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Sample records for cultured hippocampal neurons

  1. Culturing rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C

    2001-01-01

    Cultured neurons are widely used to investigate the mechanisms of neurotoxicity. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons may be grown as described under a wide variety of conditions to suit differing experimental procedures, including electrophysiology, morphological analysis of neurite development, and various biochemical and molecular analyses.

  2. Chronic CXCL10 Alters Neuronal Properties in Rat Hippocampal Culture

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jungsook; Nelson, Thomas E.; Bajova, Hilda; Gruol, Donna L.

    2009-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL10 is expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) during neuroinflammatory conditions. Neurons express CXCR3, the receptor for CXCL10, and neuronal function has been shown to be altered by acute exposure to CXCL10. Little is known about the effects of chronic exposure to CXCL10 on neuronal function. Results from our studies show that chronic exposure of cultured rat hippocampal neurons to CXCL10 results in altered levels of protein for GABA and glutamate receptors and altered synaptic network activity. These effects of CXCL10 may contribute to altered CNS function that occurs in some chronic neuroinflammatory conditions. PMID:19167097

  3. [Electrophysiological properties of inhibitory neurones in cultured dissociated hippocampal cells].

    PubMed

    Moskaliuk, A O; Kolodin, Iu O; Kravchenko, M O; Fedulova, S A; Veselovs'kyĭ, M S

    2004-01-01

    Electrophysiological properties of inhibitory (GABAergic) neurones were studied in dissociated hippocampal culture using simultaneous whole cell recordings from pairs of monosynaptically coupled neurons. Reliable identification of GABAergic neuron was performed by presence of monosynaptic inhibitory currents at postsynaptic cell in response to action potentials at stimulated cell. It was shown that GABAergic neurons in hippocampal culture are divided in two groups by their firing characteristics: first type generates action potentials at high frequency in response to injection of current (duration 0.5 s)--fast-spiking neurons (FS), cells from second type has no ability for high-frequency action potential generation--regular spiking neurons (RS). These two groups were distinguished by kinetic characteristics of action potentials, adaptation characteristics during continuous generation of action potentials and inhibitory effect making on postsynaptic cell. Application of potassium channel blocker 4-AP to somas of FS neurons in concentration, which selectively inhibits Kv3 potassium channels evoked reversible changes in kinetic of action potentials, frequency and adaptation characteristics during continuous generation of action potentials. It was concluded that there is hight level of expression of Kv3 potassium channels in the first group of neurons.

  4. Age-Dependent Glutamate Induction of Synaptic Plasticity in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivenshitz, Miriam; Segal, Menahem; Sapoznik, Stav

    2006-01-01

    A common denominator for the induction of morphological and functional plasticity in cultured hippocampal neurons involves the activation of excitatory synapses. We now demonstrate massive morphological plasticity in mature cultured hippocampal neurons caused by a brief exposure to glutamate. This plasticity involves a slow, 70%-80% increase in…

  5. Electrophysiological properties of cultured hippocampal neurons from Wistar Audiogenic Rats.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Fernando; Aguiar, José F; Oliveira, José A; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto; Varanda, Wamberto A

    2005-03-15

    The main goal of this work was to analyze the electrophysiological properties of cultured hippocampal neurons from a particular epileptic rat strain, called Wistar Audiogenic Rats (WAR). The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record both active and passive membrane responses in an attempt to detect alterations in their characteristics in relation to controls from Wistar rats. Neurons from WARs show a significant reduction in the magnitude of the inhibitory GABAergic currents ( approximately 45%), in spite of maintaining a normal level of the excitatory glutamatergic currents. In addition, the magnitude of potassium currents, measured at +80 mV, is reduced by about 30% in comparison to controls. Surprisingly, we also found important changes in the passive cellular properties in WAR neurons such as membrane potential (-50.0 mV in WARs and -63.1 mV in controls) and input resistance (647 MOmega in WARs and 408 MOmega in controls). The changes described here, could be the basis of the neurophysiological and behavioral alterations present in these hyperexcitable animals, contributing to a better understanding of epileptogenesis in this particular animal model.

  6. Early presynaptic changes during plasticity in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Ipe; Liu, Shumin; Rabinowitz, Daniel; Arancio, Ottavio

    2006-09-20

    Long-lasting increase in synaptic strength is thought to underlie learning. An explosion of data has characterized changes in postsynaptic (pstS) AMPA receptor cycling during potentiation. However, changes occurring within the presynaptic (prS) terminal remain largely unknown. We show that appearance of new release sites during potentiation between cultured hippocampal neurons is due to (a) conversion of nonrecycling sites to recycling sites, (b) formation of new releasing sites from areas containing diffuse staining for the prS marker Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein-2 and (c) budding of new recycling sites from previously existing recycling sites. In addition, potentiation is accompanied by a release probability increase in pre-existing boutons depending upon their individual probability. These prS changes precede and regulate fluorescence increase for pstS GFP-tagged-AMPA-receptor subunit GluR1. These results suggest that potentiation involves early changes in the prS terminal including remodeling and release probability increase of pre-existing synapses.

  7. Functional alterations in immature cultured rat hippocampal neurons after sustained exposure to static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Yoneda, Yukio

    2004-01-15

    In cultured rat hippocampal neurons, gradual increases were seen in the expression of microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2), neuronal nuclei (NeuN) and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), in proportion to increased duration, up to 9 days in vitro (DIV). Sustained exposure to static magnetic fields at 100 mT for up to 9 DIV significantly decreased expression of MAP-2 and NeuN in cultured rat hippocampal neurons without markedly affecting GAP-43 expression. Although a significant increase was seen in the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in hippocampal neuronal preparations cultured for 6-9 DIV under sustained magnetism, GFAP and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression were not affected markedly in cultured astrocytes prepared from rat hippocampus and neocortex, irrespective of cellular maturity. No significant alteration was seen in cell survivability of hippocampal neurons or astrocytes cultured under sustained magnetism. In hippocampal neurons cultured for 3 DIV under sustained magnetism, marked mRNA expression was seen for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits, NR1, NR2A-2C, NR2D, and NR3A. In addition, significant potentiation of the ability of NMDA to increase intracellular free Ca(2+) ions was observed. Differential display analysis revealed a significant decrease in mRNA expression for the transcription factor ALF1 in response to sustained magnetism for 3 DIV. These results suggest that sustained exposure to static magnetic fields may affect cellular functionality and maturity in immature cultured rat hippocampal neurons through modulation of expression of particular NMDA receptor subunits.

  8. A Simplified Method for Ultra-Low Density, Long-Term Primary Hippocampal Neuron Culture.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhongming; Piechowicz, Mariel; Qiu, Shenfeng

    2016-03-05

    Culturing primary hippocampal neurons in vitro facilitates mechanistic interrogation of many aspects of neuronal development. Dissociated embryonic hippocampal neurons can often grow successfully on glass coverslips at high density under serum-free conditions, but low density cultures typically require a supply of trophic factors by co-culturing them with a glia feeder layer, preparation of which can be time-consuming and laborious. In addition, the presence of glia may confound interpretation of results and preclude studies on neuron-specific mechanisms. Here, a simplified method is presented for ultra-low density (~2,000 neurons/cm2), long-term (>3 months) primary hippocampal neuron culture that is under serum free conditions and without glia cell support. Low density neurons are grown on poly-D-lysine coated coverslips, and flipped on high density neurons grown in a 24-well plate. Instead of using paraffin dots to create a space between the two neuronal layers, the experimenters can simply etch the plastic bottom of the well, on which the high density neurons reside, to create a microspace conducive to low density neuron growth. The co-culture can be easily maintained for >3 months without significant loss of low density neurons, thus facilitating the morphological and physiological study of these neurons. To illustrate this successful culture condition, data are provided to show profuse synapse formation in low density cells after prolonged culture. This co-culture system also facilitates the survival of sparse individual neurons grown in islands of poly-D-lysine substrates and thus the formation of autaptic connections.

  9. Antibiotic Supplements Affect Electrophysiological Properties and Excitability of Rat Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons in Primary Culture

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Farideh; Janahmadi, Mahyar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Antibiotic supplements are regularly used in neuronal culture media to control contamination; however, they can interfere with the neuronal excitability and affect electrophysiological properties. Therefore, in this study, the effect of penicillin/streptomycin supplements on the spontaneous electrophysiological activity of hippocampal pyramidal neurons was examined. Methods: Electrophysiological whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from rat hippocampal pyramidal cells in primary culture were performed to investigate the effects of antibiotic supplements on the intrinsic excitability of cultured cells. Results: The present findings indicated that presence of antibiotic supplements (penicillin/streptomycin) in the culture medium altered the intrinsic electrical activity of hippocampal pyramidal neurons in primary culture. These alterations included: 1) depolarized resting membrane potential; 2) a significant enhancement in the after-hyperpolarization amplitude; 3) a significant increase in the area under the action potential and in the decay and rise time of the action potential; 4) a significant broadening of action potential and 5) a significant reduction in the firing frequency. Conclusion: These findings suggest that addition of antibiotic supplements to culture media influences the neuronal excitability and alters the electrophysiological properties of cultured neurons, possibly through changing the ionic conductance underlying neuronal excitability. PMID:23567852

  10. Quantitative measurement of neuronal degeneration in organotypic hippocampal cultures after combined oxygen/glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Strasser, U; Fischer, G

    1995-04-01

    Organotypic hippocampal cultures were used to study cell degeneration during the recovery period after defined periods (30 and 60 min) of combined oxygen/glucose deprivation mimicking transient ischemic conditions. Staining with the fluorescent dye propidium iodide allowed detection of damaged cells. Fluorescence intensity was measured by an image analysis system and used to quantify cell damage at different time points during the recovery period (up to 22 h). At 30 min of oxygen/glucose deprivation cells in the CA1 area were relatively more sensitive compared to CA3 and dentate gyrus cells, with respect to the time course of degeneration and the percentage of affected cells. Expanding the oxygen/glucose deprivation period from 30 to 60 min drastically increased the percentage of cells dying in all hippocampal areas. Still, however, cells in CA1 degenerated faster compared to those in the CA3 area and dentate gyrus. A histological analysis of toluidine blue as well as MAP2-immunostained sections revealed that almost all neurons degenerated in all hippocampal areas following the 60-min deprivation period, whereas GFAP-stained astrocytes appeared to be unaffected. Therefore, neuronal degeneration could be quantified by taking the fluorescence intensity values 22 h after 60 min of oxygen/glucose deprivation as 100% neuronal damage. The possibility to quantify neuronal damage in organotypic cultures offers a useful tool for detailed studies on mechanisms of neuronal cell death in a cell culture system which is closer to in situ conditions than monolayer cell cultures.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells enhance GABAergic transmission in co-cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Mario; Lentini, Daniela; Gravati, Marta; Foudah, Dana; Biella, Gerardo; Costa, Barbara; Toselli, Mauro; Parenti, Marco; Coco, Silvia

    2012-04-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells endowed with neurotrophic potential combined with immunological properties, making them a promising therapeutic tool for neurodegenerative disorders. However, the mechanisms through which MSCs promote the neurological recovery following injury or inflammation are still largely unknown, although cell replacement and paracrine mechanisms have been hypothesized. In order to find out what are the mechanisms of the trophic action of MSCs, as compared to glial cells, on CNS neurons, we set up a co-culture system where rat MSCs (or cortical astrocytes) were used as a feeding layer for hippocampal neurons without any direct contact between the two cell types. The analysis of hippocampal synaptogenesis, synaptic vesicle recycling and electrical activity show that MSCs were capable to support morphological and functional neuronal differentiation. The proliferation of hippocampal glial cells induced by the release of bioactive substance(s) from MSCs was necessary for neuronal survival. Furthermore, MSCs selectively increased hippocampal GABAergic pre-synapses. This effect was paralleled with a higher expression of the potassium/chloride KCC2 co-transporter and increased frequency and amplitude of mIPSCs and sIPSCs. The enhancement of GABA synapses was impaired by the treatment with K252a, a Trk/neurotrophin receptor blocker, and by TrkB receptor bodies hence suggesting the involvement of BDNF as a mediator of such effects. The results obtained here indicate that MSC-secreted factors induce glial-dependent neuronal survival and trigger an augmented GABAergic transmission in hippocampal cultures, highlighting a new effect by which MSCs could promote CNS repair. Our results suggest that MSCs may be useful in those neurological disorders characterized by an impairment of excitation versus inhibition balance.

  12. Activator protein-1 complex expressed by magnetism in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Yoneda, Yukio

    2002-03-22

    Brief exposure for 15 min to static magnetic filed at 100 mT led to marked but transient potentiation of binding of a radiolabeled probe for activator protein-1 (AP1) in immature cultured rat hippocampal neurons with high expression of growth-associated protein-43. Immunoblotting and supershift analyses revealed that brief exposure to static magnetic field increased AP1 DNA binding through expression of Fra-2, c-Jun, and Jun-D proteins in immature cultured hippocampal neurons. Significantly less potent increases were seen in both intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration and AP1 binding following the addition of N-methyl-d-aspartate in these immature neurons exposed to magnetism 24 h before. These results suggest that brief exposure to weak static magnetic field may lead to desensitization of NMDA receptor channels through modulation of de novo synthesis of particular inducible target proteins at the level of gene transcription by the AP1 complex expressed in the nucleus of immature cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

  13. Investigations into neuropeptide Y-mediated presynaptic inhibition in cultured hippocampal neurones of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bleakman, D.; Harrison, N. L.; Colmers, W. F.; Miller, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. We have examined the effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) on synaptic transmission and [Ca2+]i signals in rat hippocampal neurones grown in culture. [Ca2+]i in individual neurones displayed frequent spontaneous fluctuations often resulting in an elevated plateau [Ca2+]i. These fluctuations were reduced by tetrodotoxin (1 microM) or combinations of the excitatory amino acid antagonists 6-cyano-7-dinitro-quinoxaline (CNQX) (10 microM) and aminophosphonovalerate (APV) (50 microM), indicating that they were the result of glutamatergic transmission occurring between hippocampal neurones. 2. [Ca2+]i fluctuations were also prevented by Ni2+ (200 microM), by the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen (10 microM) and by NPY (100 nM) or Y2 receptor-selective NPY agonists. Following treatment of cells with pertussis toxin, NPY produced only a brief decrease in [Ca2+]i fluctuations which rapidly recovered. 3. Perfusion of hippocampal neurones with 50 mM K+ produced a large rapid increase in [Ca2+]i. This increase was slightly reduced by NPY or by a combination of CNQX and APV. The effects of CNQX/APV occluded those of NPY. NPY had no effect on Ba2+ currents measured in hippocampal neurones under whole cell voltage-clamp even in the presence of intracellular GTP-gamma-S. On the other hand, Ba2+ currents were reduced by both Cd2+ (200 microM) and baclofen (10 microM). 4. Current clamp recordings from hippocampal neurones demonstrated the occurrence of spontaneous e.p.s.ps and action potential firing which were accompanied by increases in [Ca2+]i. This spontaneous activity and the accompanying [Ca2+]i signals were prevented by application of NPY (100 nM).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1358389

  14. Prolactin mediates neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons via its receptor.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Castañeda, E; Grattan, D R; Pasantes-Morales, H; Pérez-Domínguez, M; Cabrera-Reyes, E A; Morales, T; Cerbón, M

    2016-04-01

    Recently it has been reported that prolactin (PRL) exerts a neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity in hippocampus in the rat in vivo models. However, the exact mechanism by which PRL mediates this effect is not completely understood. The aim of our study was to assess whether prolactin exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in an in vitro model using primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons, and to determine whether this effect is mediated via the prolactin receptor (PRLR). Primary cell cultures of rat hippocampal neurons were used in all experiments, gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR, and protein expression was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Cell viability was assessed by using the MTT method. The results demonstrated that PRL treatment of neurons from primary cultures did not modify cell viability, but that it exerted a neuroprotective effect, with cells treated with PRL showing a significant increase of viability after glutamate (Glu)--induced excitotoxicity as compared with neurons treated with Glu alone. Cultured neurons expressed mRNA for both PRL and its receptor (PRLR), and both PRL and PRLR expression levels changed after the excitotoxic insult. Interestingly, the PRLR protein was detected as two main isoforms of 100 and 40 kDa as compared with that expressed in hypothalamic cells, which was present only as a 30 kDa variant. On the other hand, PRL was not detected in neuron cultures, either by western blot or by immunohistochemistry. Neuroprotection induced by PRL was significantly blocked by specific oligonucleotides against PRLR, thus suggesting that the PRL role is mediated by its receptor expressed in these neurons. The overall results indicated that PRL induces neuroprotection in neurons from primary cell cultures.

  15. Novel Nuclear Protein Complexes of Dystrophin 71 Isoforms in Rat Cultured Hippocampal GABAergic and Glutamatergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Cárdenas-Aguayo, María Del Carmen; Alemán, Víctor; Osorio, Beatriz; Chávez-González, Oscar; Rendon, Alvaro; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila; Meraz-Ríos, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The precise functional role of the dystrophin 71 in neurons is still elusive. Previously, we reported that dystrophin 71d and dystrophin 71f are present in nuclei from cultured neurons. In the present work, we performed a detailed analysis of the intranuclear distribution of dystrophin 71 isoforms (Dp71d and Dp71f), during the temporal course of 7-day postnatal rats hippocampal neurons culture for 1h, 2, 4, 10, 15 and 21 days in vitro (DIV). By immunofluorescence assays, we detected the highest level of nuclear expression of both dystrophin Dp71 isoforms at 10 DIV, during the temporal course of primary culture. Dp71d and Dp71f were detected mainly in bipolar GABAergic (≥60%) and multipolar Glutamatergic (≤40%) neurons, respectively. We also characterized the existence of two nuclear dystrophin-associated protein complexes (DAPC): dystrophin 71d or dystrophin 71f bound to β-dystroglycan, α1-, β-, α2-dystrobrevins, α-syntrophin, and syntrophin-associated protein nNOS (Dp71d-DAPC or Dp71f-DAPC, respectively), in the hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, both complexes were localized in interchromatin granule cluster structures (nuclear speckles) of neuronal nucleoskeleton preparations. The present study evinces that each Dp71's complexes differ slightly in dystrobrevins composition. The results demonstrated that Dp71d-DAPC was mainly localized in bipolar GABAergic and Dp71f-DAPC in multipolar Glutamatergic hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our results show that dystrophin 71d, dystrophin 71f and DAP integrate protein complexes, and both complexes were associated to nuclear speckles structures.

  16. Novel Nuclear Protein Complexes of Dystrophin 71 Isoforms in Rat Cultured Hippocampal GABAergic and Glutamatergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Alemán, Víctor; Osorio, Beatriz; Chávez-González, Oscar; Rendon, Alvaro; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila; Meraz-Ríos, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The precise functional role of the dystrophin 71 in neurons is still elusive. Previously, we reported that dystrophin 71d and dystrophin 71f are present in nuclei from cultured neurons. In the present work, we performed a detailed analysis of the intranuclear distribution of dystrophin 71 isoforms (Dp71d and Dp71f), during the temporal course of 7-day postnatal rats hippocampal neurons culture for 1h, 2, 4, 10, 15 and 21 days in vitro (DIV). By immunofluorescence assays, we detected the highest level of nuclear expression of both dystrophin Dp71 isoforms at 10 DIV, during the temporal course of primary culture. Dp71d and Dp71f were detected mainly in bipolar GABAergic (≥60%) and multipolar Glutamatergic (≤40%) neurons, respectively. We also characterized the existence of two nuclear dystrophin-associated protein complexes (DAPC): dystrophin 71d or dystrophin 71f bound to β-dystroglycan, α1-, β-, α2-dystrobrevins, α-syntrophin, and syntrophin-associated protein nNOS (Dp71d-DAPC or Dp71f-DAPC, respectively), in the hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, both complexes were localized in interchromatin granule cluster structures (nuclear speckles) of neuronal nucleoskeleton preparations. The present study evinces that each Dp71’s complexes differ slightly in dystrobrevins composition. The results demonstrated that Dp71d-DAPC was mainly localized in bipolar GABAergic and Dp71f-DAPC in multipolar Glutamatergic hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our results show that dystrophin 71d, dystrophin 71f and DAP integrate protein complexes, and both complexes were associated to nuclear speckles structures. PMID:26378780

  17. Transmembrane Agrin Regulates Dendritic Filopodia and Synapse Formation in Mature Hippocampal Neuron Cultures

    PubMed Central

    McCroskery, Seumas; Bailey, Allison; Lin, Lin; Daniels, Mathew P.

    2009-01-01

    The transmembrane isoform of agrin (Tm-agrin) is the predominant form expressed in the brain but its putative roles in brain development are not well understood. Recent reports have implicated Tm-agrin in the formation and stabilization of filopodia on neurites of immature central and peripheral neurons in culture. In maturing central neurons, dendritic filopodia are believed to facilitate synapse formation. In the present study we have investigated the role of Tm-agrin in regulation of dendritic filopodia and synaptogenesis in maturing cultures of hippocampal neurons. We did this by infecting the neurons with an RNAi lentivirus to deplete endogenous agrin during the developmental period when filopodia density on the dendritic arbor was high, and synapse formation was rapid. We found that dendritic filopodia density was markedly reduced, as was synapse density along dendrites. Moreover, synapse formation was more sharply reduced on dendrites of infected neurons contacted by uninfected axons than on uninfected dendrites contacted by infected axons. The results are consistent with a physiological role for Tm-agrin in the maturation of hippocampal neurons involving positive regulation of dendritic filopodia and consequent promotion of synaptogenesis, but also suggest a role for axonal agrin in synaptogenesis. PMID:19524020

  18. Effects of antidepressant drugs on synaptic protein levels and dendritic outgrowth in hippocampal neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mi Kyoung; Lee, Chan Hong; Cho, Hye Yeon; Lee, Jung Goo; Lee, Bong Ju; Kim, Ji Eun; Seol, Wongi; Kim, Young Hoon; Park, Sung Woo

    2014-04-01

    The alteration of hippocampal plasticity has been proposed to play a critical role in both the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. In this study, the ability of different classes of antidepressant drugs (escitalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, imipramine, tranylcypromine, and tianeptine) to mediate the expression of synaptic proteins and dendritic outgrowth in rat hippocampal neurons was investigated under toxic conditions induced by B27 deprivation, which causes hippocampal cell death. Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and synaptophysin (SYP) levels were evaluated using Western blot analyses. Additionally, dendritic outgrowth was examined to determine whether antidepressant drugs affect the dendritic morphology of hippocampal neurons in B27-deprived cultures. Escitalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, imipramine, tranylcypromine, and tianeptine significantly prevented B27 deprivation-induced decreases in levels of PSD-95, BDNF, and SYP. Moreover, the independent application of fluoxetine, paroxetine, and sertraline significantly increased levels of BDNF under normal conditions. All antidepressant drugs significantly increased the total outgrowth of hippocampal dendrites under B27 deprivation. Specific inhibitors of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), KN-93, protein kinase A (PKA), H-89, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002, significantly decreased the effects of antidepressant drugs on dendritic outgrowth, whereas this effect was observed only with tianeptine for the PI3K inhibitor. Taken together, these results suggest that certain antidepressant drugs can enhance synaptic protein levels and encourage dendritic outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, effects on dendritic outgrowth likely require CaMKII, PKA, or PI3K signaling pathways. The observed effects may be may be due to chronic treatment with antidepressant drugs.

  19. Chronic exposure to alcohol alters network activity and morphology of cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Korkotian, Eduard; Botalova, Alena; Odegova, Tatiana; Segal, Menahem

    2015-03-01

    The effects of chronic exposure to moderate concentrations of ethanol were studied in cultured hippocampal neurons. Network activity, assessed by imaging of [Ca(2+)]i variations, was markedly suppressed following 5 days of exposure to 0.25-1% ethanol. The reduced activity was sustained following extensive washout of ethanol, but the activity recovered by blockade of inhibition with bicuculline. This reduction of network activity was associated with a reduction in rates of mEPSCs, but not in a change in inhibitory synaptic activity. Chronic exposure to ethanol caused a significant reduction in the density of mature dendritic spines, without an effect on dendritic length or arborization. These results indicate that chronic exposure to ethanol causes a reduction in excitatory network drive in hippocampal neurons adding another dimension to the chronic effects of alcohol abuse.

  20. Effect of enteropeptidase on survival of cultured hippocampal neurons under conditions of glutamate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Makarova, A M; Gorbacheva, L R; Savinkova, I V; Mikhailova, A G; Rumsh, L D; Pinelis, V G; Strukova, S M

    2010-09-01

    The effects of full-size bovine enteropeptidase (BEK) and of human recombinant light chain enteropeptidase (L-HEP) on survival of cultured hippocampal neurons were studied under conditions of glutamate excitotoxicity. Low concentrations of L-HEP or BEK (0.1-1 and 0.1-0.5 nM, respectively) protected hippocampal neurons against the death caused by 100 µM glutamate. Using the PAR1 (proteinase-activated receptor) antagonist SCH 79797, we revealed a PAR1-dependent mechanism of neuroprotective action of low concentrations of enteropeptidase. The protective effect of full-size enteropeptidase was not observed at the concentrations of 1 and 10 nM; moreover, 10 nM of BEK caused death of 88.9% of the neurons, which significantly exceeded the cell death caused by glutamate (31.9%). Under conditions of glutamate cytotoxicity the survival of neurons was 26.8% higher even in the presence of 10 nM of L-HEP than in the presence of 10 nM BEK. Pretreatment of cells with 10 nM of either form of enteropeptidase abolished the protective effect of 10 nM thrombin under glutamate cytotoxicity. High concentrations of BEK and L-HEP caused the death of neurons mainly through necrosis.

  1. NRSF causes cAMP-sensitive suppression of sodium current in cultured hippocampal neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadeau, H.; Lester, H. A.

    2002-01-01

    The neuron restrictive silencer factor (NRSF/REST) has been shown to bind to the promoters of many neuron-specific genes and is able to suppress transcription of Na(+) channels in PC12 cells, although its functional effect in terminally differentiated neurons is unknown. We constructed lentiviral vectors to express NRSF as a bicistronic message with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and followed infected hippocampal neurons in culture over a period of 1-2 wk. NRSF-expressing neurons showed a time-dependent suppression of Na(+) channel function as measured by whole cell electrophysiology. Suppression was reversed or prevented by the addition of membrane-permeable cAMP analogues and enhanced by cAMP antagonists but not affected by increasing protein expression with a viral enhancer. Secondary effects, including altered sensitivity to glutamate and GABA and reduced outward K(+) currents, were duplicated by culturing GFP-infected control neurons in TTX. The striking similarity of the phenotypes makes NRSF potentially useful as a genetic "silencer" and also suggests avenues of further exploration that may elucidate the transcription factor's in vivo role in neuronal plasticity.

  2. Chronic exposure to GSM 1800-MHz microwaves reduces excitatory synaptic activity in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shujun; Ning, Wei; Xu, Zhengping; Zhou, Suya; Chiang, Huai; Luo, Jianhong

    2006-05-08

    The world wide proliferation of mobile phones raises the concern about the health effects of 1800-MHz microwaves on the brain. The present study assesses the effects of microwave exposure on the function of cultured hippocampal neurons of rats using whole cell patch-clamp analysis combined with immunocytochemistry. We showed that chronic exposure (15 min per day for 8 days) to Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) 1800-MHz microwaves at specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2.4 W/kg induced a selective decrease in the amplitude of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-soxazole propionic acid (AMPA) miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), whereas the frequency of AMPA mEPSCs and the amplitude of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) mEPSCs did not change. Furthermore, the GSM microwave treatment decreased the expression of postsynaptic density 95 (PSD95) in cultured neurons. Our results indicated that 2.4 W/kg GSM 1800-MHz microwaves may reduce excitatory synaptic activity and the number of excitatory synapses in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

  3. Agonist-Dependent Postsynaptic Effects of Opioids on Miniature Excitatory Postsynaptic Currents in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Dezhi; Grigoriants, Olga O.; Loh, Horace H.; Law, Ping-Yee

    2006-01-01

    Although chronic treatment with morphine is known to alter the function and morphology of excitatory synapses, the effects of other opioids on these synapses are not clear. Here we report distinct effects of several opioids (morphine, DAMGO and etorphine) on miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in cultured hippocampal neurons: (1) Chronic treatment with morphine for > 3 days decreased the amplitude, frequency, rise time and decay time of mEPSCs. In contrast, “internalizing” opioids such as etorphine and DAMGO increased the frequency of mEPSCs and had no significant effect on the amplitude and kinetics of mEPSCs. These results demonstrate that different opioids can have distinct effects on the function of excitatory synapses. (2) MOR-GFP is clustered in dendritic spines in most hippocampal neurons but is concentrated in axon-like processes in striatal and corticostriatal non-spiny neurons. It suggests that MORs might mediate pre- or post-synaptic effects depending upon cell types. (3) Neurons were cultured from MOR knock-out mice and were exogenously transfected with GFP-tagged MORs (MOR-GFP). Chronic treatment with morphine suppressed mEPSCs only in neurons that contained postsynaptic MOR-GFP, indicating thatopioids can modulate excitatory synaptic transmission postsynaptically. (4) Morphine acutely decreased mEPSC amplitude in neurons expressing exogenous MOR-GFP, but had no effect on neurons expressing GFP. It indicates that the low level of endogenous MORs could only allow slow opioid-induced plasticity of excitatory synapses under normal conditions. (5) A theoretical model suggests that morphine might affect the function of spines by decreasing the electrotonic distance from synaptic inputs to the soma. PMID:17122315

  4. Chronic homocysteine exposure causes changes in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Christina; Uebachs, Mischa; Beck, Heinz; Linnebank, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Homocystinuria is an inborn error of metabolism characterized by plasma homocysteine levels up to 500 μM, premature vascular events and mental retardation. Mild elevations of homocysteine plasma levels up to 25 μM, which are common in the general population, are associated with vascular disease, cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. Several mechanisms of homocysteine neurotoxicity have been investigated. However, information on putative effects of hyperhomocysteinemia on the electrophysiology of neurons is limited. To screen for such effects, we examined primary cultures of mouse hippocampal neurons with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Homocysteine was applied intracellularly (100 μM), or cell cultures were incubated with 100 μM homocysteine for 24 h. Membrane voltage was measured in current-clamp mode, and action potential firing was induced with short and prolonged current injections. Single action potentials induced by short current injections (5 ms) were not altered by acute application or incubation of homocysteine. When we elicited trains of action potentials with prolonged current injections (200 ms), a broadening of action potentials during repetitive firing was observed in control neurons. This spike broadening was unaltered by acute application of homocysteine. However, it was significantly diminished when incubation with homocysteine was extended to 24 h prior to recording. Furthermore, the number of action potentials elicited by low current injections was reduced after long-term incubation with homocysteine, but not by the acute application. After 24 h of homocysteine incubation, the input resistance was reduced which might have contributed to the observed alterations in membrane excitability. We conclude that homocysteine exposure causes changes in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of cultured hippocampal neurons as a mechanism of neurological symptoms of hyperhomocysteinemia.

  5. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  6. A neural extracellular matrix-based method for in vitro hippocampal neuron culture and dopaminergic differentiation of neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to recreate an optimal cellular microenvironment is critical to understand neuronal behavior and functionality in vitro. An organized neural extracellular matrix (nECM) promotes neural cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Here, we expanded previous observations on the ability of nECM to support in vitro neuronal differentiation, with the following goals: (i) to recreate complex neuronal networks of embryonic rat hippocampal cells, and (ii) to achieve improved levels of dopaminergic differentiation of subventricular zone (SVZ) neural progenitor cells. Methods Hippocampal cells from E18 rat embryos were seeded on PLL- and nECM-coated substrates. Neurosphere cultures were prepared from the SVZ of P4-P7 rat pups, and differentiation of neurospheres assayed on PLL- and nECM-coated substrates. Results When seeded on nECM-coated substrates, both hippocampal cells and SVZ progenitor cells showed neural expression patterns that were similar to their poly-L-lysine-seeded counterparts. However, nECM-based cultures of both hippocampal neurons and SVZ progenitor cells could be maintained for longer times as compared to poly-L-lysine-based cultures. As a result, nECM-based cultures gave rise to a more branched neurite arborization of hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, the prolonged differentiation time of SVZ progenitor cells in nECM allowed us to obtain a purer population of dopaminergic neurons. Conclusions We conclude that nECM-based coating is an efficient substrate to culture neural cells at different stages of differentiation. In addition, neural ECM-coated substrates increased neuronal survival and neuronal differentiation efficiency as compared to cationic polymers such as poly-L-lysine. PMID:23594371

  7. Developmental Expression of Kv Potassium Channels at the Axon Initial Segment of Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ponce, Diana; DeFelipe, Javier; Garrido, Juan José; Muñoz, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Axonal outgrowth and the formation of the axon initial segment (AIS) are early events in the acquisition of neuronal polarity. The AIS is characterized by a high concentration of voltage-dependent sodium and potassium channels. However, the specific ion channel subunits present and their precise localization in this axonal subdomain vary both during development and among the types of neurons, probably determining their firing characteristics in response to stimulation. Here, we characterize the developmental expression of different subfamilies of voltage-gated potassium channels in the AISs of cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, including subunits Kv1.2, Kv2.2 and Kv7.2. In contrast to the early appearance of voltage-gated sodium channels and the Kv7.2 subunit at the AIS, Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunits were tethered at the AIS only after 10 days in vitro. Interestingly, we observed different patterns of Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunit expression, with each confined to distinct neuronal populations. The accumulation of Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunits at the AIS was dependent on ankyrin G tethering, it was not affected by disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and it was resistant to detergent extraction, as described previously for other AIS proteins. This distribution of potassium channels in the AIS further emphasizes the heterogeneity of this structure in different neuronal populations, as proposed previously, and suggests corresponding differences in action potential regulation. PMID:23119056

  8. Dopamine-dependent effects on basal and glutamate stimulated network dynamics in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Chen, Xin; Dzakpasu, Rhonda; Conant, Katherine

    2017-02-01

    Oscillatory activity occurs in cortical and hippocampal networks with specific frequency ranges thought to be critical to working memory, attention, differentiation of neuronal precursors, and memory trace replay. Synchronized activity within relatively large neuronal populations is influenced by firing and bursting frequency within individual cells, and the latter is modulated by changes in intrinsic membrane excitability and synaptic transmission. Published work suggests that dopamine, a potent modulator of learning and memory, acts on dopamine receptor 1-like dopamine receptors to influence the phosphorylation and trafficking of glutamate receptor subunits, along with long-term potentiation of excitatory synaptic transmission in striatum and prefrontal cortex. Prior studies also suggest that dopamine can influence voltage gated ion channel function and membrane excitability in these regions. Fewer studies have examined dopamine's effect on related endpoints in hippocampus, or potential consequences in terms of network burst dynamics. In this study, we record action potential activity using a microelectrode array system to examine the ability of dopamine to modulate baseline and glutamate-stimulated bursting activity in an in vitro network of cultured murine hippocampal neurons. We show that dopamine stimulates a dopamine type-1 receptor-dependent increase in number of overall bursts within minutes of its application. Notably, however, at the concentration used herein, dopamine did not increase the overall synchrony of bursts between electrodes. Although the number of bursts normalizes by 40 min, bursting in response to a subsequent glutamate challenge is enhanced by dopamine pretreatment. Dopamine-dependent potentiation of glutamate-stimulated bursting was not observed when the two modulators were administered concurrently. In parallel, pretreatment of murine hippocampal cultures with dopamine stimulated lasting increases in the phosphorylation of the

  9. Neurogenic and neurotrophic effects of BDNF peptides in mouse hippocampal primary neuronal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria del Carmen; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    The level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family, is down regulated in Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), depression, stress, and anxiety; conversely the level of this neurotrophin is increased in autism spectrum disorders. Thus, modulating the level of BDNF can be a potential therapeutic approach for nervous system pathologies. In the present study, we designed five different tetra peptides (peptides B-1 to B-5) corresponding to different active regions of BDNF. These tetra peptides were found to be non-toxic, and they induced the expression of neuronal markers in mouse embryonic day 18 (E18) primary hippocampal neuronal cultures. Additionally, peptide B-5 induced the expression of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB, suggesting a positive feedback mechanism. The BDNF peptides induced only a moderate activation (phosphorylation at Tyr 706) of the TrkB receptor, which could be blocked by the Trk's inhibitor, K252a. Peptide B-3, when combined with BDNF, potentiated the survival effect of this neurotrophin on H(2)O(2)-treated E18 hippocampal cells. Peptides B-3 and B-5 were found to work as partial agonists and as partial antagonists competing with BDNF to activate the TrkB receptor in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that the described BDNF tetra peptides are neurotrophic, can modulate BDNF signaling in a partial agonist/antagonist way, and offer a novel therapeutic approach to neural pathologies where BDNF levels are dysregulated.

  10. Ethanol inhibits development of dendrites and synapses in rat hippocampal pyramidal neuron cultures.

    PubMed

    Yanni, P A; Lindsley, T A

    2000-04-14

    Evidence suggests that some neuropathologic manifestations of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) result from the disruption of neuromorphogenesis and synapse formation in the hippocampus. Prior research in this laboratory has shown that ethanol in the medium during the first 24 h in culture increases the number of minor processes (the precursors of axons and dendrites) and accelerates the rate at which axons are formed in low-density cultures of embryonic rat hippocampal neurons. The current study examined the effects of ethanol on the subsequent development of dendrites and synapses in these cultures. Quantitative morphometric analysis utilized double-immunofluorescent staining for MAP2 and synapsin I to visualize dendrites and synaptic specializations, respectively. Six days of ethanol (200, 400 or 600 mg/dl) in the medium, beginning at the time of plating, resulted in decreases in total dendritic length per cell, dendrite number per cell, length of individual dendrites and synapse number per innervated dendrite but had no effect on cell survival. The decrease in synapse number was correlated with dendrite length, suggesting that ethanol's effects on synapse number are secondary to its effects on dendritogenesis. Taken together with our previous findings, these results are the first to demonstrate that ethanol has differential effects on axonal and dendritic growth in a culture model of neurons that are vulnerable to ethanol-induced cytoarchitectural abnormalities during development in vivo.

  11. Modulation of neurite branching by protein phosphorylation in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Cabell, L; Kern, M

    1997-09-20

    The control of branching of axons and dendrites is poorly understood. It has been hypothesized that branching may be produced by changes in the cytoskeleton [F.J. Diez-Guerra, J. Avila, MAP2 phosphorylation parallels dendrite arborization in hippocampal neurones in culture, NeuroReport 4 (1993) 412-419; P. Friedrich, A. Aszodi, MAP2: a sensitive cross-linker and adjustable spacer in dendritic architecture, FEBS Lett. 295 (1991) 5-9]. The assembly and stability of microtubules, which are prominent cytoskeletal elements in both axons and dendrites, are regulated by microtubule-associated proteins, including tau (predominantly found in axons) and MAP2 (predominantly found in dendrites). The phosphorylation state of tau and MAP2 modulates their interactions with microtubules. In their low-phosphorylation states, tau and MAP2 bind to microtubules and increase microtubule assembly and/or stability. Increased phosphorylation decreases these effects. Diez-Guerra and Avila [F.J. Diez-Guerra, J. Avila, MAP2 phosphorylation parallels dendrite arborization in hippocampal neurones in culture, NeuroReport 4 (1993) 412-419] found that protein phosphorylation correlates with neurite branching in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, and hypothesized that increased protein phosphorylation stimulates neurite branching. To test this hypothesis, we cultured rat hippocampal neurons in the presence of specific modulators of serine-threonine protein kinases and phosphatases. Inhibitors of several protein kinases, which would be expected to decrease protein phosphorylation, reduced branching. KT5720, an inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, and KN62, an inhibitor of Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, inhibited branching of both axons and dendrites. Calphostin C and chelerythrine, inhibitors of protein kinase C, inhibited branching of axons but not dendrites. Treatments that would be expected to increase protein phosphorylation, including inhibitors of protein

  12. Axonal regeneration of cultured mouse hippocampal neurons studied by an optical nano-surgery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Difato, F.; Tsushima, H.; Pesce, M.; Guiggiani, A.; Benfenati, F.; Blau, A.; Basso, M.; Vassalli, M.; Chieregatti, E.

    2012-02-01

    During development, the axons of neurons in the mammalian central nervous system lose their ability to regenerate after injury. In order to study the regeneration process, we developed a system integrating an optical tweezers and a laser dissector to manipulate the sample. A sub-nanosecond pulsed UVA laser was used to inflict a partial damage to the axon of mouse hippocampal neurons at early days in vitro. Partial axonal transections were performed in a highly controlled and reproducible way without affecting the regeneration process. Force spectroscopy measurements, during and after the ablation of the axon, were performed by optical tweezers with a bead attached to the neuronal membrane. Thus, the release of tension in the neurite could be analyzed in order to quantify the inflicted damage. After dissection, we monitored the viscoelastic properties of the axonal membrane, the cytoskeleton reorganization, and the dynamics of the newly formed growth cones during regeneration. In order to follow cytoskeleton dynamics in a long time window by tracking a bead attached to the neuron, we developed a real-time control of the microscope stage position with sub-millisecond and nanometer resolution. Axonal regeneration was documented by long-term (24-48 hours) bright-field live imaging using an optical microscope equipped with a custom-built cell culture incubator.

  13. Stimulation of glutamate receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons causes Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial contraction

    PubMed Central

    Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Li, Viacheslav; Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2009-01-01

    Cultured hippocampal neurons expressing mitochondrially targeted enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (mito-eYFP) were used to quantitatively examine mitochondrial remodeling in response to excitotoxic glutamate. Mitochondrial morphology was evaluated using laser spinning-disk confocal microscopy followed by calibrated image processing and 3D image rendering. Glutamate triggered an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ and mitochondrial depolarization accompanied by Ca2+-dependent morphological transformation of neuronal mitochondria from “thread-like” to rounded structures. The quantitative analysis of the mitochondrial remodeling revealed that exposure to glutamate resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial volume and surface area concurrent with an increase in sphericity of the organelles. NIM811, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition, attenuated the glutamate-induced sustained increase in cytosolic Ca2+ and suppressed mitochondrial remodeling in the majority of affected neurons, but it did not rescue mitochondrial membrane potential. Shortening, fragmentation, and formation of circular mitochondria with decreased volume and surface area accompanied mitochondrial depolarization with FCCP. However, FCCP-induced morphological alterations appeared to be distinctly different from mitochondrial remodeling caused by glutamate. Moreover, FCCP prevented glutamate-induced mitochondrial remodeling suggesting an important role of Ca2+ influx into mitochondria in the morphological alterations. Consistent with this, in saponin-permeabilized neurons, Ca2+ caused mitochondrial remodeling which could be prevented by Ru360. PMID:19409612

  14. The effects of triethyl lead on the development of hippocampal neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, T; Shugarts, D; Cabell-Kluch, L; Wardle, K

    1995-02-01

    Triethyl lead is the major metabolite of tetraethyl lead, which is used in industrial processes and as an antiknock additive to gasoline. We tested the hypothesis that low levels of triethyl lead (0.1 nmol/L to 5 mumol/L) interfere with the normal development of cultured E18 rat hippocampal neurons, possibly through increases in intracellular free calcium ion concentration, [Ca2+]in. The study assessed survival and differentiation using morphometric analysis of individual neurons. We also looked at short-term (up to 3.75-h) changes in intracellular calcium using the calcium-sensitive dye fura-2. Survival of neurons was significantly reduced at 5 mumol/L, and overall production of neurites was reduced at > or = 2 mumol/L. The length of axons and the number of axons and dendrites were reduced at > or = 1 mumol/L. Neurite branching was inhibited at 10 nmol/L for dendrites and 100 nmol/L for axons. Increases in intracellular calcium were observed during a 3.75-h exposure of newly plated neurons to 5 mumol/L triethyl lead. These increases were prevented by BAPTA-AM; which clamps [Ca2+]in at about 100 nmol/L. Culturing neurons with BAPTA-AM and 5 mumol/L triethyl lead did not reverse the effects of triethyl lead, suggesting that elevation of [Ca2+]in is not responsible for decreases in survival and neurite production. Triethyl lead has been shown to disrupt cytoskeletal elements, particularly neurofilaments, at very low levels, suggesting a possible mechanism for its inhibition of neurite branching at nanomolar concentrations.

  15. Hippocampal neurons in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Heckers, S.; Konradi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The hippocampus is crucial for normal brain function, especially for the encoding and retrieval of multimodal sensory information. Neuropsychiatric disorders such as temporal lobe epilepsy, amnesia, and the dementias are associated with structural and functional abnormalities of specific hippocampal neurons. More recently we have also found evidence for a role of the hippocampus in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The most consistent finding is a subtle, yet significant volume difference in schizophrenia. Here we review the cellular and molecular basis of smaller hippocampal volume in schizophrenia. In contrast to neurodegenerative disorders, total hippocampal cell number is not markedly decreased in schizophrenia. However, the intriguing finding of a selective loss of hippocampal inter-neurons deserves further study. Two neurotransmitter receptors, the GABAA and AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors, appear to be abnormal, whereas changes of the NMDA glutamate receptor are less robust. The expression of several genes, including those related to the GABAergic system, neurodevelopment, and synaptic function, is decreased in schizophrenia. Taken together, recent studies of hippocampal cell number, protein expression, and gene regulation point towards an abnormality of hippocampal architecture in schizophrenia. PMID:12111476

  16. Inorganic lead may inhibit neurite development in cultured rat hippocampal neurons through hyperphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kern, M; Audesirk, G

    1995-09-01

    Inorganic lead inhibits neurite initiation in cultured rat hippocampal neurons at concentrations as low as 100 nM. Conflicting reports suggest that Pb2+ may stimulate or inhibit protein kinase C, adenylyl cyclase, phosphodiesterase, and calmodulin, or increase intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations. Therefore, Pb2+ may alter the activities of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase) or protein kinases C or A. We cultured rat hippocampal neurons in 100 nM PbCI2 alone or in combination with kinase or calmodulin inhibitors. Inhibiting protein kinase C with calphostin C exacerbated the inhibition of neurite initiation caused by PbCI2, but inhibiting protein kinase A with KT5720, CaM kinase with KN62, or calmodulin with calmidazolium completely reversed the effects of PbCI2. These results indicate that Pb2+ may inhibit neurite initiation by inappropriately stimulating protein phosphorylation by CaM kinase or cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), possibly by stimulating calmodulin. This hypothesis is supported by findings that other treatments that should increase protein phosphorylation (okadaic acid, a protein phosphatase inhibitor, and Sp-cAMPS, a PKA activator) also reduced neurite initiation. Whole-cell intracellular free Ca2+ ion concentrations were not significantly altered by 100 nM PbCI2 at 4, 12, 24, or 48 hr. Therefore, the hypothesized stimulatory effects of Pb2+ exposure on calmodulin, CaM kinase, or PKA are probably not caused by increases in whole-cell intracellular free Ca2+, but may be attributable either to intracellular Pb2+ or to localized increases in [Ca2+]in that are not reflected in whole-cell measurements.

  17. Bcl-xL induces Drp1-dependent synapse formation in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongmei; Chen, Yingbei; Jones, Adrienne F.; Sanger, Richard H.; Collis, Leon P.; Flannery, Richard; McNay, Ewan C.; Yu, Tingxi; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Bossy, Blaise; Bossy-Wetzel, Ella; Bennett, Michael V. L.; Pypaert, Marc; Hickman, John A.; Smith, Peter J. S.; Hardwick, J. Marie; Jonas, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    Maturation of neuronal synapses is thought to involve mitochondria. Bcl-xL protein inhibits mitochondria-mediated apoptosis but may have other functions in healthy adult neurons in which Bcl-xL is abundant. Here, we report that overexpression of Bcl-xL postsynaptically increases frequency and amplitude of spontaneous miniature synaptic currents in rat hippocampal neurons in culture. Bcl-xL, overexpressed either pre or postsynaptically, increases synapse number, the number and size of synaptic vesicle clusters, and mitochondrial localization to vesicle clusters and synapses, likely accounting for the changes in miniature synaptic currents. Conversely, knockdown of Bcl-xL or inhibiting it with ABT-737 decreases these morphological parameters. The mitochondrial fission protein, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), is a GTPase known to localize to synapses and affect synaptic function and structure. The effects of Bcl-xL appear mediated through Drp1 because overexpression of Drp1 increases synaptic markers, and overexpression of the dominant-negative dnDrp1-K38A decreases them. Furthermore, Bcl-xL coimmunoprecipitates with Drp1 in tissue lysates, and in a recombinant system, Bcl-xL protein stimulates GTPase activity of Drp1. These findings suggest that Bcl-xL positively regulates Drp1 to alter mitochondrial function in a manner that stimulates synapse formation. PMID:18250306

  18. Neurogenic and Neurotrophic Effects of BDNF Peptides in Mouse Hippocampal Primary Neuronal Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria del Carmen; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    The level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family, is down regulated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), depression, stress, and anxiety; conversely the level of this neurotrophin is increased in autism spectrum disorders. Thus, modulating the level of BDNF can be a potential therapeutic approach for nervous system pathologies. In the present study, we designed five different tetra peptides (peptides B-1 to B-5) corresponding to different active regions of BDNF. These tetra peptides were found to be non-toxic, and they induced the expression of neuronal markers in mouse embryonic day 18 (E18) primary hippocampal neuronal cultures. Additionally, peptide B-5 induced the expression of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB, suggesting a positive feedback mechanism. The BDNF peptides induced only a moderate activation (phosphorylation at Tyr 706) of the TrkB receptor, which could be blocked by the Trk’s inhibitor, K252a. Peptide B-3, when combined with BDNF, potentiated the survival effect of this neurotrophin on H2O2-treated E18 hippocampal cells. Peptides B-3 and B-5 were found to work as partial agonists and as partial antagonists competing with BDNF to activate the TrkB receptor in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that the described BDNF tetra peptides are neurotrophic, can modulate BDNF signaling in a partial agonist/antagonist way, and offer a novel therapeutic approach to neural pathologies where BDNF levels are dysregulated. PMID:23320097

  19. Post-tetanic potentiation of GABAergic IPSCs in cultured rat hippocampal neurones

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kimmo; Jensen, Morten Skovgaard; Lambert, John D C

    1999-01-01

    Dual whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to investigate post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) of GABAergic IPSCs evoked between pairs of cultured rat hippocampal neurones. Tetanization of the presynaptic neurone at frequencies (f) ranging from 5 to 100 Hz resulted in PTP of the IPSCs. Maximum PTP had a magnitude of 51.6 % just after the stimulus train, and lasted up to 1 min. PTP was shown to be dependent on the number of stimuli in the train, but independent of f at frequencies ≥ 5 Hz. Blocking postsynaptic GABAA receptors with bicuculline during the tetanus did not affect the expression of PTP, showing that it is a presynaptic phenomenon. PTP was strongly affected by changing [Ca2+]oduring the tetanus: PTP was reduced by lowering [Ca2+]o, and increased by high [Ca2+]o. PTP was still present after presynaptic injection of BAPTA or EGTA, or following perfusion of the membrane-permeable ester EGTA-tetraacetoxymethyl ester (EGTA AM, 50 μM). On the other hand, EGTA AM blocked spontaneous, asynchronous IPSCs (asIPSCs), which were often associated with tetanic stimulation. Tetanic stimulation in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), which promotes presynaptic Ca2+ influx, evoked sustained PTP of IPSCs in half of the neurones tested. The results indicate that PTP at inhibitory GABAergic synapses is related to the magnitude of presynaptic Ca2+ influx during the tetanic stimulation, leading to an enhanced probability of vesicle release in the post-tetanic period. The increase in [Ca2+]i occurs despite the presence of high-affinity exogenous and endogenous intracellular Ca2+ buffers. That PTP of IPSCs depends on the number, and not the frequency, of spikes in the GABAergic neurone is in accordance with a slow clearing of intracellular Ca2+ from the presynaptic terminals. PMID:10432340

  20. Effect of the PGD2-DP signaling pathway on primary cultured rat hippocampal neuron injury caused by aluminum overload

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Qunfang; Wei, Yuling; Yang, Yang; Ji, Chaonan; Hu, Xinyue; Mai, Shaoshan; Kuang, Shengnan; Tian, Xiaoyan; Luo, Ying; Liang, Guojuan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the agonists and antagonists of DP receptor were used to examine whether the PGD2-DP signaling pathway affects neuronal function. Primary cultured hippocampal neuron was prepared and treated with aluminum maltolate (100 μM) to establish the neuronal damage model. PGD2 and cAMP content was detected by ELISA. L-PGDS and DPs mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The aluminium-load neuron was treated with the DP1 agonist BW245C, the DP1 antagonist BWA868C, the DP2 agonist DK-PGD2, and the DP2 antagonist CAY10471, respectively. Neuronal pathomorphology was observed using H-E staining. The cell viability and the lactate dehydrogenase leakage rates of neurons were measured with MTT and LDH kit, respectively. Ca2+ level was detected by Fluo-3/AM. In the model group, the MTT values obviously decreased; LDH leakage rates and PGD2 content increased significantly; L-PGDS, DP1 mRNA and protein expressions increased, and DP2 level decreased. BW245C reduced the Ca2+ fluorescence intensity and protected the neurons. DK-PGD2 increased the intensity of Ca2+ fluorescence, while CAY10471 had the opposite effect. In conclusion, contrary to the effect of DP2, the PGD2-DP1 signaling pathway protects against the primary cultured rat hippocampal neuronal injury caused by aluminum overload. PMID:27089935

  1. Effect of the PGD2-DP signaling pathway on primary cultured rat hippocampal neuron injury caused by aluminum overload.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Qunfang; Wei, Yuling; Yang, Yang; Ji, Chaonan; Hu, Xinyue; Mai, Shaoshan; Kuang, Shengnan; Tian, Xiaoyan; Luo, Ying; Liang, Guojuan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-04-19

    In the present study, the agonists and antagonists of DP receptor were used to examine whether the PGD2-DP signaling pathway affects neuronal function. Primary cultured hippocampal neuron was prepared and treated with aluminum maltolate (100 μM) to establish the neuronal damage model. PGD2 and cAMP content was detected by ELISA. L-PGDS and DPs mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The aluminium-load neuron was treated with the DP1 agonist BW245C, the DP1 antagonist BWA868C, the DP2 agonist DK-PGD2, and the DP2 antagonist CAY10471, respectively. Neuronal pathomorphology was observed using H-E staining. The cell viability and the lactate dehydrogenase leakage rates of neurons were measured with MTT and LDH kit, respectively. Ca(2+) level was detected by Fluo-3/AM. In the model group, the MTT values obviously decreased; LDH leakage rates and PGD2 content increased significantly; L-PGDS, DP1 mRNA and protein expressions increased, and DP2 level decreased. BW245C reduced the Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity and protected the neurons. DK-PGD2 increased the intensity of Ca(2+) fluorescence, while CAY10471 had the opposite effect. In conclusion, contrary to the effect of DP2, the PGD2-DP1 signaling pathway protects against the primary cultured rat hippocampal neuronal injury caused by aluminum overload.

  2. Imbalance between excitation and inhibition among synaptic connections of CA3 pyramidal neurons in cultured hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martín, Alberto; Schweizer, Felix E

    2008-03-01

    A fundamental property of small neuronal ensembles is their ability to be selectively activated by distinct stimuli. One cellular mechanism by which neurons achieve this input selectivity is by modulating the temporal dynamics of excitation and inhibition. We explored the interplay of excitation and inhibition in synapses between pyramidal neurons of cornu ammonis field 3 of the hippocampal formation (CA3) in cultured rat hippocampal slices, where activation of a single excitatory cell can readily recruit local interneurons. Simultaneous whole-cell recordings from pairs of CA3 pyramidal neurons revealed that the strength of connections was neither uniform nor balanced. Rather, stimulation of presynaptic neurons elicited distinct combinations of excitatory postsynaptic current-inhibitory postsynaptic current (EPSC-IPSC) amplitudes in the postsynaptic neurons. EPSC-IPSC sequences with small EPSCs had large IPSCs and sequences that contained large EPSCs had small IPSCs. In addition to differences in the amplitudes of the responses, the kinetics of the EPSCs were also different, creating distinct temporal dynamics of excitation and inhibition. Weaker EPSCs had significantly slower kinetics and were efficiently occluded by IPSCs, thereby further limiting their contribution to depolarizing the postsynaptic membrane. Our data suggest that hippocampal pyramidal cells may use an imbalance between excitation and inhibition as a filter to enhance selectivity toward preferential excitatory connections.

  3. Nondestructive evaluation of progressive neuronal changes in organotypic rat hippocampal slice cultures using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengqiang; Song, Yu; Dryer, Alexandra; Cogguillo, William; Berdichevsky, Yevgeny; Zhou, Chao

    2014-10-01

    Three-dimensional tissue cultures have been used as effective models for studying different diseases, including epilepsy. High-throughput, nondestructive techniques are essential for rapid assessment of disease-related processes, such as progressive cell death. An ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence microscopy (UHR-OCM) system with [Formula: see text] axial resolution and [Formula: see text] transverse resolution was developed to evaluate seizure-induced neuronal injury in organotypic rat hippocampal cultures. The capability of UHR-OCM to visualize cells in neural tissue was confirmed by comparison of UHR-OCM images with confocal immunostained images of the same cultures. In order to evaluate the progression of neuronal injury, UHR-OCM images were obtained from cultures on 7, 14, 21, and 28 days in vitro (DIVs). In comparison to DIV 7, statistically significant reductions in three-dimensional cell count and culture thickness from UHR-OCM images were observed on subsequent time points. In cultures treated with kynurenic acid, significantly less reduction in cell count and culture thickness was observed compared to the control specimens. These results demonstrate the capability of UHR-OCM to perform rapid, label-free, and nondestructive evaluation of neuronal death in organotypic hippocampal cultures. UHR-OCM, in combination with three-dimensional tissue cultures, can potentially prove to be a promising tool for high-throughput screening of drugs targeting various disorders.

  4. Plasticity of GABAA Receptors after Ethanol Pre-Exposure in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi; Lindemeyer, A. Kerstin; Spigelman, Igor; Sieghart, Werner; Liang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol use causes many physiological changes in brain with behavioral sequelae. We previously observed (J Neurosci 27:12367–12377, 2007) plastic changes in hippocampal slice recordings paralleling behavioral changes in rats treated with a single intoxicating dose of ethanol (EtOH). Here, we were able to reproduce in primary cultured hippocampal neurons many of the effects of in vivo EtOH exposure on GABAA receptors (GABAARs). Cells grown 11 to 15 days in vitro demonstrated GABAAR δ subunit expression and sensitivity to enhancement by short-term exposure to EtOH (60 mM) of GABAAR-mediated tonic current (Itonic) using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. EtOH gave virtually no enhancement of mIPSCs. Cells pre-exposed to EtOH (60 mM) for 30 min showed, 1 h after EtOH withdrawal, a 50% decrease in basal Itonic magnitude and tolerance to short-term EtOH enhancement of Itonic, followed by reduced basal mIPSC area at 4 h. At 24 h, we saw considerable recovery in mIPSC area and significant potentiation by short-term EtOH; in addition, GABAAR currents exhibited reduced enhancement by benzodiazepines. These changes paralleled significant decreases in cell-surface expression of normally extrasynaptic δ and α4 GABAAR subunits as early as 20 min after EtOH exposure and reduced α5-containing GABAARs at 1 h, followed by a larger reduction of normally synaptic α1 subunit at 4 h, and then by increases in α4γ2-containing cell-surface receptors by 24 h. Measuring internalization of biotinylated GABAARs, we showed for the first time that the EtOH-induced loss of Itonic and cell-surface δ/α4 20 min after withdrawal results from increased receptor endocytosis rather than decreased exocytosis. PMID:21163967

  5. Differential modulation of GABAA and NMDA receptors by α7-nicotinic receptor desensitization in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lei; Cui, Wen-yu; Chen, Ru-zhu; Wang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To explore the modulatory effect of desensitized α7-containing nicotinic receptors (α7-nAChRs) on excitatory and inhibitory amino acid receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons and to identify the mechanism underlying this effect. Methods: Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed on cultured rat hippocampal neurons to measure α7-nAChR currents and to determine the role of desensitized α7-nAChRs on brain amino acid receptor activity. Results: Pulse and perfusion applications of the α7-nAChR agonist choline were applied to induce different types of α7-nAChR desensitization in cultured hippocampal neurons. After a brief choline pulse, α7-nAChR was desensitized as a result of receptor activation, which reduced the response of the A type γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor to its agonist, muscimol, and enhanced the response of the NMDA receptor to its agonist NMDA. By contrast, the responses of glycine or AMPA receptors to their agonists, glycine or AMPA, respectively, were not affected. Pretreatment with the α7-nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA, 10 nmol/L) blocked the choline-induced negative modulation of the GABAA receptor and the positive modulation of the NMDA receptor. The regulation of the GABAA and NMDA receptors was confirmed using another type of α7-nAChR desensitization, which was produced by a low concentration of choline perfusion. The negative modulation of the GABAA receptor was characterized by choline-duration dependency and intracellular calcium dependency, but the positive modulation of the NMDA receptor was not associated with cytoplasmic calcium. Conclusion: Brain GABAA and NMDA receptors are modulated negatively and positively, respectively, by desensitized α7-nAChR as a result of choline pretreatment in cultured hippocampal neurons. PMID:26806304

  6. PYRETHROID MODULATION OF SPONTANEOUS NEURONAL EXCITABILITY AND NEUROTRANSMISSION IN HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONS IN CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides have potent actions on voltage-gated sodium channels, inhibiting inactivation and increasing channel open times. These are thought to underlie, at least in part, the clinical symptoms of pyrethroid intoxication. However, disruption of neuronal activity at ...

  7. Fractal analysis of a voltage-dependent potassium channel from cultured mouse hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Liebovitch, L S; Sullivan, J M

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of ion channels have been widely modeled as a Markov process. In these models it is assumed that the channel protein has a small number of discrete conformational states and the kinetic rate constants connecting these states are constant. In the alternative fractal model the spontaneous fluctuations of the channel protein at many different time scales are represented by a kinetic rate constant k = At1-D, where A is the kinetic setpoint and D the fractal dimension. Single-channel currents were recorded at 146 mM external K+ from an inwardly rectifying, 120 pS, K+ selective, voltage-sensitive channel in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. The kinetics of these channels were found to be statistically self-similar at different time scales as predicted by the fractal model. The fractal dimensions were approximately 2 for the closed times and approximately 1 for the open times and did not depend on voltage. For both the open and closed times the logarithm of the kinetic setpoint was found to be proportional to the applied voltage, which indicates that the gating of this channel involves the net inward movement of approximately one negative charge when this channel opens. Thus, the open and closed times and the voltage dependence of the gating of this channel are well described by the fractal model. PMID:2447974

  8. Reduced Hyperpolarization-Activated Current Contributes to Enhanced Intrinsic Excitability in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons from PrP−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Stemkowski, Patrick L.; Gandini, Maria A.; Black, Stefanie A.; Zhang, Zizhen; Souza, Ivana A.; Chen, Lina; Zamponi, Gerald W.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic ablation of cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been linked to increased neuronal excitability and synaptic activity in the hippocampus. We have previously shown that synaptic activity in hippocampi of PrP-null mice is increased due to enhanced N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function. Here, we focused on the effect of PRNP gene knock-out (KO) on intrinsic neuronal excitability, and in particular, the underlying ionic mechanism in hippocampal neurons cultured from P0 mouse pups. We found that the absence of PrPC profoundly affected the firing properties of cultured hippocampal neurons in the presence of synaptic blockers. The membrane impedance was greater in PrP-null neurons, and this difference was abolished by the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker ZD7288 (100 μM). HCN channel activity appeared to be functionally regulated by PrPC. The amplitude of voltage sag, a characteristic of activating HCN channel current (Ih), was decreased in null mice. Moreover, Ih peak current was reduced, along with a hyperpolarizing shift in activation gating and slower kinetics. However, neither HCN1 nor HCN2 formed a biochemical complex with PrPC. These results suggest that the absence of PrP downregulates the activity of HCN channels through activation of a cell signaling pathway rather than through direct interactions. This in turn contributes to an increase in membrane impedance to potentiate neuronal excitability. PMID:27047338

  9. PCB 136 Atropselectively Alters Morphometric and Functional Parameters of Neuronal Connectivity in Cultured Rat Hippocampal Neurons via Ryanodine Receptor-Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongren; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Ghogha, Atefeh; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Bose, Diptiman D.; Pessah, Isaac N.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Lein, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners with multiple ortho chlorine substitutions sensitize ryanodine receptors (RyRs), and this activity promotes Ca2+-dependent dendritic growth in cultured neurons. Many ortho-substituted congeners display axial chirality, and we previously reported that the chiral congener PCB 136 (2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-hexachlorobiphenyl) atropselectively sensitizes RyRs. Here, we test the hypothesis that PCB 136 atropisomers differentially alter dendritic growth and other parameters of neuronal connectivity influenced by RyR activity. (−)-PCB 136, which potently sensitizes RyRs, enhances dendritic growth in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, whereas (+)-PCB 136, which lacks RyR activity, has no effect on dendritic growth. The dendrite-promoting activity of (−)-PCB 136 is observed at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100nM and is blocked by pharmacologic RyR antagonism. Neither atropisomer alters axonal growth or cell viability. Quantification of PCB 136 atropisomers in hippocampal cultures indicates that atropselective effects on dendritic growth are not due to differential partitioning of atropisomers into cultured cells. Imaging of hippocampal neurons loaded with Ca2+-sensitive dye demonstrates that (−)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations. Similarly, (−)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the activity of hippocampal neurons plated on microelectrode arrays. These data support the hypothesis that atropselective effects on RyR activity translate into atropselective effects of PCB 136 atropisomers on neuronal connectivity, and suggest that the variable atropisomeric enrichment of chiral PCBs observed in the human population may be a significant determinant of individual susceptibility for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes following PCB exposure. PMID:24385416

  10. PCB 136 atropselectively alters morphometric and functional parameters of neuronal connectivity in cultured rat hippocampal neurons via ryanodine receptor-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongren; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Ghogha, Atefeh; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Bose, Diptiman D; Pessah, Isaac N; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Lein, Pamela J

    2014-04-01

    We recently demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners with multiple ortho chlorine substitutions sensitize ryanodine receptors (RyRs), and this activity promotes Ca²⁺-dependent dendritic growth in cultured neurons. Many ortho-substituted congeners display axial chirality, and we previously reported that the chiral congener PCB 136 (2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl) atropselectively sensitizes RyRs. Here, we test the hypothesis that PCB 136 atropisomers differentially alter dendritic growth and other parameters of neuronal connectivity influenced by RyR activity. (-)-PCB 136, which potently sensitizes RyRs, enhances dendritic growth in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, whereas (+)-PCB 136, which lacks RyR activity, has no effect on dendritic growth. The dendrite-promoting activity of (-)-PCB 136 is observed at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100 nM and is blocked by pharmacologic RyR antagonism. Neither atropisomer alters axonal growth or cell viability. Quantification of PCB 136 atropisomers in hippocampal cultures indicates that atropselective effects on dendritic growth are not due to differential partitioning of atropisomers into cultured cells. Imaging of hippocampal neurons loaded with Ca²⁺-sensitive dye demonstrates that (-)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the frequency of spontaneous Ca²⁺ oscillations. Similarly, (-)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the activity of hippocampal neurons plated on microelectrode arrays. These data support the hypothesis that atropselective effects on RyR activity translate into atropselective effects of PCB 136 atropisomers on neuronal connectivity, and suggest that the variable atropisomeric enrichment of chiral PCBs observed in the human population may be a significant determinant of individual susceptibility for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes following PCB exposure.

  11. Pregabalin reduces the release of synaptic vesicles from cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; Taylor, Charles P; Smith, Stephen J

    2006-08-01

    Pregabalin [S-[+]-3-isobutylGABA or (S)-3-(aminomethyl)-5-methylhexanoic acid, Lyrica] is an anticonvulsant and analgesic medication that is both structurally and pharmacologically related to gabapentin (Neurontin; Pfizer Inc., New York, NY). Previous studies have shown that pregabalin reduces the release of neurotransmitters in several in vitro preparations, although the molecular details of these effects are less clear. The present study was performed using living cultured rat hippocampal neurons with the synaptic vesicle fluorescent dye probe FM4-64 to determine details of the action of pregabalin to reduce neurotransmitter release. Our results indicate that pregabalin treatment, at concentrations that are therapeutically relevant, slightly but significantly reduces the emptying of neurotransmitter vesicles from presynaptic sites in living neurons. Dye release is reduced in both glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-immunoreactive and GAD-negative (presumed glutamatergic) synaptic terminals. Furthermore, both calcium-dependent release and hyperosmotic (calcium-independent) dye release are reduced by pregabalin. The effects of pregabalin on dye release are masked in the presence of l-isoleucine, consistent with the fact that both of these compounds have a high binding affinity to the calcium channel alpha(2)-delta protein. The effect of pregabalin is not apparent in the presence of an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist [D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid], suggesting that pregabalin action depends on NMDA receptor activation. Finally, the action of pregabalin on dye release is most apparent before and early during a train of electrical stimuli when vesicle release preferentially involves the readily releasable pool.

  12. Cannabinoids inhibit network-driven synapse loss between hippocampal neurons in culture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Jung; Waataja, Jonathan J.; Thayer, Stanley A.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic pruning and loss of synaptic contacts are early events in many neurodegenerative diseases. These effects are dynamic and appear to differ mechanistically from the cell death process. Cannabinoids modulate synaptic activity and afford protection in some neurotoxicity models. We investigated the effects of cannabinoids on activity-induced changes in the number of synapses between rat hippocampal neurons in culture. Morphology and synapses were visualized by confocal imaging of neurons expressing DsRed2 and postsynaptic density protein 95 fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (PSD95-GFP). Reducing the extracellular Mg2+ concentration to 0.1 mM for 4 hr induced intense synaptic activity that decreased the number of PSD95-GFP puncta by 45 ± 13 %. Synapse loss was an early event, required activation of NMDA receptors and was mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The cannabinoid receptor full agonist (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-morpholinyl)methyl] pyrrolo-[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl](1-napthalenyl)methanone monomethanesulfonate (WIN55,212-2; EC50=2.5±0.5 nM) and the partial agonist Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; EC50=9±3 nM) inhibited PSD loss in a manner reversed by the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant. The protection was mimicked by inhibition of presynaptic Ca2+ channels and WIN55,212-2 did not prevent PSD loss elicited by direct application of glutamate, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism. Prolonged exposure to WIN55,212-2, but not THC, desensitized the protective effect. Treating cells that had undergone PSD loss with WIN55,212-2 reversed the loss and enabled recovery of a full compliment of synapses. The modulation of synaptic number by acute and prolonged exposure to cannabinoids may account for some of the effects of these drugs on the plasticity, survival and function of neural networks. PMID:18310474

  13. Brain ischemia downregulates the neuroprotective GDNF-Ret signaling by a calpain-dependent mechanism in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Curcio, M; Salazar, I L; Inácio, A R; Duarte, E P; Canzoniero, L M T; Duarte, C B

    2015-01-01

    The glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has an important role in neuronal survival through binding to the GFRα1 (GDNF family receptor alpha-1) receptor and activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Transient brain ischemia alters the expression of the GDNF signaling machinery but whether the GDNF receptor proteins are also affected, and the functional consequences, have not been investigated. We found that excitotoxic stimulation of cultured hippocampal neurons leads to a calpain-dependent downregulation of the long isoform of Ret (Ret51), but no changes were observed for Ret9 or GFRα1 under the same conditions. Cleavage of Ret51 by calpains was selectively mediated by activation of the extrasynaptic pool of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and leads to the formation of a stable cleavage product. Calpain-mediated cleavage of Ret51 was also observed in hippocampal neurons subjected to transient oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), a model of global brain ischemia, as well as in the ischemic region in the cerebral cortex of mice exposed to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. Although the reduction of Ret51 protein levels decreased the total GDNF-induced receptor activity (as determined by assessing total phospho-Ret51 protein levels) and their downstream signaling activity, the remaining receptors still showed an increase in phosphorylation after incubation of hippocampal neurons with GDNF. Furthermore, GDNF protected hippocampal neurons when present before, during or after OGD, and the effects under the latter conditions were more significant in neurons transfected with human Ret51. These results indicate that the loss of Ret51 in brain ischemia partially impairs the neuroprotective effects of GDNF. PMID:25675305

  14. DIDS prevents ischemic membrane degradation in cultured hippocampal neurons by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase release.

    PubMed

    Pamenter, Matthew E; Ryu, Julie; Hua, Serena T; Perkins, Guy A; Mendiola, Vincent L; Gu, Xiang Q; Ellisman, Mark H; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2012-01-01

    During stroke, cells in the infarct core exhibit rapid failure of their permeability barriers, which releases ions and inflammatory molecules that are deleterious to nearby tissue (the penumbra). Plasma membrane degradation is key to penumbral spread and is mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which are released via vesicular exocytosis into the extracellular fluid in response to stress. DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid) preserves membrane integrity in neurons challenged with an in vitro ischemic penumbral mimic (ischemic solution: IS) and we asked whether this action was mediated via inhibition of MMP activity. In cultured murine hippocampal neurons challenged with IS, intracellular proMMP-2 and -9 expression increased 4-10 fold and extracellular latent and active MMP isoform expression increased 2-22 fold. MMP-mediated extracellular gelatinolytic activity increased ∼20-50 fold, causing detachment of 32.1±4.5% of cells from the matrix and extensive plasma membrane degradation (>60% of cells took up vital dyes and >60% of plasma membranes were fragmented or blebbed). DIDS abolished cellular detachment and membrane degradation in neurons and the pathology-induced extracellular expression of latent and active MMPs. DIDS similarly inhibited extracellular MMP expression and cellular detachment induced by the pro-apoptotic agent staurosporine or the general proteinase agonist 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate (APMA). Conversely, DIDS-treatment did not impair stress-induced intracellular proMMP production, nor the intracellular cleavage of proMMP-2 to the active form, suggesting DIDS interferes with the vesicular extrusion of MMPs rather than directly inhibiting proteinase expression or activation. In support of this hypothesis, an antagonist of the V-type vesicular ATPase also inhibited extracellular MMP expression to a similar degree as DIDS. In addition, in a proteinase-independent model of vesicular exocytosis, DIDS prevented stimulus

  15. Effects of Blast Overpressure on Neurons and Glial Cells in Rat Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Anna P.; Shah, Alok S.; Aperi, Brandy V.; Budde, Matthew D.; Pintar, Frank A.; Tarima, Sergey; Kurpad, Shekar N.; Stemper, Brian D.; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Due to recent involvement in military conflicts, and an increase in the use of explosives, there has been an escalation in the incidence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) among US military personnel. Having a better understanding of the cellular and molecular cascade of events in bTBI is prerequisite for the development of an effective therapy that currently is unavailable. The present study utilized organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) exposed to blast overpressures of 150 kPa (low) and 280 kPa (high) as an in vitro bTBI model. Using this model, we further characterized the cellular effects of the blast injury. Blast-evoked cell death was visualized by a propidium iodide (PI) uptake assay as early as 2 h post-injury. Quantification of PI staining in the cornu Ammonis 1 and 3 (CA1 and CA3) and the dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus at 2, 24, 48, and 72 h following blast exposure revealed significant time dependent effects. OHCs exposed to 150 kPa demonstrated a slow increase in cell death plateauing between 24 and 48 h, while OHCs from the high-blast group exhibited a rapid increase in cell death already at 2 h, peaking at ~24 h post-injury. Measurements of lactate dehydrogenase release into the culture medium also revealed a significant increase in cell lysis in both low- and high-blast groups compared to sham controls. OHCs were fixed at 72 h post-injury and immunostained for markers against neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. Labeling OHCs with PI, neuronal, and glial markers revealed that the blast-evoked extensive neuronal death and to a lesser extent loss of glial cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated activation of astrocytes and microglial cells in low- and high-blasted OHCs, which reached a statistically significant difference in the high-blast group. These data confirmed that our in vitro bTBI model is a useful tool for studying cellular and molecular changes after blast exposure. PMID:25729377

  16. Effects of blast overpressure on neurons and glial cells in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anna P; Shah, Alok S; Aperi, Brandy V; Budde, Matthew D; Pintar, Frank A; Tarima, Sergey; Kurpad, Shekar N; Stemper, Brian D; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Due to recent involvement in military conflicts, and an increase in the use of explosives, there has been an escalation in the incidence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) among US military personnel. Having a better understanding of the cellular and molecular cascade of events in bTBI is prerequisite for the development of an effective therapy that currently is unavailable. The present study utilized organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) exposed to blast overpressures of 150 kPa (low) and 280 kPa (high) as an in vitro bTBI model. Using this model, we further characterized the cellular effects of the blast injury. Blast-evoked cell death was visualized by a propidium iodide (PI) uptake assay as early as 2 h post-injury. Quantification of PI staining in the cornu Ammonis 1 and 3 (CA1 and CA3) and the dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus at 2, 24, 48, and 72 h following blast exposure revealed significant time dependent effects. OHCs exposed to 150 kPa demonstrated a slow increase in cell death plateauing between 24 and 48 h, while OHCs from the high-blast group exhibited a rapid increase in cell death already at 2 h, peaking at ~24 h post-injury. Measurements of lactate dehydrogenase release into the culture medium also revealed a significant increase in cell lysis in both low- and high-blast groups compared to sham controls. OHCs were fixed at 72 h post-injury and immunostained for markers against neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. Labeling OHCs with PI, neuronal, and glial markers revealed that the blast-evoked extensive neuronal death and to a lesser extent loss of glial cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated activation of astrocytes and microglial cells in low- and high-blasted OHCs, which reached a statistically significant difference in the high-blast group. These data confirmed that our in vitro bTBI model is a useful tool for studying cellular and molecular changes after blast exposure.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of lotus seedpod procyanidins on extremely low frequency electromagnetic field-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chunchun; Luo, Xiaoping; Duan, Yuqing; Duan, Wenyi; Zhang, Haihui; He, Yuanqing; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated the protective effects of lotus seedpod procyanidins (LSPCs) on extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF)-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons and the underlying molecular mechanism. The results of MTT, morphological observation, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) assays showed that compared with control, incubating neurons under ELF-EMF exposure significantly decreased cell viability and increased the number of apoptotic cells, whereas LSPCs evidently protected the hippocampal neurons against ELF-EMF-induced cell damage. Moreover, a certain concentration of LSPCs inhibited the elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca(2+) level, as well as prevented the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by ELF-EMF exposure. In addition, supplementation with LSPCs could alleviate DNA damage, block cell cycle arrest at S phase, and inhibit apoptosis and necrosis of hippocampal neurons under ELF-EMF exposure. Further study demonstrated that LSPCs up-regulated the activations of Bcl-2, Bcl-xl proteins and suppressed the expressions of Bad, Bax proteins caused by ELF-EMF exposure. In conclusion, these findings revealed that LSPCs protected against ELF-EMF-induced neurotoxicity through inhibiting oxidative stress and mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

  18. Serotonin (5-HT) regulates neurite outgrowth through 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Paulina S; Neira, David; Muñoz, Mauricio; Lavandero, Sergio; Fiedler, Jenny L

    2014-08-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) production and expression of 5-HT receptors (5-HTRs) occur early during prenatal development. Recent evidence suggests that, in addition to its classical role as a neurotransmitter, 5-HT regulates neuronal connectivity during mammalian development by modulating cell migration and neuronal cytoarchitecture. Given the variety of 5-HTRs, researchers have had difficulty clarifying the specific role of each receptor subtype in brain development. Signalling mediated by the G-protein-coupled 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R, however, has been associated with neuronal plasticity. Thus, we hypothesized that 5-HT promotes neurite outgrowth through 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R. The involvement of 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R in the morphology of rat hippocampal neurons was evaluated by treating primary cultures at 2 days in vitro with 5-HT and specific antagonists for 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R (WAY-100635 and SB269970, respectively). The stimulation of hippocampal neurons with 100 nM 5-HT for 24 hr produced no effect on either the number or the length of primary neurites. Nonetheless, after 5HT7 R was blocked, the addition of 5-HT increased the number of primary neurites, suggesting that 5HT7 R could inhibit neuritogenesis. In contrast, 5-HT induced secondary neurite outgrowth, an effect inhibited by 1 μM WAY-100635 or SB269970. These results suggest that both serotonergic receptors participate in secondary neurite outgrowth. We conclude that 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R regulate neuronal morphology in primary hippocampal cultures by promoting secondary neurite outgrowth.

  19. Glucose deprivation activates diversity of potassium channels in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Myrian; García, Esperanza; Onetti, Carlos G

    2006-05-01

    1. Glucose is one of the most important substrates for generating metabolic energy required for the maintenance of cellular functions. Glucose-mediated changes in neuronal firing pattern have been observed in the central nervous system of mammals. K(+) channels directly regulated by intracellular ATP have been postulated as a linkage between cellular energetic metabolism and excitability; the functional roles ascribed to these channels include glucose-sensing to regulate energy homeostasis and neuroprotection under energy depletion conditions. The hippocampus is highly sensitive to metabolic insults and is the brain region most sensitive to ischemic damage. Because the identity of metabolically regulated potassium channels present in hippocampal neurons is obscure, we decided to study the biophysical properties of glucose-sensitive potassium channels in hippocampal neurons. 2. The dependence of membrane potential and the sensitivity of potassium channels to glucose and ATP in rat hippocampal neurons were studied in cell-attached and excised inside-out membrane patches. 3. We found that under hypoglycemic conditions, at least three types of potassium channels were activated; their unitary conductance values were 37, 147, and 241 pS in symmetrical K(+), and they were sensitive to ATP. For K(+) channels with unitary conductance of 37 and 241, when the membrane potential was depolarized the longer closed time constant diminished and this produced an increase in the open-state probability; nevertheless, the 147-pS channels were not voltage-dependent. 4. We propose that neuronal glucose-sensitive K(+) channels in rat hippocampus include subtypes of ATP-sensitive channels with a potential role in neuroprotection during short-term or prolonged metabolic stress.

  20. Calcium Phosphate Transfection of Primary Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    DiBona, Victoria L.; Wu, Qian; Zhang, Huaye

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate precipitation is a convenient and economical method for transfection of cultured cells. With optimization, it is possible to use this method on hard-to-transfect cells like primary neurons. Here we describe our detailed protocol for calcium phosphate transfection of hippocampal neurons cocultured with astroglial cells. PMID:24300106

  1. Neuronal zinc stores are modulated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: an optical analysis in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Love, Rachal; Salazar, Gloria; Faundez, Victor

    2005-11-02

    Zinc chelation and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been explored as potential neuroprotective agents. However, it remains unknown whether NSAIDs and zinc chelation may converge on a similar cellular process. Using two-photon microscopy to observe hippocampal neurons labeled with a zinc-sensitive dye, we provide evidence that three chemically unrelated NSAIDs, niflumic acid, ibuprofen, and naproxen, acutely increase intracellular zinc stores from extracellular metal pools. Phospholipase A2 inhibitors triggered similar responses, suggesting that NSAIDs likely control zinc stores by their activity as cyclooxygenase inhibitors. These results provide evidence for a new link between cyclooxygenase metabolites and the mechanisms controlling neuronal zinc pools.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of neuronal genes and its effect on neural functions: gene expression in response to static magnetism in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Yoneda, Yukio

    2005-07-01

    We have previously shown a marked but transient increase in DNA binding of the nuclear transcription factor activator protein-1 after brief exposure to static magnetic fields in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, suggesting that exposure to static magnetism would lead to long-term consolidation as well as amplification of different functional alterations through modulation of de novo protein synthesis at the level of gene transcription in the hippocampus. Hippocampal neurons were cultured under sustained exposure to static magnetic fields at 100 mT, followed by extraction of total RNA for differential display (DD) analysis using random primers. The first and the second DD polymerase chain reaction similarly showed the downregulation of particular genes in response to sustained magnetism. Nucleotide sequence analysis followed by BLASTN homology searching revealed high homology of these 2 DD-PCR products to the 3' non-coding regions of the mouse basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor ALF1 and that of histone H3.3A, respectively. On Northern blot analysis using the 2 cloned differentially expressed fragments labeled with [alpha-(32)P]dCTP by the random primer method, a marked decrease was seen in expression of mRNA for ALF1 and histone H3.3A in hippocampal neurons cultured under sustained exposure to static magnetic fields at 100 mT. It thus appears that static magnetism may modulate cellular integrity and functionality through expression of a variety of responsive genes required for gene transcription and translation, proliferation, differentiation, maturation, survival, and so on in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

  3. Enhancement of dendritic branching in cultured hippocampal neurons by 17beta-estradiol is mediated by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, T; Cabell, L; Kern, M; Audesirk, G

    2003-06-01

    Both 17beta-estradiol (E2) and nitric oxide (NO) are important in neuronal development, learning and memory, and age-related memory changes. There is growing evidence that a number of estrogen receptor-mediated effects of estradiol utilize nitric oxide as an intermediary. The role of estradiol in hippocampal neuronal differentiation and function has particular implications for learning and memory. Low levels of estradiol (10nM) significantly increase dendritic branching in cultured embryonic rat hippocampal neurons (158% of control). This study investigates the hypothesis that the estrogen-stimulated increase in dendritic branching is mediated by nitric oxide. We found that nitric oxide donors also produce significantly increased dendritic branching S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP: 119%; 2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine (NOC-18): 128% of control). We then determined that the increases in dendritic branching stimulated by estradiol or by a nitric oxide donor were both blocked by an inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase. Dendritic branching was also stimulated by a cell permeable analog of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (dibutyryl-cGMP: 173% of control). Estradiol-stimulated dendritic branching was reversed by the nitric oxide scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl imidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO). This study provides evidence that estradiol influences the development of embryonic hippocampal neurons in culture by increasing the production of nitric oxide or by increasing the sensitivity of the neurons to nitric oxide. Nitric oxide in turn stimulates dendritic branching via activation of guanylyl cyclase.

  4. Cannabinoids inhibit network-driven synapse loss between hippocampal neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jung; Waataja, Jonathan J; Thayer, Stanley A

    2008-06-01

    Dendritic pruning and loss of synaptic contacts are early events in many neurodegenerative diseases. These effects are dynamic and seem to differ mechanistically from the cell death process. Cannabinoids modulate synaptic activity and afford protection in some neurotoxicity models. We investigated the effects of cannabinoids on activity-induced changes in the number of synapses between rat hippocampal neurons in culture. Morphology and synapses were visualized by confocal imaging of neurons expressing DsRed2 and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). Reducing the extracellular Mg2+ concentration to 0.1 mM for 4 h induced intense synaptic activity, which decreased the number of PSD95-GFP puncta by 45 +/- 13%. Synapse loss was an early event, required activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, and was mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The cannabinoid receptor full agonist WIN55,212-2 [(R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-morpholinyl)-methyl] pyrrolo-[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl](1-napthalenyl)-methanone monomethanesulfonate] (EC(50) = 2.5 +/- 0.5 nM) and the partial agonist Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; EC(50) = 9 +/- 3 nM) inhibited PSD loss in a manner reversed by the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant [N-piperidino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-3-pyrazole-carboxamide]. The protection was mimicked by inhibition of presynaptic Ca2+ channels, and WIN55,212-2 did not prevent PSD loss elicited by direct application of glutamate, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism. Prolonged exposure to WIN55,212-2, but not THC, desensitized the protective effect. Treating cells that had undergone PSD loss with WIN55,212-2 reversed the loss and enabled recovery of a full compliment of synapses. The modulation of synaptic number by acute and prolonged exposure to cannabinoids may account for some of the effects of these drugs on the plasticity, survival, and function of neural networks.

  5. Clotrimazole analogues: effective blockers of the slow afterhyperpolarization in cultured rat hippocampal pyramidal neurones

    PubMed Central

    Shah, M M; Miscony, Z; Javadzadeh-Tabatabaie, M; Ganellin, C R; Haylett, D G

    2001-01-01

    The pharmacology of the slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) was studied in cultured rat hippocampal pyramidal neurones. Clotrimazole, its in vivo metabolite, 2-chlorophenyl-bisphenyl-methanol (CBM) and the novel analogues, UCL 1880 and UCL 2027, inhibited the sIAHP with similar IC50s (1 – 2 μM). Clotrimazole and CBM also inhibited the high voltage-activated (HVA) Ca2+ current in pyramidal neurones with IC50s of 4.7 μM and 2.2 μM respectively. UCL 1880 was a less effective Ca2+ channel blocker, reducing the HVA Ca2+ current by 50% at 10 μM. At concentrations up to 10 μM, UCL 2027 had no effect on the Ca2+ current, indicating that its effects on the sIAHP were independent of Ca2+ channel block. Clotrimazole also inhibited both the outward holding current (IC50=2.8 μM) present at a potential of −50 mV and the apamin-sensitive medium AHP (mAHP; IC50≈amp;10 μM). The other clotrimazole analogues tested had smaller effects on these two currents. The present work also shows that 100 nM UCL 1848, an inhibitor of apamin-sensitive conductances, abolishes the mAHP. Currents were recorded from HEK293 cells transfected with hSK1 and rSK2. The SK currents were very sensitive to inhibition by UCL 1848 but were not significantly reduced by the sIAHP inhibitor, UCL 2027 (10 μM). 10 μM UCL 1880 reduced the hSK1 current by 40%. UCL 2027 appears to be the first relatively selective blocker of the sAHP to be described. Furthermore, the ability of UCL 2027 to block the sAHP with minimal effect on SK1 channel activity questions the role of this channel in the sAHP. PMID:11181430

  6. ANEPIII, a new recombinant neurotoxic polypeptide derived from scorpion peptide, inhibits delayed rectifier, but not A-type potassium currents in rat primary cultured hippocampal and cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Li; Zhang, Jing-Hai; Yang, Bao-Feng; Jiao, Jun-Dong; Wang, Ling; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2006-01-15

    A new recombinant neurotoxic polypeptide ANEPIII (BmK ANEPIII) derived from Scorpion peptide, which was demonstrated with antineuroexcitation properties in animal models, was examined for its action on K+ currents in primary cultured rat hippocampal and cortical neurons using the patch clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. The delayed rectifier K+ current (I(k)) was inhibited by externally applied recombinant BmK ANEPIII, while the transient A-current (I(A)) remained virtually unaffected. BmK ANEPIII 3 microM, reduced the delayed rectifier current by 28.2% and 23.6% in cultured rat hippocampal and cortical neurons, respectively. The concentration of half-maximal block was 155.1 nM for hippocampal neurons and 227.2 nM for cortical neurons, respectively. These results suggest that BmK ANEPIII affect K+ currents, which may lead to a reduction in neuronal excitability.

  7. Network dynamics of cultured hippocampal neurons in a multi-electrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Takahisa; Kudoh, Suguru N.

    2005-02-01

    The neurons in dissociation culture autonomously re-organized their functional neuronal networks, after the process for elongating neurites and establishing synaptic connections. The spatio-temporal patterns of activity in the networks might be a reflection of functional neuron assemblies. The functional connections were dynamically modified by synaptic potentiation and the process may be required for reorganization of the functional group of neurons. Such neuron assemblies are critical for information processing in brain. To visualize the functional connections between neurons, we have analyzed the autonomous activity of synaptically induced action potentials in the living neuronal networks on a multi-electrode array, using "connection map analysis" that we developed for this purpose. Moreover, we designed aan original wide area covering electrode array and succeeded in recording spontaneous action potentials from wider area than commercial multi electrode arrays.

  8. Sr2+ and quantal events at excitatory synapses between mouse hippocampal neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Ghani, M A; Valiante, T A; Pennefather, P S

    1996-08-15

    1. Whole-cell recording from pairs of adjacent mouse hippocampal neurons in culture was used to study the quantal properties of action potential-evoked excitatory synaptic transmission and to demonstrate the use of Sr2+ in quantifying those properties. 2. In the presence of extracellular Sr2+, excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were followed by an after-discharge of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) lasting 1-2 s and generated by evoked asynchronous release of presynaptic quanta of transmitter. Like the EPSC of which it is thought to be an extension, the after-discharge was modulated by procedures expected to modulate Sr2+ influx into the nerve terminal. The number of mEPSCs in the after-discharge was decreased by increasing extracellular [Mg2+], and increased by increasing extracellular [Sr2+] or increasing the number of action potentials used to evoke the after-discharge. 3. EPSCs recorded in media containing either 1 mM Ca2+ or 6 mM Sr2+ were of similar amplitude. Adding Sr2+ to low-Ca2+ media increased EPSC amplitude, while adding Sr2+ to high-Ca2+ media lowered EPSC amplitude. These results suggest that extracellular Sr2+ is less effective than Ca2+ in supporting quantal release. 4. The levels of extracellular Ca2+, Mg2+ and Sr2+ were adjusted so that most after-discharge mEPSCs were discrete and comparable in numbers to the quantal events that contributed to the corresponding evoked EPSCs. In a series of twenty-five pairs of neurons, the mean amplitude of mEPSCs recorded at -80 mV was 35 +/- 10 pA and the mean coefficient of variation was 0.50 +/- 0.10 (range, 0.26-0.62). The mEPSC amplitude histogram was positively skewed. 5. In ten pairs of neurons, the mean and variance of EPSCs and mEPSCs and quantal content were determined from samples of more than 100 evoked events (in superfusion solutions containing (mM): 0.5 Ca2+, 2 Sr2+ and 10 Mg2+) and mean quantal content was determined from the ratio of amplitudes of the mean EPSC and m

  9. The up-regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels subtypes coincides with an increased sodium current in hippocampal neuronal culture model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Xu, Xiaoxue; Cai, Jiqun; Hu, Huiyuan; Sun, Wei; He, Guilin; Shao, Dongxue; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris; Zhu, Tong; Hao, Liying

    2013-02-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) have been linked to inherited forms of epilepsy. The expression and biophysical properties of VGSC in the hippocampal neuronal culture model have not been clarified. In order to evaluate mechanisms of epileptogenesis that are related to VGSC, we examined the expression and function of VGSC in the hippocampal neuronal culture model in vitro and spontaneously epileptic rats (SER) in vivo. Our data showed that the peak amplitude of transient, rapidly-inactivating Na(+) current (I(Na,T)) in model neurons was significantly increased compared with control neurons, and the activation curve was shifted to the negative potentials in model neurons in whole cell recording by patch-clamp. In addition, channel activity of persistent, non-inactivating Na(+) current (I(Na,P)) was obviously increased in the hippocampal neuronal culture model as judged by single-channel patch-clamp recording. Furthermore, VGSC subtypes Na(V)1.1, Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 were up-regulated at the protein expression level in model neurons and SER as assessed by Western blotting. Four subtypes of VGSC proteins in SER were clearly present throughout the hippocampus, including CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus regions, and neurons expressing VGSC immunoreactivity were also detected in hippocampal neuronal culture model by immunofluorescence. These findings suggested that the up-regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels subtypes in neurons coincided with an increased sodium current in the hippocampal neuronal culture model, providing a possible explanation for the observed seizure discharge and enhanced excitability in epilepsy.

  10. D1/D5 dopamine receptors stimulate intracellular calcium release in primary cultures of neocortical and hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lezcano, Nelson; Bergson, Clare

    2002-04-01

    D1/D5 dopamine receptors in basal ganglia, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex modulate motor, reward, and cognitive behavior. Previous work with recombinant proteins revealed that in cells primed with heterologous G(q/11)-coupled G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists, the typically G(s)-linked D1/D5 receptors can stimulate robust release of calcium from internal stores when coexpressed with calcyon. To learn more about the intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying these D1/D5 receptor regulated behaviors, we explored the possibility that endogenous receptors stimulate internal release of calcium in neurons. We have identified a population of neurons in primary cultures of hippocampus and neocortex that respond to D1/D5 dopamine receptor agonists with a marked increase in intracellular calcium (Ca) levels. The D1/D5 receptor stimulated responses occurred in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) indicating the rises in Ca involve release from internal stores. In addition, the responses were blocked by D1/D5 receptor antagonists. Further, the D1/D5 agonist-evoked responses were state dependent, requiring priming with agonists of G(q/11)-coupled glutamate, serotonin, muscarinic, and adrenergic receptors or with high external K(+) solution. In contrast, D1/D5 receptor agonist-evoked Ca(2+) responses were not detected in neurons derived from striatum. However, D1/D5 agonists elevated cAMP levels in striatal cultures as effectively as in neocortical and hippocampal cultures. Further, neither forskolin nor 8-Br-cAMP stimulation following priming was able to mimic the D1/D5 agonist-evoked Ca(2+) response in neocortical neurons indicating that increased cAMP levels are not sufficient to stimulate Ca release. Our data suggest that D1-like dopamine receptors likely modulate neocortical and hippocampal neuronal excitability and synaptic function via Ca(2+) as well as cAMP-dependent signaling.

  11. Fluoxetine suppresses synaptically induced [Ca²⁺]i spikes and excitotoxicity in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jung; Kim, Tae Hyeong; Choi, Se Joon; Hong, Yi Jae; Yang, Ji Seon; Sung, Ki-Wug; Rhie, Duck-Joo; Hahn, Sang June; Yoon, Shin Hee

    2013-01-15

    Fluoxetine is a widely used antidepressant with an action that is primarily attributed to the inhibition of serotonin re-uptake into the synaptic terminals of the central nervous system. Fluoxetine also has blocking effects on various ion channels, including Ca(2+) channels. It remains unclear, however, how fluoxetine may affect synaptically induced [Ca(2+)](i) spikes. We investigated the effects of fluoxetine on [Ca(2+)](i) spikes, along with the subsequent neurotoxicity that is synaptically evoked by lowering extracellular Mg(2+) in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Fluoxetine inhibited the synaptically induced [Ca(2+)](i) spikes in p-chloroamphetamine-treated and non-treated neurons, in a concentration-dependent manner. However, other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as paroxetine and citalopram, did not significantly affect the spikes. Pretreatment with fluoxetine for 5 min inhibited [Ca(2+)](i) increases induced by glutamate, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, and N-methyl-d-aspartate. Fluoxetine also inhibited α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-induced currents. In addition, fluoxetine decreased the [Ca(2+)](i) responses induced by the metabotrophic glutamate receptor agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine or the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine. Fluoxetine inhibited [Ca(2+)](i) responses induced by 20mM KCl. Fluoxetine decreased the release of FM1-43 induced by electric field stimulation. Furthermore, fluoxetine inhibited 0.1mM [Mg(2+)](o)-induced cell death. Collectively, our results suggest that fluoxetine suppresses the spikes and protects neurons against excitotoxicity, particularly in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, presumably due to both direct inhibition of presynaptic glutamate release and postsynaptic glutamate receptor-mediated [Ca(2+)](i) signaling. In addition to an indirect inhibitory effect via 5-HT levels, these data suggest a new, possibly direct inhibitory action of fluoxetine on

  12. Soluble N-terminal fragment of mutant Huntingtin protein impairs mitochondrial axonal transport in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Yan, Ya-Ping; Zhou, Rui; Lou, Hui-Fang; Rong, Ye; Zhang, Bao-Rong

    2014-02-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, progressive, neurodegenerative disorder caused by an unstable expansion of CAG repeats (>35 repeats) within exon 1 of the interesting transcript 15 (IT15) gene. This gene encodes a protein called Huntingtin (Htt), and mutation of the gene results in a polyglutamine (polyQ) near the N-terminus of Htt. The N-terminal fragments of mutant Htt (mHtt), which tend to aggregate, are sufficient to cause HD. Whether these aggregates are causal or protective for HD remains hotly debated. Dysfunctional mitochondrial axonal transport is associated with HD. It remains unknown whether the soluble or aggregated form of mHtt is the primary cause of the impaired mitochondrial axonal transport in HD pathology. Here, we investigated the impact of soluble and aggregated N-terminal fragments of mHtt on mitochondrial axonal transport in cultured hippocampal neurons. We found that the N-terminal fragment of mHtt formed aggregates in almost half of the transfected neurons. Overexpression of the N-terminal fragment of mHtt decreased the velocity of mitochondrial axonal transport and mitochondrial mobility in neurons regardless of whether aggregates were formed. However, the impairment of mitochondrial axonal transport in neurons expressing the soluble and aggregated N-terminal fragments of mHtt did not differ. Our findings indicate that both the soluble and aggregated N-terminal fragments of mHtt impair mitochondrial axonal transport in cultured hippocampal neurons. We predict that dysfunction of mitochondrial axonal transport is an early-stage event in the progression of HD, even before mHtt aggregates are formed.

  13. CALCINEURIN ENHANCES L-TYPE Ca2+ CHANNEL ACTIVITY IN HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONS: INCREASED EFFECT WITH AGE IN CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    NORRIS, C. M.; BLALOCK, E. M.; CHEN, K.-C.; PORTER, N. M.; LANDFIELD, P. W.

    2006-01-01

    The Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, calcineurin, modulates a number of key Ca2+ signaling pathways in neurons, and has been implicated in Ca2+-dependent negative feedback inactivation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels. In contrast, we report here that three mechanistically disparate calcineurin inhibitors, FK-506, cyclosporin A, and the calcineurin autoinhibitory peptide, inhibited high-voltage-activated Ca2+ channel currents by up to 40% in cultured hippocampal neurons, suggesting that calcineurin acts to enhance Ca2+ currents. This effect occurred with Ba2+ or Ca2+ as charge carrier, and with or without intracellular Ca2+ buffered by EGTA. Ca2+-dependent inactivation of Ca2+ channels was not affected by FK-506. The immunosuppressant, rapamycin, and the protein phosphatase 1/2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, did not decrease Ca2+ channel current, showing specificity for effects on calcineurin. Blockade of L-type Ca2+ channels with nimodipine fully negated the effect of FK-506 on Ca2+ channel current, while blockade of N-, and P-/Q-type Ca2+ channels enhanced FK-506-mediated inhibition of the remaining L-type-enriched current. FK-506 also inhibited substantially more Ca2+ channel current in 4-week-old vs. 2-week-old cultures, an effect paralleled by an increase in calcineurin A mRNA levels. These studies provide the first evidence that calcineurin selectively enhances L-type Ca2+ channel activity in neurons. Moreover, this action appears to be increased concomitantly with the well-characterized increase in L-type Ca2+ channel availability in hippocampal neurons with age-in-culture. PMID:11958864

  14. Laser-evoked synaptic transmission in cultured hippocampal neurons expressing Channelrhodopsin-2 delivered by adeno-associated virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jennifer; Hasan, Mazahir T.; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    We present a method for studying synaptic transmission in mass cultures of dissociated hippocampal neurons based on patch clamp recording combined with laser stimulation of neurons expressing Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). Our goal was to use the high spatial resolution of laser illumination to come as close as possible to the ideal of identifying monosynaptically coupled pairs of neurons, which is conventionally done using microisland rather than mass cultures. Using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) to deliver the ChR2 gene, we focused on the time period between 14 and 20 days in vitro, during which expression levels are high, and spontaneous bursting activity has not yet started. Stimulation by wide-field illumination is sufficient to make the majority of ChR2-expressing neurons spike. Stimulation with a laser spot at least 10 μm in diameter also produces action potentials, but in a reduced fraction of neurons. We studied synaptic transmission by voltage-clamping a neuron with low expression of ChR2 and scanning a 40 μm laser spot at surrounding locations. Responses were observed to stimulation at a subset of locations in the culture, indicating spatial localization of stimulation. Pharmacological means were used to identify responses that were synaptic. Many responses were of smaller amplitude than those typically found in microisland cultures. We were unable to find an entirely reliable criterion for distinguishing between monosynaptic and polysynaptic responses. However, we propose that postsynaptic currents with small amplitudes, simple shapes, and latencies not much greater than 8 msec are reasonable candidates for monosynaptic interactions. PMID:19560489

  15. Protection from neuronal damage induced by combined oxygen and glucose deprivation in organotypic hippocampal cultures by glutamate receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Strasser, U; Fischer, G

    1995-07-31

    Organotypic hippocampal cultures were exposed to defined periods (30 and 60 min) of combined oxygen and glucose deprivation, mimicking transient ischemic conditions. The involvement of different glutamate receptors in individual hippocampal subfields (CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus) was studied using antagonists of NMDA (dizocilpine) and AMPA/kainate receptors (CNQX and GYKI 52466). Staining with the fluorescent dye propidium iodide (PI) allowed detection of damaged cells. For quantitative determination of neuronal damage, fluorescence intensity was measured after a 22 h recovery period and was related to maximal fluorescence intensity measured after fixation and PI restaining of the cultures at the end of the experiment. Dizocilpine (10 microM), CNQX (100 microM) and GYKI 52466 (100 microM) provided complete protection in CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus following the moderate ischemic insult, when the antagonists were present permanently. This indicates that none of the ionotropic glutamate receptor subtypes dominated toxicity in the most sensitive subpopulation of neurons. When applied only during the recovery period protection with dizocilpine (10 microM) or CNQX (100 microM) was drastically reduced by about 60% in the most sensitive area (CA1), but only slightly by 15% in CA3. Therefore the onset of irreversible damage seems to occur earlier in CA1 than in CA3. Blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors by GYKI 52466 (100 microM) offered no neuroprotection if the compound was applied only during the recovery period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Block by a putative antiarrhythmic agent of a calcium-dependent potassium channel in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    McLarnon, J G

    1990-05-04

    The actions of a new, putative antiarrhythmic drug, KC-8851 on single channel currents in hippocampal CA1 neurons have been studied. A calcium-dependent potassium current IK(Ca) was activated in the cultured neurons when a solution containing 140 mM K+ and 0.2 mM Ca2+ was applied to inside-out patches. Addition of the compound KC-8851, at concentrations between 1-50 microM, resulted in significant, dose-dependent, decreases in the mean open times of the K channel. The onward (blocking) rate constant was determined from a simple channel blockade scheme and was 5 x 10(7) M-1s-1; this rate constant was not dependent on voltage. Addition of KC-8851 to the solution bath with outside-out patches also caused significant decreases in the mean open times of the IK(Ca) channel consistent with channel blockade by the drug.

  17. Involvement of ClC-3 chloride/proton exchangers in controlling glutamatergic synaptic strength in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Raul E; Alekov, Alexi K; Filippov, Mikhail; Hegermann, Jan; Fahlke, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    ClC-3 is a member of the CLC family of anion channels and transporters that localizes to early and late endosomes as well as to synaptic vesicles (SV). Its genetic disruption in mouse models results in pronounced hippocampal and retinal neurodegeneration, suggesting that ClC-3 might be important for normal excitatory and/or inhibitory neurotransmission in central neurons. To characterize the role of ClC-3 in glutamate accumulation in SV we compared glutamatergic synaptic transmission in cultured hippocampal neurons from WT and Clcn3-/- mice. In Clcn3-/- neurons the amplitude and frequency of miniature as well as the amplitudes of action-potential evoked EPSCs were significantly increased as compared to WT neurons. The low-affinity competitive AMPA receptor antagonist γ-DGG reduced the quantal size of synaptic events more effectively in WT than in Clcn3-/- neurons, whereas no difference was observed for the high-affinity competitive non-NMDA antagonist NBQX. Paired pulse ratios of evoked EPSCs were significantly reduced, whereas the size of the readily releasable pool was not affected by the genetic ablation of ClC-3. Electron microscopy revealed increased volumes of SV in hippocampi of Clcn3-/- mice. Our findings demonstrate that ClC-3 controls fast excitatory synaptic transmission by regulating the amount of neurotransmitter as well as the release probability of SV. These results provide novel insights into the role of ClC-3 in synaptic transmission and identify excessive glutamate release as a likely basis of neurodegeneration in Clcn3-/-.

  18. The neurotoxicity of hallucinogenic amphetamines in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Capela, João Paulo; da Costa Araújo, Silvana; Costa, Vera Marisa; Ruscher, Karsten; Fernandes, Eduarda; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Meisel, Andreas; Carvalho, Félix

    2013-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "Ecstasy") and 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride (DOI) are hallucinogenic amphetamines with addictive properties. The hippocampus is involved in learning and memory and seems particularly vulnerable to amphetamine's neurotoxicity. We evaluated the neurotoxicity of DOI and MDMA in primary neuronal cultures of hippocampus obtained from Wistar rat embryos (E-17 to E-19). Mature neurons after 10 days in culture were exposed for 24 or 48 h either to MDMA (100-800 μM) or DOI (10-100 μM). Both the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and the tetrazolium-based (MTT) assays revealed a concentration- and time-dependent neuronal death and mitochondrial dysfunction after exposure to both drugs. Both drugs promoted a significant increase in caspase-8 and caspase-3 activities. At concentrations that produced similar levels of neuronal death, DOI promoted a higher increase in the activity of both caspases than MDMA. In the mitochondrial fraction of neurons exposed 24h to DOI or MDMA, we found a significant increase in the 67 kDa band of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) by Western blot. Moreover, 24h exposure to DOI promoted an increase in cytochrome c in the cytoplasmatic fraction of neurons. Pre-treatment with an antibody raised against the 5-HT(2A)-receptor (an irreversible antagonist) greatly attenuated neuronal death promoted by 48 h exposure to DOI or MDMA. In conclusion, hallucinogenic amphetamines promoted programmed neuronal death involving both the mitochondria machinery and the extrinsic cell death key regulators. Death was dependent, at least in part, on the stimulation of the 5-HT(2A)-receptors.

  19. SCG10, a microtubule destabilizing factor, stimulates the neurite outgrowth by modulating microtubule dynamics in rat hippocampal primary cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Morii, Hiroshi; Shiraishi-Yamaguchi, Yoko; Mori, Nozomu

    2006-09-01

    Microtubule dynamics, one of the key elements in neurite outgrowth, is regulated by various regulatory factors to determine the behavior of the neuronal growth cone and to form the specialized neuronal shape. SCG10 is a neuron-specific stathmin protein with a potent microtubule destabilizing factor and is enriched in the growth cones of the developing neurons. We investigated the functional role of SCG10 in neurite outgrowth using rat hippocampal primary cultured neurons. Genetic manipulation of SCG10 using a short-interfering RNA duplex markedly decreased the SCG10 expression level and significantly suppressed neurite outgrowth. This result was confirmed by immunodepletion experiments. On the other hand, the protein transduction of SCG10 using a polyarginine tag stimulated neurite outgrowth. Such manipulation of the SCG10 expression level affected microtubule morphology within the growth cones. A decrease in the SCG10 level converted the morphology to a more stable state, while an increase converted the morphology to a more dynamic state. However, an excess of SCG10 induced neurite retraction due to an excess of microtubule disassembly. These results suggest that SCG10 serves as an important regulatory factor of growth cone motility by enhancing microtubule dynamics, possibly through increasing the catastrophe frequency.

  20. Coexpression of glutamate vesicular transporter (VGLUT1) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) proteins in fetal rat hippocampal neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Neelima; Das, Mainak; Edwards, Darin; Stancescu, Maria; Kang, Jung-Fong; Hickman, James J

    2010-09-01

    A very small population of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactive cells is observed in all layers of the adult hippocampus. This is the intrinsic source of the hippocampal cholinergic innervation, in addition to the well-established septo-hippocampal cholinergic projection. This study aimed at quantifying and identifying the origin of this small population of ChAT-immunoreactive cells in the hippocampus at early developmental stages, by culturing the fetal hippocampal neurons in serum-free culture and on a patternable, synthetic silane substrate N-1 [3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl] diethylenetriamine. Using this method, a large proportion of glutamatergic (glutamate vesicular transporter, VGLUT1-immunoreactive) neurons, a small fraction of GABAergic (GABA-immunoreactive) neurons, and a large proportion of cholinergic (ChAT-immunoreactive) neurons were observed in the culture. Interestingly, most of the glutamatergic neurons that expressed glutamate vesicular transporter (VGLUT1) also co-expressed ChAT proteins. On the contrary, when the cultures were double-stained with GABA and ChAT, colocalization was not observed. Neonatal and adult rat hippocampal neurons were also cultured to verify whether these more mature neurons also co-express VGLUT1 and ChAT proteins in culture. Colocalization of VGLUT1 and ChAT in these relatively more mature neurons was not observed. One possible explanation for this observation is that the neurons have the ability to synthesize multiple neurotransmitters at a very early stage of development and then with time follows a complex, combinatorial strategy of electrochemical coding to determine their final fate.

  1. Inhibition of RhoA GTPase and the subsequent activation of PTP1B protects cultured hippocampal neurons against amyloid β toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Amyloid beta (Aβ) is the main agent responsible for the advent and progression of Alzheimer's disease. This peptide can at least partially antagonize nerve growth factor (NGF) signalling in neurons, which may be responsible for some of the effects produced by Aβ. Accordingly, better understanding the NGF signalling pathway may provide clues as to how to protect neurons from the toxic effects of Aβ. Results We show here that Aβ activates the RhoA GTPase by binding to p75NTR, thereby preventing the NGF-induced activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) that is required for neuron survival. We also show that the inactivation of RhoA GTPase and the activation of PTP1B protect cultured hippocampal neurons against the noxious effects of Aβ. Indeed, either pharmacological inhibition of RhoA with C3 ADP ribosyl transferase or the transfection of cultured neurons with a dominant negative form of RhoA protects cultured hippocampal neurons from the effects of Aβ. In addition, over-expression of PTP1B also prevents the deleterious effects of Aβ on cultured hippocampal neurons. Conclusion Our findings indicate that potentiating the activity of NGF at the level of RhoA inactivation and PTP1B activation may represent a new means to combat the noxious effects of Aβ in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21294893

  2. Levetiracetam Inhibits Both Ryanodine and IP3 Receptor Activated Calcium Induced Calcium Release in Hippocampal Neurons in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkatti, Nisha; Deshpande, Laxmikant S.; DeLorenzo, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately 1% of the population worldwide, and there is a pressing need to develop new anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) and understand their mechanisms of action. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a novel AED and despite its increasingly widespread clinical use, its mechanism of action is as yet undetermined. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) regulation by both inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) has been implicated in epileptogenesis and the maintenance of epilepsy. To this end, we investigated the effect of LEV on RyR and IP3R activated calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in hippocampal neuronal cultures. RyR-mediated CICR was stimulated using the well-characterized RyR activator, caffeine. Caffeine (10mM) caused a significant increase in [Ca2+]i in hippocampal neurons. Treatment with LEV (33μM) prior to stimulation of RyR-mediated CICR by caffeine led to a 61% decrease in the caffeine induced peak height of [Ca2+]i when compared to the control. Bradykinin stimulates IP3R-activated CICR—to test the effect of LEV on IP3R-mediated CICR, bradykinin (1μM) was used to stimulate cells pre-treated with LEV (100μM). The data showed that LEV caused a 74% decrease in IP3R-mediated CICR compared to the control. In previous studies we have shown that altered Ca2+ homeostatic mechanisms play a role in seizure activity and the development of spontaneous recurrent epileptiform discharges (SREDs). Elevations in [Ca2+]i mediated by CICR systems have been associated with neurotoxicity, changes in neuronal plasticity, and the development of AE. Thus, the ability of LEV to modulate the two major CICR systems demonstrates an important molecular effect of this agent on a major second messenger system in neurons. PMID:18406528

  3. Stimulation of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway through the expression of amidohydrolase for N-terminal asparagine (Ntan1) in cultured rat hippocampal neurons exposed to static magnetism.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Taniura, Hideo; Goto, Yasuaki; Ogura, Masato; Sng, Judy C G; Yoneda, Yukio

    2006-03-01

    In order to elucidate mechanisms underlying modulation by static magnetism of the cellular functionality and/or integrity in the brain, we screened genes responsive to brief magnetism in cultured rat hippocampal neurons using differential display analysis. We have for the first time cloned and identified Ntan1 (amidohydrolase for N-terminal asparagine) as a magnetism responsive gene in rat brain. Ntan1 is an essential component of a protein degradation signal, which is a destabilizing N-terminal residue of a protein, in the N-end rule. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed abundant expression of Ntan1 mRNA in hippocampal neurons in vivo. Northern blot analysis showed that Ntan1 mRNA was increased about three-fold after 3 h in response to brief magnetism. Brief magnetism also increased the transcriptional activity of Ntan1 promoter by luciferase reporter assay. Brief magnetism induced degradation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) without affecting cell morphology and viability, which was prevented by a selective inhibitor of 26S proteasome in hippocampal neurons. Overexpression of Ntan1 using recombinant Ntan1 adenovirus vector resulted in a marked decrease in the MAP2 protein expression in hippocampal neurons. Our results suggest that brief magnetism leads to the induction of Ntan1 responsible for MAP2 protein degradation through ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in rat hippocampal neurons.

  4. Differential induction of heme oxygenase and other stress proteins in cultured hippocampal astrocytes and neurons by inorganic lead.

    PubMed

    Cabell, Leigh; Ferguson, Charles; Luginbill, Deana; Kern, Marcey; Weingart, Adam; Audesirk, Gerald

    2004-07-01

    We examined the effects of exposure to inorganic lead (Pb2+) on the induction of stress proteins in cultured hippocampal neurons and astrocytes, with particular emphasis on the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). In radiolabeled neuronal cultures, Pb2+ exposure had no significant effect on the synthesis of any protein at any concentration (up to 250 microM) or duration of exposure (up to 4 days). In radiolabeled astrocyte cultures, however, Pb2+ exposure (100 nM to 100 microM; 1-4 days) increased synthesis of proteins with approximate molecular weights of 23, 32, 45, 57, 72, and 90 kDa. Immunoblot experiments showed that Pb2+ exposure (100 nM to 10 microM, 1-14 days) induces HO-1 synthesis in astrocytes, but not in neurons; this is probably the 32-kDa protein. The other heme oxygenase isoform, HO-2, is present in both neurons and astrocytes, but is not inducible by Pb2+ at concentrations up to 100 microM. HO-1 can be induced by a variety of stimuli. We found that HO-1 induction in astrocytes is increased by combined exposure to Pb2+ and many other stresses, including heat, nitric oxide, H2O2, and superoxide. One of the stimuli that may induce HO-1 is oxidative stress. Lead exposure causes oxidative stress in many cell types, including astrocytes. Induction of HO-1 by Pb2+ is reduced by the hydroxyl radical scavengers dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and mannitol, but not by inhibitors of calmodulin, calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, protein kinase C, or extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). Therefore, we conclude that oxidative stress is an important mechanism by which Pb2+ induces HO-1 synthesis in astrocytes.

  5. Amyloid-β oligomers induce tau-independent disruption of BDNF axonal transport via calcineurin activation in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ramser, Elisa M.; Gan, Kathlyn J.; Decker, Helena; Fan, Emily Y.; Suzuki, Matthew M.; Ferreira, Sergio T.; Silverman, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of fast axonal transport (FAT) is an early pathological event in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Soluble amyloid-β oligomers (AβOs), increasingly recognized as proximal neurotoxins in AD, impair organelle transport in cultured neurons and transgenic mouse models. AβOs also stimulate hyperphosphorylation of the axonal microtubule-associated protein, tau. However, the role of tau in FAT disruption is controversial. Here we show that AβOs reduce vesicular transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampal neurons from both wild-type and tau-knockout mice, indicating that tau is not required for transport disruption. FAT inhibition is not accompanied by microtubule destabilization or neuronal death. Significantly, inhibition of calcineurin (CaN), a calcium-dependent phosphatase implicated in AD pathogenesis, rescues BDNF transport. Moreover, inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β, downstream targets of CaN, prevents BDNF transport defects induced by AβOs. We further show that AβOs induce CaN activation through nonexcitotoxic calcium signaling. Results implicate CaN in FAT regulation and demonstrate that tau is not required for AβO-induced BDNF transport disruption. PMID:23783030

  6. Protective effects of aloperine on neonatal rat primary cultured hippocampal neurons injured by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning-Tian; Zhou, Ru; Chang, Ren-Yuan; Hao, Yin-Ju; Ma, Lin; Jin, Shao-Ju; Du, Juan; Zheng, Jie; Zhao, Cheng-Jun; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Li, Wei; Koike, Kazuo; Yu, Jian-Qiang; Li, Yu-Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Aloperine (ALO), one of the alkaloids isolated from Sophora alopecuroides L., is traditionally used for various diseases including neuronal disorders. This study investigated the protective effects of ALO on neonatal rat primary-cultured hippocampal neurons injured by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/RP). Treatment with ALO (25, 50, and 100 mg/l) attenuated neuronal damage (p < 0.01), with evidence of increased cell viability (p < 0.01) and decreased cell morphologic impairment. Furthermore, ALO increased mitochondrial membrane potential (p < 0.01), but inhibited intracellular-free calcium [Ca(2+)] i (p  < 0.01) elevation in a dose-dependent manner at OGD/RP. ALO also reduced the intracellular reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde production and enhanced the antioxidant enzymatic activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and the total antioxidant capacity. The results suggested that ALO has significant neuroprotective effects that can be attributed to anti-oxidative stress.

  7. Astrocyte-conditioned medium protecting hippocampal neurons in primary cultures against corticosterone-induced damages via PI3-K/Akt signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ze-Hua; Yang, Ru; Fu, Xin; Wang, Yan-Qing; Wu, Gen-Cheng

    2006-10-09

    Prolonged or excessive exposure to corticosterone leads to neuronal damages in the brain regions, including hippocampus. We reported that astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM) protected the neurons of the primary hippocampal cultures against the corticosterone-induced damages. Corticosterone added to the cultures resulted in a significant number of TUNEL-positive cells. However, corticosterone-induced TUNEL labeling was suppressed as for ACM-cultured neurons. To delineate the molecular basis underlying the neuroprotection of ACM, we assessed the activation of ERK1/2 and (PI3-K)/Akt signal pathways in response to corticosterone-induced neuronal damages. Western blot test revealed that corticosterone increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3-K/Akt in hippocampal neurons grown in Neurobasal medium supplemented with B27 and 500 microm L-glutamine (NBM+). Interestingly, the increase of phospho-ERK1/2 and Akt levels was much pronounced and the time course of phosphorylation was altered in ACM, suggesting that both signaling pathways might participate in ACM protection. Furthermore, the selective inhibitor of Akt, rather than ERK1/2, blocked the neuroprotective activity against corticosterone in ACM-cultured neurons. In summary, our data showed that ACM had a potent neuroprotective effect in cultured neurons. PI3-K/Akt signal pathway, but not ERK1/2, was involved in the protective activity against the corticosterone-induced damages.

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, but not neurotrophin-3, prevents ischaemia-induced neuronal cell death in organotypic rat hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Pringle, A K; Sundstrom, L E; Wilde, G J; Williams, L R; Iannotti, F

    1996-06-28

    We have investigated the neuroprotective actions of neurotrophins in a model of ischaemia using slice cultures. Ischaemia was induced in organotypic hippocampal cultures by simultaneous oxygen and glucose deprivation. Cell death was assessed 24 h later by propidium iodide fluorescence. Pre- but not post-ischaemic addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) produced a concentration-dependent reduction in neuronal damage. Neurotrophin-3 was not neuroprotective. These data suggest that BDNF may form part of an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism.

  9. Nanomolar concentrations of nicotine and cotinine alter the development of cultured hippocampal neurons via non-acetylcholine receptor-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, T; Cabell, L

    1999-08-01

    We investigated the effects of nicotine and its metabolic byproduct cotinine on survival, differentiation and intracellular Ca2+ levels of cultured E18 rat hippocampal neurons. We used a range of concentrations from 1 nM to 10 microM, most of which are within the likely range of human fetal exposure from maternal smoking. Nicotine did not influence neuron survival or neurite production. However, at all concentrations tested, nicotine significantly increased branching of both axons and dendrites, an effect which was not reversed by co-culturing with alpha-bungarotoxin, which blocks the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that predominate in hippocampal cultures (Alkondon and Albuquerque, 1993; Barrantes et al., 1995b). Cotinine at 100 nM and 1 microM significantly reduced neuron survival and neurite production of surviving neurons, but did not significantly alter axon or dendrite branching. These membrane-permeable compounds may work synergistically in the developing embryo to impair the survival and differentiation of hippocampal neurons via intracellular mechanisms.

  10. Effects of cordycepin on the microglia-overactivation-induced impairments of growth and development of hippocampal cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jie; Wang, Ping; Ge, Hongshan; Qu, Xianqin; Jin, Xingliang

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells are normally activated in response to brain injury or immunological stimuli to protect central nervous system (CNS). However, over-activation of microglia conversely amplifies the inflammatory effects and mediates cellular degeneration, leading to the death of neurons. Recently, cordycepin, an active component found in Cordyceps militarisa known as a rare Chinese caterpillar fungus, has been reported as an effective drug for treating inflammatory diseases and cancer via unclear mechanisms. In this study, we attempted to identify the anti-inflammatory role of cordycepin and its protective effects on the impairments of neural growth and development induced by microglial over-activation. The results indicate that cordycepin could attenuate the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation, evidenced by the dramatically reduced release of TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as the down-regulation of mRNA levels of iNOS and COX-2 after cordycepin treatment. Besides, cordycepin reversed the LPS-induced activation of NF-κB pathway, resulting in anti-inflammatory effects. Furthermore, by employing the conditioned medium (CM), we found cordycepin was able to recover the impairments of neural growth and development in the primary hippocampal neurons cultured in LPS-CM, including cell viability, growth cone extension, neurite sprouting and outgrowth as well as spinogenesis. This study expands our knowledge of the anti-inflammatory function of cordycepin and paves the way for the biomedical applications of cordycepin in the therapies of neural injuries.

  11. Chemicals eluting from disposable plastic syringes and syringe filters alter neurite growth, axogenesis and the microtubule cytoskeleton in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tet Woo; Tumanov, Sergey; Villas-Bôas, Silas G; Montgomery, Johanna M; Birch, Nigel P

    2015-04-01

    Cultures of dissociated hippocampal neurons are often used to study neuronal cell biology. We report that the development of these neurons is strongly affected by chemicals leaching from commonly used disposable medical-grade syringes and syringe filters. Contamination of culture medium by bioactive substance(s) from syringes and filters occurred with multiple manufacturing lots and filter types under normal use conditions and resulted in changes to neurite growth, axon formation and the neuronal microtubule cytoskeleton. The effects on neuronal morphology were concentration dependent and significant effects were detected even after substantial dilution of the contaminated medium. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses revealed many chemicals eluting from the syringes and filters. Three of these chemicals (stearic acid, palmitic acid and 1,2-ethanediol monoacetate) were tested but showed no effects on neurite growth. Similar changes in neuronal morphology were seen with high concentrations of bisphenol A and dibutyl phthalate, two hormonally active plasticisers. Although no such compounds were detected by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, unknown plasticisers in leachates may affect neurites. This is the first study to show that leachates from laboratory consumables can alter the growth of cultured hippocampal neurons. We highlight important considerations to ensure leachate contamination does not compromise cell biology experiments.

  12. Rit GTPase Signaling Promotes Immature Hippocampal Neuronal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weikang; Carlson, Shaun W.; Brelsfoard, Jennifer M.; Mannon, Catherine E.; Moncman, Carole L.; Saatman, Kathryn E.; Andres, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing the spontaneous recovery seen following brain injury remain elusive, but recent studies indicate that injury-induced stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis contributes to the repair process. The therapeutic potential of endogenous neurogenesis is tempered by the demonstration that traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in the selective death of adult-born immature neurons, compromising the cell population poised to compensate for trauma-induced neuronal loss. Here, we identify the Ras-related GTPase, Rit, as a critical player in the survival of immature hippocampal neurons following brain injury. While Rit knockout (Rit−/−) did not alter hippocampal development, hippocampal neural cultures derived from Rit−/− mice display increased cell death and blunted MAPK cascade activation in response to oxidative stress, without affecting BDNF-dependent signaling. When compared to wild-type hippocampal cultures, Rit loss rendered immature (Dcx+) neurons susceptible to oxidative damage, without altering the survival of neural progenitor (Nestin+) cells. Oxidative stress is a major contributor to neuronal cell death following brain injury. Consistent with the enhanced vulnerability of cultured Rit−/− immature neurons, Rit−/− mice exhibited a significantly greater loss of adult-born immature neurons within the dentate gyrus after TBI. In addition, post-TBI neuronal remodeling was blunted. Taken together, these data identify a new and unexpected role for Rit in injury-induced neurogenesis, functioning as a selective survival mechanism for immature hippocampal neurons within the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus following TBI. PMID:22815504

  13. Hippocampal neurons in organotypic slice culture are highly resistant to damage by endogenous and exogenous nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Keynes, Robert G; Duport, Sophie; Garthwaite, John

    2004-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to mediate neurodegeneration arising from NMDA receptor activity, but the issue remains controversial. The hypothesis was re-examined using organotypic slice cultures of rat hippocampus, with steps being taken to avoid known artefacts. The NO-cGMP signalling pathway was well preserved in such cultures. Brief exposure to NMDA resulted in a concentration-dependent delayed neuronal death that could be nullified by administration of the NMDA antagonist MK801 (10 microm) given postexposure. Two inhibitors of NO synthesis failed to protect the slices, despite fully blocking NMDA-induced cGMP accumulation. By comparing NMDA-induced cGMP accumulation with that produced by an NO donor, toxic NMDA concentrations were estimated to produce only physiological NO concentrations (2 nm). In studies of the vulnerability of the slices to exogenous NO, it was found that continuous exposure to up to 4.5 microm NO failed to affect ATP levels (measured after 6 h) or cause damage during 24 h, whereas treatment with the respiratory inhibitors myxothiazol or cyanide caused ATP depletion and complete cell death within 24 h. An NO concentration of 10 microm was required for ATP depletion and cell death, presumably through respiratory inhibition. It is concluded that sustained activity of neuronal NO synthase in intact hippocampal tissue can generate only low nanomolar NO concentrations, which are unlikely to be toxic. At the same time, the tissue is remarkably resistant to exogenous NO at up to 1000-fold higher concentrations. Together, the results seriously question the proposed role of NO in NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity.

  14. The rostral migratory stream generates hippocampal CA1 pyramidal-like neurons in a novel organotypic slice co-culture model

    PubMed Central

    Singec, Ilyas; Knoth, Rolf; Vida, Imre; Frotscher, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mouse subventricular zone (SVZ) generates large numbers of neuroblasts, which migrate in a distinct pathway, the rostral migratory stream (RMS), and replace specific interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB). Here, we introduce an organotypic slice culture model that directly connects the RMS to the hippocampus as a new destination. RMS neuroblasts widely populate the hippocampus and undergo cellular differentiation. We demonstrate that RMS cells give rise to various neuronal subtypes and, surprisingly, to CA1 pyramidal neurons. Pyramidal neurons are typically generated before birth and are lost in various neurological disorders. Hence, this unique slice culture model enables us to investigate their postnatal genesis under defined in vitro conditions from the RMS, an unanticipated source for hippocampal pyramidal neurons. PMID:26340944

  15. Dominance of P/Q-type calcium channels in depolarization-induced presynaptic FM dye release in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Nimmervoll, B; Flucher, B E; Obermair, G J

    2013-12-03

    Neurotransmitter release probability is related by high power to the local concentration of calcium in presynaptic terminals, which in turn is controlled by voltage-gated calcium channels. P/Q- and N-type channels trigger synaptic transmission in the majority of neurons of the central nervous system. However, whether and under which conditions both channel types act cooperatively or independently is still insufficiently understood. Previous studies suggested either a dominance of N- or P/Q-type channels, or a synergistic action of both channels, depending on the experimental paradigms. Thus, to provide insight into the properties of neurotransmitter release in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, we used quantitative analysis of FM dye release from presynaptic boutons induced by high potassium membrane depolarization. Increasing extracellular potassium concentrations revealed a sigmoid dependence of FM dye release to the stimulation strength. Individual and combined application of the P/Q- and N-type channel-specific blockers ω-agatoxin-IVA and ω-conotoxin-GVIA, respectively, allowed us to specifically isolate the contribution of both channel types to release triggered with 40 mM KCl. Analysis of the release kinetics and the fractional release amplitude demonstrate that, whereas in only 15% of the synapses release depended exclusively on P/Q-type channels, the majority of synapses (85%) contained both N- and P/Q-type channels. Nevertheless, the kinetics of FM dye release in synapses containing both channel types was determined by the P/Q-type channels. Together, our data suggest a more direct coupling of P/Q-type channels to synaptic release compared to N-type channels, which may explain the high prevalence of neurological P/Q-type channelopathies.

  16. Shockwaves Cause Synaptic Degeneration in Cultured Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-02

    constructed of delrin. A piezoresistive pressure sensor (Endevco Model 8530C) was mounted flush with the plate, coaxial with the center of the gene gun ...biolostic gene gun to deliver shockwaves to cultured hippocampal or cortical neurons. These cultured cells form abundant synapses in vitro, and after a 24-48...neurons, we used a biolostic gene gun to deliver shockwaves to cultured hippocampal or cortical neurons. These cultured cells form abundant synapses in

  17. Application of the Co-culture Membrane System Pointed to a Protective Role of Catestatin on Hippocampal Plus Hypothalamic Neurons Exposed to Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Mele, Maria; Morelli, Sabrina; Fazzari, Gilda; Avolio, Ennio; Alò, Raffaella; Piscioneri, Antonella; De Bartolo, Loredana; Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Canonaco, Marcello

    2016-11-05

    Depletion of oxygen and glucose even for brief periods is sufficient to cause cerebral ischemia, which is a predominant worldwide cause of motor deficits with the reduction of life quality and subsequently death. Hence, more insights regarding protective measures against ischemic events are becoming a major research goal. Among the many neuronal factors, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR), orexinergic neuroreceptors (ORXR), and sympatho-inhibitory neuropeptide catestatin (CST) are widely involved with ischemic episodes. In this study, it was possible to induce in vitro ischemic conditions of the hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) hippocampal and hypothalamic neuronal cultures, grown on a newly compartmentalized membrane system, via oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). These cultures displayed notably differentiated NMDARergic and ORXergic receptor expression activities along with evident brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plus orexin A (ORX-A) secretion, especially under co-cultured conditions. Interestingly, addition of CST in OGD-insulted hippocampal cells accounted for upregulated GluN1 and ORX1R transcripts that in the case of the latter neuroreceptor was very strongly (p < 0.001) increased when co-cultured with hypothalamic cells. Similarly, hypothalamic neurons supplied very evident upregulations of GluN1, ORX1R, and above all of GluN2A transcripts along with increased BDNF and ORX-A secretion in the presence of hippocampal cells. Overall, the preferential CST effects on BDNF plus ORX-A production together with altered NMDAR and ORXR levels, especially in co-cultured hypothalamic cells pointed to ORX-containing neurons as major protective constituents against ischemic damages thus opening new scenarios on the cross-talking roles of CST during ischemic disorders.

  18. Counteraction by repetitive daily exposure to static magnetism against sustained blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channels in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Taniura, Hideo; Goto, Yasuaki; Tamaki, Keisuke; Oikawa, Hirotaka; Kambe, Yuki; Ogura, Masato; Ohno, Yu; Takarada, Takeshi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2005-05-15

    In rat hippocampal neurons cultured with the antagonist for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors dizocilpine (MK-801) for 8 days in vitro (DIV), a significant decrease was seen in the expression of microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2) as well as mRNA for both brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), in addition to decreased viability. MK-801 not only decreased the expression of the NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors but also increased NR2A expression, without affecting NR2B expression. Repetitive daily exposure to static magnetic fields at 100 mT for 15 min led to a decrease in the expression of MAP-2, without significantly affecting cell viability or the expression of neuronal nuclei (NeuN) and GAP-43. However, the repetitive magnetism prevented decreases in both BDNF mRNA and MAP-2 and additionally increased the expression of NR2A subunit, without altering NR1 expression in neurons cultured in the presence of MK-801. Repetitive magnetism was also effective in preventing the decrease by MK-801 in the ability of NMDA to increase intracellular free Ca2+ ions, without affecting the decrease in the maximal response. These results suggest that repetitive magnetism may at least in part counteract the neurotoxicity of MK-801 through modulation of the expression of particular NMDA receptor subunits in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

  19. PAN hollow fiber membranes elicit functional hippocampal neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Sabrina; Piscioneri, Antonella; Salerno, Simona; Tasselli, Franco; Di Vito, Anna; Giusi, Giuseppina; Canonaco, Marcello; Drioli, Enrico; De Bartolo, Loredana

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the development of an advanced in vitro biohybrid culture model system based on the use of hollow fibre membranes (HFMs) and hippocampal neurons in order to promote the formation of a high density neuronal network. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and modified polyetheretherketone (PEEK-WC) membranes were prepared in hollow fibre configuration. The morphological and metabolic behaviour of hippocampal neurons cultured on PAN HF membranes were compared with those cultured on PEEK-WC HF. The differences of cell behaviour between HFMs were evidenced by the morphometric analysis in terms of axon length and also by the investigation of metabolic activity in terms of neurotrophin secretion. These findings suggested that PAN HFMs induced the in vitro reconstruction of very highly functional and complex neuronal networks. Thus, these biomaterials could potentially be used for the in vitro realization of a functional hippocampal tissue analogue for the study of neurobiological functions and/or neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. pH modulation of Ca2+ responses and a Ca2+-dependent K+ channel in cultured rat hippocampal neurones

    PubMed Central

    Church, John; Baxter, Keith A; McLarnon, James G

    1998-01-01

    The effects of changes in extra- and intracellular pH (pHo and pHi, respectively) on depolarization-evoked rises in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and the activity of a Ca2+-dependent K+ channel were investigated in cultured fetal rat hippocampal neurones.In neurones loaded with 2′,7′-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and -6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF), changes in pHo evoked changes in pHi. At room temperature, the ratio ΔpHi : ΔpHo (the slope of the regression line relating pHi to pHo) was 0·37 under HCO3−/CO2-buffered conditions and 0·45 under Hepes-buffered conditions; corresponding values at 37 °C were 0·71 and 0·79, respectively. The measurements of changes in pHi evoked by changes in pHo were employed in subsequent experiments to correct for the effects of changes in pHi on the Kd of fura-2 for Ca2+.In fura-2-loaded neurones, rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by transient exposure to 50 mM K+ were reduced and enhanced during perfusion with acidic and alkaline media, respectively, compared with control responses at pHo 7·3. Fifty percent inhibition of high-[K+]o-evoked rises in [Ca2+]i corresponded to pHo 7·23. In the presence of 10 μM nifedipine, 50 % inhibition of high-[K+]o-evoked responses corresponded to pHo 7·20, compared with a pHo of 7·31 for 50 % inhibition of [Ca2+]i transients evoked by N-methyl-D-aspartate.Changes in pHi at a constant pHo were evoked by exposing neurones to weak acids or bases and quantified in BCECF-loaded cells. Following pH-dependent corrections for the Kd of fura-2 for Ca2+, rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by high-[K+]o in fura-2-loaded cells were found to be affected only marginally by changes in pHi. When changes in pHi similar to those observed during the application of weak acids or bases were elicited by changing pHo, reductions in pH inhibited rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by 50 mM K+ whereas increases in pH enhanced them.The effects of changes in pH on the kinetic properties of a BK-type Ca2+-dependent K+ channel were

  1. Chronic CXCL10 alters the level of activated ERK1/2 and transcriptional factors CREB and NF-kB in hippocampal neuronal cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Bajova, Hilda; Nelson, Thomas E.; Gruol, Donna L.

    2008-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways may be important targets of chemokines during neuroinflammation. In the current study, Western blot analyses show that in rat hippocampal neuronal/glial cell cultures chronic CXCL10 increases the level of protein for ERK1/2 as well as for the transcriptional factors CREB and NF-κB. Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein whose expression can be regulated by a pathway involving ERK1/2, CREB and NF-κB, was also increased in the CXCL10 treated cultures. These results implicate a role for ERK1/2, CREB and NF-κB in effects of CXCL10 on hippocampal cells and suggest that chronic CXCL10 may have a protective role during certain neuroinflammatory conditions. PMID:18329727

  2. The Kv2.1 K+ channel targets to the axon initial segment of hippocampal and cortical neurons in culture and in situ

    PubMed Central

    Sarmiere, Patrick D; Weigle, Cecile M; Tamkun, Michael M

    2008-01-01

    Background The Kv2.1 delayed-rectifier K+ channel regulates membrane excitability in hippocampal neurons where it targets to dynamic cell surface clusters on the soma and proximal dendrites. In the past, Kv2.1 has been assumed to be absent from the axon initial segment. Results Transfected and endogenous Kv2.1 is now demonstrated to preferentially accumulate within the axon initial segment (AIS) over other neurite processes; 87% of 14 DIV hippocampal neurons show endogenous channel concentrated at the AIS relative to the soma and proximal dendrites. In contrast to the localization observed in pyramidal cells, GAD positive inhibitory neurons within the hippocampal cultures did not show AIS targeting. Photoactivable-GFP-Kv2.1-containing clusters at the AIS were stable, moving <1 μm/hr with no channel turnover. Photobleach studies indicated individual channels within the cluster perimeter were highly mobile (FRAP τ = 10.4 ± 4.8 sec), supporting our model that Kv2.1 clusters are formed by the retention of mobile channels behind a diffusion-limiting perimeter. Demonstrating that the AIS targeting is not a tissue culture artifact, Kv2.1 was found in axon initial segments within both the adult rat hippocampal CA1, CA2, and CA3 layers and cortex. Conclusion In summary, Kv2.1 is associated with the axon initial segment both in vitro and in vivo where it may modulate action potential frequency and back propagation. Since transfected Kv2.1 initially localizes to the AIS before appearing on the soma, it is likely multiple mechanisms regulate Kv2.1 trafficking to the cell surface. PMID:19014551

  3. Cholesterol does not affect the toxicity of amyloid beta fragment but mimics its effect on MTT formazan exocytosis in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Saito, H

    1999-12-01

    It has recently been reported that methyl-beta-cyclodextrin-solubilized cholesterol protects PC12 cells from amyloid beta protein (Abeta) toxicity. To ask if this is the case in brain neurons, we investigated its effect in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons. In basal culture conditions with no addition of Abeta, methyl-beta-cyclodextrin-solubilized cholesterol at concentrations of 30-100 microM was toxic to neurons, but at concentrations of 1-10 microM promoted neuronal survival. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrin-solubilized cholesterol at 1-10 microM was also effective in protecting neurons from toxicity of 20 microM Abeta. However, these effects were all mimicked by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin alone, but not by cholesterol solubilized by dimethylsulfoxide or ethanol. The effects of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin-solubilized cholesterol on neuronal survival and Abeta toxicity are probably attributed to the action of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, but not cholesterol. Alternatively, we found that methyl-beta-cyclodextrin-solubilized cholesterol at lower concentrations ( > 10 nM) inhibited cellular reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2.5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) by promoting the exocytosis of MTT formazan. This effect was shared by dimethylsulfoxide- or ethanol-solubilized cholesterol, but not by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, supporting that it is attributed to the action of cholesterol. These results suggest that cholesterol does not protect neurons from Abeta toxicity, or rather inhibits cellular MTT reduction in a similar manner to Abeta.

  4. Culture of primary rat hippocampal neurons: design, analysis, and optimization of a microfluidic device for cell seeding, coherent growth, and solute delivery.

    PubMed

    Barbati, Alexander C; Fang, Cheng; Banker, Gary A; Kirby, Brian J

    2013-02-01

    We present the design, analysis, construction, and culture results of a microfluidic device for the segregation and chemical stimulation of primary rat hippocampal neurons. Our device is designed to achieve spatio-temporal solute delivery to discrete sections of neurons with mitigated mechanical stress. We implement a geometric guidance technique to direct axonal processes of the neurons into specific areas of the device to achieve solute segregation along routed cells. Using physicochemical modeling, we predict flows, concentration profiles, and mechanical stresses within pertiment sections of the device. We demonstrate cell viability and growth within the closed device over a period of 11 days. Additionally, our modeling methodology may be generalized and applied to other device geometries.

  5. Involvement of cyclin D1/CDK4 and pRb mediated by PI3K/AKT pathway activation in Pb{sup 2+}-induced neuronal death in cultured hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chenchen Xing Tairan Tang Mingliang Yong Wu Yan Dan Deng Hongmin Wang Huili Wang Ming Chen Jutao Ruan Diyun

    2008-06-15

    Lead (Pb) is widely recognized as a neurotoxicant. One of the suggested mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity is apoptotic cell death. And the mechanism by which Pb{sup 2+} causes neuronal death is not well understood. The present study sought to examine the obligate nature of cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), phosphorylation of its substrate retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and its select upstream signal phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway in the death of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons evoked by Pb{sup 2+}. Our data showed that lead treatment of primary hippocampal cultures results in dose-dependent cell death. Inhibition of CDK4 prevented Pb{sup 2+}-induced neuronal death significantly but was incomplete. In addition, we demonstrated that the levels of cyclin D1 and pRb/p107 were increased during Pb{sup 2+} treatment. These elevated expression persisted up to 48 h, returning to control levels after 72 h. We also presented pharmacological and morphological evidences that cyclin D1/CDK4 and pRb/p107 were required for such kind of neuronal death. Addition of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (30 {mu}M) or wortmannin (100 nM) significantly rescued the cultured hippocampal neurons from death caused by Pb{sup 2+}. And that Pb{sup 2+}-elicited phospho-AKT (Ser473) participated in the induction of cyclin D1 and partial pRb/p107 expression. These results provide evidences that cell cycle elements play a required role in the death of neurons evoked by Pb{sup 2+} and suggest that certain signaling elements upstream of cyclin D1/CDK4 are modified and/or required for this form of neuronal death.

  6. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-03-22

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron's tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network's activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits.

  7. Low-Mg(2+) treatment increases sensitivity of voltage-gated Na(+) channels to Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated modulation in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Zhou, Pei-Dong; Gao, Qing-Hua; Gong, Jian; Feng, Rui; Xu, Xiao-Xue; Liu, Shu-Yuan; Hu, Hui-Yuan; Zhao, Mei-Mi; Adam, Hogan-Cann; Cai, Ji-Qun; Hao, Li-Ying

    2015-04-15

    Culture of hippocampal neurons in low-Mg(2+) medium (low-Mg(2+) neurons) results in induction of continuous seizure activity. However, the underlying mechanism of the contribution of low Mg(2+) to hyperexcitability of neurons has not been clarified. Our data, obtained using the patch-clamp technique, show that voltage-gated Na(+) channel (VGSC) activity, which is associated with a persistent, noninactivating Na(+) current (INa,P), was modulated by calmodulin (CaM) in a concentration-dependent manner in normal and low-Mg(2+) neurons, but the channel activity was more sensitive to Ca(2+)/CaM regulation in low-Mg(2+) than normal neurons. The increased sensitivity of VGSCs in low-Mg(2+) neurons was partially retained when CaM12 and CaM34, CaM mutants with disabled binding sites in the N or C lobe, were used but was diminished when CaM1234, a CaM mutant in which all four Ca(2+) sites are disabled, was used, indicating that functional Ca(2+)-binding sites from either lobe of CaM are required for modulation of VGSCs in low-Mg(2+) neurons. Furthermore, the number of neurons exhibiting colocalization of CaM with the VGSC subtypes NaV1.1, NaV1.2, and NaV1.3 was significantly higher in low- Mg(2+) than normal neurons, as shown by immunofluorescence. Our main finding is that low-Mg(2+) treatment increases sensitivity of VGSCs to Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated regulation. Our data reveal that CaM, as a core regulating factor, connects the functional roles of the three main intracellular ions, Na(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+), by modulating VGSCs and provides a possible explanation for the seizure discharge observed in low-Mg(2+) neurons.

  8. Neurotrophic effects of tianeptine on hippocampal neurons: a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chin-Chen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Kuan-Ting; Shieh, Ja-Ping; Wang, Li-Kai; Shui, Hao-Ai; Ho, Shung-Tai

    2010-02-05

    Tianeptine, an atypical tricyclic antidepressant with unique characteristics, can improve memory and prevent stress-induced hippocampal damage. It has neuroplastic and neurotrophic effects on hippocampal neurons and can prevent dendritic atrophy of the hippocampus in certain pathological conditions. To obtain a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms, we performed a proteomic analysis on tianeptine-treated hippocampal neurons. Primary hippocampal neurons were prepared from fetal Sprague-Dawley rats, eliminating glia cells by addition of cytosine beta-D-arabinofuranoside at day 2 in vitro (DIV2). The neurons were treated with tianeptine (10 microg/mL) or vehicle at DIV3, then harvested at DIV4 or DIV9 for immunocytochemical analysis of, respectively, neurite outgrowth or synapse formation. A proteomics analysis was performed on DIV4 neurons and the data were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Using specific markers, we demonstrated that tianeptine can augment neurite growth and promote synaptic contacts in cultured hippocampal neurons. The proteomics analysis identified 11 differentially expressed proteins, with roles in neurite growth, metabolism of neurotrophic substances, synaptogenesis, and synaptic activity homeostasis. The data shed light on the mechanisms underlying the neurotrophic effect of tianeptine observed in both animal studies and the clinic.

  9. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron’s tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network’s activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits. PMID:26961000

  10. Formation of Essential Ultrastructural Interface between Cultured Hippocampal Cells and Gold Mushroom-Shaped MEA- Toward "IN-CELL" Recordings from Vertebrate Neurons.

    PubMed

    Fendyur, Anna; Mazurski, Noa; Shappir, Joseph; Spira, Micha E

    2011-01-01

    Using cultured Aplysia neurons we recently reported on the development of a novel approach in which an extracellular, non-invasive multi-electrode-array system provides multisite, attenuated, intracellular recordings of subthreshold synaptic potentials, and action potentials (APs), the so called "IN-CELL" recording configuration (to differentiate it from intracellular recordings). Because of its non-invasive nature, the configuration can be used for long term semi intracellular electrophysiological monitoring of APs and synaptic potentials. Three principals converge to generate the IN-CELL configuration: (a) engulfment of approximately 1 μm size gold mushroom-shaped microelectrodes (gMμE) by the neurons, (b) formation of high seal resistance between the cell's plasma membrane and the engulfed gMμE, and (c), autonomous localized increased conductance of the membrane patch facing the gMμE. Using dissociated rat hippocampal cultures we report here that the necessary morphological and ultrastructural relationships to generate the IN-CELL recording configuration are formed between hippocampal cells and the gMμEs. Interestingly, even <1 μm thin branches expand and engulf the gMμE structures. Recordings of spontaneous electrical activity revealed fast ∼2 ms, 0.04-0.75 mV positive monophasic APs (FPMP). We propose that the FPMP are attenuated APs generated by neurons that engulf gMμEs. Computer simulations of analog electrical circuits depicting the cell-gMμE configuration point out the parameters that should be altered to improve the neuron-gMμE electrical coupling.

  11. IGF-1-Involved Negative Feedback of NR2B NMDA Subunits Protects Cultured Hippocampal Neurons Against NMDA-Induced Excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Sun, Wei; Han, Song; Li, Jianing; Ding, Shu; Wang, Wei; Yin, Yanling

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a multifunctional protein involved in neuronal polarity and axonal guidance. In our previous study, it was discovered that IGF-1 alleviated 50-μM NMDA-induced excitotoxicity against neuronal autophagy via depression of NR2B p-Ser1303 activation. However, it was found that NMDA at a higher dose did not cause neuronal autophagy. And, the performance of IGF-1 under severe excitotoxicity still needs to be clarified. In this study, we observed that IGF-1 can salvage the hippocampal neurons in an autophagy-independent manner after 150-μM NMDA exposure using thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Western blot assay, and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, over-activation of post-synaptic NMDARs was found with the whole-cell patch clamp recording method. In order to explore whether there is a positive feedback way for post-synaptic NMDARs and the different pathway caused by 150 μM NMDA, the phosphorylation level of Fyn and the phosphorylation site of NR2B were investigated. It was observed that NR2B p-Tyr1472 was increased by the activation of Fyn after 150-μM NMDA exposure. When the neutralizing antibody against NR2B p-Ser1303 was added into the medium, both the activations of Fyn and NR2B p-Tyr1472 were blocked, suggesting NR2B p-Ser1303 may be the initial step of NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. In addition, since IGF-1 can block the initial step of NR2B activation, its effect is concluded to continue with the development of excitotoxicity. Overall, this study strongly indicates that the relationship between different phosphorylation sites of NR2B should be laid more emphasis on, which may be a vital target for the NR2B-involved excitotoxicity.

  12. MicroRNA-132 Interact with p250GAP/Cdc42 Pathway in the Hippocampal Neuronal Culture Model of Acquired Epilepsy and Associated with Epileptogenesis Process

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xi; Xu, Tao; Ma, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that epilepsy is the result of synaptic reorganization and pathological excitatory loop formation in the central nervous system; however, the mechanisms that regulate this process are not well understood. We proposed that microRNA-132 (miR-132) and p250GAP might play important roles in this process by activating the downstream Rho GTPase family. We tested this hypothesis using a magnesium-free medium-induced epileptic model of cultured hippocampal neurons. We investigated whether miR-132 regulates GTPase activity through p250GAP and found that Cdc42 was significantly activated in our experimental model. Silencing miR-132 inhibited the electrical excitability level of cultured epileptic neurons, whereas silencing p250GAP had an opposite effect. In addition, we verified the effect of miR-132 in vivo and found that silencing miR-132 inhibited the aberrant formation of dendritic spines and chronic spontaneous seizure in a lithium-pilocarpine-induced epileptic mouse model. Finally, we confirmed that silencing miR-132 has a neuroprotective effect on cultured epileptic neurons; however, this effect did not occur through the p250GAP pathway. Generally, silencing miR-132 may suppress spontaneous seizure activity through the miR-132/p250GAP/Cdc42 pathway by regulating the morphology and electrophysiology of dendritic spines; therefore, miR-132 may serve as a potential target for the development of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:27579184

  13. Nanomolar concentrations of inorganic lead increase Ca2+ efflux and decrease intracellular free Ca2+ ion concentrations in cultured rat hippocampal neurons by a calmodulin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C; Kern, M; Audesirk, G

    2000-06-01

    Inorganic lead (Pb2+) activates calmodulin, which in turn may stimulate many other cellular processes. The plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase is a calmodulin-stimulated enzyme that plays the major role in regulating the "resting" intracellular free Ca2+ ion concentration, [Ca2+]i. We hypothesized that exposing neurons to low levels of Pb2+ would cause Pb2+ to enter the cytoplasm, and that intracellular Pb2+, by activating calmodulin, would stimulate plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase activity, thereby increasing Ca2+ extrusion and reducing [Ca2+]i. We used the ratiometric Ca2+ indicator fura-2 to estimate changes in [Ca2+]i. In vitro calibrations of fura-2 with solutions of defined free Ca2+ and free Pb2+ concentrations showed that, at free Ca2+ concentrations from 10 nM to 1000 nM, adding Pb2+ caused either no significant change in the F340/F380 ratio (free Pb2+ concentrations from 100 fM to 1 pM) or increased the F340/F380 ratio (free Pb2+ concentrations from 5 to 50 pM). Therefore, fura-2 should be suitable for estimating Pb2+-induced decreases in [Ca2+]i, but not increases in [Ca2+]i. We exposed cultured embryonic rat hippocampal neurons to 100 nM Pb2+ for periods from 1 hour to 2 days and measured the F340/F380 ratio; the ratio decreased significantly by 9 to 16% at all time points, indicating that Pb2+ exposure decreased [Ca2+]i. In neurons loaded with 45Ca, Pb2+ exposure increased Ca2+ efflux for at least two hours; by 24 hours, Ca2+ efflux returned to control levels. Influx of 45Ca was not altered by Pb2+ exposure. Low concentrations (250 nM) of the calmodulin inhibitor calmidazolium had no effect on either 45Ca efflux or on the F340/F380 ratio in fura-loaded control neurons, but completely eliminated the increase in 45Ca efflux and decrease in F340/F380 ratio in Pb2+-exposed neurons. Zaldoride, another calmodulin inhibitor, also eliminated the decrease in F340/F380 ratio in Pb2+-exposed neurons. We conclude that Pb2+ exposure decreases [Ca2+]i and increases Ca2+ efflux

  14. Activation of TRPC4β by Gαi subunit increases Ca2+ selectivity and controls neurite morphogenesis in cultured hippocampal neuron.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae-Pyo; Roh, Seung-Eon; Wie, Jinhong; Kim, Jinsung; Kim, Hana; Lee, Kyu-Pil; Yang, Dongki; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Kim, In-Gyu; Kang, David E; Kim, Hyun Jin; So, Insuk

    2013-10-01

    The ubiquitous transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels function as non-selective, Ca(2+)-permeable channels. TRPC channels are activated by stimulation of Gαq-PLC-coupled receptors. Here, we report that TRPC4/TRPC5 can be activated by Gαi. We studied the essential role of Gαi subunits in TRPC4 activation and investigated changes in ion selectivity and pore dilation of the TRPC4 channel elicited by the Gαi2 subunit. Activation of TRPC4 by Gαi2 increased Ca2+ permeability and Ca2+ influx through TRPC4 channels. Co-expression of the muscarinic receptor (M2) and TRPC4 in HEK293 cells induced TRPC4-mediated Ca2+ influx. Moreover, both TRPC4β and the TRPC4β-Gαi2 signaling complex induced inhibition of neurite growth and arborization in cultured hippocampal neurons. Cells treated with KN-93, a CaMKII inhibitor, prevented TRPC4- and TRPC4-Gαi2(Q205L)-mediated inhibition of neurite branching and growth. These findings indicate an essential role of Gαi proteins in TRPC4 activation and extend our knowledge of the functional role of TRPC4 in hippocampal neurons.

  15. Regulation of neurite growth in immortalized mouse hypothalamic neurons and rat hippocampal primary cultures by teneurin C-terminal-associated peptide-1.

    PubMed

    Al Chawaf, A; St Amant, K; Belsham, D; Lovejoy, D A

    2007-02-23

    Teneurins are a highly conserved family of four type II transmembrane proteins that are expressed in the CNS. The protein possesses several functional domains including a unique bioactive 40-41 amino acid sequence at the extracellular terminus. Synthetic versions of this teneurin C-terminal-associated peptide (TCAP) can modulate cyclic AMP accumulation, cell proliferation and teneurin mRNA levels in vitro. Furthermore, i.c.v. injections of TCAP-1 into rat brain induce major changes in acoustic startle response behavior 3 weeks after administration, suggesting that the peptide may act to alter interneuron communication via changes in neurite and axon outgrowth. Synthetic mouse/rat TCAP-1 was used to treat cultured immortalized mouse hypothalamic cells, to determine if TCAP-1 could directly regulate neurite and axon growth. TCAP-1-treated cells showed a significant increase in the length of neurites accompanied by a marked increase in beta-tubulin transcription and translation as determined by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Changes in alpha-actinin-4 transcription and beta-actin protein expression were also noted. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy using beta-tubulin antiserum showed enhanced resolution of beta-tubulin cytoskeletal elements throughout the cell. In order to determine if the effects of TCAP-1 could be reproduced in primary neuronal cultures, primary cultures of E18 rat hippocampal cells were treated with 100 nM TCAP-1. The TCAP-1-treated hippocampal cultures showed a significant increase in both the number of cells, dendritic branching and the presence of large and fasciculated beta-tubulin immunoreactive axons. These data suggest that TCAP acts, in part, as a functional region of the teneurins to regulate neurite and axonal growth of neurons.

  16. SIRT1 regulates dendritic development in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Codocedo, Juan F; Allard, Claudio; Godoy, Juan A; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic arborization is required for proper neuronal connectivity. SIRT1, a NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, has been associated to ageing and longevity, which in neurons is linked to neuronal differentiation and neuroprotection. In the present study, the role of SIRT1 in dendritic development was evaluated in cultured hippocampal neurons which were transfected at 3 days in vitro with a construct coding for SIRT1 or for the dominant negative SIRT1H363Y, which lacks the catalytic activity. Neurons overexpressing SIRT1 showed an increased dendritic arborization, while neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y showed a reduction in dendritic arbor complexity. The effect of SIRT1 was mimicked by treatment with resveratrol, a well known activator of SIRT1, which has no effect in neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y indicating that the effect of resveratrol was specifically mediated by SIRT1. Moreover, hippocampal neurons overexpressing SIRT1 were resistant to dendritic dystrophy induced by Aβ aggregates, an effect that was dependent on the deacetylase activity of SIRT1. Our findings indicate that SIRT1 plays a role in the development and maintenance of dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons, and suggest that these effects are mediated by the ROCK signaling pathway.

  17. SIRT1 Regulates Dendritic Development in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Juan A.; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic arborization is required for proper neuronal connectivity. SIRT1, a NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, has been associated to ageing and longevity, which in neurons is linked to neuronal differentiation and neuroprotection. In the present study, the role of SIRT1 in dendritic development was evaluated in cultured hippocampal neurons which were transfected at 3 days in vitro with a construct coding for SIRT1 or for the dominant negative SIRT1H363Y, which lacks the catalytic activity. Neurons overexpressing SIRT1 showed an increased dendritic arborization, while neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y showed a reduction in dendritic arbor complexity. The effect of SIRT1 was mimicked by treatment with resveratrol, a well known activator of SIRT1, which has no effect in neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y indicating that the effect of resveratrol was specifically mediated by SIRT1. Moreover, hippocampal neurons overexpressing SIRT1 were resistant to dendritic dystrophy induced by Aβ aggregates, an effect that was dependent on the deacetylase activity of SIRT1. Our findings indicate that SIRT1 plays a role in the development and maintenance of dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons, and suggest that these effects are mediated by the ROCK signaling pathway. PMID:23056585

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 Tat protein increases the number of inhibitory synapses between hippocampal neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Hargus, Nicholas J; Thayer, Stanley A

    2013-11-06

    Synaptodendritic damage correlates with cognitive decline in many neurodegenerative diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Because HIV-1 does not infect neurons, viral-mediated toxicity is indirect, resulting from released neurotoxins such as the HIV-1 protein transactivator of transcription (Tat). We compared the effects of Tat on inhibitory and excitatory synaptic connections between rat hippocampal neurons using an imaging-based assay that quantified clusters of the scaffolding proteins gephyrin or PSD95 fused to GFP. Tat (24 h) increased the number of GFP-gephyrin puncta and decreased the number of PSD95-GFP puncta. The effects of Tat on inhibitory and excitatory synapse number were mediated via the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and subsequent Ca(2+) influx through GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs). The effects of Tat on synapse number required cell-autonomous activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Ca(2+) buffering experiments suggested that loss of excitatory synapses required activation of CaMKII in close apposition to the NMDAR, whereas the increase in inhibitory synapses required Ca(2+) diffusion to a more distal site. The increase in inhibitory synapses was prevented by inhibiting the insertion of GABAA receptors into the membrane. Synaptic changes induced by Tat (16 h) were reversed by blocking either GluN2B-containing NMDARs or neuronal nitric oxide synthase, indicating changing roles for pathways activated by NMDAR subtypes during the neurotoxic process. Compensatory changes in the number of inhibitory and excitatory synapses may serve as a novel mechanism to reduce network excitability in the presence of HIV-1 neurotoxins; these changes may inform the development of treatments for HAND.

  19. Formation of Essential Ultrastructural Interface between Cultured Hippocampal Cells and Gold Mushroom-Shaped MEA- Toward “IN-CELL” Recordings from Vertebrate Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fendyur, Anna; Mazurski, Noa; Shappir, Joseph; Spira, Micha E.

    2011-01-01

    Using cultured Aplysia neurons we recently reported on the development of a novel approach in which an extracellular, non-invasive multi-electrode-array system provides multisite, attenuated, intracellular recordings of subthreshold synaptic potentials, and action potentials (APs), the so called “IN-CELL” recording configuration (to differentiate it from intracellular recordings). Because of its non-invasive nature, the configuration can be used for long term semi intracellular electrophysiological monitoring of APs and synaptic potentials. Three principals converge to generate the IN-CELL configuration: (a) engulfment of approximately 1 μm size gold mushroom-shaped microelectrodes (gMμE) by the neurons, (b) formation of high seal resistance between the cell’s plasma membrane and the engulfed gMμE, and (c), autonomous localized increased conductance of the membrane patch facing the gMμE. Using dissociated rat hippocampal cultures we report here that the necessary morphological and ultrastructural relationships to generate the IN-CELL recording configuration are formed between hippocampal cells and the gMμEs. Interestingly, even <1 μm thin branches expand and engulf the gMμE structures. Recordings of spontaneous electrical activity revealed fast ∼2 ms, 0.04–0.75 mV positive monophasic APs (FPMP). We propose that the FPMP are attenuated APs generated by neurons that engulf gMμEs. Computer simulations of analog electrical circuits depicting the cell–gMμE configuration point out the parameters that should be altered to improve the neuron–gMμE electrical coupling. PMID:22163219

  20. Kainic acid-induced neurodegeneration and activation of inflammatory processes in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures: treatment with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor does not prevent neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Juha T; Ruohonen, Saku; Kukko-Lukjanov, Tiina-Kaisa; Plysjuk, Anna; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Holopainen, Irma E

    2011-06-01

    In the postnatal rodent hippocampus status epilepticus (SE) leads to age- and region-specific excitotoxic neuronal damage, the precise mechanisms of which are still incompletely known. Recent studies suggest that the activation of inflammatory responses together with glial cell reactivity highly contribute to excitotoxic neuronal damage. However, pharmacological tools to attenuate their activation in the postnatal brain are still poorly elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of inflammatory mediators in kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal damage in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs). A specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl]-methanesulfonamide (NS-398) was used to study whether or not it could ameliorate neuronal death. Our results show that KA treatment (24 h) resulted in a dose-dependent degeneration of CA3a/b pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, COX-2 immunoreactivity was pronouncedly enhanced particularly in CA3c pyramidal neurons, microglial and astrocyte morphology changed from a resting to active appearance, the expression of the microglial specific protein, Iba1, increased, and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production increased. These indicated the activation of inflammatory processes. However, the expression of neither proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), nor the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 mRNA was significantly altered by KA treatment as studied by real-time PCR. Despite activation of an array of inflammatory processes, neuronal damage could not be rescued either with the combined pre- and co-treatment with a specific COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398. Our results suggest that KA induces activation of a repertoire of inflammatory processes in immature OHCs, and that the timing of anti-inflammatory treatment to achieve neuroprotection is a challenge due to developmental properties and the complexity of inflammatory processes activated by

  1. Hippocampal culture stimulus with 4-megahertz ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert; LaManna, Justine K.; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Morrison, Barclay, III

    2012-10-01

    Among current modalities, ultrasound uniquely offers both millisecond and millimeter accuracy in noninvasively stimulating brain tissue. In addition, by sweeping the ultrasound beam within the refractory period of the neuronal tissue, ultrasonic neuromodulation can be adapted to target extended or multiply connected regions with quasi-simultaneity. Towards the development of this safe brain stimulus technique, the response of rat hippocampal cultures to ultrasound was investigated. Hippocampal slices, 0.4-mm thick, were obtained from 8-day old Sprague Dawley rats and cultured for 6 days. The in vitro cultures were exposed to multiple 100-ms 4.04-MHz ultrasound pulses from a 42-mm diameter, 90-mm spherical cap transducer. Peak pressure ranged from 0 through about 77 kPa. Responses in the form of electrical potentials from a sixty channel electrode array were digitized and recorded. The DG and CA1 regions of the hippocampus exhibited similar ultrasonically-evoked field potentials.

  2. Astrocyte calcium signalling orchestrates neuronal synchronization in organotypic hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takuya; Ishikawa, Tomoe; Abe, Reimi; Nakayama, Ryota; Asada, Akiko; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are thought to detect neuronal activity in the form of intracellular calcium elevations; thereby, astrocytes can regulate neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission. Little is known, however, about how the astrocyte calcium signal regulates the activity of neuronal populations. In this study, we addressed this issue using functional multineuron calcium imaging in hippocampal slice cultures. Under normal conditions, CA3 neuronal networks exhibited temporally correlated activity patterns, occasionally generating large synchronization among a subset of cells. The synchronized neuronal activity was correlated with astrocyte calcium events. Calcium buffering by an intracellular injection of a calcium chelator into multiple astrocytes reduced the synaptic strength of unitary transmission between pairs of surrounding pyramidal cells and caused desynchronization of the neuronal networks. Uncaging the calcium in the astrocytes increased the frequency of neuronal synchronization. These data suggest an essential role of the astrocyte calcium signal in the maintenance of basal neuronal function at the circuit level. PMID:24710057

  3. N-Docosahexaenoylethanolamide promotes development of hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Yong; Moon, Hyun-Seuk; Cao, Dehua; Lee, Jeongrim; Kevala, Karl; Jun, Sang Beom; Lovinger, David M.; Akbar, Mohammed; Huang, Bill X.

    2011-01-01

    DHA (docosahexaenoic acid, C22:6,n−3) has been shown to promote neurite growth and synaptogenesis in embryonic hippocampal neurons, supporting the importance of DHA known for hippocampus-related learning and memory function. In the present study, we demonstrate that DHA metabolism to DEA (N-docosahexaenoylethanolamide) is a significant mechanism for hippocampal neuronal development, contributing to synaptic function. We found that a fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB597 potentiates DHA-induced neurite growth, synaptogenesis and synaptic protein expression. Active metabolism of DHA to DEA was observed in embryonic day 18 hippocampal neuronal cultures, which was increased further by URB597. Synthetic DEA promoted hippocampal neurite growth and synaptogenesis at substantially lower concentrations in comparison with DHA. DEA-treated neurons increased the expression of synapsins and glutamate receptor subunits and exhibited enhanced glutamatergic synaptic activity, as was the case for DHA. The DEA level in mouse fetal hippocampi was altered according to the maternal dietary supply of n−3 fatty acids, suggesting that DEA formation is a relevant in vivo process responding to the DHA status. In conclusion, DHA metabolism to DEA is a significant biochemical mechanism for neurite growth, synaptogenesis and synaptic protein expression, leading to enhanced glutamatergic synaptic function. The novel DEA-dependent mechanism offers a new molecular insight into hippocampal neurodevelopment and function. PMID:21281269

  4. Long-term culture of rat hippocampal neurons at low density in serum-free medium: combination of the sandwich culture technique with the three-dimensional nanofibrous hydrogel PuraMatrix.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Ai; Sankai, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    The primary culture of neuronal cells plays an important role in neuroscience. There has long been a need for methods enabling the long-term culture of primary neurons at low density, in defined serum-free medium. However, the lower the cell density, the more difficult it is to maintain the cells in culture. Therefore, we aimed to develop a method for long-term culture of neurons at low density, in serum-free medium, without the need for a glial feeder layer. Here, we describe the work leading to our determination of a protocol for long-term (>2 months) primary culture of rat hippocampal neurons in serum-free medium at the low density of 3×10(4) cells/mL (8.9×10(3) cells/cm2) without a glial feeder layer. Neurons were cultured on a three-dimensional nanofibrous hydrogel, PuraMatrix, and sandwiched under a coverslip to reproduce the in vivo environment, including the three-dimensional extracellular matrix, low-oxygen conditions, and exposure to concentrated paracrine factors. We examined the effects of varying PuraMatrix concentrations, the timing and presence or absence of a coverslip, the timing of neuronal isolation from embryos, cell density at plating, medium components, and changing the medium or not on parameters such as developmental pattern, cell viability, neuronal ratio, and neurite length. Using our method of combining the sandwich culture technique with PuraMatrix in Neurobasal medium/B27/L-glutamine for primary neuron culture, we achieved longer neurites (≥3,000 µm), greater cell viability (≥30%) for 2 months, and uniform culture across the wells. We also achieved an average neuronal ratio of 97%, showing a nearly pure culture of neurons without astrocytes. Our method is considerably better than techniques for the primary culture of neurons, and eliminates the need for a glial feeder layer. It also exhibits continued support for axonal elongation and synaptic activity for long periods (>6 weeks).

  5. Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Promotes Neuronal Viability and Activity of Hippocampal Neuronal Circuits In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alcazar, Marta; Culley, Georgia; Lyckenvik, Tim; Mobarrez, Kristoffer; Bjorefeldt, Andreas; Wasling, Pontus; Seth, Henrik; Asztely, Frederik; Harrer, Andrea; Iglseder, Bernhard; Aigner, Ludwig; Hanse, Eric; Illes, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    For decades it has been hypothesized that molecules within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diffuse into the brain parenchyma and influence the function of neurons. However, the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits are largely unexplored and unknown. A major reason for this is the absence of appropriate neuronal in vitro model systems, and it is uncertain if neurons cultured in pure CSF survive and preserve electrophysiological functionality in vitro. In this article, we present an approach to address how human CSF (hCSF) influences neuronal circuits in vitro. We validate our approach by comparing the morphology, viability, and electrophysiological function of single neurons and at the network level in rat organotypic slice and primary neuronal cultures cultivated either in hCSF or in defined standard culture media. Our results demonstrate that rodent hippocampal slices and primary neurons cultured in hCSF maintain neuronal morphology and preserve synaptic transmission. Importantly, we show that hCSF increases neuronal viability and the number of electrophysiologically active neurons in comparison to the culture media. In summary, our data indicate that hCSF represents a physiological environment for neurons in vitro and a superior culture condition compared to the defined standard media. Moreover, this experimental approach paves the way to assess the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits as well as suggesting a novel strategy for central nervous system (CNS) disease modeling. PMID:26973467

  6. Inhibitory control of hippocampal inhibitory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chamberland, Simon; Topolnik, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Information processing within neuronal networks is determined by a dynamic partnership between principal neurons and local circuit inhibitory interneurons. The population of GABAergic interneurons is extremely heterogeneous and comprises, in many brain regions, cells with divergent morphological and physiological properties, distinct molecular expression profiles, and highly specialized functions. GABAergic interneurons have been studied extensively during the past two decades, especially in the hippocampus, which is a relatively simple cortical structure. Different types of hippocampal inhibitory interneurons control spike initiation [e.g., axo-axonic and basket cells (BCs)] and synaptic integration (e.g., bistratified and oriens–lacunosum moleculare interneurons) within pyramidal neurons and synchronize local network activity, providing a means for functional segregation of neuronal ensembles and proper routing of hippocampal information. Thus, it is thought that, at least in the hippocampus, GABAergic inhibitory interneurons represent critical regulating elements at all stages of information processing, from synaptic integration and spike generation to large-scale network activity. However, this raises an important question: if inhibitory interneurons are fundamental for network computations, what are the mechanisms that control the activity of the interneurons themselves? Given the essential role of synaptic inhibition in the regulation of neuronal activity, it would be logical to expect that specific inhibitory mechanisms have evolved to control the operation of interneurons. Here, we review the mechanisms of synaptic inhibition of interneurons and discuss their role in the operation of hippocampal inhibitory circuits. PMID:23162426

  7. GDNF pre-treatment aggravates neuronal cell loss in oxygen-glucose deprived hippocampal slice cultures: a possible effect of glutamate transporter up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Bonde, C; Sarup, A; Schousboe, A; Gegelashvili, G; Noraberg, J; Zimmer, J

    2003-01-01

    Besides its neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects on dopaminergic neurons and spinal motoneurons, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has potent neuroprotective effects in cerebral ischemia. The protective effect has so far been related to reduced activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAr). This study tested the effects of GDNF on glutamate transporter expression, with the hypothesis that modulation of glutamate transporter activity would affect the outcome of cerebral ischemia. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, derived from 1-week-old rats, were treated with 100 ng/ml GDNF for either 2 or 5 days, followed by Western blot analysis of NMDAr subunit 1 (NR1) and two glutamate transporter subtypes, GLAST and GLT-1. After 5-day exposure to GDNF, expression of GLAST and GLT-1 was up-regulated to 169 and 181% of control values, respectively, whereas NR1 was down-regulated to 64% of control. However, despite these changes that potentially would support neuronal resistance to excitotoxicity, the long-term treatment with GDNF was found to aggravate the neuronal damage induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The increased cell death, assessed by propidium iodide (PI) uptake, occurred not only among the most susceptible CA1 pyramidal cells, but also in CA3 and fascia dentata. Given that glutamate transporters are able to release glutamate by reversed action during energy failure, it is suggested that the observed increase in OGD-induced cell death in the GDNF-pretreated cultures was caused by the build-up of excitotoxic concentrations of extracellular glutamate released through the glutamate transporters, which were up-regulated by GDNF. Although the extent and consequences of glutamate release via reversal of GLAST and GLT-1 transporters seem to vary in different energy failure models, the present findings should be taken into account in clinical trials of GDNF.

  8. Non-GABA(A)-mediated effects of lindane on neurite development and intracellular free calcium ion concentration in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C A; Audesirk, G

    1995-04-01

    Changes in transmembrane Ca(2+) fluxes and intracellular free Ca(2+) ion concentrations ([Ca(2+)](in)) regulate many aspects of neurite development in cultured neurons. Lindane has been shown to increase [Ca(2+)](in) in several cell types. It was therefore hypothesized that lindane exposure would increase [Ca(2+)](in) and thereby alter neurite development in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The study reported here showed that lindane (50-100 muM) increased [Ca(2+)](in) during short-term exposure (up to 4 hr); in contrast, with long-term exposure (24-48 hr) lindane (1-50 mum) decreased [Ca(2+)](in) significantly below control levels. Lindane decreased neurite initiation at high concentrations (25 mum or above). Lindane increased dendrite number at low concentrations (0.5-1 muM), but decreased dendrite number at high concentrations (50 mum or above). Lindane decreased axon and dendrite elongation and branching at 50 mum. Loading neurons with 1 mum 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), a calcium chelator that partially 'clamps' [Ca(2+)](in), eliminated the effects of 50 mum lindane on [Ca(2+)](in) in short-term exposures. BAPTA did not significantly reverse the inhibition of neurite initiation or axonal elongation caused by 50 mum lindane. However, BAPTA partially reversed the inhibition of dendrite elongation and completely reversed the inhibition of axon and dendrite branching caused by 50 mum lindane. Therefore, some, but not all, of lindane's effects on neurite development may be due to changes in [Ca(2+)](in). Picrotoxin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A))-associated chloride channel antagonist, had no effect on [Ca(2+)](in) or any parameters of neurite growth, suggesting that the effects of lindane on neurite development and [Ca(2+)](in) were not mediated through actions on GABA(A)-associated chloride channels.

  9. Unmodified CdSe Quantum Dots Induce Elevation of Cytoplasmic Calcium Levels and Impairment of Functional Properties of Sodium Channels in Rat Primary Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Mingliang; Xing, Tairan; Zeng, Jie; Wang, Huili; Li, Chenchen; Yin, Shuting; Yan, Dan; Deng, Hongmin; Liu, Jin; Wang, Ming; Chen, Jutao; Ruan, Di-Yun

    2008-01-01

    Background The growing applications of nanotechnologic products, such as quantum dots (QDs), increase the likelihood of exposure. Furthermore, their accumulation in the bioenvironment and retention in cells and tissues are arousing increasing worries about the potentially harmful side effects of these nanotechnologic products. Previous studies concerning QD cytotoxicity focused on the reactive oxygen species produced by QDs. Cellular calcium homeostasis dysregulation caused by QDs may be also responsible for QD cytotoxicity. Meanwhile the interference of QDs with voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) current (INa) may lead to changes in electrical activity and worsen neurotoxicologic damage. Objective We aimed to investigate the potential for neurotoxicity of cadmium selenium QDs in a hippocampal neuronal culture model, focusing on cytoplasmic calcium levels and VGSCs function. Methods We used confocal laser scanning and standard whole-cell patch clamp techniques. Results We found that a) QDs induced neuron death dose dependently; b) cytoplasmic calcium levels were elevated for an extended period by QD treatment, which was due to both extracellular calcium influx and internal calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum; and c) QD treatment enhanced activation and inactivation of INa, prolonged the time course of activation, slowed INa recovery, and reduced the fraction of available VGSCs. Conclusion Results in this study provide new insights into QD toxicology and reveal potential risks of their future applications in biology and medicine. PMID:18629314

  10. Ionotropic glutamate receptors and glutamate transporters are involved in necrotic neuronal cell death induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation of hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Bonde, C; Noraberg, J; Noer, H; Zimmer, J

    2005-01-01

    Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures represent a feasible model for studies of cerebral ischemia and the role of ionotropic glutamate receptors in oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced neurodegeneration. New results and a review of existing data are presented in the first part of this paper. The role of glutamate transporters, with special reference to recent results on inhibition of glutamate transporters under normal and energy-failure (ischemia-like) conditions is reviewed in the last part of the paper. The experimental work is based on hippocampal slice cultures derived from 7 day old rats and grown for about 3 weeks. In such cultures we investigated the subfield neuronal susceptibility to oxygen-glucose deprivation, the type of induced cell death and the involvement of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Hippocampal slice cultures were also used in our studies on glutamate transporters reviewed in the last part of this paper. Neurodegeneration was monitored and/or shown by cellular uptake of propidium iodide, loss of immunocytochemical staining for microtubule-associated protein 2 and staining with Fluoro-Jade B. To distinguish between necrotic vs. apoptotic neuronal cell death we used immunocytochemical staining for active caspase-3 (apoptosis indicator) and Hoechst 33342 staining of nuclear chromatin. Our experimental studies on oxygen-glucose deprivation confirmed that CA1 pyramidal cells were the most susceptible to this ischemia-like condition. Judged by propidium iodide uptake, a selective CA1 lesion, with only minor affection on CA3, occurred in cultures exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation for 30 min. Nuclear chromatin staining by Hoechst 33342 and staining for active caspase-3 showed that oxygen-glucose deprivation induced necrotic cell death only. Addition of 10 microM of the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801, and 20 microM of the non-N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist 2,3-dihyroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl

  11. Stiff substrates enhance cultured neuronal network activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan-You; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Xie, Jing; Li, Chen-Xu; Chen, Wei-Yi; Liu, Bai-Lin; Wu, Xiao-an; Li, Shu-Na; Huo, Bo; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Hu-Cheng

    2014-08-28

    The mechanical property of extracellular matrix and cell-supporting substrates is known to modulate neuronal growth, differentiation, extension and branching. Here we show that substrate stiffness is an important microenvironmental cue, to which mouse hippocampal neurons respond and integrate into synapse formation and transmission in cultured neuronal network. Hippocampal neurons were cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates fabricated to have similar surface properties but a 10-fold difference in Young's modulus. Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel currents determined by patch-clamp recording were greater in neurons on stiff substrates than on soft substrates. Ca(2+) oscillations in cultured neuronal network monitored using time-lapse single cell imaging increased in both amplitude and frequency among neurons on stiff substrates. Consistently, synaptic connectivity recorded by paired recording was enhanced between neurons on stiff substrates. Furthermore, spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic activity became greater and more frequent in neurons on stiff substrates. Evoked excitatory transmitter release and excitatory postsynaptic currents also were heightened at synapses between neurons on stiff substrates. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence to show that substrate stiffness is an important biophysical factor modulating synapse connectivity and transmission in cultured hippocampal neuronal network. Such information is useful in designing instructive scaffolds or supporting substrates for neural tissue engineering.

  12. Axon specification in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fukata, Yuko; Kimura, Toshihide; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2002-08-01

    Neurons are the most highly polarized cells, comprised of two structurally and functionally distinct parts, axons and dendrites. This asymmetry enables a vectorial flow of signaling within neurons. One of the most fundamental questions still to be answered in neuroscience is how these two specialized processes initially develop. The first manifestation of polarization occurs when one of the immature neurites acquires axonal characteristics. We review recent advances that have highlighted the involvement of several cellular events in the initial formation of the axon, including membrane traffic and cytoskeletal rearrangement. We then discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying axon formation, focusing on the Rho family small GTPases and an axon-inducing neuronal protein, CRMP-2.

  13. Extrasynaptic vesicle recycling in mature hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ratnayaka, Arjuna; Marra, Vincenzo; Branco, Tiago; Staras, Kevin

    2011-11-08

    Fast neuronal signalling relies on highly regulated vesicle fusion and recycling at specialized presynaptic terminals. Recently, examples of non-classical neurotransmission have also been reported, where fusion of vesicles can occur at sites remote from conventional synapses. This has potentially broad biological implications, but the underlying mechanisms are not well established. Here we show that a complete vesicle recycling pathway can occur at discrete axonal sites in mature hippocampal neurons and that extrasynaptic fusion is a robust feature of native tissue. We demonstrate that laterally mobile vesicle clusters trafficking between synaptic terminals become transiently stabilized by evoked action potentials and undergo complete but delayed Ca(2+)-dependent fusion along axons. This fusion is associated with dynamic actin accumulation and, subsequently, vesicles can be locally recycled, re-acidified and re-used. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural work demonstrates that extrasynaptic fusion sites can have apposed postsynaptic specializations, suggesting that mobile vesicle recycling may underlie highly dynamic neuron-neuron communication.

  14. Dipeptide Piracetam Analogue Noopept Improves Viability of Hippocampal HT-22 Neurons in the Glutamate Toxicity Model.

    PubMed

    Antipova, T A; Nikolaev, S V; Ostrovskaya, P U; Gudasheva, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2016-05-01

    Effect of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-prolylglycine ethyl ester) on viability of neurons exposed to neurotoxic action of glutamic acid (5 mM) was studied in vitro in immortalized mouse hippocampal HT-22 neurons. Noopept added to the medium before or after glutamic acid improved neuronal survival in a concentration range of 10-11-10-5 M. Comparison of the effective noopept concentrations determined in previous studies on cultured cortical and cerebellar neurons showed that hippocampal neurons are more sensitive to the protective effect of noopept.

  15. The modulatory effect of zinc ions on voltage-gated potassium currents in cultured rat hippocampal neurons is not related to Kv1.3 channels.

    PubMed

    Teisseyre, A; Mercik, K; Mozrzymas, J W

    2007-12-01

    We applied the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to study the influence of zinc ions (Zn(2+)) and extracellular protons at acidic pH (pH(o)) on voltage-gated potassium currents in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The first goal of the study was to estimate whether Kv1.3 currents significantly contributed to voltage-gated potassium currents in examined cells. Then, the influence of both ions on the activity of other voltage-gated potassium currents in the neurons was examined. We examined both the total current and the delayed - rectifier component. Results obtained in both cases were not significantly different from each other. Available data argued against any significant contribution of Kv1.3 currents to the recorded currents. Nevertheless, application of Zn(2+) in the concentration range from 100 microM to 5 mM reversibly modulated the recorded currents. The activation midpoint was shifted by about 40 mV (total current) and 30 mV (delayed-rectifier current) towards positive membrane potentials and the activation kinetics were slowed significantly (2 - 3 fold) upon application of Zn(2+). The inactivation midpoint was also shifted towards positive membrane potentials, but less significantly (about 14 mV). The current amplitudes were reduced in a concentration-dependent manner to about 0.5 of the control value. The effects of Zn(2+) were saturated at the concentration of 1 mM. Raising extracellular proton concentration by lowering the pH(o) from 7.35 to 6.4 did not affect significantly the currents. Possible mechanisms underlying the observed phenomena and their possible physiological significance are discussed.

  16. Brief low [Mg2+]o-induced Ca2+ spikes inhibit subsequent prolonged exposure-induced excitotoxicity in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Jung; Yang, Ji Seon

    2016-01-01

    Reducing [Mg2+]o to 0.1 mM can evoke repetitive [Ca2+]i spikes and seizure activity, which induces neuronal cell death in a process called excitotoxicity. We examined the issue of whether cultured rat hippocampal neurons preconditioned by a brief exposure to 0.1 mM [Mg2+]o are rendered resistant to excitotoxicity induced by a subsequent prolonged exposure and whether Ca2+ spikes are involved in this process. Preconditioning by an exposure to 0.1 mM [Mg2+]o for 5 min inhibited significantly subsequent 24 h exposure-induced cell death 24 h later (tolerance). Such tolerance was prevented by both the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5 and the L-type Ca2+ channel antagonist nimodipine, which blocked 0.1 mM [Mg2+]o-induced [Ca2+]i spikes. The AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX significantly inhibited both the tolerance and the [Ca2+]i spikes. The intracellular Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM significantly prevented the tolerance. The nonspecific PKC inhibitor staurosporin inhibited the tolerance without affecting the [Ca2+]i spikes. While Gö6976, a specific inhibitor of PKCα had no effect on the tolerance, both the PKCε translocation inhibitor and the PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor significantly inhibited the tolerance without affecting the [Ca2+]i spikes. Furthermore, JAK-2 inhibitor AG490, MAPK kinase inhibitor PD98059, and CaMKII inhibitor KN-62 inhibited the tolerance, but PI-3 kinase inhibitor LY294,002 did not. The protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide significantly inhibited the tolerance. Collectively, these results suggest that low [Mg2+]o preconditioning induced excitotoxic tolerance was directly or indirectly mediated through the [Ca2+]i spike-induced activation of PKCε and PKCξ, JAK-2, MAPK kinase, CaMKII and the de novo synthesis of proteins. PMID:26807029

  17. Ontogeny of Biochemical, Morphological and Functional Parameters of Synaptogenesis in Primary Cultures of Rat Hippocampal and Cortical Neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    AbstractBackground: Synaptogenesis is a critical neurodevelopmental process whereby pre-and postsynaptic neurons form apposed sites of contact specialized for excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Many neurodevelopmental disorders are thought to reflect altered patterns of...

  18. Millisecond Timescale Synchrony among Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Amarasingham, Asohan; Mizuseki, Kenji; Buzsáki, György

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons in cortical circuits play critical roles in composing spike timing and oscillatory patterns in neuronal activity. These roles in turn require coherent activation of interneurons at different timescales. To investigate how the local circuitry provides for these activities, we applied resampled cross-correlation analyses to large-scale recordings of neuronal populations in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) and CA3 regions of the hippocampus of freely moving rats. Significant counts in the cross-correlation of cell pairs, relative to jittered surrogate spike-trains, allowed us to identify the effective couplings between neurons in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal regions on the timescale of milliseconds. In addition to putative excitatory and inhibitory monosynaptic connections, we uncovered prominent millisecond timescale synchrony between cell pairs, observed as peaks in the central 0 ms bin of cross-correlograms. This millisecond timescale synchrony appeared to be independent of network state, excitatory input, and γ oscillations. Moreover, it was frequently observed between cells of differing putative interneuronal type, arguing against gap junctions as the sole underlying source. Our observations corroborate recent in vitro findings suggesting that inhibition alone is sufficient to synchronize interneurons at such fast timescales. Moreover, we show that this synchronous spiking may cause stronger inhibition and rebound spiking in target neurons, pointing toward a potential function for millisecond synchrony of interneurons in shaping and affecting timing in pyramidal populations within and downstream from the circuit. PMID:25378164

  19. A calcium-permeable cGMP-activated cation conductance in hippocampal neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leinders-Zufall, T.; Rosenboom, H.; Barnstable, C. J.; Shepherd, G. M.; Zufall, F.

    1995-01-01

    Whole-cell patch clamp recordings detected a previously unidentified cGMP-activated membrane conductance in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. This conductance is nonselectively permeable for cations and is completely but reversibly blocked by external Cd2+. The Ca2+ permeability of the hippocampal cGMP-activated conductance was examined in detail, indicating that the underlying ion channels display a high relative permeability for Ca2+. The results indicate that hippocampal neurons contain a cGMP-activated membrane conductance that has some properties similar to the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels previously shown in sensory receptor cells and retinal neurons. In hippocampal neurons this conductance similarly could mediate membrane depolarization and Ca2+ fluxes in response to intracellular cGMP elevation.

  20. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) depresses n-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated current in cultured rat hippocampal neurons via CRH receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Hui; Zhang, Yanmin; Sun, Jihu; Gao, Lu; Ma, Bei; Lu, Jianqiang; Ni, Xin

    2008-03-01

    CRH, the primary regulator of the neuroendocrine responses to stress, has been shown to modulate synaptic efficacy and the process of learning and memory in hippocampus. However, effects of CRH on N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, the key receptor for synaptic plasticity, remain unclear. In primary cultured hippocampal neurons, using the technique of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we found that CRH (1 pmol/liter to 10 nmol/liter) inhibited NMDA-induced currents in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was reversed by the CRH receptor type 1 (CRHR1) antagonist antalarmin but not by the CRHR2 antagonist astressin-2B, suggesting that CRHR1 mediated the inhibitory effect of CRH. Investigations on the signaling pathways of CRH showed that CRH dose-dependently induced phosphorylated phospholipase C (PLC)-beta3 expression and increased intracellular cAMP content in these cells. Blocking PLC activity with U73122 prevented CRH-induced depression of NMDA current, whereas blocking protein kinase A (H89) and adenylate cyclase (SQ22536) failed to affect the CRH-induced depression of NMDA current. Application of inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) antagonist, Ca(2+) chelators or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also mainly blocked CRH-induced depression of NMDA currents, suggesting involvement of PLC/IP(3)R/Ca(2+)and PLC/PKC signaling pathways in CRH down-regulation of NMDA receptors. Our results suggest that CRH may exert neuromodulatory actions on hippocampus through regulating NMDA receptor function.

  1. Metformin Alleviated Aβ-Induced Apoptosis via the Suppression of JNK MAPK Signaling Pathway in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Teng, Ying; Zhang, Xingguang; Lv, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Both diabetes and hyperinsulinemia are confirmed risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Some researchers proposed that antidiabetic drugs may be used as disease-modifying therapies, such as metformin and thiazolidinediones, although more evidence was poorly supported. The aim of the current study is to investigate the role of metformin in Aβ-induced cytotoxicity and explore the underlying mechanisms. First, the experimental results show that metformin salvaged the neurons exposed to Aβ in a concentration-dependent manner with MTT and LDH assay. Further, the phosphorylation levels of JNK, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK were measured with western blot analysis. It was investigated that Aβ increased phospho-JNK significantly but had no effect on phospho-p38 MAPK and phospho-ERK1/2. Metformin decreased hyperphosphorylated JNK induced by Aβ; however, the protection of metformin against Aβ was blocked when anisomycin, the activator of JNK, was added to the medium, indicating that metformin performed its protection against Aβ in a JNK-dependent way. In addition, it was observed that metformin protected the neurons via the suppression of apoptosis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that metformin may have a positive effect on Aβ-induced cytotoxicity, which provides a preclinical strategy against AD for elders with diabetes. PMID:27403417

  2. The Edible Marine Alga Gracilariopsis chorda Alleviates Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Oxidative Stress in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mohibbullah, Md.; Hannan, Md. Abdul; Choi, Ji-Young; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Maqueshudul Haque; Hong, Yong-Ki; Choi, Jae-Suk; Choi, In Soon; Moon, Il Soo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Age-related neurological disorders are of growing concern among the elderly, and natural products with neuroprotective properties have been attracting increasing attention as candidates for the prevention or treatment of neurological disorders induced by oxidative stress. In an effort to explore natural resources, we collected some common marine seaweed from the Korean peninsula and Indonesia and screened them for neuroprotective activity against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced oxidative stress. Of the 23 seaweeds examined, the ethanol extract of Gracilariopsis chorda (GCE) provided maximum neuroprotection at an optimum concentration of 15 μg/mL, followed by Undaria pinnatifida. GCE increased cell viability after H/R, decreased the formation of reactive oxygen species (measured by 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate [DCF-DA] staining), and inhibited the double-stranded DNA breaks (measured by H2AX immunocytochemistry), apoptosis (measured by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining), internucleosomal DNA fragmentation (measured by DNA laddering), and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (measured by JC-1 staining). Using reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography, we quantitated the arachidonic acid (AA) in GCE, which provides neuroprotection against H/R-induced oxidative stress. This neuroprotective effect of AA was comparable to that of GCE. These findings suggest that the neuroprotective effect of GCE against H/R-induced neuronal death is due, at least in part, to the AA content that suppresses neuronal apoptosis. PMID:26106876

  3. Hippocampal neuronal subtypes develop abnormal dendritic arbors in the presence of Fragile X astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S; Cheng, C; Doering, L C

    2016-06-02

    Astrocytes are now recognized as key players in the neurobiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as Fragile X syndrome. However, the nature of Fragile X astrocyte-mediated control of dendrite development in subtypes of hippocampal neurons is not yet known. We used a co-culture procedure in which wildtype primary hippocampal neurons were cultured with astrocytes from either a wildtype or Fragile X mouse, for either 7, 14 or 21 days. The neurons were processed for immunocytochemistry with the dendritic marker MAP2, classified by morphological criteria into one of five neuronal subtypes, and subjected to Sholl analyses. Both linear and semi-log methods of Sholl analyses were applied to the neurons in order to provide an in depth analysis of the dendritic arborizations. We found that Fragile X astrocytes affect the development of dendritic arborization of all subtypes of wildtype hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we show that hippocampal neurons with spiny stellate neuron morphology exhibit the most pervasive developmental delays, with significant dendritic arbor alterations persisting at 21 days in culture. The results further dictate the critical role astrocytes play in governing neuronal morphology including altered dendrite development in Fragile X.

  4. Optogenetic Activation of Septal Glutamatergic Neurons Drive Hippocampal Theta Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer; Manseau, Frédéric; Ducharme, Guillaume; Amilhon, Bénédicte; Vigneault, Erika; El Mestikawy, Salah; Williams, Sylvain

    2016-03-09

    The medial septum and diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB) has an essential role for theta rhythm generation in the hippocampus and is critical for learning and memory. The MS-DBB contains cholinergic, GABAergic, and recently described glutamatergic neurons, but their specific contribution to theta generation is poorly understood. Here, we examined the role of MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons in theta rhythm using optogenetic activation and electrophysiological recordings performed in in vitro preparations and in freely behaving mice. The experiments in slices suggest that MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons provide prominent excitatory inputs to a majority of local GABAergic and a minority of septal cholinergic neurons. In contrast, activation of MS-DBB glutamatergic fiber terminals in hippocampal slices elicited weak postsynaptic responses in hippocampal neurons. In the in vitro septo-hippocampal preparation, activation of MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons did increase the rhythmicity of hippocampal theta oscillations, whereas stimulation of septo-hippocampal glutamatergic fibers in the fornix did not have an effect. In freely behaving mice, activation of these neurons in the MS-DBB strongly synchronized hippocampal theta rhythms over a wide range of frequencies, whereas activation of their projections to the hippocampus through fornix stimulations had no effect on theta rhythms, suggesting that MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons played a role in theta generation through local modulation of septal neurons. Together, these results provide the first evidence that MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons modulate local septal circuits, which in turn contribute to theta rhythms in the hippocampus.

  5. Ventral hippocampal neurons inhibit postprandial energy intake.

    PubMed

    Hannapel, Reilly C; Henderson, Yoko H; Nalloor, Rebecca; Vazdarjanova, Almira; Parent, Marise B

    2017-03-01

    Evidence suggests that the memory of a recently ingested meal limits subsequent intake. Given that ventral hippocampal (vHC) neurons are involved in memory and energy intake, the present experiment tested the hypothesis that vHC neurons contribute to the formation of a memory of a meal and inhibit energy intake during the postprandial period. We tested (1) whether pharmacological inactivation of vHC neurons during the period following a sucrose meal, when the memory of the meal would be undergoing consolidation, accelerates the onset of the next sucrose meal and increases intake and (2) whether sucrose intake increases vHC expression of the synaptic plasticity marker activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to consume a 32% sucrose solution daily at the same time and location. On the experimental day, the rats were given intra-vHC infusions of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol or vehicle after they finished their first sucrose meal. Compared to vehicle infusions, postmeal intra-vHC muscimol infusions decreased the latency to the next sucrose meal, increased the amount of sucrose consumed during that meal, increased the total number of sucrose meals and the total amount of sucrose ingested. In addition, rats that consumed sucrose had higher levels of Arc expression in both vHC CA1 and CA3 subfields than cage control rats. Collectively, these findings are the first to show that vHC neurons inhibit energy intake during the postprandial period and support the hypothesis that vHC neurons form a memory of a meal and inhibit subsequent intake. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Multisite electrophysiological recordings by self-assembled loose-patch-like junctions between cultured hippocampal neurons and mushroom-shaped microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Shmoel, Nava; Rabieh, Noha; Ojovan, Silviya M.; Erez, Hadas; Maydan, Eilon; Spira, Micha E.

    2016-01-01

    Substrate integrated planar microelectrode arrays is the “gold standard” method for millisecond-resolution, long-term, large-scale, cell-noninvasive electrophysiological recordings from mammalian neuronal networks. Nevertheless, these devices suffer from drawbacks that are solved by spike-detecting, spike-sorting and signal-averaging techniques which rely on estimated parameters that require user supervision to correct errors, merge clusters and remove outliers. Here we show that primary rat hippocampal neurons grown on micrometer sized gold mushroom-shaped microelectrodes (gMμE) functionalized simply by poly-ethylene-imine/laminin undergo self-assembly processes to form loose patch-like hybrid structures. More than 90% of the hybrids formed in this way record monophasic positive action potentials (APs). Of these, 34.5% record APs with amplitudes above 300 μV and up to 5,085 μV. This self-assembled neuron-gMμE configuration improves the recording quality as compared to planar MEA. This study characterizes and analyzes the electrophysiological signaling repertoire generated by the neurons-gMμE configuration, and discusses prospects to further improve the technology. PMID:27256971

  7. Metabotropic suppression of excitation in murine autaptic hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Straiker, Alex; Mackie, Ken

    2007-02-01

    Depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) and inhibition (DSI) are forms of short-term neuronal plasticity involving postsynaptic release of an endocannabinoid and the activation of presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors. We have recently reported that CB1-dependent DSE can be elicited in autaptic cultures of excitatory hippocampal neurons of the mouse. We now report that the same preparation exhibits a parallel G(q)-coupled receptor-dependent production of endocannabinoids causing retrograde inhibition, also via CB1 receptors, which we will refer to as metabotropic suppression of excitation (MSE). We tested a spectrum of G(q)-coupled receptor agonists and found that both muscarinic and metabotropic glutamate receptors (group I) mediate retrograde inhibition via CB1 receptors in autaptic hippocampal neurons. Thus these neurons possess not only the pre- and postsynaptic machinery necessary for DSE but also that for MSE. This permitted a closer examination of MSE and its interaction with other aspects of the endocannabinoid retrograde signalling machinery: MSE mimics and occludes DSE and is itself occluded by the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), consistent with 2-AG as a likely mediator of MSE. In contrast to DSE, MSE undergoes heterologous desensitization over the time course of minutes. In keeping with data reported for metabotropic suppression of inhibition (MSI) and DSI in the hippocampus, subthreshold MSE and DSE act synergistically. We additionally found that Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, which has been shown to attenuate DSE, antagonizes MSE. Finally, we have distinguished a neuronal subpopulation that exhibits DSE and a differential complement of MSE-mediating Gq-coupled receptors, making possible contrasting studies of MSE. Autaptic endocannabinoid signalling is rich, robust and complex in a deceptively simple package, including a previously unreported postsynaptic mechanism of adaptation in addition to known presynaptic CB1

  8. Abnormal alterations in the Ca2+/CaV1.2/calmodulin/caMKII signaling pathway in a tremor rat model and in cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Mg2+-free solution

    PubMed Central

    LV, XINTONG; GUO, FENG; XU, XIAOXUE; CHEN, ZAIXING; SUN, XUEFEI; MIN, DONGYU; CAO, YONGGANG; SHI, XIANBAO; WANG, LEI; CHEN, TIANBAO; SHAW, CHRIS; GAO, HUILING; HAO, LIYING; CAI, JIQUN

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) are key elements in epileptogenesis. There are several binding-sites linked to calmodulin (CaM) and several potential CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated phosphorylation sites in CaV1.2. The tremor rat model (TRM) exhibits absence-like seizures from 8 weeks of age. The present study was performed to detect changes in the Ca2+/CaV1.2/CaM/CaMKII pathway in TRMs and in cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Mg2+-free solution. The expression levels of CaV1.2, CaM and phosphorylated CaMKII (p-CaMKII; Thr-286) in these two models were examined using immunofluorescence and western blotting. Compared with Wistar rats, the expression levels of CaV1.2 and CaM were increased, and the expression of p-CaMKII was decreased in the TRM hippocampus. However, the expression of the targeted proteins was reversed in the TRM temporal cortex. A significant increase in the expression of CaM and decrease in the expression of CaV1.2 were observed in the TRM cerebellum. In the cultured neuron model, p-CaMKII and CaV1.2 were markedly decreased. In addition, neurons exhibiting co-localized expression of CaV1.2 and CaM immunoreactivities were detected. Furthermore, intracellular calcium concentrations were increased in these two models. For the first time, o the best of our knowledge, the data of the present study suggested that abnormal alterations in the Ca2+/CaV1.2/CaM/CaMKII pathway may be involved in epileptogenesis and in the phenotypes of TRMs and cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Mg2+-free solution. PMID:26299765

  9. Frizzled-5 receptor is involved in neuronal polarity and morphogenesis of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Slater, Paula G; Ramirez, Valerie T; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays important roles during different stages of neuronal development, including neuronal polarization and dendritic and axonal outgrowth. However, little is known about the identity of the Frizzled receptors mediating these processes. In the present study, we investigated the role of Frizzled-5 (Fzd5) on neuronal development in cultured Sprague-Dawley rat hippocampal neurons. We found that Fzd5 is expressed early in cultured neurons on actin-rich structures localized at minor neurites and axonal growth cones. At 4 DIV, Fzd5 polarizes towards the axon, where its expression is detected mainly at the peripheral zone of axonal growth cones, with no obvious staining at dendrites; suggesting a role of Fzd5 in neuronal polarization. Overexpression of Fzd5 during the acquisition of neuronal polarity induces mislocalization of the receptor and a loss of polarized axonal markers. Fzd5 knock-down leads to loss of axonal proteins, suggesting an impaired neuronal polarity. In contrast, overexpression of Fzd5 in neurons that are already polarized did not alter polarity, but decreased the total length of axons and increased total dendrite length and arborization. Fzd5 activated JNK in HEK293 cells and the effects triggered by Fzd5 overexpression in neurons were partially prevented by inhibition of JNK, suggesting that a non-canonical Wnt signaling mechanism might be involved. Our results suggest that, Fzd5 has a role in the establishment of neuronal polarity, and in the morphogenesis of neuronal processes, in part through the activation of the non-canonical Wnt mechanism involving JNK.

  10. Frizzled-5 Receptor Is Involved in Neuronal Polarity and Morphogenesis of Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Paula G.; Ramirez, Valerie T.; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays important roles during different stages of neuronal development, including neuronal polarization and dendritic and axonal outgrowth. However, little is known about the identity of the Frizzled receptors mediating these processes. In the present study, we investigated the role of Frizzled-5 (Fzd5) on neuronal development in cultured Sprague-Dawley rat hippocampal neurons. We found that Fzd5 is expressed early in cultured neurons on actin-rich structures localized at minor neurites and axonal growth cones. At 4 DIV, Fzd5 polarizes towards the axon, where its expression is detected mainly at the peripheral zone of axonal growth cones, with no obvious staining at dendrites; suggesting a role of Fzd5 in neuronal polarization. Overexpression of Fzd5 during the acquisition of neuronal polarity induces mislocalization of the receptor and a loss of polarized axonal markers. Fzd5 knock-down leads to loss of axonal proteins, suggesting an impaired neuronal polarity. In contrast, overexpression of Fzd5 in neurons that are already polarized did not alter polarity, but decreased the total length of axons and increased total dendrite length and arborization. Fzd5 activated JNK in HEK293 cells and the effects triggered by Fzd5 overexpression in neurons were partially prevented by inhibition of JNK, suggesting that a non-canonical Wnt signaling mechanism might be involved. Our results suggest that, Fzd5 has a role in the establishment of neuronal polarity, and in the morphogenesis of neuronal processes, in part through the activation of the non-canonical Wnt mechanism involving JNK. PMID:24205342

  11. Downregulation of CREB expression in Alzheimer's brain and in Aβ-treated rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress plays an important role in neuronal dysfunction and neuron loss in Alzheimer's brain. Previous studies have reported downregulation of CREB-mediated transcription by oxidative stress and Aβ. The promoter for CREB itself contains cyclic AMP response elements. Therefore, we examined the expression of CREB in the hippocampal neurons of Tg2576 mice, AD post-mortem brain and in cultured rat hippocampal neurons exposed to Aβ aggregates. Results Laser Capture Microdissection of hippocampal neurons from Tg2576 mouse brain revealed decreases in the mRNA levels of CREB and its target, BDNF. Immunohistochemical analysis of Tg2576 mouse brain showed decreases in CREB levels in hippocampus and cortex. Markers of oxidative stress were detected in transgenic mouse brain and decreased CREB staining was observed in regions showing abundance of astrocytes. There was also an inverse correlation between SDS-extracted Aβ and CREB protein levels in Alzheimer's post-mortem hippocampal samples. The levels of CREB-regulated BDNF and BIRC3, a caspase inhibitor, decreased and the active cleaved form of caspase-9, a marker for the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, was elevated in these samples. Exposure of rat primary hippocampal neurons to Aβ fibrils decreased CREB promoter activity. Decrease in CREB mRNA levels in Aβ-treated neurons was reversed by the antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine. Overexpression of CREB by adenoviral transduction led to significant protection against Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic downregulation of CREB-mediated transcription results in decrease of CREB content in the hippocampal neurons of AD brain which may contribute to exacerbation of disease progression. PMID:21854604

  12. Culturing conditions determine neuronal and glial excitability.

    PubMed

    Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2010-12-15

    The cultivation of pure neuronal cultures is considered advantageous for the investigation of cell-type specific responses (such as transmitter release and also pharmacological agents), however, divergent results are a likely consequence of media modifications and culture composition. Using Fura-2 based imaging techniques, we here set out to compare calcium responses of rat hippocampal neurones and glia to excitatory stimulation with l-glutamate in different culture types and media. Neurones in neurone-enriched cultures had increased responses to 10 μM and 100 μM l-glutamate (+43 and 45%, respectively; p's< 0.001) and a slower recovery compared to mixed cultures, indicating heightened excitability. In matured (15-20 days in vitro) mixed cultures, neuronal responder rates were suppressed in a neurone-supportive medium (Neurobasal-A, NB: 65%) compared to a general-purpose medium (supplemented minimal essential medium, MEM: 96%). Glial response size in contrast did not differ greatly in isolated or mixed cultures maintained in MEM, but responder rates were suppressed in both culture types in NB (e.g. 10 μM l-glutamate responders in mixed cultures: 29% in NB, 71% in MEM). This indicates that medium composition is more important for glial excitability than the presence of neurones, whereas the presence of glia has an important impact on neuronal excitability. Therefore, careful consideration of culturing conditions is crucial for interpretation and comparison of experimental results. Especially for investigations of toxicity and neuroprotection mixed cultures may be more physiologically relevant over isolated cultures as they comprise aspects of mutual influences between glia and neurones.

  13. Dendritic potassium channels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Daniel; Hoffman, Dax A; Magee, Jeffrey C; Poolos, Nicholas P; Watanabe, Shigeo; Colbert, Costa M; Migliore, Michele

    2000-01-01

    Potassium channels located in the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons control the shape and amplitude of back-propagating action potentials, the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and dendritic excitability. Non-uniform gradients in the distribution of potassium channels in the dendrites make the dendritic electrical properties markedly different from those found in the soma. For example, the influence of a fast, calcium-dependent potassium current on action potential repolarization is progressively reduced in the first 150 μm of the apical dendrites, so that action potentials recorded farther than 200 μm from the soma have no fast after-hyperpolarization and are wider than those in the soma. The peak amplitude of back-propagating action potentials is also progressively reduced in the dendrites because of the increasing density of a transient potassium channel with distance from the soma. The activation of this channel can be reduced by the activity of a number of protein kinases as well as by prior depolarization. The depolarization from excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) can inactivate these A-type K+ channels and thus lead to an increase in the amplitude of dendritic action potentials, provided the EPSP and the action potentials occur within the appropriate time window. This time window could be in the order of 15 ms and may play a role in long-term potentiation induced by pairing EPSPs and back-propagating action potentials. PMID:10811726

  14. Dendritic potassium channels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D; Hoffman, D A; Magee, J C; Poolos, N P; Watanabe, S; Colbert, C M; Migliore, M

    2000-05-15

    Potassium channels located in the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons control the shape and amplitude of back-propagating action potentials, the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and dendritic excitability. Non-uniform gradients in the distribution of potassium channels in the dendrites make the dendritic electrical properties markedly different from those found in the soma. For example, the influence of a fast, calcium-dependent potassium current on action potential repolarization is progressively reduced in the first 150 micrometer of the apical dendrites, so that action potentials recorded farther than 200 micrometer from the soma have no fast after-hyperpolarization and are wider than those in the soma. The peak amplitude of back-propagating action potentials is also progressively reduced in the dendrites because of the increasing density of a transient potassium channel with distance from the soma. The activation of this channel can be reduced by the activity of a number of protein kinases as well as by prior depolarization. The depolarization from excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) can inactivate these A-type K+ channels and thus lead to an increase in the amplitude of dendritic action potentials, provided the EPSP and the action potentials occur within the appropriate time window. This time window could be in the order of 15 ms and may play a role in long-term potentiation induced by pairing EPSPs and back-propagating action potentials.

  15. Blockade by ifenprodil of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in rat and mouse cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones: comparison with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist actions.

    PubMed Central

    Church, J; Fletcher, E J; Baxter, K; MacDonald, J F

    1994-01-01

    1. The block by ifenprodil of voltage-activated Ca2+ channels was investigated in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) evoked by 50 mM K+ (high-[K+]o) in Fura-2-loaded rat hippocampal pyramidal neurones in culture and on currents carried by Ba2+ ions (IBa) through Ca2+ channels in mouse cultured hippocampal neurones under whole-cell voltage-clamp. The effects of ifenprodil on voltage-activated Ca2+ channels were compared with its antagonist actions on N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA) evoked responses in the same neuronal preparations. 2. Rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by transient exposure to high-[K+]o in our preparation of rat cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones are mediated predominantly by Ca2+ flux through nifedipine-sensitive Ca2+ channels, with smaller contributions from nifedipine-resistant, omega-conotoxin GVIA-sensitive Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ channels sensitive to crude funnel-web spider venom (Church et al., 1994). Ifenprodil (0.1-200 microM) reversibly attenuated high-[K+]o-evoked rises in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 17 +/- 3 microM, compared with an IC50 value of 0.7 +/- 0.1 microM for the reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by 20 microM NMDA. Tested in the presence of nifedipine 10 microM, ifenprodil (1-50 microM) produced a concentration-dependent reduction of the dihydropyridine-resistant high-[K+]o-evoked rise in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 13 +/- 4 microM. The results suggest that ifenprodil blocks Ca2+ flux through multiple subtypes of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. 3. Application of the polyamine, spermine (0.25-5 mM), produced a concentration-dependent reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by high-[K+]o.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7834201

  16. Acute ethanol suppresses glutamatergic neurotransmission through endocannabinoids in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S; Ninan, Ipe; Arancio, Ottavio

    2008-11-01

    Ethanol exposure during fetal development is a leading cause of long-term cognitive impairments. Studies suggest that ethanol exposure have deleterious effects on the hippocampus, a brain region that is important for learning and memory. Ethanol exerts its effects, in part, via alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission, which is critical for the maturation of neuronal circuits during development. The current literature strongly supports the growing evidence that ethanol inhibits glutamate release in the neonatal CA1 hippocampal region. However, the exact molecular mechanism responsible for this effect is not well understood. In this study, we show that ethanol enhances endocannabinoid (EC) levels in cultured hippocampal neurons, possibly through calcium pathways. Acute ethanol depresses miniature post-synaptic current (mEPSC) frequencies without affecting their amplitude. This suggests that ethanol inhibits glutamate release. The CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) present on pre-synaptic neurons are not altered by acute ethanol. The CB1R antagonist SR 141716A reverses ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. Drugs that are known to enhance the in vivo function of ECs occlude ethanol effects on mEPSC frequency. Chelation of post-synaptic calcium by EGTA antagonizes ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. The activation of CB1R with the selective agonist WIN55,212-2 also suppresses the mEPSC frequency. This WIN55,212-2 effect is similar to the ethanol effects and is reversed by SR141716A. In addition, tetani-induced excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) are depressed by acute ethanol. SR141716A significantly reverses ethanol effects on evoked EPSC amplitude in a dual recording preparation. These observations, taken together, suggest the participation of ECs as retrograde messengers in the ethanol-induced depression of synaptic activities.

  17. How to make a hippocampal dentate gyrus granule neuron.

    PubMed

    Yu, Diana X; Marchetto, Maria C; Gage, Fred H

    2014-06-01

    Granule neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) receive their primary inputs from the cortex and are known to be continuously generated throughout adult life. Ongoing integration of newborn neurons into the existing hippocampal neural circuitry provides enhanced neuroplasticity, which plays a crucial role in learning and memory; deficits in this process have been associated with cognitive decline under neuropathological conditions. In this Primer, we summarize the developmental principles that regulate the process of DG neurogenesis and discuss recent advances in harnessing these developmental cues to generate DG granule neurons from human pluripotent stem cells.

  18. The Edible Red Alga Porphyra yezoensis Promotes Neuronal Survival and Cytoarchitecture in Primary Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Mohibbullah, Md; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Maqueshudul Haque; Hannan, Md Abdul; Getachew, Paulos; Hong, Yong-Ki; Choi, Jae-Suk; Choi, In Soon; Moon, Il Soo

    2016-07-01

    The edible red alga Porphyra yezoensis is among the most popular marine algae and is of economic and medicinal importance. In the present study, the neurotrophic and neuroprotective activities of the ethanol extract of P. yezoensis (PYE) were investigated in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. Results revealed that PYE significantly increased neurite outgrowth at an optimal concentration of 15 µg/mL. PYE dose-dependently increased viable cells, significantly accelerated the rate of neuronal differentiation in cultures, promoted axodendritic arborization, and eventually induced synaptogenesis. In addition to morphological development, PYE also promoted functional maturation as indicated by the staining of live cultures with FM 1-43. Moreover, PYE increased neuronal survivability, which was attributed to reduced apoptosis and its ROS scavenging activity. Taurine, a major organic acid in PYE (2.584/100 mg of dry PYE) promoted neurite outgrowth in a dose-dependent manner, and this promotion was suppressed by the taurine antagonist isethionic acid. The study indicates that PYE and its active component, taurine, facilitate neuronal development and maturation and have a neuroprotective effect.

  19. Effects of selective inhibition of protein kinase C, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase on neurite development in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Cabell, L; Audesirk, G

    1993-06-01

    A variety of experimental evidence suggests that calmodulin and protein kinases, especially protein kinase C, may participate in regulating neurite development in cultured neurons, particularly neurite initiation. However, the results are somewhat contradictory. Further, the roles of calmodulin and protein kinases on many aspects of neurite development, such as branching or elongation of axons vs dendrites, have not been extensively studied. Cultured embryonic rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons develop readily identifiable axons and dendrites. We used this culture system and the new generation of highly specific protein kinase inhibitors to investigate the roles of protein kinases and calmodulin in neurite development. Neurons were cultured for 2 days in the continuous presence of calphostin C (a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C), KT5720 (inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase), KN62 (inhibitor of Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II), or calmidazolium (inhibitor of calmodulin), each at concentrations from approximately 1 to 10 times the concentration reported in the literature to inhibit each kinase by 50%. The effects of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (an activator of protein kinase C) and 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (an inactive phorbol ester) were also tested. At concentrations that had no effect on neuronal viability, calphostin C reduced neurite initiation and axon branching without significantly affecting the number of dendrites per neuron, dendrite branching, dendrite length, or axon length. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate increased axon branching and the number of dendrites per cell, compared to the inactive 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate. KT5720 inhibited only axon branching. KN62 reduced axon length, the number of dendrites per neuron, and both axon and dendrite branching. At low concentrations, calmidazolium had no effect on any aspect of neurite development, but at high concentrations, calmidazolium inhibited every

  20. VTA neurons coordinate with the hippocampal reactivation of spatial experience

    PubMed Central

    Gomperts, Stephen N; Kloosterman, Fabian; Wilson, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Spatial learning requires the hippocampus, and the replay of spatial sequences during hippocampal sharp wave-ripple (SPW-R) events of quiet wakefulness and sleep is believed to play a crucial role. To test whether the coordination of VTA reward prediction error signals with these replayed spatial sequences could contribute to this process, we recorded from neuronal ensembles of the hippocampus and VTA as rats performed appetitive spatial tasks and subsequently slept. We found that many reward responsive (RR) VTA neurons coordinated with quiet wakefulness-associated hippocampal SPW-R events that replayed recent experience. In contrast, coordination between RR neurons and SPW-R events in subsequent slow wave sleep was diminished. Together, these results indicate distinct contributions of VTA reinforcement activity associated with hippocampal spatial replay to the processing of wake and SWS-associated spatial memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05360.001 PMID:26465113

  1. Differential Tiam1/Rac1 activation in hippocampal and cortical neurons mediates differential spine shrinkage in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Suárez, Elena; Fiuza, Maria; Liu, Xun; Chakkarapani, Elavazhagan; Hanley, Jonathan G

    2014-01-01

    Distinct neuronal populations show differential sensitivity to global ischemia, with hippocampal CA1 neurons showing greater vulnerability compared to cortical neurons. The mechanisms that underlie differential vulnerability are unclear, and we hypothesize that intrinsic differences in neuronal cell biology are involved. Dendritic spine morphology changes in response to ischemic insults in vivo, but cell type-specific differences and the molecular mechanisms leading to such morphologic changes are unexplored. To directly compare changes in spine size in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) in cortical and hippocampal neurons, we used separate and equivalent cultures of each cell type. We show that cortical neurons exhibit significantly greater spine shrinkage compared to hippocampal neurons. Rac1 is a Rho-family GTPase that regulates the actin cytoskeleton and is involved in spine dynamics. We show that Rac1 and the Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Tiam1 are differentially activated by OGD in hippocampal and cortical neurons. Hippocampal neurons express more Tiam1 than cortical neurons, and reducing Tiam1 expression in hippocampal neurons by shRNA enhances OGD-induced spine shrinkage. Tiam1 knockdown also reduces hippocampal neuronal vulnerability to OGD. This work defines fundamental differences in signalling pathways that regulate spine morphology in distinct neuronal populations that may have a role in the differential vulnerability to ischemia. PMID:25248834

  2. A viral vector expressing hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha inhibits hippocampal neuronal apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Xiqing; Kong, Weina; Liu, Lingyun; Yu, Wenguo; Zhang, Zhenqing; Sun, Yimin

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) attenuates amyloid-beta protein neurotoxicity and decreases apoptosis induced by oxidative stress or hypoxia in cortical neurons. In this study, we constructed a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the human HIF-1α gene (rAAV-HIF-1α), and tested the assumption that rAAV-HIF-1α represses hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by amyloid-beta protein. Our results confirmed that rAAV-HIF-1α significantly reduces apoptosis induced by amyloid-beta protein in primary cultured hippocampal neurons. Direct intracerebral rAAV-HIF-1α administration also induced robust and prolonged HIF-1α production in rat hippocampus. Single rAAV-HIF-1α administration resulted in decreased apoptosis of hippocampal neurons in an Alzheimer's disease rat model established by intracerebroventricular injection of aggregated amyloid-beta protein (25–35). Our in vitro and in vivo findings demonstrate that HIF-1 has potential for attenuating hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by amyloid-beta protein, and provides experimental support for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases using gene therapy. PMID:25206774

  3. Synaptic Structure Quantification in Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Guizzetti, Marina; Costa, Lucio G.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral problems (e.g. learning and memory) following developmental exposure to toxicants suggests that dysregulation of the process of synapse formation and function may occur. The ability to assess these changes is thus of value. This protocol describes a method to investigate toxicant-induced changes to synaptic structure formation in primary hippocampal neurons using immunocytochemical labeling of the pre- and post-synaptic markers synaptophysin and PSD-95, confocal imaging, and three-dimensional object analysis. Protocols for the long-term culturing of primary hippocampal neurons and of primary cortical astrocytes, as well as their co-culture are included. While the described methods focus on how astrocytes influence synapse formation and how toxicants may interfere in this process, modifications to the experimental plan can easily be implemented. This would allow for the investigation of the effects of toxicants after treating neurons alone, or both astrocytes and neurons in co-culture. With the common endpoint of synapse structure formation, differences between varying treatment paradigms can expand our understanding of the influence of particular toxicants on these diverse cell types and provide insight into potential mechanisms of effect and the contributions of each to synapse formation. PMID:24865645

  4. Lamina-specific synaptic connections of hippocampal neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Frotscher, M; Heimrich, B

    1995-03-01

    By using slice cultures as a model, we demonstrate here that different target selectivities exist among the various afferent fibers to the hippocampus. As in intact animals, septohippocampal cholinergic fibers, provided by a slice culture of septum, innervate a co-cultured slice of hippocampus diffusely, that is, without forming distinct layers of termination. As in vivo, the septal cholinergic fibers establish synapses with a variety of target cells. Conversely, fibers from an entorhinal slice co-cultured to a hippocampal slice display their normal laminar specificity. They preferentially terminate in the outer molecular layer of the fascia dentata, thereby selectively contacting peripheral dendrites of the granule cells. This preferential termination on peripheral dendritic segments is remarkable, since these fibers do not have to compete with commissural fibers, hypothalamic fibers, and septal afferents for dendritic space under these culture conditions. Moreover, in triplet cultures in which first two hippocampal slices were co-cultured and then, with a delay of 5 days, an entorhinal slice was added, the fibers from the entorhinal slice and those from the hippocampal culture terminated in their appropriate layers in the hippocampal target culture. However, in this approach the normal sequence of ingrowth of these two afferents was reversed. In normal ontogenetic development, entorhinal afferents arrive in the hippocampus before the commissural fibers. The results show that there are different degrees of target selectivity of hippocampal afferents and that the characteristic lamination of certain afferent fibers in the hippocampus is not determined by their sequential ingrowth during development.

  5. Kalirin-7, an important component of excitatory synapses, is regulated by estradiol in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin-Ming; Huang, Jian-Ping; Kim, Eun-Ji; Zhu, Qing; Kuchel, George A; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2011-06-01

    Estradiol enhances the formation of dendritic spines and excitatory synapses in hippocampal neurons in vitro and in vivo, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Kalirin-7 (Kal7), the major isoform of Kalirin in the adult hippocampus, is a Rho GDP/GTP exchange factor localized to postsynaptic densities. In the hippocampus, both Kal7 and estrogen receptor α (ERα) are highly expressed in a subset of interneurons. Over-expression of Kal7 caused an increase in spine density and size in hippocampal neurons. To determine whether Kalirin might play a role in the effects of estradiol on spine formation, Kal7 expression was examined in the hippocampus of ovariectomized rats. Estradiol replacement increased Kal7 staining in both CA1 pyramidal neurons and interneurons in ovariectomized rats. Estradiol treatment of cultured hippocampal neurons increased Kal7 levels at the postsynaptic side of excitatory synapses and increased the number of excitatory synapses along the dendrites of pyramidal neurons. These increases were mediated via ERα because a selective ERα agonist, but not a selective ERβ agonist, caused a similar increase in both Kal7 levels and excitatory synapse number in cultured hippocampal neurons. When Kal7 expression was reduced using a Kal7-specific shRNA, the density of excitatory synapses was reduced and estradiol was no longer able to increase synapse formation. Expression of exogenous Kal7 in hippocampal interneurons resulted in decreased levels of GAD65 staining. Inhibition of GABAergic transmission with bicuculline produced a robust increase in Kal7 expression. These studies suggest Kal7 plays a key role in the mechanisms of estradiol-mediated synaptic plasticity.

  6. Potent activity of nobiletin-rich Citrus reticulata peel extract to facilitate cAMP/PKA/ERK/CREB signaling associated with learning and memory in cultured hippocampal neurons: identification of the substances responsible for the pharmacological action.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Ichiro; Yoshida, Masaaki; Sun, Wen; Nakajima, Akira; Lai, Yanxin; Osaka, Naoya; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Naganuma, Akira; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Yamakuni, Tohru

    2013-10-01

    cAMP/PKA/ERK/CREB signaling linked to CRE-mediated transcription is crucial for learning and memory. We originally found nobiletin as a natural compound that stimulates this intracellular signaling and exhibits anti-dementia action in animals. Citrus reticulata or C. unshiu peels are employed as "chinpi" and include a small amount of nobiletin. We here provide the first evidence for beneficial pharmacological actions on the cAMP/PKA/ERK/CREB cascade of extracts from nobiletin-rich C.reticulata peels designated as Nchinpi, the nobiletin content of which was 0.83 ± 0.13% of the dry weight or 16-fold higher than that of standard chinpi extracts. Nchinpi extracts potently facilitated CRE-mediated transcription in cultured hippocampal neurons, whereas the standard chinpi extracts showed no such activity. Also, the Nchinpi extract, but not the standard chinpi extract, stimulated PKA/ERK/CREB signaling. Interestingly, treatment with the Nchinpi extract at the concentration corresponding to approximately 5 μM nobiletin more potently facilitated CRE-mediated transcriptional activity than did 30 μM nobiletin alone. Consistently, sinensetin, tangeretin, 6-demethoxynobiletin, and 6-demethoxytangeretin were also identified as bioactive substances in Nchinpi that facilitated the CRE-mediated transcription. Purified sinensetin enhanced the transcription to a greater degree than nobiletin. Furthermore, samples reconstituted with the four purified compounds and nobiletin in the ratio of each constituent's content in the extract showed activity almost equal to that of the Nchinpi extract to stimulate CRE-mediated transcription. These findings suggest that above four compounds and nobiletin in the Nchinpi extract mainly cooperated to facilitate potently CRE-mediated transcription linked to the upstream cAMP/PKA/ERK/CREB pathway in hippocampal neurons.

  7. The ROR2 tyrosine kinase receptor regulates dendritic spine morphogenesis in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Iván E; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-07-01

    Wnt signaling regulates synaptic development and function and contributes to the fine-tuning of the molecular and morphological differentiation of synapses. We have shown previously that Wnt5a activates non-canonical Wnt signaling to stimulate postsynaptic differentiation in excitatory hippocampal neurons promoting the clustering of the postsynaptic scaffold protein PSD-95 and the development of dendritic spines. At least three different kinds of Wnt receptors have been associated with Wnt5a signaling: seven trans-membrane Frizzled receptors and the tyrosine kinase receptors Ryk and ROR2. We report here that ROR2 is distributed in the dendrites of hippocampal neurons in close proximity to synaptic contacts and it is contained in dendritic spine protrusions. We demonstrate that ROR2 is necessary to maintain dendritic spine number and morphological distribution in cultured hippocampal neurons. ROR2 overexpression increased dendritic spine growth without affecting the density of dendritic spine protrusions in a form dependent on its extracellular Wnt binding cysteine rich domain (CRD) and kinase domain. Overexpression of dominant negative ROR2 lacking the extracellular CRD decreased spine density and the proportion of mushroom like spines, while ROR2 lacking the C-terminal and active kinase domains only affected spine morphology. Our results indicate a crucial role of the ROR2 in the formation and maturation of the postsynaptic dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons.

  8. The Effect of Vitamin D Treatment On Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) Release From Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    GEZEN-AK, Duygu; DURSUN, Erdinç; YILMAZER, Selma

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vitamin D, the main function of which is thought to be the maintenance of calcium and phosphate homeostasis and bone structure, has been shown in recent studies to have important roles in brain development as well. A certain vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene haplotype was reported, for the first time by our group, to increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Our studies also showed that vitamin D prevents beta amyloid-induced calcium elevation and toxicity that target nerve growth factor (NGF) release in cortical neurons; beta amyloid suppresses VDR expression and the disruption of vitamin D-VDR pathway mimics beta amyloid-induced neurodegeneration. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effects of vitamin D on the NGF release from hippocampal neurons. Method Primary hippocampal neuron cultures that were prepared from 18-day-old Sprague-Dawley rat embryos were treated with vitamin D for 48 hours. The alteration in the NGF release was determined with ELISA. Cytotoxicity tests were also performed for all groups. Results The NGF release in vitamin D-treated group was significantly higher than in untreated control group. The protective effect of vitamin D against cytotoxicity was also observed. Conclusion Our results indicated that vitamin D regulates the release of NGF, a very important molecule for neuronal survival of hippocampal neurons as well as cortical neurons.

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mediates estradiol-induced dendritic spine formation in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D D; Cole, N B; Segal, M

    1998-09-15

    Dendritic spines are of major importance in information processing and memory formation in central neurons. Estradiol has been shown to induce an increase of dendritic spine density on hippocampal neurons in vivo and in vitro. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) recently has been implicated in neuronal maturation, plasticity, and regulation of GABAergic interneurons. We now demonstrate that estradiol down-regulates BDNF in cultured hippocampal neurons to 40% of control values within 24 hr of exposure. This, in turn, decreases inhibition and increases excitatory tone in pyramidal neurons, leading to a 2-fold increase in dendritic spine density. Exogenous BDNF blocks the effects of estradiol on spine formation, and BDNF depletion with a selective antisense oligonucleotide mimics the effects of estradiol. Addition of BDNF antibodies also increases spine density, and diazepam, which facilitates GABAergic neurotransmission, blocks estradiol-induced spine formation. These observations demonstrate a functional link between estradiol, BDNF as a potent regulator of GABAergic interneurons, and activity-dependent formation of dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons.

  10. Preservation of hippocampal neuron numbers and hippocampal subfield volumes in behaviorally characterized aged tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Keuker, Jeanine I H; de Biurrun, Gabriel; Luiten, Paul G M; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2004-01-19

    Aging is associated with a decreased ability to store and retrieve information. The hippocampal formation plays a critical role in such memory processes, and its integrity is affected during normal aging. We used tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri) as an animal model of aging, because in many characteristics, tree shrews are closer to primates than they are to rodents. Young and aged male tree shrews performed a holeboard spatial memory task, which permits assessment of reference and working memory. Upon completion of the behavioral measurements, we carried out modified stereological analyses of neuronal numbers in various subdivisions of the hippocampus and used the Cavalieri method to calculate the volumes of these subfields. Results showed that the working memory of aged tree shrews was significantly impaired compared with that of young animals, whereas the hippocampus-dependent reference memory remained unchanged by aging. Estimation of the number of neurons revealed preserved neuron numbers in the subiculum, in the subregions CA1, CA2, CA3, and in the hilus of the dentate gyrus. Volume measurements showed no aging-related changes in the volume of any of these hippocampal subregions, or in the molecular and granule cell layers of the dentate gyrus of tree shrews. We conclude that the observed changes in memory performance in aging tree shrews are not accompanied by observable reductions of hippocampal neuron numbers or hippocampal volume, rather, the changes in memory performance are more likely the result of modified subcellular mechanisms that are affected by the aging process.

  11. Enhancement of morphological plasticity in hippocampal neurons by a physically modified saline via phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase.

    PubMed

    Roy, Avik; Modi, Khushbu K; Khasnavis, Saurabh; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2014-01-01

    Increase of the density of dendritic spines and enhancement of synaptic transmission through ionotropic glutamate receptors are important events, leading to synaptic plasticity and eventually hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory formation. Here we have undertaken an innovative approach to upregulate hippocampal plasticity. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing charge-stabilized nanobubbles that are generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline), PNS60 (saline containing a comparable level of oxygen without the TCP modification), or RNS10.3 (TCP-modified normal saline without excess oxygen), stimulated morphological plasticity and synaptic transmission via NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive calcium influx in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. Using mRNA-based targeted gene array, real-time PCR, immunoblot, and immunofluorescence analyses, we further demonstrate that RNS60 stimulated the expression of many plasticity-associated genes in cultured hippocampal neurons. Activation of type IA, but not type IB, phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase by RNS60 together with abrogation of RNS60-mediated upregulation of plasticity-related proteins (NR2A and GluR1) and increase in spine density, neuronal size, and calcium influx by LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI-3 kinase, suggest that RNS60 upregulates hippocampal plasticity via activation of PI-3 kinase. Finally, in the 5XFAD transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), RNS60 treatment upregulated expression of plasticity-related proteins PSD95 and NR2A and increased AMPA- and NMDA-dependent hippocampal calcium influx. These results describe a novel property of RNS60 in stimulating hippocampal plasticity, which may help AD and other dementias.

  12. Reduced potassium currents in old rat CA1 hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Alshuaib, W B; Hasan, S M; Cherian, S P; Mathew, M V; Hasan, M Y; Fahim, M A

    2001-01-15

    Potassium currents are an important factor in repolarizing the membrane potential and determining the level of neuronal excitability. We compared potassium currents in CA1 hippocampal neurons dissociated from young (2-3 months old) and old (26-30 months old) Sprague-Dawley rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were used to measure the delayed rectifier (sustained) and the A-type (transient) potassium currents. The delayed rectifier current was smaller in old (548 +/- 57 pA) than in young (1193 +/- 171 pA) neurons. In the absence of extracellular calcium, the delayed rectifier current was also smaller in old (427 +/- 41 pA) than in young (946 +/- 144 pA) neurons. The cell membrane capacitance was unchanged in old (13.3 +/- 1.2 pF) compared to young (13.6 +/- 1.2 pF). Therefore, the reduction in the delayed rectifier current was not due to a change in membrane surface area. Moreover, activation and inactivation of the delayed rectifier current were unchanged in old compared to young neurons. The slope of the current-voltage relation, however, was smaller in old (B = 5.03) than in young (B = 9.62) neurons. Similarly, the A-current was smaller in old (100 +/- 16 pA) than in young (210 +/- 44 pA) neurons in the presence of extracellular calcium. This reduction of potassium currents could account for the prolongation of action potentials reported previously for old rat CA1 hippocampal neurons. The age-related reduction in potassium current indicates plasticity in neuronal function that can impact communication in the hippocampal neural network during aging.

  13. Assay of Rab17 and its guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rabex-5 in the dendrites of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yasunori; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are functionally and morphologically compartmentalized into axons and dendrites, and the localization of specific proteins within these compartments is critical to the proper formation of neuronal networks, which includes neurite morphogenesis and synapse formation. The small GTPase Rab17 is specifically localized in dendrites and is not found in axons, and it regulates the dendrite morphogenesis and postsynaptic development of mouse hippocampal neurons. However, the spatiotemporal regulation of Rab17 is poorly understood. We recently identified Rabex-5, originally described as a Rab5-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), as a physiological Rab17-GEF that promotes translocation of Rab17 from the cell body to the dendrites of developing hippocampal neurons. Knockdown of Rab17 in mouse hippocampal neurons resulted in reductions in dendrite growth, branch numbers, filopodium density, and active synapse numbers. Knockdown of Rab17-GEF Rabex-5 in hippocampal neurons resulted in decreased targeting of Rab17 to the dendrites, which led to a reduction in dendrite growth. In this chapter we describe the assay procedures for analyzing Rab17 and Rabex-5 in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, and we particularly focus on the measurement of total dendrite (or axon) length and total dendrite (or axon) branch numbers, filopodium density, number of active synapses, and dendritic Rab17 signals.

  14. In Vitro Ischemia Triggers a Transcriptional Response to Down-Regulate Synaptic Proteins in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Joana; Vieira, Marta; Carreto, Laura; Santos, Manuel A. S.; Duarte, Carlos B.; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Santos, Armanda E.

    2014-01-01

    Transient global cerebral ischemia induces profound changes in the transcriptome of brain cells, which is partially associated with the induction or repression of genes that influence the ischemic response. However, the mechanisms responsible for the selective vulnerability of hippocampal neurons to global ischemia remain to be clarified. To identify molecular changes elicited by ischemic insults, we subjected hippocampal primary cultures to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro model for global ischemia that resulted in delayed neuronal death with an excitotoxic component. To investigate changes in the transcriptome of hippocampal neurons submitted to OGD, total RNA was extracted at early (7 h) and delayed (24 h) time points after OGD and used in a whole-genome RNA microarray. We observed that at 7 h after OGD there was a general repression of genes, whereas at 24 h there was a general induction of gene expression. Genes related with functions such as transcription and RNA biosynthesis were highly regulated at both periods of incubation after OGD, confirming that the response to ischemia is a dynamic and coordinated process. Our analysis showed that genes for synaptic proteins, such as those encoding for PICK1, GRIP1, TARPγ3, calsyntenin-2/3, SAPAP2 and SNAP-25, were down-regulated after OGD. Additionally, OGD decreased the mRNA and protein expression levels of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit as well as the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors, but increased the mRNA expression of the GluN3A subunit, thus altering the composition of ionotropic glutamate receptors in hippocampal neurons. Together, our results present the expression profile elicited by in vitro ischemia in hippocampal neurons, and indicate that OGD activates a transcriptional program leading to down-regulation in the expression of genes coding for synaptic proteins, suggesting that the synaptic proteome may change after ischemia. PMID:24960035

  15. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi; Costa, Lucio G.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glial-neuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, a most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. PMID:24342266

  16. Rho kinase regulates neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons via calcium dependent cytoskeleton regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhisheng; Cai, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jifeng; Liu, Nannuan; Chen, Jing; Tan, Minghui; Lin, Hongsheng; Guo, Guoqing

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether calcium is involved in downstream signal transduction in neurite outgrowth regulated by Rho kinase. Methods: In vitro primary hippocampal neurons were cultured and treated with Rho kinase agonist (LPA) or antagonist (Y-27632). Then, the cytoskeleton and neurite outgrowth were observed. After addition of calcium antagonist BAPTA/AM to reduce intracellular calcium, the cytoskeleton distribution and neurite outgrowth were observed. Results: The activation or inhibition of Rho kinase could significantly alter the number and length of neurites of hippocampal neurons. Rho kinase regulated the cytoskeleton to regulate the neurite outgrowth, and LPA could significantly increase intracellular calcium. After BAPTA/AM treatment, the length and branch number of neurites of neurons reduced markedly. BAPTA/AM was able to reduce intracellular calcium and decrease neuronal cytoskeleton. Treatment with both BAPTA/AM and LPA could stop the retraction of neurites, but the length and branch number of neurites remained unchanged after treatment with Y-27632 and LPA. Conclusion: Calcium may affect the cytoskeleton arrangement to regulate neurite outgrowth, and calcium is involved in the downstream signal transduction of Rho kinase regulated neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons. PMID:28337305

  17. Soluble cpg15 from Astrocytes Ameliorates Neurite Outgrowth Recovery of Hippocampal Neurons after Mouse Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Jing; Hu, Jie-Xian; Lu, De-Xin; Ji, Chun-Xia; Qi, Yao; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Feng-Yan; Huang, Fang; Xu, Ping; Chen, Xian-Hua

    2017-02-08

    The present study focuses on the function of cpg15, a neurotrophic factor, in ischemic neuronal recovery using transient global cerebral ischemic (TGI) mouse model and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated primary cultured cells. The results showed that expression of cpg15 proteins in astrocytes, predominantly the soluble form, was significantly increased in mouse hippocampus after TGI and in the cultured astrocytes after OGD. Addition of the medium from the cpg15-overexpressed astrocytic culture into the OGD-treated hippocampal neuronal cultures reduces the neuronal injury, whereas the recovery of neurite outgrowths of OGD-injured neurons was prevented when cpg15 in the OGD-treated astrocytes was knocked down, or the OGD-treated-astrocytic medium was immunoadsorbed by cpg15 antibody. Furthermore, lentivirus-delivered knockdown of cpg15 expression in mouse hippocampal astrocytes diminishes the dendritic branches and exacerbates injury of neurons in CA1 region after TGI. In addition, treatment with inhibitors of MEK1/2, PI3K, and TrkA decreases, whereas overexpression of p-CREB, but not dp-CREB, increases the expression of cpg15 in U118 or primary cultured astrocytes. Also, it is observed that the Flag-tagged soluble cpg15 from the astrocytes transfected with Flag-tagged cpg15-expressing plasmids adheres to the surface of neuronal bodies and the neurites. In conclusion, our results suggest that the soluble cpg15 from astrocytes induced by ischemia could ameliorate the recovery of the ischemic-injured hippocampal neurons via adhering to the surface of neurons. The upregulated expression of cpg15 in astrocytes may be activated via MAPK and PI3K signal pathways, and regulation of CREB phosphorylation.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuronal plasticity plays a crucial role in the amelioration of neurological recovery of ischemic injured brain, which remains a challenge for clinic treatment of cerebral ischemia. cpg15 as a synaptic plasticity-related factor may participate in

  18. Alpha-conotoxin-ImI: a competitive antagonist at alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive neuronal nicotinic receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Pereira, E F; Alkondon, M; McIntosh, J M; Albuquerque, E X

    1996-09-01

    In the present study, the patch-clamp technique was applied to rat hippocampal neurons or myoballs in culture to study the actions of alpha-conotoxin-ImI on the native alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive, presumably alpha 7-bearing, neuronal nicotinic receptor and on other ligand-gated channels. Preexposure of the neurons for 5 min to alpha-conotoxin-ImI decreased the peak amplitude of alpha-BGT-sensitive currents (referred to as type IA currents) in a concentration-dependent fashion. Several lines of evidence revealed that the inhibitory effect of alpha-conotoxin-ImI was competitive with respect to the agonist (IC50 approximately 85 nM) and reversible by washing. At 300 nM, alpha-conotoxin-ImI decreased by only 15% the peak amplitude of ACh-evoked currents in rat myoballs, did not affect the activation of currents gated by gamma-aminobutyric acid, glycine, N-methyl-D-aspartate, kainate, or quisqualate in hippocampal neurons, but reduced to approximately 60% the peak amplitude and shortened the decay phase of curare-sensitive, serotonin-gated currents in these neurons. The competitive and reversible nature of the alpha-conotoxin-ImI-induced inhibition of native alpha 7-bearing neuronal nicotinic receptors makes this peptide a valuable new tool for the functional and structural characterization of these receptors in the central nervous system.

  19. Recovery of network-driven glutamatergic activity in rat hippocampal neurons during chronic glutamate receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Leininger, Eric; Belousov, Andrei B

    2009-01-28

    Previous studies indicated that a long-term decrease in the activity of ionotropic glutamate receptors induces cholinergic activity in rat and mouse hypothalamic neuronal cultures. Here we studied whether a prolonged inactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors also induces cholinergic activity in hippocampal neurons. Receptor activity was chronically suppressed in rat hippocampal primary neuronal cultures with two proportionally increasing sets of concentrations of NMDA plus non-NMDA receptor antagonists: 100 microM/10 microM AP5/CNQX (1X cultures) and 200 microM/20 microM AP5/CNQX (2X cultures). Using calcium imaging we demonstrate that cholinergic activity does not develop in these cultures. Instead, network-driven glutamate-dependent activity, that normally is detected in hyper-excitable conditions, reappears in each culture group in the presence of these antagonists and can be reversibly suppressed by higher concentrations of AP5/CNQX. This activity is mediated by non-NMDA receptors and is modulated by NMDA receptors. Further, non-NMDA receptors, the general level of glutamate receptor activity and CaMK-dependent signaling are critical for development of this network-driven glutamatergic activity in the presence of receptor antagonists. Using electrophysiology, western blotting and calcium imaging we show that some neuronal parameters are either reduced or not affected by chronic glutamate receptor blockade. However, other parameters (including neuronal excitability, mEPSC frequency, and expression of GluR1, NR1 and betaCaMKII) become up-regulated and, in some cases, proportionally between the non-treated, 1X and 2X cultures. Our data suggest recovery of the network-driven glutamatergic activity after chronic glutamate receptor blockade. This recovery may represent a form of neuronal plasticity that compensates for the prolonged suppression of the activity of glutamate receptors.

  20. Tetramethylpyrazine Suppresses Transient Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Connexin32 Expression and Cell Apoptosis via the ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK Pathway in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lin; Ran, Maorong; Zhang, Yulan; Gong, Huaqu; Dai, Xuemei; Wu, Wei; Dong, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) has been widely used in China as a drug for the treatment of various diseases. Recent studies have suggested that TMP has a protective effect on ischemic neuronal damage. However, the exact mechanism is still unclear. This study aims to investigate the mechanism of TMP mediated ischemic hippocampal neurons injury induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The effect of TMP on hippocampal neurons viability was detected by MTT assay, LDH release assay and apoptosis rate was measured by flow cytometry. TMP significantly suppressed neuron apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. TMP could significantly reduce the elevated levels of connexin32 (Cx32) induced by OGD. Knockdown of Cx32 by siRNA attenuated OGD injury. Moreover, our study showed that viability was increased in siRNA-Cx32-treated-neurons, and neuron apoptosis was suppressed by activating Bcl-2 expression and inhibiting Bax expression. Over expression of Cx32 could decrease neurons viability and increase LDH release. Furthermore, OGD increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38, whose inhibitors relieved the neuron injury and Cx32 up-regulation. Taken together, TMP can reverse the OGD-induced Cx32 expression and cell apoptosis via the ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways. PMID:25237906

  1. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi; Costa, Lucio G.

    2014-02-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glial–neuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, the most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. - Highlights: • DZ and DZO inhibit astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth in rat hippocampal neurons. • Oxidative stress is involved in inhibition of neuritogenesis by DZ and DZO. • DZ and DZO decrease expression of the neuritogenic

  2. Damage of hippocampal neurons in rats with chronic alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ailin; Jiang, Hongbo; Xu, Lei; An, Na; Liu, Hui; Li, Yinsheng; Zhang, Ruiling

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism can damage the cytoskeleton and aggravate neurological deficits. However, the effect of chronic alcoholism on hippocampal neurons remains unclear. In this study, a model of chronic alcoholism was established in rats that were fed with 6% alcohol for 42 days. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide content and cystathionine-beta-synthase activity in the hippocampus of rats with chronic alcoholism were significantly increased, while F-actin expression was decreased. Hippocampal neurons in rats with chronic alcoholism appeared to have a fuzzy nuclear membrane, mitochondrial edema, and ruptured mitochondrial crista. These findings suggest that chronic alcoholism can cause learning and memory decline in rats, which may be associated with the hydrogen sulfide/cystathionine-beta-synthase system, mitochondrial damage and reduced expression of F-actin. PMID:25368648

  3. Hypoglycemia-activated K+ channels in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Tromba, C; Salvaggio, A; Racagni, G; Volterra, A

    1992-08-31

    Channels linking the electrical and metabolic activities of cells (KATP channels) have been described in various tissues, including some brain areas (hypothalamus, cerebral cortex and substantia nigra). Here we report the existence in hippocampal neurons of K+ permeant channels whose activity is regulated by extracellular glucose. They are open at the cell resting potential and respond to transient hypoglycemia with a reversible increase in activity. The one type so far characterized has a conductance of approximately 100 pS in isotonic K+, is inhibited by the sulphonylurea glibenclamide (1 microM), and is activated by the potassium channel opener lemakalim (0.1-1 microM). These data provide a direct demonstration of the presence, in hippocampal neurons, of glucose-sensitive channels that could belong to the KATP family.

  4. Benzodiazepines do not potentiate GABA responses in neonatal hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Rovira, C; Ben-Ari, Y

    1991-09-16

    Benzodiazepines (midazolam; flunitrazepam) and pentobarbital increase the response to exogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in adult hippocampal cells. We report in this paper that in contrast pentobarbital but not benzodiazepine potentiate the effects of exogenous (GABA) in neurons recorded from slices of less than two weeks old. This finding suggests that the functional association of benzodiazepine and GABAA receptors is changed during early postnatal life.

  5. Stochastic and Coherence Resonance in Hippocampal Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    decreases the signal to noise ratio of subthreshold synaptic inputs. Keywords - Hippocampus , neurons, stochastic resonance I. INTRODUCTION... subthreshold signals in the hippocampus ,” J. Neurophysiology , in press. [3] J. Collins C.C. Chow and T.T. Imboff, “Stochastic resonance without...nonlinear systems whereby the introduction of noise enhances the detection of subthreshold signals. Both computer simulations and experimental

  6. Regulation of intrinsic excitability in hippocampal neurons by activity-dependent modulation of the Kv2.1 potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Durga P.; Misonou, Hiroaki; Pan, Sheng-Jun; Held, Joshua E.; Surmeier, D. James; Trimmer, James S.

    2009-01-01

    Kv2.1 is the prominent somatodendritic sustained or delayed rectifier voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel in mammalian central neurons, and is a target for activity-dependent modulation via calcineurin-dependent dephosphorylation. Using hanatoxin-mediated block of Kv2.1 we show that, in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, glutamate stimulation leads to significant hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage-dependent activation and inactivation gating properties of the Kv2.1-component of delayed rectifier K+ (IK) currents. In computer models of hippocampal neurons, these glutamate-stimulated shifts in the gating of the Kv2.1-component of IK lead to a dramatic suppression of action potential firing frequency. Current-clamp experiments in cultured rat hippocampal neurons showed glutamate-stimulation induced a similar suppression of neuronal firing frequency. Membrane depolarization also resulted in similar hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage-dependent gating properties of neuronal IK currents, and suppression of neuronal firing. The glutamate-induced effects on neuronal firing were eliminated by hanatoxin, but not by dendrotoxin-K, a blocker of Kv1.1-containing channels. These studies together demonstrate a specific contribution of modulation of Kv2.1 channels in the activity-dependent regulation of intrinsic neuronal excitability. PMID:19276663

  7. Regulation of dendrite growth by the Cdc42 activator Zizimin1/Dock9 in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Kazuya; Negishi, Manabu; Katoh, Hironori

    2009-06-01

    Rho family small GTPases are key regulators of morphological changes in neurons. Cdc42, one of the most characterized members of the Rho family of proteins, is involved in axon and dendrite outgrowth through cytoskeletal reorganization. Recent studies have identified Zizimin1, a member of the Dock180-related family of proteins [also called CDM (Ced-5/Dock180/Myoblast city)-zizimin homology (CZH) proteins], as a specific guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Cdc42. However, the physiological function of Zizimin1 is totally unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of Zizimin1 in dendrite development in rat hippocampal neurons. In situ hybridization and Western blot analysis showed that Zizimin1 is strongly expressed in the developing brain including in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in late developmental stages. Overexpression of wild-type Zizimin1 promoted dendrite growth, whereas knockdown of Zizimin1 by short hairpin RNA or expression of a mutant Zizimin1 lacking Cdc42 GEF activity suppressed dendrite growth in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Both the N-terminal CZH1 domain, which is conserved among CZH proteins, and the Pleckstrin homology domain of Zizimin1 are involved in membrane localization, Cdc42 activation, and regulation of dendrite growth. Thus, these results suggest that Zizimin1 plays an important role in dendrite growth in hippocampal neurons through activation of Cdc42.

  8. Tetramethyl Pyrazine Protects Hippocampal Neurons Against Anoxia/Reoxygenation Injury Through Inhibiting Apoptosis Mediated by JNK/MARK Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ming; Ma, Wuhua; Zhang, Xiong; Wang, Yong; Gao, Xiaoqiu

    2016-01-01

    Background Tetramethyl pyrazine (TMP) is a typical biologically active alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herb Ligusticum walliichi. It has been reported that TMP shows neuroprotective and stroke injury reductive properties in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) animal models. In the present study we sought to investigate the effect and potential intervention mechanism of TMP in anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R) rat hippocampal neurons. Material/Methods After being cultured for 7 days, primary hippocampal neurons were randomly assigned into a normal control group (N), a TMP group (C: 0 ug/ml, L: 60 ug/ml, M: 200ug/ml and H: 800 ug/ml), and a JNK inhibitor group (S: SP600125, 10 μmol/L). A hypoxia/reoxygenation model were prepared 1 h after incubation. Hippocampal neurons were incubated in 90% N2 and 10% CO2 for 2 h, and then reoxygenated for 24 h in an incubator with 5%CO2 at the temperature of 37°C. The apoptosis rate, MKK4 and MKK7 mRNA and JNK kinase protein levels (C-fos, c-jun, and P-JNK) of hippocampal neurons were detected. Results The apoptosis rates of hippocampal neurons induced by A/R showed significant reduction after being pre-treated with JNK inhibitor, TMP 60 μg/ml, 200 μg/ml, and 800 μg/ml. The JNK kinase MKK4mRNA and MKK7mRNA levels, as well as the expressions of C-fos, C-jun, and P-JNK protein levels, were also be reduced. Conclusions TMP may produce a protective effect in anoxia/reoxygenation-induced primary hippocampal neuronal injury by inhibiting the apoptosis of the hippocampal neurons; the possible mechanism may be inhibition of the JNK signal pathway. PMID:28009855

  9. High frequency stimulation induces sonic hedgehog release from hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yujuan; Yuan, Yuan; Feng, Shengjie; Ma, Shaorong; Wang, Yizheng

    2017-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) as a secreted protein is important for neuronal development in the central nervous system (CNS). However, the mechanism about SHH release remains largely unknown. Here, we showed that SHH was expressed mainly in the synaptic vesicles of hippocampus in both young postnatal and adult rats. High, but not low, frequency stimulation, induces SHH release from the neurons. Moreover, removal of extracellular Ca2+, application of tetrodotoxin (TTX), an inhibitor of voltage-dependent sodium channels, or downregulation of soluble n-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) proteins, all blocked SHH release from the neurons in response to HFS. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism to control SHH release from the hippocampal neurons. PMID:28262835

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated hippocampal neuron apoptosis involved in diabetic cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Xu, Linhao; He, Daqiang; Ling, Shucai

    2013-01-01

    Poor management of DM causes cognitive impairment while the mechanism is still unconfirmed. The aim of the present study was to investigate the activation of C/EBP Homology Protein (CHOP), the prominent mediator of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis under hyperglycemia. We employed streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats to explore the ability of learning and memory by the Morris water maze test. The ultrastructure of hippocampus in diabetic rats and cultured neurons in high glucose medium were observed by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. TUNEL staining was also performed to assess apoptotic cells while the expression of CHOP was assayed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot assay in these hippocampal neurons. Six weeks after diabetes induction, the escape latency increased and the average frequency in finding the platform decreased in diabetic rats (P < 0.05). The morphology of neuron and synaptic structure was impaired; the number of TUNEL-positive cells and the expression of CHOP in hippocampus of diabetic rats and high glucose medium cultured neurons were markedly altered (P < 0.05). The present results suggested that the CHOP-dependent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis may be involved in hyperglycemia-induced hippocampal synapses and neurons impairment and promote the diabetic cognitive impairment.

  11. Extracellular sodium modulates the excitability of cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, Xianghong; Foster, Hailey; Su, Lei; Do, Huy; Wain, Andrew J.; Fonteh, Alfred N.; Zhou, Feimeng; Harrington, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated a photophobia mechanism with modulation of nociceptive, cortico-thalamic neurons by retinal ganglion cell projections, however, little is known about how their neuronal homeostasis is disrupted. Since we have found that lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sodium increases during migraine and that cranial sodium increases in a rat migraine model, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of extracellular sodium ([Na+]o) on the intrinsic excitability of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We monitored excitability by whole cell patch using a multiplex micropipette with a common outlet to change artificial CSF (ACSF) [Na+]o at cultured neurons accurately (SD < 7 mM) and rapidly (< 5 s) as determined by a sodium selective micro-electrode of the same size and at the same location as a neuronal soma. Changing [Na+]o in ACSF from 100 to 160 mM, choline-balanced at 310 – 320 mOsm, increased the action potential (AP) amplitude, decreased AP width, and augmented firing rate by 28%. These effects were reversed on returning the ACSF [Na+]o to 100 mM. Testing up to 180 mM [Na+]o required ACSF with higher osmolarity (345 – 355 mOsm), at which the firing rate increased by 36% between 100 to 180 mM [Na +]o, with higher amplitude and narrower APs. In voltage clamp mode, the sodium and potassium currents increased significantly at higher [Na+]o. These results demonstrate that fluctuations in [Na+]o modulate neuronal excitability by a sodium current mechanism, and that excessively altered neuronal excitability may contribute to hypersensitivity symptoms. PMID:21679932

  12. Wnt-5a occludes Aβ oligomer-induced depression of glutamatergic transmission in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Soluble amyloid-β (Aβ;) oligomers have been recognized to be early and key intermediates in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related synaptic dysfunction. Aβ oligomers block hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and impair rodent spatial memory. Wnt signaling plays an important role in neural development, including synaptic differentiation. Results We report here that the Wnt signaling activation prevents the synaptic damage triggered by Aβ oligomers. Electrophysiological analysis of Schaffer collaterals-CA1 glutamatergic synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices indicates that Wnt-5a increases the amplitude of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) and both AMPA and NMDA components of the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), without modifying the paired pulse facilitation (PPF). Conversely, in the presence of Aβ oligomers the fEPSP and EPSCs amplitude decreased without modification of the PPF, while the postsynaptic scaffold protein (PSD-95) decreased as well. Co-perfusion of hippocampal slices with Wnt-5a and Aβ oligomers occludes against the synaptic depression of EPSCs as well as the reduction of PSD-95 clusters induced by Aβ oligomers in neuronal cultures. Taken together these results indicate that Wnt-5a and Aβ oligomers inversely modulate postsynaptic components. Conclusion These results indicate that post-synaptic damage induced by Aβ oligomers in hippocampal neurons is prevented by non-canonical Wnt pathway activation. PMID:20205789

  13. NaHS Protects against the Impairments Induced by Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation in Different Ages of Primary Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qian; Wang, Binrong; Zhao, Tianzhi; Zhang, Xiangnan; Tao, Lei; Shi, Jinshan; Sun, Xude; Ding, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Brain ischemia leads to poor oxygen supply, and is one of the leading causes of brain damage and/or death. Neuroprotective agents are thus in great need for treatment purpose. Using both young and aged primary cultured hippocampal neurons as in vitro models, we investigated the effect of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), an exogenous donor of hydrogen sulfide, on oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) damaged neurons that mimick focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induced brain injury. NaHS treatment (250 μM) protected both young and aged hippocampal neurons, as indicated by restoring number of primary dendrites by 43.9 and 68.7%, number of dendritic end tips by 59.8 and 101.1%, neurite length by 36.8 and 66.7%, and spine density by 38.0 and 58.5% in the OGD-damaged young and aged neurons, respectively. NaHS treatment inhibited growth-associated protein 43 downregulation, oxidative stress in both young and aged hippocampal neurons following OGD damage. Further studies revealed that NaHS treatment could restore ERK1/2 activation, which was inhibited by OGD-induced protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) upregulation. Our results demonstrated that NaHS has potent protective effects against neuron injury induced by OGD in both young and aged hippocampal neurons. PMID:28326019

  14. Deep Sequencing and High-Resolution Imaging Reveal Compartment-Specific Localization of Bdnf mRNA in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Will, Tristan J.; Tushev, Georgi; Kochen, Lisa; Nassim-Assir, Belquis; Cajigas, Ivan J.; tom Dieck, Susanne; Schuman, Erin M.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a small protein of the neurotrophin family that regulates various brain functions. Although much is known about how its transcription is regulated, the abundance of endogenous BDNF mRNA and its subcellular localization pattern are matters of debate. We used next-generation sequencing and high-resolution in situ hybridization in the rat hippocampus to reexamine this question. We performed 3′ end sequencing on rat hippocampal slices and detected two isoforms of Bdnf containing either a short or a long 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR). Most of the Bdnf transcripts contained the short 3′UTR isoform and were present in low amounts relative to other neuronal transcripts. Bdnf mRNA was present in the somatic compartment of rat hippocampal slices or the somata of cultured rat hippocampal neurons but was rarely detected in the dendritic processes. Pharmacological stimulation of hippocampal neurons induced Bdnf expression but did not change the ratio of Bdnf isoform abundance. The findings indicate that endogenous Bdnf mRNA, although weakly abundant, is primarily localized to the somatic compartment of hippocampal neurons. Both Bdnf mRNA isoforms have shorter half-lives compared with other neuronal mRNAs. Furthermore, the findings show that using complementary high-resolution techniques can provide sensitive measures of endogenous transcript abundance. PMID:24345682

  15. GABAergic hub neurons orchestrate synchrony in developing hippocampal networks.

    PubMed

    Bonifazi, P; Goldin, M; Picardo, M A; Jorquera, I; Cattani, A; Bianconi, G; Represa, A; Ben-Ari, Y; Cossart, R

    2009-12-04

    Brain function operates through the coordinated activation of neuronal assemblies. Graph theory predicts that scale-free topologies, which include "hubs" (superconnected nodes), are an effective design to orchestrate synchronization. Whether hubs are present in neuronal assemblies and coordinate network activity remains unknown. Using network dynamics imaging, online reconstruction of functional connectivity, and targeted whole-cell recordings in rats and mice, we found that developing hippocampal networks follow a scale-free topology, and we demonstrated the existence of functional hubs. Perturbation of a single hub influenced the entire network dynamics. Morphophysiological analysis revealed that hub cells are a subpopulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid-releasing (GABAergic) interneurons possessing widespread axonal arborizations. These findings establish a central role for GABAergic interneurons in shaping developing networks and help provide a conceptual framework for studying neuronal synchrony.

  16. Repeated Stimulation of Cultured Networks of Rat Cortical Neurons Induces Parallel Memory Traces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    le Feber, Joost; Witteveen, Tim; van Veenendaal, Tamar M.; Dijkstra, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    During systems consolidation, memories are spontaneously replayed favoring information transfer from hippocampus to neocortex. However, at present no empirically supported mechanism to accomplish a transfer of memory from hippocampal to extra-hippocampal sites has been offered. We used cultured neuronal networks on multielectrode arrays and…

  17. Maternal immune activation produces neonatal excitability defects in offspring hippocampal neurons from pregnant rats treated with poly I:C

    PubMed Central

    Patrich, Eti; Piontkewitz, Yael; Peretz, Asher; Weiner, Ina; Attali, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) resulting from prenatal exposure to infectious pathogens or inflammatory stimuli is increasingly recognized to play an important etiological role in neuropsychiatric disorders with neurodevelopmental features. MIA in pregnant rodents induced by injection of the synthetic double-stranded RNA, Poly I:C, a mimic of viral infection, leads to a wide spectrum of behavioral abnormalities as well as structural and functional defects in the brain. Previous MIA studies using poly I:C prenatal treatment suggested that neurophysiological alterations occur in the hippocampus. However, these investigations used only juvenile or adult animals. We postulated that MIA-induced alterations could occur earlier at neonatal/early postnatal stages. Here we examined the neurophysiological properties of cultured pyramidal-like hippocampal neurons prepared from neonatal (P0-P2) offspring of pregnant rats injected with poly I:C. Offspring neurons from poly I:C-treated mothers exhibited significantly lower intrinsic excitability and stronger spike frequency adaptation, compared to saline. A similar lower intrinsic excitability was observed in CA1 pyramidal neurons from hippocampal slices of two weeks-old poly I:C offspring. Cultured hippocampal neurons also displayed lower frequency of spontaneous firing, higher charge transfer of IPSCs and larger amplitude of miniature IPSCs. Thus, maternal immune activation leads to strikingly early neurophysiological abnormalities in hippocampal neurons. PMID:26742695

  18. Maternal immune activation produces neonatal excitability defects in offspring hippocampal neurons from pregnant rats treated with poly I:C.

    PubMed

    Patrich, Eti; Piontkewitz, Yael; Peretz, Asher; Weiner, Ina; Attali, Bernard

    2016-01-08

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) resulting from prenatal exposure to infectious pathogens or inflammatory stimuli is increasingly recognized to play an important etiological role in neuropsychiatric disorders with neurodevelopmental features. MIA in pregnant rodents induced by injection of the synthetic double-stranded RNA, Poly I:C, a mimic of viral infection, leads to a wide spectrum of behavioral abnormalities as well as structural and functional defects in the brain. Previous MIA studies using poly I:C prenatal treatment suggested that neurophysiological alterations occur in the hippocampus. However, these investigations used only juvenile or adult animals. We postulated that MIA-induced alterations could occur earlier at neonatal/early postnatal stages. Here we examined the neurophysiological properties of cultured pyramidal-like hippocampal neurons prepared from neonatal (P0-P2) offspring of pregnant rats injected with poly I:C. Offspring neurons from poly I:C-treated mothers exhibited significantly lower intrinsic excitability and stronger spike frequency adaptation, compared to saline. A similar lower intrinsic excitability was observed in CA1 pyramidal neurons from hippocampal slices of two weeks-old poly I:C offspring. Cultured hippocampal neurons also displayed lower frequency of spontaneous firing, higher charge transfer of IPSCs and larger amplitude of miniature IPSCs. Thus, maternal immune activation leads to strikingly early neurophysiological abnormalities in hippocampal neurons.

  19. NGF and BDNF signaling control amyloidogenic route and Abeta production in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Matrone, Carmela; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Mercanti, Delio; Marolda, Roberta; Calissano, Pietro

    2008-09-02

    Here, we report that interruption of NGF or BDNF signaling in hippocampal neurons rapidly activates the amyloidogenic pathway and causes neuronal apoptotic death. These events are associated with an early intracellular accumulation of PS1 N-terminal catalytic subunits and of APP C-terminal fragments and a progressive accumulation of intra- and extracellular Abeta aggregates partly released into the culture medium. The released pool of Abeta induces an increase of APP and PS1 holoprotein levels, creating a feed-forward toxic loop that might also cause the death of healthy neurons. These events are mimicked by exogenously added Abeta and are prevented by exposure to beta- and gamma-secretase inhibitors and by antibodies directed against Abeta peptides. The same cultured neurons deprived of serum die, but APP and PS1 overexpression does not occur, Abeta production is undetectable, and cell death is not inhibited by anti-Abeta antibodies, suggesting that hippocampal amyloidogenesis is not a simple consequence of an apoptotic trigger but is due to interruption of neurotrophic signaling.

  20. Inositol hexakisphosphate suppresses excitatory neurotransmission via synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain in the hippocampal neuron.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shao-Nian; Shi, Yue; Yang, Guang; Li, Yuxin; Yu, Lina; Shin, Ok-Ho; Bacaj, Taulant; Südhof, Thomas C; Yu, Jia; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2012-07-24

    Inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP(6)) levels rise and fall with neuronal excitation and silence, respectively, in the hippocampus, suggesting potential signaling functions of this inositol polyphosphate in hippocampal neurons. We now demonstrate that intracellular application of InsP(6) caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of autaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in cultured hippocampal neurons. The treatment did not alter the size and replenishment rate of the readily releasable pool in autaptic neurons. Intracellular exposure to InsP(6) did not affect spontaneous EPSCs or excitatory amino acid-activated currents in neurons lacking autapses. The InsP(6)-induced inhibition of autaptic EPSCs was effectively abolished by coapplication of an antibody to synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain. Importantly, preabsorption of the antibody with a GST-WT synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain fragment but not with a GST-mutant synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain fragment that poorly reacted with the antibody impaired the activity of the antibody on the InsP(6)-induced inhibition of autaptic EPSCs. Furthermore, K(+) depolarization significantly elevated endogenous levels of InsP(6) and occluded the inhibition of autaptic EPSCs by exogenous InsP(6). These data reveal that InsP(6) suppresses excitatory neurotransmission via inhibition of the presynaptic synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain-mediated fusion via an interaction with the synaptotagmin Ca(2+)-binding sites rather than via interference with presynaptic Ca(2+) levels, synaptic vesicle trafficking, or inactivation of postsynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptors. Therefore, elevated InsP(6) in activated neurons serves as a unique negative feedback signal to control hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission.

  1. Comparative Effects of Heterologous TRPV1 and TRPM8 Expression in Rat Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Devon C.; Moulder, Krista L.; Gereau, Robert W.; Story, Gina M.; Mennerick, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Heterologous channel expression can be used to control activity in select neuronal populations, thus expanding the tools available to modern neuroscience. However, the secondary effects of exogenous channel expression are often left unexplored. We expressed two transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family members, TRPV1 and TRPM8, in cultured hippocampal neurons. We compared functional expression levels and secondary effects of channel expression and activation on neuronal survival and signaling. We found that activation of both channels with appropriate agonist caused large depolarizing currents in voltage-clamped hippocampal neurons, exceeding the amplitude responses to a calibrating 30 mM KCl stimulation. Both TRPV1 and TRPM8 currents were reduced but not eliminated by 4 hr incubation in saturating agonist concentration. In the case of TRPV1, but not TRPM8, prolonged agonist exposure caused strong calcium-dependent toxicity. In addition, TRPV1 expression depressed synaptic transmission dramatically without overt signs of toxicity, possibly due to low-level TRPV1 activation in the absence of exogenous agonist application. Despite evidence of expression at presynaptic sites, in addition to somatodendritic sites, TRPM8 expression alone exhibited no effects on synaptic transmission. Therefore, by a number of criteria, TRPM8 proved the superior choice for control over neuronal membrane potential. This study also highlights the need to explore potential secondary effects of long-term expression and activation of heterologously introduced channels. PMID:19997638

  2. Novel transient outward K+ current of mature murine hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed

    Li, X Y; McArdle, J J

    1997-06-01

    Hippocampal neurones were freshly isolated from the brain of adult mice and voltage-dependent K+ currents were recorded with whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Three components of transient K+ current (IA) were isolated when analyzing data with exponential functions or treating neurones with a variety of voltage protocols and pharmacologic agents. Subtraction of the delayed rectifier current (IK) from the K+ currents elicited after prepulses to -120 mV of varying duration revealed fast (IAf) and slow (IAs) components with decay time constants of 45 +/- 8 and 612 +/- 140 ms, respectively; the corresponding time constants for the removal of inactivation were 12.3 and 189.6 ms. both tetraethylammonium and dendrotoxin selectively inhibited IAs. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) specifically blocked IAf and 40% of IAs with different affinities. Therefore, the properties of a 4-AP-resistant (IAsR) and 4-AP-sensitive (IAsS) component of IAs were compared. These data suggest that three distinct subtypes of K+ currents contribute to the IA of mature murine hippocampal neurones.

  3. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation modulates gamma-aminobutyric acid release from CA1 neurons of rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Alkondon, M; Pereira, E F; Barbosa, C T; Albuquerque, E X

    1997-12-01

    In the present study we investigated electrophysiologically the nicotinic responses of pyramidal neurons and interneurons visualized by infrared-assisted videomicroscopy and fluorescence in the CA1 field of hippocampal slices obtained from 8- to 24-day-old rats. Application of nicotinic agonists to CA1 neurons evoked at least four types of nicotinic responses. Of major interest was the ability of these agonists to induce the release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from interneurons. Slowly decaying ACh whole-cell currents and GABA-mediated postsynaptic currents could be recorded from pyramidal neurons and interneurons, whereas fast-decaying nicotinic currents and fast current transients were recorded only from interneurons. Nicotinic responses were sensitive to blockade by d-tubocurarine (10 microM), which indicated that they were mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The slowly decaying currents, the postsynaptic currents and the fast current transients were insensitive to blockade by the alpha-7 nAChR-specific antagonist methyllycaconitine (up to 1 microM) or alpha-bungarotoxin (100 nM). On the other hand, the slowly decaying nicotinic currents recorded from the interneurons were blocked by the alpha4beta2 nAChR-specific antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine, and the fast-desensitizing nicotinic currents were evoked by the alpha-7 nAChR-specific agonist choline. In experimental conditions similar to those used to record nicotinic responses from neurons in slice (i. e., in the absence of tetrodotoxin), we observed that nicotinic agonists can also induce the release of GABA from hippocampal neurons in culture. In summary, these results provide direct evidence for more than one subtype of functional nAChR in CA1 neurons and suggest that activation of nAChRs present in GABAergic interneurons can evoke inhibitory activity in CA1 pyramidal neurons, thereby modulating processing of information in the hippocampus.

  4. Blocking brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits injury-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons.

    PubMed

    Gill, Raminder; Chang, Philip K-Y; Prenosil, George A; Deane, Emily C; McKinney, Rebecca A

    2013-12-01

    Brain trauma can disrupt synaptic connections, and this in turn can prompt axons to sprout and form new connections. If these new axonal connections are aberrant, hyperexcitability can result. It has been shown that ablating tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), a receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), can reduce axonal sprouting after hippocampal injury. However, it is unknown whether inhibiting BDNF-mediated axonal sprouting will reduce hyperexcitability. Given this, our purpose here was to determine whether pharmacologically blocking BDNF inhibits hyperexcitability after injury-induced axonal sprouting in the hippocampus. To induce injury, we made Schaffer collateral lesions in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. As reported by others, we observed a 50% reduction in axonal sprouting in cultures treated with a BDNF blocker (TrkB-Fc) 14 days after injury. Furthermore, lesioned cultures treated with TrkB-Fc were less hyperexcitable than lesioned untreated cultures. Using electrophysiology, we observed a two-fold decrease in the number of CA3 neurons that showed bursting responses after lesion with TrkB-Fc treatment, whereas we found no change in intrinsic neuronal firing properties. Finally, evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potential recordings indicated an increase in network activity within area CA3 after lesion, which was prevented with chronic TrkB-Fc treatment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that blocking BDNF attenuates injury-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons. Axonal sprouting has been found in patients with post-traumatic epilepsy. Therefore, our data suggest that blocking the BDNF-TrkB signaling cascade shortly after injury may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of post-traumatic epilepsy.

  5. Hippocampal Somatostatin Interneurons Control the Size of Neuronal Memory Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Stefanelli, Thomas; Bertollini, Cristina; Lüscher, Christian; Muller, Dominique; Mendez, Pablo

    2016-03-02

    Hippocampal neurons activated during encoding drive the recall of contextual fear memory. Little is known about how such ensembles emerge during acquisition and eventually form the cellular engram. Manipulating the activity of granule cells (GCs) of the dentate gyrus (DG), we reveal a mechanism of lateral inhibition that modulates the size of the cellular engram. GCs engage somatostatin-positive interneurons that inhibit the dendrites of surrounding GCs. Our findings reveal a microcircuit within the DG that controls the size of the cellular engram and the stability of contextual fear memory.

  6. Distinct pathways for rule-based retrieval and spatial mapping of memory representations in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Navawongse, Rapeechai; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons encode events within the context in which they occurred, a fundamental feature of episodic memory. Here we explored the sources of event and context information represented by hippocampal neurons during the retrieval of object associations in rats. Temporary inactivation of the medial prefrontal cortex differentially reduced the selectivity of rule-based object associations represented by hippocampal neuronal firing patterns but did not affect spatial firing patterns. By contrast, inactivation of the medial entorhinal cortex resulted in a pervasive reorganization of hippocampal mappings of spatial context and events. These results suggest distinct and cooperative prefrontal and medial temporal mechanisms in memory representation. PMID:23325238

  7. Comparison of Steroid Modulation of Spontaneous Inhibitory Postsynaptic Currents in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons and Steady-State Single-Channel Currents from Heterologously Expressed α1β2γ2L GABA(A) Receptors.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Sampurna; Qian, Mingxing; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Covey, Douglas F; Mennerick, Steven; Akk, Gustav

    2016-04-01

    Neuroactive steroids are efficacious modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)) receptor function. The effects of steroids on the GABA(A) receptor are typically determined by comparing steady-state single-channel open probability or macroscopic peak responses elicited by GABA in the absence and presence of a steroid. Due to differences in activation conditions (exposure duration, concentration of agonist), it is not obvious whether modulation measured using typical experimental protocols can be used to accurately predict the effect of a modulator on native receptors under physiologic conditions. In the present study, we examined the effects of 14 neuroactive steroids and analogs on the properties of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The goal was to determine whether the magnitude of modulation of the decay time course of sIPSCs correlates with the extent of modulation and kinetic properties of potentiation as determined in previous single-channel studies. The steroids were selected to cover a wide range of efficacy on heterologously expressed rat α1β2γ2L GABA(A) receptors, ranging from essentially inert to highly efficacious (strong potentiators of single-channel and macroscopic peak responses). The data indicate a strong correlation between prolongation of the decay time course of sIPSCs and potentiation of single-channel open probability. Furthermore, changes in intracluster closed time distributions were the single best predictor of prolongation of sIPSCs. We infer that the information obtained in steady-state single-channel recordings can be used to forecast modulation of synaptic currents.

  8. Delivery of recombinant alphavirus into hippocampal slice tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2012-08-01

    The alphaviruses Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and Sindbis virus (SIN) have been used frequently as expression vectors in vitro and in vivo. Usually, these systems consist of replication-deficient vectors that require a helper vector for packaging of recombinant particles. Replication-proficient vectors have also been engineered. Alphaviral vectors can be used as nucleic-acid-based vectors (DNA and RNA) or infectious particles. High-titer viral production is achieved in <2 d. The broad host range of alphaviruses facilitates studies in mammalian and nonmammalian cell lines, primary cells in culture, and in vivo. The strong preference for expression in neuronal cells has made alphaviruses particularly useful in neurobiological studies. Unfortunately, their strong cytotoxic effect on host cells, relatively short-term transient expression patterns, and the reasonably high cost of viral production remain drawbacks. However, novel mutant alphaviruses have shown reduced cytotoxicity and prolonged expression. This protocol describes gene delivery of recombinant alphavirus to hippocampal slice cultures. Organotypic slices are covered by a layer of glial cells that impedes the penetration of viral particles to the neurons. Thus, viral particles should be injected manually into the extracellular space of the tissue.

  9. Hyperpolarization-Activated Current (Ih) Is Reduced in Hippocampal Neurons from Gabra5−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Robert P.; Zurek, Agnieszka A.; Yu, Jieying; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Orser, Beverley A.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the expression of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors can either drive or mediate homeostatic alterations in neuronal excitability. A homeostatic relationship between α5 subunit-containing GABAA (α5GABAA) receptors that generate a tonic inhibitory conductance, and HCN channels that generate a hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) was recently described for cortical neurons, where a reduction in Ih was accompanied by a reciprocal increase in the expression of α5GABAA receptors resulting in the preservation of dendritosomatic synaptic function. Here, we report that in mice that lack the α5 subunit gene (Gabra5−/−), cultured embryonic hippocampal pyramidal neurons and ex vivo CA1 hippocampal neurons unexpectedly exhibited a decrease in Ih current density (by 40% and 28%, respectively), compared with neurons from wild-type (WT) mice. The resting membrane potential and membrane hyperpolarization induced by blockade of Ih with ZD-7288 were similar in cultured WT and Gabra5−/− neurons. In contrast, membrane hyperpolarization measured after a train of action potentials was lower in Gabra5−/− neurons than in WT neurons. Also, membrane impedance measured in response to low frequency stimulation was greater in cultured Gabra5−/− neurons. Finally, the expression of HCN1 protein that generates Ih was reduced by 41% in the hippocampus of Gabra5−/− mice. These data indicate that loss of a tonic GABAergic inhibitory conductance was followed by a compensatory reduction in Ih. The results further suggest that the maintenance of resting membrane potential is preferentially maintained in mature and immature hippocampal neurons through the homeostatic co-regulation of structurally and biophysically distinct cation and anion channels. PMID:23516534

  10. beta-estradiol influences differentiation of hippocampal neurons in vitro through an estrogen receptor-mediated process.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, T; Cabell, L; Kern, M; Audesirk, G

    2003-01-01

    We utilized morphometric analysis of 3 day cultures of hippocampal neurons to determine the effects of both estradiol and the synthetic estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene on several parameters of neuronal growth and differentiation. These measurements included survival, neurite production, dendrite number, and axon and dendrite length and branching. 17 beta-Estradiol (10 nM) selectively stimulated dendrite branching; this effect was neither mimicked by alpha-estradiol, nor blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. The selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene (100 nM) neither mimicked nor reversed the effects of estradiol on dendritic branching. Western immunoblotting for the alpha and beta subtypes of estrogen receptor revealed the presence of alpha, but not beta, estrogen receptors in our hippocampal cultures. There is growing recognition of the effects of 17 beta-estradiol on neuronal development and physiology, with implications for brain sexual dimorphism, plasticity, cognition, and the maintenance of cognitive function during aging. The role of estradiol in hippocampal neuronal differentiation and function has particular implications for learning and memory. These data support the hypothesis that 17 beta-estradiol is acting via alpha estrogen receptors in influencing hippocampal development in vitro. Raloxifene, prescribed to combat osteoporosis in post-menopausal women, is a selective estrogen receptor modulator with tissue-specific agonist/antagonist properties. Because raloxifene had no effect on dendritic branching, we hypothesize that it does not interact with the alpha estrogen receptor in this experimental paradigm.

  11. Synchronization in hybrid neuronal networks of the hippocampal formation.

    PubMed

    Netoff, Theoden I; Banks, Matthew I; Dorval, Alan D; Acker, Corey D; Haas, Julie S; Kopell, Nancy; White, John A

    2005-03-01

    Understanding the mechanistic bases of neuronal synchronization is a current challenge in quantitative neuroscience. We studied this problem in two putative cellular pacemakers of the mammalian hippocampal theta rhythm: glutamatergic stellate cells (SCs) of the medial entorhinal cortex and GABAergic oriens-lacunosum-molecular (O-LM) interneurons of hippocampal region CA1. We used two experimental methods. First, we measured changes in spike timing induced by artificial synaptic inputs applied to individual neurons. We then measured responses of free-running hybrid neuronal networks, consisting of biological neurons coupled (via dynamic clamp) to biological or virtual counterparts. Results from the single-cell experiments predicted network behaviors well and are compatible with previous model-based predictions of how specific membrane mechanisms give rise to empirically measured synchronization behavior. Both cell types phase lock stably when connected via homogeneous excitatory-excitatory (E-E) or inhibitory-inhibitory (I-I) connections. Phase-locked firing is consistently synchronous for either cell type with E-E connections and nearly anti-synchronous with I-I connections. With heterogeneous connections (e.g., excitatory-inhibitory, as might be expected if members of a given population had heterogeneous connections involving intermediate interneurons), networks often settled into phase locking that was either stable or unstable, depending on the order of firing of the two cells in the hybrid network. Our results imply that excitatory SCs, but not inhibitory O-LM interneurons, are capable of synchronizing in phase via monosynaptic mutual connections of the biologically appropriate polarity. Results are largely independent of synaptic strength and synaptic kinetics, implying that our conclusions are robust and largely unaffected by synaptic plasticity.

  12. Undaria pinnatifida Promotes Spinogenesis and Synaptogenesis and Potentiates Functional Presynaptic Plasticity in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Maqueshudul Haque Bhuiyan, Mohammad; Mohibbullah, Md; Hannan, Md Abdul; Hong, Yong-Ki; Choi, Jae-Suk; Choi, In Soon; Moon, Il Soo

    2015-01-01

    Reductions in neurotrophic factors are implicated in synaptic dysfunction in the central nervous system, but exogenous neurotrophic factors with potential effects on neuritic regeneration and synaptic reconstruction could offer therapeutic and preventive strategies for treating memory-related neurological disorders. In an earlier effort to identify natural neurotrophic agents, we found that the ethanol extract of the edible marine alga Undaria pinnatifida (UPE) had promising effects on the neuritogenesis of cultured hippocampal neurons. Here, we further investigated the ability of UPE to promote spinogenesis and synaptogenesis in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. It was found that UPE triggered significant increase in numbers of dendritic filopodia and spines, promoted the formation of excitatory and inhibitory synapses, and potentiated synaptic transmission by increasing the sizes of reserve vesicle pools at presynaptic terminals. These findings indicate a substantial role for UPE in the morphological and functional maturation of neurons and suggest that UPE is a possible therapeutic preventative measure and treatment for neurodegenerative diseases, such as those involving cognitive disorders and memory impairments.

  13. Moderate increases in intracellular calcium activate neuroprotective signals in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bickler, P E; Fahlman, C S

    2004-01-01

    Although large increases in neuronal intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) are lethal, moderate increases in [Ca(2+)](i) of 50-200 nM may induce immediate or long-term tolerance of ischemia or other stresses. In neurons in rat hippocampal slice cultures, we determined the relationship between [Ca(2+)](i), cell death, and Ca(2+)-dependent neuroprotective signals before and after a 45 min period of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Thirty minutes before OGD, [Ca(2+)](i) was increased in CA1 neurons by 40-200 nM with 1 nM-1 microM of a Ca(2+)-selective ionophore (calcimycin or ionomycin-"Ca(2+) preconditioning"). Ca(2+) preconditioning greatly reduced cell death in CA1, CA3 and dentate during the following 7 days, even though [Ca(2+)](i) was similar (approximately 2 microM) in preconditioned and control neurons 1 h after the OGD. When pre-OGD [Ca(2+)](i) was lowered to 25 nM (10 nM ionophore in Ca(2+)-free medium) or increased to 8 microM (10 microM ionophore), more than 90% of neurons died. Increased levels of the anti-apoptotic protein protein kinase B (Akt) and the MAP kinase ERK (p42/44) were present in preconditioned slices after OGD. Reducing Ca(2+) influx, inhibiting calmodulin, and preventing Akt or MAP kinase p42/44 upregulation prevented Ca(2+) preconditioning, supporting a specific role for Ca(2+) in the neuroprotective process. Further, in continuously oxygenated cultured hippocampal/cortical neurons, preconditioning for 30 min with 10 nM ionomycin reduced cell death following a 4 microM increase in [Ca(2+)](i) elicited by 1 microM ionomycin. Thus, a zone of moderately increased [Ca(2+)](i) before a potentially lethal insult promotes cell survival, uncoupling subsequent large increases in [Ca(2+)](i) from initiating cell death processes.

  14. Mild hypothermia, but not propofol, is neuroprotective in organotypic hippocampal cultures.

    PubMed

    Feiner, John R; Bickler, Philip E; Estrada, Sergio; Donohoe, Paul H; Fahlman, Christian S; Schuyler, Jennifer A

    2005-01-01

    The neuroprotective potency of anesthetics such as propofol compared to mild hypothermia remains undefined. Therefore, we determined whether propofol at two clinically relevant concentrations is as effective as mild hypothermia in preventing delayed neuron death in hippocampal slice cultures (HSC). Survival of neurons was assessed 2 and 3 days after 1 h oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) either at 37 degrees C (with or without 10 or 100 microM propofol) or at an average temperature of 35 degrees C during OGD (mild hypothermia). Cell death in CA1, CA3, and dentate neurons in each slice was measured with propidium iodide fluorescence. Mild hypothermia eliminated death in CA1, CA3, and dentate neurons but propofol protected dentate neurons only at a concentration of 10 microM; the more ischemia vulnerable CA1 and CA3 neurons were not protected by either 10 microM or 100 microM propofol. In slice cultures, the toxicity of 100 muM N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), 500 microM glutamate, and 20 microM alpha-amino-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) was not reduced by 100 microM propofol. Because propofol neuroprotection may involve gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated indirect inhibition of glutamate receptors (GluRs), the effects of propofol on GluR activity (calcium influx induced by GluR agonists) were studied in CA1 neurons in HSC, in isolated CA1 neurons, and in cortical brain slices. Propofol (100 and 200 microM, approximate burst suppression concentrations) decreased glutamate-mediated [Ca2+]i increases (Delta[Ca2+]i) responses by 25%-35% in isolated CA1 neurons and reduced glutamate and NMDA Delta[Ca2+]i in acute and cultured hippocampal slices by 35%-50%. In both CA1 neurons and cortical slices, blocking GABAA receptors with picrotoxin reduced the inhibition of GluRs substantially. We conclude that mild hypothermia, but not propofol, protects CA1 and CA3 neurons in hippocampal slice cultures subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation. Propofol was not

  15. Ischemic Preconditioning Mediates Neuroprotection against Ischemia in Mouse Hippocampal CA1 Neurons by Inducing Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunlin; Cai, Ying; Zhang, Xuebin; Huang, Huiling; Wang, Jin; Wang, Yajing; Tong, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jinhuan; Wu, Jialing

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal CA1 region is sensitive to hypoxic and ischemic injury but can be protected by ischemic preconditioning (IPC). However, the mechanism through which IPC protects hippocampal CA1 neurons is still under investigation. Additionally, the role of autophagy in determining the fate of hippocampal neurons is unclear. Here, we examined whether IPC induced autophagy to alleviate hippocampal CA1 neuronal death in vitro and in vivo with oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) and bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) models. Survival of hippocampal neurons increased from 51.5% ± 6.3% in the non-IPC group (55 min of OGD) to 77.3% ± 7.9% in the IPC group (15 min of OGD, followed by 55 min of OGD 24 h later). The number of hippocampal CA1 layer neurons increased from 182 ± 26 cells/mm2 in the non-IPC group (20 min of BCCAO) to 278 ± 55 cells/mm2 in the IPC group (1 min × 3 BCCAO, followed by 20 min of BCCAO 24 h later). Akt phosphorylation and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II/LC3-I expression were increased in the preconditioning group. Moreover, the protective effects of IPC were abolished only by inhibiting the activity of autophagy, but not by blocking the activation of Akt in vitro. Using in vivo experiments, we found that LC3 expression was upregulated, accompanied by an increase in neuronal survival in hippocampal CA1 neurons in the preconditioning group. The neuroprotective effects of IPC on hippocampal CA1 neurons were completely inhibited by treatment with 3-MA. In contrast, hippocampal CA3 neurons did not show changes in autophagic activity or beneficial effects of IPC. These data suggested that IPC may attenuate ischemic injury in hippocampal CA1 neurons through induction of Akt-independent autophagy.

  16. Ischemic Preconditioning Mediates Neuroprotection against Ischemia in Mouse Hippocampal CA1 Neurons by Inducing Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuebin; Huang, Huiling; Wang, Jin; Wang, Yajing; Tong, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jinhuan; Wu, Jialing

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal CA1 region is sensitive to hypoxic and ischemic injury but can be protected by ischemic preconditioning (IPC). However, the mechanism through which IPC protects hippocampal CA1 neurons is still under investigation. Additionally, the role of autophagy in determining the fate of hippocampal neurons is unclear. Here, we examined whether IPC induced autophagy to alleviate hippocampal CA1 neuronal death in vitro and in vivo with oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) and bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) models. Survival of hippocampal neurons increased from 51.5% ± 6.3% in the non-IPC group (55 min of OGD) to 77.3% ± 7.9% in the IPC group (15 min of OGD, followed by 55 min of OGD 24 h later). The number of hippocampal CA1 layer neurons increased from 182 ± 26 cells/mm2 in the non-IPC group (20 min of BCCAO) to 278 ± 55 cells/mm2 in the IPC group (1 min × 3 BCCAO, followed by 20 min of BCCAO 24 h later). Akt phosphorylation and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II/LC3-I expression were increased in the preconditioning group. Moreover, the protective effects of IPC were abolished only by inhibiting the activity of autophagy, but not by blocking the activation of Akt in vitro. Using in vivo experiments, we found that LC3 expression was upregulated, accompanied by an increase in neuronal survival in hippocampal CA1 neurons in the preconditioning group. The neuroprotective effects of IPC on hippocampal CA1 neurons were completely inhibited by treatment with 3-MA. In contrast, hippocampal CA3 neurons did not show changes in autophagic activity or beneficial effects of IPC. These data suggested that IPC may attenuate ischemic injury in hippocampal CA1 neurons through induction of Akt-independent autophagy. PMID:26325184

  17. Tech: a RhoA GEF selectively expressed in hippocampal and cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ruth; Henderson, Jennifer; Wang, James; Baraban, Jay M

    2005-02-01

    Recent studies implicating the Rho family of small G proteins in the regulation of neuronal morphology have focused attention on identifying key components of Rho signaling pathways in neurons. To this end, we have conducted studies aimed at defining the localization and function of Tech, a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) family member that is highly enriched in brain. We have found that Tech is selectively expressed in cortical and hippocampal neurons with prominent Tech immunostaining apparent in the cell bodies and dendrites of these cells. In vitro studies with prototypical members of the major Rho subfamilies, RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42, indicate that Tech binds selectively to and activates RhoA. To assess whether Tech may be involved in the regulation of neuronal morphology, we examined the effects of Tech constructs on the morphology of cortical neurons grown in primary culture. We found that a constitutively active Tech construct, Tech 245DeltaC, decreases the number of dendritic processes present on these neurons. This reduction appears to be mediated by activation of RhoA as it is blocked by insertion of a point mutation into the DH domain of Tech which blocks its ability to activate RhoA or coexpression of a dominant negative RhoA construct. As Tech protein levels increase during post-natal development and remain at peak levels into adulthood, these results indicate that Tech regulates RhoA signaling pathways in developing and mature forebrain neurons.

  18. Topiramate protects against glutamate excitotoxicity via activating BDNF/TrkB-dependent ERK pathway in rodent hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Cao, Yong-Gang; Ji, Zhong; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Sun, Hong-Li

    2015-07-03

    Topiramate (TPM) was previously found to have neuroprotection against neuronal injury in epileptic and ischemic models. However, whether TPM protects against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons is elusive. Our present work aimed to evaluate the protective effect of TPM against glutamate toxicity in hippocampal neurons and further figure out the potential molecular mechanisms. The in vitro glutamate excitotoxic model was prepared with 125μM glutamate for 20min. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis and Hoechst 33342 staining were conducted to detect neuronal survival. The protein expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade (including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK), cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), Bcl-2, Bax and β-actin were detected via Western blot assay. Our results demonstrated that TPM protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate toxicity. Meanwhile, the pretreatment of TPM for 10min significantly prevented the down-regulation of BDNF and the phosphorylation of TrkB. Furthermore, the elevation of phosphorylated EKR expression was significantly inhibited after blockade of TrkB by TrkB IgG, while no alterations of phosphorylated JNK and p38 MAPK were found in the cultured hippocampal neurons. Besides, it was also found that the enhanced phosphorylation of CREB was evidently reversed under excitotoxic conditions after treating with U0126 (the selective inhibitor of ERK). The protein level of Bcl-2 was also observed to be remarkably increased after TPM treatment. In conclusion, these findings implicate that TPM exerts neuroprotective effects against glutamate excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons and its protection may be modulated through BDNF/TrkB-dependent ERK pathway.

  19. Channel shutdown: a response of hippocampal neurons to adverse environments.

    PubMed

    Somjen, G G; Faas, G C; Vreugdenhil, M; Wadman, W J

    1993-12-31

    Stretch-activated ion channels have been discovered in the membrane of many types of cells, but their presence in neurons is uncertain. We used freshly dissociated rat hippocampal neurons to study the effect of hypotonic swelling but, surprisingly, the isolated neurons did not swell. Voltage-dependent whole-cell membrane currents mediated by K+, Na+ and Ca2+ were rapidly and reversibly suppressed during sudden exposure to strongly hypo-osmotic, hyper-osmotic or glucose deficient solutions. The amplitudes of the sustained components of K+ and Ca2+ currents were more depressed than transient currents, but the rate of decay of transient K+ current greatly accelerated. The voltage dependence of activation and of steady state inactivation of residual K+ and Ca2+ currents were not shifted. The current holding membrane potential at -70 mV and therefore the conductance at that voltage were unchanged or somewhat decreased. Capacitive (charging) membrane current was not affected. Changes in tail current suggested moderate loss of cytosolic K+ in some but not in all cells. We conclude that channel shutdown is a uniform response of neuron somata and proximal dendrites to various adverse environments. Hypothetically we propose that swelling was prevented in anisosmotic conditions because membrane water permeability decreased.

  20. Mechanism of PAMAM Dendrimers Internalization in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Felipe; Vásquez, Pilar; Díaz, Carola; Nova, Daniela; Alderete, Joel; Guzmán, Leonardo

    2016-10-03

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers are hyperbranched macromolecules which have been described as one of the most promising drug nanocarrier systems. A key process to understand is their cellular internalization mechanism because of its direct influence on their intracellular distribution, association with organelles, entry kinetics, and cargo release. Despite that internalization mechanisms of dendrimers have been studied in different cell types, in the case of neurons they are not completely described. Considering the relevance of central nervous system (CNS) diseases and neuropharmacology, the aim of this report is to describe the molecular internalization mechanism of different PAMAM-based dendrimer systems in hippocampal neurons. Four dendrimers based on fourth generation PAMAM with different surface properties were studied: unmodified G4, with a positively charged surface; PP50, with a substitution of the 50% of amino surface groups with polyethylene glycol neutral groups; PAc, with a substitution of the 30% of amino surface groups with acrylate anionic groups; and PFO, decorated with folic acid groups in a 25% of total terminal groups. Confocal images show that both G4 and PFO are able to enter the neurons, but not PP50 and PAc. Colocalization study with specific endocytosis markers and specific endocytosis inhibitor assay demonstrate that clathrin-mediated endocytosis would be the main internalization mechanism for G4, whereas clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis would be implicated in PFO internalization. These results show the existence of different internalization mechanisms for PAMAM dendrimers in neurons and the possibility to control their internalization properties with specific chemical modifications.

  1. Astrocytic Clasmatodendrosis in Hippocampal Organ Culture

    PubMed Central

    HULSE, RAYMOND E.; WINTERFIELD, J.; KUNKLER, PHILLIP E.; KRAIG, RICHARD P.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms by which astrocytes are irreversibly injured from ischemic brain injury remain incompletely defined. More than 90 years ago Alzheimer showed that astrocytes lose their distal processes (i.e., undergo “clasmatodendrosis”) when irreversibly injured by a reduction in blood flow, a process shown by Friede and van Houten (1961) to be due to energy failure and acidosis. Such alterations in astrocytic morphology can relate directly to changes in cell function. However, astrocytic clasmatodendrosis has largely been lost to the modern literature, perhaps because of a inability to study it under controlled conditions. In the present study, novel four-dimensional (4D) and digital deblurring imaging of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining changes in hippocampal organ cultures (HOTCs) were used to establish an in vitro model of astrocytic clasmatodendrosis. Also, astrocytes in primary culture were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) to show the occurrence of clasmatodendrosis via a parallel and separate means. In HOTCs, a significant reduction in astrocytic process length occurred 15 min (and remained for 60 min) after exposure to acidic Ringer’s and mitochondrial inhibition in the pyramidal cell body layer. Time-lapsed images of primary cultures showed thinning of cell processes within 15 min of exposure to acidic Ringer’s and mitochondrial inhibition. Distal processes subsequently broke away but retained their fluorescence for minutes before disintegrating along with their parent cell bodies. This report shows the spatiotemporal occurrence of clasmatodendrosis in astrocytes of HOTCs closely parallels that seen in vivo. Thus, HOTCs, where microenvironmental conditions can be controlled and single, identified cells can be followed in space and time, can be applied to study the interrelations between energy metabolism and pH that result in clasmatodendrosis. PMID:11180514

  2. Phosphorylation of CRMP2 is involved in proper bifurcation of the apical dendrite of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Niisato, Emi; Nagai, Jun; Yamashita, Naoya; Nakamura, Fumio; Goshima, Yoshio; Ohshima, Toshio

    2013-02-01

    The neural circuit in the hippocampus is important for higher brain functions. Dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons mainly receive input from the axons of CA3 pyramidal neurons in this neural circuit. A CA1 pyramidal neuron has a single apical dendrite and multiple basal dendrites. In wild-type mice, most of CA1 pyramidal neurons extend a single trunk, or alternatively, the apical dendrite bifurcates into two daughter trunks at the stratum radiatum layer. We previously reported the proximal bifurcation phenotype in Sema3A-/-, p35-/-, and CRMP4-/- mice. Cdk5/p35 phosphorylates CRMP2 at Ser522, and inhibition of this phosphorylation suppressed Sema3A-induced growth cone collapse. In this study, we analyzed the bifurcation points of the apical dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in CRMP2KI/KI mice in which the Cdk5/p35-phosphorylation site Ser522 was mutated into an Ala residue. The proximal bifurcation phenotype was not observed in CRMP2KI/KI mice; however, severe proximal bifurcation of apical dendrites was found in CRMP2KI/KI;CRMP4-/- mice. Cultured hippocampal neurons from CRMP2KI/KI and CRMP2KI/KI;CRMP4-/- embryos showed an increased number of dendritic branching points compared to those from wild-type embryos. Sema3A increased the number of branching points and the total length of dendrites in wild-type hippocampal neurons, but these effects of Sema3A for dendrites were not observed in CRMP2KI/KI and CRMP2KI/KI;CRMP4-/-hippocampal neurons. Binding of CRMP2 to tubulin increased in both CRMP2KI/KI and CRMP2KI/KI:CRMP4-/- brain lysates. These results suggest that CRMP2 and CRMP4 synergistically regulate dendritic development, and CRMP2 phosphorylation is critical for proper bifurcation of apical dendrite of CA1 pyramidal neurons.

  3. Leptin Counteracts the Hypoxia-Induced Inhibition of Spontaneously Firing Hippocampal Neurons: A Microelectrode Array Study

    PubMed Central

    Gavello, Daniela; Rojo-Ruiz, Jonathan; Marcantoni, Andrea; Franchino, Claudio; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Besides regulating energy balance and reducing body-weight, the adipokine leptin has been recently shown to be neuroprotective and antiapoptotic by promoting neuronal survival after excitotoxic and oxidative insults. Here, we investigated the firing properties of mouse hippocampal neurons and the effects of leptin pretreatment on hypoxic damage (2 hours, 3% O2). Experiments were carried out by means of the microelectrode array (MEA) technology, monitoring hippocampal neurons activity from 11 to 18 days in vitro (DIV). Under normoxic conditions, hippocampal neurons were spontaneously firing, either with prevailing isolated and randomly distributed spikes (11 DIV), or with patterns characterized by synchronized bursts (18 DIV). Exposure to hypoxia severely impaired the spontaneous activity of hippocampal neurons, reducing their firing frequency by 54% and 69%, at 11 and 18 DIV respectively, and synchronized their firing activity. Pretreatment with 50 nM leptin reduced the firing frequency of normoxic neurons and contrasted the hypoxia-induced depressive action, either by limiting the firing frequency reduction (at both ages) or by increasing it to 126% (in younger neurons). In order to find out whether leptin exerts its effect by activating large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK), as shown on rat hippocampal neurons, we applied the BK channel blocker paxilline (1 µM). Our data show that paxilline reversed the effects of leptin, both on normoxic and hypoxic neurons, suggesting that the adipokine counteracts hypoxia through BK channels activation in mouse hippocampal neurons. PMID:22848520

  4. Differential toxicity of novel aluminium compounds in hippocampal culture.

    PubMed

    Platt, Bettina; Drysdale, Alison J; Nday, Christiane; Roloff, Eva von Linstow; Drever, Benjamin D; Salifoglou, Athanasios

    2007-05-01

    The dependence of aluminium (Al) toxicity on its chemical form has been implicated in previous studies, but the complex chemistry of Al in solutions of biological preparations has hampered a reliable assessment. Here, we assessed the toxicity of select and pure Al(III) citrate compounds, well-characterized at physiological pH, and compared it with Al from standard solution (in HCl). Cell death rates of neurones and glia were established in hippocampal cultures following 3h incubations in a HEPES-buffered solution and 24h incubations in full culture medium. Overall, Al toxicity was found to vary considerably between compounds, with duration of exposure, medium type, and cell type as factors. While Al (from atomic absorption standard solution) induced the highest levels of cell death, AlCit1, ((NH(4))(5)[Al(C(6)H(4)O(7))(2)].2H(2)O) was the most toxic citrate compound, and affected viability of neurones more than glia (viability at 500 microM/3h-neurones: 40%; glia: 60%). AlCit2 (K(4)[Al(C(6)H(4)O(7))(C(6)H(5)O(7))].4H(2)O) did not show any toxicity after 3h, but severe toxicity after 24h in both cell types (viability at 500 microM/24h-neurones: 50%, glia: 30%). AlCit3 ((NH(4))(5)[Al(3)(C(6)H(4)O(7))(3)(OH)(H(2)O)].(NO(3)).6H(2)O), exhibited a cell type specific toxicity profile, and only affected neuronal viability at both time points (neuronal viability at 500 microM/3h: 20%). The medium type and presence of serum (FBS) was also found to contribute to the toxicity pattern, with serum providing partial protection. Since the Al(III) compounds introduced here are assumed to form in vivo, our data raise further awareness for the toxicity of Al(III) in general, and for the importance of Al speciation and cell type specific actions in its toxicity.

  5. NMDAR-Mediated Hippocampal Neuronal Death is Exacerbated by Activities of ASIC1a

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Su; Yu, Yang; Ma, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Hui; Zhang, Yong-Li; Wang, Xing-Tao; Wang, Chaoyun; Fan, Wei-Ming; Zheng, Qing-Yin

    2015-01-01

    NMDARs and ASIC1a both exist in central synapses and mediate important physiological and pathological conditions, but the functional relationship between them is unclear. Here we report several novel findings that may shed light on the functional relationship between these two ion channels in the excitatory postsynaptic membrane of mouse hippocampus. Firstly, NMDAR activation induced by either NMDA or OGD led to increased [Ca2+]i and greater apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths in cultured hippocampal neurons; these cell deaths were prevented by application of NMDAR antagonists. Secondly, ASIC1a activation induced by pH 6.0 extracellular solution (ECS) showed similar increases in apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths; these cell deaths were prevented by ASIC1a antagonists, and also by NMDAR antagonists. Since increased [Ca2+]i leads to increased cell deaths and since NMDAR exhibits much greater calcium permeability than ASIC1a, these data suggest that ASIC1a-induced neuronal death is mediated through activation of NMDARs. Thirdly, treatment of hippocampal cultures with both NMDA and acidic ECS induced greater degrees of cell deaths than either NMDA or acidic ECS treatment alone. These results suggest that ASIC1a activation up-regulates NMDAR function. Additional data supporting the functional relationship between ASIC1a and NMDAR are found in our electrophysiology experiments in hippocampal slices, where stimulation of ASIC1a induced a marked increase in NMDAR EPSC amplitude, and inhibition of ASIC1a resulted in a decrease in NMDAR EPSC amplitude. In summary, we present evidence that ASIC1a activity facilitates NMDAR function and exacerbates NMDAR-mediated neuronal death in pathological conditions. These findings are invaluable to the search for novel therapeutic targets in the treatment of brain ischemia. PMID:25947342

  6. Temporal expression of neuronal connexins during hippocampal ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Rozental, R; Srinivas, M; Gökhan, S; Urban, M; Dermietzel, R; Kessler, J A; Spray, D C; Mehler, M F

    2000-04-01

    Communication through gap junction channels provides a major signaling mechanism during early brain histogenesis, a developmental time during which neural progenitor cells are inexcitable and do not express ligand-gated channel responses to the major CNS neurotransmitters. Expression of different gap junction types during neurogenesis may therefore define intercellular pathways for transmission of developmentally relevant molecules. To better understand the molecular mechanism(s) by which growth and differentiation of neurons are modulated by gap junction channels, we have been examining the developmental effects of a specific set of cytokines on differentiation and gap junction expression in a conditionally immortalized mouse embryonic hippocampal neuronal progenitor cell line (MK31). When multipotent MK31 cells are in an uncommitted state, they uniformly express the neuroepithelial intermediate filament class VI marker, nestin, are strongly coupled by gap junctions composed of connexin43 (Cx43) and express connexin45 (Cx45) at the mRNA level. As these cells undergo neuronal lineage commitment and exit from cell cycle, they begin to express the early neurofilament marker, NF66, and coupling strength and expression of Cx43 begin to decline with concurrent expression of other connexin proteins, including Cx26, Cx33, Cx36, Cx40 and Cx45. Terminal neuronal differentiation is heralded by the expression of more advanced neurofilament proteins, increased morphologic maturation, the elaboration of inward currents and action potentials that possess mature physiological properties, and changing profiles of expression of connexin subtypes, including upregulation of Cx36 expression. These important developmental transitions are regulated by a complex network of cell cycle checkpoints. To begin to examine the precise roles of gap junction proteins in traversing these developmental checkpoints and in thus regulating neurogenesis, we have focused on individual members of two

  7. Scale Invariant Disordered Nanotopography Promotes Hippocampal Neuron Development and Maturation with Involvement of Mechanotransductive Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Carsten; Ripamonti, Maddalena; Maffioli, Elisa; Cappelluti, Martino A.; Nonnis, Simona; Puricelli, Luca; Lamanna, Jacopo; Piazzoni, Claudio; Podestà, Alessandro; Lenardi, Cristina; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Malgaroli, Antonio; Milani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The identification of biomaterials which promote neuronal maturation up to the generation of integrated neural circuits is fundamental for modern neuroscience. The development of neural circuits arises from complex maturative processes regulated by poorly understood signaling events, often guided by the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here we report that nanostructured zirconia surfaces, produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition of zirconia nanoparticles and characterized by ECM-like nanotopographical features, can direct the maturation of neural networks. Hippocampal neurons cultured on such cluster-assembled surfaces displayed enhanced differentiation paralleled by functional changes. The latter was demonstrated by single-cell electrophysiology showing earlier action potential generation and increased spontaneous postsynaptic currents compared to the neurons grown on the featureless unnaturally flat standard control surfaces. Label-free shotgun proteomics broadly confirmed the functional changes and suggests furthermore a vast impact of the neuron/nanotopography interaction on mechanotransductive machinery components, known to control physiological in vivo ECM-regulated axon guidance and synaptic plasticity. Our results indicate a potential of cluster-assembled zirconia nanotopography exploitable for the creation of efficient neural tissue interfaces and cell culture devices promoting neurogenic events, but also for unveiling mechanotransductive aspects of neuronal development and maturation. PMID:27917111

  8. Scale Invariant Disordered Nanotopography Promotes Hippocampal Neuron Development and Maturation with Involvement of Mechanotransductive Pathways.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Carsten; Ripamonti, Maddalena; Maffioli, Elisa; Cappelluti, Martino A; Nonnis, Simona; Puricelli, Luca; Lamanna, Jacopo; Piazzoni, Claudio; Podestà, Alessandro; Lenardi, Cristina; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Malgaroli, Antonio; Milani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The identification of biomaterials which promote neuronal maturation up to the generation of integrated neural circuits is fundamental for modern neuroscience. The development of neural circuits arises from complex maturative processes regulated by poorly understood signaling events, often guided by the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here we report that nanostructured zirconia surfaces, produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition of zirconia nanoparticles and characterized by ECM-like nanotopographical features, can direct the maturation of neural networks. Hippocampal neurons cultured on such cluster-assembled surfaces displayed enhanced differentiation paralleled by functional changes. The latter was demonstrated by single-cell electrophysiology showing earlier action potential generation and increased spontaneous postsynaptic currents compared to the neurons grown on the featureless unnaturally flat standard control surfaces. Label-free shotgun proteomics broadly confirmed the functional changes and suggests furthermore a vast impact of the neuron/nanotopography interaction on mechanotransductive machinery components, known to control physiological in vivo ECM-regulated axon guidance and synaptic plasticity. Our results indicate a potential of cluster-assembled zirconia nanotopography exploitable for the creation of efficient neural tissue interfaces and cell culture devices promoting neurogenic events, but also for unveiling mechanotransductive aspects of neuronal development and maturation.

  9. Bdnf overexpression in hippocampal neurons prevents dendritic atrophy caused by Rett-associated MECP2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Larimore, Jennifer L; Chapleau, Christopher A; Kudo, Shinichi; Theibert, Anne; Percy, Alan K; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2009-05-01

    The expression of the methylated DNA-binding protein MeCP2 increases during neuronal development, which suggests that this epigenetic factor is crucial for neuronal terminal differentiation. We evaluated dendritic and axonal development in embryonic day-18 hippocampal neurons in culture by measuring total length and counting branch point numbers at 4 days in vitro, well before synapse formation. Pyramidal neurons transfected with a plasmid encoding a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) to knockdown endogenous Mecp2 had shorter dendrites than control untransfected neurons, without detectable changes in axonal morphology. On the other hand, overexpression of wildtype (wt) human MECP2 increased dendritic branching, in addition to axonal branching and length. Consistent with reduced neuronal growth and complexity in Rett syndrome (RTT) brains, overexpression of human MECP2 carrying missense mutations common in RTT individuals (R106W or T158M) reduced dendritic and axonal length. One of the targets of MeCP2 transcriptional control is the Bdnf gene. Indeed, endogenous Mecp2 knockdown increased the intracellular levels of BDNF protein compared to untransfected neurons, suggesting that MeCP2 represses Bdnf transcription. Surprisingly, overexpression of wt MECP2 also increased BDNF levels, while overexpression of RTT-associated MECP2 mutants failed to affect BDNF levels. The extracellular BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc prevented dendritic overgrowth in wt MECP2-overexpressing neurons, while overexpression of the Bdnf gene reverted the dendritic atrophy caused by Mecp2-knockdown. However, this effect was only partial, since Bdnf increased dendritic length only to control levels in mutant MECP2-overexpressing neurons, but not as much as in Bdnf-transfected cells. Our results demonstrate that MeCP2 plays varied roles in dendritic and axonal development during neuronal terminal differentiation, and that some of these effects are mediated by autocrine actions of BDNF.

  10. Lead increases tetrodotoxin-insensitive spontaneous release of glutamate and GABA from hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Braga, M F; Pereira, E F; Marchioro, M; Albuquerque, E X

    1999-04-24

    This study was aimed at investigating the effects of the environmental pollutant lead (Pb2+) on the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-insensitive release of neurotransmitters from hippocampal neurons. Evidence is provided that Pb2+ (>/=100 nM) increases the frequency of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)- and glutamate-mediated miniature postsynaptic currents (MPSCs) recorded by means of the patch-clamp technique from cultured hippocampal neurons. Because Pb2+ changed neither the amplitude nor the decay-time constant of the MPSCs, Pb2+-induced changes in MPSC frequency are exclusively due to a presynaptic action of this heavy metal. Increase by Pb2+ of the action potential-independent release of GABA and glutamate was concentration dependent and was only partially reversible upon washing of the neurons with nominally Pb2+-free external solution. This effect was also Ca2+ independent and began approximately after 1-2-min exposure of the neurons to Pb2+. The latency for the onset of the Pb2+'s effect on the MPSC frequency and the inability of the chelator ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (100 microM) to reverse the effect that remained after washing of the neurons with external solution suggested that Pb2+ acted via an intracellular mechanism. Of interest also was the finding that Pb2+ simultaneously increased the release of GABA and glutamate, overriding the ability of these neurotransmitters to decrease the release of one another. Given that synaptic activity is a key mechanism for the establishment of stable synaptic connections early in the development, it is possible that, by interfering with spontaneous transmitter release, Pb2+ has lasting effects on neuronal maturation and plasticity.

  11. Specific responses of human hippocampal neurons are associated with better memory.

    PubMed

    Suthana, Nanthia A; Parikshak, Neelroop N; Ekstrom, Arne D; Ison, Matias J; Knowlton, Barbara J; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Fried, Itzhak

    2015-08-18

    A population of human hippocampal neurons has shown responses to individual concepts (e.g., Jennifer Aniston) that generalize to different instances of the concept. However, recordings from the rodent hippocampus suggest an important function of these neurons is their ability to discriminate overlapping representations, or pattern separate, a process that may facilitate discrimination of similar events for successful memory. In the current study, we explored whether human hippocampal neurons can also demonstrate the ability to discriminate between overlapping representations and whether this selectivity could be directly related to memory performance. We show that among medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurons, certain populations of neurons are selective for a previously studied (target) image in that they show a significant decrease in firing rate to very similar (lure) images. We found that a greater proportion of these neurons can be found in the hippocampus compared with other MTL regions, and that memory for individual items is correlated to the degree of selectivity of hippocampal neurons responsive to those items. Moreover, a greater proportion of hippocampal neurons showed selective firing for target images in good compared with poor performers, with overall memory performance correlated with hippocampal selectivity. In contrast, selectivity in other MTL regions was not associated with memory performance. These findings show that a substantial proportion of human hippocampal neurons encode specific memories that support the discrimination of overlapping representations. These results also provide previously unidentified evidence consistent with a unique role of the human hippocampus in orthogonalization of representations in declarative memory.

  12. Interaction of Acetylcholinesterase with Neurexin-1β regulates Glutamatergic Synaptic stability in Hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Excess expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the cortex and hippocampus causes a decrease in the number of glutamatergic synapses and alters the expression of neurexin and neuroligin, trans-synaptic proteins that control synaptic stability. The molecular sequence and three-dimensional structure of AChE are homologous to the corresponding aspects of the ectodomain of neuroligin. This study investigated whether excess AChE interacts physically with neurexin to destabilize glutamatergic synapses. Results The results showed that AChE clusters colocalized with neurexin assemblies in the neurites of hippocampal neurons and that AChE co-immunoprecipitated with neurexin from the lysate of these neurons. Moreover, when expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, N-glycosylated AChE co-immunoprecipitated with non-O–glycosylated neurexin-1β, with N-glycosylation of the AChE being required for this co-precipitation to occur. Increasing extracellular AChE decreased the association of neurexin with neuroligin and inhibited neuroligin-induced synaptogenesis. The number and activity of excitatory synapses in cultured hippocampal neurons were reduced by extracellular catalytically inactive AChE. Conclusions Excessive glycosylated AChE could competitively disrupt a subset of the neurexin–neuroligin junctions consequently impairing the integrity of glutamatergic synapses. This might serve a molecular mechanism of excessive AChE induced neurodegeneration. PMID:24594013

  13. Effects of inorganic lead on the differentiation and growth of cultured hippocampal and neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, T; Audesirk, G; Ferguson, C; Shugarts, D

    1991-01-01

    Lead exposure has devastating effects on the developing nervous system, and has been implicated in variety of behavioral and cognitive deficits as well as neural morphological abnormalities. Since lead impacts many calcium-dependent processes, one likely mechanism of lead toxicity is its disruption of calcium dependent processes, among which is neuronal differentiation. We investigated the effects of inorganic lead on survival and several parameters of differentiation of cultured neurons. Three different cell types were used: Rat hippocampal neurons (a primary CNS cell type), B50 rat neuroblastoma cells (a transformed CNS-derived cell line), and N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells (a transformed peripherally-derived cell line). Lead concentrations ranged from low nM to 1 mM. Lead effects differed considerably among the three cell types, with B50 cells least affected. Lead effects were generally multimodal, with fewest effects observed at intermediate concentrations. Lead inhibited neurite initiation in hippocampal neurons, but stimulated initiation in N1E-115 cells. In those cells that differentiated, lead increased dendrite numbers in hippocampal neurons and neurite numbers in N1E-115 cells. Lead exposure increased both the length and the degree of branching of axons in hippocampal neurons and the length of neurites in N1E-115 cells. We hypothesize that lead impacts multiple regulatory processes that influence neuron survival and differentiation, and that its effects show differing dose-dependencies. The differing responses of the different cell types to lead suggests that differentiation may be regulated in different ways by the three types of cells. Alternatively, or additionally, the cell types may differ in their ability to compensate for, sequester, or expel lead.

  14. Differential NMDA receptor-dependent calcium loading and mitochondrial dysfunction in CA1 vs. CA3 hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Stanika, Ruslan I.; Winters, Christine A.; Pivovarova, Natalia B.; Andrews, S. Brian

    2009-01-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are selectively vulnerable to ischemia, while adjacent CA3 neurons are relatively resistant. Although glutamate receptor-mediated mitochondrial Ca2+ overload and dysfunction is a major component of ischemia-induced neuronal death, no direct relationship between selective neuronal vulnerability and mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated in intact brain preparations. Here, we show that in organotypic slice cultures NMDA induces much larger Ca2+ elevations in vulnerable CA1 neurons than in resistant CA3. Consequently, CA1 mitochondria exhibit stronger calcium accumulation, more extensive swelling and damage, stronger depolarization of their membrane potential, and a significant increase in ROS generation. NMDA-induced Ca2+ and ROS elevations were abolished in Ca2+-free medium or by NMDAR antagonists, but not by zinc chelation. We conclude that Ca2+-overload-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction is a determining factor in the selective vulnerability of CA1 neurons. PMID:19879359

  15. Selective regulation of axonal growth from developing hippocampal neurons by tumor necrosis factor superfamily member APRIL☆

    PubMed Central

    Osório, Catarina; Chacón, Pedro J.; White, Matthew; Kisiswa, Lilian; Wyatt, Sean; Rodríguez-Tébar, Alfredo; Davies, Alun M.

    2014-01-01

    APRIL (A Proliferation-Inducing Ligand, TNFSF13) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that regulates lymphocyte survival and activation and has been implicated in tumorigenesis and autoimmune diseases. Here we report the expression and first known activity of APRIL in the nervous system. APRIL and one of its receptors, BCMA (B-Cell Maturation Antigen, TNFRSF17), are expressed by hippocampal pyramidal cells of fetal and postnatal mice. In culture, these neurons secreted APRIL, and function-blocking antibodies to either APRIL or BCMA reduced axonal elongation. Recombinant APRIL enhanced axonal elongation, but did not influence dendrite elongation. The effect of APRIL on axon elongation was inhibited by anti-BCMA and the expression of a signaling-defective BCMA mutant in these neurons, suggesting that the axon growth-promoting effect of APRIL is mediated by BCMA. APRIL promoted phosphorylation and activation of ERK1, ERK2 and Akt and serine phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3β in cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells. Inhibition of MEK1/MEK2 (activators of ERK1/ERK2), PI3-kinase (activator of Akt) or Akt inhibited the axon growth-promoting action of APRIL, as did pharmacological activation of GSK-3β and the expression of a constitutively active form of GSK-3β. These findings suggest that APRIL promotes axon elongation by a mechanism that depends both on ERK signaling and PI3-kinase/Akt/GSK-3β signaling. PMID:24444792

  16. Apnea promotes glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Simon J.; Xi, Ming-Chu; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Sampogna, Sharon; Yamuy, Jack; Morales, Francisco R.; Chase, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) exhibit hippocampal damage and cognitive deficits. To determine the effect of apnea on the synaptic transmission in the hippocampus, we performed electrophysiological studies in an in vivo guinea pig model of OSA. Specifically, we determined the cornu ammonis region 1 (CA1) field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) response to cornu ammonis region 3 (CA3) stimulation and examined the presynaptic mechanisms underlying the changes in the fEPSP. Single episodes of apnea resulted in a maximal potentiation of the fEPSPs at one to three minutes after the termination of each episode of apnea. The mean amplitude and slope of the post-apneic fEPSP was significantly larger compared with the pre-apneic control. These changes were accompanied by a significant decrease in the paired-pulse facilitation ratio during the post-apneic period compared with the pre-apneic control. The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801, when applied locally to the CA1 recording site by pressure ejection, blocked the apnea-induced potentiation of the fEPSP. In the experimental animals that were subjected to extended periods of recurrent apnea, CA1 neurons exhibited positive immunoreactivity for fragmented DNA strands, which indicates apoptotic cell death. The present results demonstrate that apnea-induced potentiation of the hippocampal CA1 fEPSP is mediated by an NMDA receptor mechanism. We therefore conclude that recurrent apnea produces abnormally high levels of glutamate that results in the apoptosis of CA1 neurons. We hypothesize that this damage is reflected by the cognitive deficits that are commonly observed in patients with breathing disorders such as OSA. PMID:17888415

  17. [Cold inducible RNA-binding protein inhibits hippocampal neuronal apoptosis under hypothermia by regulating redox system].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Hui; Zhang, Xue; Meng, Yu; Li, Chang-Sheng; Ji, Hong; Yang, Huan-Min; Li, Shi-Ze

    2015-08-25

    In this study, we intend to confirm our hypothesis that cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) can inhibit neuronal apoptosis through suppressing the formation of oxygen free radicals under hypothermia. Primary rat hippocampal neurons were isolated and cultured in vitro, and were divided into five groups: (1) normal control group (37 °C), (2) cells infected by empty viral vector group, (3) CIRP over-expressed group, (4) CIRP knock-down group, and (5) hypothermia control group. Cells in groups 2-5 were cultured under 32 °C, 5% CO2. Apoptosis of hippocampal neurons were detected by Annexin V-FITC/PI staining and flow cytometry; Expression of CIRP was determined by Western blot; Redox-related parameters (T-AOC, GSH-Px, SOD, MDA) were detected by ELISA kits. Results showed that CIRP expression levels were significantly increased (P < 0.01) and the apoptotic rates were significantly decreased (P < 0.01) in hypothermia control group and CIRP over-expressed group when compared with normal control group. On the other hand, the apoptotic rate was significantly increased (P < 0.05) in CIRP knock-down group compared with that in hypothermia control group. The levels of redox parameters in hypothermia control group and CIRP over-expressed group were significantly changed in comparison with those in normal control group, CIRP knock-down group and empty viral vector infected group, respectively (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). These results suggest that up-regulation of CIRP by hypothermia treatment can protect the neuron from apoptosis through suppressing the formation of oxygen free radicals.

  18. Strychnine-sensitive glycine responses of neonatal rat hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S; Cherubini, E

    1991-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings employing current and voltage clamp techniques were used to study the effects of glycine on rat CA3 hippocampal neurones during the first 3 weeks of postnatal (P) life. 2. Glycine (0.3-1 mM) depolarized neurones from rats less than 4 days old (P4). Neurones from older neonates (P5-P7) were hyperpolarized by glycine, whereas adult neurones were unaffected. 3. Both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing responses were associated with large conductance increases; they reversed polarity at a potential which changed with the extracellular chloride concentration. The responses persisted in tetrodotoxin (1 microM) or in a solution with a much reduced calcium concentration. 4. Strychnine (1 microM) but not bicuculline (10-50 microM) antagonized the effects of glycine. The action of strychnine was apparently competitive with a dissociation constant of 350 nM. 5. In voltage clamp experiments, glycine elicited a non-desensitizing outward current at -60 mV. When a maximal concentration of glycine was applied at the same time as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the conductance increase induced by the two agonists was additive, suggesting the activation of different populations of channels. 6. Concentrations of glycine lower than 100 microM did not affect membrane potential. However, at 30-50 microM glycine increased the frequency of spontaneous GABA-mediated synaptic responses; this action was not blocked by strychnine. 7. It is concluded that during the first 2 weeks of life glycine acts at strychnine-sensitive receptors to open chloride channels. PMID:1804982

  19. Astaxanthin Protects Primary Hippocampal Neurons against Noxious Effects of Aβ-Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Lobos, Pedro; Bruna, Barbara; Cordova, Alex; Barattini, Pablo; Galáz, Jose Luis; Adasme, Tatiana; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Muñoz, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and the ensuing oxidative stress contribute to Alzheimer's disease pathology. We reported previously that amyloid-β peptide oligomers (AβOs) produce aberrant Ca2+ signals at sublethal concentrations and decrease the expression of type-2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2), which are crucial for hippocampal synaptic plasticity and memory. Here, we investigated whether the antioxidant agent astaxanthin (ATX) protects neurons from AβOs-induced excessive mitochondrial ROS generation, NFATc4 activation, and RyR2 mRNA downregulation. To determine mitochondrial H2O2 production or NFATc4 nuclear translocation, neurons were transfected with plasmids coding for HyperMito or NFATc4-eGFP, respectively. Primary hippocampal cultures were incubated with 0.1 μM ATX for 1.5 h prior to AβOs addition (500 nM). We found that incubation with ATX (≤10 μM) for ≤24 h was nontoxic to neurons, evaluated by the live/dead assay. Preincubation with 0.1 μM ATX also prevented the neuronal mitochondrial H2O2 generation induced within minutes of AβOs addition. Longer exposures to AβOs (6 h) promoted NFATc4-eGFP nuclear translocation and decreased RyR2 mRNA levels, evaluated by detection of the eGFP-tagged fluorescent plasmid and qPCR, respectively. Preincubation with 0.1 μM ATX prevented both effects. These results indicate that ATX protects neurons from the noxious effects of AβOs on mitochondrial ROS production, NFATc4 activation, and RyR2 gene expression downregulation. PMID:27034843

  20. Recruitment and replacement of hippocampal neurons in young and adult chickadees: an addition to the theory of hippocampal learning.

    PubMed Central

    Barnea, A; Nottebohm, F

    1996-01-01

    We used [3H]thymidine to document the birth of neurons and their recruitment into the hippocampal complex (HC) of juvenile (4.5 months old) and adult blackcapped chickadees (Parus atricapillus) living in their natural surroundings. Birds received a single dose of [3H]thymidine in August and were recaptured and killed 6 weeks later, in early October. All brains were stained with Cresyl violet, a Nissl stain. The boundaries of the HC were defined by reference to the ventricular wall, the brain surface, or differences in neuronal packing density. The HC of juveniles was as large as or larger than that of adults and packing density of HC neurons was 31% higher in juveniles than in adults. Almost all of the 3H-labeled HC neurons were found in a 350-m-wide layer of tissue adjacent to the lateral ventricle. Within this layer the fraction of 3H-labeled neurons was 50% higher in juveniles than in adults. We conclude that the HC of juvenile chickadees recruits more neurons and has more neurons than that of adults. We speculate that juveniles encounter greater environmental novelty than adults and that the greater number of HC neurons found in juveniles allows them to learn more than adults. At a more general level, we suggest that (i) long-term learning alters HC neurons irreversibly; (ii) sustained hippocampal learning requires the periodic replacement of HC neurons; (iii) memories coded by hippocampal neurons are transferred elsewhere before the neurons are replaced. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:11607626

  1. Visualizing Metal Content and Intracellular Distribution in Primary Hippocampal Neurons with Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that metal dyshomeostasis plays an important role in human neurodegenerative diseases. Although distinctive metal distributions are described for mature hippocampus and cortex, much less is known about metal levels and intracellular distribution in individual hippocampal neuronal somata. To solve this problem, we conducted quantitative metal analyses utilizing synchrotron radiation X-Ray fluorescence on frozen hydrated primary cultured neurons derived from rat embryonic cortex (CTX) and two regions of the hippocampus: dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1. Comparing average metal contents showed that the most abundant metals were calcium, iron, and zinc, whereas metals such as copper and manganese were less than 10% of zinc. Average metal contents were generally similar when compared across neurons cultured from CTX, DG, and CA1, except for manganese that was larger in CA1. However, each metal showed a characteristic spatial distribution in individual neuronal somata. Zinc was uniformly distributed throughout the cytosol, with no evidence for the existence of previously identified zinc-enriched organelles, zincosomes. Calcium showed a peri-nuclear distribution consistent with accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. Iron showed 2–3 distinct highly concentrated puncta only in peri-nuclear locations. Notwithstanding the small sample size, these analyses demonstrate that primary cultured neurons show characteristic metal signatures. The iron puncta probably represent iron-accumulating organelles, siderosomes. Thus, the metal distributions observed in mature brain structures are likely the result of both intrinsic neuronal factors that control cellular metal content and extrinsic factors related to the synaptic organization, function, and contacts formed and maintained in each region. PMID:27434052

  2. Sex Stratified Neuronal Cultures to Study Ischemic Cell Death Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Saurabh; Traystman, Richard J.; Herson, Paco S.

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences in neuronal susceptibility to ischemic injury and neurodegenerative disease have long been observed, but the signaling mechanisms responsible for those differences remain unclear. Primary disassociated embryonic neuronal culture provides a simplified experimental model with which to investigate the neuronal cell signaling involved in cell death as a result of ischemia or disease; however, most neuronal cultures used in research today are mixed sex. Researchers can and do test the effects of sex steroid treatment in mixed sex neuronal cultures in models of neuronal injury and disease, but accumulating evidence suggests that the female brain responds to androgens, estrogens, and progesterone differently than the male brain. Furthermore, neonate male and female rodents respond differently to ischemic injury, with males experiencing greater injury following cerebral ischemia than females. Thus, mixed sex neuronal cultures might obscure and confound the experimental results; important information might be missed. For this reason, the Herson Lab at the University of Colorado School of Medicine routinely prepares sex-stratified primary disassociated embryonic neuronal cultures from both hippocampus and cortex. Embryos are sexed before harvesting of brain tissue and male and female tissue are disassociated separately, plated separately, and maintained separately. Using this method, the Herson Lab has demonstrated a male-specific role for the ion channel TRPM2 in ischemic cell death. In this manuscript, we share and discuss our protocol for sexing embryonic mice and preparing sex-stratified hippocampal primary disassociated neuron cultures. This method can be adapted to prepare sex-stratified cortical cultures and the method for embryo sexing can be used in conjunction with other protocols for any study in which sex is thought to be an important determinant of outcome. PMID:24378980

  3. ATP induces NO production in hippocampal neurons by P2X(7) receptor activation independent of glutamate signaling.

    PubMed

    Codocedo, Juan Francisco; Godoy, Juan Alejandro; Poblete, Maria Ines; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    To assess the putative role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) upon nitric oxide (NO) production in the hippocampus, we used as a model both rat hippocampal slices and isolated hippocampal neurons in culture, lacking glial cells. In hippocampal slices, additions of exogenous ATP or 2'(3')-O-(4-Benzoylbenzoyl) ATP (Bz-ATP) elicited concentration-dependent NO production, which increased linearly within the first 15 min and plateaued thereafter; agonist EC50 values were 50 and 15 µM, respectively. The NO increase evoked by ATP was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by Coomassie brilliant blue G (BBG) or by N(ω)-propyl-L-arginine, suggesting the involvement of P2X7Rs and neuronal NOS, respectively. The ATP induced NO production was independent of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor activity as effects were not alleviated by DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), but antagonized by BBG. In sum, exogenous ATP elicited NO production in hippocampal neurons independently of NMDA receptor activity.

  4. ATP Induces NO Production in Hippocampal Neurons by P2X7 Receptor Activation Independent of Glutamate Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Codocedo, Juan Francisco; Godoy, Juan Alejandro; Poblete, Maria Ines; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    To assess the putative role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) upon nitric oxide (NO) production in the hippocampus, we used as a model both rat hippocampal slices and isolated hippocampal neurons in culture, lacking glial cells. In hippocampal slices, additions of exogenous ATP or 2′(3′)-O-(4-Benzoylbenzoyl) ATP (Bz-ATP) elicited concentration-dependent NO production, which increased linearly within the first 15 min and plateaued thereafter; agonist EC50 values were 50 and 15 µM, respectively. The NO increase evoked by ATP was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by Coomassie brilliant blue G (BBG) or by Nω-propyl-L-arginine, suggesting the involvement of P2X7Rs and neuronal NOS, respectively. The ATP induced NO production was independent of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor activity as effects were not alleviated by DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), but antagonized by BBG. In sum, exogenous ATP elicited NO production in hippocampal neurons independently of NMDA receptor activity. PMID:23472093

  5. Astrocytes are crucial for survival and maturation of embryonic hippocampal neurons in a neuron-glia cell-insert coculture assay.

    PubMed

    Pyka, Martin; Busse, Claudia; Seidenbecher, Constanze; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Faissner, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Synapses represent specialized cell-cell contact sites between nerve cells. These structures mediate the rapid and efficient transmission of signals between neurons and are surrounded by glial cells. Previous investigations have shown that astrocytes are important for the formation, maintenance, and function of CNS synapses. To study effects of glial-derived molecules on synaptogenesis, we have established an in vitro cell-insert coculture system for E18 rat hippocampal neurons and various glial cell types. Neurons were cultured without direct contact with glial cells for distinct time periods. First, it was confirmed that astrocytes are essential to promote survival of E18 hippocampal neurons. Beginning with 10 days in culture, the concurrent expression of pre- and postsynaptic proteins was observed. Moreover, the colocalization of the presynaptic marker Bassoon and the postsynaptic protein ProSAP1/Shank2 indicated the formation of synapses. A technique was developed that permits the semiautomated quantitative determination of the number of synaptic puncta per neuron. The culture system was used to assess effects of pharmacological treatments on synapse formation by applying blockers and activators of small GTPases. In particular, treatment with lysophosphatidic acid enhanced synaptogenesis in the coculture system.

  6. The gene silencing transcription factor REST represses miR-132 expression in hippocampal neurons destined to die

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jee-Yeon; Kaneko, Naoki; Noh, Kyung-Min; Pontarelli, Fabrizio; Zukin, R. Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    The gene silencing transcription factor REST/NRSF (Repressor Element-1 (RE1) Silencing Transcription Factor/Neuron-Restrictive Silencer Factor) actively represses a large array of coding and noncoding neuron-specific genes important to synaptic plasticity including miR-132. miR-132 is a neuron-specific microRNA and plays a pivotal role in synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity and structural remodeling. However, a role for miR-132 in neuronal death is not, as yet, well-delineated. Here we show that ischemic insults promote REST binding and epigenetic remodeling at the miR-132 promoter and silencing of miR-132 expression in selectively-vulnerable hippocampal CA1 neurons. REST occupancy was not altered at the miR-9 or miR-124a promoters despite the presence of RE1 sites, indicating REST target specificity. Ischemia induced a substantial decrease in two marks of active gene transcription, dimethylation of lysine 4 on core histone 3 (H3K4me2) and acetylation of lysine 9 on H3 (H3K9ac) at the miR-132 promoter. RNAi-mediated depletion of REST in vivo blocked ischemia-induced loss of miR-132 in insulted hippocampal neurons, consistent with a causal relation between activation of REST and silencing of miR-132. Overexpression of miR-132 in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons or delivered directly into the CA1 of living rats by means of the lentiviral expression system prior to induction of ischemia afforded robust protection against ischemia-induced neuronal death. These findings document a previously unappreciated role for REST-dependent repression of miR-132 in the neuronal death associated with global ischemia and identify a novel therapeutic target for amelioration of the neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits associated with ischemic stroke. PMID:25108103

  7. Spatial gene's (Tbata) implication in neurite outgrowth and dendrite patterning in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yammine, Miriam; Saade, Murielle; Chauvet, Sophie; Nguyen, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    The unique architecture of neurons requires the establishment and maintenance of polarity, which relies in part on microtubule-based kinesin motor transport to deliver essential cargo into axons and dendrites. In developing neurons, kinesin trafficking is essential for delivering organelles and molecules that are crucial for elongation and guidance of the growing axonal and dendritic termini. In mature neurons, kinesin cargo delivery is essential for neuron dynamic physiological functions which are critical in brain development. In this work, we followed Spatial (Tbata) gene expression during primary hippocampal neuron development and showed that it is highly expressed during dendrite formation. Spatial protein exhibits a somatodendritic distribution and we show that the kinesin motor Kif17, among other dendrite specific kinesins, is crucial for Spatial localization to dendrites of hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, Spatial down regulation in primary hippocampal cells revealed a role for Spatial in maintaining neurons' polarity by ensuring proper neurite outgrowth. This polarity is specified by intrinsic and extracellular signals that allow neurons to determine axon and dendrite fate during development. Neurotrophic factors, such as the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), are candidate extracellular polarity-regulating cues which are proposed to accelerate neuronal polarization by enhancing dendrite growth. Here, we show that NGF treatment increases Spatial expression in hippocampal neurons. Altogether, these data suggest that Spatial, in response to NGF and through its transport by Kif17, is crucial for neuronal polarization and can be a key regulator of neurite outgrowth.

  8. GABA mediated excitation in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Cherubini, E; Rovira, C; Gaiarsa, J L; Corradetti, R; Ben Ari, Y

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular recordings from rat hippocampal neurons in vitro during the first postnatal week revealed the presence of spontaneous giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). These were generated by the synchronous discharge of a population of neurons. GDPs reversed polarity at -27 and -51 mV when recorded with KCl or K-methylsulphate filled electrodes, respectively. GDPs were blocked by the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 microM). Iontophoretic or bath applications of GABA (10-300 microM) in the presence of tetrodotoxin (1 microM), induced a membrane depolarization or in voltage clamp experiments an inward current which reversed polarity at the same potential as GDPs. The response to GABA was blocked in a non-competitive manner by bicuculline (10 microM) and did not desensitize. GABA mediated GDPs were presynaptically modulated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors. Their frequency was reduced or blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists and by the rather specific non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). The frequency of GDPs was enhanced by glycine and D-serine (10-30 microM) in a strychnine insensitive manner. This effect was blocked by AP-5, suggesting that it was mediated by the allosteric modulatory site of the NMDA receptor. These observations suggest that most of the 'excitatory' drive in immature neurons is mediated by GABA acting on GABAA receptors; furthermore excitatory amino acids modulate the release of GABA by a presynaptic action on GABAergic interneurons.

  9. GABAergic neurons of the medial septum lead the hippocampal network during theta activity.

    PubMed

    Hangya, Balázs; Borhegyi, Zsolt; Szilágyi, Nóra; Freund, Tamás F; Varga, Viktor

    2009-06-24

    Information processing in the hippocampus critically relies on its reciprocal interaction with the medial septum (MS). Synchronization of the septo-hippocampal system was demonstrated during both major hippocampal activity states, the regular theta rhythm and the large amplitude irregular activity. Previous experimental and modeling data suggest that the MS provides rhythmic drive to the hippocampus, and hippocampo-septal feedback synchronizes septal pacemaker units. However, this view has recently been questioned based on the possibility of intrahippocampal theta genesis. Previously, we identified putative pacemaker neurons expressing parvalbumin (PV) and/or the pacemaker hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic nucleotide-gated nonselective cation channel (HCN) in the MS. In this study, by analyzing the temporal relationship of activity between the PV/HCN-containing medial septal neurons and hippocampal local field potential, we aimed to uncover whether the sequence of events during theta formation supports the classic view of septal drive or the challenging theory of hippocampal pacing of theta. Importantly, by implementing a circular statistical method, a temporal lead of these septal neurons over the hippocampus was observed on the course of theta synchronization. Moreover, the activity of putative hippocampal interneurons also preceded hippocampal local field theta, but by a shorter time period compared with PV/HCN-containing septal neurons. Using the concept of mutual information, the action potential series of PV/HCN-containing neurons shared higher amount of information with hippocampal field oscillation than PV/HCN-immunonegative cells. Thus, a pacemaker neuron population of the MS leads hippocampal activity, presumably via the synchronization of hippocampal interneurons.

  10. Lithium increases synaptic GluA2 in hippocampal neurons by elevating the δ-catenin protein.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Mobeen; Kim, Seonil; Patel, Sunny; Khatri, Latika; Hikima, Takuya; Rice, Margaret E; Ziff, Edward B

    2017-02-01

    Lithium (Li(+)) is a drug widely employed for treating bipolar disorder, however the mechanism of action is not known. Here we study the effects of Li(+) in cultured hippocampal neurons on a synaptic complex consisting of δ-catenin, a protein associated with cadherins whose mutation is linked to autism, and GRIP, an AMPA receptor (AMPAR) scaffolding protein, and the AMPAR subunit, GluA2. We show that Li(+) elevates the level of δ-catenin in cultured neurons. δ-catenin binds to the ABP and GRIP proteins, which are synaptic scaffolds for GluA2. We show that Li(+) increases the levels of GRIP and GluA2, consistent with Li(+)-induced elevation of δ-catenin. Using GluA2 mutants, we show that the increase in surface level of GluA2 requires GluA2 interaction with GRIP. The amplitude but not the frequency of mEPSCs was also increased by Li(+) in cultured hippocampal neurons, confirming a functional effect and consistent with AMPAR stabilization at synapses. Furthermore, animals fed with Li(+) show elevated synaptic levels of δ-catenin, GRIP, and GluA2 in the hippocampus, also consistent with the findings in cultured neurons. This work supports a model in which Li(+) stabilizes δ-catenin, thus elevating a complex consisting of δ-catenin, GRIP and AMPARs in synapses of hippocampal neurons. Thus, the work suggests a mechanism by which Li(+) can alter brain synaptic function that may be relevant to its pharmacologic action in treatment of neurological disease.

  11. Homeostasis of intrinsic excitability in hippocampal neurones: dynamics and mechanism of the response to chronic depolarization.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Timothy; van Rossum, Mark C W; Wyllie, David J A

    2010-01-01

    In order to maintain stable functionality in the face of continually changing input, neurones in the CNS must dynamically modulate their electrical characteristics. It has been hypothesized that in order to retain stable network function, neurones possess homeostatic mechanisms which integrate activity levels and alter network and cellular properties in such a way as to counter long-term perturbations. Here we describe a simple model system where we investigate the effects of sustained neuronal depolarization, lasting up to several days, by exposing cultures of primary hippocampal pyramidal neurones to elevated concentrations (10-30 mm) of KCl. Following exposure to KCl, neurones exhibit lower input resistances and resting potentials, and require more current to be injected to evoke action potentials. This results in a rightward shift in the frequency-input current (FI) curve which is explained by a simple linear model of the subthreshold I-V relationship. No changes are observed in action potential profiles, nor in the membrane potential at which action potentials are evoked. Furthermore, following depolarization, an increase in subthreshold potassium conductance is observed which is accounted for within a biophysical model of the subthreshold I-V characteristics of neuronal membranes. The FI curve shift was blocked by the presence of the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine, whilst antagonism of NMDA receptors did not interfere with the effect. Finally, changes in the intrinsic properties of neurones are reversible following removal of the depolarizing stimulus. We suggest that this experimental system provides a convenient model of homeostatic regulation of intrinsic excitability, and permits the study of temporal characteristics of homeostasis and its dependence on stimulus magnitude.

  12. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha impairs neuronal differentiation but not proliferation of hippocampal neural precursor cells: Role of Hes1.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Aoife; Ryan, Sinead; Maloney, Eimer; Sullivan, Aideen M; Nolan, Yvonne M

    2010-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine, which influences neuronal survival and function yet there is limited information available on its effects on hippocampal neural precursor cells (NPCs). We show that TNFalpha treatment during proliferation had no effect on the percentage of proliferating cells prepared from embryonic rat hippocampal neurosphere cultures, nor did it affect cell fate towards either an astrocytic or neuronal lineage when cells were then allowed to differentiate. However, when cells were differentiated in the presence of TNFalpha, significantly reduced percentages of newly born and post-mitotic neurons, significantly increased percentages of astrocytes and increased expression of TNFalpha receptors, TNF-R1 and TNF-R2, as well as expression of the anti-neurogenic Hes1 gene, were observed. These data indicate that exposure of hippocampal NPCs to TNFalpha when they are undergoing differentiation but not proliferation has a detrimental effect on their neuronal lineage fate, which may be mediated through increased expression of Hes1.

  13. Low concentrations of ethanol protect against synaptotoxicity induced by Aβ in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Gonzalo; Urrutia, Juan C; Burgos, Carlos F; Silva, Viviana; Aguilar, Felipe; Sama, Michelle; Yeh, Hermes H; Opazo, Carlos; Aguayo, Luis G

    2015-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported a reduction in the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in individuals that ingest low amounts of alcohol. Also, it has been found that moderate consumption of ethanol might protect against β-amyloid (Aβ) toxicity. However, the mechanism underlying its potential neuroprotection is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that ethanol improved the cognitive processes of learning and memory in 3xTgAD mice. In addition, we found that a low concentration of ethanol (equivalent to moderate ethanol consumption) decreased the binding of Aβ (1 and 5 μM) to neuronal membranes and, consequently, its synaptotoxic effect in rat hippocampal and cortical neurons under acute (30 minutes) and chronic (24 hours) incubation conditions. This effect appears to be exerted by a direct action of ethanol on Aβ because electron microscopy studies showed that ethanol altered the degree of Aβ aggregation. The action of ethanol on Aβ also prevented the peptide from perforating the neuronal membrane, as assayed with patch clamp experiments. Taken together, these results contribute to elucidating the mechanism by which low concentrations of ethanol protect against toxicity induced by Aβ oligomers in primary neuronal cultures. These results may also provide an explanation for the decrease in the risk of Alzheimer's disease in people who consume moderate doses of alcohol.

  14. Fingolimod Limits Acute Aβ Neurotoxicity and Promotes Synaptic Versus Extrasynaptic NMDA Receptor Functionality in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pooja; Gabrielli, Martina; Ponzoni, Luisa; Pelucchi, Silvia; Stravalaci, Matteo; Beeg, Marten; Mazzitelli, Sonia; Braida, Daniela; Sala, Mariaelvina; Boda, Enrica; Buffo, Annalisa; Gobbi, Marco; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Matteoli, Michela; Marcello, Elena; Verderio, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Fingolimod, also known as FTY720, is an analogue of the sphingolipid sphingosine, which has been proved to be neuroprotective in rodent models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Several cellular and molecular targets underlying the neuroprotective effects of FTY720 have been recently identified. However, whether the drug directly protects neurons from toxicity of amyloid-beta (Aβ) still remains poorly defined. Using a combination of biochemical assays, live imaging and electrophysiology we demonstrate that FTY720 induces a rapid increase in GLUN2A-containing neuroprotective NMDARs on the surface of dendritic spines in cultured hippocampal neurons. In addition, the drug mobilizes extrasynaptic GLUN2B-containing NMDARs, which are coupled to cell death, to the synapses. Altered ratio of synaptic/extrasynaptic NMDARs decreases calcium responsiveness of neurons to neurotoxic soluble Aβ 1–42 and renders neurons resistant to early alteration of calcium homeostasis. The fast defensive response of FTY720 occurs through a Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1P-R) -dependent mechanism, as it is lost in the presence of S1P-R1 and S1P-R3 antagonists. We propose that rapid synaptic relocation of NMDARs might have direct impact on amelioration of cognitive performance in transgenic APPswe/PS1dE9 AD mice upon sub-chronic treatment with FTY720. PMID:28134307

  15. Tumor necrosis factor expressed by primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells is regulated by alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Renauld, A E; Spengler, R N

    2002-01-15

    Neuron expression of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and the regulation of the levels of TNF by alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation were investigated. Adult rat hippocampal neurons and phorbol ester (PMA)-differentiated SH-SY5Y cells were examined. Intracellular levels of TNF mRNA accumulation, as well as TNF protein and that released into the supernatant were quantified by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry and bioanalysis, respectively. Both neuron cultures demonstrated constitutive production of TNF. Activation of the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor increased intracellular levels of TNF mRNA and protein in SH-SY5Y cells after addition of graded concentrations of the selective agonist, Brimonidine (UK-14304) to parallel cultures. Intracellular levels of mRNA were increased in a concentration-dependent fashion within 15 min of UK-14304 addition and were sustained during 24 hr of receptor activation. In addition, the levels of TNF in the supernatant were increased in both types of neuron cultures within 15 min of alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation. Furthermore, levels of TNF significantly increased in the supernatants of both neuron cultures after potassium-induced depolarization. A reduction in this depolarization-induced release occurred in hippocampal neuron cultures after exposure to the sympathomimetic tyramine with media replacement to deplete endogenous catecholamines. This finding reveals a role for endogenous catecholamines in the regulation of TNF production. Potassium-induced depolarization resulted in the release of TNF in hippocampal neuron cultures within 15 min but not until 24 hr in SH-SY5Y cultures demonstrating a temporally mediated event dependent upon cell type. Neuron expression of TNF, regulated by alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation demonstrates not only how a neuron controls its own production of this pleiotropic cytokine, but also displays a normal role for neurons in directing the many functions of TNF.

  16. Transient oxytocin signaling primes the development and function of excitatory hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Silvia; Ambrozkiewicz, Mateusz C; Guzzi, Francesca; Gravati, Marta; Biella, Gerardo; Bormuth, Ingo; Hammer, Matthieu; Tuffy, Liam P; Sigler, Albrecht; Kawabe, Hiroshi; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Toselli, Mauro; Brose, Nils; Parenti, Marco; Rhee, JeongSeop

    2017-02-23

    Beyond its role in parturition and lactation, oxytocin influences higher brain processes that control social behavior of mammals, and perturbed oxytocin signaling has been linked to the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders. However, it is still largely unknown how oxytocin exactly regulates neuronal function. We show that early, transient oxytocin exposure in vitro inhibits the development of hippocampal glutamatergic neurons, leading to reduced dendrite complexity, synapse density, and excitatory transmission, while sparing GABAergic neurons. Conversely, genetic elimination of oxytocin receptors increases the expression of protein components of excitatory synapses and excitatory synaptic transmission in vitro. In vivo, oxytocin-receptor-deficient hippocampal pyramidal neurons develop more complex dendrites, which leads to increased spine number and reduced γ-oscillations. These results indicate that oxytocin controls the development of hippocampal excitatory neurons and contributes to the maintenance of a physiological excitation/inhibition balance, whose disruption can cause neurobehavioral disturbances.

  17. Chronic exposure to morphine decreases the expression of EAAT3 via opioid receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingyan; Cao, Dexiong; Zhu, Siyu; Fu, Ganglan; Wu, Qiang; Liang, Jianjun; Cao, Minghui

    2015-12-02

    Alterations in glutamate transporter expression are closely related to opiate addition behavior, but the role of opioid receptors is unclear. In this study, we used primary cultures of hippocampal neurons from neonatal rats to study the effects of chronic exposure to morphine on excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) expression and the roles of µ opioid receptor (MOR), δ opioid receptor (DOR), and κ opioid receptor (KOR) in the morphine-dependent alterations in EAAT3 expression. The results showed that the EAAT3 protein and mRNA expression levels decreased significantly after chronic exposure to morphine (10μmol/L) for 48h, whereas the concentration of extracellular glutamate increased. In addition, we found that both the MOR inhibitor CTOP and the DOR inhibitor naltrindole could reverse the decreased expression of EAAT3 after exposure to morphine, whereas the MOR activator DAMGO and the DOR activator DPDPE significantly decreased EAAT3 expression. The KOR inhibitor had no effect on the expression of EAAT3, whereas its activator increased EAAT3 expression. These results suggest that the down-regulation of morphine-dependent EAAT3 expression in primary rat hippocampal cultures may be mediated by MOR and DOR and that KOR may not contribute significantly to this effect.

  18. Dietary cholesterol modulates the excitability of rabbit hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Desheng; Schreurs, Bernard G

    2010-08-02

    Previous work has shown high dietary cholesterol can affect learning and memory including rabbit eyeblink conditioning and this effect may be due to increased membrane cholesterol and enhanced hippocampal amyloid beta production. This study investigated whether dietary cholesterol modulates rabbit hippocampal CA1 neuron membrane properties known to be involved in rabbit eyeblink conditioning. Whole-cell current clamp recordings in hippocampal neurons from rabbits fed 2 percent cholesterol or normal chow for 8 weeks revealed changes including decreased after-hyperpolarization amplitudes (AHPs) - an index of membrane excitability shown to be important for rabbit eyeblink conditioning. This index was reversed by adding copper to drinking water - a dietary manipulation that can retard rabbit eyeblink conditioning. Evidence of cholesterol effects on membrane excitability was provided by application of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, a compound that reduces membrane cholesterol, which increased the excitability of hippocampal CA1 neurons.

  19. Injured Fluoro-Jade-positive hippocampal neurons contain high levels of zinc after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hellmich, Helen L; Eidson, Kristine A; Capra, Bridget A; Garcia, Jeanna M; Boone, Deborah R; Hawkins, Bridget E; Uchida, Tatsuo; Dewitt, Douglas S; Prough, Donald S

    2007-01-05

    Hippocampal damage contributes to cognitive dysfunction after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We previously showed that Fluoro-Jade, a fluorescent stain that labels injured, degenerating brain neurons, quantifies the extent of hippocampal injury after experimental fluid percussion TBI in rats. Coincidentally, we observed that injured neurons in the rat hippocampus also stained with Newport Green, a fluorescent dye specific for free ionic zinc. Here, we show that, regardless of injury severity or therapeutic intervention, the post-TBI population of injured neurons in rat hippocampal subfields CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus is indistinguishable, both in numbers and anatomical distribution, from the population of neurons containing high levels of zinc. Treatment with lamotrigine, which inhibits presynaptic release of glutamate and presumably zinc that is co-localized with glutamate, reduced numbers of Fluoro-Jade-positive and Newport Green-positive neurons equally as did treatment with nicardipine, which blocks voltage-gated calcium channels through which zinc enters neurons. To confirm using molecular techniques that Fluoro-Jade and Newport Green-positive neurons are equivalent populations, we isolated total RNA from 25 Fluoro-Jade-positive and 25 Newport Green-positive pyramidal neurons obtained by laser capture microdissection (LCM) from the CA3 subfield, linearly amplified the mRNA and used quantitative ribonuclease protection analysis to demonstrate similar expression of mRNA for selected TBI-induced genes. Our data suggest that therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing neurotoxic zinc levels after TBI may reduce hippocampal neuronal injury.

  20. Rhythmic coordination of hippocampal neurons during associative memory processing

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Lara M; Rueckemann, Jon W; Riviere, Pamela D; Keefe, Katherine R; Porter, Blake S; Heimbuch, Ian S; Budlong, Carl H; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal oscillations are dynamic, with unique oscillatory frequencies present during different behavioral states. To examine the extent to which these oscillations reflect neuron engagement in distinct local circuit processes that are important for memory, we recorded single cell and local field potential activity from the CA1 region of the hippocampus as rats performed a context-guided odor-reward association task. We found that theta (4–12 Hz), beta (15–35 Hz), low gamma (35–55 Hz), and high gamma (65–90 Hz) frequencies exhibited dynamic amplitude profiles as rats sampled odor cues. Interneurons and principal cells exhibited unique engagement in each of the four rhythmic circuits in a manner that related to successful performance of the task. Moreover, principal cells coherent to each rhythm differentially represented task dimensions. These results demonstrate that distinct processing states arise from the engagement of rhythmically identifiable circuits, which have unique roles in organizing task-relevant processing in the hippocampus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09849.001 PMID:26751780

  1. Impact of nanosecond pulsed electric fields on primary hippocampal neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Payne, Jason A.; Kuipers, Marjorie A.; Thompson, Gary L.; Wilmink, Gerald J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2012-02-01

    Cellular exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) are believed to cause immediate creation of nanopores in the plasma membrane. These nanopores enable passage of small ions, but remain impermeable to larger molecules like propidium iodide. Previous work has shown that nanopores are stable for minutes after exposure, suggesting that formation of nanopores in excitable cells could lead to prolonged action potential inhibition. Previously, we measured the formation of nanopores in neuroblastoma cells by measuring the influx of extracellular calcium by preloading cells with Calcium Green-AM. In this work, we explored the impact of changing the width of a single nsPEF, at constant amplitude, on uptake of extracellular calcium ions by primary hippocampal neurons (PHN). Calcium Green was again used to measure the influx of extracellular calcium and FM1-43 was used to monitor changes in membrane conformation. The observed thresholds for nanopore formation in PHN by nsPEF were comparable to those measured in neuroblastoma. This work is the first study of nsPEF effects on PHN and strongly suggests that neurological inhibition by nanosecond electrical pulses is highly likely at doses well below irreversible damage.

  2. NMDA receptors and the differential ischemic vulnerability of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gee, Christine E; Benquet, Pascal; Raineteau, Olivier; Rietschin, Lotty; Kirbach, Sebastian W; Gerber, Urs

    2006-05-01

    Transient cerebral ischemia causes an inhomogeneous pattern of cell death in the brain. We investigated mechanisms, which may underlie the greater susceptibility of hippocampal CA1 vs. CA3 pyramidal cells to ischemic insult. Using an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model of ischemia, we found that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) responses were enhanced in the more susceptible CA1 pyramidal cells and transiently depressed in the resistant CA3 pyramidal cells. The long-lasting potentiation of NMDA responses in CA1 cells was associated with delayed cell death and was prevented by blocking tyrosine kinase-dependent up-regulation of NMDA receptor function. In CA3 cells, the energy deprivation-induced transient depression of NMDA responses was converted to potentiation by blocking protein phosphatase signalling. These results suggest that energy deprivation differentially shifts the intracellular equilibrium between the tyrosine kinase and phosphatase activities that modulate NMDA responses in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells. Therapeutic modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation may thus prove beneficial in mitigating ischemia-induced neuronal death in vulnerable brain areas.

  3. p75 neurotrophin receptor distribution and transport in cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Formaggio, Elena; Cantù, Cinzia; Chiamulera, Christian; Fumagalli, Guido F

    2008-09-01

    In this work, we define a GFP-tagged version of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75GFP) as a useful molecular tool for studying its distribution and cellular dynamics. Expression and subcellular localization of p75GFP have been characterized in non-neuronal (HEK 293) and in neuronal (cortical and hippocampal) cells. By monitoring movements of intracellular p75GFP in living cultured hippocampal neurons, we found that the chimeric protein was transported by tubulo-vesicular structures both anterogradely (0.1-0.5microm/s) and retrogradely (0.1-1.1microm/s), with a faster component in retrogradely moving structures. Movements of the p75GFP-containing structures were inhibited by treatment with the microtubule-disrupting agent nocodazole. Our data indicate that p75GFP is a reliable tool for studying spatial and cellular properties of p75 in CNS neurons and that p75 transport inside neurons is mediated by microtubule-associated motors.

  4. Evaluation of PFOS-mediated neurotoxicity in rat primary neurons and astrocytes cultured separately or in co-culture.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenwei; Liu, Qi; Liu, Chang; Li, Chunna; Li, Yachen; Li, Shuangyue; Liu, Xiaohui; Shao, Jing

    2017-02-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a potential neurotoxicant reported by epidemiological investigations and experimental studies, while the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes not only support for the construction of neurons, but also conduct neuronal functions through glutamate-glutamine cycle in astrocyte-neuron crosstalk. In the present study, the effect of PFOS exposure on rat primary hippocampal neurons or cortex astrocytes was evaluated. Then the role of the astrocytes in PFOS-induced toxic effect on neurons was explored with astrocyte-neuron co-culture system. Exposure of rat primary hippocampal neurons to PFOS has led to oxidation-antioxidation imbalance, increased apoptosis and abnormal autophagy. The adverse effect of PFOS on rat primary cortex astrocytes manifested in the form of altered extracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations, decreased glutamine synthase activity, as well as decreased gene expression of glutamine synthase, glutamate transporters and glutamine transporters in the glutamate-glutamine cycle. Especially, the alleviation of PFOS-inhibited neurite outgrowth in neurons could be observed in astrocyte-neuron co-culture system, though the ability of astrocytes in fostering neurite outgrowth was affected by PFOS. These results indicated that both astrocytes and neurons might be the targets of PFOS-induced neurotoxicity, and astrocytes could protect against PFOS-inhibited neurite outgrowth in primary cultured neurons. Our research might render some information in explaining the mechanisms of PFOS-induced neurotoxicity.

  5. Immunohistochemical visualization of hippocampal neuron activity after spatial learning in a mouse model of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Provenzano, Giovanni; Pangrazzi, Luca; Poli, Andrea; Berardi, Nicoletta; Bozzi, Yuri

    2015-05-12

    Induction of phosphorylated extracellular-regulated kinase (pERK) is a reliable molecular readout of learning-dependent neuronal activation. Here, we describe a pERK immunohistochemistry protocol to study the profile of hippocampal neuron activation following exposure to a spatial learning task in a mouse model characterized by cognitive deficits of neurodevelopmental origin. Specifically, we used pERK immunostaining to study neuronal activation following Morris water maze (MWM, a classical hippocampal-dependent learning task) in Engrailed-2 knockout (En2(-/-)) mice, a model of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). As compared to wild-type (WT) controls, En2(-/-) mice showed significant spatial learning deficits in the MWM. After MWM, significant differences in the number of pERK-positive neurons were detected in specific hippocampal subfields of En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT animals. Thus, our protocol can robustly detect differences in pERK-positive neurons associated to hippocampal-dependent learning impairment in a mouse model of ASD. More generally, our protocol can be applied to investigate the profile of hippocampal neuron activation in both genetic or pharmacological mouse models characterized by cognitive deficits.

  6. The Neuropsychiatric Disease-Associated Gene cacna1c Mediates Survival of Young Hippocampal Neurons123

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anni S.; Kabir, Zeeba D.; Knobbe, Whitney; Orr, Madeline; Burgdorf, Caitlin; Huntington, Paula; McDaniel, Latisha; Britt, Jeremiah K.; Hoffmann, Franz; Brat, Daniel J.; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variations in CACNA1C, which encodes the Cav1.2 subunit of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs), are associated with multiple forms of neuropsychiatric disease that manifest high anxiety in patients. In parallel, mice harboring forebrain-specific conditional knockout of cacna1c (forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO) display unusually high anxiety-like behavior. LTCCs in general, including the Cav1.3 subunit, have been shown to mediate differentiation of neural precursor cells (NPCs). However, it has not previously been determined whether Cav1.2 affects postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo. Here, we show that forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice exhibit enhanced cell death of young hippocampal neurons, with no change in NPC proliferation, hippocampal size, dentate gyrus thickness, or corticosterone levels compared with wild-type littermates. These mice also exhibit deficits in brain levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and Cre recombinase-mediated knockdown of adult hippocampal Cav1.2 recapitulates the deficit in young hippocampal neurons survival. Treatment of forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice with the neuroprotective agent P7C3-A20 restored the net magnitude of postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis to wild-type levels without ameliorating their deficit in BDNF expression. The role of Cav1.2 in young hippocampal neurons survival may provide new approaches for understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disease associated with aberrations in CACNA1C. Visual Abstract PMID:27066530

  7. The Neuropsychiatric Disease-Associated Gene cacna1c Mediates Survival of Young Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anni S; De Jesús-Cortés, Héctor; Kabir, Zeeba D; Knobbe, Whitney; Orr, Madeline; Burgdorf, Caitlin; Huntington, Paula; McDaniel, Latisha; Britt, Jeremiah K; Hoffmann, Franz; Brat, Daniel J; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M; Pieper, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variations in CACNA1C, which encodes the Cav1.2 subunit of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs), are associated with multiple forms of neuropsychiatric disease that manifest high anxiety in patients. In parallel, mice harboring forebrain-specific conditional knockout of cacna1c (forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO) display unusually high anxiety-like behavior. LTCCs in general, including the Cav1.3 subunit, have been shown to mediate differentiation of neural precursor cells (NPCs). However, it has not previously been determined whether Cav1.2 affects postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo. Here, we show that forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice exhibit enhanced cell death of young hippocampal neurons, with no change in NPC proliferation, hippocampal size, dentate gyrus thickness, or corticosterone levels compared with wild-type littermates. These mice also exhibit deficits in brain levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and Cre recombinase-mediated knockdown of adult hippocampal Cav1.2 recapitulates the deficit in young hippocampal neurons survival. Treatment of forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice with the neuroprotective agent P7C3-A20 restored the net magnitude of postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis to wild-type levels without ameliorating their deficit in BDNF expression. The role of Cav1.2 in young hippocampal neurons survival may provide new approaches for understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disease associated with aberrations in CACNA1C. Visual Abstract.

  8. Greater hippocampal neuronal recruitment in food-storing than in non-food-storing birds.

    PubMed

    Hoshooley, Jennifer S; Sherry, David F

    2007-03-01

    Previous research has shown heightened recruitment of new neurons to the chickadee hippocampus in the fall. The present study was conducted to determine whether heightened fall recruitment is associated with the seasonal onset of food-storing by comparing neurogenesis in chickadees and a non-food-storing species, the house sparrow. Chickadees and house sparrows were captured in the wild in fall and spring and received multiple injections of the cell birth marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Birds were held in captivity and the level of hippocampal neuron recruitment was assessed after 6 weeks. Chickadees showed significantly more hippocampal neuronal recruitment than house sparrows. We found no seasonal differences in hippocampal neuronal recruitment in either species. In chickadees and in house sparrows, one-third of new cells labeled for BrdU also expressed the mature neuronal protein, NeuN. In a region adjacent to the hippocampus, the hyperpallium apicale, we observed no significant differences in neuronal recruitment between species or between seasons. Hippocampal volume and total neuron number both were greater in spring than in fall in chickadees, but no seasonal differences were observed in house sparrows. Enhanced neuronal recruitment in the hippocampus of food-storing chickadees suggests a degree of neurogenic specialization that may be associated with the spatial memory requirements of food-storing behavior.

  9. Giant synaptic potentials in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Y; Cherubini, E; Corradetti, R; Gaiarsa, J L

    1989-09-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were made from rat CA3 hippocampal neurones in vitro during the first eighteen days of postnatal life. The cells had resting membrane potentials more negative than -51 mV, action potentials greater than 55 mV and membrane input resistances of 117 +/- 12 M omega. An unusual characteristic of these cells was the presence of spontaneous giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) which were observed during the first eight postnatal (P) days in over 85% of neurones. They were less frequent between P9 and P12 (48%) and disappeared after P12. 2. The GDPs were synchronously generated by a population of neurones; they reversed polarity at -27 mV when recorded with KCl-containing electrodes and at -51 mV with potassium acetate- or potassium methylsulphate-filled electrodes. 3. The GDPs were blocked by bath application of bicuculline (10 microM) or picrotoxin (100-200 microM). Exogenously applied gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA; 0.2-1 mM) induced at resting membrane potential a bicuculline-sensitive membrane depolarization which reversed polarity at -25 and -51 mV when recorded with KCl- or potassium methylsulphate-filled electrodes respectively. 4. The GDPs were reduced in frequency or blocked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists DL-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoate (AP-7; 50 microM), D(-)2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP-5, 10-50 microM) and (+-)3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 10-50 microM) or NMDA channel blockers phencyclidine (2 microM) and ketamine (20 microM). 5. Stimulation of the hilus during the first week of life evoked a GDP followed by a hyperpolarization. The GDPs were generated by a population of synchronized neurones and reversed polarity at -27 mV with KCl-filled electrodes and at -52 mV with potassium acetate- or potassium methylsulphate-containing electrodes. 6. Bath application of bicuculline (1-10 microM) or picrotoxin (100-200 microM) reversibly blocked the evoked GDPs in the majority of cells

  10. Giant synaptic potentials in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ari, Y; Cherubini, E; Corradetti, R; Gaiarsa, J L

    1989-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were made from rat CA3 hippocampal neurones in vitro during the first eighteen days of postnatal life. The cells had resting membrane potentials more negative than -51 mV, action potentials greater than 55 mV and membrane input resistances of 117 +/- 12 M omega. An unusual characteristic of these cells was the presence of spontaneous giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) which were observed during the first eight postnatal (P) days in over 85% of neurones. They were less frequent between P9 and P12 (48%) and disappeared after P12. 2. The GDPs were synchronously generated by a population of neurones; they reversed polarity at -27 mV when recorded with KCl-containing electrodes and at -51 mV with potassium acetate- or potassium methylsulphate-filled electrodes. 3. The GDPs were blocked by bath application of bicuculline (10 microM) or picrotoxin (100-200 microM). Exogenously applied gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA; 0.2-1 mM) induced at resting membrane potential a bicuculline-sensitive membrane depolarization which reversed polarity at -25 and -51 mV when recorded with KCl- or potassium methylsulphate-filled electrodes respectively. 4. The GDPs were reduced in frequency or blocked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists DL-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoate (AP-7; 50 microM), D(-)2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP-5, 10-50 microM) and (+-)3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 10-50 microM) or NMDA channel blockers phencyclidine (2 microM) and ketamine (20 microM). 5. Stimulation of the hilus during the first week of life evoked a GDP followed by a hyperpolarization. The GDPs were generated by a population of synchronized neurones and reversed polarity at -27 mV with KCl-filled electrodes and at -52 mV with potassium acetate- or potassium methylsulphate-containing electrodes. 6. Bath application of bicuculline (1-10 microM) or picrotoxin (100-200 microM) reversibly blocked the evoked GDPs in the majority of cells

  11. Inhibitory ryanodine prevents ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca²⁺ release without affecting endoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺ content in primary hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Adasme, Tatiana; Paula-Lima, Andrea; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2015-02-27

    Ryanodine is a cell permeant plant alkaloid that binds selectively and with high affinity to ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca(2+) release channels. Sub-micromolar ryanodine concentrations activate RyR channels while micromolar concentrations are inhibitory. Several reports indicate that neuronal synaptic plasticity, learning and memory require RyR-mediated Ca(2+)-release, which is essential for muscle contraction. The use of micromolar (inhibitory) ryanodine represents a common strategy to suppress RyR activity in neuronal cells: however, micromolar ryanodine promotes RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) depletion in muscle cells. Information is lacking in this regard in neuronal cells; hence, we examined here if addition of inhibitory ryanodine elicited Ca(2+) release in primary hippocampal neurons, and if prolonged incubation of primary hippocampal cultures with inhibitory ryanodine affected neuronal ER calcium content. Our results indicate that inhibitory ryanodine does not cause Ca(2+) release from the ER in primary hippocampal neurons, even though ryanodine diffusion should produce initially low intracellular concentrations, within the RyR activation range. Moreover, neurons treated for 1 h with inhibitory ryanodine had comparable Ca(2+) levels as control neurons. These combined findings imply that prolonged incubation with inhibitory ryanodine, which effectively abolishes RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release, preserves ER Ca(2+) levels and thus constitutes a sound strategy to suppress neuronal RyR function.

  12. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Rajput, Padmesh S.; Kumar, Ujendra; Sastry, Bhagavatula R.

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA) in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2) but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS)-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG), a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary. PMID:26389591

  13. The Influence of Vitamin D Treatment on the Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (INOS) Expression in Primary Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    DURSUN, Erdinç; GEZEN-AK, Duygu; YILMAZER, Selma

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neurodegeneration is a process that is characterized by the loss of neuronal structure and function and eventually ends with neuronal death. An elevated level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is suggested to accompany this process by inducing oxidative and nitrosative damage. Vitamin D is reported to protect glial cells against neurotoxicity via suppressing iNOS synthesis. Though there was no data about whether iNOS is regulated by vitamin D in hippocampal neurons. In this study our aim was to determine any alteration in iNOS expression of hippocampal neurons in response to vitamin D treatment. Method Twenty four and 48 hours of vitamin D treatments were performed on primary hippocampal neuron cultures that were prepared from Sprague dawley rat embryos (E18). The alterations in the iNOS mRNA expression were determined with quantative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The cytotoxicity levels of each group were investigated by the measurement of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) that is released to culture medium. Results No difference was observed between groups in 24 hours of treatment regarding the iNOS expression. Though the iNOS mRNA level of vitamin D treated group was significantly lower than that of control group on the 48th hours of treatment (p<.001). Vitamin D treatment also attenuated the LDH release which is an indicator of cytotoxicity (p<.001). Conclusion Our results indicated that vitamin D has the potential to prevent oxidative damage by suppressing iNOS expression.

  14. Regular theta-firing neurons in the nucleus incertus during sustained hippocampal activation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bellver, Sergio; Cervera-Ferri, Ana; Martínez-Ricós, Joana; Ruiz-Torner, Amparo; Luque-Garcia, Aina; Luque-Martinez, Aina; Blasco-Serra, Arantxa; Guerrero-Martínez, Juan; Bataller-Mompeán, Manuel; Teruel-Martí, Vicent

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the existence of theta-coupled neuronal activity in the nucleus incertus (NI). Theta rhythm is relevant for cognitive processes such as spatial navigation and memory processing, and can be recorded in a number of structures related to the hippocampal activation including the NI. Strong evidence supports the role of this tegmental nucleus in neural circuits integrating behavioural activation with the hippocampal theta rhythm. Theta oscillations have been recorded in the local field potential of the NI, highly coupled to the hippocampal waves, although no rhythmical activity has been reported in neurons of this nucleus. The present work analyses the neuronal activity in the NI in conditions leading to sustained hippocampal theta in the urethane-anaesthetised rat, in order to test whether such activation elicits a differential firing pattern. Wavelet analysis has been used to better define the neuronal activity already described in the nucleus, i.e., non-rhythmical neurons firing at theta frequency (type I neurons) and fast-firing rhythmical neurons (type II). However, the most remarkable finding was that sustained stimulation activated regular-theta neurons (type III), which were almost silent in baseline conditions and have not previously been reported. Thus, we describe the electrophysiological properties of type III neurons, focusing on their coupling to the hippocampal theta. Their spike rate, regularity and phase locking to the oscillations increased at the beginning of the stimulation, suggesting a role in the activation or reset of the oscillation. Further research is needed to address the specific contribution of these neurons to the entire circuit.

  15. Inhibitory effect of ganglioside GD1b on K+ current in hippocampal neurons and its involvement in apoptosis suppression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesong; Chi, Shaopeng; Liu, Mingna; Yang, Wei; Wei, Taotao; Qi, Zhi; Yang, Fuyu

    2005-12-01

    Gangliosides are endogenous membrane components enriched in neuronal cells. They have been shown to play regulatory roles in many cellular processes. Here, we show for the first time that ganglioside GD1b plays an antiapoptotic role in cultured hippocampal neurons. GD1b inhibited the voltage-dependent outward delayed rectifier current (I(K)) but not the transient outward A-type current in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 15.2 microM. This effect appears to be somehow specific, because GD1b, but not GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1a, GD3, or GT1b, was effective in inhibiting I(K). Intracellular application of staurosporine (STS; 0.1 microM) resulted in rapid activation of I(K), which was partially reversed upon addition of the K+ channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA; 5 mM) and GD1b (10 microM). Furthermore, GD1b (10 microM) attenuated STS-induced neuronal apoptosis by nearly the same amount as 5 mM TEA. In addition, GD1b suppressed the apoptosis-associated caspase 3 activation that was activated by STS. Collectively, these findings suggest that GD1b plays an antiapoptotic role in cultured hippocampal neurons through its inhibitory effect on the I(K) and caspase activity.

  16. Interfering of the Reelin/ApoER2/PSD95 Signaling Axis Reactivates Dendritogenesis of Mature Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ampuero, Estibaliz; Jury, Nur; Härtel, Steffen; Marzolo, María-Paz; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2017-05-01

    Reelin, an extracellular glycoprotein secreted in embryonic and adult brain, participates in neuronal migration and neuronal plasticity. Extensive evidence shows that reelin via activation of the ApoER2 and VLDLR receptors promotes dendrite and spine formation during early development. Further evidence suggests that reelin signaling is needed to maintain a stable architecture in mature neurons, but, direct evidence is lacking. During activity-dependent maturation of the neuronal circuitry, the synaptic protein PSD95 is inserted into the postsynaptic membrane to induce structural refinement and stability of spines and dendrites. Given that ApoER2 interacts with PSD95, we tested if reelin signaling interference in adult neurons reactivates the dendritic architecture. Unlike findings in developing cultures, the presently obtained in vitro and in vivo data show, for the first time, that reelin signaling interference robustly increase dendritogenesis and reduce spine density in mature hippocampal neurons. In particular, the expression of a mutant ApoER2 form (ApoER2-tailless), which is unable to interact with PSD95 and hence cannot transduce reelin signaling, resulted in robust dendritogenesis in mature hippocampal neurons in vitro. These results indicate that reelin/ApoER2/PSD95 signaling is important for neuronal structure maintenance in mature neurons. Mechanistically, obtained immunofluorescent data indicate that reelin signaling impairment reduced synaptic PSD95 levels, consequently leading to synaptic re-insertion of NR2B-NMDARs. Our findings underscore the importance of reelin in maintaining adult network stability and reveal a new mode for reactivating dendritogenesis in neurological disorders where dendritic arbor complexity is limited, such as in depression, Alzheimer's disease, and stroke. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1187-1199, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Limitations of Mild, Moderate, and Profound Hypothermia in Protecting Developing Hippocampal Neurons After Simulated Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Maren; Lee, Deok Hee; Gabatto, Pablo; Bickler, Philip E

    2013-12-01

    Mild hypothermia (33°C-34°C) after cerebral ischemia in intact animals or ischemia-like conditions in vitro reduces neuron death. However, it is now clear that more profound hypothermia or delayed hypothermia may not provide significant protection. To further define the limitations of hypothermia after cerebral ischemia, we used hippocampal slice cultures to examine the effects of various degrees, durations, and delays of hypothermia on neuron death after an ischemia-like insult. Organotypic cultures of the hippocampus from 7- to 8 day-old rat pups were cooled to 32°C, 23°C, 17°C, or 4°C immediately or after a 2-4 hour delay from an injurious insult of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Cell death in CA1, CA3 and dentate regions of the cultures was assessed 24 hours later with SYTOX(®) or propidium iodide, both of which are fluorescent markers labeling damaged cells. OGD caused extensive cell death in CA1, CA3, and dentate regions of the hippocampal cultures. Hypothermia (32°C, 23°C and 17°C) for 4-6 hours immediately after OGD was protective at 24 hours, but when hypothermia was applied for longer periods or delayed after OGD, no protection or increased death was seen. Ultra-profound hypothermia (4°C) increased cell death in all cell areas of the hippocampus even when after a milder insult of only hypoxia. In an in vitro model of recovery after an ischemia-like insult, mild to profound hypothermia is protective only when applied without delay and for limited periods of time (6-8 hours). Longer durations of hypothermia, or delayed application of the hypothermia can increase neuron death. These findings may have implications for clinical uses of therapeutic hypothermia after hypoxic or ischemic insults, and suggest that further work is needed to elucidate the limitations of hypothermia as a protective treatment after ischemic stress.

  18. Amyloid-β Oligomers Transiently Inhibit AMP-activated kinase and Cause Metabolic Defects in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Seixas da Silva, Gisele S; Melo, Helen M; Lourenco, Mychael V; Lyra E Silva, Natalia de M; de Carvalho, Marcelo B; Alves-Leon, Soniza; de Souza, Jorge M; Klein, William L; da-Silva, Wagner S; Ferreira, Sergio T; De Felice, Fernanda G

    2017-03-16

    AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is a key player in energy sensing and metabolic reprogramming under cellular energy restriction. Several studies have linked impaired AMPK function to peripheral metabolic diseases such as diabetes. However, the impact of neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), on AMPK function and downstream effects of altered AMPK activity on neuronal metabolism have been investigated only recently. Here, we report the impact of A β oligomers (AβOs), synaptotoxins that accumulate in AD brains, on neuronal AMPK activity. Short-term exposure of cultured rat hippocampal neurons or ex vivo human cortical slices to AβOs transiently decreased intracellular ATP levels and AMPK activity, as evaluated by its phosphorylation at threonine residue 172 (AMPKpThr172). The AβO-dependent reduction in AMPKpThr172 levels was mediated by glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype, and resulted in removal of glucose transporters (GLUTs) from the surfaces of dendritic processes in hippocampal neurons. Importantly, insulin prevented the AβO-induced inhibition of AMPK. Our results establish a novel toxic impact of A βOs on neuronal metabolism and suggest that AβO-induced, NMDA receptor-mediated AMPK inhibition may play a key role in early brain metabolic defects in AD.

  19. Cardiac arrest triggers hippocampal neuronal death through autophagic and apoptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Derong; Shang, Hanbing; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Wei; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of neuronal death induced by ischemic injury remains unknown. We investigated whether autophagy and p53 signaling played a role in the apoptosis of hippocampal neurons following global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, in a rat model of 8-min asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation. Increased autophagosome numbers, expression of lysosomal cathepsin B, cathepsin D, Beclin-1, and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) suggested autophagy in hippocampal cells. The expression of tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) and its target genes: Bax, p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), and damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM) were upregulated following CA. The p53-specific inhibitor pifithrin-α (PFT-α) significantly reduced the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax and PUMA) and autophagic proteins (LC3-II and DRAM) that generally increase following CA. PFT-α also reduced hippocampal neuronal damage following CA. Similarly, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), which inhibits autophagy and bafilomycin A1 (BFA), which inhibits lysosomes, significantly inhibited hippocampal neuronal damage after CA. These results indicate that CA affects both autophagy and apoptosis, partially mediated by p53. Autophagy plays a significant role in hippocampal neuronal death induced by cerebral I/R following asphyxial-CA. PMID:27273382

  20. Argipressin(4-8) upregulate CTP: phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kan-Yan; Xiong, Ying; Du, Yu-Cang

    2002-07-01

    In order to study the effect of argipressin(4-8)(AVP(4-8)) on the mRNA level and activity of cytidine triphosphate: phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase(CCT) in rat hippocampal neurons, and elucidate it's possible mechanism. Rat hippocampal neurons treated with AVP(4-8) or actinomycin D were incubated with different time periods. The mRNA level of CCT was detected using RT-PCR plus Southern blot, CCT activity was determined by measuring the rate of incorporation of (14)C - phosphocholine into cytidine diphosphate-choline(CDP-choline). It was found that AVP4-8 could upregulate the CCT mRNA in rat hippocampal neurons. ZDC(C)PR, the antagonist of AVP(4-8), could greatly inhibit this upregulation. Using actinomycin D to inhibite the eucaryotic transcription, it was found that the halflife of CCT mRNA could be prolonged by coincubation with AVP(4-8). Meanwhile, AVP(4-8) could also increase CCT activity in rat hippocampal neurons. These results demonstrated that AVP(4-8) upregulated CCT mRNA level and its activity through stabilizing the CCT mRNA in rat hippocampal neurons.

  1. Hippocampal neuron populations are reduced in vervet monkeys with fetal alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Burke, Mark W; Ptito, Maurice; Ervin, Frank R; Palmour, Roberta M

    2015-05-01

    Prenatal exposure to beverage alcohol is a major cause of mild mental retardation and developmental delay. In nonendangered alcohol-preferring vervet monkeys, we modeled the most common nondysmorphic form of fetal alcohol syndrome disorder with voluntary drinking during the third trimester of pregnancy. Here, we report significant numerical reductions in the principal hippocampal neurons of fetal alcohol-exposed (FAE) offspring, as compared to age-matched, similarly housed conspecifics with isocaloric sucrose exposure. These deficits, particularly marked in CA1 and CA3, are present neonatally and persist through infancy (5 months) and juvenile (2 years) stages. Although the volumes of hippocampal subdivisions in FAE animals are not atypical at birth, by age 2, they are only 65-70% of those estimated in age-matched controls. These data suggest that moderate, naturalistic alcohol consumption during late pregnancy results in a stable loss of hippocampal neurons and a progressive reduction of hippocampal volume.

  2. Imaging dendritic spines of rat primary hippocampal neurons using structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Marijn; De Luca, Giulia M R; Alatriste González, Diana K; de Jong, Babette E; Timmermans, Wendy; Xiong, Hui; Krugers, Harm; Manders, Erik M M; Fitzsimons, Carlos P

    2014-05-04

    Dendritic spines are protrusions emerging from the dendrite of a neuron and represent the primary postsynaptic targets of excitatory inputs in the brain. Technological advances have identified these structures as key elements in neuron connectivity and synaptic plasticity. The quantitative analysis of spine morphology using light microscopy remains an essential problem due to technical limitations associated with light's intrinsic refraction limit. Dendritic spines can be readily identified by confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy. However, measuring subtle changes in the shape and size of spines is difficult because spine dimensions other than length are usually smaller than conventional optical resolution fixed by light microscopy's theoretical resolution limit of 200 nm. Several recently developed super resolution techniques have been used to image cellular structures smaller than the 200 nm, including dendritic spines. These techniques are based on classical far-field operations and therefore allow the use of existing sample preparation methods and to image beyond the surface of a specimen. Described here is a working protocol to apply super resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM) to the imaging of dendritic spines in primary hippocampal neuron cultures. Possible applications of SIM overlap with those of confocal microscopy. However, the two techniques present different applicability. SIM offers higher effective lateral resolution, while confocal microscopy, due to the usage of a physical pinhole, achieves resolution improvement at the expense of removal of out of focus light. In this protocol, primary neurons are cultured on glass coverslips using a standard protocol, transfected with DNA plasmids encoding fluorescent proteins and imaged using SIM. The whole protocol described herein takes approximately 2 weeks, because dendritic spines are imaged after 16-17 days in vitro, when dendritic development is optimal. After completion of the

  3. Nanomolar concentrations of lead inhibit glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Braga, M F; Pereira, E F; Albuquerque, E X

    1999-04-24

    To investigate whether lead (Pb2+) affects the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive release of neurotransmitters, the whole-cell mode of the patch-clamp technique was applied to cultured hippocampal neurons. Pb2+ (>/=10 nM) reversibly blocked the TTX-sensitive release of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), as evidenced by the reduction of the amplitude and frequency of glutamate- and GABA-mediated postsynaptic currents (PSCs) evoked by spontaneous neuronal firing. This effect of Pb2+, which occurred 2-3 s after exposure of the neurons to Pb2+-containing external solution, was not related to changes in Na+-channel activity, and was quantified by measurements of changes in the amplitude of PSCs evoked when a 50-micros, 5-V stimulus was applied via a bipolar electrode to a neuron synaptically connected to the neuron under study. With an IC50 of approximately 68 nM, Pb2+ blocked the evoked release of glutamate and GABA. This effect was most likely mediated by Pb2+'s actions on extracellular targets, because there was a very short delay (<3 s) for its onset, and it could be completely reversed by the chelator ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Given that Pb2+-induced blockade of evoked transmitter release could be reversed by 4-aminopyridine, it is suggested that the effect on release was mediated via the binding of Pb2+ to voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Thus, it is most likely that the neurotoxic effects of Pb2+ in the mammalian brain involve a decrease of the TTX-sensitive, Ca2+-dependent release of neurotransmitters.

  4. Functional Integration of Adult-Born Hippocampal Neurons after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Villasana, Laura E.; Kim, Kristine N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases hippocampal neurogenesis, which may contribute to cognitive recovery after injury. However, it is unknown whether TBI-induced adult-born neurons mature normally and functionally integrate into the hippocampal network. We assessed the generation, morphology, and synaptic integration of new hippocampal neurons after a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury model of TBI. To label TBI-induced newborn neurons, we used 2-month-old POMC-EGFP mice, which transiently and specifically express EGFP in immature hippocampal neurons, and doublecortin-CreERT2 transgenic mice crossed with Rosa26-CAG-tdTomato reporter mice, to permanently pulse-label a cohort of adult-born hippocampal neurons. TBI increased the generation, outward migration, and dendritic complexity of neurons born during post-traumatic neurogenesis. Cells born after TBI had profound alterations in their dendritic structure, with increased dendritic branching proximal to the soma and widely splayed dendritic branches. These changes were apparent during early dendritic outgrowth and persisted as these cells matured. Whole-cell recordings from neurons generated during post-traumatic neurogenesis demonstrate that they are excitable and functionally integrate into the hippocampal circuit. However, despite their dramatic morphologic abnormalities, we found no differences in the rate of their electrophysiological maturation, or their overall degree of synaptic integration when compared to age-matched adult-born cells from sham mice. Our results suggest that cells born after TBI participate in information processing, and receive an apparently normal balance of excitatory and inhibitory inputs. However, TBI-induced changes in their anatomic localization and dendritic projection patterns could result in maladaptive network properties. PMID:26478908

  5. Ultrastructural study of hippocampal cortex neurons in an experimental model of valproate encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sendrowski, Krzysztof; Sobaniec, Wojciech; Sobaniec, Piotr; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria E

    2013-01-01

    Valproate (VPA) is a widely used antiepileptic drug. A serious neurological-outcome defined as valproate encephalopathy (VE) may rarely occur during VPA therapy. Structural abnormalities within neurons are postulated as one of the reasons for VE. The aim of this study was to assess the ultrastructure of neurons in the hippocampal cortex during the course of chronic application of VPA to rats. VPA was chronically administered to rats, intragastrically, once daily at a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w. for 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. The samples of hippocampal cortex, after routine laboratory preparation, were examined by electron microscopy. The drug induced pronounced ultrastructural changes in the population of pyramidal neurons within the hippocampal cortex after 9 and 12 months of VPA administration. The most expressed abnormalities were observed within the mitochondria and manifested by fragmentation of crests and almost complete disappearance of intramitochondrial granules. Mitochondria of numerous neurons resembled large vacuolar structures. Widening, shortening and irregular distribution of rough endoplasmic reticulum was also found. A characteristic feature of damaged neurocytes in the last two phases of the experiment was the disintegration of nuclear chromatin and the presence of numerous lipofuscin deposits within hyaloplasm. These cells assumed the look of "dark neurons" and presented the ultrastructural features of apoptosis and necrosis. Our results indicate that long-term VPA administration to rats leads to aponecrosis of hippocampal neurons.

  6. Positive modulation of AMPA receptors increases neurotrophin expression by hippocampal and cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Lauterborn, J C; Lynch, G; Vanderklish, P; Arai, A; Gall, C M

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated whether positive modulators of AMPA-type glutamate receptors influence neurotrophin expression by forebrain neurons. Treatments with the ampakine CX614 markedly and reversibly increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein levels in cultured rat entorhinal/hippocampal slices. Acute effects of CX614 were dose dependent over the range in which the drug increased synchronous neuronal discharges; threshold concentrations for acute responses had large effects on mRNA content when applied for 3 d. Comparable results were obtained with a second, structurally distinct ampakine CX546. Ampakine-induced upregulation was broadly suppressed by AMPA, but not NMDA, receptor antagonists and by reducing transmitter release. Antagonism of L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels blocked induction in entorhinal cortex but not hippocampus. Prolonged infusions of suprathreshold ampakine concentrations produced peak BDNF mRNA levels at 12 hr and a return to baseline levels by 48 hr. In contrast, BDNF protein remained elevated throughout a 48 hr incubation with the drug. Nerve growth factor mRNA levels also were increased by ampakines but with a much more rapid return to control levels during chronic administration. Finally, intraperitoneal injections of CX546 increased hippocampal BDNF mRNA levels in aged rats and middle-aged mice. The present results provide evidence of regional differences in mechanisms via which activity regulates neurotrophin expression. Moreover, these data establish that changes in synaptic potency produce sufficient network level physiological effects for inducing neurotrophin genes, indicate that the response becomes refractory during prolonged ampakine exposure, and raise the possibility of using positive AMPA modulators to regulate neurotrophin levels in aged brain.

  7. Active dendrites support efficient initiation of dendritic spikes in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sooyun; Guzman, Segundo J; Hu, Hua; Jonas, Peter

    2013-01-01

    CA3 pyramidal neurons are important for memory formation and pattern completion in the hippocampal network. It is generally thought that proximal synapses from the mossy fibers activate these neurons most efficiently, whereas distal inputs from the perforant path have a weaker modulatory influence. We used confocally targeted patch-clamp recording from dendrites and axons to map the activation of rat CA3 pyramidal neurons at the subcellular level. Our results reveal two distinct dendritic domains. In the proximal domain, action potentials initiated in the axon backpropagate actively with large amplitude and fast time course. In the distal domain, Na+ channel–mediated dendritic spikes are efficiently initiated by waveforms mimicking synaptic events. CA3 pyramidal neuron dendrites showed a high Na+-to-K+ conductance density ratio, providing ideal conditions for active backpropagation and dendritic spike initiation. Dendritic spikes may enhance the computational power of CA3 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal network. PMID:22388958

  8. Effect of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Haploinsufficiency on Stress-Induced Remodeling of Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Magariños, A.M.; Li, C.J.; Toth, J. Gal; Bath, K.G.; Jing, D.; Lee, F.S.; McEwen, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces the remodeling (i.e., retraction and simplification) of the apical dendrites of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in rats, suggesting that intrahippocampal connectivity can be affected by a prolonged stressful challenge. Since the structural maintenance of neuronal dendritic arborizations and synaptic connectivity requires neurotrophic support, we investigated the potential role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin enriched in the hippocampus and released from neurons in an activity-dependent manner, as a mediator of the stress-induced dendritic remodeling. The analysis of Golgi-impregnated hippocampal sections revealed that wild type (WT) C57BL/6 male mice showed a similar CA3 apical dendritic remodeling in response to three weeks of CRS to that previously described for rats. Haploinsufficient BDNF mice (BDNF±) did not show such remodeling, but, even without CRS, they presented shorter and simplified CA3 apical dendritic arbors, like those observed in stressed WT mice. Furthermore, unstressed BDNF± mice showed a significant decrease in total hippocampal volume. The dendritic arborization of CA1 pyramidal neurons was not affected by CRS or genotype. However, only in WT mice, CRS induced changes in the density of dendritic spine shape subtypes in both CA1 and CA3 apical dendrites. These results suggest a complex role of BDNF in maintaining the dendritic and spine morphology of hippocampal neurons and the associated volume of the hippocampal formation. The inability of CRS to modify the dendritic structure of CA3 pyramidal neurons in BDNF± mice suggests an indirect, perhaps permissive, role of BDNF in mediating hippocampal dendritic remodeling. PMID:20095008

  9. Effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor haploinsufficiency on stress-induced remodeling of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Magariños, A M; Li, C J; Gal Toth, J; Bath, K G; Jing, D; Lee, F S; McEwen, B S

    2011-03-01

    Chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces the remodeling (i.e., retraction and simplification) of the apical dendrites of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in rats, suggesting that intrahippocampal connectivity can be affected by a prolonged stressful challenge. Since the structural maintenance of neuronal dendritic arborizations and synaptic connectivity requires neurotrophic support, we investigated the potential role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin enriched in the hippocampus and released from neurons in an activity-dependent manner, as a mediator of the stress-induced dendritic remodeling. The analysis of Golgi-impregnated hippocampal sections revealed that wild type (WT) C57BL/6 male mice showed a similar CA3 apical dendritic remodeling in response to three weeks of CRS to that previously described for rats. Haploinsufficient BDNF mice (BDNF(±) ) did not show such remodeling, but, even without CRS, they presented shorter and simplified CA3 apical dendritic arbors, like those observed in stressed WT mice. Furthermore, unstressed BDNF(±) mice showed a significant decrease in total hippocampal volume. The dendritic arborization of CA1 pyramidal neurons was not affected by CRS or genotype. However, only in WT mice, CRS induced changes in the density of dendritic spine shape subtypes in both CA1 and CA3 apical dendrites. These results suggest a complex role of BDNF in maintaining the dendritic and spine morphology of hippocampal neurons and the associated volume of the hippocampal formation. The inability of CRS to modify the dendritic structure of CA3 pyramidal neurons in BDNF(±) mice suggests an indirect, perhaps permissive, role of BDNF in mediating hippocampal dendritic remodeling.

  10. The Analysis of Neurovascular Remodeling in Entorhino-hippocampal Organotypic Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Chip, Sophorn; Zhu, Xinzhou; Kapfhammer, Josef P.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic brain injury is among the most common and devastating conditions compromising proper brain function and often leads to persisting functional deficits in the affected patients. Despite intensive research efforts, there is still no effective treatment option available that reduces neuronal injury and protects neurons in the ischemic areas from delayed secondary death. Research in this area typically involves the use of elaborate and problematic animal models. Entorhino-hippocampal organotypic slice cultures challenged with oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) are established in vitro models which mimic cerebral ischemia. The novel aspect of this study is that changes of the brain blood vessels are studied in addition to neuronal changes and the reaction of both the neuronal compartment and the vascular compartment can be compared and correlated. The methods presented in this protocol substantially broaden the potential applications of the organotypic slice culture approach. The induction of OGD or hypoxia alone can be applied by rather simple means in organotypic slice cultures and leads to reliable and reproducible damage in the neural tissue. This is in stark contrast to the complicated and problematic animal experiments inducing stroke and ischemia in vivo. By broadening the analysis to include the study of the reaction of the vasculature could provide new ways on how to preserve and restore brain functions. The slice culture approach presented here might develop into an attractive and important tool for the study of ischemic brain injury and might be useful for testing potential therapeutic measures aimed at neuroprotection. PMID:25408363

  11. Pathological involvement of the motor neuron system and hippocampal formation in motor neuron disease-inclusion dementia.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Yasuko; Piao, Yue-Shan; Tan, Chun-Feng; Morita, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masaharu; Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Okamoto, Koichi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2003-07-01

    We report two patients with motor neuron disease-inclusion dementia, with special reference to the pathology of the motor neuron system and hippocampal formation. The ages of the patients at death were 55 and 62 years, and the disease durations were 8 and 3 years, respectively. The two patients exhibited progressive frontotemporal dementia in the absence of motor neuron signs. At autopsy, both cases exhibited frontotemporal lobar atrophy with ubiquitin-positive, and tau- and alpha-synuclein-negative neuronal inclusions. As expected from the clinical signs, in both cases, the upper and lower motor neuron systems were well preserved: no Bunina bodies or ubiquitinated inclusions were detected in the motor neurons. However, of great importance was that when visualized immunohistochemically, the Golgi apparatus and trans-Golgi network often exhibited fragmentation in the lower motor neurons (the spinal anterior horn cells). In one of the cases, a decrease in the amount of Golgi apparatus was also a frequent feature in the upper motor neurons (Betz cells in the motor cortex). Moreover, in both cases, circumscribed degeneration affecting the CA1-subiculum border zone was evident in the hippocampal formation. These findings further strengthen the idea that, pathologically, motor neuron disease-inclusion dementia is a rare phenotype of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  12. Hippocampal Neuron Number Is Unchanged 1 Year After Fractionated Whole-Brain Irradiation at Middle Age

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Lei Molina, Doris P.; Robbins, Michael E.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hippocampal neurons are lost 12 months after middle-aged rats received a fractionated course of whole-brain irradiation (WBI) that is expected to be biologically equivalent to the regimens used clinically in the treatment of brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Twelve-month-old Fischer 344 X Brown Norway male rats were divided into WBI and control (CON) groups (n = 6 per group). Anesthetized WBI rats received 45 Gy of {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays delivered as 9 5-Gy fractions twice per week for 4.5 weeks. Control rats were anesthetized but not irradiated. Twelve months after WBI completion, all rats were anesthetized and perfused with paraformaldehyde, and hippocampal sections were immunostained with the neuron-specific antibody NeuN. Using unbiased stereology, total neuron number and the volume of the neuronal and neuropil layers were determined in the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1 subregions of hippocampus. Results: No differences in tissue integrity or neuron distribution were observed between the WBI and CON groups. Moreover, quantitative analysis demonstrated that neither total neuron number nor the volume of neuronal or neuropil layers differed between the two groups for any subregion. Conclusions: Impairment on a hippocampal-dependent learning and memory test occurs 1 year after fractionated WBI at middle age. The same WBI regimen, however, does not lead to a loss of neurons or a reduction in the volume of hippocampus.

  13. Neurons on Parafilm: versatile elastic substrates for neuronal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang Jin; Nam, Yoonkey

    2012-02-15

    A variety of materials has been applied to neuronal cell culture substrates to improve the efficiency of the culture and to provide pertinent cell growth environment. Here we report the application of Parafilm(®) M ('Parafilm') as a novel substrate for neuronal culture and patterning. Cell culture results show that elastic Parafilm had effects on cell viability, length and number of neurites, and soma spreading. Parafilm was also an effective substrate to obtain patterned neuronal cultures using a conventional micro-contract printing (μCP) technique. Polylysine micropatterns in line or grid forms were readily transferred from PDMS stamp to bare Parafilm surfaces and spatially confined neuronal cultures were successfully maintained for over three weeks. We also demonstrate that batch-processing cell culture substrates can be easily fabricated using a piece of Parafilm. The softness, plasticity, and hydrophobicity were main features that made it attractive for Parafilm to be considered as a practical cell culture platform. The results can be extended to develop an inexpensive and practical neuronal culture substrates in tissue engineering and biochip applications.

  14. Differences in Ca2+ buffering properties between excitatory and inhibitory hippocampal neurons from the rat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suk-Ho; Rosenmund, Christian; Schwaller, Beat; Neher, Erwin

    2000-01-01

    Endogenous calcium binding ratios (κS) in dendrites of cultured hippocampal neurons were estimated according to the single compartment model for transients in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]). In addition, the electrophysiological characteristics of neurons were classified by their autaptic currents and intrinsic firing patterns. These data were analysed in order to determine whether a correlation between Ca2+ buffers and electrophysiological type exists. Ca2+ binding ratios of endogenous buffers were estimated by eliciting [Ca2+] transients with short depolarizations, while cells were loaded with fura-2. Two types of estimates could be obtained: one termed κS(τ), based on analysing time constants (τ) of [Ca2+] transients, and another termed κS(dCa), derived from an analysis of initial amplitudes of [Ca2+] transients. Values for κS(τ) and κS(dCa) were estimated as 57 ± 10 (mean ±s.d., n = 10) and 60 ± 14 (n = 10), respectively, in excitatory neurons, and 130 ± 50 (n = 11) and 150 ± 70 (n = 11), respectively, in inhibitory neurons. The κS values of excitatory and inhibitory cells were significantly different from each other, regardless of the measurement method (Student's t test, P < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference in κS between the groups classified according to firing patterns. Although κS(τ) values were well matched to those of κS(dCa) in most excitatory cells, the two values did not agree in three out of the fourteen inhibitory cells investigated. In these cells, the first few [Ca2+] transients after obtaining the whole cell configuration displayed a double exponential decay, suggesting that buffers with slow binding kinetics, such as parvalbumin, are involved. This hypothesis is further explored in an accompanying paper. PMID:10835043

  15. Differential effects of cannabis extracts and pure plant cannabinoids on hippocampal neurones and glia.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Duncan; Drysdale, Alison J; Pertwee, Roger G; Platt, Bettina

    2006-11-20

    We have shown previously that the plant cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) elevates intracellular calcium levels in both cultured hippocampal neurones and glia. Here, we investigated whether the main psychotropic constituent of cannabis, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) alone or in combination with other cannabis constituents can cause similar responses, and whether THC affects the responses induced by CBD. Our experiments were performed with 1 microM pure THC (pTHC), with 1 microM pure CBD (pCBD), with a high-THC, low CBD cannabis extract (eTHC), with a high-CBD, low THC cannabis extract (eCBD), with a mixture of eTHC and eCBD (THC:CBD=1:1) or with corresponding 'mock extracts' that contained only pTHC and pCBD mixed in the same proportion as in eTHC, eCBD or the 1:1 mixture of eTHC and eCBD. We detected significant differences in neurones both between the effects of pTHC and eTHC and between the effects of pCBD and eCBD. There were also differences between the Ca(2+) responses evoked in both neurones and glia by eTHC and mock eTHC, but not between eCBD and mock eCBD. A particularly striking observation was the much increased response size and maximal responder rates induced by the mixture of eTHC and eCBD than by the corresponding 1:1 mixture of pTHC and pCBD. Our data suggest that THC shares the ability of CBD to elevate Ca(2+) levels in neurones and glia, that THC and CBD interact synergistically and that the cannabis extracts have other constituents yet to be identified that can significantly modulate the ability of THC and CBD to raise Ca(2+) levels.

  16. Sub-chronic Antipsychotic Drug Administration Reverses the Expression of Neuregulin 1 and ErbB4 in a Cultured MK801-Induced Mouse Primary Hippocampal Neuron or a Neurodevelopmental Schizophrenia Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Cunyan; Tang, Yamei; Yang, Jingjing; Zhang, Xianghui; Liu, Yong; Tang, Aiguo

    2016-08-01

    It has been reported that specific environmental influences during the postpartum period might contribute to the development of schizophrenia (SZ). Administration of MK801 during early development led to persistent brain pathology. Glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD67) and parvalbumin (PV), and neuregulin 1 (NRG1)/ErbB4 signaling were closely associated with SZ pathology. We postulated therefore that NMDA receptor antagonists exposure during the postpartum period may be associated with expression dysregulation of some of the SZ candidate proteins. To test this, we used mouse primary hippocampal neurons and neonatal male mice treated with the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801 at postnatal day 4 (P4) or P7, followed by the treatments of antipsychotic drugs (i.e., olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol). The expressions of GAD67, PV, NRG1, and ErbB4 in in vitro and in vivo SZ models were detected with Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Behavioral tests (locomotion activity, social interaction, novel object recognition and prepulse inhibition) were measured. We found MK801 decreased the expression of GAD67, PV, NRG1 and ErbB4, and induced obvious behavioral alterations, while antipsychotics reversed these alterations. These results suggest that exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist in early development may lead to long-lasting influence on the expression of specific proteins, such as GAD67, PV, NRG1, and ErbB4. Moreover, our results suggest that rescue of the activation of the NRG1/ErbB4 signaling pathway may be one of the mechanisms by which antipsychotic drugs have an antipsychotic effect.

  17. Pharmacological characterization of the newly synthesized 5-amino-N-butyl-2-(4-ethoxyphenoxy)-benzamide hydrochloride (BED) as a potent NCX3 inhibitor that worsens anoxic injury in cortical neurons, organotypic hippocampal cultures, and ischemic brain.

    PubMed

    Secondo, Agnese; Pignataro, Giuseppe; Ambrosino, Paolo; Pannaccione, Anna; Molinaro, Pasquale; Boscia, Francesca; Cantile, Maria; Cuomo, Ornella; Esposito, Alba; Sisalli, Maria Josè; Scorziello, Antonella; Guida, Natascia; Anzilotti, Serenella; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Severino, Beatrice; Santagada, Vincenzo; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Di Renzo, Gianfranco; Annunziato, Lucio

    2015-08-19

    The Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), a 10-transmembrane domain protein mainly involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, plays a crucial role in cerebral ischemia. In the present paper, we characterized the effect of the newly synthesized compound 5-amino-N-butyl-2-(4-ethoxyphenoxy)-benzamide hydrochloride (BED) on the activity of the three NCX isoforms and on the evolution of cerebral ischemia. BED inhibited NCX isoform 3 (NCX3) activity (IC50 = 1.9 nM) recorded with the help of single-cell microflorimetry, (45)Ca(2+) radiotracer fluxes, and patch-clamp in whole-cell configuration. Furthermore, this drug displayed negligible effect on NCX2, the other isoform expressed within the CNS, and it failed to modulate the ubiquitously expressed NCX1 isoform. Concerning the molecular site of action, the use of chimera strategy and deletion mutagenesis showed that α1 and α2 repeats of NCX3 represented relevant molecular determinants for BED inhibitory action, whereas the intracellular regulatory f-loop was not involved. At 10 nM, BED worsened the damage induced by oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by reoxygenation in cortical neurons through a dysregulation of [Ca(2+)]i. Furthermore, at the same concentration, BED significantly enhanced cell death in CA3 subregion of hippocampal organotypic slices exposed to OGD and aggravated infarct injury after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. These results showed that the newly synthesized 5-amino-N-butyl-2-(4-ethoxyphenoxy)-benzamide hydrochloride is one of the most potent inhibitor of NCX3 so far identified, representing an useful tool to dissect the role played by NCX3 in the control of Ca(2+) homeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions.

  18. Study on dynamic characteristics' change of hippocampal neuron reduced models caused by the Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yueping; Wang, Jue; Zheng, Chongxun

    2016-01-01

    In the paper, based on the electrophysiological experimental data, the Hippocampal neuron reduced model under the pathology condition of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been built by modifying parameters' values. The reduced neuron model's dynamic characteristics under effect of AD are comparatively studied. Under direct current stimulation, compared with the normal neuron model, the AD neuron model's dynamic characteristics have obviously been changed. The neuron model under the AD condition undergoes supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation from the rest state to the continuous discharge state. It is different from the neuron model under the normal condition, which undergoes saddle-node bifurcation. So, the neuron model changes into a resonator with monostable state from an integrator with bistable state under AD's action. The research reveals the neuron model's dynamic characteristics' changing under effect of AD, and provides some theoretic basis for AD research by neurodynamics theory.

  19. Pharmacology meets vesicular trafficking at a central nervous system synapse: pregabalin effects on synaptic vesicle cycling in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Holz, Ronald W

    2006-08-01

    The contribution by Micheva et al. in this issue of Molecular Pharmacology adds to our understanding of the action of pregabalin, a drug used for treatment of partial seizures and neuropathic pain. The authors examine the effects of pregabalin on presynaptic function of cultured hippocampal neurons using a powerful technique to follow the trafficking of synaptic vesicles in individual boutons. The study revealed that pregabalin reduces the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles in an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-dependent manner.

  20. Blockade of NR2B-Containing NMDA Receptors Prevents BDNF Enhancement of Glutamatergic Transmission in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Crozier, Robert A.; Black, Ira B.; Plummer, Mark R.

    1999-01-01

    Application of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to hippocampal neurons has profound effects on glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Both pre- and postsynaptic actions have been identified that depend on the age and type of preparation. To understand the nature of this diversity, we have begun to examine the mechanisms of BDNF action in cultured dissociated embryonic hippocampal neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording during iontophoretic application of glutamate revealed that BDNF doubled the amplitude of induced inward current. Coexposure to BDNF and the NMDA receptor antagonist AP-5 markedly reduced, but did not entirely prevent, the increase in current. Coexposure to BDNF and ifenprodil, an NR2B subunit antagonist, reproduced the response observed with AP-5, suggesting BDNF primarily enhanced activity of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors with a lesser effect on non-NMDA receptors. Protein kinase involvement was confirmed with the broad spectrum inhibitor staurosporine, which prevented the response to BDNF. PKCI19-31 and H-89, selective antagonists of PKC and PKA, had no effect on the response to BDNF, whereas autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide, an antagonist of CaM kinase II, reduced response magnitude by 60%. These results demonstrate the predominant role of a specific NMDA receptor subtype in BDNF modulation of hippocampal synaptic transmission. PMID:10492007

  1. Photoperiod affects the diurnal rhythm of hippocampal neuronal morphology of Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Tomoko; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2013-11-01

    Individuals of many species can regulate their physiology, morphology, and behavior in response to annual changes of day length (photoperiod). In mammals, the photoperiodic signal is mediated by a change in the duration of melatonin, leading to alterations in gene expressions, neuronal circuits, and hormonal secretion. The hippocampus is one of the most plastic structures in the adult brain and hippocampal neuronal morphology displays photoperiod-induced differences. Because the hippocampus is important for emotional and cognitive behaviors, photoperiod-driven remodeling of hippocampal neurons is implicated in seasonal differences of affect, including seasonal affective disorder (SAD) in humans. Because neuronal architecture is also affected by the day-night cycle in several brain areas, we hypothesized that hippocampal neuronal morphology would display a diurnal rhythm and that day length would influence that rhythm. In the present study, we examined diurnal and seasonal differences in hippocampal neuronal morphology, as well as mRNA expression of the neurotrophic factors (i.e., brain-derived neurotrophic factor [Bdnf], tropomyosin receptor kinase B [trkB; a receptor for BDNF], and vascular endothelial growth factor [Vegf]) and a circadian clock gene, Bmal1, in the hippocampus of Siberian hamsters. Diurnal rhythms in total length of dendrites, the number of primary dendrites, dendritic complexity, and distance of the furthest intersection from the cell body were observed only in long-day animals; however, diurnal rhythms in the number of branch points and mean length of segments were observed only in short-day animals. Spine density of dendrites displayed diurnal rhythmicity with different peak times between the CA1 and DG subregions and between long and short days. These results indicate that photoperiod affects daily morphological changes of hippocampal neurons and the daily rhythm of spine density, suggesting the possibility that photoperiod-induced adjustments

  2. ATP P2X receptors downregulate AMPA receptor trafficking and postsynaptic efficacy in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Pougnet, Johan-Till; Toulme, Estelle; Martinez, Audrey; Choquet, Daniel; Hosy, Eric; Boué-Grabot, Eric

    2014-07-16

    P2X receptors (P2XRs) are ATP-gated cation channels widely expressed in the brain where they mediate action of extracellular ATP released by neurons or glia. Although purinergic signaling has multiple effects on synaptic transmission and plasticity, P2XR function at brain synapses remains to be established. Here, we show that activation of postsynaptic P2XRs by exogenous ATP or noradrenaline-dependent glial release of endogenous ATP decreases the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and AMPA-evoked currents in cultured hippocampal neurons. We also observed a P2X-mediated depression of field potentials recorded in CA1 region from brain slices. P2X2Rs trigger dynamin-dependent internalization of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), leading to reduced surface AMPARs in dendrites and at synapses. AMPAR alteration required calcium influx through opened ATP-gated channels and phosphatase or CamKII activities. These findings indicate that postsynaptic P2XRs play a critical role in regulating the surface expression of AMPARs and thereby regulate the synaptic strength.

  3. Inactivation of a high conductance calcium dependent potassium current in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    McLarnon, J G

    1995-06-23

    Inactivating, high conductance BK-type currents have been recorded from inside-out patches (internal and external K+ of 140 mM and 5 mM, respectively), obtained from cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The presence of prominent inactivation, not normally associated with BK channel activity, was dependent on two factors: a depolarizing step to 0 mV from a holding level of -80 mV and internal calcium at a concentration of 0.7 microM. Without the prior conditioning step to a negative potential, unitary currents were not evident at 0 mV; in addition, such currents were not elicited with the stimulus protocol if the internal Ca2+ was reduced to a level of 0.3 microM. Concomitant with current inactivation was the finding of a delayed activation of BK currents following the depolarizing step. Higher internal calcium, at 100 microM, led to persistent and sustained channel activity at 0 mV which was not dependent on a prior step to -80 mV. These results may be relevant to the complex nature of the repolarizing neuronal current Ic which is the macroscopic analogue of the unitary BK current.

  4. Protein fucosylation regulates synapsin Ia/Ib expression and neuronal morphology in primary hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Murrey, Heather E.; Gama, Cristal I.; Kalovidouris, Stacey A.; Luo, Wen.-I.; Driggers, Edward M.; Porton, Barbara; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C.

    2006-01-01

    Although fucose-α(1-2)-galactose [Fucα(1-2)Gal] carbohydrates have been implicated in cognitive processes such as long-term memory, the molecular mechanisms by which these sugars influence neuronal communication are not well understood. Here, we present molecular insights into the functions of Fucα(1-2)Gal sugars, demonstrating that they play a role in the regulation of synaptic proteins and neuronal morphology. We show that synapsins Ia and Ib, synapse-specific proteins involved in neurotransmitter release and synaptogenesis, are the major Fucα(1-2)Gal glycoproteins in mature cultured neurons and the adult rat hippocampus. Fucosylation has profound effects on the expression and turnover of synapsin in cells and protects synapsin from degradation by the calcium-activated protease calpain. Our studies suggest that defucosylation of synapsin has critical consequences for neuronal growth and morphology, leading to stunted neurite outgrowth and delayed synapse formation. We also demonstrate that Fucα(1-2)Gal carbohydrates are not limited to synapsin but are found on additional glycoproteins involved in modulating neuronal architecture. Together, our studies identify important roles for Fucα(1-2)Gal sugars in the regulation of neuronal proteins and morphological changes that may underlie synaptic plasticity. PMID:16373512

  5. Effects of inorganic lead on the differentiation and growth of cortical neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Kern, M; Audesirk, T; Audesirk, G

    1993-01-01

    Lead exposure has devastating effects on the developing nervous system, producing morphological, cognitive, and behavioral deficits. To elucidate some of the mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity, we have examined its effects on the differentiation of several types of cultured neurons. Previously, we reported the effects of inorganic lead on several parameters of growth and differentiation of E18 rat hippocampal neurons and two types of neuroblastoma cells cultured in medium with 2% fetal calf serum (FCS) (Audesirk et al., 1991). In the present study, we report the effects of concentrations of lead ranging from 1nM to 1 mM on the differentiation of hippocampal neurons cultured in medium containing 10% FCS. In addition, we investigated lead effects on neurons isolated from the motor cortex region of the E18 rat embryo. Cortical neurons were exposed to lead in concentrations ranging from 0.1 nM to 1 mM in medium with either 10% FCS or 2% FCS for 48 hr. The effects of lead tended to be multimodal. Neurite initiation, which is highly sensitive to neurotoxic compounds, was inhibited by lead at both high and low concentrations, with no effects at intermediate levels. Medium with 10% FCS enhanced certain growth parameters and tended to reduce the effects of lead. There was an overall consistency in the effects of lead on motor cortex and hippocampal neurons.

  6. Exercise preconditioning exhibits neuroprotective effects on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Shamsaei, Nabi; Khaksari, Mehdi; Erfani, Sohaila; Rajabi, Hamid; Aboutaleb, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested the neuroprotective effects of physical exercise on cerebral ischemic injury. However, the role of physical exercise in cerebral ischemia-induced hippocampal damage remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of pre-ischemia treadmill training on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia. Male adult rats were randomly divided into control, ischemia and exercise + ischemia groups. In the exercise + ischemia group, rats were subjected to running on a treadmill in a designated time schedule (5 days per week for 4 weeks). Then rats underwent cerebral ischemia induction through occlusion of common carotids followed by reperfusion. At 4 days after cerebral ischemia, rat learning and memory abilities were evaluated using passive avoidance memory test and rat hippocampal neuronal damage was detected using Nissl and TUNEL staining. Pre-ischemic exercise significantly reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells and necrotic cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region as compared to the ischemia group. Moreover, pre-ischemic exercise significantly prevented ischemia-induced memory dysfunction. Pre-ischemic exercise mighct prevent memory deficits after cerebral ischemia through rescuing hippocampal CA1 neurons from ischemia-induced degeneration. PMID:26487851

  7. Neuronal implementation of hippocampal-mediated spatial behavior: a comparative evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Bingman, Verner P; Sharp, Patricia E

    2006-06-01

    The hippocampal formation (HF) of mammals and birds plays a strikingly similar role in the representation of space. This evolutionarily conserved property, however, belies the contrasting spatial ecology of animals such as rats and homing pigeons, differing spatial ecologies that should have promoted the evolution of group-specific adaptations to the HF representation of space. However, the spatial response properties of pigeon and rat HF neurons reveal surprising similarity in the contribution of position, direction, and trajectory toward explaining spatial variation in firing rate. By contrast, the asymmetrical distribution of neuronal response properties in the left and right HF of homing pigeons, but not rats, indicates a difference in network organization. The authors propose that hippocampal evolution may be characterized by inertia with respect to changes in the basic spatial elements that determine the response properties of neurons but considerable plasticity in how the neuronal response elements are organized into functional networks.

  8. New neurons and new memories: how does adult hippocampal neurogenesis affect learning and memory?

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Aimone, James B.; Gage, Fred H.

    2010-01-01

    The integration of adult-born neurons into the circuitry of the adult hippocampus suggests an important role for adult hippocampal neurogenesis in learning and memory, but its specific function in these processes has remained elusive. In this article, we summarize recent progress in this area, including advances based on behavioural studies and insights provided by computational modelling. Increasingly, evidence suggests that newborn neurons might be involved in hippocampal functions that are particularly dependent on the dentate gyrus, such as pattern separation. Furthermore, newborn neurons at different maturation stages may make distinct contributions to learning and memory. In particular, computational studies suggest that, before newborn neurons are fully mature, they might function as a pattern integrator by introducing a degree of similarity to the encoding of events that occur closely in time. PMID:20354534

  9. PRIMARY CULTURES OF DISSOCIATED SYMPATHETIC NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Mains, Richard E.; Patterson, Paul H.

    1973-01-01

    Rat sympathetic ganglia were disrupted by mechanical agitation to yield dissociated primary neurons, and the conditions for long-term growth in culture of the isolated neurons were examined. The neurons were grown with or without non-neural cells, simply by the addition or deletion of bicarbonate during growth in culture. Fluorescence histochemistry indicated that the isolated neurons contained catecholamines; incubations with radioactive precursors were used to verify the synthesis and accumulation of both dopamine and norepinephrine. The neurons also produced octopamine using tyramine as precursor, but not with tyrosine as the precursor. In the presence of eserine, older cultures synthesized and stored small amounts of acetylcholine. The cultures did not synthesize and accumulate detectable levels of radioactive γ-aminobutyric acid, 5-hydroxytryptamine, or histamine. PMID:4616046

  10. Bilaminar Co-culture of Primary Rat Cortical Neurons and Glia

    PubMed Central

    Meucci, Olimpia

    2011-01-01

    extend processes. A detailed protocol of culturing rat hippocampal neurons using this co-culture system has been described previously4,12,13. Here we detail a modified protocol suited for cortical neurons. As approximately 20x106 cells are recovered from each rat embryo, this method is particularly useful for experiments requiring large numbers of neurons (but not concerned about a highly homogenous neuronal population). The preparation of neurons and glia needs to be planned in a time-specific manner. We will provide the step-by-step protocol for culturing rat cortical neurons as well as culturing glial cells to support the neurons. PMID:22105098

  11. The magnitude of alpha7 nicotinic receptor currents in rat hippocampal neurons is dependent upon GABAergic activity and depolarization.

    PubMed

    Santos, Hélio R; Ribeiro, Helizane S; Setti-Perdigão, Pedro; Albuquerque, Edson X; Castro, Newton G

    2006-10-01

    Hippocampal alpha7(*) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors modulate the release of GABA and glutamate. The control of functional receptor pools by cell firing or synaptic activity could therefore allow for a local adjustment of the sensitivity to cholinergic input upon changes in neuronal activity. We first investigated whether tonic depolarization or cell firing affected the function of alpha7(*). The amplitude of alpha7(*)-gated whole-cell currents in cultured rat hippocampal neurons exposed to high-extracellular K(+) (40 mM KCl) for 24 to 48 h increased 1.3 to 5.5 times. The proportion of alpha7(*)-responsive neurons (99%), the potency of acetylcholine, and the sensitivity to nicotinic antagonists were all unaffected. In contrast, block of spontaneous cell firing with tetrodotoxin for 24 h led to a 37% reduction in mean current amplitude. Reduced alpha7(*) responses were seen after a 24-h blockade of N-type calcium channels but not of L-type calcium channels, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), or non-NMDA receptor channels, protein kinase C, or calcium-calmodulin kinases II and IV. The N-type or L-type calcium channel antagonists omega-conotoxin GVIA and nifedipine did not prevent the current-potentiating effect of KCl. The GABA(A) antagonist picrotoxin led to a 44% reduction of the currents, despite increasing action potential firing, and also reversed the potentiating effect of KCl. Treatment with GABA, midazolam, or a GABA uptake blocker led to increased currents. These data indicate that alpha7(*)-gated currents in hippocampal neurons are regulated by GABAergic activity and suggest that depolarization-induced GABA release may underlie the effect of increased extracellular KCl.

  12. The Role of Chloride Transport in Postsynaptic Inhibition of Hippocampal Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misgeld, U.; Deisz, R. A.; Dodt, H. U.; Lux, H. D.

    1986-06-01

    Hippocampal inhibitory postsynaptic potentials are depolarizing in granule cells but hyperpolarizing in CA3 neurons because the reversal potentials and membrane potentials of these cells differ. Here the hippocampal slice preparation was used to investigate the role of chloride transport in these inhibitory responses. In both cell types, increasing the intracellular chloride concentration by injection shifted the reversal potential of these responses in a positive direction, and blocking the outward transport of chloride with furosemide slowed their recovery from the injection. In addition, hyperpolarizing and depolarizing inhibitory responses and the hyperpolarizing and depolarizing responses to the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ - aminobutyric acid decreased in the presence of furosemide. These effects of furosemide suggest that the internal chloride activity of an individual hippocampal neuron is regulated by two transport processes, one that accumulates chloride and one that extrudes chloride.

  13. Metabolic syndrome causes rec ognition memory impairments and reduced the hippocampal neuronal plasticity in rats.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Samuel; Vázquez-Roque, Rubén A; López-López, Gustavo; Perez-Cruz, Claudia; Moran, Carolina; Handal-Silva, Anhabella; González-Vergara, Enrique; Flores, Gonzalo; Guevara, Jorge; Díaz, Alfonso

    2017-02-17

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a serious public health problem, which can promote neuronal alterations in cognitive regions related to memory processes and learning, such as the hippocampus. However, up to now there is no information of a regional segregation of this damage. In this study, we evaluate the MS effect on the neuronal morphology of the hippocampus by a regional segregation approach. Our results demonstrate that 90days of a high-calorie diet altered metabolic energy markers and caused memory impairments, as evaluated by the recognition of novel objects test (NORT). In addition, MS animals showed significant differences in dendritic order, total dendritic length and density of dendritic spines in CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampal area compared to control fed rats. Furthermore, the immunoreactivity to synaptophysin (Syp) decreased in the hippocampus of MS animals compared to controls. These results indicate that metabolic alterations induced by MS affect hippocampal plasticity and hippocampal dependent memory processes.

  14. Human hippocampal neurons predict how well word pairs will be remembered.

    PubMed

    Cameron, K A; Yashar, S; Wilson, C L; Fried, I

    2001-04-01

    What is the neuronal basis for whether an experience is recalled or forgotten? In contrast to recognition, recall is difficult to study in nonhuman primates and rarely is accessible at the single neuron level in humans. We recorded 128 medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurons in patients implanted with intracranial microelectrodes while they encoded and recalled word paired associates. Neurons in the amygdala, entorhinal cortex, and hippocampus showed altered activity during encoding (9%), recall (22%), and both task phases (23%). The responses of hippocampal neurons during encoding predicted whether or not subjects later remembered the pairs successfully. Entorhinal cortex neuronal activity during retrieval was correlated with recall success. These data provide support at the single neuron level for MTL contributions to encoding and retrieval, while also suggesting there may be differences in the level of contribution of MTL regions to these memory processes.

  15. Somatodendritic and excitatory postsynaptic distribution of neuron-type dystrophin isoform, Dp40, in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2014-09-12

    The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produces multiple dystrophin (Dp) products due to the presence of several promoters. We previously reported the existence of a novel short isoform of Dp, Dp40, in adult mouse brain. However, the exact biochemical expression profile and cytological distribution of the Dp40 protein remain unknown. In this study, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the NH2-terminal region of the Dp40 and identified the expression profile of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Through an analysis using embryonic and postnatal mouse cerebrums, we found that Dp40 emerged from the early neonatal stages until adulthood, whereas Dp71, an another Dp short isoform, was highly detected in both prenatal and postnatal cerebrums. Intriguingly, relative expressions of Dp40 and Dp71 were prominent in cultured dissociated neurons and non-neuronal cells derived from mouse hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore, the immunocytological distribution of Dp40 was analyzed in dissociated cultured neurons, revealing that Dp40 is detected in the soma and its dendrites, but not in the axon. It is worthy to note that Dp40 is localized along the subplasmalemmal region of the dendritic shafts, as well as at excitatory postsynaptic sites. Thus, Dp40 was identified as a neuron-type Dp possibly involving dendritic and synaptic functions.

  16. A Mechanism for the Formation of Hippocampal Neuronal Firing Patterns that Represent What Happens Where

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tort, Adriano B. L.; Komorowski, Robert; Kopell, Nancy; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2011-01-01

    The association of specific events with the context in which they occur is a fundamental feature of episodic memory. However, the underlying network mechanisms generating what-where associations are poorly understood. Recently we reported that some hippocampal principal neurons develop representations of specific events occurring in particular…

  17. Modulation of Hippocampal Theta Oscillations and Spatial Memory by Relaxin-3 Neurons of the Nucleus Incertus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Sherie; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E.; Hossain, M. Akhter; Lin, Feng; Kuei, Chester; Liu, Changlu; Wade, John D.; Sutton, Steven W.; Nunez, Angel; Gundlach, Andrew L.

    2009-01-01

    Hippocampal theta rhythm is thought to underlie learning and memory, and it is well established that "pacemaker" neurons in medial septum (MS) modulate theta activity. Recent studies in the rat demonstrated that brainstem-generated theta rhythm occurs through a multisynaptic pathway via the nucleus incertus (NI), which is the primary source of the…

  18. Entorhinal-Hippocampal Neuronal Circuits Bridge Temporally Discontiguous Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitamura, Takashi; Macdonald, Christopher J.; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex (EC)-hippocampal (HPC) network plays an essential role for episodic memory, which preserves spatial and temporal information about the occurrence of past events. Although there has been significant progress toward understanding the neural circuits underlying the spatial dimension of episodic memory, the relevant circuits…

  19. Characterization of NADPH Diaphorase- and Doublecortin-Positive Neurons in the Lizard Hippocampal Formation.

    PubMed

    Macedo-Lima, Matheus; Freire, Marco Aurélio M; de Carvalho Pimentel, Hugo; Rodrigues Ferreira Lins, Lívia Cristina; Amador de Lucena Medeiros, Katty Anne; Viola, Giordano Gubert; Dos Santos, José Ronaldo; Marchioro, Murilo

    2016-01-01

    The lizard cortex has remarkable similarities with the mammalian hippocampus. Both regions process memories, have similar cytoarchitectural properties, and are important neurogenic foci in adults. Lizards show striking levels of widespread neurogenesis in adulthood and can regenerate entire cortical areas after injury. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulatory factor of mammalian neurogenesis and hippocampal function. However, little is known about its role in nonmammalian neurogenesis. Here, we analyzed the distribution, morphology, and dendritic complexity (Neurolucida reconstructions) of NO-producing neurons through NADPH diaphorase (NADPHd) activity, and how they compare with the distribution of doublecortin-positive (DCX+) neurons in the hippocampal formation of the neotropical lizard Tropidurus hispidus. NADPHd-positive (NADPHd+) neurons in the dorsomedial cortex (DMC; putatively homologous to mammalian CA3) were more numerous and complex than the ones in the medial cortex (MC; putatively homologous to the dentate gyrus). We found that NADPHd+ DMC neurons send long projections into the MC. Interestingly, in the MC, NADPHd+ neurons existed in 2 patterns: small somata with low intensity of staining in the outer layer and large somata with high intensity of staining in the deep layer, a pattern similar to the mammalian cortex. Additionally, NADPHd+ neurons were absent in the granular cell layer of the MC. In contrast, DCX+ neurons were scarce in the DMC but highly numerous in the MC, particularly in the granular cell layer. We hypothesize that NO-producing neurons in the DMC provide important input to proliferating/migrating neurons in the highly neurogenic MC.

  20. GnRH analogue attenuated apoptosis of rat hippocampal neuron after ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chenyu; Xu, Bainan; Huang, Weiquan

    2010-12-01

    The expression and new functions of reproductive hormones in organs beyond hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis have been reported. So far, there is no report about the protective effects of GnRH analogue to hippocampal neurons suffering from ischemia-reperfusion injury. Middle cerebral artery occlusion model together with TUNEL staining were made in vivo and oxygen-glucose deprivation model together with double staining of Annexin V/PI with flow cytometer were made in vitro to observe the anti-apoptotic effects of GnRH analogue to hippocampal neurons after ischemia-reperfusion injury. The results found that the number of TUNEL positive pyramidal neurons in CA1 region in GnRH analogue experiment group was less than that in control group in vivo; the percentage of apoptotic neurons in GnRH analogue experiment group was less than that in control group in vitro. These findings suggested that pretreatment with certain concentration of GnRH analogue could attenuate apoptosis of hippocampal neurons. GnRH analogue has the protective effects to neurons.

  1. Trim9 Deletion Alters the Morphogenesis of Developing and Adult-Born Hippocampal Neurons and Impairs Spatial Learning and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Winkle, Cortney C.; Olsen, Reid H. J.; Kim, Hyojin; Moy, Sheryl S.

    2016-01-01

    During hippocampal development, newly born neurons migrate to appropriate destinations, extend axons, and ramify dendritic arbors to establish functional circuitry. These developmental stages are recapitulated in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus, where neurons are continuously generated and subsequently incorporate into existing, local circuitry. Here we demonstrate that the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM9 regulates these developmental stages in embryonic and adult-born mouse hippocampal neurons in vitro and in vivo. Embryonic hippocampal and adult-born dentate granule neurons lacking Trim9 exhibit several morphological defects, including excessive dendritic arborization. Although gross anatomy of the hippocampus was not detectably altered by Trim9 deletion, a significant number of Trim9−/− adult-born dentate neurons localized inappropriately. These morphological and localization defects of hippocampal neurons in Trim9−/− mice were associated with extreme deficits in spatial learning and memory, suggesting that TRIM9-directed neuronal morphogenesis may be involved in hippocampal-dependent behaviors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Appropriate generation and incorporation of adult-born neurons in the dentate gyrus are critical for spatial learning and memory and other hippocampal functions. Here we identify the brain-enriched E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM9 as a novel regulator of embryonic and adult hippocampal neuron shape acquisition and hippocampal-dependent behaviors. Genetic deletion of Trim9 elevated dendritic arborization of hippocampal neurons in vitro and in vivo. Adult-born dentate granule cells lacking Trim9 similarly exhibited excessive dendritic arborization and mislocalization of cell bodies in vivo. These cellular defects were associated with severe deficits in spatial learning and memory. PMID:27147649

  2. Casein Kinase 1 Suppresses Activation of REST in Insulted Hippocampal Neurons and Halts Ischemia-Induced Neuronal Death

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Naoki; Hwang, Jee-Yeon; Gertner, Michael; Pontarelli, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Repressor Element-1 (RE1) Silencing Transcription Factor/Neuron-Restrictive Silencer Factor (REST/NRSF) is a gene-silencing factor that is widely expressed during embryogenesis and plays a strategic role in neuronal differentiation. Recent studies indicate that REST can be activated in differentiated neurons during a critical window of time in postnatal development and in adult neurons in response to neuronal insults such as seizures and ischemia. However, the mechanism by which REST is regulated in neurons is as yet unknown. Here, we show that REST is controlled at the level of protein stability via β-TrCP-dependent, ubiquitin-based proteasomal degradation in differentiated neurons under physiological conditions and identify Casein Kinase 1 (CK1) as an upstream effector that bidirectionally regulates REST cellular abundance. CK1 associates with and phosphorylates REST at two neighboring, but distinct, motifs within the C terminus of REST critical for binding of β-TrCP and targeting of REST for proteasomal degradation. We further show that global ischemia in rats in vivo triggers a decrease in CK1 and an increase in REST in selectively vulnerable hippocampal CA1 neurons. Administration of the CK1 activator pyrvinium pamoate by in vivo injection immediately after ischemia restores CK1 activity, suppresses REST expression, and rescues neurons destined to die. Our results identify a novel and previously unappreciated role for CK1 as a brake on REST stability and abundance in adult neurons and reveal that loss of CK1 is causally related to ischemia-induced neuronal death. These findings point to CK1 as a potential therapeutic target for the amelioration of hippocampal injury and cognitive deficits associated with global ischemia. PMID:24760862

  3. Differentiation of apical and basal dendrites in pyramidal cells and granule cells in dissociated hippocampal cultures.

    PubMed

    Wu, You Kure; Fujishima, Kazuto; Kengaku, Mineko

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal cells and dentate granule cells develop morphologically distinct dendritic arbors, yet also share some common features. Both cell types form a long apical dendrite which extends from the apex of the cell soma, while short basal dendrites are developed only in pyramidal cells. Using quantitative morphometric analyses of mouse hippocampal cultures, we evaluated the differences in dendritic arborization patterns between pyramidal and granule cells. Furthermore, we observed and described the final apical dendrite determination during dendritic polarization by time-lapse imaging. Pyramidal and granule cells in culture exhibited similar dendritic patterns with a single principal dendrite and several minor dendrites so that the cell types were not readily distinguished by appearance. While basal dendrites in granule cells are normally degraded by adulthood in vivo, cultured granule cells retained their minor dendrites. Asymmetric growth of a single principal dendrite harboring the Golgi was observed in both cell types soon after the onset of dendritic growth. Time-lapse imaging revealed that up until the second week in culture, final principal dendrite designation was not stabilized, but was frequently replaced by other minor dendrites. Before dendritic polarity was stabilized, the Golgi moved dynamically within the soma and was repeatedly repositioned at newly emerging principal dendrites. Our results suggest that polarized growth of the apical dendrite is regulated by cell intrinsic programs, while regression of basal dendrites requires cue(s) from the extracellular environment in the dentate gyrus. The apical dendrite designation is determined from among multiple growing dendrites of young developing neurons.

  4. Progressive neuronal activation accompanies epileptogenesis caused by hippocampal glutamine synthetase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Albright, Benjamin; Dhaher, Roni; Wang, Helen; Harb, Roa; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Zaveri, Hitten; Eid, Tore

    2017-02-01

    Loss of glutamine synthetase (GS) in hippocampal astrocytes has been implicated in the causation of human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). However, the mechanism by which the deficiency in GS leads to epilepsy is incompletely understood. Here we ask how hippocampal GS inhibition affects seizure phenotype and neuronal activation during epilepsy development (epileptogenesis). Epileptogenesis was induced by infusing the irreversible GS blocker methionine sulfoximine (MSO) unilaterally into the hippocampal formation of rats. We then used continuous video-intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring and c-Fos immunohistochemistry to determine the type of seizures and spatial distribution of neuronal activation early (1-5days postinfusion) and late (16-43days postinfusion) in epileptogenesis. Early in epileptogenesis, seizures were preferentially mild (stage 1-2), activating neurons in the entorhinal-hippocampal area, the basolateral amygdala, the piriform cortex, the midline thalamus, and the anterior olfactory area. Late in epileptogenesis, the seizures were generally more severe (stages 4-5) with neuronal activation extending to the neocortex, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the mediodorsal thalamu\\s, and the central nucleus of the amygdala. Our findings demonstrate that inhibition of GS focally in the hippocampal formation triggers a process of epileptogenesis characterized by gradual worsening of seizure severity and involvement of progressively larger neuronal populations over a period of several weeks. Knowledge about the underlying mechanism of epileptogenesis is important because such knowledge may result in more specific and efficacious treatments of MTLE by moving away from large and poorly specific surgical resections to highly targeted surgical or pharmacological interventions of the epileptogenic process.

  5. A study of epileptogenic network structures in rat hippocampal cultures using first spike latencies during synchronization events.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Mohan; Amrutur, Bharadwaj; Srinivas, Kalyan V; Sikdar, Sujit K

    2012-10-01

    Study of hypersynchronous activity is of prime importance for combating epilepsy. Studies on network structure typically reconstruct the network by measuring various aspects of the interaction between neurons and subsequently measure the properties of the reconstructed network. In sub-sampled networks such methods lead to significant errors in reconstruction. Using rat hippocampal neurons cultured on a multi-electrode array dish and a glutamate injury model of epilepsy in vitro, we studied synchronous activity in neuronal networks. Using the first spike latencies in various neurons during a network burst, we extract various recurring spatio-temporal onset patterns in the networks. Comparing the patterns seen in control and injured networks, we observe that injured networks express a wide diversity in their foci (origin) and activation pattern, while control networks show limited diversity. Furthermore, we note that onset patterns in glutamate injured networks show a positive correlation between synchronization delay and physical distance between neurons, while control networks do not.

  6. Somatodendritic and excitatory postsynaptic distribution of neuron-type dystrophin isoform, Dp40, in hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • Identification of dystrophin (Dp) shortest isoform, Dp40, is a neuron-type Dp. • Dp40 expression is temporally and differentially regulated in comparison to Dp71. • Somatodendritic and nuclear localization of Dp40. • Dp40 is localized to excitatory postsynapses. • Dp40 might play roles in dendritic and synaptic functions. - Abstract: The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produces multiple dystrophin (Dp) products due to the presence of several promoters. We previously reported the existence of a novel short isoform of Dp, Dp40, in adult mouse brain. However, the exact biochemical expression profile and cytological distribution of the Dp40 protein remain unknown. In this study, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the NH{sub 2}-terminal region of the Dp40 and identified the expression profile of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Through an analysis using embryonic and postnatal mouse cerebrums, we found that Dp40 emerged from the early neonatal stages until adulthood, whereas Dp71, an another Dp short isoform, was highly detected in both prenatal and postnatal cerebrums. Intriguingly, relative expressions of Dp40 and Dp71 were prominent in cultured dissociated neurons and non-neuronal cells derived from mouse hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore, the immunocytological distribution of Dp40 was analyzed in dissociated cultured neurons, revealing that Dp40 is detected in the soma and its dendrites, but not in the axon. It is worthy to note that Dp40 is localized along the subplasmalemmal region of the dendritic shafts, as well as at excitatory postsynaptic sites. Thus, Dp40 was identified as a neuron-type Dp possibly involving dendritic and synaptic functions.

  7. Cell cycle markers have different expression and localization patterns in neuron-like PC12 cells and primary hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Negis, Yesim; Unal, Aysegul Yildiz; Korulu, Sirin; Karabay, Arzu

    2011-06-01

    Neuron-like PC12 cells are extensively used in place of neurons in published studies. Aim of this paper has been to compare mRNA and protein expressions of cell cycle markers; cyclinA, B, D, E; Cdk1, 2 and 4; and p27 in post-mitotic primary hippocampal neurons, mitotically active PC12 cells and NGF-differentiated post-mitotic PC12 cells. Contrary to PC12 cells, in neurons, the presence of all these markers was detected only at mRNA level; except for cyclinA, cyclinE and Cdk4, which were detectable also at protein levels. In both NGF-treated PC12 cells and neurons, cyclinE was localized only in the nucleus. In NGF-treated PC12 cells cyclinD and Cdk4 were localized in the nucleus while, in neurons cyclinD expression was not detectable; Cdk4 was localized in the cytoplasm. In neurons, cyclinA was nuclear, whereas in NGF-treated PC12 cells, it was localized in the cell body and along the processes. These results suggest that PC12 cells and primary neurons are different in terms of cell cycle protein expressions and localizations. Thus, it may not be very appropriate to use these cells as neuronal model system in order to understand neuronal physiological activities, upstream of where may lie cell cycle activation triggered events.

  8. Serotonergic neuron diversity: Identification of raphe neurons with discharges time-locked to the hippocampal theta rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Kocsis, Bernat; Varga, Viktor; Dahan, Lionel; Sik, Attila

    2006-01-01

    The serotonergic system plays a key role in the regulation of brain states, and many of the known features of serotonergic neurons appear to match this function. Midbrain raphe nuclei provide a diffuse projection to all regions of the forebrain, and raphe neurons exhibit a slow metronome-like activity that sets the ambient levels of serotonin across the sleep–wake cycle. Serotonergic cells have also been implicated, however, in a variety of more specific functions that can hardly be related to their low-rate monotonous patterns of discharges. The amazing variety of serotonergic receptors and their type-specific distribution on cortical neurons also raise the possibility of a more intimate coordination between the activity of serotonergic neurons and their target cortical circuits. Here we report an unexpected diversity in the behavior of immunohistochemically identified serotonergic neurons. Two outstanding subpopulations were identified by using the in vivo juxtacellular recording and labeling technique. The first subpopulation of serotonergic cells exhibited the classic clock-like activity with no apparent short timescale interaction with the hippocampal electroencephalogram. The other subpopulation discharged action potentials that were phase-locked to the hippocampal theta rhythm, the oscillatory pattern associated with acquisition of information and memory formation. These results indicate that the ascending serotonergic system comprises cells involved in complex information processing beyond the regulation of state transitions. The heterogeneity of serotonergic neuron behavior can also help to explain the complexity of symptoms associated with serotonergic dysfunction. PMID:16418294

  9. Serotonergic neuron diversity: identification of raphe neurons with discharges time-locked to the hippocampal theta rhythm.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Bernat; Varga, Viktor; Dahan, Lionel; Sik, Attila

    2006-01-24

    The serotonergic system plays a key role in the regulation of brain states, and many of the known features of serotonergic neurons appear to match this function. Midbrain raphe nuclei provide a diffuse projection to all regions of the forebrain, and raphe neurons exhibit a slow metronome-like activity that sets the ambient levels of serotonin across the sleep-wake cycle. Serotonergic cells have also been implicated, however, in a variety of more specific functions that can hardly be related to their low-rate monotonous patterns of discharges. The amazing variety of serotonergic receptors and their type-specific distribution on cortical neurons also raise the possibility of a more intimate coordination between the activity of serotonergic neurons and their target cortical circuits. Here we report an unexpected diversity in the behavior of immunohistochemically identified serotonergic neurons. Two outstanding subpopulations were identified by using the in vivo juxtacellular recording and labeling technique. The first subpopulation of serotonergic cells exhibited the classic clock-like activity with no apparent short timescale interaction with the hippocampal electroencephalogram. The other subpopulation discharged action potentials that were phase-locked to the hippocampal theta rhythm, the oscillatory pattern associated with acquisition of information and memory formation. These results indicate that the ascending serotonergic system comprises cells involved in complex information processing beyond the regulation of state transitions. The heterogeneity of serotonergic neuron behavior can also help to explain the complexity of symptoms associated with serotonergic dysfunction.

  10. Developmental Changes in Hippocampal CA1 Single Neuron Firing and Theta Activity during Associative Learning

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jangjin; Goldsberry, Mary E.; Harmon, Thomas C.; Freeman, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal development is thought to play a crucial role in the emergence of many forms of learning and memory, but ontogenetic changes in hippocampal activity during learning have not been examined thoroughly. We examined the ontogeny of hippocampal function by recording theta and single neuron activity from the dorsal hippocampal CA1 area while rat pups were trained in associative learning. Three different age groups [postnatal days (P)17-19, P21-23, and P24-26] were trained over six sessions using a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) and a periorbital stimulation unconditioned stimulus (US). Learning increased as a function of age, with the P21-23 and P24-26 groups learning faster than the P17-19 group. Age- and learning-related changes in both theta and single neuron activity were observed. CA1 pyramidal cells in the older age groups showed greater task-related activity than the P17-19 group during CS-US paired sessions. The proportion of trials with a significant theta (4–10 Hz) power change, the theta/delta ratio, and theta peak frequency also increased in an age-dependent manner. Finally, spike/theta phase-locking during the CS showed an age-related increase. The findings indicate substantial developmental changes in dorsal hippocampal function that may play a role in the ontogeny of learning and memory. PMID:27764172

  11. Mapping the location of functional nicotinic and gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptors on hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Alkondon, M; Pereira, E F; Albuquerque, E X

    1996-12-01

    To assess the density and distribution of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors on hippocampal neurons, we have combined infrared videomicroscopy with a nanorobotic micromanipulator system and studied the receptor-mediated currents by using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Acetylcholine or GABA was applied by pressure ejection onto a small segment of either cell soma or dendrite, and the resulting current was measured in cultured hippocampal neurons by using a whole-cell pipette positioned at the cell soma. Type IA nicotinic currents, sensitive to blockade by methyllycaconitine (1 nM) and alpha-bungarotoxin and associated with alpha 7-subunit-containing nAChRs, type II currents, sensitive to blockade by dihydro-beta-erythroidine (100 nM) subserved by alpha 4 beta 2 nAChRs, and GABA-mediated currents were evoked when the agonists were applied to either cell soma or the dendrites. Analysis of the current amplitude with respect to the membrane area covered by the applied agonist provided an estimation of the receptor density along the somato-dendritic axis of the hippocampal neurons. Such analysis revealed: 1) a nonuniform distribution for the receptor types studied; 2) a higher density of nAChR and GABA receptors at the dendrites than at the soma; and 3) an increasing density for both nAChR subtypes with distance from the center of the cell soma, but increasing and then decreasing density for the GABA receptor. Exposure of cultured hippocampal neurons to colchicine (100 nM for 3 days) produced a dramatic reduction in the dendritic branching, and this morphological feature was associated with a significant decrease in the receptor density, such an effect being more prominent for nAChRs than for GABA receptors. Given the high Ca+2 permeability of nAChRs, the dendritic localization of nAChRs suggest that they are involved in modulating the synaptic efficacy at the level of the dendrites.

  12. Leptin regulation of neuronal morphology and hippocampal synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Jenni

    2013-01-01

    The central actions of the hormone leptin in regulating energy homeostasis via the hypothalamus are well documented. However, evidence is growing that this hormone can also modify the structure and function of synapses throughout the CNS. The hippocampus is a region of the forebrain that plays a crucial role in associative learning and memory and is an area also highly vulnerable to neurodegenerative processes. Recent studies indicate that leptin is a potential cognitive enhancer as it modulates the cellular processes underlying hippocampal-dependent learning and memory including dendritic morphology, glutamate receptor trafficking and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Here, we review the recent evidence implicating the hormone leptin as a key regulator of hippocampal synaptic function and discuss the role of leptin receptor-driven lipid signaling pathways involved in this process. PMID:23964236

  13. Transient oxytocin signaling primes the development and function of excitatory hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ripamonti, Silvia; Ambrozkiewicz, Mateusz C; Guzzi, Francesca; Gravati, Marta; Biella, Gerardo; Bormuth, Ingo; Hammer, Matthieu; Tuffy, Liam P; Sigler, Albrecht; Kawabe, Hiroshi; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Toselli, Mauro; Brose, Nils; Parenti, Marco; Rhee, JeongSeop

    2017-01-01

    Beyond its role in parturition and lactation, oxytocin influences higher brain processes that control social behavior of mammals, and perturbed oxytocin signaling has been linked to the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders. However, it is still largely unknown how oxytocin exactly regulates neuronal function. We show that early, transient oxytocin exposure in vitro inhibits the development of hippocampal glutamatergic neurons, leading to reduced dendrite complexity, synapse density, and excitatory transmission, while sparing GABAergic neurons. Conversely, genetic elimination of oxytocin receptors increases the expression of protein components of excitatory synapses and excitatory synaptic transmission in vitro. In vivo, oxytocin-receptor-deficient hippocampal pyramidal neurons develop more complex dendrites, which leads to increased spine number and reduced γ-oscillations. These results indicate that oxytocin controls the development of hippocampal excitatory neurons and contributes to the maintenance of a physiological excitation/inhibition balance, whose disruption can cause neurobehavioral disturbances. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22466.001 PMID:28231043

  14. Restraint stress increases hemichannel activity in hippocampal glial cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Juan A; Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; Díaz-Galarce, Raúl; Rojas, Sebastián; Maturana, Carola J; Stehberg, Jimmy; Sáez, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Stress affects brain areas involved in learning and emotional responses, which may contribute in the development of cognitive deficits associated with major depression. These effects have been linked to glial cell activation, glutamate release and changes in neuronal plasticity and survival including atrophy of hippocampal apical dendrites, loss of synapses and neuronal death. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions, we recently unveiled a sequential activation of glial cells that release ATP and glutamate via hemichannels inducing neuronal death due to activation of neuronal NMDA/P2X7 receptors and pannexin1 hemichannels. In the present work, we studied if stress-induced glia activation is associated to changes in hemichannel activity. To this end, we compared hemichannel activity of brain cells after acute or chronic restraint stress in mice. Dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices revealed that acute stress induces opening of both Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels in astrocytes, which were further increased by chronic stress; whereas enhanced Panx1 hemichannel activity was detected in microglia and neurons after acute/chronic and chronic stress, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of NMDA/P2X7 receptors reduced the chronic stress-induced hemichannel opening, whereas blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels fully reduced ATP and glutamate release in hippocampal slices from stressed mice. Thus, we propose that gliotransmitter release through hemichannels may participate in the pathogenesis of stress-associated psychiatric disorders and possibly depression.

  15. Hippocampal cannabinoid transmission modulates dopamine neuron activity: impact on rewarding memory formation and social interaction.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Michael; Renard, Justine; Zunder, Jordan; Laviolette, Steven R

    2015-05-01

    Disturbances in cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R) signaling have been linked to emotional and cognitive deficits characterizing neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Thus, there is growing interest in characterizing the relationship between cannabinoid transmission, emotional processing, and dopamine (DA)-dependent behavioral deficits. The CB1R is highly expressed in the mammalian nervous system, particularly in the hippocampus. Activation of the ventral hippocampal subregion (vHipp) is known to increase both the activity of DAergic neurons located in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and DA levels in reward-related brain regions, particularly the nucleus accumbens (NAc). However, the possible functional relationship between hippocampal CB1R transmission and VTA DA neuronal activity is not currently understood. In this study, using in vivo neuronal recordings in rats, we demonstrate that activation of CB1R in the vHipp strongly increases VTA DA neuronal firing and bursting activity, while simultaneously decreasing the activity of VTA non-DA neurons. Furthermore, using a conditioned place preference procedure and a social interaction test, we report that intra-vHipp CB1R activation potentiates the reward salience of normally sub-threshold conditioning doses of opiates and induces deficits in natural sociability and social recognition behaviors. Finally, these behavioral effects were prevented by directly blocking NAc DAergic transmission. Collectively, these findings identify hippocampal CB1R transmission as a critical modulator of the mesolimbic DA pathway and in the processing of reward and social-related behavioral phenomena.

  16. Restraint stress increases hemichannel activity in hippocampal glial cells and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Juan A.; Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; Díaz-Galarce, Raúl; Rojas, Sebastián; Maturana, Carola J.; Stehberg, Jimmy; Sáez, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Stress affects brain areas involved in learning and emotional responses, which may contribute in the development of cognitive deficits associated with major depression. These effects have been linked to glial cell activation, glutamate release and changes in neuronal plasticity and survival including atrophy of hippocampal apical dendrites, loss of synapses and neuronal death. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions, we recently unveiled a sequential activation of glial cells that release ATP and glutamate via hemichannels inducing neuronal death due to activation of neuronal NMDA/P2X7 receptors and pannexin1 hemichannels. In the present work, we studied if stress-induced glia activation is associated to changes in hemichannel activity. To this end, we compared hemichannel activity of brain cells after acute or chronic restraint stress in mice. Dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices revealed that acute stress induces opening of both Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels in astrocytes, which were further increased by chronic stress; whereas enhanced Panx1 hemichannel activity was detected in microglia and neurons after acute/chronic and chronic stress, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of NMDA/P2X7 receptors reduced the chronic stress-induced hemichannel opening, whereas blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels fully reduced ATP and glutamate release in hippocampal slices from stressed mice. Thus, we propose that gliotransmitter release through hemichannels may participate in the pathogenesis of stress-associated psychiatric disorders and possibly depression. PMID:25883550

  17. Basolateral amygdala regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and fear-related activation of newborn neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Elizabeth D.; Friedman, Aaron R.; Covarrubias, David; Ying, Carl; Sun, Wayne G.; Goosens, Ki A.; Sapolsky, Robert M.; Kaufer, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Impaired regulation of emotional memory is a feature of several affective disorders, including depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. Such regulation occurs, in part, by interactions between the hippocampus and the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Recent studies have indicated that within the adult hippocampus, newborn neurons may contribute to support of emotional memory, and that regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis is implicated in depressive disorders. How emotional information impacts newborn neurons in adults is not clear. Given the role of the BLA in hippocampus-dependent emotional memory, we investigated whether hippocampal neurogenesis was sensitive to emotional stimuli from the BLA. We show that BLA lesions suppress adult neurogenesis, while lesions of the central nucleus of the amygdala do not. Similarly, we show that reducing BLA activity through viral vector-mediated overexpression of an outwardly rectifying potassium channel suppresses neurogenesis. We also show that BLA lesions prevent selective activation of immature newborn neurons in response to a fear conditioning task. These results demonstrate that BLA activity regulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis and the fear context-specific activation of newborn neurons. Together, these findings denote functional implications for proliferation and recruitment of new neurons into emotional memory circuits. PMID:21670733

  18. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase contributes to pentylenetetrazole-kindling-induced hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinjian; Dong, Jingde; Shen, Kai; Bai, Ying; Chao, Jie; Yao, Honghong

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), the major nitric oxide synthase isoform in the mammalian brain, is implicated in the pathophysiology of several neurological conditions, including epilepsy. Neurogenesis in hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) persists throughout life in the adult brain. Alterations in this process occur in many neurological diseases, including epilepsy. Few studies, however, have addressed the role of nNOS in hippocampal DG neurogenesis in epileptic brain. The present study, therefore, investigated the role of nNOS in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindling-induced neurogenesis in hippocampal DG. Our results showed that nNOS expression and enzymatic activity were significantly increased in the hippocampus of PTZ-kindled mice. Meanwhile, these PTZ-kindled mice were characterized by significant enhancement of new born cells proliferation and survival in hippocampal DG, and these survived cells are co-labeled with NeuN and GFAP. Selective inhibition of nNOS by 7-NI, however, suppressed PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal DG new born cells proliferation and survival, suggesting that nNOS contributes to PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal neurogenesis.

  19. [Effect of interrupting hippocampal connections on the neuronal activity of several midbrain nuclei].

    PubMed

    Kichigina, V F; Vinogradova, O S

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were performed on unanaesthetized rabbits with intact brain and with septo-hippocampal disconnection depriving midbrain structures of descending hippocampal influences. General characteristics of neuronal reactions in midbrain raphe (MR) and ventral tegmental nucleus (VT) did not change following deafferentation. The level of reactivity increased in VT and decreased in MR. The mean latencies of on-responses in MR became longer (15,5 msec for auditory stimuli versus 10,5 msec in intact brain); in VT they became shorter (14,5 msec versus 17 msec). Habituation of reactions, normally present in about half of neurones, disappeared. Neurones with incremental responses gradually increasing in strength and duration were observed. Complex functional relations between the hippocampus and unspecific midbrain structures are discussed.

  20. LTP Induction Modifies Functional Relationship among Hippocampal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yun, Sung H.; Lee, Deok S.; Lee, Hyunjung; Baeg, Eun H.; Kim, Yun B.; Jung, Min W.

    2007-01-01

    To obtain evidence linking long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory, we examined whether LTP induction modifies functional relationship among neurons in the rat hippocampus. In contrast to neurons in low-frequency stimulated or AP5-treated slices, LTP induction altered "functional connectivity," as defined by the degree of synchronous firing, among…

  1. Perforated patch-clamp analysis of the passive membrane properties of three classes of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Spruston, N; Johnston, D

    1992-03-01

    1. Perforated patch-clamp recordings were made from the three major classes of hippocampal neurons in conventional in vitro slices prepared from adult guinea pigs. This technique provided experimental estimates of passive membrane properties (input resistance, RN, and membrane time constant, tau m) determined in the absence of the leak conductance associated with microelectrode impalement or the washout of cytoplasmic constituents associated with conventional whole-cell recordings. 2. To facilitate comparison of our data with previous results and to determine the passive membrane properties under conditions as physiological as possible, recordings were made at the resting potential, in physiological saline, and without any added blockers of voltage-dependent conductances. 3. Membrane-potential responses to current steps were analyzed, and four criteria were used to identify voltage responses that were the least affected by activation of voltage-dependent conductances. tau m was estimated from the slowest component (tau 0) of multiexponential fits of responses deemed passive by these criteria. RN was estimated from the slope of the linear region in the hyperpolarizing direction of the voltage-current relation. 4. It was not possible to measure purely passive membrane properties that were completely independent of membrane potential in any of the three classes of hippocampal neurons. Changing the membrane potential by constant current injection resulted in changes in RN and tau 0; subthreshold depolarization produced an increase, and hyperpolarization a decrease, in both RN and tau 0 for all three classes of hippocampal neurons. 5. Each of the three classes of hippocampal neurons also displayed a depolarizing "sag" during larger hyperpolarizing voltage transients. To evaluate the effect of the conductances underlying this sag on passive membrane properties, 2-5 mM Cs+ was added to the physiological saline. Extracellular Cs+ effectively blocked the sag in all three

  2. Valproic acid enhances the efficacy of radiation therapy by protecting normal hippocampal neurons and sensitizing malignant glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Thotala, Dinesh; Karvas, Rowan M.; Engelbach, John A.; Garbow, Joel R.; Hallahan, Andrew N.; DeWees, Todd A.; Laszlo, Andrei; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2015-01-01

    Neurocognitive deficits are serious sequelae that follow cranial irradiation used to treat patients with medulloblastoma and other brain neoplasms. Cranial irradiation causes apoptosis in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus leading to cognitive deficits. Valproic acid (VPA) treatment protected hippocampal neurons from radiation-induced damage in both cell culture and animal models. Radioprotection was observed in VPA-treated neuronal cells compared to cells treated with radiation alone. This protection is specific to normal neuronal cells and did not extend to cancer cells. In fact, VPA acted as a radiosensitizer in brain cancer cells. VPA treatment induced cell cycle arrest in cancer cells but not in normal neuronal cells. The level of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was increased and the pro-apoptotic protein Bax was reduced in VPA treated normal cells. VPA inhibited the activities of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), the latter of which is only inhibited in normal cells. The combination of VPA and radiation was most effective in inhibiting tumor growth in heterotopic brain tumor models. An intracranial orthotopic glioma tumor model was used to evaluate tumor growth by using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE MRI) and mouse survival following treatment with VPA and radiation. VPA, in combination with radiation, significantly delayed tumor growth and improved mouse survival. Overall, VPA protects normal hippocampal neurons and not cancer cells from radiation-induced cytotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo. VPA treatment has the potential for attenuating neurocognitive deficits associated with cranial irradiation while enhancing the efficiency of glioma radiotherapy. PMID:26413814

  3. Pretreatment with apoaequorin protects hippocampal CA1 neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Detert, Julia A; Adams, Erin L; Lescher, Jacob D; Lyons, Jeri-Anne; Moyer, James R

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke affects ∼795,000 people each year in the U.S., which results in an estimated annual cost of $73.7 billion. Calcium is pivotal in a variety of neuronal signaling cascades, however, during ischemia, excess calcium influx can trigger excitotoxic cell death. Calcium binding proteins help neurons regulate/buffer intracellular calcium levels during ischemia. Aequorin is a calcium binding protein isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, and has been used for years as a calcium indicator, but little is known about its neuroprotective properties. The present study used an in vitro rat brain slice preparation to test the hypothesis that an intra-hippocampal infusion of apoaequorin (the calcium binding component of aequorin) protects neurons from ischemic cell death. Bilaterally cannulated rats received an apoaequorin infusion in one hemisphere and vehicle control in the other. Hippocampal slices were then prepared and subjected to 5 minutes of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), and cell death was assayed by trypan blue exclusion. Apoaequorin dose-dependently protected neurons from OGD--doses of 1% and 4% (but not 0.4%) significantly decreased the number of trypan blue-labeled neurons. This effect was also time dependent, lasting up to 48 hours. This time dependent effect was paralleled by changes in cytokine and chemokine expression, indicating that apoaequorin may protect neurons via a neuroimmunomodulatory mechanism. These data support the hypothesis that pretreatment with apoaequorin protects neurons against ischemic cell death, and may be an effective neurotherapeutic.

  4. Active dentate granule cells encode experience to promote the addition of adult-born hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kirschen, Gregory W; Shen, Jia; Tian, Mu; Schroeder, Bryce; Wang, Jia; Man, Guoming; Wu, Song; Ge, Shaoyu

    2017-04-03

    The continuous addition of new dentate granule cells, exquisitely regulated by brain activity, renders the hippocampus plastic. However, how neural circuits encode experiences to impact the addition of adult-born neurons remains unknown. Here, we used endoscopic Ca(2+) imaging to track the real-time activity of individual dentate granule cells in freely-behaving mice. For the first time, we found that active dentate granule cells responded to a novel experience by preferentially increasing their Ca(2+) event frequency. This elevated activity, which we found to be associated with object exploration, returned to baseline by one hour in the same environment, but could be dishabituated via introduction to a novel environment. To seamlessly transition between environments, we next established a freely-controllable virtual reality system for unrestrained mice. We again observed increased firing of active neurons in a virtual enriched environment. Interestingly, multiple novel virtual experiences accumulatively increased the number of newborn neurons when compared to a single experience. Finally, optogenetic silencing of existing dentate granule cells during novel environmental exploration perturbed experience-induced neuronal addition. Together, our study shows that the adult brain conveys novel, enriched experiences to increase the addition of adult-born hippocampal neurons by increasing the firing of active dentate granule cells.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTAdult brains are constantly reshaping themselves from synapses to circuits as we encounter novel experiences from moment to moment. Importantly, this reshaping includes the addition of newborn hippocampal neurons. However, it remains largely unknown how our circuits encode experience-induced brain activity to govern the addition of new hippocampal neurons. By coupling in vivo Ca(2+) imaging of dentate granule neurons with a novel unrestrained virtual reality system for rodents, we discovered that a new experience rapidly

  5. The neuroprotective action of pyrroloquinoline quinone against glutamate-induced apoptosis in hippocampal neurons is mediated through the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qi; Shen Mi; Ding Mei; Shen Dingding; Ding Fei

    2011-04-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a cofactor in several enzyme-catalyzed redox reactions, possesses a potential capability of scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibiting cell apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the effects of PQQ on glutamate-induced cell death in primary cultured hippocampal neurons and the possible underlying mechanisms. We found that glutamate-induced apoptosis in cultured hippocampal neurons was significantly attenuated by the ensuing PQQ treatment, which also inhibited the glutamate-induced increase in Ca2+ influx, caspase-3 activity, and ROS production, and reversed the glutamate-induced decrease in Bcl-2/Bax ratio. The examination of signaling pathways revealed that PQQ treatment activated the phosphorylation of Akt and suppressed the glutamate-induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK). And inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt cascade by LY294002 and wortmannin significantly blocked the protective effects of PQQ, and alleviated the increase in Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Taken together, our results indicated that PQQ could protect primary cultured hippocampal neurons against glutamate-induced cell damage by scavenging ROS, reducing Ca2+ influx, and caspase-3 activity, and suggested that PQQ-activated PI3K/Akt signaling might be responsible for its neuroprotective action through modulation of glutamate-induced imbalance between Bcl-2 and Bax. - Research Highlights: >PQQ attenuated glutamate-induced cell apoptosis of cultured hippocampal neurons. >PQQ inhibited glutamate-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx and caspase-3 activity. >PQQ reduced glutamate-induced increase in ROS production. >PQQ affected phosphorylation of Akt and JNK signalings after glutamate injury. >PI3K/Akt was required for neuroprotection of PQQ by modulating Bcl-2/Bax ratio.

  6. Synapse-to-neuron ratio is inversely related to neuronal density in mature neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Cullen, D Kacy; Gilroy, Meghan E; Irons, Hillary R; Laplaca, Michelle C

    2010-11-04

    Synapse formation is a fundamental process in neurons that occurs throughout development, maturity, and aging. Although these stages contain disparate and fluctuating numbers of mature neurons, tactics employed by neuronal networks to modulate synapse number as a function of neuronal density are not well understood. The goal of this study was to utilize an in vitro model to assess the influence of cell density and neuronal maturity on synapse number and distribution. Specifically, cerebral cortical neurons were plated in planar culture at densities ranging from 10 to 5000 neurons/mm², and synapse number and distribution were evaluated via immunocytochemistry over 21 days in vitro (DIV). High-resolution confocal microscopy revealed an elaborate three-dimensional distribution of neurites and synapses across the heights of high-density neuronal networks by 21 DIV, which were up to 18 μm thick, demonstrating the complex degree of spatial interactions even in planar high-density cultures. At 7 DIV, the mean number of synapses per neuron was less than 5, and this did not vary as a function of neuronal density. However, by 21 DIV, the number of synapses per neuron had jumped 30- to 80-fold, and the synapse-to-neuron ratio was greatest at lower neuronal densities (< 500 neurons/mm²; mean approximately 400 synapses/neuron) compared to mid and higher neuronal densities (500-4500 neurons/mm²; mean of approximately 150 synapses/neuron) (p<0.05). These results suggest a relationship between neuronal density and synapse number that may have implications in the neurobiology of developing neuronal networks as well as processes of cell death and regeneration.

  7. The Neuroprotective Effects of Carvacrol on Ethanol-Induced Hippocampal Neurons Impairment via the Antioxidative and Antiapoptotic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption causes hippocampal neuronal impairment, which is associated with oxidative stress and apoptosis. Carvacrol is a major monoterpenic phenol found in essential oils from the family Labiatae and has antioxidative stress and antiapoptosis actions. However, the protective effects of carvacrol in ethanol-induced hippocampal neuronal impairment have not been fully understood. We explored the neuroprotective effects of carvacrol in vivo and in vitro. Male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 35% ethanol for 4 weeks to establish ethanol model in vivo, and hippocampal neuron injury was simulated by 200 mM ethanol in vitro. Morris water maze test was performed to evaluate the cognitive dysfunction. The oxidative stress injury of hippocampal neurons was evaluated by measuring the levels of oxidative stress biomarkers. Histopathological examinations and western blot were performed to evaluate the apoptosis of neurons. The results showed that carvacrol attenuates the cognitive dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis of the mice treated with ethanol and decreases hippocampal neurons apoptosis induced by ethanol in vitro. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that carvacrol modulates the protein expression of Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, and p-ERK, without influence of p-JNK and p-p38. Our results suggest that carvacrol alleviates ethanol-mediated hippocampal neuronal impairment by antioxidative and antiapoptotic effects. PMID:28191274

  8. The Neuroprotective Effects of Carvacrol on Ethanol-Induced Hippocampal Neurons Impairment via the Antioxidative and Antiapoptotic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Luo, Qian; Qiao, Hui; Ding, Hui; Cao, Yonggang; Yu, Juan; Liu, Ruxia; Zhang, Qianlong; Zhu, Hui; Qu, Lihui

    2017-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption causes hippocampal neuronal impairment, which is associated with oxidative stress and apoptosis. Carvacrol is a major monoterpenic phenol found in essential oils from the family Labiatae and has antioxidative stress and antiapoptosis actions. However, the protective effects of carvacrol in ethanol-induced hippocampal neuronal impairment have not been fully understood. We explored the neuroprotective effects of carvacrol in vivo and in vitro. Male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 35% ethanol for 4 weeks to establish ethanol model in vivo, and hippocampal neuron injury was simulated by 200 mM ethanol in vitro. Morris water maze test was performed to evaluate the cognitive dysfunction. The oxidative stress injury of hippocampal neurons was evaluated by measuring the levels of oxidative stress biomarkers. Histopathological examinations and western blot were performed to evaluate the apoptosis of neurons. The results showed that carvacrol attenuates the cognitive dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis of the mice treated with ethanol and decreases hippocampal neurons apoptosis induced by ethanol in vitro. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that carvacrol modulates the protein expression of Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, and p-ERK, without influence of p-JNK and p-p38. Our results suggest that carvacrol alleviates ethanol-mediated hippocampal neuronal impairment by antioxidative and antiapoptotic effects.

  9. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons comprise two distinct cell types that are countermodulated by metabotropic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Austin R; Moore, Shannon J; Bloss, Erik B; Mensh, Brett D; Kath, William L; Spruston, Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Summary Relating the function of neuronal cell types to information processing and behavior is a central goal of neuroscience. In the hippocampus, pyramidal cells in CA1 and the subiculum process sensory and motor cues to form a cognitive map encoding spatial, contextual, and emotional information, which they transmit throughout the brain. Do these cells constitute a single class, or are there multiple cell types with specialized functions? Using unbiased cluster analysis, we show that there are two morphologically and electrophysiologically distinct principal cell types that carry hippocampal output. We show further that these two cell types are inversely modulated by the synergistic action of glutamate and acetylcholine acting on metabotropic receptors that are central to hippocampal function. Combined with prior connectivity studies, our results support a model of hippocampal processing in which the two pyramidal cell types are predominantly segregated into two parallel pathways that process distinct modalities of information. PMID:23177962

  10. Active 3-D microscaffold system with fluid perfusion for culturing in vitro neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Laura; Almasri, Mahmoud; Lee, Kil; Fogleman, Nick; Brewer, Gregory J; Nam, Yoonkey; Wheeler, Bruce C; Vukasinovic, Jelena; Glezer, Ari; Frazier, A Bruno

    2007-04-01

    This work demonstrated the design, fabrication, packaging, and characterization of an active microscaffold system with fluid perfusion/nutrient delivery functionalities for culturing in vitro neuronal networks from dissociated hippocampal rat pup neurons. The active microscaffold consisted of an 8 x 8 array of hollow, microfabricated, SU-8 towers (1.0 mm or 1.5 mm in height), with integrated, horizontal, SU-8 cross-members that connect adjacent towers, thus forming a 3-D grid that is conducive to branching, growth, and increased network formation of dissociated hippocampal neurons. Each microtower in the microscaffold system contained a hollow channel and multiple fluid ports for media delivery and perfusion of nutrients to the in vitro neuronal network growing within the microscaffold system. Additionally, there were two exposed Au electrodes on the outer wall of each microtower at varying heights (with insulated leads running within the microtower walls), which will later allow for integration of electrical stimulation/recording functionalities into the active microscaffold system. However, characterization of the stimulation/recording electrodes was not included in the scope of this paper. Design, fabrication, fluid packaging, and characterization of the active microscaffold system were performed. Furthermore, use of the active microscaffold system was demonstrated by culturing primary hippocampal embryonic rat pup neurons, and characterizing cell viability within the microscaffold system.

  11. A new extracellular multirecording system for electrophysiological studies: application to hippocampal organotypic cultures.

    PubMed

    Stoppini, L; Duport, S; Corrèges, P

    1997-03-01

    The present paper describes a new multirecording device which performs continuous electrophysiological studies on organotypic cultures. This device is formed by a card (Physiocard) carrying the culture which is inserted into an electronic module. Electrical activities are recorded by an array of 30 biocompatible microelectrodes which are adjusted into close contact with the upper surface of the slice culture. The microelectrode array is integrated into the card enabling electrical stimulation and recording of neurons over periods ranging from several hours to a few days outside a Faraday cage. Neuronal responses are recorded and analyzed by a dedicated electronic and acquisition chain. A perfusion chamber is contained in the card, allowing continuous perfusion in sterile conditions. Electrophysiological extracellular recordings and some drugs' effects obtained with this system in hippocampal slice cultures were identical to conventional electrophysiological set-up results with tetrodotoxin, bicuculline, kainate, dexamethasone and NBQX. The Physiocard system allows new insights for studies on nervous tissue and allows sophisticated approaches to be used quicker and more easily. It could be used for various neurophysiological studies or screening tests such as neural network mapping, nervous recovery, epilepsy, neurotoxicity or neuropharmacology.

  12. Store-operated Ca2+ entry in hippocampal neurons: Regulation by protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B.

    PubMed

    Koss, David J; Riedel, Gernot; Bence, Kendra; Platt, Bettina

    2013-02-01

    Store operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) replenishes intracellular Ca(2+) stores and activates a number of intracellular signalling pathways. Whilst several molecular components forming store operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCC) have been identified, their modulation in neurons remains poorly understood. Here, we extend on our previous findings and show that neuronal SOCE is modulated by tyrosine phosphorylation. Cyclopiazonic acid induced SOCE was characterised in hippocampal cultures derived from forebrain specific protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B knockout (PTP1B KO) mice and wild type (WT) litter mates using Fura-2 Ca(2+) imaging. PTP1B KO cultures expressed elevated SOCE relative to WT cultures without changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) homeostasis or depolarisation-induced Ca(2+) influx. WT and PTP1B KO cultures displayed similar pharmacological sensitivities towards the SOCE inhibitors gadolinium and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, as well as the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Ag126 indicating an augmentation of native SOCCs by PTP1B. Following store depletion WT culture homogenates showed heightened phospho-tyrosine levels, an increase in Src tyrosine kinase activation and two minor PTP1B species. These data suggest tyrosine phosphorylation gating SOCE, and implicate PTP1B as a key regulatory enzyme. The involvement of PTP1B in SOCE and its relation to SOCC components and mechanism of regulation are discussed.

  13. Early Transcriptional Changes Induced by Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Palma, Eduardo; Andrade, Víctor; Caracci, Mario O.; Bustos, Bernabé I.; Villaman, Camilo; Medina, Matías A.; Ávila, Miguel E.; Ugarte, Giorgia D.

    2016-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling modulates brain development and function and its deregulation underlies pathological changes occurring in neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders. Since one of the main effects of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is the modulation of target genes, in the present work we examined global transcriptional changes induced by short-term Wnt3a treatment (4 h) in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons. RNAseq experiments allowed the identification of 170 differentially expressed genes, including known Wnt/β-catenin target genes such as Notum, Axin2, and Lef1, as well as novel potential candidates Fam84a, Stk32a, and Itga9. Main biological processes enriched with differentially expressed genes included neural precursor (GO:0061364, p-adjusted = 2.5 × 10−7), forebrain development (GO:0030900, p-adjusted = 7.3 × 10−7), and stem cell differentiation (GO:0048863 p-adjusted = 7.3 × 10−7). Likewise, following activation of the signaling cascade, the expression of a significant number of genes with transcription factor activity (GO:0043565, p-adjusted = 4.1 × 10−6) was induced. We also studied molecular networks enriched upon Wnt3a activation and detected three highly significant expression modules involved in glycerolipid metabolic process (GO:0046486, p-adjusted = 4.5 × 10−19), learning or memory (GO:0007611, p-adjusted = 4.0 × 10−5), and neurotransmitter secretion (GO:0007269, p-adjusted = 5.3 × 10−12). Our results indicate that Wnt/β-catenin mediated transcription controls multiple biological processes related to neuronal structure and activity that are affected in synaptic dysfunction disorders. PMID:28116168

  14. High-resolution extracellular stimulation of dispersed hippocampal culture with high-density CMOS multielectrode array based on non-Faradaic electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lei, N; Ramakrishnan, S; Shi, P; Orcutt, J S; Yuste, R; Kam, L C; Shepard, K L

    2011-08-01

    We introduce a method to electrically stimulate individual neurons at single-cell resolution in arbitrary spatiotemporal patterns with precise control over stimulation thresholds. By exploiting a custom microelectronic chip, up to 65,000 non-Faradaic electrodes can be uniquely addressed with electrode density exceeding 6500 electrodes mm(-2). We demonstrate extracellular stimulation of dispersed primary hippocampal neuronal cultures using the chip at single-cell resolution.

  15. Activities of visual cortical and hippocampal neurons co-fluctuate in freely moving rats during spatial behavior

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Daniel Christopher; Ji, Daoyun

    2015-01-01

    Visual cues exert a powerful control over hippocampal place cell activities that encode external spaces. The functional interaction of visual cortical neurons and hippocampal place cells during spatial navigation behavior has yet to be elucidated. Here we show that, like hippocampal place cells, many neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) of freely moving rats selectively fire at specific locations as animals run repeatedly on a track. The V1 location-specific activity leads hippocampal place cell activity both spatially and temporally. The precise activities of individual V1 neurons fluctuate every time the animal travels through the track, in a correlated fashion with those of hippocampal place cells firing at overlapping locations. The results suggest the existence of visual cortical neurons that are functionally coupled with hippocampal place cells for spatial processing during natural behavior. These visual neurons may also participate in the formation and storage of hippocampal-dependent memories. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08902.001 PMID:26349031

  16. Mechanisms of transport and exocytosis of dense-core granules containing tissue plasminogen activator in developing hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael A; Johnson, Scooter; Gurkins, Dmitri; Farmer, Meredith; Lochner, Janis E; Rosa, Patrizia; Scalettar, Bethe A

    2005-03-23

    Dense-core granules (DCGs) are organelles found in specialized secretory cells, including neuroendocrine cells and neurons. Neuronal DCGs facilitate many critical processes, including the transport and secretion of proteins involved in learning, and yet their transport and exocytosis are poorly understood. We have used wide-field and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, in conjunction with transport theory, to visualize the transport and exocytosis of DCGs containing a tissue plasminogen activator-green fluorescent protein hybrid in cell bodies, neurites, and growth cones of developing hippocampal neurons and to quantify the roles that diffusion, directed motion, and immobility play in these processes. Our results demonstrate that shorter-ranged transport of DCGs near sites of exocytosis in hippocampal neurons and neuroendocrine cells differs markedly. Specifically, the immobile fraction of DCGs within growth cones and near the plasma membrane of hippocampal neurons is small and relatively unaltered by actin disruption, unlike in neuroendocrine cells. Moreover, transport of DCGs in these domains of hippocampal neurons is unusually heterogeneous, being significantly rapid and directed as well as slow and diffusive. Our results also demonstrate that exocytosis is preceded by substantial movement and heterogeneous transport; this movement may facilitate delivery of DCG cargo in hippocampal neurons, given the relatively low abundance of neuronal DCGs. In addition, the extensive mobility of DCGs in hippocampal neurons argues strongly against the hypothesis that cortical actin is a major barrier to membrane-proximal DCGs in these cells. Instead, our results suggest that extended release of DCG cargo from hippocampal neurons arises from heterogeneity in DCG mobility.

  17. Dynamic inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission by astrocyte-derived ATP in hippocampal cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Schuichi; Fujishita, Kayoko; Tsuda, Makoto; Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2003-09-01

    Originally ascribed passive roles in the CNS, astrocytes are now known to have an active role in the regulation of synaptic transmission. Neuronal activity can evoke Ca2+ transients in astrocytes, and Ca2+ transients in astrocytes can evoke changes in neuronal activity. The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate has been shown to mediate such bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. We demonstrate here that ATP, a primary mediator of intercellular Ca2+ signaling among astrocytes, also mediates intercellular signaling between astrocytes and neurons in hippocampal cultures. Mechanical stimulation of astrocytes evoked Ca2+ waves mediated by the release of ATP and the activation of P2 receptors. Mechanically evoked Ca2+ waves led to decreased excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmission in an ATP-dependent manner. Exogenous application of ATP does not affect postsynaptic glutamatergic responses but decreased presynaptic exocytotic events. Finally, we show that astrocytes exhibit spontaneous Ca2+ waves mediated by extracellular ATP and that inhibition of these Ca2+ responses enhanced excitatory glutamatergic transmission. We therefore conclude that ATP released from astrocytes exerts tonic and activity-dependent down-regulation of synaptic transmission via presynaptic mechanisms.

  18. Graph Theoretic and Motif Analyses of the Hippocampal Neuron Type Potential Connectome

    PubMed Central

    White, Charise M.; Komendantov, Alexander O.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We computed the potential connectivity map of all known neuron types in the rodent hippocampal formation by supplementing scantly available synaptic data with spatial distributions of axons and dendrites from the open-access knowledge base Hippocampome.org. The network that results from this endeavor, the broadest and most complete for a mammalian cortical region at the neuron-type level to date, contains more than 3200 connections among 122 neuron types across six subregions. Analyses of these data using graph theory metrics unveil the fundamental architectural principles of the hippocampal circuit. Globally, we identify a highly specialized topology minimizing communication cost; a modular structure underscoring the prominence of the trisynaptic loop; a core set of neuron types serving as information-processing hubs as well as a distinct group of particular antihub neurons; a nested, two-tier rich club managing much of the network traffic; and an innate resilience to random perturbations. At the local level, we uncover the basic building blocks, or connectivity patterns, that combine to produce complex global functionality, and we benchmark their utilization in the circuit relative to random networks. Taken together, these results provide a comprehensive connectivity profile of the hippocampus, yielding novel insights on its functional operations at the computationally crucial level of neuron types. PMID:27896314

  19. Immature doublecortin-positive hippocampal neurons are important for learning but not for remembering.

    PubMed

    Vukovic, Jana; Borlikova, Gilyana G; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Robinson, Gregory J; Sullivan, Robert K P; Walker, Tara L; Bartlett, Perry F

    2013-04-10

    It is now widely accepted that hippocampal neurogenesis underpins critical cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. To assess the behavioral importance of adult-born neurons, we developed a novel knock-in mouse model that allowed us to specifically and reversibly ablate hippocampal neurons at an immature stage. In these mice, the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) is expressed under control of the doublecortin (DCX) promoter, which allows for specific ablation of immature DCX-expressing neurons after administration of diphtheria toxin while leaving the neural precursor pool intact. Using a spatially challenging behavioral test (a modified version of the active place avoidance test), we present direct evidence that immature DCX-expressing neurons are required for successful acquisition of spatial learning, as well as reversal learning, but are not necessary for the retrieval of stored long-term memories. Importantly, the observed learning deficits were rescued as newly generated immature neurons repopulated the granule cell layer upon termination of the toxin treatment. Repeat (or cyclic) depletion of immature neurons reinstated behavioral deficits if the mice were challenged with a novel task. Together, these findings highlight the potential of stimulating neurogenesis as a means to enhance learning.

  20. Oxidative stress-mediated down-regulation of bcl-2 promoter in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Nesterova, Albina; Jambal, Purevsuren; Audesirk, Gerald; Kern, Marcey; Cabell, Leigh; Eves, Eva; Rosner, Marsha R; Boxer, Linda M; Reusch, Jane E-B

    2003-03-01

    Generation of oxidative stress/reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the causes of neuronal apoptosis. We have examined the effects of ROS at the transcriptional level in an immortalized hippocampal neuronal cell line (H19-7) and in rat primary hippocampal neurons. Treatment of H19-7 cells with hydrogen peroxide (150 micro m) resulted in a 40% decrease in Bcl-2 protein and a parallel decrease in bcl-2 mRNA levels. H19-7 cells overexpressing bcl-2 were found to be resistant to ROS-induced apoptosis. We had previously shown that bcl-2 promoter activity is positively regulated by the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) in neurons. In the present study, we demonstrate that ROS decreases the activity of luciferase reporter gene driven by a cyclic AMP response element site containing bcl-2 promoter. Exposure of neurons to ROS for 6 h resulted in basal and fibroblast growth factor-2-stimulated phosphorylation/activation of CREB. Chronic 24 h treatment with ROS led to a significant (p < 0.01) decrease in CREB protein and CREB mRNA levels. Adenoviral overexpression of wild type CREB in H19-7 cells resulted in significant (p < 0.01) protection against ROS-induced apoptosis through up-regulation of Bcl-2 expression whereas dominant negative CREB exaggerated the injury. These findings demonstrate that loss of CREB function contributes to oxidative stress-induced neuronal dysfunction.

  1. Sleep deprivation and hippocampal vulnerability: changes in neuronal plasticity, neurogenesis and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Kreutzmann, J C; Havekes, R; Abel, T; Meerlo, P

    2015-11-19

    Despite the ongoing fundamental controversy about the physiological function of sleep, there is general consensus that sleep benefits neuronal plasticity, which ultimately supports brain function and cognition. In agreement with this are numerous studies showing that sleep deprivation (SD) results in learning and memory impairments. Interestingly, such impairments appear to occur particularly when these learning and memory processes require the hippocampus, suggesting that this brain region may be particularly sensitive to the consequences of sleep loss. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying sleep and memory formation remain to be investigated, available evidence suggests that SD may impair hippocampal neuronal plasticity and memory processes by attenuating intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling which may lead to alterations in cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-mediated gene transcription, neurotrophic signaling, and glutamate receptor expression. When restricted sleep becomes a chronic condition, it causes a reduction of hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis, which may eventually lead to a reduction in hippocampal volume. Ultimately, by impairing hippocampal plasticity and function, chronically restricted and disrupted sleep contributes to cognitive disorders and psychiatric diseases.

  2. Hippocampal Neuron Populations Are Reduced in Vervet Monkeys With Fetal Alcohol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Mark W; Ptito, Maurice; Ervin, Frank R; Palmour, Roberta M

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to beverage alcohol is a major cause of mild mental retardation and developmental delay. In nonendangered alcohol-preferring vervet monkeys, we modeled the most common nondysmorphic form of fetal alcohol syndrome disorder with voluntary drinking during the third trimester of pregnancy. Here, we report significant numerical reductions in the principal hippocampal neurons of fetal alcohol-exposed (FAE) offspring, as compared to age-matched, similarly housed conspecifics with isocaloric sucrose exposure. These deficits, particularly marked in CA1 and CA3, are present neonatally and persist through infancy (5 months) and juvenile (2 years) stages. Although the volumes of hippocampal subdivisions in FAE animals are not atypical at birth, by age 2, they are only 65–70% of those estimated in age-matched controls. These data suggest that moderate, naturalistic alcohol consumption during late pregnancy results in a stable loss of hippocampal neurons and a progressive reduction of hippocampal volume. © 2015 The Authors. Developmental Psychobiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 57:470–485, 2015. PMID:25913787

  3. Hyperforin modulates dendritic spine morphology in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by activating Ca(2+) -permeable TRPC6 channels.

    PubMed

    Leuner, Kristina; Li, Wei; Amaral, Michelle D; Rudolph, Stephanie; Calfa, Gaston; Schuwald, Anita M; Harteneck, Christian; Inoue, Takafumi; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    The standardized extract of the St. John's wort plant (Hypericum perforatum) is commonly used to treat mild to moderate depression. Its active constituent is hyperforin, a phloroglucinol derivative that reduces the reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine by increasing intracellular Na(+) concentration through the activation of nonselective cationic TRPC6 channels. TRPC6 channels are also Ca(2+) -permeable, resulting in intracellular Ca(2+) elevations. Indeed, hyperforin activates TRPC6-mediated currents and Ca(2+) transients in rat PC12 cells, which induce their differentiation, mimicking the neurotrophic effect of nerve growth factor. Here, we show that hyperforin modulates dendritic spine morphology in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of hippocampal slice cultures through the activation of TRPC6 channels. Hyperforin also evoked intracellular Ca(2+) transients and depolarizing inward currents sensitive to the TRPC channel blocker La(3+) , thus resembling the actions of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. These results suggest that the antidepressant actions of St. John's wort are mediated by a mechanism similar to that engaged by BDNF.

  4. HYPERFORIN MODULATES DENDRITIC SPINE MORPHOLOGY IN HIPPOCAMPAL PYRAMIDAL NEURONS BY ACTIVATING Ca2+-PERMEABLE TRPC6 CHANNELS

    PubMed Central

    Leuner, Kristina; Li, Wei; Amaral, Michelle D.; Rudolph, Stephanie; Calfa, Gaston; Schuwald, Anita M.; Harteneck, Christian; Inoue, Takafumi; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    The standardized extract of the St. John’s wort plant (Hypericum perforatum) is commonly used to treat mild to moderate depression. Its active constituent is hyperforin, a phloroglucinol derivative that reduces the reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine by increasing intracellular Na+ concentration through the activation of non-selective cationic TRPC6 channels. TRPC6 channels are also Ca2+-permeable, resulting in intracellular Ca2+ elevations. Indeed, hyperforin activates TRPC6-mediated currents and Ca2+ transients in rat PC12 cells, which induce their differentiation, mimicking the neurotrophic effect of NGF. Here, we show that hyperforin modulates dendritic spine morphology in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of hippocampal slice cultures through the activation of TRPC6 channels. Hyperforin also evoked intracellular Ca2+ transients and depolarizing inward currents sensitive to the TRPC channel blocker La3+, thus resembling the actions of the neurotrophin BDNF in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. These results suggest that the antidepressant actions of St. John’s wort are mediated by a mechanism similar to that engaged by BDNF. PMID:22815087

  5. Spinal Cord Neuronal Precursors Generate Multiple Neuronal Phenotypes in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Anjali J.; Piper, David; Mujtaba, Tahmina; Lucero, Mary T.; Rao, Mahendra S.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal restricted precursors (NRPs) (Mayer-Proschel et al., 1997) can generate multiple neurotransmitter phenotypes during maturation in culture. Undifferentiated E-NCAM+ (embryonic neural cell adhesion molecule) immunoreactive NRPs are mitotically active and electrically immature, and they express only a subset of neuronal markers. Fully mature cells are postmitotic, process-bearing cells that are neurofilament-M and synaptophysin immunoreactive, and they synthesize and respond to different subsets of neurotransmitter molecules. Mature neurons that synthesize and respond to glycine, glutamate, GABA, dopamine, and acetylcholine can be identified by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and calcium imaging in mass cultures. Individual NRPs also generate heterogeneous progeny as assessed by neurotransmitter response and synthesis, demonstrating the multipotent nature of the precursor cells. Differentiation can be modulated by sonic hedgehog (Shh) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2/4 molecules. Shh acts as a mitogen and inhibits differentiation (including cholinergic differentiation). BMP-2 and BMP-4, in contrast, inhibit cell division and promote differentiation (including cholinergic differentiation). Thus, a single neuronal precursor cell can differentiate into multiple classes of neurons, and this differentiation can be modulated by environmental signals. PMID:9742154

  6. Correlation of hippocampal theta rhythm with changes in cutaneous temperature. [evoked neuron response in thermoregulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Saleh, M. A.; Karem, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    A possible role for the hippocampus in alerting an animal to changes in cutaneous temperature was examined. Following local warming or cooling of the ears of unanesthetized, loosely restrained rabbits, theta waves (4-7 Hz EEG waves) were recorded from electrodes straddling the hippocampus. The onset of the hippocampal theta rhythm was correlated with changes in cutaneous temperature, an observation consistent with studies indicating that the theta rhythm is a nonspecific response evoked by stimulation of several sensory modalities. Additional data from cats and rabbits were correlated with specific neurons within the hippocampus, namely pyramidal cells. Post stimulus time histograms obtained by excitation of the dorsal fornix were interpreted in terms of excitatory and inhibitory inputs to pyramidal cells. Thus, the theta rhythm, which appears to be evoked by changes in cutaneous temperature, can be related to a specific type of hippocampal neuron which is in turn connected with other areas of the brain involved in temperature regulation.

  7. Robust conjunctive item-place coding by hippocampal neurons parallels learning what happens where

    PubMed Central

    Komorowski, Robert W.; Manns, Joseph R.; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Previous research indicates a critical role of the hippocampus in memory for events in the context in which they occur. However, studies to date have not provided compelling evidence that hippocampal neurons encode event-context conjunctions directly associated with this kind of learning. Here we report that, as animals learn different meanings for items in distinct contexts, individual hippocampal neurons develop responses to specific stimuli in the places where they have differential significance. Furthermore, this conjunctive coding evolves in the form of enhanced item-specific responses within a subset of the pre-existing spatial representation. These findings support the view that conjunctive representations in the hippocampus underlie the acquisition of context specific memories. PMID:19657042

  8. Liquiritigenin inhibits Aβ25–35-induced neurotoxicity and secretion of Aβ1–40 in rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui-ting; Zou, Li-bo; Lü, Qiu-jun

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To examine whether liquiritigenin, a newly found agonist of selective estrogen receptor-β, has neuroprotective activity against β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in rat hippocampal neurons. Methods: Primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons were pretreated with liquiritigenin (0.02, 0.2, and 2 μmol/L) prior to Aβ25–35 exposure. Following treatment, viability of the cells was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide analysis and by a lactate dehydrogenase activity-based cytotoxicity assay. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as apoptotic rates, were determined. Our studies were extended in tests of whether liquiritigenin treatment could inhibit the secretion of Aβ1–40 as measured using an ELISA method. In order to analyze which genes may be involved, we used a microarray assay to compare gene expression patterns. Finally, the levels of specific proteins related to neurotrophy and neurodenegeration were detected by Western blotting. Results: Pretreated neurons with liquiritigenin in the presence of Aβ25–35 increased cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. Liquiritigenin treatment also attenuated Aβ25–35-induced increases in [Ca2+]i and ROS level and decreased the apoptotic rate of neurons. Some genes, including B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (Bcl-2), neurotrophin 3 (Ntf-3) and amyloid β (A4) precursor protein-binding, family B, member 1 (Apbb-1) were regulated by liquiritigenin; similar results were shown at the protein level by Western blotting. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that liquiritigenin exhibits neuroprotective effects against Aβ25-35-induced neurotoxicity and that it can decrease the secretion of Aβ1–40. Therefore, liquiritigenin may be useful for further study as a prodrug for treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19574995

  9. Hippocampal GABAergic interneurons coexpressing alpha7-nicotinic receptors and connexin-36 are able to improve neuronal viability under oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Voytenko, L P; Lushnikova, I V; Savotchenko, A V; Isaeva, E V; Skok, M V; Lykhmus, O Yu; Patseva, M A; Skibo, G G

    2015-08-07

    The hippocampal interneurons are very diverse by chemical profiles and rather inconsistent by sensitivity to CI. Some hippocampal GABAergic interneurons survive certain time after ischemia while ischemia-sensitive interneurons and pyramidal neurons are damaged. GABAergic signaling, nicotinic receptors expressing α7-subunit (α7nAChRs(+)) and connexin-36 (Cx36(+), electrotonic gapjunctions protein) contradictory modulate post-ischemic environment. We hypothesized that hippocampal ischemia-resistant GABAergic interneurons coexpressing glutamate decarboxylase-67 isoform (GAD67(+)), α7nAChRs(+), Cx36(+) are able to enhance neuronal viability. To check this hypothesis the histochemical and electrophysiological investigations have been performed using rat hippocampal organotypic culture in the condition of 30-min oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Post-OGD reoxygenation (4h) revealed in CA1 pyramidal layer numerous damaged cells, decreased population spike amplitude and increased pair-pulse depression. In these conditions GAD67(+) interneurons displayed the OGD-resistance and significant increase of GABA synthesis/metabolism (GAD67-immunofluorescence, mitochondrial activity). The α7nAChRs(+) and Cx36(+) co-localizations were revealed in resistant GAD67(+) interneurons. Under OGD: GABAA-receptors (GABAARs) blockade increased cell damage and exacerbated the pair-pulse depression in CA1 pyramidal layer; α7nAChRs and Cx36-channels separate blockades sufficiently decreased cell damage while interneuronal GAD67-immunofluorescence and mitochondrial activity were similar to the control. Thus, hippocampal GABAergic interneurons co-expressing α7nAChRs and Cx36 remained resistant certain time after OGD and were able to modulate CA1 neuron survival through GABAARs, α7nAChRs and Cx36-channels activity. The enhancements of the neuronal viability together with GABA synthesis/metabolism normalization suggest cooperative neuroprotective mechanism that could be used for increase in

  10. Dendritic remodeling of hippocampal neurons is associated with altered NMDA receptor expression in alcohol dependent rats

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Miranda C.; Kim, Airee; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged alcohol exposure has been previously shown to impair the structure and function of the hippocampus, although the underlying structural and biochemical alterations contributing to these deleterious effects are unclear. Also unclear is whether these changes persist into prolonged periods of abstinence. Previous work from our lab utilizing a clinically relevant rodent model of alcohol consumption demonstrated that alcohol dependence (induced by chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure or CIE) decreases proliferation and survival of neural stem cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone and hippocampal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, implicating this region of the cortex as particularly sensitive to the toxic effects of prolonged ethanol exposure. For this study, we investigated seven weeks of CIE-induced morphological changes (dendritic complexity and dendritic spine density) of dentate gyrus (DG) granule cell neurons, CA3, and CA1 pyramidal neurons and the associated alterations in biochemical markers of synaptic plasticity and toxicity (NMDA receptors and PSD-95) in the hippocampus in ethanol-experienced Wistar rats 3h (CIE) and 21 days (protracted abstinence) after the last ethanol vapor exposure. CIE reduced dendritic arborization of DG neurons and this effect persisted into protracted abstinence. CIE enhanced dendritic arborization of pyramidal neurons and this effect did not persist into protracted abstinence. The architectural changes in dendrites did not correlate with alterations in dendritic spine density, however, they were associated with increases in the expression of pNR2B, total NR2B, and total NR2A immediately following CIE with expression levels returning to control levels in prolonged abstinence. Overall, these data provide the evidence that CIE produces profound changes in hippocampal structural plasticity and in molecular tools that maintain hippocampal structural plasticity, and these alterations may underlie cognitive dysfunction

  11. Distinct electrophysiological properties of glutamatergic, cholinergic and GABAergic rat septohippocampal neurons: novel implications for hippocampal rhythmicity

    PubMed Central

    Sotty, F; Danik, M; Manseau, F; Laplante, F; Quirion, R; Williams, S

    2003-01-01

    The medial septum-diagonal band complex (MSDB) contains cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons known to play key roles in learning and memory processing, and in the generation of hippocampal theta rhythm. Electrophysiologically, several classes of neurons have been described in the MSDB, but their chemical identity remains to be fully established. By combining electrophysiology with single-cell RT-PCR, we have identified four classes of neurons in the MSDB in vitro. The first class displayed slow-firing and little or no Ih, and expressed choline acetyl-transferase mRNA (ChAT). The second class was fast-firing, had a substantial Ih and expressed glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 mRNA (GAD67), sometimes co-localized with ChAT mRNAs. A third class exhibited fast- and burst-firing, had an important Ih and expressed GAD67 mRNA also occasionally co-localized with ChAT mRNAs. The ionic mechanism underlying the bursts involved a low-threshold spike and a prominent Ih current, conductances often associated with pacemaker activity. Interestingly, we identified a fourth class that expressed transcripts solely for one or two of the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2), but not ChAT or GAD. Some putative glutamatergic neurons displayed electrophysiological properties similar to ChAT-positive slow-firing neurons such as the occurrence of a very small Ih, but nearly half of glutamatergic neurons exhibited cluster firing with intrinsically generated voltage-dependent subthreshold membrane oscillations. Neurons belonging to each of the four described classes were found among septohippocampal neurons by retrograde labelling. We provide results suggesting that slow-firing cholinergic, fast-firing and burst-firing GABAergic, and cluster-firing glutamatergic neurons, may each uniquely contribute to hippocampal rhythmicity in vivo. PMID:12865506

  12. Gastrin-releasing peptide contributes to the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Walton, Noah M; de Koning, Anoek; Xie, Xiuyuan; Shin, Rick; Chen, Qian; Miyake, Shinichi; Tajinda, Katsunori; Gross, Adam K; Kogan, Jeffrey H; Heusner, Carrie L; Tamura, Kouichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki

    2014-09-01

    In the postnatal hippocampus, newly generated neurons contribute to learning and memory. Disruptions in neurogenesis and neuronal development have been linked to cognitive impairment and are implicated in a broad variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. To identify putative factors involved in this process, we examined hippocampal gene expression alterations in mice possessing a heterozygous knockout of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha heterozygous knockout gene (CaMK2α-hKO), an established model of cognitive impairment that also displays altered neurogenesis and neuronal development. Using this approach, we identified gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) as the most dysregulated gene. In wild-type mice, GRP labels NeuN-positive neurons, the lone exception being GRP-positive, NeuN-negative cells in the subgranular zone, suggesting GRP expression may be relevant to neurogenesis and/or neuronal development. Using a model of in vitro hippocampal neurogenesis, we determined that GRP signaling is essential for the continued survival and development of newborn neurons, both of which are blocked by transient knockdown of GRP's cognate receptor (GRPR). Furthermore, GRP appears to negatively regulate neurogenesis-associated proliferation in neural stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Intracerebroventricular infusion of GRP resulted in a decrease in immature neuronal markers, increased cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and decreased neurogenesis. Despite increased levels of GRP mRNA, CaMK2α-hKO mutant mice expressed reduced levels of GRP peptide. This lack of GRP may contribute to the elevated neurogenesis and impaired neuronal development, which are reversed following exogenous GRP infusion. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that GRP modulates neurogenesis and neuronal development and may contribute to hippocampus-associated cognitive impairment.

  13. Blockade of Ca2+-permeable AMPA/kainate channels decreases oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced Zn2+ accumulation and neuronal loss in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hong Z; Sensi, Stefano L; Ogoshi, Fumio; Weiss, John H

    2002-02-15

    Synaptic release of Zn2+ and its translocation into postsynaptic neurons probably contribute to neuronal injury after ischemia or epilepsy. Studies in cultured neurons have revealed that of the three major routes of divalent cation entry, NMDA channels, voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs), and Ca2+-permeable AMPA/kainate (Ca-A/K) channels, Ca-A/K channels exhibit the highest permeability to exogenously applied Zn2+. However, routes through which synaptically released Zn2+ gains entry to postsynaptic neurons have not been characterized in vivo. To model ischemia-induced Zn2+ movement in a system approximating the in vivo situation, we subjected mouse hippocampal slice preparations to controlled periods of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Timm's staining revealed little reactive Zn2+ in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of slices exposed in the presence of O2 and glucose. However, 15 min of OGD resulted in marked labeling in both regions. Whereas strong Zn2+ labeling persisted if both the NMDA antagonist MK-801 and the VSCC blocker Gd3+ were present during OGD, the presence of either the Ca-A/K channel blocker 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine (NAS) or the extracellular Zn2+ chelator Ca2+ EDTA substantially decreased Zn2+ accumulation in pyramidal neurons of both subregions. In parallel experiments, slices were subjected to 5 min OGD exposures as described above, followed 4 hr later by staining with the cell-death marker propidium iodide. As in the Timm's staining experiments, substantial CA1 or CA3 pyramidal neuronal damage occurred despite the presence of MK-801 and Gd3+, whereas injury was decreased by NAS or by Ca2+ EDTA (in CA1).

  14. Sericin can reduce hippocampal neuronal apoptosis by activating the Akt signal transduction pathway in a rat model of diabetes mellitus☆

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhihong; He, Yaqiang; Song, Chengjun; Dong, Zhijun; Su, Zhejun; Xue, Jingfeng

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by continuous peritoneal injection of streptozotocin. Following intragastric perfusion of sericin for 35 days, blood glucose levels significantly reduced, neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampal CA1 region decreased, hippocampal phosphorylated Akt and nuclear factor kappa B expression were enhanced, but Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 associated death promoter expression decreased. Results demonstrated that sericin can reduce hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in a rat model of diabetes mellitus by regulating abnormal changes in the Akt signal transduction pathway. PMID:25767499

  15. Maternal creatine supplementation affects the morpho-functional development of hippocampal neurons in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Sartini, S; Lattanzi, D; Ambrogini, P; Di Palma, M; Galati, C; Savelli, D; Polidori, E; Calcabrini, C; Rocchi, M B L; Sestili, P; Cuppini, R

    2016-01-15

    Creatine supplementation has been shown to protect neurons from oxidative damage due to its antioxidant and ergogenic functions. These features have led to the hypothesis of creatine supplementation use during pregnancy as prophylactic treatment to prevent CNS damage, such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Unfortunately, very little is known on the effects of creatine supplementation during neuron differentiation, while in vitro studies revealed an influence on neuron excitability, leaving the possibility of creatine supplementation during the CNS development an open question. Using a multiple approach, we studied the hippocampal neuron morphological and functional development in neonatal rats born by dams supplemented with 1% creatine in drinking water during pregnancy. CA1 pyramidal neurons of supplemented newborn rats showed enhanced dendritic tree development, increased LTP maintenance, larger evoked-synaptic responses, and higher intrinsic excitability in comparison to controls. Moreover, a faster repolarizing phase of action potential with the appearance of a hyperpolarization were recorded in neurons of the creatine-treated group. Consistently, CA1 neurons of creatine exposed pups exhibited a higher maximum firing frequency than controls. In summary, we found that creatine supplementation during pregnancy positively affects morphological and electrophysiological development of CA1 neurons in offspring rats, increasing neuronal excitability. Altogether, these findings emphasize the need to evaluate the benefits and the safety of maternal intake of creatine in humans.

  16. Odours stimulate neuronal activity in the dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation during path integration

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, P. E.; Phillips, J. B.; Gonçalves, A.; Marques, P. A. M.; Nĕmec, P.

    2014-01-01

    The dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation of birds is commonly assumed to play a central role in processing information needed for geographical positioning and homing. Previous work has interpreted odour-induced activity in this region as evidence for an ‘olfactory map’. Here, we show, using c-Fos expression as a marker, that neuronal activation in the dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation of pigeons is primarily a response to odour novelty, not to the spatial distribution of odour sources that would be necessary for an olfactory map. Pigeons exposed to odours had significantly more neurons activated in this area of the brain than pigeons exposed to filtered air with odours removed. This increased activity was observed only in response to unfamiliar odours. No change in activity was observed when pigeons were exposed to home odours. These findings are consistent with non-home odours activating non-olfactory components of the pigeon's navigation system. The pattern of neuronal activation in the triangular and dorsomedial areas of the hippocampal formation was, by contrast, consistent with the possibility that odours play a role in providing spatial information. PMID:24671977

  17. Odours stimulate neuronal activity in the dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation during path integration.

    PubMed

    Jorge, P E; Phillips, J B; Gonçalves, A; Marques, P A M; Nĕmec, P

    2014-05-22

    The dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation of birds is commonly assumed to play a central role in processing information needed for geographical positioning and homing. Previous work has interpreted odour-induced activity in this region as evidence for an 'olfactory map'. Here, we show, using c-Fos expression as a marker, that neuronal activation in the dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation of pigeons is primarily a response to odour novelty, not to the spatial distribution of odour sources that would be necessary for an olfactory map. Pigeons exposed to odours had significantly more neurons activated in this area of the brain than pigeons exposed to filtered air with odours removed. This increased activity was observed only in response to unfamiliar odours. No change in activity was observed when pigeons were exposed to home odours. These findings are consistent with non-home odours activating non-olfactory components of the pigeon's navigation system. The pattern of neuronal activation in the triangular and dorsomedial areas of the hippocampal formation was, by contrast, consistent with the possibility that odours play a role in providing spatial information.

  18. Dietary cholesterol concentration affects synaptic plasticity and dendrite spine morphology of rabbit hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Desheng; Zheng, Wen

    2015-10-05

    Previous studies have shown dietary cholesterol can enhance learning but retard memory which may be partly due to increased cholesterol levels in hippocampus and reduced afterhyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude of hippocampal CA1 neurons. This study explored the dose-dependent effect of dietary cholesterol on synaptic plasticity of rabbit hippocampal CA1 neurons and spine morphology, the postsynaptic structures responsible for synaptic plasticity. Field potential recordings revealed a low concentration of dietary cholesterol increased long-term potentiation (LTP) expression while high concentrations produced a pronounced reduction in LTP expression. Dietary cholesterol facilitated basal synaptic transmission but did not influence presynaptic function. DiI staining showed dietary cholesterol induced alterations in dendrite spine morphology characterized by increased mushroom spine density and decreased thin spine density, two kinds of dendritic spines that may be linked to memory consolidation and learning acquisition. Dietary cholesterol also modulated the geometric measures of mushroom spines. Therefore, dietary cholesterol dose-dependently modulated both synaptic plasticity and dendrite spine morphologies of hippocampal CA1 neurons that could mediate learning and memory changes previously seen to result from feeding a cholesterol diet.

  19. K+ channel regulation of signal propagation in dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, D A; Magee, J C; Colbert, C M; Johnston, D

    1997-06-26

    Pyramidal neurons receive tens of thousands of synaptic inputs on their dendrites. The dendrites dynamically alter the strengths of these synapses and coordinate them to produce an output in ways that are not well understood. Surprisingly, there turns out to be a very high density of transient A-type potassium ion channels in dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. These channels prevent initiation of an action potential in the dendrites, limit the back-propagation of action potentials into the dendrites, and reduce excitatory synaptic events. The channels act to prevent large, rapid dendritic depolarizations, thereby regulating orthograde and retrograde propagation of dendritic potentials.

  20. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} is expressed in hippocampal neurons and its activation prevents {beta}-amyloid neurodegeneration: role of Wnt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C. . E-mail: ninestr@genes.bio.puc.cl; Godoy, Juan A.; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A.; Koenig, Cecilia S.; Bronfman, Miguel

    2005-03-10

    The molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves the participation of the amyloid-{beta}-peptide (A{beta}), which plays a critical role in the neurodegeneration that triggers the disease. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors, which are members of the nuclear receptor family. We report here that (1) PPAR{gamma} is present in rat hippocampal neurons in culture. (2) Activation of PPAR{gamma} by troglitazone and rosiglitazone protects rat hippocampal neurons against A{beta}-induced neurodegeneration, as shown by the 3-[4,5 -2yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay, immunofluorescence using an anti-heavy neurofilament antibody, and quantitative electron microscopy. (3) Hippocampal neurons treated with several PPAR{gamma} agonists, including troglitazone, rosiglitazone, and ciglitazone, prevent the excitotoxic A{beta}-induced rise in bulk-free Ca{sup 2+}. (4) PPAR{gamma} activation results in the modulation of Wnt signaling components, including the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and an increase of the cytoplasmic and nuclear {beta}-catenin levels. We conclude that the activation of PPAR{gamma} prevents A{beta}-induced neurodegeneration by a mechanism that may involve a cross talk between neuronal PPAR{gamma} and the Wnt signaling pathway. More important, the fact that the activation of PPAR{gamma} attenuated A{beta}-dependent neurodegeneration opens the possibility to fight AD from a new therapeutic perspective.

  1. Rat Hippocampal Neurons Express Genes for Both Rod Retinal and Olfactory Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels: Novel Targets for cAMP/cGMP Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingston, Paul A.; Zufall, Frank; Barnstable, Colin J.

    1996-09-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are Ca2+-permeable, nonspecific cation channels that can be activated through direct interaction with cAMP and/or cGMP. Recent electrophysiological evidence for these channels in cultured hippocampal neurons prompted us to investigate the expression of CNG channel genes in hippocampus. PCR amplification detected the expression of transcripts for subunit 1 of both the rod photoreceptor (RCNGC1) and the olfactory receptor cell (OCNGC1) subtype of CNG channel in adult rat hippocampus. In situ hybridization detected expression of both channel subtypes in most principal neurons, including pyramidal cells of the CA1 through CA3 regions and granule cells of the dentate gyrus. From the hybridization patterns, we conclude that the two genes are colocalized in individual neurons. Comparison of the patterns of expression of type 1 cGMP-dependent protein kinase and the CNG channels suggests that hippocampal neurons can respond to changes in cGMP levels with both rapid changes in CNG channel activity and slower changes induced by phosphorylation. Future models of hippocampal function should include CNG channels and their effects on both electrical responses and intracellular Ca2+ levels.

  2. Young adult born neurons enhance hippocampal dependent performance via influences on bilateral networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Jia-Min; Tseng, Hua-an; Desai, Mitul; Bucklin, Mark E; Mohammed, Ali I; Robinson, Nick TM; Boyden, Edward S; Rangel, Lara M; Jasanoff, Alan P; Gritton, Howard J; Han, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis supports performance in many hippocampal dependent tasks. Considering the small number of adult-born neurons generated at any given time, it is surprising that this sparse population of cells can substantially influence behavior. Recent studies have demonstrated that heightened excitability and plasticity may be critical for the contribution of young adult-born cells for certain tasks. What is not well understood is how these unique biophysical and synaptic properties may translate to networks that support behavioral function. Here we employed a location discrimination task in mice while using optogenetics to transiently silence adult-born neurons at different ages. We discovered that adult-born neurons promote location discrimination during early stages of development but only if they undergo maturation during task acquisition. Silencing of young adult-born neurons also produced changes extending to the contralateral hippocampus, detectable by both electrophysiology and fMRI measurements, suggesting young neurons may modulate location discrimination through influences on bilateral hippocampal networks. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22429.001 PMID:27914197

  3. Increased vulnerability of hippocampal neurons from presenilin-1 mutant knock-in mice to amyloid beta-peptide toxicity: central roles of superoxide production and caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q; Sebastian, L; Sopher, B L; Miller, M W; Ware, C B; Martin, G M; Mattson, M P

    1999-03-01

    Many cases of early-onset inherited Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by mutations in the presenilin-1 (PS1) gene. Overexpression of PS1 mutations in cultured PC12 cells increases their vulnerability to apoptosis-induced trophic factor withdrawal and oxidative insults. We now report that primary hippocampal neurons from PS1 mutant knock-in mice, which express the human PS1M146V mutation at normal levels, exhibit increased vulnerability to amyloid beta-peptide toxicity. The endangering action of mutant PS1 was associated with increased superoxide production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and caspase activation. The peroxynitrite-scavenging antioxidant uric acid and the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone protected hippocampal neurons expressing mutant PS1 against cell death induced by amyloid beta-peptide. Increased oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenic action of PS1 mutations, and antioxidants may counteract the adverse property of such AD-linked mutations.

  4. Differential regulation of amyloid-. beta. -protein mRNA expression within hippocampal neuronal subpopulations in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, G.A.; Lewis, D.A.; Bahmanyar, S.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Young, W.G.; Morrison, J.H.; Wilson, M.C.

    1988-02-01

    The authors have mapped the neuroanatomical distribution of amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA within neuronal subpopulations of the hippocampal formation in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), normal aged human, and patients with Alzheimer disease. Amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA appears to be expressed in all hippocampal neurons, but at different levels of abundance. In the central nervous system of monkey and normal aged human, image analysis shows that neurons of the dentate gyrus and cornu Ammonis fields contain a 2.5-times-greater hybridization signal than is present in neurons of the subiculum and entorhinal cortex. In contrast, in the Alzheimer disease hippocampal formation, the levels of amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA in the cornu Ammonis field 3 and parasubiculum are equivalent. These findings suggest that within certain neuronal subpopulations cell type-specific regulation of amyloid-..beta..-protein gene expression may be altered in Alzheimer disease.

  5. Domoic acid disrupts the activity and connectivity of neuronal networks in organotypic brain slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Hiolski, E M; Ito, S; Beggs, J M; Lefebvre, K A; Litke, A M; Smith, D R

    2016-09-01

    Domoic acid is a neurotoxin produced by algae and is found in seafood during harmful algal blooms. As a glutamate agonist, domoic acid inappropriately stimulates excitatory activity in neurons. At high doses, this leads to seizures and brain lesions, but it is unclear how lower, asymptomatic exposures disrupt neuronal activity. Domoic acid has been detected in an increasing variety of species across a greater geographical range than ever before, making it critical to understand the potential health impacts of low-level exposure on vulnerable marine mammal and human populations. To determine whether prolonged domoic acid exposure altered neuronal activity in hippocampal networks, we used a custom-made 512 multi-electrode array with high spatial and temporal resolution to record extracellular potentials (spikes) in mouse organotypic brain slice cultures. We identified individual neurons based on spike waveform and location, and measured the activity and functional connectivity within the neuronal networks of brain slice cultures. Domoic acid exposure significantly altered neuronal spiking activity patterns, and increased functional connectivity within exposed cultures, in the absence of overt cellular or neuronal toxicity. While the overall spiking activity of neurons in domoic acid-exposed cultures was comparable to controls, exposed neurons spiked significantly more often in bursts. We also identified a subset of neurons that were electrophysiologically silenced in exposed cultures, and putatively identified those neurons as fast-spiking inhibitory neurons. These results provide evidence that domoic acid affects neuronal activity in the absence of cytotoxicity, and suggest that neurodevelopmental exposure to domoic acid may alter neurological function in the absence of clinical symptoms.

  6. Stochastic fluctuations in gene expression in aging hippocampal neurons could be exacerbated by traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Joseph; Boone, Deborah; Weisz, Harris; Jennings, Kristofer; Uchida, Tatsuo; Parsley, Margaret; DeWitt, Douglas; Prough, Donald; Hellmich, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a risk factor for age-related dementia and development of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease that are associated with cognitive decline. The exact mechanism for this risk is unknown but we hypothesized that TBI is exacerbating age-related changes in gene expression. Here, we present evidence in an animal model that experimental TBI increases age-related stochastic gene expression. We compared the variability in expression of several genes associated with cell survival or death, among three groups of laser capture microdissected hippocampal neurons from aging rat brains. TBI increased stochastic fluctuations in gene expression in both dying and surviving neurons compared to the naïve neurons. Increases in random, stochastic fluctuations in prosurvival or prodeath gene expression could potentially alter cell survival or cell death pathways in aging neurons after TBI which may lead to age-related cognitive decline.

  7. An organotypic hippocampal slice culture model of excitotoxic injury induced spontaneous recurrent epileptiform discharges

    PubMed Central

    Ziobro, Julie M.; Deshpande, Laxmikant S.; DeLorenzo, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the major cause of acquired epilepsy in the adult population. The mechanisms of ischemia-induced epileptogenesis are not completely understood, but glutamate is associated with both ischemia-induced injury and epileptogenesis. The objective of this study was to develop an in vitro model of epileptogenesis induced by glutamate injury in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs), as observed in stroke-induced acquired epilepsy. OHSCs were prepared from 1-week old Sprague-Dawley rat pups. They were exposed to 3.5 mM glutamate for 35 minutes at 21 days in vitro. Field potential recordings and whole-cell current clamp electrophysiology were used to monitor the development of in vitro seizure events up to 19 days after injury. Propidium iodide uptake assays were used to examine acute cell death following injury. Glutamate exposure produced a subset of hippocampal neurons that died acutely and a larger population of injured but surviving neurons. These surviving neurons manifested spontaneous, recurrent epileptiform discharges in neural networks, characterized by paroxysmal depolarizing shifts and high frequency spiking in both field potential and intracellular recordings. This model also exhibited anticonvulsant sensitivity similar to in vivo models. Our study is the first demonstration of a chronic model of acquired epilepsy in OHSCs following a glutamate injury. This in vitro model of glutamate injury–induced epileptogenesis may help develop therapeutic strategies to prevent epileptogenesis after stroke and elucidate some of the mechanisms that underlie stroke-induced epilepsy in a more anatomically in-tact system. PMID:21111720

  8. Altered neuronal excitability underlies impaired hippocampal function in an animal model of psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Grüter, Thomas; Wiescholleck, Valentina; Dubovyk, Valentyna; Aliane, Verena; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Psychosis is accompanied by severe attentional deficits, and impairments in associational-memory processing and sensory information processing that are ascribed to dysfunctions in prefrontal and hippocampal function. Disruptions of glutamatergic signaling may underlie these alterations: Antagonism of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) results in similar molecular, cellular, cognitive and behavioral changes in rodents and/or humans as those that occur in psychosis, raising the question as to whether changes in glutamatergic transmission may be intrinsic to the pathophysiology of the disease. In an animal model of psychosis that comprises treatment with the irreversible NMDAR-antagonist, MK801, we explored the cellular mechanisms that may underlie hippocampal dysfunction in psychosis. MK801-treatment resulted in a profound loss of hippocampal LTP that was evident 4 weeks after treatment. Whereas neuronal expression of the immediate early gene, Arc, was enhanced in the hippocampus by spatial learning in controls, MK801-treated animals failed to show activity-dependent increases in Arc expression. By contrast, a significant increase in basal Arc expression in the absence of learning was evident compared to controls. Paired-pulse (PP) facilitation was increased at the 40 ms interval indicating that NMDAR and/or fast GABAergic-mediated neurotransmission was disrupted. In line with this, MK801-treatment resulted in a significant decrease in GABA(A), and increase in GABA(B)-receptor-expression in PFC, along with a significant increase of GABA(B)- and NMDAR-GluN2B expression in the dentate gyrus. NMDAR-GluN1 or GluN2A subunit expression was unchanged. These data suggest that in psychosis, deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory may be caused by a loss of hippocampal LTP that arises through enhanced hippocampal neuronal excitability, altered GluN2B and GABA receptor expression and an uncoupling of the hippocampus-prefrontal cortex circuitry. PMID:26042007

  9. Muscarine inhibits high-threshold calcium currents with two distinct modes in rat embryonic hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Toselli, M; Taglietti, V

    1995-01-01

    1. Ca2+ channel modulation by muscarine was investigated in primary cultured embryonic rat hippocampal neurons using the whole-cell variant of the patch-clamp technique. 2. Muscarine produced a reversible and concentration-dependent decrease in the Ba2+ current amplitude. In 65% of neurons sensitive to the agonist, current inhibition was time and voltage dependent, being maximal between -20 and 0 mV and decreasing at depolarizing potentials. In the remaining 35% of neurons, the effects of muscarine were voltage independent, inhibition being constant in a wide potential range between -20 and +80 mV. 3. Different receptors might be involved in the two modes of modulation. Muscarine-induced voltage-dependent inhibition of Ba2+ current was best suppressed by the muscarinic receptor antagonist 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methyl-piperidine methiodide (81% suppression), while voltage-independent inhibition was best suppressed by AFDX116 (75% suppression). 4. In cells treated with omega-conotoxin (omega-CgTX), the voltage-independent mode of inhibition was strongly prevented, suggesting that the two modulatory mechanisms (voltage dependent and voltage independent) operate on separate classes of high-voltage-activated (HVA) Ca2+ channels. 5. A pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein is involved in both modes of action of muscarine, since both modes were prevented by pretreatment of the cells with 50 ng ml-1 pertussis toxin. 6. Both modes of modulation were mimicked in different cells by intracellular application of GTP-gamma-S. However, the onset of voltage-independent inhibition was about 5 times slower than that of voltage-dependent inhibition, suggesting involvement of a more complex metabolic pathway for the former mode of channel modulation. 7. Relief of the voltage-dependent inhibition was obtained by depolarizing voltage prepulses and occurred with kinetics that depended on agonist concentration. 8. The voltage-dependent inhibition could be simulated by a kinetic model in which

  10. Neuronal Activity Regulates Hippocampal miRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Eacker, Stephen M.; Keuss, Matthew J.; Berezikov, Eugene; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal activity regulates a broad range of processes in the hippocampus, including the precise regulation of translation. Disruptions in proper translational control in the nervous system are associated with a variety of disorders that fall in the autistic spectrum. MicroRNA (miRNA) represent a relatively recently discovered player in the regulation of translation in the nervous system. We have conducted an in depth analysis of how neuronal activity regulates miRNA expression in the hippocampus. Using deep sequencing we exhaustively identify all miRNAs, including 15 novel miRNAs, expressed in hippocampus of the adult mouse. We identified 119 miRNAs documented in miRBase but less than half of these miRNA were expressed at a level greater than 0.1% of total miRNA. Expression profiling following induction of neuronal activity by electroconvulsive shock demonstrates that most miRNA show a biphasic pattern of expression: rapid induction of specific mature miRNA expression followed by a decline in expression. These results have important implications into how miRNAs influence activity-dependent translational control. PMID:21984899

  11. Diversity of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat hippocampal neurons. I. Pharmacological and functional evidence for distinct structural subtypes.

    PubMed

    Alkondon, M; Albuquerque, E X

    1993-06-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors present on cultured hippocampal neurons from fetal rats were characterized by means of whole-cell patch-clamp technique, using a number of structurally divergent agonists and highly selective antagonists. Based upon the decay kinetics of the currents elicited by 3 mM acetylcholine (ACh) and their sensitivities to agonists and antagonists, the neurons were shown to exhibit four current types, IA, IB, II and III. Rapidly decaying currents (type IA) that were blocked by alpha-bungarotoxin (10 nM), kappa-bungarotoxin (10 nM) and methyllycaconitine (MLA, 1 nM) were the most frequent and were found in 83% of the neurons tested. Type II currents (found in 5% of the neurons) were blocked by dihydro-beta-erythroidine (10 nM), and by high concentrations of MLA and kappa-bungarotoxin (100 nM each) but not by alpha-bungarotoxin (100 nM). Type III currents (elicited in 2% of the neurons) decayed slowly and were blocked by (+/-)-mecamylamine (1 microM) but not by alpha-bungarotoxin, kappa-bungarotoxin or MLA (each at 100 nM). Some of the cells (10% of the neurons) had mixed responses (named type IB), which were only partially blocked by MLA (1 nM) or dihydro-beta-erythroidine (10 nM) alone and were completely blocked by combination of the two agents. The order of potency of agonists in activating the currents was the following: for type IA, (+)-anatoxin-a > 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenyl-piperazinium > (-)-nicotine > cystisine > ACh > carbachol > (+)-nicotine > arecoline > suberyldicholine; for type II, ACh > (+)-anatoxin-a > (-)-nicotine > 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenyl-piperazinium > carbachol > cytisine > (+)-nicotine > suberyldicholine > arecoline. Certain agonists were particularly useful in discriminating among the various types of currents: ACh, carbachol, (-)-nicotine and suberyldicholine for type II, and cytisine for type III currents. The EC50 of ACh was approximately 130 microM for type IA and approximately 2 microM for type II currents. A marked

  12. Amyloid beta oligomers induce neuronal elasticity changes in age-dependent manner: a force spectroscopy study on living hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ungureanu, Andreea-Alexandra; Benilova, Iryna; Krylychkina, Olga; Braeken, Dries; De Strooper, Bart; Van Haesendonck, Chris; Dotti, Carlos G.; Bartic, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Small soluble species of amyloid-beta (Aβ) formed during early peptide aggregation stages are responsible for several neurotoxic mechanisms relevant to the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), although their interaction with the neuronal membrane is not completely understood. This study quantifies the changes in the neuronal membrane elasticity induced by treatment with the two most common Aβ isoforms found in AD brains: Aβ40 and Aβ42. Using quantitative atomic force microscopy (AFM), we measured for the first time the static elastic modulus of living primary hippocampal neurons treated with pre-aggregated Aβ40 and Aβ42 soluble species. Our AFM results demonstrate changes in the elasticity of young, mature and aged neurons treated for a short time with the two Aβ species pre-aggregated for 2 hours. Neurons aging under stress conditions, showing aging hallmarks, are the most susceptible to amyloid binding and show the largest decrease in membrane stiffness upon Aβ treatment. Membrane stiffness defines the way in which cells respond to mechanical forces in their environment and has been shown to be important for processes such as gene expression, ion-channel gating and neurotransmitter vesicle transport. Thus, one can expect that changes in neuronal membrane elasticity might directly induce functional changes related to neurodegeneration. PMID:27173984

  13. Activation of GABA(A) receptors by taurine and muscimol blocks the neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid in rat hippocampal and cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Paula-Lima, Andréa C; De Felice, Fernanda G; Brito-Moreira, Jordano; Ferreira, Sérgio T

    2005-12-01

    The beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) is centrally related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is potently neurotoxic to central nervous system neurons. The neurotoxicity of Abeta has been partially related to the over activation of glutamatergic transmission and excitotoxicity. Taurine is a naturally occurring beta-amino acid present in the mammalian brain. Due to its safety and tolerability, taurine has been clinically used in humans in the treatment of a number of non-neurological disorders. Here, we show that micromolar doses of taurine block the neurotoxicity of Abeta to rat hippocampal and cortical neurons in culture. Moreover, taurine also rescues central neurons from the excitotoxicity induced by high concentrations of extracellular glutamate. Neuroprotection by taurine is abrogated by picrotoxin, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist. GABA and muscimol, an agonist of the GABA(A) receptor, also block neuronal death induced by Abeta in rat hippocampal and cortical neurons. These results suggest that activation of GABA(A) receptors protects neurons against Abeta toxicity in AD-affected regions of the mammalian brain and that taurine should be investigated as a novel therapeutic tool in the treatment of AD and of other neurological disorders in which excitotoxicity plays a relevant role.

  14. Bcl-xL Is Necessary for Neurite Outgrowth in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Park, Han-A; Licznerski, Pawel; Alavian, Kambiz N.; Shanabrough, Marya

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) protects survival in dividing cells and developing neurons, but was not known to regulate growth. Growth and synapse formation are indispensable for neuronal survival in development, inextricably linking these processes. We have previously shown that, during synaptic plasticity, Bcl-xL produces changes in synapse number, size, activity, and mitochondrial metabolism. In this study, we determine whether Bcl-xL is required for healthy neurite outgrowth and whether neurite outgrowth is necessary for survival in developing neurons in the presence or absence of stress. Results: Depletion of endogenous Bcl-xL impairs neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons followed by delayed cell death which is dependent on upregulation of death receptor 6 (DR6), a molecule that regulates axonal pruning. Under hypoxic conditions, Bcl-xL-depleted neurons demonstrate increased vulnerability to neuronal process loss and to death compared with hypoxic controls. Endogenous DR6 expression and upregulation during hypoxia are associated with worsened neurite damage; depletion of DR6 partially rescues neuronal process loss, placing DR6 downstream of the effects of Bcl-xL on neuronal process outgrowth and protection. In vivo ischemia produces early increases in DR6, suggesting a role for DR6 in brain injury. Innovation: We suggest that DR6 levels are usually suppressed by Bcl-xL; Bcl-xL depletion leads to upregulation of DR6, failure of neuronal outgrowth in nonstressed cells, and exacerbation of hypoxia-induced neuronal injury. Conclusion: Bcl-xL regulates neuronal outgrowth during development and protects neurites from hypoxic insult, as opposed by DR6. Factors that enhance neurite formation may protect neurons against hypoxic injury or neurodegenerative stimuli. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 93–108. PMID:24787232

  15. Discharge correlates of hippocampal complex spike neurons in behaving rats passively displaced on a mobile robot.

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, V V; Wiener, S I; Berthoz, A

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated location-, movement-, and directional-selectivity of action potential discharges of hippocampal neurons in awake rats subjected to passive displacements in order to estimate vestibular contributions to this activity. Water-deprived rats were habituated to being restrained in a sling mounted on a moving robot. The extracellular activity of single complex-spike cells in area CA1 of the hippocampus was recorded with glass micropipettes in the rats during passive translations, rotations, and immobility. The robot made a standardized series of trajectories starting from each of four corners of a square enclosure surrounded by black curtains. A drop of water was delivered to the rat each time the robot arrived at one designated corner of the arena. The activities of 29 neurons were investigated in 45 recording sessions (16 of which were in total darkness) in four rats. Hippocampal neurons recorded in 31 sessions (9 sessions in the dark) had significant location-selective increases or decreases in firing rate as the rat was passively displaced or immobile within the experimental arena. In 20 sessions (6 in the dark) direction-selective discharges were found when the rat was in the corners. In six sessions, cells discharged selectively during movement initiation or termination. These data suggest that information essential for path integration is present in the hippocampus and that inertial cues could play a vital role in hippocampal spatial functions. These results resemble those of O'Mara et al. ([1994] J Neurosci 14:6511) using the same protocol in macaques, suggesting similarities in hippocampal processing and function.

  16. Early β-Amyloid-induced Synaptic Dysfunction Is Counteracted by Estrogen in Organotypic Hippocampal Cultures.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Sara; Spampinato, Simona Federica; Capani, Francisco; Sortino, Maria Angela

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we set up a model of slow progression of neuronal injury by exposing organotypic hippocampal cultures to a low concentration of Amyloid β (25-35) peptide (Aβ, 2 μM) to analyze the time-related effects of 17-β estradiol (17β-E2, 10 nM). Neuronal death occurs after 7 d and is prevented by addition of 17β-E2 24 h prior to, together with or 48 h after exposure to Aβ. This effect is mimicked by selective ERα agonist PPT (100 nM). Treatment with Aβ leads to early and transient (16-72 h) increase of pre- and post-synaptic proteins synaptophysin and PSD95, followed by a decrease coincident with neuronal death (7d), all prevented by 17β-E2. At 72 h of Aβ exposure, synaptic activity is increased, as by higher levels of glutamate and increased loading and unloading of FM 1-43-labeled synaptic vesicles. All these effects are also prevented by 17β-E2. These data point out beneficial effects of estrogen on early Aβ-induced synaptic disruption.

  17. Epileptogenesis in organotypic hippocampal cultures has limited dependence on culture medium composition

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Mark M.; Staley, Kevin J.

    2017-01-01

    Rodent organotypic hippocampal cultures spontaneously develop epileptiform activity after approximately 2 weeks in vitro and are increasingly used as a model of chronic post-traumatic epilepsy. However, organotypic cultures are maintained in an artificial environment (culture medium), which contains electrolytes, glucose, amino acids and other components that are not present at the same concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Therefore, it is possible that epileptogenesis in organotypic cultures is driven by these components. We examined the influence of medium composition on epileptogenesis. Epileptogenesis was evaluated by measurements of lactate and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (biomarkers of ictal activity and cell death, respectively) in spent culture media, immunohistochemistry and automated 3-D cell counts, and extracellular recordings from CA3 regions. Changes in culture medium components moderately influenced lactate and LDH levels as well as electrographic seizure burden and cell death. However, epileptogenesis occurred in any culture medium that was capable of supporting neural survival. We conclude that medium composition is unlikely to be the cause of epileptogenesis in the organotypic hippocampal culture model of chronic post-traumatic epilepsy. PMID:28225808

  18. Epileptogenesis in organotypic hippocampal cultures has limited dependence on culture medium composition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Saponjian, Yero; Mahoney, Mark M; Staley, Kevin J; Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2017-01-01

    Rodent organotypic hippocampal cultures spontaneously develop epileptiform activity after approximately 2 weeks in vitro and are increasingly used as a model of chronic post-traumatic epilepsy. However, organotypic cultures are maintained in an artificial environment (culture medium), which contains electrolytes, glucose, amino acids and other components that are not present at the same concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Therefore, it is possible that epileptogenesis in organotypic cultures is driven by these components. We examined the influence of medium composition on epileptogenesis. Epileptogenesis was evaluated by measurements of lactate and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (biomarkers of ictal activity and cell death, respectively) in spent culture media, immunohistochemistry and automated 3-D cell counts, and extracellular recordings from CA3 regions. Changes in culture medium components moderately influenced lactate and LDH levels as well as electrographic seizure burden and cell death. However, epileptogenesis occurred in any culture medium that was capable of supporting neural survival. We conclude that medium composition is unlikely to be the cause of epileptogenesis in the organotypic hippocampal culture model of chronic post-traumatic epilepsy.

  19. Diverse impact of neuronal activity at θ frequency on hippocampal long-term plasticity.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2015-09-01

    Brain oscillatory activity is considered an essential aspect of brain function, and its frequency can vary from <1 Hz to >200 Hz, depending on the brain states and projection. Episodes of rhythmic activity accompany hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in vivo. Therefore, long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression, which are considered viable substrates of learning and memory, are often experimentally studied in paradigms of patterned high-frequency (>50 Hz) and low-frequency (<5 Hz) stimulation. However, the impact of intermediate frequencies on neuronal plasticity remains less well understood. In particular, hippocampal neurons are specifically tuned for activity at θ frequency (4-8 Hz); this band contributes significantly to electroencephalographic signals, and it is likely to be involved in shaping synaptic strength in hippocampal circuits. Here, we review in vitro and in vivo studies showing that variation of θ-activity duration may affect long-term modification of synaptic strength and neuronal excitability in the hippocampus. Such θ-pulse-induced neuronal plasticity 1) is long-lasting, 2) may be built on previously stabilized potentiation in the synapse, 3) may produce opposite changes in synaptic strength, and 4) requires complex molecular machinery. Apparently innocuous episodes of low-frequency synaptic activity may have a profound impact on network signaling, thereby contributing to information processing in the hippocampus and beyond. In addition, θ-pulse-induced LTP might be an advantageous protocol in studies of specific molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity.

  20. The tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor orthovanadate mimics NGF-induced neuroprotective signaling in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Norbert; Culmsee, Carsten; Klumpp, Susanne; Krieglstein, Josef

    2004-06-01

    Activation of the high affinity neurotrophin receptor tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) by nerve growth factor (NGF) leads to phosphorylation of intracellular tyrosine residues of the receptor with subsequent activation of signaling pathways involved in neuronal survival such as the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3-K)/protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. In the present study, we tested whether inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) by orthovanadate could enhance tyrosine phosphorylation of TrkA thereby stimulating NGF-like survival signaling in embryonic hippocampal neurons. We found that the PTP inhibitor orthovanadate (1 microM) enhanced TrkA phosphorylation and protected neurons against staurosporine (STS)-induced apoptosis in a time-and concentration-dependent manner. Inhibition of PTP enhanced TrkA phosphorylation also in the presence of NGF antibodies indicating that NGF binding to TrkA was not required for the effects of orthovanadate. Moreover, orthovanadate enhanced phosphorylation of Akt and the MAPK Erk1/2 suggesting that the signaling pathways involved in the protective effect were similar to those activated by NGF. Accordingly, inhibition of PI3-K by wortmannin and MAPK-kinase (MEK) inhibition by UO126 abolished the neuroprotective effects. In conclusion, the results indicate that orthovanadate mimics the effect of NGF on survival signaling pathways in hippocampal neurons. Thus, PTP inhibition appears to be an appropriate strategy to trigger neuroprotective signaling pathways downstream of neurotrophin receptors.

  1. Active Summation of Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials in Hippocampal CA3 Pyramidal Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Nathaniel N.; Barrionuevo, German

    1998-09-01

    The manner in which the thousands of synaptic inputs received by a pyramidal neuron are summed is critical both to our understanding of the computations that may be performed by single neurons and of the codes used by neurons to transmit information. Recent work on pyramidal cell dendrites has shown that subthreshold synaptic inputs are modulated by voltage-dependent channels, raising the possibility that summation of synaptic responses is influenced by the active properties of dendrites. Here, we use somatic and dendritic whole-cell recordings to show that pyramidal cells in hippocampal area CA3 sum distal and proximal excitatory postsynaptic potentials sublinearly and actively, that the degree of nonlinearity depends on the magnitude and timing of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials, and that blockade of transient potassium channels linearizes summation. Nonlinear summation of synaptic inputs could have important implications for the computations performed by single neurons and also for the role of the mossy fiber and perforant path inputs to hippocampal area CA3.

  2. Roles of the serotonin 5-HT4 receptor in dendrite formation of the rat hippocampal neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kozono, Naoki; Ohtani, Akiko; Shiga, Takashi

    2017-01-15

    Serotonin (5-HT) is involved in various aspects of hippocampal development, although the specific roles of 5-HT receptors are poorly understood. We investigated the roles of 5-HT receptors in the dendrite formation of hippocampal neurons. We focused on the 5-HT4 receptor, which is coupled with Gs protein, and compared the effects with those of the Gi-coupled 5-HT1A receptor. Neurons from rat hippocampi at embryonic day 18 were dissociated and treated for 4 days with the 5-HT4 receptor agonist BIMU8 or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH DPAT. The formation of primary dendrites and dendrite branching were promoted by BIMU8, whereas the dendrite branching was inhibited by 8-OH DPAT. BIMU8-induced promotion of dendrite formation was neutralized by concomitant treatment with the 5-HT4 receptor antagonist, confirming the specific actions of the 5-HT4 receptor. We then examined the signaling mechanisms underlying the actions of the 5-HT4 receptor by using a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. The BIMU8-induced promotion of dendrite formation was reversed partially by the PKA inhibitor, suggesting involvement of PKA signaling downstream of the 5-HT4 receptor. Finally, we examined the contribution of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to the promotion of dendrite formation by BIMU8. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that BIMU8 increased the BDNF mRNA expression and that treatment of cultured neurons with the TrkB antagonist reversed the BIMU8-induced increase in dendrite formation. In summary, the present study suggests a novel role for the 5-HT4 receptor in facilitation of dendrite formation in which intracellular signaling of PKA and the BDNF-TrkB system may be involved.

  3. Effect of dexmedetomidine on hippocampal neuron development and BDNF-TrkB signal expression in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jie; Ou, Wei; Zou, Xiao-Hua; Yao, Yin; Wu, Jin-Li

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to explore the effect of dexmedetomidine (DEX) on hippocampal neuron development process and on molecular expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) signaling pathway in neonatal rats. The hippocampal neuron cells were isolated from newborn neonatal rats and cultured in vitro. One control group and three treated groups with 1, 10, and 100 μmol/L DEX were used for the study. Cell activity and apoptosis were detected by the MTT and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated uridine triphosphate (UTP) nick end labeling assays. The synaptophysin (SYN) and postsynaptic density 95 (PSD95) were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. There was no difference in the viability of neuron cells among the different dose groups of DEX and the control group during days 2–10 (P>0.05). Compared to the control group, there was no significant difference (P>0.05) in the expressions of SYN and PSD95 in the groups treated with 1 and 10 μmol/L DEX, whereas significant difference in the expression was observed in the group treated with 100 μmol/L DEX (P<0.01). Compared with the control group, the expression of BDNF was significantly upregulated (P<0.05) in the group treated with 100 μmol/L DEX. There were no significant differences in TrkB expression among the four groups. The expression of p-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor increased with an increase in the concentration of DEX; however, only the high dose revealed a significant upregulation compared with the control group. The neuroprotective effect of DEX may be achieved by upregulating the expression of BDNF and phosphorylation level of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. PMID:28003751

  4. Base excision repair activities in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Rolseth, Veslemøy; Rundén-Pran, Elise; Neurauter, Christine Gran; Yndestad, Arne; Luna, Luisa; Aukrust, Pål; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Bjørås, Magnar

    2008-06-01

    The capacity for DNA repair is likely to be one of the factors that determine the vulnerability of neurons to ischemic stress and may influence the pathological outcome of stroke. In this report, initiation of base excision repair (BER) was assessed by analysis of enzyme activity and gene expression level of DNA glycosylases and AP-endonucleases in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) - an in vitro model of stroke. Under basal conditions, AP-endonuclease activity and base removal of ethenoadenine and 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) were higher (by approximately 20-35 %) in CA3/fascia dentata (FD) than in CA1. Base removal of uracil did not differ between the two hippocampal regions, while removal of 5-hydroxyuracil (5-OHU) was slightly less efficient in CA3/FD than in CA1. Analyses performed immediately after 30 min of OGD revealed a decreased AP-endonuclease activity (by approximately 20%) in CA1 as well as CA3/FD, and an increased ethenoadenine activity (by approximately 25%) in CA1. Activities for 8-oxoG, 5-OHU and uracil showed no significant changes at this time point. At 8h after OGD, none of the enzyme activities differed from control values. Real-time RT-PCR showed that transcription of DNA glycosylases, including Ogg1, Nth1, Ung, Aag, Neil1 and Neil2 were not changed in response to OGD treatment (t=0 h). The hippocampal expression of Neil2 was low compared with the other DNA glycosylases. These data indicate that CA1 has a lower capacity than CA3/FD for removal of base lesions under basal conditions. The relatively low capacity for BER in basal conditions and the apparent failure to upregulate repair of oxidative damage after OGD might contribute to the high vulnerability of CA1 to ischemic injury.

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor differentially regulates excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal cultures.

    PubMed

    Bolton, M M; Pittman, A J; Lo, D C

    2000-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been postulated to be a key signaling molecule in regulating synaptic strength and overall circuit activity. In this context, we have found that BDNF dramatically increases the frequency of spontaneously initiated action potentials in hippocampal neurons in dissociated culture. Using analysis of unitary synaptic transmission and immunocytochemical methods, we determined that chronic treatment with BDNF potentiates both excitatory and inhibitory transmission, but that it does so via different mechanisms. BDNF strengthens excitation primarily by augmenting the amplitude of AMPA receptor-mediated miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) but enhances inhibition by increasing the frequency of mIPSC and increasing the size of GABAergic synaptic terminals. In contrast to observations in other systems, BDNF-mediated increases in AMPA-receptor mediated mEPSC amplitudes did not require activity, because blocking action potentials with tetrodotoxin for the entire duration of BDNF treatment had no effect on the magnitude of this enhancement. These forms of synaptic regulations appear to be a selective action of BDNF because intrinsic excitability, synapse number, and neuronal survival are not affected in these cultures. Thus, although BDNF induces a net increase in overall circuit activity, this results from potentiation of both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic drive through distinct and selective physiological mechanisms.

  6. Pericellular innervation of neurons expressing abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in the hippocampal formation of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; Defelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) represent one of the main neuropathological features in the cerebral cortex associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This neurofibrillary lesion involves the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated or abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHF-tau) within neurons. We have used immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy reconstructions to examine the distribution of PHF-tau-immunoreactive (ir) cells, and their perisomatic GABAergic and glutamatergic innervations in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, correlative light and electron microscopy was employed to examine these neurons and the perisomatic synapses. We observed two patterns of staining in PHF-tau-ir neurons, pattern I (without NFT) and pattern II (with NFT), the distribution of which varies according to the cortical layer and area. Furthermore, the distribution of both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals around the soma and proximal processes of PHF-tau-ir neurons does not seem to be altered as it is indistinguishable from both control cases and from adjacent neurons that did not contain PHF-tau. At the electron microscope level, a normal looking neuropil with typical symmetric and asymmetric synapses was observed around PHF-tau-ir neurons. These observations suggest that the synaptic connectivity around the perisomatic region of these PHF-tau-ir neurons was apparently unaltered.

  7. Pericellular Innervation of Neurons Expressing Abnormally Hyperphosphorylated Tau in the Hippocampal Formation of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) represent one of the main neuropathological features in the cerebral cortex associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This neurofibrillary lesion involves the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated or abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHF-tau) within neurons. We have used immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy reconstructions to examine the distribution of PHF-tau-immunoreactive (ir) cells, and their perisomatic GABAergic and glutamatergic innervations in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, correlative light and electron microscopy was employed to examine these neurons and the perisomatic synapses. We observed two patterns of staining in PHF-tau-ir neurons, pattern I (without NFT) and pattern II (with NFT), the distribution of which varies according to the cortical layer and area. Furthermore, the distribution of both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals around the soma and proximal processes of PHF-tau-ir neurons does not seem to be altered as it is indistinguishable from both control cases and from adjacent neurons that did not contain PHF-tau. At the electron microscope level, a normal looking neuropil with typical symmetric and asymmetric synapses was observed around PHF-tau-ir neurons. These observations suggest that the synaptic connectivity around the perisomatic region of these PHF-tau-ir neurons was apparently unaltered. PMID:20631843

  8. Glutamatergic neurons of the mouse medial septum and diagonal band of Broca synaptically drive hippocampal pyramidal cells: relevance for hippocampal theta rhythm.

    PubMed

    Huh, Carey Y L; Goutagny, Romain; Williams, Sylvain

    2010-11-24

    Neurons of the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB) provide an important input to the hippocampus and are critically involved in learning and memory. Although cholinergic and GABAergic MS-DBB neurons are known to modulate hippocampal activity, the role of recently described glutamatergic MS-DBB neurons is unknown. Here, we examined the electrophysiological properties of glutamatergic MS-DBB neurons and tested whether they provide a functional synaptic input to the hippocampus. To visualize the glutamatergic neurons, we used MS-DBB slices from transgenic mice in which the green fluorescent protein is expressed specifically by vesicular glutamate transporter 2-positive neurons and characterized their properties using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. For assessing the function of the glutamatergic projection, we used an in vitro septohippocampal preparation, electrically stimulated the fornix or chemically activated the MS-DBB using NMDA microinfusions and recorded postsynaptic responses in CA3 pyramidal cells. We found that glutamatergic MS-DBB neurons as a population display a highly heterogeneous set of firing patterns including fast-, cluster-, burst-, and slow-firing. Remarkably, a significant proportion exhibited fast-firing properties, prominent I(h), and rhythmic spontaneous firing at theta frequencies similar to those found in GABAergic MS-DBB neurons. Activation of the MS-DBB led to fast, AMPA receptor-mediated glutamatergic responses in CA3 pyramidal cells. These results describe for the first time the electrophysiological signatures of glutamatergic MS-DBB neurons, th