal stenting as a bridge to ERCP for duodenal obstruction is safe procedure and in most cases allows successful performance of therapeutic ERCP. This technique could be a sound option as a step up approach before referring such cases for more complex techniques such as EUS-BD or PTBD. PMID:27652301

  1. Temporary duodenal stenting as a bridge to ERCP for inaccessible papilla due to duodenal obstruction: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Donatelli, Gianfranco; Cereatti, Fabrizio; Dumont, Jean-Loup; Dhumane, Parag; Tuszynski, Thierry; Derhy, Serge; Meduri, Alexandre; Vergeau, Bertrand Marie; Meduri, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Duodenal obstruction may prevent performance of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or Endoscopic ultrasonograhy-guided biliary access (EUS-BD) are alternative treatments but are associated with a higher morbidity and mortality rate. The aim of the study is to report overall technical success rate and clinical outcome with deployment of temporary fully or partially covered self-expanding duodenal stent (pc/fcSEMS) as a bridge to ERCP in case of inaccessible papilla due to duodenal strictures. Patients and methods: This retrospective study included 66 consecutive patients presenting with a duodenal stricture impeding the ability to perform an ERCP. Provisional duodenal stenting was performed as a bridge to ERCP. A second endoscopic session was performed to remove the provisional stent and to perform an ERCP. Afterward, a permanent duodenal stent was delivered if necessary. Results: Sixty-six duodenal stents (17 pcSEMS and 49 fcSEMS) were delivered with a median indwelling time of 3.15 (1 – 7) days. Two migrations occurred in the pcSEMS group, 1 of which required lower endoscopy for retrieval. No other procedure-related complications were observed. At second endoscopy a successful ERCP was performed in 56 patients (85 %); 10 patients (15 %) with endoscopic failure underwent PTBD or EUS-BD. Forty patients needed permanent duodenal stenting. Conclusions: Provisional removable covered duodenal stenting as a bridge to ERCP for duodenal obstruction is safe procedure and in most cases allows successful performance of therapeutic ERCP. This technique could be a sound option as a step up approach before referring such cases for more complex techniques such as EUS-BD or PTBD.

  2. Below-the-ankle Angioplasty and Stenting for Limb Salvage: Anatomical Considerations and Long-term Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Katsanos, Konstantinos Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Siablis, Dimitris

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo report the long-term angiographic and clinical results in a series of below-the-ankle (BTA) angioplasty procedures and to present some biomechanical issues related to the unique anatomical geometry of the ankle.MethodsWe performed a retrospective analysis of BTA angioplasty procedures. Clinical end points included technical success, patient mortality, salvage of the treated foot, and repeat target lesion revascularization. Imaging end points included primary patency, binary restenosis of the target lesion at the 50 % threshold, and stent integrity (stent fracture, deformation, or collapse). Univariate subgroup analysis was performed.ResultsIn total, 40 limbs in 37 patients (age 73.5 {+-} 8.2 years) with critical limb ischemia were included and 42 inframalleolar lesions (4.2 {+-} 1.4 cm) were analyzed. Technical success was achieved in 95.2 % (40 of 42). Provisional stent placement was performed in 45.2 % (19 of 42). Two patients died, and two major amputations occurred up to 3 years. At 1 year, overall primary vessel patency was 50.4 {+-} 9.1 %, lesion binary restenosis rate was 64.1 {+-} 8.3 %, and repeat intervention-free survival was 93.6 {+-} 4.3 % according to life table analysis of all treated lesions. Pairwise subgroup analysis showed that BTA self-expanding stents were associated with significantly higher restenosis and poorer primary patency compared to plain balloon angioplasty or sirolimus-eluting balloon-expandable stents. Significant deformation and/or fracture of balloon-expandable stents placed BTA were identified in five of 11. Dynamic imaging showed that the dorsalis pedis artery is kinked during foot dorsiflexion, whereas the distal posterior tibial artery is kinked during plantar flexion of the foot.ConclusionBTA angioplasty for critical limb ischemia treatment is safe and feasible with satisfactory long-term results. BTA stent placement must be reserved for bailout indications.

  3. [Imaging of coronary stents using multislice computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Seifarth, H; Heindel, W; Maintz, D

    2010-06-01

    Coronary artery stenting has become the most important form of coronary revascularization. With the introduction of drug-eluting stents (DES) the rate of restenosis has declined but due to the delayed formation of intimal tissue the incidence of late (>30 days after stent placement) and very late thrombosis of the stents is higher for DES. Visualization of the stent lumen is possible with multislice computed tomography (MSCT) but blooming artifacts hamper the delineation of the stent lumen. The severity of these artifacts and thus the width of the visible stent lumen depends on several factors, such as the thickness of the stent struts, the design of the stent and the underlying material itself. The most important factor influencing the extent of blooming artifacts is the convolution kernel selected for image reconstruction. Dedicated, edge-enhancing kernels offer superior lumen visualization compared to the soft or medium kernels used for coronary artery imaging. The trade-off using edge-enhancing kernels is an increase in image noise.Despite all efforts undertaken to enhance stent lumen visualization, stent imaging is still a challenge in MSCT. In the majority of stents currently used, sufficient lumen visualization is only possible in stents with a diameter larger than 3 mm. A position of the stent in the proximal segments of the coronary artery tree facilitates delineation of the stent lumen not only because of the relatively little motion but also because of the lesser extent of blooming artifacts obscuring the stent lumen if the stent is oriented perpendicular to the z-axis of the scanner. PMID:20521021

  4. Transradial bilateral common iliac ostial stenting using simultaneous hugging stent (SHS) technique.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tejas; Shah, Sanjay; Pancholy, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Current literature has limited reports of iliac artery interventions performed via transradial approach (TRA). We report four successive cases of bilateral common iliac ostial stenting using simultaneous hugging stent (SHS) technique through bilateral TRA. This technique allows the patient and the operator to exploit the benefits of TRA while treating this complex substrate. PMID:26804292

  5. Image-based mechanical analysis of stent deformation: concept and exemplary implementation for aortic valve stents.

    PubMed

    Gessat, Michael; Hopf, Raoul; Pollok, Thomas; Russ, Christoph; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Sündermann, Simon Harald; Hirsch, Sven; Mazza, Edoardo; Székely, Gábor; Falk, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    An approach for extracting the radial force load on an implanted stent from medical images is proposed. To exemplify the approach, a system is presented which computes a radial force estimation from computer tomography images acquired from patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The deformed shape of the implanted valve prosthesis' Nitinol frame is extracted from the images. A set of displacement vectors is computed that parameterizes the observed deformation. An iterative relaxation algorithm is employed to adapt the information extracted from the images to a finite-element model of the stent, and the radial components of the interaction forces between the stent and the tissue are extracted. For the evaluation of the method, tests were run using the clinical data from 21 patients. Stent modeling and extraction of the radial forces were successful in 18 cases. Synthetic test cases were generated, in addition, for assessing the sensitivity to the measurement errors. In a sensitivity analysis, the geometric error of the stent reconstruction was below 0.3 mm, which is below the image resolution. The distribution of the radial forces was qualitatively and quantitatively reasonable. An uncertainty remains in the quantitative evaluation of the radial forces due to the uncertainty in defining a radial direction on the deformed stent. With our approach, the mechanical situation of TAVI stents after the implantation can be studied in vivo, which may help to understand the mechanisms that lead to the complications and improve stent design. PMID:24626769

  6. Computational Study of Axial Fatigue for Peripheral Nitinol Stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meoli, Alessio; Dordoni, Elena; Petrini, Lorenza; Migliavacca, Francesco; Dubini, Gabriele; Pennati, Giancarlo

    2014-07-01

    Despite their success as primary treatment for vascular diseases, Nitinol peripheral stents are still affected by complications related to fatigue failure. Hip and knee movements during daily activities produce large and cyclic deformations of the superficial femoral artery, that concomitant to the effects of pulsatile blood pressure, may cause fatigue failure in the stent. Fatigue failure typically occurs in cases of very extended lesions, which often require the use of two or more overlapping stents. In this study, finite element models were used to study the fatigue behavior of Nitinol stents when subjected to cyclic axial compression in different conditions. A specific commercial Nitinol stent was chosen for the analysis and subjected to cyclic axial compression typical of the femoral vascular region. Three different configurations were investigated: stent alone, stent deployed in a tube, and two overlapping stents deployed in a tube. Results confirm that stent oversizing has an influence in determining both the mean and amplitude strains induced in the stent and plays an important role in determining the fatigue response of Nitinol stents. In case of overlapping stents, numerical results suggest higher amplitude strains concentrate in the region close to the overlapping portion where the abrupt change in stiffness causes higher cyclic compression. These findings help to explain the high incidence of stent fractures observed in various clinical trials located close to the overlapping portion.

  7. Impact of Neointimal Calcifications on Acute Stent Performance during the Treatment of In-Stent Restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Mehanna, Emile; Attizzani, Guilherme Ferragut; Nakamura, Daisuke; Nishino, Setsu; Fares, Anas; Aoun, Reem; Costa, Marco Aurelio; Bezerra, Hiram Grando

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become the invasive imaging modality of choice for coronary stent assessment due to its unmatched spatial resolution. Neointimal calcification (NC) is a rare finding, observed in 5-10% of in-stent restenosis (ISR) neointima. The impact of NC on percutaneous coronary intervention of ISR is unknown. We therefore present the outcome of six unique cases of ISR and NC in which OCT was used to evaluate the impact of NC on the quality of stent-in-stent deployment for the treatment of ISR. This series demonstrates for the first time the impact of NC on stent expansion, a finding which might help guiding percutaneous coronary intervention for ISR with NC. PMID:27305286

  8. Treatment of Secondary Stent-Graft Collapse After Endovascular Stent-Grafting for Iliac Artery Pseudoaneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Clevert, D.-A. Stickel, M.; Steitz, H.-O.; Kopp, R.; Strautz, T.; Flach, P.; Johnson, T.; Jung, E.M.; Jauch, K.W.; Reiser, M.

    2007-02-15

    We report the case of a patient who developed an asymptomatic pseudoaneurysm in the left external iliac artery after transplant nephrectomy. The pseudoaneurysm most probably arose as a suture aneurysm from the external iliac artery after removal of the graft renal artery. Obviously we can not exclude the possibility it was a true aneurysm, although this seems much less likely. The pseudoaneurysm was detected during a routine CT scan and was treated interventionally with a stent-graft. One month later the asymptomatic patient underwent a vascular ultrasound examination including color Doppler, power Doppler, and B-flow as a routine control. An endoleak with collapse of the stent-graft was diagnosed. There was no evidence of stent infection. At a reintervention, the pseudoaneurysm was successfully treated using two uncovered Palmaz stents at the proximal and distal edge of the stent graft. Peri- and post-interventional ultrasound and CT angiography confirmed the exclusion of the aneurysm without an endoleak.

  9. Stent

    MedlinePlus

    ... of coronary artery disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  10. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting (TIPS) with balloon-expandable and self-expanding stents: Technical and clinical aspects after 3 1/2 years' experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tesdal, I. Kaare; Jaschke, Werner; Buehler, Mathias; Adamus, Ralf; Filser, Thomas; Holm, Eggert; Georgi, Max

    1997-01-15

    Purpose. To evaluate prospectively our experience with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) using four different metallic stents. Methods. Between November 1991 and April 1995, 57 patients (41 men and 16 women; age 35-72 years, mean 54 years) underwent the TIPS procedure. Techniques for portal vein localization before and during TIPS were fluoroscopy, computed tomography (CT) studies, wedged hepatic venography, arterial portography, and ultrasound. After predilation we deployed balloon-expandable (n=48) and self-expanding (n=45) metallic stents. Fifteen patients underwent variceal embolization. Initial follow-up angiograms (mean 6.9 months, range 3-24 months) were obtained in 39 of these patients. Results. Fifty-three patients (93%) had successful TIPS placement. The mean decrease in portal pressure was 42.7%. Besides fluoroscopy, the most helpful techniques for portal vein localization were venography and CT. Residual stenosis (n=1) and late shortening (n=4) of Wallstents resulted in shunt dysfunction. The technical problems encountered with the Palmaz stent resulted from its lack of flexibility. We combined balloon-expandable and self-expanding stents in 12 patients. The 30-day and late follow-up (mean 11.9 months) percutaneous reintervention rates were 11.3% and 64.2%, respectively. There were no clinically significant complications related to the TIPS insertions. Conclusion. An ideal stent does not exist for TIPS, and the authors recommend combining a Palmaz stent with a flexible self-expanding stent.

  11. Percutaneous Endoluminal Stent and Stent-Graft Placement for the Treatment of Femoropopliteal Aneurysms: Early Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Link, Johann; Schwarzenberg, Helmut; Walluscheck, Knut P.; Heller, Martin

    1999-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of percutaneous endoluminal stents and stent-grafts for the treatment of isolated femoropopliteal aneurysms. Methods: Seven men (age 51-69 years) with femoropopliteal occlusions (n= 6) related to aneurysms and a patent femoropopliteal aneurysm (n= 1) were treated percutaneously. In two patients uncovered Wallstents and in five patients polyester-covered nitinol stents were implanted. Assessment was performed with Doppler ultrasound and duplex ultrasonography 24 hr, 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. Additionally, intraarterial angiography was performed at 6 months. Results: Stent placement succeeded in all cases. No immediate adjunctive surgical treatment was necessary. Ankle-brachial index (ABI) improved from 0.29 {+-} 0.29 (SD) before to 0.78 {+-} 0.23 (SD) 24 hr after the intervention. One patient was lost to follow-up. Stent-graft occlusion occurred in four patients: after 2 days (n1), 1 month (n= 2), and 3 months (n= 1). One of the patients, whose stent occluded at 1 month, underwent successful recanalization with local fibrinolysis therapy. Three of the seven, all with three-vessel run-off, demonstrated patency of the stent, which was assessed by duplex ultrasonography at 29, 31, and 34 months. Breaking of the stent struts or significant stent migration was not observed. Conclusions: These results in a small number of patients warrant further investigation to evaluate the role of percutaneous stents in femoropopliteal aneurysms. Until further data of clinical studies are available, this method cannot be recommended, and it cannot replace surgical treatment.

  12. What Are the Risks of Having a Stent?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Risks of Having a Stent? Risks Related to Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Percutaneous coronary ... growing and blocking the artery. Restenosis of a Stent-Widened Coronary Artery Figure A shows the coronary ...

  13. British Society of Interventional Radiology Iliac Artery Angioplasty-Stent Registry III

    SciTech Connect

    Uberoi, Raman Milburn, Simon; Moss, Jon

    2009-09-15

    The objective of this study was to audit current practice in iliac artery intervention in the United Kingdom. In 2001 the British Society of Interventional Radiology Iliac Artery Angioplasty-Stent (BIAS) III registry provided the first national database for iliac intervention. It recommended that data collection needed to continue in order to facilitate the dissemination of comparative data to individual units. BIAS III was designed to continue this work and has a simplified data set with an online submission form. Interventionalists were invited to complete a 3-page tick sheet for all iliac angioplasties and stents. Questions covered risk factors, procedural data, and outcome. Data for 2233 patients were submitted from 37 institutions over a 43-month period. Consultants performed 80% of the procedures, 62% of which were for claudication. Fifty-four percent of lesions were treated with stents and 25% of patients underwent bilateral intervention, resulting in a residual stenosis of <50% in 98%. Ninety-seven percent of procedures had no limb complication and there was a 98% inpatient survival rate. In conclusion, these figures provide an essential benchmark for both audit and patient information. National databases need to be expanded across the range of interventional procedures, and their collection made simple and, preferably, online.

  14. First Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Aortic Stenting and Cava Filter Placement Using a Polyetheretherketone-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Compatible Guidewire in Swine: Proof of Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Kos, Sebastian; Huegli, Rolf; Hofmann, Eugen; Quick, Harald H.; Kuehl, Hilmar; Aker, Stephanie; Kaiser, Gernot M.; Borm, Paul J. A.; Jacob, Augustinus L.; Bilecen, Deniz

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate feasibility of percutaneous transluminal aortic stenting and cava filter placement under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance exclusively using a polyetheretherketone (PEEK)-based MRI-compatible guidewire. Percutaneous transluminal aortic stenting and cava filter placement were performed in 3 domestic swine. Procedures were performed under MRI-guidance in an open-bore 1.5-T scanner. The applied 0.035-inch guidewire has a PEEK core reinforced by fibres, floppy tip, hydrophilic coating, and paramagnetic markings for passive visualization. Through an 11F sheath, the guidewire was advanced into the abdominal (swine 1) or thoracic aorta (swine 2), and the stents were deployed. The guidewire was advanced into the inferior vena cava (swine 3), and the cava filter was deployed. Postmortem autopsy was performed. Procedural success, guidewire visibility, pushability, and stent support were qualitatively assessed by consensus. Procedure times were documented. Guidewire guidance into the abdominal and thoracic aortas and the inferior vena cava was successful. Stent deployments were successful in the abdominal (swine 1) and thoracic (swine 2) segments of the descending aorta. Cava filter positioning and deployment was successful. Autopsy documented good stent and filter positioning. Guidewire visibility through applied markers was rated acceptable for aortic stenting and good for venous filter placement. Steerability, pushability, and device support were good. The PEEK-based guidewire allows either percutaneous MRI-guided aortic stenting in the thoracic and abdominal segments of the descending aorta and filter placement in the inferior vena cava with acceptable to good device visibility and offers good steerability, pushability, and device support.

  15. A Migrated Aortic Stent Graft Causing Erosive Spondylopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Gestrich, Christopher Probst, Chris; Wilhelm, Kai; Schiller, Wolfgang

    2013-12-15

    We report about a patient presenting with back pain 4 months after an uneventful endovascular implantation of an aortic stent graft. Computed tomography scan revealed a migration of the stent with consecutive endoleakage, kink formation, and movement of the stent toward the spine, which caused destruction of the aortic wall as well as vertebral necrosis. Explantation of the stent and replacement of the native aorta relieved the patient of his symptoms.

  16. Broken Esophageal Stent Successfully Treated by Interventional Radiology Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Mistuna, Dusan; Lucan, Jaroslav; Polacek, Hubert

    2010-06-15

    Esophageal stent fractures occur quite rarely. A 61-year-old male patient was previously treated for rupture of benign stenosis, occurring after dilatation, by implanting an esophageal stent. However, a year after implantation, the patient suffered from dysphagia caused by the broken esophageal stent. He was treated with the interventional radiology technique, whereby a second implantation of the esophageal stent was carried out quite successfully.

  17. Radiological image-guided placement of covered Niti-S stent for palliation of dysphagia in patients with cervical esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takeshi; Tanabe, Masahiro; Shimizu, Kensaku; Iida, Etsushi; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of covered Niti-S stent placement under multidetector CT and fluoroscopy guidance for the palliation of dysphagia in patients with cervical esophageal cancer. Under radiological imaging guidance using axial and sagittal CT scans, and fluoroscopy, Niti-S esophageal stents were placed in ten consecutive patients with complete obstruction caused by cervical esophageal cancer (9 men and 1 woman; age range = 54-79 years; mean age = 68.1 years) between February 2010 and December 2011. The procedure time and technical success rate were evaluated. Swallowing improvement was assessed by the following items: ability to eat and/or swallow (graded as follows: 3 = ability to eat normal diet, 2 = ability to eat semisolids, 1 = ability to swallow liquids, 0 = complete obstruction). Procedural and post-procedural complications were also evaluated. Survival (mean ± SD) was examined. The mean (±SD) procedure time was 40 ± 19 min (range = 21-69 min). Stent placement was technically successful in all patients; inadequate stent deployment did not occur in any case. Ability to eat and/or swallow was improved and scored 2.4 (score 3 in 5 cases, score 2 in 4 cases, score 1 in 1 case, and score 0 in no case) after stent placement. No major or post-procedural complications were encountered. The mean survival time was 131 ± 77 days (range = 31-259 days). Niti-S stents appeared to be a safe and effective device for the palliation of dysphagia caused by advanced cervical esophageal cancer. Multidetector CT and fluoroscopy image guidance helped the operators accurately place the stents in the cervical esophagus.

  18. The forgotten biliary stent: an unusual cause of diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Sran, Harkiran; Sebastian, Joseph; Doughan, Samer

    2016-09-01

    This case highlights the possible complications of biliary stents, which may include migration and impaction in the gastrointestinal tract. It also emphasizes the need for a robust follow-up system after stent placement, to minimize the risks and possible sequelae of a forgotten stent. PMID:27648272

  19. Intraluminal tracheal stent fracture in a Yorkshire terrier.

    PubMed

    Woo, Heung-Myong; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Lee, Seung-Gon; Nam, Hyun-Sook; Kwak, Ho-Hyun; Lee, Joon-Seok; Park, In-Chul; Hyun, Changbaig

    2007-10-01

    An 8-year-old Yorkshire terrier was presented with tracheal collapse. Two intraluminal nitinol stents were implanted. The implanted stents were found to be fractured 4 weeks after implantation. The fractured stents were removed. To restore the collapsed trachea, ring prostheses were applied. However, the dog was euthanized because of a bad outcome following surgery.

  20. Bioresorbable polymer coated drug eluting stent: a model study.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Filippo; Casalini, Tommaso; Raffa, Edoardo; Masi, Maurizio; Perale, Giuseppe

    2012-07-01

    In drug eluting stent technologies, an increased demand for better control, higher reliability, and enhanced performances of drug delivery systems emerged in the last years and thus offered the opportunity to introduce model-based approaches aimed to overcome the remarkable limits of trial-and-error methods. In this context a mathematical model was studied, based on detailed conservation equations and taking into account the main physical-chemical mechanisms involved in polymeric coating degradation, drug release, and restenosis inhibition. It allowed highlighting the interdependence between factors affecting each of these phenomena and, in particular, the influence of stent design parameters on drug antirestenotic efficacy. Therefore, the here-proposed model is aimed to simulate the diffusional release, for both in vitro and the in vivo conditions: results were verified against various literature data, confirming the reliability of the parameter estimation procedure. The hierarchical structure of this model also allows easily modifying the set of equations describing restenosis evolution to enhance model reliability and taking advantage of the deep understanding of physiological mechanisms governing the different stages of smooth muscle cell growth and proliferation. In addition, thanks to its simplicity and to the very low system requirements and central processing unit (CPU) time, our model allows obtaining immediate views of system behavior.

  1. Design of the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial (CREST)

    PubMed Central

    Sheffet, Alice J.; Roubin, Gary; Howard, George; Howard, Virginia; Moore, Wesley; Meschia, James F.; Hobson, Robert W.; Brott, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and medical therapy were shown superior to medical therapy alone for symptomatic (≥50%) and asymptomatic (≥60%) stenosis. Carotid angioplasty stenting (CAS) offers a less invasive alternative. Establishing safety, efficacy, and durability of CAS requires rigorous comparison with CEA in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Aims The objective is to compare the efficacy of CAS versus CEA in patients with symptomatic (≥50%) or asymptomatic (≥60%) extracranial carotid stenosis. Design The Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial (CREST) is a prospective, randomized, parallel, two-arm, multi-center trial with blinded endpoint adjudication. Primary endpoints are analyzed using standard time-to-event statistical modeling with adjustment for major baseline covariates. Primary analysis is on an intent-to-treat basis. Study Outcomes The primary outcome is the occurrence of any stroke, myocardial infarction, or death during a 30-day peri-procedural period, and ipsilateral stroke during follow-up of up to four years. Secondary outcomes include restenosis and health-related quality of life. PMID:20088993

  2. Electromagnetic Navigation for Thoracic Aortic Stent Graft Deployment: A Pilot Study in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Glossop, Neil; Dake, Michael; Pritchard, William F.; Chiesa, Alberto; Dreher, Matthew R.; Tang, Thomas; Karanian, John W.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to determine the feasibility of electromagnetic tracking as a method to augment conventional imaging guidance for the safe delivery, precise positioning, and accurate deployment of thoracic aortic endografts. Materials & Methods Custom guidewires were fabricated and the delivery catheters for thoracic aortic endoprostheses (Gore TAG endoprostheses, W.L. Gore & Assoc. Inc., Flagstaff AZ) were retrofitted with integrated electromagnetic coil sensors enabling realtime endovascular tracking. Pre-procedure thoracic CTA were obtained after placement of fiducial skin patches on the chest wall of three anesthetized swine, enabling automatic registration. The stent graft deployment location target near the subclavian artery was selected on the pre-procedure CTA. Two steps were analyzed: advancing a tracked glidewire to the aortic arch, and positioning the tracked stent graft assembly using electromagnetic guidance alone. Multiple CT scans were performed to evaluate the accuracy of the electromagnetic tracking system by measuring the target registration error which compared the actual position of the tracked devices to the displayed “virtual” electromagnetic-tracked position. Post-deployment CTA and necropsy confirmed stent graft position and subclavian artery patency. Results A stent graft was successfully delivered and deployed in each of the three animals using real-time electromagnetic tracking alone. The mean of the fiducial registration error of the auto-registration was 1.5 mm. Sixteen comparative scans were obtained to determine the target registration error, which was 4.3mm ± 0.97 mm (Range: 3.0 to 6.0mm) for the glidewire sensor coil. The target registration error for the stent graft delivery catheter sensor coil was 2.6 mm ± 0.7 mm (Range: 1.9 to 3.8 mm). The deployment error for the stent graft defined as deployment deviation from target was 2.6mm ± 3.0 mm. Conclusion Delivery and deployment of customized thoracic stent

  3. Very late in-stent thrombosis 9 years after double stent treatment of fusiform basilar artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Juszkat, Robert; Stanislawska, Katarzyna; Wasik, Norbert; Jankowski, Roman; Liebert, Włodzimierz

    2015-06-01

    Endovascular treatment seems to be the best approach to posterior circulation fusiform aneurysms. Double stent techniques are frequently used to occlude basilar artery dilations. Unfortunately, there is a limited number of studies that have followed up with patients over prolonged periods of time in order to evaluate delayed complications, such as stenosis, thrombosis or migration of stents. We present an unusual case of in-stent thrombosis 9 years after basilar artery aneurysm treatment to caution about complications associated with double stent implantation.

  4. Mechanical analysis of ovine and pediatric pulmonary artery for heart valve stent design.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, M S; Oomens, C W J; Bouten, C V C; Bogers, A J J C; Hoerstrup, S P; Baaijens, F P T

    2013-08-01

    Transcatheter heart valve replacement is an attractive and promising technique for congenital as well as acquired heart valve disease. In this procedure, the replacement valve is mounted in a stent that is expanded at the aimed valve position and fixated by clamping. However, for this technique to be appropriate for pediatric patients, the material properties of the host tissue need to be determined to design stents that can be optimized for this particular application. In this study we performed equibiaxial tensile tests on four adult ovine pulmonary artery walls and compared the outcomes with one pediatric pulmonary artery. Results show that the pediatric pulmonary artery was significantly thinner (1.06 ± 0.36 mm (mean ± SD)) than ovine tissue (2.85 ± 0.40 mm), considerably stiffer for strain values that exceed the physiological conditions (beyond 50% strain in the circumferential and 60% in the longitudinal direction), more anisotropic (with a significant difference in stiffness between the longitudinal and circumferential directions beyond 60% strain) and presented stronger non-linear stress-strain behavior at equivalent strains (beyond 26% strain) compared to ovine tissue. These discrepancies suggest that stents validated and optimized using the ovine pre-clinical model might not perform satisfactorily in pediatric patients. The material parameters derived from this study may be used to develop stent designs for both applications using computational models. PMID:23849135

  5. Initial clinical experience with the trabecular micro-bypass stent in patients with glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Detlev; Wetzel, Wolfgang; Haffner, David S; Hill, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficiency of a trabecular micro-bypass stent designed to allow direct aqueous drainage from the anterior chamber into Schlemm's canal in patients with glaucoma. In this prospective case series of 6 patients with open-angle glaucoma, the microstent was inserted ab interno under local anesthesia in an ophthalmic operating room. Patients were seen postoperatively at 1 to 2 d, 1 wk, and 1, 2, 6, and 12 mo. All stents were successfully placed within Schlemm's canal. Mean intraocular pressure (IOP) at preoperative baseline was 20.2+/-6.3 mm Hg (range, 14-31 mm Hg). Mean IOP decreased during the immediate postoperative period to approximately 12 to 13 mm Hg and was stabilized at 14 to 15 mm Hg with reduction of medication throughout 1 y of follow-up. No major complications occurred. According to observations reported in this feasibility study, the microstent was effective in reducing IOP and in decreasing the number of glaucoma medications required to control IOP. Implantation procedures were safe, and stents remained in place throughout the follow-up period. None of the complications traditionally associated with filtering surgery were reported. Further research on this stent in a larger group of patients is needed to assess its role in glaucoma therapy.

  6. Comparison of Inhospital Outcomes and Hospitalization Costs of Peripheral Angioplasty and Endovascular Stenting.

    PubMed

    Panaich, Sidakpal S; Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Lahewala, Sopan; Solanki, Shantanu; Manvar, Sohilkumar; Savani, Chirag; Jhamnani, Sunny; Singh, Vikas; Patel, Samir V; Thakkar, Badal; Patel, Achint; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Chothani, Ankit; Bhatt, Parth; Savani, Ghanshyambhai T; Patel, Jay; Mavani, Keyur; Bhimani, Ronak; Tripathi, Byomesh; Mohamad, Tamam; Remetz, Michael S; Curtis, Jeptha P; Attaran, Robert R; Grines, Cindy; Mena, Carlos I; Cleman, Michael; Forrest, John K; Badheka, Apurva O

    2015-08-15

    The comparative data for angioplasty and stenting for treatment of peripheral arterial disease are largely limited to technical factors such as patency rates with sparse data on clinical outcomes like mortality, postprocedural complications, and amputation. The study cohort was derived from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2006 to 2011. Peripheral endovascular interventions were identified using appropriate International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) Diagnostic and procedural codes. Two-level hierarchical multivariate mixed models were created. The primary outcome includes inhospital mortality, and secondary outcome was a composite of inhospital mortality and postprocedural complications. Amputation was a separate outcome. Hospitalization costs were also assessed. Endovascular stenting (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval, p value) was independently predictive of lower composite end point of inhospital mortality and postprocedural complications compared with angioplasty alone (0.96, 0.91 to 0.99, 0.025) and lower amputation rates (0.56, 0.53 to 0.60, <0.001) with no significant difference in terms of inhospital mortality alone. Multivariate analysis also revealed stenting to be predictive of higher hospitalization costs ($1,516, 95% confidence interval 1,082 to 1,950, p <0.001) compared with angioplasty. In conclusion, endovascular stenting is associated with a lower rate of postprocedural complications, lower amputation rates, and only minimal increase in hospitalization costs compared with angioplasty alone.

  7. Penetrating Atherosclerotic Ulcer of the Descending Thoracic Aorta: Treatment by Endovascular Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Murgo, Salvatore; Dussaussois, Luc; Golzarian, Jafar; Cavenaile, Jean Christophe; Abada, Hicham Tarik; Ferreira, Jose; Struyven, Julien

    1998-11-15

    Purpose: To present four cases of penetrating ulcer of the descending thoracic aorta treated by transfemoral insertion of an endoluminal stent-graft. Methods: Four patients with penetrating aortic ulcers were reviewed. Three cases were complicated by rupture, false aneurysm, or retrograde dissection. All patients were treated by endovascular stent-graft and were followed by helical computed tomography (CT). Results: Endovascular stent-graft deployment was successful in all patients. However, in one case we observed a perigraft leak that spontaneously disappeared within the first month, and two interventions were needed for another patient. Following treatment, one episode of transient spinal ischemia was observed. The 30-day survival rate was 100%, but one patient died from pneumonia with cardiac failure 34 days after the procedure. In one patient, helical CT performed at 3 months showed a false aneurysm independent of the first ulcer. This patient refused any further treatment and suddenly died at home (unknown cause) after a 6-month follow-up period. Conclusion: Transluminal placement of endovascular stent-grafts for treatment of penetrating ulcers of the descending thoracic aorta appears to be a possible alternative to classical surgery. After treatment, follow-up by CT is essential to detect possible complications of the disease.

  8. Comparison of Inhospital Outcomes and Hospitalization Costs of Peripheral Angioplasty and Endovascular Stenting.

    PubMed

    Panaich, Sidakpal S; Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Lahewala, Sopan; Solanki, Shantanu; Manvar, Sohilkumar; Savani, Chirag; Jhamnani, Sunny; Singh, Vikas; Patel, Samir V; Thakkar, Badal; Patel, Achint; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Chothani, Ankit; Bhatt, Parth; Savani, Ghanshyambhai T; Patel, Jay; Mavani, Keyur; Bhimani, Ronak; Tripathi, Byomesh; Mohamad, Tamam; Remetz, Michael S; Curtis, Jeptha P; Attaran, Robert R; Grines, Cindy; Mena, Carlos I; Cleman, Michael; Forrest, John K; Badheka, Apurva O

    2015-08-15

    The comparative data for angioplasty and stenting for treatment of peripheral arterial disease are largely limited to technical factors such as patency rates with sparse data on clinical outcomes like mortality, postprocedural complications, and amputation. The study cohort was derived from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2006 to 2011. Peripheral endovascular interventions were identified using appropriate International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) Diagnostic and procedural codes. Two-level hierarchical multivariate mixed models were created. The primary outcome includes inhospital mortality, and secondary outcome was a composite of inhospital mortality and postprocedural complications. Amputation was a separate outcome. Hospitalization costs were also assessed. Endovascular stenting (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval, p value) was independently predictive of lower composite end point of inhospital mortality and postprocedural complications compared with angioplasty alone (0.96, 0.91 to 0.99, 0.025) and lower amputation rates (0.56, 0.53 to 0.60, <0.001) with no significant difference in terms of inhospital mortality alone. Multivariate analysis also revealed stenting to be predictive of higher hospitalization costs ($1,516, 95% confidence interval 1,082 to 1,950, p <0.001) compared with angioplasty. In conclusion, endovascular stenting is associated with a lower rate of postprocedural complications, lower amputation rates, and only minimal increase in hospitalization costs compared with angioplasty alone. PMID:26096999

  9. Meta-analysis of stent-assisted coiling versus coiling-only for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Huo, Ya R; Jia, Fangzhi; Phan, Steven; Rao, Prashanth J; Mobbs, Ralph J; Mortimer, Alex M

    2016-09-01

    Endovascular coil embolization is a widely accepted and useful treatment modality for intracranial aneurysms. However, the principal limitation of this technique is the high aneurysm recurrence. The adjunct use of stents for coil embolization procedures has revolutionized the field of endovascular aneurysm management, however its safety and efficacy remains unclear. Two independent reviewers searched six databases from inception to July 2015 for trials that reported outcomes according to those who received stent-assisted coiling versus coiling-only (no stent-assistance). There were 14 observational studies involving 2698 stent-assisted coiling and 29,388 coiling-only patients. The pooled immediate occlusion rate for stent-assisted coiling was 57.7% (range: 20.2%-89.2%) and 48.7% (range: 31.7%-89.2%) for coiling-only, with no significant difference between the two (odds ratio [OR}=1.01; 95% confidence intervals [CI}: 0.68-1.49). However, progressive thrombosis was significantly more likely in stent-assisted coiling (29.9%) compared to coiling-only (17.5%) (OR=2.71; 95% CI: 1.95-3.75). Aneurysm recurrence was significantly lower in stent-assisted coiling (12.7%) compared to coiling-only (27.9%) (OR=0.43; 95% CI: 0.28-0.66). In terms of complications, there was no significant difference between the two techniques for all-complications, permanent complications or thrombotic complications. Mortality was significantly higher in the stent-assisted group 1.4% (range: 0%-27.5%) compared to the coiling-only group 0.2% (range: 0%-19.7%) (OR=2.16; 95% CI: 1.33-3.52). Based on limited evidence, stent-assisted coiling shows similar immediate occlusion rates, improved progressive thrombosis and decreased aneurysm recurrence compared to coiling-only, but is associated with a higher mortality rate. Future randomized controlled trials are warranted to clarify the safety of stent-associated coiling. PMID:27344091

  10. The Use of Biodegradable Stents in Malignant Oesophageal Strictures for the Treatment of Dysphagia Before Neoadjuvant Treatment or Radical Radiotherapy: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Krokidis, Miltiadis Burke, Chris; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Gkoutzios, Panos; Hynes, Orla; Ahmed, Irfan; Dourado, Renato; Sabharwal, Tarun; Mason, Robert; Adam, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the clinical results of the use of biodegradable oesophageal stents in malignant strictures.MethodsEleven patients were included in this prospective analysis in which a woven polydioxanone biodegradable oesophageal stent was used. The inclusion criterion was that the patient underwent neoadjuvant treatment or radical radiotherapy after the stent insertion. Primary end points were dysphagia score at discharge, stent patency, and complication rate. Secondary end points were overall survival and surgical outcome of surgery.ResultsThere was a 100 % procedure technical success rate. Early complications occurred in three patients resulting in failure to restore oral nutrition. In the remaining eight patients, dysphagia was significantly improved at discharge. Mean stent patency rate in this group was 71.5 days. Stent dysfunction occurred in five of eight patients (62.5 %); in two of five patients this was due to local inflammatory reaction, and in three of five patients it was due to tumour growth after a mean time of 97.8 days, and a new metallic stent was consequently placed in four of five patients. One patient was successfully treated with esophagectomy. At the end of follow-up (mean time 102.1 days), three of eight stents were patent. The overall patient survival rate was 81.8 %.ConclusionAlthough short-term dysphagia scores improved, biodegradable stents do not appear to offer a clear beneficial effect in most cases of malignant strictures, particularly due to a local inflammatory reaction that may be induced. Technical improvement of the device and delineation of the patient group that would benefit from its use is necessary if further studies are to be conducted in the future.

  11. Shortening of Wallstent RP during carotid artery stenting requires appropriate stent placement.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Hiroshi; Nagata, Shun-ichi; Onizuka, Masanari; Tsutsumi, Masanori; Iko, Minoru; Kodama, Tomonobu; Nii, Kouhei; Matsubara, Shuko; Etou, Hosei; Go, Yoshinori; Kazekawa, Kiyoshi

    2008-06-01

    Changes in the location and length of the Wallstent RP during carotid artery stenting (CAS) were evaluated using intraoperative videos of 28 patients with carotid artery stenosis who underwent CAS with a 10/20 mm Wallstent RP to determine the appropriate stent placement. The stent was deployed after its midpoint was positioned over a virtual center line, the perpendicular line which crossed the most stenotic point of the lesion on the road mapping image. The length of the stenotic lesion, the changes in the locations of the distal and proximal ends of the stent, and the changes in stent length were examined. The distal end of the stent moved a maximum of 6.1 mm toward the proximal side to a point 19.9 mm from the virtual center line. The proximal end moved a maximum of 11.3 mm toward the distal side to a point 14.7 mm from the virtual center line. The stent length ranged from 37.7 to 44.5 mm (mean 41.2 mm). The 10/20 mm Wallstent RP placed by our technique covers the entire lesion with no less than 5.7 mm of margin over the segment distal to the lesion in patients with stenotic segments shorter than 29.4 mm.

  12. Impact of stent strut design in metallic stents and biodegradable scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Foin, Nicolas; Lee, Renick D; Torii, Ryo; Guitierrez-Chico, Juan Luis; Mattesini, Alessio; Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Sen, Sayan; Petraco, Ricardo; Davies, Justin E; Di Mario, Carlo; Joner, Michael; Virmani, Renu; Wong, Philip

    2014-12-20

    Advances in the understanding of healing mechanisms after stent implantation have led to the recognition of stent strut thickness as an essential factor affecting re-endothelialization and overall long term vessel healing response after Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (PCI). Emergence of Drug-eluting stents (DESs) with anti-proliferative coating has contributed to reducing the incidence of restenosis and Target Lesion Revascularization (TVR), while progress and innovations in stent materials have in the meantime facilitated the design of newer platforms with more conformability and thinner struts, producing lesser injury and improving integration into the vessel wall. Recent advances in biodegradable metal and polymer materials now also allow for the design of fully biodegradable platforms, which are aimed at scaffolding the vessel only temporarily to prevent recoil and constrictive remodeling of the vessel during the initial period required, and are then progressively resorbed thereby avoiding the drawback of leaving an unnecessary implant permanently in the vessel. The aim of this article is to review recent evolution in stent material and stent strut design while understanding their impact on PCI outcomes. The article describes the different metallic alloys and biodegradable material properties and how these have impacted the evolution of stent strut thickness and ultimately outcomes in patients.

  13. Stent hypersensitivity and infection in sinus cavities

    PubMed Central

    Soufras, George D.; Hahalis, George

    2013-01-01

    Persistent mucosal inflammation, granulation tissue formation, hypersensitivity, and multifactorial infection are newly described complications of retained drug-eluting stents from endoscopic sinus surgery for refractory rhinosinusitis. In an important report published in Allergy and Rhinology, a 45-year-old male patient suffering from recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery and was found, for the first time, to have steroid-eluting catheters that were inadvertently left in the ethmoid and frontal sinuses. The retained catheters had caused persistent mucosal inflammation and formation of granulation tissue denoting hypersensitivity reaction. These consequences had induced perpetuation of symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis. Meticulous removal of the retained stents with the nitinol wings from inflamed tissues of the frontal, ethmoidal, and sphenoethmoidal recesses in which they were completely imbedded was successfully performed without polypoid regrowth. Cultures of specimens taken from both left and right stents showed heavy growth of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and moderate growth of Klebsiella oxytoca, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, and beta-hemolytic Streptococcus anginosus. Fungal infection was not detected. The current knowledge and experience regarding stent hypersensitivity and infection in relation with the use of stents in sinus cavities is reviewed. PMID:24498522

  14. Oxygen Mass Transport in Stented Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Eoin A; Dunne, Adrian S; Martin, David M; Boyle, Fergal J

    2016-02-01

    Oxygen deficiency, known as hypoxia, in arterial walls has been linked to increased intimal hyperplasia, which is the main adverse biological process causing in-stent restenosis. Stent implantation has significant effects on the oxygen transport into the arterial wall. Elucidating these effects is critical to optimizing future stent designs. In this study the most advanced oxygen transport model developed to date was assessed in two test cases and used to compare three coronary stent designs. Additionally, the predicted results from four simplified blood oxygen transport models are compared in the two test cases. The advanced model showed good agreement with experimental measurements within the mass-transfer boundary layer and at the luminal surface; however, more work is needed in predicting the oxygen transport within the arterial wall. Simplifying the oxygen transport model within the blood flow produces significant errors in predicting the oxygen transport in arteries. This study can be used as a guide for all future numerical studies in this area and the advanced model could provide a powerful tool in aiding design of stents and other cardiovascular devices.

  15. Metallic stents in malignant biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Rieber, Andrea; Brambs, Hans-Juergen

    1997-01-15

    Purpose. Retrospective analysis of our results with metallic stent placement for malignant biliary strictures. We sought to determine parameters that influence stent patency. Methods. A total of 95 Wallstents were implanted in 65 patients (38 men, 27 women; mean age, 65.1 years) with malignant biliary obstruction. Serum bilirubin levels were assessed in 48 patients; the mean value prior to intervention was 15.0 mg/dl. Results. In 12 patients (21%) complications occurred as a result of percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Stent implantation was complicated in 13 patients, but was possible in all patients. A significant decrease in bilirubin level was seen in 83.3% of patients following stent implantation. Approximately 30% of patients developed recurrent jaundice after a mean 97.1 days. In 9 patients (15%) the recurrent jaundice was caused by stent occlusion due to tumor growth. The mean follow-up was 141.8 days, the mean survival 118.7 days. Patients with cholangiocarcinomas and gallbladder carcinomas had the best results. Worse results were seen in patients with pancreatic tumors and with lymph node metastases of colon and gastric cancers. Conclusions. The main predictive factors for occlusion rate and survival are the type of primary tumor, tumor stage, the decrease in bilirubin level, and the general condition of the patient.

  16. Intraluminal Radioactive Stent Compared with Covered Stent Alone for the Treatment of Malignant Esophageal Stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhongmin; Huang Xunbo; Cao Jun; Huang Gang; Chen Kemin LIu Yu; Liu Fenju

    2012-04-15

    Objective: This study was designed to compare the clinical effectiveness of intraluminal radioactive stent loaded with iodine-125 seeds implantation versus covered stent alone insertion in patients with malignant esophageal stricture. Methods: We studied two groups of patients with malignant esophageal stricture. Group A comprised 28 patients (19 men and 9 women) who underwent intraluminal radioactive stent loaded with iodine-125 seeds implantation and were followed prospectively. Group B comprised 30 patients (18 men and 12 women) who had previously received covered stent alone insertion; these patients were evaluated retrospectively. There was no crossover between the two groups during follow-up. Informed consent was obtained from each patient, and our institutional review board approved the study. The dysphagia score, overall survival rates, complication rates, and reintervention rates were compared in the two groups. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics. Stent placement was technically successful and well tolerated in all patients. The dysphagia score was improved in both groups after stent placement. The median survival was significantly longer in group A than in group B: 11 versus 4.9 months, respectively (P < 0.001). The complications of chest pain, esophageal reflux, and stent migration was more frequent in group B, but this difference did not reach statistical significance. There was no statistical difference in reintervention between two groups. Conclusions: Intraluminal radioactive stent loaded with iodine-125 seeds implantation was a feasible and practical management in treating malignant esophageal stricture and was superior to covered stent alone insertion, as measured by survival.

  17. Dual Arterial Access for Stenting of Aortic Coarctation in Patients with Near-Total Descending Aortic Interruption.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Tahir; Jamallulail, Syed Ibrahim; Clarke, Bernard; Mahadevan, Vaikom S

    2015-12-01

    Endovascular stenting is a recognized treatment strategy for the treatment of coarctation of aorta (COA) in adults. The aortic coarctation is usually crossed retrogradely from the descending aorta via the femoral approach. We report three patients who had near-total descending aortic interruption and underwent successful stenting of severe COA using a combined radial/brachial and femoral approach due to difficulty in crossing the lesion retrogradely via a femoral approach. There were no procedural complications and no adverse events during 6 months of follow-up.

  18. Role of Extracranial Carotid Duplex and Computed Tomography Perfusion Scanning in Evaluating Perfusion Status of Pericarotid Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Chang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Yu, Cheng-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stenting is an effective treatment of choice in terms of treating ischemic stroke patients with concomitant carotid stenosis. Though computed tomography perfusion scan has been recognized as a standard tool to monitor/follow up this group of patients, not everyone could endure due to underlying medical illness. In contrast, carotid duplex is a noninvasive assessment tool and could track patient clinical condition in real time. In this study we found that “resistance index” of the carotid ultrasound could detect flow changes before and after the stenting procedure, thus having great capacity to replace the role of computed tomography perfusion exam. PMID:27051669

  19. Urinary Drainage Procedures in Interventional Radiology.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Raymond H; Covey, Anne M

    2016-09-01

    Urinary drainage procedures are used to treat a wide range of clinical situations including pyonephrosis, preservation of renal function in patients with ureteral obstruction, as a means to access the collecting system for stone retrieval or lithotripsy and to divert urine from a distal leak or fistula. Several different drainage devices are available and include those that provide obligatory external drainage (nephrostomy), both internal and external drainage (nephroureteral stent) and internal drainage (double-J stent). Each device requires some maintenance and effort on the patient's part-from having to undergo routine exchange of double-J stents every 3-6 months to the daily management of an external catheter and drainage bag. Ideally, the desired outcome can be attained with minimal effect on patient lifestyle. In this article, we present our approach to patients who require urinary drainage, with a focus on choosing and placing the most appropriate device in a variety of clinical scenarios. PMID:27641451

  20. Complications and Follow-up after Unprotected Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, Elke A.M. Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian; Gissler, H. Martin; Schwarz, Michael; Forsting, Michael; Jaeger, Horst J.; Mathias, Klaus D.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. This prospective study was undertaken to determine the success rate, complications, and outcome of carotid artery stenting (CAS) without the use of cerebral protection devices. Methods. During 12 months, 94 high-grade stenoses of the carotid artery in 91 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-six (70%) of the stenoses were symptomatic and 28 (30%) were asymptomatic. Results. In all 94 carotid stenoses CAS was successfully performed. During the procedure and within the 30 days afterwards, there were 2 deaths and 3 major strokes in the 66 symptomatic patients, resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 5 of 66 (7%). Only one of these complications, a major stroke, occurred during the procedure. In the 6-month follow-up, one additional major stroke occurred in a originally symptomatic patient resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 6 of 66 (10%) for symptomatic patients at 6 months. No major complications occurred in asymptomatic patients during the procedure or in the 6-month follow-up period. At 6 months angiographic follow-up the restenosis rate with a degree of >50% was 3 of 49 (6%) and the rate with a degree of {>=}70% was 1 of 49 (2%). Conclusions. Cerebral embolization during CAS is not the only cause of the stroke and death rate associated with the procedure. The use of cerebral protection devices during the procedure may therefore not prevent all major complications following CAS.

  1. Measurement and Comparison of Mechanical Properties of Nitinol Stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanus, Josef; Zahora, Jiri

    2005-01-01

    The self expandable Nitinol stents or stentgrafts are typically used for miniinvasive treatment of stenosis and aneurysms in the cardiovascular system. The minimal traumatisation of the patient, shorter time of hospitalization are typical advantages of these methods. More than ten years of experience has yielded also important information about the performance of stents in interaction with biological system and the possible problems related with it. The leakage or the shift of stent are some typical disadvantages, that can be related among other in the construction of the stent. The problem is that the mechanical properties, dimensions and the dynamical properties of the stent do not exactly correspond to the properties of the vessel or generally of tissue where this stent is introduced. The measurement, the description and the comparison of the relations between the mechanical properties of stents and tissues can be one of the possible ways to minimize these disadvantages. The developed original computer controlled measuring system allows the measurement of mechanical properties of stents, the measurement of strain-stress curves or simulation of interaction of the stent and vessel for exactly defined hemodynamic conditions. We measured and compared the mechanical parameters of different selfexpandable Nitinol stents, which differed in geometry (radius and length), in the type of construction (number of branches and rising of winding) and in the diameter of used wire. The results of measurements confirmed the theoretical assumptions that just the diameter of the Nitinol wire significantly influences the rigidity and the level of compressibility of the stent as well. A compromise must be found between the required rigidity of the stent and the minimal size of the delivery system. The exact description of the relation between the mechanical properties and geometry and construction of the stents enables to design the stent to fit the patient and it is expected that

  2. Double-v side-branch stenting followed by main trunk stenting in type-a3 trifurcation coronary artery disease using a dual-catheter technique - the triple-tine fork technique.

    PubMed

    Omeish, Abdallah

    2013-10-01

    We report on a 55-year-old male patient who presented with acute non-ST elevation inferolateral myocardial infarction. He underwent conventional coronary angiography 3 days after admission that revealed normal right coronary artery, 30% plaque in midleft anterior descending artery as well as total proximal left circumflex artery occlusion, which proved to be a type-A3 trifurcation lesion after predilatation. The trifurcation was approached with triple wiring and tackled with a novel 4-stent strategy that predicates at first the distal two side branches and the distal main branch (MB) stenting using dual 6 and 7 Fr guiding catheters that were introduced via a bifemoral approach, followed by main trunk (proximal main vessel) stenting with final trissing-balloon inflation. Angiography at the end of the procedure revealed a triple-tine fork-like shape. There was no postprocedural pain or CPK leakage. One year later, the patient was free from any cardiac complaints.

  3. Self-expandable metallic stents in the treatment of post-esophagogastrostomy/post-esophagoenterostomy fistula.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, P; Ziaja, K; Ludyga, T; Kuczmik, W; Biolik, G; Cwik, P; Ziaja, D

    2007-01-01

    Esophageus or gaster resection in patients with malignant disease is still a treatment of choice. It is obvious that each surgical procedure in these patients carries some possibility of complications. Esophageo-gastric or esophageo-jejuno anastomosis has a 4-27% frequency of fistula occurrence. All these result in 65% mortality in cases of poorer prognosis. The aim of this paper is not to present all types of complications but to objectively analyse the usefulness of the covered stent placement in the treatment of anastomotic fistulas. We present six patients who were treated for postoperative fistula of esophageo-gastric anastomosis (1 case) or esophageo-jejuno anastomosis (5 cases). All patients were treated with stapler suture for digestive tract reconstruction after malignancy removal during the primary surgical procedure. Signs and symptoms of suture leak between 5-8 days post-surgery were observed. Conservative therapy was not effective. Thus a new method of treatment was employed - covered stent placement. The procedure was performed under X-ray control. In all treated patients there was change for the better and quick reduction of secretion from the fistulas was observed. All patients were discharged from the department after several days and all had survived at 30 days follow-up. Covered esophageal stent placement seems to be a safe and promising method of treatment for patients with anastomotic fistula which significantly reduces mortality and improves quality of live. Our experiences confirms that of other investigators.

  4. Fast virtual stenting with deformable meshes: application to intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Larrabide, Ignacio; Radaelli, Alessandro; Frangi, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial stents are medical devices that are becoming increasingly popular in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. A methodology that predicts the released stent configuration prior to intervention has the potential to support the physician in the selection of the optimal approach for a specific patient. This paper proposes a fast virtual stenting technique based on constrained simplex deformable models that is able to virtually release stents in arbitrarily shaped vessel and aneurysm models. The technique effectively embeds the geometrical properties of the stent (cell design, strut size and shape and angles between struts) and achieves favorable execution times of the order of one minute.

  5. Stent Application for the Treatment of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Joon; Kim, Dong Ik

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and striking development in both the techniques and devices make it possible to treat most of cerebral aneurysms endovascularly. Stent has become one of the most important tools in treating difficult aneurysms not feasible for simple coiling. The physical features, the dimensions, and the functional characteristics of the stents show considerable differences. There are also several strategies and tips to treat difficult aneurysms by using stent and coiling. Nevertheless, they require much experience in clinical practice as well as knowledge of the stents to treat cerebral aneurysms safely and effectively. In this report, a brief review of properties of the currently available stents and strategies of their application is presented. PMID:22125751

  6. Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Metal Stent for Malignant Hilar Obstruction: Results and Predictive Factors for Efficacy in 159 Patients from a Single Center

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mingwu Bai, Ming Qi, Xingshun Li, Kai Yin, Zhanxin; Wang, Jianhong; Wu, Wenbing Zhen, Luanluan He, Chuangye; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Zhuoli; Han, Guohong E-mail: Hangh@fmmu.edu.cn

    2015-06-15

    AimTo investigate and compare the efficacy and safety of percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting (PTBS) using a one- or two-stage procedure and determine the predictive factors for the efficacious treatment of malignant hilar obstruction (MHO).Methods159 consecutive patients with MHO who underwent PTBS were enrolled between January 2010 and June 2013. Patients were classified into one- or two-stage groups. Independent predictors of therapeutic success were evaluated using a logistic regression model.Results108 patients were treated with one-stage PTBS and 51 patients were treated with two-stage PTBS. The stents were technically successful in all patients. Successful drainage was achieved in 114 patients (71.4 %). A total of 42 early major complications were observed. Re-interventions were attempted in 23 patients during follow-up. The cumulative primary patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months were 88, 71, and 48 %, respectively. Stent placement using a one- or two-stage procedure did not significantly affect therapeutic success, early major complications, median stent patency, or survival. A stent placed across the duodenal papilla was an independent predictor of therapeutic success (odds ratio = 0.262, 95 % confidence interval [0.107–0.642]). Patients with stents across papilla had a lower rate of cholangitis compared with patients who had a stent above papilla (7.1 vs. 20.3 %, respectively, p = 0.03).ConclusionsThe majority of patients with MHO who underwent one-stage PTBS showed similar efficacy and safety outcomes compared with those who underwent two-stage PTBS. Stent placement across the duodenal papilla was associated with a higher therapeutic success rate.

  7. Stent thrombosis and restenosis: what have we learned and where are we going? The Andreas Grüntzig Lecture ESC 2014

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Robert A.; Joner, Michael; Kastrati, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Modern-day stenting procedures leverage advances in pharmacotherapy and device innovation. Patients treated with contemporary antiplatelet agents, peri-procedural antithrombin therapy and new-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have excellent outcomes over the short to medium term. Indeed, coupled with the reducing costs of these devices in most countries there remain very few indications where patients should be denied treatment with standard-of-care DES therapy. The two major causes of stent failure are stent thrombosis (ST) and in-stent restenosis (ISR). The incidence of both has reduced considerably in recent years. Current clinical registries and randomized trials with broad inclusion criteria show rates of ST at or <1% after 1 year and ∼0.2–0.4% per year thereafter; rates of clinical ISR are 5% respectively. Angiographic surveillance studies in large cohorts show rates of angiographic ISR of ∼10% with new-generation DES. The advent of high-resolution intracoronary imaging has shown that in many cases of late stent failure neoatherosclerotic change within the stented segment represents a final common pathway for both thrombotic and restenotic events. In future, a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this process may translate into improved late outcomes. Moreover, the predominance of non-stent-related disease as a cause of subsequent myocardial infarction during follow-up highlights the importance of lifestyle and pharmacological interventions targeted at modification of the underlying disease process. Finally, although recent developments focus on strategies which circumvent the need for chronically indwelling stents—such as drug-coated balloons or fully bioresorbable stents—more data are needed before the wider use of these therapies can be advocated. PMID:26417060

  8. Risk Factors for Post-Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) Pancreatitis and Stent Dysfunction after Preoperative Biliary Drainage in Patients with Malignant Biliary Stricture.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shinichi; Ito, Kei; Koshida, Shinsuke; Kanno, Yoshihide; Ogawa, Takahisa; Masu, Kaori; Iwashita, Yuji; Horaguchi, Jun; Kobayashi, Go; Noda, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively evaluate the risk factors for post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP) and stent dysfunction after performing preoperative biliary drainage (BD) in patients with malignant biliary stricture. Methods Between January 2003 and February 2013, 105 consecutive patients who had undergone transpapillary BD before surgery were enrolled in this study. Procedure-related complications, stent dysfunction rates, and their respective risk factors were investigated. PEP was defined according to the consensus guidelines. Results Fifty-five patients had bile duct cancer, 31 had pancreatic cancer, 16 had ampullary cancer, and 3 had gallbladder cancer. Endoscopic biliary stenting (EBS) and nasobiliary drainage (NBD) were performed in 84 patients and 21 patients, respectively. PEP occurred in 10% of the patients, with a significantly higher frequency in those with hilar/upper bile duct stricture (p=0.026) and a normal bilirubin level at admission (p=0.016). Of the 84 patients who underwent initial EBS, stent dysfunction occurred in 13%. The mean number of days from EBS to stent dysfunction was 14±12 days. A multivariate analysis revealed a male gender (p=0.048), a stent diameter ≤8 Fr (p=0.036), and an ERCP procedure time ≥45 minutes (p=0.021) to be risk factors for stent dysfunction. No NBD tube dysfunction was observed. Conclusion Patients with upper/hilar bile duct stricture or a normal bilirubin level are at high risk of developing PEP after preoperative BD. NBD or EBS with a large-bore stent is therefore recommended as preoperative BD. PMID:27629944

  9. Gastrointestinal stenting: Current status and imaging features.

    PubMed

    Malgras, B; Lo Dico, R; Pautrat, K; Dohan, A; Boudiaf, M; Pocard, M; Soyer, P

    2015-06-01

    The use of stents in the gastrointestinal tract has been subjected to major changes. Initially, the use of stents was restricted to malignant strictures in patients with metastatic disease. But thanks to reduction of the morbidity and mortality rates, they are now used with curative intention and in patients with benign diseases after careful selection. However, for patients presenting with colon obstruction due to an advanced colon carcinoma, the mortality and morbidity are still high. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of indications, techniques and further developments of the stents in the gastrointestinal tract and to highlight the predominant role of multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) in the detection of potential complications. PMID:25953525

  10. [Recent developments of drug eluting stent coatings].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-ping; Zhan, Hong-bing

    2011-11-01

    Drug eluting stents (DESs) have revolutionized the interventional cardiology over the past decade since the first DES became commercially available in Europe in 2002. Compared to bare metal stents that are deployed to keep the vessel open by mechanical force, DESs have an additional function of reducing restenosis by the action of the drug on the target site. Coatings on the stent surface which ensure the maximum delivery of therapeutic agents to the target site with minimal systematic toxicity, also play an important role in adjusting the drug release profile. Coating material and technology not only affect the surface biocompatibility and the integrity maintenance during the implanting process, but also decide the way of drug delivering and transmitting from the coating. This paper reviews the basic principles of DES coating design, the categories of DES coatings, the commonly used clinical DES coatings and their efficiency in reducing restenosis, and finally provides the future perspectives for DES coatings. PMID:22260019

  11. Duodenal stents for malignant duodenal strictures.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, S. D.; McKelvey, S. T. D.; Moorehead, R. J.; Spence, R. A. J.; Tham, T. C. K.

    2002-01-01

    Duodenal obstruction may be caused by inoperable malignant disease. Symptoms of nausea and vomiting have been traditionally palliated by surgery. The aim of the study was to determine the efficacy of the endoscopic placement of metal self expanding duodenal stents for the palliation of malignant duodenal obstruction. Four patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction are described. One patient had a history of oesophagectomy for oesophageal adenocarcinoma and presented with further dysphagia. At endoscopy the recurrent oesophageal tumour and an adenocarcinoma involving the pylorus were both stented. In the other three patients there was a previous history of colonic carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma and oesophageal adenocarcinoma respectively. All four patients were successfully stented with good palliation of their symptoms. Duodenal Wallstents are a useful alternative to surgery in patients with inoperable malignant duodenal obstruction or those who are unfit for surgery. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:12137161

  12. Percutaneous recanalization of totally occluded coarctation of the aorta in children using Brockenbrough needle and covered stents

    PubMed Central

    Tefera, Endale; Leye, Mohamed; Chanie, Yilkal; Raboisson, Marie-Josée; Miró, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous treatment of totally occluded coarctation of the aorta has been reported predominantly in adults. The success and challenges of this procedure in children is reported in few patients. We report an outcome of percutaneous treatment of three children with completely occluded coarctation of the aorta. The age range was 9-14 years. All the patients had upper limb hypertension. One case had severe left ventricular dysfunction. In all cases, a pediatric Brockenbrough needle and a covered stent were implanted. Recanalization and implantation of a covered stent was successful in all patients. One of these patients developed transient postcoarctectomy syndrome. Percutaneous recanalization of totally occluded coarctation of the aorta using Brockenbrough needle and a covered stent in children is feasible and effective. PMID:27212850

  13. Stent-Grafts in the Management of Hemorrhagic Complications Related to Hemostatic Closure Devices: Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Giansante Abud, Daniel; Mounayer, Charbel; Saint-Maurice, Jean Pierre; Salles Rezende, Marco Tulio; Houdart, Emmanuel; Moret, Jacques

    2007-02-15

    We report 2 cases of hemorrhagic complications related to use of the Angio-Seal hemostatic closure device that were successfully managed with stent-grafts. Two patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage were referred to our departments for endovascular treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms. The treatment was performed through a femoral access; the sheaths were removed immediately after the procedures, and the punctures sites closed by Angio-Seals. Both patients presented clinical signs of hypovolemic shock after treatment. The diagnosis of active bleeding through the puncture site was made by emergency digital subtraction angiography. The lesions were managed with stent-grafts. The use of stent-grafts proved to be efficient in the management of these life-threatening hemorrhagic complications following the use of the Angio-Seal hemostatic closure device.

  14. Biomechanical Challenges to Polymeric Biodegradable Stents.

    PubMed

    Soares, Joao S; Moore, James E

    2016-02-01

    Biodegradable implants have demonstrated clinical success in simple applications (e.g., absorbable sutures) and have shown great potential in many other areas of interventional medicine, such as localized drug delivery, engineered tissue scaffolding, and structural implants. For endovascular stenting and musculoskeletal applications, they can serve as temporary mechanical support that provides a smooth