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Sample records for culture clostridium bifermentans

  1. Fatal Spontaneous Clostridium bifermentans Necrotizing Endometritis: A Case Report and Literature Review of the Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Andrew; Kirby, James E.; Albrecht, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium bifermentans is a rare pathogen in humans. A fatal case of fulminant endometritis with toxic shock and capillary leak secondary to C bifermentans infection in a young woman is described, and this is compared to all 13 previously described cases of C bifermentans infection. PMID:27419167

  2. Biodegradation of trinitrotoluene (TNT) by a strain of Clostridium bifermentans

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, C.Y.; Crawford, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    A Clostridium capable of degrading 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) cometabolically was isolated from a mixed culture obtained from a bioreactor fed TNT. This bacterium, identified as a strain of Clostridium bifermentans, and designated strain CYS-1, was able to degrade TNT via 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4-ADNT) and 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene (2,4-DANT) to aliphatic polar products which are now being identified and are assumed to be organic acids. CYS 1 cells are tolerant of TNT and capable of degrading it at starting concentrations of up to {ge}100 mg/L TNT. The number of cells inoculated and the availability of cosubstrate nutrients are significant factors influencing TNT degradation, as are TNT tolerance and survival of the cells at high TNT concentrations. In liquid media, at high TNT concentrations, TNT toxicity could be overcome by increasing the amount of inoculum and supplementing the culture with appropriate rich organic cosubstrates. Under these conditions, the reduction of 4-ADNT to 2,4-DANT occurred very fast, whereas the further degradation of 2,4-DANT proceeded more slowly.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium bifermentans Strain WYM, a Promising Biohydrogen Producer Isolated from Landfill Leachate Sludge.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y M; Juan, J C; Gan, H M; Austin, C M

    2014-03-06

    Clostridium bifermentans strain WYM is an effective biohydrogen producer isolated from landfill leachate sludge. Here, we present the assembly and annotation of its genome, which may provide further insights into the metabolic pathways involved in efficient biohydrogen production.

  4. Paraclostridium benzoelyticum gen. nov. sp. nov., isolated from marine sediment and reclassification of Clostridium bifermentans as Paraclostridium bifermentans comb. nov. Proposal of a new genus Paeniclostridium gen. nov. to accommodate Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium ghonii.

    PubMed

    T S, Sasi Jyothsna; L, Tushar; Ch, Sasikala; Ch V, Ramana

    2016-01-05

    Twenty three rod shaped, endospore forming, Gram-stain-positive, obligately anaerobic bacteria were isolated from different marine sediment samples of Gujarat. All the twenty three strains have 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of ~100%. Strain JC272T was designated as the type strain and has sequence similarity with Clostridium bifermentans ATCC638T (99.8%), Clostridium ghonii JCM1400T (98.0%), Clostridium sordellii ATCC9714T (97.9%) and other members of the genus Clostridium (<96.4%). C16:0, C18:0, C17:0, C16:1ω9C and iso-C16:0 are the major (>5%) fatty acids. Strain JC272T contains diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine and unidentified amino lipids (AL1&AL2). However, genome based analysis of ANI and in silico DDH of strain JC272T with C. bifermentans ATCC 638T yielded values of 94.35% and 58.5+2.8%, respectively. G+C mol% of strain JC272T was 28.3%. Strain JC272T together with C. bifermentans fall outside Clostridium rRNA cluster I considered as Clostridium senso stricto. Based on ANI value, in-silico DDH, distinct morphological and physiological differences from the previously described taxa, we propose strain JC272T as a representative of a new genus and species in the family Clostridiaceae, for which the name Paraclostridium benzoelyticum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. Type strain is JC272T (=KCTC15476T =LMG28745T). It is also proposed to transfer C. bifermentans to this new genus, as Paraclostridium bifermentans comb. nov. (type strain is ATCC638T =DSM14991T =JCM1386T). We also propose the genus Paeniclostridium gen. nov. to accommodate Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium ghonii as Paeniclostridium sordellii comb. nov. (type strain is ATCC9714T =LMG15708T =JCM3814T) and Paeniclostridium ghonii comb. nov. (type strain is ATCC25757T = DSM15049T =JCM1400T).

  5. First Report of Clostridium lavalense Isolated in Human Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Bourque, Christine; Thibault, Louise; Côté, Jean-Charles; Domingo, Marc-Christian

    2016-01-01

    An 88-year-old man was admitted to the hospital with worsening malaise, fever, and weakness. Anaerobic blood culture bottles revealed the presence of an anaerobic, Gram-positive sporulated bacillus. Empirical antibiotherapy with intravenous piperacillin-tazobactam was initiated. The patient defervesced after four days and was switched to oral amoxicillin on his 6th day of antibiotic therapy and later discharged from the hospital. Four months later, he had recovered. The bacterium was initially identified as Clostridium butyricum using anaerobic manual identification panel. 16S rRNA gene sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed the bacterium to be Clostridium lavalense, a recently described species with no previously published case of isolation in human diagnostic samples so far. This is the first report of Clostridium lavalense isolation from human blood cultures. Further studies are needed in order to elucidate the role of Clostridium lavalense in human disease and its virulence factors. PMID:27478446

  6. Physiology, biochemistry, and genetics of a pure culture of an obligatory anaerobic bacterium that utilizes 2,4,-6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and biodegradation of RDX by pure cultures of obligatory anaerobic bacteria of the genus clostridium. Final report, 1 September 1993-31 August 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.L.; Crawford, D.L.

    1996-09-01

    In work supported by the US AFOSR (grant F49620-94-1-0306) we are conducting detailed biochemical and genetic studies of three strains of Clostridium bifernientans, obligatory anaerobic bacteria that appear to completely degrade a variety of nitroaromatic compounds, including 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). We are determining the optimal physiological conditions for the degradative activities of C. bifermentans strains; and identifying and characterizing enzymes and genes involved in the biotransformation of nitroaromatic compounds by C. bifermentans. In our AASERT supplemental grant(AFOSR-93-1-O464) we expanded these goals to the explosive RDX (1,3,5-triaza-1, 3,5-trinitrocyclohexane). The AASERT grant funded two graduate students, who characterized the ability of C. bifermentans to degrade RDX (Regan, K. N., and R.L. Crawford, 1994. Biotechnol. Kett. 16: 1081- 1086), and prepared both genomic and plasmid DNA libraries from C. bifermentans. This genetic work will accelerate our progress toward our goal of characterizing the genetics of TNT/RDx degradation by our clostridia (K. Diedrich, M.S. thesis, University of Idaho; in preparation).

  7. Isolation of Clostridium absonum and its cultural and biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Hayase, M; Mitsui, N; Tamai, K; Nakamura, S; Nishida, S

    1974-01-01

    A new procedure for isolation of Clostridium absonum was devised. Sixtyseven strains of C. absonum were isolated from 135 soil samples, but no strain of C. absonum could be found from human fecal samples. The lecithinase, hemolysin, and lethal toxin in the culture filtrates of this species exhibited low avidity for C. perfringens type A antitoxin. The three activities were inseparable by the present method of purification. A reinvestigation of biochemical properties revealed that incomplete suppression of lecithinase reaction by C. perfringens type A antitoxin and no fermentation of raffinose, melibiose, and starch are useful criteria to differentiate C. absonum from C. perfringens, and that positive, although weak, gelatin liquefaction and fermentation of trehalose are useful to differentiate it from C. paraperfringens.

  8. Lactic acid bacteria as protective cultures in fermented pork meat to prevent Clostridium spp. growth.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, Diana; Mazzola, Giuseppe; Nikodinoska, Ivana; Aloisio, Irene; Langerholc, Tomaz; Rossi, Maddalena; Raimondi, Stefano; Melero, Beatriz; Rovira, Jordi

    2016-10-17

    In meat fermented foods, Clostridium spp. growth is kept under control by the addition of nitrite. The growing request of consumers for safer products has led to consider alternative bio-based approaches, the use of protective cultures being one of them. This work is aimed at checking the possibility of using two Lactobacillus spp. strains as protective cultures against Clostridium spp. in pork ground meat for fermented salami preparation. Both Lactobacillus strains displayed anti-clostridia activity in vitro using the spot agar test and after co-culturing them in liquid medium with each Clostridium strain. Only one of them, however, namely L. plantarum PCS20, was capable of effectively surviving in ground meat and of performing anti-microbial activity in carnis in a challenge test where meat was inoculated with the Clostridium strain. Therefore, this work pointed out that protective cultures can be a feasible approach for nitrite reduction in fermented meat products.

  9. Evaluation of CP Chromo Select Agar for the enumeration of Clostridium perfringens from water.

    PubMed

    Manafi, Mammad; Waldherr, Kerstin; Kundi, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The European Directive on drinking water quality has included mCP agar as the reference method for recovering Clostridium perfringens from drinking waters. In the present study, three media (mCP, TSCF and CP Chromo Select Agar) were evaluated for recovery of C. perfringens in different surface water samples. Out of 139 water samples, using a membrane filtration technique, 131 samples (94.2%) were found to be presumptively positive for C. perfringens in at least one of the culture media. Green colored colonies on CP Chromo Select Agar (CCP agar) were counted as presumptive C. perfringens isolates. Out of 483 green colonies on CCP agar, 96.3% (465 strains, indole negative) were identified as C. perfringens, and 15 strains (3.1%) were indole positive and were identified as Clostridium sordellii, Clostridium bifermentans or Clostridium tetani. Only 3 strains (0.6%) gave false positive results and were identified as Clostridium fallax, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tertium. Variance analysis of the data obtained shows statistically no significant differences in the counts obtained between media employed in this work. The mCP method is very onerous for routine screening and bacterial colonies could not be used for further biochemical testing. The colonies on CCP and TSCF were easy to count and subculture for confirmation tests. TSCF detects sulfite-reducing clostridia, including species other than C. perfringens, and in some cases excessive blackening of the agar frustrated counting of the colonies. If the contamination was too high, TSCF did not consistently produce black colonies and as a consequence, the colonies were white and gave false negative results. On the other hand, the identification of typical and atypical colonies isolated from all media demonstrated that CCP agar was the most useful medium for C. perfringens recovery in water samples.

  10. A Quantitative Electrochemiluminescence Assay for Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-10

    is the predominant etiolog- ical agent responsible for gas gangrene [1], although other Clostridium species including C. novyi, C. bifermentans, and...great reduction of the inci- dence of gangrene [1]. Gas gangrene remains a potential problematic disease after traumatic injury such as burns and...is a bacterium associated with three disease syndromes: classic gas gangrene (a muscle tis- sue infection resulting in muscle necrosis), enteritis

  11. PCR detection of Clostridium chauvoei in pure cultures and in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Uzal, F A; Hugenholtz, P; Blackall, L L; Petray, S; Moss, S; Assis, R A; Fernandez Miyakawa, M; Carloni, G

    2003-02-02

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify specific segments of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of Clostridium chauvoei, a major pathogen of ruminants. Three sets of primers were used to produce amplicons of 159, 836 and 959 base pairs (bp), respectively. The PCR was evaluated by testing clinically important strains of Clostridium, including 21 strains of C. chauvoei, five strains each of Clostridium septicum and Clostridium perfringens and two strains each of Clostridium novyi, Clostridium histolyticum and Clostridium sordellii. Both purified DNA and biomass from pure cultures of each of these microorganisms were evaluated as templates in the PCR. In addition, extracts of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of eight sheep experimentally inoculated with C. chauvoei or C. septicum (four animals each) were also tested by the PCR using the three sets of primers. Purified DNA template of all C. chauvoei strains produced PCR amplicons of the expected size for all three primer pairs. However, when biomass from pure cultures of C. chauvoei or tissue extracts were used as templates, only the primer pair designed to produce the 159bp amplicon gave consistently positive results. No positive results were obtained with any primer pair when purified DNA or biomass from pure cultures of non-target clostridial species were used as templates. Therefore, the PCR primer sets appear to be very specific for identifying C. chauvoei in both cultures and tissues.

  12. Fermentation of cellulosic substrates in batch and continuous culture by Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Lynd, L.R.; Grethlein, H.E.; Wolkin, R.H. )

    1989-12-01

    Fermentation of dilute-acid-pretreated mixed hardwood and Avicel by Clostridium thermocellum was compared in batch and continuous cultures. Results indicate that fermentation parameters, with the exception of free cellulase activity, are essentially the same for pretreated mixed hardwood and Avicel under a variety of conditions. Hydrolysis yields obtained with C. thermocellum cellulase acting either in vitro or in vivo were comparable to those previously reported for Trichoderma reesei on the same substrates.

  13. An Atypical Clostridium Strain Related to the Clostridium botulinum Group III Strain Isolated from a Human Blood Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ruimy, Raymond; Bouchier, Christiane; Faucher, Nathalie; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    A nontoxigenic strain isolated from a fatal human case of bacterial sepsis was identified as a Clostridium strain from Clostridium botulinum group III, based on the phenotypic characters and 16S rRNA gene sequence, and was found to be related to the mosaic C. botulinum D/C strain according to a multilocus sequence analysis of 5 housekeeping genes. PMID:24088855

  14. An atypical Clostridium strain related to the Clostridium botulinum group III strain isolated from a human blood culture.

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Philippe; Ruimy, Raymond; Bouchier, Christiane; Faucher, Nathalie; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R

    2014-01-01

    A nontoxigenic strain isolated from a fatal human case of bacterial sepsis was identified as a Clostridium strain from Clostridium botulinum group III, based on the phenotypic characters and 16S rRNA gene sequence, and was found to be related to the mosaic C. botulinum D/C strain according to a multilocus sequence analysis of 5 housekeeping genes.

  15. Metabolism of lactose by Clostridium thermolacticum growing in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Collet, Christophe; Girbal, Laurence; Péringer, Paul; Schwitzguébel, Jean-Paul; Soucaille, Philippe

    2006-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the metabolism of Clostridium thermolacticum, a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium, growing continuously on lactose (10 g l(-1)) and to determine the enzymes involved in the pathways leading to the formation of the fermentation products. Biomass and metabolites concentration were measured at steady-state for different dilution rates, from 0.013 to 0.19 h(-1). Acetate, ethanol, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were produced at all dilution rates, whereas lactate was detected only for dilution rates below 0.06 h(-1). The presence of several key enzymes involved in lactose metabolism, including beta-galactosidase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, acetate kinase, ethanol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase, was demonstrated. Finally, the intracellular level of NADH, NAD+, ATP and ADP was also measured for different dilution rates. The production of ethanol and lactate appeared to be linked with the re-oxidation of NADH produced during glycolysis, whereas hydrogen produced should come from reduced ferredoxin generated during pyruvate decarboxylation. To produce more hydrogen or more acetate from lactose, it thus appears that an efficient H2 removal system should be used, based on a physical (membrane) or a biological approach, respectively, by cultivating C. thermolacticum with efficient H2 scavenging and acetate producing microorganisms.

  16. [Cell cultures as a system for distinguishing between strains ofClostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum isolated in northeastern Mexico].

    PubMed

    Wong González, A; Roth, F

    1999-01-01

    Clostridium chauvoei and C. septicum have similar characteristics as far as results from biochemical methods and gas chromatography (GC) are concerned. A total of 267 samples collected from sick or dead animals in the fields from Northeast Mexico, were bacteriologically analysed and differentiated by the GC technique. From these strains, 16 belong to the group of C. chauvoei/C. septicum. Studies on the effect of toxin on cell cultures of the lines EBL, 3T3, BHK21-BSR/PK5/88, CHO-K1 and MDCK were performed. The objective was to obtain further data for identification, as the results from GC do not allow exact differentiation between C. chauvoei and C. septicum species. The results were obtained in tests with BHK21-BSR/PK5/88 cells as this had proved to be the most sensitive cell line, closely followed by 3T3 and CHO-K1 cells. MDCK cells were of little sensitivity. Results of the cytotoxin test of the 16 strains were reproducible and suggested a differentiation between C. chauvoei and C. septicum other than indicated by GC. The cytotoxin test is a highly specific system that provides also an additional method to distinguish between C. chauvoei and C. septicum strains.

  17. Identification of Clostridium chauvoei in cultures and clinical material from blackleg using PCR.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, P; Krampe, M; Capaul, S E; Frey, J; Nicolet, J

    1997-09-01

    An identification system for Clostridium chauvoei, using PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene (rrs) with specific oligonucleotide primers and subsequent restriction digestion of the amplification product is described. The specific oligonucleotide primers were designed based on the rrs gene sequences of C. chauvoei by comparing it to the DNA sequences of the rrs genes of its most closely related species Clostridium septicum and Clostridium carnis. A subsequent restriction digestion of the 960 bp amplification product was used in order to unambiguously identify C. chauvoei. The developed identification system was evaluated on clinical material during a recent outbreak of blackleg in cattle. Thereby, C. chauvoei was identified as the etiologic agent of the outbreak either directly from clinical samples of muscle, liver, spleen and kidney or from primary cultures made with this material. A comparison of the newly developed method with standard diagnostic tools for C. chauvoei showed that it has advantages over the immunofluorescence and is, therefore, a useful option to it. Moreover, the assay is a valuable tool for the phylogenetic identification of C. chauvoei which can assist to substitute the fastidious traditional identification methods and replace laboratory animal testing currently used.

  18. Influence of culture conditions on growth and protective antigenicity of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Cortiñas, T I; Micalizzi, B; de Guzman, A M

    1994-10-01

    The effect of culture conditions on growth and immunogenicity of Clostridium chauvoei were examined. The pH control and partial feeding of the carbon source at high concentrations were beneficial for growth. The biomass yield was significatively improved, however the butanol concentration reached toxic levels hampering further growth. For each experimental condition the immunogenicity of cells was tested. No differences were found with cells obtained at different temperatures, but it decreased significatively with the partial supply of the carbon source and pH control.

  19. Defined bacterial culture development for methane generation from lactose. [Streptococcus lactis; Clostridium formicoaceticum; Methanococcus mazei

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.T.; Tang, I.C.; Okos, M.R.

    1988-06-20

    The defined microbial cultures for methane generation from lactose were investigated. A mixed culture consisting of homolactic (Streptococcus lactis), homoacetic (Clostridium formicoaceticum), and acetate-utilizing methanogenic (Methanococcus mazei) bacteria was used to convert lactose and whey permeate to methane at mesophilic temperatures (35-37/sup 0/C) and a pH around 7.0. Lactose was first converted to lactic acid by S. lactis, then to acetic acid by C. formicoaceticum, and finally to methane and CO/sub 2/ by M. mazei. About 5.3 mol methane were obtained from each mole of lactose consumed, and the conversion of acetate to methane was the rate-limiting step for this mixed-culture fermentation.

  20. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum sequential culture in a continuous flow reactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study was conducted to evaluate fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum and C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum in a continuous-flow, high-solids reactor. Liquid medium was continuously flowed through switchgrass (2 mm particle size) at one of three flow rates: 83.33 mL h-1 (2 L d-1), 41.66 mL h-1(1 ...

  1. Fermentation of residual glycerol by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 in pure and mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Dams, Rosemeri I; Guilherme, Alexandre A; Vale, Maria S; Nunes, Vanja F; Leitão, Renato C; Santaella, Sandra T

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this research was to estimate the production of hydrogen, organic acids and alcohols by the strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 using residual glycerol as a carbon source. The experiments were carried out in pure and mixed cultures in batch experiments. Three different sources of inocula for mixed culture were used. Ruminal liquid from goats and sludge collected from two upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors treating municipal wastewater and brewery effluent were tested for hydrogen, organic acids and alcohols production with or without C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The main detected end-products from the glycerol fermentation were hydrogen, organic acids (acetic, propionic, butyric and caproic) and alcohol (ethanol and 1,3-propanediol - 1,3PD). High hydrogen (0.44 mol H2/mol glycerol consumed) and 1,3PD (0.32 mol 1,3PD/mol glycerol consumed) yields were obtained when the strain C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was bioaugmented into the sludge from municipal wastewater using 5 g/L of glycerol. Significant concentrations of n-caproic acid were detected in the ruminal liquid when amended with C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The results suggest that glycerol can be used for the generation of H2, 1,3PD and n-caproic acid using C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 as agent in pure or mixed cultures.

  2. Fermentative hydrogen production from glucose and starch using pure strains and artificial co-cultures of Clostridium spp.

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pure bacterial strains give better yields when producing H2 than mixed, natural communities. However the main drawback with the pure cultures is the need to perform the fermentations under sterile conditions. Therefore, H2 production using artificial co-cultures, composed of well characterized strains, is one of the directions currently undertaken in the field of biohydrogen research. Results Four pure Clostridium cultures, including C. butyricum CWBI1009, C. pasteurianum DSM525, C. beijerinckii DSM1820 and C. felsineum DSM749, and three different co-cultures composed of (1) C. pasteurianum and C. felsineum, (2) C. butyricum and C. felsineum, (3) C. butyricum and C. pasteurianum, were grown in 20 L batch bioreactors. In the first part of the study a strategy composed of three-culture sequences was developed to determine the optimal pH for H2 production (sequence 1); and the H2-producing potential of each pure strain and co-culture, during glucose (sequence 2) and starch (sequence 3) fermentations at the optimal pH. The best H2 yields were obtained for starch fermentations, and the highest yield of 2.91 mol H2/ mol hexose was reported for C. butyricum. By contrast, the biogas production rates were higher for glucose fermentations and the highest value of 1.5 L biogas/ h was observed for the co-culture (1). In general co-cultures produced H2 at higher rates than the pure Clostridium cultures, without negatively affecting the H2 yields. Interestingly, all the Clostridium strains and co-cultures were shown to utilize lactate (present in a starch-containing medium), and C. beijerinckii was able to re-consume formate producing additional H2. In the second part of the study the co-culture (3) was used to produce H2 during 13 days of glucose fermentation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). In addition, the species dynamics, as monitored by qPCR (quantitative real-time PCR), showed a stable coexistence of C. pasteurianum and C. butyricum during this

  3. Enrichment, Isolation, and Cultural Characteristics of Marine Strains of Clostridium botulinum Type C

    PubMed Central

    Segner, W. P.; Schmidt, C. F.; Boltz, J. K.

    1971-01-01

    Terrestrial strains of Clostridium botulinum type C, designated 468 and 571, were used to screen various media for growth and sporulation at 30 C. Of the various formulations tested, only egg meat medium fortified with 1% additions of yeast extract, ammonium sulfate, and glucose (FEM medium) gave good growth and satisfactory sporulation. FEM medium was used to recover four marine type C isolates from inshore sediments collected along the Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Pacific coasts of the United States. The isolation techniques involved repeated transfer of cultures showing type C toxin in FEM medium and purification by a deep tube method. The medium used for purification was beef infusion-agar supplemented with 0.14% sodium bicarbonate and 0.1% l-cysteine hydrochloride. l-Cysteine was adopted in preference to sodium thioglycolate, because some lots of the latter were definitely inhibitory for growth. The addition of bicarbonate markedly increased viable spore counts of both the marine and terrestrial strains. Various cultural and biochemical characteristics of the marine and the terrestrial strains were compared. With the exception of some variations in their fermentation patterns, both groups showed similar characteristics. Of 23 fermentable compounds tested, the terrestrial strains attacked only glucose and mannose. The marine strains fermented glucose, mannose, galactose, and ribose actively; dextrin, inositol, maltose, and melibiose were weakly fermented. PMID:4944800

  4. Global transcriptional changes of Clostridium acetobutylicum cultures with increased butanol:acetone ratios.

    PubMed

    Hönicke, Daniel; Janssen, Holger; Grimmler, Christina; Ehrenreich, Armin; Lütke-Eversloh, Tina

    2012-05-15

    Artificial electron carriers have been widely used to shift the solvent ratio toward butanol in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation of solventogenic clostridia according to decreased hydrogen production. In this study, first insights on the molecular level were gained to explore the effect of methyl viologen addition to cultures of Clostridium acetobutylicum. Employing batch fermentation in mineral salts medium, the butanol:acetone ratio was successively increased from 2.3 to 12.4 on a 100-ml scale in serum bottles and from 1.4 to 16.5 on a 1300-ml scale in bioreactors, respectively. The latter cultures were used for DNA microarray analyses to provide new information on the transcriptional changes referring to methyl viologen exposure and thus, exhibit gene expression patterns according to the manipulation of the cellular redox balance. Methyl viologen-exposed cultures revealed lower expression levels of the sol operon (CAP0162-0164) and the adjacent adc gene (CAP0165) responsible for solvent formation as well as iron and sulfate transporters and the CAC0105-encoded ferredoxin. On the contrary, genes for riboflavin biosynthesis, for the butyrate/butanol metabolic pathway and genes coding for sugar transport systems were induced. Interestingly, the adhE2-encoded bifunctional NADH-dependent aldhehyde/alcohol-dehydrogenase (CAP0035) was upregulated up to more than 100-fold expression levels as compared to the control culture without methyl viologen addition. The data presented here indicate a transcriptional regulation for decreased acetone biosynthesis and the redox-dependent substitution of adhE1 (CAP0162) by adhE2.

  5. Enumeration of Clostridium perfringens spores in human feces: comparison of four culture media.

    PubMed

    Harmon, S M; Kautter, D A

    1987-01-01

    Enumeration of Clostridium perfringens spores was compared using 4 culture media. Duplicate 1 g portions of 35 stools (25 from C. perfringens food poisoning outbreaks and 10 from normal stools) were heat treated 20 min at 75 degrees C and tested on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine (TSC) agar, trypticase-soy-blood (TSB) agar, lactose-sulfite (LS) medium, and iron milk (IM) medium. Dilutions were plated directly onto TSB and TSC, and a 3-tube most probable number determination was made with each specimen in LS and IM incubated at 45 degrees C. TSB was easiest to use and nonhemolytic food poisoning strains were readily differentiated from the normal hemolytic biotype on this medium. Confirmed counts on TSC and TSB were similar for all specimens, but counts of 8 of 25 outbreak specimens were 2-4 log units lower in LS and IM than on plating media; spores in specimens associated with 2 of 5 outbreaks were intolerant of the elevated temperatures. Results showed that elevated temperature MPN methods in LS and IM are inappropriate for the examination of outbreak stools.

  6. Inhibited growth of Clostridium butyricum in efficient H2-producing co-culture with Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Laurinavichene, Tatyana; Laurinavichius, Kestutis; Shastik, Evgeny; Tsygankov, Anatoly

    2016-12-01

    Cell number of Clostridium butyricum and Rhodobacter sphaeroides in co-culture was measured using q-PCR approach. During efficient H2 photoproduction from starch (6.2 mol H2/mol glucose), Clostridia growth and starch-hydrolyzing activity was partly suppressed. Apparently, the effect of R. sphaeroides towards C. butyricum was not attributed to altered Eh or pH values in the presence of purple bacteria. Further, disk-diffusion test proved that R. sphaeroides was capable of producing inhibitors against another purple bacterium, Rhodospirillum rubrum, but not against C. butyricum. We suggested that at initial cell number ratio C. butyricum:R. sphaeroides 1:1 purple bacteria outcompeted C. butyricum for yeast extract at its low concentration (80 mg/L). Under these conditions, the H2 yield was rather high (5.7 mol/mol). When the yeast extract concentration increased to 320 mg/L, this process was replaced by the low-yield H2 production (1.8 mol/mol) characteristic of Clostridia. However, increased percentage of purple bacteria in inoculum under these conditions prevented this shift. The outcome of competition depended on both the yeast extract concentration and cell number ratio. Apparently, the competition for yeast extract helped to maintain balance between fast-growing C. butyricum and slower-growing R. sphaeroides for efficient H2 photoproduction.

  7. Artificial symbiosis for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation from alkali extracted deshelled corn cobs by co-culture of Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium cellulovorans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Butanol is an industrial commodity and also considered to be a more promising gasoline substitute compared to ethanol. Renewed attention has been paid to solvents (acetone, butanol and ethanol) production from the renewable and inexpensive substrates, for example, lignocellulose, on account of the depletion of oil resources, increasing gasoline prices and deteriorating environment. Limited to current tools for genetic manipulation, it is difficult to develop a genetically engineered microorganism with combined ability of lignocellulose utilization and solvents production. Mixed culture of cellulolytic microorganisms and solventogenic bacteria provides a more convenient and feasible approach for ABE fermentation due to the potential for synergistic utilization of the metabolic pathways of two organisms. But few bacteria pairs succeeded in producing biobutanol of high titer or high productivity without adding butyrate. The aim of this work was to use Clostridium cellulovorans 743B to saccharify lignocellulose and produce butyric acid, instead of adding cellulase and butyric acid to the medium, so that the soluble sugars and butyric acid generated can be subsequently utilized by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 to produce butanol in one pot reaction. Results A stable artificial symbiotic system was constructed by co-culturing a celluloytic, anaerobic, butyrate-producing mesophile (C. cellulovorans 743B) and a non-celluloytic, solventogenic bacterium (C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052) to produce solvents by consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) with alkali extracted deshelled corn cobs (AECC), a low-cost renewable feedstock, as the sole carbon source. Under optimized conditions, the co-culture degraded 68.6 g/L AECC and produced 11.8 g/L solvents (2.64 g/L acetone, 8.30 g/L butanol and 0.87 g/L ethanol) in less than 80 h. Besides, a real-time PCR assay based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence was performed to study the dynamics of the abundance of each strain

  8. Detection of neutralizing antibodies against alpha-toxin of different Clostridium septicum strains in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Roth, F; Jansen, K; Petzke, S

    1999-07-01

    Clostridium septicum, a ubiquitious organism, is the pathogen which causes the classical malignant edema after injuries. Because of its strong cytotoxic alpha-toxin, infections are often lethal. To prevent losses in animals, vaccination with alpha-toxoid vaccines is carried out. Quality control of the vaccines is done by a neutralization test in mice. A cytotoxin test and as an alternative method to detect neutralizing antibodies, a cytotoxin inhibition test was standardized. In the studies, alpha-toxin of the C. septicum reference strain (NC 547) from the National Collection of Type Cultures was compared with alpha-toxin of a field strain from an outbreak in Germany. Sera from five heterologous polyvalent and three monovalent vaccines from eight rabbit groups were available. Each vaccination had been carried out according to the procedure of the German Pharmacopoeia. In three out of the five sera of the groups vaccinated with the heterologous polyvalent vaccine, cytotoxin neutralizing antibodies were detected. High antibody titers were observed in sera of rabbits vaccinated with a vaccine of strain NC 547, lower titers in the sera of rabbits vaccinated with a vaccine of the field strain. No cytotoxin neutralizing antibodies could be found in the sera of rabbits vaccinated with the monovalent C. chauvoei vaccine. The toxins of all strains showed the same ranking of the vaccines. Vaccines which caused high antibody titers in the animals were detected by all toxins as such, as well as vaccines which had medium or low antibody inducing capacity. The results were independent of the C. septicum strain used for the production of alpha-toxin.

  9. Determination of the cellulase activity distribution in Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis cultures using a fluorescent substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.; Elkins, James G.; Wang, Zhi-Wu

    2015-05-30

    This study took advantage of resorufin cellobioside as a fluorescent substrate to determine the distribution of cellulase activity in cellulosic biomass fermentation systems. Cellulolytic biofilms were found to express nearly four orders greater cellulase activity compared to planktonic cultures of Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis, which can be primarily attributed to the high cell concentration and surface attachment. The formation of biofilms results in cellulases being secreted close to their substrates, which appears to be an energetically favorable stategy for insoluble substrate utilization. For the same reason, cellulases should be closely associated with the surfaces of suspended cell in soluble substrate-fed culture, which has been verified with cellobiose-fed cultures of C. thermocellum and C. obsidiansis. This study addressed the importance of cellulase activity distribution in cellulosic biomass fermentation, and provided theoretical foundation for the leading role of biofilm in cellulose degradation. System optimization and reactor designs that promote biofilmformation in cellulosic biomass hydrolysismay promise an improved cellulosic biofuel process.

  10. Predictive modeling in Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentations employing Raman spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis for real-time culture monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Theresah N. K.; Liu, Sanchao; Germane, Katherine L.; Servinsky, Matthew D.; Gerlach, Elliot S.; Mackie, David M.; Sund, Christian J.

    2016-05-01

    The coupling of optical fibers with Raman instrumentation has proven to be effective for real-time monitoring of chemical reactions and fermentations when combined with multivariate statistical data analysis. Raman spectroscopy is relatively fast, with little interference from the water peak present in fermentation media. Medical research has explored this technique for analysis of mammalian cultures for potential diagnosis of some cancers. Other organisms studied via this route include Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and some Bacillus sp., though very little work has been performed on Clostridium acetobutylicum cultures. C. acetobutylicum is a gram-positive anaerobic bacterium, which is highly sought after due to its ability to use a broad spectrum of substrates and produce useful byproducts through the well-known Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) fermentation. In this work, real-time Raman data was acquired from C. acetobutylicum cultures grown on glucose. Samples were collected concurrently for comparative off-line product analysis. Partial-least squares (PLS) models were built both for agitated cultures and for static cultures from both datasets. Media components and metabolites monitored include glucose, butyric acid, acetic acid, and butanol. Models were cross-validated with independent datasets. Experiments with agitation were more favorable for modeling with goodness of fit (QY) values of 0.99 and goodness of prediction (Q2Y) values of 0.98. Static experiments did not model as well as agitated experiments. Raman results showed the static experiments were chaotic, especially during and shortly after manual sampling.

  11. Contributing factors in the improvement of cellulosic H2 production in Clostridium thermocellum/Thermoanaerobacterium co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyu; Zhao, Qi; Li, Ling; Niu, Kangle; Li, Yi; Wang, Fangzhong; Jiang, Baojie; Liu, Kuimei; Jiang, Yi; Fang, Xu

    2016-10-01

    Lignocellulosic biohydrogen is a promising renewable energy source that could be a potential alternative to the unsustainable fossil fuel-based energy. Biohydrogen production could be performed by Clostridium thermocellum that is the fastest known cellulose-degrading bacterium. Previous investigations have shown that the co-culture of C. thermocellum JN4 and a non-cellulolytic bacterium Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum GD17 produces more hydrogen than the C. thermocellum JN4 mono-culture, but the mechanism of this improvement is unknown. In this work, we carried out genomic and evolutionary analysis of hydrogenase-coding genes in C. thermocellum and T. thermosaccharolyticum, identifying one Ech-type [NiFe] hydrogenase complex in each species, and, respectively, five and four monomeric or multimeric [FeFe] hydrogenases in the two species. Further transcriptional analysis showed hydrogenase-coding genes in C. thermocellum are regulated by carbon sources, while hydrogenase-coding genes in T. thermosaccharolyticum are not. However, comparison between transcriptional abundance of hydrogenase-coding genes in mono- and co-cultures showed the co-culturing condition leads to transcriptional changes of hydrogenase-coding genes in T. thermosaccharolyticum but not C. thermocellum. Further metabolic analysis showed T. thermosaccharolyticum produces H2 at a rate 4-12-fold higher than C. thermocellum. These findings lead to the suggestion that the improvement of H2 production in the co-culture over mono-culture should be attributed to changes in T. thermosaccharolyticum but not C. thermocellum. Further suggestions can be made that C. thermocellum and T. thermosaccharolyticum perform highly specialized tasks in the co-culture, and optimization of the co-culture for more lignocellulosic biohydrogen production should be focused on the improvement of the non-cellulolytic bacterium.

  12. Simultaneous determination of amino acids and carbohydrates in culture media of Clostridium thermocellum by valve-switching ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fa, Yun; Yang, Haiyan; Ji, Chengshuai; Cui, He; Zhu, Xinshu; Du, Juan; Gao, Jun

    2013-10-10

    An improved method for the simultaneous determination of 20 amino acids and 7 carbohydrates using one-valve switching after injection, ion chromatography, and integrated pulsed amperometric detection is proposed. The resolution of the amino acids and carbohydrates in the cation trap column was investigated. In addition, parameters including flow liquid type, flow rate, concentration, and valve-switch timing were optimized. The method is time-saving, effective, and accurate for the simultaneous separation of amino acids and carbohydrates, with a mean correlation coefficient of >0.99 and repeatability of 0.5-4.6% for eight replicates. The method was successfully applied in the analysis of amino acids and carbohydrates in aseptic media and in extracellular culture media of three phenotypes of Clostridium thermocellum.

  13. Immunogenic protein variations of Clostridium chauvoei cellular antigens associated with the culture growth phase.

    PubMed

    Mattar, María Aída; Cortiñas, Teresa Inés; de Guzmán, Ana María Stefanini

    2002-03-25

    The immunoprotective capacity of four Clostridium chauvoei strains at different growth stages is reported. In all the strains tested, the cells coming from the stationary phase were those with the highest immunoprotective capacity and, depending on the strain, this protective capacity diminished or even disappeared in other phases. Protein profiles were similar in all the strains and few proteins were differentially expressed during growth as shown by SDS-PAGE. For strain 17, a local strain, a clear relationship was observed between the diminution of immunogenicity and the total loss of protective capacity of sonicated cells at late stationary phase.

  14. Influence of pH on organic acid production by Clostridium sporogenes in test tube and fermentor cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Montville, T J; Parris, N; Conway, L K

    1985-01-01

    The influence of pH on the growth parameters of and the organic acids produced by Clostridium sporogenes 3121 cultured in test tubes and fermentors at 35 degrees C was examined. Specific growth rates in the fermentor maintained at a constant pH ranged from 0.20 h-1 at pH 5.00 to 0.86 h-1 at pH 6.50. Acetic acid was the primary organic acid in supernatants of 24-h cultures; total organic acid levels were 2.0 to 22.0 mumol/ml. Supernatants from pH 5.00 and 5.50 cultures had total organic acid levels less than one-third of those found at pH 6.00 to 7.00. The specific growth rates of the test tube cultures ranged from 0.51 h-1 at pH 5.00 to 0.95 h-1 at pH 6.50. The pH of the medium did not affect the average total organic acid content (51.5 mumol/ml) but did affect the distribution of the organic acids, which included formic, acetic, propionic, butyric, 3-(p-hydroxyphenyl)propionic, and 3-phenylpropionic acids. Butyric acid levels were lower, but formic and propionic acid levels were higher, at pH 5.00 than at other pHs. PMID:4004207

  15. A rapid chemiluminescent slot blot immunoassay for the detection and quantification of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type E, in cultures.

    PubMed

    Cadieux, Brigitte; Blanchfield, Burke; Smith, James P; Austin, John W

    2005-05-01

    A simple, rapid, cost-effective in vitro slot blot immunoassay was developed for the detection and quantification of botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E) in cultures. Culture supernatants of 36 strains of clostridia, including 12 strains of Clostridium botulinum type E, 12 strains of other C. botulinum neurotoxin serotypes, and 12 strains of other clostridial species were tested. Samples containing BoNT/E were detected using affinity-purified polyclonal rabbit antisera prepared against BoNT/E with subsequent detection of secondary antibodies using chemiluminescence. All strains of C. botulinum type E tested positive, while all non C. botulinum type E strains tested negative. The sensitivity of the slot blot immunoassay for detection of BoNT/E was approximately four mouse lethal doses (MLD). The intensity of chemiluminescence was directly correlated with the concentration of BoNT/E up to 128 MLD, allowing quantification of BoNT/E between 4 and 128 MLD. The slot blot immunoassay was compared to the mouse bioassay for detection of BoNT/E using cultures derived from fish samples inoculated with C. botulinum type E, and cultures derived from naturally contaminated environmental samples. A total of 120 primary enrichment cultures derived from fish samples, of which 103 were inoculated with C. botulinum type E, and 17 were uninoculated controls, were assayed. Of the 103 primary enrichment cultures derived from inoculated fish samples, all were positive by mouse bioassay, while 94 were also positive by slot blot immunoassay, resulting in a 7.5% false-negative rate. All 17 primary enrichment cultures derived from the uninoculated fish samples were negative by both mouse bioassay and slot blot immunoassay. A total of twenty-six primary enrichment cultures derived from environmental samples were tested by mouse bioassay and slot blot immunoassay. Of 13 primary enrichment cultures positive by mouse bioassay, 12 were also positive by slot blot immunoassay, resulting in a 3

  16. Determination of the cellulase activity distribution in Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis cultures using a fluorescent substrate

    DOE PAGES

    Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.; Elkins, James G.; Wang, Zhi-Wu

    2015-05-30

    This study took advantage of resorufin cellobioside as a fluorescent substrate to determine the distribution of cellulase activity in cellulosic biomass fermentation systems. Cellulolytic biofilms were found to express nearly four orders greater cellulase activity compared to planktonic cultures of Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis, which can be primarily attributed to the high cell concentration and surface attachment. The formation of biofilms results in cellulases being secreted close to their substrates, which appears to be an energetically favorable stategy for insoluble substrate utilization. For the same reason, cellulases should be closely associated with the surfaces of suspended cell in solublemore » substrate-fed culture, which has been verified with cellobiose-fed cultures of C. thermocellum and C. obsidiansis. This study addressed the importance of cellulase activity distribution in cellulosic biomass fermentation, and provided theoretical foundation for the leading role of biofilm in cellulose degradation. System optimization and reactor designs that promote biofilmformation in cellulosic biomass hydrolysismay promise an improved cellulosic biofuel process.« less

  17. Effect of Bifidobacterium upon Clostridium difficile Growth and Toxicity When Co-cultured in Different Prebiotic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Varela, L.; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M.; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal overgrowth of Clostridium difficile, often after disturbance of the gut microbiota by antibiotic treatment, leads to C. difficile infection (CDI) which manifestation ranges from mild diarrhea to life-threatening conditions. The increasing CDI incidence, not only in compromised subjects but also in traditionally considered low-risk populations, together with the frequent relapses of the disease, has attracted the interest for prevention/therapeutic options. Among these, probiotics, prebiotics, or synbiotics constitute a promising approach. In this study we determined the potential of selected Bifidobacterium strains for the inhibition of C. difficile growth and toxicity in different carbon sources. We conducted co-cultures of the toxigenic strain C. difficile LMG21717 with four Bifidobacterium strains (Bifidobacterium longum IPLA20022, Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20006, Bifidobacterium bifidum IPLA20015, and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12) in the presence of various prebiotic substrates (Inulin, Synergy, and Actilight) or glucose, and compared the results with those obtained for the corresponding mono-cultures. C. difficile and bifidobacteria levels were quantified by qPCR; the pH and the production of short chain fatty acids was also determined. Moreover, supernatants of the cultures were collected to evaluate their toxicity using a recently developed model. Results showed that co-culture with B. longum IPLA20022 and B. breve IPLA20006 in the presence of short-chain fructooligosaccharides, but not of Inulin, as carbon source significantly reduced the growth of the pathogen. With the sole exception of B. animalis Bb12, whose growth was enhanced, the presence of C. difficile did not show major effects upon the growth of the bifidobacteria. In accordance with the growth data, B. longum and B. breve were the strains showing higher reduction in the toxicity of the co-culture supernatants. PMID:27242753

  18. Inhibitory activity of Lactobacillus plantarum TF711 against Clostridium sporogenes when used as adjunct culture in cheese manufacture.

    PubMed

    González, Lorena; Zárate, Victoria

    2015-05-01

    Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria are of great interest to the food-processing industry as natural preservatives. This work aimed to investigate the efficacy of bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus plantarum TF711, isolated from artisanal Tenerife cheese, in controlling Clostridium sporogenes during cheese ripening. Cheeses were made from pasteurised milk artificially contaminated with 10(4) spores m/l C. sporogenes. Experimental cheeses were manufactured with Lb. plantarum TF711 added at 1% as adjunct to commercial starter culture. Cheeses made under the same conditions but without Lb. plantarum TF711 served as controls. Evolution of microbiological parameters, pH and NaCl content, as well as bacteriocin production was studied throughout 45 d of ripening. Addition of Lb. plantarum TF711 did not bring about any significant change in starter culture counts, NaCl content and pH, compared with control cheese. In contrast, clostridial spore count in experimental cheeses were significantly lower than in control cheeses from 7 d onwards, reaching a maximum reduction of 2·2 log units on day 21. Inhibition of clostridia found in experimental cheeses was mainly attributed to plantaricin activity, which in fact was recovered from these cheeses.

  19. Enumeration of Clostridium perfringens spores in groundwater samples: comparison of six culture media.

    PubMed

    Araujo, M; Sueiro, R A; Gómez, M J; Garrido, M J

    2004-05-01

    In order to investigate the ability of Fluorocult-supplemented TSC agar (TSCF (Fluorocult supplemented TSC-agar): prepared from Tryptose Sulfite Cycloserine Agar Base (Merck), D-cycloserine (Fluka Chemika, USA), and fluorocult TSC-Agar supplement (Merck)) for detecting spores of Clostridium perfringens in water, we analyzed groundwater samples, pretreated by heating to 80 degrees C/5 min, using this fluorogenic medium together with five other media: mCP agar (Panreac; Cultimed), TSC agar (Merck, Germany), TSN agar (Merck), and SPS agar (BBL, USA) by the membrane filtration technique, and Wilson-Blair agar (WB) following the still-in-force Spanish official method. Variance analysis of the data obtained shows statistically significant differences in the counts obtained between media employed in this work. The C. perfringens spore counts on mCP agar were significantly lower (P<0.05) than the corresponding values of TSC, TSCF, SPS, and WB media. No statistically significant differences were found between C. perfringens spore counts on TSCF compared with those of other methods used. On the other hand, the identification of typical and atypical colonies isolated from all media demonstrated that fluorogenic TSC agar was the most specific medium for C. perfringens spore recovery in groundwater samples. Additionally, the results obtained indicate that mCP agar, which is the reference method in the European Union, is not suitable medium for recovering C. perfringens spores from groundwater samples.

  20. Butanol and hexanol production in Clostridium carboxidivorans syngas fermentation: Medium development and culture techniques.

    PubMed

    Phillips, John R; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Tanner, Ralph S; Torres, Juan R; Saxena, Jyotisna; Wilkins, Mark R; Huhnke, Raymond L

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium carboxidivorans was grown on model syngas (CO:H2:CO2 [70:20:10]) in a defined nutrient medium with concentrations of nitrogen, phosphate and trace metals formulated to enhance production of higher alcohols. C. carboxidivorans was successfully grown in a limited defined medium (no yeast extract, no MES buffer and minimal complex chemical inputs) using an improved fermentation protocol. Low partial pressure of CO in the headspace, coupled with restricted mass transfer for CO and H2, was required for successful fermentation. In the absence of substrate inhibition (particularly from CO), growth limitation increased production of alcohols, especially butanol and hexanol. Concentrations of butanol (over 1.0g/L), hexanol (up to 1.0g/L) and ethanol (over 3.0g/L) were achieved in bottle fermentations. Minimal medium and controlled supply of CO and H2 should be used in characterizing candidate butanol and hexanol producing strains to select for commercial potential.

  1. Outgrowth inhibition of Clostridium beijerinckii spores by a bacteriocin-producing lactic culture in ovine milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Garde, Sonia; Avila, Marta; Arias, Ramón; Gaya, Pilar; Nuñez, Manuel

    2011-10-17

    In the manufacture of model cheeses, ovine milk was deliberately contaminated with spores of Clostridium beijerinckii INIA 63, a wild isolate from Manchego cheese with late blowing defect, and inoculated with nisin- and lacticin 481-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis INIA 415 as starter, to test its potential to prevent the late blowing defect, or with L. lactis subsp. lactis INIA 415-2, a spontaneous mutant not producing bacteriocins. Cheeses made individually with the lactococcal strains, without clostridial spores, served as controls. Cheese made with clostridial spores and L. lactis subsp. lactis INIA 415-2 showed late blowing defect after 120days of ripening. Spoilt cheese also showed lower concentrations of lactic acid, and higher levels of acetic, propionic and butyric acids, and of other volatile compounds such as 2-propanol and 1-butanol, than control cheese. In addition, cheese made with the bacteriocin producer did not show any late blowing symptoms, despite its spore counts similar to those of blown cheese, pointing to outgrowth inhibition of C. beijerinckii spores by bacteriocins. Besides, cheese made with the bacteriocin producer showed similar concentrations of lactic acid and volatile compounds than control cheese. Inclusion of L. lactis subsp. lactis INIA 415 in starter cultures seems a feasible method to prevent late blowing defect in cheese without altering its sensory characteristics.

  2. High-efficient n-butanol production by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae integrated with butyrate fermentative supernatant addition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongzhen; Zeng, Qingwei; Han, Shuo; Wang, Zhaoyu; Dong, Qing; Bi, Yanhong; Zhao, Yuping

    2017-04-01

    Butanol is not only an important chemical intermediate and solvent in pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries, but also considered as an advanced biofuel. Although species of the natural host Clostridium have been engineered, butanol titers in the anaerobe seem to be limited by its intolerance to butanol less than 13 g/L. Here we aimed to develop a technology for enhancing butanol production by a co-culture system with butyrate fermentative supernatant addition. First, when adding 4.0 g/L butyrate into the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation broth with single-shot at 24 h, the "acid crash" phenomenon occurred and the ABE fermentation performance deteriorated. Subsequently, we found that adding certain amino acids could effectively enhance butyrate re-assimilation, butanol tolerance and titer (from 11.1 to 14.8 g/L). Additionally, in order to decrease the raw material cost, butyrate fermentative supernatant produced by Clostridium tyrobutyricum was applied to butanol production in the Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-culture system, instead of adding synthetic butyrate. Final butanol and total ABE concentrations reached higher levels of 16.3 and 24.8 g/L with increments of 46.8 and 37.8%, respectively. These results show that the proposed fermentation strategy has great potential for efficiently butanol production with an economic approach.

  3. [The effect of Clostridium tetani cultures on immunization with tetanus anatoxin in an experiment].

    PubMed

    Stovbun, S F; Bukova, V E

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents the data on the study, carried out on 383 guinea pigs, of the action of C.tetani cultures on immune reactions of the animals after the injection of tetanus toxoid. The state of the humoral and cell-mediated immunity of the animals (in the hemagglutination inhibition test, the neutralization test, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the skin allergic test with tetanin), as well as their resistance to challenge with C.tetani. The inhibiting effect of C.tetani on primary immune response to tetanus toxoid and their stimulating effect on secondary immune response have been established. This fact may be used for enhancing the quality of antitetanus preparations, such as toxoid and serum, as well as for working out tactical approaches for the rapid prevention of tetanus.

  4. Common Mesophilic Anaerobes, Including Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani, in 21 Soil Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Louis Ds.

    1975-01-01

    A relatively rich medium was markedly superior to a dilute medium for the isolation of anaerobic bacteria from soil. The obligate anaerobes isolated from 21 soil samples were all clostridia and the counts ranged from 2.7 × 102 to 3.3 × 106 per g. The organisms most frequently isolated were Clostridium subterminale, C. sordellii, C. sporogenes, C. indolis, C. bifermentans, C. mangenoti, and C. perfringens. Seventeen other species were also recognized but almost one-third of the isolates could not be identified with any known species of Clostridum. C. botulinum type A was demonstrated in six soil samples, and type B in one. These soils were neutral to alkaline in reaction (average pH 7.9) and low in organic matter content (1.4%). The association of C. botulinum types A and B with neutral to alkaline soils was statistically significant (P = 0.001) as was their association with soils low in organic matter (P = 0.005). C. botulinum types E and F were found in one soil sample, pH 4.5, with organic matter 13.7%. C. tetani was isolated from two soil samples, both of intermediate pH value and higher than average organic matter content. PMID:238468

  5. Clostridium difficile and C. difficile Toxin Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... C diff antigen; GDH Formal name: Clostridium difficile Culture; C. difficile Toxin, A and B; C. difficile Cytotoxin Assay; Glutamate Dehydrogenase Test Related tests: Stool Culture ; O&P At a Glance Test Sample The ...

  6. A Clostridium Group IV Species Dominates and Suppresses a Mixed Culture Fermentation by Tolerance to Medium Chain Fatty Acids Products

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Stephen J.; De Groof, Vicky; Khor, Way Cern; Roume, Hugo; Props, Ruben; Coma, Marta; Rabaey, Korneel

    2017-01-01

    A microbial community is engaged in a complex economy of cooperation and competition for carbon and energy. In engineered systems such as anaerobic digestion and fermentation, these relationships are exploited for conversion of a broad range of substrates into products, such as biogas, ethanol, and carboxylic acids. Medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs), for example, hexanoic acid, are valuable, energy dense microbial fermentation products, however, MCFA tend to exhibit microbial toxicity to a broad range of microorganisms at low concentrations. Here, we operated continuous mixed population MCFA fermentations on biorefinery thin stillage to investigate the community response associated with the production and toxicity of MCFA. In this study, an uncultured species from the Clostridium group IV (related to Clostridium sp. BS-1) became enriched in two independent reactors that produced hexanoic acid (up to 8.1 g L−1), octanoic acid (up to 3.2 g L−1), and trace concentrations of decanoic acid. Decanoic acid is reported here for the first time as a possible product of a Clostridium group IV species. Other significant species in the community, Lactobacillus spp. and Acetobacterium sp., generate intermediates in MCFA production, and their collapse in relative abundance resulted in an overall production decrease. A strong correlation was present between the community composition and both the hexanoic acid concentration (p = 0.026) and total volatile fatty acid concentration (p = 0.003). MCFA suppressed species related to Clostridium sp. CPB-6 and Lactobacillus spp. to a greater extent than others. The proportion of the species related to Clostridium sp. BS-1 over Clostridium sp. CPB-6 had a strong correlation with the concentration of octanoic acid (p = 0.003). The dominance of this species and the increase in MCFA resulted in an overall toxic effect on the mixed community, most significantly on the Lactobacillus spp., which resulted in a decrease in total

  7. Comparison of a frozen human foreskin fibroblast cell assay to an enzyme immunoassay and toxigenic culture for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile☆☆☆★

    PubMed Central

    Strachan, Alastair J.; Evans, Natalie E.; Williams, O. Martin; Spencer, Robert C.; Greenwood, Rosemary; Probert, Chris J.

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to validate the Hs27 ReadyCell assay (RCCNA) as an alternative CCNA method compared against a commonly used commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) method and toxigenic culture (TC) reference standard. A total of 860 samples were identified from those submitted to the Health Protection Agency microbiology laboratories over a 30-week period. RCCNA performed much better than EIA when using TC as a gold standard, with sensitivities of 90.8% versus 78.6% and positive predictive value of 87.3% to 81.9%, respectively. The Hs27 Human Foreskin Fibroblast ReadyCells are an easy-to-use and a sensitive CCNA method for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile directly from stool. A turnaround time of up to 48 h for a negative result and possible need for repeat testing make it an unsuitable method to be used in most clinical laboratory setting. PMID:23107315

  8. Effect of continuous sub-culturing on infectivity of Clostridium perfringens ATCC13124 in mouse gas gangrene model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravi Bhushan; Alam, Syed Imteyaz

    2017-02-17

    Clostridium perfringens is a Validated Biological Agent and a pathogen of medical, veterinary, and military significance. Gas gangrene is the most destructive of all the clostridial diseases and is caused by C. perfringens type A strains wherein the infection spreads quickly (several inches per hour) with production of gas. Influence of repeated in vitro cultivation on the infectivity of C. perfringens was investigated by comparing the surface proteins of laboratory strain and repository strains of the bacterium using 2DE-MS approach. In order to optimize host-pathogen interaction during experimental gas gangrene infection, we also explored the role of particulate matrix on ability of C. perfringens to cause gas gangrene.

  9. Using Phenotype MicroArrays to Determine Culture Conditions That Induce or Repress Toxin Production by Clostridium difficile and Other Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiang-He; Bochner, Barry R.

    2013-01-01

    Toxin production is a central issue in the pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile and many other pathogenic microorganisms. Toxin synthesis is influenced by a variety of known and unknown factors of genetics, physiology, and environment. To facilitate the study of toxin production by C. difficile, we have developed a new, reliable, quantitative, and robust cell-based cytotoxicity assay. Then we combined this new assay with Phenotype MicroArrays (PM) technology which provides high throughput testing of culture conditions. This allowed us to quantitatively measure toxin production by C. difficile type strain ATCC 9689 under 768 culture conditions. The culture conditions include different carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur sources. Among these, 89 conditions produced strong toxin induction and 31 produced strong toxin repression. Strong toxin inducers included adenine, guanosine, arginine dipeptides, γ-D-Glu-Gly, methylamine, and others. Some leucine dipeptides and the triple-leucine tripeptide were among the strongest toxin repressors. While some results are consistent with previous observations, others are new observations that provide insights into toxin regulation and pathogenesis of C. difficile. Additionally, we have demonstrated that this combined assay technology can be applied broadly to a wide range of toxin producing microorganisms. This study is the first demonstration of simultaneous assessment of a large number of culture conditions influencing bacterial toxin production. The new functional cytotoxin quantitation method developed provides a valuable tool for studying toxigenic microorganisms and may also find applications in clinical and epidemiological research. PMID:23437164

  10. Enhancing Butanol Production under the Stress Environments of Co-Culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae Integrated with Exogenous Butyrate Addition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongzhen; Ge, Laibing; Zhang, Jingshu; Zhao, Yanli; Ding, Jian; Li, Zhigang; He, Zhenni; Chen, Rui; Shi, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation strategy integrating Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-culturing system with exogenous butyrate addition, was proposed and experimentally conducted. In solventogenic phase, by adding 0.2 g-DCW/L-broth viable S. cerevisiae cells and 4.0 g/L-broth concentrated butyrate solution into C. acetobutylicum culture broth, final butanol concentration and butanol/acetone ratio in a 7 L anaerobic fermentor reached the highest levels of 15.74 g/L and 2.83 respectively, with the increments of 35% and 43% as compared with those of control. Theoretical and experimental analysis revealed that, the proposed strategy could, 1) extensively induce secretion of amino acids particularly lysine, which are favorable for both C. acetobutylicum survival and butanol synthesis under high butanol concentration environment; 2) enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and over-produce intracellular NADH for butanol synthesis in C. acetobutylicum metabolism simultaneously; 3) direct most of extra consumed glucose into butanol synthesis route. The synergetic actions of effective amino acids assimilation, high rates of substrate consumption and NADH regeneration yielded highest butanol concentration and butanol ratio in C. acetobutylicum under this stress environment. The proposed method supplies an alternative way to improve ABE fermentation performance by traditional fermentation technology.

  11. Enhancing Butanol Production under the Stress Environments of Co-Culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae Integrated with Exogenous Butyrate Addition

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hongzhen; Ge, Laibing; Zhang, Jingshu; Zhao, Yanli; Ding, Jian; Li, Zhigang; He, Zhenni; Chen, Rui; Shi, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation strategy integrating Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-culturing system with exogenous butyrate addition, was proposed and experimentally conducted. In solventogenic phase, by adding 0.2 g-DCW/L-broth viable S. cerevisiae cells and 4.0 g/L-broth concentrated butyrate solution into C. acetobutylicum culture broth, final butanol concentration and butanol/acetone ratio in a 7 L anaerobic fermentor reached the highest levels of 15.74 g/L and 2.83 respectively, with the increments of 35% and 43% as compared with those of control. Theoretical and experimental analysis revealed that, the proposed strategy could, 1) extensively induce secretion of amino acids particularly lysine, which are favorable for both C. acetobutylicum survival and butanol synthesis under high butanol concentration environment; 2) enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and over-produce intracellular NADH for butanol synthesis in C. acetobutylicum metabolism simultaneously; 3) direct most of extra consumed glucose into butanol synthesis route. The synergetic actions of effective amino acids assimilation, high rates of substrate consumption and NADH regeneration yielded highest butanol concentration and butanol ratio in C. acetobutylicum under this stress environment. The proposed method supplies an alternative way to improve ABE fermentation performance by traditional fermentation technology. PMID:26489085

  12. A recombinant carboxy-terminal domain of alpha-toxin protects mice against Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Oda, Masataka; Kobayashi, Keiko; Ochi, Sadayuki; Takagishi, Teruhisa; Shibutani, Masahiro; Sakurai, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin (CP, 370 residues) is one of the main agents involved in the development of gas gangrene. In this study, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the C-terminal domain (CP251-370) of the toxin and phospholipase C (PLC; CB, 372 residues) of Clostridum bifermentans isolated from cases of clostridium necrosis were examined. The recombinant proteins were expressed as glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins. Antibodies that cross-reacted with alpha-toxin were produced after immunization with recombinant proteins including GST-CP251-370, GST-CP281-370, GST-CP311-370, CB1-372 and GST-CB251-372. Anti-GST-CP251-370, anti-GST-CP281-370 and anti-GST-CP311-370 sera neutralized both the PLC and hemolytic activities of alpha-toxin, whereas anti-CB1-372 and anti-GST-CB251-372 weakly neutralized these activities. Immunization with GST-CP251-370 and GST-CP281-370 provided protection against the lethal effects of the toxin and C. perfringens type A NCTC8237. Partial protection from the toxin and C. perfringens was elicited by immunization with GST-CP311-370 and CB1-372. GST-CP251-370 and GST-CP281-370 are promising candidates for vaccines for clostridial-induced gas gangrene.

  13. Sporulation of Clostridium cellulolyticum while grown in cellulose-batch and cellulose-fed continuous cultures on a mineral-salt based medium.

    PubMed

    Desvaux, M; Petitdemange, H

    2002-03-01

    Clostridium cellulolyticum sporulation was investigated during growth on cellulose fibers in a mineral-salt based medium which corresponds to conditions linked to its natural ecological niche. At steady state of the continuous cultures under limitation and with an excess of cellulose and/or ammonium, bacterial cells mainly sporulated at low dilution rates (D), at least 10% sporulation being observed at the lowest D tested. Increasing the cellulose concentration in the feed-medium reservoir increased the percentage of spores in the bioreactor. It appeared that the remaining undigested cellulose could serve as an exogenous carbon source supply at a continuous but limited rate throughout the sporulation process. In addition to the proportion of carbon and nitrogen, the influence of the environmental pH on spore formation was studied. In cellulose-fed continuous cultures at a constant D and a pH decreasing from 7.2 to 6.4, the percentage of spores increased to 14% at the lowest pH tested. When C. cellulolyticum was grown in batch culture, the level of sporulation was dramatically higher in unregulated-pH fermentation compared to pH-controlled growth conditions at pH 7.2 since in the former it reached 45% within 5 days of cultivation. It then appeared that a low specific growth rate and a low environmental pH in the presence of an insoluble carbon substrate were the major factors inducing sporulation in C. cellulolyticum. Furthermore, since the spores adhere to the carbon substrate (the cellulose) the bacteria gain advantages when the environment allows germination thanks to the recovery of suitable growth conditions. By allowing the maintenance and the integrity of the bacteria in the microbiota, spore formation could then explain the successful survival of C. cellulolyticum in cellulosic anaerobic habitats where low environmental pH conditions are often found.

  14. Selective growth-inhibitory effect of 8-hydroxyquinoline towards Clostridium difficile and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum in co-culture analysed by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Novakova, Jitka; Džunková, Mária; Musilova, Sarka; Vlkova, Eva; Kokoska, Ladislav; Moya, Andrés; D'Auria, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    The major risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the use of antibiotics owing to the disruption of the equilibrium of the host gut microbiota. To preserve the beneficial resident probiotic bacteria during infection treatment, the use of molecules with selective antibacterial activity enhances the efficacy by selectively removing C. difficile. One of them is the plant alkaloid 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQ), which has been shown to selectively inhibit clostridia without repressing bifidobacteria. Selective antimicrobial activity is generally tested by culture techniques of individual bacterial strains. However, the main limitation of these techniques is the inability to describe differential growth dynamics of more bacterial strains in co-culture within the same experiment. In the present study, we combined fluorescent in situ hybridization and flow cytometry to describe the changes in active and non-active cells of a mixed culture formed by the opportunistic pathogen C. difficile CECT 531 and the beneficial Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum CCMDMND BL1 after exposure to 8HQ. It was observed that without 8HQ, the proportion of both strains was almost equal, oscillating between 22.7 and 77.9 % during a time lapse of 12 h, whereas with 8HQ the proportion of active C. difficile decreased after 4 h, and persisted only between 8.8 and 17.5 %. In contrast, bifidobacterial growth was not disturbed by 8HQ. The results of this study showed the selective inhibitory effect of 8HQ on clostridial and bifidobacterial growth dynamics, and the potential of this compound for the development of selective agents to control CDIs.

  15. Genome wide transcriptomic analysis identifies pathways affected by the infusion of Clostridium perfringens culture supernatant in the duodenum of broilers in situ.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadou, S; Russell, K M; Kaiser, P; Kanellos, T; Burgess, S T G; Mitchell, M; Clutton, E; Naylor, S W; Low, C J; Hutchings, M R; Sparks, N

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A is the main etiological factor for necrotic enteritis, a multifactorial enteric disease that penalizes performance, health, and welfare of poultry. Lack of knowledge of host responses and disease pathogenesis is slowing down progress on developing therapies for disease control. A combined genomewide and targeted gene approach was used to investigate pathways and biological functions affected by the infusion of C. perfringens culture supernatant in the duodenum of broilers in 2 experiments. An in situ isolated loop of duodenum was prepared in anesthetized broilers of 3 wk of age (Exp. 1) and was infused either with crude C. perfringens culture supernatant (n = 7; treated), positive for necrotic enteritis B-like toxin (NetB) as determined by a cytotoxicity assay, or with a control preparation (n = 6; control). Birds were maintained alive for 1 h and then euthanized for tissue recovery. The use of the Affymetrix chicken genome array on RNA samples from loop tissue showed top biological functions affected by culture supernatant infusion included cell morphology, immune cell trafficking, and cell death; pathways affected included death receptor signaling, inflammatory response, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling. In a second in situ study (Exp. 2), broilers were maintained alive for 4 h to monitor temporal expression patterns of targeted genes. Duodenal tissue was removed at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h post-infusion with culture supernatant (n = 9) or a control preparation (n = 5) for histology and gene expression analysis. Genes encoding proinflammatory cytokines, such as interferon γ (IFNγ), cell trafficking, such as neuroblastoma 1 (NBL1) and B cell CLL/Lymphoma 6 (BCL6), and cell death, such as Fas cell surface death receptor (FAS) and GTPase IMAP family member 8 (GIMAP8), were differentially expressed in the duodenum of treated and control broilers (P < 0.05). We have demonstrated that C. perfringens culture supernatant (NetB positive

  16. Enhancing acetone biosynthesis and acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation performance by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae integrated with exogenous acetate addition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongzhen; Ge, Laibing; Zhang, Jingshu; Ding, Jian; Chen, Rui; Shi, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Acetone is the major by-product in ABE fermentations, most researches focused on increasing butanol/acetone ratio by decreasing acetone biosynthesis. However, economics of ABE fermentation industry strongly relies on evaluating acetone as a valuable platform chemical. Therefore, a novel ABE fermentation strategy focusing on bio-acetone production by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae with exogenous acetate addition was proposed. Experimental and theoretical analysis revealed the strategy could, enhance C. acetobutylicum survival oriented amino acids assimilation in the cells; control NADH regeneration rate at moderately lower level to enhance acetone synthesis but without sacrificing butanol production; enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and direct most of extra consumed glucose into acetone/butanol synthesis routes. By implementing the strategy using synthetic or acetate fermentative supernatant, acetone concentrations increased to 8.27-8.55g/L from 5.86g/L of the control, while butanol concentrations also elevated to the higher levels of 13.91-14.23g/L from 11.63g/L simultaneously.

  17. Integrative modelling of pH-dependent enzyme activity and transcriptomic regulation of the acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Millat, Thomas; Janssen, Holger; Bahl, Hubert; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2013-09-01

    In a continuous culture under phosphate limitation the metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum depends on the external pH level. By comparing seven steady-state conditions between pH 5.7 and pH 4.5 we show that the switch from acidogenesis to solventogenesis occurs between pH 5.3 and pH 5.0 with an intermediate state at pH 5.1. Here, an integrative study is presented investigating how a changing external pH level affects the clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation pathway. This is of particular interest as the biotechnological production of n-butanol as biofuel has recently returned into the focus of industrial applications. One prerequisite is the furthering of the knowledge of the factors determining the solvent production and their integrative regulations. We have mathematically analysed the influence of pH-dependent specific enzyme activities of branch points of the metabolism on the product formation. This kinetic regulation was compared with transcriptomic regulation regarding gene transcription and the proteomic profile. Furthermore, both regulatory mechanisms were combined yielding a detailed projection of their individual and joint effects on the product formation. The resulting model represents an important platform for future developments of industrial butanol production based on C. acetobutylicum.

  18. An in vitro culture model to study the dynamics of colonic microbiota in Syrian golden hamsters and their susceptibility to infection with Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Miezeiewski, Matthew; Schnaufer, Todd; Muravsky, Michele; Wang, Su; Caro-Aguilar, Ivette; Secore, Susan; Thiriot, David S; Hsu, Charlie; Rogers, Irene; DeSantis, Todd; Kuczynski, Justin; Probst, Alexander J; Chehoud, Christel; Steger, Rachel; Warrington, Janet; Bodmer, Jean-Luc; Heinrichs, Jon H

    2015-02-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are caused by colonization and growth of toxigenic strains of C. difficile in individuals whose intestinal microbiota has been perturbed, in most cases following antimicrobial therapy. Determination of the protective commensal gut community members could inform the development of treatments for CDI. Here, we utilized the lethal enterocolitis model in Syrian golden hamsters to analyze the microbiota disruption and recovery along a 20-day period following a single dose of clindamycin on day 0, inducing in vivo susceptibility to C. difficile infection. To determine susceptibility in vitro, spores of strain VPI 10463 were cultured with and without soluble hamster fecal filtrates and growth was quantified by quantitative PCR and toxin immunoassay. Fecal microbial population changes over time were tracked by 16S ribosomal RNA gene analysis via V4 sequencing and the PhyloChip assay. C. difficile culture growth and toxin production were inhibited by the presence of fecal extracts from untreated hamsters but not extracts collected 5 days post-administration of clindamycin. In vitro inhibition was re-established by day 15, which correlated with resistance of animals to lethal challenge. A substantial fecal microbiota shift in hamsters treated with antibiotics was observed, marked by significant changes across multiple phyla including Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria. An incomplete return towards the baseline microbiome occurred by day 15 correlating with the inhibition of C. difficile growth in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that soluble factors produced by the gut microbiota may be responsible for the suppression of C. difficile growth and toxin production.

  19. Biofilms of Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Pantaléon, Véronique; Bouttier, Sylvie; Soavelomandroso, Anna Philibertine; Janoir, Claire; Candela, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The biofilm is a microbial community embedded in a synthesized matrix and is the main bacterial way of life. A biofilm adheres on surfaces or is found on interfaces. It protects bacteria from the environment, toxic molecules and may have a role in virulence. Clostridium species are spread throughout both environments and hosts, but their biofilms have not been extensively described in comparison with other bacterial species. In this review we describe all biofilms formed by Clostridium species during both industrial processes and in mammals where biofilms may be formed either during infections or associated to microbiota in the gut. We have specifically focussed on Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens biofilms, which have been studied in vitro. Regulatory processes including sporulation and germination highlight how these Clostridium species live in biofilms. Furthermore, biofilms may have a role in the survival and spreading of Clostridium species.

  20. Purification of Clostridium toxoids.

    PubMed

    Buchowicz, I; Hay, M; Schiller, B; Korbecki, M; Sochańska, R

    1977-01-01

    A two-step fractionation procedure was applied for purification and concentration of the individual Clostridium toxoids. The toxoids were precipitated with hydrochloric acid in the presence of sodium sextametaphosphate, then antigenic fractions were separated from inactive contaminants by Sephadex G-75 filtration. Specific activity of the preparations thus obtained, as determined by Mancini radial immunodiffusion, was 150--565 binding units per mg of protein nitrogen for Clostridium perfringens toxoid, 204--352 binding units for Clostridium oedematiens toxoid and 26.6 -- 51.2 binding units for Clostridium septicum toxoid.

  1. Prolonged conversion of n-butyrate to n-butanol with Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum in a two-stage continuous culture with in-situ product removal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 2-stage process was described for continuous bioconversion of n-butyrate into n-butanol with planktonic cells of Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. Online product removal via gas stripping was integrated within the system. Our work focused on a continuous fermentation system specifically...

  2. Gas gangrene due to Clostridium perfringens in two injecting drug users in Vienna, Austria.

    PubMed

    Assadian, Ojan; Assadian, Afshin; Senekowitsch, Christian; Makristathis, Athanasios; Hagmüller, George

    2004-04-30

    We describe two cases of severe myonecrotic infections caused by Clostridium perfringens in injecting drug users (IDUs) in Vienna, Austria. Clostridial myonecrosis, or gas gangrene, is a clostridial infection primarily of muscle tissue. C. perfringens is isolated in 90% of these infections. Other clostridial species isolated are C. novyi, C. septicum, C. histolyticum, C. fallax, and C. bifermentans. Classically, clostridial myonecrosis has an acute presentation and a fulminant clinical course. It is diagnosed mainly on a clinical basis. The infection may be so rapidly progressive that any delay in recognition or treatment may be fatal. The onset is sudden, often within 4 to 6 hours after an injury. An early clinical finding is sudden severe pain in the area of infection. Swelling and edema in the area of infection is pronounced. At surgery, the infected muscle is dark-red to black, is noncontractile, and does not bleed when cut. Crepitus, although not prominent, is sometimes detected. We were able to demonstrate spores that were morphologically indistinguishable from spores of C. perfringens in a drug sample obtained from case 2. General practitioners and accident and emergency staff should be aware of the possibility of C. perfringens infection in IDUs, especially if injection into soft tissue is suspected.

  3. A Narrow pH Range Supports Butanol, Hexanol, and Octanol Production from Syngas in a Continuous Co-culture of Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium kluyveri with In-Line Product Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Hanno; Molitor, Bastian; Diender, Martijn; Sousa, Diana Z.; Angenent, Largus T.

    2016-01-01

    Carboxydotrophic bacteria (CTB) have received attention due to their ability to synthesize commodity chemicals from producer gas and synthesis gas (syngas). CTB have an important advantage of a high product selectivity compared to chemical catalysts. However, the product spectrum of wild-type CTB is narrow. Our objective was to investigate whether a strategy of combining two wild-type bacterial strains into a single, continuously fed bioprocessing step would be promising to broaden the product spectrum. Here, we have operated a syngas-fermentation process with Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium kluyveri with in-line product extraction through gas stripping and product condensing within the syngas recirculation line. The main products from C. ljungdahlii fermentation at a pH of 6.0 were ethanol and acetate at net volumetric production rates of 65.5 and 431 mmol C·L−1·d−1, respectively. An estimated 2/3 of total ethanol produced was utilized by C. kluyveri to chain elongate with the reverse β-oxidation pathway, resulting in n-butyrate and n-caproate at net rates of 129 and 70 mmol C·L−1·d−1, respectively. C. ljungdahlii likely reduced the produced carboxylates to their corresponding alcohols with the reductive power from syngas. This resulted in the longer-chain alcohols n-butanol, n-hexanol, and n-octanol at net volumetric production rates of 39.2, 31.7, and 0.045 mmol C·L−1·d−1, respectively. The continuous production of the longer-chain alcohols occurred only within a narrow pH spectrum of 5.7–6.4 due to the pH discrepancy between the two strains. Regardless whether other wild-type strains could overcome this pH discrepancy, the specificity (mol carbon in product per mol carbon in all other liquid products) for each longer-chain alcohol may never be high in a single bioprocessing step. This, because two bioprocesses compete for intermediates (i.e., carboxylates): (1) chain elongation; and (2) biological reduction. This innate competition

  4. A Narrow pH Range Supports Butanol, Hexanol, and Octanol Production from Syngas in a Continuous Co-culture of Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium kluyveri with In-Line Product Extraction.

    PubMed

    Richter, Hanno; Molitor, Bastian; Diender, Martijn; Sousa, Diana Z; Angenent, Largus T

    2016-01-01

    Carboxydotrophic bacteria (CTB) have received attention due to their ability to synthesize commodity chemicals from producer gas and synthesis gas (syngas). CTB have an important advantage of a high product selectivity compared to chemical catalysts. However, the product spectrum of wild-type CTB is narrow. Our objective was to investigate whether a strategy of combining two wild-type bacterial strains into a single, continuously fed bioprocessing step would be promising to broaden the product spectrum. Here, we have operated a syngas-fermentation process with Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium kluyveri with in-line product extraction through gas stripping and product condensing within the syngas recirculation line. The main products from C. ljungdahlii fermentation at a pH of 6.0 were ethanol and acetate at net volumetric production rates of 65.5 and 431 mmol C·L(-1)·d(-1), respectively. An estimated 2/3 of total ethanol produced was utilized by C. kluyveri to chain elongate with the reverse β-oxidation pathway, resulting in n-butyrate and n-caproate at net rates of 129 and 70 mmol C·L(-1)·d(-1), respectively. C. ljungdahlii likely reduced the produced carboxylates to their corresponding alcohols with the reductive power from syngas. This resulted in the longer-chain alcohols n-butanol, n-hexanol, and n-octanol at net volumetric production rates of 39.2, 31.7, and 0.045 mmol C·L(-1)·d(-1), respectively. The continuous production of the longer-chain alcohols occurred only within a narrow pH spectrum of 5.7-6.4 due to the pH discrepancy between the two strains. Regardless whether other wild-type strains could overcome this pH discrepancy, the specificity (mol carbon in product per mol carbon in all other liquid products) for each longer-chain alcohol may never be high in a single bioprocessing step. This, because two bioprocesses compete for intermediates (i.e., carboxylates): (1) chain elongation; and (2) biological reduction. This innate competition

  5. Improvement of the butanol production selectivity and butanol to acetone ratio (B:A) by addition of electron carriers in the batch culture of a new local isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1.

    PubMed

    Nasser Al-Shorgani, Najeeb Kaid; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar; Shukor, Hafiza; Hamid, Aidil Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Improvement in the butanol production selectivity or enhanced butanol:acetone ratio (B:A) is desirable in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium strains. In this study, artificial electron carriers were added to the fermentation medium of a new isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1 in order to improve the butanol yield and B:A ratio. The results revealed that medium supplementation with electron carriers changed the metabolism flux of electron and carbon in ABE fermentation by YM1. A decrease in acetone production, which subsequently improved the B:A ratio, was observed. Further improvement in the butanol production and B:A ratios were obtained when the fermentation medium was supplemented with butyric acid. The maximum butanol production (18.20 ± 1.38 g/L) was gained when a combination of methyl red and butyric acid was added. Although the addition of benzyl viologen (0.1 mM) and butyric acid resulted in high a B:A ratio of 16:1 (800% increment compared with the conventional 2:1 ratio), the addition of benzyl viologen to the culture after 4 h resulted in the production of 18.05 g/L butanol. Manipulating the metabolic flux to butanol through the addition of electron carriers could become an alternative strategy to achieve higher butanol productivity and improve the B:A ratio.

  6. Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease (a thickening of tissue [plaque] inside the penis that causes the penis to curve). Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is in ... the plaque of thickened tissue and allows the penis to be straightened.

  7. Clostridium Difficile Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a bacterium that causes diarrhea and more serious intestinal conditions such as colitis. Symptoms include Watery ... Nausea Abdominal pain or tenderness You might get C. difficile disease if you have an illness that ...

  8. Cellulose fermentation by a coculture of a mesophilic cellulolytic Clostridium and Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Fond, O.; Petitdemange, E.; Petitdemange, H.; Engasser, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    A coculture of a mesophilic cellulolytic Clostridium with Clostridium acetobutylicum can yield a direct conversion of cellulose into chemicals. In 13 days 30 g/l Solka Floc is degraded and fermented into 14 g/l butyric acid, 4 g/l acetic acid, 3 g/l ethanol, and 1 g/l butanol. A four times higher rate of cellulose hydrolysis than in pure culture of the cellulolytic Clostridium is thus obtained. Fed-batch fermentations of C. acetobutylicum at different glucose feeding rate show that solvents are only produced at a sufficient high rate of glucose supply to the medium. Acids are thus the main products of the coculture because of the limited rate of cellulolysis by the mesophilic strain. 7 references, 5 figures.

  9. Clostridium chauvoei in hens.

    PubMed

    Prukner-Radovcic, E; Milakovic-Novak, L; Ivesa-Petricevic, S; Grgic, N

    1995-03-01

    The bacterium Clostridium chauvoei causes disease in certain animals, most frequently in cattle and sheep. It occurs rarely in pigs, while equines and poultry appear to be resistant to infection. Two cases are presented in which C. chauvoei was isolated from disease of complex aetiology in hens. In Case I, 15-week-old light hybrid chickens were affected with chronic respiratory disease, coccidiosis, ascariasis and inflammation of the skin on the head, with necrosis of the comb. Growth was uneven and mortality reached 24%. Clostridium chauvoei was isolated from two of three combs examined. In Case II a flock of broiler breeders aged 11 weeks developed coccidiosis and, owing to disease or death, 60% were excluded from production. Clostridium chauvoei was isolated from all of 10 livers examined. These results demonstrate that C. chauvoei can infect chickens and that its possible role as a pathogen under certain circumstances should be further investigated.

  10. Molecular Characterization and Transcriptional Analysis of adhE2, the Gene Encoding the NADH-Dependent Aldehyde/Alcohol Dehydrogenase Responsible for Butanol Production in Alcohologenic Cultures of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Lisa; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Girbal, Laurence; Yang, Xinghong; Croux, Christian; Soucaille, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    The adhE2 gene of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, coding for an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AADH), was characterized from molecular and biochemical points of view. The 2,577-bp adhE2 codes for a 94.4-kDa protein. adhE2 is expressed, as a monocistronic operon, in alcohologenic cultures and not in solventogenic cultures. Primer extension analysis identified two transcriptional start sites 160 and 215 bp upstream of the adhE2 start codon. The expression of adhE2 from a plasmid in the DG1 mutant of C. acetobutylicum, a mutant cured of the pSOL1 megaplasmid, restored butanol production and provided elevated activities of NADH-dependent butyraldehyde and butanol dehydrogenases. The recombinant AdhE2 protein expressed in E. coli as a Strep-tag fusion protein and purified to homogeneity also demonstrated NADH-dependent butyraldehyde and butanol dehydrogenase activities. This is the second AADH identified in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824, and to our knowledge this is the first example of a bacterium with two AADHs. It is noteworthy that the two corresponding genes, adhE and adhE2, are carried by the pSOL1 megaplasmid of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. PMID:11790753

  11. Bacteriophages of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The specific aims of the book chapter are to: (1) Briefly review the nomenclature of bacteriophages and how these agents are classified. (2) Discuss the problems associated with addition/removal of antibiotics in commercial animal feeds. (3) Provide a brief overview of Clostridium perfringens biolog...

  12. Clostridium tetani bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Hallit, Rabih Riad; Afridi, Muhammad; Sison, Raymund; Salem, Elie; Boghossian, Jack; Slim, Jihad

    2013-01-01

    Tetanus is a neuromuscular disease in which Clostridium tetani exotoxin (tetanospasmin) produces muscle spasms, incapacitating its host. To our knowledge, C. tetani bacteraemia has never been reported in the literature. The ideal management of this entity remains unresolved given that there is no literature to guide the therapy.

  13. Fermentative hydrogen production in an up-flow anaerobic biofilm reactor inoculated with a co-culture of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Barca, Cristian; Ranava, David; Bauzan, Marielle; Ferrasse, Jean-Henry; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Soric, Audrey

    2016-12-01

    Dark fermentation systems often show low H2 yields and unstable H2 production, as the result of the variability of microbial dynamics and metabolic pathways. Recent batch investigations have demonstrated that an artificial consortium of two anaerobic bacteria, Clostridium acetobutylicum and Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, may redirect metabolic fluxes and improve H2 yields. This study aimed at evaluating the scale-up from batch to continuous H2 production in an up-flow anaerobic packed-bed reactor (APBR) continuously fed with a glucose-medium. The effects of various parameters, including void hydraulic retention time (HRTv), pH, and alkalinity, on H2 production performances and metabolic pathways were investigated. The results demonstrated that a stable H2 production was reached after 3-4days of operation. H2 production rates increased significantly with decreasing HRTv from 4 to 2h. Instead, H2 yields remained almost stable despite the change in HRTv, indicating that the decrease in HRTv did not affect the global metabolism.

  14. Cellulolytic Activity of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Lee, S F; Forsberg, C W; Gibbins, L N

    1985-08-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum NRRL B527 and ATCC 824 exhibited extracellular and cell-bound endoglucanase and cellobiase activities during growth in a chemically defined medium with cellobiose as the sole source of carbohydrate. For both strains, the endoglucanase was found to be mainly extracellular (70 to 90%) during growth in continuous or batch cultures with the pH maintained at 5.2, whereas the cellobiase was mainly cell associated (60 to 90%). During continuous cultivation of strain B527 with cellobiose as the limiting nutrient, maximum production of the endoglucanase and cellobiase occurred at pH values of 5.2 and 4.8, respectively. In the carbon-limited continuous cultures, strain 824 produced similar levels of endoglucanase, cellobiosidase, and cellobiase activities regardless of the carbon source used. However, in ammonium- or phosphate-limited cultures, with an excess of glucose, only 1/10 of the endoglucanase was produced, and neither cellobiosidase nor cellobiase activities were detectable. A crude extracellular enzyme preparation from strain B527 hydrolyzed carboxymethylcellulose and phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose readily and microcrystalline cellulose (A vicel) to a lesser extent. Glucose accounted for more than 90% of the reducing sugar produced by the hydrolysis of acid-swollen cellulose and Avicel. Strain B527 did not grow in medium with acid-swollen cellulose as the sole source of carbohydrate, although it grew readily on the products obtained by hydrolyzing the cellulose in vitro with a preparation of extracellular cellulase derived from the same organism.

  15. Antipathogenic activity of probiotics against Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium difficile in anaerobic batch culture systems: is it due to synergies in probiotic mixtures or the specificity of single strains?

    PubMed

    Tejero-Sariñena, Sandra; Barlow, Janine; Costabile, Adele; Gibson, Glenn R; Rowland, Ian

    2013-12-01

    Probiotics are currently being investigated for prevention of infections caused by enteric pathogens. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of three single probiotics: Lactobacillus casei NCIMB 30185 (PXN 37), Lactobacillus acidophilus NCIMB 30184 (PXN 35), Bifidobacterium breve NCIMB 30180 (PXN 25) and a probiotic mixture containing the above strains plus twelve other strains belonging to the Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Lactococcus, Streptococcus and Bacillus genera on the survival of Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium difficile using pH-controlled anaerobic batch cultures containing mixed faecal bacteria. Changes in relevant bacterial groups and effects of probiotic addition on survival of the two pathogens were assessed over 24 h. Quantitative analysis of bacterial populations revealed that there was a significant increase in lactobacilli and/or bifidobacteria numbers, depending on probiotic addition, compared with the control (no added probiotic). There was also a significant reduction in S. Typhimurium and C. difficile numbers in the presence of certain probiotics compared with controls. Of the probiotic treatments, two single strains namely L. casei NCIMB 30185 (PXN 37), and B. breve NCIMB 30180 (PXN 25) were the most potent in reducing the numbers of S. Typhimurium and C. difficile. In addition, the supplementation with probiotics into the systems influenced some fermentations parameters. Acetate was found in the largest concentrations in all vessels and lactate and formate were generally detected in higher amounts in vessels with probiotic addition compared to controls.

  16. Ultraviolet irradiation of DNA complexed with. alpha. /. beta. -type small, acid-soluble proteins from spores of Bacillus or Clostridium species makes spore photoproduct but not thymine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, W.L.; Setlow, B.; Setlow, P. )

    1991-10-01

    UV irradiation of complexes of DNA and an {alpha}/{beta}-type small, acid-soluble protein (SASP) from Bacillus subtilis spores gave decreasing amounts of pyrimidine dimers and increasing amounts of spore photoproduct as the SASP/DNA ratio was increased. The yields of pyrimidine dimers and spore photoproduct were < 0.2% and 8% of total thymine, respectively, when DNA saturated with SASP was irradiated at 254 nm with 30 kJ/m{sup 2}; in the absence of SASP the yields were reversed - 4.5% and 0.3%, respectively. Complexes of DNA with {alpha}/{beta}-type SASP from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, or Clostridium bifermentans spores also gave spore photoproduct upon UV irradiation. However, incubation of these SASPs with DNA under conditions preventing complex formation or use of mutant SASPs that do not form complexes did not affect the photoproducts formed in vitro. These results suggest that the UV photochemistry of bacterial spore DNA in vivo is due to the binding of {alpha}/{beta}-type SASP, a binding that is known to cause a change in DNA conformation in vitro from the B form to the A form. The yields of spore photoproduct in vitro were significantly lower than in vivo, perhaps because of the presence of substances other than SASP in spores. It is suggested that as these factors diffuse out in the first minutes of spore germination, spore photoproduct yields become similar to those observed for irradiation of SASP/DNA complexes in vitro.

  17. Clostridium glycolicum isolated from a patient with otogenic brain abscesses.

    PubMed

    Van Leer, C; Wensing, A M J; van Leeuwen, J P; Zandbergen, E G J; Swanink, C M A

    2009-02-01

    We describe a case of brain abscesses with gas formation following otitis media, for which the patient treated himself by placing clay in his ear. Several microorganisms, including Clostridium glycolicum, were cultured from material obtained from the patient. This is the first report of an infection in an immunocompetent patient associated with this microorganism.

  18. Hydrogen production from starch by co-culture of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Rhodobacter sphaeroides in one step hybrid dark- and photofermentation in repeated fed-batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Zagrodnik, R; Łaniecki, M

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen production from starch by a co-culture hybrid dark and photofermentation under repeated fed-batch conditions at different organic loading rates (OLR) was studied. Effective cooperation between bacteria in co-culture during initial days was observed at controlled pH 7.0. However, at pH above 6.5 dark fermentation phase was redirected from H2 formation towards production of formic acid, lactic acid and ethanol (which are not coupled with hydrogen production) with simultaneous lower starch removal efficiency. This resulted in decrease in the hydrogen production rate. The highest H2 production in co-culture process (3.23LH2/Lmedium - after 11days) was achieved at OLR of 1.5gstarch/L/day, and it was twofold higher than for dark fermentation process (1.59LH2/Lmedium). The highest H2 yield in the co-culture (2.62molH2/molhexose) was obtained at the OLR of 0.375gstarch/L/day. Different pH requirements of bacteria were proven to be a key limitation in co-culture system.

  19. Long-term conversion of n-butyrate to n-butanol with Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum using a two-stage continuous culture and in-situ product removal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are operating anaerobic bioreactors with undefined mixed cultures to convert waste lignocellulosic biomass into useful products. A traditional product of anaerobic bioreactors (i.e., anaerobic digesters) is methane. Recently, we modified bioreactor conditions to more efficiently produce a range o...

  20. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Leber, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    The detection and diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection in pediatric populations have some unique considerations in comparison to testing in adults. The testing methodologies, including toxigenic culture, cell cytotoxicity, antigen detection, and, more recently, molecular testing, are the same in all age groups. However, limited data exist on the specific performance characteristics in children. In this review, we focus on the challenges of testing in pediatric populations and assess the available data on test performance in these populations. Additionally, a review of the existing guidance for testing is provided. PMID:26912759

  1. Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Heinlen, Latisha; Ballard, Jimmy D.

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in Europe and North America and is a serious re-emerging pathogen. Recent outbreaks have led to increasing morbidity and mortality and have been associated with a new strain (BI/NAP1/027) of C. difficile that produces more toxin than historical strains. With the increasing incidence of C. difficile infection, clinicians have also seen a change in the epidemiology with increased infections in previously low-risk populations. This chapter highlights the current knowledge on C. difficile virulence, human disease, epidemic outbreaks, and optimal treatment strategies. PMID:20697257

  2. [Microbiological diagnosis of gas gangrene caused by Clostridium septicum (a clinical case)].

    PubMed

    Men'shikova, E D; Titova, G P; Kartavenko, V I; Sokolov, V A; Shabanov, A K; Men'shikov, D D

    2010-08-01

    Microscopy of gram-stained impression smears is used for the rapid diagnosis of microorganisms in the wound. The shin tissues of patient P. with suspected gas gangrene of lower extremity soft tissues were microscopically found to have gram-positive spore-forming bacteria that were morphologically similar to C. bifermentans that were identified as C. septicum on cultural diagnosis. The pathogenic C. septicum strain spores were likely to be formed in the macroorganism upon exposure of the pathogen to a patient's defense factors and to a package of therapeutic measures. Microbiological data should be used only in combination with clinical and instrumental findings and the results of other laboratory studies when the optimal technology is chosen to treat gas infection. By keeping in mind that there may be clostridial gangrene in the patients and the experience of clinicians and bacteriologists may be insufficient in diagnosing this pathology, it is necessary to strengthen the training of physicians in the diagnosis of this pathology.

  3. Laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile disease.

    PubMed

    Delmée, M

    2001-08-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) is based on culture and toxin detection in fecal specimens. Culture is performed on a commercially available selective media. C. difficile colony morphology is typical when viewed under a dissecting microscope. Definitive identification is best obtained by gas liquid chromatography. Culture is very sensitive but, when used alone without toxin testing, it leads to low specificity and misdiagnosis of CDAD when high rates of asymptomatic carriage exist. Toxin detection by a tissue culture cytotoxin assay followed by neutralisation with specific antiserum is often considered the standard. However, this approach lacks sensitivity and has not detected up to 30% of patients with confirmed CDAD. Multiple enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) have been introduced by various manufacturers for the detection of toxin A alone or for both toxins A and B. Some of these are designed to give results in less than 1 h. Comparative studies of EIA kits reported that the sensitivity and specificity are slightly lower than cytotoxin assays. Toxigenic culture tests C. difficile isolates for toxin production: colonies isolated on selective media are tested for in-vitro toxin production either by a cytotoxicity assay or by direct EIA. It has higher sensitivity than the cytotoxicity assay and equivalent specificity. In the routine laboratory, culture and toxin detection should be performed on every specimen and, in culture-positive and fecal toxin-negative cases, toxigenic cultures should be performed on isolated colonies.

  4. Effects of culture conditions on the kinetic behavior of 1,3-propanediol fermentation by Clostridium butyricum with a kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chunjie; Fang, Baishan; Wang, Shizhen

    2016-07-01

    The effects of culture conditions on the kinetic behavior of 1,3-propanediol (PD) fermentation were investigated with a kinetic model. First, with initial glycerol concentration (S0) increasing, μmax and PD inhibition increased. Glycerol assimilation was harder and a little glycerol was consumed on cell maintenance at high S0. Second, with yeast extract concentration increasing, PD inhibition decreased. However, μmax decreased and glycerol assimilation became harder. It seems that the stimulus effect of yeast extract resulted from decreased PD inhibition. Glycerol amount consumed on cell maintenance also decreased. Third, with temperature decreasing, μmax and PD inhibition decreased. Glycerol assimilation was harder and a little more glycerol was consumed on cell maintenance at low temperature. Fourth, with pH increasing, μmax and PD inhibition decreased. Glycerol assimilation was harder and much more glycerol was consumed on cell maintenance at pH 6.5 and 7.5 than 7.0. This work facilitates further fermentation process optimization.

  5. Detection of toxigenic Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum from food sold in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chukwu, Emelda E; Nwaokorie, Francisca O; Coker, Akitoye O; Avila-Campos, Mario J; Solis, Rosa L; Llanco, Luis A; Ogunsola, Folasade T

    2016-12-01

    Food-borne diseases contribute to the huge burden of sickness and death globally and in the last decade, have become more frequently reported in Africa. In line with this, food safety is becoming a significant and growing public health problem in Nigeria. Diarrhoea is a common problem in Nigeria and has been reported but there has been little data on the possibility of clostridia as aetiological agents. Clostridium species are ubiquitous in the environment and in the gastrointestinal tract of man and animals and can serve as a marker for faecal contamination. We set out to determine the potential of these foods to transmit Clostridium species. A total of 220 food commodities from six local governments in Lagos State were sampled. Isolates obtained were identified based on cultural, morphological and biochemical characteristics. Toxinotyping was done using multiplex-PCR with primers specific for alpha, beta, epsilon and iota-toxin genes, enterotoxigenic cpe gene and neurotoxigenic BoNt gene. Fifty (22.7%) clostridial species were isolated of which 29 (58%) were identified as C. perfringens. Toxinotyping of the 29 strains showed that 28 (96.6%) were toxin producing C. perfringens type A while one (3.4%) was C. perfringens type D. Two (4%) C. botulinum species were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA sequencing, both harbouring BoNt/A gene. The contamination rates of food with Clostridium species show that food hygiene is a problem and Clostridium species may be a source of food borne disease in Lagos State, Nigeria.

  6. Vaccines against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Leuzzi, Rosanna; Adamo, Roberto; Scarselli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is recognized as a major cause of nosocomial diseases ranging from antibiotic related diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Emergence during the last 2 decades of C. difficile strains associated with high incidence, severity and lethal outcomes has increased the challenges for CDI treatment. A limited number of drugs have proven to be effective against CDI and concerns about antibiotic resistance as well as recurring disease solicited the search for novel therapeutic strategies. Active vaccination provides the attractive opportunity to prevent CDI, and intense research in recent years led to development of experimental vaccines, 3 of which are currently under clinical evaluation. This review summarizes recent achievements and remaining challenges in the field of C. difficile vaccines, and discusses future perspectives in view of newly-identified candidate antigens.

  7. Physical Characterization of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-17

    type A toxin of Clostridium difficile ; Von Eichel-Streiber, 1989) or total failure (eg., the bacteriocir, of the Clostridium perf•ingens plasmid... CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN GENES PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATIR: NIGEL P. MINTON PI ADDRESS: Public Health Laboratory Service Center for Applied...NUMBERS Physical Characterization of Clostridium botulinum DAMDl7-90-Z-0033 Neurotoxin Genes 61102A 6. AUTHOR(S) 3Ml61102BSI2 AA Nigel P. Minton DA335530

  8. 40 CFR 725.421 - Introduced genetic material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Sequence Source Toxin Name Bacillus alve Alveolysin Bacillus cereus Cereolysin Bacillus laterosporus Laterosporolysin Bacillus thuringiensis Thuringiolysin Clostridium bifermentans Lysin Clostridium botulinum Lysin... Streptolysin O (SLO) (5) Sequences for toxins affecting membrane function. Sequence Source Toxin Name...

  9. Mechanisms of Toxin Production of Food Bacteria (Clostridium botulinum)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-25

    food bacteria such as ’Clostridium botulinum. and closely related > organisms. Results from these studies show that C. botulinum types C and D cease...S to produce their dominant toxins when -they are cured o’ftheir prophages.’. These i nontoxigenic derivatives then become sensitive to bacteriophages...of other. culture C.) which induce the production of different toxins . One cured-strain of type C was shown to be sensitive to bacteriophages from C

  10. Genomics of Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Chapeton-Montes, Diana; Plourde, Lucile; Speck, Denis; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-05-01

    Genomic information about Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of the tetanus disease, is scarce. The genome of strain E88, a strain used in vaccine production, was sequenced about 10 years ago. One additional genome (strain 12124569) has recently been released. Here we report three new genomes of C. tetani and describe major differences among all five C. tetani genomes. They all harbor tetanus-toxin-encoding plasmids that contain highly conserved genes for TeNT (tetanus toxin), TetR (transcriptional regulator of TeNT) and ColT (collagenase), but substantially differ in other plasmid regions. The chromosomes share a large core genome that contains about 85% of all genes of a given chromosome. The non-core chromosome comprises mainly prophage-like genomic regions and genes encoding environmental interaction and defense functions (e.g. surface proteins, restriction-modification systems, toxin-antitoxin systems, CRISPR/Cas systems) and other fitness functions (e.g. transport systems, metabolic activities). This new genome information will help to assess the level of genome plasticity of the species C. tetani and provide the basis for detailed comparative studies.

  11. Clostridium difficile: clinical disease and diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, F C; Owens, M; Crocker, I C

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a spectrum of disease ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis. Although the disease was first described in 1893, the etiologic agent was not isolated and identified until 1978. Since clinical and pathological features of C. difficile-associated disease are not easily distinguished from those of other gastrointestinal diseases, including ulcerative colitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, and Crohn's disease, diagnostic methods have relied on either isolation and identification of the microorganism or direct detection of bacterial antigens or toxins in stool specimens. The current review focuses on the sensitivity, specificity, and practical use of several diagnostic tests, including methods for culture of the etiologic agent, cellular cytotoxicity assays, latex agglutination tests, enzyme immunoassay systems, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, fluorescent-antibody assays, and polymerase chain reactions. PMID:8358706

  12. Autism and Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Bolte, E R

    1998-08-01

    Autism is a severe developmental disability believed to have multiple etiologies. This paper outlines the possibility of a subacute, chronic tetanus infection of the intestinal tract as the underlying cause for symptoms of autism observed in some individuals. A significant percentage of individuals with autism have a history of extensive antibiotic use. Oral antibiotics significantly disrupt protective intestinal microbiota, creating a favorable environment for colonization by opportunistic pathogens. Clostridium tetani is an ubiquitous anaerobic bacillus that produces a potent neurotoxin. Intestinal colonization by C. tetani, and subsequent neurotoxin release, have been demonstrated in laboratory animals which were fed vegetative cells. The vagus nerve is capable of transporting tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) and provides a route of ascent from the intestinal tract to the CNS. This route bypasses TeNT's normal preferential binding sites in the spinal cord, and therefore the symptoms of a typical tetanus infection are not evident. Once in the brain, TeNT disrupts the release of neurotransmitters by the proteolytic cleavage of synaptobrevin, a synaptic vesicle membrane protein. This inhibition of neurotransmitter release would explain a wide variety of behavioral deficits apparent in autism. Lab animals injected in the brain with TeNT have exhibited many of these behaviors. Some children with autism have also shown a significant reduction in stereotyped behaviors when treated with antimicrobials effective against intestinal clostridia. When viewed as sequelae to a subacute, chronic tetanus infection, many of the puzzling abnormalities of autism have a logical basis. A review of atypical tetanus cases, and strategies to test the validity of this paper's hypothesis, are included.

  13. Policy development for Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Mark H

    2012-07-01

    The Advisory Committee on Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infection (ARHAI) was created at the height of the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). This article describes the role of ARHAI in the evaluation of laboratory testing for CDI, a related consultation on the legal requirements for manufacturers of in vitro diagnostic medical devices, a CDI healthcare bundle and surveillance of CDI in children.

  14. ClosTron-mediated engineering of Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Kuehne, Sarah A; Heap, John T; Cooksley, Clare M; Cartman, Stephen T; Minton, Nigel P

    2011-01-01

    The genus Clostridium is a diverse assemblage of Gram positive, anaerobic, endospore-forming bacteria. Whilst certain species have achieved notoriety as important animal and human pathogens (e.g. Clostridium difficile, Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium tetani, and Clostridium perfringens), the vast majority of the genus are entirely benign, and are able to undertake all manner of useful biotransformations. Prominent amongst them are those species able to produce the biofuels, butanol and ethanol from biomass-derived residues, such as Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinkii, Clostridium thermocellum, and Clostridium phytofermentans. The prominence of the genus in disease and biotechnology has led to the need for more effective means of genetic modification. The historical absence of methods based on conventional strategies for "knock-in" and "knock-out" in Clostridium has led to the adoption of recombination-independent procedures, typified by ClosTron technology. The ClosTron uses a retargeted group II intron and a retro-transposition-activated marker to selectively insert DNA into defined sites within the genome, to bring about gene inactivation and/or cargo DNA delivery. The procedure is extremely efficient, rapid, and requires minimal effort by the operator.

  15. Selective medium for isolation of Clostridium butyricum from human feces.

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, M R

    1984-01-01

    A selective medium, Clostridium butyricum isolation medium (BIM), is described for the isolation of C. butyricum from human feces. The BIM is a synthetic minimal medium and contains trimethoprim (16 micrograms/ml), D-cycloserine (10 micrograms/ml), and polymyxin B sulfate (20 micrograms/ml) as selective inhibitory agents. Qualitative tests indicated that C. butyricum and other butyric acid-producing clostridia grew on BIM, Clostridium sphenoides and Bacillus cereus produced small colonies, and other clostridia and other obligate anaerobic or facultatively anerobic bacteria were inhibited. Quantitative recovery of C. butyricum from cultures or seeded fecal samples was comparable with BIM and with complex medium, but the quantitative recovery of the other butyric acid-producing clostridia tested (C. beijerinckii, C. acetobutylicum) was lower with BIM than with complex medium. The BIM should aid the rapid isolation of C. butyricum from fecal samples and should be useful for bacteriological investigation of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis. PMID:6490827

  16. [Clostridium difficile infecion--diagnostics, prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Piekarska, Marta; Wandałowicz, Alicja D; Miigoć, Henryka

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of an antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Frequency of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) increased in the last decade. This study presents current preventive measure i.e. hand washing, disposable gloves. Additionally, the article presents diagnostic methods: detection glutamine dehydrogenase (GDH), toxins A and B, cytotoxicity neutralization test, polymerase chain reaction methods (PCR) i.e. nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) and stool culture. Moreover available methods of treatment were presented depending on severity of CDI e.i. metronidazole, vancomycin, fidaxomicin, rifaximin. Furthermore, the review provides information about alternative methods of treatment in view of new hypervirulent strains of C. difficile and increasing resistance to commonly used antibiotics, including: fuscid acid, bacitracin, probiotics, non-toxigenic strains, immunoglobulins, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, toxins binders and fecal transplant.

  17. Survey of neuraminidase production by Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Clostridium difficile strains from clinical and nonclinical sources.

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, M R; Dodin, A

    1985-01-01

    Neuraminidase production was investigated in 57 Clostridium butyricum strains, 16 Clostridium beijerinckii strains, and 25 Clostridium difficile strains. Neuraminidase activity was found only in C. butyricum strains originating from one human newborn with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, two newborns with hemorrhagic colitis, one infected placenta, and one adult with peritonitis, It was concluded that neuraminidase was not a major virulence factor in C. butyricum strains. PMID:4056013

  18. Anaerobic thermophilic culture system

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

  19. Characterization of Clostridium spp. isolated from spoiled processed cheese products.

    PubMed

    Lycken, Lena; Borch, Elisabeth

    2006-08-01

    Of 42 spoiled cheese spread products, 35 were found to harbor Clostridium spp. Typical signs of spoilage were gas production and off-odor. The identity was determined for about half of the isolates (n = 124) by Analytab Products (API), Biolog, the RiboPrinter System, 16S rDNA sequencing, cellular fatty acid analysis, or some combination of these. The majority of isolates were identified as Clostridium sporogenes (in 33% of products), but Clostridium cochlearium (in 12% of products) and Clostridium tyrobutyricum (in 2% of products) were also retrieved. Similarity analysis of the riboprint patterns for 21 isolates resulted in the identification of 10 ribogroups. A high degree of relatedness was observed between isolates of C. sporogenes originating from products produced 3 years apart, indicating a common and, over time, persistent source of infection. The spoilage potential of 11 well-characterized isolates and two culture collection strains was analyzed by inoculating shrimp cheese spread with single cultures and then storing them at 37 degrees C. Tubes inoculated with C. tyrobutyricum did not show any visible signs of growth (e.g., coagulation, discoloration, gas formation) in the cheese spread. After 2 weeks of incubation, tubes inoculated with C. cochlearium or C. sporogenes showed gas-holes, syneresis with separation of coagulated casein and liquid, and a change in color of the cheese. The amount of CO2 produced by C. cochlearium strains was approximately one-third that produced by the majority of C. sporogenes strains. To our knowledge, this is the first study to isolate and identify C. cochlearium as a spoilage organism in cheese spread.

  20. Electron capture gas chromatography study of the acid and alcohol products of Clostridium septicum and Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J B; Selin, M J; Alley, C C

    1976-02-01

    The metabolic products produced by several strains of Clostridium septicum obtained from patients and animals, along with strains of Clostridium chauvoei, were studied in chopped meat glucose medium by electron capture gas-liquid chromatography (EC-GLC). The strains of C. septicum and C. chauvoei were shown to comprise five different metabolic groups. Both the EC-GLC study and the O and H antigenic study performed previously showed that strains of C. septicum comprise a heterogeneous group. One type of metabolic profile was found only in strains of C. chauvoei. The O antigen types and EC-GLC metabolic types of C. septicum correlated fairly well in isolates from cancer patients but not in stock culture and animal isolates.

  1. Enhanced butanol production by coculture of Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Ai, Hongxia; Zhang, Shexi; Li, Shuang; Liang, Zexin; Wu, Zhen-Qiang; Yang, Shang-Tian; Wang, Ju-Fang

    2013-09-01

    Cocultures of Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium tyrobutyricum in free-cell and immobilized-cell fermentation modes were investigated as a means of enhancing butanol production. The immobilized fermentation was performed in a fibrous-bed bioreactor (FBB). The results demonstrated that two-strain coculture significantly enhanced butanol production, yield and volumetric productivity compared with those in pure culture with or without butyric acid. Further, continuous immobilized-cell cocultures in two FBBs using glucose, cassava starch, or cane molasses were conducted at a dilution rate of 0.144 h(-1). The butanol production (6.66 g/L), yield (0.18 g/g), and productivity (0.96 g/L/h) were obtained with cassava starch as the substrate. Meanwhile, the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) yield (0.36 g/g) was the highest among all processes investigated, suggesting that this continuous coculture mode may be suitable for industrial ABE production with no need for repeated sterilization and inoculation.

  2. Physical Characterization of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    jacewoburylicwn was obtained. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 115. NUMBER OF PAGES Foreign, BD, Clostridium , Cloning, Vaccines , BL3, ________ DNAotrahnsfery, Gn...met with either very limited success (eg., type A toxin of Clostridium difficile ; von Eichel-Streiber, 1989) or total failure (eg., the bacteriocin of...AD-A27 2 939 GRANT NO: DAMDl7-90-Z-0033 TITLE: PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN GENES PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nigel P

  3. Quantitative real-time PCR assay for Clostridium septicum in poultry gangrenous dermatitis associated samples.

    PubMed

    Neumann, A P; Dunham, S M; Rehberger, T G; Siragusa, G R

    2010-08-01

    Clostridium septicum is a spore-forming anaerobe frequently implicated in cases of gangrenous dermatitis (GD) and other spontaneously occurring myonecrotic infections of poultry. Although C. septicum is readily cultured from diseased tissues it can be difficult to enumerate due to its tendency to swarm over the surface of agar plates. In this study a quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed in order to more accurately measure the levels of C. septicum in healthy as well as GD associated poultry samples. The assay was specifically designed to target the C. septicum alpha toxin gene, csa, which is, to our knowledge, carried by all strains of C. septicum and has been shown to be essential for virulence. Genomic DNAs from a diverse collection of bacterial species, including closely related Clostridium chauvoei, Clostridium carnis, Clostridium tertium as well as several strains of Clostridium perfringens, all failed to produce a positive reaction. An approximate reproducible limit of detection in spiked extracts of at least 10(3) cfu/g of C. septicum was observed for a variety of different sample types. C. septicum levels in broiler chicken field samples estimated from the results of qPCR were statistically correlated to culture based enumerations obtained from those same tissues.

  4. Electrophoretic study of Clostridium species.

    PubMed Central

    Cato, E P; Hash, D E; Holdeman, L V; Moore, W E

    1982-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of soluble cellular proteins (without sodium dodecyl sulfate) of 70 Clostridium species indicated that the procedure was readily applicable to the differentiation of species in the genus. The protein patterns correlated well with the available DNA homology data and with most accepted differential tests. Results indicated that several earlier names for species were synonyms of those of accepted species and that two accepted species may be synonymous. Images PMID:6175658

  5. Necrotic Enteritis in Chickens Associated with Clostridium sordellii.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Guillermo; Uzal, Francisco; Chin, R P; Palombo, Enzo A; Awad, Milena; Lyras, Dena; Shivaprasad, H L

    2015-09-01

    Three outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease associated with Clostridium sordelii were diagnosed in commercial broiler chicken flocks with 18,000 to 31,000 birds between 18 and 26 days old. Clinical signs in the affected flocks included high mortality up to 2% a day, depression, and diarrhea. The main gross changes included segmental dilation of the small intestine with watery contents, gas, mucoid exudate, and roughened and uneven mucosa, occasionally covered with a pseudomembrane. Microscopic lesions in the small intestine were characterized by extensive areas of coagulative necrosis of the villi, fibrinous exudate in the lumen, and high numbers of large, Gram-positive rods, occasionally containing subterminal spores, seen in the necrotic tissue and lumen. These rods were identified as C. sordellii by immunohistochemistry. Clostridium sordellii was isolated in an almost pure culture from the intestine of affected birds. A retrospective study of commercial broiler chicken and turkey submissions to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System revealed that C. sordellii had been isolated from intestinal lesions in outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease in 8 of 39 cases, 5 times together with Clostridium perfringens and 3 times alone. The latter three cases are reported here.

  6. Regulation of protease production in Clostridium sporogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, C; Macfarlane, G T

    1990-01-01

    The physiological and nutritional factors that regulate protease synthesis in Clostridium sporogenes C25 were studied in batch and continuous cultures. Formation of extracellular proteases occurred at the end of active growth and during the stationary phase in batch cultures. Protease production was inversely related to growth rate in glucose-excess and glucose-limited chemostats over the range D = 0.05 to 0.70 h-1. In pulse experiments, glucose, ammonia, phosphate, and some amino acids (tryptophan, proline, tyrosine, and isoleucine) strongly repressed protease synthesis. This repression was not relieved by addition of 4 mM cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Protease formation was markedly inhibited by 4 mM ATP and ADP, but GTP and GDP had little effect on the process. It is concluded that protease production by C. sporogenes is strongly influenced by the amount of energy available to the cells, with the highest levels of protease synthesis occurring under energy-limiting conditions. PMID:2268158

  7. Clostridium difficile infection: monoclonal or polyclonal genesis?

    PubMed

    Hell, M; Permoser, M; Chmelizek, G; Kern, J M; Maass, M; Huhulescu, S; Indra, A; Allerberger, F

    2011-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is considered to be a leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea. C. difficile (CDI) infection shows a high rate of recurrence. There would have to be a predominantly monoclonal mechanism of CDI within individual patients in order for molecular epidemiologic tools such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotyping to be useful in outbreak investigation or differentiation between infection relapse versus re-infection. It was the aim of our study to determine whether CDI is of monoclonal or of polyclonal genesis. Between December 2009 and June 2010, 11 patients with nosocomial CDI were chosen arbitrarily. Five individual colonies of C. difficile were picked from each of the primary culture plates. Of 55 isolates gained, 47 were available for PCR ribotyping (eight isolates failed attempts to re-culture). Among these 47 isolates, eight different PCR ribotypes were identified. Only one of the 11 patients had a stool sample that yielded more than one ribotype (PCR ribotypes 438 and 232); this 67-year-old female cancer patient was already suffering from recurring diarrhea prior to the fatal episode of colitis which was subsequently investigated. We conclude that polyclonal infections may occasionally occur in patients with CDI. Our findings of predominantly monoclonal origin of CDI within patients suggest that molecular epidemiologic investigations can be used reliably for outbreak investigations or discrimination between relapse and re-infection.

  8. Parameters affecting solvent production by Clostridium pasteurianum

    SciTech Connect

    Dabrock, B.; Bahl, H.; Gottschalk, G. )

    1992-04-01

    The effect of pH, growth rate, phosphate and iron limitation, carbon monoxide, and carbon source on product formation by Clostridium pasteurianum was determined. Under phosphate limitation, glucose was fermented almost exclusively to acetate and butyrate independently of the pH and growth rate. Iron limitation caused lactate production (38 mol/100 mol) from glucose in batch and continuous culture. At 15% (vol/vol) carbon monoxide in the atmosphere, glucose was fermented to ethanol (24 mol/100 mol), lactate (32 mol/100 mol), and butanol (36 mol/100 mol) in addition to the usual products, acetate (38 mol/100 mol) and butyrate (17 mol/100 mol). During glycerol fermentation, a completely different product pattern was found. In continuous culture under phosphate limitation, acetate and butyrate were produced only in trace amounts, whereas ethanol (30 mol/10 mol), butanol (18 mol/100 mol), and 1,3-propanediol (18 mol/100 mol) were the major products. Under iron limitation, the ratio of these products could be changed in favor of 1,3-propanediol (34 mol/100 mol). In addition, lactate was produced in significant amounts (25 mol/100 mol). The tolerance of C. pasteurianum to glycerol was remarkably high; growth was not inhibited by glycerol concentrations up to 17% (wt/vol). Increasing glycerol concentrations favored the production of 1,3-propanediol.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Clostridium sp. strain BNL1100, a cellulolytic mesophile isolated from corn stover.

    PubMed

    Li, Luen-Luen; Taghavi, Safiyh; Izquierdo, Javier A; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    We present the full genome sequence of Clostridium sp. strain BNL1100, a Gram-positive, endospore-forming, lignocellulolytic bacterium isolated from a corn stover enrichment culture. The 4,613,747-bp genome of strain BNL1100 contains 4,025 putative protein-coding genes, of which 103 are glycoside hydrolases, the highest detected number in cluster III clostridia.

  10. Production of 1,3-propanediol from glycerol by Clostridium acetobutylicum and other Clostridium species

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1987-04-01

    Glycerol was fermented with the production of 1,3-propanediol as the major fermentation product by four strains of Clostridium acetobutylicum, six of C. butylicum, two of C. beijerinckii, one of C. kainantoi, and three of C. butylicum. 1,3-Propanediol was identified by its retention times in gas chromatography and high-pressure liquid chromatography and by its mass spectrum. During growth of C. butylicum B593 in a chemostat culture at pH 6.5, 61% of the glycerol fermented was converted to 1,3-propanediol. When the pH was decreased to 4.9, growth and 1,3-propanediol production were substantially reduced.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis and PCR detection of Clostridium chauvoei, Clostridium haemolyticum, Clostridium novyi types A and B, and Clostridium septicum based on the flagellin gene.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yoshimasa; Kojima, Akemi; Aoki, Hiroshi; Ogikubo, Yasuaki; Takikawa, Noriyasu; Tamura, Yutaka

    2002-05-01

    The flagellin genes (fliC) of Clostridium chauvoei, Clostridium haemolyticum, Clostridium novyi types A and B, and Clostridium septicum were analysed by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. The five Clostridium species have at least two copies of the flagellin gene (fliC) arranged in tandem on the chromosome. The deduced N- and C-terminal aminoacid sequences of the flagellin proteins (FliCs) of these clostridia are well conserved but their central region aminoacid sequences are not. Phylogenic analysis based on the N-terminal aminoacid sequence of the FliC protein revealed that these clostridia, which belong to Clostridium 16S rDNA phylogenic cluster I (), are more closely related to Bacillus subtilis than to Clostridium difficile, which belongs to the cluster XI. Moreover, a multiplex polymerase reaction (PCR) system based on the fliC sequence was developed to rapidly identify C. chauvoei, C. haemolyticum, C. novyi types A and B, and C. septicum. PCR of each Clostridium amplified a species-specific band. The multiplex PCR system may be useful for rapid identification of pathogenic clostridia.

  12. Citrate, a specific substrate for the isolation of Clostridium sphenoides.

    PubMed Central

    Walther, R; Hippe, H; Gottschalk, G

    1977-01-01

    With a medium containing citrate as the carbon and energy source, 10 clostridial strains were isolated from various mud samples. Characterization of these strains revealed that they all belonged to the same species, Clostridium sphenoides. Strains of this organism obtained from culture collections were also able to grow citrate, whereas 15 other clostridial species tested were not. Citrate was fermented by C. sphenoides to acetate, ethanol, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen. Experiments with stereospecifically 14C-labeled citrate indicated that citrate lyase was involved in citrate degradation. Images PMID:869540

  13. Ultrastructure and extreme heat resistance of spores from thermophilic Clostridium species.

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, H H; Zeikus, J G; Longin, R; Millet, J; Ryter, A

    1983-01-01

    The heat resistance and ultrastructural features of spore suspensions prepared from Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, Clostridium thermosulfurogenes 4B, and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum 39E were compared as a function of decimal reduction time. The decimal reduction times at 121 degrees C for strains LQRI, 4B, and 39E were 0.5, 2.5, and 11 min. The higher degree of spore heat resistance was associated with a spore architecture displaying a thicker cortex layer. Heat resistance of these spores was proportional to the ratio of spore cortex volume to cytoplasmic volume. These ratios for spores of strains LQRI, 4B, and 39E were 1.4, 1.6, and 6.6, respectively. The extreme heat resistance and autoclavable nature of C. thermohydrosulfuricum spores under routine sterilization procedures is suggested as a common cause of laboratory contamination with pure cultures of thermophilic, saccharide-fermenting anaerobes. Images PMID:6643392

  14. Clostridium difficile and the microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Seekatz, Anna M.; Young, Vincent B.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading health care–associated illness. Both human and animal models have demonstrated the importance of the gut microbiota’s capability of providing colonization resistance against C. difficile. Risk factors for disease development include antibiotic use, which disrupts the gut microbiota, leading to the loss of colonization resistance and subsequent CDI. Identification of the specific microbes capable of restoring this function remains elusive. Future studies directed at how microbial communities influence the metabolic environment may help elucidate the role of the microbiota in disease development. These findings will improve current biotherapeutics for patients with CDI, particularly those with recurrent disease. PMID:25036699

  15. Regulation of toxin synthesis in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Connan, Chloé; Denève, Cécile; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R

    2013-12-01

    Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins are structurally and functionally related proteins that are potent inhibitors of neuroexocytosis. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) associates with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs) to form complexes of various sizes, whereas tetanus toxin (TeNT) does not form any complex. The BoNT and ANTP genes are clustered in a DNA segment called the botulinum locus, which has different genomic localization (chromosome, plasmid, phage) in the various Clostridium botulinum types and subtypes. The botulinum locus genes are organized in two polycistronic operons (ntnh-bont and ha/orfX operons) transcribed in opposite orientations. A gene called botR lying between the two operons in C. botulinum type A encodes an alternative sigma factor which regulates positively the synthesis of BoNT and ANTPs at the late exponential growth phase and beginning of the stationary phase. In Clostridium tetani, the gene located immediately upstream of tent encodes a positive regulatory protein, TetR, which is related to BotR. C. botulinum and C. tetani genomes contain several two-component systems and predicted regulatory orphan genes. In C. botulinum type A, four two-component systems have been found that positively or negatively regulate the synthesis of BoNT and ANTPs independently of BotR/A. The synthesis of neurotoxin in Clostridia seems to be under the control of complex network of regulation.

  16. Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    Twelve conference papers on cultural aspects of second language instruction include: "Towards True Multiculturalism: Ideas for Teachers" (Brian McVeigh); Comparing Cultures Through Critical Thinking: Development and Interpretations of Meaningful Observations" (Laurel D. Kamada); "Authority and Individualism in Japan and the…

  17. Clostridium botulinum in cattle and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Miia; Myllykoski, Jan; Sivelä, Seppo; Korkeala, Hannu

    2010-04-01

    The use of plastic-wrapped and nonacidified silage as cattle feed has led to an increasing number of botulism outbreaks due to Clostridium botulinum Groups I-III in dairy cattle. The involvement of Groups I and II organisms in cattle botulism has raised concern of human botulism risk associated with the consumption of dairy products. Multiplication of C. botulinum in silage and in the gastrointestinal tract of cattle with botulism has been reported, thus contamination of the farm environment and raw milk, and further transmission through the dairy chain, are possible. The standard milk pasteurization treatment does not eliminate spores, and the intrinsic factors of many dairy products allow botulinal growth and toxin production. Although rare, several large botulism outbreaks due to both commercial and home-prepared dairy products have been reported. Factors explaining these outbreaks include most importantly temperature abuse, but also unsafe formulation, inadequate fermentation, insufficient thermal processing, post-process contamination, and lack of adequate quality control for adjunct ingredients were involved. The small number of outbreaks is probably explained by a low incidence of spores in milk, the presence of competitive bacteria in pasteurized milk and other dairy products, and growth-inhibitory combinations of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in cultured and processed dairy products.

  18. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Clostridium difficile▿

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, David; Fawley, Warren; Kachrimanidou, Melina; Bowden, Rory; Crook, Derrick W.; Fung, Rowena; Golubchik, Tanya; Harding, Rosalind M.; Jeffery, Katie J. M.; Jolley, Keith A.; Kirton, Richard; Peto, Tim E.; Rees, Gareth; Stoesser, Nicole; Vaughan, Alison; Walker, A. Sarah; Young, Bernadette C.; Wilcox, Mark; Dingle, Kate E.

    2010-01-01

    A robust high-throughput multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for Clostridium difficile was developed and validated using a diverse collection of 50 reference isolates representing 45 different PCR ribotypes and 102 isolates from recent clinical samples. A total of 49 PCR ribotypes were represented overall. All isolates were typed by MLST and yielded 40 sequence types (STs). A web-accessible database was set up (http://pubmlst.org/cdifficile/) to facilitate the dissemination and comparison of C. difficile MLST genotyping data among laboratories. MLST and PCR ribotyping were similar in discriminatory abilities, having indices of discrimination of 0.90 and 0.92, respectively. Some STs corresponded to a single PCR ribotype (32/40), other STs corresponded to multiple PCR ribotypes (8/40), and, conversely, the PCR ribotype was not always predictive of the ST. The total number of variable nucleotide sites in the concatenated MLST sequences was 103/3,501 (2.9%). Concatenated MLST sequences were used to construct a neighbor-joining tree which identified four phylogenetic groups of STs and one outlier (ST-11; PCR ribotype 078). These groups apparently correlate with clades identified previously by comparative genomics. The MLST scheme was sufficiently robust to allow direct genotyping of C. difficile in total stool DNA extracts without isolate culture. The direct (nonculture) MLST approach may prove useful as a rapid genotyping method, potentially benefiting individual patients and informing hospital infection control. PMID:20042623

  19. Clostridium difficile: its disease and toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Lyerly, D M; Krivan, H C; Wilkins, T D

    1988-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the etiologic agent of pseudomembranous colitis, a severe, sometimes fatal disease that occurs in adults undergoing antimicrobial therapy. The disease, ironically, has been most effectively treated with antibiotics, although some of the newer methods of treatment such as the replacement of the bowel flora may prove more beneficial for patients who continue to relapse with pseudomembranous colitis. The organism produces two potent exotoxins designated toxin A and toxin B. Toxin A is an enterotoxin believed to be responsible for the diarrhea and mucosal tissue damage which occur during the disease. Toxin B is an extremely potent cytotoxin, but its role in the disease has not been as well studied. There appears to be a cascade of events which result in the expression of the activity of these toxins, and these events, ranging from the recognition of a trisaccharide receptor by toxin A to the synergistic action of the toxins and their possible dissemination in the body, are discussed in this review. The advantages and disadvantages of the various assays, including tissue culture assay, enzyme immunoassay, and latex agglutination, currently used in the clinical diagnosis of the disease also are discussed. PMID:3144429

  20. Molecular and Cellular Basis of Microvascular Perfusion Deficits Induced by Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium septicum

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Michael J.; Kwan, Rain Y. Q.; Awad, Milena M.; Kennedy, Catherine L.; Young, Lauren F.; Hall, Pam; Cordner, Leanne M.; Lyras, Dena; Emmins, John J.; Rood, Julian I.

    2008-01-01

    Reduced tissue perfusion leading to tissue ischemia is a central component of the pathogenesis of myonecrosis caused by Clostridium perfringens. The C. perfringens α-toxin has been shown capable of inducing these changes, but its potential synergy with perfringolysin O (θ-toxin) is less well understood. Similarly, Clostridium septicum is a highly virulent causative agent of spontaneous gas gangrene, but its effect on the microcirculation has not been examined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use intravital microscopy to examine the effects of C. perfringens and C. septicum on the functional microcirculation, coupled with the use of isogenic toxin mutants to elucidate the role of particular toxins in the resultant microvascular perfusion deficits. This study represents the first time this integrated approach has been used in the analysis of the pathological response to clostridial toxins. Culture supernatants from wild-type C. perfringens induced extensive cell death within 30 min, as assessed by in vivo uptake of propidium iodide. Furthermore, significant reductions in capillary perfusion were observed within 60 min. Depletion of either platelets or neutrophils reduced the alteration in perfusion, consistent with a role for these blood-borne cells in obstructing perfusion. In addition, mutation of either the α-toxin or perfringolysin O structural genes attenuated the reduction in perfusion, a process that was reversed by genetic complementation. C. septicum also induced a marked reduction in perfusion, with the degree of microvascular compromise correlating with the level of the C. septicum α-toxin. Together, these data indicate that as a result of its ability to produce α-toxin and perfringolysin O, C. perfringens rapidly induces irreversible cellular injury and a marked reduction in microvascular perfusion. Since C. septicum induces a similar reduction in microvascular perfusion, it is postulated that this function is central to the pathogenesis of

  1. Lytic Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage 39-O Genomic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening for bacteriophages lytic for Clostridium perfringens was completed utilizing filtered samples obtained from poultry (intestinal material), soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water. Following limit dilution cloning and three rounds of plaque purification lytic phage preparations ...

  2. Evidence for antibiotic induced Clostridium perfringens diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Modi, N; Wilcox, M

    2001-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a well documented cause of antibiotic associated diarrhoea in hospitalised patients, but may account for only approximately 20% of all cases. This leader reviews the current knowledge and understanding of the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and diagnosis of non-food borne Clostridium perfringens diarrhoea. Although enterotoxigenic C perfringens has been implicated in some C difficile negative cases of antibiotic associated diarrhoea, C perfringens enterotoxin detection methods are not part of the routine laboratory investigation of such cases. Testing for C perfringens enterotoxin in faecal samples from patients with antibiotic associated diarrhoea and sporadic diarrhoea on a routine basis would have considerable resource implications. Therefore, criteria for initiating investigations and optimum laboratory tests need to be established. In addition, establishing the true burden of C perfringens antibiotic associated diarrhoea is important before optimum control and treatment measures can be defined. Key Words: Clostridium perfringens • Clostridium difficile • hospital acquired infective diarrhoea PMID:11577119

  3. [Clostridium-difficile-associated diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Bujanda, Luis; Cosme, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea and is a significant cause of morbidity among hospitalized patients. The inflammation is produced as a result of a non-specific response to toxins. In the last few years, a hypervirulent strain, NAP1/BI/027, has been reported. Symptoms usually consist of abdominal pain and diarrhea. The diagnosis should be suspected in any patient who develops diarrhea during antibiotic therapy or 6-8 weeks after treatment. Diagnosis should be confirmed by the detection of CD toxin in stool and by colonoscopy in special situations. The treatment of choice is metronidazole or vancomycin. In some patients who do not respond to this therapy or who have complications, subtotal colectomy may be required. Relapse is frequent and must be distinguished from reinfection. Prevention and control in healthcare settings requires careful attention.

  4. Identification of Clostridium Species and DNA Fingerprinting of Clostridium perfringens by Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis▿

    PubMed Central

    Keto-Timonen, Riikka; Heikinheimo, Annamari; Eerola, Erkki; Korkeala, Hannu

    2006-01-01

    An amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method was applied to 129 strains representing 24 different Clostridium species, with special emphasis on pathogenic clostridia of medical or veterinary interest, to assess the potential of AFLP for identification of clostridia. In addition, the ability of the same AFLP protocol to type clostridia at the strain level was assessed by focusing on Clostridium perfringens strains. All strains were typeable by AFLP, so the method seemed to overcome the problem of extracellular DNase production. AFLP differentiated all Clostridium species tested, except for Clostridium ramosum and Clostridium limosum, which clustered together with a 45% similarity level. Other Clostridium species were divided into species-specific clusters or occupied separate positions. Wide genetic diversity was observed among Clostridium botulinum strains, which were divided into seven species-specific clusters. The same AFLP protocol was also suitable for typing C. perfringens at the strain level. A total of 29 different AFLP types were identified for 37 strains of C. perfringens; strains initially originating from the same isolate showed identical fingerprinting patterns and were distinguished from unrelated strains. AFLP proved to be a highly reproducible, easy-to-perform, and relatively fast method which enables high throughput of samples and can serve in the generation of identification libraries. These results indicate that the AFLP method provides a promising tool for the identification and characterization of Clostridium species. PMID:16971642

  5. Physiology and Sporulation in Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Dürre, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Clostridia are Gram-positive, anaerobic, endospore-forming bacteria, incapable of dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Comprising approximately 180 species, the genus Clostridium is one of the largest bacterial genera. Physiology is mostly devoted to acid production. Numerous pathways are known, such as the homoacetate fermentation by acetogens, the propionate fermentation by Clostridium propionicum, and the butyrate/butanol fermentation by C. acetobutylicum, a well-known solvent producer. Clostridia degrade sugars, alcohols, amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, and polymers such as starch and cellulose. Energy conservation can be performed by substrate-level phosphorylation as well as by the generation of ion gradients. Endospore formation resembles the mechanism elucidated in Bacillus. Morphology, contents, and properties of spores are very similar to bacilli endospores. Sporulating clostridia usually form swollen mother cells and accumulate the storage substance granulose. However, clostridial sporulation differs by not employing the so-called phosphorelay. Initiation starts by direct phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A. The cascade of sporulation-specific sigma factors is again identical to what is known from Bacillus. The onset of sporulation is coupled in some species to either solvent (acetone, butanol) or toxin (e.g., C. perfringens enterotoxin) formation. The germination of spores is often induced by various amino acids, often in combination with phosphate and sodium ions. In medical applications, C. butyricum spores are used as a C. difficile prophylaxis and as treatment against diarrhea. Recombinant spores are currently under investigation and testing as antitumor agents, because they germinate only in hypoxic tissues (i.e., tumor tissue), allowing precise targeting and direct killing of tumor cells.

  6. Formation of involatile methylantimony species by Clostridium spp.

    PubMed

    Smith, L M; Craig, P J; Jenkins, R O

    2002-04-01

    Trimethylantimony was detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in the headspace of a soil enrichment culture designed to promote growth of clostridia. Clostridial isolates from the soil enrichment culture were shown to biomethylate inorganic antimony in monseptic culture, using hydride generation-gas chromatographyatomic absorption spectrometry (HG-GC-AAS). GC-MS profiles of headspace gases from soil enrichment cultures shown to generate trimethylantimony, were used to select characterised Clostridium spp for assessment of antimony biomethylation capability. Involatile methylantimony species (up to 21 microg Sb dm(-3)) were detected by HG-GC-AAS in the medium of monoseptic cultures of C. acetobutylicum, C. butyricum and C. cochlearium. The relative quantities of involatile mono-, di- and trimethylantimony species produced over the course of a 28-day cultivation period is consistent with trimethylantimony oxide being a final product of antimony biomethylation by these bacteria, with mono- and dimethylantimony species appearing transiently in the cultures as intermediates of an antimony biomethylation pathway. Clostridia may be the principal agents of antimony biomethylation in methanogenic environments and could give rise to methylated forms of antimony in both the aqueous and gaseous phases.

  7. Evaluation of two novel chemiluminescence immunoassays for the detection of Clostridium difficile glutamate dehydrogenase and toxin A&B.

    PubMed

    Blaich, Annette; Frei, Reno; Castellano, Carine; Kiessling, Christine; Geschke, Angelika; Rentsch, Katharina M; Egli, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    A novel immunoassay for Clostridium difficile glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and toxin A&B (LIAISON, DiaSorin) was compared to another GDH assay (Alere), PCR and toxigenic culture. The GDH-DiaSorin is slightly more sensitive than the GDH-Alere. Sensitivity of the Toxin-Diasorin test is in accordance to the sensitivity of other immunoassays in literature.

  8. Use of the cobas 4800 system for the rapid detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Moure, Raquel; Cañizares, Ángeles; Muíño, María; Lobato, Margarita; Fernández, Ana; Rodríguez, María; Gude, Maria José; Tomás, Maria; Bou, Germán

    2016-01-01

    The new cobas® Cdiff and cobas® MRSA/SA tests were compared with conventional methods for the rapid detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The final concordance between cobas Cdiff Test and GDH/toxin gene screening was 97.62% and between cobas MRSA/SA Test and chromogenic culture, 91.30%, respectively.

  9. Characterization of a symbiotic coculture of Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum YM3 and clostridium thermocellum YM4

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yutaka )

    1990-01-01

    Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum YM3 and C. thermocellum YM4 were isolated from a coculture which was obtained from an enrichment culture inoculated with volcanic soil in Izu Peninsula, Japan. Strain YM3 had advantages over reported C. thermohydrosulfuricum strains in that it fermented inulin and could accumulate ethanol up to 1.3% (wt/vol). The highest ethanol yield obtained was 1.96 mol/mol of anhydroglucose unit in cellobiose. Strain YM4 had features different from those reported in C. thermocellum strains: it formed spores rarely (at a frequency of <10{sup {minus}5}), it required CO{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} for growth, and it fermented sucrose. Strain YM4 completely decomposed 1% Avicel within 25 h when the inoculum constituted 2 % of the culture medium volume, and it produced 0.22 U of Avicelase and 2.21 U of carboxymethylcellulase per ml of the medium. The doubling times on Avicel, cellobiose, and glucose were 2.7, 1.1, and 1.6 h, respectively. Reconstructed cocultures of strains YM3 and YM4 were very stable and degraded Avicel more rapidly than did strain YM4 monoculture. Without yeast extract, neither microorganism was able to grow. However, the coculture grew on cellulose without yeast extract and produced ethanol in high yield. Moreover, cell-free spent culture broth of strain YM3 could replace yeast extract in supporting the growth of strain YM4. The symbiotic relationship of the two bacteria in cellulose fermentation is probably a case of mutualism.

  10. Adjuvants for Clostridium tetani and Clostridium diphtheriae vaccines updating.

    PubMed

    Alshanqiti, Fatimah M; Al-Masaudi, Saad B; Al-Hejin, Ahmed M; Redwan, Elrashdy M

    2017-01-01

    It's known that diphtheria and tetanus are a contagious lethal diseases over the years, they caused by pathogenic microbes corynebacterium diphtheria and Clostridium tetani, respectively. The diseases result from the production of bacterial toxin. Vaccination with bacterial toxoid vaccines adsorbed on particulates adjuvants still are the best way to prevent this epidemic diseases from spread. The particulate vaccines have been shown to be more efficient than soluble one for the induction of the immune responses. Nanoparticles can be engineered to enhance the immune responses. As well known the immune response to inactivate killed and subunit vaccine enhances by alum adjuvants. The adjuvants examined and tested after reducing its size to particle size, thus mimic size of viruses which is considered smallest units can derive the immune system. The major issue is minimizing the adjuvant particles, to gain insight of resulting immunity types and impact on immune response. The adjuvant effect of micro/nanoparticles appears to largely be a consequence of their uptake into antigen presenting cells.

  11. Pervaporative butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum B18

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Q.; Park, C.H. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering)

    1994-04-15

    Extractive acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was carried out successfully using pervaporation and a low-acid-producing Clostridium acetobutylicum B18. A pervaporation module with 0.17 m[sup 2] of surface area was made of silicone membrane of 240 [mu]m thickness. Pervaporation experiments using make-up solutions showed that butanol and acetone fluxes increased linearly with their concentrations in the aqueous phase. Fickian diffusion coefficients were constants for fixed air flow rates, and increased at higher sweep air flow rates. During batch and fed-batch fermentation, pervaporation at an air flow rate of 8 L/min removed butanol and acetone efficiently. Butanol concentration was maintained below 4.5 g/L even though Clostridium acetobutylicum B18 produced butanol steadily. Pervaporation could not remove organic acids efficiently, but organic acids did not accumulate because strain B18 produced little organic acid and recycled added organic acids efficiently. With pervaporation, glucose consumption rate increased compared to without pervaporation, and up to 160 g/L of glucose was consumed during 80 h. Cell growth was not inhibited by possible salt accumulation or oxygen diffusion through the silicone tubing. The culture volume was maintained relatively constant during fed-batch operation because of an offsetting effect of water and product removal by pervaporation and addition of nutrient supplements.

  12. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis

    PubMed Central

    Essenmacher, Alex C.; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  13. Production of toxin by Clostridium botulinum type A strains cured by plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Weickert, M J; Chambliss, G H; Sugiyama, H

    1986-01-01

    Twelve strains of Clostridium botulinum type A and seven strains of Clostridium sporogenes were screened for plasmids by agarose gel electrophoresis of cleared lysates of cells from 5 ml of mid-log-phase culture. Nine type A strains had one or more plasmids of 4.3, 6.8, or 36 megadaltons (MDa); several strains showed a large plasmid of 61 MDa, but it was not consistently recovered. Four C. sporogenes strains had one or more plasmids of 4.3, 5.6 or 36 MDa. Isolates obtained from cultures of plasmid-containing C. botulinum type A strains grown in ionic detergent broth and from spontaneously arising variants were screened both for toxin production and for plasmid content. Toxigenicity of C. botulinum could not be correlated with the presence of any one plasmid. Images PMID:3082278

  14. Amplification of the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region for rapid detection of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Yamamoto, K; Amimoto, K; Kojima, A; Ogikubo, Y; Norimatsu, M; Ogata, H; Tamura, Y

    2001-12-01

    Amplification of the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for the rapid detection of Clostridium chauvoei and C septicum. To assess its specificity, PCR was performed with total DNA from 42 strains of clostridia and three strains of other genera. PCR products specific to C chauvoei or to C septicum were generated from homologous cultures only. Clostridium chauvoer-specific or C septicum-specific amplicons were also generated from tissues of cows experimentally infected with C chauvoei or C septicum and in DNA samples from cows clinically diagnosed as having blackleg or malignant oedema. These results suggest that a species-specific PCR may be useful for the rapid and direct detection of C chauvoei and C septicum in clinical specimens.

  15. Production of butanol by fermentation in the presence of cocultures of clostridium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, S. L.; Foutch, G. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Sugars are converted to a mixture of solvents including butanol by a fermentation process employing a coculture of microorganisms of the Clostridium genus, one of said microorganisms favoring the production of butyric acid and the other of which converts the butyric acid so produced to butanol. The use of a coculture substantially increases the yield of butanol over that obtained using a culture employing only one microorganism.

  16. Isolation of Clostridium difficile from human jejunum: identification of a reservoir for disease?

    PubMed Central

    Testore, G P; Nardi, F; Babudieri, S; Giuliano, M; Di Rosa, R; Panichi, G

    1986-01-01

    The possibility that the small intestine may represent a reservoir for Clostridium difficile was studied, using segments of human jejunum collected at necropsy. Our results (three of 100 specimens positive for C difficile culture) support the hypothesis that C difficile can be found in human jejunum and that it adheres to the normal mucosa as a resident bacterium. These findings suggest that gastrointestinal disease caused by C difficile has an endogenous origin. PMID:3745477

  17. Venous sinus thrombosis after Proteus vulgaris meningitis and concomitant Clostridium abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Bodur, Hürrem; Colpan, Aylin; Gozukucuk, Ramazan; Akinci, Esragul; Cevik, Mustafa Aydin; Balaban, Neriman

    2002-01-01

    A 19-y-old woman presented with Proteus vulgaris meningitis as a complication of chronic otitis media. Despite treatment with ceftazidime and amikacin no clinical improvement was observed. Cranial MRI revealed right-sided mastoiditis/otitis media and venous sinus thrombosis. After mastoidectomy, repeat cranial MRI demonstrated abscess formation in the venous sinuses. The abscess was drained. Clostridium spp. was isolated from the abscess culture.

  18. Clostridium difficile infection in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Putsathit, Papanin; Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Ngamwongsatit, Puriya; Riley, Thomas V

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the aetiological agent in ca. 20% of cases of antimicrobial-associated diarrhoea in hospitalised adults. Diseases caused by this organism range from mild diarrhoea to occasional fatal pseudomembranous colitis. The epidemiology of C. difficile infection (CDI) has changed notably in the past decade, following epidemics in the early 2000s of PCR ribotype (RT) 027 infection in North America and Europe, where there was an increase in disease severity and mortality. Another major event has been the emergence of RT 078, initially as the predominant ribotype in production animals in the USA and Europe, and then in humans in Europe. Although there have been numerous investigations of the epidemiology of CDI in North America and Europe, limited studies have been undertaken elsewhere, particularly in Asia. Antimicrobial exposure remains the major risk factor for CDI. Given the high prevalence of indiscriminate and inappropriate use of antimicrobials in Asia, it is conceivable that CDI is relatively common among humans and animals. This review describes the level of knowledge in Thailand regarding C. difficile detection methods, prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profile, as well as the clinical features of, treatment options for and outcomes of the disease. In addition, antimicrobial usage in livestock in Thailand will be reviewed. A literature search yielded 18 studies mentioning C. difficile in Thailand, a greater number than from any other Asian country. It is possible that the situation in Thailand in relation to CDI may mirror the situation in other developing Asians countries.

  19. Thermostable chaperonin from Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Cross, S J; Ciruela, A; Poomputsa, K; Romaniec, M P; Freedman, R B

    1996-06-01

    Homologues of the chaperonins Cpn60 and Cpn10 have been purified from the Gram-positive cellulolytic thermophile Clostridium thermocellum. The Cpn60 protein was purified by ATP-affinity chromatography and the Cpn10 protein was purified by gel-filtration, ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatographies. The identities of the proteins were confirmed by N-terminal sequence analysis and antigenic cross-reactivity. The Cpn60 homologue is a weak, thermostable ATPase (t1/2 at 70 decrees C more than 90 min) with optimum activity (Kcat 0.07 S-1) between 60 degrees C and 70 degrees C. The ATPase activity of the authentic Cpn60 was inhibited by Escherichia coli GroES. The catalytic properties of a recombinant C. thermocellum Cpn60 purified from a GST-Cpn60 fusion protein expressed in E. coli [Ciruela (1995) Ph.D. Thesis, University of Kent] were identical with those of the authentic C. thermocellum Cpn60. Gel-filtration studies show that at room temperature the Cpn60 migrates mainly as a heptamer. Electron microscopy confirms the presence of complexes showing 7-fold rotational symmetry and also reveals a small number of particles that seem to be tetradecamers with a similar structure to E. coli GroEL complexes.

  20. Probiotics in Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Na, Xi; Kelly, Ciaran

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is one of the most prevalent nosocomial infections. A dramatic increase in the incidence and severity of CDI has been noted in the past decade. Current recommendations suggest metronidazole as first-line therapy in mild to moderately severe CDI and oral vancomycin in individuals with severe CDI, or when metronidazole fails or is contradicted. Alterations of the colonic microbiota, usually caused by antimicrobial therapy, seem to play a critical role in CDI pathogenesis. Probiotics are live microorganisms that confer a health benefit to the host, and have been used in CDI. Although a wide variety of probiotics have been studied, the exact role of probiotics in preventing and treating CDI is not clear. In this study, we reviewed the current literature and recommendations on the most commonly studied protiotic agents (Saccharomyces boulardii, Lactobacillus species, and probiotic mixtures) used to prevent or treat CDI. Lactobacillus-containing probiotic mixtures and S. boulardii may be effective in the prevention of CDI in high-risk antibiotic recipients but this finding is based on small, individual studies, and further, larger, well-controlled studies are needed to confirm preliminary positive findings and to better delineate the efficacy of probiotics in CDI prevention or treatment. PMID:21992956

  1. Management of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jashaami, Layth S.

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the 1970s, there has been an increase in the incidence, severity, and recurrence rate of the disease. We reviewed the recent CDI literature in PubMed published before February 28, 2016 that focused on advances in therapy. Despite a large number of studies describing methods for diagnosing the disease, there is currently no definitive test that identifies this infection with certainty, which complicates therapy. Recommended therapy for CDI includes oral metronidazole for mild cases and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for moderate to severe cases, each given for 10 to 14 days. For infection with spore-forming C difficile, this length of treatment may be insufficient to lead to cure; however, continuing antibiotics for longer periods of time may unfavorably alter the microbiome, preventing recovery. Treatment with metronidazole has been associated with an increasing failure rate, and the only clear recommended form of metronidazole for treatment of CDI is the intravenous formulation for patients unable to take oral medications. For vancomycin or fidaxomicin treatment of first CDI recurrences, the drug used in the initial bout can be repeated. For second or future recurrences, vancomycin can be given in pulsed or tapered doses. New modalities of treatment, such as bacteriotherapy and immunotherapy, show promise for the treatment of recurrent CDI. PMID:27917075

  2. Fidaxomicin: in Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sean T

    2011-12-24

    Fidaxomicin is a first-in-class macrocyclic antibacterial that primarily demonstrates activity against species of clostridia, predominantly Clostridium difficile, while having limited or no activity against normal faecal microflora. Fidaxomicin is minimally absorbed following oral administration and is excreted almost solely in the faeces. Fidaxomicin displayed a high level of antibacterial activity against C. difficile in vitro, with a minimum inhibitory concentration required to inhibit 90% of C. difficile strains of 0.125-0.5 μg/mL, and was ≈2- to 8-fold more active than vancomycin or metronidazole. Fidaxomicin demonstrated a prolonged postantibiotic effect against C. difficile relative to vancomycin and metronidazole. In two randomized, double-blind, phase III trials, oral fidaxomicin 200 mg every 12 hours for 10 days was no less effective than oral vancomycin 125 mg every 6 hours for 10 days in the treatment of C. difficile infection, based on noninferiority analyses of clinical cure rates (primary endpoint). Fidaxomicin therapy was associated with a significantly lower rate of recurrence, as well as a significantly higher rate of global cure (i.e. sustained clinical response; resolution of diarrhoea without recurrence) compared with vancomycin therapy in the two clinical trials. Fidaxomicin was generally well tolerated in patients with C. difficile infection, with a tolerability profile generally similar to that of vancomycin.

  3. Prevention of Infection Due to Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christopher C; Jump, Robin L P; Chopra, Teena

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is one of the foremost nosocomial pathogens. Preventing infection is particularly challenging. Effective prevention efforts typically require a multifaceted bundled approach. A variety of infection control procedures may be advantageous, including strict hand decontamination with soap and water, contact precautions, and using chlorine-containing decontamination agents. Additionally, risk factor reduction can help reduce the burden of disease. The risk factor modification is principally accomplished though antibiotic stewardship programs. Unfortunately, most of the current evidence for prevention is in acute care settings. This review focuses on preventative approaches to reduce the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection in healthcare settings.

  4. ISOLATION OF CLOSTRIDIUM TETANI FROM SOIL.

    PubMed

    SANADA, I; NISHIDA, S

    1965-03-01

    Sanada, Ichiro (Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan), and Shoki Nishida. Isolation of Clostridium tetani from soil. J. Bacteriol. 89:626-629. 1965.-The higher the temperatures applied to soil specimens, the weaker the toxigenicity of Clostridium tetani strains isolated from them. The glucose- and maltose-fermenting ability of these isolates was inversely proportional to their toxigenicity. The biological properties of atoxic strains were indistinguishable from those of C. tetanomorphum. Since a considerable number of toxic strains fermented glucose and maltose, these criteria are of doubtful value for differentiating C. tetani from C. tetanomorphum.

  5. Cellulase system of a free-living, mesophilic clostridium (strain C7).

    PubMed Central

    Cavedon, K; Leschine, S B; Canale-Parola, E

    1990-01-01

    The enzymatic activity responsible for crystalline cellulose degradation (Avicelase activity) by a mesophilic clostridium (strain C7) was present in culture supernatant fluid but was not detected in significant amounts in association with whole cells or in disrupted cells. Cells of the mesophilic clostridium lacked cellulosome clusters on their surface and did not adhere to cellulose fibers. The extracellular cellulase system of the mesophilic clostridium was fractionated by Sephracryl S-300 gel filtration, and the fractions were assayed for Avicelase and carboxymethylcellulase activities. The Avicelase activity coincided with an A280 peak that eluted in the 700,000-Mr region. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of the 700,000-Mr fractions showed that Avicelase was present as a multiprotein aggregate that lost the ability to hydrolyze crystalline cellulose when partially dissociated by sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment. Proteins resulting from the partial dissociation of the aggregate retained carboxymethylcellulase activity. An Avicelase-deficient mutant of strain C7 (strain LS), which was not capable of degrading crystalline cellulose, lacked the Avicelase-active 700,000-Mr peak. The results indicated that an extracellular 700,000-Mr multiprotein complex, consisting of at least 15 proteins, is utilized by the mesophilic clostridium for the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. At least six different endo-1,4-beta-glucanases may be part of the cellulase system of strain C7. Sephacryl S-300 column fractions, corresponding to an A280 peak in the 130,000-Mr region, contained carboxymethylcellulase-active proteins that may serve as precursors for the assembly of the Avicelase-active complex by the mesophilic clostridium. Images PMID:2376559

  6. Clostridium septicum: An Unusual Link to a Lower Gastrointestinal Bleed

    PubMed Central

    Jessamy, Kegan; Ojevwe, Fidelis O.; Ubagharaji, Ezinnaya; Sharma, Anuj; Anozie, Obiajulu; Gilman, Christy Ann; Rawlins, Sekou

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium septicum is a highly virulent pathogen which is associated with colorectal malignancy, hematological malignancy, immunosuppression, diabetes mellitus and cyclical neutropenia. Presentation may include disseminated clostridial infection in the form of septicemia, gas gangrene, and mycotic aortic aneurysms. We report the case of a 62-year-old female presenting with necrotizing fasciitis of her left thigh and subsequently developing rectal bleeding. While she was being treated with empiric antibiotics, her blood culture was found to be positive for C. septicum. We would like to highlight the importance of early colorectal cancer screening in minimizing the occurrence of undetected tumors which provide an optimal growth environment for C. septicum, leading to localized and/or remote infection. PMID:27721737

  7. The complete genome sequence of Clostridium indolis DSM 755T

    PubMed Central

    Leschine, Susan; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Schaumberg, Andrew; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Lobos, Elizabeth; Goodwin, Lynne; Nordberg, Henrik P.; Cantor, Michael N.; Hua, Susan X.; Woyke, Tanja; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium indolis DSM 755T is a bacterium commonly found in soils and the feces of birds and mammals. Despite its prevalence, little is known about the ecology or physiology of this species. However, close relatives, C. saccharolyticum and C. hathewayi, have demonstrated interesting metabolic potentials related to plant degradation and human health. The genome of C. indolis DSM 755T reveals an abundance of genes in functional groups associated with the transport and utilization of carbohydrates, as well as citrate, lactate, and aromatics. Ecologically relevant gene clusters related to nitrogen fixation and a unique type of bacterial microcompartment, the CoAT BMC, are also detected. Our genome analysis suggests hypotheses to be tested in future culture based work to better understand the physiology of this poorly described species. PMID:25197485

  8. The complete genome sequence of Clostridium indolis DSM 755(T.).

    PubMed

    Biddle, Amy S; Leschine, Susan; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Schaumberg, Andrew; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Lobos, Elizabeth; Goodwin, Lynne; Nordberg, Henrik P; Cantor, Michael N; Hua, Susan X; Woyke, Tanja; Blanchard, Jeffrey L

    2014-06-15

    Clostridium indolis DSM 755(T) is a bacterium commonly found in soils and the feces of birds and mammals. Despite its prevalence, little is known about the ecology or physiology of this species. However, close relatives, C. saccharolyticum and C. hathewayi, have demonstrated interesting metabolic potentials related to plant degradation and human health. The genome of C. indolis DSM 755(T) reveals an abundance of genes in functional groups associated with the transport and utilization of carbohydrates, as well as citrate, lactate, and aromatics. Ecologically relevant gene clusters related to nitrogen fixation and a unique type of bacterial microcompartment, the CoAT BMC, are also detected. Our genome analysis suggests hypotheses to be tested in future culture based work to better understand the physiology of this poorly described species.

  9. Molecular diversity of Clostridium botulinum and phenotypically similar strains.

    PubMed

    Grenda, T; Kukier, E; Sieradzki, Z; Goldsztejn, M; Kwiatek, K

    2016-12-01

    This study was undertaken to examine phenotypic and genetic features of strains preliminary classified as Clostridium botulinum species. The phenotypic characteristics were assessed with different culture media and biochemical tests. The genetic characterization included detection of botulinum toxin genes by PCR and macrorestriction analysis with SmaI, XhoI and SacII by PFGE (Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis). Despite similar biochemical properties of all analysed strains, only 47% of them contained genes determining toxicity specific to C. botulinum species. The most valuable differentiation of C. botulinum and C. botulinum-like strains was obtained after SmaI digestion. The highest affinity was observed among C. botulinum type B profiles which was even up to 100%. It was found 100% of affinity between C. botulinum and C. botulinum-like strains, however, the similarity among C. botulinum and C. botulinum-like was generally lower than 80%.

  10. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins.

  11. Identification of Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium argentinense, and related organisms by cellular fatty acid analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, F M; Ridpath, A C; Moore, W E; Moore, L V

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of 686 analyses of 285 strains of Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium argentinense (formerly C. botulinum type G), and phenotypically related organisms, 14 cellular fatty acid (CFA) groups of toxic organisms and 6 CFA groups of nontoxic organisms were delineated. The CFA groups of toxic strains included two of type A, three of proteolytic strains of type B, two of proteolytic strains of type F, one each of nonproteolytic strains of types B, E, and F, and one each of types C alpha, C beta, and D and C. argentinense. The groups of phenotypically similar nontoxic strains included Clostridium sporogenes, Clostridium putrificum, nontoxic strains with phenotypic characteristics similar to those of nonproteolytic strains of C. botulinum types B, E, and F (BEF-like), two groups of nontoxigenic organisms with phenotypic characteristics similar to those of C. botulinum types C and D and Clostridium novyi (CDN-like), and Clostridium subterminale, which has phenotypic characteristics similar to those of C. argentinense. Within the toxin types, 89 to 100% of the strains were correctly identified by CFA analysis, and 74 to 100% of the analyses were correct. Of 36 strains of C. sporogenes, 30 (83%) were correctly identified; 17% of the strains of C. sporogenes were incorrectly identified as C. botulinum type A or B. All analyses of C. putrificum and C. subterminale were correctly identified. There was no significant level of similarity between strains of C. botulinum and phenotypically similar organisms and 85 other species of clostridia or 407 other taxa of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Additionally, the one strain each of Clostridium baratii and Clostridium butyricum previously reported to produce C. botulinum toxin could be differentiated from C.botulinum types as well as from strains of C. baratii and C. butyricum that did not produce neurotoxin. PMID:1864927

  12. Phylogenetic positions of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, P; Capaul, S E; Nicolet, J; Frey, J

    1996-10-01

    The sequences of the 16S rRNA genes (rrs genes) of Clostridium chauvoei, the causative agent of blackleg in cattle, and the phenotypically related organism Clostridium septicum were determined. After amplification of 1,507-bp PCR fragments from the corresponding rrs genes, the sequences were determined in a single round of sequencing by using conserved region primers. A sequence similarity analysis of the sequences revealed the close phylogenetic relationship of C. chauvoei and C. septicum in Clostridium cluster I (M. D. Collins, P. A. Lawson, A. Willems, J. J. Cordoba, J. Fernandez-Garayzabal, P. Garcia, J. Cai, H. Hippe, and J. A. E. Farrow, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 44:812-826, 1994), which includes Clostridium carnis, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tetani. We found that 99.3% of the nucleotides in the genes of C. chauvoei and C. septicum are identical.

  13. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Katherine R.; Clokie, Martha R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however, developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarize the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the solutions and strategies used for the development of C. difficile phages for use as novel therapeutics. Epidemiological data has highlighted the diversity and distribution of C. difficile, and shown that novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings. In parallel with epidemiological studies, advances in molecular biology have bolstered our understanding of C. difficile biology, and our knowledge of phage–host interactions in other bacterial species. These three fields of biology have therefore paved the way for future work on C. difficile phages to progress and develop. Benefits of using C. difficile phages as therapeutic agents include the fact that they have highly specific interactions with their bacterial hosts. Studies also show that they can reduce bacterial numbers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Genetic analysis has revealed the genomic diversity among these phages and provided an insight into their taxonomy and evolution. No strictly virulent C. difficile phages have been reported and this contributes to the difficulties with their therapeutic exploitation. Although treatment approaches using the phage-encoded endolysin protein have been explored, the benefits of using “whole-phages” are such that they remain a major research focus. Whilst we don’t envisage working with C. difficile phages will be problem-free, sufficient study should inform future strategies to facilitate their development to combat this problematic pathogen. PMID:24808893

  14. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  15. Comparative Analysis of Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Clostridium perfringens are Gram-positive bacteria that are a major bacterial cause of food-borne disease and gas gangrene among humans. These anaerobic bacteria are also the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Pathogenesis and symptoms of a necrotic enterit...

  16. Coculture Production of Butanol by Clostridium Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, S. L.; Foutch, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Production of butanol by anaerobic fermentation of sugars enhanced by use of two Clostridium species, one of which feeds on metabolic product of other. Renewed interest in fermentation process for making butanol stimulated by potential use of butanol as surfactant in enhanced oil recovery. Butanol also used as fuel or as chemical feedstock and currently produced synthetically from petroleum.

  17. Isolation of Clostridium tetani from anaerobic empyema.

    PubMed

    Mayall, B C; Snashall, E A; Peel, M M

    1998-11-01

    We report the isolation of Clostridium tetani (along with Fusobacterium mortiferum) from empyema pus. The patient, a 68 year old retired farmer from rural NSW, had recently undergone cholecystectomy, had heart failure and developed an empyema. He improved after drainage of the empyema and penicillin therapy, but died suddenly during convalescence.

  18. Clostridium difficile in poultry and poultry meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer t...

  19. Characterization of a butanol-acetone-producing Clostridium strain and identification of its solventogenic genes.

    PubMed

    Chua, Teck Khiang; Liang, Da-Wei; Qi, Chao; Yang, Kun-Lin; He, Jianzhong

    2013-05-01

    A unique Clostridium species strain G117 was obtained in this study to be capable of producing dominant butanol from glucose. Butanol of 13.50 g/L was produced when culture G117 was fed with 60 g/L glucose, which is ~20% higher than previously reported butanol production by wild-type Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 under similar conditions. Strain G117 also distinguishes itself by generating negligible amount of ethanol, but producing butanol and acetone as biosolvent end-products. A butanol dehydrogenase gene (bdh gene) was identified in strain G117, which demonstrated a ~200-fold increase in transcription level measured by quantitative real-time PCR after 10h of culture growth. The high transcription suggests that this bdh gene could be a putative gene involved in butanol production. In all, Clostridium sp. strain G117 serves as a potential candidate for industrial biobutanol production while the absence of ethanol ensures an economic-efficient separation and purification of butanol.

  20. Clostridium botulinum Type E in Fish from the Great Lakes1

    PubMed Central

    Bott, Thomas L.; Deffner, Janet S.; McCoy, Elizabeth; Foster, E. M.

    1966-01-01

    Bott, Thomas L. (University of Wisconsin, Madison), Janet S. Deffner, Elizabeth McCoy, and E. M. Foster. Clostridium botulinum type E in fish from the Great Lakes. J. Bacteriol. 91:919–924. 1966.—The intestinal contents of more than 3,000 fish from Lakes Erie, Superior, Huron, and Michigan were examined for Clostridium botulinum type E. Demonstration of the organism was accomplished by identifying its toxin in liquid cultures inoculated with material from the alimentary tract. Incidence figures, expressed as per cent of the fish tested, were: Lake Erie, 1%; Lake Superior, 1%; Lake Huron, 4%; the main body of Lake Michigan, 9%; and Green Bay (on Lake Michigan), 57%. Thus, C. botulinum type E appears to be widely but unevenly distributed in the Great Lakes, and fish from all areas are potential carriers of it. PMID:5326102

  1. An unexpected negative influence of light intensity on hydrogen production by dark fermentative bacteria Clostridium beijerinckii.

    PubMed

    Zagrodnik, R; Laniecki, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of light intensity on biohydrogen production from glucose by Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium acetobutylicum, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides was studied to evaluate the performance and possible application in co-culture fermentation system. The applied source of light had spectrum similar to the solar radiation. The influence of light intensity on hydrogen production in dark process by C. acetobutylicum was negligible. In contrast, dark fermentation by C. beijerinckii bacteria showed a significant decrease (83%) in produced hydrogen at light intensity of 540W/m(2). Here, the redirection of metabolism from acetic and butyric acid formation towards lactic acid was observed. This not yet reported effect was probably caused by irradiation of these bacteria by light within UVA range, which is an important component of the solar radiation. The excessive illumination with light of intensity higher than 200W/m(2) resulted in decrease in hydrogen production with photofermentative bacteria as well.

  2. Microbiology of wetwood: importance of pectin degradation and Clostridium species in living trees. [Eastern Cottonwood; Block Poplar; American Elm

    SciTech Connect

    Schink, B.; Ward, J.C.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1981-09-01

    Wetwood samples from standing trees of eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides), black poplar (Populus nigra), and American elm (Ulmus americana) contained high numbers of aerobic and anaerobic pectin-degrading bacteria (10 to the power of 4 to 10 to the power of 6 cells per g of wood). High activity of polygalacturonate lyase (is less than or equal to 0.5 U/ml) was also detected in the fetid liquid that spurted from wetwood zones in the lower trunk when the trees were bored. A prevalent pectin-degrading obligately anaerobic bacterium isolated from these wetwoods was identified as Clostridium butyricum. Pectin decomposition by Clostridium butyricum strain 4P1 was associated with an inducible polygalacturonate lyase and pectin methylesterase, the same types of pectinolytic activity expressed in the wetwood of these trees. The pH optimum of the extracellular polygalacturonate lyase was alkaline (near pH 8.5). In vitro tests with sapwood samples from a conifer (Douglas fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii) showed that tori in membranes of bordered pits are degraded by pure cultures of strain 4P1, polygalacturonate lyase enzyme preparations of strain 4P1, and mixed methanogenic cultures from the tree samples of wetwood. These results provide evidence that pectin in xylem tissue is actively degraded by Clostridium butyricum strain 4P1 via polygalacturonate lyase activity. The importance of pectin degradation by bacteria, including Clostridium species, appears paramount in the formation and maintenance of the wetwood syndrome in certain living trees. (Refs. 38).

  3. Metabolic Response of Clostridium ljungdahlii to Oxygen Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Whitham, Jason M.; Tirado-Acevedo, Oscar; Chinn, Mari S.; Pawlak, Joel J.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium ljungdahlii is an important synthesis gas-fermenting bacterium used in the biofuels industry, and a preliminary investigation showed that it has some tolerance to oxygen when cultured in rich mixotrophic medium. Batch cultures not only continue to grow and consume H2, CO, and fructose after 8% O2 exposure, but fermentation product analysis revealed an increase in ethanol concentration and decreased acetate concentration compared to non-oxygen-exposed cultures. In this study, the mechanisms for higher ethanol production and oxygen/reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification were identified using a combination of fermentation, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) differential expression, and enzyme activity analyses. The results indicate that the higher ethanol and lower acetate concentrations were due to the carboxylic acid reductase activity of a more highly expressed predicted aldehyde oxidoreductase (CLJU_c24130) and that C. ljungdahlii's primary defense upon oxygen exposure is a predicted rubrerythrin (CLJU_c39340). The metabolic responses of higher ethanol production and oxygen/ROS detoxification were found to be linked by cofactor management and substrate and energy metabolism. This study contributes new insights into the physiology and metabolism of C. ljungdahlii and provides new genetic targets to generate C. ljungdahlii strains that produce more ethanol and are more tolerant to syngas contaminants. PMID:26431975

  4. Mechanisms of Toxin Production of Food Bacteria (Clostridium botulinum)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    l~ V- 9;-iC -’.1,- r, 4. •, . . . . . MECHANISMS OF TOXIN PRODUCTION OF FOOD BACTERIA ( CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM) FINAL REPORT DR. H. U. EKLUND F. T...Mechanisms of Toxin Production of Food Bacteria Clostridium botulinum Final Y,’v/ ’ "D30 • ’q• 6, PERFORM G ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(.) S...WORDS (Continue on reverse aide If necessary and Identify by block number) Clostridium botulinum Bacteriophages Plasmids Food Poisoning Toxins

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium clariflavum DSM 19732

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Lynne A.; Davenport, Karen W.; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Han, James; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Amy; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Liolios, Konstantinos; Woyke, Tanja; Lynd, Lee R

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium clariflavum is a Cluster III Clostridium within the family Clostridiaceae isolated from thermophilic anaerobic sludge (Shiratori et al, 2009). This species is of interest because of its similarity to the model cellulolytic organism Clostridium thermocellum and for the ability of environmental isolates to break down cellulose and hemicellulose. Here we describe features of the 4,897,678 bp long genome and its annotation, consisting of 4,131 proteincoding and 98 RNA genes, for the type strain DSM 19732.

  6. Genetic Engineering of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-14

    AD N o GENETIC ENGINEERING OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE TOXIN A VACCINE 0 C%" ANNUAL REPORT ! Lycurgus L. Muldrow Joe Johnson July 14, 1988 Supported by...17. COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Clostridium difficile Vaccine ...development of vaccines . Improvement of vaccine biotechnology in the area of recombinant DNA studies using Clostridium difficile toxin A as the model, is

  7. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Clostridium difficile Carriage

    PubMed Central

    Alasmari, Faisal; Seiler, Sondra M.; Hink, Tiffany; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Dubberke, Erik R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) incidence has increased dramatically over the last decade. Recent studies suggest that asymptomatic carriers may be an important reservoir of C. difficile in healthcare settings. We sought to identify the prevalence and risk factors for asymptomatic C. difficile carriage on admission to the hospital. Methods. Patients admitted to Barnes-Jewish Hospital without diarrhea were enrolled from June 2010 through October 2011. Demographic information and healthcare and medication exposures 90 days prior to admission were collected. Stool specimens or rectal swabs were collected within 48 hours of admission and stored at −30°C until cultured. Clostridium difficile isolates were typed and compared with isolates from patients with CDI. Results. A stool/swab specimen was obtained for 259 enrolled subjects on admission. Two hundred four (79%) were not colonized, 40 (15%) had toxigenic C. difficile (TCD), and 15 (6%) had nontoxigenic C. difficile. There were no differences between TCD-colonized and -uncolonized subjects for age (mean, 56 vs 58 years; P = .46), comorbidities, admission from another healthcare facility (33% vs 24%; P = .23), or recent hospitalization (50% vs 50%; P = .43). There were no differences in antimicrobial exposures in the 90 days prior to admission (55% vs 56%; P = .91). Asymptomatic carriers were colonized with strains similar to strains from patients with CDI, but the relative proportions were different. Conclusions. There was a high prevalence of TCD colonization on admission. In contrast to past studies, TCD colonization was not associated with recent antimicrobial or healthcare exposures. Additional investigation is needed to determine the role of asymptomatic TCD carriers on hospital-onset CDI incidence. PMID:24755858

  8. Competitive inhibition between different Clostridium botulinum types and strains.

    PubMed

    Eklund, M W; Poysky, F T; Peterson, M E; Paranjpye, R N; Pelroy, G A

    2004-12-01

    Mixtures of proteolytic and nonproteolytic strains of toxigenic Clostridium botulinum types A, B, and F; nonproteolytic types B, E, and F; Clostridium sporogenes; and nontoxic E-like organisms resembling nonproteolytic C. botulinum were tested against each other for the purpose of selecting a mixture of compatible C. botulinum strains for inoculated pack studies on the basis of their sensitivity to bacteriophages and bacteriocin-like agents. All of the proteolytic strains produced bacteriocin-like agents that were inhibitory to three or more of the other proteolytic types and C. sporogenes. When selected strains of proteolytic types A and B were grown together, type A cultures produced neurotoxin, but type B toxin production was inhibited. Nonproteolytic strains of C. botulinum also produced bacteriocin-like agents against each other. Of these, type E strain EF4 produced bacteriocin-like agents against both proteolytic and nonproteolytic types of C. botulinum and C. sporogenes. EF4, however, was not inhibitory to the nontoxigenic E-like strains. When EF4 was grown with type A strain 62A, it had an inhibitory effect on type A toxin production. Strain 62A inactivated the type E toxin of EF4 after 7 to 21 days at 30 degrees C. On the basis of the production of these bacteriocin-like agents by different strains of C. botulinum and their potential effect on neurotoxin production, it is very important that compatible strains are used in mixtures for inoculated pack studies to determine the safety of a food process or product.

  9. Immunization strategies for Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Rebeaud, Fabien; Bachmann, Martin F

    2012-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is a major cause of nosocomial disease in Western countries. The recent emergence of hypervirulent strains resistant to most antibiotics correlates with increasing disease incidence, severity and lethal outcomes. Current treatments rely on metronidazol and vancomycin, but the limited ability of these antibiotics to cure infection and prevent relapse highlights the need for new strategies. A better knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the disease, the host immune response and identification of key virulence factors of Clostridium difficile now permits the development of new products specifically targeting the pathogen. Immune-based strategies relying on active vaccination or passive administration of antibody products are the focus of intense research and, today, the efficacy of monoclonal antibodies and of two vaccines are evaluated clinically. This review presents recent data, discusses the different strategies and highlights the challenges linked to the development of immunization strategies against this emerging threat.

  10. Genetic Analysis of Nitroaromatic Degradation by Clostridium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-30

    Phenazine , a molecule produced by some soil bacteria was found to have a significant effect on metabolite pattern in two clostridium test strains...potential Effect on butyrate levels Methylene blue +0.011 no phenazine -1-carboxylic acid -0.116 More butyrate TNT -0.253 More butyrate Neutral red -0.325...interesting in light of the analysis of natural mobile soluble electron carriers in natural soil ecosystems where molecules such as quinones, and phenazines

  11. Outbreak of necrotizing fasciitis due to Clostridium sordellii among black-tar heroin users.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Akiko C; Higa, Jeffrey I; Levin, Robert M; Simpson, Gail; Vargas, Yolanda; Vugia, Duc J

    2004-05-01

    In California, black tar heroin (BTH) use among injection drug users (IDUs) has resulted in an increased number of cases of wound botulism due to Clostridium botulinum, tetanus due to Clostridium tetani, and necrotizing soft-tissue infections due to a variety of clostridia. From December 1999 to April 2000, nine IDUs in Ventura County, California, developed necrotizing fasciitis; 4 died. Cultures of wound specimens from 6 case patients yielded Clostridium sordellii. Some of the patients appeared to have the toxic shock syndrome previously reported to be characteristic of toxin-mediated C. sordellii infection, which is characterized by hypotension, marked leukocytosis, and hemoconcentration. The suspected source of this outbreak was contaminated BTH that was injected subcutaneously or intramuscularly ("skin popped"). This outbreak of C. sordellii infection serves as another example of how BTH can potentially serve as a vehicle for transmitting severe and often deadly clostridial infections, and reinforces the need to educate IDUs and clinicians about the risks associated with skin popping of BTH.

  12. Laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea and molecular characterization of clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Russello, Giuseppe; Russo, Antonio; Sisto, Francesca; Scaltrito, Maria Maddalena; Farina, Claudio

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated a three-step algorithm for laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD). First, stool specimens were screened using an EIA test for glutamate dehydrogenase detection. Screen-positive specimens were tested by a rapid cytotoxintoxin A/B assay and subjected to stool culture. All cultures positive for C. difficile underwent toxigenic culture. The results showed that toxigenic culture allowed us to recover 37/156 (24.4%) stool samples harbouring toxigenic C. difficile that would have been missed by using faecal cytotoxin assay alone. This determined an increase in infection prevalence of 4.2% (from 11.4% to 15.6 %). Furthermore, to characterize the clinical Clostridium difficile isolates and the distribution of PCR ribotypes circulating in the San Carlo Borromeo hospital, molecular typing using semi-automated repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep- PCR) and PCR ribotyping, and an evaluation of the antibiotic resistance were also performed. Among them, 71 indistinguishable strains were detected by rep-PCR and 83 by PCR-ribotyping revealing C. difficile outbreaks in our hospital. A total of 6 different ribotypes were obtained by PCR ribotyping. The most frequent ribotype was 018 (88.2%) that also showed resistance to moxifloxacin. In one case, uncommon PCR ribotype 186 was also identified.

  13. Cooperative growth of Geobacter sulfurreducens and Clostridium pasteurianum with subsequent metabolic shift in glycerol fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Moscoviz, Roman; de Fouchécour, Florence; Santa-Catalina, Gaëlle; Bernet, Nicolas; Trably, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Interspecies electron transfer is a common way to couple metabolic energy balances between different species in mixed culture consortia. Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) mechanism has been recently characterised with Geobacter species which couple the electron balance with other species through physical contacts. Using this mechanism could be an efficient and cost-effective way to directly control redox balances in co-culture fermentation. The present study deals with a co-culture of Geobacter sulfurreducens and Clostridium pasteurianum during glycerol fermentation. As a result, it was shown that Geobacter sulfurreducens was able to grow using Clostridium pasteurianum as sole electron acceptor. C. pasteurianum metabolic pattern was significantly altered towards improved 1,3-propanediol and butyrate production (+37% and +38% resp.) at the expense of butanol and ethanol production (−16% and −20% resp.). This metabolic shift was clearly induced by a small electron uptake that represented less than 0.6% of the electrons consumed by C. pasteurianum. A non-linear relationship was found between G. sulfurreducens growth (i.e the electrons transferred between the two species) and the changes in C. pasteurianum metabolite distribution. This study opens up new possibilities for controlling and increasing specificity in mixed culture fermentation. PMID:28287150

  14. Clostridium difficile infection: a review of current and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ofosu, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) is the most common cause of ­healthcare-associated infections in US hospitals. The epidemic strain NAP1/BI/ribotype 027 accounts for outbreaks worldwide, with increasing mortality and severity. CDI is acquired from an endogenous source or from spores in the environment, most easily acquired during the hospital stay. The use of antimicrobials disrupts the intestinal microflora enabling C. difficile to proliferate in the colon and produce toxins. Clinical diagnosis in symptomatic patients requires toxin detection from stool specimens and rarely in combination with stool culture to increase sensitivity. However, stool culture is essential for epidemiological studies. Oral metronidazole is the recommended therapy for milder cases of CDI and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for more severe cases. Treatment of first recurrence involves the use of the same therapy used in the initial CDI. In the event of a second recurrence oral vancomycin often given in a tapered dose or intermittently, or fidaxomicin may be used. Fecal transplantation is playing an immense role in therapy of recurrent CDI with remarkable results. Fulminant colitis and toxic megacolon warrant surgical intervention. Novel approaches including new antibiotics and immunotherapy against CDI or its toxins appear to be of potential value. PMID:27065726

  15. Genetic and biochemical analysis of solvent formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.N.; Rudolph, F.B.

    1998-05-01

    The anaerobic organism Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used for commercial production of important organic solvents due to its ability to convert a wide variety of crude substrates to acids and alcohols. Current knowledge concerning the molecular genetics, cell regulation and metabolic engineering of this organism is still rather limited. The objectives are to improve the knowledge of the molecular genetics and enzymology of Clostridia in order to make genetic alterations which will more effectively channel cell metabolism toward production of desired products. Two factors that limit butanol production in continuous cultures are: (1) The degeneration of the culture, with an increase in the proportion of cells which are incapable of solvent production. Currently isolated degenerate strains are being evaluated to analyze the molecular mechanism of degeneration to determine if it is due to a genetic loss of solvent related genes, loss of a regulatory element, or an increase in general mutagenesis. Recent studies show two general types of degenerates, one which seems to have lost essential solvent pathway genes and another which has not completely lost all solvent production capability and retains the DNA bearing solvent pathway genes. (2) The production of hydrogen which uses up reducing equivalents in the cell. If the reducing power were more fully directed to the reduction reactions involved in butanol production, the process would be more efficient. The authors have studied oxidation reduction systems related to this process. These studies focus on ferredoxin and rubredoxin and their oxidoreductases.

  16. Incidence of Clostridium botulinum Type E in Salmon and Other Marine Fish in the Pacific Northwest

    PubMed Central

    Craig, James M.; Hayes, Sidney; Pilcher, K. S.

    1968-01-01

    Salmon, sole, cod, oysters, clams, and crabs from ocean waters along the coast of Oregon and Washington were examined for the presence of Clostridium botulinum type E. The organism was detected by identification of the type E toxin in enrichment cultures of the viscera of individual fish. Of 369 salmon specimens, 48 yielded cultures containing toxin lethal to mice, and almost half of the toxic cultures were shown to contain botulinal toxin, chiefly type E. Eighteen of 113 sole and cod specimens, 4 of 22 Dungeness crab specimens, 5 of 16 oyster specimens, and 27 of 115 clam specimens gave rise to cultures containing botulinal toxin which was usually type E, although types A and B were occasionally encountered. PMID:4869616

  17. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Nathaniel A; Ben Ami, Ronen; Guzner-Gur, Hanan; Santo, Moshe E; Halpern, Zamir; Maharshak, Nitsan

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is a problem most hospital-based physicians will face in their career. This review aims to refresh current knowledge with regard to Clostridium difficile infection and bring physicians up to date with the latest developments in the growing field of fecal microbiota transplantation, the benefits it offers, and the promise this and other developments hold for the future.

  18. [Isolation and identification in Senegal of the most immunogenic protein soluble antigen of a Clostridium chauvoei strain].

    PubMed

    Mbengue, M B

    2008-02-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the pathogenic agent for blackleg, a toxinfection disease in bovine and small ruminants, always lethal and involving considerable economic losses. Some bacteriological, biochemical, immunological studies permitted to isolate identify the major soluble antigenic protein of this bacteria. It's a protein fragment of 70 kDa weight, the 19 fraction, excreted by the bacteria in a suitable culture medium. The 19 fraction of extracellular medium leads to antibodies production on guinea pigs revealed by the ELISA/antibody test.

  19. Detection and identification by PCR of Clostridium chauvoei in clinical isolates, bovine faeces and substrates from biogas plant

    PubMed Central

    Bagge, E; Lewerin, S Sternberg; Johansson, K-E

    2009-01-01

    Background Clostridium chauvoei causes blackleg, an acute disease associated with high mortality in ruminants. The apparent primary port of entry is oral, during grazing on pasture contaminated by spores. Cases of blackleg can occur year after year on contaminated pastures. A method to determine the prevalence of C. chauvoei spores on pasture would be useful. The standard method for C. chauvoei detection is culture and biochemical identification, which requires a pure culture. In most muscle samples from cattle dead from blackleg the amount of C. chauvoei in samples is high and the bacterium can easily be cultured, although some samples may be contaminated. Detection by PCR would be faster and independent of contaminating flora. Digested residues from biogas plants provide an excellent fertiliser, but it is known that spore-forming baeria such as Clostridium spp. are not reduced by pasteurisation. The use of digested residues as fertiliser may contribute to the spread of C. chauvoei. Soil, manure and substrate from biogas plants are contaminated with other anaerobic bacteria which outgrow C. chauvoei. Therefore, detection by PCR is would be useful. This study applied a PCR-based method to detect of C. chauvoei in 25 muscle and blood samples, 114 manure samples, 84 soil samples and 33 samples from the biogas process. Methods Muscle tissues from suspected cases of blackleg were analysed both by the standard culture method followed by biochemical identification and by PCR, with and without preculture. To investigate whether muscle tissue samples are necessary, samples taken by swabs were also investigated. Samples from a biogas plant and manure and soil from farms were analysed by culture followed by PCR. The farms had proven cases of blackleg. For detection of C. chauvoei in the samples, a specific PCR primer pair complementary to the spacer region of the 16S-23S rRNA gene was used. Results Clostridium chauvoei was detected in 32% of muscle samples analysed by

  20. Development of a microarray for identification of pathogenic Clostridium species

    PubMed Central

    Janvilisri, Tavan; Scaria, Joy; Gleed, Robin; Fubini, Susan; Bonkosky, Michelle M.; Gröhn, Yrjö T.; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, Clostridium species have rapidly reemerged as human and animal pathogens. The detection and identification of pathogenic Clostridium species is therefore critical for clinical diagnosis and antimicrobial therapy. Traditional diagnostic techniques for clostridia are laborious, time-consuming and may adversely affect the therapeutic outcome. In this study, we developed an oligonucleotide diagnostic microarray for pathogenic Clostridium species. The microarray specificity was tested against 65 Clostridium isolates. The applicability of this microarray in a clinical setting was assessed with the use of mock stool samples. The microarray was successful in discriminating at least four species with the limit of detection as low as 104 CFU/ml. In addition, the pattern of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes of tested strains were determined through the microarrays. This approach demonstrates the high-throughput detection and identification of Clostridium species and provides advantages over traditional methods. Microarray-based techniques are promising applications for clinical diagnosis and epidemiological investigations. PMID:19879710

  1. [Spontaneous gas gangrene in a diabetic patient with Clostridium septicum].

    PubMed

    Mischke, A; Besier, S; Walcher, F; Waibel, H; Brade, V; Brandt, C

    2005-10-01

    Atraumatic infections due to Clostridium septicum are known to be associated with immunosuppression or even malignancy. In this case report, we present a patient with severe Clostridium septicum infection related to advanced colon cancer that had not previously been diagnosed. The case demonstrates the strong association between Clostridium septicum infections and malignancy, particularly in the presence of other predisposing diseases such as diabetes mellitus. It strongly suggests excluding malignant neoplasms, especially of the gastrointestinal tract, when severe Clostridium septicum infections occur. Moreover, if patients with known colorectal or other malignancy develop septicaemia or spontaneous gas gangrene, clinicians should be aware of Clostridium septicum as one of the main causative agents, as early diagnosis and aggressive treatment are important to improve prognosis.

  2. Plasmidome Interchange between Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum Converts Strains of Independent Lineages into Distinctly Different Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Skarin, Hanna; Segerman, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum (group III), Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum are well-known pathogens causing animal botulism, gas gangrene/black disease, and bacillary hemoglobinuria, respectively. A close genetic relationship exists between the species, which has resulted in the collective term C. novyi sensu lato. The pathogenic traits in these species, e.g., the botulinum neurotoxin and the novyi alpha toxin, are mainly linked to a large plasmidome consisting of plasmids and circular prophages. The plasmidome of C. novyi sensu lato has so far been poorly characterized. In this study we explored the genomic relationship of a wide range of strains of C. novyi sensu lato with a special focus on the dynamics of the plasmidome. Twenty-four genomes were sequenced from strains selected to represent as much as possible the genetic diversity in C. novyi sensu lato. Sixty-one plasmids were identified in these genomes and 28 of them were completed. The genomic comparisons revealed four separate lineages, which did not strictly correlate with the species designations. The plasmids were categorized into 13 different plasmid groups on the basis of their similarity and conservation of plasmid replication or partitioning genes. The plasmid groups, lineages and species were to a large extent entwined because plasmids and toxin genes had moved across the lineage boundaries. This dynamic process appears to be primarily driven by phages. We here present a comprehensive characterization of the complex species group C. novyi sensu lato, explaining the intermixed genetic properties. This study also provides examples how the reorganization of the botulinum toxin and the novyi alpha toxin genes within the plasmidome has affected the pathogenesis of the strains. PMID:25254374

  3. Plasmidome interchange between Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum converts strains of independent lineages into distinctly different pathogens.

    PubMed

    Skarin, Hanna; Segerman, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum (group III), Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum are well-known pathogens causing animal botulism, gas gangrene/black disease, and bacillary hemoglobinuria, respectively. A close genetic relationship exists between the species, which has resulted in the collective term C. novyi sensu lato. The pathogenic traits in these species, e.g., the botulinum neurotoxin and the novyi alpha toxin, are mainly linked to a large plasmidome consisting of plasmids and circular prophages. The plasmidome of C. novyi sensu lato has so far been poorly characterized. In this study we explored the genomic relationship of a wide range of strains of C. novyi sensu lato with a special focus on the dynamics of the plasmidome. Twenty-four genomes were sequenced from strains selected to represent as much as possible the genetic diversity in C. novyi sensu lato. Sixty-one plasmids were identified in these genomes and 28 of them were completed. The genomic comparisons revealed four separate lineages, which did not strictly correlate with the species designations. The plasmids were categorized into 13 different plasmid groups on the basis of their similarity and conservation of plasmid replication or partitioning genes. The plasmid groups, lineages and species were to a large extent entwined because plasmids and toxin genes had moved across the lineage boundaries. This dynamic process appears to be primarily driven by phages. We here present a comprehensive characterization of the complex species group C. novyi sensu lato, explaining the intermixed genetic properties. This study also provides examples how the reorganization of the botulinum toxin and the novyi alpha toxin genes within the plasmidome has affected the pathogenesis of the strains.

  4. Acute Hemolysis with Renal Failure due to Clostridium Bacteremia in a Patient with AML

    PubMed Central

    Medrano-Juarez, R. M.; Sotello, D.; D'Cuhna, L.; Payne, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of acute hemolytic anemia, renal failure, and Clostridium perfringens bacteremia in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. The high fatality of C. perfringens bacteremia requires that clinicians recognize and rapidly treat patients at risk for this infection. Although other hemolytic processes are in the differential diagnosis of these events, the presence of high fever, chills, and rapidly positive blood cultures may help narrow the diagnosis. Most cases of C. perfringens bacteremia have a concomitant coinfection, which makes broad spectrum empiric therapy essential. There is a high mortality rate of C. perfringens infections associated with leukemia. PMID:27774325

  5. Hemorrhagic Enterotoxemia Caused by Clostridium perfringens Type C in a Foal

    PubMed Central

    Niilo, L.; Chalmers, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    A four day old Appaloosa foal in Alberta died from hemorrhagic enterotoxemia. Beta-toxin of Clostridium perfringens was demonstrated in the intestinal contents of the foal and a pure culture of C. perfringens type C was grown from the small intestine. Histological examination showed hemorrhage and extensive necrosis of the small intestinal mucosa. Areas of necrotic tissue were surrounded by massive numbers of clostridia-like rods. There was also a moderate degree of thyroid hyperplasia. This is believed to be the first published report of hemorrhagic enterotoxemia associated with C. perfringens type C in the horse in Canada. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:17422190

  6. Detection of Clostridium difficile in retail ground meat products in Manitoba

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Monique; Sepehrim, Shadi; Olson, Nancy; Du, Tim; Mulvey, Michael R; Alfa, Michelle J

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether Clostridium difficile was present in uncooked retail ground beef and ground pork products sold in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Using an alcohol treatment protocol and inoculation of cultures on C difficile Moxalactam Norfloxacin (CDMN), toxigenic C difficile was found in 6.3% of 48 meat samples. The C difficile isolates belonged to different pulsotypes, all of which had been previously isolated from the stool of Manitoba patients with C difficile disease. Because cooking of meat will not eradicate C difficile spores, this raises a concern regarding potential foodborne transmissibility of this organism. PMID:23450202

  7. Small RNAs in the genus Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yili; Indurthi, Dinesh C; Jones, Shawn W; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2011-01-25

    The genus Clostridium includes major human pathogens and species important to cellulose degradation, the carbon cycle, and biotechnology. Small RNAs (sRNAs) are emerging as crucial regulatory molecules in all organisms, but they have not been investigated in clostridia. Research on sRNAs in clostridia is hindered by the absence of a systematic method to identify sRNA candidates, thus delegating clostridial sRNA research to a hit-and-miss process. Thus, we wanted to develop a method to identify potential sRNAs in the Clostridium genus to open up the field of sRNA research in clostridia. Using comparative genomics analyses combined with predictions of rho-independent terminators and promoters, we predicted sRNAs in 21 clostridial genomes: Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. beijerinckii, C. botulinum (eight strains), C. cellulolyticum, C. difficile, C. kluyveri (two strains), C. novyi, C. perfringens (three strains), C. phytofermentans, C. tetani, and C. thermocellum. Although more than one-third of predicted sRNAs have Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences, only one-sixth have a start codon downstream of SD sequences; thus, most of the predicted sRNAs are noncoding RNAs. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) and Northern analysis were employed to test the presence of a randomly chosen set of sRNAs in C. acetobutylicum and several C. botulinum strains, leading to the confirmation of a large fraction of the tested sRNAs. We identified a conserved, novel sRNA which, together with the downstream gene coding for an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene, responds to the antibiotic clindamycin. The number of predicted sRNAs correlated with the physiological function of the species (high for pathogens, low for cellulolytic, and intermediate for solventogenic), but not with 16S rRNA-based phylogeny.

  8. Butanol production from wheat straw hydrolysate using Clostridium beijerinckii.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Nasib; Saha, Badal C; Cotta, Michael A

    2007-11-01

    In these studies, butanol (acetone butanol ethanol or ABE) was produced from wheat straw hydrolysate (WSH) in batch cultures using Clostridium beijerinckii P260. In control fermentation 48.9 g L(-1) glucose (initial sugar 62.0 g L(-1)) was used to produce 20.1 g L(-1) ABE with a productivity and yield of 0.28 g L(-1 )h(-1) and 0.41, respectively. In a similar experiment where WSH (60.2 g L(-1) total sugars obtained from hydrolysis of 86 g L(-1) wheat straw) was used, the culture produced 25.0 g L(-1) ABE with a productivity and yield of 0.60 g L(-1 )h(-1) and 0.42, respectively. These results are superior to the control experiment and productivity was improved by 214%. When WSH was supplemented with 35 g L(-1) glucose, a reactor productivity was improved to 0.63 g L(-1 )h(-1) with a yield of 0.42. In this case, ABE concentration in the broth was 28.2 g L(-1). When WSH was supplemented with 60 g L(-1) glucose, the resultant medium containing 128.3 g L(-1) sugars was successfully fermented (due to product removal) to produce 47.6 g L(-1) ABE, and the culture utilized all the sugars (glucose, xylose, arabinose, galactose, and mannose). These results demonstrate that C. beijerinckii P260 has excellent capacity to convert biomass derived sugars to solvents and can produce over 28 g L(-1) (in one case 41.7 g L(-1) from glucose) ABE from WSH. Medium containing 250 g L(-1) glucose resulted in no growth and no ABE production. Mixtures containing WSH + 140 g L(-1) glucose (total sugar approximately 200 g L(-1)) showed poor growth and poor ABE production.

  9. Influence of Water Activity on the Growth of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Dorothy H.; Foster, Edith F.; Duncan, Charles L.

    1970-01-01

    Each of four strains of Clostridium perfringens was grown in modified fluid thioglycolate medium which was adjusted to yield selected water activity (aw) levels. The adjustments to secure the desired aw levels were made with NaCl, KCl, or glucose. At each aw level, further modification was effected to produce four pH values. Cultures were incubated at either 37 or 46 C. The solute used to achieve the reduced aw levels appeared to have a definite effect on the magnitude of growth achieved, the rate of growth, and the limiting aw at which growth would occur. Use of glucose as the controlling solute permitted growth at the lowest aw level tested, 0.960, and yielded the greatest magnitude of growth as measured by turbidity values, at all of the aw levels investigated. Cultures grown in the medium with added KCl generally demonstrated the longest lag times and the least amount of growth. Regardless of specific solute used, as the aw level was lowered and the pH value decreased within each aw level, the rate and amount of growth were lessened. It appeared, however, that low pH values had less effect on inhibiting growth at low aw levels than at higher aw levels. Those cultures incubated at 46 C generally exhibited shorter lag periods than those at 37 C, although the maximal growth attained was somewhat less than that achieved at 37 C. The response to all of the investigated conditions was similar for each of the four strains tested. PMID:4318452

  10. Clostridium cellulolyticum: model organism of mesophilic cellulolytic clostridia.

    PubMed

    Desvaux, Mickaël

    2005-09-01

    Clostridium cellulolyticum ATCC 35319 is a non-ruminal mesophilic cellulolytic bacterium originally isolated from decayed grass. As with most truly cellulolytic clostridia, C. cellulolyticum possesses an extracellular multi-enzymatic complex, the cellulosome. The catalytic components of the cellulosome release soluble cello-oligosaccharides from cellulose providing the primary carbon substrates to support bacterial growth. As most cellulolytic bacteria, C. cellulolyticum was initially characterised by limited carbon consumption and subsequent limited growth in comparison to other saccharolytic clostridia. The first metabolic studies performed in batch cultures suggested nutrient(s) limitation and/or by-product(s) inhibition as the reasons for this limited growth. In most recent investigations using chemostat cultures, metabolic flux analysis suggests a self-intoxication of bacterial metabolism resulting from an inefficiently regulated carbon flow. The investigation of C. cellulolyticum physiology with cellobiose, as a model of soluble cellodextrin, and with pure cellulose, as a carbon source more closely related to lignocellulosic compounds, strengthen the idea of a bacterium particularly well adapted, and even restricted, to a cellulolytic lifestyle. The metabolic flux analysis from continuous cultures revealed that (i) in comparison to cellobiose, the cellulose hydrolysis by the cellulosome introduces an extra regulation of entering carbon flow resulting in globally lower metabolic fluxes on cellulose than on cellobiose, (ii) the glucose 1-phosphate/glucose 6-phosphate branch point controls the carbon flow directed towards glycolysis and dissipates carbon excess towards the formation of cellodextrins, glycogen and exopolysaccharides, (iii) the pyruvate/acetyl-CoA metabolic node is essential to the regulation of electronic and energetic fluxes. This in-depth analysis of C. cellulolyticum metabolism has permitted the first attempt to engineer metabolically a

  11. Spore formation and toxin production in Clostridium difficile biofilms.

    PubMed

    Semenyuk, Ekaterina G; Laning, Michelle L; Foley, Jennifer; Johnston, Pehga F; Knight, Katherine L; Gerding, Dale N; Driks, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The ability to grow as a biofilm can facilitate survival of bacteria in the environment and promote infection. To better characterize biofilm formation in the pathogen Clostridium difficile, we established a colony biofilm culture method for this organism on a polycarbonate filter, and analyzed the matrix and the cells in biofilms from a variety of clinical isolates over several days of biofilm culture. We found that biofilms readily formed in all strains analyzed, and that spores were abundant within about 6 days. We also found that extracellular DNA (eDNA), polysaccharide and protein was readily detected in the matrix of all strains, including the major toxins A and/or B, in toxigenic strains. All the strains we analyzed formed spores. Apart from strains 630 and VPI10463, which sporulated in the biofilm at relatively low frequencies, the frequencies of biofilm sporulation varied between 46 and 65%, suggesting that variations in sporulation levels among strains is unlikely to be a major factor in variation in the severity of disease. Spores in biofilms also had reduced germination efficiency compared to spores obtained by a conventional sporulation protocol. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that in 3 day-old biofilms, the outermost structure of the spore is a lightly staining coat. However, after 6 days, material that resembles cell debris in the matrix surrounds the spore, and darkly staining granules are closely associated with the spores surface. In 14 day-old biofilms, relatively few spores are surrounded by the apparent cell debris, and the surface-associated granules are present at higher density at the coat surface. Finally, we showed that biofilm cells possess 100-fold greater resistance to the antibiotic metronidazole then do cells cultured in liquid media. Taken together, our data suggest that C. difficile cells and spores in biofilms have specialized properties that may facilitate infection.

  12. Protective cellular antigen of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J R; Stonger, K A

    1980-04-01

    Cellular antigens of Clostridium chauvoei, strain IRP-128, were demonstrated to be important in induction of immunity against this bacterium in guinea pigs. At least one major component of the cellular antigen complex was heat-labile. Acid extraction of the bacterial cells, followed by selective purification for flagella, led to the preparation of an acid extract antigen that possessed a high degree of immunogenicity. The acid extract antigen contained flagellar components and was resolved into two major and approximately five minor protein components by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis.

  13. An Update on Clostridium difficile Toxinotyping

    PubMed Central

    Janezic, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Toxinotyping is a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-based method for differentiation of Clostridium difficile strains according to the changes in the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc), a region coding for toxins A and B. Toxinotypes are a heterogenous group of strains that are important in the development of molecular diagnostic tests and vaccines and are a good basis for C. difficile phylogenetic studies. Here we describe an overview of the 34 currently known toxinotypes (I to XXXIV) and some changes in nomenclature. PMID:26511734

  14. Regulation of Toxin Production in Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens is widely distributed in nature, especially in soil and the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals. C. perfringens causes gas gangrene and food poisoning, and it produces extracellular enzymes and toxins that are thought to act synergistically and contribute to its pathogenesis. A complicated regulatory network of toxin genes has been reported that includes a two-component system for regulatory RNA and cell-cell communication. It is necessary to clarify the global regulatory system of these genes in order to understand and treat the virulence of C. perfringens. We summarize the existing knowledge about the regulatory mechanisms here. PMID:27399773

  15. Chronic Clostridium botulinum infections in farmers.

    PubMed

    Rodloff, Arne C; Krüger, Monika

    2012-04-01

    Although botulism is usually an acute, often lethal disease that is caused by the ingestion of botulinum neurotoxin, there are also recognized forms like infant botulism, wound botulism, or "botulism of undefined origin" that are characterized by the fact that Clostridium botulinum colonizes the host and produces its toxin in the host. Evidence is presented here that a disease in cattle and in human care takers of diseased animals that has evolved over the past two decades, may be a chronic, visceral form of C. botulinum infection.

  16. Clostridium difficile: from obscurity to superbug.

    PubMed

    Brazier, J S

    2008-01-01

    According to the UK media and popular press, Clostridium difficile is now a fully fledged member of that notorious but ill-defined group of microorganisms portrayed to the general public as superbugs. Following the trail blazed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), C. difficile has made the transition from being an obscure anaerobic bacterium, mainly of interest to specialist anaerobic microbiologists, to that of an infamous superbug responsible for outbreaks of hospital-acquired infection that commonly result in serious disease and death. This review tracks the rise in scientific knowledge and public awareness of this organism.

  17. Annotation of the Clostridium Acetobutylicum Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, M. J.

    2004-06-09

    The genome sequence of the solvent producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC824, has been determined by the shotgun approach. The genome consists of a 3.94 Mb chromosome and a 192 kb megaplasmid that contains the majority of genes responsible for solvent production. Comparison of C. acetobutylicum to Bacillus subtilis reveals significant local conservation of gene order, which has not been seen in comparisons of other genomes with similar, or, in some cases, closer, phylogenetic proximity. This conservation allows the prediction of many previously undetected operons in both bacteria.

  18. An Update on Clostridium difficile Toxinotyping.

    PubMed

    Rupnik, Maja; Janezic, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Toxinotyping is a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-based method for differentiation of Clostridium difficile strains according to the changes in the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc), a region coding for toxins A and B. Toxinotypes are a heterogenous group of strains that are important in the development of molecular diagnostic tests and vaccines and are a good basis for C. difficile phylogenetic studies. Here we describe an overview of the 34 currently known toxinotypes (I to XXXIV) and some changes in nomenclature.

  19. Clostridium difficile infection: Updates in management.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Raseen; Khanna, Sahil

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was first identified in 1978 as a diarrhea-causing bacterium in humans. In the last three decades, C. difficile infection (CDI) has reached an epidemic state, both in health care and community settings worldwide. There has been substantial progress in the field of CDI, including identification of novel risk factors, presence of CDI in individuals not considered at risk previously, and treatment options including new drugs, monoclonal antibodies, and fecal microbiota transplantation. This review discusses epidemiology, novel and traditional risk factors, and updates in management for CDI.

  20. Clostridium difficile colitis: pathogenesis and host defence.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; McKenney, Peter T; Pamer, Eric G

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of intestinal infection and diarrhoea in individuals following antibiotic treatment. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that induce spore formation and germination and have determined the roles of C. difficile toxins in disease pathogenesis. Exciting progress has also been made in defining the role of the microbiome, specific commensal bacterial species and host immunity in defence against infection with C. difficile. This Review will summarize the recent discoveries and developments in our understanding of C. difficile infection and pathogenesis.

  1. In situ extractive fermentation for the production of hexanoic acid from galactitol by Clostridium sp. BS-1.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Byoung Seung; Moon, Chuloo; Kim, Byung-Chun; Kim, Hyunook; Um, Youngsoon; Sang, Byoung-In

    2013-08-15

    Clostridium sp. BS-1 produces hexanoic acid as a metabolite using galactitol and enhanced hexanoic acid production was obtained by in situ extractive fermentation with Clostridium sp. BS-1 under an optimized medium composition. For medium optimization, five ingredients were selected as variables, and among them yeast extract, tryptone, and sodium butyrate were selected as significant variables according to a fractional factorial experimental design, a steepest ascent experimental design, and a Box-Behnken experimental design. The optimized medium had the following compositions in modified Clostridium acetobutyricum (mCAB) medium: 15.5gL(-1) of yeast extract, 10.13gL(-1) of tryptone, 0.04gL(-1) of FeSO4·7H2O, 0.85gL(-1) of sodium acetate, and 6.47gL(-1) of sodium butyrate. The predicted concentration of hexanoic acid with the optimized medium was 6.98gL(-1), and this was validated experimentally by producing 6.96gL(-1) of hexanoic acid with Clostridium sp. BS-1 under the optimized conditions. In situ extractive fermentation for hexanoic acid removal was then applied in a batch culture system with the optimized medium and 10% (v/v) alamine 336 in oleyl alcohol as an extractive solvent. The pH of the culture in the extractive fermentation was maintained at 5.4-5.6 by an acid balance between production and retrieval by extraction. During a 16 day culture, the hexanoic acid concentration in the solvent increased to 32gL(-1) while it was maintained in a range of 1-2gL(-1) in the medium. The maximum rate of hexanoic acid production was 0.34gL(-1)h(-1) in in situ extractive fermentation.

  2. Immunization of guinea-pigs and cattle with a reduced dose Clostridium chauvoei vaccine produced in a semi-synthetic medium.

    PubMed

    Cameron, C M; Botha, W J; Schoeman, J H

    1986-03-01

    A semi-synthetic culture medium and method are described for the production of a reduced dose Clostridium chauvoei vaccine. The vaccine gave excellent results in guinea-pigs, and 2 injections of 2.0 ml protected cattle against challenge with 2 M.L.D. of a virulent culture for at least 12 months. The suitability of C. chauvoei Strain OP64 as a vaccine strain was confirmed.

  3. Reduction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene by Clostridium acetobutylicum through hydroxylamino-nitrotoluene intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, J.B.; Wang, C.Y.; Bhadra, R.; Richardson, A.; Bennett, G.N.; Rudolph, F.B.

    1998-03-01

    Studies were conducted to isolate and identify intermediates of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) transformation by Clostridium acetobutylicum and to quantify their concentrations in active whole cell cultures. Only two intermediates of TNT reduction were detected in cell cultures and were identified as 4-hydroxylamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene and 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene. Structures were confirmed with {sup 1}H-NMR, {sup 13}C-NMR, and desorption chemical ionization mass spectroscopy. When cells were suspended in a non-growth saline medium, both hydroxylamine forms accumulated. In media capable of supporting cell growth, the 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene accumulated with concentrations of 4-hydroxylamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene remaining near detection limits. Studies using purified 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene confirmed that its biotransformation rate in active cultures greatly exceeded abiotic decomposition in aqueous medium.

  4. Quantification of Nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum Spore Loads in Food Materials.

    PubMed

    Barker, Gary C; Malakar, Pradeep K; Plowman, June; Peck, Michael W

    2016-01-04

    We have produced data and developed analysis to build representations for the concentration of spores of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum in materials that are used during the manufacture of minimally processed chilled foods in the United Kingdom. Food materials are categorized into homogenous groups which include meat, fish, shellfish, cereals, fresh plant material, dairy liquid, dairy nonliquid, mushroom and fungi, and dried herbs and spices. Models are constructed in a Bayesian framework and represent a combination of information from a literature survey of spore loads from positive-control experiments that establish a detection limit and from dedicated microbiological tests for real food materials. The detection of nonproteolytic C. botulinum employed an optimized protocol that combines selective enrichment culture with multiplex PCR, and the majority of tests on food materials were negative. Posterior beliefs about spore loads center on a concentration range of 1 to 10 spores kg(-1). Posterior beliefs for larger spore loads were most significant for dried herbs and spices and were most sensitive to the detailed results from control experiments. Probability distributions for spore loads are represented in a convenient form that can be used for numerical analysis and risk assessments.

  5. Clostridium difficile Genotypes in Piglet Populations in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Heinrich; Schmoock, Gernot; Baier, Sylvia; Harlizius, Jürgen; Nienhoff, Hendrik; Brase, Katja; Zimmermann, Stefan; Seyboldt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was isolated from 147 of 201 (73%) rectal swabs of piglets from 15 farms of Lower Saxony and North Rhine-Westphalia. In 14 farms, 14 to 100% (mean, 78%) of the animals tested were culture positive. The rate of isolation was 68% postpartum, increased to 94% in animals 2 to 14 days of age, and declined to 0% for animals 49 days of age and older. There was no link between isolation and antibiotic treatment or diarrhea of piglets. Strains were assigned to 10 PCR ribotypes, and up to 4 PCR ribotypes were found to be present at the same time on a farm. The closely related PCR ribotypes 078 (55%) and 126 (20%) were most frequently recovered and were present in 13 of the 14 positive farms. The comparison of multilocus VNTR (variable number of tandem repeats) analysis (MLVA) data from this study and previously published data on human, porcine, and bovine PCR ribotype 078 isolates from 5 European countries revealed genetic differences between strains of different geographic origin and confirmed the relatedness of human and porcine C. difficile isolates. This study demonstrated that the human-pathogenic PCR ribotypes 078 and 126 are predominant in piglets in Germany. The results suggest that presence of C. difficile is correlated with animal age but not with antibiotic treatment or clinical disease. MLVA indicated that strains of the same geographical origin are often genetically related and corroborated the hypothesis of a close epidemiological connection between human and porcine C. difficile isolates. PMID:24025903

  6. Outcomes in patients tested for Clostridium difficile toxins

    PubMed Central

    Polage, Christopher R.; Chin, David L.; Leslie, Jhansi L.; Tang, Jevon; Cohen, Stuart H.; Solnick, Jay V.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile testing is shifting from toxin detection to C. difficile detection. Yet, up to 60% of patients with C. difficile by culture test negative for toxins and it is unclear if they are infected or carriers. We reviewed medical records for 7,046 inpatients with a C. difficile toxin test from 2005–2009 to determine the duration of diarrhea and rate of complications and mortality among toxin-positive (toxin+) and toxin− patients. Overall, toxin− patients had less severe diarrhea, fewer diarrhea days and lower mortality (P<0.001, all comparisons) than toxin+ patients. One toxin− patient (n=1/6,121; 0.02%) was diagnosed with pseudomembranous colitis but there were no complications such as megacolon or colectomy for fulminant CDI among toxin− patients. These data suggest that C. difficile-attributable complications are rare among patients testing negative for C. difficile toxins and more studies are needed to evaluate the clinical significance of C. difficile detection in toxin− patients. PMID:23009731

  7. Quantification of Nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum Spore Loads in Food Materials

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Gary C.; Malakar, Pradeep K.; Plowman, June

    2016-01-01

    We have produced data and developed analysis to build representations for the concentration of spores of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum in materials that are used during the manufacture of minimally processed chilled foods in the United Kingdom. Food materials are categorized into homogenous groups which include meat, fish, shellfish, cereals, fresh plant material, dairy liquid, dairy nonliquid, mushroom and fungi, and dried herbs and spices. Models are constructed in a Bayesian framework and represent a combination of information from a literature survey of spore loads from positive-control experiments that establish a detection limit and from dedicated microbiological tests for real food materials. The detection of nonproteolytic C. botulinum employed an optimized protocol that combines selective enrichment culture with multiplex PCR, and the majority of tests on food materials were negative. Posterior beliefs about spore loads center on a concentration range of 1 to 10 spores kg−1. Posterior beliefs for larger spore loads were most significant for dried herbs and spices and were most sensitive to the detailed results from control experiments. Probability distributions for spore loads are represented in a convenient form that can be used for numerical analysis and risk assessments. PMID:26729721

  8. Thermostable amylolytic enzymes from a new Clostridium isolate

    SciTech Connect

    Madi, E.; Antranikian, G.; Ohmiya, K.; Gottschalk, G.

    1987-07-01

    A new Clostridium strain was isolated on starch at 60 degrees C. Starch, pullulan, maltotriose, and maltose induced the synthesis of alpha-amylase and pullulanase, while glucose, ribose, fructose, and lactose did not. The formation of the amylolytic enzymes was dependent on growth and occurred predominantly in the exponential phase. The enzymes were largely cell bound during growth of the organism with 0.5% starch, but an increase of the starch concentration in the growth medium was accompanied by the excretion of alpha-amylase and pullulanase into the culture broth; but also by a decrease of total activity. Alpha-amylase, pullulanase, and alpha-glucosidase were active in a broad temperature range (40 to 85 degrees C) and displayed temperature optima for activity at 60 to 70 degrees C. During incubation with starch under aerobic conditions at 75 degrees C for 2 hours, the activity of both enzymes decreased to only 90 or 80%. The apparent Km values of alpha-amylase, pullulanase, and alpha-glucosidase for their corresponding substrates, starch, pullulan, and maltose were 0.35 mg/ml, 0.63 mg/ml, and 25 mM, respectively. (Refs. 31).

  9. Genetic Engineering of Clostridium Difficile Toxin A Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-04

    AD-A242 265 AD GENETIC ENGINEERING OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE TOXIN A VACCINE ANNUAL/FINAL REPORT DTIC LYCJRGUS L. MULDROW F EIECTE JOE JOHNSON ’ N OVI...62770A 62770A871 AA DA314471 (U) Genetic Engineering of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Vaccine 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lycurgus L. Muldrow and Joe... Clostridium difficile Vaccine 06 o2 Recombinant DNA 06 o3 RA 1 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on revere if n.ece•x••y and itd•entify by 0o/ r ou er).. .... Recombinant

  10. Clostridium novyi, sordellii, and tetani: mechanisms of disease.

    PubMed

    Aronoff, David M

    2013-12-01

    Clostridia represent a diverse group of spore-forming gram positive anaerobes that include several pathogenic species. In general, diseases caused by clostridia are a result of intoxication of the infected host. Thus, clostridial toxins have been targeted for diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive strategies against infection. Studying the mechanisms of action of clostridial toxins has not only shed light on the pathogenesis of infection but has provided important new insights into cell biology and immunology. A primary purpose of this manuscript is to provide a succinct review on the mechanisms of disease caused by intoxication by the pathogens Clostridium tetani, Clostridium novyi, and Clostridium sordellii.

  11. Secretion of clostridium cellulase by E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Ida Kuo

    1998-01-01

    A gene, encoding an endocellulase from a newly isolated mesophilic Clostridium strain IY-2 which can digest bamboo fibers, cellulose, rice straw, and sawdust, was isolated by shotgun cloning in an E. coli expression plasmid pLC2833. E. coli positive clones were selected based on their ability to hydrolyze milled bamboo fibers and cellulose present in agar plates. One clone contained a 2.8 kb DNA fragment that was responsible for cellulase activity. Western blot analyses indicated that the positive clone produced a secreted cellulase with a mass of about 58,000 daltons that was identical in size to the subunit of one of the three major Clostridium cellulases. The products of cellulose digestion by this cloned cellulase were cellotetraose and soluble higher polymers. The cloned DNA contained signal sequences capable of directing the secretion of heterologous proteins from an E. coli host. The invention describes a bioprocess for the treatment of cellulosic plant materials to produce cellular growth substrates and fermentation end products suitable for production of liquid fuels, solvents, and acids.

  12. The Pangenome of the genus Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Udaondo, Zulema; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2017-03-21

    We present the pangenome for the genus Clostridium sensu stricto, which was obtained using highly curated and annotated genomes from 16 species, some of these cause disease, while others are used for the production of added-value chemicals. Multilocus sequencing analysis revealed that species of this genus group into at least two clades that include non-pathogenic and pathogenic strains, suggesting that pathogenicity is dispersed across the phylogenetic tree. The core genome of the genus includes 546 protein families, which mainly comprise those involved in protein translation and DNA repair. The GS-GOGAT may represent the central pathway for generating organic nitrogen from inorganic nitrogen sources. Glycerol and glucose metabolism genes are well represented in the core genome together with a set of energy conservation systems. A metabolic network comprising proteins/enzymes, RNAs and metabolites, whose topological structure is a non-random and scale-free network with hierarchically structured modules was built. These modules shed light on the interactions between RNAs, proteins and metabolites, revealing biological features of transcription and translation, cell wall biosynthesis, C1 metabolism and N metabolism. Network analysis identified four nodes that function as hubs and bottlenecks, namely, coenzyme A, HPr kinases, S-adenosylmethionine and the ribonuclease P-protein, suggesting pivotal roles for them in Clostridium. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Tea and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Starley, Brad; Galagan, Jack Carl; Yabes, Joseph Michael; Evans, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Studies have shown effects of diet on gut microbiota. We aimed to identify foods associated with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Methods. In this cross-sectional survey, consecutive patients diagnosed with CDI were identified by electronic medical records. Colitis symptoms and positive Clostridium difficile assay were confirmed. Health-care onset-health-care facility associated CDI was excluded. Food surveys were mailed to 411 patients. Survey responses served as the primary outcome measure. Spearman's rank correlation identified risk factors for CDI recurrence. Results. Surveys were returned by 68 patients. Nineteen patients experienced CDI recurrence. Compared to patients without CDI recurrence, patients with CDI recurrence had more antibiotics prescribed preceding their infection (p = 0.003). Greater numbers of the latter also listed tea (p = 0.002), coffee (p = 0.013), and eggs (p = 0.013), on their 24-hour food recall. Logistic regression identified tea as the only food risk factor for CDI recurrence (adjusted OR: 5.71; 95% CI: 1.26–25.89). Conclusion. The present results indicate a possible association between tea and CDI recurrence. Additional studies are needed to characterize and confirm this association. PMID:27651790

  14. [Selected aspects of Clostridium difficile infection].

    PubMed

    Mehlich, Agnieszka; Górska, Sabina; Gamian, Andrzej; Myc, Andrzej

    2015-05-05

    Clostridium difficile pathogen is a cause of the most frequent nosocomial infection, which is antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Antibiotic treatment causes disruption of the microbiome balance, which makes the gut a friendly environment for the pathogen. It leads to pseudomembranous colitis, toxic megacolon and even death. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is particularly dangerous to elderly patients, leading to the highest mortality rate. C. difficile is equipped with many virulence factors such as toxin A and B, binary toxin CDT, flagellum, S-layer proteins, Cwp66 and GroEL proteins, protease Cwp84, fibronectin-binding protein and the ability to form biofilm and spores. Problems with anti-CDI therapy prompt researchers and clinicians to seek alternative ways of therapy. Identification of immunological epitopes in outer layer proteins and the use of them as antigens for anti-CDI vaccines would be a rational approach to prevent the disease, but unfortunately such vaccines are not available yet. In this article we review the course of the disease, virulence and risk factors. We summarize briefly epidemiological data and the latest achievements in CDI treatment.

  15. Clinico-pathological findings of Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxaemia in goats and its hemolytic activity in different erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ali Nasir, A.; Younus, M.; Rashid, A.; Abdul Khaliq, S.; Khan, E.; Shah, S. H.; Aslam, A.; Ghumman, M. A.; Joiya, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation was conducted to study the effects of experimental Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxaemia in teddy goats. Clinical signs started to appear after 30 min of experimental infection like anorexia, diarrhea, dehydration, frothing and dyspnea. Gross lesions consisted of severe congestion in tissues of varying intensity with enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes while histological examination revealed edema of lungs, kidney, and lymph nodes and to some extent in brain along with hemorrhages in lungs and intestines. Clostridium perfringens type D carrying alpha and epsilon toxin genes were amplified with amplicon size about 247 bp and 665 bp, respectively. Human erythrocytes showed the highest hemolysis, 68%, followed by mice, 57%, against culture supernatants. The percentage of hemolysis was significantly higher at 37°C as compared to 25°C except for rabbit and dog. PMID:27175159

  16. Conditions associated with Clostridium sporogenes growth as a surrogate for Clostridium botulinum in nonthermally processed canned butter.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R H; Dunn, M L; Ogden, L V; Jefferies, L K; Eggett, D L; Steele, F M

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to better understand the effect of butter composition and emulsion structure on growth and survival of Clostridium sporogenes, used as a surrogate for C. botulinum in canned butter. The lack of a thermal process step in commercially available canned butter raises questions of potential safety, because it is hermetically sealed and generally exhibits anaerobic growth conditions, which are optimal for Clostridium botulinum growth. Without thermal processing, low-acid canned foods must have inhibitory factors present to prevent C. botulinum growth. Some potential intrinsic inhibitory factors, or hurdles, within butter include: reduced water activity, acidity in cultured products, elevated salt content, and the micro-droplet nature of the aqueous phase in the butter emulsion. It was hypothesized that a normal, intact butter emulsion would have sufficient hurdles to prevent C. botulinum growth, whereas a broken butter emulsion would result in a coalesced aqueous phase that would allow for C. botulinum growth. Batch-churned butter was inoculated with C. sporogenes; butter samples with varying salt contents (0, 0.8, 1.6, and 2.4% wt/wt NaCl) were prepared and stored in coated steel cans for varying times (1 or 2 wk) and temperatures (22 or 41°C) to determine temperature and emulsion structure effects on C. sporogenes growth. Samples stored at 41°C showed a significant increase in C. sporogenes growth compared with those stored at 22°C. Furthermore, NaCl addition was found to have a significant effect on C. sporogenes growth, with 0.8% NaCl promoting more growth than 0%, but with decreases in growth observed at 1.6 and 2.4%. Uninoculated control plates were also found to have bacterial growth; this growth was attributed to other anaerobic bacteria present within the cream. It was concluded that removal of the hurdle created by the micro-droplet size of the emulsion aqueous phase could result in C. botulinum growth even at elevated salt

  17. Diagnostic trends in Clostridium difficile detection in Finnish microbiology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Könönen, Eija; Rasinperä, Marja; Virolainen, Anni; Mentula, Silja; Lyytikäinen, Outi

    2009-12-01

    Due to increased interest directed to Clostridium difficile-associated infections, a questionnaire survey of laboratory diagnostics of toxin-producing C. difficile was conducted in Finland in June 2006. Different aspects pertaining to C. difficile diagnosis, such as requests and criteria used for testing, methods used for its detection, yearly changes in diagnostics since 1996, and the total number of investigations positive for C. difficile in 2005, were asked in the questionnaire, which was sent to 32 clinical microbiology laboratories, including all hospital-affiliated and the relevant private clinical microbiology laboratories in Finland. The situation was updated by phone and email correspondence in September 2008. In June 2006, 28 (88%) laboratories responded to the questionnaire survey; 24 of them reported routinely testing requested stool specimens for C. difficile. Main laboratory methods included toxin detection (21/24; 88%) and/or anaerobic culture (19/24; 79%). In June 2006, 18 (86%) of the 21 laboratories detecting toxins directly from feces, from the isolate, or both used methods for both toxin A (TcdA) and B (TcdB), whereas only one laboratory did so in 1996. By September 2008, all of the 23 laboratories performing diagnostics for C. difficile used methods for both TcdA and TcdB. In 2006, the number of specimens processed per 100,000 population varied remarkably between different hospital districts. In conclusion, culturing C. difficile is common and there has been a favorable shift in toxin detection practice in Finnish clinical microbiology laboratories. However, the variability in diagnostic activity reported in 2006 creates a challenge for national monitoring of the epidemiology of C. difficile and related diseases.

  18. Bystander Host Cell Killing Effects of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Archana; Hendricks, Matthew R.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) binds to claudin receptors, e.g., claudin-4, and then forms a pore that triggers cell death. Pure cultures of host cells that do not express claudin receptors, e.g., fibroblasts, are unaffected by pathophysiologically relevant CPE concentrations in vitro. However, both CPE-insensitive and CPE-sensitive host cells are present in vivo. Therefore, this study tested whether CPE treatment might affect fibroblasts when cocultured with CPE-sensitive claudin-4 fibroblast transfectants or Caco-2 cells. Under these conditions, immunofluorescence microscopy detected increased death of fibroblasts. This cytotoxic effect involved release of a toxic factor from the dying CPE-sensitive cells, since it could be reproduced using culture supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells. Supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells, particularly Caco-2 cells, were found to contain high levels of membrane vesicles, often containing a CPE species. However, most cytotoxic activity remained in those supernatants even after membrane vesicle depletion, and CPE was not detected in fibroblasts treated with supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells. Instead, characterization studies suggest that a major cytotoxic factor present in supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells may be a 10- to 30-kDa host serine protease or require the action of that host serine protease. Induction of caspase-3-mediated apoptosis was found to be important for triggering release of the cytotoxic factor(s) from CPE-treated sensitive host cells. Furthermore, the cytotoxic factor(s) in these supernatants was shown to induce a caspase-3-mediated killing of fibroblasts. This bystander killing effect due to release of cytotoxic factors from CPE-treated sensitive cells could contribute to CPE-mediated disease. PMID:27965452

  19. Production and counting of spores of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Bagadi, H O

    1977-06-01

    The concentration and viability of spores produced by four different strains of Clostridium chauvoei (C. feseri) grown in a modified medium for 18 days are described. The medium yielded enough viable spores for experimental work.

  20. Flooding and Clostridium difficile infection: a case-crossover analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospttalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community­ associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more ...

  1. Characterization of Clostridium sp. RKD producing botulinum-like neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Aparna; Dhaked, Ram Kumar; Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Singh, Lokendra

    2005-07-01

    A Gram positive, motile, rod-shaped, strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from intestine of decaying fish was identified as Clostridium sp. RKD and produced a botulinum type B-like neurotoxin as suggested by mouse bioassay and protection with anti botulinum antibodies. The neurotoxicity was functionally characterized by the phrenic nerve hemi-diaphragm assay. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence, placed it at a different position from the reported strains of Clostridium botulinum. The strain exhibited differences from both Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani with respect to morphological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic characteristics. Botulinum group specific and serotype specific primers amplified the DNA fragments of 260 and 727 bp, respectively, indicating presence of botulinum type 'B' toxin gene. Sequence of nearly 700 bp amplified using primers specific for botulinum neurotoxin type B gene, did not show any significant match in the database when subjected to BLAST search.

  2. The effect of probiotics on Clostridium difficile diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Pochapin, M

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of nosocomially acquired intestinal infection in the United States, affecting virtually all cases of pseudomembranous colitis and up to 20% of cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Even after receiving antibiotic treatment with either metronidazole or vancomycin, 20% of patients will have recurrent Clostridium difficile diarrhea. An innovative approach to the problem involves the introduction of competing, nonpathogenic (probiotic) organisms into the intestinal tract to restore microbial balance. The theoretical premise behind this approach is that the protective intestinal microflora is damaged by antibiotic treatment; the initial antibiotic exposure thus leaves the host susceptible to colonization and subsequent infection by Clostridium difficile. A so-called "second-hit" to the intestinal microflora occurs when the infected host is treated with flagyl or vancomycin, further destroying susceptible bacterial flora. Probiotic agents, such as Lactobacillus GG and Saccharomyces boulardii, have been studied for the treatment of Clostridium difficile. We are currently running a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus GG in combination with standard antibiotics for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection. Although it is too early to draw statistically significant conclusions, two patterns seem to be emerging: Lactobacillus GG is effective in reducing the 3-wk recurrence rate of Clostridium difficile, and patients feel better when taking Lactobacillus GG, as compared with the placebo, with early disappearance of abdominal cramps and diarrhea. In conclusion, the use of probiotics for the treatment of primary and recurrent Clostridium difficile diarrhea looks promising. Patients seem to have less recurrent Clostridium difficile diarrhea and early symptomatic improvement when using the probiotic Lactobacillus GG.

  3. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens in the feces of adult horses and foals with acute enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Gohari, Iman Mehdizadeh; Arroyo, Luis; MacInnes, Janet I.; Timoney, John F.; Parreira, Valeria R.; Prescott, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Up to 60% of cases of equine colitis have no known cause. To improve understanding of the causes of acute colitis in horses, we hypothesized that Clostridium perfringens producing enterotoxin (CPE) and/or beta2 toxin (CPB2) are common and important causes of severe colitis in horses and/or that C. perfringens producing an as-yet-undescribed cytotoxin may also cause colitis in horses. Fecal samples from 55 horses (43 adults, 12 foals) with clinical evidence of colitis were evaluated by culture for the presence of Clostridium difficile, C. perfringens, and Salmonella. Feces were also examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for C. difficile A/B toxins and C. perfringens alpha toxin (CPA), beta2 toxin (CPB2), and enterotoxin (CPE). Five C. perfringens isolates per sample were genotyped for the following genes: cpa, cpb, cpb2 consensus, cpb2 atypical, cpe (enterotoxin), etx (epsilon toxin), itx (iota toxin), netB (necrotic enteritis toxin B), and tpeL (large C. perfringens cytotoxin). The supernatants of these isolates were also evaluated for toxicity for an equine cell line. All fecal samples were negative for Salmonella. Clostridium perfringens and C. difficile were isolated from 40% and 5.4% of samples, respectively. All fecal samples were negative for CPE. Clostridium perfringens CPA and CPB2 toxins were detected in 14.5% and 7.2% of fecal samples, respectively, all of which were culture-positive for C. perfringens. No isolates were cpe, etx, netB, or tpeL gene-positive. Atypical cpb2 and consensus cpb2 genes were identified in 15 (13.6%) and 4 (3.6%) of 110 isolates, respectively. All equine C. perfringens isolates showed far milder cytotoxicity effects than a CPB-producing positive control, although cpb2-positive isolates were slightly but significantly more cytotoxic than negative isolates. Based on this studied population, we were unable to confirm our hypothesis that CPE and CPB2-producing C. perfringens are common in horses with colitis in

  4. Fecal microbiota transplantation in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Austin, Matthew; Mellow, Mark; Tierney, William M

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, Clostridium difficile infections have become more frequent, more severe, more refractory to standard treatment, and more likely to recur. Current antibiotic treatment regimens for Clostridium difficile infection alter the normal gut flora, which provide colonization resistance against Clostridium difficile. Over the past few years, there has been a marked increase in the knowledge of the gut microbiota and its role in health maintenance and disease causation. This has, fortuitously, coincided with the use of a unique microbial replacement therapy, fecal microbiota transplantation, in the treatment of patients with multiple recurrent Clostridium difficile infections. We briefly review current knowledge of the gut microbiota's functions. We then review the indications for use of fecal microbiota transplantation in Clostridium difficile infection, the techniques employed, and results of treatment. Fecal microbiota transplantation has been shown to be efficacious for patients with multiply recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (reported cure rates of 90%), with an excellent short-term safety profile, and has been included in the American College of Gastroenterology treatment guidelines for this troublesome disease.

  5. Novel Real-Time PCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Differentiation of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum in Clostridial Myonecrosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Halm, Anna; Wagner, Martin; Köfer, Josef; Hein, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence was designed for differentiation of blackleg-causing Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum, a phylogenetically closely related bacterium responsible for malignant edema. In order to exclude false-negative results, an internal amplification control was included in the assay. A set of three probes, one specific for C. chauvoei, one specific for C. septicum, and one specific for both species, permitted unequivocal detection of C. chauvoei in tests of 32 Clostridium sp. strains and 10 non-Clostridium strains. The assay proved to be sensitive, detecting one genome of C. chauvoei or C. septicum per PCR and 1.79 × 103 C. chauvoei cells/g artificially contaminated muscle tissue. In tests of 11 clinical specimens, the real-time PCR assay yielded the same results as an established conventional PCR method. PMID:20129968

  6. Novel real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection and differentiation of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum in clostridial myonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Halm, Anna; Wagner, Martin; Köfer, Josef; Hein, Ingeborg

    2010-04-01

    A real-time PCR assay based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence was designed for differentiation of blackleg-causing Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum, a phylogenetically closely related bacterium responsible for malignant edema. In order to exclude false-negative results, an internal amplification control was included in the assay. A set of three probes, one specific for C. chauvoei, one specific for C. septicum, and one specific for both species, permitted unequivocal detection of C. chauvoei in tests of 32 Clostridium sp. strains and 10 non-Clostridium strains. The assay proved to be sensitive, detecting one genome of C. chauvoei or C. septicum per PCR and 1.79 x 10(3) C. chauvoei cells/g artificially contaminated muscle tissue. In tests of 11 clinical specimens, the real-time PCR assay yielded the same results as an established conventional PCR method.

  7. Characterization of flagellin from Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Kojima, A; Amimoto, K; Ohgitani, T; Tamura, Y

    1999-06-30

    Differential centrifugation and cesium chloride-equilibrium centrifugation were used to purify the flagella from the strain Okinawa of the formalin-fixed Clostridium chauvoei. SDS-PAGE profile of purified flagella showed that a major protein band with a molecular mass of 46 kDa, corresponding to the flagellin monomer, and at least two minor protein bands with molecular masses of approximately 73 and 100 kDa were found. The amino acid composition of C. chauvoei flagellin was similar to the flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus subtilis. In addition, C. chauvoei flagellin monomer shared limited sequence homology with the N-terminal amino acid sequence reported for other bacterial flagellins. N-terminal sequences of two minor bands corresponded to the flagellin monomer, indicating that higher molecular mass bands were polymeric forms of the flagellin monomer.

  8. Patho-genetics of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Frey, Joachim; Falquet, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    The genomic sequence of Clostridium chauvoei, the etiological agent of blackleg, a severe disease of ruminants with high mortality specified by a myonecrosis reveals a chromosome of 2.8 million base-pairs and a cryptic plasmid of 5.5 kilo base-pairs. The chromosome contains the main pathways like glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, sugar metabolism, purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, but the notable absence of genes of the citric acid cycle and deficient or partially deficient amino acid metabolism for Histidine, Tyrosine, Phenylalanine, and Tryptophan. These essential amino acids might be acquired from host tissue damage caused by various toxins and by protein metabolism that includes 57 genes for peptidases, and several ABC transporters for amino acids import.

  9. [Laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection].

    PubMed

    Alcalá-Hernández, Luis; Mena-Ribas, Ana; Niubó-Bosh, Jordi; Marín-Arriaza, Mercedes

    2016-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in developed countries, and is one of the main aetiologic agents of community diarrhea. The eruption of the hypervirulent strain BI/NAP1/027 has given rise to an increase in the morbidity and mortality of C.difficile infection (CDI). This document aims to review the main clinical pictures of CDI and the laboratory diagnosis, including sampling, transport and storage of specimens, specimen processing, diagnostic procedures, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and molecular characterisation of the isolates. The main purpose of the article is to develop a practical document that provides answers to the main questions that arise in the laboratory diagnosis of CDI.

  10. Clostridium difficile infection in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Robin LP

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection, the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea, disproportionately affects older adults. The two most important risk factors for developing C. difficile infection are antimicrobial exposure and age >65 years old. Risk factors specific to older adults are frequent interactions with healthcare systems and age-related changes in physiology, including immune senescence and changes to the gut microbiome. Metronidazole and oral vancomcyin are the mainstays of conventional treatment for C. difficile infection. Alternative therapies include fidaxomicin, a narrow-spectrum macrocyclic antibiotic, and fectal bacteriotherapy, which offers an excellent therapeutic outcome. Strategies to prevent C. difficile infections include enhanced infection control measures and reducing inappropriate antimicrobial use through stewardship. PMID:24955106

  11. Biotechnological potential of Clostridium butyricum bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Szymanowska-Powałowska, Daria; Orczyk, Dorota; Leja, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    In response to demand from industry for microorganisms with auspicious biotechnological potential, a worldwide interest has developed in bacteria and fungi isolation. Microorganisms of interesting metabolic properties include non-pathogenic bacteria of the genus Clostridium, particularly C. acetobutylicum, C. butyricum and C. pasteurianum. A well-known property of C. butyricum is their ability to produce butyric acid, as well as effectively convert glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (38.2 g/L). A conversion rate of 0.66 mol 1,3-propanediol/mol of glycerol has been obtained. Results of the studies described in the present paper broaden our knowledge of characteristic features of C. butyricum specific isolates in terms of their phylogenetic affiliation, fermentation capacity and antibacterial properties. PMID:25477923

  12. Clostridium difficile Infection and Fecal Microbiota Transplant.

    PubMed

    Liubakka, Alyssa; Vaughn, Byron P

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major source of morbidity and mortality for hospitalized patients. Although most patients have a clinical response to existing antimicrobial therapies, recurrent infection develops in up to 30% of patients. Fecal microbiota transplant is a novel approach to this complex problem, with an efficacy rate of nearly 90% in the setting of multiple recurrent CDI. This review covers the current epidemiology of CDI (including toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains, risk factors for infection, and recurrent infection), methods of diagnosis, existing first-line therapies in CDI, the role of fecal microbiota transplant for multiple recurrent CDIs, and the potential use of fecal microbial transplant for patients with severe or refractory infection.

  13. Engineering Clostridium Strain to Accept Unmethylated DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Dai, Zongjie; Li, Yin

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to genetically manipulate the medically and biotechnologically important genus Clostridium due to the existence of the restriction and modification (RM) systems. We identified and engineered the RM system of a model clostridial species, C. acetobutylicum, with the aim to allow the host to accept the unmethylated DNA efficiently. A gene CAC1502 putatively encoding the type II restriction endonuclease Cac824I was identified from the genome of C. acetobutylicum DSM1731, and disrupted using the ClosTron system based on group II intron insertion. The resulting strain SMB009 lost the type II restriction endonuclease activity, and can be transformed with unmethylated DNA as efficiently as with methylated DNA. The strategy reported here makes it easy to genetically modify the clostridial species using unmethylated DNA, which will help to advance the understanding of the clostridial physiology from the molecular level. PMID:20161730

  14. Carbohydrate-based Clostridium difficile vaccines.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Mario A; Ma, Zuchao; Bertolo, Lisa; Jiao, Yuening; Arroyo, Luis; Hodgins, Douglas; Mallozzi, Michael; Vedantam, Gayatri; Sagermann, Martin; Sundsmo, John; Chow, Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is responsible for thousands of deaths each year and a vaccine would be welcomed, especially one that would disrupt bacterial maintenance, colonization and persistence in carriers and convalescent patients. Structural explorations at the University of Guelph (ON, Canada) discovered that C. difficile may express three phosphorylated polysaccharides, named PSI, PSII and PSIII; this review captures our recent efforts to create vaccines based on these glycans, especially PSII, the common antigen that has precipitated immediate attention. The authors describe the design and immunogenicity of vaccines composed of raw polysaccharides and conjugates thereof. So far, it has been observed that anti-PSII antibodies can be raised in farm animals, mice and hamster models; humans and horses carry anti-PSII IgA and IgG antibodies from natural exposure to C. difficile, respectively; phosphate is an indispensable immunogenic epitope and vaccine-induced PSII antibodies recognize PSII on C. difficile outer surface.

  15. Therapeutic approaches for Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Jane W; Curry, Scott R

    2013-10-02

    Metronidazole and vancomycin remain the front-line therapies for most Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). However, recurrent CDI occurs in ∼ 25% of patients, causing significant morbidity and mortality and healthcare costs. For this population, traditional antibiotic therapies fail and new treatment options are greatly needed. The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved fidaxomicin for CDI treatment. This narrow-spectrum antibiotic preserves the normal gut microbiota and shows promise as a treatment for severe and recurrent CDI. Monoclonal antibodies and vaccines directed against toxin are currently in clinical trials and represent alternative, non-antibiotic therapies. Less traditional therapeutic interventions include bacteriotherapy with non-toxigenic C. difficile and fecal transplant. This commentary will provide an overview of current and forthcoming CDI therapies.

  16. Investigational new treatments for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Mattias E; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Castagner, Bastien

    2015-05-01

    Significant progress has been made by industry and academia in the past two years to address the medical threats posed by Clostridium difficile infection. These developments provide an excellent example of how patient need has driven a surge of innovation in drug discovery. Indeed, only two drugs were approved for the infection in the past 30 years but there are 13 treatment candidates in clinical trials today. What makes the latter number even more remarkable is the diversity in the strategies represented (antibiotics, microbiota supplements, vaccines, antibiotic quenchers and passive immunization). In this review, we provide a snapshot of the current stage of these breakthroughs and argue that there is still room for further innovation in treating C. difficile infection.

  17. Clostridium difficile outbreaks: prevention and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Fernando J; Leffler, Daniel A; Kelly, Ciaran P

    2012-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have increased dramatically over the past decade. Its treatment, however, has largely remained the same with the exception of oral vancomycin use as a first-line agent in severe disease. From 1999 to 2004, 20,642 deaths were attributed to CDI in the United States, almost 7 times the rate of all other intestinal infections combined. Worldwide, several major CDI outbreaks have occurred, and many of these were associated with the NAP1 strain. This ‘epidemic’ strain has contributed to the rising incidence and mortality of CDI. The purpose of this article is to review the current management, treatment, infection control, and prevention strategies that are needed to combat this increasingly morbid disease. PMID:22826646

  18. Clostridium difficile infection in horses: a review.

    PubMed

    Diab, S S; Songer, G; Uzal, F A

    2013-11-29

    Clostridium difficile is considered one of the most important causes of diarrhea and enterocolitis in horses. Foals and adult horses are equally susceptible to the infection. The highly resistant spore of C. difficile is the infectious unit of transmission, which occurs primarily via the fecal-oral route, with sources of infection including equine feces, contaminated soil, animal hospitals, and feces of other animals. Two major risk factors for the development of C. difficile associated disease (CDAD) in adult horses are hospitalization and antimicrobial treatment, although sporadically, cases of CDAD can occur in horses that have not received antimicrobials or been hospitalized. The most common antibiotics associated with CDAD in horses are erythromycin, trimethoprim/sulfonamides, β-lactam antimicrobials, clindamycin, rifampicin, and gentamicin. Clinical signs and intestinal lesions of CDAD infection are not specific and they cannot be used to distinguish infections by C. difficile from infections by other agents, such as Clostridium perfringens or Salmonella sp. The distribution of lesions throughout the intestinal tract seems to be age-dependent. Small intestine is invariably affected, and colon and cecum may or may not have lesions in foals<1-month old. Naturally acquired disease in older foals and adult horses has a more aboral distribution, affecting colon and sometimes cecum, but rarely the small intestine. Detection of toxin A, toxin B or both in intestinal contents or feces is considered the most reliable diagnostic criterion for CDAD in horses. Isolation of toxigenic strains of C. difficile from horses with intestinal disease is highly suggestive of CDAD. A better understanding of pathogenesis, reservoirs of infection, and vaccines and other methods of control is needed. Also further studies are recommended to investigate other possible predisposing factors and/or etiological agents of enteric diseases of horses.

  19. Identification and Characterization of a New Enterotoxin Produced by Clostridium perfringens Isolated from Food Poisoning Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yasunori; Nakama, Akiko; Kai, Akemi; Fukui-Miyazaki, Aya; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kamata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    There is a strain of Clostridium perfringens, W5052, which does not produce a known enterotoxin. We herein report that the strain W5052 expressed a homologue of the iota-like toxin components sa and sb of C. spiroforme, named Clostridium perfringens iota-like enterotoxin, CPILE-a and CPILE-b, respectively, based on the results of a genome sequencing analysis and a systematic protein screening. In the nicotinamide glyco-hydrolase (NADase) assay the hydrolysis activity was dose-dependently increased by the concentration of rCPILE-a, as judged by the mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, the actin monomer of the lysates of Vero and L929 cells were radiolabeled in the presence of [32P]NAD and rCPILE-a. These findings indicated that CPILE-a possesses ADP-ribosylation activity. The culture supernatant of W5052 facilitated the rounding and killing of Vero and L929 cells, but the rCPILE-a or a non-proteolyzed rCPILE-b did not. However, a trypsin-treated rCPILE-b did. Moreover, a mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b enhanced the cell rounding and killing activities, compared with that induced by the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b alone. The injection of the mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b into an ileum loop of rabbits evoked the swelling of the loop and accumulation of the fluid dose-dependently, suggesting that CPILE possesses enterotoxic activity. The evidence presented in this communication will facilitate the epidemiological, etiological, and toxicological studies of C. perfringens food poisoning, and also stimulate studies on the transfer of the toxins’ gene(s) among the Genus Clostridium. PMID:26584048

  20. Identification and Characterization of a New Enterotoxin Produced by Clostridium perfringens Isolated from Food Poisoning Outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Irikura, Daisuke; Monma, Chie; Suzuki, Yasunori; Nakama, Akiko; Kai, Akemi; Fukui-Miyazaki, Aya; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kamata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    There is a strain of Clostridium perfringens, W5052, which does not produce a known enterotoxin. We herein report that the strain W5052 expressed a homologue of the iota-like toxin components sa and sb of C. spiroforme, named Clostridium perfringens iota-like enterotoxin, CPILE-a and CPILE-b, respectively, based on the results of a genome sequencing analysis and a systematic protein screening. In the nicotinamide glyco-hydrolase (NADase) assay the hydrolysis activity was dose-dependently increased by the concentration of rCPILE-a, as judged by the mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, the actin monomer of the lysates of Vero and L929 cells were radiolabeled in the presence of [32P]NAD and rCPILE-a. These findings indicated that CPILE-a possesses ADP-ribosylation activity. The culture supernatant of W5052 facilitated the rounding and killing of Vero and L929 cells, but the rCPILE-a or a non-proteolyzed rCPILE-b did not. However, a trypsin-treated rCPILE-b did. Moreover, a mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b enhanced the cell rounding and killing activities, compared with that induced by the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b alone. The injection of the mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b into an ileum loop of rabbits evoked the swelling of the loop and accumulation of the fluid dose-dependently, suggesting that CPILE possesses enterotoxic activity. The evidence presented in this communication will facilitate the epidemiological, etiological, and toxicological studies of C. perfringens food poisoning, and also stimulate studies on the transfer of the toxins' gene(s) among the Genus Clostridium.

  1. A possible role for Clostridium difficile in the etiology of calf enteritis.

    PubMed

    Hammitt, Melissa C; Bueschel, Dawn M; Keel, M Kevin; Glock, Robert D; Cuneo, Peder; DeYoung, Donald W; Reggiardo, Carlos; Trinh, Hien T; Songer, J Glenn

    2008-03-18

    Clostridium difficile was investigated as a possible cause of enteritis in calves. The organism and its toxins (TcdA and TcdB), respectively, were found in 25.3% and 22.9% of stool samples from diarrheic calves. Culture positive samples were more likely than culture negative samples to be toxin positive. However, toxin positive stools were more common among nondiarrheic calves, but diarrheic calves were nearly twice as likely to be culture positive. Ribotype 078 was dominant among isolates. Salmonella sp. was isolated from both diarrheic and nondiarrheic calves, but large numbers of E. coli were found more commonly in diarrheic calves than in nondiarrheic animals. Prevalence rates for coronavirus and Cryptosporidium sp. were substantially higher in nondiarrheic calves than in diarrheic, but rates of detection of rotavirus and Giardia sp. were more nearly equal between groups. Lesions in naturally infected calves included superficial mucosal erosion with associated fibrinous exudates. Neutrophils and eosinophils infiltrated lamina propria. Large Gram-positive rods morphologically compatible with C. difficile were abundant in the colonic lumen and the organism was isolated by bacteriologic culture. Toxins were found throughout the colon. Purified toxins A and B (individually and conjointly) caused comparable lesions, as well as fluid accumulation, in ligated intestinal loops. Our findings are in substantial agreement with those of others [Rodriguez-Palacios, A., Stampfli, H.R., Duffield, T., Peregrine, A.S., Trotz-Williams, L.A., Arroyo, L.G., Brazier, J.S., Weese, J.S., 2006. Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes in calves, Canada. Emerg. Infect. Dis. 12, 1730-1736; Porter, M.C., Reggiardo, C., Bueschel, D.M., Keel, M.K., Songer, J.G., 2002. Association of Clostridium difficile with bovine neonatal diarrhea. Proc. 45th Ann. Mtg. Amer. Assoc. Vet. Lab. Diagn., St. Louis, MO, U.S.A.] and add strength to a working hypothesis that C. difficile infection and the

  2. Diagnostic testing for Clostridium difficile in Italian microbiological laboratories.

    PubMed

    Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Morandi, Matteo; Moro, Maria Luisa; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2016-02-01

    A laboratory diagnosis survey of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was performed in Italy in 2012-2013. Questionnaires from 278 healthcare settings from 15 regions of Italy were collected and analysed. Eighty seven percent of the laboratories declared to routinely perform CDI diagnosis, 99% of them only after the clinician's request. Among the 216 laboratories providing information on the size of the hospitals in which they were located, 65 had more than 500 beds (large hospitals), while 151 had less than 500 beds (small hospitals). The average percentage of positive tests for C. difficile toxins was 12.2%. Almost half of the laboratories (42%) used immunoenzymatic assay (EIA) for Tox A/B as a stand-alone method, while only 34% used an algorithm for CDI as indicated by the European guidelines. A low percentage of laboratories performed molecular assays or C. difficile culture, 25% and 29%, respectively. Most laboratories (161/278) declared to type C. difficile strains, the majority in collaboration with a reference laboratory. Among the 103 C. difficile clinical isolates collected during the study, 31 different PCR-ribotypes were identified. PCR-ribotype 356/607 (27%) was predominant, followed by 018 (12%). These two PCR-ribotypes show 87.5% of similarity in ribotyping profile. PCR-ribotypes 027 and 078 represented 8% and 4% of the strains, respectively. Four PCR-ribotypes (027, 033, 078 and 126) were positive for the binary toxin CDT. In particular, PCR-ribotype 033 produces only CDT, and it has recently been associated with symptomatic cases. The majority of strains were multidrug resistant. In particular, all strains PCR-ribotypes 356/607 and 018 were resistant to moxifloxacin, rifampicin, erythromycin and clindamycin. The results obtained highlight the need to raise awareness to the microbiological diagnosis of CDI among clinicians and to implement and harmonize diagnostic methods for CDI in Italian laboratories in the perspective of a future national

  3. Metabolic flexibility of a butyrate pathway mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Minyeong; Croux, Christian; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Soucaille, Philippe

    2017-01-31

    Clostridium acetobutylicum possesses two homologous buk genes, buk (or buk1) and buk2, which encode butyrate kinases involved in the last step of butyrate formation. To investigate the contribution of buk in detail, an in-frame deletion mutant was constructed. However, in all the Δbuk mutants obtained, partial deletions of the upstream ptb gene were observed, and low phosphotransbutyrylase and butyrate kinase activities were measured. This demonstrates that i) buk (CA_C3075) is the key butyrate kinase-encoding gene and that buk2 (CA_C1660) that is poorly transcribed only plays a minor role; and ii) strongly suggests that a Δbuk mutant is not viable if the ptb gene is not also inactivated, probably due to the accumulation of butyryl-phosphate, which might be toxic for the cell. One of the ΔbukΔptb mutants was subjected to quantitative transcriptomic (mRNA molecules/cell) and fluxomic analyses in acidogenic, solventogenic and alcohologenic chemostat cultures. In addition to the low butyrate production, drastic changes in metabolic fluxes were also observed for the mutant: i) under acidogenic conditions, the primary metabolite was butanol and a new metabolite, 2-hydroxy-valerate, was produced ii) under solventogenesis, 58% increased butanol production was obtained compared to the control strain under the same conditions, and a very high yield of butanol formation (0.3gg(-1)) was reached; and iii) under alcohologenesis, the major product was lactate. Furthermore, at the transcriptional level, adhE2, which encodes an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase and is known to be a gene specifically expressed in alcohologenesis, was surprisingly highly expressed in all metabolic states in the mutant. The results presented here not only support the key roles of buk and ptb in butyrate formation but also highlight the metabolic flexibility of C. acetobutylicum in response to genetic alteration of its primary metabolism.

  4. Hydrolyzable and condensed tannins resistance in Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Redondo, L M; Dominguez, J E; Rabinovitz, B C; Redondo, E A; Fernández Miyakawa, M E

    2015-08-01

    Tannins added in the diet are being used to improve nutrition and health in farm animals as an alternative to antibiotic growth promoters and to control enteric clostridial diseases. However, the capacity of Clostridium perfringens to develop resistance under the selective pressure of tannins is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if C. perfringens possess the ability to develop resistance against tannins in comparison with antimicrobial agents. Susceptibility for 7 AGPs (antimicrobial growth promoters), 9 therapeutic antimicrobials and 2 tannin based extracts was determined for 30 C. perfringens strains isolated from poultry and cattle. Two susceptible strains were selected and cultured in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of tannins and AGPs for resistant sub-populations selection. Tannin resistance of C. perfringens isolates from both animal species revealed no statistically significant differences in MICs (minimum inhibitory concentration). Poultry isolates showed higher MICs to several AGPs compared with cattle isolates. All isolates were susceptible to the therapeutic antimicrobials tested, but avian isolates showed a significantly lower susceptibility to these antimicrobials which was highly correlated with an increased resistance to bacitracin and others AGPs. In-vitro selection of resistant clones suggests that C. perfringens was unable to develop resistance against tannins at least compared to AGPs like bacitracin and avilamycin. Avian origin strains, which were previously exposed to antibiotics showed higher resistance, compared to cattle origin strains. These results suggest that the evolution of resistance against tannins in C. perfringens would be more difficult and slower than to the determined AGPs.

  5. The importance of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for correct identification of Clostridium difficile isolated from chromID C. difficile chromogenic agar.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jonathan H K; Cheng, Vincent C C; Wong, Oi-Ying; Wong, Sally C Y; So, Simon Y C; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-01-11

    The clinical workflow of using chromogenic agar and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-fight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for Clostridium difficile identification was evaluated. The addition of MALDI-TOF MS identification after the chromID C. difficile chromogenic agar culture could significantly improve the diagnostic accuracy of C. difficile.

  6. Spirotetronate antibiotics with anti-Clostridium activity from Actinomadura sp. 2EPS.

    PubMed

    Euanorasetr, Jirayut; Intra, Bungonsiri; Mongkol, Phayungsak; Chankhamhaengdecha, Surang; Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Mori, Mihoko; Shiomi, Kazuro; Nihira, Takuya; Panbangred, Watanalai

    2015-02-01

    The rare actinomycetes strain 2EPS was isolated from soil and analysis of cultural, morphological characteristics, diaminopimelic acid content of its cell wall, and 16S rRNA gene sequence indicates that 2EPS belongs to genus Actinomadura. In addition, neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree also confirmed the relationships of this strain to other members of Actinomadura. A butanol extract with antibacterial activity was purified by reversed-phase chromatography to obtain three bioactive compounds, designated as compounds 1, 2 and 3. The structures of these compounds were determined using spectroscopic analysis ((1)H-NMR and (13)C-NMR) and mass spectrometric analysis (HR-TOF-MS). Compounds 1-3 were identified and found to be the same as those included in the Japanese patent number JP 09227587 for spirotetronate antibiotics and are BE-45722A (1), BE-45722B (2) and BE-45722C (3), respectively. All compounds were active against Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579, and B. subtilis ATCC 6633) with low MIC values between 0.08 and 5.0 µg/ml. Moreover, both 1 and 3 also exhibited strong activity, with similar MIC values, against Clostridium perfringens S107 at 0.63 µg/ml and C. difficile 630 at 0.08 µg/ml. These results suggest the identified spirotetronate compounds may have potential in the treatment of Clostridium infections. Overall, this analysis demonstrates that rare actinomycetes are a promising source for discovery of antimicrobial compounds.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium estertheticum DSM 8809, a Microbe Identified in Spoiled Vacuum Packed Beef

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhongyi; Gunn, Lynda; Brennan, Evan; Reid, Rachael; Wall, Patrick G.; Gaora, Peadar Ó.; Hurley, Daniel; Bolton, Declan; Fanning, Séamus

    2016-01-01

    Blown pack spoilage (BPS) is a major issue for the beef industry. Etiological agents of BPS involve members of a group of Clostridium species, including Clostridium estertheticum which has the ability to produce gas, mostly carbon dioxide, under anaerobic psychotrophic growth conditions. This spore-forming bacterium grows slowly under laboratory conditions, and it can take up to 3 months to produce a workable culture. These characteristics have limited the study of this commercially challenging bacterium. Consequently information on this bacterium is limited and no effective controls are currently available to confidently detect and manage this production risk. In this study the complete genome of C. estertheticum DSM 8809 was determined by SMRT® sequencing. The genome consists of a circular chromosome of 4.7 Mbp along with a single plasmid carrying a potential tellurite resistance gene tehB and a Tn3-like resolvase-encoding gene tnpR. The genome sequence was searched for central metabolic pathways that would support its biochemical profile and several enzymes contributing to this phenotype were identified. Several putative antibiotic/biocide/metal resistance-encoding genes and virulence factors were also identified in the genome, a feature that requires further research. The availability of the genome sequence will provide a basic blueprint from which to develop valuable biomarkers that could support and improve the detection and control of this bacterium along the beef production chain. PMID:27891116

  8. Enhanced butanol production in a microbial electrolysis cell by Clostridium beijerinckii IB4.

    PubMed

    He, Ai-Yong; Yin, Chun-Yan; Xu, Hao; Kong, Xiang-Ping; Xue, Jia-Wei; Zhu, Jing; Jiang, Min; Wu, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Reducing power such as NADH is an essential factor for acetone/butanol/ethanol (ABE) fermentation using Clostridium spp. The objective of this study was to increase available NADH in Clostridium beijerinckii IB4 by a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with an electron carrier to enhance butanol production. First of all, a MEC was performed without electron carrier to study the function of cathodic potential applying. Then, various electron carriers were tested, and neutral red (NR)-amended cultures showed an increase of butanol concentration. Optimal NR concentration (0.1 mM) was used to add in a MEC. Electricity stimulated the cell growth obviously and dramatically diminished the fermentation time from 40 to 28 h. NR and electrically reduced NR improved the final butanol concentration and inhibited the acetone generation. In the MEC with NR, the butanol concentration, yield, proportion and productivity were increased by 12.2, 17.4, 7.2 and 60.3 %, respectively. To further understand the mechanisms of NR, cathodic potential applying and electrically reduced NR, NADH and NAD(+) levels, ATP levels and hydrogen production were determined. NR and electrically reduced NR also improved ATP levels and the ratio of NADH/NAD(+), whereas they decreased hydrogen production. Thus, the MEC is an efficient method for enhancing the butanol production.

  9. Phylogeny of the ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, and Clostridium aminophilum sp. nov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paster, B. J.; Russell, J. B.; Yang, C. M.; Chow, J. M.; Woese, C. R.; Tanner, R.

    1993-01-01

    In previous studies, gram-positive bacteria which grew rapidly with peptides or an amino acid as the sole energy source were isolated from bovine rumina. Three isolates, strains C, FT (T = type strain), and SR, were considered to be ecologically important since they produced up to 20-fold more ammonia than other ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria. On the basis of phenotypic criteria, the taxonomic position of these new isolates was uncertain. In this study, the 16S rRNA sequences of these isolates and related bacteria were determined to establish the phylogenetic positions of the organisms. The sequences of strains C, FT, and SR and reference strains of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, Clostridium coccoides, Clostridium aminovalericum, Acetomaculum ruminis, Clostridium leptum, Clostridium lituseburense, Clostridium acidiurici, and Clostridium barkeri were determined by using a modified Sanger dideoxy chain termination method. Strain C, a large coccus purported to belong to the genus Peptostreptococcus, was closely related to P. anaerobius, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.6%. Strain SR, a heat-resistant, short, rod-shaped organism, was closely related to C. sticklandii, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.9%. However, strain FT, a heat-resistant, pleomorphic, rod-shaped organism, was only distantly related to some clostridial species and P. anaerobius. On the basis of the sequence data, it was clear that strain FT warranted designation as a separate species. The closest known relative of strain FT was C. coccoides (level of similarity, only 90.6%). Additional strains that are phenotypically similar to strain FT were isolated in this study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  10. Clostridium phytofermentans sp. nov., a cellulolytic mesophile from forest soil.

    PubMed

    Warnick, Thomas A; Methé, Barbara A; Leschine, Susan B

    2002-07-01

    An obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, strain ISDgT, was isolated from forest soil. Cells of this isolate stained Gram-negative, despite possessing a Gram-positive cell-wall ultrastructure, and were motile, straight rods that formed spherical terminal spores that swelled the sporangium. Cellulose, pectin, polygalacturonic acid, starch, xylan, arabinose, cellobiose, fructose, galactose, gentiobiose, glucose, lactose, maltose, mannose, ribose and xylose supported growth. The major end products of fermentation were ethanol, acetate, CO2 and H2; formate and lactate were minor products. The optimum temperature for growth was 35-37 degrees C. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA sequence comparisons showed that strain ISDgT was related to a group of anaerobes that included Clostridium herbivorans, Clostridium polysaccharolyticum and Clostridium populeti. The G+C content of this strain was 35.9 mol%. On the basis of numerous genotypic and phenotypic differences between strain ISDgT and its close relatives, strain ISDgT is proposed as a novel species in the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium phytofermentans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ISDgT (= ATCC 700394T).

  11. Antimicrobial stewardship and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Piacenti, Frank J; Leuthner, Kimberly D

    2013-10-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programs are essential to health care institutions to promote the appropriate use of antibiotics not only to decrease antimicrobial resistance but to prevent the spread and infection of Clostridium difficile. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is increasing rapidly in the United States and is now considered a major public health problem that poses an immediate threat to the health of patients prescribed antibiotics, more so than antimicrobial resistance. Clostridium difficile-associated disease is the result of collateral damage to the normal bacterial flora of the human body, which is an inevitable consequence of any antibiotic use. Antimicrobial stewardship programs such as audit with feedback and antibiotic restriction are designed to help limit Clostridium difficile infections and other hospital-associated organisms by optimizing antimicrobial selection, dosing, de-escalation, and duration of therapy. These programs also incorporate implementation of hospital-wide guidelines, staff education, enforcement of infection-control policies, and the use of electronic medical records when possible to help control antibiotic use. This article reviews the literature on how antimicrobial stewardship programs impact Clostridium difficile rates and discusses experiences in designing, implementing, monitoring, and follow-through of such programs.

  12. Ferredoxin and Formyltetrahydrofolate Synthetase: Comparative Studies with Clostridium acidiurici, Clostridium cylindrosporum, and Newly Isolated Anaerobic Uric Acid-Fermenting Strains

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Alexander B.; Rabinowitz, Jesse C.

    1977-01-01

    Six strains of Clostridium acidiurici and three strains of C. cylindrosporum were isolated from soil samples by enrichment culture with uric acid as the source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. The newly isolated strains were characterized by their spore morphology and the amounts of glycine and formate formed by the fermentation of uric acid. The strains were easily identified as belonging to one species or the other on the basis of spore morphology and formate production. The crystal properties and spectra of the native ferredoxins of all the strains isolated and the amino acid composition and partial carboxy-terminal sequence of all their apoferredoxins were determined. All the ferredoxins were tested for cross-reactivity with antiserum to C. acidiurici ferredoxin by microcomplement fixation. Five of the six C. acidiurici strains, which had ferredoxins with amino acid compositions identical to that from C. acidiurici, also showed immunological identity (immunological distance = 0.0). These results suggest sequence identity. The one strain with a different amino acid composition failed to show complete cross-reactivity. Two of the three C. cylindrosporum strains have ferredoxin amino acid compositions identical to that from C. cylindrosporum. The third strain had a minimum of five differences in sequence. All C. cylindrosporum strains had ferredoxins that differed considerably from C. acidiurici strains (minimum of eight to nine differences), and none of these ferredoxins cross-reacted with antisera to C. acidiurici ferredoxin. Antisera were prepared to formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase from C. acidiurici and C. cylindrosporum, and all possible comparisons were made by using immunodiffusion and microcomplement fixation. There is more intraspecies variation in the synthetases than in the ferredoxins; however, the results suggest considerable interspecies differences in both proteins. These results suggest a low degree of genomic relatedness between the two species

  13. Detection and characterization of Clostridium perfringens in the feces of healthy and diarrheic dogs

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Michael R.; Kruth, Stephen A.; Bersenas, Alexa M.E.; Holowaychuk, Marie K.; Weese, J. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens has been implicated as a cause of diarrhea in dogs. The objectives of this study were to compare 2 culture methods and to evaluate a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to detect C. perfringens toxin genes alpha (α), beta (β ), beta 2 (β2), epsilon (ɛ), iota (ι), and C. perfringens enterotoxin (cpe) from canine isolates. Fecal samples were collected from clinically normal non-diarrheic (ND) dogs, (n = 105) and diarrheic dogs (DD, n = 54). Clostridium perfringens was isolated by directly inoculating stool onto 5% sheep blood agar (SBA) and enrichment in brain-heart infusion (BHI) broth, followed by inoculation onto SBA. Isolates were tested by multiplex PCR for the presence of α, β, β2, ɛ, ι, and cpe genes. C. perfringens was isolated from 84% of ND samples using direct culture and from 87.6% with enrichment (P = 0.79). In the DD group, corresponding isolation rates were 90.7% and 93.8% (P = 0.65). All isolates possessed the α toxin gene. Beta (β), β2, ɛ, ι, and cpe toxin genes were identified in 4.5%, 1.1%, 3.4%, 1.1%, and 14.8% of ND isolates, respectively. In the DD group, β and β2 were identified in 5%, ɛ and ι were not identified, and the cpe gene was identified in 16.9% of isolates. Enrichment with BHI broth did not significantly increase the yield of C. perfringens, but it did increase the time and cost of the procedure. C. perfringens toxin genes were present in equal proportions in both the ND and DD groups (P ≤ 0.15 to 0.6). Within the parameters of this study, culture of C. perfringens and PCR for toxin genes is of limited diagnostic usefulness due to its high prevalence in normal dogs and the lack of apparent difference in the distribution of toxin genes between normal and diarrheic dogs. PMID:23277693

  14. Growth conditions of clostridium perfringens type B for production of toxins used to obtain veterinary vaccines.

    PubMed

    Viana Brandi, Igor; Domenici Mozzer, Otto; Jorge, Edson Vander; Vieira Passos, Frederico Jose; Lopes Passos, Flavia Maria; Cangussu, Alex Sander Rodrigues; Macedo Sobrinho, Eliane

    2014-09-01

    The diseases caused for Clostridium perfringens are generically called enterotoxemias because toxins produced in the intestine may be absorbed into the general circulation. C. perfringens type B, grown in batch fermentation, produced toxins used to obtain veterinary vaccines. Glucose in concentrations of 1.4-111.1 mM was used to define the culture medium. The minimum concentration for a satisfactory production of vaccines against clostridial diseases was 55.6 mM. Best results were brought forth by meat and casein peptones, both in the concentration 5.0 g l(-1) in combination with glucose and a culture pH maintained at 6.5 throughout the fermentation process. The production of lactic, acetic and propionic organic acids was observed. Ethanol was the metabolite produced in the highest concentration when cultures maintained steady pH of 6.5 with exception of cultures with initial glucose concentration of 1.4 mM, where the highest production was of propionic acid. Maximal cell concentration and the highest toxin title concomitantly low yield coefficient to organic acids and ethanol were obtained using basal medium containing 111.1 mM glucose under a controlled pH culture (pH) 6.5 in batch fermentations of C. perfringens type B. These data contribute to improve process for industrial toxin production allowing better condition to produce a toxoid vaccine.

  15. Organization and regulation of the neurotoxin genes in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Raffestin, Stéphanie; Marvaud, Jean Christophe; Cerrato, Rosario; Dupuy, Bruno; Popoff, Michel R

    2004-04-01

    Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins are structurally and functionally related 150 kDa proteins that are potent inhibitors of neuroexocytosis. Botulinum neurotoxin associates with non-toxic proteins to form complexes of various sizes. The botulinum neurotoxin and non-toxic protein genes are clustered in a DNA segment called the botulinum locus. This locus is probably located on a mobile or degenerate mobile element, which accounts for the various genomic localizations (chromosome, plasmid, phage) in different Clostridium botulinum types. The botulinum neurotoxin and non-toxic protein genes are organized in two polycistronic operons (ntnh-bont and ha operons) transcribed in opposite orientations. The gene that separates the two operons of the botulinum locus in C. botulinum A encodes a 21 kDa protein BotR/A, which is a positive regulator of the expression of the botulinum locus genes. Similarly, in Clostridium tetani, the gene located immediately upstream of the tetanus toxin gene, encodes a positive regulatory protein, TetR. BotR and TetR are possibly alternative sigma factors related to TxeR and UviA, which regulate C. difficile toxin and C. perfringens bacteriocin production, respectively. TxeR and UviA define a new sub-group of the sigma(70) family of RNA polymerase initiation factors. In addition, the C. botulinum genome contains predicted two-component system genes, some of which are possibly involved in regulation of toxinogenesis.

  16. Action of nitroheterocyclic drugs against Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Adhikari, Sudip; Hurdle, Julian G.

    2014-01-01

    The nitroheterocyclic classes of drugs have a long history of use in treating anaerobic infections, as exemplified by metronidazole as a first-line treatment for mild-to-moderate Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Since direct comparisons of the three major classes of nitroheterocyclic drugs (i.e. nitroimidazole, nitazoxanide and nitrofurans) and nitrosating agents against C. difficile are under-examined, in this study their actions against C. difficile were compared. Results show that whilst transient resistance occurs to metronidazole and nitazoxanide, stable resistance arises to nitrofurans upon serial passage. All compounds killed C. difficile at high concentrations in addition to the host defence nitrosating agent S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). This suggests that GSNO killing of C. difficile contributes to its efficacy in murine CDI. Although nitric oxide production could not be detected for the nitroheterocyclic drugs, the cellular response to metronidazole and nitrofurans has some overlap with the response to GSNO, causing significant upregulation of the hybrid-cluster protein Hcp that responds to nitrosative stress. These findings provide new insights into the action of nitroheterocyclic drugs against C. difficile. PMID:25129314

  17. Molecular genetics and pathogenesis of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed Central

    Rood, J I; Cole, S T

    1991-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the causative agent of a number of human diseases, such as gas gangrene and food poisoning, and many diseases of animals. Recently significant advances have been made in the development of C. perfringens genetics. Studies on bacteriocin plasmids and conjugative R plasmids have led to the cloning and analysis of many C. perfringens genes and the construction of shuttle plasmids. The relationship of antibiotic resistance genes to similar genes from other bacteria has been elucidated. A detailed physical map of the C. perfringens chromosome has been prepared, and numerous genes have been located on that map. Reproducible transformation methods for the introduction of plasmids into C. perfringens have been developed, and several genes coding for the production of extracellular toxins and enzymes have been cloned. Now that it is possible to freely move genetic information back and forth between C. perfringens and Escherichia coli, it will be possible to apply modern molecular methods to studies on the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infections. PMID:1779929

  18. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon1,2. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host3,4. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics. PMID:27571750

  19. Elimination of formate production in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Rydzak, Thomas; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-07-11

    We study the ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly degrade cellulose and ferment resulting hydrolysis products into ethanol makes it a promising platform organism for cellulosic biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Currently, however, ethanol yield are far below theoretical maximum due to branched product pathways that divert carbon and electrons towards formate, H2, lactate, acetate, and secreted amino acids. To redirect carbon and electron flux away from formate, pyruvate:formate lyase (pfl) and respective PFL-activating enzyme were deleted. Formate production in the resulting Δpfl strain was eliminated and acetate production decreased by 50% on both complex and defined medium. Growth ratemore » of Δpfl decreased by 2.9-fold on defined medium and diauxic growth was observed on complex medium. Supplementation of defined medium with 2 mM formate restored Δpfl growth rate to 80% of the parent strain. Finally, we discuss the role of pfl in metabolic engineering strategies and C1 metabolism.« less

  20. Perfringolysin O: The Underrated Clostridium perfringens Toxin?

    PubMed Central

    Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Goossens, Evy; Valgaeren, Bonnie; Pardon, Bart; Timbermont, Leen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Deprez, Piet; Wade, Kristin R.; Tweten, Rodney; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as θ toxin), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC). PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250–300 Å in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis. PMID:26008232

  1. Secretome analysis of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Boetzkes, Alexander; Felkel, Katharina Wiebke; Zeiser, Johannes; Jochim, Nelli; Just, Ingo; Pich, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium difficile causes infections ranging from mild C. difficile-associated diarrhea to severe pseudomembranous colitis. Since 2003 new hypervirulent C. difficile strains (PCR ribotype 027) emerged characterized by a dramatically increased mortality. The secretomes of the three C. difficile strains CDR20291, CD196, and CD630 were analyzed and compared. Proteins were separated and analyzed by means of SDS--PAGE and LC-MS. MS data were analyzed using Mascot and proteins were checked for export signals with SecretomeP and SignalP. LC-MS analysis revealed 158 different proteins in the supernatant of C. difficile. Most of the identified proteins originate from the cytoplasm. Thirty-two proteins in CDR20291, 36 in CD196 and 26 in CD630 were identified to be secreted by C. difficile strains. Those were mainly S-layer proteins, substrate-binding proteins of ABC-transporters, cell wall hydrolases, pilin and unknown hypothetical proteins. Toxin A and toxin B were identified after growth in brain heart infusion medium using immunological techniques. The ADP-ribosyltransferase-binding component protein, which is a part of the binary toxin CDT, was only identified in the hypervirulent ribotype 027 strains. Further proteins that are secreted specifically by hypervirulent strains were identified.

  2. Clostridium difficile in poultry and poultry meat.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Roger B; Norman, Keri N; Andrews, Kathleen; Hume, Michael E; Scanlan, Charles M; Callaway, Todd R; Anderson, Robin C; Nisbet, David J

    2011-12-01

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer to human beings. The objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of toxigenic C. difficile in chickens and retail poultry meat in Texas. Seven C. difficile isolates were detected in fecal samples of 300 (2.3%) broiler chickens. Three cultivation procedures were evaluated for isolation of C. difficile from poultry meat and detected 1/32 (3.1%), 2/32 (6.2%), and 4/32 (12.5%) for the three procedures, respectively. Chicken and poultry meat isolates were characterized as toxinotype V and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis gel type-NAP7 or NAP7-variant. Susceptibilities to 11 antimicrobial agents in the current study suggested somewhat reduced resistance than reported for other meat or animal toxinotype V isolates.

  3. The Tcp conjugation system of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Jessica A; Rood, Julian I

    2017-03-07

    The Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens possesses a family of large conjugative plasmids that is typified by the tetracycline resistance plasmid pCW3. Since these plasmids may carry antibiotic resistance genes or genes encoding extracellular or sporulation-associated toxins, the conjugative transfer of these plasmids appears to be important for the epidemiology of C. perfringens-mediated diseases. Sequence analysis of members of this plasmid family identified a highly conserved 35kb region that encodes proteins with various functions, including plasmid replication and partitioning. The tcp conjugation locus also was identified in this region, initially based on low-level amino acid sequence identity to conjugation proteins from the integrative conjugative element Tn916. Genetic studies confirmed that the tcp locus is required for conjugative transfer and combined with biochemical and structural analyses have led to the development of a functional model of the Tcp conjugation apparatus. This review summarises our current understanding of the Tcp conjugation system, which is now one of the best-characterized conjugation systems in Gram-positive bacteria.

  4. Genomics of Clostridium botulinum group III strains.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Oguma, Keiji

    2015-05-01

    In Clostridium botulinum, the characteristics of type C and D strains are quite different from other types, and they are classified as group III. They produce C2 binary toxin and C3 exoenzyme in addition to type C and D neurotoxins. Two different phages and many plasmids are identified in the organisms. The genes of neurotoxin and C3 exoenzyme are converted from toxigenic strains to non-toxigenic strains by the specific bacteriophages (phages), whereas, the C2 toxin gene is carried by large or small plasmids. Classification of type C and D strains has been in confusion because 1) antigenicity of type C and D neurotoxins is complex, 2) the cells produce two types of toxins, neurotoxin and C2 toxin, and 3) some non-toxigenic strains can be converted to produce C or D neurotoxin by the infection with phages. Until now, entire nucleotide sequences of cell chromosomes, phages, and plasmids have been determined. Since both genetic and protein-chemical analyses have been clarifying the above confusions, these data are reviewed historically.

  5. Glycolysis without pyruvate kinase in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Daniel G.; Horl, Manuel; Fuhrer, Tobias; Cui, Jingxuan; Zhou, Jilai; Maloney, Marybeth I.; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Tian, Liang; Sauer, Uwe; Lynd, Lee R.

    2016-12-01

    The metabolism of Clostridium thermocellum is notable in that it assimilates sugar via the EMP pathway but does not possess a pyruvate kinase enzyme. In the wild type organism, there are three proposed pathways for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate, which differ in their cofactor usage. One path uses pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), another pathway uses the combined activities of PEP carboxykinase (PEPCK) and oxaloacetate decarboxylase (ODC). Yet another pathway, the malate shunt, uses the combined activities of PEPCK, malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme. First we showed that there is no flux through the ODC pathway by enzyme assay. Flux through the remaining two pathways (PPDK and malate shunt) was determined by dynamic 13C labeling. In the wild-type strain, the malate shunt accounts for about 33 ± 2% of the flux to pyruvate, with the remainder via the PPDK pathway. Deletion of the ppdk gene resulted in a redirection of all pyruvate flux through the malate shunt. Lastly, this provides the first direct evidence of the in-vivo function of the malate shunt.

  6. Glycolysis without pyruvate kinase in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Daniel G.; Horl, Manuel; Fuhrer, Tobias; ...

    2016-12-01

    The metabolism of Clostridium thermocellum is notable in that it assimilates sugar via the EMP pathway but does not possess a pyruvate kinase enzyme. In the wild type organism, there are three proposed pathways for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate, which differ in their cofactor usage. One path uses pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), another pathway uses the combined activities of PEP carboxykinase (PEPCK) and oxaloacetate decarboxylase (ODC). Yet another pathway, the malate shunt, uses the combined activities of PEPCK, malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme. First we showed that there is no flux through the ODC pathway by enzyme assay.more » Flux through the remaining two pathways (PPDK and malate shunt) was determined by dynamic 13C labeling. In the wild-type strain, the malate shunt accounts for about 33 ± 2% of the flux to pyruvate, with the remainder via the PPDK pathway. Deletion of the ppdk gene resulted in a redirection of all pyruvate flux through the malate shunt. Lastly, this provides the first direct evidence of the in-vivo function of the malate shunt.« less

  7. Current Status of Clostridium difficile Infection Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Lessa, Fernanda C.; Gould, Carolyn V.; McDonald, L. Clifford

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) during recent years, with increases in incidence and severity of disease in several countries, have made CDI a global public health challenge. Increases in CDI incidence have been largely attributed to the emergence of a previously rare and more virulent strain, BI/NAP1/027. Increased toxin production and high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones have made this strain a very successful pathogen in healthcare settings. In addition, populations previously thought to be at low risk are now being identified as having severe CDI. Recent genetic analysis suggests that C. difficile has a highly fluid genome with multiple mechanisms to modify its content and functionality, which can make C. difficile adaptable to environmental changes and potentially lead to the emergence of more virulent strains. In the face of these changes in the epidemiology and microbiology of CDI, surveillance systems are necessary to monitor trends and inform public health actions. PMID:22752867

  8. The Changing Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, J.; Bauer, M. P.; Baines, S. D.; Corver, J.; Fawley, W. N.; Goorhuis, B.; Kuijper, E. J.; Wilcox, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed dramatically during this millennium. Infection rates have increased markedly in most countries with detailed surveillance data. There have been clear changes in the clinical presentation, response to treatment, and outcome of CDI. These changes have been driven to a major degree by the emergence and epidemic spread of a novel strain, known as PCR ribotype 027 (sometimes referred to as BI/NAP1/027). We review the evidence for the changing epidemiology, clinical virulence and outcome of treatment of CDI, and the similarities and differences between data from various countries and continents. Community-acquired CDI has also emerged, although the evidence for this as a distinct new entity is less clear. There are new data on the etiology of and potential risk factors for CDI; controversial issues include specific antimicrobial agents, gastric acid suppressants, potential animal and food sources of C. difficile, and the effect of the use of alcohol-based hand hygiene agents. PMID:20610822

  9. Effects of butanol on Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, L K; Ellefson, W L

    1985-01-01

    The internal pH of Clostridium acetobutylicum was determined at various stages during the growth of the organism. Even in the presence of significant quantities of acetic, butyric, and lactic acids, an internal pH of 6.2 was maintained. Experiments using N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide indicated that a functioning H+-ATPase is necessary for internal pH control. Butanol, one of the end products of the fermentation, had numerous harmful effects on C. acetobutylicum. At a concentration high enough to inhibit growth, butanol destroyed the ability of the cell to maintain internal pH, lowered the intracellular level of ATP, and inhibited glucose uptake. Experiments done at two different external pH values suggested that the butanol-mediated decrease in ATP concentration was independent of the drop in internal pH. Glucose uptake was not affected by arsenate, suggesting that uptake was not ATP dependent. The effects of butanol on C. acetobutylicum are complex, inhibiting several interrelated membrane processes. PMID:2868690

  10. Promoters and proteins from Clostridium thermocellum and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Wu, J. H. David; Newcomb, Michael

    2012-11-13

    The present invention relates to an inducible and a high expression nucleic acid promoter isolated from Clostridium thermocellum. These promoters are useful for directing expression of a protein or polypeptide encoded by a nucleic acid molecule operably associated with the nucleic acid promoters. The present invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs including the C. thermocellum promoters, and expression vectors and hosts containing such nucleic acid constructs. The present invention also relates to protein isolated from Clostridium thermocellum, including a repressor protein. The present invention also provides methods of using the isolated promoters and proteins from Clostridium thermocellum, including methods for directing inducible in vitro and in vivo expression of a protein or polypeptide in a host, and methods of producing ethanol from a cellulosic biomass.

  11. Botulinum neurotoxin homologs in non-Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Michael J; Adams, Jeremy B; Doxey, Andrew C

    2015-01-30

    Clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) are the deadliest toxins known and the causative agents of botulism and tetanus. Despite their structural and functional complexity, no CNT homologs are currently known outside Clostridium. Here, we report the first homologs of Clostridium CNTs within the genome of the rice fermentation organism Weissella oryzae SG25. One gene in W. oryzae S25 encodes a protein with a four-domain architecture and HExxH protease motif common to botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). An adjacent gene with partial similarity to CNTs is also present, and both genes seem to have been laterally transferred into the W. oryzae genome from an unknown source. Identification of mobile, CNT-related genes outside of Clostridium has implications for our understanding of the evolution of this important toxin family.

  12. Cap0037, a Novel Global Regulator of Clostridium acetobutylicum Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Phuong-Thao; Linder, Sonja; Flitsch, Stefanie K.; Schiel-Bengelsdorf, Bettina; Dürre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An operon comprising two genes, CA_P0037 and CA_P0036, that encode proteins of unknown function that were previously shown to be highly expressed in acidogenic cells and repressed in solventogenic and alcohologenic cells is located on the pSOL1 megaplasmid of Clostridium acetobutylicum upstream of adhE2. A CA_P0037::int (189/190s) mutant in which an intron was inserted at position 189/190 in the sense strand of CA_P0037 was successfully generated by the Targetron technique. The resultant mutant showed significantly different metabolic flux patterns in acidogenic (producing mainly lactate, butyrate, and butanol) and alcohologenic (producing mainly butyrate, acetate, and lactate) chemostat cultures but not in solventogenic or batch cultures. Transcriptomic investigation of the CA_P0037::int (189/190s) mutant showed that inactivation of CA_P0037 significantly affected the expression of more than 258 genes under acidogenic conditions. Surprisingly, genes belonging to the Fur regulon, involved in iron transport (CA_C1029-CA_C1032), or coding for the main flavodoxin (CA_C0587) were the most significantly expressed genes under all conditions, whereas fur (coding for the ferric uptake regulator) gene expression remained unchanged. Furthermore, most of the genes of the Rex regulon, such as the adhE2 and ldhA genes, and of the PerR regulon, such as rbr3A-rbr3B and dfx, were overexpressed in the mutant. In addition, the whole CA_P0037-CA_P0036 operon was highly expressed under all conditions in the CA_P0037::int (189/190s) mutant, suggesting a self-regulated expression mechanism. Cap0037 was shown to bind to the CA_P0037-CA_P0036 operon, sol operon, and adc promoters, and the binding sites were determined by DNA footprinting. Finally, a putative Cap0037 regulon was generated using a bioinformatic approach. PMID:27703070

  13. [A patient with sepsis and a gas-forming liver abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens treated with continuous perfusion drainage].

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Kiyonori; Hamada, Akihiko; Kusaka, Toshihiro; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Yoshioka, Takuto; Nakai, Yoshitaka; Matsubara, Susumu; Azechi, Hidemasa; Fujii, Shigehiko; Kokuryu, Hiroyuki

    2014-07-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with diarrhea, fever, and disturbance of consciousness; he was subsequently diagnosed with acute renal and hepatic disorder. Abdominal computed tomography identified a gas-forming liver abscess, and the patient underwent emergency drainage. However, his condition did not improve, and Clostridium perfringens was observed in his blood culture. Continuous perfusion drainage was performed by placing an additional drainage tube, which resulted in abscess shrinkage and improved the patient's general condition. Despite the low survival rate in patients with gas-forming liver abscesses caused by C. perfringens, therapy was successful in this patient.

  14. Detection of Clostridium tetani in human clinical samples using tetX specific primers targeting the neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Madhu; Sheikh, Nasira K; Shah, Pooja; Mehetre, Gajanan; Dharne, Mahesh S; Nagoba, Basavraj S

    2016-01-01

    Tetanus resulting from ear injury remains an important health problem, particularly in the developing world. We report the successful detection of Clostridium tetani using tetX specific primers targeting the Cl. tetani neurotoxin. The sample was obtained from an ear discharge of a case of otogenic tetanus in a 2-year-old male child. Based on the culture results of the ear discharge, Gram staining and virulence testing by genotyping, a diagnosis of tetanus was confirmed. This is the first report from India on the successful detection of Cl. tetani in a human clinical sample using tetX specific primers targeting the Cl. tetani neurotoxin.

  15. Thermolabile triose phosphate isomerase in a psychrophilic Clostridium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. W.; Akagi, J. M.; Himes, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    It was found that a psychrophilic Clostridium contains a triose phosphate isomerase which is very labile at moderate temperatures. An investigation showed that the optimal growth temperature of the psychrophile was between 15 and 20 deg C. No growth occurred at 25 deg C. The thermostability of the glycolytic enzymes in the cell-free extracts of Clostridium sp. strain 69 was studied. The data obtained show that the triose phosphate isomerase is quite labile at moderate temperatures. The instability of the enzyme is sufficient to explain the low maximum growth temperature of the psychrophile.

  16. A case of Clostridium septicum spontaneous gas gangrene.

    PubMed

    Dylewski, Joe; Drummond, Robert; Rowen, John

    2007-03-01

    Severe skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are often life-threatening emergencies that require a rapid diagnosis. Gas gangrene is one of the most fulminant types of SSTI and is usually caused by Clostridium perfringens' contamination of an open wound. Although gas gangrene is usually associated with fecally contaminated wounds, "spontaneous" cases occur and are most commonly caused by Clostridium (C.) septicum. We report a case of spontaneous gas gangrene caused by C. septicum that only became manifest while the patient was being monitored in the emergency department. We also review the diagnosis and treatment aspects of this entity.

  17. The story of Clostridium botulinum: from food poisoning to Botox.

    PubMed

    Ting, Patricia T; Freiman, Anatoli

    2004-01-01

    In the last fifty years, Clostridium botulinum has become notorious for its ability to produce the deadly botulinum neurotoxins. While botulinum toxin A, better known as Botox, is universally recognised by the public as a cosmetic enhancement tool, the botulinum neurotoxins are commonly used off-label for many medical conditions in ophthalmology, neurology and dermatology. The versatility of these botulinum toxins has made Clostridium botulinum one of the most widely known bacterial pathogens in medical history. This article outlines the discovery of botulinum toxins through to their present day applications in medicine.

  18. Genetic Engineering of Clostridium Difficile Toxin a Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-16

    D’iC FILE COPY • AD I’- GENETIC ENGINEERING OF 0 CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE TOXIN A VACCINE ANNUAL REPORT Lycurgus L. Muldrow Joe Johnson August 16, 1990...62770A 1 62770A871 I AA f 348 11. TITLE (kicAld Sowufy 0aiaflcanon) (U) Genetic Engineering of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Vaccine 12. PERSONAL...FIELD GROUP ISU3.GROUP- Clastridlum difficile Vaccine __ 02IRU Recomb in nta ~ 06 1 03 -9 4W .RA-W--I It ABSTRACT (Contin. on ’erser if neconay and

  19. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of volatile amines produced by several strains of Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Pons, J L; Rimbault, A; Darbord, J C; Leluan, G

    1985-02-08

    A gas chromatographic--mass spectrometric technique is proposed for the analysis of volatile amines which were isolated from Clostridium cultures by vacuum distillation and concentrated as hydrochloride salts. Headspace sampling after alkalinization of the salts under vacuum was the most suitable for subsequent gas chromatographic analysis. With ammonia-loaded helium as carrier gas, methylamines were separated on 4.8% PEG 2OM + 0.3% potassium hydroxide on Carbopack B, and other volatile amines on 28% Pennwalt 223 + 4% potassium hydroxide on Gas-Chrom R. Bacterial volatile amines (dimethylamine, trimethylamine, isobutylamine, 3-methylbutylamine, etc.) were detected with a flame-ionization detector and identified by gas chromatography--mass spectrometry in electron-impact and chemical ionization modes.

  20. Symbiotic relationship of Bacteroides cellulosolvens and Clostridium saccharolyticum in cellulose fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, W.D.

    1986-04-01

    In coculture, Bacteroides cellulosolvens and Clostridium saccharolyticum fermented 33% more cellulose than did B. cellulosolvens alone. Also, cellulose digestion continued at a maximum rate 48 h longer in coculture. B. cellulosolvens hydrolyzes cellulose and supplies C. saccharolyticum with sugars and a growth factor replaceable by yeast extract. Alone, B. cellulosovens exhibited an early cessation of growth which was not due to nutrient depletion, low pH, or toxic accumulation of acetic acid, ethanol, lactic acid, H/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, cellobiose, glucose, or xylose. However, a 1-h incubation of B. cellulosolvens spent-culture medium with C. saacharolyticum cells starved for growth factor allowed a resumption of B. cellulosolvens growth. The symbiotic relationship of this naturally occurring coculture is one of mutualism, in which the cellulolytic microbe supplies the saccharolytic microbe with nutrients, and in turn the saccharolytic microbe removes a secondary metabolite toxic to the primary microbe.

  1. Effect of exogenous electron shuttles on growth and fermentative metabolism in Clostridium sp. BC1

    SciTech Connect

    Yarlagadda V. N.; Francis A.; Gupta, A.; Dodge, C. J.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, the influence exogenous electron shuttles on the growth and glucose fermentative metabolism of Clostridium sp. BC1 was investigated. Bicarbonate addition to mineral salts (MS) medium accelerated growth and glucose fermentation which shifted acidogenesis (acetic- and butyric-acids) towards solventogenesis (ethanol and butanol). Addition of ferrihydrite, anthraquinone disulfonate, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in bicarbonate to growing culture showed no significant influence on fermentative metabolism. In contrast, methyl viologen (MV) enhanced ethanol- and butanol-production by 28- and 12-fold, respectively with concomitant decrease in hydrogen, acetic- and butyric-acids compared to MS medium. The results show that MV addition affects hydrogenase activity with a significant reduction in hydrogen production and a shift in the direction of electron flow towards enhanced production of ethanol and butanol.

  2. Biobutanol production by a new local isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shorgani, Najeeb Kaid; Tibin, El Mubarak; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid; Yusoff, Wan Mohtar Wan; Hamid, Aidil Abdul

    2014-09-01

    Increasing demand of energy and awareness about environmental pollution has led to increase interest in alternative, clean and renewable energy sources. Biobutanol is considered as the candidate liquid biofuel to replace gasoline. In this study, the capability of a newly isolated strain of local Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1 was tested to produce biobutanol in batch fermentation. Various culture conditions including glucose concentration, initial pH, incubation temperature and inoculum size were investigated for their effects on production of biobutanol using strain YM1. The results showed that the optimal biobutanol production was obtained at glucose concentration 50 g/L, initial pH 6.2, temperature 30°C and inoculum size 10%. These results show that C. acetobutylicum YM1 as a mesophilic bacterium is a potential candidate for biobutanol production.

  3. Symbiotic Relationship of Bacteroides cellulosolvens and Clostridium saccharolyticum in Cellulose Fermentation†

    PubMed Central

    Murray, William D.

    1986-01-01

    In coculture, Bacteroides cellulosolvens and Clostridium saccharolyticum fermented 33% more cellulose than did B. cellulosolvens alone. Also, cellulose digestion continued at a maximum rate 48 h longer in coculture. B. cellulosolvens hydrolyzes cellulose and supplies C. saccharolyticum with sugars and a growth factor replaceable by yeast extract. Alone, B. cellulosolvens exhibited an early cessation of growth which was not due to nutrient depletion, low pH, or toxic accumulation of acetic acid, ethanol, lactic acid, H2, CO2, cellobiose, glucose, or xylose. However, a 1-h incubation of B. cellulosolvens spent-culture medium with C. saacharolyticum cells starved for growth factor allowed a resumption of B. cellulosolvens growth. The symbiotic relationship of this naturally occurring coculture is one of mutualism, in which the cellulolytic microbe supplies the saccharolytic microbe with nutrients, and in turn the saccharolytic microbe removes a secondary metabolite toxic to the primary microbe. Images PMID:16347034

  4. Occurrence of human pathogenic Clostridium botulinum among healthy dairy animals: an emerging public health hazard

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Moein, Khaled A.; Hamza, Dalia A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study was conducted to investigate the occurrence of human pathogenic Clostridium botulinum in the feces of dairy animals. Fecal samples were collected from 203 apparently healthy dairy animals (50 cattle, 50 buffaloes, 52 sheep, 51 goats). Samples were cultured to recover C. botulinum while human pathogenic C. botulinum strains were identified after screening of all C. botulinum isolates for the presence of genes that encode toxins type A, B, E, F. The overall prevalence of C. botulinum was 18.7% whereas human pathogenic C. botulinum strains (only type A) were isolated from six animals at the rates of 2, 2, 5.8, and 2% for cattle, buffaloes, sheep, and goats, respectively. High fecal carriage rates of C. botulinum among apparently healthy dairy animals especially type A alarm both veterinary and public health communities for a potential role which may be played by dairy animals in the epidemiology of such pathogen. PMID:27077311

  5. THE ACTION OF ENZYMES FROM CLOSTRIDIUM TERTIUM ON THE I ANTIGENIC DETERMINANT OF HUMAN ERYTHROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Donald M.; Kabat, Elvin A.; Rosenfield, Richard E.

    1963-01-01

    A method was described for the partial purification of beta galactosidase and beta glucosaminidase from Clostridium tertium culture supernatants. Treatment of erythrocytes with preparations containing both enzymes decreases their ability to react with anti-I cold agglutinins, and with Type XIV antipneumococcal horse serum. Erythrocytes of blood group A1 are altered more rapidly and extensively than are group O cells. The enzymatic treatment of stroma results in a decrease in ability to absorb anti-I agglutinins and the release of galactose and N-acetylglucosamine as monosaccharides. The data suggest that these two sugars may be structural units of the erythrocyte I determinant, but no direct evidence is available. PMID:14074383

  6. Prevalence of Clostridium difficile in Uncooked Ground Meat Products from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Jane W.; Schlackman, Jessica L.; Harrison, Lee H.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile in retail meat samples has varied widely. The food supply may be a source for C. difficile infections. A total of 102 ground meat and sausage samples from 3 grocers in Pittsburgh, PA, were cultured for C. difficile. Brand A pork sausages were resampled between May 2011 and January 2012. Two out of 102 (2.0%) meat products initially sampled were positive for C. difficile; both were pork sausage from brand A from the same processing facility (facility A). On subsequent sampling of brand A products, 10/19 samples from processing facility A and 1/10 samples from 3 other facilities were positive for C. difficile. The isolates recovered were inferred ribotype 078, comprising 6 genotypes. The prevalence of C. difficile in retail meat may not be as high as previously reported in North America. When contamination occurs, it may be related to events at processing facilities. PMID:22504814

  7. Conversion of acids to alcohols by Clostridium ragsdalei strain P11: Process optimization and biochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isom, Catherine E.

    Research focus was directed toward the development of a biocatalyst that can be used to produce commodity chemicals and transportation fuels from volatile fatty acids ubiquitous in waste biomass. Clostridium ragsdalei was introduced to serve as an exemplar carboxidotrophic acetogen that reduces VFAs to alcohols of the same carbon structure with only acetate and ethanol as by-products of the fermentation. This dissertation developed a better understanding of this process in C. ragsdalei and, in turn, other similar bacteria and to supported previous discoveries as they relate to carboxylate reduction in acetogens. Additionally, pure culture studies allowed for a more detailed understanding of the biochemical behavior response to different compounds without skewing the results due to the influence of other species.

  8. Fatal clostridium septicum myonecrosis in a captive canada lynx (Lynx canadensis).

    PubMed

    Izer, Jenelle M; Wilson, Ronald P; Cooper, Timothy K

    2014-09-01

    A 1-yr-old female Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) presented for sudden onset of rapidly progressive bilateral pelvic limb paralysis. The lynx was chemically immobilized to perform a physical examination but expired shortly thereafter. On postmortem radiographs, there were myriad small irregular, round-to-spherical gas densities within the skeletal muscle of the right thigh and epaxial musculature. At gross necropsy, the muscles of the right thigh, right lateral abdominal wall, and epaxial region were emphysematous and necrohemorrhagic, with subcutaneous and muscular crepitant swelling. Multiple skin puncture wounds, consistent with bites, were present over the affected tissues. Clostridium septicum was isolated in pure anaerobic culture from the musculature of the right hind limb. Histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute, severe necrohemorrhagic and gangrenous myositis and cellulitis. Gram stains demonstrated large gram-positive bacilli with subterminal spores. This is the first known documented case of C. septicum myonecrosis in a nondomestic felid.

  9. Notes from the field: infant botulism caused by Clostridium baratii type F - Iowa, 2013.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Amaran; Quinlisk, Patricia; Garvey, Ann; Kalas, Nicholas; Barash, Jason R; Khouri, Jessica M

    2015-04-17

    In June 2013, a male newborn aged 9 days (delivered after a full-term pregnancy) was brought to a hospital emergency department with a 2-day history of constipation, fussiness, and poor feeding. The mother reported her son's symptoms as excessive crying, reluctance to suck, and difficulty in swallowing milk. Within hours of arrival, the infant became less responsive and "floppy," and was intubated for respiratory failure. Infant botulism was suspected and Botulism Immune Globulin Intravenous (Human) (BIG-IV), licensed for the treatment of infant botulism types A and B, was administered on hospital day 2. Results of preliminary stool studies were reported positive for botulinum toxin type F on hospital day 3. Clostridium baratii type F was subsequently isolated in stool culture.

  10. Occurrence of human pathogenic Clostridium botulinum among healthy dairy animals: an emerging public health hazard.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Moein, Khaled A; Hamza, Dalia A

    2016-01-01

    The current study was conducted to investigate the occurrence of human pathogenic Clostridium botulinum in the feces of dairy animals. Fecal samples were collected from 203 apparently healthy dairy animals (50 cattle, 50 buffaloes, 52 sheep, 51 goats). Samples were cultured to recover C. botulinum while human pathogenic C. botulinum strains were identified after screening of all C. botulinum isolates for the presence of genes that encode toxins type A, B, E, F. The overall prevalence of C. botulinum was 18.7% whereas human pathogenic C. botulinum strains (only type A) were isolated from six animals at the rates of 2, 2, 5.8, and 2% for cattle, buffaloes, sheep, and goats, respectively. High fecal carriage rates of C. botulinum among apparently healthy dairy animals especially type A alarm both veterinary and public health communities for a potential role which may be played by dairy animals in the epidemiology of such pathogen.

  11. Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons are a Novel, Highly Sensitive Tissue Culture Platform for Botulinum Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    drug discovery while dramatically decreasing animal use. Published by Elsevier Inc. 1. Introduction The Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are...Quinn, Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins act with a wide range of potencies on SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, Neurotoxicology 22 (2001) 447–453...tissue culture platform for botulinum research 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) McNutt, P, Celver, J, Hamilton, T, Mesngon

  12. Diagnosis and management of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Herbert L

    2013-10-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is increasing in frequency and severity in and out of the hospital, with a high probability of recurrence after treatment. The recent literature on CDI was reviewed using PubMed to include recent publications dealing with diagnosis and therapy. Real-time polymerase chain reaction is a sensitive and useful diagnostic test for CDI but there are growing concerns of false-positive test results if the rate of CDI is low in the patient population providing samples and/or if the population being studied commonly includes people with C difficile colonization. Recommended therapy of CDI includes oral metronidazole for milder cases of CDI and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for more severe cases, each given for 10 days. Colectomy is being performed more frequently in patients with fulminant CDI. For treatment of first recurrences the drug used in the first bout can be used again and for second recurrences longer courses of vancomycin often are given in a tapered dose or intermittently to allow gut flora reconstitution, or other treatments including fidaxomicin may be used. Bacteriotherapy with fecal transplantation is playing an increasing role in therapy of recurrent cases. Metagenomic studies of patients with CDI during successful therapy are needed to determine how best to protect the flora from assaults from antibacterial drugs and to develop optimal therapeutic approaches. Immunotherapy and immunoprophylaxis offer opportunities to prevent CDI, to speed up recovery from CDI, and to eliminate recurrent infection. Humanized monoclonal antitoxin antibodies and active immunization with vaccines against C difficile or its toxins are both in development and appear to be of potential value.

  13. Digestion of epithelial tight junction proteins by the commensal Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Pruteanu, Mihaela; Shanahan, Fergus

    2013-11-15

    The enteric microbiota contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, but the pathways involved and bacterial participants may vary in different hosts. We previously reported that some components of the human commensal microbiota, particularly Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens), have the proteolytic capacity for host matrix degradation and reduce transepithelial resistance. Here, we examined the C. perfringens-derived proteolytic activity against epithelial tight junction proteins using human intestinal epithelial cell lines. We showed that the protein levels of E-cadherin, occludin, and junctional adhesion molecule 1 decrease in colonic cells treated with C. perfringens culture supernatant. E-cadherin ectodomain shedding in C. perfringens-stimulated intestinal epithelial cells was detected with antibodies against the extracellular domain of E-cadherin, and we demonstrate that this process occurs in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, we showed that the filtered sterile culture supernatant of C. perfringens has no cytotoxic activity on the human intestinal cells at the concentrations used in this study. The direct cleavage of E-cadherin by the proteases from the C. perfringens culture supernatant was confirmed by C. perfringens supernatant-induced in vitro degradation of the human recombinant E-cadherin. We conclude that C. perfringens culture supernatant mediates digestion of epithelial cell junctional proteins, which is likely to enable access to the extracellular matrix components by the paracellular pathway.

  14. Chemical characterization of the regularly arranged surface layers of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum.

    PubMed

    Sleytr, U B; Thorne, K J

    1976-04-01

    Clostridum thermosaccharolyticum and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum possess as outermost cell wall layer a tetragonal or hexagonal ordered array of macromolecules. The subunits of the surface layer can be detached from isolated cell walls with urea (8M) or guanidine-HCl (4 to 5 M). Triton X-100, dithiothreitol, ethylenediaminetetracetate, and KCl (3 M) had no visible effect on the regular arrays. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophroesis showed that, in both organisms, the surface layer is composed of glycoprotein of molecular weight 140,000. The glycoprotein from both microorganisms has a predominantly acidic amino acid composition and an acidic isoelectric point after isoelectric focusing on polyacrylamide gels. The glycocomponent is composed of glucose, galactose, mannose, and rhamnose.

  15. Metal Ion Activation of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium difficile Toxin B

    PubMed Central

    Genth, Harald; Schelle, Ilona; Just, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Lethal Toxin from Clostridium sordellii (TcsL) and Toxin B from Clostridium difficile (TcdB) belong to the family of the “Large clostridial glycosylating toxins.” These toxins mono-O-glucosylate low molecular weight GTPases of the Rho and Ras families by exploiting UDP-glucose as a hexose donor. TcsL is casually involved in the toxic shock syndrome and the gas gangrene. TcdB—together with Toxin A (TcdA)—is causative for the pseudomembranous colitis (PMC). Here, we present evidence for the in vitro metal ion activation of the glucosyltransferase and the UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity of TcsL and TcdB. The following rating is found for activation by divalent metal ions: Mn2+ > Co2+ > Mg2+ >> Ca2+, Cu2+, Zn2+. TcsL and TcdB thus require divalent metal ions providing an octahedral coordination sphere. The EC50 values for TcsL were estimated at about 28 µM for Mn2+ and 180 µM for Mg2+. TcsL and TcdB further require co-stimulation by monovalent K+ (not by Na+). Finally, prebound divalent metal ions were dispensible for the cytopathic effects of TcsL and TcdB, leading to the conclusion that TcsL and TcdB recruit intracellular metal ions for activation of the glucosyltransferase activity. With regard to the intracellular metal ion concentrations, TcsL and TcdB are most likely activated by K+ and Mg2+ (rather than Mn2+) in mammalian target cells. PMID:27089365

  16. Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens from wild carnivore species in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; D'Elia, Mirella Lauria; Tostes Teixeira, Erika Procópio; Pereira, Pedro Lúcio Lithg; de Magalhães Soares, Danielle Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Álvaro Roberto; Kocuvan, Aleksander; Rupnik, Maja; Santos, André Luiz Quagliatto; Junior, Carlos Augusto Oliveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2014-08-01

    Despite some case reports, the importance of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile for wild carnivores remains unclear. Thus, the objective of this study was to identify C. perfringens and C. difficile strains in stool samples from wild carnivore species in Brazil. A total of 34 stool samples were collected and subjected to C. perfringens and C. difficile isolation. Suggestive colonies of C. perfringens were then analyzed for genes encoding the major C. perfringens toxins (alpha, beta, epsilon and iota) and the beta-2 toxin (cpb2), enterotoxin (cpe) and NetB (netb) genes. C. difficile strains were analyzed by multiplex-PCR for toxins A (tcdA) and B (tcdB) and a binary toxin gene (cdtB) and also submitted to a PCR ribotyping. Unthawed aliquots of samples positive for C. difficile isolation were subjected to the detection of A/B toxins by a cytotoxicity assay (CTA). C. perfringens was isolated from 26 samples (76.5%), all of which were genotyped as type A. The netb gene was not detected, whereas the cpb2 and cpe genes were found in nine and three C. perfringens strains, respectively. C. difficile was isolated from two (5.9%) samples. A non-toxigenic strain was recovered from a non-diarrheic maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus). Conversely, a toxigenic strain was found in the sample of a diarrheic ocelot (Leopardus pardallis); an unthawed stool sample was also positive for A/B toxins by CTA, indicating a diagnosis of C. difficile-associated diarrhea in this animal. The present work suggests that wild carnivore species could carry C. difficile strains and that they could be susceptible to C. difficile infection.

  17. Human fulminant gas gangrene caused by Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Noriyuki; Isomine, Shinji; Kato, Haru; Sasaki, Yoshimasa; Takahashi, Motohide; Sakaida, Koji; Nagano, Yukiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2008-04-01

    The first human case of fulminant gas gangrene caused by Clostridium chauvoei, a pathogen causing ruminant blackleg, was confirmed for a 58-year-old man suffering from diabetes mellitus. The patient developed conspicuous emphysematous gangrene in the right chest wall as well as intravascular gas entrapments and died 2 h after hospital arrival.

  18. Biosynthesis of a thiamin antivitamin in Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Lisa E; O'Leary, Seán E; Begley, Tadhg P

    2014-04-15

    Bacimethrin-derived 2'-methoxythiamin pyrophosphate inhibits microbial growth by disrupting metabolic pathways dependent on thiamin-utilizing enzymes. This study describes the discovery of the bacimethrin biosynthetic gene cluster of Clostridium botulinum A ATCC 19397 and in vitro reconstitution of bacimethrin biosynthesis from cytidine 5'-monophosphate.

  19. Clostridium difficile from healthy food animals: Optimized isolation and prevalence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two isolation methods were compared for isolation of Clostridium difficile from food animal feces. The single alcohol shock method (SS) used selective enrichment in cycloserine-cefoxitin fructose broth supplemented with 0.1% sodium taurocholate (TCCFB) followed by alcohol shock and isolation on tryp...

  20. Ribulokinase and transcriptional regulation of arabinose metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Leyn, Semen A; Gu, Yang; Jiang, Weihong; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Yang, Chen

    2012-03-01

    The transcription factor AraR controls utilization of L-arabinose in Bacillus subtilis. In this study, we combined a comparative genomic reconstruction of AraR regulons in nine Clostridium species with detailed experimental characterization of AraR-mediated regulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum. Based on the reconstructed AraR regulons, a novel ribulokinase, AraK, present in all analyzed Clostridium species was identified, which was a nonorthologous replacement of previously characterized ribulokinases. The predicted function of the araK gene was confirmed by inactivation of the araK gene in C. acetobutylicum and biochemical assays using purified recombinant AraK. In addition to the genes involved in arabinose utilization and arabinoside degradation, extension of the AraR regulon to the pentose phosphate pathway genes in several Clostridium species was revealed. The predicted AraR-binding sites in the C. acetobutylicum genome and the negative effect of L-arabinose on DNA-regulator complex formation were verified by in vitro binding assays. The predicted AraR-controlled genes in C. acetobutylicum were experimentally validated by testing gene expression patterns in both wild-type and araR-inactivated mutant strains during growth in the absence or presence of L-arabinose.

  1. Clostridium septicum Aortitis of the Infrarenal Abdominal Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aditya; Yousuf, Tariq; Rachid, Mohammed; Ali, Naureen; Tabriz, Muhammad; Loughry, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium septicum aortitis is a rare infection that has a strong association with occult colonic malignancy. There is also emerging evidence to support the combination of medical and surgical management over medical management alone. To the best of our knowledge, we report the 40th known case of C. septicum aortitis. PMID:26767087

  2. Human Fulminant Gas Gangrene Caused by Clostridium chauvoei▿

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Noriyuki; Isomine, Shinji; Kato, Haru; Sasaki, Yoshimasa; Takahashi, Motohide; Sakaida, Koji; Nagano, Yukiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2008-01-01

    The first human case of fulminant gas gangrene caused by Clostridium chauvoei, a pathogen causing ruminant blackleg, was confirmed for a 58-year-old man suffering from diabetes mellitus. The patient developed conspicuous emphysematous gangrene in the right chest wall as well as intravascular gas entrapments and died 2 h after hospital arrival. PMID:18256217

  3. Genome of a chronic osteitis-causing Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P-E; Levy, P-Y; Million, M; Croce, O; Blanc-Tailleur, C; Brouqui, P; Raoult, D

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced the genome of a Clostridium tetani strain that caused chronic tibial osteitis without any clinical sign of tetanus in a 26-year-old man previously vaccinated against this disease. The genome contained a plasmid that harboured the tetX-tetR tetanospasmin operon, and was highly similar to that of a tetanus-causing strain.

  4. Prevention of Healthcare-Associated Clostridium difficile: What Works?

    PubMed Central

    Dubberke, Erik R.

    2013-01-01

    Prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has become extremely important because of increases in CDI incidence and severity. Unfortunately CDI prevention efforts are hampered by lack of data to support optimal prevention methods, especially for endemic CDI. Studies are needed to define optimal prevention practices and to investigate novel prevention methods. PMID:20929366

  5. Clostridium difficile in retail meat and processing plants in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile (Cd) have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains of Cd. Toxigenic Cd has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer ...

  6. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in a hepatology ward.

    PubMed

    Vanjak, Dominique; Girault, Guillaume; Branger, Catherine; Rufat, Pierre; Valla, Dominique-Charles; Fantin, Bruno

    2007-02-01

    During 2001, Clostridium difficile infection was observed in 23 patients hospitalized in a hepatology ward (attack rate, 0.9%). Since strain typing ruled out a clonal dissemination, we performed a case-control study. In addition to antibiotic use as a risk factor, the C. difficile infection rate was higher among patients with autoimmune hepatitis (P<.01).

  7. Diagnosis of Clostridium perfringens intestinal infections in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Uzal, F A

    2004-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens produces disease in sheep, goats and other animal species, most of which are generically called enterotoxemias. This micro-organism can be a normal inhabitant of the intestine of most animal species including humans, but when the intestinal environment is altered by sudden changes in diet or other factors, C. perfringens proliferates in large numbers and produces several potent toxins that are absorbed into the general circulation or act locally with usually devastating effects on the host. History, clinical signs and gross post-mortem findings are useful tools for establishing a presumptive diagnosis of enterotoxaemia by C. perfringens in sheep and goats, although no definitive diagnosis of these diseases can be made without laboratory confirmation. Because all types of C. perfringens can be normal inhabitants of the intestine of most animals, culture of this micro-organism from intestinal contents of animals has no diagnostic value unless a colony count is performed and large numbers (usually more than 10(4)-10(7)CFU/g) of C. perfringens are found. The most accepted criterion in establishing a definitive diagnosis of enterotoxaemia by C. perfringens is the detection of its toxins in intestinal contents. However, some of the major toxins of C. perfringens (i.e. epsilon toxin) can also be found, albeit in small amounts, in the small intestine of clinically normal sheep, and this poses a diagnostic challenge. In such cases the histopathology of the brain must be used as an alternative diagnostic tool, since the lesions produced by epsilon toxin in the brains of sheep and goats are unique and pathognomonic for C. perfringens type D enterotoxaemia. Ancillary tests, such as measurement of urine glucose or observation of Gram stained smears of intestinal mucosa can be used and, although they have a presumptive diagnostic value when positive, they cannot be used to rule out a diagnosis of enterotoxaemia if they are negative. In conclusion, the

  8. Nitrogen-gas bubbling during the cultivation of Clostridium tetani produces a higher yield of tetanus toxin for the preparation of its toxoid.

    PubMed

    De Luca, M M; Abeiro, H D; Bernagozzi, J A; Basualdo, J A

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the effect of exposing cultures of Clostridium tetani to nitrogen (N2) gas on the recovery of tetanus toxin to be processed for the preparation of its toxoid. N2 was bubbled through nine 10-liter cultures during the growth of the bacteria, while nine parallel control incubations were maintained without bubbling. We found that treatment of the C. tetani anaerobes with an inert gas in this manner during cultivation produced a highly significant increase in the yield of tetanus toxin from them in comparison with the standard procedure.

  9. Entérite nécrotique chez le poulet de gril II. Caractères des souches de Clostridium perfringens isolées

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, G.; Filion, R.; Malo, R.; Phaneuf, J.-B.

    1974-01-01

    A Gram positive bacillus, strictly anaerobic, was isolated from the viscera of all diseased birds showing lesions of necrotic enteritis. Its morphology and biochemical reactions, the presence of alpha and thêta hemolysins and the production of a lecithinase-C in vitro, all these characteristics indicated a similarity to those belonging to the group of Clostridium perfringens. The two hemolysins were neutralized in vitro only by the antitoxin A. Broiler chickens injected I.V. with a Viande-Foie (VF) broth culture of Clostridium perfringens together with the antitoxin A survived, whereas those receiving antitoxin C died. These results seem to indicate that this organism belongs to the type A. This bacillus was sensitive to a great variety of antibiotics, except neomycin. PMID:4368193

  10. Development and validation of a multiplex real-time PCR for detection of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum.

    PubMed

    Lange, Martin; Neubauer, Heinrich; Seyboldt, Christian

    2010-08-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the causative agent of blackleg in cattle and sheep. The clinical symptoms of this severe disease are very similar to that of malignant edema (Clostridium septicum), infections of other Clostridium species belonging to the gas edema complex, and anthrax (Bacillus anthracis). C. chauvoei and C. septicum are closely related taxa and share many phenotypic properties hampering diagnosis by using traditional microbiological methods. Thus, there is a need for a fast and reliable identification method for specific detection of both species in clinical samples. The multiplex real-time PCR assay presented here is based on the detection of the spo0A gene and enables the simultaneous identification of C. chauvoei and C. septicum. The assay design includes an amplification control DNA template for the recognition of PCR-inhibitors. Assay validation was performed using a collection of 29 C. chauvoei, 38 C. septicum strains and 26 strains of other Clostridium species. Furthermore, the real-time PCR assay was successfully tested on tissue samples from 19 clinical blackleg cases. The assay allowed the reliable detection of one picogram DNA which represents approximate 239 genome equivalents.

  11. Genome Sequence of Clostridium paraputrificum 373-A1 Isolated in Chile from a Patient Infected with Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Araya, Enzo; Plaza-Garrido, Angela; Díaz-Yañez, Fernando; Pizaro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Valenzuela, Sandro L.; Meneses, Claudio; Gil, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium paraputrificum is a gut microbiota member reported in several cases of bacteremia and coinfections. So far, only one genome sequence of a C. paraputrificum (AGR2156) isolate is available. Here, we present the draft genome of C. paraputrificum strain 373-A1, isolated from stools from a patient with C. difficile infection. PMID:27811092

  12. Genome Sequence of Clostridium paraputrificum 373-A1 Isolated in Chile from a Patient Infected with Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Araya, Enzo; Plaza-Garrido, Angela; Díaz-Yañez, Fernando; Pizaro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Valenzuela, Sandro L; Meneses, Claudio; Gil, Fernando; Castro-Nallar, Eduardo; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2016-11-03

    Clostridium paraputrificum is a gut microbiota member reported in several cases of bacteremia and coinfections. So far, only one genome sequence of a C. paraputrificum (AGR2156) isolate is available. Here, we present the draft genome of C. paraputrificum strain 373-A1, isolated from stools from a patient with C. difficile infection.

  13. Development of a real time PCR Taqman assay based on the TPI gene for simultaneous identification of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum.

    PubMed

    Garofolo, G; Galante, D; Serrecchia, L; Buonavoglia, D; Fasanella, A

    2011-02-01

    In the present study, a Taqman allelic discrimination assay based on three SNPs of the TPI gene is described. It was used as a differential diagnostic tool to detect blackleg and malignant edema. Sudden deaths of grazing ruminants, such as cattle, sheep and goats, which show clinical signs related to hyperacute infective processes, encouraged the development of a rapid and precise diagnostic molecular method. Specific primers and probes for Clostridium septicum and Clostridium chauvoei were designed on the basis of the TPI gene sequence. The multiplex PCR was tested on the DNA of a total of 57 strains, including 24 Clostridium chauvoei, 20 Clostridium septicum, 1 Bacillus anthracis and 12 other Clostridium spp. The DNA samples from Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum strains were amplified. Amplification of other DNA samples was not observed, with the exception of Clostridium tertium, which showed a weak positive signal. To avoid misdiagnosis, a confirmatory assay based on a Sybr green real time PCR was proposed. The authors confirmed the efficacy and the specificity of the test used in this study, which proved to be a useful tool for the diagnosis of clostridiosis that are often diagnosed using only traditional tools.

  14. Application of Long Sequence Reads To Improve Genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7.

    PubMed

    Utturkar, Sagar M; Bayer, Edward A; Borovok, Ilya; Lamed, Raphael; Hurt, Richard A; Land, Miriam L; Klingeman, Dawn M; Elias, Dwayne; Zhou, Jizhong; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Brown, Steven D

    2016-09-29

    We and others have shown the utility of long sequence reads to improve genome assembly quality. In this study, we generated PacBio DNA sequence data to improve the assemblies of draft genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7.

  15. Application of long sequence reads to improve genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7

    DOE PAGES

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Bayer, Edward A.; Borovok, Ilya; ...

    2016-09-29

    Here, we and others have shown the utility of long sequence reads to improve genome assembly quality. In this study, we generated PacBio DNA sequence data to improve the assemblies of draft genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7.

  16. Application of Long Sequence Reads To Improve Genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7

    PubMed Central

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Bayer, Edward A.; Borovok, Ilya; Lamed, Raphael; Hurt, Richard A.; Land, Miriam L.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    We and others have shown the utility of long sequence reads to improve genome assembly quality. In this study, we generated PacBio DNA sequence data to improve the assemblies of draft genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7. PMID:27688341

  17. Characterisation of non-toxigenic Clostridium spp. strains, to use as surrogates for non-proteolytic Clostridium botulinum in chilled food challenge testing.

    PubMed

    Parker, M D; Barrett, P I; Shepherd, J; Price, L J; Bull, S D

    2015-01-01

    Under many of the conditions studied, a two-strain cocktail of non-toxigenic Clostridium spp. was found to be suitable as a surrogate for non-proteolytic Clostridium botulinum, and has the potential for use in chilled food challenge tests measuring growth. Non-toxigenic surrogates could also be used in thermal process screening studies.

  18. Clostridium difficile associated infection, diarrhea and colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hookman, Perry; Barkin, Jamie S

    2009-01-01

    A new, hypervirulent strain of Clostridium difficile, called NAP1/BI/027, has been implicated in C. difficile outbreaks associated with increased morbidity and mortality since the early 2000s. The epidemic strain is resistant to fluoroquinolones in vitro, which was infrequent prior to 2001. The name of this strain reflects its characteristics, demonstrated by different typing methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (NAP1), restriction endonuclease analysis (BI) and polymerase chain reaction (027). In 2004 and 2005, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) emphasized that the risk of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is increased, not only by the usual factors, including antibiotic exposure, but also gastrointestinal surgery/manipulation, prolonged length of stay in a healthcare setting, serious underlying illness, immune-compromising conditions, and aging. Patients on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have an elevated risk, as do peripartum women and heart transplant recipients. Before 2002, toxic megacolon in C. difficile-associated colitis (CDAC), was rare, but its incidence has increased dramatically. Up to two-thirds of hospitalized patients may be infected with C. difficile. Asymptomatic carriers admitted to healthcare facilities can transmit the organism to other susceptible patients, thereby becoming vectors. Fulminant colitis is reported more frequently during outbreaks of C. difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). C. difficile infection with IBD carries a higher mortality than without underlying IBD. This article reviews the latest information on C. difficile infection, including presentation, vulnerable hosts and choice of antibiotics, alternative therapies, and probiotics and immunotherapy. We review contact precautions for patients with known or suspected C. difficile-associated disease. Healthcare institutions require accurate and rapid diagnosis for early detection of possible outbreaks, to initiate

  19. Biology and genomic analysis of Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Peck, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    The ability to form botulinum neurotoxin is restricted to six phylogenetically and physiologically distinct bacteria (Clostridium botulinum Groups I-IV and some strains of C. baratii and C. butyricum). The botulinum neurotoxin is the most potent toxin known, with as little as 30-100 ng potentially fatal, and is responsible for botulism, a severe neuroparalytic disease that affects humans, animals, and birds. In order to minimize the hazards presented by the botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is necessary to extend understanding of the biology of these bacteria. Analyses of recently available genome sequences in conjunction with studies of bacterial physiology are beginning to reveal new and exciting information on the biology of these dangerous bacteria. At the whole organism level, substantial differences between the six botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia have been reported. For example, the genomes of proteolytic C. botulinum (C. botulinum Group I) and non-proteolytic C. botulinum (C. botulinum Group II) are highly diverged and show neither synteny nor homology. It has also emerged that the botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia are not overtly pathogenic (unlike C. difficile), but saprophytic bacteria that use the neurotoxin to kill a host and create a source of nutrients. One important feature that has contributed to the success of botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia is their ability to form highly resistant endospores. The spores, however, also present an opportunity to control these bacteria if escape from lag phase (and hence growth) can be prevented. This is dependent on extending understanding of the biology of these processes. Differences in the genetics and physiology of spore germination in proteolytic C. botulinum and non-proteolytic C. botulinum have been identified. The biological variability in lag phase and its stages has been described for individual spores, and it has been shown that various adverse treatments extend different

  20. Efficient gene knockdown in Clostridium acetobutylicum by synthetic small regulatory RNAs.

    PubMed

    Cho, Changhee; Lee, Sang Yup

    2017-02-01

    Clostridium is considered a promising microbial host for the production of valuable industrial chemicals. However, Clostridium is notorious for the difficulty of genetic manipulations, and consequently metabolic engineering. Thus, much effort has been exerted to develop novel tools for genetic and metabolic engineering of Clostridium strains. Here, we report the development of a synthetic small regulatory RNA (sRNA)-based system for controlled gene expression in Clostridium acetobutylicum, consisting of a target recognition site, MicC sRNA scaffold, and an RNA chaperone Hfq. To examine the functional operation of sRNA system in C. acetobutylicum, expression control was first examined with the Evoglow fluorescent protein as a model protein. Initially, a C. acetobutylicum protein annotated as Hfq was combined with the synthetic sRNA based on the Escherichia coli MicC scaffold to knockdown Evoglow expression. However, C. acetobutylicum Hfq did not bind to E. coli MicC, while MicC scaffold-based synthetic sRNA itself was able to knockdown the expression of Evoglow. When E. coli hfq gene was introduced, the knockdown efficiency assessed by measuring fluorescence intensity, could be much enhanced. Then, this E. coli MicC scaffold-Hfq system was used to knock down adhE1 gene expression in C. acetobutylicum. Knocking down the adhE1 gene expression using the synthetic sRNA led to a 40% decrease in butanol production (2.5 g/L), compared to that (4.5 g/L) produced by the wild-type strain harboring an empty vector. The sRNA system was further extended to knock down the pta gene expression in the buk mutant C. acetobutylicum strain PJC4BK for enhanced butanol production. The PJC4BK (pPta-Hfq(Eco) ) strain, which has the pta gene expression knocked down, was able to produce 16.9 g/L of butanol, which is higher than that (14.9 g/L) produced by the PJC4BK strain, mainly due to reduced acetic acid production. Fed-batch culture of PJC4BK (pPta-Hfq(Eco) ) strain coupled with

  1. Metabolite Analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum: Fermentation in a Microbial Fuel Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Metabolite analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum : Fermentation in a microbial fuel cell Amethist S. Finch, Timothy D. Mackie, Christian J. Sund...Fermentation products Clostridium acetobutylicum Current generation a b s t r a c t Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were used to monitor metabolism...changes in Clostridium acetobutylicum fer- mentations. When MFCs were inoculated with C. acetobutylicum , they generated a unique voltage output pattern

  2. Prevalence of Clostridium species and behaviour of Clostridium botulinum in gnocchi, a REPFED of italian origin.

    PubMed

    Del Torre, M; Stecchini, M L; Braconnier, A; Peck, M W

    2004-11-01

    Sales and consumption of refrigerated processed foods of extended durability (REPFEDs) have increased many-fold in Europe over the last 10 years. The safety and quality of these convenient ready-to-eat foods relies on a combination of mild heat treatment and refrigerated storage, sometimes in combination with other hurdles such as mild preservative factors. The major hazard to the microbiological safety of these foods is Clostridium botulinum. This paper reports on the prevalence and behaviour of proteolytic C. botulinum and non-proteolytic C. botulinum in gnocchi, a potato-based REPFED of Italian origin. Attempts to isolate proteolytic C. botulinum and non-proteolytic C. botulinum from gnocchi and its ingredients were unsuccessful. Based on assessment of the adequacy of the methods used, it was estimated that for proteolytic C. botulinum there was < 25 spores/kg of gnocchi and < 70 spores/kg of ingredients. The total anaerobic microbial load of gnocchi and its ingredients was low, with an estimated 1 MPN/g in processed gnocchi. Most of the anaerobic flora was facultatively anaerobic. A few obligately anaerobic bacteria were isolated from gnocchi and its ingredients and belonged to different Clostridium species. The protection factor, number of decimal reductions in the probability of toxigenesis from a single spore, was determined for eight different gnocchi formulations by challenge test studies. For all gnocchi stored at 8 degrees C (as recommended by the manufacturer) or 12 degrees C (mild temperature abuse), growth and toxin production were not detected in 75 days. The protection factor was >4.2 for proteolytic C. botulinum, and >6.2 for non-proteolytic C. botulinum. When inoculated packs were stored at 20 degrees C (severe temperature abuse), toxin production in 75 days was prevented by the inclusion of 0.09% (w/w) sorbic acid (protection factors as above), however in the absence of sorbic acid the packs became toxic before the end of the intended shelf

  3. [Diarrhea associated with Clostridium difficile: one-year experience in a general hospital].

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Padilla, B; Catalán, P; Sánchez-Carrillo, C; Blázquez, R; Peláez, T

    1996-07-01

    Clostridium difficile is considered the most common cause of nosocomial acquired diarrhoea, with frequencies differing widely from one institution to another. So far, it is a scarcely reported condition in Spain. In the present study 129 episodes of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea (CDAD) occurred in 120 patients in a 2,000-bed hospital in 1994 is reported. All cases were diagnosed by demonstrating cytotoxicity on cellular lines (MRC-5) from feces or from the strain isolated from a culture medium (CCFA). The overall incidence was 2.4 episodes every 1,000 admissions. Twenty-eight out of the 120 patients (23%) were HIV-positive patients, that is, an incidence of 30 episodes every 1,000 admissions. No significant differences were observed regarding the presentation and clinical course between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients, with the exception of the antimicrobial agents used previously. Forty-two percent of patients had undergone surgery and 97% had received antimicrobials in the 8 weeks before the CDAD episode, with an average of 3.3 antibiotics per patient. Out of the 129 episodes, 72.8% were treated correctly. A total of 11.7% of patients responded exclusively to the discontinuation of the antimicrobials that were being administered. Eighty-three patients were treated with specific antibiotics, 59 with oral vancomycin, and 24 with metronidazole. Seventy-six patients (91.5%) responded to the initial therapy, 5 relapsed (6%), and 2 (2.5%) failed. The associated mortality rate was 0.7%. C. difficile can be a relevant cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in our setting, particularly in HIV-positive patients, but also in other patients. Its early diagnosis and appropriate therapy can contribute to decrease a relevant cause of morbidity in inpatients.

  4. DETECTION, RIBOTYPING AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE PROPERTIES OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE STRAINS ISOLATED FROM THE CASES OF DIARRHEA

    PubMed Central

    Kouzegaran, Samaneh; Ganjifard, Mahmood; Tanha, Amir Saber

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile is the most prevalent cause of antibiotic-associated infectious diarrhea al-around the world. Prevalence of virulent and resistant strains of Clostridium difficile is increasing now a day. The present investigation was carried out to study the prevalence, ribotyping and antibiotic resistance pattern of C. difficile isolated from diarrheic and non-diarrheic pediatrics. Materials and methods: Four-hundred stool specimens were collected from the diarrheic and non-diarrheic pediatrics hospitalized due to the diseases other than diarrhea. Samples were cultured and their positive results were subjected to disk diffusion and PCR-based ribotyping. Results: Thirty-five out of 400 (8.75%) samples were positive for C. difficile. Prevalence of C. difficile in diarrheic and non-diarrheic pediatrics were 11.25% and 4.16%, respectively. Male had the higher prevalence of bacteria than female (P < 0.05). eight to twelve months old pediatrics were the most commonly infected group. R27 (14.28%), R1 (10.71%), R12 (7.14%), R13 (7.14%) and R18 (7.14%) were most commonly detected ribotypes. There were no positive results for studied ribotypes in non-diarrheic pediatrics. C. difficile strains had the highest levels of resistance against tetracycline (71.42%), erythromycin (57.14%), moxifloxacin (48.57%), metronidazole (28.57%) and clindamycin (22.85%) antibiotics. Conclusion: Prescription of antibiotics in diarrheic pediatrics, males and also 8-12 months old pediatrics should be done in a regular and cautious manner. PMID:27999477

  5. Identification of risk factors influencing Clostridium difficile prevalence in middle-size dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Bandelj, Petra; Blagus, Rok; Briski, France; Frlic, Olga; Vergles Rataj, Aleksandra; Rupnik, Maja; Ocepek, Matjaz; Vengust, Modest

    2016-03-12

    Farm animals have been suggested to play an important role in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the community. The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors associated with C. difficile dissemination in family dairy farms, which are the most common farming model in the European Union. Environmental samples and fecal samples from cows and calves were collected repeatedly over a 1 year period on 20 mid-size family dairy farms. Clostridium difficile was detected in cattle feces on all farms using qPCR. The average prevalence between farms was 10% (0-44.4%) and 35.7% (3.7-66.7%) in cows and calves, respectively. Bacterial culture yielded 103 C. difficile isolates from cattle and 61 from the environment. Most C. difficile isolates were PCR-ribotype 033. A univariate mixed effect model analysis of risk factors associated dietary changes with increasing C. difficile prevalence in cows (P = 0.0004); and dietary changes (P = 0.004), breeding Simmental cattle (P = 0.001), mastitis (P = 0.003) and antibiotic treatment (P = 0.003) in calves. Multivariate analysis of risk factors found that dietary changes in cows (P = 0.0001) and calves (P = 0.002) increase C. difficile prevalence; mastitis was identified as a risk factor in calves (P = 0.001). This study shows that C. difficile is common on dairy farms and that shedding is more influenced by farm management than environmental factors. Based on molecular typing of C. difficile isolates, it could also be concluded that family dairy farms are currently not contributing to increased CDI incidence.

  6. Discrimination of clostridium species using a magnetic bead based hybridization assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlow, Susanne; Seise, Barbara; Pollok, Sibyll; Seyboldt, Christian; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the causative agent of blackleg, which is an endogenous bacterial infection. Mainly cattle and other ruminants are affected. The symptoms of blackleg are very similar to those of malignant edema, an infection caused by Clostridium septicum. [1, 2] Therefore a reliable differentiation of Clostridium chauvoei from other Clostridium species is required. Traditional microbiological detection methods are time consuming and laborious. Additionally, the unique identification is hindered by the overgrowing tendency of swarming Clostridium septicum colonies when both species are present. [1, 3, 4] Thus, there is a crucial need to improve and simplify the specific detection of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum. Here we present an easy and fast Clostridium species discrimination method combining magnetic beads and fluorescence spectroscopy. Functionalized magnetic particles exhibit plentiful advantages, like their simple manipulation in combination with a large binding capacity of biomolecules. A specific region of the pathogenic DNA is amplified and labelled with biotin by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These PCR products were then immobilized on magnetic beads exploiting the strong biotin-streptavidin interaction. The specific detection of different Clostridium species is achieved by using fluorescence dye labeled probe DNA for the hybridization with the immobilized PCR products. Finally, the samples were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. [5

  7. FT-IR spectroscopic analysis for studying Clostridium cell response to conversion of enzymatically hydrolyzed hay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grube, Mara; Gavare, Marita; Nescerecka, Alina; Tihomirova, Kristina; Mezule, Linda; Juhna, Talis

    2013-07-01

    Grass hay is one of assailable cellulose containing non-food agricultural wastes that can be used as a carbohydrate source by microorganisms producing biofuels. In this study three Clostridium strains Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium tetanomorphum, capable of producing acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) were adapted to convert enzymatically hydrolyzed hay used as a growth media additive. The results of growth curves, substrate degradation kinetics and FT-IR analyses of bacterial biomass macromolecular composition showed diverse strain-specific cell response to the growth medium composition.

  8. Anaerobic biotransformation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene by Clostridium acetobutylicum: A pathway through dihydroxylamino intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, J.B.; Wang, C.Y.; Zhang, C.

    1999-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to isolate and identify the intermediates and products of 2,4-dinitrotoluene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene metabolism by Clostridium acetobutylicum. Transformation of both dinitrotoluenes initially resulted in the formation of hydroxylaminonitrotoluenes. Subsequent transformation favored the formation of dihydroxylaminotoluenes, with a limited reduction to aminonitrotoluene isomers. In cell cultures, metabolism beyond the level of dihydroxylaminotoluene was not observed. In cell extracts, where activity could be maintained for periods in excess of those in cell cultures, further transformation yielded aminohydroxylaminotoluenes and eventually diaminotoluenes. These findings further demonstrate the potential for hydroxylamines to be significant intermediates of nitroaromatic transformation under anaerobic fermentative conditions. Interestingly, the rearrangement of dihydroxylaminotoluenes was not observed, as was the case in previous studies of 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene metabolism. Dihydroxylaminotoluenes were found to be quite unstable, decomposing rapidly upon exposure to oxygen, complicating the assessment of their fate in remediation processes.

  9. Longitudinal study of Clostridium difficile and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli in healthy horses in a community setting.

    PubMed

    Schoster, A; Staempfli, H R; Arroyo, L G; Reid-Smith, R J; Janecko, N; Shewen, P E; Weese, J S

    2012-10-12

    Point prevalence studies have reported carriage rates of enteric pathogens in healthy horses, but longitudinal data are lacking. Commensal E. coli is an indicator organism to evaluate antimicrobial resistance of enteric bacteria, yet there are limited data for horses. The objectives of this study were to investigate and molecularly characterize isolates of Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Salmonella, collected sequentially over a one year period, and to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profile for E. coli. Fecal samples were collected monthly from 25 adult horses for one year. Selective cultures were performed for all above bacteria. C. difficile isolates were characterized via PCR toxin gene profiling and ribotyping. Broth microdilution was performed to assess antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of E. coli. Toxigenic Clostridium difficile was isolated from 15/275 (5.45%) samples from 10/25 (40%) horses. Four horses were positive at multiple sampling times but different ribotypes were found in three. Ribotypes included 078 (n=6), 001 (n=6) and C (n=3). C. perfringens was not isolated, nor was Salmonella. E. coli was isolated from 232/300 (77%) fecal samples. Resistance to ≥ 1 and ≥ 3 antimicrobials was present in 31/232 (13.4%) and 6/232 (2.6%) respectively. Only two horses shed the same strain of toxigenic C. difficile for more than one month, indicating that shedding is transient. The high number of ribotype 078 is consistent with recent emergence of this strain in the local horse population. The low prevalence of antibiotic resistance in commensal E. coli suggests that healthy horses are not likely a major reservoir of resistance for enteric bacteria.

  10. Direct Image-Based Enumeration of Clostridium phytofermentans Cells on Insoluble Plant Biomass Growth Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Alvelo-Maurosa, Jesús G.; Lee, Scott J.; Hazen, Samuel P.

    2015-01-01

    A dual-fluorescent-dye protocol to visualize and quantify Clostridium phytofermentans ISDg (ATCC 700394) cells growing on insoluble cellulosic substrates was developed by combining calcofluor white staining of the growth substrate with cell staining using the nucleic acid dye Syto 9. Cell growth, cell substrate attachment, and fermentation product formation were investigated in cultures containing either Whatman no. 1 filter paper, wild-type Sorghum bicolor, or a reduced-lignin S. bicolor double mutant (bmr-6 bmr-12 double mutant) as the growth substrate. After 3 days of growth, cell numbers in cultures grown on filter paper as the substrate were 6.0- and 2.2-fold higher than cell numbers in cultures with wild-type sorghum and double mutant sorghum, respectively. However, cells produced more ethanol per cell when grown with either sorghum substrate than with filter paper as the substrate. Ethanol yields of cultures were significantly higher with double mutant sorghum than with wild-type sorghum or filter paper as the substrate. Moreover, ethanol production correlated with cell attachment in sorghum cultures: 90% of cells were directly attached to the double mutant sorghum substrate, while only 76% of cells were attached to wild-type sorghum substrate. With filter paper as the growth substrate, ethanol production was correlated with cell number; however, with either wild-type or mutant sorghum, ethanol production did not correlate with cell number, suggesting that only a portion of the microbial cell population was active during growth on sorghum. The dual-staining procedure described here may be used to visualize and enumerate cells directly on insoluble cellulosic substrates, enabling in-depth studies of interactions of microbes with plant biomass. PMID:26637592

  11. Models for the study of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Best, Emma L.; Freeman, Jane; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Models of Clostridium difficile infection (C. difficile) have been used extensively for Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) research. The hamster model of C. difficile infection has been most extensively employed for the study of C. difficile and this has been used in many different areas of research, including the induction of C. difficile, the testing of new treatments, population dynamics and characterization of virulence. Investigations using in vitro models for C. difficile introduced the concept of colonization resistance, evaluated the role of antibiotics in C. difficile development, explored population dynamics and have been useful in the evaluation of C. difficile treatments. Experiments using models have major advantages over clinical studies and have been indispensible in furthering C. difficile research. It is important for future study programs to carefully consider the approach to use and therefore be better placed to inform the design and interpretation of clinical studies. PMID:22555466

  12. Necrotizing gastritis associated with Clostridium septicum in a rabbit.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Jorge P; Moore, Janet; Loukopoulos, Panayiotis; Diab, Santiago S; Uzal, Francisco A

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium septicum is the causative agent of histotoxic infections, including malignant edema and braxy (necrotizing abomasitis) in several animal species. The carcass of a 2-year-old, female New Zealand white rabbit with a history of acute depression and obtundation followed by death was received at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System (San Bernardino, California) for necropsy and diagnostic workup. No gross lesions were detected at necropsy. Microscopically, there was moderate to severe, multifocal fibrinonecrotizing, transmural gastritis with numerous intralesional Gram-positive, sporulated rods, and disseminated thrombosis of the brain, lungs, heart, and liver, with occasional intravascular rods. The rods observed within the gastric wall and thrombi in the stomach and lung were positive for C. septicum by immunohistochemical staining. However, this microorganism was not isolated from stomach content. Clostridium septicum should be included in the list of possible etiologies of gastritis in rabbits.

  13. Beneficial and harmful roles of bacteria from the Clostridium genus.

    PubMed

    Samul, Dorota; Worsztynowicz, Paulina; Leja, Katarzyna; Grajek, Włodzimierz

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria of the Clostridium genus are often described only as a biological threat and a foe of mankind. However, many of them have positive properties and thanks to them they may be used in many industry branches (e.g., in solvents and alcohol production, in medicine, and also in esthetic cosmetology). During the last 10 years interest in application of C. botulinum and C. tetani in medicine significantly increased. Currently, the structure and biochemical properties of neurotoxins produced by these bacterial species, as well as possibilities of application of such toxins as botulinum as a therapeutic factor in humans, are being intensely researched. The main aim of this article is to demonstrate that bacteria from Clostridium spp. are not only pathogens and the enemy of humanity but they also have many important beneficial properties which make them usable among many chemical, medical, and cosmetic applications.

  14. The utilization of a commercial soil nucleic acid extraction kit and PCR for the detection of Clostridium tetanus and Clostridium chauvoei on farms after flooding in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shr-Wei; Chan, Jacky Peng-Wen; Shia, Wei-Yau; Shyu, Chin-Lin; Tung, Kwon-Chung; Wang, Chi-Young

    2013-05-02

    Clostridial diseases are zoonoses and are classified as soil-borne diseases. Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium tetani cause blackleg disease and tetanus, respectively. Since bacteria and spores are re-distributed by floods and then, subsequently, contaminate soils, pastures and water; the case numbers associated with clostridial diseases usually increase after floods. Because Taiwan is often affected by flood damage during the typhoon season, possible threats from these diseases are present. Thus, this study's aim is to apply a combination of a commercial nucleic acid extraction kit and PCR to assess the prevalence of Clostridia spp. in soil and to compare the positivity rates for farms before and after floods. The minimum amounts of Clostridium tetanus and Clostridium chauvoei that could be extracted from soils and detected by PCR were 10 and 50 colony forming units (cfu), respectively. In total, 76 samples were collected from the central and southern regions of Taiwan, which are the areas that are most frequently damaged by typhoons. Noteworthy, the positive rates for Clostridium tetanus and Clostridium chauvoei in Pingtung county after the severe floods caused by a typhoon increased significantly from 13.73 and 7.84% to 53.85 and 50.00%, respectively. This study for the first time provides the evidence from surveillance data that there are changes in the environmental distribution of Clostridium spp. after floods. This study indicates that screening for soil-related zoonotic pathogens is a potential strategy that may help to control these diseases.

  15. Clostridium chauvoei-associated meningoencephalitis in a calf.

    PubMed

    2016-01-16

    ·Meningoencephalitis in a calf associated with Clostridium chauvoei infection. ·Bovine papular stomatitis in calves. ·Otitis media due to Mycoplasma bovis in calves. ·Sporadic porcine abortion due to Nocardia species. ·Spotty liver disease in hens. These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for September 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS).

  16. Fecal microbiota transplantation for the management of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Rao, Krishna; Young, Vincent B

    2015-03-01

    This article discusses the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The disruption of the normal gut microbiota is central to the pathogenesis of CDI, and disruption persists in recurrent disease. The use of FMT for recurrent CDI is characterized by a high response rate and short term safety is excellent, although the long-term effects of FMT are as yet unknown.

  17. An ultrasensitive rapid immunocytotoxicity assay for detecting Clostridium difficile toxins

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiangyun; Wang, Jufang; Steele, Jennifer; Sun, Xingmin; Nie, Weijia; Tzipori, Saul; Feng, Hanping

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel ultrasensitive cell-based immunocytotoxicity assay for detecting less then 1 pg/ml of Clostridium difficile toxins in porcine clinical samples. The assay is simple to perform with a turnaround time of approximately 3 hours and capable of detecting less then 1 pg/ml of toxin A. Using this assay, we were able to detect the presence of C. difficile toxins in the fecal and serum specimens of experimentally infected piglets. PMID:19393695

  18. Clostridium defficiel in the urogenital tract of males and females.

    PubMed

    Hafiz, S; McEntegart, M G; Morton, R S; Waitkins, S A

    1975-02-22

    A study of the occurrence of Clostridium difficile in the urogenital tract of males and females revealed higher isolation-rates in patients attending the special (venereal-disease) clinic than in patients attending family-planning and urological clinics. The presence of Cl. difficile in patients with venereal diseases is being investigated to see if the organism is simply an opportunist infecting a urethra disturbed by some antecedent disease, or if it is perhaps a primary cuase of disease.

  19. Historical and current perspectives on Clostridium botulinum diversity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Theresa J; Hill, Karen K; Raphael, Brian H

    2015-05-01

    For nearly one hundred years, researchers have attempted to categorize botulinum neurotoxin-producing clostridia and the toxins that they produce according to biochemical characterizations, serological comparisons, and genetic analyses. Throughout this period the bacteria and their toxins have defied such attempts at categorization. Below is a description of both historic and current Clostridium botulinum strain and neurotoxin information that illustrates how each new finding has significantly added to the knowledge of the botulinum neurotoxin-containing clostridia and their diversity.

  20. [Toxins of Clostridium perfringens as a natural and bioterroristic threats].

    PubMed

    Omernik, Andrzej; Płusa, Tadeusz

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is absolutely anaerobic rod-shaped, sporeforming bacterium. The morbidity is connected with producing toxins. Depending on the type of toxin produced Clostridium perfringens can be divided into five serotypes:A-E. Under natural conditions, this bacterium is responsible for local outbreaks of food poisoning associated with eating contaminated food which which was improperly heat treated. Some countries with lower economic level are endemic foci of necrotizing enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens. The bacterium is also a major cause of gas gangrene. It is a disease, associated with wound infection, with potentially fatal prognosis in the case of treatment's delays. In the absence of early radical surgery, antibiotic therapy and (if available) hyperbaric treatment leads to the spread of toxins in the body causing shock, coma and death. Due to the force of produced toxins is a pathogen that poses a substrate for the production of biological weapons. It could potentially be used to induce outbreaks of food poisoning and by missiles contamination by spore lead to increased morbidity of gas gangrene in injured soldiers. C. perfringens types B and D produce epsilon toxin considered to be the third most powerful bacterial toxin. Because of the ability to disperse the toxin as an aerosol and a lack of methods of treatment and prevention of poisoning possible factors it is a potential tool for bioterrorism It is advisable to continue research into vaccines and treatments for poisoning toxins of C. perfringens.

  1. A Thermophilic Phage Endolysin Fusion to a Clostridium perfringens-Specific Cell Wall Binding Domain Creates an Anti-Clostridium Antimicrobial with Improved Thermostability.

    PubMed

    Swift, Steven M; Seal, Bruce S; Garrish, Johnna K; Oakley, Brian B; Hiett, Kelli; Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Woolsey, Rebekah; Schegg, Kathleen M; Line, John Eric; Donovan, David M

    2015-06-12

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Many enzymes are added to animal feed during production and are subjected to high-heat stress during feed processing. To produce a thermostabile endolysin for treating poultry, an E. coli codon-optimized gene was synthesized that fused the N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase domain from the endolysin of the thermophilic bacteriophage ɸGVE2 to the cell-wall binding domain (CWB) from the endolysin of the C. perfringens-specific bacteriophage ɸCP26F. The resulting protein, PlyGVE2CpCWB, lysed C. perfringens in liquid and solid cultures. PlyGVE2CpCWB was most active at pH 8, had peak activity at 10 mM NaCl, 40% activity at 150 mM NaCl and was still 16% active at 600 mM NaCl. The protein was able to withstand temperatures up to 50° C and still lyse C. perfringens. Herein, we report the construction and characterization of a thermostable chimeric endolysin that could potentially be utilized as a feed additive to control the bacterium during poultry production.

  2. A Thermophilic Phage Endolysin Fusion to a Clostridium perfringens-Specific Cell Wall Binding Domain Creates an Anti-Clostridium Antimicrobial with Improved Thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Steven M.; Seal, Bruce S.; Garrish, Johnna K.; Oakley, Brian B.; Hiett, Kelli; Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Woolsey, Rebekah; Schegg, Kathleen M.; Line, John Eric; Donovan, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Many enzymes are added to animal feed during production and are subjected to high-heat stress during feed processing. To produce a thermostabile endolysin for treating poultry, an E. coli codon-optimized gene was synthesized that fused the N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase domain from the endolysin of the thermophilic bacteriophage ΦGVE2 to the cell-wall binding domain (CWB) from the endolysin of the C. perfringens-specific bacteriophage ΦCP26F. The resulting protein, PlyGVE2CpCWB, lysed C. perfringens in liquid and solid cultures. PlyGVE2CpCWB was most active at pH 8, had peak activity at 10 mM NaCl, 40% activity at 150 mM NaCl and was still 16% active at 600 mM NaCl. The protein was able to withstand temperatures up to 50 °C and still lyse C. perfringens. Herein, we report the construction and characterization of a thermostable chimeric endolysin that could potentially be utilized as a feed additive to control the bacterium during poultry production. PMID:26075507

  3. Gas gangrene caused by clostridium perfringens involving the liver, spleen, and heart in a man 20 years after an orthotopic liver transplant: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kitterer, Daniel; Braun, Niko; Jehs, Margit C; Schulte, Bernhard; Alscher, M Dominik; Latus, Joerg

    2014-04-01

    Despite advances in immunosuppression and liver transplant in the past, mortality and morbidity caused by infections remain major problems. We present a 71-year-old man who was admitted to our internal intensive care unit with septicemia. Upon admission, he had poorly localized epigastric pain and fever of 2 days ' duration. Twenty years earlier, he had undergone an orthotopic liver transplant. Testing revealed a high C-reactive protein level, elevated liver enzymes, and an acute kidney injury. A computer tomography scan showed 2 circular, non--rim-enhancing, totally emphysematous intrahepatic lesions. Additionally, gas could be seen in the portal veins mainly, as well as in the biliary system, in the right auricle, and the splenic veins. To the best of our knowledge, he showed no malignant lesion or predisposing trauma. Empirically, treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics was begun, and the patient was transferred to the operating suite. When surgery began, blood cultures revealed the presence of gram-positive bacilli, which were identified as Clostridium perfringens. Seven hours after the surgery, the patient developed asystole and died. In septic patients presenting with severe hemolysis, Clostridium perfringens infection must be considered in the absence of a malignant lesion or a predisposing trauma; a previous episode of gastroenteritis might be a predisposing trauma by impairing the barrier of the intestinal flora, leading to Clostridium perfringens infection.

  4. Development of Clostridium septicum gas gangrene as an adverse effect of clindamycin-induced Clostridium difficile infection in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Kiser, Casey J; Urish, Kenneth L; Boateng, Henry A

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium myonecrosis or gas gangrene is a life-threatening infection characterized by either traumatic or atraumatic etiology. It has been widely described in patients with traumatic open wounds and in immunocompromised patients, including malignancy. A third source can result from natural flora in the gastrointestinal tract after bowel ischemia. This is a rare occurrence and is even less commonly described in the pediatric population. We present a pediatric patient who developed Clostridium septicum myonecrosis as an iatrogenic complication from clindamycin-induced Clostridium difficile ischemic colitis.

  5. Tracking Inhibitory Alterations during Interstrain Clostridium difficile Interactions by Monitoring Cell Envelope Capacitance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Global threats arising from the increasing use of antibiotics coupled with the high recurrence rates of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infections (CDI) after standard antibiotic treatments highlight the role of commensal probiotic microorganisms, including nontoxigenic C. difficile (NTCD) strains in preventing CDI due to highly toxigenic C. difficile (HTCD) strains. However, optimization of the inhibitory permutations due to commensal interactions in the microbiota requires probes capable of monitoring phenotypic alterations to C. difficile cells. Herein, by monitoring the field screening behavior of the C. difficile cell envelope with respect to cytoplasmic polarization, we demonstrate that inhibition of the host-cell colonization ability of HTCD due to the S-layer alterations occurring after its co-culture with NTCD can be quantitatively tracked on the basis of the capacitance of the cell envelope of co-cultured HTCD. Furthermore, it is shown that effective inhibition requires the dynamic contact of HTCD cells with freshly secreted extracellular factors from NTCD because contact with the cell-free supernatant causes only mild inhibition. We envision a rapid method for screening the inhibitory permutations to arrest C. difficile colonization by routinely probing alterations in the HTCD dielectrophoretic frequency response due to variations in the capacitance of its cell envelope. PMID:27547818

  6. Beta Lactamase Producing Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia in an Elderly Man with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rashmi; Duncalf, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is associated with adverse outcomes. Known risk factors include chronic kidney disease, malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and gastrointestinal disease. We present a 74-year-old man admitted with confusion, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Exam revealed tachycardia, hypotension, lethargy, distended abdomen, and cold extremities. He required intubation and aggressive resuscitation for septic shock. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis, metabolic acidosis, acute kidney injury, and elevated lipase. CT scan of abdomen revealed acute pancreatitis and small bowel ileus. He was started on vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam. Initial blood cultures were positive for C. perfringens on day five. Metronidazole and clindamycin were added to the regimen. Repeat CT (day 7) revealed pancreatic necrosis. The patient developed profound circulatory shock requiring multiple vasopressors, renal failure requiring dialysis, and bacteremia with vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Hemodynamic instability precluded surgical intervention and he succumbed to multiorgan failure. Interestingly, our isolate was beta lactamase producing. We review the epidemiology, risk factors, presentation, and management of C. perfringens bacteremia. This case indicates a need for high clinical suspicion for clostridial sepsis and that extended spectrum beta lactam antibiotic coverage may be inadequate and should be supplemented with use of clindamycin or metronidazole if culture is positive, until sensitivities are known. PMID:26904307

  7. Experimental production of hemorrhagic enterotoxemia by Clostridium perfringens type C in maturing lambs.

    PubMed

    Niilo, L

    1986-01-01

    Maturing lambs, eight to nine months old, were dosed by the intraduodenal route with various preparations of Clostridium perfringens type C. Whole cultures of this organism or cells suspended in fresh medium, both supplemented with soybean flour as a protease inhibitor, produced acute fatal hemorrhagic enterotoxemia in these animals. The latter preparation was more effective than the former in causing disease. Without the soybean supplement the inocula did not produce fatal disease. Dosing with toxic cell-free culture supernatant fluid, with or without soybean supplement, had no lethal effect. Animals that died showed severe hemorrhagic enteritis with necrosis and sloughing of the mucosal epithelium, involving jejunum, ileum and part of duodenum. These lesions were similar to those seen in natural cases of hemorrhagic enterotoxemia in neonatal animals. This experiment demonstrated that nonimmune animals are normally protected against C. perfringens type C enterotoxemia by adequate levels of pancreatic proteases in the intestine, and that factors which inhibit or reduce these enzymes predispose animals for the development of this disease.

  8. Clinicopathologic features of experimental Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxemia in cattle.

    PubMed

    Filho, E J F; Carvalho, A U; Assis, R A; Lobato, F F; Rachid, M A; Carvalho, A A; Ferreira, P M; Nascimento, R A; Fernandes, A A; Vidal, J E; Uzal, F A

    2009-11-01

    This study was designed to experimentally reproduce enterotoxemia by Clostridium perfringens type D in cattle and to characterize the clinicopathologic findings of this disease. Fourteen 9-month-old calves were inoculated intraduodenally according to the following schedule: group 1 (n = 4), C. perfringens type D whole culture; group 2 (n = 3), C. perfringens type D washed cells; group 3 (n = 5), C. perfringens type D filtered and concentrated supernatant; group 4 (n = 2), sterile, nontoxic culture medium. In addition, all animals received a 20% starch solution in the abomasum. Ten animals from groups 1 (4/4), 2 (3/3), and 3 (3/5) showed severe respiratory and neurologic signs. Gross findings were observed in these 10 animals and consisted of acute pulmonary edema, excessive protein-rich pericardial fluid, watery contents in the small intestine, and multifocal petechial hemorrhages on the jejunal mucosa. The brain of one animal of group 2 that survived for 8 days showed multifocal, bilateral, and symmetric encephalomalacia in the corpus striatum. The most striking histologic changes consisted of perivascular high protein edema in the brain, and alveolar and interstitial proteinaceous pulmonary edema. The animal that survived for 8 days and that had gross lesions in the corpus striatum showed histologically severe, focal necrosis of this area, cerebellar peduncles, and thalamus. Koch's postulates have been met and these results show that experimental enterotoxemia by C. perfringens type D in cattle has similar clinical and pathologic characteristics to the natural and experimental disease in sheep.

  9. Ex situ product recovery for enhanced butanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Eom, Moon-Ho; Choi, Jin-Dal-Rae; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Shin, Yong-An; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2016-05-01

    In situ butanol recovery fermentation has been intensively studied as an effective alternative to conventional butanol production, which is limited due to the cellular toxicity of butanol. However, the low biocompatibility of adsorbents often leads to failure of in situ recovery fermentations. In this study, Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 was cultured in flasks without shaking and in situ recovery fermentation was performed by using an adsorbent L493. The amounts of acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) increased by 34.4 % in the presence of the adsorbent. In contrast, cell growth and production of organic acids and ABE were retarded in the 7-L batch fermentations with in situ butanol recovery. Cell damage occurred in the fermentor upon agitation in the presence of the adsorbent, unlike in static flask cultures with in situ recovery. Ex situ recovery fermentation using circulation of fermentation broth after mid-exponential phase of cell growth was developed to avoid adsorbent-cell incompatibility. No apparent cell damage was observed and 25.7 g/L of ABE was produced from 86.2 g/L glucose in the fed-batch mode using 7 L fermentors. Thus, ex situ recovery fermentation with C. beijerinckii is effective for enhancing butanol fermentation.

  10. High prevalence of toxigenic Clostridium difficile in public space lawns in Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Moono, Peter; Lim, Su Chen; Riley, Thomas V.

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a well-established hospital pathogen. Recently, it has been detected increasingly in patients without hospital contact. Given this rise in community associated infections with C. difficile, we hypothesized that the environment could play an important role in transmission of spores outside the hospital. Lawn samples (311) collected in public spaces in the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia, from February to June 2016 were cultured for C. difficile. C. difficile was isolated from the samples by direct and enrichment culture, and characterized by standard molecular methods using toxin gene PCR and ribotyping. The overall prevalence of C. difficile was 59%, new lawn (≤4 months old) was twice as likely as old lawn (>4 months old) to test positive (OR = 2.3; 95%CI 1.16–4.57, p = 0.015) and 35 C. difficile ribotypes were identified with toxigenic ribotype 014/020 (39%) predominating. The highest viable count from lawn soil samples was 1200 CFU/g. These results show that lawns in Perth, Western Australia, harbor toxigenic C. difficile, an important finding. The source of lawn contamination is likely related to modern practice of producing “roll-out” lawn. Further work should focus on identifying specific management practices that lead to C. difficile contamination of lawn to inform prevention and control measures. PMID:28145453

  11. Characterization of Clostridium botulinum strains associated with an infant botulism case in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eric A; Tepp, William H; Bradshaw, Marite; Gilbert, Richard J; Cook, Paul E; McIntosh, E David G

    2005-06-01

    The sixth case of infant botulism in the United Kingdom was reported in 2001. The case was caused by a type B strain of Clostridium botulinum. Strains of C. botulinum were isolated from the baby's feces and from foodstuffs in the household in an attempt to document transmission. The aims of this study were to characterize the strains of C. botulinum associated with the botulism case. This was performed using a variety of techniques, including C. botulinum culture phenotypic properties, neurotoxin characterization, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) banding patterns. Cultures associated with this case as well as isolates from stored and historical samples were analyzed and compared. C. botulinum type B PFGE patterns from the infant and from an opened container of infant formula were indistinguishable, while the PFGE profile of a strain presumably isolated from an unopened archival container was unique. The results suggest that the unopened brand of formula was not the source for transmission of spores to the infant and that the strain was distinct from previous botulism cases in the United Kingdom. Since environmental testing was not performed, it is not possible to deduce other sources of transmission.

  12. Characterization of Clostridium botulinum Strains Associated with an Infant Botulism Case in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eric A.; Tepp, William H.; Bradshaw, Marite; Gilbert, Richard J.; Cook, Paul E.; McIntosh, E. David G.

    2005-01-01

    The sixth case of infant botulism in the United Kingdom was reported in 2001. The case was caused by a type B strain of Clostridium botulinum. Strains of C. botulinum were isolated from the baby's feces and from foodstuffs in the household in an attempt to document transmission. The aims of this study were to characterize the strains of C. botulinum associated with the botulism case. This was performed using a variety of techniques, including C. botulinum culture phenotypic properties, neurotoxin characterization, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) banding patterns. Cultures associated with this case as well as isolates from stored and historical samples were analyzed and compared. C. botulinum type B PFGE patterns from the infant and from an opened container of infant formula were indistinguishable, while the PFGE profile of a strain presumably isolated from an unopened archival container was unique. The results suggest that the unopened brand of formula was not the source for transmission of spores to the infant and that the strain was distinct from previous botulism cases in the United Kingdom. Since environmental testing was not performed, it is not possible to deduce other sources of transmission. PMID:15956371

  13. Influence of long-chain polyphosphate and heat treatment on Clostridium cochlearium and Clostridium sporogenes isolated from processed cheese spread.

    PubMed

    Borch, Elisabeth; Lycken, Lena

    2007-03-01

    The outgrowth of Clostridium spp. spores causes spoilage in processed cheese products due to gas and off-odor formation. The present study focuses on the response of spores of Clostridium sporogenes and Clostridium cochlearium at 25 degrees C to polyphosphate, both alone and in combination with heat treatment. The two strains used were isolated from spoiled cheese spread. The addition of 1.5% polyphosphate but not 0.75% polyphosphate totally inhibited the growth of C. sporogenes SIK4.3; in contrast, 0.75% polyphosphate was sufficient to totally inhibit C. cochlearium CCUG 45978. The highest polyphosphate concentration tested (1.5%) was sporicidal for C. sporogenes SIK4.3 but not for C. cochlearium CCUG 45978. When 0.75% polyphosphate Bekaplus FS was combined with a holding time of 5 min at 98 degrees C, no survival or growth of C. sporogenes SIK4.3 was detected; however, the same effect was not achieved through heating alone or through application of polyphosphate alone. C. cochlearium CCUG 45978 was more heat tolerant, as shown by higher D-values. In conclusion, the results strongly suggest that polyphosphate Bekaplus FS has the potential to restrict the growth of C. sporogenes and C. cochlearium in cheese spread stored at ambient storage temperature. Experiments with cheese are needed in order to verify this effect.

  14. Different substrate recognition requirements for cleavage of synaptobrevin-2 by Clostridium baratii and Clostridium botulinum type F neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Baudys, Jakub; Egan, Christina; Smith, Theresa J; Smith, Leonard A; Pirkle, James L; Barr, John R

    2011-02-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause botulism, which can be fatal if it is untreated. BoNTs cleave proteins necessary for nerve transmission, resulting in paralysis. The in vivo protein target has been reported for all seven serotypes of BoNT, i.e., serotypes A to G. Knowledge of the cleavage sites has led to the development of several assays to detect BoNT based on its ability to cleave a peptide substrate derived from its in vivo protein target. Most serotypes of BoNT can be subdivided into subtypes, and previously, we demonstrated that three of the currently known subtypes of BoNT/F cleave a peptide substrate, a shortened version of synaptobrevin-2, between Q58 and K59. However, our research indicated that Clostridium baratii type F toxin did not cleave this peptide. In this study, we detail experiments demonstrating that Clostridium baratii type F toxin cleaves recombinant synaptobrevin-2 in the same location as that cleaved by proteolytic F toxin. In addition, we demonstrate that Clostridium baratii type F toxin can cleave a peptide substrate based on the sequence of synaptobrevin-2. This peptide substrate is an N-terminal extension of the original peptide substrate used for detection of other BoNT/F toxins and can be used to detect four of the currently known BoNT/F subtypes by mass spectrometry.

  15. Evaluation of hydrogen peroxide vapour as a method for the decontamination of surfaces contaminated with Clostridium botulinum spores.

    PubMed

    Johnston, M D; Lawson, S; Otter, J A

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV) against spores of Clostridium botulinum, for use as a method for decontaminating environments where this pathogen has been handled. Spores were dried onto stainless steel slides and exposed to HPV in a sealed glovebox enclosure, transferred to a quenching agent at timed intervals during the exposure period, before survivors were cultured and enumerated. D-values were calculated from graphs of log10 survivors plotted against time and were found to range from 1.41 to 4.38 min. HPV was found to be effective at deactivating spores of toxigenic Cl. botulinum, non-toxigenic Clostridium spp. and Geobacillus stearothermophilus dried onto stainless steel surfaces. HPV could be used to decontaminate cabinets and rooms where Cl. botulinum has been handled. The cycle parameters should be based on studies carried out with relevant spores of this organism, rather than based on inactivation data for G. stearothermophilus spores, which have been used in the past as a standard biological challenge for disinfection and sterilisation procedures. HPV could provide an attractive alternative to other decontamination methods, as it was rapid, residue-free and did not give rise to the health and safety concerns associated with other gaseous decontamination systems.

  16. Prevalence of Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin and dysbiosis in fecal samples of dogs with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Yasushi; Dhanani, Naila; Markel, Melissa E; Steiner, Jörg M; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2014-12-05

    Clostridium perfringens has been suspected as an enteropathogen in dogs. However, its exact role in gastrointestinal (GI) disorders in dogs remains unknown. Recent studies suggest the importance of an altered intestinal microbiota in the activation of virulence factors of enteropathogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between diarrhea, dysbiosis, and the presence of C. perfringens and its enterotoxin (CPE). Fecal samples were collected prospectively from 95 healthy control dogs and 104 dogs with GI disease and assessed for bacterial abundances and the presence of CPE using quantitative PCR and ELISA, respectively. C. perfringens was detected in all dogs. Potentially enterotoxigenic C. perfringens were detected in 33.7% (32/95) of healthy control dogs and 48.1% (50/104) diseased dogs, respectively. CPE was detected by ELISA in 1.0% (1/95) of control dogs and 16.3% (17/104) of diseased dogs. Abundances of Fusobacteria, Ruminococcaceae, Blautia, and Faecalibacterium were significantly decreased in diseased dogs, while abundances of Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, and Escherichia coli were significantly increased compared to control dogs. The microbial dysbiosis was independent of the presence of the enterotoxigenic C. perfringens or CPE. In conclusion, the presence of CPE as well as fecal dysbiosis was associated with GI disease. However, the presence of C. perfringens was not indicative of GI disease in all cases of diarrhea, and the observed increased abundance of enterotoxigenic C. perfringens may be part of intestinal dysbiosis occurring in GI disease. The significance of an intestinal dysbiosis in dogs with GI disease deserves further attention.

  17. Mathematical modeling and growth kinetics of Clostridium sporogenes in cooked beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 is a common surrogate for proteolytic Clostridium botulinum for thermal process development and validation. However, little information is available concerning the growth kinetics of C. sporogenes in food. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the...

  18. Clostridium septicum gas gangrene in a previously healthy 8-year-old female with survival.

    PubMed

    Pinzon-Guzman, Carolina; Bashir, Dalia; McSherry, George; Beck, Michael J; Rocourt, Dorothy V

    2013-04-01

    We present the only reported case of an immunocompetent pediatric patient in the literature to have fulminate gas gangrene of the lower extremity and concomitant gastrointestinal tract infection due to Clostridium septicum coinfected with Clostridium difficile colitis respectively. The patient survived with aggressive medical and surgical treatment.

  19. Foot Infection by Clostridium sordellii: Case Report and Review of 15 Cases in France

    PubMed Central

    Sautereau, Jean; Le Coustumier, Alain; Mory, Francine; Bouchier, Christiane; Popoff, Michel-R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of foot infection by Clostridium sordellii and review 15 human infections registered at a Reference Center in France during the period 1998 to 2011. All strains were found nontoxigenic, lacking the lethal toxin gene coding for TcsL. Like Clostridium septicum, several C. sordellii infections were associated with intestinal neoplasms. PMID:25609723

  20. Genome Sequence of Clostridium tunisiense TJ, Isolated from Drain Sediment from a Pesticide Factory

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lili; Wang, Yu; Yu, Chunyan; Zhao, Yongqin

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium tunisiense is a Gram-positive, obligate anaerobe that was first isolated in an anaerobic evironment under eutrophication. Here we report the first genome sequence of the Clostridium tunisiense TJ isolated from drain sediment of a pesticide factory in Tianjin, China. The genome is of great importance for both basic and application research. PMID:23209212

  1. Presumptive diagnosis of Clostridium botulinum type D intoxication in a herd of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Heider, L C; McClure, J T; Leger, E R

    2001-03-01

    Fifty-two feedlot cattle exhibited clinical signs suggestive of botulism. Clostridium botulinum type D organisms were recovered from ruminal fluid of 4 of the 5 affected animals tested and were isolated from bakery waste fed to the cattle. Clostridium botulinum type D has not been reported previously in Canadian cattle.

  2. Presumptive diagnosis of Clostridium botulinum type D intoxication in a herd of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Heider, L C; McClure, J T; Leger, E R

    2001-01-01

    Fifty-two feedlot cattle exhibited clinical signs suggestive of botulism. Clostridium botulinum type D organisms were recovered from ruminal fluid of 4 of the 5 affected animals tested and were isolated from bakery waste fed to the cattle. Clostridium botulinum type D has not been reported previously in Canadian cattle. PMID:11265191

  3. Two Serious Cases of Infection with Clostridium celatum after 40 Years in Hiding?

    PubMed Central

    Hoegh, Silje Vermedal; Holt, Hanne Marie; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium celatum [ce.la'tum. L. adj. celatum hidden] has been known since 1974, when it was isolated from human feces. In 40 years, no association with human infection has been reported. In this work, we present two serious cases of infection with the anaerobic Gram-positive rod Clostridium celatum. PMID:26560535

  4. Clostridium septicum infection of hepatic metastases following alcohol injection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium septicum infections are generally associated with gastrointestinal or hematologic malignancies. We report the first case of hepatic metastases infection with Clostridium septicum that followed alcohol injection of liver lesion. Clinicians should consider this possibility in patients with underlying malignancy who present with hepatic abscess, as prompt surgical drainage and empiric antibiotics may be life saving. PMID:20072687

  5. Clostridium septicum infection of hepatic metastases following alcohol injection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Neam; Sohail, Muhammad R; Hashmey, Rayhan H; Al Kaabi, Mohammed

    2009-12-31

    Clostridium septicum infections are generally associated with gastrointestinal or hematologic malignancies. We report the first case of hepatic metastases infection with Clostridium septicum that followed alcohol injection of liver lesion. Clinicians should consider this possibility in patients with underlying malignancy who present with hepatic abscess, as prompt surgical drainage and empiric antibiotics may be life saving.

  6. Genome sequence of Clostridium tunisiense TJ, isolated from drain sediment from a pesticide factory.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lili; Wang, Yu; Yu, Chunyan; Zhao, Yongqin; Gan, Yinbo

    2012-12-01

    Clostridium tunisiense is a Gram-positive, obligate anaerobe that was first isolated in an anaerobic environment under eutrophication. Here we report the first genome sequence of the Clostridium tunisiense TJ isolated from drain sediment of a pesticide factory in Tianjin, China. The genome is of great importance for both basic and application research.

  7. Expression of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 Genes in Escherichia coli for Acetone Production and Acetate Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Lourdes L.; Welker, Neil E.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    1998-01-01

    A synthetic acetone operon (ace4) composed of four Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 genes (adc, ctfAB, and thl, coding for the acetoacetate decarboxylase, coenzyme A transferase, and thiolase, respectively) under the control of the thl promoter was constructed and was introduced into Escherichia coli on vector pACT. Acetone production demonstrated that ace4 is expressed in E. coli and resulted in the reduction of acetic acid levels in the fermentation broth. Since different E. coli strains vary significantly in their growth characteristics and acetate metabolism, ace4 was expressed in three E. coli strains: ER2275, ATCC 11303, and MC1060. Shake flask cultures of MC1060(pACT) produced ca. 2 mM acetone, while both strains ER2275(pACT) and ATCC 11303(pACT) produced ca. 40 mM acetone. Glucose-fed cultures of strain ATCC 11303(pACT) resulted in a 150% increase in acetone titers compared to those of batch shake flask cultures. External addition of sodium acetate to glucose-fed cultures of ATCC 11303(pACT) resulted in further increased acetone titers. In bioreactor studies, acidic conditions (pH 5.5 versus 6.5) improved acetone production. Despite the substantial acetone evaporation due to aeration and agitation in the bioreactor, 125 to 154 mM acetone accumulated in ATCC 11303(pACT) fermentations. These acetone titers are equal to or higher than those produced by wild-type C. acetobutylicum. This is the first study to demonstrate the ability to use clostridial genes in nonclostridial hosts for solvent production. In addition, acetone-producing E. coli strains may be useful hosts for recombinant protein production in that detrimental acetate accumulation can be avoided. PMID:9501448

  8. Transcription activation of a UV-inducible Clostridium perfringens bacteriocin gene by a novel sigma factor.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Bruno; Mani, Nagraj; Katayama, Seiichi; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2005-02-01

    Expression of the plasmid-encoded Clostridium perfringens gene for bacteriocin BCN5 was shown to depend in vivo and in vitro on the activity of UviA protein. UviA, also plasmid-encoded, proved to be an RNA polymerase sigma factor and was also partly autoregulatory. The uviA gene has two promoters; one provided a UviA-independent, basal level of gene expression while the stronger, UviA-dependent promoter was only utilized after the cell experienced DNA damage. As a result, BCN5 synthesis is induced by treatment with UV light or mitomycin C. UviA is related to a special class of sigma factors found to date only in Clostridium species and responsible for activating transcription of toxin genes in Clostridium difficile, Clostridium tetani, and Clostridium botulinum.

  9. A thermophilic phage endolysin fusion to a Clostridium perfringens-specific cell wall binding domain creates an anti-clostridium antimicrobial with improved thermostability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of Necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Man...

  10. Fusion of a thermophilic phage endolysin to a Clostridium perfringens-specific cell wall binding domain creates an anti-clostridium antimicrobial with improved thermostability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of Necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Man...

  11. Clostridium perfringens type A netF and netE positive and Clostridium difficile co-infection in two adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Amanda Nádia; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Oliveira Junior, Carlos Augusto; Pierezan, Felipe; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to report two cases of Clostridium perfringens type A and Clostridium difficile co-infection in adult dogs. Both animals were positive for A/B toxin. Toxigenic C. difficile and C. perfringens type A positive for NetE and NetF-encoding genes were isolated. This report reinforces the necessity of studying a possible synergism of C. difficile and C. perfringens in enteric disorders.

  12. Construction of an alpha toxin gene knockout mutant of Clostridium perfringens type A by use of a mobile group II intron.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; McClane, Bruce A; Fisher, Derek J; Rood, Julian I; Gupta, Phalguni

    2005-11-01

    In developing Clostridium perfringens as a safe vaccine vector, the alpha toxin gene (plc) in the bacterial chromosome must be permanently inactivated. Disrupting genes in C. perfringens by traditional mutagenesis methods is very difficult. Therefore, we developed a new strategy using group II intron-based Target-Tron technology to inactivate the plc gene in C. perfringens ATCC 3624. Western blot analysis showed no production of alpha toxin protein in the culture supernatant of the plc mutant. Advantages of this technology, such as site specificity, relatively high frequency of insertion, and introduction of no antibiotic resistance genes into the chromosome, could facilitate construction of other C. perfringens mutants.

  13. Traits of selected Clostridium strains for syngas fermentation to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Martin, Michael E; Richter, Hanno; Saha, Surya; Angenent, Largus T

    2016-03-01

    Syngas fermentation is an anaerobic bioprocess that could become industrially relevant as a biorefinery platform for sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. An important prerequisite for commercialization is adequate performance of the biocatalyst (i.e., sufficiently high production rate, titer, selectivity, yield, and stability of the fermentation). Here, we compared the performance of three potential candidate Clostridium strains in syngas-to-ethanol conversion: Clostridium ljungdahlii PETC, C. ljungdahlii ERI-2, and Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1. Experiments were conducted in a two-stage, continuously fed syngas-fermentation system that had been optimized for stable ethanol production. The two C. ljungdahlii strains performed similar to each other but different from C. autoethanogenum. When the pH value was lowered from 5.5 to 4.5 to induce solventogenesis, the cell-specific carbon monoxide and hydrogen consumption (similar rate for all strains at pH 5.5), severely decreased in JA1-1, but hardly in PETC and ERI-2. Ethanol production in strains PETC and ERI-2 remained relatively stable while the rate of acetate production decreased, resulting in a high ethanol/acetate ratio, but lower overall productivities. With JA1-1, lowering the pH severely lowered rates of both ethanol and acetate production; and as a consequence, no pronounced shift to solventogenesis was observed. The highest overall ethanol production rate of 0.301 g · L(-1)  · h(-1) was achieved with PETC at pH 4.5 with a corresponding 19 g/L (1.9% w/v) ethanol concentration and a 5.5:1 ethanol/acetate molar ratio. A comparison of the genes relevant for ethanol metabolism revealed differences between C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum that, however, did not conclusively explain the different phenotypes.

  14. Toxin Synthesis and Mucin Breakdown Are Related to Swarming Phenomenon in Clostridium septicum

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Sandra; Hopkins, Mark J.; Macfarlane, George T.

    2001-01-01

    Clostridium septicum is responsible for several diseases in humans and animals. The bacterium is capable of a simple kind of multicellular behavior known as swarming. In this investigation, environmental and physiologic factors affecting growth and swarm cell formation in C. septicum were studied over a range of dilution rates (D = 0.02 to 0.65 h−1) in glucose-limited, glucose-excess, and mucin-limited chemostats. Cellular differentiation was observed at low specific growth rates, irrespective of the carbon and energy source, showing that swarming occurred in response to nutrient depletion. Differential expression of virulence determinants was detected in swarm cells. Hemolysin was secreted by short motile rods but not swarm cells, whereas in cultures grown with glucose, only swarm cells formed DNase, hyaluronidase, and neuraminidase. However, neuraminidase and, to a lesser degree, hyaluronidase were induced in short motile rods in mucin-limited cultures. Both swarm cells and short rods were cytotoxic to Vero cells. Mucin was chemotaxic to C. septicum, and large amounts of mucin-degrading enzymes (β-galactosidase, N-acetyl β-glucosaminidase, glycosulfatase, and neuraminidase) were produced. Synthesis of these enzymes was catabolite regulated. In chemostat experiments, glycosulfatase secretion occurred only in swarm cells at low dilution rates in mucin-limited cultures. Determinations of oligosaccharide utilization demonstrated that N-acetylglucosamine, galactose, and N-acetylgalactosamine were the main carbon sources for C. septicum in mucin. Neuraminic acid was not assimilated, showing that neuraminidase does not have a direct nutritional function in this pathogen. PMID:11160009

  15. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea from a general hospital in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Legaria, M C; Lumelsky, G; Rosetti, S

    2003-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is responsible for 15-25% of all cases of antibiotic associated diarrhea. The incidence of infection with this organism is increasing in hospitals worldwide, consequent to the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Although the clinical and financial impact of nosocomial C. difficile infection is believed to be significant, only limited information is available on the importance of C. difficile as a cause of diarrhea in Argentina. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact and diagnosis methods of CDAD from symptomatic patients in a general hospital from Argentina. Consecutive diarrheal stool samples from symptomatic patients from a General Hospital in Argentina were screened for toxigenic C. difficile between April 2000 and April 2001. Toxins were detected in stools by the Premier Cytoclone A+B EIA. Each specimen was examined for toxigenic C. difficile strains by culture. From 104 specimens, 40 (38.5%) [32 of 87 patients (36.8%)] were positive and 64 (61.5%) [55 of 87 patients (63.2%)] were negative by stool toxin assay and/or toxigenic culture. In 11 of 40 positives samples C. difficile toxins were detected only by toxigenic culture. Five (15.6%) patients presented with symptomatic recurrences. Toxin-negative strains were not isolated. This data indicates that the high prevalence of toxigenic strains of C. difficile is of concern in routine diagnostic testing for C. difficile toxins in our study population. Detection of toxins in stools by EIA, coupled with testing strains for toxigenicity only in those cases in which direct toxin assay produces negative results, may be a satisfactory strategy. CDAD is an emerging nosocomial problem in our hospital. It will be necessary to evaluate the epidemiology and measures to control nosocomial spread.

  16. Regulation of Major Cellulosomal Endoglucanases of Clostridium thermocellum Differs from That of a Prominent Cellulosomal Xylanase

    PubMed Central

    Dror, Tali W.; Rolider, Adi; Bayer, Edward A.; Lamed, Raphael; Shoham, Yuval

    2005-01-01

    The expression of scaffoldin-anchoring genes and one of the major processive endoglucanases (CelS) from the cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum has been shown to be dependent on the growth rate. For the present work, we studied the gene regulation of selected cellulosomal endoglucanases and a major xylanase in order to examine the previously observed substrate-linked alterations in cellulosome composition. For this purpose, the transcript levels of genes encoding endoglucanases CelB, CelG, and CelD and the family 10 xylanase XynC were determined in batch cultures, grown on either cellobiose or cellulose, and in carbon-limited continuous cultures at different dilution rates. Under all conditions tested, the transcript levels of celB and celG were at least 10-fold higher than that of celD. Like the major processive endoglucanase CelS, the transcript levels of these endoglucanase genes were also dependent on the growth rate. Thus, at a rate of 0.04 h−1, the levels of celB, celG, and celD were threefold higher than those obtained in cultures grown at maximal rates (0.35 h−1) on cellobiose. In contrast, no clear correlation was observed between the transcript level of xynC and the growth rate—the levels remained relatively high, fluctuating between 30 and 50 transcripts per cell. The results suggest that the regulation of C. thermocellum endoglucanases is similar to that of the processive endoglucanase celS but differs from that of a major cellulosomal xylanase in that expression of the latter enzyme is independent of the growth rate. PMID:15774868

  17. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens TpeL Toxin Gene Carriage, Production, Cytotoxic Contributions, and Trypsin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Large clostridial toxins (LCTs) are produced by at least four pathogenic clostridial species, and several LCTs are proven pivotal virulence factors for both human and veterinary diseases. TpeL is a recently identified LCT produced by Clostridium perfringens that has received relatively limited study. In response, the current study surveyed carriage of the tpeL gene among different C. perfringens strains, detecting this toxin gene in some type A, B, and C strains but not in any type D or E strains. This study also determined that all tested strains maximally produce, and extracellularly release, TpeL at the late-log or early-stationary growth stage during in vitro culture, which is different from the maximal late-stationary-phase production reported previously for other LCTs and for TpeL production by C. perfringens strain JIR12688. In addition, the present study found that TpeL levels in culture supernatants can be repressed by either glucose or sucrose. It was also shown that, at natural production levels, TpeL is a significant contributor to the cytotoxic activity of supernatants from cultures of tpeL-positive strain CN3685. Lastly, this study identified TpeL, which presumably is produced in the intestines during diseases caused by TpeL-positive type B and C strains, as a toxin whose cytotoxicity decreases after treatment with trypsin; this finding may have pathophysiologic relevance by suggesting that, like beta toxin, TpeL contributes to type B and C infections in hosts with decreased trypsin levels due to disease, diet, or age. PMID:25824828

  18. Clostridium perfringens Epsilon Toxin Causes Selective Death of Mature Oligodendrocytes and Central Nervous System Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Jennifer R.; Ma, Yinghua; Zhao, Baohua; Harris, Jason Michael; Rumah, Kareem Rashid; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ε-toxin) is responsible for a devastating multifocal central nervous system (CNS) white matter disease in ruminant animals. The mechanism by which ε-toxin causes white matter damage is poorly understood. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which ε-toxin causes pathological changes to white matter. In primary CNS cultures, ε-toxin binds to and kills oligodendrocytes but not astrocytes, microglia, or neurons. In cerebellar organotypic culture, ε-toxin induces demyelination, which occurs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, while preserving neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. ε-Toxin specificity for oligodendrocytes was confirmed using enriched glial culture. Sensitivity to ε-toxin is developmentally regulated, as only mature oligodendrocytes are susceptible to ε-toxin; oligodendrocyte progenitor cells are not. ε-Toxin sensitivity is also dependent on oligodendrocyte expression of the proteolipid myelin and lymphocyte protein (MAL), as MAL-deficient oligodendrocytes are insensitive to ε-toxin. In addition, ε-toxin binding to white matter follows the spatial and temporal pattern of MAL expression. A neutralizing antibody against ε-toxin inhibits oligodendrocyte death and demyelination. This study provides several novel insights into the action of ε-toxin in the CNS. (i) ε-Toxin causes selective oligodendrocyte death while preserving all other neural elements. (ii) ε-Toxin-mediated oligodendrocyte death is a cell autonomous effect. (iii) The effects of ε-toxin on the oligodendrocyte lineage are restricted to mature oligodendrocytes. (iv) Expression of the developmentally regulated proteolipid MAL is required for the cytotoxic effects. (v) The cytotoxic effects of ε-toxin can be abrogated by an ε-toxin neutralizing antibody. PMID:26081637

  19. Incorrect diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection in a university hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mori, Nobuaki; Yoshizawa, Sadako; Saga, Tomoo; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Murakami, Hinako; Iwata, Morihiro; Collins, Deirdre A; Riley, Thomas V; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Physicians often fail to suspect Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and many microbiology laboratories use suboptimal diagnostic techniques. To estimate the extent of and reasons for incorrect diagnosis of CDI in Japan, we investigated toxigenic C. difficile isolated from all stool culture samples and clinical course. Over a 12-month period in 2010, all stool culture samples (n = 975) submitted from inpatients in a university hospital in Japan were cultured for C. difficile and routine microbiological testing was conducted. In total, 177 C. difficile isolates were recovered, and 127 isolates were toxigenic. Among the toxin-A-positive/toxin-B-positive isolates, 12 were also positive for the binary toxin gene. However, clinically important ribotypes, such as 027 and 078, were not identified. A total of 58 (45.7%) cases with toxigenic C. difficile had unformed stool, and the incidence CDI was 1.6 cases per 10,000 patient-days. Of these 58 cases, 40 were not diagnosed in routine testing due to a lack of clinical suspicion (24.1%, 14/58) or a negative C. difficile toxin assay result (44.8%, 26/58). A stool toxin assay was performed in 54 patients (78.2%, 54/69) who did not have unformed stool. The present study demonstrated that a significant number of CDI cases in Japan might be overlooked or misdiagnosed in clinical practice due to a lack of clinical suspicion and limitations of microbiological testing for CDI in Japan. Providing education to promote awareness of CDI among physicians is important to improve the accuracy of diagnosis in Japan.

  20. Reductive Disslocation of Pu(IV) by Clostridium sp. Under Anaerobic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Francis,A.; Dodge, C.; Gillow, J.

    2008-01-01

    An anaerobic, gram positive, spore-forming bacterium Clostridium sp., common in soils and wastes, capable of reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), Mn(IV) to Mn(II), Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), and U(VI) to U(IV), reduced Pu(IV) to Pu(III). Addition of 242Pu (IV)-nitrate to the bacterial growth medium at pH 6.4 resulted in the precipitation of Pu as amorphous Pu(OH)4 due to hydrolysis and polymerization reactions. The Pu (1 x 10-5 M) had no effect upon growth of the bacterium as evidenced by glucose consumption; carbon dioxide and hydrogen production; a decrease in pH of the medium from 6.4 to 3.0 due to production of acetic and butyric acids from glucose fermentation; and a change in the Eh of the culture medium from +50 to -180 mV. Commensurate with bacterial growth, Pu was rapidly solubilized as evidenced by an increase in Pu concentration in solution which passed through a 0.03 {mu}m filtration. Selective solvent extraction of the culture by thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) indicated the presence of a reduced Pu species in the soluble fraction. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopic (XANES) analysis of Pu in the culture sample at the Pu LIII absorption edge (18.054 keV) showed a shift of -3 eV compared to a Pu(IV) standard indicating reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III). These results suggest that, although Pu generally exists as insoluble Pu(IV) in the environment, under appropriate conditions, anaerobic microbial activity could affect the long-term stability and mobility of Pu by its reductive dissolution.

  1. Demonstration of protective antigen carried by flagella of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Y; Minamoto, N; Tanaka, S

    1984-01-01

    The protective antigen present on the flagella of Clostridium chauvoei was studied by the mouse protection test. A partially purified flagella preparation (PPF) showed protective antigenicity after two intraperitoneal injections of 2 micrograms as protein, while the protective antigenicity of nonflagellated mutants (NFM) was 100-fold less than that of the flagellated parent strain. Although the protective effect of antisera against the whole cells and PPF, in terms of ED50 values, was mostly lost after absorption with the parent strain, that of antisera after absorption with NFMs showed no appreciable loss. These results suggest that the flagella of Cl. chauvoei play some role in inducing protective immunity in mice.

  2. Purification and sensitivity of Clostridium chauvoei hemolysin to various erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mudenda Hang'ombe, Bernard; Kohda, Tomoko; Mukamoto, Masafumi; Kozaki, Shunji

    2006-07-01

    Using ammonium sulphate fractionation, the Clostridium chauvoei hemolysin was purified by cation exchange chromatography and sephacryl S-100 gel filtration. The molecular mass of the hemolysin, determined by SDS-PAGE was found to be approximately 27kDa. The activity of the hemolysin was determined in erythrocytes of various animals, with sensitivities observed in the order of cow, sheep, chicken, rabbit, rat, mouse, dog and horse. Temperature affected the sensitivity of erythrocytes to C. chauvoei hemolysin. These results may reflect distinct characteristics of the hemolytic activity of C. chauvoei hemolysin and that the hemolysin may be pore-forming.

  3. [Treating Clostridium difficile infection with faecal transplantation: donor microbiological testing].

    PubMed

    Russello, Giuseppe; Brovarone, Flavia; Bardaro, Marcellino; Carretto, Edoardo

    2014-03-01

    Clostridium difficile associated diseases (CDADs) or C. difficile infections (CDIs) are increasing in incidence, severity and mortality. Among patients with CDIs, those with recurrent disease are less responsive to traditional therapies with commonly used drugs, such as metronidazole and vancomycin. Faecal microbiota transplantation is an old therapeutic procedure that has been recently proposed as a safe and effective treatment for CDI patients non-responsive to antibiotic therapy. In this paper we discuss the microbiological procedures that should be performed on faecal microbiota donors.

  4. [Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection treated with faecal microbiota transplantation].

    PubMed

    Fløe, Andreas; Leutscher, Peter

    2014-02-17

    Treatment of severe Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) poses a clinical challenge. Emerging evidence supports the use of faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). An 81-year-old man was admitted with a third recurrent episode of CDI within two months. Because of clinical deterioration with development of pancolitis in spite of two weeks of metronidazole and vanco-mycin treatment, FMT was performed using a duodenal tube. The patient recovered completely without further relapse during follow-up. FMT was shown to be an efficient adjuvant treatment of complicated CDI.

  5. Clostridium thermocellum DSM 1313 transcriptional responses to redox perturbation

    DOE PAGES

    Sander, Kyle B.; Wilson, Charlotte M.; M. Rodriquez, Jr.; ...

    2015-12-12

    Clostridium thermocellum is a promising consolidated bioprocessing candidate organism capable of directly converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Current ethanol yields, productivities, and growth inhibitions are industrial deployment impediments for commodity fuel production by this bacterium. Redox imbalance under certain conditions and in engineered strains may contribute to incomplete substrate utilization and may direct fermentation products to undesirable overflow metabolites. As a result, towards a better understanding of redox metabolism in C. thermocellum, we established continuous growth conditions and analyzed global gene expression during addition of two stress chemicals (methyl viologen and hydrogen peroxide) which changed the fermentation redox potential.

  6. Clostridium perfringens type A-E toxin plasmids.

    PubMed

    Freedman, John C; Theoret, James R; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Uzal, Francisco A; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell.

  7. Clostridium perfringens gas gangrene at a wrist intravenous line insertion.

    PubMed

    Determann, Catherine; Walker, Craig Andrew

    2013-10-09

    A patient admitted to the intensive care unit for management of hypotension following a multiple medications overdose subsequently deteriorated rapidly with sepsis. A cannula site was noted to be bruised, swollen and erythematous and the X-ray demonstrated gas sitting within the tissues surrounding the metacarpal bones. The patient was referred to the orthopaedic surgeons and quickly taken for debridement of the affected area and fasciotomies of the forearm. Microbiological investigation confirmed Clostridium perfringens to be present in multiple fluid samples taken from the affected site.

  8. Fulminant massive gas gangrene caused by Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Shoji; Okada, Yumi; Mita, Masaki; Okamoto, Yasuo; Kato, Hirotaka; Ueyama, Shigemitsu; Fujii, Ikuzo; Morita, Sumiharu; Yoshida, Yasuaki

    2005-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens (C.P) gas gangrene is one of the most fulminant infectious diseases. We encountered fulminant massive gas gangrene in a 56- year-old man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. The patient died 14 hours after diagnosis of gas gangrene (54 hours after admission). Dramatic changes in abdominal CT imaging revealed development of a massive volume of gas in the intra-portal vein, retroperitoneum and abdominal subcutaneous tissue within 24 hours. We also proved C.P infection by immunohistological staining, leading to a diagnosis of C.P gas gangrene.

  9. Probiotics and Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea and Clostridium difficile Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surawicz, Christina M.

    Diarrhea is a common side effect of antibiotics. Antibiotics can cause diarrhea in 5-25% of individuals who take them but its occurrence is unpredictable. Diarrhea due to antibiotics is called antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Diarrhea may be mild and resolve when antibiotics are discontinued, or it may be more severe. The most severe form of AAD is caused by overgrowth of Clostridium difficile which can cause severe diarrhea, colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, or even fatal toxic megacolon. Rates of diarrhea vary with the specific antibiotic as well as with the individual susceptibility.

  10. Characteristic strategy of assimilation of various saccharides by Clostridium cellulovorans.

    PubMed

    Inamori, Takako; Aburaya, Shunsuke; Morisaka, Hironobu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium cellulovorans can effectively assimilate not only cellulose but also hemicellulose by producing cellulosomal and non-cellulosomal enzymes. However, little is known about how C. cellulovorans assimilates various saccharides in media containing polysaccharides and oligosaccharides. In this research, we investigated the property of saccharide incorporation and assimilation by C. cellulovorans. Faster growth in media containing xylan and cellulose was achieved by switching polysaccharides, in which xylan was first assimilated, followed by cellulose. Furthermore, the presence of polysaccharides that can be easily degraded might increase the assimilation rate of lignocellulose by promoting growth. These properties of C. cellulovorans could be suitable for the effective utilization of lignocellulosic biomass.

  11. Using expert process to combat Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Isabelle; Achonu, Camille; Volkening, Grace; MacFarlane, Sam; McCreight, Liz; Egan, Cathy; Robertson, Jennifer; Garber, Gary

    2016-12-01

    In 2008, Clostridium difficile rates were increasing in Ontario, Canada, and in response, hospitals were mandated by the Ontario Ministry of Health to publicly report their C difficile infection (CDI) rates. In order to assist hospitals which had ongoing CDI outbreaks, a process of an external infection control resource team (ICRT) was introduced. This article describes the function and process of the ICRT, managed by Public Health Ontario, and reviews the lessons learned over the first 5 years of operation. These lessons may assist other hospitals in managing their own infection prevention and control outbreak.

  12. Femtomolar sensitivity of a NO sensor from Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Nioche, Pierre; Berka, Vladimir; Vipond, Julia; Minton, Nigel; Tsai, Ah-Lim; Raman, C S

    2004-11-26

    Nitric oxide (NO) is extremely toxic to Clostridium botulinum, but its molecular targets are unknown. Here, we identify a heme protein sensor (SONO) that displays femtomolar affinity for NO. The crystal structure of the SONO heme domain reveals a previously undescribed fold and a strategically placed tyrosine residue that modulates heme-nitrosyl coordination. Furthermore, the domain architecture of a SONO ortholog cloned from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii indicates that NO signaling through cyclic guanosine monophosphate arose before the origin of multicellular eukaryotes. Our findings have broad implications for understanding bacterial responses to NO, as well as for the activation of mammalian NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase.

  13. The actin-ADP-ribosylating Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin.

    PubMed

    Aktories, Klaus; Barth, Holger

    2004-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin is the prototype of actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins. The toxin consists of the enzyme component C2I and the separated binding/translocation component C2II. C2II is proteolytically activated to form heptamers, which bind the enzyme component. After endocytosis of the receptor-toxin complex, the enzyme component enters the cytosol from an acidic endosomal compartment to modify G-actin at arginine177. Recent data indicate that chaperons are involved in the translocation process of the toxin.

  14. Clostridium difficile Infection in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Cynthia L.; Oliva-Hemker, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are disproportionately susceptible to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and the incidence is increasing. There has also been growing recognition of asymptomatic C. difficile colonization in pediatric IBD, which can sometimes be very difficult to distinguish from symptomatic C. difficile–associated disease in this population. In this study, we discuss the current knowledge of C. difficile infection in children with IBD, reviewing epidemiology, risk factors, and outcomes that often differ from the adult IBD population, and discuss the complexities and dilemmas of diagnosing and treating CDI in pediatric IBD. PMID:26689599

  15. Clostridium septicum gas gangrene in the orbit: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fejes, I; Dégi, R; Végh, M

    2013-02-01

    Our report presents a case of Clostridium septicum gas gangrene in an unusual, orbital localization. The predisposing factors are typical: colon tumour and lymphatic malignancy. Most probably bacteria from the intestinal flora entered the bloodstream through the compromised intestinal wall and settled in the orbit resulting in the development of an abscess containing gas. At the site of the gas gangrene, an indolent B cell lymphoma was present. After surgery and antibiotic treatment, the patient healed from the C. septicum infection; but subsequently died as a consequence of the tumour.

  16. Novel approaches to treating Clostridium difficile-associated colitis.

    PubMed

    Padua, David; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is being recognized as a growing threat to many health-care systems. Epidemiology data shows that infection rates are soaring and the disease burden is increasing. Despite the efficacy of standard treatments, it is becoming evident that novel therapeutics will be required to tackle this disease. These new treatments aim to enhance the intestinal microbial barrier, activate the immune system and neutralize the toxins that mediate this disease. Many of these therapies are still in the beginning stages of investigation, however, in the next few years, more clinical data will become available to help implement many of these exciting new therapeutic approaches.

  17. The prospect for vaccines to prevent Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Chandrabali; Kelly, Ciarán P

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming anaerobic gram-positive organism that is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated nosocomial infectious diarrhea in the Western world. This article describes the evolving epidemiology of C difficile infection (CDI) in the twenty-first century, evaluates the importance of vaccines against the disease, and defines the roles of both innate and adaptive host immune responses in CDI. The effects of passive immunotherapy and active vaccination against CDI in both humans and animals are also discussed.

  18. Fecal microbiota transplantation and emerging treatments for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Gens, Krista D; Elshaboury, Ramy H; Holt, Jessica S

    2013-10-01

    Due to the increased incidence and recurrence of Clostridium difficile infection, health care providers are seeking new and alternative treatments to the standard antibiotic therapy. The objective of this article is to present a review on the background, microbiologic efficacy, clinical efficacy, and safety of fecal microbiota transplantation and to provide an overview of emerging treatment options currently under investigation. Emerging treatment options discussed include the use of monoclonal antibodies directed against toxins A and B, C difficile vaccination, and transplantation of nontoxigenic C difficile strains.

  19. Isolation and Identification of Psychrophilic Species of Clostridium from Milk

    PubMed Central

    Bhadsavle, C. H.; Shehata, T. E.; Collins, E. B.

    1972-01-01

    Four of 48 raw milk samples contained catalase-negative, gram-positive, motile, sporeforming, rod-shaped bacteria that grew optimally at 22 to 30 C and slowly at low temperatures. Isolates from two samples had a minimal growth temperature of 4 C, were anaerobic, and had characteristics similar to Clostridium hastiforme; those from the other two samples had a minimal growth temperature of 0 ± 1 C, were anaerobic, aerotolerant, and had characteristics similar to C. carnis. Specific growth rates, doubling times, ability to grow in pasteurized milk stored in commercial cartons, and resistance of spores to heating were determined for one strain of C. hastiforme. PMID:4565634

  20. Infantile botulism caused by Clostridium butyricum type E toxin.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuichi; Negasawa, Tetsuro; Monma, Chie; Oka, Akira

    2008-01-01

    The case of a 9-month-old boy with infantile botulism caused by Clostridium butyricum type E toxin is reported. Because infantile botulism is rare in Japan, it was difficult to diagnose it at an early stage. Electrophysiologic findings were useful for the diagnosis, and were characterized by incremental responses (waxing) to short intervals and rapid repetitive nerve stimulation. A bioassay for botulism in mice indicated that the patient had botulism due to type E or F botulinum toxin. C. butyricum type E was isolated from his feces, confirming the diagnosis. This is the first known case of infantile botulism due to C. butyricum type E toxin in Japan.

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R. O. S.; Salvarani, F.M.; Assis, R.A.; Martins, N.R.S.; Pires, P.S.; Lobato, F.C.F.

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a normal inhabitant of the intestinal tract of chickens as well as a potential pathogen that causes necrotic enteritis and colangio hepatitis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of seven different compounds used for therapy, growth promotion or prevention of coccidiosis was determined by agar dilution method for 55 C. perfringens strains isolated from the intestines of broiler chickens. All strains showed high susceptibility to penicillin, avilamycin, monensin and narasin. Only 7.3% of the strains showed an intermediated sensitivity to lincomycin, and 49 (89.1%) were considered susceptible. For tetracycline and bacitracin, 41.8% and 47.3% of strains, respectively, were considered resistant. PMID:24031355

  2. Structure, Function and Regulation of the Clostridium cellulovorans Cellulosome

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Roy H

    2008-06-01

    Our major goal for this project (2004-2008) was to obtain an understanding ofthe structure, function, and regulation of the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulosomes. Our specific goals were to select genes for cellulosomal and non-cellulosomal enzymes and characterize their products, to study the synergistic action between cellulosomal and non-cellulosomal enzymes, to study the composition of cellulosomes when cells were grown with different carbon sources, continue our studies on the scaffolding protein and examine heterologous expression of cellulosomal genes in Bacillus subtilis. We fulfilled the specific goals of our proposal.

  3. [Characteristics of Clostridium tetani and laboratory diagnosis of tetanus].

    PubMed

    Smietańska, Karolina; Rokosz-Chudziak, Natalia; Rastawicki, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    The causative agent of tetanus is the obligate anaerobic bacterium--Clostridium tetani. These bacteria form endospores that are able to survive long periods of exposure to air and other adverse environmental conditions. Infection generally occurs through wound contamination. We can distinguish several forms of tetanus: generalized, local and neonatal. Diagnosis of tetanus is based primarily on the patient's clinical symptoms (muscle cramps, painful back muscle spasms, generalized contractions of the arcuate curvature of the body) as well as on microbiological diagnosis. This article is a brief review of C. tetani and diagnosis of infections caused by these organisms in humans.

  4. The Antimicrobial Stewardship Approach to Combating Clostridium Difficile

    PubMed Central

    Wenzler, Eric; Mulugeta, Surafel G.; Danziger, Larry H.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile remains a major public health threat and continues to contribute to excess morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Antimicrobial stewardship programs have demonstrated success in combating C. difficile, primarily through antibiotic restrictive strategies. As the incidence and prevalence of C. difficile associate disease continues to increase both in the hospital and community setting, additional stewardship approaches are needed. This manuscript reviews stewardship interventions that have been successful against C. difficile associated disease and proposes future tactics that antimicrobial stewardship programs may employ to develop a more global approach to combat this difficult pathogen. PMID:27025621

  5. Clostridium difficile infection: Evolution, phylogeny and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Briony; Androga, Grace O; Knight, Daniel R; Riley, Thomas V

    2017-04-01

    Over the recent decades, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has emerged as a global public health threat. Despite growing attention, C. difficile remains a poorly understood pathogen, however, the exquisite sensitivity offered by next generation sequencing (NGS) technology has enabled analysis of the genome of C. difficile, giving us access to massive genomic data on factors such as virulence, evolution, and genetic relatedness within C. difficile groups. NGS has also demonstrated excellence in investigations of outbreaks and disease transmission, in both small and large-scale applications. This review summarizes the molecular epidemiology, evolution, and phylogeny of C. difficile, one of the most important pathogens worldwide in the current antibiotic resistance era.

  6. Clostridium perfringens type A–E toxin plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John C.; Theoret, James R.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell. PMID:25283728

  7. Isolation of Clostridium difficile and molecular detection of binary and A/B toxins in faeces of dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ghavidel, M.; Salari Sedigh, H.; Razmyar, J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate Clostridium difficile from dogs’ faeces, and to study the frequency of its virulence genes. A total of 151 samples of dogs’ faeces were collected. The isolation of C. difficile was performed by using the bacterial culture methods followed by DNA extraction using boiling method. Multiplex PCR method was performed for identification of tcdA, tcdB, cdtA and cdtB genes and single method was carried out for detection of tcdC. Twelve samples (7.9%) were positive in bacteriological assay and based on molecular assay, 66.7% of the isolates (8 of 12 C. difficile isolated) had shown tcdA+, tcdB+ profile. This is the first investigation on molecular assay of C. difficile in Iran’s dog population. PMID:28224013

  8. Purification and characterization of neurotoxin complex from a dual toxin gene containing Clostridium Botulinum Strain PS-5.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay K; Sachdeva, Amita; Degrasse, Jeffrey A; Croley, Timothy R; Stanker, Larry H; Hodge, David; Sharma, Shashi K

    2013-04-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are produced as a toxin complex (TC) which consists of neurotoxin (NT) and neurotoxin associated proteins. The characterization of NT in its native state is an essential step for developing diagnostics and therapeutic countermeasures against botulism. The presence of NT genes was validated by PCR amplification of toxin specific fragments from genomic DNA of Clostridium botulinum strain PS-5 which indicated the presence of both serotype A and B genes on PS-5 genome. Further, TC was purified and characterized by Western blotting, Digoxin-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, endopeptidase activity assay, and Liquid chromatography-Mass spectrometry. The data showed the presence of serotype A specific neurotoxin. Based on the analysis of neurotoxin genes and characterization of TC, PS-5 strain appears as a serotype A (B) strain of C. botulinum which produces only serotype A specific TC in the cell culture medium.

  9. Resistance of ovine, caprine and bovine endothelial cells to Clostridium perfringens type D epsilon toxin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Uzal, F A; Rolfe, B E; Smith, N J; Thomas, A C; Kelly, W R

    1999-08-01

    Ovine, caprine and bovine endothelial cells were grown in vitro and challenged with Clostridium perfringens type D epsilon toxin to compare their susceptibility to this toxin. Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, which are known to be susceptible to epsilon toxin, were used as a positive control. No morphological alterations were observed in any of the endothelial cell cultures tested, even after challenging with doses as high as 1200 MLD50/ml of epsilon toxin. MDCK cells showed contour rounding and nuclear condensation as early as 30 min after exposure to 100 MLD50/ml of epsilon toxin and after 60 min of exposure to 12.5 MLD50/ml of the same toxin. All the MDCK cells were dead after 3 h of exposure to all concentrations of epsilon toxin. The results indicate that ovine, caprine and bovine endothelial cells are not morphologically responsive to the action of epsilon toxin in vitro.

  10. Differences in signs and lesions in sheep and goats with enterotoxemia induced by intraduodenal infusion of Clostridium perfringens type D.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, T E; Butler, D G; Prescott, J F; Wilcock, B P

    1991-07-01

    Enterotoxemia was induced in 4 lambs and 4 goat kids by continuous intraduodenal infusion of a whole culture of Clostridium perfringens type D. Clinical signs, hematologic values, biochemical alterations, and postmortem lesions in the lambs and goat kids were compared. The 4 lambs and 4 goat kids died within 25 hours of beginning the infusions. Lesions were not observed in the gastrointestinal tract of the 4 lambs; however, severe hemorrhagic enterocolitis was found in the 4 goat kids. This difference between the lambs and goat kids in the lesions caused by experimentally induced enterotoxemia may explain the discrepancies reported between sheep and goats in clinical signs, response to treatment, and efficacy of vaccination observed in naturally induced enterotoxemia in the 2 species.

  11. Isolation and identification of Clostridium spp. from infections associated with the injection of drugs: experiences of a microbiological investigation team.

    PubMed

    Brazier, J S; Duerden, B I; Hall, V; Salmon, J E; Hood, J; Brett, M M; McLauchlin, J; George, R C

    2002-11-01

    Pathogenic species of the genus Clostridium may contaminate the materials used in the injection of drugs and under the right conditions may cause serious or life-threatening disease. C. novyi type A was implicated in an outbreak of severe infection with high mortality in injecting drug users who injected heroin extravascularly. The isolation of such highly oxygen-sensitive clostridia from clinical material may require adherence to enhanced methods and, once isolated, commercially available anaerobe identification kits alone may not give an accurate identification. Additional phenotypic tests that are useful in recognising the main pathogenic species are described. Differentiation of C. novyi type A from C. botulinum type C in reference laboratories was based on 16S rDNA sequence data and specific neutralisation of cytopathic effects in tissue culture.

  12. Co-infection with Toxoplasma gondii and Clostridium perfringens in a postpartum woman with uterine gas gangrene: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alsammani, Mohamed Alkhatim; Ahmed, Salah Roshdy; Alsheeha, Muneera A; Saadia, Zaheera; Khairi, Somia A

    2012-07-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a protozoan infection caused by Toxoplasma gondii. We report a case of Toxoplasma gondii and Clostridium perfringens co-infection complicating uterine gas gangrene following a term pregnancy. The histological examination of the necrotic uterine tissues and uterine swab cultures obtained at laparotomy revealed T. gondii and C. perfringens, respectively. Treatment was administered with bactericidal activity against both pathogens and the patient had an uneventful post-operative recovery. Although there have been some cases that have documented an association between toxoplasmosis and non-uterine C. perfringens infection, such a relationship has not been established. It is of interest to determine if the presence of both organisms can explain the severe myonecrosis that occurs in some cases of uterine gas gangrene.

  13. Nitrogen and Sulfur Requirements for Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii on Cellulosic Substrates in Minimal Nutrient Media

    SciTech Connect

    Kridelbaugh, Donna M; Nelson, Josh C; Engle, Nancy L; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Graham, David E

    2013-01-01

    Growth media for cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii bacteria usually contain excess nutrients that would increase costs for consolidated bioprocessing for biofuel production and create a waste stream with nitrogen, sulfur and phosphate. C. thermocellum was grown on crystalline cellulose with varying concentrations of nitrogen and sulfur compounds, and growth rate and alcohol production response curves were determined. Both bacteria assimilated sulfate in the presence of ascorbate reductant, increasing the ratio of oxidized to reduced fermentation products. From these results, a low ionic strength, defined minimal nutrient medium with decreased nitrogen, sulfur, phosphate and vitamin supplements was developed for the fermentation of cellobiose, cellulose and acid-pretreated Populus. Carbon and electron balance calculations indicate the unidentified residual fermentation products must include highly reduced molecules. Both bacterial populations were maintained in co-cultures with substrates containing xylan or hemicellulose in defined medium with sulfate and basal vitamin supplements.

  14. Microbiologic characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium tetani isolated from wounds of patients with clinically diagnosed tetanus.

    PubMed

    Campbell, James I; Lam, Thi Minh Yen; Huynh, Thi Loan; To, So Diep; Tran, Thi Thu Nga; Nguyen, Van Minh Hoang; Le, Thanh Son; Nguyen, van Vinh Chau; Parry, Christopher; Farrar, Jeremy J; Tran, Tinh Hien; Baker, Stephen

    2009-05-01

    Clostridium tetani is the etiologic agent of the muscle-spasming disease tetanus. Despite an effective vaccine, tetanus is an ongoing problem in some developing countries. Diagnosis by bacterial culture is not done because it is generally unnecessary and the entry of route of the bacteria can be inapparent. We attempted to isolate and evaluate C. tetani from the wounds of 84 patients with tetanus. We effectively isolated C. tetani from 45 patients. All strains tested positive by polymerase chain reaction for the gene encoding tetanus neurotoxin. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined by disc diffusion and E-test. All C. tetani isolates were susceptible to penicillin and metronidazole but resistant to co-trimoxazole. Despite treatment with high doses of penicillin, C. tetani was isolated after 16 days of intravenous penicillin in two cases. These data show that the intravenous route for penicillin may be inadequate for clearing the infection and emphasizes wound debridement in the treatment of tetanus.

  15. Facultative Anaerobe Caldibacillus debilis GB1: Characterization and Use in a Designed Aerotolerant, Cellulose-Degrading Coculture with Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Wushke, Scott; Levin, David B; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard

    2015-08-15

    Development of a designed coculture that can achieve aerotolerant ethanogenic biofuel production from cellulose can reduce the costs of maintaining anaerobic conditions during industrial consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). To this end, a strain of Caldibacillus debilis isolated from an air-tolerant cellulolytic consortium which included a Clostridium thermocellum strain was characterized and compared with the C. debilis type strain. Characterization of isolate C. debilis GB1 and comparisons with the type strain of C. debilis revealed significant physiological differences, including (i) the absence of anaerobic metabolism in the type strain and (ii) different end product synthesis profiles under the experimental conditions used. The designed cocultures displayed unique responses to oxidative conditions, including an increase in lactate production. We show here that when the two species were cultured together, the noncellulolytic facultative anaerobe C. debilis GB1 provided respiratory protection for C. thermocellum, allowing the synergistic utilization of cellulose even under an aerobic atmosphere.

  16. Effect of pH and lactose concentration on solvent production from whey permeate using Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, B.M.; Maddox, I.S.

    1987-02-20

    A study was performed to optimize the production of solvents from whey permeate in batch fermentation using Clostridium acetobutylicum P262. Fermentations performed at relatively low pH values resulted in high solvent yields and productivities, but lactose utilization was incomplete. At higher pH values, lactose-utilization was improved but acid production dominated over solvent production. When operating at the higher pH values, an increase in the initial lactose concentration of the whey permeate resulted in lower rates of lactose utilization, and this was accompanied by increased solvent production and decreased acid production. Analysis of data from several experiments revealed a strong inverse relationship between solvent yield and lactose utilization rate. Thus, conditions which minimize the lactose utilization rate such as low culture pH values or high initial lactose concentrations, favor solventogenesis at the expense of acid production. 12 references.

  17. The fur transcription regulator and fur-regulated genes in Clostridium botulinum A ATCC 3502.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weibin; Ma, Junhua; Zang, Chengyuan; Song, Yingying; Liu, Peipei

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a spore-forming bacterium that can produce a very powerful neurotoxin that causes botulism. In this study, we have investigated the Fur transcription regulators in Clostridium botulinum and Fur-regulated genes in Clostridium botulinum A ATCC 3502. We found that gene loss may be the main cause leading to the different numbers of Fur transcription regulators in different Clostridium botulinum strains. Meanwhile, 46 operons were found to be regulated by the Fur transcription regulator in Clostridium botulinum A ATCC 3502, involved in several functional classifications, including iron acquisition, iron utilization, iron transport, and transcription regulator. Under an iron-restricted medium, we experimentally found that a Fur transcription regulator (CBO1372) and two operons (DedA, CBO2610-CBO2614 and ABC transporter, CBO0845-CBO0847) are shown to be differentially expressed in Clostridium botulinum A ATCC 3502. This study has provided-us novel insights into the diversity of Fur transcription regulators in different Clostridium botulinum strains and diversity of Fur-targeted genes, as well as a better understanding of the dynamic changes in iron restriction occurring in response to this stress.

  18. Isolation of Clostridium botulinum type G from Swiss soil specimens by using sequential steps in an identification scheme.

    PubMed Central

    Sonnabend, W F; Sonnabend, U P; Krech, T

    1987-01-01

    After Clostridium botulinum type G organisms and toxin were identified in necropsy specimens in cases of unexplained death in adults and infants (O. Sonnabend, W. Sonnabend, R. Heinzle, T. Sigrist, R Dirnhofer, and U. Krech, J. Infect. Dis. 143:22-27, 1981), extensive research to detect C. botulinum type G in soil samples from Switzerland was done. A total of 41 specimens from virgin soil and from cultivated land were examined for the presence of C. botulinum type G and other toxin types. Because of the lack of the lipase marker in type G, the detection of C. botulinum type G was based on the demonstration of type G organisms in enrichment cultures by a type G-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect both the type G toxin and antigen; enrichment cultures in which type G toxin or antigen was identified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were then tested by a type G-specific gel immunodiffusion agar procedure. This method not only isolated strains of type G but also strains of Clostridium subterminale, a nontoxigenic variant of C. botulinum type G. As a consequence of the observed cross-reactions caused by strains of C. subterminale within this test system, all isolates of type G had to be definitively confirmed by mouse bioassay. The sequential steps of these methods seem to be very useful for detecting C. botulinum type G organisms. C. botulinum type G strains were isolated in five soil samples from different locations in close association with cultivated land.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:3116935

  19. Evaluation of the BD Max Cdiff assay for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile in human stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Putsathit, Papanin; Morgan, Justin; Bradford, Damien; Engelhardt, Nelly; Riley, Thomas V

    2015-02-01

    The Becton Dickinson (BD) PCR-based GeneOhm Cdiff assay has demonstrated a high sensitivity and specificity for detecting Clostridium difficile. Recently, the BD Max platform, using the same principles as BD GeneOhm, has become available in Australia. This study aimed to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of BD Max Cdiff assay for the detection of toxigenic C. difficile in an Australian setting. Between December 2013 and January 2014, 406 stool specimens from 349 patients were analysed with the BD Max Cdiff assay. Direct and enrichment toxigenic culture were performed on bioMérieux ChromID C. difficile agar as a reference method. isolates from specimens with discrepant results were further analysed with an in-house PCR to detect the presence of toxin genes. The overall prevalence of toxigenic C. difficile was 7.2%. Concordance between the BD Max assay and enrichment culture was 98.5%. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for the BD Max Cdiff assay were 95.5%, 99.0%, 87.5% and 99.7%, respectively, when compared to direct culture, and 91.7%, 99.0%, 88.0% and 99.4%, respectively, when compared to enrichment culture. The new BD Max Cdiff assay appeared to be an excellent platform for rapid and accurate detection of toxigenic C. difficile.

  20. Impact of Pretreated Switchgrass and Biomass Carbohydrates on Clostridium thermocellum 27405 Cellulosome Composition- a Quantitative Proteomic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, Babu; Pan, Chongle; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; McKeown, Catherine K; Lankford, Patricia K; Samatova, Nagiza F; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    The anaerobic thermophilic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulolytic organism capable of hydrolyzing cellulose and fermenting the hydrolysis products to ethanol and other metabolic products. C. thermocellum achieves efficient cellulose hydrolysis using multiprotein extracellular enzymatic complexes, termed the cellulosomes. In this study, we used quantitative proteomics (multidimensional LC-MS/MS and 15N-metabolic labeling) to measure relative changes in levels of cellulosomal subunit proteins (per CipA scaffoldin basis) when C. thermocellum was grown on a variety of carbon sources [dilute-acid pretreated switchgrass, cellobiose, amorphous cellulose, crystalline cellulose (Avicel) and combinations of crystalline cellulose with pectin or xylan or both]. Cellulosome samples isolated from cultures grown on these carbon sources were compared to 15N labeled cellulosome samples isolated from crystalline cellulose grown cultures. In total from all samples, proteomic analysis identified 59 dockerin- and 8 cohesin-module containing components, including 15 previously undetected cellulosomal subunits. Many cellulosomal components showed differential protein abundance in the presence of non-cellulose substrates in the growth medium. Cellulosome samples from amorphous cellulose, cellobiose and pretreated switchgrass grown cultures displayed the most distinct differences in composition as compared to cellulosome samples from crystalline cellulose grown cultures. While Glycoside Hydrolase Family 9 enzymes showed increased levels in the presence of crystalline cellulose, and pretreated switchgrass in particular, GH5 enzymes showed increased levels in response to the presence of cellulose in general, amorphous or crystalline. Overall, the results suggest a coordinated substrate-specific regulation of cellulosomal composition in C. thermocellum.

  1. Bioenergetics and end-product regulation of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum in response to nutrient limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, P.W. ); Klapatch, T.R. . Dept. of Biological Sciences); Lynd, L.R. . Dept. of Biological Sciences Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH . Thayer School of Engineering)

    1993-09-20

    Fermentation of xylose by Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum was studied in batch and continuous culture in which the limiting nutrient was either xylose, phosphate, or ammonia. Transient results obtained in continuous cultures with batch grown inoculum and progressively higher feed substrate concentrations exhibited ethanol selectivities (moles ethanol/moles other products) in excess of 11. The hypothesis that this high ethanol selectivity was a general response to mineral nutrient limitation was tested but could not be supported. Growth and substrate consumption were related by the equation q[sub s](1 Y[sup c][sub x])G[sub ATP] = ([mu]/Y[sup max][sub ATP]) + m, with q, the specific rate of xylose consumption (moles xylose/hour[center dot]g cells), Y[sup c][sub x] the carbon based cell yield (g cell carbon/g substrate carbon), G[sub ATP] the ATP gain (moles ATP produces/mol substrate catabolized), [mu] the specific growth rate (1/h), Y[sup max][sub ATP] the ATP-based cell yield (g cells/mol ATP), and m the maintenance coefficient (moles ATP/hour [center dot] g cells). Y[sup max][sub ATP] was found to be 11.6 g cells/mol ATP, and m 9.3 mol ATP/hour[center dot]g cells for growth on defined medium. Different responses to nutrient limitation were observed depending on the mode of cultivation. Batch and immobilized cell continuous cultures decreased G[sub ATP] by initiating production of the secondary metabolites, propanediol, and in some cases, D-lactate; in addition, batch cultures increased the fractional allocation of ATP to maintenance and/or wastage. Nitrogen-limited continuous free-cell cultures maintained a constant cell yield, whereas phosphate-limited continuous free-cell cultures did not. In the case of phosphate limitation, the decreased ATP demand associated with the lowered cell yield was accompanied by an increased rate of ATP consumption for maintenance and/or wastage.

  2. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Imlay, Hannah; Kaul, Daniel; Rao, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile infection is a healthcare-associated infection resulting in significant morbidity. Although immunosuppression is associated with Clostridium difficile infection acquisition and adverse outcomes, the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in HIV-infected patients has been little studied in the era of antiretroviral therapy. This study identifies the risk factors for acquisition of Clostridium difficile infection in HIV-infected patients. Methods: A retrospective, propensity score–matched case–control study design was employed, with patients selected from our institution’s outpatient HIV clinic. Clostridium difficile infection cases were defined as having positive stool testing plus an appropriate clinical presentation. The propensity score was generated via multiple logistic regression from year of HIV diagnosis, age at first contact, duration of follow-up, gender, and initial CD4 count. Results: The 46 cases included were matched to a total of 180 controls. Prior antibiotic treatment was a significant predictor of Clostridium difficile infection (odds ratio: 13, 95% confidence interval: 3.49–48.8, p < .001) as was number of hospital admissions in the preceding year (odds ratio: 4.02, confidence interval: 1.81–8.94, p < .001). Having both proton pump inhibitor use and CD4 count <200 cells/µL significantly increased odds of Clostridium difficile infection in the multivariable model (odds ratio: 15.17, confidence interval: 1.31–175.9, p = .021). Conclusion: As in the general population, frequent hospitalizations and exposure to antimicrobials are independent predictors of Clostridium difficile infection acquisition in patients with HIV. Additionally, low CD4 count and proton pump inhibitor use are new potentially modifiable variables that can be targeted for prevention of Clostridium difficile infection in future interventional studies. PMID:28348742

  3. Complementation of a Clostridium perfringens spo0A mutant with wild-type spo0A from other Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Huang, I-Hsiu; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2006-09-01

    To evaluate whether C. perfringens can be used as a model organism for studying the sporulation process in other clostridia, C. perfringens spo0A mutant IH101 was complemented with wild-type spo0A from four different Clostridium species. Wild-type spo0A from C. acetobutylicum or C. tetani, but not from C. botulinum or C. difficile, restored sporulation and enterotoxin production in IH101. The ability of spo0A from C. botulinum or C. difficile to complement the lack of spore formation in IH101 might be due, at least in part, to the low levels of spo0A transcription and Spo0A production.

  4. Lethal human neutropenic entercolitis caused by Clostridium chauvoei in the United States: tip of the iceberg?

    PubMed

    Weatherhead, Jill E; Tweardy, David J

    2012-02-01

    The patient is a 44-year-old woman with metastatic grade 3 intra-ductal carcinoma of the breast who was started on palliative chemotherapy (docetaxel) 10 days prior to admission and presented to the emergency center complaining of diffuse abdominal pain and generalized weakness. CT abdomen showed diffuse bowel wall thickening from the cecum to the transverse colon with free fluid in the pelvis. The patient was neutropenic on admission (absolute neutrophil count of 600 cells/μl). She received antibiotics for 21 days for neutropenic enterocolitis. Blood culture isolate from admission was sent for 16s rRNA gene sequencing, which identified Clostridium chauvoei. While C. chauvoei has a long history of veterinary importance, this is the first documented case of infection caused by C. chauvoei in a human in the United States. C. chauvoei has a close phylogenetic relationship with C. septicum making the two species difficult to differentiate using conventional microbiologic methods. With increased use of more reliable detection methods the actual prevalence of C. chauvoei causing human disease may be higher than currently recognized.

  5. Extracellular proteins of Clostridium chauvoei are protective in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Mattar, María A; Cortiñas, Teresa I; Stefanini, Ana M

    2007-06-01

    The anaerobic bacillus Clostridium chauvoei is the causative agent of blackleg, a lethal disease that has an important impact on the sheep and cattle industry worldwide. Immunity to C. chauvoei is considered to be mainly anticellular, and for this reason there is scarce information about the immunogenicity of extracellular proteins. In this work variations in protein profiles, immune response by ELISA and protective capacity of culture supernatants of three C. chauvoei strains, collected at different growth phases, are reported. Sera raised against extracellular antigens also recognised cellular antigens of the same molecular masses. Partially purified cell-free supernatants and those concentrated 10 times by ultrafiltration (C-CFS), obtained at the early stationary phase of growth, induced a strong immunoprotective response, even at low doses, that was more marked for C. chauvoei strain ATCC 10092 (p < or = 0.05). With C-CFS formulations, a clear relationship was observed between IgG titres, protective capacity and concentration of the antigen doses, indicating a specific immune response.

  6. Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin induces permanent neuronal degeneration and behavioral changes.

    PubMed

    Morris, Winston E; Goldstein, Jorge; Redondo, Leandro M; Cangelosi, Adriana; Geoghegan, Patricia; Brocco, Marcela; Loidl, Fabián C; Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2017-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX), the most potent toxin produced by this bacteria, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of enterotoxaemia in ruminants, causing brain edema and encephalomalacia. Studies of animals suffering from ETX intoxication describe severe neurological disorders that are thought to be the result of vasogenic brain edemas and indirect neuronal toxicity, killing oligodendrocytes but not astrocytes, microglia, or neurons in vitro. In this study, by means of intravenous and intracerebroventricular delivery of sub-lethal concentrations of ETX, the histological and ultrastructural changes of the brain were studied in rats and mice. Histological analysis showed degenerative changes in neurons from the cortex, hippocampus, striatum and hypothalamus. Ultrastructurally, necrotic neurons and apoptotic cells were observed in these same areas, among axons with accumulation of neurofilaments and demyelination as well as synaptic stripping. Lesions observed in the brain after sub-lethal exposure to ETX, result in permanent behavioral changes in animals surviving ETX exposure, as observed individually in several animals and assessed in the Inclined Plane Test and the Wire Hang Test. Pharmacological studies showed that dexamethasone and reserpine but not ketamine or riluzole were able to reduce the brain lesions and the lethality of ETX. Cytotoxicity was not observed upon neuronal primary cultures in vitro. Therefore, we hypothesize that ETX can affect the brain of animals independently of death, producing changes on neurons or glia as the result of complex interactions, independently of ETX-BBB interactions.

  7. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Lynd, Lee R; Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Zhu, Mingjun

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1 2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  8. Characterization of Clostridium thermocellum strains with disrupted fermentation end product pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Veen, Douwe; Lo, Jonathan; Brown, Steven D; Johnson, Courtney M; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Martin, Madhavi Z; Engle, Nancy L; Argyros, Aaron; Van den Berg, Robert A; Caiazza, Nicky; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic, cellulolytic anaerobe that is a candidate microorganism for industrial biofuels production. Strains with mutations in genes associated with production of Llactate ( ldh) and/or acetate ( pta) were characterized to gain insight into the intracellular processes that convert cellobiose to ethanol and other fermentation end products. Cellobiose-grown cultures of the ldh strain had identical biomass accumulation, fermentation end products, transcription profile and intracellular metabolite concentrations compared to its parent strain (DSM1313 hpt spo0A). The pta-deficient strain grew slower and had 30% lower final biomass concentration compared to the parent strain, yet produced 75% more ethanol. A ldh pta double mutant strain evolved for faster growth had growth rate and ethanol yield comparable to the parent strain, whereas its biomass accumulation was comparable to pta. Free amino acids were secreted by all examined strains, with both pta strains secreting higher amounts of alanine, valine, isoleucine, proline, glutamine, and threonine. Valine concentration for ldh pta reached 5 mM by the end of growth, or 2.7% of the substrate carbon utilized. These secreted amino acid concentrations correlate with increased intracellular pyruvate concentrations, up to 6-fold in the pta and 16-fold in the ldh pta strain. We hypothesize that the deletions in fermentation end product pathways result in an intracellular redox imbalance, which the organism attempts to relieve, in part by recycling NADP+ through increased production of amino acids.

  9. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  10. Characterization of Clostridium thermocellum strains with disrupted fermentation end-product pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Veen, Douwe; Lo, Jonathan; Brown, Steven D; Johnson, Courtney M; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Martin, Madhavi Z; Engle, Nancy L; Van den Berg, Robert A; Argyros, Aaron; Caiazza, Nicky; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic, cellulolytic anaerobe that is a candidate microorganism for industrial biofuels production. Strains with mutations in genes associated with production of L-lactate (Dldh) and/or acetate (Dpta) were characterized to gain insight into the intracellular processes that convert cellobiose to ethanol and other fermentation end-products. Cellobiose-grown cultures of the Dldh strain had identical biomass accumulation, fermentation end-products, transcription profile, and intracellular metabolite concentrations compared to its parent strain (DSM1313 Dhpt Dspo0A). The Dpta-deficient strain grew slower and had 30 % lower final biomass concentration compared to the parent strain, yet produced 75% more ethanol. A Dldh Dpta double-mutant strain evolved for faster growth had a growth rate and ethanol yield comparable to the parent strain, whereas its biomass accumulation was comparable to Dpta. Free amino acids were secreted by all examined strains, with both Dpta strains secreting higher amounts of alanine, valine, isoleucine, proline, glutamine, and threonine. Valine concentration for Dldh Dpta reached 5 mM by the end of growth, or 2.7 % of the substrate carbon utilized. These secreted amino acid concentrations correlate with increased intracellular pyruvate concentrations, up to sixfold in the Dpta and 16-fold in the Dldh Dpta strain. We hypothesize that the deletions in fermentation end-product pathways result in an intracellular redox imbalance, which the organism attempts to relieve, in part by recycling NADP* through increased production of amino acids.

  11. Regulation of neurotoxin and protease formation in Clostridium botulinum Okra B and Hall A by arginine.

    PubMed Central

    Patterson-Curtis, S I; Johnson, E A

    1989-01-01

    Supplementation of a minimal medium with high levels of arginine (20 g/liter) markedly decreased neurotoxin titers and protease activities in cultures of Clostridium botulinum Okra B and Hall A. Nitrogenous nutrients that are known to be derived from arginine, including proline, glutamate, and ammonia, also decreased protease and toxin but less so than did arginine. Proteases synthesized during growth were rapidly inactivated after growth stopped in media containing high levels of arginine. Separation of extracellular proteins by electrophoresis and immunoblots with antibodies to toxin showed that the decrease in toxin titers in media containing high levels of arginine was caused by both reduced synthesis of protoxin and impaired proteolytic activation. In contrast, certain other nutritional conditions stimulated protease and toxin formation in C. botulinum and counteracted the repression by arginine. Supplementation of the minimal medium with casein or casein hydrolysates increased protease activities and toxin titers. Casein supplementation of a medium containing high levels of arginine prevented protease inactivation. High levels of glucose (50 g/liter) also delayed the inactivation of proteases in both the minimal medium and a medium containing high levels of arginine. These observations suggest that the availability of nitrogen and energy sources, particularly arginine, affects the production and proteolytic processing of toxins and proteases in C. botulinum. Images PMID:2669631

  12. Mechanisms of food processing and storage-related stress tolerance in Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Dahlsten, Elias; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2015-05-01

    Vegetative cultures of Clostridium botulinum produce the extremely potent botulinum neurotoxin, and may jeopardize the safety of foods unless sufficient measures to prevent growth are applied. Minimal food processing relies on combinations of mild treatments, primarily to avoid deterioration of the sensory qualities of the food. Tolerance of C. botulinum to minimal food processing is well characterized. However, data on effects of successive treatments on robustness towards further processing is lacking. Developments in genetic manipulation tools and the availability of annotated genomes have allowed identification of genetic mechanisms involved in stress tolerance of C. botulinum. Most studies focused on low temperature, and the importance of various regulatory mechanisms in cold tolerance of C. botulinum has been demonstrated. Furthermore, novel roles in cold tolerance were shown for metabolic pathways under the control of these regulators. A role for secondary oxidative stress in tolerance to extreme temperatures has been proposed. Additionally, genetic mechanisms related to tolerance to heat, low pH, and high salinity have been characterized. Data on genetic stress-related mechanisms of psychrotrophic Group II C. botulinum strains are scarce; these mechanisms are of interest for food safety research and should thus be investigated. This minireview encompasses the importance of C. botulinum as a food safety hazard and its central physiological characteristics related to food-processing and storage-related stress. Special attention is given to recent findings considering genetic mechanisms C. botulinum utilizes in detecting and countering these adverse conditions.

  13. Severe Sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia of Urinary Origin: A Case Report and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Michael A.; McManus, Kathleen A.; Wispelwey, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is an uncommon yet serious clinical syndrome that typically arises from a gastrointestinal source. However, clinicians should consider nongastrointestinal sources as well. We present a rare case of C. perfringens bacteremia of urinary origin that required surgical intervention for definitive treatment. A 61-year-old male presented with acute nausea and vomiting, altered mental status, and chronic diarrhea. His physical exam revealed right costovertebral tenderness and his laboratory work-up revealed acute renal failure. Percutaneous blood cultures grew C. perfringens. Cross-sectional imaging revealed a right-sided ureteral stone with hydronephrosis, which required nephrostomy placement. On placement of the nephrostomy tube, purulent drainage was identified and Gram stain of the drainage revealed Gram-variable rods. A urinary source of C. perfringens was clinically supported. Although it is not a common presentation, nongastrointestinal sources such as a urinary source should be considered in C. perfringens bacteremia because failure to recognize a nongastrointestinal source can delay appropriate treatment, which may include surgical intervention. PMID:26998370

  14. Identification of an epithelial cell receptor responsible for Clostridium difficile TcdB-induced cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    LaFrance, Michelle E.; Farrow, Melissa A.; Chandrasekaran, Ramyavardhanee; Sheng, Jinsong; Rubin, Donald H.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in the United States. The two main virulence factors of C. difficile are the large toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which enter colonic epithelial cells and cause fluid secretion, inflammation, and cell death. Using a gene-trap insertional mutagenesis screen, we identified poliovirus receptor-like 3 (PVRL3) as a cellular factor necessary for TcdB-mediated cytotoxicity. Disruption of PVRL3 expression by gene-trap mutagenesis, shRNA, or CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis resulted in resistance of cells to TcdB. Complementation of the gene-trap or CRISPR mutants with PVRL3 resulted in restoration of TcdB-mediated cell death. Purified PVRL3 ectodomain bound to TcdB by pull-down. Pretreatment of cells with a monoclonal antibody against PVRL3 or prebinding TcdB to PVRL3 ectodomain also inhibited cytotoxicity in cell culture. The receptor is highly expressed on the surface epithelium of the human colon and was observed to colocalize with TcdB in both an explant model and in tissue from a patient with pseudomembranous colitis. These data suggest PVRL3 is a physiologically relevant binding partner that can serve as a target for the prevention of TcdB-induced cytotoxicity in C. difficile infection. PMID:26038560

  15. Animal models to study the pathogenesis of human and animal Clostridium perfringens infections

    PubMed Central

    Uzal, Francisco A.; McClane, Bruce A.; Cheung, Jackie K.; Theoret, James; Garcia, Jorge P.; Moore, Robert J.; Rood, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    The most common animal models used to study Clostridium perfringens infections in humans and animals are reviewed here. The classical C. perfringens-mediated histotoxic disease of humans is clostridial myonecrosis or gas gangrene and the use of a mouse myonecrosis model coupled with genetic studies has contributed greatly to our understanding of disease pathogenesis. Similarly, the use of a chicken model has enhanced our understanding of type A-mediated necrotic enteritis in poultry and has led to the identification of NetB as the primary toxin involved in disease. C. perfringens type A food poisoning is a highly prevalent bacterial illness in the USA and elsewhere. Rabbits and mice are the species most commonly used to study the action of enterotoxin, the causative toxin. Other animal models used to study the effect of this toxin are rats, non-human primates, sheep and cattle. In rabbits and mice, CPE produces severe necrosis of the small intestinal epithelium along with fluid accumulation. C. perfringens type D infection has been studied by inoculating epsilon toxin (ETX) intravenously into mice, rats, sheep, goats and cattle, and by intraduodenal inoculation of whole cultures of this microorganism in mice, sheep, goats and cattle. Molecular Koch's postulates have been fulfilled for enterotoxigenic C. perfringens type A in rabbits and mice, for C. perfringens type A necrotic enteritis and gas gangrene in chickens and mice, respectively, for C. perfringens type C in mice, rabbits and goats, and for C. perfringens type D in mice, sheep and goats. PMID:25770894

  16. The pathology of peracute experimental Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxemia in sheep.

    PubMed

    Uzal, F A; Kelly, W R; Morris, W E; Bermudez, J; Baisón, M

    2004-09-01

    The pathological findings in sheep with peracute experimental Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxemia are described. Of 16 animals inoculated intraduodenally with a whole culture of this microorganism and a starch solution in the abomasum, 12 developed clinical signs including increased respiratory efforts, recumbency, paddling, bleating, convulsions, blindness, and opisthotonus. Diarrhea was not observed in any of the animals. The time lapse between the beginning of intraduodenal infusion and onset of clinical signs varied between 30 minutes and 26 hours, and the clinical course varied between 1 and 9 hours. Gross postmortem changes were observed in these 12 animals and included pulmonary edema; excess pericardial, peritoneal, or pleural fluid with or without strands of fibrin; liquid small intestinal contents; leptomeningeal edema; cerebellar coning; and subcapsular petechiae on kidneys. Histological changes consisted of severe edema of pleura and interlobular septa and around blood vessels and airways and acidophilic, homogeneous, proteinaceous perivascular edema in the brain. Five of 12 animals (42%) with clinical signs consistent with enterotoxemia lacked specific histological lesions in the brain. None of the intoxicated or control animals developed nephrosis. Glucose was detected in the urine of 3 of 6 animals that were tested for this analyte. These results stress the importance of the use of histological examination of the brain, coupled with epsilon toxin detection, for a definitive diagnosis of C. perfringens type D enterotoxemia in sheep.

  17. Effects of end products on fermentation profiles in Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 for syngas fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Taylor, Steven; Wang, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 is a strict anaerobic bacterium capable of converting syngas to biofuels. However, its fermentation profiles is poorly understood. Here, various end-products, including acetic acid, butyric acid, hexanoic acid, ethanol and butanol were supplemented to evaluate their effects on fermentation profiles in C. carboxidivorans at two temperatures. At 37°C, fatty acids addition likely led to more corresponding alcohols production. At 25°C, C2 and C4 fatty acids supplementation resulted in more corresponding higher fatty acids, while supplemented hexanoic acid increased yields of C2 and C4 fatty acids and hexanol. Supplementation of ethanol or butanol caused increased production of C2 and C4 acids at both temperatures; however, long-chain alcohols were still more likely produced at lower temperature. In conclusion, fermentation profiles of C. carboxidivorans can be changed in respond to pre-added end-products and carbon flow may be redirected to desired products by controlling culture conditions.

  18. Four foodborne disease outbreaks caused by a new type of enterotoxin-producing Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Monma, Chie; Hatakeyama, Kaoru; Obata, Hiromi; Yokoyama, Keiko; Konishi, Noriko; Itoh, Takeshi; Kai, Akemi

    2015-03-01

    The epidemiological and bacteriological investigations on four foodborne outbreaks caused by a new type of enterotoxin-producing Clostridium perfringens are described. C. perfringens isolated from patients of these outbreaks did not produce any known enterotoxin and did not carry the C. perfringens enterotoxin gene. However, the culture filtrates of these isolates induced the accumulation of fluid in rabbit ileal loop tests. The molecular weight of the new enterotoxin may be between 50,000 and 100,000, although the known C. perfringens enterotoxin is ca. 35,000. This new enterotoxin was heat labile, and its biological activities were inactivated by heating for 5 min at 60°C. The new enterotoxin was sensitive to pH values higher than 11.0 and protease treatment but was resistant to trypsin treatment. These results suggest that the new enterotoxin may be a protein. Although C. perfringens enterotoxin induced morphological changes in Vero cells, the changes induced by the new enterotoxin differed from those by the known C. perfringens enterotoxin. The new enterotoxin also induced morphological changes in L929 cells, whereas the known C. perfringens enterotoxin did not, because L929 cells lacked an appropriate enterotoxin receptor. Although C. perfringens enterotoxin is recognized as the only diarrheagenic toxin responsible for C. perfringens foodborne outbreaks, the results of the present study indicate that C. perfringens isolated from these four outbreaks produced a new type of enterotoxin.

  19. Proteome Alterations of Hippocampal Cells Caused by Clostridium botulinum C3 Exoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Anke; Rohrbeck, Astrid; Just, Ingo; Pich, Andreas

    2015-11-06

    C3bot from Clostridium botulinum is a bacterial mono-ADP-ribosylating enzyme, which transfers an ADP-ribose moiety onto the small GTPases Rho A/B/C. C3bot and the catalytic inactive mutant (C3E174Q) cause axonal and dendritic growth as well as branching in primary hippocampal neurons. In cultured murine hippocampal HT22 cells, protein abundances were analyzed in response to C3bot or C3E174Q treatment using a shotgun proteomics approach. Proteome analyses were performed at four time points over 6 days. More than 4000 protein groups were identified at each time point and quantified in triplicate analyses. On day one, 46 proteins showed an altered abundance, and after 6 days, more than 700 proteins responded to C3bot with an up- or down-regulation. In contrast, C3E174Q had no provable impact on protein abundance. Protein quantification was verified for several proteins by multiple reaction monitoring. Data analysis of altered proteins revealed different cellular processes that were affected by C3bot. They are particularly involved in mitochondrial and lysosomal processes, adhesion, carbohydrate and glucose metabolism, signal transduction, and nuclear proteins of translation and ribosome biogenesis. The results of this study gain novel insights into the function of C3bot in hippocampal cells.

  20. Carvacrol and trans-Cinnamaldehyde Reduce Clostridium difficile Toxin Production and Cytotoxicity in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mooyottu, Shankumar; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Flock, Genevieve; Bouillaut, Laurent; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Sonenshein, Abraham L.; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a nosocomial pathogen that causes a serious toxin-mediated enteric disease in humans. Reducing C. difficile toxin production could significantly minimize its pathogenicity and improve disease outcomes in humans. This study investigated the efficacy of two, food-grade, plant-derived compounds, namely trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and carvacrol (CR) in reducing C. difficile toxin production and cytotoxicity in vitro. Three hypervirulent C. difficile isolates were grown with or without the sub-inhibitory concentrations of TC or CR, and the culture supernatant and the bacterial pellet were collected for total toxin quantitation, Vero cell cytotoxicity assay and RT-qPCR analysis of toxin-encoding genes. The effect of CR and TC on a codY mutant and wild type C. difficile was also investigated. Carvacrol and TC substantially reduced C. difficile toxin production and cytotoxicity on Vero cells. The plant compounds also significantly down-regulated toxin production genes. Carvacrol and TC did not inhibit toxin production in the codY mutant of C. difficile, suggesting a potential codY-mediated anti-toxigenic mechanism of the plant compounds. The antitoxigenic concentrations of CR and TC did not inhibit the growth of beneficial gut bacteria. Our results suggest that CR and TC could potentially be used to control C. difficile, and warrant future studies in vivo. PMID:24625665

  1. Animal models to study the pathogenesis of human and animal Clostridium perfringens infections.

    PubMed

    Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A; Cheung, Jackie K; Theoret, James; Garcia, Jorge P; Moore, Robert J; Rood, Julian I

    2015-08-31

    The most common animal models used to study Clostridium perfringens infections in humans and animals are reviewed here. The classical C. perfringens-mediated histotoxic disease of humans is clostridial myonecrosis or gas gangrene and the use of a mouse myonecrosis model coupled with genetic studies has contributed greatly to our understanding of disease pathogenesis. Similarly, the use of a chicken model has enhanced our understanding of type A-mediated necrotic enteritis in poultry and has led to the identification of NetB as the primary toxin involved in disease. C. perfringens type A food poisoning is a highly prevalent bacterial illness in the USA and elsewhere. Rabbits and mice are the species most commonly used to study the action of enterotoxin, the causative toxin. Other animal models used to study the effect of this toxin are rats, non-human primates, sheep and cattle. In rabbits and mice, CPE produces severe necrosis of the small intestinal epithelium along with fluid accumulation. C. perfringens type D infection has been studied by inoculating epsilon toxin (ETX) intravenously into mice, rats, sheep, goats and cattle, and by intraduodenal inoculation of whole cultures of this microorganism in mice, sheep, goats and cattle. Molecular Koch's postulates have been fulfilled for enterotoxigenic C. perfringens type A in rabbits and mice, for C. perfringens type A necrotic enteritis and gas gangrene in chickens and mice, respectively, for C. perfringens type C in mice, rabbits and goats, and for C. perfringens type D in mice, sheep and goats.

  2. Butanol production by a Clostridium beijerinckii mutant with high ferulic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Guo, Ting; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jiahui; Ying, Hanjie

    2016-09-01

    A mutant strain of Clostridium beijerinckii, with high tolerance to ferulic acid, was generated using atmospheric pressure glow discharge and high-throughput screening of C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052. The mutant strain M11 produced 7.24 g/L of butanol when grown in P2 medium containing 30 g/L of glucose and 0.5 g/L of ferulic acid, which is comparable to the production from non-ferulic acid cultures (8.11 g/L of butanol). When 0.8 g/L of ferulic acid was introduced into the P2 medium, C. beijerinckii M11 grew well and produced 4.91 g/L of butanol. Both cell growth and butanol production of C. beijerinckii M11 were seriously inhibited when 0.9 g/L of ferulic acid was added into the P2 medium. Furthermore, C. beijerinckii M11 could produce 6.13 g/L of butanol using non-detoxified hemicellulosic hydrolysate from diluted sulfuric acid-treated corn fiber (SAHHC) as the carbon source. These results demonstrate that C. beijerinckii M11 has a high ferulic acid tolerance and is able to use non-detoxified SAHHC for butanol production.

  3. Recombinant Alpha, Beta, and Epsilon Toxins of Clostridium perfringens: Production Strategies and Applications as Veterinary Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Marcos Roberto A.; Moreira, Gustavo Marçal S. G.; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P.; Mendonça, Marcelo; Salvarani, Felipe M.; Moreira, Ângela N.; Conceição, Fabricio R.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a spore-forming, commensal, ubiquitous bacterium that is present in the gastrointestinal tract of healthy humans and animals. This bacterium produces up to 18 toxins. The species is classified into five toxinotypes (A–E) according to the toxins that the bacterium produces: alpha, beta, epsilon, or iota. Each of these toxinotypes is associated with myriad different, frequently fatal, illnesses that affect a range of farm animals and humans. Alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins are the main causes of disease. Vaccinations that generate neutralizing antibodies are the most common prophylactic measures that are currently in use. These vaccines consist of toxoids that are obtained from C. perfringens cultures. Recombinant vaccines offer several advantages over conventional toxoids, especially in terms of the production process. As such, they are steadily gaining ground as a promising vaccination solution. This review discusses the main strategies that are currently used to produce recombinant vaccines containing alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins of C. perfringens, as well as the potential application of these molecules as vaccines for mammalian livestock animals. PMID:27879630

  4. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-11-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  5. Purification and properties of an endo-1,4-. beta. -glucanase from Clostridium josui

    SciTech Connect

    Fujino, Tsuchiyoshi ); Sukhumavasi, J. ); Sasaki, Takuji; Ohmiya, Kunio; Shimizu, Shoichi )

    1989-07-01

    Recently, cellulolytic anaerobic bacteria have become of great interest because of possible conversion of cellulosic materials from agricultural and forestry wastes, such as rice straw, water hyacinth, and wood chips, to ethanol and other valuable compounds. An enzyme active against carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was purified from the stationary-phase-culture supernatant of Clostridium josui grown in a medium containing ball-milled cellulose. The purification in the presence of 6 M urea yielded homogeneous enzyme after an approximately 50-fold increase in specific activity and a 13% yield. The enzyme had a molecular mass of 45 kilodaltons. The optimal temperature and pH of the enzyme against CMC were 60{degree}C and 6.8, respectively. The enzyme hydrolyzed cellotetraose, cellopentaose, and cellohexaose to cellobiose and cellotriose but did not hydrolyze cellobiose or cellotriose. A microcrystalline cellulose, Avicel, was also hydrolyzed significantly, but the extent of hydrolysis was remarkably less than that of CMC. On the basis of these results, the enzyme purified here is one of the endo-1,4-{beta}-glucanases. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the enzyme is Tyr-Asp-Ala-Ser-Leu-Lys-Pro-Asn-Leu-Gln-Ile-Pro-Gln-Lys-Asn-Ile-Pro-Asn-Asn-Asp-Ala-Val-Asn-Ile-Lys.

  6. Carvacrol and trans-cinnamaldehyde reduce Clostridium difficile toxin production and cytotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mooyottu, Shankumar; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Flock, Genevieve; Bouillaut, Laurent; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Sonenshein, Abraham L; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2014-03-12

    Clostridium difficile is a nosocomial pathogen that causes a serious toxin-mediated enteric disease in humans. Reducing C. difficile toxin production could significantly minimize its pathogenicity and improve disease outcomes in humans. This study investigated the efficacy of two, food-grade, plant-derived compounds, namely trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and carvacrol (CR) in reducing C. difficile toxin production and cytotoxicity in vitro. Three hypervirulent C. difficile isolates were grown with or without the sub-inhibitory concentrations of TC or CR, and the culture supernatant and the bacterial pellet were collected for total toxin quantitation, Vero cell cytotoxicity assay and RT-qPCR analysis of toxin-encoding genes. The effect of CR and TC on a codY mutant and wild type C. difficile was also investigated. Carvacrol and TC substantially reduced C. difficile toxin production and cytotoxicity on Vero cells. The plant compounds also significantly down-regulated toxin production genes. Carvacrol and TC did not inhibit toxin production in the codY mutant of C. difficile, suggesting a potential codY-mediated anti-toxigenic mechanism of the plant compounds. The antitoxigenic concentrations of CR and TC did not inhibit the growth of beneficial gut bacteria. Our results suggest that CR and TC could potentially be used to control C. difficile, and warrant future studies in vivo.

  7. Emergence in gnotobiotic mice of nontoxinogenic clones of Clostridium difficile from a toxinogenic one.

    PubMed Central

    Corthier, G; Muller, M C

    1988-01-01

    In previous studies, we showed that diet composition or Saccharomyces boulardii ingestion could protect gnotobiotic mice against lethal Clostridium difficile infection. Using an original method, we detected nontoxinogenic clones from feces of protected mice challenged with a toxinogenic clone of C. difficile. These clones became established at the same level as the toxinogenic one after about 30 days. In these protected mice bearing nontoxinogenic clones, no enterotoxin production could be detected and cytotoxin titers were highly reduced. These nontoxinogenic clones were genetically stable because nontoxinogenic clones and clones that produce intermediate levels of toxins in vivo did not revert to toxin production, even after repeated culture in vitro. Furthermore, the nontoxinogenic clones were shown to arise from a single toxinogenic clone and were identical to that clone in metabolic patterns and antibiotic sensitivity tests. When mice fed a nonprotective diet were challenged with a nontoxinogenic or intermediate clone, they remained healthy and no toxin production could be detected in their feces. Moreover, these mice were protected against further infections with toxinogenic strains of C. difficile, and a strong antagonism between nontoxinogenic and toxinogenic clones was observed. PMID:3372017

  8. Diagnostic test accuracy of glutamate dehydrogenase for Clostridium difficile: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Arimoto, Jun; Horita, Nobuyuki; Kato, Shingo; Fuyuki, Akiko; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Endo, Hiroki; Takashi, Nonaka; Kaneko, Takeshi; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    We performed this systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the diagnostic accuracy of detecting glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) based on the hierarchical model. Two investigators electrically searched four databases. Reference tests were stool cell cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA) and stool toxigenic culture (TC). To assess the overall accuracy, we calculated the diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) using a DerSimonian-Laird random-model and area the under hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristics (AUC) using Holling’s proportional hazard models. The summary estimate of the sensitivity and the specificity were obtained using the bivariate model. According to 42 reports consisting of 3055 reference positive comparisons, and 26188 reference negative comparisons, the DOR was 115 (95%CI: 77–172, I2 = 12.0%) and the AUC was 0.970 (95%CI: 0.958–0.982). The summary estimate of sensitivity and specificity were 0.911 (95%CI: 0.871–0.940) and 0.912 (95%CI: 0.892–0.928). The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 10.4 (95%CI 8.4–12.7) and 0.098 (95%CI 0.066–0.142), respectively. Detecting GDH for the diagnosis of CDI had both high sensitivity and specificity. Considering its low cost and prevalence, it is appropriate for a screening test for CDI. PMID:27418431

  9. Cloning a neutral protease of Clostridium histolyticum, determining its substrate specificity, and designing a specific substrate.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Kanako; Murayama, Kazutaka; Goto, Masafumi; Watanabe, Kimiko; Takeuchi, Michio; Yamagata, Youhei

    2015-12-01

    Islet transplantation is a prospective treatment for restoring normoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes. Islet isolation from pancreases by decomposition with proteolytic enzymes is necessary for transplantation. Two collagenases, collagenase class I (ColG) and collagenase class II (ColH), from Clostridium histolyticum have been used for islet isolation. Neutral proteases have been added to the collagenases for human islet isolation. A neutral protease from C. histolyticum (NP) and thermolysin from Bacillus thermoproteolyicus has been used for the purpose. Thermolysin is an extensively studied enzyme, but NP is not well known. We therefore cloned the gene encoding NP and constructed a Bacillus subtilis overexpression strain. The expressed enzyme was purified, and its substrate specificity was examined. We observed that the substrate specificity of NP was higher than that of thermolysin, and that the protein digestion activities of NP, as determined by colorimetric methods, were lower than those of thermolysin. It seems that decomposition using NP does not negatively affect islets during islet preparation from pancreases. Furthermore, we designed a novel substrate that allows the measurement of NP activity specifically in the enzyme mixture for islet preparation and the culture broth of C. histolyticum. The activity of NP can also be monitored during islet isolation. We hope the purified enzyme and this specific substrate contribute to the optimization of islet isolation from pancreases and that it leads to the success of islet transplantation and the improvement of the quality of life (QOL) for diabetic patients.

  10. Enumeration and Isolation of cpe-Positive Clostridium perfringens Spores from Feces

    PubMed Central

    Heikinheimo, Annamari; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2004-01-01

    A hydrophobic grid membrane filter-colony hybridization (HGMF-CH) method for the enumeration and isolation of cpe gene-carrying (cpe-positive) Clostridium perfringens spores from feces was developed. A 425-bp DNA probe specific for the cpe gene was sensitive and specific when tested with bacterial DNA and pure cultures. The enumeration of cpe-positive C. perfringens by the HGMF-CH method proved to be as sensitive as nested PCR combined with the most-probable number technique when tested with fecal samples from healthy individuals. With the aid of the HGMF-CH method, positive hybridization signals were detected from two out of seven fecal samples obtained from healthy individuals. Furthermore, cpe-positive C. perfringens was successfully isolated from both of these samples. The detection of cpe-positive C. perfringens by the HGMF-CH method is dependent on the ratio of cpe-positive C. perfringens colonies to total C. perfringens colonies growing on the HGMF-tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine plate. cpe-positive C. perfringens could be isolated if the ratio of cpe-positive C. perfringens spores to total C. perfringens spores was 6 × 10−5 or higher. The HGMF-CH method provides an aid in the investigation of fecal samples of patients suffering from food poisoning or other diseases caused by cpe-positive C. perfringens. The method also offers a new approach in the investigation of the epidemiology of cpe-positive C. perfringens strains. PMID:15364981

  11. Enumeration and isolation of cpe-positive Clostridium perfringens spores from feces.

    PubMed

    Heikinheimo, Annamari; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2004-09-01

    A hydrophobic grid membrane filter-colony hybridization (HGMF-CH) method for the enumeration and isolation of cpe gene-carrying (cpe-positive) Clostridium perfringens spores from feces was developed. A 425-bp DNA probe specific for the cpe gene was sensitive and specific when tested with bacterial DNA and pure cultures. The enumeration of cpe-positive C. perfringens by the HGMF-CH method proved to be as sensitive as nested PCR combined with the most-probable number technique when tested with fecal samples from healthy individuals. With the aid of the HGMF-CH method, positive hybridization signals were detected from two out of seven fecal samples obtained from healthy individuals. Furthermore, cpe-positive C. perfringens was successfully isolated from both of these samples. The detection of cpe-positive C. perfringens by the HGMF-CH method is dependent on the ratio of cpe-positive C. perfringens colonies to total C. perfringens colonies growing on the HGMF-tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine plate. cpe-positive C. perfringens could be isolated if the ratio of cpe-positive C. perfringens spores to total C. perfringens spores was 6 x 10(-5) or higher. The HGMF-CH method provides an aid in the investigation of fecal samples of patients suffering from food poisoning or other diseases caused by cpe-positive C. perfringens. The method also offers a new approach in the investigation of the epidemiology of cpe-positive C. perfringens strains.

  12. Spontaneous large-scale autolysis in Clostridium acetobutylicum contributes to generation of more spores

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Qiao, Kai; Tian, Lei; Zhang, Quan; Liu, Zi-Yong; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-01-01

    Autolysis is a widespread phenomenon in bacteria. In batch fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, there is a spontaneous large-scale autolysis phenomenon with significant decrease of cell density immediately after exponential phase. To unravel the role of autolysis, an autolysin-coding gene, CA_C0554, was disrupted by using ClosTron system to obtain the mutant C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72). The lower final cell density and faster cell density decrease rate of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 than those of C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72) indicates that CA_C0554 was an important but not the sole autolysin-coding gene responding for the large-scale autolysis. Similar glucose utilization and solvents production but obvious lower cell density of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 comparing to C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72) suggests that lysed C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 cells were metabolic inactive. On the contrary, the spore density of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 is 26.1% higher than that of C. acetobutylicum lyc::int(72) in the final culture broth of batch fermentation. We speculated that spontaneous autolysis of metabolic-inactive cells provided nutrients for the sporulating cells. The present study suggests that one important biological role of spontaneous large-scale autolysis in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 batch fermentation is contributing to generation of more spores during sporulation. PMID:26441884

  13. Development of a cyclic voltammetry method for the detection of Clostridium novyi in black disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, L L; Jiang, D N; Xiang, G M; Liu, C; Yu, J C; Pu, X Y

    2014-03-17

    Black disease is an acute disease of sheep and cattle. The pathogen is the obligate anaerobe, Clostridium novyi. Due to difficulties of anaerobic culturing in the country or disaster sites, a simple, rapid, and sensitive method is required. In this study, an electrochemical method, the cyclic voltammetry method, basing on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), electrochemical ion bonding (positive dye, methylene blue), was introduced. DNA extracted from C. novyi specimens was amplified through the LAMP reaction. Then the products combined were with methylene blue, which lead to a reduction in the oxidation peak current (ipA) and the reduction peak current (ipC) of the cyclic voltammetry. The changes of ipA/ipC were real-time measured by special designed electrode, so the DNA was quantitatively detected. The results displayed that this electrochemical detection of C. novyi could be completed in 1-2 h with the lowest bacterial concentration of 10(2) colony forming units/mL, and high accuracy (96.5%), sensitivity (96%), and specificity (97%) compared to polymerase chain reation. The cyclic voltammetry method was a simple and fast method, with high sensitivity and high specificity, and has great potential to be a usable molecular tool for fast diagnosis of Black disease.

  14. Detection limit of Clostridium botulinum spores in dried mushroom samples sourced from China.

    PubMed

    Malakar, Pradeep K; Plowman, June; Aldus, Clare F; Xing, Zengtao; Zhao, Yong; Peck, Michael W

    2013-08-16

    A survey of dried mushrooms (Lentinula edodes (Shiitake) and Auricularia auricula (Wood Ear)) sourced from China was carried out to determine the natural contamination of these mushrooms with spores of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum and non-proteolytic C. botulinum. The mushrooms were collected from supermarkets and retailers in 21 cities in China during October 2008. Spore loads of C. botulinum in mushrooms have a degree of uncertainty and variability and this study contributes valuable data for determining prevalence of spores of C. botulinum in mushrooms. An optimized detection protocol that combined selective enrichment culture with multiplex PCR was used to test for spores of proteolytic and non-proteolytic C. botulinum. Detection limits were calculated, using a maximum likelihood protocol, from mushroom samples inoculated with defined numbers of spores of proteolytic C. botulinum or non-proteolytic C. botulinum. Based on the maximum likelihood detection limit, it is estimated that dried mushroom A. auricula contained <550spores/kg of proteolytic C. botulinum, and <350spores/kg of non-proteolytic C. botulinum. Dried L. edodes contained <1500spores/kg of proteolytic C. botulinum and it was not possible to determine reliable detection limits for spores of non-proteolytic C. botulinum using the current detection protocol.

  15. Molecular characterization of nosocomial Clostridium difficile infection in pediatric ward in Iran.

    PubMed

    Khoshdel, Abolfazl; Habibian, Roya; Parvin, Neda; Doosti, Abbas; Famouri, Fatemeh; Eshraghi, Ali; Hafizi, Massoud

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is recognized as a major cause of nosocomial acquired antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. It is a significant financial burden on modern healthcare resources. This study aimed to assess the molecular characterization of C. difficile strains isolated from children under 5 years old suffered from nosocomial diarrhea. One hundred diarrheic and 130 non-diarrheic fecal samples were collected from pediatrics less than 5 years old. Samples were cultured and C. difficile isolates were subjected to the PCR technique to study the distribution of ribotypes of C. difficile using P3 and P5 primers. Fifty-two out of 100 samples (52 %) were positive for C. difficile. The prevalence of bacterium in healthy children was 4.61 %. Total prevalence of C. difficile in diarrheic girls and boys were 48.9 and 54.7 %, respectively. Thirteen to twenty-four month age children had the highest prevalence of C. difficile. The most commonly detected ribotypes in the C. difficile isolates of Iranian pediatrics were RT027 (11.52 %), R1 (9.61 %) and R13 (7.68 %). The ribotypes of all of the six bacterial isolates of healthy children was not diagnosed. According to the presence of C. difficile and R27 ribotype, a continued genotype surveillance of this bacterium is necessary to monitor changes in the prevalence of certain strains and to identify the emergence of new strains that could affect future vaccine strategies.

  16. A novel approach to generate a recombinant toxoid vaccine against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Donald, Robert G K; Flint, Mike; Kalyan, Narender; Johnson, Erik; Witko, Susan E; Kotash, Cheryl; Zhao, Ping; Megati, Shakuntala; Yurgelonis, Irina; Lee, Phillip Kwok; Matsuka, Yury V; Severina, Elena; Deatly, Anne; Sidhu, Mini; Jansen, Kathrin U; Minton, Nigel P; Anderson, Annaliesa S

    2013-07-01

    The Clostridium difficile toxins A and B are primarily responsible for symptoms of C. difficile associated disease and are prime targets for vaccine development. We describe a plasmid-based system for the production of genetically modified toxins in a non-sporulating strain of C. difficile that lacks the toxin genes tcdA and tcdB. TcdA and TcdB mutations targeting established glucosyltransferase cytotoxicity determinants were introduced into recombinant plasmids and episomally expressed toxin mutants purified from C. difficile transformants. TcdA and TcdB mutants lacking glucosyltransferase and autoproteolytic processing activities were ~10 000-fold less toxic to cultured human IMR-90 cells than corresponding recombinant or native toxins. However, both mutants retained residual cytotoxicity that could be prevented by preincubating the antigens with specific antibodies or by formalin treatment. Such non-toxic formalin-treated mutant antigens were immunogenic and protective in a hamster model of infection. The remaining toxicity of untreated TcdA and TcdB mutant antigens was associated with cellular swelling, a phenotype consistent with pore-induced membrane leakage. TcdB substitution mutations previously shown to block vesicular pore formation and toxin translocation substantially reduced residual toxicity. We discuss the implications of these results for the development of a C. difficile toxoid vaccine.

  17. Clostridium perfringens Sialidases: Potential Contributors to Intestinal Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Uzal, Francisco A.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a major cause of histotoxic and intestinal infections of humans and other animals. This Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium can produce up to three sialidases named NanH, NanI, and NanJ. The role of sialidases in histotoxic infections, such as gas gangrene (clostridial myonecrosis), remains equivocal. However, recent in vitro studies suggest that NanI may contribute to intestinal virulence by upregulating production of some toxins associated with intestinal infection, increasing the binding and activity of some of those toxins, and enhancing adherence of C. perfringens to intestinal cells. Possible contributions of NanI to intestinal colonization are further supported by observations that the C. perfringens strains causing acute food poisoning in humans often lack the nanI gene, while other C. perfringens strains causing chronic intestinal infections in humans usually carry a nanI gene. Certain sialidase inhibitors have been shown to block NanI activity and reduce C. perfringens adherence to cultured enterocyte-like cells, opening the possibility that sialidase inhibitors could be useful therapeutics against C. perfringens intestinal infections. These initial in vitro observations should be tested for their in vivo significance using animal models of intestinal infections. PMID:27869757

  18. Recombinant Alpha, Beta, and Epsilon Toxins of Clostridium perfringens: Production Strategies and Applications as Veterinary Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcos Roberto A; Moreira, Gustavo Marçal S G; Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P da; Mendonça, Marcelo; Salvarani, Felipe M; Moreira, Ângela N; Conceição, Fabricio R

    2016-11-21

    Clostridium perfringens is a spore-forming, commensal, ubiquitous bacterium that is present in the gastrointestinal tract of healthy humans and animals. This bacterium produces up to 18 toxins. The species is classified into five toxinotypes (A-E) according to the toxins that the bacterium produces: alpha, beta, epsilon, or iota. Each of these toxinotypes is associated with myriad different, frequently fatal, illnesses that affect a range of farm animals and humans. Alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins are the main causes of disease. Vaccinations that generate neutralizing antibodies are the most common prophylactic measures that are currently in use. These vaccines consist of toxoids that are obtained from C. perfringens cultures. Recombinant vaccines offer several advantages over conventional toxoids, especially in terms of the production process. As such, they are steadily gaining ground as a promising vaccination solution. This review discusses the main strategies that are currently used to produce recombinant vaccines containing alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins of C. perfringens, as well as the potential application of these molecules as vaccines for mammalian livestock animals.

  19. Mechanisms of microbial oil recovery by Clostridium acetobutylicum and Bacillus strain JF-2

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, T.L.; Zhang, X.; Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Sharma, P.K.; Jackson, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    Core displacement experiments at elevated pressures were conducted to determine whether microbial processes are effective under conditions that simulate those found in an actual oil reservoir. The in-situ growth of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Bacillus strain JF-2 resulted in the recovery of residual oil. About 21 and 23% of the residual oil was recovered by C. acetobutylicum and Bacillus strain JF-2, respectively. Flooding cores with cell-free culture fluids of C. acetobutylicum with and without the addition of 50 mM acetone and 100 mM butanol did not result in the recovery of residual oil. Mathematical simulations showed that the amount of gas produced by the clostridial fermentation was not showed that the amount of gas produced by the clostridial fermentation was not sufficient to recover residual oil. Oil recovery by Bacillus strain JF-2 was highly correlated to surfactant production. A biosurfactant-deficient mutant of strain JF-2 was not capable of recovering residual oil. These data show that surfactant production is an important mechanism for microbially enhanced oil recovery. The mechanism for oil recovery by C. acetobutylicum is not understood at this time, but the production of acids, solvents, or gases alone cannot explain the observed increases in oil recovery by this organism.

  20. Auranofin disrupts selenium metabolism in Clostridium difficile by forming a stable Au-Se adduct.

    PubMed

    Jackson-Rosario, Sarah; Cowart, Darin; Myers, Andrew; Tarrien, Rebecca; Levine, Rodney L; Scott, Robert A; Self, William Thomas

    2009-05-01

    Clostridium difficile is a nosocomial pathogen whose incidence and importance are on the rise. Previous work in our laboratory characterized the central role of selenoenzyme-dependent Stickland reactions in C. difficile metabolism. In this work we have identified, using mass spectrometry, a stable complex formed upon reaction of auranofin (a gold-containing drug) with selenide in vitro. X-ray absorption spectroscopy supports the structure that we proposed on the basis of mass-spectrometric data. Auranofin potently inhibits the growth of C. difficile but does not similarly affect other clostridia that do not utilize selenoproteins to obtain energy. Moreover, auranofin inhibits the incorporation of radioisotope selenium ((75)Se) in selenoproteins in both Escherichia coli, the prokaryotic model for selenoprotein synthesis, and C. difficile without impacting total protein synthesis. Auranofin blocks the uptake of selenium and results in the accumulation of the auranofin-selenide adduct in the culture medium. Addition of selenium in the form of selenite or L-selenocysteine to the growth medium significantly reduces the inhibitory action of auranofin on the growth of C. difficile. On the basis of these results, we propose that formation of this complex and the subsequent deficiency in available selenium for selenoprotein synthesis is the mechanism by which auranofin inhibits C. difficile growth. This study demonstrates that targeting selenium metabolism provides a new avenue for antimicrobial development against C. difficile and other selenium-dependent pathogens.

  1. Clostridiolysin S, a Post-translationally Modified Biotoxin from Clostridium botulinum*

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, David J.; Lee, Shaun W.; Hensler, Mary E.; Markley, Andrew L.; Dahesh, Samira; Mitchell, Douglas A.; Bandeira, Nuno; Nizet, Victor; Dixon, Jack E.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2010-01-01

    Through elaboration of its botulinum toxins, Clostridium botulinum produces clinical syndromes of infant botulism, wound botulism, and other invasive infections. Using comparative genomic analysis, an orphan nine-gene cluster was identified in C. botulinum and the related foodborne pathogen Clostridium sporogenes that resembled the biosynthetic machinery for streptolysin S, a key virulence factor from group A Streptococcus responsible for its hallmark β-hemolytic phenotype. Genetic complementation, in vitro reconstitution, mass spectral analysis, and plasmid intergrational mutagenesis demonstrate that the streptolysin S-like gene cluster from Clostridium sp. is responsible for the biogenesis of a novel post-translationally modified hemolytic toxin, clostridiolysin S. PMID:20581111

  2. Technical guide for genetic advancement of underdeveloped and intractable Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Michael E; Bruder, Mark; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A; Chou, C Perry

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the genus Clostridium has risen to the forefront of both medical biotechnology and industrial biotechnology owing to its potential in applications as diverse as anticancer therapy and production of commodity chemicals and biofuels. The prevalence of hyper-virulent strains of C. difficile within medical institutions has also led to a global epidemic that demands a more thorough understanding of clostridial genetics, physiology, and pathogenicity. Unfortunately, Clostridium suffers from a lack of sophisticated genetic tools and techniques which has hindered the biotechnological exploitation of this important bacterial genus. This review provides a comprehensive summary of biotechnological progress made in clostridial genetic tool development, while also aiming to serve as a technical guide for the advancement of underdeveloped clostridial strains, including recalcitrant species, novel environmental samples, and non-type strains. Relevant strain engineering techniques, from genome sequencing and establishment of a gene transfer methodology through to deployment of advanced genome editing procedures, are discussed in detail to provide a blueprint for future clostridial strain construction endeavors. It is expected that a more thorough and rounded-out genetic toolkit available for use in the clostridia will bring about the construction of superior bioprocessing strains and a more complete understanding of clostridial genetics, physiology, and pathogenicity.

  3. Effective Sequestration of Clostridium difficile Protein Toxins by Calcium Aluminosilicate

    PubMed Central

    Pokusaeva, Karina; Carpenter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the etiologic agent responsible for C. difficile infection. Toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB) are nearly indispensable virulence factors for Clostridium difficile pathogenesis. Given the toxin-centric mechanism by which C. difficile pathogenesis occurs, the selective sequestration with neutralization of TcdA and TcdB by nonantibiotic agents represents a novel mode of action to prevent or treat C. difficile-associated disease. In this preclinical study, we used quantitative enzyme immunoassays to determine the extent by which a novel drug, calcium aluminosilicate uniform particle size nonswelling M-1 (CAS UPSN M-1), is capable of sequestering TcdA and TcdB in vitro. The following major findings were derived from the present study. First, we show that CAS UPSN M-1 efficiently sequestered both TcdA and TcdB to undetectable levels. Second, we show that CAS UPSN M-1's affinity for TcdA is greater than its affinity for TcdB. Last, we show that CAS UPSN M-1 exhibited limited binding affinity for nontarget proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that ingestion of calcium aluminosilicate might protect gastrointestinal tissues from antibiotic- or chemotherapy-induced C. difficile infection by neutralizing the cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of luminal TcdA and TcdB. PMID:26149988

  4. Clostridium difficile infection: A critical analysis of the guidance.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Ann-Marie

    A recent report by the Department of Health, Clostridium Difficile Infection: How to deal with the problem - a board to ward approach, is a revised set of guidelines based on best practice and key recommendations for the NHS to ensure the control of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). It takes into account a national framework for clinical governance which did not previously exist, a framework that gives significant weight to infection control as a matter of patient safety, and highlights that all clinicians have a personal responsibility for infection prevention and control. It puts the onus on Trust management and PCTs to ensure that measures are in place to prevent and manage CDI according to best evidence. However, the report fails to explain how these measures will have an impact on finance and resources on an already burdened system. The author explains how much of the report is comparable with the one published in 1994, and highlights many of its limitations within the busy hospital setting. Reducing CDI is achievable, as many hospitals are showing large reductions in their CDI rates. Healthcare workers must be applauded for their success in reducing CDI, but there is more to be done.

  5. Manganese superoxide dismutase from human pathogen Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Hongfei; Lei, Cheng; Ying, Tianlei; Tan, Xiangshi

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium difficile is a human pathogen that causes severe antibiotic-associated Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Herein the MnSODcd from C. difficile was cloned, expressed in Escherichia Coli,and characterized by X-ray crystallography, UV/Vis and EPR spectroscopy, and activity assay, et al. The crystal structure of MnSODcd (2.32 Å) reveals a manganese coordination geometry of distorted trigonal bipyramidal, with His111, His197 and Asp193 providing the equatorial ligands and with His56 and a hydroxide or water forming the axial ligands. The catalytic activity of MnSODcd (8,600 U/mg) can be effectively inhibited by 2-methoxyestradiol with an IC50 of 75 μM. The affinity investigation between 2-methoxyestradiol and MnSODcd by ITC indicated a binding constant of 8.6 μM with enthalpy changes (ΔH = -4.08 ± 0.03 kcal/mol, ΔS = 9.53 ± 0.02 cal/mol/deg). An inhibitory mechanism of MnSODcd by 2-methoxyestradiol was probed and proposed based on molecular docking models and gel filtration analysis. The 2-methoxyestradiol may bind MnSODcd to interfere with the cross-linking between the two active sites of the dimer enzyme, compromising the SOD activity. These results provide valuable insight into the rational design of MnSODcd inhibitors for potential therapeutics for CDI.

  6. Identification and Characterization of Clostridium sordellii Toxin Gene Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Sirigi Reddy, Apoorva Reddy; Girinathan, Brintha Parasumanna; Zapotocny, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Toxigenic Clostridium sordellii causes uncommon but highly lethal infections in humans and animals. Recently, an increased incidence of C. sordellii infections has been reported in women undergoing obstetric interventions. Pathogenic strains of C. sordellii produce numerous virulence factors, including sordellilysin, phospholipase, neuraminidase, and two large clostridial glucosylating toxins, TcsL and TcsH. Recent studies have demonstrated that TcsL toxin is an essential virulence factor for the pathogenicity of C. sordellii. In this study, we identified and characterized TcsR as the toxin gene (tcsL) regulator in C. sordellii. High-throughput sequencing of two C. sordellii strains revealed that tcsR lies within a genomic region that encodes TcsL, TcsH, and TcsE, a putative holin. By using ClosTron technology, we inactivated the tcsR gene in strain ATCC 9714. Toxin production and tcsL transcription were decreased in the tcsR mutant strain. However, the complemented tcsR mutant produced large amounts of toxins, similar to the parental strain. Expression of the Clostridium difficile toxin gene regulator tcdR also restored toxin production to the C. sordellii tcsR mutant, showing that these sigma factors are functionally interchangeable. PMID:23873908

  7. Tequila vinasses acidogenesis in a UASB reactor with Clostridium predominance.

    PubMed

    Marino-Marmolejo, E N; Corbalá-Robles, L; Cortez-Aguilar, R C; Contreras-Ramos, S M; Bolaños-Rosales, R E; Davila-Vazquez, G

    2015-01-01

    Tequila vinasses represent an acidic, highly concentrated pollutant effluent generated during the distillation step of Tequila production. Although acidogenesis of Tequila vinasses has been reported for some reactor configurations, a characterization of the bacteria present during this metabolic process is lacking in the literature. Hydraulic retention times (HRT) between 36 and 6 h and organic loading rates (OLR) from 5 to 30 g COD L(-1) d(-1) were assessed in a UASB reactor fed with Tequila vinasses. Results showed that OLR excerted a stronger effect (p ≤ 0.0001) on parameters such as gas production rate, pH, and acidity than HRT. While it was clear that shorter HRT were related to higher volatile fatty acid production levels. Figures above 2 Lgas Lreactor (-1) d(-1) (where "gas" could be a mixture of methane and hydrogen) were attained only with an OLR as high as 30 g COD L(-1) d(-1). Bacterial identification of a sludge sample at the end of the experiment revealed that acid-tolerant microorganisms that remained in the reactor were exclusively affiliated to the Clostridium genera, being the first report of organisms identification for Tequila vinasses acidogenesis. These findings are relevant to the field of biotechnology since acidogenesis of Tequila vinasses using identified and studied microorganism abilities (i.e. Clostridium strains) presents the opportunity of optimizing processes intended for different metabolites production (butanol, volatile fatty acids, hydrogen, solvents).

  8. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN SEROTYPE B.

    SciTech Connect

    SWAMINATHAN,S.; ESWARAMOORTHY,S.

    2001-11-19

    The toxigenic strains of Clostridium botulinum produce seven serologically distinct types of neurotoxins labeled A - G (EC 3.4.24.69), while Clostridium tetani produces tetanus neurotoxin (EC 3.4.24.68). Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins (BoNTs and TeNT) are produced as single inactive chains of molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Most of these neurotoxins are released after being cleaved into two chains, a heavy chain (HI) of 100 kDa and a light chain (L) of 50 kDa held together by an interchain disulfide bond, by tissue proteinases. BoNT/E is released as a single chain but cleaved by host proteinases [1]. Clostvidium botulinum neurotoxins are extremely poisonous proteins with their LD{sub 50} for humans in the range of 0.1 - 1 ng kg{sup -1} [2]. Botulinum neurotoxins are responsible for neuroparalytic syndromes of botulism characterized by serious neurological disorders and flaccid paralysis. BoNTs block the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction causing flaccid paralysis while TeNT blocks the release of neurotransmitters like glycine and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the inhibitory interneurons of the spinal cord resulting in spastic paralysis. In spite of different clinical symptoms, their aetiological agents intoxicate neuronal cells in the same way and these toxins have similar structural organization [3].

  9. Intracellular survival of Clostridium chauvoei in bovine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Santos, Renato Lima; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; de Oliveira Bernardes, Laura Cristina; de Macêdo, Auricélio Alves; Gonçalves, Luciana Aramuni; de Oliveira Júnior, Carlos Augusto; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2017-02-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the etiological agent of blackleg, a severe disease of domestic ruminants, causing myonecrosis and serious toxemia with high mortality. Despite the known importance of this agent, studies evaluating its pathogenesis of blackleg are scarce, and many are based on an unproven hypothesis that states that macrophages are responsible for carrying C. chauvoei spores from the intestines to muscles in the early stages of blackleg. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the survival of C. chauvoei vegetative cells or spores after phagocytosis by a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) and bovine monocyte-derived macrophages and to profile inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine transcripts of bovine macrophages infected with C. chauvoei vegetative cells or spores. Both vegetative cells and spores of C. chauvoei remain viable after internalization by murine and bovine macrophages. Bovine macrophages infected with vegetative cells showed a pro-inflammatory profile, while those infected with spores displayed an anti-inflammatory profile. Together, these results corroborate the classical hypothesis that macrophages may play a role in the early pathogenesis of blackleg. Moreover, this is the first study to evaluate the infection kinetics and cytokine profile of bovine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with a Clostridium species.

  10. Role of collagenase clostridium histolyticum in Peyronie’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Peak, Taylor C; Mitchell, Gregory C; Yafi, Faysal A; Hellstrom, Wayne J

    2015-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease is a localized connective tissue disease characterized by an active, inflammatory phase and a stable, quiescent phase, with the eventual development of collagenous plaques within the tunica albuginea of the penis. Risk factors primarily associated with Peyronie’s disease include Dupuytren’s contracture, penile trauma, and family history. A variety of treatment strategies have been utilized, including oral and topical agents, electromotive drug administration, intralesional injections, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, penile traction, and surgery. However, most of these strategies are ineffective, with surgery being the only definitive treatment. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum is a newly US Food and Drug Administration-approved agent for intralesional injection. It is thought to downregulate many of the disease-related genes, cytokines, and growth factors and degrade collagen fibers. It also suppresses cell attachment, spreading, and proliferation. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum has been clinically proven to be a safe and effective therapeutic option, demonstrating decreases in penile curvature and plaque consistency, as well as increases in patient satisfaction. During clinical evaluation, the Peyronie’s Disease Questionnaire was validated as an effective tool for assessing treatment outcomes. PMID:26491251

  11. Clostridium Sacroiliitis (Gas Gangrene) Following Sacroiliac Joint Injection--Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Kurnutala, Lakshmi N; Ghatol, Dipti; Upadhyay, Aman

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old woman presented with chronic lumbosacral pain since her laminectomy and instrumentation 10 years ago. Examination was consistent with left sacroiliitis, and the patient underwent an elective left sacroiliac joint injection. Two days following her procedure she fell and landed on her left hip and on the next day, she presented to the emergency room with acutely worsening left gluteal pain. On evaluation in the emergency department, she was found to be suffering from a fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, and dysuria. A computed tomography (CT) scan was performed and this showed extensive foci of gas throughout the posterior aspect of the left iliopsoas muscle, sacrum, and ileum surrounding the left sacroiliac joint. The patient underwent emergent surgical debridement. The microbiology report of blood culture revealed clostridium perfringens, while her pathology showed necrosis and acute inflammation of fibroadipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and fat. The patient's hospital course resulted in multi-organ failure and the family elected for comfort care measures only. Unfortunately, she passed away 36 hours later. Septic arthritis is a potential catastrophic complication following intra-articular steroid therapy. The cause of the septic joint can be multifactorial but is likely caused by one of the following processes: direct inoculation of bacteria by the injection, hematogenous seeding of the percutaneous injection tract, or due to activation of a quiescent infection by the injected steroid. Clostridial spores are very resistant to standard aseptic skin preparations, including chlorhexidine and betadine solutions. The only effective methods to eliminate the spores is to heat them at a temperature greater than 100 degrees Celsius for 10 minutes or with use of a 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution. We hypothesize that clostridium spores were present on the patient's skin from previous stool soiling, and that these were introduced directly into the soft

  12. Simultaneous and enhanced production of thermostable amylases and ethanol from starch by cocultures of Clostridium thermosulfurogenes and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, H.H.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1985-05-01

    Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum and Clostridium thermosulfurogenes produced ethanol and amylases with different components as primary metabolites of starch fermentation. Starch fermentation parameters were compared in mono- and cocultures of these two thermoanaerobes to show that the fermentation was dramatically improved as a consequence of coordinate action of amylolytic enzymes and synergistic metabolic interactions between the two species. Under given monoculture fermentation conditions, neither species completely degraded starch during the time course of the study, whereas in coculture, starch was completely degraded. In monoculture starch fermentation, C. thermohydrosulfuricum produced lower levels of pullulanase and glucoamylase, whereas C. thermosulfurogenes produced lower levels of ..beta..-amylase and glucoamylase. In coculture fermentation, improvement of starch metabolism by each species was noted in terms of increased amounts and rates of increased starch consumption, amylase production, and ethanol formation. The single-step coculture fermentation completely degraded 2.5% starch in 30 h at 60/sup 0/C and produced 9 U of ..beta..-amylase per ml, 1.3 U of pullulanase per ml, 0.3 U of glucoamylase per ml, and > 120 mM ethanol with a yield of 1.7 mol/mol of glucose in starch. The potential industrial applications of the coculture fermentation and the physiological basis for the interspecies metabolic interactions are discussed.

  13. Characterization of the spore surface and exosporium proteins of Clostridium sporogenes; implications for Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    PubMed

    Janganan, Thamarai K; Mullin, Nic; Tzokov, Svetomir B; Stringer, Sandra; Fagan, Robert P; Hobbs, Jamie K; Moir, Anne; Bullough, Per A

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium sporogenes is a non-pathogenic close relative and surrogate for Group I (proteolytic) neurotoxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strains. The exosporium, the sac-like outermost layer of spores of these species, is likely to contribute to adhesion, dissemination, and virulence. A paracrystalline array, hairy nap, and several appendages were detected in the exosporium of C. sporogenes strain NCIMB 701792 by EM and AFM. The protein composition of purified exosporium was explored by LC-MS/MS of tryptic peptides from major individual SDS-PAGE-separated protein bands, and from bulk exosporium. Two high molecular weight protein bands both contained the same protein with a collagen-like repeat domain, the probable constituent of the hairy nap, as well as cysteine-rich proteins CsxA and CsxB. A third cysteine-rich protein (CsxC) was also identified. These three proteins are also encoded in C. botulinum Prevot 594, and homologues (75-100% amino acid identity) are encoded in many other Group I strains. This work provides the first insight into the likely composition and organization of the exosporium of Group I C. botulinum spores.

  14. Functional characterisation of germinant receptors in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium sporogenes presents novel insights into spore germination systems.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Jason; Plowman, June; Gaskin, Duncan J H; Itchner, Manoa; Carter, Andrew T; Peck, Michael W

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a dangerous pathogen that forms the highly potent botulinum toxin, which when ingested causes a deadly neuroparalytic disease. The closely related Clostridium sporogenes is occasionally pathogenic, frequently associated with food spoilage and regarded as the non-toxigenic equivalent of Group I C. botulinum. Both species form highly resistant spores that are ubiquitous in the environment and which, under favourable growth conditions germinate to produce vegetative cells. To improve the control of botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is imperative to comprehend the mechanisms by which spores germinate. Germination is initiated following the recognition of small molecules (germinants) by a specific germinant receptor (GR) located in the spore inner membrane. The present study precisely defines clostridial GRs, germinants and co-germinants. Group I C. botulinum ATCC3502 contains two tricistronic and one pentacistronic GR operons, while C. sporogenes ATCC15579 has three tricistronic and one tetracistronic GR operons. Insertional knockout mutants, allied with characterisation of recombinant GRs shows for the first time that amino acid stimulated germination in C. botulinum requires two tri-cistronic encoded GRs which act in synergy and cannot function individually. Spore germination in C. sporogenes requires one tri-cistronic GR. Two other GRs form part of a complex involved in controlling the rate of amino-acid stimulated germination. The suitability of using C. sporogenes as a substitute for C. botulinum in germination studies and food challenge tests is discussed.

  15. Comparative analysis of the ability of Clostridium clariflavum strains and Clostridium thermocellumto utilize hemicellulose and unpretreated plant material

    DOE PAGES

    Izquierdo, Javier A.; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Guseva, Anna; ...

    2014-11-18

    Among themophilic consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) candidate organisms, environmental isolates of Clostridium clariflavum have demonstrated the ability to grow on xylan, and the genome of C. clariflavum DSM 19732 has revealed a number of mechanisms that foster solubilization of hemicellulose that are distinctive relative to the model cellulolytic thermophile Clostridium thermocellum. Growth experiments on xylan, xylooligosaccharides, and xylose reveal that C. clariflavum strains are able to completely break down xylan to xylose and that the environmental strain C. clariflavum sp. 4-2a is able to grow on monomeric xylose. C. clariflavum strains were able to utilize a larger proportion of unpretreated switchgrass,more » and solubilize a higher proportion of glucan, xylan, and arabinan, with strain 4-2a reaching the highest extent of solubilization of these components (64.7 to 69.4%) compared to C. thermocellum (29.5 to 42.5%). In addition, glycome immunoanalyses of residual plant biomass reveal differences in the extent of degradation of easily accessible xylans, with C. clariflavum strains having increased solubilization of this fraction of xylans relative to C. thermocellum. In conclusion, C. clariflavum strains exhibit higher activity than C. thermocellum in the breakdown of hemicellulose and are capable of degrading xylan to xylooligomers and xylose. This capability seems to also play a role in the higher levels of utilization of unpretreated plant material.« less

  16. Comparative analysis of the ability of Clostridium clariflavum strains and Clostridium thermocellumto utilize hemicellulose and unpretreated plant material

    SciTech Connect

    Izquierdo, Javier A.; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Guseva, Anna; Hahn, Michael G.; Lynd, Lee R.

    2014-11-18

    Among themophilic consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) candidate organisms, environmental isolates of Clostridium clariflavum have demonstrated the ability to grow on xylan, and the genome of C. clariflavum DSM 19732 has revealed a number of mechanisms that foster solubilization of hemicellulose that are distinctive relative to the model cellulolytic thermophile Clostridium thermocellum. Growth experiments on xylan, xylooligosaccharides, and xylose reveal that C. clariflavum strains are able to completely break down xylan to xylose and that the environmental strain C. clariflavum sp. 4-2a is able to grow on monomeric xylose. C. clariflavum strains were able to utilize a larger proportion of unpretreated switchgrass, and solubilize a higher proportion of glucan, xylan, and arabinan, with strain 4-2a reaching the highest extent of solubilization of these components (64.7 to 69.4%) compared to C. thermocellum (29.5 to 42.5%). In addition, glycome immunoanalyses of residual plant biomass reveal differences in the extent of degradation of easily accessible xylans, with C. clariflavum strains having increased solubilization of this fraction of xylans relative to C. thermocellum. In conclusion, C. clariflavum strains exhibit higher activity than C. thermocellum in the breakdown of hemicellulose and are capable of degrading xylan to xylooligomers and xylose. This capability seems to also play a role in the higher levels of utilization of unpretreated plant material.

  17. Carbon isotope effects associated with mixed-acid fermentation of saccharides by Clostridium papyrosolvens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning, Holger; Conrad, Ralf

    2006-05-01

    In anoxic environments, microbial fermentation is the first metabolic process in the path of organic matter degradation. Since little is known about carbon isotope fractionation during microbial fermentation, we studied mixed-acid fermentation of different saccharides (glucose, cellobiose, and cellulose) in Clostridium papyrosolvens. The bacterium was grown anaerobically in batch under different growth conditions, both in pure culture and in co-culture with Methanobacterium bryantii utilizing H 2/CO 2 or Methanospirillum hungatei utilizing both H 2/CO 2 and formate. Fermentation products were acetate, lactate, ethanol, formate, H 2, and CO 2 (and CH 4 in methanogenic co-culture), with acetate becoming dominant at low H 2 partial pressures. After complete conversion of the saccharides, acetate was 13C-enriched ( αsacc/ac = 0.991-0.997), whereas lactate ( αsacc/lac = 1.001-1.006), ethanol ( αsacc/etoh = 1.007-1.013), and formate ( αsacc/form = 1.007-1.011) were 13C-depleted. The total inorganic carbon produced was only slightly enriched in 13C, but was more enriched, when formate was produced in large amounts, as 12CO 2 was preferentially converted with H 2 to formate. During biomass formation, 12C was slightly preferred ( αsacc/biom ≈ 1.002). The observations in batch culture were confirmed in glucose-limited chemostat culture at growth rates of 0.02-0.15 h -1 at both low and high hydrogen partial pressures. Our experiments showed that the carbon flow at metabolic branch points in the fermentation path governed carbon isotope fractionation to the accumulated products. During production of pyruvate, C isotopes were not fractionated when using cellulose, but were fractionated to different extents depending on growth conditions when using cellobiose or glucose. At the first catabolic branch point (pyruvate), the produced lactate was depleted in 13C, whereas the alternative product acetyl-CoA was 13C enriched. At the second branch point (acetyl-CoA), the ethanol

  18. Clostridium guangxiense sp. nov. and Clostridium neuense sp. nov., two phylogenetically closely related hydrogen-producing species isolated from lake sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Li, Danyang; Xu, Shuhong; Guo, Zhanghao; Zhang, Yan; Man, Lin; Jiang, Binhui; Hu, Xiaomin

    2017-03-01

    Two novel anaerobic, mesophilic, biohydrogen-producing bacteria, designated strains ZGM211T and G1T, were isolated from lake sediment. 16S rRNA and ATP synthase beta subunit (atpD) gene sequences and phylogenetic analysis of strains ZGM211T and G1T revealed an affiliation to the genus Clostridium sensu stricto (cluster I of the clostridia), with Clostridium acetobutylicum as the closest characterized species, showing the same sequence similarity of 96.4 % to the type strain (98.9 % between the two isolates). Cells of the two strains were rod shaped. Growth occurred at 20-45 °C, pH 4.0-8.0 and NaCl concentrations up to 2 % (w/v). Grown on glucose, the main fermentation products were H2, CO2, acetate and butyrate. The major fatty acids were C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. The DNA G+C contents of strains ZGM211T and G1T were 40.7 and 41.5 mol%, respectively. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic differences, strains ZGM211T (=CICC 24070T=BCRC 80950T) and G1T (=CICC 24069T=BCRC 80949T) are proposed as the type strains of novel species of the genus Clostridium with the names Clostridium guangxiense sp. nov. and Clostridium neuense sp. nov., respectively.

  19. Multiple product inhibition and growth modeling of Clostridium butyricum and Klebsiella pneumoniae in glycerol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, A.P.; Ross, A.; Biebl, H.; Tag, C.; Guenzel, B.; Deckwer, W.D. . Biochemical Engineering Division)

    1994-10-01

    The inhibition potentials of products and substrate on the growth of Clostridium butyricum and Klebsiella pneumoniae in the glycerol fermentation are examined from experimental data and with a mathematical model. Whereas the inhibition potential of externally added and self-produced 1,3-propanediol is essentially the same, butyric acid produced by the culture is more toxic than that externally added. The same seems to apply for acetic acid. The inhibitory effect of butyric acid is due to the total concentration instead of its undissociated form. For acetic acid, it cannot be distinguished between the total concentration and the undissociated form. The inhibition effects of products and substrate in the glycerol fermentation are irrespective of the strains, and, therefore, the same growth model can be used. The maximum product concentrations tolerated are 0.35 g/L for undissociated acetic acid, 10.1 g/L for total butyric acid, 16.6 g/L for ethanol, 71.4 g/L for 1,3-propanediol, and 187.6 g/L for glycerol, which are applicable to C. butyricum and K. pneumoniae growth under a variety of conditions. For 55 steady-states, which were obtained from different types of continuous cultures over a pH range of 5.3--8.5 and under both substrate limitation and substrate excess, the proposed growth model fits the experimental data with an average deviation of 17.0%. The deviation of model description from experimental values reduces of 11.4% if only the steady-states with excessive substrate are considered.

  20. Bolaamphiphile-based nanocomplex delivery of phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, John P; Krzeminski, Jacek; Sharma, Arun K; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar; Stewart, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a conceptually appealing alternative to conventional antibiotics, a major challenge toward the successful implementation of antisense treatments for bacterial infections is the development of efficient oligonucleotide delivery systems. Cationic vesicles (bolasomes) composed of dequalinium chloride (“DQAsomes”) have been used to deliver plasmid DNA across the cardiolipin-rich inner membrane of mitochondria. As cardiolipin is also a component of many bacterial membranes, we investigated the application of cationic bolasomes to bacteria as an oligonucleotide delivery system. Antisense sequences designed in silico to target the expression of essential genes of the bacterial pathogen, Clostridium difficile, were synthesized as 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). These antisense gapmers were quantitatively assessed for their ability to block mRNA translation using luciferase reporter and C. difficile protein expression plasmid constructs in a coupled transcription–translation system. Cationic bolaamphiphile compounds (dequalinium derivatives) of varying alkyl chain length were synthesized and bolasomes were prepared via probe sonication of an aqueous suspension. Bolasomes were characterized by particle size distribution, zeta potential, and binding capacities for anionic oligonucleotide. Bolasomes and antisense gapmers were combined to form antisense nanocomplexes. Anaerobic C. difficile log phase cultures were treated with serial doses of gapmer nanocomplexes or equivalent amounts of empty bolasomes for 24 hours. Antisense gapmers for four gene targets achieved nanomolar minimum inhibitory concentrations for C. difficile, with the lowest values observed for oligonucleotides targeting polymerase genes rpoB and dnaE. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed from treatments at matched dosages of scrambled gapmer nanocomplexes or plain, oligonucleotide-free bolasomes compared to untreated control cultures. We

  1. Regulation of Expression of Scaffoldin-Related Genes in Clostridium thermocellum

    PubMed Central

    Dror, Tali W.; Rolider, Adi; Bayer, Edward A.; Lamed, Raphael; Shoham, Yuval

    2003-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum produces an extracellular multienzyme complex, termed the cellulosome, that allows efficient solubilization of crystalline cellulose. The complex is organized around a large noncatalytic protein subunit, termed CipA or scaffoldin, and is found either free in the supernatant or cell bound. The binding of the complex to the cell is mediated by three cell surface anchoring proteins, OlpB, Orf2p, and SdbA, that interact with the CipA scaffoldin. The transcriptional level of the olpB, orf2, sdbA, and cipA genes was determined quantitatively by RNase protection assays in batch and continuous cultures, under carbon and nitrogen limitation. The mRNA level of olpB, orf2, and cipA varied with growth rate, reaching 40 to 60 transcripts per cell under carbon limitation at a low growth rate of 0.04 h−1 and 2 to 10 transcripts per cell at a growth rate of 0.35 h−1 in batch culture. The mRNA level of sdbA was about three transcripts per cell and was not influenced by growth rate. Primer extension analysis revealed two major transcriptional start sites, at −81 and −50 bp, upstream of the translational start site of the cipA gene. The potential promoters exhibited homology to the known sigma factors σA and σL (σ54) of Bacillus subtilis. Transcription from the σL-like promoter was found under all growth conditions, whereas transcription from the σA-like promoter was significant only under carbon limitation. The overall expression level obtained in the primer extension analysis was in good agreement with the results of the RNase-protection assays. PMID:12923083

  2. Soy molasses as fermentation substrate for production of butanol using Clostridium beijerinckii BA101.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, N; Lolas, A; Blaschek, H P

    2001-05-01

    Spray-dried soy molasses (SDSM) contains the sugars dextrose, sucrose, fructose, pinitol, raffinose, verbascose, melibiose, and stachyose. Of the 746 g kg(-1) total sugars in SDSM, 434 g kg(-1) is fermentable using Clostridium beijerinckii BA101. SDSM was used to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) by C. beijerinckii BA101 in batch cultures. Using 80 g l(-1) SDSM, 10.7 g l(-1) ABE was produced in P2 medium. Higher concentrations of SDSM resulted in poor solvent production due to the presence of excessive salt and inhibitory components. C. beijerinckii BA101 in SDSM at 80 g l(-1) concentration produced 22.8 g l(-1) ABE when supplemented with 25.3 g l(-1) glucose. SDSM contains 57.4 g kg(-1) mineral ash and 2% tri-calcium phosphate. Tri-calcium phosphate up to 43.1 g l(-1) was not inhibitory and at a tri-calcium phosphate concentration of 28.8 g l(-1), the culture produced more solvents (30.1 g l(-1)) than the control experiment (23.8 g l(-1)). In contrast, sodium chloride was a strong inhibitor of C. beijerinckii BA101 cell growth. At a concentration of 10 g l(-1) sodium chloride, a maximum cell concentration of 0.6 g l(-1) was achieved compared to 1.7 g l(-1) in the control experiment. The effects of two salts on specific growth rate constant (mu) and specific rate of ABE production (nu) for C. beijerinckii BA101 were examined.

  3. MAPK-Activated Protein Kinase 2 Contributes to Clostridium difficile-Associated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bobo, Linda D.; El Feghaly, Rana E.; Chen, Yee-Shiuan; Dubberke, Erik R.; Han, Zhuolin; Baker, Alexandra H.; Li, Jinmei; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) results in toxin-induced epithelial injury and marked intestinal inflammation. Fecal markers of intestinal inflammation correlate with CDI disease severity, but regulation of the inflammatory response is poorly understood. Previous studies demonstrated that C. difficile toxin TcdA activates p38 kinase in tissue culture cells and mouse ilium, resulting in interleukin-8 (IL-8) release. Here, we investigated the role of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase (MK2 kinase, pMK2), a key mediator of p38-dependent inflammation, in CDI. Exposure of cultured intestinal epithelial cells to the C. difficile toxins TcdA and TcdB resulted in p38-dependent MK2 activation. Toxin-induced IL-8 and GROα release required MK2 activity. We found that p38 and MK2 are activated in response to other actin-disrupting agents, suggesting that toxin-induced cytoskeleton disruption is the trigger for kinase-dependent cytokine response. Phosphorylated MK2 was detected in the intestines of C. difficile-infected hamsters and mice, demonstrating for the first time that the pathway is activated in infected animals. Furthermore, we found that elevated pMK2 correlated with the presence of toxigenic C. difficile among 100 patient stool samples submitted for C. difficile testing. In conclusion, we find that MK2 kinase is activated by TcdA and TcdB and regulates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Activation of p38-MK2 in infected animals and humans suggests that this pathway is a key driver of intestinal inflammation in patients with CDI. PMID:23264053

  4. The undiagnosed cases of Clostridium difficile infection in a whole nation: where is the problem?

    PubMed

    Alcalá, L; Martín, A; Marín, M; Sánchez-Somolinos, M; Catalán, P; Peláez, T; Bouza, E

    2012-07-01

    Underdiagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) because of lack of clinical suspicion or the use of non-sensitive diagnostic techniques is a known problem whose real magnitude has not yet been quantified. In order to estimate the extent of this underdiagnosis, we performed C. difficile cultures on all unformed stool specimens sent-irrespective of the type of request-to a series of laboratories in Spain on a single day. The specimens were cultured, and isolates were characterized at a central reference laboratory. A total of 807 specimens from 730 patients aged ≥ 2 years were selected from 118 laboratories covering 75.4% of the Spanish population. The estimated rate of hospital-acquired CDI was 2.4 episodes per 1000 admissions or 3.8 episodes per 10,000 patient-days. Only half of the episodes occurred in patients hospitalized for >2 days. Two of every three episodes went undiagnosed or were misdiagnosed, owing to non-sensitive diagnostic tests (19.0%) or lack of clinical suspicion and request (47.6%; mostly young people or non-hospitalized patients). The main ribotypes were 014/020 (20.5%), 001 (18.2%), and 126/078 (18.2%). No ribotype 027 strains were detected. Strains were fully susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. CDI was underdiagnosed in diarrhoeic stools in a high proportion of episodes, owing to the use of non-sensitive techniques or lack of clinical suspicion, particularly in people aged <65 years or patients with community-acquired diarrhoea. C. difficile toxins should be routinely sought in unformed stools of any origin sent for microbiological diagnosis. The ribotype 027 clone has not yet disseminated in Spain.

  5. The exometabolome of Clostridium thermocellum reveals overflow metabolism at high cellulose loading

    SciTech Connect

    Holwerda, Evert K.; Thorne, Philip G.; Olson, Daniel G.; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Engle, Nancy L.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; van Dijken, Johannes P.; Lynd, Lee R.

    2014-10-21

    Background: Clostridium thermocellum is a model thermophilic organism for the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic substrates. The majority of publications studying the physiology of this organism use substrate concentrations of ≤10 g/L. However, industrially relevant concentrations of substrate start at 100 g/L carbohydrate, which corresponds to approximately 150 g/L solids. To gain insight into the physiology of fermentation of high substrate concentrations, we studied the growth on, and utilization of high concentrations of crystalline cellulose varying from 50 to 100 g/L by C. thermocellum. Results: Using a defined medium, batch cultures of C. thermocellum achieved 93% conversion of cellulose (Avicel) initially present at 100 g/L. The maximum rate of substrate utilization increased with increasing substrate loading. During fermentation of 100 g/L cellulose, growth ceased when about half of the substrate had been solubilized. However, fermentation continued in an uncoupled mode until substrate utilization was almost complete. In addition to commonly reported fermentation products, amino acids - predominantly L-valine and L-alanine - were secreted at concentrations up to 7.5 g/L. Uncoupled metabolism was also accompanied by products not documented previously for C. thermocellum, including isobutanol, meso- and RR/SS-2,3-butanediol and trace amounts of 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol and 1-propanol. We hypothesize that C. thermocellum uses overflow metabolism to balance its metabolism around the pyruvate node in glycolysis. In conclusion: C. thermocellum is able to utilize industrially relevant concentrations of cellulose, up to 93 g/L. We report here one of the highest degrees of crystalline cellulose utilization observed thus far for a pure culture of C. thermocellum, the highest maximum substrate utilization rate and the highest amount of isobutanol produced by a wild-type organism.

  6. Clostridium botulinum strains producing BoNT/F4 or BoNT/F5.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Brian H; Bradshaw, Marite; Kalb, Suzanne R; Joseph, Lavin A; Lúquez, Carolina; Barr, John R; Johnson, Eric A; Maslanka, Susan E

    2014-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type F (BoNT/F) may be produced by Clostridium botulinum alone or in combination with another toxin type such as BoNT/A or BoNT/B. Type F neurotoxin gene sequences have been further classified into seven toxin subtypes. Recently, the genome sequence of one strain of C. botulinum (Af84) was shown to contain three neurotoxin genes (bont/F4, bont/F5, and bont/A2). In this study, eight strains containing bont/F4 and seven strains containing bont/F5 were examined. Culture supernatants produced by these strains were incubated with BoNT/F-specific peptide substrates. Cleavage products of these peptides were subjected to mass spectral analysis, allowing detection of the BoNT/F subtypes present in the culture supernatants. PCR analysis demonstrated that a plasmid-specific marker (PL-6) was observed only among strains containing bont/F5. Among these strains, Southern hybridization revealed the presence of an approximately 242-kb plasmid harboring bont/F5. Genome sequencing of four of these strains revealed that the genomic backgrounds of strains harboring either bont/F4 or bont/F5 are diverse. None of the strains analyzed in this study were shown to produce BoNT/F4 and BoNT/F5 simultaneously, suggesting that strain Af84 is unusual. Finally, these data support a role for the mobility of a bont/F5-carrying plasmid among strains of diverse genomic backgrounds.

  7. The exometabolome of Clostridium thermocellum reveals overflow metabolism at high cellulose loading

    DOE PAGES

    Holwerda, Evert K.; Thorne, Philip G.; Olson, Daniel G.; ...

    2014-10-21

    Background: Clostridium thermocellum is a model thermophilic organism for the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic substrates. The majority of publications studying the physiology of this organism use substrate concentrations of ≤10 g/L. However, industrially relevant concentrations of substrate start at 100 g/L carbohydrate, which corresponds to approximately 150 g/L solids. To gain insight into the physiology of fermentation of high substrate concentrations, we studied the growth on, and utilization of high concentrations of crystalline cellulose varying from 50 to 100 g/L by C. thermocellum. Results: Using a defined medium, batch cultures of C. thermocellum achieved 93% conversion of cellulose (Avicel)more » initially present at 100 g/L. The maximum rate of substrate utilization increased with increasing substrate loading. During fermentation of 100 g/L cellulose, growth ceased when about half of the substrate had been solubilized. However, fermentation continued in an uncoupled mode until substrate utilization was almost complete. In addition to commonly reported fermentation products, amino acids - predominantly L-valine and L-alanine - were secreted at concentrations up to 7.5 g/L. Uncoupled metabolism was also accompanied by products not documented previously for C. thermocellum, including isobutanol, meso- and RR/SS-2,3-butanediol and trace amounts of 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol and 1-propanol. We hypothesize that C. thermocellum uses overflow metabolism to balance its metabolism around the pyruvate node in glycolysis. In conclusion: C. thermocellum is able to utilize industrially relevant concentrations of cellulose, up to 93 g/L. We report here one of the highest degrees of crystalline cellulose utilization observed thus far for a pure culture of C. thermocellum, the highest maximum substrate utilization rate and the highest amount of isobutanol produced by a wild-type organism.« less

  8. John G. Bartlett: Contributions to the discovery of Clostridium difficile antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, Sherwood L

    2014-09-15

    In 1975 John Bartlett began trials investigating the problem of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. His work led the discovery of Clostridium difficile and he identified it as the leading cause of hospital-associated infections.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Thermophile Clostridium clariflavum Strain 4-2a.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Elise A; Rowe, Kenneth T; Guseva, Anna; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James K; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor M; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Liolios, Konstantinos; Nordberg, Henrik P; Cantor, Michael N; Hua, Susan X; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Lynd, Lee R; Izquierdo, Javier A

    2015-07-23

    Clostridium clariflavum strain 4-2a, a novel strain isolated from a thermophilic biocompost pile, has demonstrated an extensive capability to utilize both cellulose and hemicellulose under thermophilic anaerobic conditions. Here, we report the draft genome of this strain.

  10. Clostridium and Bacillus Binary Enterotoxins: Bad for the Bowels, and Eukaryotic Being

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Bradley G.; Pradhan, Kisha; Fleming, Jodie M.; Samy, Ramar Perumal; Barth, Holger; Popoff, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    Some pathogenic spore-forming bacilli employ a binary protein mechanism for intoxicating the intestinal tracts of insects, animals, and humans. These Gram-positive bacteria and their toxins include Clostridium botulinum (C2 toxin), Clostridium difficile (C. difficile toxin or CDT), Clostridium perfringens (ι-toxin and binary enterotoxin, or BEC), Clostridium spiroforme (C. spiroforme toxin or CST), as well as Bacillus cereus (vegetative insecticidal protein or VIP). These gut-acting proteins form an AB complex composed of ADP-ribosyl transferase (A) and cell-binding (B) components that intoxicate cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and endosomal trafficking. Once inside the cytosol, the A components inhibit normal cell functions by mono-ADP-ribosylation of globular actin, which induces cytoskeletal disarray and death. Important aspects of each bacterium and binary enterotoxin will be highlighted in this review, with particular focus upon the disease process involving the biochemistry and modes of action for each toxin. PMID:25198129

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium mangenotii TR, Isolated from the Fecal Material of a Timber Rattlesnake

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Philip A.; Dowd, Scot E.; Andersen, Kylie; Anderson, Nichole; Brennan, Rachel; Brook, Nicole; Callaway, Tracie; Diamante, Kimberly; Duberstine, Annie; Fitch, Karla; Freiheit, Heidi; Godlewski, Chantel; Gorman, Kelly; Haubrich, Mark; Hernandez, Mercedes; Hirtreiter, Amber; Ivanoski, Beth; Jaminet, Xochitl; Kirkpatrick, Travis; Kratowicz, Jennifer; Latus, Casey; Leable, Tiegen; Lingafelt, Nicole; Lowe, DeAnna; Lowrance, Holly; Malsack, Latiffa; Mazurkiewicz, Julie; Merlos, Persida; Messley, Jamie; Montemurro, Dawn; Nakitare, Samora; Nelson, Christine; Nye, Amber; Pazera, Valerie; Pierangeli, Gina; Rellora, Ashley; Reyes, Angelica; Roberts, Jennifer; Robins, Shadara; Robinson, Jeshannah; Schultz, Alissa; Seifert, Sara; Sigler, Elona; Spangler, Julie; Swift, Ebony; TenCate, Rebecca; Thurber, Jessica; Vallee, Kristin; Wamboldt, Jennifer; Whitten, Shannon; Woods, De’andrea; Wright, Amanda; Yankunas, Darin

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium mangenotii strain TR, which was isolated from the fecal material of a timber rattlesnake. This bacterium is nonpathogenic but contains 68 genes involved in virulence, disease, and defense. PMID:24407632

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium mangenotii TR, Isolated from the Fecal Material of a Timber Rattlesnake.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Richard W; Cochran, Philip A; Dowd, Scot E; Andersen, Kylie; Anderson, Nichole; Brennan, Rachel; Brook, Nicole; Callaway, Tracie; Diamante, Kimberly; Duberstine, Annie; Fitch, Karla; Freiheit, Heidi; Godlewski, Chantel; Gorman, Kelly; Haubrich, Mark; Hernandez, Mercedes; Hirtreiter, Amber; Ivanoski, Beth; Jaminet, Xochitl; Kirkpatrick, Travis; Kratowicz, Jennifer; Latus, Casey; Leable, Tiegen; Lingafelt, Nicole; Lowe, Deanna; Lowrance, Holly; Malsack, Latiffa; Mazurkiewicz, Julie; Merlos, Persida; Messley, Jamie; Montemurro, Dawn; Nakitare, Samora; Nelson, Christine; Nye, Amber; Pazera, Valerie; Pierangeli, Gina; Rellora, Ashley; Reyes, Angelica; Roberts, Jennifer; Robins, Shadara; Robinson, Jeshannah; Schultz, Alissa; Seifert, Sara; Sigler, Elona; Spangler, Julie; Swift, Ebony; Tencate, Rebecca; Thurber, Jessica; Vallee, Kristin; Wamboldt, Jennifer; Whitten, Shannon; Woods, De'andrea; Wright, Amanda; Yankunas, Darin

    2014-01-09

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium mangenotii strain TR, which was isolated from the fecal material of a timber rattlesnake. This bacterium is nonpathogenic but contains 68 genes involved in virulence, disease, and defense.

  13. Guidance for the Efficacy Evaluation of Products with Sporicidal Claims Against Clostridium difficile (June 2014)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document provides an update to the Agency’s interim guidance for the efficacy evaluation of antimicrobial pesticides that are labeled for treating hard non-porous surfaces in healthcare settings contaminated with spores of Clostridium difficile.

  14. Metabolic control of Clostridium thermocellum via selective inhibition and compensatory product formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium that catabolizes recalcitrant plant fibers such as cellulose. Cellulose is depolymerized by an extracellular, membrane-associated enzyme system, and the sugars are then transported across the cell membrane for fermentation. C. thermoc...

  15. Discovery of External Modulators of the Fe-Fe Hydrogenase Enzyme in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    ARL-TR-7189 ● FEB 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Discovery of External Modulators of the Fe-Fe Hydrogenase...ARL-TR-7189 ● FEB 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Discovery of External Modulators of the Fe-Fe Hydrogenase Enzyme in Clostridium...October 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Discovery of External Modulators of the Fe-Fe Hydrogenase Enzyme in Clostridium acetobutylicum 5a. CONTRACT

  16. Clostridium perfringens in Long Island Sound sediments: An urban sedimentary record

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchholtz ten Brink, M. R.; Mecray, E.L.; Galvin, E.L.

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a conservative tracer and an indicator of sewage-derived pollution in the marine environment. The distribution of Clostridium perfringens spores was measured in sediments from Long Island Sound, USA, as part of a regional study designed to: (1) map the distribution of contaminated sediments; (2) determine transport and dispersal paths; (3) identify the locations of sediment and contaminant focusing; and (4) constrain predictive models. In 1996, sediment cores were collected at 58 stations, and surface sediments were collected at 219 locations throughout the Sound. Elevated concentrations of Clostridium perfringens in the sediments indicate that sewage pollution is present throughout Long Island Sound and has persisted for more than a century. Concentrations range from undetectable amounts to 15,000 spores/g dry sediment and are above background levels in the upper 30 cm at nearly all core locations. Sediment focusing strongly impacts the accumulation of Clostridium perfringens spores. Inventories in the cores range from 28 to 70,000 spores/cm2, and elevated concentrations can extend to depths of 50 cm. The steep gradients in Clostridium perfringens profiles in muddier cores contrast with concentrations that are generally constant with depth in sandier cores. Clostridium perfringens concentrations rarely decrease in the uppermost sediment, unlike those reported for metal contaminants. Concentrations in surface sediments are highest in the western end of the Sound, very low in the eastern region, and intermediate in the central part. This pattern reflects winnowing and focusing of Clostridium perfringens spores and fine-grained sediment by the hydrodynamic regime; however, the proximity of sewage sources to the westernmost Sound locally enhances the Clostridium perfringens signals.

  17. A cluster of three cases of botulism due to Clostridium baratii type F, France, August 2015.

    PubMed

    Tréhard, Hélène; Poujol, Isabelle; Mazuet, Christelle; Blanc, Quentin; Gillet, Yves; Rossignol, Frédérique; Popoff, Michel-Robert; Jourdan Da Silva, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    A cluster of three cases of food-borne botulism due to Clostridium baratii type F occurred in France in August 2015. All cases required respiratory assistance. Consumption of a Bolognese sauce at the same restaurant was the likely source of contamination. Clostridium baratii was isolated both from stool specimens from the three patients and ground meat used to prepare the sauce. This is the second episode reported in France caused by this rare pathogen.

  18. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction-based method for selectively detecting vegetative cells of toxigenic Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Senoh, Mitsutoshi; Kato, Haru; Murase, Tomoko; Hagiya, Hideharu; Tagashira, Yasuaki; Fukuda, Tadashi; Iwaki, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Shibayama, Keigo

    2014-11-01

    The laboratory diagnostic methods for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) include toxigenic culture, enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) to detect the toxins of C. difficile, and nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) to detect C. difficile toxin genes, but each of these methods has disadvantages; toxigenic cultures require a long time to produce results, EIAs have low sensitivity, and NAATs that target DNA cannot distinguish vegetative cells from spores and dead cells. Here we report a new detection method that uses reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to target the toxin-gene transcripts. This method was able to specifically detect the vegetative cells of toxigenic C. difficile in fecal samples in spike tests, with a minimum detection limit of 5 × 10(2) colony-forming units per 100 mg of stool specimen. The performance of this method was also demonstrated in a pilot scale evaluation using clinical fecal specimens, which showed that this method may be more sensitive than EIA and requires a shorter time than toxigenic culture. This method could potentially be applied in the clinical laboratory to detect C. difficile in fecal specimens. The ability of this method to discriminate the presence of vegetative cells from spores and dead cells could help to further the understanding of CDI.

  19. Production of caproic acid by cocultures of ruminal cellulolytic bacteria and Clostridium kluyveri grown on cellulose and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Kenealy, W R; Cao, Y; Weimer, P J

    1995-12-01

    Ruminal cellulolytic bacteria (Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 or Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1) were combined with the non-ruminal bacterium Clostridium kluyveri and grown together on cellulose and ethanol. Succinate and acetate produced by the cellulolytic organisms were converted to butyrate and caproate only when the culture medium was supplemented with ethanol. Ethanol (244 mM) and butyrate (30 mM at pH 6.8) did not inhibit cellulose digestion or product formation by S85 or FD-1; however caproate (30 mM at pH 6.8) was moderately inhibitory to FD-1. Succinate consumption and caproate production were sensitive to culture pH, with more caproic acid being produced when the culture was controlled at a pH near neutrality. In a representative experiment under conditions of controlled pH (at 6.8) 6.0 g cellulose l-1 and 4.4 g ethanol l-1 were converted to 2.6 g butyrate l-1 and 4.6 g caproate l-1. The results suggest that bacteria that efficiently produce low levels of ethanol and acetate or succinate from cellulose should be useful in cocultures for the production of caproic acid, a potentially useful industrial chemical and bio-fuel precursor.

  20. Myonecrosis by Clostridium septicum in a dog, diagnosed by a new multiplex-PCR.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Martinho, Anna Paula Vitirito; Lucas, Thays Mizuki; Teixeira, Ana Izabel Passarela; Paes, Antonio Carlos; Barros, Claudenice Batista; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2012-10-01

    Clostridial myositis is an acute, generally fatal toxemia that is considered to be rare in pet animals. The present report describes an unusual canine clostridial myositis that was diagnosed by a new multiplex-PCR (mPCR) designed for simultaneous identification of Clostridium sordellii, Clostridium septicum, Clostridium perfringens type A, Clostridium chauvoei, and Clostridium novyi type A. A ten-month-old male Rottweiler dog, that had displayed lameness and swelling of the left limb for 12 h, was admitted to a veterinary hospital. The animal was weak, dyspneic and hyperthermic, and a clinical examination indicated the presence of gas and edema in the limb. Despite emergency treatment, the animal died in only a few minutes. Samples of muscular tissue from the necrotic area were aseptically collected and plated onto defibrinated sheep blood agar (5%) in anaerobic conditions. Colonies suggestive of Clostridium spp. were submitted to testing by multiplex-PCR. Impression smears of the tissues, visualized with Gram and also with panoptic stains, revealed long rod-shaped organisms, and specimens also tested positive using the fluorescent antibody technique (FAT). The FAT and mPCR tests enabled a diagnosis of C. septicum myonecrosis in the dog.