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Sample records for cultured rat retinal

  1. A Method for the Isolation and Culture of Adult Rat Retinal Pigment Epithelial (RPE) Cells to Study Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Janosch P.; Kwok, Jessica C. F.; Vecino, Elena; Martin, Keith R.; Fawcett, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affect the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and lead to the death of the epithelial cells and ultimately blindness. RPE transplantation is currently a major focus of eye research and clinical trials using human stem cell-derived RPE cells are ongoing. However, it remains to be established to which extent the source of RPE cells for transplantation affects their therapeutic efficacy and this needs to be explored in animal models. Autotransplantation of RPE cells has attractions as a therapy, but existing protocols to isolate adult RPE cells from rodents are technically difficult, time-consuming, have a low yield and are not optimized for long-term cell culturing. Here, we report a newly devised protocol which facilitates reliable and simple isolation and culture of RPE cells from adult rats. Incubation of a whole rat eyeball in 20 U/ml papain solution for 50 min yielded 4 × 104 viable RPE cells. These cells were hexagonal and pigmented upon culture. Using immunostaining, we demonstrated that the cells expressed RPE cell-specific marker proteins including cytokeratin 18 and RPE65, similar to RPE cells in vivo. Additionally, the cells were able to produce and secrete Bruch’s membrane matrix components similar to in vivo situation. Similarly, the cultured RPE cells adhered to isolated Bruch’s membrane as has previously been reported. Therefore, the protocol described in this article provides an efficient method for the rapid and easy isolation of high quantities of adult rat RPE cells. This provides a reliable platform for studying the therapeutic targets, testing the effects of drugs in a preclinical setup and to perform in vitro and in vivo transplantation experiments to study retinal diseases. PMID:26635529

  2. Rat retinal transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kozhevnikova, Oyuna S.; Korbolina, Elena E.; Ershov, Nikita I.; Kolosova, Natalia G.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly, remains poorly understood due to the paucity of animal models that fully replicate the human disease. Recently, we showed that senescence-accelerated OXYS rats develop a retinopathy similar to human AMD. To identify alterations in response to normal aging and progression of AMD-like retinopathy, we compared gene expression profiles of retina from 3- and 18-mo-old OXYS and control Wistar rats by means of high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 160 and 146 age-regulated genes in Wistar and OXYS retinas, respectively. The majority of them are related to the immune system and extracellular matrix turnover. Only 24 age-regulated genes were common for the two strains, suggestive of different rates and mechanisms of aging. Over 600 genes showed significant differences in expression between the two strains. These genes are involved in disease-associated pathways such as immune response, inflammation, apoptosis, Ca2+ homeostasis and oxidative stress. The altered expression for selected genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. To our knowledge, this study represents the first analysis of retinal transcriptome from young and old rats with biologic replicates generated by RNA-Seq technology. We can conclude that the development of AMD-like retinopathy in OXYS rats is associated with an imbalance in immune and inflammatory responses. Aging alters the expression profile of numerous genes in the retina, and the genetic background of OXYS rats has a profound impact on the development of AMD-like retinopathy. PMID:23656783

  3. Müller glia activation by VEGF-antagonizing drugs: An in vitro study on rat primary retinal cultures.

    PubMed

    Gaddini, Lucia; Varano, Monica; Matteucci, Andrea; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Villa, Marika; Pricci, Flavia; Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella

    2016-04-01

    The effects of the anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) drugs ranibizumab and aflibercept were studied in Müller glia in primary mixed cultures from rat neonatal retina. Treatment with both agents induced activation of Müller glia, demonstrated by increased levels of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein. In addition, phosphorylated Extracellular-Regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) showed enhanced immunoreactivity in activated Müller glia. Treatment with aflibercept induced an increase in K(+) channel (Kir) 4.1 levels and both drugs upregulated Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) in activated Müller glia. The results show that VEGF-antagonizing drugs influence the homeostasis of Müller cells in primary retinal cultures, inducing an activated phenotype. Upregulation of Kir4.1 and AQP4 suggests that Müller glia activation following anti-VEGF drugs may not depict a detrimental gliotic reaction. Indeed, it could represent one of the mechanisms able to contribute to the therapeutic effects of these drugs, particularly in the presence of macular edema. PMID:26607807

  4. Frequency Responses of Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cloherty, Shaun L.; Hung, Yu-Shan; Kameneva, Tatiana; Ibbotson, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    There are 15–20 different types of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) in the mammalian retina, each encoding different aspects of the visual scene. The mechanism by which post-synaptic signals from the retinal network generate spikes is determined by each cell’s intrinsic electrical properties. Here we investigate the frequency responses of morphologically identified rat RGCs using intracellular injection of sinusoidal current waveforms, to assess their intrinsic capabilities with minimal contributions from the retinal network. Recorded cells were classified according to their morphological characteristics (A, B, C or D-type) and their stratification (inner (i), outer (o) or bistratified) in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Most cell types had low- or band-pass frequency responses. A2, C1 and C4o cells were band-pass with peaks of 15–30 Hz and low-pass cutoffs above 56 Hz (A2 cells) and ~42 Hz (C1 and C4o cells). A1 and C2i/o cells were low-pass with peaks of 10–15 Hz (cutoffs 19–25 Hz). Bistratified D1 and D2 cells were also low-pass with peaks of 5–10 Hz (cutoffs ~16 Hz). The least responsive cells were the B2 and C3 types (peaks: 2–5 Hz, cutoffs: 8–11 Hz). We found no difference between cells stratifying in the inner and outer IPL (i.e., ON and OFF cells) or between cells with large and small somas or dendritic fields. Intrinsic physiological properties (input resistance, spike width and sag) had little impact on frequency response at low frequencies, but account for 30–40% of response variability at frequencies >30 Hz. PMID:27341669

  5. Glucose metabolism in rat retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2006-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the major transport pathway for exchange of metabolites and ions between choroidal blood supply and the neural retina. To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling glucose metabolism in RPE and its possible relationship to retinopathy, we studied the influence of different glucose concentrations on glycogen and lactate levels and CO(2) production in RPE from normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. Incubation of normal RPE in the absence of glucose caused a decrease in lactate production and glycogen content. In normal RPE, increasing glucose concentrations from 5.6 mM to 30 mM caused a four-fold increase in glucose accumulation and CO(2) yield, as well as reduction in lactate and glycogen production. In RPE from diabetic rats glucose accumulation did not increase in the presence of high glucose substrate, but it showed a four- and a seven-fold increase in CO(2) production through the mitochondrial and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. We found high glycogen levels in RPE which can be used as an energy reserve for RPE itself and/or neural retina. Findings further show that the RPE possesses a high oxidative capacity. The large increase in glucose shunting to the pentose phosphate pathway in diabetic retina exposed to high glucose suggests a need for reducing capacity, consistent with increased oxidative stress. PMID:16475003

  6. Inner retinal preservation in rat models of retinal degeneration implanted with subretinal photovoltaic arrays.

    PubMed

    Light, Jacob G; Fransen, James W; Adekunle, Adewumi N; Adkins, Alice; Pangeni, Gobinda; Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Palanker, Daniel V; McCall, Maureen A; Pardue, Machelle T

    2014-11-01

    Photovoltaic arrays (PVA) implanted into the subretinal space of patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are designed to electrically stimulate the remaining inner retinal circuitry in response to incident light, thereby recreating a visual signal when photoreceptor function declines or is lost. Preservation of inner retinal circuitry is critical to the fidelity of this transmitted signal to ganglion cells and beyond to higher visual targets. Post-implantation loss of retinal interneurons or excessive glial scarring could diminish and/or eliminate PVA-evoked signal transmission. As such, assessing the morphology of the inner retina in RP animal models with subretinal PVAs is an important step in defining biocompatibility and predicting success of signal transmission. In this study, we used immunohistochemical methods to qualitatively and quantitatively compare inner retinal morphology after the implantation of a PVA in two RP models: the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) or transgenic S334ter-line 3 (S334ter-3) rhodopsin mutant rat. Two PVA designs were compared. In the RCS rat, we implanted devices in the subretinal space at 4 weeks of age and histologically examined them at 8 weeks of age and found inner retinal morphology preservation with both PVA devices. In the S334ter-3 rat, we implanted devices at 6-12 weeks of age and again, inner retinal morphology was generally preserved with either PVA design 16-26 weeks post-implantation. Specifically, the length of rod bipolar cells and numbers of cholinergic amacrine cells were maintained along with their characteristic inner plexiform lamination patterns. Throughout the implanted retinas we found nonspecific glial reaction, but none showed additional glial scarring at the implant site. Our results indicate that subretinally implanted PVAs are well-tolerated in rodent RP models and that the inner retinal circuitry is preserved, consistent with our published results showing implant-evoked signal transmission. PMID

  7. Inner retinal preservation in rat models of retinal degeneration implanted with subretinal photovoltaic arrays

    PubMed Central

    Light, Jacob G.; Fransen, James W.; Adekunle, Adewumi N.; Adkins, Alice; Pangeni, Gobinda; Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Palanker, Daniel V.; McCall, Maureen A.; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays (PVA) implanted into the subretinal space of patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are designed to electrically stimulate the remaining inner retinal circuitry in response to incident light, thereby recreating a visual signal when photoreceptor function declines or is lost. Preservation of inner retinal circuitry is critical to the fidelity of this transmitted signal to ganglion cells and beyond to higher visual targets. Post-implantation loss of retinal interneurons or excessive glial scarring could diminish and/or eliminate PVA-evoked signal transmission. As such, assessing the morphology of the inner retina in RP animal models with subretinal PVAs is an important step in defining biocompatibility and predicting success of signal transmission. In this study, we used immunohistochemical methods to qualitatively and quantitatively compare inner retinal morphology after the implantation of a PVA in two RP models: the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) or transgenic S334ter-line 3 (S334ter-3) rhodopsin mutant rat. Two PVA designs were compared. In the RCS rat, we implanted devices in the subretinal space at 4 weeks of age and histologically examined them at 8 weeks of age and found inner retinal morphology preservation with both PVA devices. In the S334ter-3 rat, we implanted devices at 6 to 12 weeks of age and again, inner retinal morphology was generally preserved with either PVA design 16 to 26 weeks post implantation. Specifically, the length of rod bipolar cells and numbers of cholinergic amacrine cells were maintained along with their characteristic inner plexiform lamination patterns. Throughout the implanted retinas we found nonspecific glial reaction, but none showed additional glial scarring at the implant site. Our results indicate that subretinally implanted PVAs are well-tolerated in rodent RP models and that the inner retinal circuitry is preserved, consistent with our published results showing implant-evoked signal transmission. PMID

  8. Time-Lapse Retinal Ganglion Cell Dendritic Field Degeneration Imaged in Organotypic Retinal Explant Culture

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Thomas V.; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Cone-Kimball, Elizabeth; Jefferys, Joan; Quigley, Harry A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop an ex vivo organotypic retinal explant culture system suitable for multiple time-point imaging of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dendritic arbors over a period of 1 week, and capable of detecting dendrite neuroprotection conferred by experimental treatments. Methods Thy1-YFP mouse retinas were explanted and maintained in organotypic culture. Retinal ganglion cell dendritic arbors were imaged repeatedly using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Maximal projection z-stacks were traced by two masked investigators and dendritic fields were analyzed for characteristics including branch number, size, and complexity. One group of explants was treated with brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) added to the culture media. Changes in individual dendritic fields over time were detected using pair-wise comparison testing. Results Retinal ganglion cells in mouse retinal explant culture began to degenerate after 3 days with 52.4% surviving at 7 days. Dendritic field parameters showed minimal change over 8 hours in culture. Intra- and interobserver measurements of dendrite characteristics were strongly correlated (Spearman rank correlations consistently > 0.80). Statistically significant (P < 0.001) dendritic tree degeneration was detected following 7 days in culture including: 40% to 50% decreases in number of branch segments, number of junctions, number of terminal branches, and total branch length. Scholl analyses similarly demonstrated a significant decrease in dendritic field complexity. Treatment of explants with BDNF+CNTF significantly attenuated dendritic field degeneration. Conclusions Retinal explant culture of Thy1-YFP tissue provides a useful model for time-lapse imaging of RGC dendritic field degeneration over a course of several days, and is capable of detecting neuroprotective amelioration of dendritic pruning within individual RGCs. PMID:26811145

  9. Isolation and Transfection of Primary Culture Bovine Retinal Pericytes.

    PubMed

    Primo, Vincent A; Arboleda-Velasquez, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes an enzymatic approach for isolating homogeneous cultures of pericytes from retinas of bovine source. In summary, retinas are dissected, washed, digested, filtered, cultured in specific media to select for pericytes, and finally expanded for a low passage culture of about 14 million bovine retinal pericytes (BRP) within 4-6 weeks. This protocol also describes a liposomal-based technique for transfection of BRPs. PMID:27172949

  10. Characterization of a transformed rat retinal ganglion cell line.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, R R; Agarwal, P; Prasanna, G; Vopat, K; Lambert, W; Sheedlo, H J; Pang, I H; Shade, D; Wordinger, R J; Yorio, T; Clark, A F; Agarwal, N

    2001-01-31

    The purpose of the present study was to establish a rat retinal ganglion cell line by transformation of rat retinal cells. For this investigation, retinal cells were isolated from postnatal day 1 (PN1) rats and transformed with the psi2 E1A virus. In order to isolate retinal ganglion cells (RGC), single cell clones were chosen at random from the transformed cells. Expression of Thy-1 (a marker for RGC), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a positive marker for Muller cells), HPC-1/syntaxin (a marker for amacrine cells), 8A1 (a marker for horizontal and ganglion cells) and neurotrophins was studied using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. One of the retinal cell clones, designated RGC-5, was positive for Thy-1, Brn-3C, Neuritin, NMDA receptor, GABA-B receptor, and synaptophysin expression and negative for GFAP, HPC-1, and 8A1, suggesting that it represented a putative RGC clone. The results of RT-PCR analysis were confirmed by immunocytochemistry for Thy-1 and GFAP. Upon further characterization by immunoblotting, the RGC-5 clone was positive for Thy-1, negative for GFAP, 8A1 and syntaxin. RGC 5 cells were also positive for the expression of neurotrophins and their cognate receptors. To establish the physiological relevance of RGC-5, the effects of serum/trophic factor deprivation and glutamate toxicity were analyzed to determine if these cells would undergo apoptosis. The protective effects of neurotrophins on RGC-5 after serum deprivation was also investigated. Apoptosis was studied by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated fluoresceinated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Serum deprivation resulted in apoptosis and supplementation with both BDNF and NT-4 in the growth media, protected the RGC-5 cells from undergoing apoptosis. On differentiation with succinyl concanavalin A (sConA), RGC-5 cells became sensitive to glutamate toxicity, which could be reversed by inclusion of ciplizone (MK801

  11. Astrocytes and Müller Cell Alterations During Retinal Degeneration in a Transgenic Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Lax, Pedro; Campello, Laura; Pinilla, Isabel; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Retinitis pigmentosa includes a group of progressive retinal degenerative diseases that affect the structure and function of photoreceptors. Secondarily to the loss of photoreceptors, there is a reduction in retinal vascularization, which seems to influence the cellular degenerative process. Retinal macroglial cells, astrocytes, and Müller cells provide support for retinal neurons and are fundamental for maintaining normal retinal function. The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of macroglial changes during retinal degeneration in P23H rats. Methods: Homozygous P23H line-3 rats aged from P18 to 18 months were used to study the evolution of the disease, and SD rats were used as controls. Immunolabeling with antibodies against GFAP, vimentin, and transducin were used to visualize macroglial cells and cone photoreceptors. Results: In P23H rats, increased GFAP labeling in Müller cells was observed as an early indicator of retinal gliosis. At 4 and 12 months of age, the apical processes of Müller cells in P23H rats clustered in firework-like structures, which were associated with ring-like shaped areas of cone degeneration in the outer nuclear layer. These structures were not observed at 16 months of age. The number of astrocytes was higher in P23H rats than in the SD matched controls at 4 and 12 months of age, supporting the idea of astrocyte proliferation. As the disease progressed, astrocytes exhibited a deteriorated morphology and marked hypertrophy. The increase in the complexity of the astrocytic processes correlated with greater connexin 43 expression and higher density of connexin 43 immunoreactive puncta within the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of P23H vs. SD rat retinas. Conclusions: In the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa, the loss of photoreceptors triggers major changes in the number and morphology of glial cells affecting the inner retina. PMID:26733810

  12. Dissection, culture, and analysis of Xenopus laevis embryonic retinal tissue.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Molly J; Allen, Chelsea E; Ng-Sui-Hing, Ng-Kwet-Leok A; Rabe, Brian A; Lewis, Brittany B; Saha, Margaret S

    2012-01-01

    The process by which the anterior region of the neural plate gives rise to the vertebrate retina continues to be a major focus of both clinical and basic research. In addition to the obvious medical relevance for understanding and treating retinal disease, the development of the vertebrate retina continues to serve as an important and elegant model system for understanding neuronal cell type determination and differentiation(1-16). The neural retina consists of six discrete cell types (ganglion, amacrine, horizontal, photoreceptors, bipolar cells, and Müller glial cells) arranged in stereotypical layers, a pattern that is largely conserved among all vertebrates (12,14-18). While studying the retina in the intact developing embryo is clearly required for understanding how this complex organ develops from a protrusion of the forebrain into a layered structure, there are many questions that benefit from employing approaches using primary cell culture of presumptive retinal cells (7,19-23). For example, analyzing cells from tissues removed and dissociated at different stages allows one to discern the state of specification of individual cells at different developmental stages, that is, the fate of the cells in the absence of interactions with neighboring tissues (8,19-22,24-33). Primary cell culture also allows the investigator to treat the culture with specific reagents and analyze the results on a single cell level (5,8,21,24,27-30,33-39). Xenopus laevis, a classic model system for the study of early neural development (19,27,29,31-32,40-42), serves as a particularly suitable system for retinal primary cell culture (10,38,43-45). Presumptive retinal tissue is accessible from the earliest stages of development, immediately following neural induction (25,38,43). In addition, given that each cell in the embryo contains a supply of yolk, retinal cells can be cultured in a very simple defined media consisting of a buffered salt solution, thus removing the confounding

  13. Vitreous humor and albumin augment the proliferation of cultured retinal precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Klassen, Henry; Pries, Mette; Wang, Wei; Nissen, Mogens H

    2009-02-01

    Intravitreal injection is an important delivery route for studies involving the transplantation of various types of precursor cells to the retina; however, the effect on these cells of exposure to the vitreous microenvironment has not been specifically investigated. Here vitreous humor was evaluated for the potential to influence the proliferation of rat retinal precursor cells in vitro. Cells were isolated at embryonic day 19 and plated in standard proliferation medium in the presence or absence of fluid expressed from porcine vitreous humor. Cellular proliferation at different concentrations of vitreous fluid supplementation was quantified by using a (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. Active components of vitreous fluid were partially characterized by gel filtration chromatography (GFC) and UV spectral analysis. The effect of each vitreous fraction on proliferation was determined as well. Results showed that addition of 20% vitreous fluid to primary rat retinal cultures significantly increased (3)H-thymidine incorporation compared with growth medium without vitreous supplementation. A vitreous fraction showing growth-promoting activity was localized to a molecular mass range <1000 Da, consistent with ascorbic acid. Ascorbic acid was confirmed in vitreous fluid by UV spectral analysis. Growth-augmenting activity was present in higher molecular mass vitreous fractions, consistent with protein components. Albumin, the major protein in vitreous fluid, was found to augment proliferation. Because vitreous-associated augmentation of retinal precursor proliferation remains an epidermal growth factor-dependent phenomenon, the proliferative status of transplanted cells in the vitreous cavity is likely determined by a combination of factors. PMID:18803297

  14. Expression of Aquaporin-6 in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sun Young; Lee, Eung Suk; Ohn, Young-Hoon; Park, Tae Kwann

    2016-08-01

    Several aquaporins (AQPs) have been identified to be present in the eyes, and it has been suggested that they are involved in the movement of water and small solutes. AQP6, which has low water permeability and transports mainly anions, was recently discovered in the eyes. In the present study, we investigate the localization of AQP6 in the rat retina and show that AQP6 is selectively localized to the ganglion cell layer and the outer plexiform layer. Along with the gradual decrease in retinal ganglion cells after a crushing injury of optic nerve, immunofluorescence signals of AQP6 gradually decreased. Confocal microscope images confirmed AQP6 expression in retinal ganglion cells and Müller cells in vitro. Therefore, AQP6 might participate in water and anion transport in these cells. PMID:26526333

  15. Colocalization of HCN Channel Subunits in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Ogata, Genki; Partida, Gloria J.; Oi, Hanako; Greenberg, Kenneth P.; Krempely, Kalen S.; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    The current-passing pore of mammalian hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated ("HCN") channels is formed by subunit isoforms denoted HCN1-4. In various brain areas, antibodies directed against multiple isoforms bind to single neurons and the current ("Ih") passed during hyperpolarizations differs from that of heterologously expressed homomeric channels. By contrast, retinal rod, cone, and bipolar cells appear to use homomeric HCN channels. Here, we assess the generality of this pattern by examining HCN1 and HCN4 immunoreactivity in rat retinal ganglion cells, measuring Ih in dissociated cells, and testing whether HCN1 and HCN4 protein coimmunoprecipitate. Nearly half of the ganglion cells in whole-mounted retinae bound antibodies against both isoforms. Consistent with colocalization and physical association, 8-bromo-cAMP shifted the voltage-sensitivity of Ih less than that of HCN4 channels and more than that of HCN1 channels, and HCN1 coimmunoprecipitated with HCN4 from membrane fraction proteins. Lastly, the immunopositive somata ranged in diameter from the smallest to the largest in rat retina, the dendrites of immunopositive cells arborized at various levels of the inner plexiform layer and over fields of different diameters, and Ih activated with similar kinetics and proportions of fast and slow components in small, medium, and large somata. These results show that different HCN subunits colocalize in single retinal ganglion cells, identify a subunit that can reconcile native Ih properties with the previously reported presence of HCN4 in these cells, and indicate that Ih is biophysically similar in morphologically diverse retinal ganglion cells and differs from Ih in rods, cones, and bipolar cells. PMID:21456027

  16. Gender difference in the neuroprotective effect of rat bone marrow mesenchymal cells against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Yu, Jian-xiong

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can reduce retinal ganglion cell death and effectively prevent vision loss. Previously, we found that during differentiation, female rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells acquire a higher neurogenic potential compared with male rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. This suggests that female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have a stronger neuroprotective effect than male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Here, we first isolated and cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from female and male rats by density gradient centrifugation. Retinal tissue from newborn rats was prepared by enzymatic digestion to obtain primary retinal ganglion cells. Using the transwell system, retinal ganglion cells were co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxia. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assay. We found a marked increase in apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells after 24 hours of hypoxia compared with normoxia. Moreover, apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells significantly decreased with both female and male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell co-culture under hypoxia compared with culture alone, with more significant effects from female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Our results indicate that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells exert a neuroprotective effect against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and also that female cells have greater neuroprotective ability compared with male cells. PMID:27335573

  17. Gender difference in the neuroprotective effect of rat bone marrow mesenchymal cells against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Yu, Jian-Xiong

    2016-05-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can reduce retinal ganglion cell death and effectively prevent vision loss. Previously, we found that during differentiation, female rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells acquire a higher neurogenic potential compared with male rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. This suggests that female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have a stronger neuroprotective effect than male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Here, we first isolated and cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from female and male rats by density gradient centrifugation. Retinal tissue from newborn rats was prepared by enzymatic digestion to obtain primary retinal ganglion cells. Using the transwell system, retinal ganglion cells were co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxia. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assay. We found a marked increase in apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells after 24 hours of hypoxia compared with normoxia. Moreover, apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells significantly decreased with both female and male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell co-culture under hypoxia compared with culture alone, with more significant effects from female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Our results indicate that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells exert a neuroprotective effect against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and also that female cells have greater neuroprotective ability compared with male cells. PMID:27335573

  18. Ethambutol-induced toxicity is mediated by zinc and lysosomal membrane permeabilization in cultured retinal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hyewon; Yoon, Young Hee; Hwang, Jung Jin; Cho, Kyung Sook; Koh, Jae Young; Kim, June-Gone

    2009-03-01

    Ethambutol, an efficacious antituberculosis agent, can cause irreversible visual loss in a small but significant fraction of patients. However, the mechanism of ocular toxicity remains to be established. We previously reported that ethambutol caused severe vacuole formation in cultured retinal cells, and that the addition of zinc along with ethambutol aggravated vacuole formation whereas addition of the cell-permeable zinc chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), reduced vacuole formation. To investigate the origin of vacuoles and to obtain an understanding of drug toxicity, we used cultured primary retinal cells from newborn Sprague-Dawley rats and imaged ethambutol-treated cells stained with FluoZin-3, zinc-specific fluorescent dye, under a confocal microscope. Almost all ethambutol-induced vacuoles contained high levels of labile zinc. Double staining with LysoTracker or MitoTracker revealed that almost all zinc-containing vacuoles were lysosomes and not mitochondria. Intracellular zinc chelation with TPEN markedly blocked both vacuole formation and zinc accumulation in the vacuole. Immunocytochemistry with antibodies to lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2) and cathepsin D, an acid lysosomal hydrolase, disclosed lysosomal activation after exposure to ethambutol. Immunoblotting after 12 h exposure to ethambutol showed that cathepsin D was released into the cytosol. In addition, cathepsin inhibitors attenuated retinal cell toxicity induced by ethambutol. This is consistent with characteristics of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). TPEN also inhibited both lysosomal activation and LMP. Thus, accumulation of zinc in lysosomes, and eventual LMP, may be a key mechanism of ethambutol-induced retinal cell death.

  19. Methods for culturing retinal pigment epithelial cells: a review of current protocols and future recommendations.

    PubMed

    Fronk, Aaron H; Vargis, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium is an important part of the vertebrate eye, particularly in studying the causes and possible treatment of age-related macular degeneration. The retinal pigment epithelium is difficult to access in vivo due to its location at the back of the eye, making experimentation with age-related macular degeneration treatments problematic. An alternative to in vivo experimentation is cultivating the retinal pigment epithelium in vitro, a practice that has been going on since the 1970s, providing a wide range of retinal pigment epithelial culture protocols, each producing cells and tissue of varying degrees of similarity to natural retinal pigment epithelium. The purpose of this review is to provide researchers with a ready list of retinal pigment epithelial protocols, their effects on cultured tissue, and their specific possible applications. Protocols using human and animal retinal pigment epithelium cells, derived from tissue or cell lines, are discussed, and recommendations for future researchers included. PMID:27493715

  20. Methods for culturing retinal pigment epithelial cells: a review of current protocols and future recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Fronk, Aaron H; Vargis, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium is an important part of the vertebrate eye, particularly in studying the causes and possible treatment of age-related macular degeneration. The retinal pigment epithelium is difficult to access in vivo due to its location at the back of the eye, making experimentation with age-related macular degeneration treatments problematic. An alternative to in vivo experimentation is cultivating the retinal pigment epithelium in vitro, a practice that has been going on since the 1970s, providing a wide range of retinal pigment epithelial culture protocols, each producing cells and tissue of varying degrees of similarity to natural retinal pigment epithelium. The purpose of this review is to provide researchers with a ready list of retinal pigment epithelial protocols, their effects on cultured tissue, and their specific possible applications. Protocols using human and animal retinal pigment epithelium cells, derived from tissue or cell lines, are discussed, and recommendations for future researchers included. PMID:27493715

  1. Vasodilator Effects of Elcatonin, a Synthetic Eel Calcitonin, on Retinal Blood Vessels in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mori, Asami; Suzawa, Hironori; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of elcatonin, a synthetic derivative of eel calcitonin, on rat retinal blood vessels, and to determine how diabetes affects the retinal vascular responses. Ocular fundus images were captured with an original high-resolution digital fundus camera in vivo. The retinal vascular responses were evaluated by measuring the diameter of retinal blood vessels contained in the digital images. Both systemic blood pressure and heart rate were continuously recorded. Elcatonin increased the diameter of retinal blood vessels but decreased mean blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner, whereas it had no significant effect on heart rate. A diminished retinal vasodilator response and significant pressor response to elcatonin were observed in rats injected intravenously with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor. Intravitreal injection of indomethacin, a non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, and SQ22536, an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, markedly attenuated the vasodilator effects of elcatonin on retinal blood vessels. The retinal vasodilator responses to elcatonin were unaffected 2 weeks after the induction of diabetes by a combination of streptozotocin treatment and D-glucose feeding. These results suggest that elcatonin dilates rat retinal blood vessels via NO- and COX-dependent mechanisms and that the adenylyl cyclase-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate system plays a major role in the vasodilator mechanisms. The retinal vasodilatory effects of elcatonin seem to be preserved at early stages of diabetes.

  2. Vasodilator effects of adenosine on retinal arterioles in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Taisuke; Mori, Asami; Saito, Maki; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2008-02-01

    Adenosine is a potent vasodilator of retinal blood vessels and is implicated to be a major regulator of retinal blood flow during metabolic stress, but little is known about the impact of diabetes on the role of adenosine in regulation of retinal hemodynamics. Therefore, we examined how diabetes affects adenosine-induced vasodilation of retinal arterioles. Male Wistar rats were treated with streptozotocin (80 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), and experiments were performed 6-8 weeks later. Rats were treated with tetrodotoxin (50 microg/kg, intravenously [i.v.]) to eliminate any nerve activity and prevent movement of the eye and infused with methoxamine continuously to maintain adequate systemic circulation. Fundus images were captured with a digital camera that was equipped with a special objective lens, and diameters of retinal arterioles were measured. Adenosine increased diameters of retinal arterioles and decreased systemic blood pressure. These responses were significantly attenuated by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (30 mg/kg, i.v.) and the adenosine triphosphate-dependent K+ (K(ATP)) channel blocker glibenclamide (20 mg/kg, i.v.). The depressor responses to adenosine were reduced in diabetic rats, whereas diabetes did not alter vasodilation of retinal arterioles to adenosine. In contrast, both depressor response and vasodilation of retinal arteriole to acetylcholine were reduced in diabetic rats. The retinal vasodilator responses to adenosine and acetylcholine observed in diabetic rats were diminished by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. There were no differences in the responses to pinacidil, a K(ATP) channel opener, between the diabetic and nondiabetic rats. These results suggest that both the activation of nitric oxide synthase and opening of K(ATP) channels contribute to the vasodilator effects of adenosine in rats in vivo. However, diabetes has no significant impact on the vasodilation mediated by these mechanisms in

  3. Proinsulin slows retinal degeneration and vision loss in the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Lax, Pedro; Isiegas, Carolina; Ayuso, Eduard; Ruiz, José M; de la Villa, Pedro; Bosch, Fatima; de la Rosa, Enrique J; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2012-12-01

    Proinsulin has been characterized as a neuroprotective molecule. In this work we assess the therapeutic potential of proinsulin on photoreceptor degeneration, synaptic connectivity, and functional activity of the retina in the transgenic P23H rat, an animal model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP). P23H homozygous rats received an intramuscular injection of an adeno-associated viral vector serotype 1 (AAV1) expressing human proinsulin (hPi+) or AAV1-null vector (hPi-) at P20. Levels of hPi in serum were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and visual function was evaluated by electroretinographic (ERG) recording at P30, P60, P90, and P120. Preservation of retinal structure was assessed by immunohistochemistry at P120. Human proinsulin was detected in serum from rats injected with hPi+ at all times tested, with average hPi levels ranging from 1.1 nM (P30) to 1.4 nM (P120). ERG recordings showed an amelioration of vision loss in hPi+ animals. The scotopic b-waves were significantly higher in hPi+ animals than in control rats at P90 and P120. This attenuation of visual deterioration correlated with a delay in photoreceptor degeneration and the preservation of retinal cytoarchitecture. hPi+ animals had 48.7% more photoreceptors than control animals. Presynaptic and postsynaptic elements, as well as the synaptic contacts between photoreceptors and bipolar or horizontal cells, were preserved in hPi+ P23H rats. Furthermore, in hPi+ rat retinas the number of rod bipolar cell bodies was greater than in control rats. Our data demonstrate that hPi expression preserves cone and rod structure and function, together with their contacts with postsynaptic neurons, in the P23H rat. These data strongly support the further development of proinsulin-based therapy to counteract retinitis pigmentosa.

  4. Proinsulin Slows Retinal Degeneration and Vision Loss in the P23H Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Lax, Pedro; Isiegas, Carolina; Ayuso, Eduard; Ruiz, José M.; de la Villa, Pedro; Bosch, Fatima; de la Rosa, Enrique J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Proinsulin has been characterized as a neuroprotective molecule. In this work we assess the therapeutic potential of proinsulin on photoreceptor degeneration, synaptic connectivity, and functional activity of the retina in the transgenic P23H rat, an animal model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP). P23H homozygous rats received an intramuscular injection of an adeno-associated viral vector serotype 1 (AAV1) expressing human proinsulin (hPi+) or AAV1-null vector (hPi−) at P20. Levels of hPi in serum were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and visual function was evaluated by electroretinographic (ERG) recording at P30, P60, P90, and P120. Preservation of retinal structure was assessed by immunohistochemistry at P120. Human proinsulin was detected in serum from rats injected with hPi+ at all times tested, with average hPi levels ranging from 1.1 nM (P30) to 1.4 nM (P120). ERG recordings showed an amelioration of vision loss in hPi+ animals. The scotopic b-waves were significantly higher in hPi+ animals than in control rats at P90 and P120. This attenuation of visual deterioration correlated with a delay in photoreceptor degeneration and the preservation of retinal cytoarchitecture. hPi+ animals had 48.7% more photoreceptors than control animals. Presynaptic and postsynaptic elements, as well as the synaptic contacts between photoreceptors and bipolar or horizontal cells, were preserved in hPi+ P23H rats. Furthermore, in hPi+ rat retinas the number of rod bipolar cell bodies was greater than in control rats. Our data demonstrate that hPi expression preserves cone and rod structure and function, together with their contacts with postsynaptic neurons, in the P23H rat. These data strongly support the further development of proinsulin-based therapy to counteract retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:23017108

  5. Safranal, a saffron constituent, attenuates retinal degeneration in P23H rats.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Lax, Pedro; Esquiva, Gema; Martín-Nieto, José; Pinilla, Isabel; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2012-01-01

    Saffron, an extract from Crocus sativus, has been largely used in traditional medicine for its antiapoptotic and anticarcinogenic properties. In this work, we investigate the effects of safranal, a component of saffron stigmas, in attenuating retinal degeneration in the P23H rat model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We demonstrate that administration of safranal to homozygous P23H line-3 rats preserves both photoreceptor morphology and number. Electroretinographic recordings showed higher a- and b-wave amplitudes under both photopic and scotopic conditions in safranal-treated versus non-treated animals. Furthermore, the capillary network in safranal-treated animals was preserved, unlike that found in untreated animals. Our findings indicate that dietary supplementation with safranal slows photoreceptor cell degeneration and ameliorates the loss of retinal function and vascular network disruption in P23H rats. This work also suggests that safranal could be potentially useful to retard retinal degeneration in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

  6. Compound 49b Restores Retinal Thickness and Reduces Degenerate Capillaries in the Rat Retina following Ischemia/Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Jiang, Youde

    2016-01-01

    We have recently reported that Compound 49b, a novel β-adrenergic receptor agonist, can significantly reduce VEGF levels in retinal endothelial cells (REC) grown in diabetic-like conditions. In this study, we investigated whether Compound 49b could protect the retina under hypoxic conditions using the ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced model in rats, as well REC cultured in hypoxic conditions. Some rats received 1mM topical Compound 49b for the 2 (5 rats each group) or 10 (4 rats in each group) days post-I/R. Analyses for retinal thickness and cell loss in the ganglion cell layer was done at 2 days post-I/R, while numbers of degenerate capillaries and pericyte ghosts were measured at 10 days post-I/R. Additionally, REC were cultured in normal oxygen or hypoxia (5% O2) only or treated with 50 nM Compound 49b for 12 hours. Twelve hours after Compound 49b exposure, cells were collected and analyzed for protein levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (KDR), angiopoietin 1 and its receptor Tie2 for Western blotting. Data indicate that exposure to I/R significantly decreased retinal thickness, with increasing numbers of degenerate capillaries and pericyte ghosts. Compound 49b treatment inhibited these retinal changes. In REC cultured in hypoxia, levels of IGFBP-3 were reduced, which were significantly increased by Compound 49b. Hypoxia significantly increased protein levels of VEGF, KDR, Angiopoiein 1, and Tie2, which were reduced following Compound 49b treatment. These data strongly suggested that Compound 49b protected the retina against I/R-induced injury. This provides additional support for a role of β-adrenergic receptor actions in the retina. PMID:27439004

  7. Vision maintenance and retinal apoptosis reduction in RCS rats with Okayama University-type retinal prosthesis (OUReP™) implantation.

    PubMed

    Alamusi; Matsuo, Toshihiko; Hosoya, Osamu; Tsutsui, Kimiko M; Uchida, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    Photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film, designated Okayama University-type retinal prosthesis or OUReP™, generates light-evoked surface electric potentials and stimulates neurons. In this study, the vision was assessed by behavior tests in aged hereditary retinal dystrophic RCS rats with OUReP™, retinal apoptosis and electroretinographic responses were measured in dystrophic eyes with OUReP™. The dye-coupled films, or plain films as a control, were implanted in subretinal space of RCS rats. On behavior tests, RCS rats with dye-coupled films, implanted at the old age of 14 weeks, showed the larger number of head-turning, consistent with clockwise and anticlockwise rotation of a surrounding black-and-white-striped drum, compared with rats with plain films, under the dim (50 lux) and bright (150 lux) conditions in the observation period until the age of 22 weeks (n = 5, P < 0.05, repeated-measure ANOVA). The number of apoptotic cells in retinal sections at the site of dye-coupled film implantation was significantly smaller, compared with the other retinal sites, neighboring the film, or opposite to the film, 5 months after film implantation at the age of 6 weeks (P = 0.0021, Friedman test). The dystrophic eyes of RCS rats with dye-coupled films showed positive responses to maximal light stimulus at a significantly higher rate, compared with the eyes with no treatment (P < 0.05, Chi-square test). Electroretinograms in normal eyes of Wistar rats with dye-coupled or plain films showed significantly decreased amplitudes (n = 14, P < 0.05, repeated-measure ANOVA). In conclusions, vision was maintained in RCS rats with dye-coupled films implanted at the old age. The dystrophic eyes with dye-coupled films showed electroretinographic responses. Five-month film implantation caused no additional retinal changes. PMID:25732059

  8. Primary Retinal Cultures as a Tool for Modeling Diabetic Retinopathy: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Varano, Monica; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Gaddini, Lucia; Formisano, Giuseppe; Pricci, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Experimental models of diabetic retinopathy (DR) have had a crucial role in the comprehension of the pathophysiology of the disease and the identification of new therapeutic strategies. Most of these studies have been conducted in vivo, in animal models. However, a significant contribution has also been provided by studies on retinal cultures, especially regarding the effects of the potentially toxic components of the diabetic milieu on retinal cell homeostasis, the characterization of the mechanisms on the basis of retinal damage, and the identification of potentially protective molecules. In this review, we highlight the contribution given by primary retinal cultures to the study of DR, focusing on early neuroglial impairment. We also speculate on possible themes into which studies based on retinal cell cultures could provide deeper insight. PMID:25688355

  9. Recognition of mannose 6-phosphate ligands by dystrophic rat retinal pigment epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Tarnowski, B.; Shepherd, V.; McLaughlin, B.

    1986-05-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) phagocytize discarded rod outer segments (ROS) during normal eye function. In the dystrophic rat, an animal model for retinitis pigmentosa in humans, ROS phagocytosis is defective. Dystrophic RPE can phagocytize particles other than ROS, suggesting that the defect may be in the RPE phagocytic recognition. They are currently investigating the recognition markers on RPE in dystrophic rats. In studies using ligand-coated latex beads, no uptake of mannose-coated beads was found in dystrophic rat RPE. They found that dystrophic RPE could specifically phagocytize phosphomannan-coated beads. Studies were begun to examine the presence and function of a phosphomannan receptor (PMR) on dystrophic RPE. ..cap alpha..-Mannosidase, isolated from D. discoideum has been shown to be an efficient ligand for the PMR in fibroblasts and macrophages. It is also recognized by the macrophage mannose receptor. Dystrophic rat RPE and retina explants were placed in culture dishes (5-7/well). /sup 125/I-Labelled ..cap alpha..-mannosidase was added to each well in the presence or absence of 10 mM mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) or yeast mannan (lmg/ml). Explants were incubated at 37/sup 0/ for 2 hr., washed and bound /sup 125/I-mannosidase quantitated. Approximately 2-3% of total counts added were bound to the RPE via a M6P-inhibitable recognition process. The binding to RPE was not blocked by mannan. No mannan or M6P-specific binding was found in retina explants. These results support the findings of specific uptake of phosphomannan-coated beads and demonstrate the presence of a specific PMR on dystrophic RPE phagocytic membranes.

  10. Retinal ischemic injury rescued by sodium 4-phenylbutyrate in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Yung-Yue; Lin, Nien-Ting; Chang, Pen-Heng; Huang, Yuan-Ping; Pang, Victor Fei; Liu, Chen-Hsuan; Lin, Chung-Tien

    2007-03-01

    Retinal ischemia is a common cause of visual impairment for humans and animals. Herein, the neuroprotective effects of phenylbutyrate (PBA) upon retinal ischemic injury were investigated using a rat model. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were retrograde labeled with the fluorescent tracer fluorogold (FG) applied to the superior collicoli of test Sprague-Dawley rats. High intraocular pressure and retinal ischemia were induced seven days subsequent to such FG labeling. A dose of either 100 or 400 mg/kg PBA was administered intraperitoneally to test rats at two time points, namely 30 min prior to the induction of retinal ischemia and 1 h subsequent to the cessation of the procedure inducing retinal ischemia. The test-rat retinas were collected seven days subsequent to the induction of retinal ischemia, and densities of surviving RGCs were estimated by counting FG-labeled RGCs within the retina. Histological analysis revealed that ischemic injury caused the loss of retinal RGCs and a net decrease in retinal thickness. For PBA-treated groups, almost 100% of the RGCs were preserved by a pre-ischemia treatment with PBA (at a dose of either 100 or 400 mg/kg), while post-ischemia treatment of RGCs with PBA did not lead to the preservation of RGCs from ischemic injury by PBA as determined by the counting of whole-mount retinas. Pre-ischemia treatment of RGCs with PBA (at a dose of either 100 or 400 mg/kg) significantly reduced the level of ischemia-associated loss of thickness of the total retina, especially the inner retina, and the inner plexiform layer of retina. Besides, PBA treatment significantly reduced the ischemia-induced loss of cells in the ganglion-cell layer of the retina. Taken together, these results suggest that PBA demonstrates a marked neuroprotective effect upon high intraocular pressure-induced retinal ischemia when the PBA is administered prior to ischemia induction. PMID:17178414

  11. Atoh7 promotes the differentiation of Müller cells-derived retinal stem cells into retinal ganglion cells in a rat model of glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei-tao; Zhang, Xue-yong; Xia, Xiao-bo

    2015-05-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading eye diseases resulting in blindness due to the death of retinal ganglion cells. This study aimed to develop novel protocol to promote the differentiation of retinal Müller cells into ganglion cells in vivo in a rat model of glaucoma. The stem cells dedifferentiated from rat retinal Müller cells were randomized to receive transfection with empty lentivirus PGC-FU-GFP or lentivirus PGC-FU-Atoh7-GFP, or no transfection. The stem cells were induced further to differentiate. Ocular hypertension was induced using laser photocoagulation. The eyes were injected with Atoh7 expression vector lentivirus PGC-FU-Atoh7-GFP. Eyeball frozen sections, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, Western bolt, and apoptosis assay were performed. We found that the proportion of ganglion cells differentiated from Atoh7-tranfected stem cells was significantly higher than that of the other two groups. The mean intraocular pressure of glaucomatous eyes was elevated significantly compared with those of contralateral eyes. Some retinal Müller cells in the inner nuclear layer entered the mitotic cell cycle in rat chronic ocular hypertension glaucoma model. Atoh7 contributes to the differentiation of retinal Müller cells into retinal ganglion cells in rat model of glaucoma. In conclusion, Atoh7 promotes the differentiation of Müller cells-derived retinal stem cells into retinal ganglion cells in a rat model of glaucoma, thus opening up a new avenue for gene therapy and optic nerve regeneration in glaucoma.

  12. Features specific to retinal pigment epithelium cells derived from three-dimensional human embryonic stem cell cultures — a new donor for cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengya; Li, Qiyou; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) transplantation is a particularly promising treatment of retinal degenerative diseases affecting RPE-photoreceptor complex. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) provide an abundant donor source for RPE transplantation. Herein, we studied the time-course characteristics of RPE cells derived from three-dimensional human ESCs cultures (3D-RPE). We showed that 3D-RPE cells possessed morphology, ultrastructure, gene expression profile, and functions of authentic RPE. As differentiation proceeded, 3D-RPE cells could mature gradually with decreasing proliferation but increasing functions. Besides, 3D-RPE cells could form polarized monolayer with functional tight junction and gap junction. When grafted into the subretinal space of Royal College of Surgeons rats, 3D-RPE cells were safe and efficient to rescue retinal degeneration. This study showed that 3D-RPE cells were a new donor for cell therapy of retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:27009841

  13. Beta-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation of retinal blood vessels is reduced in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Taisuke; Sato, Ayumi; Mori, Asami; Saito, Maki; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effects of epinephrine and dopamine on retinal blood vessels in streptozotocin (STZ, 80 mg/kg, i.p.)-treated rats and age-matched control rats to determine whether diabetes mellitus alters the retinal vascular responses to circulating catecholamines. Experiments were performed 6-8 weeks after treatment with STZ or the vehicle. The fundus images were captured with the digital fundus camera system for small animals we developed and diameters of retinal blood vessels contained in the digital images were measured. Epinephrine increased the diameters of retinal blood vessels, but the vasodilator responses were reduced in diabetic rats. Dopamine produced a biphasic retinal vascular response with an initial vasoconstriction followed by a vasodilation. The vasoconstrictor effects of dopamine on retinal arterioles were enhanced in diabetic rats, whereas the difference between the two groups was abolished by treatment with propranolol. The vasodilator effect of isoproterenol, but not of the activator of adenylyl cyclase colforsin, on retinal blood vessels was reduced in diabetic rats. No difference in vasoconstriction of retinal blood vessels to phenylephrine between non-diabetic and diabetic rats was observed. The vasodilator responses of retinal blood vessels to 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium, a ganglionic nicotinic receptor agonist, were also attenuated in diabetic rats. These results suggest that diabetes mellitus alters the retinal vascular responses to circulating catecholamines and the impairment of vasodilator responses mediated by beta-adrenoceptors contributes to the alteration.

  14. A novel co-culture model of the blood-retinal barrier based on primary retinal endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wisniewska-Kruk, Joanna; Hoeben, Kees A; Vogels, Ilse M C; Gaillard, Pieter J; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Klaassen, Ingeborg

    2012-03-01

    Loss of blood-retinal barrier (BRB) properties is an important feature in the pathology of diabetic macular edema (DME), but cellular mechanisms underlying BRB dysfunction are poorly understood. Therefore, we developed and characterized a novel in vitro BRB model, based on primary bovine retinal endothelial cells (BRECs). These cells were shown to maintain specific in vivo BRB properties by expressing high levels of the endothelial junction proteins occludin, claudin-5, VE-cadherin and ZO-1 at cell borders, and the specific pumps glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) and efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (MDR1). To investigate the influence of pericytes and astrocytes on BRB maintenance in vitro, we compared five different co-culture BRB models, based on BRECs, bovine retinal pericytes (BRPCs) and rat glial cells. Co-cultures of BRECs with BRPCs and glial cells showed the highest trans-endothelial resistance (TEER) as well as decreased permeability of tracers after vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulation, suggesting a major role for these cell types in maintaining barrier properties. To mimic the in vivo situation of DME, we stimulated BRECs with VEGF, which downregulated MDR1 and GLUT1 mRNA levels, transiently reduced expression levels of endothelial junctional proteins and altered their organization, increased the number of intercellular gaps in BRECs monolayers and influence the permeability of the model to differently-sized molecular tracers. Moreover, as has been shown in vivo, expression of plasmalemma vesicle-associated protein (PLVAP) was increased in endothelial cells in the presence of VEGF. This in vitro model is the first co-culture model of the BRB that mimicks in vivo VEGF-dependent changes occurring in DME. PMID:22200486

  15. Apelin Protects Primary Rat Retinal Pericytes from Chemical Hypoxia-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Tao, Yong; Feng, Jing; Jiang, Yan Rong

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes are a population of cells that participate in normal vessel architecture and regulate permeability. Apelin, as the endogenous ligand of G protein-coupled receptor APJ, participates in a number of physiological and pathological processes. To date, the effect of apelin on pericyte is not clear. Our study aimed to investigate the potential protection mechanisms of apelin, with regard to primary rat retinal pericytes under hypoxia. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that pericytes colocalized with APJ in the fibrovascular membranes dissected from proliferative diabetic retinopathy patients. In the in vitro studies, we first demonstrated that the expression of apelin/APJ was upregulated in pericytes under hypoxia, and apelin increased pericytes proliferation and migration. Moreover, knockdown of apelin in pericyte was achieved via lentivirus-mediated RNA interference. After the inhibition of apelin, pericytes proliferation was inhibited significantly in hypoxia culture condition. Furthermore, exogenous recombinant apelin effectively prevented hypoxia-induced apoptosis through downregulating active-caspase 3 expression and increasing the ratio of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)/Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) in pericytes. These results suggest that apelin suppressed hypoxia-induced pericytes injury, which indicated that apelin could be a potential therapeutic target for retinal angiogenic diseases. PMID:26491547

  16. Sphingolipid profile alters in retinal dystrophic P23H-1 rats and systemic FTY720 can delay retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Megan; Qi, Hui; Sun, Eleanor; Tan, Jeremy; Porter, Hunter; Allegood, Jeremy; Chalfant, Charles E; Yasumura, Douglas; Matthes, Michael T; LaVail, Matthew M; Mandal, Nawajes A

    2016-05-01

    Retinal degeneration (RD) affects millions of people and is a major cause of ocular impairment and blindness. With a wide range of mutations and conditions leading to degeneration, targeting downstream processes is necessary for developing effective treatments. Ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate, a pair of bioactive sphingolipids, are involved in apoptosis and its prevention, respectively. Apoptotic cell death is a potential driver of RD, and in order to understand the mechanism of degeneration and potential treatments, we studied rhodopsin mutant RD model, P23H-1 rats. Investigating this genetic model of human RD allows us to investigate the association of sphingolipid metabolites with the degeneration of the retina in P23H-1 rats and the effects of a specific modulator of sphingolipid metabolism, FTY720. We found that P23H-1 rat retinas had altered sphingolipid profiles that, when treated with FTY720, were rebalanced closer to normal levels. FTY720-treated rats also showed protection from RD compared with their vehicle-treated littermates. Based on these data, we conclude that sphingolipid dysregulation plays a secondary role in retinal cell death, which may be common to many forms of RDs, and that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug FTY720 or related compounds that modulate sphingolipid metabolism could potentially delay the cell death. PMID:26947037

  17. Adenosine modulates light responses of rat retinal ganglion cell photoreceptors througha cAMP-mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Puneet; Hartwick, Andrew T E

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is an established neuromodulator in the mammalian retina, with A1 adenosine receptors being especially prevalent in the innermost ganglion cell layer. Activation of A1 receptors causes inhibition of adenylate cyclase, decreases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels and inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA). In this work, our aim was to characterize the effects of adenosine on the light responses of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) and to determine whether these photoreceptors are subject to neuromodulation through intracellular cAMP-related signalling pathways. Using multielectrode array recordings from postnatal and adult rat retinas, we demonstrated that adenosine significantly shortened the duration of ipRGC photoresponses and reduced the number of light-evoked spikes fired by these neurons. The effects were A1 adenosine receptor-mediated, and the expression of this receptor on melanopsin-containing ipRGCs was confirmed by calcium imaging experiments on isolated cells in purified cultures. While inhibition of the cAMP/PKA pathway by adenosine shortened ipRGC light responses, stimulation of this pathway with compounds such as forskolin had the opposite effect and lengthened the duration of ipRGC spiking. Our findings reveal that the modification of ipRGC photoresponses through a cAMP/PKA pathway is a general feature of rat ganglion cell photoreceptors, and this pathway can be inhibited through activation of A1 receptors by adenosine. As adenosine levels in the retina rise at night, adenosinergic modulation of ipRGCs may serve as an internal regulatory mechanism to limit transmission of nocturnal photic signals by ipRGCs to the brain. Targeting retinal A1 adenosine receptors for ipRGC inhibition represents a potential therapeutic target for sleep disorders and migraine-associated photophobia. PMID:25038240

  18. Three-dimensional neuroepithelial culture from human embryonic stem cells and its use for quantitative conversion to retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Carido, Madalena; Meinhardt, Andrea; Kurth, Thomas; Karl, Mike O; Ader, Marius; Tanaka, Elly M

    2013-01-01

    A goal in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research is the faithful differentiation to given cell types such as neural lineages. During embryonic development, a basement membrane surrounds the neural plate that forms a tight, apico-basolaterally polarized epithelium before closing to form a neural tube with a single lumen. Here we show that the three-dimensional epithelial cyst culture of hESCs in Matrigel combined with neural induction results in a quantitative conversion into neuroepithelial cysts containing a single lumen. Cells attain a defined neuroepithelial identity by 5 days. The neuroepithelial cysts naturally generate retinal epithelium, in part due to IGF-1/insulin signaling. We demonstrate the utility of this epithelial culture approach by achieving a quantitative production of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from hESCs within 30 days. Direct transplantation of this RPE into a rat model of retinal degeneration without any selection or expansion of the cells results in the formation of a donor-derived RPE monolayer that rescues photoreceptor cells. The cyst method for neuroepithelial differentiation of pluripotent stem cells is not only of importance for RPE generation but will also be relevant to the production of other neuronal cell types and for reconstituting complex patterning events from three-dimensional neuroepithelia. PMID:23358448

  19. Three-dimensional neuroepithelial culture from human embryonic stem cells and its use for quantitative conversion to retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Carido, Madalena; Meinhardt, Andrea; Kurth, Thomas; Karl, Mike O; Ader, Marius; Tanaka, Elly M

    2013-01-01

    A goal in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research is the faithful differentiation to given cell types such as neural lineages. During embryonic development, a basement membrane surrounds the neural plate that forms a tight, apico-basolaterally polarized epithelium before closing to form a neural tube with a single lumen. Here we show that the three-dimensional epithelial cyst culture of hESCs in Matrigel combined with neural induction results in a quantitative conversion into neuroepithelial cysts containing a single lumen. Cells attain a defined neuroepithelial identity by 5 days. The neuroepithelial cysts naturally generate retinal epithelium, in part due to IGF-1/insulin signaling. We demonstrate the utility of this epithelial culture approach by achieving a quantitative production of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from hESCs within 30 days. Direct transplantation of this RPE into a rat model of retinal degeneration without any selection or expansion of the cells results in the formation of a donor-derived RPE monolayer that rescues photoreceptor cells. The cyst method for neuroepithelial differentiation of pluripotent stem cells is not only of importance for RPE generation but will also be relevant to the production of other neuronal cell types and for reconstituting complex patterning events from three-dimensional neuroepithelia.

  20. The neuroprotective effect of hyperbaric oxygen treatment on laser-induced retinal damage in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnevskia-Dai, Victoria; Belokopytov, Mark; Dubinsky, Galina; Nachum, Gal; Avni, Isaac; Belkin, Michael; Rosner, Mordechai

    2005-04-01

    Retinal damage induced by mechanical trauma, ischemia or laser photocoagulation increases considerably by secondary degeneration processes. The spread of damage may be ameliorated by neuroprotection that is aimed at reducing the extent of the secondary degeneration and promote healing processes. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment consists of inspiration of oxygen at higher than one absolute atmospheric pressure. Improved neural function was observed in patients with acute brain trauma or ischemia treated with HBO. This study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on laser induced retinal damage in a rat model. Standard argon laser lesions were created in 25 pigmented rats divided into three groups: Ten rats were treated immediately after the irradiation with HBO three times during the first 24 hr followed by 12 consecutive daily treatments. Five rats received a shorter treatment regimen of 10 consecutive HBO treatments. The control group (10 rats) underwent the laser damage with no additional treatment. The retinal lesions were evaluated 20 days after the injury. All outcome measures were improved by the longer HBO treatment (P<0.01). The shorter HBO treatment was less effective, showing an increase only in nuclei density at the central area of lesion (P< 0.01). Hyperbaric oxygen seems to exert a neuroprotective effect on laser-induced retinal damage in a rat model. In the range of HBO exposures studied, longer exposure provides more neuroprotection. These results encourage further evaluation of the potential therapeutic use of hyperbaric oxygen in diseases and injuries of the retina.

  1. Displaced retinal ganglion cells in albino and pigmented rats

    PubMed Central

    Nadal-Nicolás, Francisco M.; Salinas-Navarro, Manuel; Jiménez-López, Manuel; Sobrado-Calvo, Paloma; Villegas-Pérez, María P.; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta

    2014-01-01

    We have studied in parallel the population of displaced retinal ganglion cells (dRGCs) and normally placed (orthotopic RGCs, oRGCs) in albino and pigmented rats. Using retrograde tracing from the optic nerve, from both superior colliculi (SC) or from the ipsilateral SC in conjunction with Brn3 and melanopsin immunodetection, we report for the first time their total number and topography as well as the number and distribution of those dRGCs and oRGCs that project ipsi- or contralaterally and/or that express any of the three Brn3 isoforms or melanopsin. The total number of RGCs (oRGCs+dRGCs) is 84,706 ± 1249 in albino and 90,440 ± 2236 in pigmented, out of which 2383 and 2428 are melanopsin positive (m-RGCs), respectively. Regarding dRGCs: i/ albino rats have a significantly lower number of dRGCs than pigmented animals (0.5% of the total number of RGCs vs. 2.5%, respectively), ii/ dRGCs project massively to the contralateral SC, iii/ the percentage of ipsilaterality is higher for dRGCs than for oRGCs, iv/ a higher proportion of ipsilateral dRGCs is observed in albino than pigmented animals, v/ dRGC topography is very specific, they predominate in the equatorial temporal retina, being densest where the oRGCs are densest, vi/ Brn3a detects all dRGCs except half of the ipsilateral ones and those that express melanopsin, vii/ the proportion of dRGCs that express Brn3b or Brn3c is slightly lower than in the oRGC population, viii/ a higher percentage of dRGCs (13% albino, 9% pigmented) than oRGCs (2.6%) express melanopsin, ix/ few m-RGCs (displaced and orthotopic) project to the ipsilateral SC, x/ the topography of m-dRGCs does not resemble the general distribution of dRGCs, xi/ The soma size in m-oRGCs ranges from 10 to 21 μm and in m-dRGCs from 8 to 15 μm, xii/ oRGCs and dRGCs have the same susceptibility to axonal injury and ocular hypertension. Although the role of mammalian dRGCs remains to be determined, our data suggest that they are not misplaced by an

  2. Atoh7 promotes the differentiation of Müller cells-derived retinal stem cells into retinal ganglion cells in a rat model of glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei-tao; Zhang, Xue-yong

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading eye diseases resulting in blindness due to the death of retinal ganglion cells. This study aimed to develop novel protocol to promote the differentiation of retinal Müller cells into ganglion cells in vivo in a rat model of glaucoma. The stem cells dedifferentiated from rat retinal Müller cells were randomized to receive transfection with empty lentivirus PGC-FU-GFP or lentivirus PGC-FU-Atoh7-GFP, or no transfection. The stem cells were induced further to differentiate. Ocular hypertension was induced using laser photocoagulation. The eyes were injected with Atoh7 expression vector lentivirus PGC-FU-Atoh7-GFP. Eyeball frozen sections, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, Western bolt, and apoptosis assay were performed. We found that the proportion of ganglion cells differentiated from Atoh7-tranfected stem cells was significantly higher than that of the other two groups. The mean intraocular pressure of glaucomatous eyes was elevated significantly compared with those of contralateral eyes. Some retinal Müller cells in the inner nuclear layer entered the mitotic cell cycle in rat chronic ocular hypertension glaucoma model. Atoh7 contributes to the differentiation of retinal Müller cells into retinal ganglion cells in rat model of glaucoma. In conclusion, Atoh7 promotes the differentiation of Müller cells-derived retinal stem cells into retinal ganglion cells in a rat model of glaucoma, thus opening up a new avenue for gene therapy and optic nerve regeneration in glaucoma. PMID:25710928

  3. Ethyl Pyruvate Prevents Methyglyoxal-Induced Retinal Vascular Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Yun Mi; Kim, Chan-Sik; Sohn, Eunjin; Jo, Kyuhyung; Shin, So Dam; Kim, Jin Sook

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate is an endogenous antioxidant substance. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of ethyl pyruvate (EP) on retinal vascular injury in diabetic retinopathy. To investigate the protective effect of EP on vascular cell apoptosis and blood-retinal barrier (BRB) breakage, we have used intravitreally methylglyoxal-(MGO-) injected rat eyes. Apoptosis of the retinal vascular cell that was stimulated by the intravitreal injection of MGO was evidently attenuated by the EP treatment. EP exerts inhibitory effect on MGO-induced vascular cell apoptosis by blocking oxidative injury. In addition, EP treatment prevented MGO-induced BRB breakage and the degradation of occludin, an important tight junction protein. These observations suggest that EP acts through an antioxidant mechanism to protect against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in retinal vessels. PMID:23671872

  4. Zingiber officinale attenuates retinal microvascular changes in diabetic rats via anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dongare, Shirish; Mathur, Rajani; Saxena, Rohit; Mathur, Sandeep; Agarwal, Renu; Nag, Tapas C.; Srivastava, Sushma; Kumar, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is a common microvascular complication of long-standing diabetes. Several complex interconnecting biochemical pathways are activated in response to hyperglycemia. These pathways culminate into proinflammatory and angiogenic effects that bring about structural and functional damage to the retinal vasculature. Since Zingiber officinale (ginger) is known for its anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties, we investigated the effects of its extract standardized to 5% 6-gingerol, the major active constituent of ginger, in attenuating retinal microvascular changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Methods Diabetic rats were treated orally with the vehicle or the ginger extract (75 mg/kg/day) over a period of 24 weeks along with regular monitoring of bodyweight and blood glucose and weekly fundus photography. At the end of the 24-week treatment, the retinas were isolated for histopathological examination under a light microscope, transmission electron microscopy, and determination of the retinal tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Results Oral administration of the ginger extract resulted in significant reduction of hyperglycemia, the diameter of the retinal vessels, and vascular basement membrane thickness. Improvement in the architecture of the retinal vasculature was associated with significantly reduced expression of NF-κB and reduced activity of TNF-α and VEGF in the retinal tissue in the ginger extract–treated group compared to the vehicle-treated group. Conclusions The current study showed that ginger extract containing 5% of 6-gingerol attenuates the retinal microvascular changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes through anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic actions. Although precise molecular targets remain to be determined, 6-gingerol seems to be a potential candidate for further investigation. PMID:27293376

  5. Rat neurosphere cells protect axotomized rat retinal ganglion cells and facilitate their regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hill, Andrew J; Zwart, Isabel; Samaranayake, Asanka Nuwan; Al-Allaf, Faisal; Girdlestone, John; Mehmet, Huseyin; Navarrete, Roberto; Navarrete, Cristina; Jen, Ling-Sun

    2009-07-01

    We investigated the ability of a population of rat neural stem and precursor cells derived from rat embryonic spinal cord to protect injured neurons in the rat central nervous system (CNS). The neonatal rat optic pathway was used as a model of CNS injury, whereby retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were axotomized by lesion of the lateral geniculate nucleus one day after birth. Neural stem and precursor cells derived from expanded neurospheres (NS) were transplanted into the lesion site at the time of injury. Application of Fast Blue tracer dye to the lesion site demonstrated that significant numbers of RGCs survived at 4 and 8 weeks in animals that received a transplant, with an average of 28% survival, though in some individual cases survival was greater than 50%. No RGCs survived in animals that received a lesion alone. Furthermore, labeled RGCs were also observed when Fast Blue was applied to the superior colliculus (SC) at 4 weeks, suggesting that neurosphere cells also facilitated RGC to regenerate to their normal target. Transplanted cells did not migrate or express neural markers after transplantation, and secreted several neurotrophic factors in vitro. We conclude that NS cells can protect injured CNS neurons and promote their regeneration. These effects are not attributable to cell replacement, and may be mediated via secretion of neurotrophic factors. Thus, neuroprotection by stem cell populations may be a more viable approach for treatment of CNS disorders than cell replacement therapy.

  6. Partial mitochondrial complex I inhibition induces oxidative damage and perturbs glutamate transport in primary retinal cultures. Relevance to Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON).

    PubMed

    Beretta, Simone; Wood, John P M; Derham, Barry; Sala, Gessica; Tremolizzo, Lucio; Ferrarese, Carlo; Osborne, Neville N

    2006-11-01

    Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited form of visual loss, due to selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. Despite the established aetiological association between LHON and mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I of the electron transport chain, the pathophysiology of this disorder remains obscure. Primary rat retinal cultures were exposed to increasing concentrations of rotenone to titrate complex I inhibition. Neural cells were more sensitive than Müller glial cells to rotenone toxicity. Rotenone induced an increase in mitochondrial-derived free radicals and lipid peroxidation. Sodium-dependent glutamate uptake, which is mostly mediated by the glutamate transporter GLAST expressed by Müller glial cells, was reduced dose-dependently by rotenone with no changes in GLAST expression. Our findings suggest that complex I-derived free radicals and disruption of glutamate transport might represent key elements for explaining the selective retinal ganglion cell death in LHON.

  7. Light adaptation does not prevent early retinal abnormalities in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kur, Joanna; Burian, Michael A.; Newman, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    The aetiology of diabetic retinopathy (DR), the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, remains controversial. One hypothesis holds that retinal hypoxia, exacerbated by the high O2 consumption of rod photoreceptors in the dark, is a primary cause of DR. Based on this prediction we investigated whether early retinal abnormalities in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats are alleviated by preventing the rods from dark adapting. Diabetic rats and their non-diabetic littermates were housed in a 12:12 hour light-dim light photocycle (30 lux during the day and 3 lux at night). Progression of early retinal abnormalities in diabetic rats was assessed by monitoring the ERG b-wave and oscillatory potentials, Müller cell reactive gliosis, and neuronal cell death, as assayed by TUNEL staining and retinal thickness at 6 and 12 weeks after diabetes induction. Maintaining diabetic animals in a dim-adapting light did not slow the progression of these neuronal and glial changes when compared to diabetic rats maintained in a standard 12:12 hour light-dark photocycle (30 lux during the day and 0 lux at night). Our results indicate that neuronal and glial abnormalities in early stages of diabetes are not exacerbated by rod photoreceptor O2 consumption in the dark. PMID:26852722

  8. Light adaptation does not prevent early retinal abnormalities in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kur, Joanna; Burian, Michael A; Newman, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    The aetiology of diabetic retinopathy (DR), the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, remains controversial. One hypothesis holds that retinal hypoxia, exacerbated by the high O2 consumption of rod photoreceptors in the dark, is a primary cause of DR. Based on this prediction we investigated whether early retinal abnormalities in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats are alleviated by preventing the rods from dark adapting. Diabetic rats and their non-diabetic littermates were housed in a 12:12 hour light-dim light photocycle (30 lux during the day and 3 lux at night). Progression of early retinal abnormalities in diabetic rats was assessed by monitoring the ERG b-wave and oscillatory potentials, Müller cell reactive gliosis, and neuronal cell death, as assayed by TUNEL staining and retinal thickness at 6 and 12 weeks after diabetes induction. Maintaining diabetic animals in a dim-adapting light did not slow the progression of these neuronal and glial changes when compared to diabetic rats maintained in a standard 12:12 hour light-dark photocycle (30 lux during the day and 0 lux at night). Our results indicate that neuronal and glial abnormalities in early stages of diabetes are not exacerbated by rod photoreceptor O2 consumption in the dark.

  9. Effects of intravitreal injection of netrin-1 in retinal neovascularization of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yao; Zou, Jing; Han, Yun; Quyang, Luowa; He, Hui; Hu, Peihong; Shao, Yi; Tu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background In a previous study, we confirmed that netrin-1 acts as an antiangiogenic factor by inhibiting alkali burn-induced corneal neovascularization in rats. Here, we continue working on the role of netrin-1 in retinal neovascularization. Methods Using an in vitro angiogenesis assay, we detected the effects of netrin-1 on human umbilical vein endothelial cell tube formation, viability and proliferation, migration, and invasion at concentrations of 0.1 μg/mL or 5 μg/mL. We intravitreally injected 0.1 μg/mL or 5 μg/mL netrin-1 into streptozotocin-induced rats to assess retinal neovascularization using retinal electrophysiology and electroretinography, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, fundus fluoresce in angiography, measurement of inner blood retinal barrier, retinal hematoxylin-eosin staining, and retinal flat-mount fluorescence assays. Results Human umbilical vein endothelial cell tube formation, viability and proliferation, migration, and invasion were upregulated by netrin-1 at a concentration of 0.1 μg/mL (P<0.05), while 5 μg/mL netrin-1 had an opposite effect (P<0.05) in our in vitro angiogenesis assay. Retinal electrophysiology testing revealed that intravitreal injection of netrin-1 affected the amplitude of a- and b-waves (a-wave: 0.1 μg/mL netrin-1 =17.67±3.39 μm, 5 μg/mL netrin-1 =28.50±1.31 μm, phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]-treated =17.67±3.39 μm; b-wave: 0.1 μg/mL netrin-1 =44.67±4.80 μm, 5 μg/mL netrin-1 =97.17±9.63 μm, PBS-treated =44.67±4.80 μm) and the expression of VEGF-A (no-treatment rats, 9.29±0.80 pg/mL; PBS-treated rats, 19.64±3.77 pg/mL; 0.1 μg/mL netrin-1 treated rats, 21.37±3.64 pg/mL; 5 μg/mL netrin-1 treated rats, 9.85±0.54 pg/mL, at 6 weeks after induction). By comparing fluoresce in angiography, level of inner blood retinal barrier breakdown (% of control), retinal hematoxylin-eosin staining, and collagen-IV fluorescence assays in the retinas of PBS-treated rats, netrin-1 was found to suppress and

  10. Retrograde labeling, enrichment, and characterization of retinal ganglion cells from the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Sarthy, P V; Curtis, B M; Catterall, W A

    1983-12-01

    We have developed a method for labeling retinal ganglion cells in neonatal rats by retrograde transport of the fluorescent dye, True Blue (TB), injected into the optic chiasm. Following proteolytic dissociation of labeled retinas into single cells, the labeled cells could be enriched 50- to 100-fold by centrifugation in a 5%/10% metrizamide gradient. When plated in Ham's F-10 medium in the presence of fetal calf serum and chick optic tectum-conditioned medium, the labeled cells could be maintained in vitro up to 48 hr. In these cultures, the ganglion cells (GCS) constituted 50 to 70% of the total cell population. When GC-rich fractions or GC cultures were stained with a monoclonal antibody to Thy-1 antigen, greater than 90% of the TB-labeled cells were reactive. In order to localize voltage-sensitive sodium channels, GC-rich cultures were reacted with 125I-scorpion toxin. Analysis of the autoradiograms showed that the density of silver grains was about 10-fold higher on TB-labeled cells than on nonfluorescent cells, or in controls which contained excess of unlabeled toxin. When GC cultures were incubated with micromolar concentrations of putative GC transmitters, aspartate and glutamate, the amino acids were accumulated by 15 to 20% of labeled cells. Several lectin receptors were also localized on TB-labeled cells in situ. Whereas the lectins wheat germ agglutinin, concanavalin A, peanut agglutinin, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin bound to TB-labeled cells, others such as Ricinus communis agglutinin I, Ulex, and Lotus lectins showed no binding. The lectin binding was specific since preincubation with the appropriate hapten sugar blocked lectin binding.

  11. Measuring retinal blood flow in rats using Doppler optical coherence tomography without knowing eyeball axial length

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenzhong; Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) is widely used for measuring retinal blood flow. Existing Doppler OCT methods require the eyeball axial length, in which empirical values are usually used. However, variations in the axial length can create a bias unaccounted for in the retinal blood flow measurement. The authors plan to develop a Doppler OCT method that can measure the total retinal blood flow rate without requiring the eyeball axial length. Methods: The authors measured the retinal blood flow rate using a dual-ring scanning protocol. The small and large scanning rings entered the eye at different incident angles (small ring: 4°; large ring: 6°), focused on different locations on the retina, and detected the projected velocities/phase shifts along the probing beams. The authors calculated the ratio of the projected velocities between the two rings, and then used this ratio to estimate absolute flow velocity. The authors tested this method in both Intralipid phantoms and in vivo rats. Results: In the Intralipid flow phantom experiments, the preset and measured flow rates were consistent with the coefficient of determination as 0.97. Linear fitting between preset and measured flow rates determined the fitting slope as 1.07 and the intercept as −0.28. In in vivo rat experiments, the measured average total retinal blood flow was 7.02 ± 0.31μl/min among four wild-type rats. The authors’ measured flow rates were consistent with results in the literature. Conclusions: By using a dual-ring scanning protocol with carefully controlled incident angle difference between the two scanning rings in Doppler OCT, the authors demonstrated that it is feasible to measure the absolute retinal blood flow without knowing the eyeball axial length. PMID:26328984

  12. Review: R28 retinal precursor cells: The first 20 years

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The R28 retinal precursor cell line was established 20 years ago, originating from a postnatal day 6 rat retinal culture immortalized with the 12S E1A (NP-040507) gene of the adenovirus in a replication-incompetent viral vector. Since that time, R28 cells have been characterized and used for a variety of in vitro and in vivo studies of retinal cell behavior, including differentiation, neuroprotection, cytotoxicity, and light stimulation, as well as retinal gene expression and neuronal function. While no cell culture is equivalent to the intact eye, R28 cells continue to provide an important experimental system for the study of many retinal processes. PMID:24644404

  13. A rat retinal damage model predicts for potential clinical visual disturbances induced by Hsp90 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dan; Liu, Yuan; Ye, Josephine; Ying, Weiwen; Ogawa, Luisa Shin; Inoue, Takayo; Tatsuta, Noriaki; Wada, Yumiko; Koya, Keizo; Huang, Qin; Bates, Richard C.; Sonderfan, Andrew J.

    2013-12-01

    In human trials certain heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors, including 17-DMAG and NVP-AUY922, have caused visual disorders indicative of retinal dysfunction; others such as 17-AAG and ganetespib have not. To understand these safety profile differences we evaluated histopathological changes and exposure profiles of four Hsp90 inhibitors, with or without clinical reports of adverse ocular effects, using a rat retinal model. Retinal morphology, Hsp70 expression (a surrogate marker of Hsp90 inhibition), apoptotic induction and pharmacokinetic drug exposure analysis were examined in rats treated with the ansamycins 17-DMAG and 17-AAG, or with the second-generation compounds NVP-AUY922 and ganetespib. Both 17-DMAG and NVP-AUY922 induced strong yet restricted retinal Hsp70 up-regulation and promoted marked photoreceptor cell death 24 h after the final dose. In contrast, neither 17-AAG nor ganetespib elicited photoreceptor injury. When the relationship between drug distribution and photoreceptor degeneration was examined, 17-DMAG and NVP-AUY922 showed substantial retinal accumulation, with high retina/plasma (R/P) ratios and slow elimination rates, such that 51% of 17-DMAG and 65% of NVP-AUY922 present at 30 min post-injection were retained in the retina 6 h post-dose. For 17-AAG and ganetespib, retinal elimination was rapid (90% and 70% of drugs eliminated from the retina at 6 h, respectively) which correlated with lower R/P ratios. These findings indicate that prolonged inhibition of Hsp90 activity in the eye results in photoreceptor cell death. Moreover, the results suggest that the retina/plasma exposure ratio and retinal elimination rate profiles of Hsp90 inhibitors, irrespective of their chemical class, may predict for ocular toxicity potential. - Highlights: • In human trials some Hsp90 inhibitors cause visual disorders, others do not. • Prolonged inhibition of Hsp90 in the rat eye results in photoreceptor cell death. • Retina/plasma ratio and retinal

  14. Gene Expression Changes under Cyclic Mechanical Stretching in Rat Retinal Glial (Müller) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Fan, Jiawen; Zhang, Meng; Sun, Zhongcui; Xu, Gezhi

    2013-01-01

    Objective The retina is subjected to tractional forces in various conditions. As the predominant glial element in the retina, Müller cells are active players in all forms of retinal injury and disease. In this study, we aim to identify patterns of gene expression changes induced by cyclic mechanical stretching in Müller cells. Methods Rat Müller cells were seeded onto flexible bottom culture plates and subjected to a cyclic stretching regimen of 15% equibiaxial stretching for 1 and 24 h. RNA was extracted and amplified, labeled, and hybridized to rat genome microarrays. The expression profiles were analyzed using GeneSpring software, and gene ontology analysis and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) were used to select, annotate, and visualize genes by function and pathway. The selected genes of interest were further validated by Quantitative Real-time PCR (qPCR). Results Microarray data analysis showed that at 1 and 24 h, the expression of 532 and 991 genes in the Müller cells significantly (t-test, p<0.05) differed between the mechanically stretched and unstretched groups. Of these genes, 56 genes at 1 h and 62 genes at 24 h showed more than a twofold change in expression. Several genes related to response to stimulus (e.g., Egr2, IL6), cell proliferation (e.g., Areg, Atf3), tissue remodeling (e.g., PVR, Loxl2), and vasculogenesis (e.g., Epha2, Nrn1) were selected and validated by qPCR. KEGG pathway analysis showed significant changes in MAPK signaling at both time points. Conclusions Cyclic mechanical strain induces extensive changes in the gene expression in Müller cells through multiple molecular pathways. These results indicate the complex mechanoresponsive nature of Müller cells, and they provide novel insights into possible molecular mechanisms that would account for many retinal diseases in which the retina is often subjected to mechanical forces, such as pathological myopia and proliferative vitreoretinopathy. PMID:23723984

  15. [Ameliorative effects on retinal disorder in diabetic SHRSP (stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat)].

    PubMed

    Nagisa, Yasutaka; Shintani, Asae; Nakagawa, Shizue

    2002-10-01

    The results of the EUCLID highlighted the importance of the renin-angiotensin system in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of candesartan cilexetil(TCV-116), a potent angiotensin II receptor antagonist, in ameliorating retinal disorders in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats(SHRSP) with storeptozotocin(STZ)-induced diabetes. Retinal VEGF mRNA expression was significantly higher and the latencies of oscillatory potentials were significantly elongated in STZ-treated SHRSP compared with a non-treated SHRSP group matched for age. Treatment with TCV-116(3 mg/kg) significantly diminished retinal VEGF mRNA expression and the latencies of oscillatory potentials, but had no effect on plasma glucose concentrations. These results suggest that TCV-116 is effective in preventing the development of diabetic retinopathy already in the early stages.

  16. Pharmacological evidence for the presence of functional beta(3)-adrenoceptors in rat retinal blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Mori, Asami; Miwa, Tomoyo; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether stimulation of beta(3)-adrenoceptors dilates rat retinal blood vessels and how diabetes affects the vasodilator responses. Images of ocular fundus were captured with an original high-resolution digital fundus camera in vivo. The retinal vascular responses were evaluated by measuring diameter of retinal blood vessels contained in the digital images. Both systemic blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were continuously recorded. The beta(3)-adrenoceptor agonist CL316243 (0.3-10 microg/kg/min, i.v.) increased diameter of retinal arterioles (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 31% increase) and decreased mean blood pressure (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 21% decrease) in a dose-dependent manner. CL316243 produced a small but significant increase in HR (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 9% increase). Both SR59230A (1 mg/kg, i.v.) and L-748337 (50 microg/kg, i.v.), beta(3)-adrenoceptor antagonists, significantly prevented CL316243-induced retinal vasodilator responses. Similar observations were made with another beta(3)-adrenoceptor agonist, BRL37344. The beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol also increased diameter of retinal arterioles (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 43% increase), whereas the drug produced greater decrease in blood pressure (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 46% decrease) and increase in HR (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 16% increase), compared with beta(3)-adrenoceptor agonists. The retinal vasodilator responses to CL316243 and BRL37344 observed under blockade of beta(1)/beta(2)-adrenoceptors with propranolol (2 mg/kg, i.v. bolus followed by 100 microg/kg/min infusion) were unaffected 2 weeks after induction of diabetes by the combination of streptozotocin treatment and D: -glucose feeding. On the other hand, the vasodilator responses to salbutamol of retinal arterioles were significantly reduced in diabetic rats. These results suggest that stimulation of beta(3)-adrenoceptors causes the vasodilation of retinal arterioles in vivo and the vasodilator responses are

  17. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs) as a chronic experimental model for investigation of retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Andrew; Hopes, Marina; Wright, Phillip; Broadway, David C; Sanderson, Julie

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing need for models of human diseases that utilise native, donated human tissue in order to model disease processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies. In this paper we assessed the suitability of adult human retinal explants as a potential model of chronic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration. Our results confirmed that RGC markers commonly used in rodent studies (NeuN, βIII Tubulin and Thy-1) were appropriate for labelling human RGCs and followed the expected differential expression patterns across, as well as throughout, the macular and para-macular regions of the retina. Furthermore, we showed that neither donor age nor post-mortem time (within 24 h) significantly affected the initial expression levels of RGC markers. In addition, the feasibility of using human post mortem donor tissue as a long-term model of RGC degeneration was determined with RGC protein being detectable up to 4 weeks in culture with an associated decline in RGC mRNA and significant, progressive, apoptotic labelling of NeuN(+) cells. Differences in RGC apoptosis might have been influenced by medium compositions indicating that media constituents could play a role in supporting axotomised RGCs. We propose that using ex vivo human explants may prove to be a useful model for testing the effectiveness of neuroprotective strategies.

  18. VSX2 and ASCL1 Are Indicators of Neurogenic Competence in Human Retinal Progenitor Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Lynda S.; Pinilla, Isabel; Saha, Jishnu; Clermont, Joshua M.; Lien, Jessica S.; Borys, Katarzyna D.; Capowski, Elizabeth E.; Phillips, M. Joseph; Gamm, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) culture techniques are frequently used for CNS tissue modeling and organoid production, including generation of retina-like tissues. A proposed advantage of these 3D systems is their potential to more closely approximate in vivo cellular microenvironments, which could translate into improved manufacture and/or maintenance of neuronal populations. Visual System Homeobox 2 (VSX2) labels all multipotent retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) and is known to play important roles in retinal development. In contrast, the proneural transcription factor Acheate scute-like 1 (ASCL1) is expressed transiently in a subset of RPCs, but is required for the production of most retinal neurons. Therefore, we asked whether the presence of VSX2 and ASCL1 could gauge neurogenic potential in 3D retinal cultures derived from human prenatal tissue or ES cells (hESCs). Short term prenatal 3D retinal cultures displayed multiple characteristics of human RPCs (hRPCs) found in situ, including robust expression of VSX2. Upon initiation of hRPC differentiation, there was a small increase in co-labeling of VSX2+ cells with ASCL1, along with a modest increase in the number of PKCα+ neurons. However, 3D prenatal retinal cultures lost expression of VSX2 and ASCL1 over time while concurrently becoming refractory to neuronal differentiation. Conversely, 3D optic vesicles derived from hESCs (hESC-OVs) maintained a robust VSX2+ hRPC population that could spontaneously co-express ASCL1 and generate photoreceptors and other retinal neurons for an extended period of time. These results show that VSX2 and ASCL1 can serve as markers for neurogenic potential in cultured hRPCs. Furthermore, unlike hESC-OVs, maintenance of 3D structure does not independently convey an advantage in the culture of prenatal hRPCs, further illustrating differences in the survival and differentiation requirements of hRPCs extracted from native tissue vs. those generated entirely in vitro. PMID:26292211

  19. Chemical Exacerbation of Light-induced Retinal Degeneration in F344/N Rats in National Toxicology Program Rodent Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Haruhiro; Hoenerhoff, Mark J; Peddada, Shyamal D; Sills, Robert C; Pandiri, Arun R

    2016-08-01

    Retinal degeneration due to chronic ambient light exposure is a common spontaneous age-related finding in albino rats, but it can also be related to exposures associated with environmental chemicals and drugs. Typically, light-induced retinal degeneration has a central/hemispherical localization whereas chemical-induced retinal degeneration has a diffuse localization. This study was conducted to identify and characterize treatment-related retinal degeneration in National Toxicology Program rodent bioassays. A total of 3 chronic bioassays in F344/N rats (but not in B6C3F1/N mice) were identified that had treatment-related increases in retinal degeneration (kava kava extract, acrylamide, and leucomalachite green). A retrospective light microscopic evaluation of the retinas from rats in these 3 studies showed a dose-related increase in the frequencies of retinal degeneration, beginning with the loss of photoreceptor cells, followed by the inner nuclear layer cells. These dose-related increased frequencies of degenerative retinal lesions localized within the central/hemispherical region are suggestive of exacerbation of light-induced retinal degeneration. PMID:27230502

  20. Measurement of retinal blood flow in the rat by combining Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with fundus imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Vietauer, Martin; Knopf, Corinna; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Reitsamer, Herbert; Gröschl, Martin; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Vilser, Walthard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-10-01

    A wide variety of ocular diseases are associated with abnormalities in ocular circulation. As such, there is considerable interest in techniques for quantifying retinal blood flow, among which Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be the most promising. We present an approach to measure retinal blood flow in the rat using a new optical system that combines the measurement of blood flow velocities via Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and the measurement of vessel diameters using a fundus camera-based technique. Relying on fundus images for extraction of retinal vessel diameters instead of OCT images improves the reliability of the technique. The system was operated with an 841-nm superluminescent diode and a charge-coupled device camera that could be operated at a line rate of 20 kHz. We show that the system is capable of quantifying the response of 100% oxygen breathing on the retinal blood flow. In six rats, we observed a decrease in retinal vessel diameters of 13.2% and a decrease in retinal blood velocity of 42.6%, leading to a decrease in retinal blood flow of 56.7%. Furthermore, in four rats, the response of retinal blood flow during stimulation with diffuse flicker light was assessed. Retinal vessel diameter and blood velocity increased by 3.4% and 28.1%, respectively, leading to a relative increase in blood flow of 36.2%;. The presented technique shows much promise to quantify early changes in retinal blood flow during provocation with various stimuli in rodent models of ocular diseases in rats.

  1. Octreotide, a Somatostatin Analogue, Fails to Inhibit Hypoxia-induced Retinal Neovascularization in the Neonatal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Averbukh, Edward; Halpert, Michael; Yanko, Ravit; Yanko, Lutza; Peèr, Jacob; Levinger, Samuel; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Octreotide, a somatostatin analogue, has been shown to prevent angiogenesis in diverse in vitro models. We evaluated its effect on retinal neovascularization in vivo, using a neonatal rat retinopathy model. Methods: We used, on alternating days, hypoxia (10% O2) and hyperoxia (50% O2) during the first 14 days of neonatal rats, to induce retinal neovascularization. Half of the rats were injected subcutaneously with octreotide 0.7 μg/g BW twice daily. At day 18 the eyes were evaluated for the presence of epiretinal and vitreal hemorrhage, neovascularization and epiretinal proliferation. Octreotide pharmacokinetics and its effect on serum growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) were examined in 28 rats. Results: Serum octreotide levels were 667 μg/1 two hours after injection, 26.4 μg/1 after nine hours and 3.2 μg/1 after 14 hours. GH levels were decreased by 40% (p = 0.002) two hours after injection but thereafter returned to baseline. IGF-I levels were unchanged two hours after injection and were elevated by 26% 14 hours after injection (p = 0.02). Epiretinal membranes were highly associated with epiretinal hemorrhages (p < 0.001), while retinal neovascularization was notably associated with vitreal hemorrhages (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Twice-daily injections of octreotide failed to produce sustained decrease in serum GH, but produced rebound elevation of serum IGF-I. Accordingly, no statistically significant effect of injections on retinal pathology was noted. This finding, however, does not contradict our assumption that GH suppression may decrease the severity of retinopathy. PMID:11469389

  2. Electrophysiology Alterations in Primary Visual Cortex Neurons of Retinal Degeneration (S334ter-line-3) Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Wang, Yi; Liang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Yihuai; Ng, Tsz Kin; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic nature of the brain is critical for the success of treatments aimed at restoring vision at the retinal level. The success of these treatments relies highly on the functionality of the surviving neurons along the entire visual pathway. Electrophysiological properties at the retina level have been investigated during the progression of retinal degeneration; however, little is known about the changes in electrophysiological properties that occur in the primary visual cortex (V1) during the course of retinal degeneration. By conducting extracellular recording, we examined the electrophysiological properties of V1 in S334ter-line-3 rats (a transgenic model of retinal degeneration developed to express a rhodopsin mutation similar to that found in human retinitis pigmentosa patients). We measured the orientation tuning, spatial and temporal frequency tunings and the receptive field (RF) size for 127 V1 neurons from 11 S334ter-3 rats and 10 Long-Evans (LE) rats. V1 neurons in the S334ter-3 rats showed weaker orientation selectivity, lower optimal spatial and temporal frequency values and a smaller receptive field size compared to the LE rats. These results suggest that the visual cognitive ability significantly changes during retinal degeneration. PMID:27225415

  3. Changes in aquaporin-4 and Kir4.1 expression in rats with inherited retinal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lassiale, S; Valamanesh, F; Klein, C; Hicks, D; Abitbol, M; Versaux-Botteri, C

    2016-07-01

    Muller glial cells (MGC) are essential for normal functioning of retina. They are especially involved in potassium (K+) and water homeostasis, via inwardly rectifying K+ (Kir 4.1) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) channels respectively. Because MGC appear morphologically and functionally altered in most retinal pathologies, we studied the expression of AQP 4 and Kir 4.1 during the time course of progressive retinal degeneration in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, an animal model for the hereditary human retinal degenerative disease Retinitis pigmentosa. Simultaneous detection of AQP4 and Kir 4.1 was performed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry at birth and during progression of the pathology. Although small quantities of AQP4 and Kir 4.1 mRNA were detected at birth (postnatal day (PNd) 0) in both control and dystrophic rat retinas, proteins could not be detected at this age. Detectable proteins appeared in the second week of postnatal life. From PNd15 onwards, the time course in the expression of both AQP4 and Kir 4.1 mRNAs and protein was similar in dystrophic and control rats, with a progressive increase peaking at PNd60 and a subsequent decrease by one year. AQP4 protein and mRNA content were significantly lowered in dystrophic compared to control rats. Kir 4.1 protein levels were also lower in dystrophic retinas, while mRNA concentrations were unchanged and/or slightly higher in dystrophic rats. The discrepancies between Kir4.1 mRNA and protein suggest perturbation in protein translation due to the pathology. AQP4 and Kir 4.1/vimentin co-immunolabeling showed that: 1) apical radial processes of some MGC invaded the subretinal zone, and 2) MGC morphology was distorted in advanced pathology. MGC became hypertrophic both during the pathology and also with age in control rats. In conclusion, our results confirm that this inherited photoreceptor degeneration also leads to progressive alterations in

  4. Chemical stimulation of rat retinal neurons: feasibility of an epiretinal neurotransmitter-based prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inayat, Samsoon; Rountree, Corey M.; Troy, John B.; Saggere, Laxman

    2015-02-01

    Objective. No cure currently exists for photoreceptor degenerative diseases, which cause partial or total blindness in millions of people worldwide. Electrical retinal prostheses have been developed by several groups with the goal of restoring vision lost to these diseases, but electrical stimulation has limitations. It excites both somas and axons, activating retinal pathways nonphysiologically, and limits spatial resolution because of current spread. Chemical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) using the neurotransmitter glutamate has been suggested as an alternative to electrical stimulation with some significant advantages. However, sufficient scientific data to support developing a chemical-based retinal prosthesis is lacking. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a neurotransmitter-based retinal prosthesis and determine therapeutic stimulation parameters. Approach. We injected controlled amounts of glutamate into rat retinas from the epiretinal side ex vivo via micropipettes using a pressure injection system and recorded RGC responses with a multielectrode array. Responsive units were identified using a spike rate threshold of 3 Hz. Main results. We recorded both somal and axonal units and demonstrated successful glutamatergic stimulation across different RGC subtypes. Analyses show that exogenous glutamate acts on RGC synapses similar to endogenous glutamate and, unlike electrical prostheses, stimulates only RGC somata. The spatial spread of glutamate stimulation was ˜ 290 μm from the injection site, comparable to current electrical prostheses. Further, the glutamate injections produced spatially differential responses in OFF, ON, and ON-OFF RGC subtypes, suggesting that differential stimulation of the OFF and ON systems may be possible. A temporal resolution of 3.2 Hz was obtained, which is a rate suitable for spatial vision. Significance. We provide strong support for the feasibility of an epiretinal neurotransmitter

  5. Transplantation of tectal tissue in rats. IV. Maturation of transplants and development of host retinal projection.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A R; Lund, R D

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the time course of maturation of embryonic tectal tissue transplanted to the midbrain region of newborn rats and studied the development of the host retinal projection to the grafts. Transplants were examined 2-19 days after transplantation. The morphology of developing transplants was studied using Holmes silver and neutral red stained material. Tectal transplants attained their mature morphology about 17 days after transplantation. The time course of tectal transplant maturation appeared to be similar to that of normal superior colliculus in situ. The development of the host retinal projection into the transplants was examined by injecting the host eyes with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) at various times after transplantation. Retinal fibers anterogradely labeled with HRP were first seen growing into the transplants 3-4 days after transplantation. Ingrowing fibers were always located close to the surface of the transplants. The rate of growth of optic axons into the grafts was estimated to be about 250 to 300 micron per day. Patch-like arborizations of retinal afferents were formed soon after innervation and the mature pattern of optic innervation was established by about two weeks. There was no evidence for an initial transitory phase in which the axons invaded the whole transplant. The development of the host retinal projection preceded morphological maturation of the transplants. The mode of ingrowth of retinal axons into tectal grafts was in many respects similar to the way optic fibers grow into the superior colliculus during normal in situ development. The transplant technique thus provides an opportunity to manipulate and analyze the factors which guide optic fiber growth in intact brains. PMID:6697254

  6. Insulin treatment normalizes retinal neuroinflammation but not markers of synapse loss in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Masser, Dustin R.; VanGuilder Starkey, Heather D.; Bixler, Georgina V.; Dunton, Wendy; Bronson, Sarah K.; Freeman, Willard M.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness in developed countries, and a majority of patients with type I and type II diabetes will develop some degree of vision loss despite blood glucose control regimens. The effects of different insulin therapy regimens on early metabolic, inflammatory and neuronal retinal disease processes such as retinal neuroinflammation and synapse loss have not been extensively investigated. This study compared 3 months non-diabetic and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic Sprague Dawley rats. Diabetic rats received either no insulin treatment, systemic insulin treatment beginning after 1 week uncontrolled diabetes (early intervention, 11 weeks on insulin), or after 1.5 months uncontrolled diabetes (late intervention, 6 weeks on insulin). Changes in both whole animal metabolic and retinal inflammatory markers were prevented by early initiation of insulin treatment. These metabolic and inflammatory changes were also normalized by the later insulin intervention. Insulin treatment begun 1 week after diabetes induction ameliorated loss of retinal synapse markers. Synapse markers and presumably synapse numbers were equivalent in uncontrolled diabetes and when insulin treatment began at 1.5 months of diabetes. These findings are in agreement with previous demonstrations that retinal synapses are lost within 1 month of uncontrolled diabetes and suggest that synapses are not regained with glycemic control and restoration of insulin signaling. However, increased expression of metabolic and inflammatory markers associated with diabetes was reversed in both groups of insulin treatment. This study also emphasizes the need for insulin treatment groups in diabetic retinopathy studies to provide a more faithful modeling of the human condition. PMID:24931083

  7. Photovoltaic restoration of sight with high visual acuity in rats with retinal degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, D.; Goetz, G.; Lorach, H.; Mandel, Y.; Smith, R.; Boinagrov, D.; Lei, X.; Kamins, T.; Harris, J.; Mathieson, K.; Sher, A.

    2015-03-01

    Patients with retinal degeneration lose sight due to gradual demise of photoreceptors. Electrical stimulation of the surviving retinal neurons provides an alternative route for delivery of visual information. Subretinal photovoltaic arrays with 70μm pixels were used to convert pulsed near-IR light (880-915nm) into pulsed current to stimulate the nearby inner retinal neurons. Network-mediated responses of the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) could be modulated by pulse width (1-20ms) and peak irradiance (0.5-10 mW/mm2). Similarly to normal vision, retinal response to prosthetic stimulation exhibited flicker fusion at high frequencies, adaptation to static images, and non-linear spatial summation. Spatial resolution was assessed in-vitro and in-vivo using alternating gratings with variable stripe width, projected with rapidly pulsed illumination (20-40Hz). In-vitro, average size of the electrical receptive fields in normal retina was 248+/-59μm - similar to their visible light RF size: 249+/-44μm. RGCs responded to grating stripes down to 67μm using photovoltaic stimulation in degenerate rat retina, and 28μm with visible light in normal retina. In-vivo, visual acuity in normally-sighted controls was 29+/-5μm/stripe, vs. 63+/-4μm/stripe in rats with subretinal photovoltaic arrays, corresponding to 20/250 acuity in human eye. With the enhanced acuity provided by eye movements and perceptual learning in human patients, visual acuity might exceed the 20/200 threshold of legal blindness. Ease of implantation and tiling of these wireless arrays to cover a large visual field, combined with their high resolution opens the door to highly functional restoration of sight.

  8. UV-induced retinal proteome changes in the rat model of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra; Klobučar, Marko; Sedić, Mirela; Micek, Vedran; Gehrig, Peter; Grossman, Jonas; Pavelić, Krešimir; Vojniković, Božidar

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by irreversible damage of photoreceptors in the central posterior part of the retina, called the macula and is the most common cause of vision loss in those aged over 50. A growing body of evidence shows that cumulative long-term exposure to UV radiation may be harmful to the retina and possibly leads to AMD irrespective of age. In spite of many research efforts, cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to UV-induced retinal damage and possibly retinal diseases such as AMD are not completely understood. In the present study we explored damage mechanisms accounting for UV-induced retinal phototoxicity in the rats exposed to UVA and UVB irradiation using a proteomics approach. Our study showed that UV irradiation induces profound changes in the retinal proteomes of the rats associated with the disruption of energy homeostasis, oxidative stress, DNA damage response and structural and functional impairments of the interphotoreceptor matrix components and their cell surface receptors such as galectins. Two small leucine-rich proteoglycans, biglycan and lumican, were identified as phototoxicity biomarkers associated with UV-induced disruption of interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM). In addition, UVB induced activation of Src kinase, which could account for cytoskeletal rearrangements in the retina was observed at the proteomics level. Pharmacological intervention either to target Src kinase with the aim of preventing cytoskeletal rearrangements in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and neuronal retina or to help rebuild damaged IPM may provide fresh avenues of treatment for patients suffering from AMD. PMID:26071645

  9. In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing Corrects Retinal Dystrophy in the S334ter-3 Rat Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Bakondi, Benjamin; Lv, Wenjian; Lu, Bin; Jones, Melissa K; Tsai, Yuchun; Kim, Kevin J; Levy, Rachelle; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J; Svendsen, Clive N; Wang, Shaomei

    2016-03-01

    Reliable genome editing via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 may provide a means to correct inherited diseases in patients. As proof of principle, we show that CRISPR/Cas9 can be used in vivo to selectively ablate the rhodopsin gene carrying the dominant S334ter mutation (Rho(S334)) in rats that model severe autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A single subretinal injection of guide RNA/Cas9 plasmid in combination with electroporation generated allele-specific disruption of Rho(S334), which prevented retinal degeneration and improved visual function.

  10. Astaxanthin Inhibits Expression of Retinal Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Mediators in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Po-Ting; Huang, Hsin-Wei; Yang, Chung-May; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Yang, Chang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated whether orally administered astaxanthin (AST) protects against oxidative damage in the ocular tissues of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Methods and Results Fifty 6-week-old female Wistar rats were randomly assigned to receive an injection of STZ to induce diabetes (n = 40) or to remain uninduced (n = 10). The diabetic rats were randomly selected into four groups and they were separately administered normal saline, 0.6 mg/kg AST, 3 mg/kg AST, or 0.5 mg/kg lutein daily for eight weeks. Retinal functions of each group were evaluated by electroretinography. The expression of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators in the ocular tissues was then assessed by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis, ELISA, RT-PCR, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Retinal functions were preserved by AST and lutein in different levels. Ocular tissues from AST- and lutein-treated rats had significantly reduced levels of oxidative stress mediators (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, nitrotyrosine, and acrolein) and inflammatory mediators (intercellular adhesion molecule-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and fractalkine), increased levels of antioxidant enzymes (heme oxygenase-1 and peroxiredoxin), and reduced activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). Conclusion The xanthophyll carotenoids AST and lutein have neuroprotective effects and reduce ocular oxidative stress, and inflammation in the STZ diabetic rat model, which may be mediated by downregulation of NF-κB activity. PMID:26765843

  11. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides promotes in vivo proliferation of adult rat retinal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Wang, Ning-li; Wang, Si-ying; Lu, Qing-jun; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; So, Kwok-fai

    2015-01-01

    Lycium barbarum is a widely used Chinese herbal medicine prescription for protection of optic nerve. However, it remains unclear regarding the effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides, the main component of Lycium barbarum, on in vivo proliferation of adult ciliary body cells. In this study, adult rats were intragastrically administered low- and high-dose Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (1 and 10 mg/kg) for 35 days and those intragastrically administered phosphate buffered saline served as controls. The number of Ki-67-positive cells in rat ciliary body in the Lycium barbarum polysaccharides groups, in particular low-dose Lycium barbarum polysaccharides group, was significantly greater than that in the phosphate buffered saline group. Ki-67-positive rat ciliary body cells expressed nestin but they did not express glial fibrillary acidic protein. These findings suggest that Lycium barbarum polysaccharides can promote the proliferation of adult rat retinal progenitor cells and the proliferated cells present with neuronal phenotype. PMID:26889185

  12. Retinal degeneration in rats induced by CI-1010, a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Breider, M A; Pilcher, G D; Graziano, M J; Gough, A W

    1998-01-01

    The anti-cancer compound CI-1010, designated as (R)-alpha-([(2-bromoethyl)amino]methyl)-2-nitro-1H-imidazole-1-ethanol monohydrobromide, has a proposed dual mechanism of action due to alkylating and radiosensitizing activities. To assess potential toxicity, adult Wistar rats were treated with a single intravenous injection (0, 50, 100, 150, 225, or 350 mg/kg) and necropsied at 4 or 29 days following treatment. In a repeated dose experiment, rats were injected daily (0, 10, 40, or 80 mg/kg; 5 doses/wk) for 3 wk and necropsied at the end of week 3 or 7. CI-1010 induced retinal degeneration by 4 days after a single injection of > or = 225 mg/kg or by 3 wk of repeated injections of > or = 40 mg/kg. The locally extensive to diffuse retinal degeneration involved the photoreceptor and outer nuclear layer. The photoreceptor layer was vacuolated and compressed corresponding to ultrastructural evidence of inner segment swelling and outer segment fragmentation. The outer nuclear layer was thinned due to loss of nuclei and contained numerous pyknotic or karyorrhectic nuclei. These nuclear changes were morphologically consistent with apoptosis and many outer nuclear layer nuclei labeled with in situ TdT-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labeling (Apoptag). The retinal degeneration was nonreversible, evidenced by increased lesion severity and incidence after CI-1010 was withdrawn for either 25 or 28 days.

  13. Human dental pulp stem cells respond to cues from the rat retina and differentiate to express the retinal neuronal marker rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Bray, A F; Cevallos, R R; Gazarian, K; Lamas, M

    2014-11-01

    Human adult dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are self-renewing stem cells that originate from the neural crest during development and remain within the dental pulp niche through adulthood. Due to their multi-lineage differentiation potential and their relative ease of access they represent an exciting alternative for autologous stem cell-based therapies in neurodegenerative diseases. In animal models, DPSCs transplanted into the brain differentiate into functional neurons or astrocytes in response to local environmental cues that appear to influence the fate of the surviving cells. Here we tested the hypothesis that DPSCs might be able to respond to factors present in the retina enabling the regenerative potential of these cells. We evaluated the response of DPSCs to conditioned media from organotypic explants from control and chemically damaged rat retinas. To evaluate cell differentiation, we analyzed the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), early neuronal and retinal markers (polysialic acid-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM); Pax6; Ascl1; NeuroD1) and the late photoreceptor marker rhodopsin, by immunofluorescence and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Exposure of DPSC cultures to conditioned media from control retinas induced a 39% reduction on the number of DPSCs that expressed GFAP; the expression of Pax6, Ascl1, PSA-NCAM or NeuroD1 was undetectable or did not change significantly. Expression of rhodopsin was not detectable in control or after exposure of the cultures with retinal conditioned media. By contrast, 44% of DPSCs exposed to conditioned media from damaged retinas were immunopositive to this protein. This response could not be reproduced when conditioned media from Müller-enriched primary cultures was used. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR was performed to compare the relative expression of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and brain

  14. Subconjunctivally Implanted Hydrogels for Sustained Insulin Release to Reduce Retinal Cell Apoptosis in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Hisanori; Misra, Gauri P.; Wu, Linfeng; Janagam, Dileep R.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Lowe, Tao L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of blindness in diabetic patients that involves early-onset retinal cell loss. Here, we report our recent work using subconjunctivally implantable hydrogels for sustained insulin release to the retina to prevent retinal degeneration. Methods The hydrogels are synthesized by UV photopolymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide and a dextran macromer containing oligolactate-(2-hydroxyetheyl methacrylate) units. Insulin was loaded into the hydrogels during the synthesis. The ex vivo bioactivity of insulin released from the hydrogels was tested on fresh rat retinas using immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting to measure insulin receptor tyrosine and Akt phosphorylation. The biosafety and the effect on the blood glucose of the hydrogels were evaluated in rats 2 months after subconjunctival implantation. The release of insulin from the hydrogels was studied both in vitro in PBS (pH 7.4), and in vivo using confocal microscopy and RIA kit. The in vivo bioactivity of the released insulin was investigated in diabetic rats using DNA fragmentation method. Results The hydrogels could load insulin with approximately 98% encapsulation efficiency and continuously release FITC-insulin in PBS (pH = 7.4) at 37°C for at least 5 months depending on their composition. Insulin lispro released from the hydrogels was biologically active by increasing insulin receptor tyrosine and Akt serine phosphorylation of ex vivo retinas. In vivo studies showed normal retinal histology 2 months post subconjunctival implantation. Insulin released from subconjunctivally implanted hydrogels could be detected in the retina by using confocal microscopy and RIA kit for 1 week. The implanted hydrogels with insulin lispro did not change the blood glucose level of normal and diabetic rats, but significantly reduced the DNA fragmentation of diabetic retinas for 1 week. Conclusions The developed hydrogels have great potential to sustain release of insulin to the

  15. Differences in Retinal Structure and Function between Aging Male and Female Sprague-Dawley Rats are Strongly Influenced by the Estrus Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Chaychi, Samaneh; Polosa, Anna; Lachapelle, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Biological sex and age are considered as two important factors that may influence the function and structure of the retina, an effect that might be governed by sexual hormones such as estrogen. The purpose of this study was to delineate the influence that biological sex and age exert on the retinal function and structure of rodents and also clarify the effect that the estrus cycle might exert on the retinal function of female rats. Method The retinal function of 50 normal male and female albino Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was investigated with the electroretinogram (ERG) at postnatal day (P) 30, 60, 100, 200, and 300 (n = 5–6 male and female rats/age). Following the ERG recording sessions, retinal histology was performed in both sexes. In parallel, the retinal function of premenopausal and menopausal female rats aged P540 were also compared. Results Sex and age-related changes in retinal structure and function were observed in our animal model. However, irrespective of age, no significant difference was observed in ERG and retinal histology obtained from male and female rats. Notwithstanding the above we did however notice that between P60 and P200 there was a gradual increase in ERG amplitudes of female rats compared to males. Furthermore, the ERG of premenopausal female rats aged 18 months old (P540) was larger compared to age-matched menopausal female rats as well as that of male rats. Conclusion Our results showed that biological sex and age can influence the retinal function and structure of albino SD rats. Furthermore, we showed that cycled female rats have better retinal function compared to the menopausal female rats suggesting a beneficial effect of the estrus cycle on the retinal function. PMID:26317201

  16. Chronologic analysis of variations in retinal damage in two strains of rats after short-term illumination

    SciTech Connect

    O'Steen, W.K.; Donnelly, J.E.

    1982-02-01

    In order to determine whether an optimal period existed for evaluating retinal photodamage in rats, a chronologic analysis was made of quantifiable changes in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) and retinal thicknesses in Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Wag/Rij rats after a single, 24 hr exposure to fluorescent light. A gradual reduction in ONL and retinal thicknesses occurred between postexposure days 0 and 10 and appeared to stabilize by day 14 in both strains. The percent difference in both ONL and retinal thickness in unexposed and exposed rats was greater in Wag/Rij than in SD rats. That the superior hemisphere of the retina was more susceptible to photodamage than the inferior was substantiated, and the difference was greater in the Wag/Rij than in SD rats. This finding emphasizes a significant variability between rat strains and is possibly a manifestation of the slowly progressing genetic retinopathy in the Wag/Rij rats. Results indicated that the optimal period for assessing photodamage under these experimental conditions was not sooner than 10 to 14 days after exposure. Quantifiable analyses prior to that time would not provide an accurate evaluation of the total influence of a short-tern exposure period.

  17. Retinol and retinal metabolism. Relationship to the state of differentiation of cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Siegenthaler, G; Saurat, J H; Ponec, M

    1990-01-01

    Cultured keratinocytes offer an attractive model for studying the metabolism of retinol in relation to cell differentiation, since the extent of keratinocyte differentiation can be modulated experimentally. The metabolism of retinol and retinal was studied in cytosol fractions prepared from two distinct keratinocyte populations, differentiating and non-differentiated. The enzymic activities were analysed using physiological concentrations of [3H]retinol and [3H]retinal in the presence of cofactors. The products formed were quantified by h.p.l.c. In the population of differentiating keratinocytes, the formation of retinoic acid from retinol occurred at a rate of 4.49 +/- 0.17 pmol/h per mg of protein, but no such conversion was observed in the population of non-differentiated cells. However, when retinal was used as substrate, retinoic acid was formed in both cell populations, at rates of 14.4 pmol/h per mg of protein in non-differentiated and 51.6 pmol/h per mg of protein in differentiating keratinocytes. Using PAGE/radiobinding assay, we demonstrated that retinoic acid formed from retinol was bound in differentiating keratinocytes to endogenous cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (CRABP). Furthermore, retinal was reduced to retinol in the presence of NADH in both differentiating and non-differentiated keratinocytes at a similar rate (8 pmol/h per mg of protein). Although retinal could not be detected under physiological conditions, it was found in significant amounts at pH 8.5-9, which is optimal for enzymic activity. This indicates that in keratinocytes retinal is an intermediate metabolite in retinoic acid formation from retinol. The enzymes catalysing the conversion of retinol into retinoic acid were found to differ from other alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases, since the formation of retinoic acid was not significantly affected by specific inhibitors of alcohol metabolism, such as 4-methylpyrazole and disulfiram. Moreover, the cytosol of non

  18. Characterization of retinal damage in the episcleral vein cauterization rat glaucoma model.

    PubMed

    Danias, John; Shen, Fran; Kavalarakis, Manolis; Chen, Bin; Goldblum, David; Lee, Kevin; Zamora, Maria-Florencia; Su, YanLing; Brodie, Scott E; Podos, Steven M; Mittag, Thom

    2006-02-01

    Episcleral vein cauterization (EVC) is used in rats to generate a glaucoma model with high intraocular pressure (IOP). The long-term retinal damage in this glaucoma model, however, has not been accurately quantified. We report the location and amount of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) damage caused by (EVC) induced IOP elevation in two rat strains. IOP was raised in one eye of Wistar (N = 5) and Brown-Norway(B-N)(N = 7) rats by EVC and monitored monthly until IOP in contralateral eyes equalized at 5 months post-surgery. Animals were maintained for 3.5-4.5 additional months. B-N rats (N = 7) that had no EVC served as controls for this strain. Scotopic flash ERGs were recorded at baseline and just prior to euthanasia. Automated counts of all retrogradely labeled RGCs in retinal flat-mounts were determined and compared between contralateral eyes. RGC density maps were constructed and RGC size distribution was determined. Oscillatory potentials in the group of eyes which had elevated IOP were decreased at the time of euthanasia, when IOP had returned to normal. The group of normal B-N rats had similar RGC counts between contralateral eyes. In the experimental group the mean number of RGCs was not significantly different between control and experimental eyes, but 1 of 5 Wistar and 2 of 7 B-N experimental eyes had at least 30% fewer RGCs than contralateral control eyes. Total retinal area in B-N experimental eyes was higher compared to contralateral eyes. Cumulative IOP exposure of the experimental eyes was modestly correlated with RGC loss while oscillatory potentials appeared to be inversely related to RGC loss. In retinas with extensive (> 30% RGC loss) but not complete damage, smaller cells were preserved better than larger ones. The above results indicate that RGC loss in both Wistar and B-N strains is variable after a prolonged elevation of IOP via EVC. Such variability despite equivalent IOP levels and ERG abnormalities, suggests unknown factors that can protect IOP

  19. Involvement of nucleotides in glial growth following scratch injury in avian retinal cell monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thayane Martins; França, Guilherme Rapozeiro; Ornelas, Isis Moraes; Loiola, Erick Correia; Ulrich, Henning; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques

    2015-06-01

    When retinal cell cultures were mechanically scratched, cell growth over the empty area was observed. Only dividing and migrating, 2 M6-positive glial cells were detected. Incubation of cultures with apyrase (APY), suramin, or Reactive Blue 2 (RB-2), but not MRS 2179, significantly attenuated the growth of glial cells, suggesting that nucleotide receptors other than P2Y1 are involved in the growth of glial cells. UTPγS but not ADPβS antagonized apyrase-induced growth inhibition in scratched cultures, suggesting the participation of UTP-sensitive receptors. No decrease in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA(+)) cells was observed at the border of the scratch in apyrase-treated cultures, suggesting that glial proliferation was not affected. In apyrase-treated cultures, glial cytoplasm protrusions were smaller and unstable. Actin filaments were less organized and alfa-tubulin-labeled microtubules were mainly parallel to scratch. In contrast to control cultures, very few vinculin-labeled adhesion sites could be noticed in these cultures. Increased Akt and ERK phosphorylation was observed in UTP-treated cultures, effect that was inhibited by SRC inhibitor 1 and PI3K blocker LY294002. These inhibitors and the FAK inhibitor PF573228 also decreased glial growth over the scratch, suggesting participation of SRC, PI3K, and FAK in UTP-induced growth of glial cells in scratched cultures. RB-2 decreased dissociated glial cell attachment to fibronectin-coated dishes and migration through transwell membranes, suggesting that nucleotides regulated adhesion and migration of glial cells. In conclusion, mechanical scratch of retinal cell cultures induces growth of glial cells over the empty area through a mechanism that is dependent on activation of UTP-sensitive receptors, SRC, PI3K, and FAK.

  20. Protective effects of triptolide on retinal ganglion cells in a rat model of chronic glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Dongmei; Wu, Lingling; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the effects of triptolide, a Chinese herb extract, on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a rat model of chronic glaucoma. Methods Eighty Wistar rats were randomly divided into triptolide group (n=40) and normal saline (NS) group (n=40). Angle photocoagulation was used to establish the model of glaucoma, with right eye as laser treated eye and left eye as control eye. Triptolide group received triptolide intraperitoneally daily, while NS group received NS. Intraocular pressure (IOP), anti-CD11b immunofluorescent stain in retina and optic nerve, RGCs count with Nissel stain and microglia count with anti-CD11b immunofluorescence stain in retina flat mounts, retinal tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α mRNA detection by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, and double immunofluorescent labeling with anti-TNF-α and anti-CD11b in retinal frozen section were performed. Results Mean IOP of the laser treated eyes significantly increased 3 weeks after photocoagulation (P<0.05), with no statistical difference between the two groups (P>0.05). RGCs survival in the laser treated eyes was significantly improved in the triptolide group than the NS group (P<0.05). Microglia count in superficial retina of the laser treated eyes was significantly less in the triptolide group (30.40±4.90) than the NS group (35.06±7.59) (P<0.05). TNF-α mRNA expression in the retina of the laser treated eyes in the triptolide group decreased by 60% compared with that in the NS group (P<0.01). The double immunofluorescent labeling showed that TNF-α was mainly distributed around the microglia. Conclusion Triptolide improved RGCs survival in this rat model of chronic glaucoma, which did not depend on IOP decrease but might be exerted by inhibiting microglia activities and reducing TNF-α secretion. PMID:26604697

  1. Effects of p-xylene inhalation on axonal transport in the rat retinal ganglion cells

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, S.S.; Lyerly, D.P. )

    1989-12-01

    Although the solvent xylene is suspected of producing nervous system dysfunction in animals and humans, little is known regarding the neurochemical consequences of xylene inhalation. The intent of this study was to determine the effect of intermittent, acute, and subchronic p-xylene exposure on the axonal transport of proteins and glycoproteins within the rat retinofugal tract. A number of different exposure regimens were tested ranging from 50 ppm for a single 6-hr exposure to 1600 ppm 6 hr/day, 5 days/week, for a total of 8 exposure days. Immediately following removal from the inhalation chambers rats were injected intraocularly with (35S)methionine and (3H)fucose (to label retinal proteins and glycoproteins, respectively) and the axonal transport of labeled macromolecules to axons (optic nerve and optic tract) and nerve endings (lateral geniculate body and superior colliculus) was examined 20 hr after precursor injection. Only relatively severe exposure regimens (i.e., 800 or 1600 ppm 6 hr/day, 5 days/week, for 1.5 weeks) produced significant reductions in axonal transport; there was a moderate reduction in the axonal transport of 35S-labeled proteins in the 800-ppm-treated group which was more widespread in the 1600 ppm-treated group. Transport of 3H-labeled glycoproteins was less affected. Assessment of retinal metabolism immediately after isotope injection indicated that the rate of precursor uptake was not reduced in either treatment group. Furthermore, rapid transport was still substantially reduced in animals exposed to 1600 ppm p-xylene and allowed a 13-day withdrawal period. These data indicate that p-xylene inhalation decreases rapid axonal transport supplied to the projections of the rat retinal ganglion cells immediately after cessation of inhalation exposure and that this decreased transport is still apparent 13 days after the last exposure.

  2. The Extract of Aster Koraiensis Prevents Retinal Pericyte Apoptosis in Diabetic Rats and Its Active Compound, Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits AGE Formation and AGE/RAGE Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghyun; Jo, Kyuhyung; Lee, Ik-Soo; Kim, Chan-Sik; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-01-01

    Retinal capillary cell loss is a hallmark of early diabetic retinal changes. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are believed to contribute to retinal microvascular cell loss in diabetic retinopathy. In this study, the protective effects of Aster koraiensis extract (AKE) against damage to retinal vascular cells were investigated in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. To examine this issue further, AGE accumulation, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were investigated using retinal trypsin digests from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In the diabetic rats, TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling)-positive retinal microvascular cells were markedly increased. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that AGEs were accumulated within the retinal microvascular cells, and this accumulation paralleled the activation of NF-κB and the expression of iNOS in the diabetic rats. However, AKE prevented retinal microvascular cell apoptosis through the inhibition of AGE accumulation and NF-κB activation. Moreover, to determine the active compounds of AKE, two major compounds, chlorogenic acid and 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, were tested in an in vitro assay. Among these compounds, chlorogenic acid significantly reduced AGE formation as well as AGE/RAGE (receptor for AGEs) binding activity. These results suggest that AKE, particularly chlorogenic acid, is useful in inhibiting AGE accumulation in retinal vessels and exerts a preventive effect against the injuries of diabetic retinal vascular cells. PMID:27657123

  3. Characterization of release of basic fibroblast growth factor from bovine retinal endothelial cells in monolayer cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, R A; Burrin, J M; Kohner, E M

    1991-01-01

    Release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was investigated in bovine retinal endothelial cells (BREC) maintained in monolayer culture. Confluent cells released bFGF into serum-free culture medium or medium containing 5% serum at rates of up to 105.2 and 61.3 pM/day respectively. bFGF release coincided with a decrease in monolayer cell number and increases in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) concentration and cells and cell-debris particles in the medium, which suggested that cell damage and lysis were responsible for growth-factor release. Maximum bFGF release at 24 h (230 +/- 10 pM) occurred when the cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide (10 micrograms/ml), which also produced the greatest changes in parameters of cell damage. Sub-confluent cells showed little overt damage at 24 h, but released bFGF (78 +/- 20 pM) along with LDH, indicating that some cell lysis had occurred. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) was also released into serum-free culture medium at a rate of 0.34 nM/day, but not into medium containing serum or when the cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide. This implies that the mechanism of IGF-1 release is different from that of bFGF and is not related to cell damage. Culture medium conditioned by BREC stimulated the proliferation of these cells, as measured by an increase in their incorporation of [methyl-3H]thymidine from 7550 +/- 479 to 10467 +/- 924 d.p.m. These results demonstrate that bFGF is released from damaged BREC and that medium conditioned by these cells can stimulate retinal-endothelial-cell proliferation. This strengthens the case for an involvement of this growth factor in retinal neovascularization. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2039465

  4. The effects of taurine on vigabatrin, high light intensity and mydriasis induced retinal toxicity in the pigmented rat.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Allan D; Truchot, Nathalie; Pickersgill, Nigel; Thale, Zia Irene; Rosolen, Serge G; Botteron, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to establish a model that may be used for examining the effect of Vigabatrin-induced retinal toxicity in pigmented rats, and subsequently examine the possible effects of taurine on the retinal toxicity. In the first part of the study, pigmented Long Evans rats were subjected to combinations of induced mydriasis, low/high light intensities (40/2000 lx) and oral administration of near-MTD (Maximum Tolerated Dose) doses (200 mg/kg/day) of Vigabatrin for up to 6 weeks. The combination of mydriasis and high light intensity applied to Long Evans rats resulted in retinal damage that was increased by the administration of Vigabatrin. In the second part of the study Long Evans rats were subjected to combinations of induced mydriasis and high/low light intensity (40/2000 lx) while being orally administered low (30 mg/kg/day) or high (200 mg/kg/day) doses of Vigabatrin for up to 6 weeks. In addition, selected groups of animals were administered taurine via the drinking water (20 mg/ml), resulting in systemic taurine concentrations of approximately threefold the endogenous concentration. The combined results of the studies demonstrate that retinal damage can be induced in pigmented animals when combining mydriasis and high light intensity. Retinal damage was functionally evaluated by electroretinography (ERG), then confirmed by histopathology. While depending on mydriasis and high light intensity, administration of Vigabatrin increased the retinal toxicity and resulted in the formation of rosette-like structures in the retina in a dose-related manner. Administration of taurine did not alleviate the Vigabatrin-induced retinal toxicity, as demonstrated either functionally by ERG or morphologically, although systemic concentrations of 3-fold the endogenous levels were reached, and it was thus not possible to demonstrate a protective effect of taurine in these pigmented animals. PMID:25446799

  5. RNA sequencing reveals retinal transcriptome changes in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Jie; Lian, Zhi-Yun; Liu, Geng; Zhou, Hong-Ying; Yang, Hui-Jun

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate changes in retinal gene expression in streptozotocin (STZ)‑induced diabetic rats using next‑generation sequencing, utilize transcriptome signatures to investigate the molecular mechanisms of diabetic retinopathy (DR), and identify novel strategies for the treatment of DR. Diabetes was chemically induced in 10‑week‑old male Sprague‑Dawley rats using STZ. Flash‑electroretinography (F‑ERG) was performed to evaluate the visual function of the rats. The retinas of the rats were removed to perform high throughput RNA sequence (RNA‑seq) analysis. The a‑wave, b‑wave, oscillatory potential 1 (OP1), OP2 and ∑OP amplitudes were significantly reduced in the diabetic group, compared with those of the control group (P<0.05). Furthermore, the implicit b‑wave duration 16 weeks post‑STZ induction were significantly longer in the diabetic rats, compared with the control rats (P<0.001). A total of 868 genes were identified, of which 565 were upregulated and 303 were downregulated. Among the differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 94 apoptotic genes and apoptosis regulatory genes, and 19 inflammatory genes were detected. The results of the KEGG pathway significant enrichment analysis revealed enrichment in cell adhesion molecules, complement and coagulation cascades, and antigen processing and presentation. Diabetes alters several transcripts in the retina, and RNA‑seq provides novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying DR. PMID:26781437

  6. Enzymatic conversion of all-trans-. beta. -carotene to retinal by a cytosolic enzyme from rabbit and rat intestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshman, M.R.; Mychkovsky, I.; Attlesey, M. )

    1989-12-01

    Enzymatic conversion of all-trans-{beta}-carotene to retinal by a partially purified enzyme from rabbit and rat intestinal mucosa was demonstrated. The enzymatic product was characterized based on the following evidence: (i) the product gave rise to its O-ethyloxime by treatment with O-ethylhydroxylamine with an absorption maximum at 363 nm in ethanol characteristics of authentic retinal O-ethyloxime. High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of this derivative yielded a sharp peak with a retention time of 7.99 min corresponding to the authentic compound; (ii) the mass spectrum of the O-ethyloxime of the enzymatic product was identical to that of authentic retinal O-ethyloxime; (iii) the specific activity of the enzymatically formed ({sup 14}C)retinal O-ethyloxime remained constant even after repeated crystallization; (iv) the enzymatic product exhibited an absorption maximum at 370 nm in light petroleum characteristic of authentic retinal. This retinol was enzymatically esterified to retinyl palmitate by rat pancreatic esterase with a retention time of 10 min on HPLC corresponding to authentic retinyl palmitate. Thus, the enzymatic product of {beta}-carotene cleavage by the partially purified intestinal enzyme was unequivocally confirmed to be retinal.

  7. A new immunodeficient pigmented retinal degenerate rat strain to study transplantation of human cells without immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Magdalene J.; Aramant, Robert B.; Jones, Melissa K.; Ferguson, Dave L.; Bryda, Elizabeth C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to develop an immunodeficient rat model of retinal degeneration (RD nude rats) that will not reject transplanted human cells. Methods SD-Tg(S334ter)3Lav females homozygous for a mutated mouse rhodopsin transgene were mated with NTac:NIH-Whn (NIH nude) males homozygous for the Foxn1rnu allele. Through selective breeding, a new stock, SD-Foxn1 Tg(S334ter)3Lav (RD nude) was generated such that all animals were homozygous for the Foxn1rnu allele and either homo- or hemizygous for the S334ter transgene. PCR-based assays for both the Foxn1rnu mutation and the S334ter transgene were developed for accurate genotyping. Immunodeficiency was tested by transplanting sheets of hESC-derived neural progenitor cells to the subretinal space of RD nude rats, and, as a control, NIH nude rats. Rats were killed between 8 and 184 days after surgery, and eye sections were analyzed for human, neuronal, and glial markers. Results After transplantation to RD nude and to NIH nude rats, hESC-derived neural progenitor cells differentiated to neuronal and glial cells, and migrated extensively from the transplant sheets throughout the host retina. Migration was more extensive in RD nude than in NIH nude rats. Already 8 days after transplantation, donor neuronal processes were found in the host inner plexiform layer. In addition, host glial cells extended processes into the transplants. The host retina showed the same photoreceptor degeneration pattern as in the immunocompetent SD-Tg(S334ter)3Lav rats. Recipients survived well after surgery. Conclusions This new rat model is useful for testing the effect of human cell transplantation on the restoration of vision without interference of immunosuppression. PMID:24817311

  8. Retinal Afferent Ingrowth to Neocortical Transplants in the Adult Rat Superior Colliculus is due to the Regeneration of Damaged Axons

    PubMed Central

    Ross, D. T.; Das, G. D.

    1994-01-01

    Retinal afferent ingrowth to embryonic neural transplants in the adult rat superior colliculus may represent either sprouting of intact axons or the regeneration of transected axons. If ingrowth represents regeneration of damaged retinofugai axons, then lesions that axotomize more retinofugal axons at the transplantation site should induce greater retinal afferent ingrowth. Alternately, if ingrowth represents terminal or collateral sprouting of intact retinofugal axons at or near the transplant/host optic layer interface, then the magnitude of retinal afferent ingrowth should be directly related to the total area of this interface. To test between these two hypotheses surgical knife wounds were made either parallel (in the sagittal plane) or perpendicular (in the transverse plane) to the course of axons in the stratum opticum, embryonic neocortical tissue was transplanted at the coordinates of these tectal slits, and retinal afferent ingrowth visualized 1-90 days after surgery using anterogradely transported HRP. A zone of traumatic reaction (ztr) in the optic layers was seen in every case, characterized by hypertrophied axons and swollen terminal clubs at 1 day. Between 30 and 90 days the damaged retinofugal axons in the zone formed dense fascicles and neuroma-like tangles. Retinal afferent ingrowth occurred only across transplant interface regions with the ztr. The magnitude of ingrowth was directly related to the area of the ztr interface and not the total optic layer interface area. Retinal afferent ingrowth appears to reflect the intrinsic regenerative capacity of adult mammalian retinal ganglion cells and not sprouting of undamaged axons. PMID:7703292

  9. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Rate in Diabetic Rats: Disparity Between Techniques Due to Redistribution of Flow

    PubMed Central

    Leskova, Wendy; Watts, Megan N.; Carter, Patsy R.; Eshaq, Randa S.; Harris, Norman R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Reports of altered retinal blood flow in experimental models of type I diabetes have provided contrasting results, which leads to some confusion as to whether flow is increased or decreased. The purpose of our study was to evaluate early diabetes-induced changes in retinal blood flow in diabetic rats, using two distinctly different methods. Methods. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin (STZ), and retinal blood flow rate was measured under anesthesia by a microsphere infusion technique, or by an index of flow based on the mean circulation time between arterioles and venules. Measurements in STZ rats were compared to age-matched nondiabetic controls. In addition, the retinal distribution of fluorescently-labeled red blood cells (RBCs) was viewed by confocal microscopy in excised flat mounts. Results. Retinal blood flow rate was found to decrease by approximately 33% in the STZ rats compared to controls (P < 0.001) as assessed by the microsphere technique. However, in striking contrast, the mean circulation time through the retina was found to be almost 3× faster in the STZ rats (P < 0.01). This contradiction could be explained by flow redistribution through the superficial vessels of the diabetic retina, with this possibility supported by our observation of significantly fewer RBCs flowing through the deeper capillaries. Conclusions. We conclude that retinal blood flow rate is reduced significantly in the diabetic rat, with a substantial decrease of flow through the capillaries due to shunting of blood through the superficial layer, allowing rapid transit from arterioles to venules. PMID:23572104

  10. In the Early Stages of Diabetes, Rat Retinal Mitochondria Undergo Mild Uncoupling due to UCP2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Osorio-Paz, Ixchel; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Salceda, Rocío

    2015-01-01

    In order to maintain high transmembrane ionic gradients, retinal tissues require a large amount of energy probably provided by a high rate of both, glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. However, little information exists on retinal mitochondrial efficiency. We analyzed the retinal mitochondrial activity in ex vivo retinas and in isolated mitochondria from normal rat retina and from short-term streptozotocin-diabetic rats. In normal ex vivo retinas, increasing glucose concentrations from 5.6mM to 30mM caused a four-fold increase in glucose accumulation and CO2 production. Retina from diabetic rats accumulated similar amounts of glucose. However, CO2 production was not as high. Isolated mitochondria from normal rat retina exhibited a resting rate of oxygen consumption of 14.6 ± 1.1 natgO (min.mg prot)-1 and a respiratory control of 4.0. Mitochondria from 7, 20 and 45 days diabetic rats increased the resting rate of oxygen consumption and the activity of the electron transport complexes; under these conditions the mitochondrial transmembrane potential decreased. In spite of this, the ATP synthesis was not modified. GDP, an UCP2 inhibitor, increased mitochondrial membrane potential and superoxide production in controls and at 45 days of diabetes. The role of UCP2 is discussed. The results suggest that at the early stage of diabetes we studied, retinal mitochondria undergo adaptations leading to maintain energetic requirements and prevent oxidative stress. PMID:25951172

  11. Novel non-contact retina camera for the rat and its application to dynamic retinal vessel analysis

    PubMed Central

    Link, Dietmar; Strohmaier, Clemens; Seifert, Bernd U.; Riemer, Thomas; Reitsamer, Herbert A.; Haueisen, Jens; Vilser, Walthard

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel non-invasive and non-contact system for reflex-free retinal imaging and dynamic retinal vessel analysis in the rat. Theoretical analysis was performed prior to development of the new optical design, taking into account the optical properties of the rat eye and its specific illumination and imaging requirements. A novel optical model of the rat eye was developed for use with standard optical design software, facilitating both sequential and non-sequential modes. A retinal camera for the rat was constructed using standard optical and mechanical components. The addition of a customized illumination unit and existing standard software enabled dynamic vessel analysis. Seven-minute in-vivo vessel diameter recordings performed on 9 Brown-Norway rats showed stable readings. On average, the coefficient of variation was (1.1 ± 0.19) % for the arteries and (0.6 ± 0.08) % for the veins. The slope of the linear regression analysis was (0.56 ± 0.26) % for the arteries and (0.15 ± 0.27) % for the veins. In conclusion, the device can be used in basic studies of retinal vessel behavior. PMID:22076270

  12. Retinal ganglion cells projecting to the accessory optic system in optokinetic blind albinotic rats are direction-selective.

    PubMed

    Krause, Martin; Distler, Claudia; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter

    2014-07-01

    The optokinetic deficits in albinotic rats and ferrets are caused by the loss of direction selectivity in the accessory optic system (AOS). However, the underlying mechanisms for this loss are still not clear. Here we tested the hypothesis that, in albino rats, the retinal input to the AOS lacks direction selectivity and, as a consequence, neurons in the AOS are direction non-selective. We investigated ON-center direction-selective retinal ganglion cells, the major input to the AOS, in pigmented Long Evans and albino Wistar rats using extracellular in vitro patch-clamp techniques. To visualise putative AOS-projecting direction-selective ganglion cells, we retrogradely labeled them by injection of the infrared-sensitive dye indocyanine green into the medial terminal nucleus of the AOS. The present study is the first to present physiological evidence for retinal ON-center direction-selective ganglion cells in rat. Our results show that, in albinotic and pigmented rats, ON-center retinal ganglion cells projecting to the AOS are similarly direction-selective, suggesting that the optokinetic deficit must be caused by the abolition of direction selectivity in the AOS itself. PMID:24698401

  13. Altered aldose reductase gene regulation in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, D N; Del Monte, M; Greene, D A; Killen, P D

    1993-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR2), a putative "hypertonicity stress protein" whose gene is induced by hyperosmolarity, protects renal medullary cells against the interstitial hyperosmolarity of antidiuresis by catalyzing the synthesis of millimolar concentrations of intracellular sorbitol from glucose. Although AR2 gene induction has been noted in a variety of renal and nonrenal cells subjected to hypertonic stress in vitro, the functional significance of AR2 gene expression in cells not normally exposed to a hyperosmolar milieu is not fully understood. The physiological impact of basal AR2 expression in such cells may be limited to hyperglycemic states in which AR2 promotes pathological polyol accumulation, a mechanism invoked in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Since AR2 overexpression in the retinal pigment epithelium has been associated with diabetic retinopathy, the regulation of AR2 gene expression and associated changes in sorbitol and myo-inositol were studied in human retinal pigment epithelial cells in culture. The relative abundance of aldehyde reductase (AR1) and AR2 mRNA was quantitated by filter hybridization of RNA from several human retinal pigment epithelial cell lines exposed to hyperglycemic and hyperosmolar conditions in vitro. AR2 but not AR1 mRNA was significantly increased some 11- to 18-fold by hyperosmolarity in several retinal pigment epithelial cell lines. A single cell line with a 15-fold higher basal level of AR2 mRNA than other cell lines tested demonstrated no significant increase in AR2 mRNA in response to hypertonic stress. This cell line demonstrated accelerated and exaggerated production of sorbitol and depletion of myo-inositol upon exposure to 20 mM glucose. Therefore, abnormal AR2 expression may enhance the sensitivity of cells to the biochemical consequences of hyperglycemia potentiating the development of diabetic complications. Images PMID:8349800

  14. Responses of cultured neural retinal cells to substratum-bound laminin and other extracellular matrix molecules.

    PubMed

    Adler, R; Jerdan, J; Hewitt, A T

    1985-11-01

    The responses of cultured chick embryo retinal neurons to several extracellular matrix molecules are described. Retinal cell suspensions in serum-free medium containing the "N1" supplement (J. E. Bottenstein, S. D. Skaper, S. Varon, and J. Sato, 1980, Exp. Cell Res. 125, 183-190) were seeded on tissue culture plastic surfaces pretreated with polyornithine (PORN) and with one of the factors to be tested. Substantial cell survival could be observed after 72 hr in vitro on PORN pretreated with serum or laminin, whereas most cells appeared to be degenerating on untreated PORN, PORN-fibronectin, and PORN-chondronectin. Cell attachment, although quantitatively similar for all these substrata, was temperature-dependent on serum and laminin but not on fibronectin or untreated PORN. In a short-term bioassay, neurite development was abundant on laminin, scarce on serum and fibronectin, and absent on PORN. No positive correlation between cell spreading and neurite production could be seen: cell spreading was more extensive on PORN and fibronectin than on laminin or serum, while on laminin-treated dishes, spreading was similar for neurite-bearing and non-neurite-bearing cells. Laminin effects on retinal neurons were clearly substratum dependent. When bound to tissue culture plastic, laminin showed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell attachment and did not stimulate neurite development. PORN-bound laminin, on the other hand, did not affect cell attachment but caused marked stimulation of neurite development, suggesting that laminin conformation and/or the spatial distribution of active sites play an important role in the neurite-promoting function of this extracellular matrix molecule. Investigation of the embryonic retina with ELISA and immunocytochemical methods showed that laminin is present in this organ during development. Therefore, in vivo and in vitro observations are consistent with the possibility that laminin might influence neuronal development in the retina.

  15. Responses of cultured neural retinal cells to substratum-bound laminin and other extracellular matrix molecules.

    PubMed

    Adler, R; Jerdan, J; Hewitt, A T

    1985-11-01

    The responses of cultured chick embryo retinal neurons to several extracellular matrix molecules are described. Retinal cell suspensions in serum-free medium containing the "N1" supplement (J. E. Bottenstein, S. D. Skaper, S. Varon, and J. Sato, 1980, Exp. Cell Res. 125, 183-190) were seeded on tissue culture plastic surfaces pretreated with polyornithine (PORN) and with one of the factors to be tested. Substantial cell survival could be observed after 72 hr in vitro on PORN pretreated with serum or laminin, whereas most cells appeared to be degenerating on untreated PORN, PORN-fibronectin, and PORN-chondronectin. Cell attachment, although quantitatively similar for all these substrata, was temperature-dependent on serum and laminin but not on fibronectin or untreated PORN. In a short-term bioassay, neurite development was abundant on laminin, scarce on serum and fibronectin, and absent on PORN. No positive correlation between cell spreading and neurite production could be seen: cell spreading was more extensive on PORN and fibronectin than on laminin or serum, while on laminin-treated dishes, spreading was similar for neurite-bearing and non-neurite-bearing cells. Laminin effects on retinal neurons were clearly substratum dependent. When bound to tissue culture plastic, laminin showed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell attachment and did not stimulate neurite development. PORN-bound laminin, on the other hand, did not affect cell attachment but caused marked stimulation of neurite development, suggesting that laminin conformation and/or the spatial distribution of active sites play an important role in the neurite-promoting function of this extracellular matrix molecule. Investigation of the embryonic retina with ELISA and immunocytochemical methods showed that laminin is present in this organ during development. Therefore, in vivo and in vitro observations are consistent with the possibility that laminin might influence neuronal development in the retina

  16. Enzymatic conversion of all-trans-beta-carotene to retinal by a cytosolic enzyme from rabbit and rat intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Lakshman, M R; Mychkovsky, I; Attlesey, M

    1989-01-01

    Enzymatic conversion of all-trans-beta-carotene to retinal by a partially purified enzyme from rabbit and rat intestinal mucosa was demonstrated. The enzymatic product was characterized based on the following evidence: (i) The product gave rise to its O-ethyloxime by treatment with O-ethylhydroxylamine with an absorption maximum at 363 nm in ethanol characteristic of authentic retinal O-ethyloxime. High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of this derivative yielded a sharp peak with a retention time of 7.99 min corresponding to the authentic compound. The enzyme blank and boiled enzyme blank failed to show any significant HPLC peaks corresponding to retinal O-ethyloxime, retinal, or retinol. (ii) The mass spectrum of the O-ethyloxime of the enzymatic product was identical to that of authentic retinal O-ethyloxime (m/z 327: 45%, M+. and m/z 282: 100%, M--ethoxy). (iii) The specific activity of the enzymatically formed [14C]retinal O-ethyloxime remained constant even after repeated crystallization. (iv) The enzymatic product exhibited an absorption maximum at 370 nm in light petroleum characteristic of authentic retinal. Furthermore, it was reduced by horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase to retinol with an absorption maximum at 326 nm in light petroleum. This retinol was enzymatically esterified to retinyl palmitate by rat pancreatic esterase with a retention time of 10 min on HPLC corresponding to authentic retinyl palmitate. Thus, the enzymatic product of beta-carotene cleavage by the partially purified intestinal enzyme was unequivocally confirmed to be retinal. PMID:2594754

  17. Adhesive protein-free synthetic hydrogels for retinal pigment epithelium cell culture with low ROS level.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong Mei; Liu, Zhen Qi; Feng, Zhi Hui; Xu, Feng; Liu, Jian Kang

    2014-07-01

    Engineering of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell monolayer with low level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is important for regenerative RPE-based therapies. However, it is still challenging to culture RPE monolayer with low ROS level on soft substrates in vitro. To address this, we developed cytocompatible hydrogels to culture human RPE cell monolayer for future use in regenerative RPE-based therapies. The cell adhesion, proliferation, monolayer formation, morphology, survival, and ROS level of human ARPE-19 cells cultured on the surfaces of negatively charged poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl propane sulfonic sodium) (PNaAMPS) and neutral poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMAAm) hydrogels with different stiffness were investigated. The importance of hydrogel stiffness on the cell function was firstly highlighted on the base of determined optimal Young's modulus for cultivation of RPE cell monolayer with relatively low ROS level. The construction of RPE cell monolayer with low ROS level on the PNaAMPS hydrogel may hold great potential as promising candidates for transplantation of RPE cell monolayer-hydrogel construct into the subretinal space to repair retinal functions.

  18. Subretinal electrical stimulation preserves inner retinal function in RCS rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Mocko, Julie A.; Kim, Moon K.; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previously, studies showed that subretinal electrical stimulation (SES) from a microphotodiode array (MPA) preserves electroretinography (ERG) b-wave amplitude and regional retinal structure in the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat and simultaneously upregulates Fgf2 expression. This preservation appears to be associated with the increased current produced when the MPA is exposed to ERG test flashes, as weekly ERG testing produces greater neuroprotection than biweekly or no testing. Using an infrared source to stimulate the MPA while avoiding potential confounding effects from exposing the RCS retina to high luminance white light, this study examined whether neuroprotective effects from SES increased with subretinal current in a dose-dependent manner. Methods RCS rats (n=49) underwent subretinal implantation surgery at P21 with MPA devices in one randomly selected eye, and the other eye served as the control. Naïve RCS rats (n=25) were also studied. To increase SES current levels, implanted eyes were exposed to 15 min per session of flashing infrared light (IR) of defined intensity, frequency, and duty cycle. Rats were divided into four SES groups that received ERG testing only (MPA only), about 450 µA/cm2 once per week (Low 1X), about 450 µA/cm2 three times per week (Low 3X), and about 1350 µA/cm2 once per week (High 1X). One eye of the control animals was randomly chosen for IR exposure. All animals were followed for 4 weeks with weekly binocular ERGs. A subset of the eyes was used to measure retina Fgf2 expression with real-time reverse-transcription PCR. Results Eyes receiving SES showed significant preservation of b-wave amplitude, a- and b-wave implicit times, oscillatory potential amplitudes, and post-receptoral parameters (Vmax and log σ) compared to untreated eyes. All SES-treated eyes had similar preservation, regardless of increased SES from IR light exposure. SES-treated eyes tended to have greater retinal Fgf2 expression than untreated

  19. Comparative analysis of three purification protocols for retinal ganglion cells from rat

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fengjuan; Li, Tingting; Hu, Jianyan; Zhou, Xujiao; Wu, Jihong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To make comparative analyses of the common three purification protocols for retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), providing a solid practical basis for selecting the method for purifying RGCs for use in subsequent experiments. Methods Rat RGCs were isolated and purified using three methods, including two-step immunopanning (TIP) separation, two-step immunopanning-magnetic (TIPM) separation, and flow cytometric (FC) separation. Immunocytochemical staining, quantitative real-time PCR, flow cytometry, electrophysiology, and Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) analyses were performed to compare the purity, yield, and viability of the RGCs. Results The RGC yields from the TIP, TIPM, and FC methods were 24.60±15.98 × 104, 5.28±4.42 × 104, and 5.4±2.7 × 103 per retina, respectively. We easily controlled the relative purity of the RGCs with the FC method and even reached 100% of the maximum expected purity. However, the RGC purity was only 80.97±5.45% and 95.41±3.23% using the TIP and TIPM methods, respectively. The contaminant cells were mainly large, star-shaped, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes and small, round, syntaxin 1-positive amacrine cells with multiple short neurites. The RGCs purified with FC could not be cultured successively in our study; however, the TIP-RGCs survived more than 20 days with good viability, while the TIPM-RGCs survived less than 9 days. Conclusions The three protocols for purifying the RGCs each had its own pros and cons. The RGCs isolated by the TIP method exhibited the highest viability and yield but had low purity. The purity of the RGCs isolated with the FC method could reach approximately 100% but had a low yield and cell viability. The TIPM method was reliable and produced RGCs with considerable purity, yield, and viability. This study provides a solid practical basis for selecting the method for purifying RGCs for use in subsequent experiments. PMID:27122968

  20. Treatment Paradigms for Retinal and Macular Diseases Using 3-D Retina Cultures Derived From Human Reporter Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kaewkhaw, Rossukon; Swaroop, Manju; Homma, Kohei; Nakamura, Jutaro; Brooks, Matthew; Kaya, Koray Dogan; Chaitankar, Vijender; Michael, Sam; Tawa, Gregory; Zou, Jizhong; Rao, Mahendra; Zheng, Wei; Cogliati, Tiziana; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the use of pluripotent stem cell lines carrying fluorescent reporters driven by retinal promoters to derive three-dimensional (3-D) retina in culture and how this system can be exploited for elucidating human retinal biology, creating disease models in a dish, and designing targeted drug screens for retinal and macular degeneration. Furthermore, we realize that stem cell investigations are labor-intensive and require extensive resources. To expedite scientific discovery by sharing of resources and to avoid duplication of efforts, we propose the formation of a Retinal Stem Cell Consortium. In the field of vision, such collaborative approaches have been enormously successful in elucidating genetic susceptibility associated with age-related macular degeneration. PMID:27116668

  1. Treatment Paradigms for Retinal and Macular Diseases Using 3-D Retina Cultures Derived From Human Reporter Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Kaewkhaw, Rossukon; Swaroop, Manju; Homma, Kohei; Nakamura, Jutaro; Brooks, Matthew; Kaya, Koray Dogan; Chaitankar, Vijender; Michael, Sam; Tawa, Gregory; Zou, Jizhong; Rao, Mahendra; Zheng, Wei; Cogliati, Tiziana; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the use of pluripotent stem cell lines carrying fluorescent reporters driven by retinal promoters to derive three-dimensional (3-D) retina in culture and how this system can be exploited for elucidating human retinal biology, creating disease models in a dish, and designing targeted drug screens for retinal and macular degeneration. Furthermore, we realize that stem cell investigations are labor-intensive and require extensive resources. To expedite scientific discovery by sharing of resources and to avoid duplication of efforts, we propose the formation of a Retinal Stem Cell Consortium. In the field of vision, such collaborative approaches have been enormously successful in elucidating genetic susceptibility associated with age-related macular degeneration. PMID:27116668

  2. Extraction (DSX) from Erigeron breviscapus modulates outward potassium currents in rat retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shuo; Wang, Zhong-Feng; Duan, Jun-Guo; Ji, Lu; Lu, Xue-Jing

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effect of DSX, an active component extracted from Erigeron breviscapus, on the voltage-gated outward K+ channel currents in rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) by using electrophysiological method, and to explore the possible mechanisms of DSX on optic nerve protection. METHODS Outward K+ currents were recorded by using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques on acutely isolated rat RGCs. Outward K+ currents were induced by a series of depolarizing voltage pulses from a holding potential of -70 mV to +20 mV in an increment of 10 mV. RESULTS Extracellular application of DSX voltage-dependently suppressed both the steady-state and peak current amplitudes of outward K+ currents in rat RGCs. Furthermore, DSX reversibly and dose-dependently inhibited the amplitudes of outward K+ currents of the cells. At +20 mV membrane potential DSX at the concentrations of 0.02 g/L and 0.05 g/L showed no significant effects on the currents. In contrast, DSX at higher concentrations (0.1 g/L, 0.2 g/L and 0.5 g/L) significantly suppressed the current amplitudes. CONCLUSION These results suggest that DSX reversibly and dose-dependently suppress outward K+ channel currents in rat RGCs, which may be one of the possible mechanisms underlying Erigeron breviscapus prevents vision loss and RGC damage caused by glaucoma. PMID:26682155

  3. KR-31378, a potassium-channel opener, induces the protection of retinal ganglion cells in rat retinal ischemic models.

    PubMed

    Choi, Anho; Choi, Jun-Sub; Yoon, Yone-Jung; Kim, Kyung-A; Joo, Choun-Ki

    2009-04-01

    KR-31378 is a newly developed K(ATP)-channel opener. To investigate the ability of KR-31378 to protect retinal ganglion cells (RGC), experiments were conducted using two retinal ischemia models. Retinal ischemia was induced by transient high intraocular pressure (IOP) for acute ischemia and by three episcleral vein occlusion for chronic retinal ischemia. KR-31378 was injected intraperitoneally and administered orally in the acute and chronic ischemia models, respectively. Under the condition of chronic ischemia, RGC density in the KR-31378-treated group was statistically higher than that in the non-treated group, and IOP was reduced. In the acute retinal ischemia model, 90% of RGC were degenerated after one week in non-treated retina, but, RGC in KR-31378-treated retina were protected from ischemic damage in a dose-dependent manner and showed inhibited glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. Furthermore, the KR-31378 protective effect was inhibited by glibenclamide treatment in acute ischemia. These findings indicate that systemic KR-31378 treatment may protect against ischemic injury-induced ganglion cell loss in glaucoma.

  4. Optical Coherence Tomography of Retinal Degeneration in Royal College of Surgeons Rats and Its Correlation with Morphology and Electroretinography

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Kodai; Mounai, Natsuki; Tanabu, Reiko; Nakazawa, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the correlation between optical coherence tomography (OCT) and the histological, ultrastructural and electroretinography (ERG) findings of retinal degeneration in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS-/-) rats. Materials and Methods Using OCT, we qualitatively and quantitatively observed the continual retinal degeneration in RCS-/- rats, from postnatal (PN) day 17 until PN day 111. These findings were compared with the corresponding histological, electron microscopic, and ERG findings. We also compared them to OCT findings in wild type RCS+/+ rats, which were used as controls. Results After PN day 17, the hyperreflective band at the apical side of the photoreceptor layer became blurred. The inner segment (IS) ellipsoid zone then became obscured, and the photoreceptor IS and outer segment (OS) layers became diffusely hyperreflective after PN day 21. These changes correlated with histological and electron microscopic findings showing extracellular lamellar material that accumulated in the photoreceptor OS layer. After PN day 26, the outer nuclear layer became significantly thinner (P < 0.01) and hyperreflective compared with that in the controls; conversely, the photoreceptor IS and OS layers, as well as the inner retinal layers, became significantly thicker (P < 0.001 and P = 0.05, respectively). The apical hyperreflective band, as well as the IS ellipsoid zone, gradually disappeared between PN day 20 and PN day 30; concurrently, the ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes deteriorated. In contrast, the thicknesses of the combined retinal pigment epithelium and choroid did not differ significantly between RCS-/- and RCS+/+ rats. Conclusion Our results suggest that OCT demonstrates histologically validated photoreceptor degeneration in RCS rats, and that OCT findings partly correlate with ERG findings. We propose that OCT is a less invasive and useful method for evaluating photoreceptor degeneration in animal models of retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:27644042

  5. Nrf2 activators modulate oxidative stress responses and bioenergetic profiles of human retinal epithelial cells cultured in normal or high glucose conditions.

    PubMed

    Foresti, Roberta; Bucolo, Claudio; Platania, Chiara Maria Bianca; Drago, Filippo; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Motterlini, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial cells exert an important supporting role in the eye and develop adaptive responses to oxidative stress or high glucose levels, as observed during diabetes. Endogenous antioxidant defences are mainly regulated by Nrf2, a transcription factor that is activated by naturally-derived and electrophilic compounds. Here we investigated the effect of the Nrf2 activators dimethylfumarate (DMF) and carnosol on antioxidant pathways, oxygen consumption rate and wound healing in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) cultured in medium containing normal (NG, 5mM) or high (HG, 25 mM) glucose levels. We also assessed wound healing using an in vivo corneal epithelial injury model. We found that Nrf2 nuclear translocation and heme oxygenase activity increased in ARPE cells treated with 10 μM DMF or carnosol irrespective of glucose culture conditions. However, HG rendered retinal cells more sensitive to regulators of glutathione synthesis or inhibition and caused a decrease of both cellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Culture in HG also reduced ATP production and mitochondrial function as measured with the Seahorse XF analyzer and electron microscopy analysis revealed morphologically damaged mitochondria. Acute treatment with DMF or carnosol did not restore mitochondrial function in HG cells; conversely, the compounds reduced cellular maximal respiratory and reserve capacity, which were completely prevented by N-acetylcysteine thus suggesting the involvement of thiols in this effect. Interestingly, the scratch assay showed that wound closure was faster in cells cultured in HG than NG and was accelerated by carnosol. This effect was reversed by an inhibitor of heme oxygenase activity. Moreover, topical application of carnosol to the cornea of diabetic rats significantly accelerated wound healing. In summary, these data indicate that culture of retinal epithelial cells in HG does not affect the activation of the Nrf2/heme oxygenase

  6. L-Citrulline dilates rat retinal arterioles via nitric oxide- and prostaglandin-dependent pathways in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mori, Asami; Morita, Masahiko; Morishita, Koji; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2015-04-01

    L-Citrulline is an effective precursor of L-arginine produced by the L-citrulline/L-arginine cycle, and it exerts beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system by supporting enhanced nitric oxide (NO) production. NO dilates retinal blood vessels via the cyclooxygenase-mediated pathway. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of L-citrulline on retinal circulation and to investigate the potential involvement of NO and prostaglandins in L-citrulline-induced responses in rats. L-Citrulline (10-300 μg kg(-1) min(-1), i.v.) increased the diameter of retinal arterioles without significantly changing mean blood pressure, heart rate, and fundus blood flow. The vasodilator response of retinal arterioles to l-citrulline was significantly diminished following treatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (30 mg/kg, i.v.), an NO synthase inhibitor, or indomethacin (5 mg/kg, i.v.), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. In addition, α-methyl-dl-aspartic acid (147 mg/kg, i.v.), an inhibitor of argininosuccinate synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme for the recycling of l-citrulline to l-arginine, diminished the L-citrulline-induced retinal vasodilation. These results suggest that both NO- and prostaglandin-dependent pathways contribute to the L-citrulline-induced vasodilation of rat retinal arterioles. The L-citrulline/L-arginine recycling pathway may have more importance in regulating vascular tone in retinal blood vessels than in peripheral resistance vessels. PMID:25953269

  7. Extracellular lactate as a dynamic vasoactive signal in the rat retinal microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Shigeki; Katsumura, Kozo; Kobayashi, Takatoshi; Puro, Donald G

    2006-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that extracellular lactate regulates the function of pericyte-containing retinal microvessels. Although abluminally positioned pericytes appear to adjust capillary perfusion by contracting and relaxing, knowledge of the molecular signals that regulate the contractility of these mural cells is limited. Here, we focused on lactate because this metabolic product is in the retinal extracellular space under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In microvessels freshly isolated from the adult rat retina, we used perforated-patch pipettes to monitor ionic currents, fura-2 to measure calcium levels, and time-lapse photography to visualize changes in mural cell contractility and lumen diameter. During lactate exposure, pericyte calcium rose; these cells contracted, and lumens constricted. This contractile response appears to involve a cascade of events resulting in the inhibition of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers (NCXs), the decreased of which function causes pericyte calcium to increase and contraction to be triggered. On the basis of our observation that gap junction uncouplers minimized the lactate-induced rise in pericyte calcium, we propose that the NCXs inhibited by lactate are predominately located in the endothelium. Indicative of the importance of endothelial/pericyte gap junctions, uncouplers of these junctions switched the pericyte response to lactate from contraction to relaxation. In addition, we observed that hypoxia, which closes microvascular gap junctions, also switched lactate's effect from vasocontraction to vasorelaxation. Thus the response of pericyte-containing retinal microvessels to extracellular lactate is metabolically modulated. The ability of lactate to serve as a vasoconstrictor when energy supplies are ample and a vasodilator under hypoxic conditions may be an efficient mechanism to link capillary function with local metabolic need. PMID:16299264

  8. Facilitation of uniform maturation of human retinal pigment epithelial cells through collective movement in culture.

    PubMed

    Sonoi, Rie; Kim, Mee-Hae; Kino-Oka, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    Understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that govern tight junction formation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells provides surface design strategies for promoting their maturation in culture. RPE cells were cultured to investigate their migratory behavior and the expression of tight junction protein ZO-1 in the central and peripheral regions of a culture vessel. Regardless of locational differences in the culture vessel, the cells at day 1 were elongated in shape, did not form tight junctions, and migrated actively. As the culture progressed, the cells in the central region slowly moved with morphological change of a cobblestone-like shape via interaction between contact cells and exhibiting the shift from random migration to collective movement toward the center, accompanied by tight junction formation. On the other hand, the cells in the peripheral region maintained the random migration at day 5, meaning spatial heterogeneity in maturation in the vessel. At day 5, RPE cells were incubated in medium with Rac1 inhibitor and the exposure to the Rac1 inhibitor triggered the rapid conversion of migratory behavior from random migration to collective movement toward the center of the vessel, resulting in uniform maturation. These findings indicate that the change in migratory patterns is an important cues and the collective movement toward the center causes the facilitation of uniform maturation in the vessel.

  9. Effects of nuclear factor κB expression on retinal neovascularization and apoptosis in a diabetic retinopathy rat model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ning; Chen, Xiao-Long; Yang, Hong-Wei; Ma, Yu-Ru

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the expression and role of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) in diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its relationship with neovascularization and retinal cell apoptosis. METHODS A total of 80 male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to control (4, 8, 12 and 16wk, n=10 in each group) and diabetes mellitus (DM) groups (4, 8, 12 and 16wk, n=10 in each group). A diabetic rat model was established by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg). After 4, 8, 12 and 16wk, rats were sacrificed. Retinal layers and retinal neovascularization growth were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and examined under light microscopy. Cell apoptosis in the retina was detected by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling, and NF-κB distribution and expression in the retina was determined using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS DM model success rate up to 100%. Diabetes model at each time point after the experimental groupcompared with the control group, the blood glucose was significantly increased, decreased body weight, each time point showed significant differences compared with the control group (P<0.01). After 12wk other pathological changes in the retina of diabetic rats were observed; after 16wk, neovascularization were observed. After 1mo, retinal cell apoptosis was observed. Compared with the control group, NF-κB expression in the DM group significantly increased with disease duration. CONCLUSION With the prolonging of DM progression, the expression NF-κB increases. NF-κB may be related to retinal cell apoptosis and neovascularization. PMID:26085989

  10. Rat retina shows robust circadian expression of clock and clock output genes in explant culture

    PubMed Central

    Buonfiglio, Daniella C.; Malan, André; Sandu, Cristina; Jaeger, Catherine; Cipolla-Neto, José; Hicks, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Circadian rhythms are central to vision and retinal physiology. A circadian clock located within the retina controls various rhythmic processes including melatonin synthesis in photoreceptors. In the present study, we evaluated the rhythmic expression of clock genes and clock output genes in retinal explants maintained for several days in darkness. Methods Retinas were dissected from Wistar rats, either wild-type or from the Per1-luciferase transgenic line housed under a daily 12 h:12 h light-dark cycle (LD12/12), and put in culture at zeitgeber time (ZT) 12 on semipermeable membranes. Explants from wild-type rats were collected every 4 h over 3 days, and total RNA was extracted, quantified, and reverse transcribed. Gene expression was assessed with quantitative PCR, and the periodicity of the relative mRNA amounts was assessed with nonlinear least squares fitting to sine wave functions. Bioluminescence in explants from Per1-luciferase rats was monitored for several days under three different culture protocols. Results Rhythmic expression was found for all studied clock genes and for clock downstream targets such as c-fos and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aanat) genes. Clock and output genes cycled with relatively similar periods and acrophases (peaks of expression during subjective night, except c-fos, which peaked around the end of the subjective day). Data for Per1 were confirmed with bioluminescence monitoring, which also permitted culture conditions to be optimized to study the retina clock. Conclusions Our work shows the free-running expression profile of multiple clock genes and potential clock targets in mammalian retinal explants. This research further strengthens the notion that the retina contains a self-sustained oscillator that can be functionally characterized in organotypic culture. PMID:24940028

  11. Distribution of melanosomes across the retinal pigment epithelium of a hooded rat: implications for light damage

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, W.L.; Rapp, L.M.; Williams, T.P.

    1982-02-01

    Distribution of melanosomes across the retinal pigment epithelium of hooded rats (Long-Evans) is studied at the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. This distribution is shown to be nonuniform: more melanosomes exist in the periphery than elsewhere and, importantly, there are very few melanosomes in a restricted area of the central portion of the superior hemisphere compared with the corresponding part of the inferior hemisphere. The region with fewest melanosomes is precisely the one that is highly susceptible to light damage. Because this region is the same in both pigmented and albino eyes, the paucity of melanin in this region is not the cause of its great sensitivity to light damage. Nor does light cause the nonuniform distribution of melanin. A possible explanation, involving a proposed vestigial tapetum, is given in order to explain the correlation of melanosome counts and sensitivity to light damage.

  12. Salvia miltiorrhiza extracts protect against retinal injury in a rat glaucoma model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qi; Su, Guanfang; Nie, Lili; Wang, Chenguang; He, Yuxi; Liu, Xin

    2014-06-01

    Glaucoma is a serious progressive degenerative disorder of the eye that leads to the continuous loss of retinal ganglion cells. Traditional Chinese medicine provides an important source for new drug screening and identification. The present study used Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen) extracts to examine the potential neuroprotective effects for the eye in a rat model of experimental glaucoma. The results of the study indicated that Salvia miltiorrhiza extracts were unable to prevent intraocular pressure increase in the laser-induced glaucoma model, but the treatment did reduce cell loss during glaucoma progression. Therefore, the results provide the basis for the development of a novel therapeutic agent that exhibits neuroprotective effects against glaucoma. In the future, further studies are required to purify the extracts and determine the effective bioactive components of Salvia miltiorrhiza.

  13. ER stress in retinal degeneration in S334ter Rho rats.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Vishal M; Sizova, Olga S; Lin, Jonathan H; LaVail, Matthew M; Gorbatyuk, Marina S

    2012-01-01

    The S334ter rhodopsin (Rho) rat (line 4) bears the rhodopsin gene with an early termination codon at residue 334 that is a model for several such mutations found in human patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) is implicated in the pathophysiology of several retinal disorders including ADRP in P23H Rho rats. The aim of this study was to examine the onset of UPR gene expression in S334ter Rho retinas to determine if UPR is activated in ADRP animal models and to investigate how the activation of UPR molecules leads to the final demise of S334ter Rho photoreceptors. RT-PCR was performed to evaluate the gene expression profiles for the P10, P12, P15, and P21 stages of the development and progression of ADRP in S334ter Rho photoreceptors. We determined that during the P12-P15 period, ER stress-related genes are strongly upregulated in transgenic retinas, resulting in the activation of the UPR that was confirmed using western blot analysis and RT-PCR. The activation of UPR was associated with the increased expression of JNK, Bik, Bim, Bid, Noxa, and Puma genes and cleavage of caspase-12 that together with activated calpains presumably compromise the integrity of the mitochondrial MPTP, leading to the release of pro-apoptotic AIF1 into the cytosol of S334ter Rho photoreceptor cells. Therefore, two major cross-talking pathways, the UPR and mitochondrial MPTP occur in S334ter-4 Rho retina concomitantly and eventually promote the death of the photoreceptor cells.

  14. Global Gene Expression Changes in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells in Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan Yi; Ray, Arjun; Rodgers, Kathryn; Ergorul, Ceren; Hyman, Bradley T.; Huang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Intraocular pressure (IOP) is an important risk factor in glaucoma. Gene expression changes were studied in glaucomatous rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to elucidate altered transcriptional pathways. Methods. RGCs were back-labeled with Fluorogold. Unilateral IOP elevation was produced by injection of hypertonic saline into the episcleral veins. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to capture an equal number of RGCs from normal and glaucomatous retinal sections. RNA was extracted and amplified, labeled, and hybridized to rat genome microarrays, and data analysis was performed. After selected microarray data were confirmed by RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry, biological pathway analyses were performed. Results. Significant changes were found in the expression of 905 genes, with 330 genes increasing and 575 genes decreasing in glaucomatous RGCs. Multiple cellular pathways were involved. Ingenuity pathway analysis demonstrated significant changes in cardiac β-adrenergic signaling, interferon signaling, glutamate receptor signaling, cAMP-mediated signaling, chemokine signaling, 14-3-3-mediated signaling, and G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. Gene set enrichment analysis showed that the genes involved in apoptotic pathways were enriched in glaucomatous RGCs. The prosurvival gene Stat3 was upregulated in response to elevated IOP, and immunohistochemistry confirmed that Stat3 and phosphorylated-Stat3 levels were increased in RGCs in experimental glaucoma. In addition, the expression of several prosurvival genes normally expressed in RGCs was decreased. Conclusions. There are extensive changes in gene expression in glaucomatous RGCs involving multiple molecular pathways, including prosurvival and prodeath genes. The alteration in the balance between prosurvival and prodeath may contribute to RGC death in glaucoma. PMID:20335623

  15. Inhibition of Adult Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells by D1-type Dopamine Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hayashida, Yuki; Rodríguez, Carolina Varela; Ogata, Genki; Partida, Gloria J.; Oi, Hanako; Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Lee, Sherwin C.; Colado, Anselmo Felipe; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    The spike output of neural pathways can be regulated by modulating output neuron excitability and/or their synaptic inputs. Dopaminergic interneurons synapse onto cells that route signals to mammalian retinal ganglion cells, but it is unknown whether dopamine can activate receptors in these ganglion cells and, if it does, how this affects their excitability. Here, we show D1a-receptor-like immunoreactivity in ganglion cells identified in adult rats by retrogradely transported dextran, and that dopamine, D1-type receptor agonists, and cAMP analogs inhibit spiking in ganglion cells dissociated from adult rats. These ligands curtailed repetitive spiking during constant current injections, and reduced the number and rate of rise of spikes elicited by fluctuating current injections without significantly altering the timing of the remaining spikes. Consistent with mediation by D1-type receptors, SCH-23390 reversed the effects of dopamine on spikes. Contrary to a recent report, spike inhibition by dopamine was not precluded by blocking Ih. Consistent with the reduced rate of spike rise, dopamine reduced voltage-gated Na+ current (INa) amplitude and tetrodotoxin, at doses that reduced INa as moderately as dopamine, also inhibited spiking. These results provide the first direct evidence that D1-type dopamine receptor activation can alter mammalian retinal ganglion cell excitability, and demonstrate that dopamine can modulate spikes in these cells by a mechanism different from the pre- and postsynaptic means proposed by previous studies. To our knowledge, our results also provide the first evidence that dopamine receptor activation can reduce excitability without altering the temporal precision of spike firing. PMID:19940196

  16. Five recombinant simian immunodeficiency virus pseudotypes lead to exclusive transduction of retinal pigmented epithelium in rat.

    PubMed

    Duisit, Ghislaine; Conrath, Hervé; Saleun, Sylvie; Folliot, Sebastien; Provost, Nathalie; Cosset, François-Loïc; Sandrin, Virginie; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate lentiviral vector-mediated rat retinal transduction using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) pseudotyped with envelope proteins from vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G), Mokola virus G protein (MK-G), amphotropic murine leukemia virus envelope (4070A-Env), influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA), lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus G protein (LCMV-G), and RD114 retrovirus envelope (RD114-Env). The six pseudotyped lentivirus vectors carried CMV-driven green fluorescent protein (GFP) or beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) reporter genes. Intravitreal and subretinal injections of each pseudotyped recombinant SIV were performed in cohorts of Wistar rats. Our results showed that no transgene expression was detected after intravitreal injection of each pseudotyped SIV vector. Also, no transduction could be detected following subretinal injection of RD114 pseudotyped SIV vectors. However, selective transduction of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells was repeatedly obtained after subretinal delivery of VSV-G, MK-G, 4070A-Env, HA, and LCMV-G pseudotyped SIV. GFP expression was maximum as soon as 4 days postadministration for VSV-G, MK-G, 4070A-Env, and HA pseudotypes, with no evidence of pseudotransduction for VSV-G. Maximum transgene expression was observed 3 weeks postinjection for LCMV-6. Importantly, HA and VSV-G pseudotyped SIV lead to such a high level of transgene expression that GFP-related toxicity occurred. Therefore, when a high level of GFP synthesis is achieved, replacement of enhanced GFP (egfp, Aequorea victoria) by a low-toxicity GFP (Renilla reniformis) cDNA is necessary to allow long-term expression.

  17. Chemotherapeutic response of tumor derived from human adenovirus 12--induced retinal tumor cell line in syngeneic CDF (F 344) rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Mukai, N; Solish, S P; Sawada, T; Pomeroy, M E

    1983-01-01

    The effect of two anticancer agents, vincristine (VCR) and cyclophosphamide (CTX), on an established cell line (EXP-5) derived from human adenovirus serotype 12 (Ad 12)--induced retinal tumor was studied in vitro and in vivo. VCR at a concentration of 5 and 10 micrograms/ml of culture medium and CTX at 50 and 100 micrograms/ml suppressed growth in vitro. EXP-5 cells were transplanted into the vitreous of 56 inbred CDF (F 344 strain) rats. The implants grew almost exclusively as intravitreous tumors within one month. When the tumor was full grown in the vitreous, VCR and CTX were administered intravenously, singly or in combination, on a schedule based on the protocol CCG-961 for localized unilateral retinoblastoma, Reese-Ellsworth group 5. At a dosage of 0.05 mg/kg, VCR was effective in reducing tumor size; at a dosage of 5 mg/kg, CTX did not reduce tumor size. Combined VCR/CTX therapy induced reduction of about two thirds in tumor size in 2 of 10 treated animals; in all 10 animals, the tumor became morphologically less distinct during the course of treatment although some characteristic features remained. Cytotoxic tumor changes (necrosis, fibrous proliferation, cell transformation, and bizarre giant cells) were observed in all treated animals. This model used the EXP-5 cell line grown in the vitreous, thereby providing a potential tool for evaluating growth and chemotherapeutic responsiveness of retinoblastoma.

  18. Retinal pigment epithelium cell culture on thin biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) films.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Garcia, C A; Mikos, A G

    1998-01-01

    Thin films of 50:50 and 75:25 poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) were manufactured with a controlled thickness of less than 10 microm. The effect of PLGA copolymer ratio on in vitro cell attachment, proliferation, morphology, and tight junction formation was evaluated using a human D407 retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line. Almost complete cell attachment was achieved on both PLGA films after 8 h of cell seeding, which was comparable to that on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) controls. The initial cell seeding density affected attachment, and the optimal value for 50:50 PLGA was 25000 cells cm(-2). After 7 days of in vitro culture, cell density on 50:50 and 75:25 PLGA films increased 45 and 40 folds, respectively, and a 34-fold increase was observed on TCPS. The RPE cells cultured on PLGA films at confluence had a characteristic cobblestone morphology. Confluent RPE cells also developed normal tight junctions in vitro which were concentrated mainly at the apical surfaces of cell-cell junctions. These results demonstrated that thin biodegradable PLGA films can provide suitable substrates for human RPE cell culture, and may serve as temporary carriers for subretinal implantation of organized sheets of RPE.

  19. Delayed Administration of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Conditioned Medium Significantly Improves Outcome After Retinal Ischemia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dreixler, John C.; Poston, Jacqueline N.; Balyasnikova, Irina; Shaikh, Afzhal R.; Tupper, Kelsey Y.; Conway, Sineadh; Boddapati, Venkat; Marcet, Marcus M.; Lesniak, Maciej S.; Roth, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Delayed treatment after ischemia is often unsatisfactory. We hypothesized that injection of bone marrow stem cell (BMSC) conditioned medium after ischemia could rescue ischemic retina, and in this study we characterized the functional and histological outcomes and mechanisms of this neuroprotection. Methods. Retinal ischemia was produced in adult Wistar rats by increasing intraocular pressure for 55 minutes. Conditioned medium (CM) from rat BMSCs or unconditioned medium (uCM) was injected into the vitreous 24 hours after the end of ischemia. Recovery was assessed 7 days after ischemia using electroretinography, at which time we euthanized the animals and then prepared 4-μm-thick paraffin-embedded retinal sections. TUNEL and Western blot were used to identify apoptotic cells and apoptosis-related gene expression 24 hours after injections; that is, 48 hours after ischemia. Protein content in CM versus uCM was studied using tandem mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics methods were used to model protein interactions. Results. Intravitreal injection of CM 24 hours after ischemia significantly improved retinal function and attenuated cell loss in the retinal ganglion cell layer. CM attenuated postischemic apoptosis and apoptosis-related gene expression. By spectral counting, 19 proteins that met stringent identification criteria were increased in the CM compared to uCM; the majority were extracellular matrix proteins that mapped into an interactional network together with other proteins involved in cell growth and adhesion. Conclusions. By restoring retinal function, attenuating apoptosis, and preventing retinal cell loss after ischemia, CM is a robust means of delayed postischemic intervention. We identified some potential candidate proteins for this effect. PMID:24699381

  20. Regression of retinal capillaries following N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced neurotoxicity in the neonatal rat retina.

    PubMed

    Asano, Daiki; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Ishii, Kunio

    2015-02-01

    Degeneration of retinal capillaries occurs following N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced retinal neurotoxicity, and the degree of capillary degeneration decreases in an age-dependent manner. To determine the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the high susceptibility of capillaries to neuronal damage during the early postnatal stage, this study compares the vascular regression patterns between NMDA-treated retinas and retinas treated with N-[2-chloro-4-{(6,7-dimethoxy-4-quinazolinyl)oxy}phenyl]-N'-propylurea (KRN633), a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in neonatal rats. Two days after a single intravitreal injection of NMDA (200 nmol/eye) on postnatal day (P) 7, substantial retinal neuron loss and delayed expansion of the retinal vascular bed were observed. The reduction in the capillary density in the central retina reached statistical significance 4 days after NMDA treatment. In retinas of rats injected subcutaneously with KRN633 (10 mg/kg) on P7 and P8, simplified vasculature attributable to capillary regression and prevention of endothelial cell growth were seen on P9, whereas no visible changes in the morphology of the retinal layers were observed. The degree of capillary degeneration in NMDA-treated retinas was less than that in KRN633-treated retinas. No apparent changes in immunoreactivities for VEGF were found 2 days after NMDA treatment. These results indicate that neuronal cell loss in the retina precedes retinal capillary degeneration following NMDA treatment, and VEGF-dependent immature capillaries might be more susceptible to NMDA-induced neuronal damage. PMID:25284371

  1. Hydrogen peroxide induces microvilli on human retinal pigment epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Reid, G G; Edwards, J G; Marshall, G E; Sutcliffe, R G; Lee, W R

    1995-02-01

    We have found that hydrogen peroxide (10(-4)-10(-2) M) rapidly induces microvilli on separate cells and confluent sheets of human retinal pigment epithelium in culture. t-butyl hydroperoxide and sodium arsenite do not induce microvilli. A role for hydrogen peroxide as an intercellular messenger has previously been proposed in the inflammatory response, in which hydrogen peroxide from phagocytes may signal to vascular endothelial cells. Our observations thus provide a second example of the induction of what may be a physiological response by this potentially toxic agent. In the retina, hydrogen peroxide released from illuminated photoreceptors may elongate the microvilli which extend into the spaces between them. Increased numbers of microvilli and their protrusion further into the photoreceptor layer may enhance various interactions between the two cell types, including the antioxidant functions of the epithelium.

  2. Adenosine A2A Receptor Up-Regulates Retinal Wave Frequency via Starburst Amacrine Cells in the Developing Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pin-Chien; Hsiao, Yu-Tien; Kao, Shao-Yen; Chen, Ching-Feng; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Chiang, Chung-Wei; Lee, Chien-fei; Lu, Juu-Chin; Chern, Yijuang; Wang, Chih-Tien

    2014-01-01

    Background Developing retinas display retinal waves, the patterned spontaneous activity essential for circuit refinement. During the first postnatal week in rodents, retinal waves are mediated by synaptic transmission between starburst amacrine cells (SACs) and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The neuromodulator adenosine is essential for the generation of retinal waves. However, the cellular basis underlying adenosine's regulation of retinal waves remains elusive. Here, we investigated whether and how the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) regulates retinal waves and whether A2AR regulation of retinal waves acts via presynaptic SACs. Methodology/Principal Findings We showed that A2AR was expressed in the inner plexiform layer and ganglion cell layer of the developing rat retina. Knockdown of A2AR decreased the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ transients, suggesting that endogenous A2AR may up-regulate wave frequency. To investigate whether A2AR acts via presynaptic SACs, we targeted gene expression to SACs by the metabotropic glutamate receptor type II promoter. Ca2+ transient frequency was increased by expressing wild-type A2AR (A2AR-WT) in SACs, suggesting that A2AR may up-regulate retinal waves via presynaptic SACs. Subsequent patch-clamp recordings on RGCs revealed that presynaptic A2AR-WT increased the frequency of wave-associated postsynaptic currents (PSCs) or depolarizations compared to the control, without changing the RGC's excitability, membrane potentials, or PSC charge. These findings suggest that presynaptic A2AR may not affect the membrane properties of postsynaptic RGCs. In contrast, by expressing the C-terminal truncated A2AR mutant (A2AR-ΔC) in SACs, the wave frequency was reduced compared to the A2AR-WT, but was similar to the control, suggesting that the full-length A2AR in SACs is required for A2AR up-regulation of retinal waves. Conclusions/Significance A2AR up-regulates the frequency of retinal waves via presynaptic SACs, requiring its full

  3. Iron and other elements (Cu, Zn, Ca) contents in retina of rats during development and hereditary retinal degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, C.; Llabador, Y.; Devès, G.; Vesvres, M. H.; Simonoff, M.; Yefimova, M.; Courtois, Y.; Jeanny, J. C.

    2001-07-01

    The retina as well as other tissues needs iron to survive, but modifications in iron metabolism have also been suggested to contribute to cerebral neurodegenerative diseases. Our study was intended to investigate iron distribution in the retina of normal rats and Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats affected by hereditary degeneration of the photoreceptors at different developmental stages (35, 45 and 55 days after birth). Iron (Fe) distribution was determined by proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) microanalysis on retinal sections and compared to other tissues (cornea, liver, spleen) and to other elements (Cu, Zn, Ca). Elemental concentrations were determined in different retinal layers especially the photoreceptors, which are progressively altered and disappear in the RCS rats. Iron is unevenly distributed throughout the rat retina. The highest concentration is observed in the choroid and the retinal pigmented epithelium and in the inner segments of photoreceptors. Iron content is lower in the outer segments but still significant. It increases during both the development and the disease at the level of the segments. This last localised iron increase can result in an overproduction of free radicals and be correlated with the photoreceptor cell loss. The distributions of other elements (Cu, Zn, Ca) revealed interesting temporal progressions.

  4. Effects of Low-dose Triamcinolone Acetonide on Rat Retinal Progenitor Cells under Hypoxia Condition

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yao; Cui, Li-Jun; Kang, Qian-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Retinal degenerative diseases are the leading causes of blindness in developed world. Retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) play a key role in retina restoration. Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) is widely used for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. In this study, we investigated the role of TA on RPCs in hypoxia condition. Methods: RPCs were primary cultured and identified by immunofluorescence staining. Cells were cultured under normoxia, hypoxia 6 h, and hypoxia 6 h with TA treatment conditions. For the TA treatment groups, after being cultured under hypoxia condition for 6 h, RPCs were treated with different concentrations of TA for 48–72 h. Cell viability was measured by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. Cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. Western blotting was employed to examine the expression of cyclin D1, Akt, p-Akt, nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65, and caspase-3. Results: CCK-8 assays indicated that the viability of RPCs treated with 0.01 mg/ml TA in hypoxia group was improved after 48 h, comparing with control group (P < 0.05). After 72 h, the cell viability was enhanced in both 0.01 mg/ml and 0.02 mg/ml TA groups compared with control group (all P < 0.05). Flow cytometry revealed that there were more cells in S-phase in hypoxia 6 h group than in normoxia control group (P < 0.05). RPCs in S and G2/M phases decreased in groups given TA, comparing with other groups (all P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the total Akt protein expression among different groups, whereas upregulation of p-Akt and NF-κB p65 protein expression and downregulation of caspase-3 and cyclin D1 protein expression were observed in 0.01 mg/ml TA group, comparing with hypoxia 6 h group and control group (all P < 0.05). Conclusion: Low-dose TA has anti-apoptosis effect on RPCs while it has no stimulatory effect on cell proliferation. PMID:27364798

  5. Retinal ganglion cell neuroprotection in a rat model of glaucoma following brimonidine, latanoprost or combined treatments.

    PubMed

    Hernández, María; Urcola, J Haritz; Vecino, Elena

    2008-05-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of two antiglaucomatous substances, regardless of their hypotensive effect in the eye. Brimonidine, which does not reduce IOP when administered intraperitoneally, and latanoprost, which has a renowned hypotensive effect topically. We examined rat retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and size distribution in experimental glaucoma in response to different glaucomatous agents. IOP was elevated by episcleral vein cauterization (EVC) prior to the application of different treatments: (I) PBS application (control group), (II) intraperitoneal administration of brimonidine (a general hypotensive agent), (III) topical application of latanoprost (an ocular hypotensive agent), and (IV) latanoprost combined with brimonidine. After 12 weeks, RGCs were retrogradely labeled with fluorogold and RGC density was analyzed. EVC caused a significant increase (42%) in IOP in each group before drug treatment. After 12weeks of EVC, RGC survival in control vs. EVC rats was 78.9+/-3.2%. No IOP reduction was observed in brimonidine injected rats, but RGC survival at 12 weeks was total (103.7+/-2.7%). In latanoprost treated rats, IOP dropped by around 22% and 94.7+/-3.7% of the RGC population survived. Finally in the latanoprost+brimonidine combined group, IOP was significantly reduced by 25% and 94.4+/-2.2% of RGCs survived. Surprisingly, whereas EVC led to a 6% increase in RGC soma size, brimonidine treatment was associated with a 9% reduction in the soma size of RGCs at 12 weeks. We conclude that brimonidine exerts a neuroprotective effect via a mechanism which is independent of IOP reduction. These findings indicate that cell survival in glaucoma may be enhanced by neuroprotective strategies which are independent of IOP reduction. No synergistic neuroprotective effect was observed when both treatments were applied simultaneously.

  6. Green tea catechins are potent anti-oxidants that ameliorate sodium iodate-induced retinal degeneration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaping; Qin, Yong Jie; Yip, Yolanda W. Y.; Chan, Kwok Ping; Chu, Kai On; Chu, Wai Kit; Ng, Tsz Kin; Pang, Chi Pui; Chan, Sun On

    2016-01-01

    Green tea extracts exhibit anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory actions in different disease conditions. We hypothesized that green tea extract and its catechin constituents ameliorate sodium iodate-induced retinal degeneration in rats by counteracting oxidative stress. In this study, adult Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously injected with a single dose of sodium iodate. Green tea extract (GTE; Theaphenon-E) or combinations of its catechin constituents, including (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), were administered intra-gastrically before injection. Live imaging analysis using confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography showed a progressive increase of degenerating profile across the retinal surface and decrease in thickness of outer nuclear layer (ONL) at Day-14 of post-injection. These lesions were significantly ameliorated by Theaphenon-E and catechin combinations with EGCG. Catechins with exclusion of EGCG did not show obvious protective effect. Histological analyses confirmed that Theaphenon-E and catechins containing EGCG protect the retina by reducing ONL disruption. Retinal protective effects were associated with reduced expression of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and caspase-3, and suppression of 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α generation in the retina. In summary, GTE and its catechin constituents are potent anti-oxidants that offer neuroprotection to the outer retinal degeneration after sodium iodate insult, among which EGCG is the most active constituent. PMID:27383468

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitors sodium butyrate and valproic acid delay spontaneous cell death in purified rat retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Jennifer; Pielen, Amelie; Lagrèze, Wolf Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have neuroprotective effects under various neurodegenerative conditions, e.g., after optic nerve crush (ONC). HDACi-mediated protection of central neurons by increased histone acetylation has not previously been demonstrated in rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), although epigenetic changes were shown to be associated with cell death after ONC. We investigated whether HDACi can delay spontaneous cell death in purified rat RGCs and analyzed concomitant histone acetylation levels. Methods RGCs were purified from newborn (postnatal day [P] 0–P2) rat retinas by immunopanning with antibodies against Thy-1.1 and culturing in serum-free medium for 2 days. RGCs were treated with HDACi, each at several different concentrations: 0.1–10 mM sodium butyrate (SB), 0.1–2 mM valproic acid (VPA), or 0.5–10 nM trichostatin A (TSA). Negative controls were incubated in media alone, while positive controls were incubated in 0.05–0.4 IU/µl erythropoietin. Survival was quantified by counting viable cells using phase-contrast microscopy. The expression of acetylated histone proteins (AcH) 3 and 4 was analyzed in RGCs by immunohistochemistry. Results SB and VPA enhanced RGC survival in culture, with both showing a maximum effect at 0.1 mM (increase in survival to 188% and 163%, respectively). Their neuroprotective effect was comparable to that of erythropoietin at 0.05 IU/µl. TSA 0.5–1.0 nM showed no effect on RGC survival, and concentrations ≥5 nM increased RGC death. AcH3 and AcH4 levels were only significantly increased in RGCs treated with 0.1 mM SB. VPA 0.1 mM produced only a slight effect on histone acetylation. Conclusions Millimolar concentrations of SB and VPA delayed spontaneous cell death in purified RGCs; however, significantly increased histone acetylation levels were only detectable in RGCs after SB treatment. As the potent HDACi TSA was not neuroprotective, mechanisms other than histone acetylation may be the

  8. Mead acid supplementation does not rescue rats from cataract and retinal degeneration induced by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Emoto, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Hamazaki, Kei; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Yuki, Michiko; Yuri, Takashi; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Tsubura, Airo

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids and their derivatives play a role in the response to ocular disease. Our current study investigated the effects of dietary mead acid (MA, 5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid) supplementation on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced cataract and retinal degeneration in Sprague-Dawley rats. Experiment 1 was designed to inhibit cataract formation, with the dams fed a 2.4% MA or basal (<0.01% MA) diet during lactational periods. On postnatal day 7, male pups received a single intraperitoneal (ip) injection of 50 mg/kg MNU or vehicle. Lens opacity and morphology were examined 7 and 14 days after the MNU injection. Experiment 2 was designed to inhibit retinal degeneration and was performed with female postweaning rats. In this experiment, dams were fed the 2.4% MA or basal diet during the lactational periods. Thereafter, the female pups were continuously fed the same diets during their postweaning periods. On postnatal day 21 (at weaning), pups received a single ip injection of 50 mg/kg MNU. Retinal morphology was examined 7 days after the MNU injection. In experiment 3, six-week-old female rats were fed the 2.4% MA or basal diet starting at one week before the MNU injection and were then continuously fed the same diets until sacrifice. Rats at 7 weeks of age were given a single ip injection of 40 mg/kg MNU, and the retina was then examined morphologically one week after the MNU injection. In experiment 1, mature cataract was found in all of the MNU-treated groups, with or without MA supplementation. In experiments 2 and 3, atrophy of both the peripheral and central outer retina occurred in all rats exposed to MNU, with or without MA supplementation, respectively. The severities of the cataracts and retinal atrophy in the rats were similar regardless of MA supplementation. Dietary mead acid, which is used as a substitute in essential fatty acid deficiency in the body, does not modify MNU-induced cataract and retinal degeneration in rat models.

  9. Number and spatial distribution of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in the adult albino rat.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Romero, C; Jiménez-López, M; García-Ayuso, D; Salinas-Navarro, M; Nadal-Nicolás, F M; Agudo-Barriuso, M; Villegas-Pérez, M P; Avilés-Trigueros, M; Vidal-Sanz, M

    2013-03-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) respond directly to light and are responsible of the synchronization of the circadian rhythm with the photic stimulus and for the pupillary light reflex. To quantify the total population of rat-ipRGCs and to assess their spatial distribution we have developed an automated routine and used neighbour maps. Moreover, in all analysed retinas we have studied the general population of RGCs - identified by their Brn3a expression - and the population of ipRGCs - identified by melanopsin immunodetection - thus allowing the co-analysis of their topography. Our results show that the total mean number ± standard deviation of ipRGCs in the albino rat is 2047 ± 309. Their distribution in the retina seems to be complementary to that of Brn3a(+)RGCs, being denser in the periphery, especially in the superior retina where their highest densities are found in the temporal quadrant, above the visual streak. In addition, by tracing the retinas from both superior colliculi, we have also determined that 90.62% of the ipRGC project to these central targets. PMID:23295345

  10. Signaling mechanism for modulation by ATP of glycine receptors on rat retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Gong; Zhou, Wei; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2016-01-01

    ATP modulates voltage- and ligand-gated channels in the CNS via the activation of ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptors. While P2Y receptors are expressed in retinal neurons, the function of these receptors in the retina is largely unknown. Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in rat retinal slice preparations, we demonstrated that ATP suppressed glycine receptor-mediated currents of OFF type ganglion cells (OFF-GCs) dose-dependently, and the effect was in part mediated by P2Y1 and P2Y11, but not by P2X. The ATP effect was abolished by intracellular dialysis of a Gq/11 protein inhibitor and phosphatidylinositol (PI)-phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, but not phosphatidylcholine (PC)-PLC inhibitor. The ATP effect was accompanied by an increase in [Ca2+]i through the IP3-sensitive pathway and was blocked by intracellular Ca2+-free solution. Furthermore, the ATP effect was eliminated in the presence of PKC inhibitors. Neither PKA nor PKG system was involved. These results suggest that the ATP-induced suppression may be mediated by a distinct Gq/11/PI-PLC/IP3/Ca2+/PKC signaling pathway, following the activation of P2Y1,11 and other P2Y subtypes. Consistently, ATP suppressed glycine receptor-mediated light-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents of OFF-GCs. These results suggest that ATP may modify the ON-to-OFF crossover inhibition, thus changing action potential patterns of OFF-GCs. PMID:27357477

  11. Zerumbone, a Phytochemical of Subtropical Ginger, Protects against Hyperglycemia-Induced Retinal Damage in Experimental Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Tzeng, Yu-Cheng; Liu, I-Min

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most ordinary and specific microvascular complication of diabetes, is a disease of the retina. Zerumbone (ZER) is a monocyclic sesquiterpene compound, and based on reports, it is the predominant bioactive compound from the rhizomes of Zingiber zerumbet. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the protective effect of zerumbone against DR in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. STZ-diabetic rats were treated with ZER (40 mg/kg) once a day orally for 8 weeks. ZER administration significantly (p < 0.05) lowered the levels of plasma glucose (32.5% ± 5.7% lower) and glycosylated hemoglobin (29.2% ± 3.4% lower) in STZ-diabetic rats. Retinal histopathological observations indicated that disarrangement and reduction in thickness of retinal layers were reversed in ZER-treated diabetic rats. ZER downregulated both the elevated levels of advanced glycosylated end products (AGEs) and the higher levels of the receptors for AGEs (RAGE) in retinas of diabetic rats. What's more, ZER significantly (p < 0.05) ameliorated diabetes-induced upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6. ZER also attenuated overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and suppressed activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and apoptosis in the retinas of STZ-diabetic rats. Our results suggest ZER possesses retinal protective effects, which might be associated with the blockade of the AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB pathway and its anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:27463726

  12. Zerumbone, a Phytochemical of Subtropical Ginger, Protects against Hyperglycemia-Induced Retinal Damage in Experimental Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Tzeng, Yu-Cheng; Liu, I-Min

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most ordinary and specific microvascular complication of diabetes, is a disease of the retina. Zerumbone (ZER) is a monocyclic sesquiterpene compound, and based on reports, it is the predominant bioactive compound from the rhizomes of Zingiber zerumbet. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the protective effect of zerumbone against DR in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. STZ-diabetic rats were treated with ZER (40 mg/kg) once a day orally for 8 weeks. ZER administration significantly (p < 0.05) lowered the levels of plasma glucose (32.5% ± 5.7% lower) and glycosylated hemoglobin (29.2% ± 3.4% lower) in STZ-diabetic rats. Retinal histopathological observations indicated that disarrangement and reduction in thickness of retinal layers were reversed in ZER-treated diabetic rats. ZER downregulated both the elevated levels of advanced glycosylated end products (AGEs) and the higher levels of the receptors for AGEs (RAGE) in retinas of diabetic rats. What’s more, ZER significantly (p < 0.05) ameliorated diabetes-induced upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6. ZER also attenuated overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and suppressed activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and apoptosis in the retinas of STZ-diabetic rats. Our results suggest ZER possesses retinal protective effects, which might be associated with the blockade of the AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB pathway and its anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:27463726

  13. Progressive Early Breakdown of Retinal Pigment Epithelium Function in Hyperglycemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Danielle M.; Yates, Phil W.; Dahrouj, Mohammad; Liu, Yueying; Crosson, Craig E.; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic macular edema (DME), an accumulation of fluid in the subretinal space, is a significant cause of vision loss. The impact of diabetes on the breakdown of the inner blood–retina barrier (BRB) is an established event that leads to DME. However, the role of the outer BRB in ocular diabetes has received limited attention. We present evidence that the breakdown of normal RPE function in hyperglycemia facilitates conditions conducive to DME pathogenesis. Methods Brown Norway rats (130–150 g) were injected intraperitoneally with streptozotocin (STZ; 60 mg/kg) to induce hyperglycemia. After 4 weeks, Evans blue (EB) dye was injected intravenously to determine whether there was leakage of albumin into the retina. Subretinal saline blebs (0.5–1 μL) were placed 4 and 9 weeks after STZ injection, and time-lapse optical coherence tomography tracked the resorption rate. In a subset of rats, intravitreal bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody targeted to VEGF, was given at 5 weeks and resorption was measured at 9 weeks. Results The ability of the RPE to transport fluid was reduced significantly after 4 and 9 weeks of hyperglycemia with a reduction of over 67% at 9 weeks. No EB dye leakage from inner retinal vessels was measured in hyperglycemic animals compared to control. The intravitreal administration of bevacizumab at week 5 significantly increased the rate of fluid transport in rats subjected to hyperglycemia for 9 weeks. Conclusions These results demonstrate that chronic hyperglycemia altered RPE fluid transport, in part dependent on the actions of VEGF. These results support the idea that RPE dysfunction is an early event associated with hyperglycemia that contributes to fluid accumulation in DME. PMID:27191823

  14. Retinal ganglion cell protection with geranylgeranylacetone, a heat shock protein inducer, in a rat glaucoma model.

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, Joseph; Ishii, Yoko; Kwong, Jacky M K

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the effects of geranylgeranylacetone (GCA) on the expression of inducible (HSP72) and constitutive (HSC70) heat shock proteins (HSPs) on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a rat model of glaucoma. METHODS: Adult Wistar rats were given intraperitoneal injections of GGA, 200 mg/kg daily. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining for HSP72 and HSC70 were performed after 1, 3, and 7 days of GGA administration. After 7 days of GGA pretreatment, intraocular pressure (IOP) was elevated unilaterally by repeated trabecular argon laser photocoagulation 5 days after intracameral injection of india ink. After the first laser photocoagulation, CGA was given twice a week. RGC survival was evaluated after 5 weeks of IOP elevation. Immunohistochemistry and TdT-mediated biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) were performed after 1 week of IOP elevation. Quercetin, an inhibitor of HSP expression, was also administered to a separate group. RESULTS: There was increased expression of HSP72 in RGCs at 3 and 7 days after GGA administration, but HSC70 was unchanged. After 5 weeks of IOP elevation, there was 27% +/- 6% loss of RGCs. The administration of GGA significantly reduced the loss of RGCs, lessened optic nerve damage, decreased the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the RGC layer, and increased HSP72. Quercetin administration abolished these protective effects. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that systemic administration of GGA protects RGCs from glaucomatous damage in a rat model and suggest a novel pathway for netroprotection for patients with glaucoma. PMID:14971562

  15. The effect of intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor on inner retinal oxygen delivery and metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Blair, Norman P; Wanek, Justin; Teng, Pang-yu; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2016-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is stimulated by hypoxia and plays an important role in pathologic vascular leakage and neovascularization. Increased VEGF may affect inner retinal oxygen delivery (DO2) and oxygen metabolism (MO2), however, quantitative information is lacking. We tested the hypotheses that VEGF increases DO2, but does not alter MO2. In 10 rats, VEGF was injected intravitreally into one eye, whereas balanced salt solution (BSS) was injected into the fellow eye, 24 h prior to imaging. Vessel diameters and blood velocities were determined by red-free and fluorescent microsphere imaging, respectively. Vascular PO2 values were derived by phosphorescence lifetime imaging of an intravascular oxyphor. Retinal blood flow, vascular oxygen content, DO2 and MO2 were calculated. Retinal arterial and venous diameters were larger in VEGF-injected eyes compared to control eyes (P < 0.03), however no significant difference was observed in blood velocity (P = 0.21). Thus, retinal blood flow was greater in VEGF-injected eyes (P = 0.007). Retinal vascular PO2 and oxygen content were similar between control and VEGF-injected eyes (P > 0.11), while the arteriovenous oxygen content difference was marginally lower in VEGF-injected eyes (P = 0.05). DO2 was 950 ± 340 and 1380 ± 650 nL O2/min in control and VEGF-injected eyes, respectively (P = 0.005). MO2 was 440 ± 150 and 490 ± 190 nL O2/min in control and VEGF-injected eyes, respectively (P = 0.31). Intravitreally administered VEGF did not alter MO2 but increased DO2, suggesting VEGF may play an offsetting role in conditions characterized by retinal hypoxia.

  16. White Light–Emitting Diodes (LEDs) at Domestic Lighting Levels and Retinal Injury in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yu-Man; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Sliney, David; Lee, Li-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Background: Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) deliver higher levels of blue light to the retina than do conventional domestic light sources. Chronic exposure to high-intensity light (2,000–10,000 lux) has previously been found to result in light-induced retinal injury, but chronic exposure to relatively low-intensity (750 lux) light has not been previously assessed with LEDs in a rodent model. Objective: We examined LED-induced retinal neuronal cell damage in the Sprague-Dawley rat using functional, histological, and biochemical measurements. Methods: We used blue LEDs (460 nm) and full-spectrum white LEDs, coupled with matching compact fluorescent lights, for exposures. Pathological examinations included electroretinogram, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also measured free radical production in the retina to determine the oxidative stress level. Results: H&E staining and TEM revealed apoptosis and necrosis of photoreceptors, which indicated blue-light induced photochemical injury of the retina. Free radical production in the retina was increased in LED-exposed groups. IHC staining demonstrated that oxidative stress was associated with retinal injury. Although we found serious retinal light injury in LED groups, the compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) groups showed moderate to mild injury. Conclusion: Our results raise questions about adverse effects on the retina from chronic exposure to LED light compared with other light sources that have less blue light. Thus, we suggest a precautionary approach with regard to the use of blue-rich “white” LEDs for general lighting. Citation: Shang YM, Wang GS, Sliney D, Yang CH, Lee LL. 2014. White light–emitting diodes (LEDs) at domestic lighting levels and retinal injury in a rat model. Environ Health Perspect 122:269–276; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307294 PMID:24362357

  17. Orexin-A potentiates L-type calcium/barium currents in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Weng, S-J; Yang, X-L; Zhong, Y-M

    2015-10-01

    Two neuropeptides, orexin-A and orexin-B (also called hypocretin-1 and -2), have been implicated in sleep/wake regulation, feeding behaviors via the activation of two subtypes of G-protein-coupled receptors: orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors (OX1R and OX2R). While the expression of orexins and orexin receptors is immunohistochemically revealed in retinal neurons, the function of these peptides in the retina is largely unknown. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in rat retinal slices, we demonstrated that orexin-A increased L-type-like barium currents (IBa,L) in ganglion cells (GCs), and the effect was blocked by the selective OX1R antagonist SB334867, but not by the OX2R antagonist TCS OX2 29. The orexin-A effect was abolished by intracellular dialysis of GDP-β-S/GPAnt-2A, a Gq protein inhibitor, suggesting the mediation of Gq. Additionally, during internal dialysis of the phosphatidylinositol (PI)-phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, orexin-A did not change the IBa,L of GCs, whereas the orexin-A effect persisted in the presence of the phosphatidylcholine (PC)-PLC inhibitor D609. The orexin-A-induced potentiation was not seen with internal infusion of Ca(2+)-free solution or when inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores was blocked by heparin/xestospongins-C. Moreover, the orexin-A effect was mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, but was eliminated when PKC was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide IV (Bis-IV)/Gö6976. Neither adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) nor guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-protein kinase G (PKG) signaling pathway was likely involved, as orexin-A persisted to potentiate the IBa,L of GCs no matter these two pathways were activated or inhibited. These results suggest that, by activating OX1R, orexin-A potentiates the IBa,L of rat GCs through a distinct Gq/PI-PLC/IP3/Ca(2+)/PKC signaling pathway.

  18. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of ...

  19. Enhanced Endothelin-1 Mediated Vasoconstriction of the Ophthalmic Artery May Exacerbate Retinal Damage after Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Blixt, Frank W.; Johansson, Sara Ellinor; Johnson, Leif; Haanes, Kristian Agmund; Warfvinge, Karin; Edvinsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vasculature is often the target of stroke studies. However, the vasculature supplying the eye might also be affected by ischemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the transient global cerebral ischemia (GCI) enhances vascular effect of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and 5-hydroxytryptamine/serotonin (5-HT) on the ophthalmic artery in rats, leading to delayed retinal damage. This was preformed using myography on the ophthalmic artery, coupled with immunohistochemistry and electroretinogram (ERG) to assess the ischemic consequences on the retina. Results showed a significant increase of ET-1 mediated vasoconstriction at 48 hours post ischemia. The retina did not exhibit any morphological changes throughout the study. However, we found an increase of GFAP and vimentin expression at 72 hours and 7 days after ischemia, indicating Müller cell mediated gliosis. ERG revealed significantly decreased function at 72 hours, but recovered almost completely after 7 days. In conclusion, we propose that the increased contractile response via ET-1 receptors in the ophthalmic artery after 48 hours may elicit negative retinal consequences due to a second ischemic period. This may exacerbate retinal damage after ischemia as illustrated by the decreased retinal function and Müller cell activation. The ophthalmic artery and ET-1 mediated vasoconstriction may be a valid and novel therapeutic target after longer periods of ischemic insults. PMID:27322388

  20. Both electrical stimulation thresholds and SMI-32-immunoreactive retinal ganglion cell density correlate with age in S334ter line 3 rat retina.

    PubMed

    Chan, Leanne L H; Lee, Eun-Jin; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D

    2011-06-01

    Electrical stimulation threshold and retinal ganglion cell density were measured in a rat model of retinal degeneration. We performed in vivo electrophysiology and morphometric analysis on normal and S334ter line 3 (RD) rats (ages 84-782 days). We stimulated the retina in anesthetized animals and recorded evoked responses in the superior colliculus. Current pulses were delivered with a platinum-iridium (Pt-Ir) electrode of 75-μm diameter positioned on the epiretinal surface. In the same animals used for electrophysiology, SMI-32 immunolabeling of the retina enabled ganglion cell counting. An increase in threshold currents positively correlated with age of RD rats. SMI-32-labeled retinal ganglion cell density negatively correlated with age of RD rats. ANOVA shows that RD postnatal day (P)100 and P300 rats have threshold and density similar to normal rats, but RD P500 and P700 rats have threshold and density statistically different from normal rats (P < 0.05). Threshold charge densities were within the safety limits of Pt for all groups and pulse configurations, except at RD P600 and RD P700, where pulses were only safe up to 1- and 0.2-ms duration, respectively. Preservation of ganglion cells may enhance the efficiency and safety of electronic retinal implants.

  1. Regulation of tyrosinase expression and activity in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abul-Hassan, K; Walmsley, R; Tombran-Tink, J; Boulton, M

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the regulation of tyrosinase gene expression and activity in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. The tyrosinase promoter (Ty.prom) region (400 bp) was PCR amplified and cloned into a modified mammalian expression vector (pcDNA3.1) upstream of a firefly luciferase (Luc) cDNA and was designated 'pcDNA3.1-Ty.prom.Luc'. The plasmid was co-transfected into RPE cells with a second mammalian expression plasmid (pRL-TK) containing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter region upstream of Renilla Luc in a protocol designated the 'dual luciferase assay' (DLA). After co-transfection, cells were treated with a range of potential melanogenic agents; basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), methyl methane sulphonate, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, verapamil, phorbol myristate acetate, cholera toxin (CT), pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF), and L-tyrosine. The expression of tyrosinase promoter and enzymatic activities were determined 48 hr post-transfection using the DLA and DOPA oxidase assays, respectively. Tyrosinase activity could not be detected in RPE cells with any of the treatments. Tyrosinase promoter activity was significantly up-regulated in RPE cells treated with bFGF, PEDF, verapamil, CT and tyrosine compared with control cells. In conclusion, the tyrosinase gene is not only expressed but can be regulated in response to different chemicals in cultured human RPE cells. However, it appears that RPE cells in culture lack a post-transcriptional and/or translational modification point(s), which are necessary for tyrosinase enzymic activity. PMID:11153695

  2. Retinal Electrophysiological Effects of Intravitreal Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Akkoç, Tolga; Eraslan, Muhsin; Şahin, Özlem; Özkara, Selvinaz; Vardar Aker, Fugen; Subaşı, Cansu; Karaöz, Erdal; Akkoç, Tunç

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of legal blindness in developed countries at middle age adults. In this study diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) in male Wistar albino rats. After 3 months of diabetes, rights eye were injected intravitreally with green fluorescein protein (GFP) labelled bone marrow derived stem cells (BMSC) and left eyes with balanced salt solution (Sham). Animals were grouped as Baseline (n = 51), Diabetic (n = 45), Diabetic+BMSC (n = 45 eyes), Diabetic+Sham (n = 45 eyes), Healthy+BMSC (n = 6 eyes), Healthy+Sham (n = 6 eyes). Immunohistology analysis showed an increased retinal gliosis in the Diabetic group, compared to Baseline group, which was assessed with GFAP and vimentin expression. In the immunofluorescence analysis BMSC were observed to integrate mostly into the inner retina and expressing GFP. Diabetic group had prominently lower oscillatory potential wave amplitudes than the Baseline group. Three weeks after intravitreal injection Diabetic+BMSC group had significantly better amplitudes than the Diabetic+Sham group. Taken together intravitreal BMSC were thought to improve visual function. PMID:27300133

  3. Expression of mannose receptors for pinocytosis and phagocytosis on rat retinal pigment epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Tarnowski, B.I.; Shepherd, V.L.; McLaughlin, B.J.

    1988-05-01

    We report here the presence of a mannose-specific receptor on apical membranes of rat retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. For pinocytic studies, 125I-Mannose-BSA (125I-Man-BSA) was incubated with RPE explants from normal (Long Evans) and dystrophic (pigmented RCS) rat retinas. Normal RPE bound 36.1 ng of ligand and, in the presence of mannan competitor, the amount bound was 18.3 ng. In a similar assay, total ligand uptake by dystrophic RPE was 25.9 ng with 9.8 ng specific for mannose recognition. Comparing the amounts of ligand bound, dystrophic RPE recognized 55% of the amount recognized by normal RPE. The presence of the mannose receptor was localized on both normal and dystrophic RPE apical plasma membranes by autoradiographic techniques using 125I-Man-BSA. Normal RPE showed a greater number of silver grains present at the apical cell membrane as compared to dystrophic RPE. Silver grains were significantly reduced when incubation with the ligand was carried out in the presence of a mannan competitor. Further, in phagocytic studies, latex beads coated with mannan were used as phagocytic particles. Normal RPE phagocytized 4.52 mannan-beads per cell profile by a mannose-specific mechanism, whereas dystrophic RPE did not recognize mannan-beads. Our data suggest that RPE cells express surface receptors which recognize both soluble and particulate mannose ligands. The pinocytic and autoradiographic studies suggest that normal RPE binds more soluble ligand than does dystrophic RPE. If the mannose receptors mediate both pinocytosis and phagocytosis, a possible reduction in number of soluble mannose binding sites on the dystrophic RPE may be related to the diminished phagocytic recognition of particulate ligand by the dystrophic RPE.

  4. Cell-mediated immunity in F 344 rats bearing intraocular tumors derived from human adenovirus 12-induced retinal tumor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Mukai, N; Solish, S P; Sawada, T; Pomeroy, M E

    1983-10-01

    The eyes of 10 F344 rats were inoculated with retinal tumor cells (EXP-5 cell line) induced by human adenovirus 12. The animals were killed at 4 weeks thereafter, and the cytotoxicity of their lymphocytes was investigated by using 51Cr-releasing assay. The percentage of EXP-5 cells killed in vitro by lymphocytes was higher in 10 rats with ocular tumors (24.6% +/- 6.1%, mean +/- SD) than in 10 control rats (6.2% +/- 1.8%). Morphologic investigation using syngeneic spleen cells confirmed the presence of lymphoid cells, resembling T-lymphocytes, adhering to EXP-5 cells. The influence of subcutaneous injection of EXP-5 cells on the growth of intravitreously injected tumor cells was investigated. Cells injected subcutaneously prior to intravitreous injection elicited an immune response that was capable of controlling vitreous tumor growth. These findings suggest that the rats with transplanted retinal tumors develop a cell-mediated immune response in the early stage of tumor bearing, and that a state of pre-existing specific immunity can overcome so-called "immunologic privilege" of the vitreous body.

  5. Vasoinhibins prevent retinal vasopermeability associated with diabetic retinopathy in rats via protein phosphatase 2A–dependent eNOS inactivation

    PubMed Central

    García, Celina; Aranda, Jorge; Arnold, Edith; Thébault, Stéphanie; Macotela, Yazmín; López-Casillas, Fernando; Mendoza, Valentín; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo; Hernández-Montiel, Hebert Luis; Lin, Sue-Hwa; de la Escalera, Gonzalo Martínez; Clapp, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Increased retinal vasopermeability contributes to diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults. Despite clinical progress, effective therapy remains a major need. Vasoinhibins, a family of peptides derived from the protein hormone prolactin (and inclusive of the 16-kDa fragment of prolactin), antagonize the proangiogenic effects of VEGF, a primary mediator of retinal vasopermeability. Here, we demonstrate what we believe to be a novel function of vasoinhibins as inhibitors of the increased retinal vasopermeability associated with diabetic retinopathy. Vasoinhibins inhibited VEGF-induced vasopermeability in bovine aortic and rat retinal capillary endothelial cells in vitro. In vivo, vasoinhibins blocked retinal vasopermeability in diabetic rats and in response to intravitreous injection of VEGF or of vitreous from patients with diabetic retinopathy. Inhibition by vasoinhibins was similar to that achieved following immunodepletion of VEGF from human diabetic retinopathy vitreous or blockage of NO synthesis, suggesting that vasoinhibins inhibit VEGF-induced NOS activation. We further showed that vasoinhibins activate protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), leading to eNOS dephosphorylation at Ser1179 and, thereby, eNOS inactivation. Moreover, intravitreous injection of okadaic acid, a PP2A inhibitor, blocked the vasoinhibin effect on endothelial cell permeability and retinal vasopermeability. These results suggest that vasoinhibins have the potential to be developed as new therapeutic agents to control the excessive retinal vasopermeability observed in diabetic retinopathy and other vasoproliferative retinopathies. PMID:18497878

  6. Inhibiting Matrix Metalloproteinase 3 Ameliorates Neuronal Loss in the Ganglion Cell Layer of Rats in Retinal Ischemia/Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tu; You, Qiuting; Chen, Dan; Tong, Jianbin; Shang, Lei; Luo, Jia; Qiu, Yi; Yu, Huimin; Zeng, Leping; Huang, Jufang

    2016-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) is integrally involved in the neuronal degeneration of the central nervous system by promoting glial activation, neuronal apoptosis and damage to the brain-blood barrier. However, whether MMP3 also contributes to the neuronal degeneration induced by retinal ischemia/reperfusion is still uncertain. In the present study, we detected the cellular localization of MMP3 in adult rat retinae and explored the relationship of its expression with neuronal loss in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) in retinal ischemia/reperfusion. We found that MMP3 was widely expressed in many cells throughout the layers of the rat retinae, including Vertebrate neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-, parvalbumin-, calbindin-, protein kinase C-α-, glial fibrillary acidic protein-, glutamine synthetase- and CD11b-positive cells. Furthermore, all rats were treated with high intraocular pressure (HIOP) for 1 h (h) and sacrificed at 6 h, 1 day (d), 3 d, and 7 d after HIOP. Compared to the normal control, the expression of both proenzyme MMP3 and active MMP3 were significantly up-regulated after HIOP treatment without alteration of the laminar distribution pattern. Moreover, inhibiting MMP3 ameliorated the loss of NeuN-positive cells in the GCL following HIOP. In summary, our data demonstrates that MMP3 is expressed in multiple types of neurons and glial cells in normal rat retinae. Simultaneously, the up-regulation of its expression and activity are closely involved in neuronal loss in the GCL in retinal ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:26830289

  7. Resveratrol Mitigates Rat Retinal Ischemic Injury: The Roles of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, Inducible Nitric Oxide, and Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Qian; Wu, Bing-Jhih; Pan, Wynn H.T.; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Chen, Mi-Mi; Chao, Fang-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Retinal ischemia-associated ocular disorders, such as retinal occlusive disorders, neovascular age-related macular degeneration, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma are vision-threatening. In this study, we examined whether and by what mechanisms resveratrol, a polyphenol found in red wine, is able to protect against retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Methods In vivo rat retinal ischemia was induced by high intraocular pressure (HIOP), namely, 120 mmHg for 60 min. The mechanism and management was evaluated by electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave amplitudes measurement, immunohistochemistry, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results The HIOP-induced retinal ischemic changes were characterized by a decrease in ERG b-wave amplitudes, a loss of choline acetyltransferase immunolabeling of amacrine cell bodies/neuronal processes, and increased vimentin immunoreactivity, which is a marker of Müller cells, together with upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), and downregulation of Thy-1, both at the mRNA level. The detrimental effects due to the ischemia were concentration-dependent (weaker effect at 0.05 nmole) and/or significantly (at 0.5 nmole) altered when resveratrol was applied 15 min before or after retina ischemia. Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis that resveratrol may be able to protect the retina against ischemia by downregulation of MMP-9 and iNOS, and upregulation of HO-1. PMID:23075401

  8. Interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein is a potent tolerogen in Lewis rat: suppression of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis is retinal antigen specific

    PubMed Central

    Laliotou, B.; Liversidge, J.; Forrester, J.; Dick, A.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—Administration of unfractionated retinal antigen(s) (retinal extract, RE) suppresses RE induced experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) and offers a potential therapeutic alternative to non-specific immunosuppressive therapies for posterior uveitis and autoimmune diseases. S-Ag and interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP) are two major autoantigens within soluble RE. It was aimed to assess, firstly, as has previously been shown with S-Ag, if IRBP can induce intranasal tolerance and, secondly, the contribution of both these major autoantigens to tolerance induction by whole RE.
METHODS—Animals were tolerised by intranasal administration with S-Ag or IRBP, either alone or in combination, or RE before immunisation with either IRBP or RE. Control animals were administered nasally either PBS or MBP. Daily clinical responses were recorded biomicroscopically and histological grades were obtained using a semiquantitative scoring system. Weekly serum antibody levels to retinal antigens were measured by ELISA and delayed hypersensitivity responses (DTH) were assessed by skin reactivity to intradermal inoculation with retinal or non-specific antigens.
RESULTS—Microgram doses of IRBP successfully suppressed both clinically and histologically IRBP induced EAU. This suppression was accompanied by reduced antigen specific DTH reactivity but maintained T cell dependent (IgG2a) antibody responses. Furthermore, combined S-Ag and IRBP administration afforded equal suppression of RE induced EAU when compared with RE therapy alone. Suppression of RE induced EAU was not achieved with administration of a non-retinal specific autoantigen, MBP. Although individually, both S-Ag and IRBP suppressed RE induced EAU, whole RE was unable to protect against IRBP induced disease.
CONCLUSIONS—Intranasal administration of IRBP suppressed IRBP induced EAU in the Lewis rat. S-Ag and IRBP are the major contributors to the tolerogenicity within RE, despite the known

  9. Comparison of Longitudinal In Vivo Measurements of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness and Retinal Ganglion Cell Density after Optic Nerve Transection in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Tiffany E.; Abbott, Carla J.; Piper, Chelsea; Wang, Lin; Fortune, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between longitudinal in vivo measurements of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) density after unilateral optic nerve transection (ONT). Methods Nineteen adult Brown-Norway rats were studied; N = 10 ONT plus RGC label, N = 3 ONT plus vehicle only (sans label), N = 6 sham ONT plus RGC label. RNFLT was measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) at baseline then weekly for 1 month. RGCs were labeled by retrograde transport of fluorescently conjugated cholera toxin B (CTB) from the superior colliculus 48 hours prior to ONT or sham surgery. RGC density measurements were obtained by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (CSLO) at baseline and weekly for 1 month. RGC density and reactivity of microglia (anti-Iba1) and astrocytes (anti-GFAP) were determined from post mortem fluorescence microscopy of whole-mount retinae. Results RNFLT decreased after ONT by 17% (p<0.05), 30% (p<0.0001) and 36% (p<0.0001) at weeks 2, 3 and 4. RGC density decreased after ONT by 18%, 69%, 85% and 92% at weeks 1, 2, 3 and 4 (p<0.0001 each). RGC density measured in vivo at week 4 and post mortem by microscopy were strongly correlated (R = 0.91, p<0.0001). In vivo measures of RNFLT and RGC density were strongly correlated (R = 0.81, p<0.0001). In ONT- CTB labeled fellow eyes, RNFLT increased by 18%, 52% and 36% at weeks 2, 3 and 4 (p<0.0001), but did not change in fellow ONT-eyes sans CTB. Microgliosis was evident in the RNFL of the ONT-CTB fellow eyes, exceeding that observed in other fellow eyes. Conclusions In vivo measurements of RNFLT and RGC density are strongly correlated and can be used to monitor longitudinal changes after optic nerve injury. The strong fellow eye effect observed in eyes contralateral to ONT, only in the presence of CTB label, consisted of a dramatic increase in RNFLT associated with retinal microgliosis. PMID:25393294

  10. Damage thresholds for cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells exposed to lasers at 532 nm and 458 nm.

    PubMed

    Denton, Michael L; Foltz, Michael S; Schuster, Kurt J; Estlack, Larry E; Thomas, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    The determination of safe exposure levels for lasers has come from damage assessment experiments in live animals, which typically involve correlating visually identifiable damage with laser dosimetry. Studying basic mechanisms of laser damage in animal retinal systems often requires tissue sampling (animal sacrifice), making justification and animal availability problematic. We determined laser damage thresholds in cultured monolayers of a human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line. By varying exposure duration and laser wavelength, we identified conditions leading to damage by presumed photochemical or thermal mechanisms. A comparison with literature values for ocular damage thresholds validates the in vitro model. The in vitro system described will facilitate molecular and cellular approaches for understanding laser-tissue interaction.

  11. Taurine Provides Neuroprotection against Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Froger, Nicolas; Cadetti, Lucia; Lorach, Henri; Martins, Joao; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Dubus, Elisabeth; Degardin, Julie; Pain, Dorothée; Forster, Valérie; Chicaud, Laurent; Ivkovic, Ivana; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Jammoul, Firas; Léveillard, Thierry; Benosman, Ryad; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion) and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats). After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%), whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM) partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23115615

  12. Taurine provides neuroprotection against retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Froger, Nicolas; Cadetti, Lucia; Lorach, Henri; Martins, Joao; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Dubus, Elisabeth; Degardin, Julie; Pain, Dorothée; Forster, Valérie; Chicaud, Laurent; Ivkovic, Ivana; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Jammoul, Firas; Léveillard, Thierry; Benosman, Ryad; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion) and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats). After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%), whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM) partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases.

  13. Taurine provides neuroprotection against retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Froger, Nicolas; Cadetti, Lucia; Lorach, Henri; Martins, Joao; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Dubus, Elisabeth; Degardin, Julie; Pain, Dorothée; Forster, Valérie; Chicaud, Laurent; Ivkovic, Ivana; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Jammoul, Firas; Léveillard, Thierry; Benosman, Ryad; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion) and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats). After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%), whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM) partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23115615

  14. Antioxidant-Rich Extract from Plantaginis Semen Ameliorates Diabetic Retinal Injury in a Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liu, Wayne Young; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Hong, Tang-Yao; Liu, I-Min

    2016-01-01

    Plantaginis semen, the dried ripe seed of Plantago asiatica L. or Plantago depressa Willd. (Plantaginaceae), has been traditionally used to treat blurred vision in Asia. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of plantaginis semen ethanol extract (PSEE) on the amelioration of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats. PSEE has abundant polyphenols with strong antioxidant activity. PSEE (100, 200 or 300 mg/kg) was oral administrated to the diabetic rats once daily consecutively for 8 weeks. Oral administration of PSEE resulted in significant reduction of hyperglycemia, the diameter of the retinal vessels, and retinal vascular permeability and leukostasis in diabetic rats. In addition, PSEE administration increased the activities of superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH) level in diabetic retinae. PSEE treatment inhibited the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the phosphorylation of Akt without altering the Akt protein expression in diabetic retinae. PSEE not only down-regulated the gene expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), but also reduced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in diabetic retinae. Moreover, PSEE reduced the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and corrected imbalance between histone deacetylases (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferases (HAT) activities in diabetic retinae. In conclusion, phenolic antioxidants extract from plantaginis semen has potential benefits in the prevention and/or progression of DR. PMID:27649243

  15. Antioxidant-Rich Extract from Plantaginis Semen Ameliorates Diabetic Retinal Injury in a Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liu, Wayne Young; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Hong, Tang-Yao; Liu, I-Min

    2016-01-01

    Plantaginis semen, the dried ripe seed of Plantago asiatica L. or Plantago depressa Willd. (Plantaginaceae), has been traditionally used to treat blurred vision in Asia. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of plantaginis semen ethanol extract (PSEE) on the amelioration of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats. PSEE has abundant polyphenols with strong antioxidant activity. PSEE (100, 200 or 300 mg/kg) was oral administrated to the diabetic rats once daily consecutively for 8 weeks. Oral administration of PSEE resulted in significant reduction of hyperglycemia, the diameter of the retinal vessels, and retinal vascular permeability and leukostasis in diabetic rats. In addition, PSEE administration increased the activities of superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH) level in diabetic retinae. PSEE treatment inhibited the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the phosphorylation of Akt without altering the Akt protein expression in diabetic retinae. PSEE not only down-regulated the gene expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), but also reduced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in diabetic retinae. Moreover, PSEE reduced the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and corrected imbalance between histone deacetylases (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferases (HAT) activities in diabetic retinae. In conclusion, phenolic antioxidants extract from plantaginis semen has potential benefits in the prevention and/or progression of DR. PMID:27649243

  16. Light and darkness regulate melanopsin in the retinal ganglion cells of the albino Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Jens; Georg, Birgitte; Hindersson, Peter; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are daily adjusted to the environmental day/night cycle by photic input via the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). Recent studies indicate that melanopsin, a newly identified opsin-like molecule, is involved in the light responsiveness of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) constituting the RHT. In the present study, we examined the expression of melanopsin at the mRNA and protein level during a day/night cycle and during prolonged periods of light and darkness in the retina of albino Wistar rats. We observed a diurnal change in melanopsin, with mRNA level being highest at early subjective night and protein level highest at late subjective day. Prolonged exposure to darkness significantly increased melanopsin mRNA level as early as the first day, and the expression continued to increase during 5 d in darkness. The decrease in mRNA level during exposure to constant light was slower. After 48 h of light, the melanopsin mRNA level was significantly reduced, and an almost undetectable level was found after 5 d. The induction of melanopsin by darkness was even more pronounced if darkness was preceded by light suppression for 5 d. By use of immunohistochemistry, we showed that darkness increased the amount of protein in the dendritic processes, resulting in a dense network covering the entire retina. Constant light decreased melanopsin immunostaining time dependently, beginning in the distal dendrites and progressing to the proximal dendrites and the soma. Our observations suggest that the intrinsic light-responsive RGCs adapt their expression of the putative circadian photopigment melanopsin to environmental light and darkness.

  17. Co-Expression of Two Subtypes of Melatonin Receptor on Rat M1-Type Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Wen-Long; Chen, Wei-Yi; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei; Weng, Shi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are involved in circadian and other non-image forming visual responses. An open question is whether the activity of these neurons may also be under the regulation mediated by the neurohormone melatonin. In the present work, by double-staining immunohistochemical technique, we studied the expression of MT1 and MT2, two known subtypes of mammalian melatonin receptors, in rat ipRGCs. A single subset of retinal ganglion cells labeled by the specific antibody against melanopsin exhibited the morphology typical of M1-type ipRGCs. Immunoreactivity for both MT1 and MT2 receptors was clearly seen in the cytoplasm of all labeled ipRGCs, indicating that these two receptors were co-expressed in each of these neurons. Furthermore, labeling for both the receptors were found in neonatal M1 cells as early as the day of birth. It is therefore highly plausible that retinal melatonin may directly modulate the activity of ipRGCs, thus regulating non-image forming visual functions. PMID:25714375

  18. OSSC1E-K19, a novel phytochemical component of Osteomeles schwerinae, prevents glycated albumin-induced retinal vascular injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan-Sik; Kim, Junghyun; Jo, Kyuhyung; Lee, Yun Mi; Sohn, Eunjin; Yoo, Nam Hee; Kim, Jin Sook

    2015-11-01

    In the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy (DR), advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are thought to have important roles. It is known that VEGF causes a breakdown of the blood‑retinal barrier (BRB) and retinal neovascularization; however, how AGEs affect the retina has largely remained elusive. OSSC1E‑K19 is a novel phytochemical component of Osteomeles schwerinae. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the protective effects of OSSC1E‑K19 on retinal vascular injury in AGE‑modified rat serum albumin (AGE-RSA)-induced retinopathy. AGE-RSA-injected rat eyes were used investigate the protective effects of OSSC1E‑K19 on BRB breakdown. Intravitreal injection of OSSC1E-K19 prevented AGE-RSA-induced BRB breakdown and decreased retinal VEGF expression in retinal vessels. In addition, OSSC1E-K19 inhibited the loss of occludin, a significant tight junction protein. These results supported the potential therapeutic utility of OSSC1E-K19 for retinal vascular permeability diseases. PMID:26460071

  19. OSSC1E-K19, a novel phytochemical component of Osteomeles schwerinae, prevents glycated albumin-induced retinal vascular injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    KIM, CHAN-SIK; KIM, JUNGHYUN; JO, KYUHYUNG; LEE, YUN MI; SOHN, EUNJIN; YOO, NAM HEE; KIM, JIN SOOK

    2015-01-01

    In the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy (DR), advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are thought to have important roles. It is known that VEGF causes a breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) and retinal neovascularization; however, how AGEs affect the retina has largely remained elusive. OSSC1E-K19 is a novel phytochemical component of Osteomeles schwerinae. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the protective effects of OSSC1E-K19 on retinal vascular injury in AGE-modified rat serum albumin (AGE-RSA)-induced retinopathy. AGE-RSA-injected rat eyes were used investigate the protective effects of OSSC1E-K19 on BRB breakdown. Intravitreal injection of OSSC1E-K19 prevented AGE-RSA-induced BRB breakdown and decreased retinal VEGF expression in retinal vessels. In addition, OSSC1E-K19 inhibited the loss of occludin, a significant tight junction protein. These results supported the potential therapeutic utility of OSSC1E-K19 for retinal vascular permeability diseases. PMID:26460071

  20. Laser speckle imaging of rat retinal blood flow with hybrid temporal and spatial analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Haiying; Yan, Yumei; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2009-02-01

    Noninvasive monitoring of blood flow in retinal circulation will reveal the progression and treatment of ocular disorders, such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. A non-invasive and direct BF measurement technique with high spatial-temporal resolution is needed for retinal imaging. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is such a method. Currently, there are two analysis methods for LSI: spatial statistics LSI (SS-LSI) and temporal statistical LSI (TS-LSI). Comparing these two analysis methods, SS-LSI has higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) and TSLSI is less susceptible to artifacts from stationary speckle. We proposed a hybrid temporal and spatial analysis method (HTS-LSI) to measure the retinal blood flow. Gas challenge experiment was performed and images were analyzed by HTS-LSI. Results showed that HTS-LSI can not only remove the stationary speckle but also increase the SNR. Under 100% O2, retinal BF decreased by 20-30%. This was consistent with the results observed with laser Doppler technique. As retinal blood flow is a critical physiological parameter and its perturbation has been implicated in the early stages of many retinal diseases, HTS-LSI will be an efficient method in early detection of retina diseases.

  1. Lipofuscin response to the "aging-reversal" drug centrophenoxine in rat retinal pigment epithelium and frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Katz, M L; Robison, W G

    1983-09-01

    The effects of centrophenoxine on the lipofuscin contents of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and frontal cortex of the brain were examined in senescent female Fischer rats. Rats (106 weeks old) were injected daily for 11 weeks with centrophenoxine (80 to 120 mg/kg body weight) or saline, and then sacrificed along with untreated 28- and 46-week-old controls. The number of lipofuscin granules seen in the RPE by light microscopy increased by 70% between 28 and 117 weeks of age in control animals. There was a concomitant age-related increase in lipofuscin specific fluorescence in the RPE. Centrophenoxine treatment neither reduced the amount of lipofuscin, nor altered the ultrastructural appearance of lipofuscin granules in the RPE. Between 28 and 117 weeks of age, there was an almost nine-fold increase in the lipofuscin content of the frontal cortex of control animals; centrophenoxine treatment failed to reverse this pigment accumulation.

  2. In vitro assays for evaluating the ultraviolet B-induced damage in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hyun-Yi; Bantseev, Vladimir; Bols, Niels C; Cullen, Anthony P; Sivak, Jacob G

    2007-07-27

    The present study demonstrates broadband UV-B-induced damage of cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells as an effort to develop an in vitro model that can be used, along with in vivo research and other in vitro efforts, to evaluate the need for retinal UV protection in humans after cataract removal. The human retinal pigment epithelial cell line, ARPE-19, was cultured in two groups: control and treated. Treated cells were irradiated with three broadband UVB radiations at energy levels of 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2J/cm(2). After irradiation, cells were incubated for 48h while cellular viability, morphology, and phagocytotic activity were analyzed using the Alamar blue assay, confocal microscopy, and fluorescent microspheres. Confocal analysis concentrated on the study of the cell nuclei and mitochondria. The Alamar blue assay of UV-B-exposed cells showed dose and time-dependent decreases in cellular viability in comparison to control cells. Loss of cell viability was measured at the two higher energy levels (0.2 and 0.1J/cm(2)), but the cell group exposed to 0.05J/cm(2) showed no significant viability change at 1-h time point. Morphological evaluation also showed dose and time-dependent degradation of mitochondria and nucleic acids. Cells exposed with 0.05J/cm(2) UVB did not show significant degradation of mitochondria and nucleic acids during the entire culture period. Phagocytotic activity assay data for UVB-exposed cells showed dose-dependent decreases in phagocytotic activity in comparison with the control cells. The control cells have significantly greater capacities for uptake than the 0.1 and 0.2J/cm(2) UV-B-exposed cells, while the 0.05J/cm(2) UV-B-exposed cell group showed no significant difference from the control cell group. The findings suggest that UVB radiation-induced cultured RPE cell damage can be evaluated by assays that probe cellular viability, morphological change, and phagocytotic activity, and that these assay methods together provide a

  3. Iron overload in cultured rat myocardial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauminger, E. R.; Iancu, T. C.; Link, G.; Pinson, A.; Hershko, C.

    1987-03-01

    In order to characterize the nature of iron deposits associated with iron overload in heart cells, Mössbauer spectroscopy and ultrastructural studies were performed in iron loaded heart cell cultures obtained from newborn rats grown in a medium containing 20 μg iron/ml. Maximal uptake of iron after 24 hrs was about 15%. Not more than 20% of the iron in these cells was stored in ferritin and the rest was found in smaller trivalent iron aggregates. With time there was a shift from smaller to larger aggregates. In chase samples there was only a very limited spontaneous release of iron from heart cells. Desferrioxamine, an iron chelating drug, removed a major part of the smaller aggregates, but did not remove ferritin iron.

  4. Light-Emitting Diodes and Cool White Fluorescent Light Similarly Suppress Pineal Gland Melatonin and Maintain Retinal Function and Morphology in the Rat. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, Daniel C.; Heeke, D.; Mele, G.

    1999-01-01

    Currently, the light sources most commonly used in animal habitat lighting are cool white fluorescent or incandescent lamps. We evaluated a novel light-emitting diode (LED) light source for use in animal habitat lighting by comparing its effectiveness to cool white fluorescent light (CWF) in suppressing pineal gland melatonin and maintaining normal retinal physiology and morphology in the rat. Results of pineal melatonin suppression experiments showed equal suppression of pineal melatonin concentrations for LED light and CWF light at five different light illuminances (100, 40, 10, 1 and 0.1 lux). There were no significant differences in melatonin suppression between LED and CWF light when compared to unexposed controls. Retinal physiology was evaluated using electroretinography. Results show no differences in a-wave implicit times and amplitudes or b-wave implicit times and amplitudes between 100-lux LED-exposed rats and 100-lux CWF-exposed rats. Results of retinal histology assessment show no differences in retinal thickness rod outer segment length and number of rod nuclei between rats exposed to 100-lux LED and 100-lux CWF for days. Furthermore, the retinal pigmented epithelium and rod outer segments of all eyes observed were in good condition and of normal thickness. This study indicates that LED light does not cause retinal damage and can suppress pineal melatonin at similar intensities as a conventional CWF light source. These data suggest that LED light sources may be suitable replacements for conventional light sources used in the lighting of rodent vivariums while providing many mechanical and economical advantages.

  5. Pigmented epithelium induces complete retinal reconstitution from dispersed embryonic chick retinae in reaggregation culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rothermel, A; Willbold, E; Degrip, W J; Layer, P G

    1997-01-01

    Reaggregation of dispersed retinal cells of the chick embryo leads to histotypic retinospheroids in which the laminar organization remains incomplete: photoreceptors form rosettes which are surrounded by constituents of the other retinal layers. Here, for the first time, a complete arrangement of layers is achieved in cellular spheres (stratoids), provided that fully dispersed retinal cells are younger than embryonic day E6, and are reaggregated in the presence of a monolayer of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE). A remarkable mechanism of stratoid formation from 1 to 15 days in vitro is revealed by the establishment of a radial Müller glia scaffold and of photoreceptors. During the first two days of reaggregation on RPE, rosettes are still observed. At this stage immunostaining with vimentin and F11 antibodies for radial Müller glia reveal a disorganized pattern. Subsequently, radial glia processes organize into long parallel fibre bundles which are arranged like spokes to stabilize the surface and centre of the stratoid. The opsin-specific antibody CERN 901 detects photoreceptors as they gradually build up an outer nuclear layer at the surface. These findings assign to the RPE a decisive role for the genesis and regeneration of a vertebrate retina. PMID:9332014

  6. The effects of concentration-dependent morphology of self-assembling RADA16 nanoscaffolds on mixed retinal cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Dominic; Fitzgerald, Melinda; Bartlett, Carole A.; Zdyrko, Bogdan; Luzinov, Igor A.; Dunlop, Sarah A.; Swaminathan Iyer, K.

    2011-03-01

    RADA16 self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds (SAPNSs) have been shown to have positive effects on neural regeneration following injury to the central nervous system in vivo, but mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that RADA16 SAPNSs form scaffolds of increasing fiber density with increasing peptide concentration which in turn has a concentration-dependent effect on neurons and astrocytes in mixed retinal cultures. Importantly, we report that the final nanoscale fiber architecture is an important factor to consider in designing scaffolds to promote regeneration in the central nervous system.RADA16 self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds (SAPNSs) have been shown to have positive effects on neural regeneration following injury to the central nervous system in vivo, but mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that RADA16 SAPNSs form scaffolds of increasing fiber density with increasing peptide concentration which in turn has a concentration-dependent effect on neurons and astrocytes in mixed retinal cultures. Importantly, we report that the final nanoscale fiber architecture is an important factor to consider in designing scaffolds to promote regeneration in the central nervous system. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedures, additional SEM data and AFM analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00666a

  7. Culture Model of Rat Portal Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    El Mourabit, Haquima; Loeuillard, Emilien; Lemoinne, Sara; Cadoret, Axelle; Housset, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Myofibroblasts are matrix-producing cells with contractile properties, usually characterized by de novo expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, that arise in fibrotic diseases. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), known as perisinusoidal cells containing auto-fluorescent vitamin A, are the major although not exclusive source of myofibroblasts in the injured liver. Portal myofibroblasts (PMFs) have been defined as liver myofibroblasts derived from cells that are distinct from HSCs and located in the portal tract. Here, we describe the protocol we have established to obtain rat PMFs in culture. In this method, the biliary tree is (i) separated from the liver parenchyma by in situ enzymatic perfusion of the liver, (ii) minced and further digested in vitro, until bile duct segments are isolated by sequential filtration. Bile duct isolates free of HSC contaminants, form small cell clusters, which initially comprise a large majority of epithelial cells. In culture conditions (fetal bovine serum) that provide a growth advantage to mesenchymal cells over epithelial cells, the epithelial cells die and detach from the substrate, while spindle-shaped cells outgrow from the periphery of the cell clusters, as shown by video-microscopy. These cells are highly proliferative and after 4–5 days, the culture is composed exclusively of fully differentiated myofibroblasts, which express alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen 1, and secrete abundant collagen. We found no evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, i.e., no co-expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and cytokeratin at any stage, while cytokeratin becomes undetectable in the confluent cells. PMFs obtained by this method express the genes that were previously reported to be overexpressed in non-HSC or portal fibroblast-derived liver myofibroblasts as compared to HSC-derived myofibroblasts, including the most discriminant, collagen 15, fibulin 2, and Thy-1. After one passage, PMFs retain the same phenotypic features as in

  8. Mechanism of memantine block of NMDA-activated channels in rat retinal ganglion cells: uncompetitive antagonism.

    PubMed

    Chen, H S; Lipton, S A

    1997-02-15

    1. N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA)-activated currents were recorded from dissociated rat retinal ganglion cells using whole-cell recording. The NMDA open-channel blocking drug memantine was evaluated for non-competitive and/or uncompetitive components of antagonism. A rapid superfusion system was used to apply various drugs for kinetic analysis. 2. Dose-response data revealed that memantine blocked 200 microM NMDA-evoked responses with a 50% inhibition constant (IC50) of approximately 1 microM at -60 mV and an empirical Hill coefficient of approximately 1. The antagonism followed a bimolecular reaction process. This 1:1 stoichiometry is supported by the fact that the macroscopic blocking rate of memantine (kon) increased linearly with memantine concentration and the macroscopic unblocking rate (koff) was independent of it. The estimated pseudo-first order rate constant for macroscopic blockade was 4 x 10(5) M-1 S-1 and the rate constant for unblocking was 0.44 s-1. Both the blocking and unblocking actions of memantine were well fitted by a single exponential process. 3. The kon for 2 microM memantine decreased with decreasing concentrations of NMDA. By analysing kon behaviour, we estimate that memantine has minimal interaction with the closed-unliganded state of the channel. As channel open probability (Po) approached zero, a small residual action of memantine may be explained by the presence of endogenous glutamate and glycine. 4. Memantine could be trapped within the NMDA-gated channel if it was suddenly closed by fast washout of agonist. The measured gating process of channel activation and deactivation appeared at least 10-20-fold faster than the kinetics of memantine action. By combining the agonist and voltage dependence of antagonism, a trapping scheme was established for further kinetic analysis. 5. With low agonist concentrations, NMDA-gated channels recovered slowly from memantine blockade. By analysing the probability of a channel remaining blocked, we

  9. Mechanism of memantine block of NMDA-activated channels in rat retinal ganglion cells: uncompetitive antagonism.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H S; Lipton, S A

    1997-01-01

    1. N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA)-activated currents were recorded from dissociated rat retinal ganglion cells using whole-cell recording. The NMDA open-channel blocking drug memantine was evaluated for non-competitive and/or uncompetitive components of antagonism. A rapid superfusion system was used to apply various drugs for kinetic analysis. 2. Dose-response data revealed that memantine blocked 200 microM NMDA-evoked responses with a 50% inhibition constant (IC50) of approximately 1 microM at -60 mV and an empirical Hill coefficient of approximately 1. The antagonism followed a bimolecular reaction process. This 1:1 stoichiometry is supported by the fact that the macroscopic blocking rate of memantine (kon) increased linearly with memantine concentration and the macroscopic unblocking rate (koff) was independent of it. The estimated pseudo-first order rate constant for macroscopic blockade was 4 x 10(5) M-1 S-1 and the rate constant for unblocking was 0.44 s-1. Both the blocking and unblocking actions of memantine were well fitted by a single exponential process. 3. The kon for 2 microM memantine decreased with decreasing concentrations of NMDA. By analysing kon behaviour, we estimate that memantine has minimal interaction with the closed-unliganded state of the channel. As channel open probability (Po) approached zero, a small residual action of memantine may be explained by the presence of endogenous glutamate and glycine. 4. Memantine could be trapped within the NMDA-gated channel if it was suddenly closed by fast washout of agonist. The measured gating process of channel activation and deactivation appeared at least 10-20-fold faster than the kinetics of memantine action. By combining the agonist and voltage dependence of antagonism, a trapping scheme was established for further kinetic analysis. 5. With low agonist concentrations, NMDA-gated channels recovered slowly from memantine blockade. By analysing the probability of a channel remaining blocked, we

  10. α-Aminoadipic acid protects against retinal disruption through attenuating Müller cell gliosis in a rat model of acute ocular hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolei; Su, Jier; Ding, Jingwen; Han, Song; Ma, Wei; Luo, Hong; Hughes, Guy; Meng, Zhaoyang; Yin, Yi; Wang, Yanling; Li, Junfa

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ocular hypertension is an important risk factor for glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the gliotoxic effects of α-aminoadipic acid (AAA) in a rat model of AOH and its underlying mechanisms. Materials and methods In the rat model of acute ocular hypertension (AOH), intraocular pressure was increased to 110 mmHg for 60 minutes. Animals were divided into four groups: sham operation (Ctrl), AOH, AOH + phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and AOH + AAA. Cell apoptosis in the ganglion cell layer was detected with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine 5′-triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) immunostained with Thy-1 were counted. Müller cell activation was detected using immunostaining with glutamine synthetase and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was examined using Western blot. Results In the rat model of AOH, cell apoptosis was induced in the ganglion cell layer and the number of RGCs was decreased. Müller cell gliosis in the retinas of rats was induced, and retinal protein levels of TNF-α were increased. Intravitreal treatment of AAA versus PBS control attenuated these retinal abnormalities to show protective effects in the rat model of AOH. Conclusion In the retinas of the rat model of AOH, AAA treatment attenuated retinal apoptosis in the ganglion cell layer and preserved the number of RGCs, likely through the attenuation of Müller cell gliosis and suppression of TNF-α induction. Our observations suggest that AAA might be a potential therapeutic target in glaucoma. PMID:27799744

  11. Beta-adrenergic receptor agonists and antagonists counteract LPS-induced neuronal death in retinal cultures by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kunizo; Wood, John P M; Osborne, Neville N

    2003-09-26

    Treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 72 h was shown to dose-dependently increase nitric oxide production from 6-day-old retinal cultures. Cell death, as determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and an increase in neuronal labelling for TUNEL, was elevated concurrently. During treatment there was an increase of both inducible nitric oxide synthase and glial fibrillary acidic protein labelling in glial cells and a reduction in the number of gamma-aminobutyric acid-positive neurones. The NOS inhibitors, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, dexamethasone and indomethacin potently inhibited both nitric oxide stimulation and cell death caused by LPS. In this study, the beta(2)- (ICI-18551), beta(1)- (betaxolol) and mixed beta(1)/beta(2)- (timolol, metipranolol) adrenergic receptor antagonists were all shown to attenuate LPS-induced LDH release from these cultures, but to have no effect on LPS-stimulated nitric oxide production. This effect was mimicked by the calcium channel blocker, nifedipine. Interestingly, the beta-adrenergic receptor agonists, salbutamol, arterenol and isoproterenol were also able to attenuate cell death caused by LPS. Moreover, these compounds also inhibited LPS-stimulated nitric oxide release. These studies suggest that LPS stimulates nitric oxide release from cultured retinal glial cells and that this process leads to neurone death. beta-adrenergic receptor agonists prevent the effects of LPS by inhibiting the stimulation of nitric oxide production. The data also suggest that beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists can attenuate LPS-induced death of neurones, but that these compounds act in a manner that is neurone-dependent, is mimicked by blockade of calcium channels and is independent of the stimulation of nitric oxide release.

  12. Argon Inhalation Attenuates Retinal Apoptosis after Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in a Time- and Dose-Dependent Manner in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrich, Felix; Schallner, Nils; Coburn, Mark; Loop, Torsten; Lagrèze, Wolf Alexander; Biermann, Julia; Goebel, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Retinal ischemia and reperfusion injuries (IRI) permanently affect neuronal tissue and function by apoptosis and inflammation due to the limited regenerative potential of neurons. Recently, evidence emerged that the noble gas Argon exerts protective properties, while lacking any detrimental or adverse effects. We hypothesized that Argon inhalation after IRI would exert antiapoptotic effects in the retina, thereby protecting retinal ganglion cells (RGC) of the rat's eye. Methods IRI was performed on the left eyes of rats (n = 8) with or without inhaled Argon postconditioning (25, 50 and 75 Vol%) for 1 hour immediately or delayed after ischemia (i.e. 1.5 and 3 hours). Retinal tissue was harvested after 24 hours to analyze mRNA and protein expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3, NF-κB. Densities of fluorogold-prelabeled RGCs were analyzed 7 days after injury in whole-mounts. Histological tissue samples were prepared for immunohistochemistry and blood was analyzed regarding systemic effects of Argon or IRI. Statistics were performed using One-Way ANOVA. Results IRI induced RGC loss was reduced by Argon 75 Vol% inhalation and was dose-dependently attenuated by lower concentrations, or by delayed Argon inhalation (1504±300 vs. 2761±257; p<0.001). Moreover, Argon inhibited Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA expression significantly (Bax: 1.64±0.30 vs. 0.78±0.29 and Bcl-2: 2.07±0.29 vs. 0.99±0.22; both p<0.01), as well as caspase-3 cleavage (1.91±0.46 vs. 1.05±0.36; p<0.001). Expression of NF-κB was attenuated significantly. Immunohistochemistry revealed an affection of Müller cells and astrocytes. In addition, IRI induced leukocytosis was reduced significantly after Argon inhalation at 75 Vol%. Conclusion Immediate and delayed Argon postconditioning protects IRI induced apoptotic loss of RGC in a time- and dose-dependent manner, possibly mediated by the inhibition of NF-κB. Further studies need to evaluate Argon's possible role as a therapeutic option. PMID

  13. Laminin is produced by early rat astrocytes in primary culture

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The production of laminin by early rat astrocytes in primary culture was investigated by double immunofluorescence staining for laminin and the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a defined astrocyte marker. In early cultures (3 d in vitro; 3 DIV) cytoplasmic laminin was detected in all the GFAP-positive cells which formed the major population (80%) of the nonneuronal cells present in cultures from 20- 21-d embryonic, newborn, or 5-d-old rat brains. Monensin treatment (10 microM, 4 h) resulted in accumulation of laminin in the Golgi region, located using labeled wheat germ agglutinin. Laminin started gradually to disappear from the cells with the time in culture, was absent in star-shaped, apparently mature astrocytes, but remained as pericellular matrix deposits. The disappearance of cellular laminin was dependent on the age of the animal and the time in culture so that it started earlier in cultures from 5-d-old rat brains (5 DIV) and approximately following the in vivo age difference in cultures from newborn (12 DIV) and embryonic (14 DIV) rat brains. Our results indicate that laminin is a protein of early astrocytes and also deposited by them in primary culture, thus suggesting a role for this glycoprotein in the development of the central nervous system. PMID:6339524

  14. Retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Sally

    2015-01-01

    The human retinal pigment epithelium forms early in development and subsequently remains dormant, undergoing minimal proliferation throughout normal life. Retinal pigment epithelium proliferation, however, can be activated in disease states or by removing retinal pigment epithelial cells into culture. We review the conditions that control retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in culture, in animal models and in human disease and interpret retinal pigment epithelium proliferation in context of the recently discovered retinal pigment epithelium stem cell that is responsible for most in vitro retinal pigment epithelial proliferation. Retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated wound repair that occurs in selected macular diseases is contrasted with retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated fibroblastic scar formation that underlies proliferative vitreoretinopathy. We discuss the role of retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in age-related macular degeneration which is reparative in some cases and destructive in others. Macular retinal pigment epithelium wound repair and regression of choroidal neovascularization are more pronounced in younger than older patients. We discuss the possibility that the limited retinal pigment epithelial proliferation and latent wound repair in older age-related macular degeneration patients can be stimulated to promote disease regression in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26041390

  15. Quantitative Analyses of Retinal Vascular Area and Density After Different Methods to Reduce VEGF in a Rat Model of Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Yang, Zhihong; Jiang, Yanchao; Flannery, John; Hammond, Scott; Kafri, Tal; Vemuri, Sai Karthik; Jones, Bryan; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Targeted inhibition of Müller cell (MC)–produced VEGF or broad inhibition of VEGF with an intravitreal anti-VEGF antibody reduces intravitreal neovascularization in a rat model of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). In this study, we compared the effects of these two approaches on retinal vascular development and capillary density in the inner and deep plexi in the rat ROP model. Methods. In the rat model of ROP, pups received 1 μL of (1) subretinal lentivector-driven short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to knockdown MC-VEGFA (VEGFA.shRNA) or control luciferase shRNA, or (2) intravitreal anti-VEGF antibody (anti-VEGF) or control isotype goat immunoglobulin G (IgG). Analyses of lectin-stained flat mounts at postnatal day 18 (p18) included: vascular/total retinal areas (retinal vascular coverage) and pixels of fluorescence/total retinal area (capillary density) of the inner and deep plexi determined with the Syncroscan microscope, and angles between cleavage planes of mitotic vascular figures labeled with anti-phosphohistone H3 and vessel length. Results. Retinal vascular coverage and density increased in both plexi between p8 and p18 in room air (RA) pups. Compared with RA, p18 ROP pups had reduced vascular coverage and density of both plexi. Compared with respective controls, VEGFA.shRNA treatment significantly increased vascular density in the deep plexus, whereas anti-VEGF reduced vascular density in the inner and deep plexi. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A.shRNA caused more cleavage angles predicting vessel elongation and fewer mitotic figures, whereas anti-VEGF treatment led to patterns of pathologic angiogenesis. Conclusions. Targeted treatment with lentivector-driven VEGFA.shRNA permitted physiologic vascularization of the vascular plexi and restored normal orientation of dividing vascular cells, suggesting that regulation of VEGF signaling by targeted treatment may be beneficial. PMID:24425858

  16. Regional node-like membrane specializations in non-myelinated axons of rat retinal nerve fiber layer.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, C; Waxman, S G

    1983-01-01

    The axons in the nerve fiber layer (NFL) of the adult rat retina were examined by transmission electron microscopy. NFL axons range in size from 0.12 to about 2.0 microm, with a peak at 0.3-0.4 microm. In addition to conventional small mitochondria in the NFL axons contain some large ones, which are similar to astrocytic gliosomes. Two types of regional axon membrane specialization are found in the NFL. One of these represents portions of the initial axon segments of retinal ganglion cells. Apart from features typical for initial axon segments in general, a corona of lamelliform, villous or blunt glial processes is always present. The glial processes originate from MUller cells. The other regional axon membrane specialization consists of patches of an electron-dense subaxolemmal undercoating with associated tufts of Miller cell processes. These patches cover a varying but always limited proportion of the axon circumference and their longitudinal extent varies between 0.5 and 5.0 microm. They are clearly distinct from the initial axon segment and from the initial heminode in the optic nerve. Similar undercoated patches in the optic disc axons are apposed by astrocytic processes. It is concluded that rat NFL axons represent an example of central non-myelinated axons with distinct regional membrane specializations, which have some structural characteristics in common with nodes of Ranvier. PMID:24010160

  17. The Acquisition of Target Dependence by Developing Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Colette; Wheeler, Lachlan P.G.; LeVaillant, Chrisna J.; Kramer, Anne; Ryan, Marisa; Cozens, Greg S.; Sharma, Anil; Pollett, Margaret A.; Rodger, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Similar to neurons in the peripheral nervous system, immature CNS-derived RGCs become dependent on target-derived neurotrophic support as their axons reach termination sites in the brain. To study the factors that influence this developmental transition we took advantage of the fact that rat RGCs are born, and target innervation occurs, over a protracted period of time. Early-born RGCs have axons in the SC by birth (P0), whereas axons from late-born RGCs do not innervate the SC until P4-P5. Birth dating RGCs using EdU allowed us to identify RGCs (1) with axons still growing toward targets, (2) transitioning to target dependence, and (3) entirely dependent on target-derived support. Using laser-capture microdissection we isolated ∼34,000 EdU+ RGCs and analyzed transcript expression by custom qPCR array. Statistical analyses revealed a difference in gene expression profiles in actively growing RGCs compared with target-dependent RGCs, as well as in transitional versus target-dependent RGCs. Prior to innervation RGCs expressed high levels of BDNF and CNTFR α but lower levels of neurexin 1 mRNA. Analysis also revealed greater expression of transcripts for signaling molecules such as MAPK, Akt, CREB, and STAT. In a supporting in vitro study, purified birth-dated P1 RGCs were cultured for 24-48 h with or without BDNF; lack of BDNF resulted in significant loss of early-born but not late-born RGCs. In summary, we identified several important changes in RGC signaling that may form the basis for the switch from target independence to dependence. PMID:26464991

  18. Effects of elevated glucose concentration on cultured bovine retinal endothelial (BRE) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Capetandes, A.; Gerritsen, M.E.

    1986-03-01

    Salient clinical features of diabetic retinopathy include capillary microaneurysm and neovascularization, which progress with the severity of the disease. It has been suggested that exposure of the retinal vascular cells to high glucose concentrations may play a causative role in the retinopathy. In the present study, the effects of variant media glucose concentrations on BRE cell growth were determined. Normal growth curves were obtained with glucose concentrations of 100, 450 and 600 mg%, but the replication rate was decreased with 600 mg%. To determine if elevated glucose concentrations also altered DNA synthesis, BRE cells cultivated with 100 and 600 mg% glucose demonstrated increased thymidine uptake and total DNA content compared to the 100 mg% group. Furthermore, vacuolation and increased cell diameter occurred in BRE cells cultivated 600 mg% compared to 100 mg% glucose. In conclusion, increases in media glucose concentrations result in a decreased cellular replication rate, increased DNA synthesis and increased cell diameter during the log phase of growth.

  19. Modulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in rat retinal ganglion cells by gabapentin.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Spring R; Sargoy, Allison; Brecha, Nicholas C; Barnes, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The α2δ auxiliary subunits of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are important modulators of VGCC function. Gabapentin interacts with α2δ1 and α2δ2 subunits and is reported to reduce Ca2+ channel current amplitude (ICa). This study aimed to determine the effects of gabapentin on VGCCs in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Whole cell patch clamp was used to record ICa in isolated RGCs, and calcium imaging was used to measure Ca2+ transients from RGCs in situ. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the presence of α2δ1-containing VGCCs in isolated RGCs in the absence and presence of gabapentin pretreatment. Acute administration of gabapentin reduced ICa and Ca2+ transients compared to control conditions. In isolated RGCs, pretreatment with gabapentin (4-18 h) reduced ICa, and cell surface α2δ1 staining was reduced compared to nonpretreated cells. Acute administration of gabapentin to isolated RGCs that had been pretreated further reduced ICa. These results show that gabapentin has both short-term and long-term mechanisms to reduce ICa in isolated RGCs. Some Ca2+ channel blockers have been shown to protect RGCs in retinal trauma suggesting that modulation of VGCCs by gabapentin may prevent the deleterious effects of elevated Ca2+ levels in RGCs in trauma and disease.

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits osmotic swelling of rat retinal glial (Müller) and bipolar cells by activation of basic fibroblast growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Berk, B-A; Vogler, S; Pannicke, T; Kuhrt, H; Garcia, T B; Wiedemann, P; Reichenbach, A; Seeger, J; Bringmann, A

    2015-06-01

    Water accumulation in retinal glial (Müller) and neuronal cells resulting in cellular swelling contributes to the development of retinal edema and neurodegeneration. Intravitreal administration of neurotrophins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to promote survival of retinal neurons. Here, we show that exogenous BDNF inhibits the osmotic swelling of Müller cell somata induced by superfusion of rat retinal slices or freshly isolated cells with a hypoosmotic solution containing barium ions. BDNF also inhibited the osmotic swelling of bipolar cell somata in retinal slices, but failed to inhibit the osmotic soma swelling of freshly isolated bipolar cells. The inhibitory effect of BDNF on Müller cell swelling was mediated by activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and transactivation of fibroblast growth factor receptors. Exogenous basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) fully inhibited the osmotic swelling of Müller cell somata while it partially inhibited the osmotic swelling of bipolar cell somata. Isolated Müller cells displayed immunoreactivity of truncated TrkB, but not full-length TrkB. Isolated rod bipolar cells displayed immunoreactivities of both TrkB isoforms. Data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of exogenous BDNF in the retina is in part mediated by prevention of the cytotoxic swelling of retinal glial and bipolar cells. While BDNF directly acts on Müller cells by activation of TrkB, BDNF indirectly acts on bipolar cells by inducing glial release of factors like bFGF that inhibit bipolar cell swelling.

  1. Sigma-1 receptor activation inhibits osmotic swelling of rat retinal glial (Müller) cells by transactivation of glutamatergic and purinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Stefanie; Winters, Helge; Pannicke, Thomas; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Water accumulation in retinal glial (Müller) and neuronal cells resulting in cellular swelling contributes to the development of retinal edema and neurodegeneration. Sigma (σ) receptor activation is known to have neuroprotective effects in the retina. Here, we show that the nonselective σ receptor agonist ditolylguanidine, and the selective σ1 receptor agonist PRE-084, inhibit the osmotic swelling of Müller cell somata induced by superfusion of rat retinal slices with a hypoosmotic solution containing barium ions. In contrast, PRE-084 did not inhibit the osmotic swelling of bipolar cell somata. The effects of σ receptor agonists on the Müller cell swelling were abrogated in the presence of blockers of metabotropic glutamate and purinergic P2Y1 receptors, respectively, suggesting that σ receptor activation triggers activation of a glutamatergic-purinergic signaling cascade which is known to prevent the osmotic Müller cell swelling. The swelling-inhibitory effect of 17β-estradiol was prevented by the σ1 receptor antagonist BD1047, suggesting that the effect is mediated by σ1 receptor activation. The data may suggest that the neuroprotective effect of σ receptor activation in the retina is in part mediated by prevention of the cytotoxic swelling of retinal glial cells. PMID:26499958

  2. Quantification of rat retinal growth and vascular population changes after single and split doses of proton irradiation: translational study using stereology methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Xiao W.; Archambeau, John O.; Kubinova, Lucie; Boyle, Soames; Petersen, Georgia; Grove, Roger; Nelson, G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    This study quantified architectural and population changes in the rat retinal vasculature after proton irradiation using stereology. A 100 MeV conformal proton beam delivered 8, 14, 20 and 28 Gy as single and split doses to the whole eye. The vascular networks were prepared from retinal digests. Stereological methods were used to obtain the area of the retina and unbiased estimates of microvessel/artery/vein endothelial, pericyte and smooth muscle population, and vessel length. The retinal area increased progressively in the unirradiated, age-matched controls and in the retinas irradiated with 8 and 14 Gy, indicating uniform progressive retinal growth. No growth occurred after 20 and 28 Gy. Regression analysis of total endothelial cell number in all vessels (arteries, veins and capillaries) after irradiation documented a progressive time- and dose-dependent cell loss occurring over 15 to 24 months. The difference from controls was significant (P<0.01) after 28 Gy given in single and split doses and after 20 Gy given as a split dose (P<0.05). Total vessel length in microvessel was significantly shortened at 20 and 28 Gy compared to that of controls (P<0.05). No evident dose recovery was observed in the endothelial populations after split doses. At 10 Gy, the rate of endothelial cell loss, a dose parameter used to characterize the time- and dose-dependent loss of the endothelial population, was doubled.

  3. Formation of lipofuscin in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells exposed to pre-oxidized photoreceptor outer segments.

    PubMed

    Wihlmark, U; Wrigstad, A; Roberg, K; Brunk, U T; Nilsson, S E

    1996-04-01

    Accumulation of lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with increasing age may affect essential supportive functions for the photoreceptors. Earlier, we described a model system for the study of lipofuscinogenesis in RPE cell cultures and showed that mild oxidative stress enhances lipofuscin formation from phagocytized photoreceptor outer segments (POS). In the present study, bovine POS were photo-oxidized, and turned into a lipofuscin-like material, by irradiation with UV light. Transmission electron microscopy of irradiated POS showed loss of the normal stacks of the disk membranes with conversion into an amorphous osmiophilic electron-dense mass. The formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), estimated during the irradiation process, indicated lipid peroxidation. Irradiated POS also showed a strong granular yellow autofluorescence. RPE cell cultures, kept at 21% ambient oxygen, were fed daily for 3, 5 or 7 days with either (i) UV-peroxidized POS, (ii) native POS or (iii) culture medium only. RPE cells fed irradiated POS showed significantly higher levels of lipofuscin-specific autofluorescence compared to cells exposed to native POS after 3 days (p = 0.0056), 5 days (p = 0.0037) and 7 days (p = 0.0020), and to the non-exposed control cells (3 days: p = 0.005, 5 days: p = 0.0037, 7 days: p = 0.0094). The lipofuscin content of cells exposed to irradiated POS increased significantly between days 3 and 7 (p = 0.0335). Ultrastructural studies showed much more numerous and larger lipofuscin-like inclusions in RPE cells fed irradiated POS compared to cells exposed to native POS. In the control cells, lipofuscin-like granules were small and sparse. It appears that exposing RPE cells to previously peroxidized POS, thus artificially converted to lipofuscin and obviously not digestible by the lysosomal enzymes, accelerates the formation of severely lipofuscin-loaded cells. The results will be useful for further studies of possible harmful

  4. Protective Effects of Panax notoginseng Saponins against High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Injury in Rat Retinal Capillary Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yue; Qiao, Yuan; Huang, Jianmei; Tang, Minke

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of visual loss and blindness, is characterized by microvascular dysfunction. Hyperglycemia is considered the major pathogenic factor for diabetic retinopathy and is associated with increased oxidative stress in the retina. In this study, we investigated the potential protective effects of Panax notoginseng Saponins (PNS) in retinal capillary endothelial cells (RCECs) exposed to high glucose conditions. We found a pronounced increase in cell viability in rat RCECs incubated with both PNS and high glucose (30 mM) for 48 h or 72 h. The increased viability was accompanied by reduced intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2 (-)), decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lowered malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. PNS also increased the activities of total superoxide dismutase (SOD), MnSOD, catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX). The glutathione (GSH) content also increased after PNS treatment. Furthermore, PNS reduced NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. These results indicate that PNS exerts a protective effect against high glucose-induced injury in RCECs, which may be partially attributed to its antioxidative function. PMID:27019662

  5. THE ORGANOPHOSPHOROUS INSECTICIDE FENTHION DOES NOT AFFECT PHAGOCYTOSIS OF ROD OUTER SEGMENTS BY RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM CELLS IN CULTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    :
    Exposure to the organophosphorous insecticide fenthion has been associated with retinal degeneration in occupational studies. It has also been associated with pigmentary changes of the retina. Because retinal degeneration and pigmentary changes may be due to dysfunction of t...

  6. Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 4 mediates unique and exclusive long-term transduction of retinal pigmented epithelium in rat, dog, and nonhuman primate after subretinal delivery.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michel; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Provost, Nathalie; Conrath, Hervé; Folliot, Sébastien; Briot, Delphine; Chérel, Yan; Chenuaud, Pierre; Samulski, Jude; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2003-06-01

    We previously described chimeric recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors 2/4 and 2/5 as the most efficient vectors in rat retina. We now characterize these two vectors carrying the CMV.gfp genome following subretinal injection in the Wistar rat, beagle dog, and cynomolgus macaque. Both serotypes displayed stable GFP expression for the duration of the experiment (6 months) in all three animal models. Similar to the AAV-2 serotype, AAV-2/5 transduced both RPE and photoreceptor cells, with higher level of transduction in photoreceptors, whereas rAAV-2/4 transduction was unambiguously restricted to RPE cells. This unique specificity found conserved among all three species makes AAV-2/4-derived vectors attractive for retinal diseases originating in RPE such as Leber congenital amaurosis (RPE65) or retinitis pigmentosa due to a mutated mertk gene. To provide further important preclinical data, vector shedding was monitored by PCR in various biological fluids for 2 months post-rAAV administration. Following rAAV-2/4 and -5 subretinal delivery in dogs (n = 6) and in nonhuman primates (n = 2), vector genome was found in lacrymal and nasal fluids for up to 3-4 days and in the serum for up to 15-20 days. Overall, these findings will have a practical impact on the development of future gene therapy trials of retinal diseases.

  7. Transient immunohistochemical labelling of rat retinal axons during Wallerian degeneration by a monoclonal antibody to neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Meller, D; Eysel, U T; Schmidt-Kastner, R

    1994-06-13

    Immunohistochemical labelling with the monoclonal antibody SMI32 to non-phosphorylated epitopes on neurofilament proteins of high molecular weight class was low in rat central optic fibers of controls. After unilateral transection of optic nerve, a strong, transient increase of labelling with SMI32 occurred in degenerating fibers of optic tract at 2 and 4 days, which then declined at 8 and remained low at 21 days. Consequently, immunostaining with SMI32 may serve as a positive marker for degenerating fibers in rat optic system.

  8. Organotypic slice culture of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of rat

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Seong; Lee, So Yeong; Park, Jae-Yong; Hong, Seong-Geun

    2007-01-01

    Organotypic slice cultures have been developed as an alternative to acute brain slices because the neuronal viability and synaptic connectivity in these cultures can be preserved well for a prolonged period of time. This study evaluated a stationary organotypic slice culture developed for the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of rat. The results showed that the slice cultures maintain the typical shape of the nucleus, the immunocytochemical signals for oxytocin, vasopressin, and corticotropin-releasing hormone, and the electrophysiological properties of PVN neurons for up to 3 weeks in vitro. The PVN neurons in the culture expressed the green fluorescent protein gene that had been delivered by the adenoviral vectors. The results indicate that the cultured slices preserve the properties of the PVN neurons, and can be used in longterm studies on these neurons in vitro. PMID:17322769

  9. ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES.

    S. Lin1, L. M. Del Razo1, M. Styblo1, C. Wang2, W. R. Cullen2, and D.J. Thomas3. 1Univ. North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 2Univ. British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3National Health and En...

  10. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  11. Rat embryonic palatal shelves respond to TCDD in organ culture

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.D.; Birnbaum, L.S. )

    1990-05-01

    TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin), a highly toxic environmental contaminant, is teratogenic in mice, inducing cleft palate (CP) and hydronephrosis at doses which are not overtly maternally or embryo toxic. Palatal shelves of embryonic mice respond to TCDD, both in vivo and in organ culture, with altered differentiation of medial epithelial cells. By contrast, in the rat TCDD produces substantial maternal, embryonic, and fetal toxicity, including fetal lethality, with few malformations. In this study the possible effects of maternal toxicity on induction of cleft palate were eliminated by exposure of embryonic rat palatal shelves in organ culture. The shelves were examined for specific TCDD-induced alterations in differentiation of the medial cells. On Gestation Day (GD) 14 or 15 palatal shelves from embryonic F344 rats were placed in organ culture for 2 to 3 days (IMEM:F12 medium, 5% FBS, 0.1% DMSO) containing 0, 1 x 10(-8), 1 x 10(-9), 1 x 10(-10), or 5 x 10(-11) M TCDD. The medial epithelial peridermal cells degenerated on shelves exposed to control media or 5 x 10(-11) M TCDD. Exposure to 10(-10), 10(-9), and 10(-8) M TCDD inhibited this degeneration in 20, 36, and 60% of the shelves, respectively, and was statistically significant at the two highest doses. A normally occurring decrease in (3H)TdR incorporation was inhibited in some GD 15 shelves cultured with 10(-10) and 10(-9) M TCDD. The medial cells of TCDD-exposed shelves continued to express high levels of immunohistochemically detected EGF receptors. The altered differentiation of rat medial epithelium is similar to that reported for TCDD-exposed mouse medial cells in vivo and in vitro. However, in order to obtain these responses, the cultured rat shelves require much higher concentrations of TCDD than the mouse shelves.

  12. A microsystem to assay lysosomal enzyme activities in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cabral, L; Unger, W; Boulton, M; Marshall, J

    1988-11-01

    A microsystem to assay the activity of lysosomal enzymes in a small number of cultured RPE cells is described. The activities of acid phosphatase, a-mannosidase, B-glucuronidase and N-acetyl-B-glucosaminidase were estimated in different human RPE cultures of varying passages. Some biochemical characteristics for each of the enzyme assays were studied including the effect of pH, the saturating concentrations of the appropriate substrates and the relationship between the enzyme activity and the number of cells assayed. The method presented is straightforward, avoids complicated tissue fractionation procedures and is able to estimate enzyme activities in as few as 10(4) cells. PMID:3243083

  13. Acetaminophen metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity in rat primary hepatocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Milam, K.M.; Byard, J.L.

    1985-06-30

    Acetaminophen (APAP) metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity were measured in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. Although 3 mM APAP caused a slight increase in cellular release of lactate dehydrogenase into the culture medium, cellular glutathione concentration (an index of APAP metabolism) was reduced by 50%. APAP at 7 mM was significantly more toxic to these hepatocytes and had a similar but more marked effect on glutathione concentrations. In spite of its cytotoxicity, neither dose of APAP stimulated DNA repair synthesis when monitored by the rate of incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA following exposure to APAP. Thus, although APAP has been shown to be both hepato- and nephrotoxic in several in vivo and in vitro systems, the reactive toxic metabolite of APAP is not genotoxic in rat primary hepatocyte cultures.

  14. Intravitreal injection of erythropoietin protects against retinal vascular regression at the early stage of diabetic retinopathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Junko; Morikawa, Shunichi; Shimizu, Kazuhiko; Ezaki, Taichi; Yasuda, Yoshiko; Hori, Sadao

    2013-01-01

    A single intravitreal injection of erythropoietin (EPO) (50 ng/eye) or phosphate-buffered saline was administered to 5-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats at the onset of diabetes mellitus (DM) to determine and evaluate the protective effect of EPO on retinal microvessels. DM was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 60 mg/kg body weight). Morphological changes in microvessels in flat retinal preparations were evaluated during the subsequent 4 weeks by three-dimensional imaging of all blood vessels stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated tomato lectin, following immunofluorescence techniques. No marked differences were observed in the shape or density of retinal vessels and the number of retinal capillary branches of the four groups [control, EPO, DM, and DM/EPO] up to 4 weeks after STZ administration. We also observed unique type IV collagen-positive filamentous structures that lacked both cellular elements and blood circulation (lectin-/type IV+ acellular strands), suggesting regressed vessel remnants. The lectin-/type IV+ acellular strands were detected soon after the onset of DM in the diabetic rats, and the number of these structures increased in the DM group (P < 0.01). A single intravitreal injection of EPO caused a significant reduction in the number of lectin-/type IV+ acellular strands to levels observed in the control group. However, the lectin-/type IV+ acellular strands were observed in the central area of the retina near the optic disc in all four groups. Intravitreal injection of EPO resulted in downregulation of the EPO receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and VEGF receptor at 4 weeks. We conclude that EPO may play a primary role against the progression of diabetic retinopathy by reducing blood vessel degeneration at a very early disease stage. PMID:23178551

  15. Retinitis pigmentosa and retinal oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Spalton, D J; Bird, A C; Cleary, P E

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with retinitis pigmentosa and retinal leakage were investigated. Oedema was present in dominant and X-linked inherited disease and is likely to be present in recessive disease as well. We suggest that this might be a general response seen in many types of tapeto-retinal degeneration to actively degenerating photoreceptors or pigment epithelium. Images PMID:638111

  16. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, Robert E.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.; Hartzell, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by non-myocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA designed High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment which allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells in cultured in HARV's adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARV's using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar, however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissue-like organizations of cardiac cells in simulated microgravity.

  17. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, R. E.; Schroedl, N. A.; Gonda, S. R.; Hartzell, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two-dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by nonmyocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA-designed High-Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment that allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells cultured in HARVs adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARVs using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar; however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissuelike organization of cardiac cells in vitro.

  18. The Silk-protein Sericin Induces Rapid Melanization of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells by Activating the NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Eidet, J. R.; Reppe, S.; Pasovic, L.; Olstad, O. K.; Lyberg, T.; Khan, A. Z.; Fostad, I. G.; Chen, D. F.; Utheim, T. P.

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to prevent further loss of vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration represents a promising novel treatment modality. Development of RPE transplants, however, requires up to 3 months of cell differentiation. We explored whether the silk protein sericin can induce maturation of primary human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated that sericin up-regulated RPE-associated transcripts (RPE65 and CRALBP). Upstream analysis identified the NF-κB pathway as one of the top sericin-induced regulators. ELISA confirmed that sericin stimulates the main NF-κB pathway. Increased levels of RPE-associated proteins (RPE65 and the pigment melanin) in the sericin-supplemented cultures were confirmed by western blot, spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy. Sericin also increased cell density and reduced cell death following serum starvation in culture. Inclusion of NF-κB agonists and antagonists in the culture medium showed that activation of the NF-κB pathway appears to be necessary, but not sufficient, for sericin-induced RPE pigmentation. We conclude that sericin promotes pigmentation of cultured primary hRPE cells by activating the main NF-κB pathway. Sericin’s potential role in culture protocols for rapid differentiation of hRPE cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells should be investigated. PMID:26940175

  19. The dark phase intraocular pressure elevation and retinal ganglion cell degeneration in a rat model of experimental glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Jacky M K; Vo, Nancy; Quan, Ann; Nam, Michael; Kyung, Haksu; Yu, Fei; Piri, Natik; Caprioli, Joseph

    2013-07-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation is considered as a major risk factor causing the progression of vision deterioration in glaucoma. Although it is known that the IOP level changes widely throughout the day and night, how the dark or light phase IOP elevation contributes to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration is still largely unclear. To examine the profile of IOP, modified laser photocoagulation was applied to the trabecular meshwork of Brown Norway rats and both light and dark phase IOPs were monitored approximately 1-2 times a week. The relationship between IOP elevation and RGC degeneration was investigated while RGC body loss was analyzed with Rbpms immunolabeling on retinal wholemount and axonal injury in the optic nerve was semi-quantified. The baseline awake dark and light IOPs were 30.4 ± 2.7 and 20.2 ± 2.1 mmHg respectively. The average dark IOP was increased to 38.2 ± 3.2 mmHg for five weeks after the laser treatment on 270° trabecular meshwork. However, there was no significant loss of RGC body and axonal injury. After laser treatment on 330° trabecular meshwork, the dark and light IOPs were significantly increased to 43.8 ± 4.6 and 23 ± 3.7 mmHg respectively for 5 weeks. The cumulative dark and light IOP elevations were 277 ± 86 and 113 ± 50 mmHg days respectively while the cumulative total (light and dark) IOP elevation was 213 ± 114 mmHg days. After 5 weeks, regional RGC body loss of 29.5 ± 15.5% and moderate axonal injury were observed. Axonal injury and loss of RGC body had a high correlation with the cumulative total IOP elevation (R(2) = 0.60 and 0.65 respectively). There was an association between the cumulative dark IOP elevation and RGC body loss (R(2) = 0.37) and axonal injury (R(2) = 0.51) whereas the associations between neuronal damages and the cumulative light IOP elevation were weak (for RGC body loss, R(2) = 0.01; for axonal injury, R(2) = 0.26). Simple linear regression model

  20. Safety, efficacy, and quality control of a photoelectric dye-based retinal prosthesis (Okayama University-type retinal prosthesis) as a medical device.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Uchida, Tetsuya; Takarabe, Kenichi

    2009-01-01

    Patients with retinitis pigmentosa lose photoreceptor cells as a result of genetic abnormalities and hence become blind. Neurons such as bipolar cells and ganglion cells remain alive even in the retina of these patients, and ganglion cells send axons to the brain as the optic nerve. The basic concept of retinal prostheses is to replace dead photoreceptor cells with artificial devices to stimulate the remaining neurons with electric currents or potentials. Photodiode arrays and digital camera-type electrode arrays are the two main approaches for retinal prostheses to stimulate retinal neurons, but these arrays have the problems of poor biocompatibility, low sensitivity, and low output of electric currents, and hence have a requirement for external electric sources (batteries). To overcome these problems, we are developing photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses that absorb light and convert photon energy to generate electric potentials. The prototype, using a photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film, could induce intracellular calcium elevation in photoreceptor-lacking embryonic retinal tissues and cultured retinal neurons. The subretinal implantation of the prototype in the eyes of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats led to vision recovery as proved by a behavior test. The photoelectric dye that was chosen for the prototype did not exhibit any cytotoxicity. The surface potentials of the photoelectric dye-coupled film showed a rapid on-and-off response to illumination with a threshold for light intensity as measured by a Kelvin probe system. Photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses are thin and soft, and therefore, a sheet of the film of large size, corresponding to a large visual field, could be inserted into the vitreous and then to the subretinal space through a small opening by rolling up the film. Clinical studies of photoelectric dye-based retinal prostheses in patients with retinitis pigmentosa who lose sight will be planned after the manufacturing

  1. Differential Calcium Signaling Mediated by Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells and Their Unmyelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Sargoy, Allison; Sun, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC) regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury. PMID:24416240

  2. Effects of GABA receptor antagonists on thresholds of P23H rat retinal ganglion cells to electrical stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Ralph J.; Rizzo, Joseph F., III

    2011-06-01

    An electronic retinal prosthesis may provide useful vision for patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa (RP). In animal models of RP, the amount of current needed to activate retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is higher than in normal, healthy retinas. In this study, we sought to reduce the stimulation thresholds of RGCs in a degenerate rat model (P23H-line 1) by blocking GABA receptor mediated inhibition in the retina. We examined the effects of TPMPA, a GABAC receptor antagonist, and SR95531, a GABAA receptor antagonist, on the electrically evoked responses of RGCs to biphasic current pulses delivered to the subretinal surface through a 400 µm diameter electrode. Both TPMPA and SR95531 reduced the stimulation thresholds of ON-center RGCs on average by 15% and 20% respectively. Co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists had the greatest effect, on average reducing stimulation thresholds by 32%. In addition, co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists increased the magnitude of the electrically evoked responses on average three-fold. Neither TPMPA nor SR95531, applied alone or in combination, had consistent effects on the stimulation thresholds of OFF-center RGCs. We suggest that the effects of the GABA receptor antagonists on ON-center RGCs may be attributable to blockage of GABA receptors on the axon terminals of ON bipolar cells.

  3. Dopamine and Full-Field Illumination Activate D1 and D2–D5-Type Receptors in Adult Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Genki; Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Partida, Gloria J.; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine can regulate signal generation and transmission by activating multiple receptors and signaling cascades, especially in striatum, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex. Dopamine modulates an even larger variety of cellular properties in retina, yet has been reported to do so by only D1 receptor-driven cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) increases or D2 receptor-driven cAMP decreases. Here, we test the possibility that dopamine operates differently on retinal ganglion cells, because the ganglion cell layer binds D1 and D2 receptor ligands, and displays changes in signaling components other than cAMP under illumination that should release dopamine. In adult rat retinal ganglion cells, based on patch-clamp recordings, Ca2+ imaging, and immunohistochemistry, we find that 1) spike firing is inhibited by dopamine and SKF 83959 (an agonist that does not activate homomeric D1 receptors or alter cAMP levels in other systems); 2) D1 and D2 receptor antagonists (SCH 23390, eticlopride, raclopride) counteract these effects; 3) these antagonists also block light-induced rises in cAMP, light-induced activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and dopamine-induced Ca2+ influx; and 4) the Ca2+ rise is markedly reduced by removing extracellular Ca2+ and by an IP3 receptor antagonist (2-APB). These results provide the first evidence that dopamine activates a receptor in adult mammalian retinal neurons that is distinct from classical D1 and D2 receptors, and that dopamine can activate mechanisms in addition to cAMP and cAMP-dependent protein kinase to modulate retinal ganglion cell excitability. PMID:22678972

  4. Retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) is the most common form of retinal detachment, where a retinal "break" allows the ingress of fluid from the vitreous cavity to the subretinal space, resulting in retinal separation. It occurs in about 1 in 10,000 people a year. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent progression from retinal breaks or lattice degeneration to retinal detachment? What are the effects of different surgical interventions in people with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment? What are the effects of interventions to treat proliferative vitreoretinopathy occurring as a complication of retinal detachment or previous treatment for retinal detachment? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 21 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: corticosteroids, cryotherapy, daunorubicin, fluorouracil plus low molecular weight heparin, laser photocoagulation, pneumatic retinopexy, scleral buckling, short-acting or long-acting gas tamponade, silicone oil tamponade, and vitrectomy. PMID:21406128

  5. Retinal upregulation of inflammatory and proangiogenic markers in a model of neonatal diabetic rats fed on a high-fat-diet

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The contemporary peak of diabetes seems to be related to obesity, sedentary lifestyle and diet. Diabetic retinopathy is the most leading cause of blindness in adulthood in industrialized countries. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of a high-fat-diet (HFD) on the retina of diabetic rats. Methods Two groups of Wistar rats were injected with streptozotocin (STZ) two days after birth using 45 and 90 mg/kg, respectively. At 8 weeks the group on lower doses started to be fed on a HFD. Animals were sacrificed at 37 weeks of diabetes. A control group was made up of non-diabetic rats. Retinal flat mounts were examined using the trypsin digestion technique. Pericytes counts were compared between diabetic and control rats. Cross retinal sections were analyzed by histological techniques and immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescent technique. Primary antibodies against inflammatory and proangiogenic mediators such as RAGE, GFAP, 5-LO, VEGF and TNF-α were used for immunohistochemistry and Western Blot (WB) analyses. Results In the two diabetic groups we observed GFAP-positive cells with a morphology and spatial organization similar to those seen in Müller cells. Both diabetic groups had a significantly lower number of pericytes than non-diabetic animals.Increased retinal immunoreactivity of GFAP, RAGE, TNF-α, VEGF and 5-LO was seen in diabetic animals fed on HFD compared to the other groups of animals. WB analysis revealed a higher expression of 5-LO, VEGF, TNF-α and RAGE in the retina of diabetic rats on HFD than in controls and diabetics fed on a normal diet. The percentage of RAGE-stained ganglion cells and ganglion cells was found to be significantly lower in animals on a HFD than in the other animals. Conclusions Diabetic animals fed on a HFD showed an increased upregulation of inflammatory and proangiogenic markers. This animal model may be useful to study mechanisms of diabetic retinopathy and therapeutic targets. PMID:23587252

  6. The protection of rat retinal ganglion cells from ischemia/reperfusion injury by the inhibitory peptide of mitochondrial μ-calpain.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Taku; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Tomita, Hiroshi; Sugano, Eriko; Ishiguro, Sei-Ichi

    2016-09-30

    Intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent cysteine proteases such as calpains have been suggested as critical factors in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. However, it is unknown whether mitochondrial calpains are involved in RGC death. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the inhibition of mitochondrial μ-calpain activity protects against RGC death during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. This study used a well-established rat model of experimental acute glaucoma involving I/R injury. A specific peptide inhibitor of mitochondrial μ-calpain, Tat-μCL, was topically applied to rats via eye drops three times a day for 5 days after I/R. RGC death was determined by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. The truncation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was determined by western blot analyses. Retinal morphology was determined after staining with hematoxyline and eosin. In addition, the number of Fluoro Gold-labeled RGCs in flat-mounted retinas was used to determine the percentage of surviving RGCs after I/R injury. After 1 day of I/R, RGC death was observed in the ganglion cell layer. Treatment with Tat-μCL eye drops significantly prevented the death of RGCs and the truncation of AIF. After 5 days of I/R, RGC death decreased by approximately 40%. However, Tat-μCL significantly inhibited the decrease in the retinal sections and flat-mounted retinas. The results suggested that mitochondrial μ-calpain is associated with RGC death during I/R injury via truncation of AIF. In addition, the inhibition of mitochondrial μ-calpain activity by Tat-μCL had a neuroprotective effect against I/R-induced RGC death. PMID:27596965

  7. Culturing Schwann Cells from Neonatal Rats by Improved Enzyme Digestion Combined with Explants-culture Method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Liang, Xiao-Chun; Zhang, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Objective To develop an improved method for culturing Schwann cells(SCs) by using both enzyme digestion and explants-culture approaches and compared with traditional explants-culture method and general hemi-explants-culture method. Methods Bilaterally sciatic nerves and brachial plexus nerves were dissected from 3 to 5-day-old neonatal SD rats and explants-culture method,general hemi-explants-culture method,and improved enzyme digestion combined with explants-culture method were adopted to culture SCs,respectively. SCs were digested and passaged after 7 days in culture and counted under the microscope. The purity of SCs was identified by S-100 immunofluorescence staining. Results The SCs of improved method group grew fastest and the total number of cells obtained was(1.85±0.13)×10(6);the SCs of the hemi-explants-culture method group grew slower than the improved method group and the total number of cells obtained was (1.10±0.10)×10(6);the SCs of the explants-culture method group grew slowest and the total number of cells obtained was (0.77±0.03)×10(6).The total number of cells obtained showed significant difference among the three groups(P<0.01). Immunofluorescence staining showed that the SCs purity was (95.73±1.51)% in the improved method group,(84.66±2.68)% in the hemi-explants-culture method group,and (74.50±4.23)% in the explants-culture method group(P<0.01). Conclusion The improved enzyme digestion combined with explants-culture method can obtain sufficient amount of high-purity SCs in a short time and thus may be applied in further research on peripheral nerve regeneration.

  8. Culturing Schwann Cells from Neonatal Rats by Improved Enzyme Digestion Combined with Explants-culture Method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Liang, Xiao-Chun; Zhang, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Objective To develop an improved method for culturing Schwann cells(SCs) by using both enzyme digestion and explants-culture approaches and compared with traditional explants-culture method and general hemi-explants-culture method. Methods Bilaterally sciatic nerves and brachial plexus nerves were dissected from 3 to 5-day-old neonatal SD rats and explants-culture method,general hemi-explants-culture method,and improved enzyme digestion combined with explants-culture method were adopted to culture SCs,respectively. SCs were digested and passaged after 7 days in culture and counted under the microscope. The purity of SCs was identified by S-100 immunofluorescence staining. Results The SCs of improved method group grew fastest and the total number of cells obtained was(1.85±0.13)×10(6);the SCs of the hemi-explants-culture method group grew slower than the improved method group and the total number of cells obtained was (1.10±0.10)×10(6);the SCs of the explants-culture method group grew slowest and the total number of cells obtained was (0.77±0.03)×10(6).The total number of cells obtained showed significant difference among the three groups(P<0.01). Immunofluorescence staining showed that the SCs purity was (95.73±1.51)% in the improved method group,(84.66±2.68)% in the hemi-explants-culture method group,and (74.50±4.23)% in the explants-culture method group(P<0.01). Conclusion The improved enzyme digestion combined with explants-culture method can obtain sufficient amount of high-purity SCs in a short time and thus may be applied in further research on peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27594149

  9. The Use of Cultured Human Fetal Retinal Pigment Epithelium in Studies of the Classical Retinoid Visual Cycle and Retinoid-based Disease Processes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jane; Bok, Dean

    2013-01-01

    Human fetal retinal pigment epithelium (hfRPE), when harvested by mechanical dissection and cultured initially under low calcium conditions, will proliferate and tolerate cryopreservation for future use. Cryopreserved cells can be subsequently thawed and cultured in standard calcium and in the presence of appropriate nutrients to a high state of differentiation, allowing recapitulation of multiple in vivo functions. In this review we briefly discuss some of our previous studies of the classical retinoid visual cycle and introduce current studies in our laboratory that involve two new areas of investigation; the dynamic response of the receptor for retinol binding protein, STRA6 to the addition of holo-retinol binding protein to the culture medium and the protective complement-based response of hfRPE to the ingestion of toxic byproducts of the visual cycle. This response is studied in the context of genotyped hfRPE expressing either predisposing or protective variants of complement factor H. PMID:24060345

  10. Protective effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide on retinal ganglion cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Gao, Na; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Li-Xia; Lu, Xue-Jing

    2011-01-01

    AIM To observe the effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP) on rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in vitro. METHODS Retinal cells of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats were collected 1 to 3 days after birth, and co-cultured with different concentrations of LBP for 24 hours. Absorbance values (OD) were recorded using MTT assay for calculating survival rates. RESULTS All the test groups had protective effects on RGCs. The group with 10mg/mL concentration of LBP had the most significantly difference of OD value compared with that in control group (P<0.01). CONCLUSION LBP can increase the survival rate and promote the growth of mixed cultured rat RGCs. PMID:22553684

  11. Feeding Frequency Affects Cultured Rat Pituitary Cells in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Salada, T.; Cenci, R.; Krishnan, K.; Mukai, C.; Nagaoka, S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, we describe the results of a rat pituitary cell culture experiment done on STS-65 in which the effect of cell feeding on the release of the six anterior pituitary hormones was studied. We found complex microgravity related interactions between the frequency of cell feeding and the quantity and quality (i.e. biological activity) of some of the six hormones released in flight. Analyses of growth hormone (GH) released from cells into culture media on different mission days using gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography yielded qualitatively similar results between ground and flight samples. Lack of cell feeding resulted in extensive cell clumping in flight (but not ground) cultures. Vigorous fibroblast growth occurred in both ground and flight cultures fed 4 times. These results are interpreted within the context of autocrine and or paracrine feedback interactions. Finally the payload specialist successfully prepared a fresh trypsin solution in microgravity, detached the cells from their surface and reinserted them back into the culture chamber. These cells reattached and continued to release hormone in microgravity. In summary, this experiment shows that pituitary cells are microgravity sensitive and that coupled operations routinely associated with laboratory cel1 culture can also be accomplished in low gravity.

  12. Retinal Protective Effects of Resveratrol via Modulation of Nitric Oxide Synthase on Oxygen-induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Taek

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is one of the leading causes of blindness, with retinal detachment occurring due to oxygen toxicity in preterm infants. Recently, advances in neonatal care have led to improved survival rates for preterm infants, and ROP has increased in incidence. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether or not resveratrol exhibits protective effects in an animal model of ROP and in primary retinal cell cultures of neonatal rat via nitric oxide (NO)-modulating actions using western blotting and real-time PCR with inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), endothelial NOS (eNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) antibodies and mRNAs. Methods In an in vivo oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model, cyclic hyperoxia was induced with 80% O2 for one day and 21% O2 for one day from P1 to P14 in newborn Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Resveratrol was injected intravitreally for seven days and rats were sacrificed at P21. In vitro OIR primary retinal cell culture was performed using P0-2 SD rats. Hyperoxia injuries were induced through 100% O2 exposure for six hours. Western blotting and real-time PCR using iNOS, eNOS, nNOS antibodies and primers were performed in the rat model of ROP and the dispersed retinal cell culture. Results In both in vivo and in vitro OIR, the expression of iNOS antibody and mRNA was increased and of eNOS and nNOS were reduced in the resveratrol-treated group. Conclusions In conclusion, resveratrol appeared to exert retinal protective effects via modulation of NO-mediated mechanism in in vivo and in vitro OIR models. PMID:20379461

  13. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  14. Retinal cartography.

    PubMed

    Mosier, M A

    1982-10-01

    This paper analyses retinal cartography in terms of its reflection of anatomic data and its relation to several forms of geographic methods of map-making. It shows that the distances between anatomic landmarks of the eye are reasonably similar to the relative distances on the retinal drawing chart currently used. Two forms of geographic cartography--azimuth equidistant and orthographic--are described and compared with retinal cartography. The retinal drawing chart currently used most closely approximates an azimuth equidistant projection, which suffers from circumferential distortion, a fact that retinal surgeons must keep in mind. It is therefore recommended that the chart be modified to have equally spaced concentric circles and clearer identification of the ora serrata; the present accurate marking of anatomic landmarks, such as the equator and the posterior border of the ciliary body, should be preserved.

  15. Identification of a retinal aldosterone system and the protective effects of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism on retinal vascular pathology.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson-Berka, Jennifer L; Tan, Genevieve; Jaworski, Kassie; Miller, Antonia G

    2009-01-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is being evaluated as a treatment for diabetic retinopathy; however, whether the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and aldosterone influence retinal vascular pathology is unknown. We examined the effect of MR antagonism on pathological angiogenesis in rats with oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). To determine the mechanisms by which the MR and aldosterone may influence retinal angiogenesis; inflammation and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) were evaluated in OIR and cultured bovine retinal endothelial cells (BRECs) and bovine retinal pericytes (BRPs). In OIR, MR antagonism (spironolactone) was antiangiogenic. Aldosterone may mediate the pathogenic actions of MR in the retina, with 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 mRNA being detected and with aldosterone stimulating proliferation and tubulogenesis in BRECs and exacerbating angiogenesis in OIR, which was attenuated with spironolactone. The MR and aldosterone modulated retinal inflammation, with leukostasis and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNA and protein in OIR being reduced by spironolactone and increased by aldosterone. A reduction in G6PD may be an early response to aldosterone. In BRECs, BRPs, and early OIR, aldosterone reduced G6PD mRNA, and in late OIR, aldosterone increased mRNA for the NAD(P)H oxidase subunit Nox4. A functional retinal MR-aldosterone system was evident with MR expression, translocation of nuclear MR, and aldosterone synthase expression, which was modulated by RAAS blockade. We make the first report that MR and aldosterone influence retinal vasculopathy, which may involve inflammatory and G6PD mechanisms. MR antagonism may be relevant when developing treatments for retinopathies that target the RAAS.

  16. Purification and culture of adult rat dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    PubMed

    Delree, P; Leprince, P; Schoenen, J; Moonen, G

    1989-06-01

    To study the trophic requirements of adult rat dorsal root ganglia neurons (DRG) in vitro, we developed a purification procedure that yields highly enriched neuronal cultures. Forty to fifty ganglia are dissected from the spinal column of an adult rat. After enzymatic and mechanical dissociation of the ganglia, myelin debris are eliminated by centrifugation on a Percoll gradient. The resulting cell suspension is layered onto a nylon mesh with a pore size of 10 microns. Most of the neurons, the diameter of which ranged from 17 microns to greater than 100 microns, are retained on the upper surface of the sieve; most of the non-neuronal cells with a caliber of less than 10 microns after trypsinization go through it. Recovery of neurons is achieved by reversing the mesh onto a Petri dish containing culture medium. Neurons to non-neurons ratio is 1 to 10 in the initial cell suspension and 1 to 1 after separation. When these purified neurons are seeded at a density of 3,000 neurons/cm2 in 6 mm polyornithine-laminin (PORN-LAM) coated wells, neuronal survival (assessed by the ability to extend neurites), measured after 48 hr of culture, is very low (from 0 to 16%). Addition of nerve growth factor (NGF) does not improve neuronal survival. However, when neurons are cultured in the presence of medium conditioned (CM) by astrocytes or Schwann cells, 60-80% of the seeded, dye-excluding neurons survive. So, purified adult DRG neurons require for their short-term survival and regeneration in culture, a trophic support that is present in conditioned medium from PNS or CNS glia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. A Self-Assembling Injectable Biomimetic Microenvironment Encourages Retinal Ganglion Cell Axon Extension in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Laughter, Melissa R; Ammar, David A; Bardill, James R; Pena, Brisa; Kahook, Malik Y; Lee, David J; Park, Daewon

    2016-08-17

    Sensory-somatic nervous system neurons, such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), are typically thought to be incapable of regenerating. However, it is now known that these cells may be stimulated to regenerate by providing them with a growth permissive environment. We have engineered an injectable microenvironment designed to provide growth-stimulating cues for RGC culture. Upon gelation, this injectable material not only self-assembles into laminar sheets, similar to retinal organization, but also possesses a storage modulus comparable to that of retinal tissue. Primary rat RGCs were grown, stained, and imaged in this three-dimensional scaffold. We were able to show that RGCs grown in this retina-like structure exhibited characteristic long, prominent axons. In addition, RGCs showed a consistent increase in average axon length and neurite-bearing ratio over the 7 day culture period, indicating this scaffold is capable of supporting substantial RGC axon extension. PMID:27434231

  18. Polygonal networks, "geodomes", of adult rat hepatocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Y; Furukawa, K; Mitaka, T; Yokoi, T; Kodama, T

    1988-01-01

    Polygonal networks, "geodomes", in cultured hepatocytes of adult rats were examined by both light and electron microscopy. On light microscopical examinations of specimens stained with Coomassie blue after the treatment with Triton X-100, the networks were detected 5 days after culture, which consisted of triangles arranged mainly in hexagonal patterns. They surrounded main cell body, looking like a headband, or were occasionally situated over nuclei, looking like a geodesic dome. Scanning electron microscopical observations after Triton treatment revealed that these structures were located underneath surface membrane. Transmission electron microscopical investigations revealed that the connecting fibers of networks consisted of microfilaments which radiated in a compact bundle from electron-dense vertices. PMID:3396075

  19. Endotoxin suppresses surfactant synthesis in cultured rat lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.; Gelfand, J.A.; Burke, J.F.

    1989-02-01

    Pulmonary complications secondary to postburn sepsis are a major cause of death in burned patients. Using an in vitro organotypic culture system, we examined the effect of E. coli endotoxin (LPS) on lung cell surfactant synthesis. Our results showed that E. coli endotoxin (1.0, 2.5, 10 micrograms LPS/ml) was capable of suppressing the incorporation of /sup 3/H-choline into de novo synthesized surfactant, lamellar bodies (LB), and common myelin figures (CMF) at 50%, 68%, and 64%, respectively. In a similar study, we were able to show that LPS also inhibited /sup 3/H-palmitate incorporation by cultured lung cells. LPS-induced suppression of surfactant synthesis was reversed by hydrocortisone. Our results suggest that LPS may play a significant role in reducing surfactant synthesis by rat lung cells, and thus contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis-related respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in burn injury.

  20. Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, James D.; Humayun, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated from the laboratory to the clinical over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives. Improved mobility and object detection are some of the more notable findings from the clinical trials. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. This paper reviews the recent clinical trials, highlights technology breakthroughs that will contribute to next generation of retinal prostheses. PMID:24710817

  1. Genomics and proteomics analysis of cultured primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Beigel, Juergen; Fella, Kerstin; Kramer, Peter-Juergen; Kroeger, Michaela; Hewitt, Philip

    2008-02-01

    The use of animal models in pharmaceutical research is a costly and sometimes misleading method of generating toxicity data and hence predicting human safety. Therefore, in vitro test systems, such as primary rat hepatocytes, and the developing genomics and proteomics technologies, are playing an increasingly important role in toxicological research. Gene and protein expression analysis were investigated in a time series (up to 5 days) of primary rat hepatocytes cultured on collagen coated dishes. Especially after 24h, a significant down-regulation of many important Phase I and Phase II enzymes (e.g., cytochrome P450's, glutathione-S-transferases, sulfotransferases) involved in xenobiotic metabolism, and antioxidative enzymes (e.g., catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) was observed. Acute-phase-response enzymes were frequently up-regulated (e.g., LPS binding protein, alpha-2-macro-globulin, ferritin, serine proteinase inhibitor B, haptoglobin), which is likely to be a result of cellular stress caused by the cell isolation procedure (perfusion) itself. A parallel observation was the increased expression of several structural genes (e.g., beta-actin, alpha-tubulin, vimentin), possibly caused by other proliferating cell types in the culture, such as fibroblasts or alternatively by hepatocyte dedifferentiation. In conclusion, the careful interpretation of data derived from this in vitro system indicates that primary hepatocytes can be successfully used for short-term toxicity studies up to 24h. However, culturing conditions need to be further optimized to reduce the massive changes of gene and protein expression of long-term cultured hepatocytes to allow practical applications as a long-term toxicity test system.

  2. Electrophysiological properties of cultured hippocampal neurons from Wistar Audiogenic Rats.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Fernando; Aguiar, José F; Oliveira, José A; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto; Varanda, Wamberto A

    2005-03-15

    The main goal of this work was to analyze the electrophysiological properties of cultured hippocampal neurons from a particular epileptic rat strain, called Wistar Audiogenic Rats (WAR). The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record both active and passive membrane responses in an attempt to detect alterations in their characteristics in relation to controls from Wistar rats. Neurons from WARs show a significant reduction in the magnitude of the inhibitory GABAergic currents ( approximately 45%), in spite of maintaining a normal level of the excitatory glutamatergic currents. In addition, the magnitude of potassium currents, measured at +80 mV, is reduced by about 30% in comparison to controls. Surprisingly, we also found important changes in the passive cellular properties in WAR neurons such as membrane potential (-50.0 mV in WARs and -63.1 mV in controls) and input resistance (647 MOmega in WARs and 408 MOmega in controls). The changes described here, could be the basis of the neurophysiological and behavioral alterations present in these hyperexcitable animals, contributing to a better understanding of epileptogenesis in this particular animal model.

  3. Primary culture of embryonic rat olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Micholt, Evelien; Jans, Danny; Callewaert, Geert; Bartic, Carmen; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Nicolai, Bart

    2012-12-01

    Embryonic cells are very robust in surviving dissection and culturing protocols and easily adapt to their in vitro environment. Despite these advantages, research in the olfactory field on cultured embryonic olfactory neurons is sparse. In this study, two primary rat olfactory explant cultures of different embryonic d (E17 and E20) were established, comprising epithelium and bulb. The functionality of these neurons was tested by measuring intracellular calcium responses to cAMP-inducing agents forskolin (FSK) and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) with fluorescence microscopy. For E17, the responsive cell fraction increased over time, from an initial 3% at the 1 d in vitro (DIV) to a maximum of 19% at 11 DIV. The response of E20 neurons fluctuated over time around a more or less stable 13%. A logistic regression analysis indicated a significant difference between both embryonic d in the response to FSK + IBMX. In addition, of these functional neurons, 23.3% of E17 and 54.3% of E20 cultures were responsive to the odorant isoamyl acetate. PMID:23150136

  4. Reshaping the Cone-Mosaic in a Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa: Modulatory Role of ZO-1 Expression in DL-Alpha-Aminoadipic Acid Reshaping

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-A; Nair, Divya; Grzywacz, Sara X. Z.; Grzywacz, Norberto M.; Craft, Cheryl Mae; Lee, Eun-Jin

    2016-01-01

    In S334ter-line-3 rat model of Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), rod cell death induces the rearrangement of cones into mosaics of rings while the fibrotic processes of Müller cells remodel to fill the center of the rings. In contrast, previous work established that DL-alpha-aminoadipic-acid (AAA), a compound that transiently blocks Müller cell metabolism, abolishes these highly structured cone rings. Simultaneously, adherens-junction associated protein, Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) expression forms in a network between the photoreceptor segments and Müller cells processes. Thus, we hypothesized that AAA treatment alters the cone mosaic rings by disrupting the distal sealing formed by these fibrotic processes, either directly or indirectly, by down regulating the expression of ZO-1. Therefore, we examined these processes and ZO-1 expression at the outer retina after intravitreal injection of AAA and observed that AAA treatment transiently disrupts the distal glial sealing in RP retina, plus induces cones in rings to become more homogeneous. Moreover, ZO-1 expression is actively suppressed after 3 days of AAA treatment, which coincided with cone ring disruption. Similar modifications of glial sealing and cone distribution were observed after injection of siRNA to inhibit ZO-1 expression. These findings support our hypothesis and provide additional information about the critical role played by ZO-1 in glial sealing and shaping the ring mosaic in RP retina. These studies represent important advancements in the understanding of retinal degeneration’s etiology and pathophysiology. PMID:26977812

  5. Retinal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision Diabetic eye disease Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is ... children. Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula Macular hole - ...

  6. AN ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDY OF CULTURED RAT SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    Bunge, Richard P.; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Peterson, Edith R.

    1965-01-01

    Explants prepared from 17- to 18-day fetal rat spinal cord were allowed to mature in culture; such preparations have been shown to differentiate and myelinate in vitro (61) and to be capable of complex bioelectric activity (14–16). At 23, 35, or 76 days, the cultures were fixed (without removal from the coverslip) in buffered OsO4, embedded in Epon, sectioned, and stained for light and electron microscopy. These mature explants generally are composed of several strata of neurons with an overlying zone of neuropil. The remarkable cytological similarity between in vivo and in vitro nervous tissues is established by the following observations. Cells and processes in the central culture mass are generally closely packed together with little intervening space. Neurons exhibit well developed Nissl bodies, elaborate Golgi regions, and subsurface cisternae. Axosomatic and axodendritic synapses, including synaptic junctions between axons and dendritic spines, are present. Typical synaptic vesicles and increased membrane densities are seen at the terminals. Variations in synaptic fine structure (Type 1 and Type 2 synapses of Gray) are visible. Some characteristics of the cultured spinal cord resemble infrequently observed specializations of in vivo central nervous tissue. Neuronal somas may display minute synapse-bearing projections. Occasionally, synaptic vesicles are grouped in a crystal-like array. A variety of glial cells, many apparently at intermediate stages of differentiation, are found throughout the otherwise mature explant. There is ultrastructural evidence of extensive glycogen deposits in some glial processes and scattered glycogen particles in neuronal terminals. This is the first description of the ultrastructure of cultured spinal cord. Where possible, correlation is made between the ultrastructural data and the known physiological properties of these cultures. PMID:14326105

  7. Computational tool for morphological analysis of cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Leite, Maria Ruth C R; Cestari, Idágene A; Cestari, Ismar N

    2015-08-01

    This study describes the development and evaluation of a semiautomatic myocyte edge-detector using digital image processing. The algorithm was developed in Matlab 6.0 using the SDC Morphology Toolbox. Its conceptual basis is the mathematical morphology theory together with the watershed and Euclidean distance transformations. The algorithm enables the user to select cells within an image for automatic detection of their borders and calculation of their surface areas; these areas are determined by adding the pixels within each myocyte's boundaries. The algorithm was applied to images of cultured ventricular myocytes from neonatal rats. The edge-detector allowed the identification and quantification of morphometric alterations in cultured isolated myocytes induced by 72 hours of exposure to a hypertrophic agent (50 μM phenylephrine). There was a significant increase in the mean surface area of the phenylephrine-treated cells compared with the control cells (p<;0.05), corresponding to cellular hypertrophy of approximately 50%. In conclusion, this edge-detector provides a rapid, repeatable and accurate measurement of cell surface areas in a standardized manner. Other possible applications include morphologic measurement of other types of cultured cells and analysis of time-related morphometric changes in adult cardiac myocytes.

  8. Comparison of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness In Vivo and Axonal Transport after Chronic Intraocular Pressure Elevation in Young versus Older Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Carla J.; Choe, Tiffany E.; Burgoyne, Claude F.; Cull, Grant; Wang, Lin; Fortune, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare in young and old rats longitudinal measurements of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) and axonal transport 3-weeks after chronic IOP elevation. Method IOP was elevated unilaterally in 2- and 9.5-month-old Brown-Norway rats by intracameral injections of magnetic microbeads. RNFLT was measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Anterograde axonal transport was assessed from confocal scanning laser ophthalmolscopy of superior colliculi (SC) after bilateral intravitreal injections of cholera toxin-B-488. Optic nerve sections were graded for damage. Results Mean IOP was elevated in both groups (young 37, old 38 mmHg, p = 0.95). RNFL in young rats exhibited 10% thickening at 1-week (50.9±8.1 µm, p<0.05) vs. baseline (46.4±2.4 µm), then 7% thinning at 2-weeks (43.0±7.2 µm, p>0.05) and 3-weeks (43.5±4.4 µm, p>0.05), representing 20% loss of dynamic range. RNFLT in old rats showed no significant change at 1-week (44.9±4.1 µm) vs. baseline (49.2±5.3 µm), but progression to 22% thinning at 2-weeks (38.0±3.7 µm, p<0.01) and 3-weeks (40.0±6.6 µm, p<0.05), representing 59% loss of dynamic range. Relative SC fluorescence intensity was reduced in both groups (p<0.001), representing 77–80% loss of dynamic range and a severe transport deficit. Optic nerves showed 75–95% damage (p<0.001). There was greater RNFL thinning in old rats (p<0.05), despite equivalent IOP insult, transport deficit and nerve damage between age groups (all p>0.05). Conclusion Chronic IOP elevation resulted in severely disrupted axonal transport and optic nerve axon damage in all rats, associated with mild RNFL loss in young rats but a moderate RNFL loss in old rats despite the similar IOP insult. Hence, the glaucomatous injury response within the RNFL depends on age. PMID:25501362

  9. Regulation of bile acid synthesis in rat hepatocyte monolayer cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kubaska, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    Primary hepatocyte monolayer cultures (PHC) were prepared and incubated in serum free media. Cells from a cholestyramine fed rat converted exogenous (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol into (/sup 14/C)-bile acids at a 3-fold greater rate than rats fed a normal diet. PHC synthesize bile acids (BA) at a rate of approximately 0.06 ..mu..g/mg protein/h. The major bile acid composition, as determined by GLC, was ..beta..-muricholic acid (BMC) and cholic acid (CA) in a 3:1 ratio, respectively. PHC rapidly converted free BA and BA intermediates into taurine conjugated trihydroxy-BA up to 87h after plating. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A-reductase activity assayed in microsomes prepared from PHC, decreased during the initial 48h, then remained constant. Cholesterol 7..cap alpha..-hydroxylase activity decreased during the initial 48h, then increased during the next 48h. This occurred while whole cells produced BA at a linear rate. The effect of individual BA on bile acid synthesis (BAS) was also studied. Relative rates of BAS were measured as the conversion of (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol into (/sup 14/C)-BA. BA combinations were tested in order to simulate the composition of the enterohepatic circulation. The addition of TCA (525 ..mu..M) plus TCDCA (80..mu..M), in concentrations which greatly exceed the concentration of BA (60..mu..M) in rate portal blood, failed to inhibit BAS. BA plus phospholipid and/or cholesterol also did not inhibit BAS. Surprisingly, crude rat bile with a final concentration comparable to those in the synthetic mix inhibited (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol conversion into (/sup 14/C)-BA.

  10. Cell culture models using rat primary alveolar type I cells

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Charles A.; Montgomery, David W.; Merkle, Carrie J.

    2011-01-01

    There is a lack of cell culture models using primary alveolar type I (AT I) cells. The purpose of this study was to develop cell culture models using rat AT I cells and microvascular endothelial cells from the lung (MVECL). Two types of model systems were developed: single and co-culture systems; additionally a 3-dimensional model system was developed. Pure AT I cell (96.3 ±2.7%) and MVECL (97.9 ±1.1 %) preparations were used. AT I cell morphology, mitochondrial number and distribution, actin filament arrangement and number of apoptotic cells at confluence, and telomere attrition were characterized. AT I cells maintained their morphometric characteristics through at least population doubling (PD) 35, while demonstrating telomere attrition through at least PD 100. Furthermore, AT I cells maintained the expression of their specific markers, T1α and AQ-5, through PD 42. For the co-cultures, AT I cells were grown on the top and MVECL were grown on the bottom of fibronectin coated 24 well Transwell Fluroblok™ filter inserts. Neither cell type transmigrated the 1 micron pores. Additionally AT I cells were grown in a thick layer of Matrigel® to create a 3-dimensional model in which primary AT I cells form ring-like structures that resemble an alveolus. The development of these model systems offers the opportunities to investigate AT I cell cells and their interactions with MVECL in response to pharmacological interventions and in the processes of disease, repair and regeneration. PMID:21624488

  11. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Robinette, Brian L.; Mundy, William R.

    2011-11-15

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost-effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be used as screening tools to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants. The present study compared primary rat cortical cultures and human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cultures in terms of: 1) reproducibility of high content image analysis based neurite outgrowth measurements, 2) dynamic range of neurite outgrowth measurements and 3) sensitivity to chemicals which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. There was a large increase in neurite outgrowth between 2 and 24 h in both rat and human cultures. Image analysis data collected across multiple cultures demonstrated that neurite outgrowth measurements in rat cortical cultures were more reproducible and had higher dynamic range as compared to human neural cultures. Human neural cultures were more sensitive than rat cortical cultures to chemicals previously shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. Parallel analysis of morphological (neurite count, neurite length) and cytotoxicity (neurons per field) measurements were used to detect selective effects on neurite outgrowth. All chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in rat cortical cultures did so at concentrations which did not concurrently affect the number of neurons per field, indicating selective effects on neurite outgrowth. In contrast, more than half the chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in human neural cultures did so at concentrations which concurrently decreased the number of neurons per field, indicating that effects on neurite outgrowth were secondary to cytotoxicity. Overall, these data demonstrate that the culture models performed differently in terms of reproducibility, dynamic range and sensitivity to neurite outgrowth inhibitors. While human neural

  12. Phloroglucinol protects retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor against all-trans-retinal-induced toxicity and inhibits A2E formation.

    PubMed

    Cia, David; Cubizolle, Aurélie; Crauste, Céline; Jacquemot, Nathalie; Guillou, Laurent; Vigor, Claire; Angebault, Claire; Hamel, Christian P; Vercauteren, Joseph; Brabet, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Among retinal macular diseases, the juvenile recessive Stargardt disease and the age-related degenerative disease arise from carbonyl and oxidative stresses (COS). Both stresses originate from an accumulation of all-trans-retinal (atRAL) and are involved in bisretinoid formation by condensation of atRAL with phosphatidylethanolamine (carbonyl stress) in the photoreceptor and its transformation into lipofuscin bisretinoids (oxidative stress) in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). As atRAL and bisretinoid accumulation contribute to RPE and photoreceptor cell death, our goal is to select powerful chemical inhibitors of COS. Here, we describe that phloroglucinol, a natural phenolic compound having anti-COS properties, protects both rat RPE and mouse photoreceptor primary cultures from atRAL-induced cell death and reduces hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 )-induced damage in RPE in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistic analyses demonstrate that the protective effect encompasses decrease in atRAL-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species and free atRAL levels. Moreover, we show that phloroglucinol reacts with atRAL to form a chromene adduct which prevents bisretinoid A2E synthesis in vitro. Taken together, these data show that the protective effect of phloroglucinol correlates with its ability to trap atRAL and to prevent its further transformation into deleterious bisretinoids. Phloroglucinol might be a good basis to develop efficient therapeutic derivatives in the treatment of retinal macular diseases.

  13. Phloroglucinol protects retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor against all-trans-retinal-induced toxicity and inhibits A2E formation.

    PubMed

    Cia, David; Cubizolle, Aurélie; Crauste, Céline; Jacquemot, Nathalie; Guillou, Laurent; Vigor, Claire; Angebault, Claire; Hamel, Christian P; Vercauteren, Joseph; Brabet, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Among retinal macular diseases, the juvenile recessive Stargardt disease and the age-related degenerative disease arise from carbonyl and oxidative stresses (COS). Both stresses originate from an accumulation of all-trans-retinal (atRAL) and are involved in bisretinoid formation by condensation of atRAL with phosphatidylethanolamine (carbonyl stress) in the photoreceptor and its transformation into lipofuscin bisretinoids (oxidative stress) in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). As atRAL and bisretinoid accumulation contribute to RPE and photoreceptor cell death, our goal is to select powerful chemical inhibitors of COS. Here, we describe that phloroglucinol, a natural phenolic compound having anti-COS properties, protects both rat RPE and mouse photoreceptor primary cultures from atRAL-induced cell death and reduces hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 )-induced damage in RPE in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistic analyses demonstrate that the protective effect encompasses decrease in atRAL-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species and free atRAL levels. Moreover, we show that phloroglucinol reacts with atRAL to form a chromene adduct which prevents bisretinoid A2E synthesis in vitro. Taken together, these data show that the protective effect of phloroglucinol correlates with its ability to trap atRAL and to prevent its further transformation into deleterious bisretinoids. Phloroglucinol might be a good basis to develop efficient therapeutic derivatives in the treatment of retinal macular diseases. PMID:27072643

  14. Activation of Neuropeptide Y Receptors Modulates Retinal Ganglion Cell Physiology and Exerts Neuroprotective Actions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Martins, João; Elvas, Filipe; Brudzewsky, Dan; Martins, Tânia; Kolomiets, Bogdan; Tralhão, Pedro; Gøtzsche, Casper R.; Cavadas, Cláudia; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Woldbye, David P. D.; Picaud, Serge; Santiago, Ana R.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is expressed in mammalian retina but the location and potential modulatory effects of NPY receptor activation remain largely unknown. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death is a hallmark of several retinal degenerative diseases, particularly glaucoma. Using purified RGCs and ex vivo rat retinal preparations, we have measured RGC intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and RGC spiking activity, respectively. We found that NPY attenuated the increase in the [Ca2+]i triggered by glutamate mainly via Y1 receptor activation. Moreover, (Leu31, Pro34)−NPY, a Y1/Y5 receptor agonist, increased the initial burst response of OFF-type RGCs, although no effect was observed on RGC spontaneous spiking activity. The Y1 receptor activation was also able to directly modulate RGC responses by attenuating the NMDA-induced increase in RGC spiking activity. These results suggest that Y1 receptor activation, at the level of inner or outer plexiform layers, leads to modulation of RGC receptive field properties. Using in vitro cultures of rat retinal explants exposed to NMDA, we found that NPY pretreatment prevented NMDA-induced cell death. However, in an animal model of retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury, pretreatment with NPY or (Leu31, Pro34)−NPY was not able to prevent apoptosis or rescue RGCs. In conclusion, we found modulatory effects of NPY application that for the first time were detected at the level of RGCs. However, further studies are needed to evaluate whether NPY neuroprotective actions detected in retinal explants can be translated into animal models of retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:26311075

  15. Activation of Neuropeptide Y Receptors Modulates Retinal Ganglion Cell Physiology and Exerts Neuroprotective Actions In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Martins, João; Elvas, Filipe; Brudzewsky, Dan; Martins, Tânia; Kolomiets, Bogdan; Tralhão, Pedro; Gøtzsche, Casper R; Cavadas, Cláudia; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Woldbye, David P D; Picaud, Serge; Santiago, Ana R; Ambrósio, António F

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is expressed in mammalian retina but the location and potential modulatory effects of NPY receptor activation remain largely unknown. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death is a hallmark of several retinal degenerative diseases, particularly glaucoma. Using purified RGCs and ex vivo rat retinal preparations, we have measured RGC intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and RGC spiking activity, respectively. We found that NPY attenuated the increase in the [Ca2+]i triggered by glutamate mainly via Y1 receptor activation. Moreover, (Leu31, Pro34)-NPY, a Y1/Y5 receptor agonist, increased the initial burst response of OFF-type RGCs, although no effect was observed on RGC spontaneous spiking activity. The Y1 receptor activation was also able to directly modulate RGC responses by attenuating the NMDA-induced increase in RGC spiking activity. These results suggest that Y1 receptor activation, at the level of inner or outer plexiform layers, leads to modulation of RGC receptive field properties. Using in vitro cultures of rat retinal explants exposed to NMDA, we found that NPY pretreatment prevented NMDA-induced cell death. However, in an animal model of retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury, pretreatment with NPY or (Leu31, Pro34)-NPY was not able to prevent apoptosis or rescue RGCs. In conclusion, we found modulatory effects of NPY application that for the first time were detected at the level of RGCs. However, further studies are needed to evaluate whether NPY neuroprotective actions detected in retinal explants can be translated into animal models of retinal degenerative diseases.

  16. Ethanol induces heterotopias in organotypic cultures of rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Sandra M; Siegenthaler, Julie A; Miller, Michael W

    2004-10-01

    Abnormalities in the migration of cortical neurons to ectopic sites can be caused by prenatal exposure to ethanol. In extreme cases, cells migrate past the pial surface and form suprapial heterotopias or 'warts'. We used organotypic slice cultures from 17-day-old rat fetuses to examine structural and molecular changes that accompany wart formation. Cultures were exposed to ethanol (0, 200, 400 or 800 mg/dl) and maintained for 2-32 h. Fixed slices were sectioned and immunolabeled with antibodies directed against calretinin, reelin, nestin, GFAP, doublecortin, MAP-2 and NeuN. Ethanol promoted the widespread infiltration of the marginal zone (MZ) with neurons and the focal formation of warts. The appearance of warts is time- and concentration-dependent. Heterotopias comprised migrating neurons and were not detected in control slices. Warts were associated with breaches in the array of Cajal-Retzius cells and with translocation of reelin-immunoexpression from the MZ to the outer limit of the wart. Ethanol also altered the morphology of the radial glia. Thus, damage to the integrity of superficial cortex allows neurons to infiltrate the MZ, and if the pial-subpial glial barrier is also compromised these ectopic neurons can move beyond the normal cerebral limit to form a wart.

  17. Ibuprofen augments bilirubin toxicity in rat cortical neuronal culture.

    PubMed

    Berns, Monika; Toennessen, Margit; Koehne, Petra; Altmann, Rodica; Obladen, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Premature infants are at risk for bilirubin-associated brain damage. In cell cultures bilirubin causes neuronal apoptosis and necrosis. Ibuprofen is used to close the ductus arteriosus, and is often given when hyperbilirubinemia is at its maximum. Ibuprofen is known to interfere with bilirubin-albumin binding. We hypothesized that bilirubin toxicity to cultured rat embryonic cortical neurons is augmented by coincubation with ibuprofen. Incubation with ibuprofen above a concentration of 125 microg/mL reduced cell viability, measured by methylthiazole tetrazolium reduction, to 68% of controls (p < 0.05). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release increased from 29 to 38% (p < 0.01). The vehicle solution did not affect cell viability. Coincubation with 10 microM unconjugated bilirubin (UCB)/human serum albumin in a molar ratio of 3:1 and 250 microg/mL ibuprofen caused additional loss of cell viability and increased LDH release (p < 0.01), DNA fragmentation, and activated caspase-3. Preincubation with the pan-caspase inhibitor z-val-ala-asp-fluoromethyl ketone abolished ibuprofen- and UCB-induced DNA fragmentation. The study demonstrates that bilirubin in low concentration of 10 microM reduces neuron viability and ibuprofen increases this effect. Apoptosis is the underlying cell death mechanism.

  18. Chronaxie Measurements in Patterned Neuronal Cultures from Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Rotem, Assaf; Moses, Elisha; Neef, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Excitation of neurons by an externally induced electric field is a long standing question that has recently attracted attention due to its relevance in novel clinical intervention systems for the brain. Here we use patterned quasi one-dimensional neuronal cultures from rat hippocampus, exploiting the alignment of axons along the linear patterned culture to separate the contribution of dendrites to the excitation of the neuron from that of axons. Network disconnection by channel blockers, along with rotation of the electric field direction, allows the derivation of strength-duration (SD) curves that characterize the statistical ensemble of a population of cells. SD curves with the electric field aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the axons yield the chronaxie and rheobase of axons and dendrites respectively, and these differ considerably. Dendritic chronaxie is measured to be about 1 ms, while that of axons is on the order of 0.1 ms. Axons are thus more excitable at short time scales, but at longer time scales dendrites are more easily excited. We complement these studies with experiments on fully connected cultures. An explanation for the chronaxie of dendrites is found in the numerical simulations of passive, realistically structured dendritic trees under external stimulation. The much shorter chronaxie of axons is not captured in the passive model and may be related to active processes. The lower rheobase of dendrites at longer durations can improve brain stimulation protocols, since in the brain dendrites are less specifically oriented than axonal bundles, and the requirement for precise directional stimulation may be circumvented by using longer duration fields. PMID:26186201

  19. Complimentary action: C1q increases ganglion cell survival in an in vitro model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Linnéa; Arnér, Karin; Blom, Anna M; Ghosh, Fredrik

    2016-09-15

    Using a previously described retinal explant culture system as an acute injury model, we here explore the role of C1q, the initiator of the classical complement pathway, in neuronal cell survival and retinal homeostasis. Full-thickness adult rat retinal explants were divided into four groups, receiving the following supplementation: C1q (50nM), C1-inhibitor (C1-inh; Berinert; 500mg/l), C1q+C1-inh, and no supplementation (culture controls). Explants were kept for 12h or 2days after which they were examined morphologically and with a panel of immunohistochemical markers. C1q supplementation protects ganglion cells from degeneration within the explant in vitro system. This effect is correlated to an attenuated endogenous production of C1q, and a quiesced gliotic response. PMID:27609284

  20. Defined culture of human embryonic stem cells and xeno-free derivation of retinal pigmented epithelial cells on a novel, synthetic substrate.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Britney O; Clegg, Dennis O; Melkoumian, Zara K; Hikita, Sherry T

    2015-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness, is characterized by the death of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), which is a monolayer posterior to the retina that supports the photoreceptors. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can generate an unlimited source of RPE for cellular therapies, and clinical trials have been initiated. However, protocols for RPE derivation using defined conditions free of nonhuman derivatives (xeno-free) are preferred for clinical translation. This avoids exposing AMD patients to animal-derived products, which could incite an immune response. In this study, we investigated the maintenance of hESCs and their differentiation into RPE using Synthemax II-SC, which is a novel, synthetic animal-derived component-free, RGD peptide-containing copolymer compliant with good manufacturing practices designed for xeno-free stem cell culture. Cells on Synthemax II-SC were compared with cultures grown with xenogeneic and xeno-free control substrates. This report demonstrates that Synthemax II-SC supports long-term culture of H9 and H14 hESC lines and permits efficient differentiation of hESCs into functional RPE. Expression of RPE-specific markers was assessed by flow cytometry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and immunocytochemistry, and RPE function was determined by phagocytosis of rod outer segments and secretion of pigment epithelium-derived factor. Both hESCs and hESC-RPE maintained normal karyotypes after long-term culture on Synthemax II-SC. Furthermore, RPE generated on Synthemax II-SC are functional when seeded onto parylene-C scaffolds designed for clinical use. These experiments suggest that Synthemax II-SC is a suitable, defined substrate for hESC culture and the xeno-free derivation of RPE for cellular therapies. PMID:25593208

  1. Quantitative assessment of the permeability of the rat blood-retinal barrier to small water-soluble non-electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Lightman, S L; Palestine, A G; Rapoport, S I; Rechthand, E

    1987-08-01

    1. The passive permeability of the blood-retinal barrier (b.r.b.) to the water-soluble non-electrolytes, sucrose and mannitol, was determined using a multiple time point-graphical approach as has been used in the assessment of blood-brain barrier (b.b.b.) permeability. 2. The calculated permeability surface area product for the b.r.b. for sucrose was 0.44 (+/- 0.081 S.E. of mean) X 10(-5) ml g-1 s-1 (n = 20) and for mannitol was 1.25 (+/- 0.30) X 10(-5) ml g-1 s-1 (n = 18). These values are similar and comparable to those found for the capillaries in the brain (P greater than 0.05) and significantly different from zero (P less than 0.01). 3. Data on the concentrations of sucrose in different parts of the eye show that the permeability of the blood-retinal barrier, rather than the more permeable blood-aqueous barrier permeability, was being measured by our technique. PMID:3119820

  2. Diabetes increases susceptibility of primary cultures of rat proximal tubular cells to chemically induced injury

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Qing; Terlecky, Stanley R.; Lash, Lawrence H.

    2009-11-15

    Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study, we prepared primary cultures of proximal tubular (PT) cells from diabetic rats 30 days after an ip injection of streptozotocin and compared their susceptibility to oxidants (tert-butyl hydroperoxide, methyl vinyl ketone) and a mitochondrial toxicant (antimycin A) with that of PT cells isolated from age-matched control rats, to test the hypothesis that PT cells from diabetic rats exhibit more cellular and mitochondrial injury than those from control rats when exposed to these toxicants. PT cells from diabetic rats exhibited higher basal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and higher mitochondrial membrane potential, demonstrating that the PT cells maintain the diabetic phenotype in primary culture. Incubation with either the oxidants or mitochondrial toxicant resulted in greater necrotic and apoptotic cell death, greater evidence of morphological damage, greater increases in ROS, and greater decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential in PT cells from diabetic rats than in those from control rats. Pretreatment with either the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine or a catalase mimetic provided equivalent protection of PT cells from both diabetic and control rats. Despite the greater susceptibility to oxidative and mitochondrial injury, both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial glutathione concentrations were markedly higher in PT cells from diabetic rats, suggesting an upregulation of antioxidant processes in diabetic kidney. These results support the hypothesis that primary cultures of PT cells from diabetic rats are a valid model in which to study renal cellular function in the diabetic state.

  3. Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) is co-stored with PACAP in projections from the rat melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Engelund, Anna; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Harrison, Adrian; Hannibal, Jens

    2010-05-01

    The retinal ganglion cell layer of the eye comprises a subtype of cells characterized by their intrinsic photosensitivity and expression of melanopsin (ipRGCs). These cells regulate a variety of non-image-forming (NIF) functions such as light entrainment of circadian rhythms, acute suppression of locomotor activity (masking), and pupillary light reflex. Two neurotransmitters have been identified in ipRGCs, glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP). To date, little is known about their release and interplay. Here, we describe the presence and co-localization of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2; a marker of glutamate signaling) and PACAP in ipRGCs and their projections in the brain. Nine adult male Wistar rats were assigned to one of three groups; anterograde tracing (n = 3), eye enucleation (n = 3), and untreated (n = 3). Under anaesthesia, rats were transcardially perfusion-fixated, after which the brains and eyes were removed for double immunohistochemical staining using a polyclonal anti-VGLUT2 antibody and a mouse monoclonal anti-PACAP antibody. Results revealed that VGLUT2- and PACAP-immunoreactivity (-ir) were present in ipRGCs and co-localized in their projections in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the intergeniculate leaflet, and the olivary pretectal nucleus. We conclude that there is evidence to support the use of glutamate and PACAP as neurotransmitters in NIF photoperception by rat ipRGCs, and that these neurotransmitters are co-stored and probably released from the same nerve terminals. Furthermore, we conclude that VGLUT2 is the preferred subtype of vesicular transporter used by these cells.

  4. DHRS3, a retinal reductase, is differentially regulated by retinoic acid and lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in THP-1 cells and rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Zolfaghari, Reza; Chen, Qiuyan

    2012-01-01

    Both retinoid status and inflammation have been shown to control the level of expression of retinoid homeostatic genes. In the present study, DHRS3, previously shown to possess retinal reductase activity, was identified by microarray analysis of THP-1 monocytes as a possible gene target of all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). In these cells, DHRS3 mRNA increased 30- to 40-fold after treatment with ≤20 nM RA for 24 h, while DHRS3 protein also increased. Of several synthetic retinoids tested, only Am580, a RA receptor-α-selective retinoid, increased DHRS3 mRNA expression. The full-length DHRS3 cDNA was cloned from rat liver and subjected to in vitro transcription-translation. Two major ∼30- and 35-kDa proteins were detected. In adult rat tissues, DHRS3 mRNA was most abundant in the adrenal gland, liver, and ovary. In the liver, DHRS3 is expressed in hepatocytes and possibly in all liver cells. To evaluate whether DHRS3 is regulated in the liver by RA and/or inflammatory stimuli, we treated rats for 6 h with RA or LPS or both. DHRS3 mRNA was doubled by RA but reduced by >90% after treatment with LPS in the absence and presence of RA. On the basis of our results, DHRS3 mRNA expression is regulated by RA in a tissue- or cell-type specific manner; the RA-induced increase in DHRS3 may contribute to retinoid storage; and a reduction of DHRS3 expression in the liver during inflammation may contribute to the perturbation of whole body vitamin A metabolism that has previously been shown to occur in conditions of inflammatory stress. PMID:22790594

  5. DHRS3, a retinal reductase, is differentially regulated by retinoic acid and lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in THP-1 cells and rat liver.

    PubMed

    Zolfaghari, Reza; Chen, Qiuyan; Ross, A Catharine

    2012-09-01

    Both retinoid status and inflammation have been shown to control the level of expression of retinoid homeostatic genes. In the present study, DHRS3, previously shown to possess retinal reductase activity, was identified by microarray analysis of THP-1 monocytes as a possible gene target of all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). In these cells, DHRS3 mRNA increased 30- to 40-fold after treatment with ≤20 nM RA for 24 h, while DHRS3 protein also increased. Of several synthetic retinoids tested, only Am580, a RA receptor-α-selective retinoid, increased DHRS3 mRNA expression. The full-length DHRS3 cDNA was cloned from rat liver and subjected to in vitro transcription-translation. Two major ∼30- and 35-kDa proteins were detected. In adult rat tissues, DHRS3 mRNA was most abundant in the adrenal gland, liver, and ovary. In the liver, DHRS3 is expressed in hepatocytes and possibly in all liver cells. To evaluate whether DHRS3 is regulated in the liver by RA and/or inflammatory stimuli, we treated rats for 6 h with RA or LPS or both. DHRS3 mRNA was doubled by RA but reduced by >90% after treatment with LPS in the absence and presence of RA. On the basis of our results, DHRS3 mRNA expression is regulated by RA in a tissue- or cell-type specific manner; the RA-induced increase in DHRS3 may contribute to retinoid storage; and a reduction of DHRS3 expression in the liver during inflammation may contribute to the perturbation of whole body vitamin A metabolism that has previously been shown to occur in conditions of inflammatory stress.

  6. Safety profiles of anti-VEGF drugs: bevacizumab, ranibizumab, aflibercept and ziv-aflibercept on human retinal pigment epithelium cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Deepika; Tarek, Mohamed; Caceres del Carpio, Javier; Ramirez, Claudio; Boyer, David; Kenney, M Cristina; Kuppermann, Baruch D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the safety profiles of antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs ranibizumab, bevacizumab, aflibercept and ziv-aflibercept on retinal pigment epithelium cells in culture. Methods Human retinal pigment epithelium cells (ARPE-19) were exposed for 24 h to four anti-VEGF drugs at 1/2×, 1×, 2× and 10× clinical concentrations. Cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential assay were performed to evaluate early apoptotic changes and rate of overall cell death. Results Cell viability decreased at 10× concentrations in bevacizumab (82.38%, p=0.0001), aflibercept (82.68%, p=0.0002) and ziv-aflibercept (77.25%, p<0.0001), but not at lower concentrations. However, no changes were seen in cell viability in ranibizumab-treated cells at all concentrations including 10×. Mitochondrial membrane potential was slightly decreased in 10× ranibizumab-treated cells (89.61%, p=0.0006) and 2× and 10× aflibercept-treated cells (88.76%, 81.46%; p<0.01, respectively). A larger reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential was seen at 1×, 2× and 10× concentrations of bevacizumab (86.53%, 74.38%, 66.67%; p<0.01) and ziv-aflibercept (73.50%, 64.83% and 49.65% p<0.01) suggestive of early apoptosis at lower doses, including the clinical doses. Conclusions At clinical doses, neither ranibizumab nor aflibercept produced evidence of mitochondrial toxicity or cell death. However, bevacizumab and ziv-aflibercept showed mild mitochondrial toxicity at clinically relevant doses. PMID:24836865

  7. Toxic action of advanced glycation end products on cultured retinal capillary pericytes and endothelial cells: relevance to diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chibber, R; Molinatti, P A; Rosatto, N; Lambourne, B; Kohner, E M

    1997-02-01

    The toxic effects of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on bovine retinal capillary pericytes (BRP) and endothelial cells (BREC) were studied. AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) was toxic to BRP. At a concentration of 500 micrograms/ml it reduced the BRP number to 48 +/- 3% (p < 0.05) of untreated controls, as determined by cell counting with haemocytometer. AGE-BSA was also toxic to bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) reducing cell number to 84 +/- 3.1% of untreated controls. Under similar conditions, low concentrations (62.5 micrograms/ml) of AGE-BSA were mitogenic to BREC increasing the cell proliferation to 156 +/- 11% (p < 0.05) above that of untreated controls. At a higher dose of 500 micrograms/ml AGE-BSA decreased the proliferation of BREC to 85 +/- 6% of untreated controls. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that BRP and BREC express the p60 AGE-receptor. Retinal capillary bed from the human also stained positively for the p60 AGE-receptor. Addition of 0.25 micrograms/ml of p60 AGE-receptor antibody was able to block the effects of AGE-BSA on BRP and BREC. The level of binding of [125I]-labelled AGE-BSA to the cell surface was small but significant among the three cell types. There was also an increase in the internalized pool of radioligand in BRP and BREC but this was very much lower than in BAEC. In all the cell types the internalized pool of [125I]-labelled AGE-BSA was much larger than the amount associated with the cell surface. Degradation products were not detected in the media over the 24-h incubation of the cells with [125I]AGE-BSA. The binding of [125I]-labelled AGE-BSA to the cell surface was prevented by the addition of p60 AGE-receptor. These results suggest that the interaction of AGE-modified proteins with the membrane-bound AGE-receptor may play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy.

  8. Cobalt-Induced Ototoxicity in Rat Postnatal Cochlear Organotypic Cultures.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Ding, Dalian; Salvi, Richard; Roth, Jerome A

    2015-10-01

    Cobalt (Co) is a required divalent metal used in the production of metal alloys, batteries, and pigments and is a component of vitamin B12. Excessive uptake of Co is neurotoxic causing temporary or permanent hearing loss; however, its ototoxic effects on the sensory hair cells, neurons, and support cells in the cochlea are poorly understood. Accordingly, we treated postnatal day 3 rat cochlear organotypic cultures with various doses and durations of CoCl2 and quantified the damage to the hair cells, peripheral auditory nerve fibers, and spiral ganglion neurons (SGN). Five-day treatment with 250 μM CoCl2 caused extensive damage to hair cells and neurons which increased with dose and treatment duration. CoCl2 caused greater damage to outer hair cells than inner hair cells; damage was greatest in the base of the cochlea and decreased towards the base. CoCl2 increased expression of superoxide radical in hair cells and SGNs and SGN loss was characterized by nuclear condensation and fragmentation, morphological features of apoptosis. CoCl2 treatment increased the expression of caspase-3 indicative of caspase-mediated programmed cell death. These results identify hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons as the main targets of Co ototoxicity in vitro and implicate the superoxide radical as a trigger of caspase-mediated ototoxicity.

  9. Cytopathogenicity of Naegleria fowleri for cultured rat neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fulford, D E; Bradley, S G; Marciano-Cabral, F

    1985-02-01

    The cytopathogenicity of Naegleria fowleri strain LEE (ATCC-30894) for cultured rat neuroblastoma cells (B-103) has been investigated. Both live N. fowleri amoebae and Naegleria lysates added to 51Cr-labeled B-103 cells caused release of radiolabel, which was dependent upon the ratio of amoebae to target cells or to the lysate concentration. Lysates of N. fowleri strains LEE, NF-66, NF-69, and HB-4 were equally injurious to B-103 target cells whereas lysates of strains 6088 and KUL were less cytotoxic. Highly pathogenic mouse-passaged strain LEE were less cytotoxic than axenically grown amoebae. Maximum cytotoxicity was observed in lysates from amoebae in late exponential or early stationary phase of growth. Cytopathogenicity of lysates was reduced after heating at 44 degrees C for 60 min or at 60 degrees C for 30 min. Cytotoxicity was stable during storage at 4 degrees C or at -20 degrees C for 26 h. Neither live amoebae nor lysates injured B-103 target cells at 4 degrees C. Live amoebae and lysates injured B-103 by a time, temperature, and concentration dependent process.

  10. Rat parotid gland cell differentiation in three-dimensional culture.

    PubMed

    Baker, Olga J; Schulz, David J; Camden, Jean M; Liao, Zhongji; Peterson, Troy S; Seye, Cheikh I; Petris, Michael J; Weisman, Gary A

    2010-10-01

    The use of polarized salivary gland cell monolayers has contributed to our understanding of salivary gland physiology. However, these cell models are not representative of glandular epithelium in vivo, and, therefore, are not ideal for investigating salivary epithelial functions. The current study has developed a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture model for rat Par-C10 parotid gland cells that forms differentiated acinar-like spheres on Matrigel. These 3D Par-C10 acinar-like spheres display characteristics similar to differentiated acini in salivary glands, including cell polarization, tight junction (TJ) formation required to maintain transepithelial potential difference, basolateral expression of aquaporin-3 and Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransporter-1, and responsiveness to the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol that is decreased by the anion channel blocker diphenylamine-2-carboxylic acid or chloride replacement with gluconate. Incubation of the spheres in the hypertonic medium increased the expression level of the water channel aquaporin-5. Further, the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma induced alterations in TJ integrity in the acinar-like spheres without affecting individual cell viability, suggesting that cytokines may affect salivary gland function by altering TJ integrity. Thus, 3D Par-C10 acinar-like spheres represent a novel in vitro model to study physiological and pathophysiological functions of differentiated acini.

  11. [New drug therapy for retinal degeneration].

    PubMed

    Ohguro, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal degeneration characterized by nyctalopia, ring scotoma, and bone-spicule pigmentation of the retina. So far, no effective therapy has been found for RP. As a possible molecular etiology of RP, retina-specific gene deficits are most likely involved, but little has been identified in terms of intracellular mechanisms leading to retinal photoreceptor cell death at post-translational levels. In order to find an effective therapy for RP, we must look for underlying common mechanisms that are responsible for the development of RP, instead of designing a specific therapy for each of the RP types with different causes. Therefore, in the present study, several animal models with different causes of RP were studied, including (1)Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats with a deficit of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) function caused by rhodopsin mutation; (2) P23H rats, (3) S334ter rats, (4) photo stress rats, (5) retinal degeneration (rd) mice with a deficit of phosphodiesterase(PDE) function; and (6) cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) model rats with a deficit of recoverin-dependent photoreceptor adaptation function. In each of these models, the following assessments were made in order to elucidate common pathological mechanisms among the models: (1) retinal function assessed by electroretinogram (ERG), (2) retinal morphology, (3) retinoid analysis, (4) rhodopsin regeneration, (5) rhodopsin phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, and (6) cytosolic cGMP levels. We found that unregulated photoreceptor adaptation processes caused by an imbalance of rhodopsin phosphorylation and dephosphorylation caused retinal dysfunction leading to photoreceptor cell death. As possible candidate drugs for normalizing these retinal dysfunctions and stopping further retinal degeneration, nilvadipine, a Ca channel blocker, retinoid derivatives, and anthocyanine were chosen and tested to determine their effect on the above animal models with

  12. Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Mar. 01, 2016 How does a detached or torn retina affect your vision? If a retinal tear is occurring, you may ...

  13. Retinal holes.

    PubMed

    Foos, R Y

    1978-09-01

    Holes of the peripheral retina, defined as full-thickness breaks of trophic origin with no associated flap or free operculum, were found in 136 (2.4%) eyes from 2,800 autopsied subjects. Primary retinal holes (those with no indication of a proximal causative lesion and with no lattice degeneration in either eye) occurred in only eight of the 5,600 eyes studied; all were unilateral, single, less than 0.25 disk diameter in size, within the basal zone, and in eyes from elderly subjects. Secondary holes were found in 128 (2.3%) of eyes and of these, lattice degeneration was the most common cause (103). Other lesions complicated by hole formation included zonular traction tufts (10), chorioretinitis (9), meridional folds (3), and pavingstone degeneration (2). Retinal holes in surgically aphakic eyes did not differ qualitatively or quantitatively from those in age-matched phakic eyes.

  14. Retinal proteins modified by 4-hydroxynonenal: identification of molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Kapphahn, Rebecca J; Giwa, Babatomiwa M; Berg, Kristin M; Roehrich, Heidi; Feng, Xiao; Olsen, Timothy W; Ferrington, Deborah A

    2006-07-01

    The reactive aldehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), is a product of lipid peroxidation that can covalently modify and inactivate proteins. Previously, we reported increased HNE modification of select retinal proteins resolved by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis in aged Fisher 344 x Brown Norway rats (Louie, J.L., Kapphahn, R.J., Ferrington, D.A., 2002. Proteasome function and protein oxidation in the aged retina. Exp. Eye Res. 75, 271-284). In the current study, quantitative assessment of HNE molar content using slot blot immunoassays showed HNE content is increased 30% in aged rat retina. In contrast, there was no age-related difference in HNE content in individual spots resolved by 2D gel electrophoresis suggesting the increased modification is likely on membrane proteins that are missing on 2D gels. The HNE-immunoreactive proteins resolved by 2D gel electrophoresis were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. These proteins are involved in metabolism, chaperone function, and fatty acid transport. Proteins that were frequently modified and had the highest molar content of HNE included triosephosphate isomerase, alpha enolase, heat shock cognate 70 and betaB2 crystallin. Immunochemical detection of HNE adducts on retinal sections showed greater immune reaction in ganglion cells, photoreceptor inner segment, and the inner plexiform layer. Identification of HNE modified proteins in two alternative model systems, human retinal pigment epithelial cells in culture (ARPE19) and human donor eyes, indicated that triosephosphate isomerase and alpha enolase are generally modified. These results identify a common subset of proteins that contain HNE adducts and suggest that select retinal proteins are molecular targets for HNE modification. PMID:16530755

  15. Effects of trypan blue on rat and rabbit embryos cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, H; Kishida, K; Ohno, Y; Tsurumi, K; Eto, K

    1993-11-01

    Mouse and rat whole embryo cultures are widely used in teratogenicity studies. We attempted to improve the technique of culturing rabbit embryo. Rabbit embryos of the Japanese White strain were explanted on day 9, 10 or 11 of gestation and cultured for 24 or 48 hr. Rabbit embryos on day 9 of gestation were cultured in 100% rabbit serum with a gas mixture containing 20% O(2) for the first 24 hr and 95% O(2) for the following 24 hr. Rabbit embryos on day 10 or 11 of gestation were cultured in 100, 80 or 60% rabbit serum with a gas mixture of 95% O(2) for 48 or 24 hr. The development of embryos cultured for 48 hr from day 9 or day 10 or for 24 hr from day 11 was nearly the same as that of embryos that had developed in vivo. These results indicate that rabbit embryo culture is a useful and promising technique in teratogenicity studies. We then examined the effects of trypan blue on cultured rat and rabbit embryos. Slc:SD rat embryos on day 9.5 of gestation were explanted and cultured in rat serum exposed to trypan blue (300-2700 mug/ml) for 48 hr. Rabbit embryos on day 9 or 10 of gestation were explanted and cultured in rabbit serum containing trypan blue (300-2700 mug/ml) for 48 or 24 hr. Cultured rat embryos exposed to trypan blue showed neural tube abnormalities, and all growth parameters were suppressed with increasing concentrations of trypan blue. However, trypan blue had no effect on cultured rabbit embryos. These results indicate that trypan blue has species-specific effects on embryos.

  16. Synthesis and migration of /sup 3/H-fucose-labeled glycoproteins in the retinal pigment epithelium of albino rats, as visualized by radioautography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, A.; Bennett, G.

    1987-03-01

    /sup 3/H-fucose was injected into the vitreous body of the eye(s) of 250-gm rats, which were then killed by means of an intracardiac perfusion with glutaraldehyde after intervals of 10 min, 1 and 4 hr, and 1 and 7 days. The eyes were removed and further fixed, and pieces of retina were processed for light and electron microscope radioautography. Light microscope radioautography showed that the pigment epithelial cells actively incorporated /sup 3/H-fucose label. The intensity of reaction peaked at 4 hr after injection of the label and then slowly declined. Quantitative electron microscope radioautography revealed that, at 10 min after /sup 3/H-fucose injection, over 70% of the label was localized to the Golgi apparatus, indicating that fucose residues are added to newly synthesized glycoproteins principally at this site. With time the proportion of label associated with the Golgi apparatus decreased, but that assigned to the infolded basal plasma membrane, the apical microvilli, and various apical lysosomes increased. These results indicate that in retinal pigment epithelial cells newly synthesized glycoproteins continuously migrate from the Golgi apparatus to lysosomes and to various regions of the plasma membrane. In this case, the membrane glycoproteins may play specific roles in receptor functions of the basal plasma membrane or phagocytic activities at the apical surface. Very little label migrated to Bruch's membrane, indicating either a very slow turnover or a paucity of fucose-containing glycoproteins at this site.

  17. Cell volume regulation in cultured human retinal Müller cells is associated with changes in transmembrane potential.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Juan M; Di Giusto, Gisela; Kalstein, Maia; Melamud, Luciana; Rivarola, Valeria; Ford, Paula; Capurro, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Müller cells are mainly involved in controlling extracellular homeostasis in the retina, where intense neural activity alters ion concentrations and osmotic gradients, thus favoring cell swelling. This increase in cell volume is followed by a regulatory volume decrease response (RVD), which is known to be partially mediated by the activation of K(+) and anion channels. However, the precise mechanisms underlying osmotic swelling and subsequent cell volume regulation in Müller cells have been evaluated by only a few studies. Although the activation of ion channels during the RVD response may alter transmembrane potential (Vm), no studies have actually addressed this issue in Müller cells. The aim of the present work is to evaluate RVD using a retinal Müller cell line (MIO-M1) under different extracellular ionic conditions, and to study a possible association between RVD and changes in Vm. Cell volume and Vm changes were evaluated using fluorescent probe techniques and a mathematical model. Results show that cell swelling and subsequent RVD were accompanied by Vm depolarization followed by repolarization. This response depended on the composition of extracellular media. Cells exposed to a hypoosmotic solution with reduced ionic strength underwent maximum RVD and had a larger repolarization. Both of these responses were reduced by K(+) or Cl(-) channel blockers. In contrast, cells facing a hypoosmotic solution with the same ionic strength as the isoosmotic solution showed a lower RVD and a smaller repolarization and were not affected by blockers. Together, experimental and simulated data led us to propose that the efficiency of the RVD process in Müller glia depends not only on the activation of ion channels, but is also strongly modulated by concurrent changes in the membrane potential. The relationship between ionic fluxes, changes in ion permeabilities and ion concentrations -all leading to changes in Vm- define the success of RVD. PMID:23451196

  18. Promotion on the differentiation of retinal Müller cells into retinal ganglion cells by Brn-3b

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhen-Kai; Cao, Lan; Zhang, Xue-Yong; Song, Wei-Tao; Xia, Xiao-Bo

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of Brn-3b in differentiation process of stem cells derived from retinal Müller cells into the ganglion cell. METHODS The passage culture method of Müller cells from retina of newborn Sprague Dawley rats was carried out by repeated incomplete pancreatic enzyme digestion method. The cells were detected by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS), immunohistochemistry technology and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine the purity. The third passage of cells was induced in the serum-free dedifferentiation medium. The expression of the specific markers Ki-67 and nestin of retinal stem cells was measured by RT-PCR and Western blot. The cell proliferation of retinal stem cells was detected by 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (Edu) staining. The cells were randomly divided into 5 groups as follows: group A: Brn-3bsiRNA group; group B: Brn-3b control siRNA group; group C: pGC-Brn-3b-green fluorescent protein (GFP) group; group D: pGC-GFP group; group E: control group (without any handling). The purified Müller cells were cultured for 3-7d, then, the percentage of ganglion cells was counted by immunofluorescence staining. RESULTS FACS demonstrated the purity of retinal Müller cells was more 97.44%. A few spherical cell spheres appeared. Immunofluorescence staining showed that stem cells within the spheres were positive for retinal stem cell-specific markers nestin (red fluorescence, 92.94%±6.48%) and Ki-67 (green fluorescence, 85.96%±6.04%). Meanwhile, RT-PCR analysis showed cell spheres in the culture to have expressed a battery of transcripts characteristic of stem cells such as nestin and Ki-67, which were absent in the Müller cells. Western blot analysis further confirmed the expression of nestin and Ki-67 in the cell spheres but not in the Müller cells. Edu staining showed most of the nuclei within the cell spheres were stained red (82.80%±6.65%), suggesting the new cell spheres had the capacity for

  19. Ototoxicity of paclitaxel in rat cochlear organotypic cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yang; Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Shi, Jian-rong; Salvi, Richard; Roth, Jerome A.

    2014-11-01

    Paclitaxel (taxol) is a widely used antineoplastic drug employed alone or in combination to treat many forms of cancer. Paclitaxel blocks microtubule depolymerization thereby stabilizing microtubules and suppressing cell proliferation and other cellular processes. Previous reports indicate that paclitaxel can cause mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss and some histopathologic changes in the mouse cochlea; however, damage to the neurons and the underlying cell death mechanisms are poorly understood. To evaluate the ototoxicity of paclitaxel in more detail, cochlear organotypic cultures from postnatal day 3 rats were treated with paclitaxel for 24 or 48 h with doses ranging from 1 to 30 μM. No obvious histopathologies were observed after 24 h treatment with any of the paclitaxel doses employed, but with 48 h treatment, paclitaxel damaged cochlear hair cells in a dose-dependent manner and also damaged auditory nerve fibers and spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) near the base of the cochlea. TUNEL labeling was negative in the organ of Corti, but positive in SGN with karyorrhexis 48 h after 30 μM paclitaxel treatment. In addition, caspase-6, caspase-8 and caspase-9 labeling was present in SGN treated with 30 μM paclitaxel for 48 h. These results suggest that caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways are involved in paclitaxel-induced damage of SGN, but not hair cells in cochlea. - Highlights: • Paclitaxel was toxic to cochlear hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. • Paclitaxel-induced spiral ganglion degeneration was apoptotic. • Paclitaxel activated caspase-6, -8 and -8 in spiral ganglion neurons.

  20. Stimulation of DNA synthesis in cultured rat alveolar type II cells

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, C.C.; McCormick-Shannon, K.; Robinson, P.C.; Mason, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Restoration of the alveolar epithelium after injury is thought to be dependent on the proliferation of alveolar type II cells. To understand the factors that may be involved in promoting type II cell proliferation in vivo, we determined the effect of potential mitogens and culture substrata on DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture. Type II cells cultured in basal medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) exhibited essentially no DNA synthesis. Factors that stimulated /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation included cholera toxin, epidermal growth factor, and rat serum. The greatest degree of stimulation was achieved by plating type II cells on an extracellular matrix prepared from bovine corneal endothelial cells and then by culturing the pneumocytes in medium containing rat serum, cholera toxin, insulin, and epidermal growth factor. Under conditions of stimulation of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation there was an increased DNA content per culture dish but no increase in cell number. The ability of various culture conditions to promote DNA synthesis in type II cells was verified by autoradiography. Type II cells were identified by the presence of cytoplasmic inclusions, which were visualized by tannic acid staining before autoradiography. These results demonstrate the importance of soluble factors and culture substratum in stimulating DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture.

  1. Enhancement of proliferation in a rat hepatocyte co-culture model after mitogenic stimulation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary mouse and rat hepatocyte cultures have long been the gold standard for assessment of cellular changes following chemical exposure. While helpful for assessing proliferative and responses in vitro, these cultures are limited to 1 or 2 days of incubation. Our motivation was...

  2. Hydroxylation, conjugation and sulfation of bile acids in primary monolayer cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Princen, H.M.; Meijer, P.

    1988-08-15

    Hydroxylation of lithocholic, chenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic and cholic acids was studied in monolayers of rat hepatocytes cultured for 76 h. The majority of added lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids was metabolized to beta-muricholic acid (56-76%). A small part of these bile acids (9%), however, and a considerable amount of deoxycholic and cholic acids (21%) were converted into metabolites more polar than cholic acid in the first culture period. Formation of these compounds decreased during the last day of culture. Bile acids synthesized after addition of (4-/sup 14/C)-cholesterol were almost entirely (97%) sulfated and/or conjugated, predominantly with taurine (54-66%), during culture. Sulfated bile acids were mainly composed of free bile acids. The ability of hepatocytes to sulfurylate bile acids declined with culture age. Thus, rat hepatocytes in primary monolayer culture are capable to sulfurylate bile acids and to hydroxylate trihydroxylated bile acids, suggesting formation of polyhydroxylated metabolites.

  3. Adeno-associated virus mediated SOD gene therapy protects the retinal ganglion cells from chronic intraocular pressure elevation induced injury via attenuating oxidative stress and improving mitochondrial dysfunction in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenmin; Tang, Luosheng; Zeng, Jun; Chen, Baihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to determine whether chronic intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation induces retinal oxidative stress and alters mitochondrial morphology and function of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and to explore the effects of AAV-SOD2 gene therapy on the RGC survival and mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods: Chronic experimental glaucoma was induced unilaterally in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by laser burns at trabecular meshwork and episcleral veins 2 times with an interval of one week. One eye of each rat was intravitreally pretreated with recombinant adeno-associated virus expressing SOD2 (AAV-SOD2) or recombinant AAV expressing GFP (AAV-GFP) 21 days before glaucoma induction. RGCs counting, morphometric analysis of retina and optic nerve, and detection of activities of retinal SOD2 and catalase, MDA, mitochondrial morphology, mitochondrial dynamin protein OPA1 and DRP-1 expressions were conducted at 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks. Results: Severe RGC loss, degeneration of optic nerve, reduced thickness of RGC layer and nerve fiber layer, significant decrease in total SOD and catalase activities, mitochondrial dysfunction and increased MDA were observed at 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks after glaucoma. Pretreatment with AAV-SOD2 significantly reduced MDA and attenuated the damage to RGCs through a mitochondria-related pathway. Conclusion: AAV mediated pre-treatment with SOD2 is able to attenuate oxidative stress and improve mitochondrial dysfunction of RGC and optic nerve secondary to glaucoma. Thus, SOD2 may be used to prevent the retinal RGCs from glaucoma, which provides a promising strategy for glaucoma therapy. PMID:27158370

  4. Some Rat Sensory Neurons in Culture Express Characteristics of Differentiated Pain Sensory Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccaglini, Paola I.; Hogan, Patrick G.

    1983-01-01

    Sensory neurons were dissociated from trigeminal ganglia or from dorsal root ganglia of rats, grown in culture, and examined for expression of properties of pain sensory cells. Many sensory neurons in culture are excited by low concentrations of capsaicin, reportedly a selective stimulus for pain sensory neurons. Many are excited by bradykinin, sensitized by prostaglandin E2, or specifically stained by an antiserum against substance P. These experiments provide a basis for the study of pain mechanisms in cell culture.

  5. The Apical Localization of Na+, K+-ATPase in Cultured Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Depends on Expression of the β2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Lobato-Álvarez, Jorge A.; Roldán, María L.; López-Murillo, Teresa del Carmen; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Bonilla-Delgado, José; Shoshani, Liora

    2016-01-01

    Na+, K+-ATPase, or the Na+ pump, is a key component in the maintenance of the epithelial phenotype. In most epithelia, the pump is located in the basolateral domain. Studies from our laboratory have shown that the β1 subunit of Na+, K+-ATPase plays an important role in this mechanism because homotypic β1-β1 interactions between neighboring cells stabilize the pump in the lateral membrane. However, in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the Na+ pump is located in the apical domain. The mechanism of polarization in this epithelium is unclear. We hypothesized that the apical polarization of the pump in RPE cells depends on the expression of its β2 subunit. ARPE-19 cells cultured for up to 8 weeks on inserts did not polarize, and Na+, K+-ATPase was expressed in the basolateral membrane. In the presence of insulin, transferrin and selenic acid (ITS), ARPE-19 cells cultured for 4 weeks acquired an RPE phenotype, and the Na+ pump was visible in the apical domain. Under these conditions, Western blot analysis was employed to detect the β2 isoform and immunofluorescence analysis revealed an apparent apical distribution of the β2 subunit. qPCR results showed a time-dependent increase in the level of β2 isoform mRNA, suggesting regulation at the transcriptional level. Moreover, silencing the expression of the β2 isoform in ARPE-19 cells resulted in a decrease in the apical localization of the pump, as assessed by the mislocalization of the α2 subunit in that domain. Our results demonstrate that the apical polarization of Na+, K+-ATPase in RPE cells depends on the expression of the β2 subunit. PMID:27774068

  6. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eun Jee; Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah; Cho, Jin Won; Lee, Joon H.

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  7. Retinal pigment epithelium transplantation: concepts, challenges, and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, P; Thomson, H A J; Luff, A J; Lotery, A J

    2015-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a single layer of cells that supports the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that are essential for retinal function. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment, and the primary pathogenic mechanism is thought to arise in the RPE layer. RPE cell structure and function are well understood, the cells are readily sustainable in laboratory culture and, unlike other cell types within the retina, RPE cells do not require synaptic connections to perform their role. These factors, together with the relative ease of outer retinal imaging, make RPE cells an attractive target for cell transplantation compared with other cell types in the retina or central nervous system. Seminal experiments in rats with an inherited RPE dystrophy have demonstrated that RPE transplantation can prevent photoreceptor loss and maintain visual function. This review provides an update on the progress made so far on RPE transplantation in human eyes, outlines potential sources of donor cells, and describes the technical and surgical challenges faced by the transplanting surgeon. Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cells, combined with novel surgical instrumentation, hold considerable promise, and support the concept of RPE transplantation as a regenerative strategy in AMD. PMID:26043704

  8. Retinal pigment epithelium transplantation: concepts, challenges, and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Alexander, P; Thomson, H A J; Luff, A J; Lotery, A J

    2015-08-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a single layer of cells that supports the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that are essential for retinal function. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment, and the primary pathogenic mechanism is thought to arise in the RPE layer. RPE cell structure and function are well understood, the cells are readily sustainable in laboratory culture and, unlike other cell types within the retina, RPE cells do not require synaptic connections to perform their role. These factors, together with the relative ease of outer retinal imaging, make RPE cells an attractive target for cell transplantation compared with other cell types in the retina or central nervous system. Seminal experiments in rats with an inherited RPE dystrophy have demonstrated that RPE transplantation can prevent photoreceptor loss and maintain visual function. This review provides an update on the progress made so far on RPE transplantation in human eyes, outlines potential sources of donor cells, and describes the technical and surgical challenges faced by the transplanting surgeon. Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cells, combined with novel surgical instrumentation, hold considerable promise, and support the concept of RPE transplantation as a regenerative strategy in AMD. PMID:26043704

  9. Metabolic Syndrome Triggered by High-Fructose Diet Favors Choroidal Neovascularization and Impairs Retinal Light Sensitivity in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Thierry, Magalie; Pasquis, Bruno; Acar, Niyazi; Grégoire, Stéphane; Febvret, Valérie; Buteau, Bénédicte; Gambert-Nicot, Ségolène; Bron, Alain M.; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine P.; Bretillon, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration are the leading causes of blindness in Western populations. Although it is a matter of controversy, large-scale population-based studies have reported increased prevalence of age-related macular degeneration in patients with diabetes or diabetic retinopathy. We hypothesized that metabolic syndrome, one of the major risk factors for type 2 diabetes, would represent a favorable environment for the development of choroidal neovascularization, the main complication of age-related macular degeneration. The fructose-fed rat was used as a model for metabolic syndrome in which choroidal neovascularization was induced by laser photocoagulation. Male Brown Norway rats were fed for 1, 3, and 6 months with a standard equilibrated chow diet or a 60%-rich fructose diet (n = 24 per time point). The animals expectedly developed significant body adiposity (+17%), liver steatosis at 3 and 6 months, hyperleptinemia at 1 and 3 months (two-fold increase) and hyperinsulinemia at 3 and 6 months (up to two-fold increase), but remained normoglycemic and normolipemic. The fructose-fed animals exhibited partial loss of rod sensitivity to light stimulus and reduced amplitude of oscillatory potentials at 6 months. Fructose-fed rats developed significantly more choroidal neovascularization at 14 and 21 days post-laser photocoagulation after 1 and 3 months of diet compared to animals fed the control diet. These results were consistent with infiltration/activation of phagocytic cells and up-regulation of pro-angiogenic gene expression such as Vegf and Leptin in the retina. Our data therefore suggested that metabolic syndrome would exacerbate the development of choroidal neovascularization in our experimental model. PMID:25380250

  10. Metabolic syndrome triggered by high-fructose diet favors choroidal neovascularization and impairs retinal light sensitivity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Thierry, Magalie; Pasquis, Bruno; Acar, Niyazi; Grégoire, Stéphane; Febvret, Valérie; Buteau, Bénédicte; Gambert-Nicot, Ségolène; Bron, Alain M; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine P; Bretillon, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration are the leading causes of blindness in Western populations. Although it is a matter of controversy, large-scale population-based studies have reported increased prevalence of age-related macular degeneration in patients with diabetes or diabetic retinopathy. We hypothesized that metabolic syndrome, one of the major risk factors for type 2 diabetes, would represent a favorable environment for the development of choroidal neovascularization, the main complication of age-related macular degeneration. The fructose-fed rat was used as a model for metabolic syndrome in which choroidal neovascularization was induced by laser photocoagulation. Male Brown Norway rats were fed for 1, 3, and 6 months with a standard equilibrated chow diet or a 60%-rich fructose diet (n = 24 per time point). The animals expectedly developed significant body adiposity (+17%), liver steatosis at 3 and 6 months, hyperleptinemia at 1 and 3 months (two-fold increase) and hyperinsulinemia at 3 and 6 months (up to two-fold increase), but remained normoglycemic and normolipemic. The fructose-fed animals exhibited partial loss of rod sensitivity to light stimulus and reduced amplitude of oscillatory potentials at 6 months. Fructose-fed rats developed significantly more choroidal neovascularization at 14 and 21 days post-laser photocoagulation after 1 and 3 months of diet compared to animals fed the control diet. These results were consistent with infiltration/activation of phagocytic cells and up-regulation of pro-angiogenic gene expression such as Vegf and Leptin in the retina. Our data therefore suggested that metabolic syndrome would exacerbate the development of choroidal neovascularization in our experimental model.

  11. Culture of hormone-dependent functional epithelial cells from rat thyroids.

    PubMed Central

    Ambesi-Impiombato, F S; Parks, L A; Coon, H G

    1980-01-01

    Primary cultures of rat thyroid cells were made in medium supplemented with 0.1--0.5% calf serum and containing six hormones or growth factors: insulin, thyrotropin, transferrin, hydrocortisone, somatostatin, and glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine acetate. The FRTL strain was purified by successive colonial isolations and was found to maintain highly differentiated features (secretion into the culture medium of physiological amounts of thyroglobulin and concentration of iodide by 100-fold). The FRTL strain has been observed for more than 3 years in continuous culture. It has maintained the same biochemical and morphological characteristics that typified the primary cultures of thyroid follicular cells immediately after their enzymatic release from the rat thyroid. Thyroid epithelial cells that were grown under more conventional cell culture conditions failed to retain these specialized characteristics. We show that maintenance in vitro of these specialized functions of rat thyroid follicular cells is dependent on low serum concentrations and supplementation with hormones in the primary cultures. Our observations indicate that this culture strategem may be aplicable to the general problem of maintenance of differentiated characteristics in cultures of other epithelial cells. Images PMID:6106191

  12. Organ culture study of effect of vitamin-A-deficiency on rat third molar development.

    PubMed

    Navia, J M; Snider, C; Punyasingh, J; Harris, S S

    1984-01-01

    A culture procedure for rat third molars suitable for nutritional-developmental studies is described. Unerupted third molars from 12-day-old rats were cultured in BGJb media containing 20 per cent rat serum and supplemented with 25 mM HEPES buffer, 25 mg ascorbic acid, 20 mg L-glutamine, 12 mg penicillin G and 10 mg streptomycin sulphate per 100 ml of media. Molars were cultured at the liquid-gas interphase using a 50 per cent O2, 45 per cent N2, 5 per cent CO2 gas mixture at 10 lb-psig (pounds per square inch guage). Molar cultures were maintained successfully for 9-14 days without evidence of necrosis, although they developed at a slower rate than in vivo. Molars cultured in 50 per cent O2 compared to those cultured in 21 per cent O2 for periods of 2, 4, 6 and 8 days had higher values for protein, alkaline phosphatase (AP), Ca, P and Ca/P. Vitamin-A-deficiency gave lower values for AP, Ca, P, Ca/P, 45Ca, 35S and [14C]-proline uptake. Histologically, A - molars had atrophic ameloblasts, some foci of squamous metaplasia and abnormal keratin formation. Thus, deficiency of vitamin A imposed during in-vitro development of rat third molars retarded dentinogenesis and interfered with early mineralization of enamel and dentine.

  13. Dependence on exogenous methionine of rat sarcoma and murine leukemia cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Koziorowska, J; Pieńkowska, K; Tautt, J

    1980-01-01

    A comparative study was performed on methionine auxotrophy of rat sarcoma and murine leukemia cells taken directly from the organism and grown in culture in media lacking methionine or in which methionine was substituted by homocysteine. Methionine auxotrophy was observed in both kinds of cells. At low levels of methionine in the media containing homocysteine rat sarcoma cells showed an increase in growth. Addition of homocysteine to the media with low levels of methionine did not influence the survival of murine leukemia cells.

  14. Matrigel and Activin A promote cell-cell contact and anti-apoptotic activity in cultured human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoling; Zhu, Deliang; Lian, Ruiling; Han, Yuting; Guo, Yonglong; Li, Zhijie; Tang, Shibo; Chen, Jiansu

    2016-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness among the aging population. Currently, replacement of diseased retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells with transplanted healthy RPE cells could be a feasible approach for AMD therapy. However, maintaining cell-cell contact and good viability of RPE cells cultured in vitro is difficult and fundamentally determines the success of RPE cell transplantation. This study was conducted to examine the role of Matrigel and Activin A (MA) in regulating cell-cell contact and anti-apoptotic activity in human RPE (hRPE) cells, as assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), immunofluorescence staining, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis, Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) analysis, mitochondrial membrane potential (△Ψ m) assays, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays and Western blotting. hRPE cells cultured in vitro could maintain their epithelioid morphology after MA treatment over at least 4 passages. The contact of N-cadherin to the lateral cell border was promoted in hRPE cells at P2 by MA. MA treatment also enhanced the expression of tight junction-associated genes and proteins, such as Claudin-1, Claudin-3, Occludin and ZO-1, as well as polarized ZO-1 protein distribution and barrier function, in cultured hRPE cells. Moreover, MA treatment decreased apoptotic cells, ROS and Bax and increased △Ψ m and Bcl2 in hRPE cells under serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis. In addition, MA treatment elevated the protein expression levels of β-catenin and its target proteins, including Cyclin D1, c-Myc and Survivin, as well as the gene expression levels of ZO-1, β-catenin, Survivin and TCF-4, all of which could be down-regulated by the Wnt/β-catenin pathway inhibitor XAV-939. Taken together, MA treatment could effectively promote cell-cell contact and anti-apoptotic activity in hRPE cells, partly involving the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. This study

  15. Expression of IGFBP-6 in a proliferative vitreoretinopathy rat model and its effects on retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong-Mei; Sheng, Min-Jie; Yu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    AIM To investigate the expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 (IGFBP-6) in a proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) model and its effects on proliferation and migration in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. METHODS A PVR Wistar rat model was established by the intravitreal injection of RPE-J cells combined with platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The expression levels of IGFBP-6 were tested by ELISA. ARPE-19 cell proliferation was evaluated by the MTS method, and cell migration was evaluated by wound healing assays. RESULTS The success rate of the PVR model was 89.3% (25/28). IGFBP-6 was expressed at higher levels in the vitreous, serum and retina of rats experiencing advanced PVR (grade 3) than in the control group (vitreous: 152.80±15.08ng/mL vs 105.44±24.81ng/mL, P>0.05; serum: 93.48±9.27ng/mL vs 80.59±5.20ng/mL, P<0.05; retina: 3.02±0.38ng/mg vs 2.05±0.53ng/mg, P<0.05). In vitro, IGFBP-6 (500ng/mL) inhibited the IGF-II (50ng/mL) induced ARPE-19 cell proliferation (OD value at 24h: from 1.38±0.05 to 1.30±0.02; 48h: from 1.44±0.06 to 1.35±0.05). However, it did not affect basal or VEGF-, TGF-β- and PDGF-induced cell proliferation. IGFBP-6 (500ng/mL) reduced the IGF-II (50ng/mL)-induced would healing rate [24h: from (43.91±3.85)% to (29.76±2.49)%; 48 h: from (66.09±1.67)% to (59.88±3.43)%]. CONCLUSION Concentrations of IGFBP-6 increased in the vitreous, serum, and retinas only in advanced PVR in vivo. IGFBP-6 also inhibited IGF-II-induced cell proliferation in a not dose or time dependent manner and migration. IGFBP-6 participates in the development of PVR and might play a protective role in PVR. PMID:24634859

  16. Mitochondrial "movement" and lens optics following oxidative stress from UV-B irradiation: cultured bovine lenses and human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) as examples.

    PubMed

    Bantseev, Vladimir; Youn, Hyun-Yi

    2006-12-01

    Mitochondria provide energy generated by oxidative phosphorylation and at the same time play a central role in apoptosis and aging. As a byproduct of respiration, the electron transport chain is known to be the major intracellular site for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Exposure to solar and occupational ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and thus production of ROS and subsequent cell death, has been implicated in a large spectrum of skin and ocular pathologies, including cataract. Retinal pigment epithelial cell apoptosis generates photoreceptor dysfunction and ultimately visual impairment. The purpose of this article was to characterize in vitro changes following oxidative stress with UV-B radiation in (a) ocular lens optics and cellular function in terms of mitochondrial dynamics of bovine lens epithelium and superficial cortical fiber cells and (b) human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells. Cultured bovine lenses and confluent cultures of ARPE-19 cells were irradiated with broadband UV-B radiation at energy levels of 0.5 and 1.0 J/cm(2). Lens optical function (spherical aberration) was monitored daily up to 14 days using an automated laser scanning system that was developed at the University of Waterloo. This system consists of a single collimated scanning helium-neon laser source that projects a thin (0.05 mm) laser beam onto a plain mirror mounted at 45 degrees on a carriage assembly. This mirror reflects the laser beam directly up through the scanner table surface and through the lens under examination. A digital camera captures the actual position and slope of the laser beam at each step. When all steps have been made, the captured data for each step position is used to calculate the back vertex distance for each position and the difference in that measurement between beams. To investigate mitochondrial movement, the mitochondria-specific fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123 was used. Time series were acquired with a Zeiss 510 (configuration Meta

  17. Branch retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Sadaf; Mirza, Sajid Ali; Shokh, Ishrat

    2008-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusions (RVO) are the second commonest sight threatening vascular disorder. Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) are the two basic types of vein occlusion. Branch retinal vein occlusion is three times more common than central retinal vein occlusion and- second only to diabetic retinopathy as the most common retinal vascular cause of visual loss. The origin of branch retinal vein occlusion undoubtedly includes both systemic factors such as hypertension and local anatomic factors such as arteriovenous crossings. Branch retinal vein occlusion causes a painless decrease in vision, resulting in misty or distorted vision. Current treatment options don't address the underlying aetiology of branch retinal vein occlusion. Instead they focus on treating sequelae of the occluded venous branch, such as macular oedema, vitreous haemorrhage and traction retinal detachment from neovascularization. Evidences suggest that the pathogenesis of various types of retinal vein occlusion, like many other ocular vascular occlusive disorders, is a multifactorial process and there is no single magic bullet that causes retinal vein occlusion. A comprehensive management of patients with retinal vascular occlusions is necessary to correct associated diseases or predisposing abnormalities that could lead to local recurrences or systemic event. Along with a review of the literature, a practical approach for the management of retinal vascular occlusions is required, which requires collaboration between the ophthalmologist and other physicians: general practitioner, cardiologist, internist etc. as appropriate according to each case. PMID:19385476

  18. Approaches for detecting lysosomal alkalinization and impaired degradation in fresh and cultured RPE cells: evidence for a role in retinal degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Sonia; Coffey, Erin E.; Lu, Wennan; Lim, Jason C.; Beckel, Jonathan M.; Laties, Alan M.; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Mitchell, Claire H.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes contribute to a multitude of cellular processes, and the pH of the lysosomal lumen plays a central mechanistic role in many of these functions. In addition to controlling the rate of enzymatic degradation for material delivered through autophagic or phagocytotic pathways, lysosomal pH regulates events such as lysosomal fusion with autophagosomes and the release of lysosomal calcium into the cytoplasm. Disruption of either the steady state lysosomal pH or of the regulated manipulations to lysosomal pH may be pathological. For example, chloroquine elevates the lysosomal pH of retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells and triggers a retinopathy characterized by the accumulation of lipofuscin-like material in both humans and animals. Compensatory responses to restore lysosomal pH are observed; new data illustrate that chronic chloroquine treatment increases mRNA expression of the lysosomal/autophagy master transcription factor TFEB and of the vesicular proton pump vHATPase in the RPE/choroid of mice. An elevated lysosomal pH with upregulation of TFEB and vHATPase resembles the pathology in fibroblasts of patients with mutant presenilin 1 (PS1), suggesting a common link between age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and Alzheimer’s disease. While the absolute rise in pH is often small, elevations of only a few tenths of a pH unit can have a major impact on both lysosomal function and the accumulation of waste over decades. Accurate measurement of lysosomal pH can be complex, and imprecise measurements have clouded the field. Protocols to optimize pH measurement from fresh and cultured cells are discussed, and indirect measurements to confirm changes in lysosomal pH and degradative capacity are addressed. The ability of reacidifying treatments to restore degradative function confirms the central role of lysosomal pH in these functions and identifies potential approaches to treat diseases of accumulation like AMD and Alzheimer’s disease. In summary, various

  19. Efficacy and Safety of Human Retinal Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Semo, Ma'ayan; Haamedi, Nasrin; Stevanato, Lara; Carter, David; Brooke, Gary; Young, Michael; Coffey, Peter; Sinden, John; Patel, Sara; Vugler, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the long-term efficacy and safety of human retinal progenitor cells (hRPC) using established rodent models. Methods Efficacy of hRPC was tested initially in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) dystrophic rats immunosuppressed with cyclosporine/dexamethasone. Due to adverse effects of dexamethasone, this drug was omitted from a subsequent dose-ranging study, where different hRPC doses were tested for their ability to preserve visual function (measured by optokinetic head tracking) and retinal structure in RCS rats at 3 to 6 months after grafting. Safety of hRPC was assessed by subretinal transplantation into wild type (WT) rats and NIH-III nude mice, with analysis at 3 to 6 and 9 months after grafting, respectively. Results The optimal dose of hRPC for preserving visual function/retinal structure in dystrophic rats was 50,000 to 100,000 cells. Human retinal progenitor cells integrated/survived in dystrophic and WT rat retina up to 6 months after grafting and expressed nestin, vimentin, GFAP, and βIII tubulin. Vision and retinal structure remained normal in WT rats injected with hRPC and there was no evidence of tumors. A comparison between dexamethasone-treated and untreated dystrophic rats at 3 months after grafting revealed an unexpected reduction in the baseline visual acuity of dexamethasone-treated animals. Conclusions Human retinal progenitor cells appear safe and efficacious in the preclinical models used here. Translational Relevance Human retinal progenitor cells could be deployed during early stages of retinal degeneration or in regions of intact retina, without adverse effects on visual function. The ability of dexamethasone to reduce baseline visual acuity in RCS dystrophic rats has important implications for the interpretation of preclinical and clinical cell transplant studies. PMID:27486556

  20. Stimulation of DNA and Collagen Synthesis by Autologous Growth Factor in Cultured Fetal Rat Calvaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canalis, Ernesto; Peck, William A.; Raisz, Lawrence G.

    1980-11-01

    Conditioned medium derived from organ or cell cultures prepared from 19- to 21-day fetal rat calvaria stimulated the incorporation of [3H]proline into collagen and of [3H]thymidine into DNA in organ cultures of the same tissue. Addition of cortisol enhanced the effect on collagen but not on DNA synthesis. These effects appeared to be due to a nondialyzable and heat-stable growth factor.

  1. Retinal synaptic regeneration via microfluidic guiding channels.

    PubMed

    Su, Ping-Jung; Liu, Zongbin; Zhang, Kai; Han, Xin; Saito, Yuki; Xia, Xiaojun; Yokoi, Kenji; Shen, Haifa; Qin, Lidong

    2015-08-28

    In vitro culture of dissociated retinal neurons is an important model for investigating retinal synaptic regeneration (RSR) and exploring potentials in artificial retina. Here, retinal precursor cells were cultured in a microfluidic chip with multiple arrays of microchannels in order to reconstruct the retinal neuronal synapse. The cultured retinal cells were physically connected through microchannels. Activation of electric signal transduction by the cells through the microchannels was demonstrated by administration of glycinergic factors. In addition, an image-based analytical method was used to quantify the synaptic connections and to assess the kinetics of synaptic regeneration. The rate of RSR decreased significantly below 100 μM of inhibitor glycine and then approached to a relatively constant level at higher concentrations. Furthermore, RSR was enhanced by chemical stimulation with potassium chloride. Collectively, the microfluidic synaptic regeneration chip provides a novel tool for high-throughput investigation of RSR at the cellular level and may be useful in quality control of retinal precursor cell transplantation.

  2. Retinal synaptic regeneration via microfluidic guiding channels

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ping-Jung; Liu, Zongbin; Zhang, Kai; Han, Xin; Saito, Yuki; Xia, Xiaojun; Yokoi, Kenji; Shen, Haifa; Qin, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    In vitro culture of dissociated retinal neurons is an important model for investigating retinal synaptic regeneration (RSR) and exploring potentials in artificial retina. Here, retinal precursor cells were cultured in a microfluidic chip with multiple arrays of microchannels in order to reconstruct the retinal neuronal synapse. The cultured retinal cells were physically connected through microchannels. Activation of electric signal transduction by the cells through the microchannels was demonstrated by administration of glycinergic factors. In addition, an image-based analytical method was used to quantify the synaptic connections and to assess the kinetics of synaptic regeneration. The rate of RSR decreased significantly below 100 μM of inhibitor glycine and then approached to a relatively constant level at higher concentrations. Furthermore, RSR was enhanced by chemical stimulation with potassium chloride. Collectively, the microfluidic synaptic regeneration chip provides a novel tool for high-throughput investigation of RSR at the cellular level and may be useful in quality control of retinal precursor cell transplantation. PMID:26314276

  3. Retinal synaptic regeneration via microfluidic guiding channels.

    PubMed

    Su, Ping-Jung; Liu, Zongbin; Zhang, Kai; Han, Xin; Saito, Yuki; Xia, Xiaojun; Yokoi, Kenji; Shen, Haifa; Qin, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    In vitro culture of dissociated retinal neurons is an important model for investigating retinal synaptic regeneration (RSR) and exploring potentials in artificial retina. Here, retinal precursor cells were cultured in a microfluidic chip with multiple arrays of microchannels in order to reconstruct the retinal neuronal synapse. The cultured retinal cells were physically connected through microchannels. Activation of electric signal transduction by the cells through the microchannels was demonstrated by administration of glycinergic factors. In addition, an image-based analytical method was used to quantify the synaptic connections and to assess the kinetics of synaptic regeneration. The rate of RSR decreased significantly below 100 μM of inhibitor glycine and then approached to a relatively constant level at higher concentrations. Furthermore, RSR was enhanced by chemical stimulation with potassium chloride. Collectively, the microfluidic synaptic regeneration chip provides a novel tool for high-throughput investigation of RSR at the cellular level and may be useful in quality control of retinal precursor cell transplantation. PMID:26314276

  4. Transplantation of Neural Stem Cells Cultured in Alginate Scaffold for Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharafkhah, Ali; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid; Semsar-Kazerooni, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Study Design This study investigated the effects of transplantation of alginate encapsulated neural stem cells (NSCs) on spinal cord injury in Sprague-Dawley male rats. The neurological functions were assessed for 6 weeks after transplantation along with a histological study and measurement of caspase-3 levels. Purpose The aim of this study was to discover whether NSCs cultured in alginate transplantation improve recovery from spinal cord injury. Overview of Literature Spinal cord injury is one of the leading causes of disability and it has no effective treatment. Spinal cord injury can also cause sensory impairment. With an impetus on using stem cells therapy in various central nervous system settings, there is an interest in using stem cells for addressing spinal cord injury. Neural stem cell is one type of stem cells that is able to differentiate to all three neural lineages and it shows promise in spinal injury treatment. Furthermore, a number of studies have shown that culturing NSCs in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds like alginate could enhance neural differentiation. Methods The NSCs were isolated from 14-day-old rat embryos. The isolated NSCs were cultured in growth media containing basic fibroblast growth factor and endothelial growth factor. The cells were characterized by differentiating to three neural lineages and they were cultured in an alginate scaffold. After 7 days the cells were encapsulated and transplanted in a rat model of spinal cord injury. Results Our data showed that culturing in an alginate 3D scaffold and transplantation of the NSCs could improve neurological outcome in a rat model of spinal cord injury. The inflammation scores and lesion sizes and also the activity of caspase-3 (for apoptosis evaluation) were less in encapsulated neural stem cell transplantation cases. Conclusions Transplantation of NSCs that were cultured in an alginate scaffold led to a better clinical and histological outcome for recovery from spinal cord injury in

  5. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, Tracy L.; Perry, Cassandra H.; St Claire, Robert L.; Brouwer, Kim L.R.

    2012-05-15

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR{sup ®} technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na{sup +}-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA

  6. Mechanism of soluble beta-amyloid 25-35 neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Lili; Hu, Weimin; Li, Guanglai

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations of soluble beta-amyloid 25-35 (Aβ25-35) on cell viability, calcium overload, and PI3K-p85 expression in cultured cortical rat neurons. Primary cultured cerebral cortical neurons of newborn rats were divided randomly into six groups. Five groups were treated with soluble Aβ25-35 at concentrations of 10nmol/L, 100nmol/L, 1μmol/L, 10μmol/L, or 30μmol/L. Cell Counting Kit-8 staining was used to measure cell viability, laser-scanning confocal imaging was used to detect changes in intracellular free calcium concentration, and western blot assay was used to measure neuronal PI3K-p85 expression. Soluble Aβ25-35 was found to reduce cell viability and induce calcium overload in primary cultured rat cerebral cortical neurons, in a concentration-dependent manner. At certain concentrations, soluble Aβ25-35 also increased neuronal PI3K-p85 expression. These findings reveal that soluble Aβ25-35 reduces the viability of cultured cerebral cortical rat neurons. The neurotoxicity mechanism may involve calcium overload and disruption of insulin signal transduction pathways. PMID:26940239

  7. Mechanism of soluble beta-amyloid 25-35 neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Lili; Hu, Weimin; Li, Guanglai

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations of soluble beta-amyloid 25-35 (Aβ25-35) on cell viability, calcium overload, and PI3K-p85 expression in cultured cortical rat neurons. Primary cultured cerebral cortical neurons of newborn rats were divided randomly into six groups. Five groups were treated with soluble Aβ25-35 at concentrations of 10nmol/L, 100nmol/L, 1μmol/L, 10μmol/L, or 30μmol/L. Cell Counting Kit-8 staining was used to measure cell viability, laser-scanning confocal imaging was used to detect changes in intracellular free calcium concentration, and western blot assay was used to measure neuronal PI3K-p85 expression. Soluble Aβ25-35 was found to reduce cell viability and induce calcium overload in primary cultured rat cerebral cortical neurons, in a concentration-dependent manner. At certain concentrations, soluble Aβ25-35 also increased neuronal PI3K-p85 expression. These findings reveal that soluble Aβ25-35 reduces the viability of cultured cerebral cortical rat neurons. The neurotoxicity mechanism may involve calcium overload and disruption of insulin signal transduction pathways.

  8. Characteristics of rat megakaryocyte colonies and their progenitors in agar culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.L.; Rolovic, Z.; Evatt, B.L.; Sewell, E.T.

    1985-11-01

    The characteristics of megakaryocyte colonies that develop from megakaryocyte progenitors of rat bone marrow stimulated by rat spleen-conditioned medium (SCM) in agar culture were investigated. Colony frequency was optimal on day 7 and increased relative to both the number of cells plated and the concentration of SCM used. Colonies were categorized as small cell and big cell. Small-cell colonies had a greater proliferative potential, with a mean of 25 cells/colony. Big-cell colonies averaged 15 cells/colony. The ratio of big-cell to small-cell colonies was 0.69 +/- 0.29. Granulocyte-macrophage colonies, which were also stimulated by SCM, accounted for 70% +/- 15% of the total colonies in the cultures. Cytocidal experiments with tritiated thymidine reduced megakaryocyte colony formation by 45% and granulocyte-macrophage colony formation by 21%. The properties of rat, mouse, and human megakaryocyte progenitors as assayed in vitro are compared.

  9. The rat whole embryo culture assay using the Dysmorphology Score system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cindy; Panzica-Kelly, Julie; Augustine-Rauch, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The rat whole embryo culture (WEC) system has been used extensively for characterizing teratogenic properties of test chemicals. In this chapter, we describe the methodology for culturing rat embryos as well as a new morphological score system, the Dysmorphology Score (DMS) system for assessing morphology of mid gestation (gestational day 11) rat embryos. In contrast to the developmental stage focused scoring associated with the Brown and Fabro score system, this new score system assesses the respective degree of severity of dysmorphology, which delineates normal from abnormal morphology of specific embryonic structures and organ systems. This score system generates an approach that allows rapid identification and quantification of adverse developmental findings, making it conducive for characterization of compounds for teratogenic properties and screening activities.

  10. Antidiabetic effect of taurine in cultured rat skeletal l6 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Sun Hee; Chang, Kyung Ja

    2013-01-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a sulfur-containing β-amino acid, is found in all animal cells at millimolar concentrations and has been reported to show various health promoting activities including antidiabetic properties. The beneficial effects of taurine in diabetes mellitus have been known. However, the exact mechanism of hypoglycemic action of taurine is not properly defined. In this study, we investigated antidiabetic effect of taurine in the cell culture system using rat skeletal muscle cells. In cultured rat skeletal L6 myotubes, we studied the effect of taurine (0-100 μM) on glucose uptake to plasma membrane from the aspects of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. Taurine stimulated glucose uptake in a dose-dependent manner by activating AMPK signaling. From these results, it may suggest that taurine show antidiabetic effect by stimulating insulin-independent glucose uptake in rat skeletal muscle.

  11. Mutations in IFT172 cause isolated retinal degeneration and Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bujakowska, Kinga M; Zhang, Qi; Siemiatkowska, Anna M; Liu, Qin; Place, Emily; Falk, Marni J; Consugar, Mark; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Antonio, Aline; Lonjou, Christine; Carpentier, Wassila; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; den Hollander, Anneke I; Cremers, Frans P M; Leroy, Bart P; Gai, Xiaowu; Sahel, José-Alain; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; Collin, Rob W J; Zeitz, Christina; Audo, Isabelle; Pierce, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles present on most mammalian cells. The assembly and maintenance of primary cilia are facilitated by intraflagellar transport (IFT), a bidirectional protein trafficking along the cilium. Mutations in genes coding for IFT components have been associated with a group of diseases called ciliopathies. These genetic disorders can affect a variety of organs including the retina. Using whole exome sequencing in three families, we identified mutations in Intraflagellar Transport 172 Homolog [IFT172 (Chlamydomonas)] that underlie an isolated retinal degeneration and Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Extensive functional analyses of the identified mutations in cell culture, rat retina and in zebrafish demonstrated their hypomorphic or null nature. It has recently been reported that mutations in IFT172 cause a severe ciliopathy syndrome involving skeletal, renal, hepatic and retinal abnormalities (Jeune and Mainzer-Saldino syndromes). Here, we report for the first time that mutations in this gene can also lead to an isolated form of retinal degeneration. The functional data for the mutations can partially explain milder phenotypes; however, the involvement of modifying alleles in the IFT172-associated phenotypes cannot be excluded. These findings expand the spectrum of disease associated with mutations in IFT172 and suggest that mutations in genes originally reported to be associated with syndromic ciliopathies should also be considered in subjects with non-syndromic retinal dystrophy.

  12. Identification of retinal ganglion cell neuroprotection conferred by platelet-derived growth factor through analysis of the mesenchymal stem cell secretome

    PubMed Central

    DeKorver, Nicholas W.; Levasseur, Victoria A.; Osborne, Andrew; Tassoni, Alessia; Lorber, Barbara; Heller, Janosch P.; Villasmil, Rafael; Bull, Natalie D.

    2014-01-01

    The development of neuroprotective strategies to attenuate retinal ganglion cell death could lead to novel therapies for chronic optic neuropathies such as glaucoma. Intravitreal transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells slows retinal ganglion cell death in models of optic nerve injury, but the mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we characterized the neuroprotective effects of mesenchymal stem cells and mesenchymal stem cell-derived factors in organotypic retinal explant culture and an in vivo model of ocular hypertensive glaucoma. Co-culture of rat and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with retinal explants increased retinal ganglion cell survival, after 7 days ex vivo, by ∼2-fold and was associated with reduced apoptosis and increased nerve fibre layer and inner plexiform layer thicknesses. These effects were not demonstrated by co-culture with human or mouse fibroblasts. Conditioned media from mesenchymal stem cells conferred neuroprotection, suggesting that the neuroprotection is mediated, at least partly, by secreted factors. We compared the concentrations of 29 factors in human mesenchymal stem cell and fibroblast conditioned media, and identified 11 enriched in the mesenchymal stem cell secretome. Treatment of retinal explants with a cocktail of these factors conferred retinal ganglion cell neuroprotection, with factors from the platelet-derived growth factor family being the most potent. Blockade of platelet-derived growth factor signalling with neutralizing antibody or with small molecule inhibitors of platelet-derived growth factor receptor kinase or downstream phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase eliminated retinal ganglion cell neuroprotection conferred by mesenchymal stem cell co-culture. Intravitreal injection of platelet-derived growth factor -AA or -AB led to profound optic nerve neuroprotection in vivo following experimental induction of elevated intraocular pressure. These data demonstrate that mesenchymal stem cells secrete a

  13. Beacon[47-73] inhibits glucocorticoid secretion and growth of cultured rat and human adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Carraro, Gianni; Rebuffat, Piera; Spinazzi, Raffaella; Nussdorfer, Gastone G; Rucinski, Marcin; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2004-09-01

    Evidence has been recently provided that beacon, an ubiquitin-like protein overexpressed in the hypothalamus of Israeli sand rat, is also expressed in several endocrine glands of the Wistar rat, including adrenal cortex. Moreover, it has been shown that the in vivo administration of beacon[47-73] (hereinafter, beacon) evokes within 60 min a marked decrease in the plasma concentrations of ACTH and corticosterone. Hence, we have investigated the effect of beacon (4x10(-9) or 4x10(-7) M) on the secretion and growth of cultured rat and human zona fasciculata/reticularis (ZF/R) cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detected beacon mRNA in all human adrenal cortexes examined. A 3-h exposure to beacon was ineffective, but prolonged (24 and 96 h) exposures significantly lowered basal corticosterone and cortisol secretion from cultured rat and human ZF/R cells, respectively. Moreover, beacon (4x10(-7) M) counteracted the secretagogue action of 10(-8) M ACTH on cultured cells. The 96-h exposure to beacon concentration-dependently decreased basal proliferation rate of cultured cells, without inducing significant changes in the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells. Beacon (4x10(-7) M) significantly inhibited the proliferogenic effect of 10(-8) M adrenomedullin. In light of the involvement of ubiquitin-like proteins in the control of cell cycle and protein sorting and degradation, the hypothesis is advanced that the inhibitory effect of beacon on the secretion and growth of cultured rat ZF/R cells may be connected to its stimulating effect on proteolysis of steroidogenic enzymes and proteins involved in cell replication.

  14. Implantation of ultrathin, biofunctionalized polyimide membranes into the subretinal space of rats.

    PubMed

    Julien, Sylvie; Peters, Tobias; Ziemssen, Focke; Arango-Gonzalez, Blanca; Beck, Susanne; Thielecke, Hagen; Büth, Heiko; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Sirova, Milada; Rossmann, Pavel; Rihova, Blanka; Schacht, Etienne; Dubruel, Peter; Zrenner, Eberhart; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2011-06-01

    Subretinal implants aim to replace the photoreceptor function in patients suffering from degenerative retinal disease by topically applying electrical stimuli in the subretinal space. Critical obstacles in the design of high-resolution subretinal implants include the proximity of stimulating electrodes to the target cells and enabling nutrient flow between the retina and the choroid. The present work evaluates the adhesion, migration and survival of retinal cells on an ultrathin (5 μm), highly porous (Ø 1 μm spaced 3 μm), gelatin-coated polyimide (PI) membrane. The biocompatibility was examined in mice indicating a good tolerance upon subcutaneous implantation with only a mild inflammatory response. In addition, organotypic cultures of rat retina evidenced that the porous membrane allowed the necessary nutrient flow for the retinal cell survival and maintenance. A transscleral implantation technique was applied to position the membrane into the subretinal space of rats. The effect on the obtained retinal integration was investigated in vivo using scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). In 12 out of 18 rat eyes, the implant was successfully placed subretinally. SLO and OCT demonstrated complete retinal attachment and fluorescein angiography showed no retinal vascular abnormalities over and around the implant, immediately after and up to four weeks after the implantation. Histological examination of the eyes showed a close attachment of a thin fibrocyte layer to the implant, the occlusion of the pores by living cells and the survival of some photoreceptors at the implantation site.

  15. Genetic pediatric retinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Say, Emil Anthony T.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary pediatric retinal diseases are a diverse group of disorders with pathologies affecting different cellular structures or retinal development. Many can mimic typical pediatric retinal disease such as retinopathy of prematurity, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema. Multisystem involvement is frequently seen in hereditary pediatric retinal disease. A thorough history coupled with a good physical examination can oftentimes lead the ophthalmologist or pediatrician to the correct genetic test and correct diagnosis. In some instances, evaluation of parents or siblings may be required to determine familial involvement when the history is inconclusive or insufficient and clinical suspicion is high.

  16. Genetic pediatric retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Say, Emil Anthony T

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary pediatric retinal diseases are a diverse group of disorders with pathologies affecting different cellular structures or retinal development. Many can mimic typical pediatric retinal disease such as retinopathy of prematurity, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema. Multisystem involvement is frequently seen in hereditary pediatric retinal disease. A thorough history coupled with a good physical examination can oftentimes lead the ophthalmologist or pediatrician to the correct genetic test and correct diagnosis. In some instances, evaluation of parents or siblings may be required to determine familial involvement when the history is inconclusive or insufficient and clinical suspicion is high. PMID:27625880

  17. Contrasting nephropathic responses to oral administration of extract of cultured Penicillium polonicum in rat and primate.

    PubMed

    Mantle, Peter G; McHugh, Katharine M; Fincham, John E

    2010-08-01

    Liquid- or solid substrate-cultured Penicillium polonicum administered in feed to rats over several days evokes a histopathological response in kidney involving apoptosis and abnormal mitosis in proximal tubules. The amphoteric toxin is yet only partly characterized, but can be isolated from cultured sporulating biomass in a fraction that is soluble in water and ethanol, and exchangeable on either anion- or cation-exchange resins. After several weeks of treatment renal proximal tubule distortion became striking on account of karyocytomegaly, but even treatment for nearly two years remained asymptomatic. Extract from a batch of solid substrate fermentation of P. polonicum on shredded wheat was incorporated into feed for rats during four consecutive days, and also given as an aqueous solution by oral gavage to a vervet monkey daily for 10 days. Treatment was asymptomatic for both types of animal. Rat response was evident as the typical renal apoptosis and karyomegaly. In contrast there was no such response in the primate; and neither creatinine clearance nor any haematological characteristic or serum component concentration deviated from a control or from historical data for this primate. The contrast is discussed concerning other negative findings for P. polonicum in pigs and hamsters. Renal karyomegaly, as a common rat response to persistent exposure to ochratoxin A, is not known in humans suspected as being exposed to more than the usual trace amounts of dietary ochratoxin A. Therefore the present findings question assumptions that human response to ochratoxin A conforms to that in the rat.

  18. Neuropeptide Y stimulates retinal neural cell proliferation--involvement of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Alvaro, Ana Rita; Martins, João; Araújo, Inês M; Rosmaninho-Salgado, Joana; Ambrósio, António F; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2008-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36 amino acid peptide widely present in the CNS, including the retina. Previous studies have demonstrated that NPY promotes cell proliferation of rat post-natal hippocampal and olfactory epithelium precursor cells. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of NPY on cell proliferation of rat retinal neural cells. For this purpose, primary retinal cell cultures expressing NPY, and NPY Y(1), Y(2), Y(4) and Y(5) receptors [Alvaro et al., (2007) Neurochem. Int., 50, 757] were used. NPY (10-1000 nM) stimulated cell proliferation through the activation of NPY Y(1), Y(2) and Y(5) receptors. NPY also increased the number of proliferating neuronal progenitor cells (BrdU(+)/nestin(+) cells). The intracellular mechanisms coupled to NPY receptors activation that mediate the increase in cell proliferation were also investigated. The stimulatory effect of NPY on cell proliferation was reduced by L-nitroarginine-methyl-esther (L-NAME; 500 microM), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4, 3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 20 microM), a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor or U0126 (1 microM), an inhibitor of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2). In conclusion, NPY stimulates retinal neural cell proliferation, and this effect is mediated through nitric oxide-cyclic GMP and ERK 1/2 pathways.

  19. Genetic networks controlling retinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Chona, Felix R.; Khan, Amna N.; Chan, Chun K.; Moore, Anthony N.; Dash, Pramod K.; Hernandez, M. Rosario; Lu, Lu; Chesler, Elissa J.; Manly, Kenneth F.; Williams, Robert W.; Geisert, Eldon E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The present study defines genomic loci underlying coordinate changes in gene expression following retinal injury. Methods A group of acute phase genes expressed in diverse nervous system tissues was defined by combining microarray results from injury studies from rat retina, brain, and spinal cord. Genomic loci regulating the brain expression of acute phase genes were identified using a panel of BXD recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains. Candidate upstream regulators within a locus were defined using single nucleotide polymorphism databases and promoter motif databases. Results The acute phase response of rat retina, brain, and spinal cord was dominated by transcription factors. Three genomic loci control transcript expression of acute phase genes in brains of BXD RI mouse strains. One locus was identified on chromosome 12 and was highly correlated with the expression of classic acute phase genes. Within the locus we identified the inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2) as a candidate upstream regulator. Id2 was upregulated as an acute phase transcript in injury models of rat retina, brain, and spinal cord. Conclusions We defined a group of transcriptional changes associated with the retinal acute injury response. Using genetic linkage analysis of natural transcript variation, we identified regulatory loci and candidate regulators that control transcript levels of acute phase genes. PMID:16288200

  20. Chemokine Mediated Monocyte Trafficking into the Retina: Role of Inflammation in Alteration of the Blood-Retinal Barrier in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rangasamy, Sampathkumar; McGuire, Paul G.; Franco Nitta, Carolina; Monickaraj, Finny; Oruganti, Sreenivasa R.; Das, Arup

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation in the diabetic retina is mediated by leukocyte adhesion to the retinal vasculature and alteration of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB). We investigated the role of chemokines in the alteration of the BRB in diabetes. Animals were made diabetic by streptozotocin injection and analyzed for gene expression and monocyte/macrophage infiltration. The expression of CCL2 (chemokine ligand 2) was significantly up-regulated in the retinas of rats with 4 and 8 weeks of diabetes and also in human retinal endothelial cells treated with high glucose and glucose flux. Additionally, diabetes or intraocular injection of recombinant CCL2 resulted in increased expression of the macrophage marker, F4/80. Cell culture impedance sensing studies showed that purified CCL2 was unable to alter the integrity of the human retinal endothelial cell barrier, whereas monocyte conditioned medium resulted in significant reduction in cell resistance, suggesting the relevance of CCL2 in early immune cell recruitment for subsequent barrier alterations. Further, using Cx3cr1-GFP mice, we found that intraocular injection of CCL2 increased retinal GFP+ monocyte/macrophage infiltration. When these mice were made diabetic, increased infiltration of monocytes/macrophages was also present in retinal tissues. Diabetes and CCL2 injection also induced activation of retinal microglia in these animals. Quantification by flow cytometry demonstrated a two-fold increase of CX3CR1+/CD11b+ (monocyte/macrophage and microglia) cells in retinas of wildtype diabetic animals in comparison to control non-diabetic ones. Using CCL2 knockout (Ccl2−/−) mice, we show a significant reduction in retinal vascular leakage and monocyte infiltration following induction of diabetes indicating the importance of this chemokine in alteration of the BRB. Thus, CCL2 may be an important therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetic macular edema. PMID:25329075

  1. Smooth muscle myosin regulation by serum and cell density in cultured rat lung connective tissue cells.

    PubMed

    Babij, P; Zhao, J; White, S; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Periasamy, M; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    RNA and protein analyses were used to detect expression of SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) in cultured adult rat lung connective tissue cells (RL-90). Smooth muscle MHC mRNA expression in confluent cells grown in 10% serum was approximately 50% of the level in adult stomach. Similar results were obtained in cells cultured at low density (25% confluency) in 1% serum. However, in low-density cultures transferred to 10% serum for 24 h, the level of MHC mRNA decreased to approximately 20% of that in adult stomach. Smooth muscle alpha-actin showed a pattern of expression similar to that for smooth muscle MHC. Expression of nonmuscle MHC-A mRNA was higher in all culture conditions compared to stomach. MHC-A mRNA expression was less in low-density cultures in low serum and increased when low-density cultures were transferred to 10% serum for 24 h. MHC-B mRNA expression was less in low- vs. high-density cultures. In contrast to MHC-A, however, MHC-B mRNA expression in low-density cultures was higher in low serum. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting with SM1-specific antibody demonstrated the presence of the SM1 protein isoform as well as reactivity to a protein band migrating slightly faster than SM2. These results demonstrate that cultured rat lung connective tissue cells express smooth muscle MHC and that expression is modulated by culture conditions.

  2. Cultured Ito cells of rat liver express the alpha 2-macroglobulin gene.

    PubMed

    Andus, T; Ramadori, G; Heinrich, P C; Knittel, T; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1987-11-01

    Ito cells were isolated from rat liver and kept in culture for up to 13 days. The capability of the Ito cells to synthesize alpha 2-macroglobulin was analyzed at different times after isolation and by pulse-chase experiments. Newly synthesized alpha 2-macroglobulin was determined by immunoprecipitation followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. alpha 2-Macroglobulin synthesis was hardly detectable in Ito cells and their media 3 days after plating. However, 5-11 days after the isolation of the cells, increasing amounts of alpha 2-macroglobulin were synthesized. The results of pulse-chase experiments performed on day 7 showed that radioactively labeled alpha 2-macroglobulin decreased in the intracellular compartment and increased in the culture medium. alpha 2-Macroglobulin was identified by immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing and non-reducing conditions. Furthermore, when unlabeled alpha 2-macroglobulin was added during the immunoprecipitation, a competition was observed. Incubation of pancreatic elastase with culture medium of rat Ito cells or rat hepatocytes led to the same cleavage products as found with alpha 2-macroglobulin. alpha 2-Macroglobulin-specific mRNA could be demonstrated by Northern blot analysis of total RNA extracted from rat Ito cells. Under the conditions where alpha 2-macroglobulin was synthesized in Ito cells, no synthesis of alpha 1-macroglobulin, alpha 1-inhibitor 3, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, alpha 1-acute-phase globulin (T-kininogen) and albumin could be demonstrated. It is concluded that alpha 2-macroglobulin is a true secretory protein of rat Ito cells in culture. This could be of importance for collagen metabolism in liver diseases. PMID:2444437

  3. Functional studies of rat, porcine, and human pancreatic islets cultured in ten commercially available media.

    PubMed

    Holmes, M A; Clayton, H A; Chadwick, D R; Bell, P R; London, N J; James, R F

    1995-10-27

    There have been no extensive studies investigating the effect of tissue culture media on the in vitro functional characteristics of rat, porcine and human Islets of Langerhans. We therefore aimed to compare ten commercially available tissue culture media on the basis of their ability to maintain islet viability. Following isolation, islets were cultured free-floating in the ten media (RPMI 1640-11mM glucose (control), RPMI 1640-2.2mM glucose, Dulbecco's MEM, TCM 199, CMRL 1066, Iscove's MEM, Waymouth's MEM, Serum-Free medium, Ex-cell 300, Ham's F-12) and viability was assessed after 24 hr, 3 days, and 7 days on the basis of macroscopic appearance, cell membrane integrity, and insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation both by dynamic incubation and by perifusion. Each islet species demonstrated physiological insulin release characteristics in all media--however, it was possible to distinguish between the media by comparing the stimulation indices calculated from the insulin release studies. Significantly higher stimulation indices were produced in Iscove's MEM for rat islets, in Ham's F-12 for porcine islets and in CMRL 1066 for human islets. Over the entire culture period a significant deterioration in function was observed in all species cultured in the control media, although this was reversed when islets were cultured in the optimal media. Furthermore, in the case of porcine and human islets a significant improvement in function over the seven-day period was noted in the optimal media. In conclusion, of the commercially available media, the optimal tissue culture medium for rat islets is Iscove's MEM, for porcine islets is Ham's F-12, and for human islets is CMRL 1066. PMID:7482747

  4. Identification of differentially expressed genes in aflatoxin B1-treated cultured primary rat hepatocytes and Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Harris, A J; Shaddock, J G; Manjanatha, M G; Lisenbey, J A; Casciano, D A

    1998-08-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a mutagen and hepatocarcinogen in rats and humans, is a contaminant of the human food supply, particularly in parts of Africa and Asia. AFB1-induced changes in gene expression may play a part in the development of the toxic, immunosuppressive and carcinogenic properties of this fungal metabolite. An understanding of the-role of AFB1 in modulating gene regulation should provide insight regarding mechanisms of AFB1-induced carcinogenesis. We used three PCR-based subtractive techniques to identify AFB1-responsive genes in cultured primary rat hepatocyte RNA: differential display PCR (DD-PCR), representational difference analysis (RDA) and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). Each of the three techniques identified AFB1-responsive genes, although no individual cDNA was isolated by more than one technique. Nine cDNAs isolated using DD-PCR, RDA or SSH were found to represent eight genes that are differentially expressed as a result of AFB1 exposure. Genes whose mRNA levels were increased in cultured primary rat hepatocytes after AFB1 treatment were corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), cytochrome P450 4F1 (CYP4F1), alpha-2 microglobulin, C4b-binding protein (C4BP), serum amyloid A-2 and glutathione S-transferase Yb2 (GST). Transferrin and a small CYP3A-like cDNA had reduced mRNA levels after AFB1 exposure. Full-length CYP3A mRNA levels were increased. When liver RNA from AFB1-treated male F344 rats was evaluated for transferrin, CBG, GST, CYP3A and CYP4F1 expression, a decrease in transferrin mRNA and an increase in CBG, GST, CYP3A and CYP4F1 mRNA levels was also seen. Analysis of the potential function of these genes in maintaining cellular homeostasis suggests that their differential expression could contribute to the toxicity associated with AFB1 exposure.

  5. Protocol for Culturing Sympathetic Neurons from Rat Superior Cervical Ganglia (SCG)

    PubMed Central

    Zareen, Neela; Greene, Lloyd A.

    2009-01-01

    The superior cervical ganglia (SCG) in rats are small, glossy, almond-shaped structures that contain sympathetic neurons. These neurons provide sympathetic innervations for the head and neck regions and they constitute a well-characterized and relatively homogeneous population (4). Sympathetic neurons are dependent on nerve growth factor (NGF) for survival, differentiation and axonal growth and the wide-spread availability of NGF facilitates their culture and experimental manipulation (2, 3, 6). For these reasons, cultured sympathetic neurons have been used in a wide variety of studies including neuronal development and differentiation, mechanisms of programmed and pathological cell death, and signal transduction (1, 2, 5, and 6). Dissecting out the SCG from newborn rats and culturing sympathetic neurons is not very complicated and can be mastered fairly quickly. In this article, we will describe in detail how to dissect out the SCG from newborn rat pups and to use them to establish cultures of sympathetic neurons. The article will also describe the preparatory steps and the various reagents and equipment that are needed to achieve this. PMID:19229183

  6. Ketamine-induced apoptosis in cultured rat cortical neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Takadera, Tsuneo . E-mail: t-takadera@hokuriku-u.ac.jp; Ishida, Akira; Ohyashiki, Takao

    2006-01-15

    Recent data suggest that anesthetic drugs cause neurodegeneration during development. Ketamine is frequently used in infants and toddlers for elective surgeries. The purpose of this study is to determine whether glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is involved in ketamine-induced apoptosis. Ketamine increased apoptotic cell death with morphological changes which were characterized by cell shrinkage, nuclear condensation or fragmentation. In addition, insulin growth factor-1 completely blocked the ketamine-induced apoptotic cell death. Ketamine decreased Akt phosphorylation. GSK-3 is known as a downstream target of Akt. The selective inhibitors of GSK-3 prevented the ketamine-induced apoptosis. Moreover, caspase-3 activation was accompanied by the ketamine-induced cell death and inhibited by the GSK-3 inhibitors. These results suggest that activation of GSK-3 is involved in ketamine-induced apoptosis in rat cortical neurons.

  7. Change of embryotoxic susceptibility to di-n-butyltin dichloride in cultured rat embryos.

    PubMed

    Ema, M; Iwase, T; Iwase, Y; Ohyama, N; Ogawa, Y

    1996-01-01

    Di-n-butylin dichloride (DBTCl), which is commonly used as heat and light stabilizer for polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics, is a teratogen in vivo. In the present study, the toxic effects were investigated of DBTCl on cultured rat embryos during three different stages of organogenesis. Rat embryos explanted on gestational day (GD) 8.5, GD 9.5, and GD 11.5 were cultured for 68, 46, and 48 h and were exposed to a range of DBTCl concentrations for the first 24, 46, and the last 46 h of culture, respectively. Significant decreases in the placental diameter at > or = 10 ng/ml and in the number of somite pairs and the morphological score at 30 ng/ml were noted in embryos cultured from GD 8.5. Significant decreases in the yolk sac diameter and the crown-rump length at 100 ng/ml, in the number of somite pairs at > or = 50 ng/ml, and in the morphological score at > or = 30 ng/ml were found in embryos cultured from GD 9.5. No adverse effects on these parameters were detected in embryos cultured from GD 11.5 even at 300 ng/ml. Dysmorphogenesis in embryos cultured from GD 8.5, GD 9.5, and GD 11.5 was observed at > or = 10, > or = 50, and 300 ng/ml, respectively. Incomplete turning and craniofacial defects in embryos cultured from GD 8.5 and GD 9.5 and defects of the forelimb buds and tail in embryos cultured from GD 11.5 were frequently observed. These results show that in vitro exposure to DBTCl interferes with normal development of embryos during three different stages of organogenesis and that susceptibility to the embryotoxicity, including the dysmorphogenic potential of DBTCl, varies with developmental stage. PMID:8896720

  8. Role of apolipoprotein A-I in HDL binding to a rat hepatoma cell in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, B.A.

    1985-01-01

    The binding of HDL to rat Fu5AH hepatoma cells at 4/sup 0/, and uptake and degradation at 37/sup 0/, was investigated in monolayer cultures. HDL, free of apo E and apo A-IV, was obtained from the plasma of nephrotic rats (HDLne). /sup 125/I-labeled HDLne bound to the cells in a specific, saturable manner. By Scatchard analysis, two classes of binding sites were obtained: a high affinity binding site (Kd = 1.25 +/- 0.023 ..mu..g/ml, or 5 x 10/sup -9/ M), and a lower affinity site (Kd = 45 +/- 15 ..mu..g/ml, or 1.8 x 10/sup -7/ M). In competitive binding experiments, normal rat HDL was nearly as effective as HDLne, but rat VLDL and human lipoproteins were ineffective. Rat apo A-I/phospholipid complexes also did not complete effectively for HDLne binding, although they were capable of binding to the cells. However, LDL (1.02 < d < 1.063) from nephrotic rat plasma, containing 20% of apo A-I, was as effective as rat HDL in competing for HDLne binding when the competition was expressed as a function of apo A-I content. Control experiments indicated that labeled apo A-I from HDLne did not exchange appreciably with unlabeled apo A-I on the LDLne. When the hepatoma cells were allowed to internalize and degrade HDLne at 37/sup 0/, the acid-soluble products (iodotyrosine and iodide) were derived almost entirely from the breakdown of apo A-I. We conclude that the rat hepatoma cell (Fu5AH) has high affinity HDL binding sites which recognize apo A-I-lipid complexes in which apo A-I an appropriate conformation.

  9. Resveratrol Prevents Retinal Dysfunction by Regulating Glutamate Transporters, Glutamine Synthetase Expression and Activity in Diabetic Retina.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kaihong; Yang, Na; Wang, Duozi; Li, Suping; Ming, Jian; Wang, Jing; Yu, Xuemei; Song, Yi; Zhou, Xue; Yang, Yongtao

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of resveratrol (RSV) on retinal functions, glutamate transporters (GLAST) and glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in diabetic rats retina, and on glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression in high glucose-cultured Müller cells. The electroretinogram was used to evaluate retinal functions. Müller cells cultures were prepared from 5- to 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The expression of GLAST and GS was examined by qRT-PCR, ELISA and western-blotting. Glutamate uptake was measured as (3)H-glutamate contents of the lysates. GS activity was assessed by a spectrophotometric assay. 1- to 7-month RSV administrations (5 and 10 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated hyperglycemia and weight loss in diabetic rats. RSV administrations also significantly attenuated diabetes-induced decreases in amplitude of a-wave in rod response, decreases in amplitude of a-, and b-wave in cone and rod response and decreases in amplitude of OP2 in oscillatory potentials. 1- to 7-month RSV treatments also significantly inhibited diabetes-induced delay in OP2 implicit times in scotopic 3.0 OPS test. The down-regulated mRNA and protein expression of GLAST and GS in diabetic rats retina was prevented by RSV administrations. In high glucose-treated cultures, Müller cells' glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression were decreased significantly compared with normal control cultures. RSV (10, 20, and 30 mmol/l) significantly inhibited the HG-induced decreases in glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression (at least P < 0.05). These beneficial results suggest that RSV may be considered as a therapeutic option to prevent from diabetic retinopathy.

  10. Cocaine Causes Apoptotic Death in Rat Mesencephalon and Striatum Primary Cultures.

    PubMed

    Lepsch, Lucilia B; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Scavone, Critoforo

    2015-01-01

    To study cocaine's toxic effects in vitro, we have used primary mesencephalic and striatal cultures from rat embryonic brain. Treatment with cocaine causes a dramatic increase in DNA fragmentation in both primary cultures. The toxicity induced by cocaine was paralleled with a concomitant decrease in the microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) and/or neuronal nucleus protein (NeuN) staining. We also observed in both cultures that the cell death caused by cocaine was induced by an apoptotic mechanism, confirmed by TUNEL assay. Therefore, the present paper shows that cocaine causes apoptotic cell death and inhibition of the neurite prolongation in striatal and mesencephalic cell culture. These data suggest that if similar neuronal damage could be produced in the developing human brain, it could account for the qualitative or quantitative defects in neuronal pathways that cause a major handicap in brain function following prenatal exposure to cocaine. PMID:26295051

  11. Cocaine Causes Apoptotic Death in Rat Mesencephalon and Striatum Primary Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lepsch, Lucilia B.; Planeta, Cleopatra S.; Scavone, Critoforo

    2015-01-01

    To study cocaine's toxic effects in vitro, we have used primary mesencephalic and striatal cultures from rat embryonic brain. Treatment with cocaine causes a dramatic increase in DNA fragmentation in both primary cultures. The toxicity induced by cocaine was paralleled with a concomitant decrease in the microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) and/or neuronal nucleus protein (NeuN) staining. We also observed in both cultures that the cell death caused by cocaine was induced by an apoptotic mechanism, confirmed by TUNEL assay. Therefore, the present paper shows that cocaine causes apoptotic cell death and inhibition of the neurite prolongation in striatal and mesencephalic cell culture. These data suggest that if similar neuronal damage could be produced in the developing human brain, it could account for the qualitative or quantitative defects in neuronal pathways that cause a major handicap in brain function following prenatal exposure to cocaine. PMID:26295051

  12. Extracellular matrix components influence DNA synthesis of rat hepatocytes in primary culture

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, N.; Tomomura, A.; Sattler, C.A.; Sattler, G.L.; Kleinman, H.K.; Pitot, H.C.

    1986-12-01

    The effects of several extracellular matrix components (EMCs) - fibronectin (Fn), laminin (Ln), type I (C-I) and type IV (C-IV) collagen - on DNA synthesis in rat hepatocytes in primary culture were examined by both quantitative scintillation spectrometry and autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation. Hepatocytes cultured on Fn showed the most active DNA synthesis initiated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) with decreasing levels of (/sup 3/H)thymidine uptake exhibited in the cell cultured on C-IV, C-I, and Ln, respectively. The decreasing level of DNA synthesis in hepatocytes cultured on Fn, C-IV, C-I, and Ln respectively was not influenced by cell density. The number of EGF receptors of hepatocytes was also not influenced by EMCs. These data suggest that EMCs modify hepatocyte DNA synthesis by means of post-EGF-receptor mechanisms which are regulated by both growth factors and cell density.

  13. Effects of Trichostatin A on drug uptake transporters in primary rat hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Ramboer, Eva; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The present study was set up to investigate the effects of Trichostatin A (TSA), a prototypical epigenetic modifier, on the expression and activity of hepatic drug uptake transporters in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. To this end, the expression of the sinusoidal transporters sodium-dependent taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) and organic anion transporting polypeptide 4 (Oatp4) was monitored by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunoblotting. The activity of the uptake transporters was analyzed using radiolabeled substrates and chemical inhibitors. Downregulation of the expression and activity of Oatp4 and Ntcp was observed as a function of the cultivation time and could not be counteracted by TSA. In conclusion, the epigenetic modifier TSA does not seem to exert a positive effect on the expression and activity of the investigated uptake transporters in primary rat hepatocyte cultures. PMID:26648816

  14. Statistical analysis of dendritic spine distributions in rat hippocampal cultures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dendritic spines serve as key computational structures in brain plasticity. Much remains to be learned about their spatial and temporal distribution among neurons. Our aim in this study was to perform exploratory analyses based on the population distributions of dendritic spines with regard to their morphological characteristics and period of growth in dissociated hippocampal neurons. We fit a log-linear model to the contingency table of spine features such as spine type and distance from the soma to first determine which features were important in modeling the spines, as well as the relationships between such features. A multinomial logistic regression was then used to predict the spine types using the features suggested by the log-linear model, along with neighboring spine information. Finally, an important variant of Ripley’s K-function applicable to linear networks was used to study the spatial distribution of spines along dendrites. Results Our study indicated that in the culture system, (i) dendritic spine densities were "completely spatially random", (ii) spine type and distance from the soma were independent quantities, and most importantly, (iii) spines had a tendency to cluster with other spines of the same type. Conclusions Although these results may vary with other systems, our primary contribution is the set of statistical tools for morphological modeling of spines which can be used to assess neuronal cultures following gene manipulation such as RNAi, and to study induced pluripotent stem cells differentiated to neurons. PMID:24088199

  15. Regulation of period 1 expression in cultured rat pineal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukuhara, Chiaki; Dirden, James C.; Tosini, Gianluca

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro expression of Period 1 (Per1), Period 2 (Per2) and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) genes in the rat pineal gland to understand the mechanism(s) regulating the expression of these genes in this organ. Pineals, when maintained in vitro for 5 days, did not show circadian rhythmicity in the expression of any of the three genes monitored. Norepinephrine (NE) induced AA-NAT and Per1, whereas its effect on Per2 was negligible. Contrary to what was observed in other systems, NE stimulation did not induce circadian expression of Per1. The effect of NE on Per1 level was dose- and receptor subtype-dependent, and both cAMP and cGMP induced Per1. Per1 was not induced by repeated NE - or forskolin - stimulation. Protein synthesis was not necessary for NE-induced Per1, but it was for reduction of Per1 following NE stimulation. Per1 transcription in pinealocytes was activated by BMAL1/CLOCK. Our results indicate that important differences are present in the regulation of these genes in the mammalian pineal. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. [The effect of the amino acid combinations on cell proliferation in tissue cultures in old rats].

    PubMed

    Chalisova, N I; Kontsevaia, E A; Zhekalov, A N; Siniachkin, D A

    2012-01-01

    In organotypic tissue culture, the effect of the 20 coded amino acids combinations, in the effective concentration of 0.05 ng/ml, on the cell proliferation development in the spleen, myocardium, pancreas and brain cortex explants in 24 months rats was investigated. The combinations of two amino acids (stimulating and inhibiting proliferation) produced in the tissue culture the stimulating effect, exceeding by 8-10% as compared to the isolating effect of the stimulating amino acid. The results obtained form the base for the further synthesis of new effective dipeptides to be used to increase the regeneration of tissues when aging. PMID:23130534

  17. Changes in expression of a functional G sub i protein in cultured rat heart cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, I.S.; Gaa, S.T.; Rogers, T.B. )

    1988-07-01

    The muscarinic cholinergic agonist, carbachol, and pertussis toxin were used to examine the functional status of the guanine nucleotide-binding protein that inhibits adenylate cyclase (G{sub i}) in cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes. The isoproterenol stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in myocyte membranes and adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in intact cells (4 days in culture) were insensitive to carbachol. However, in cells cultured for 11 days, carbachol inhibited isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation by 30%. Angiotensin II (ANG II) was also found to inhibit isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation in day 11 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Pertussis toxin treatment reversed the inhibitory effects of both ANG II and carbachol, suggesting a role for G{sub i} in the process. Carbachol binding to membranes from day 4 cells was relatively insensitive to guanine nucleotides when compared with binding to membranes from day 11 or adult cells. Furthermore, pertussis toxin-mediated {sup 32}P incorporation into a 39- to 41-kDa substrate in day 11 membranes was increased 3.2-fold over that measured in day 4 membranes. These findings support the view that, although G{sub i} is expressed, it is nonfunctional in 4-day-old cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes and acquisition of functional G{sub i} is dependent on culture conditions. Furthermore, the ANG II receptor can couple to G{sub i} in heart.

  18. Characterization of a primary bile ductular cell culture from the livers of rats during extrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Sirica, A. E.; Sattler, C. A.; Cihla, H. P.

    1985-01-01

    The establishment of novel bile ductular cell cultures was accomplished with the use of explants of a hyperplastic bile ductular tissue preparation obtained from rat livers at 10 to 15 weeks after bile duct ligation or a bile ductular cell fraction isolated from this tissue preparation by a procedure involving Percoll density gradient centrifugation. Observations made on these primary explant and monolayer bile ductular cell cultures were limited to the first 3 days of culture where the morphologic features of the bile ductular epithelium remained fairly well preserved, while fibroblast contamination was found to be very low. These cultured cells also retained over this period a high specific activity for the bile ductular cell marker enzyme gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, as well as possessed measurable but decreasing specific activities for leucine aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase. Karyotypic analysis of the cultured monolayer cells further showed them to be diploid. In addition, preliminary transplantation studies demonstrated the presence of well-differentiated bile ductular-like structures following inoculation of the freshly isolated bile ductular cell fraction into the interscapular fat pads of recipient rats. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2861743

  19. Therapy of Chronic Cardiosclerosis in WAG Rats Using Cultures of Cardiovascular Cells Enriched with Cardiac Stem Cell.

    PubMed

    Chepeleva, E V; Pavlova, S V; Malakhova, A A; Milevskaya, E A; Rusakova, Ya L; Podkhvatilina, N A; Sergeevichev, D S; Pokushalov, E A; Karaskov, A M; Sukhikh, G T; Zakiyan, S M

    2015-11-01

    We developed a protocol for preparing cardiac cell culture from rat heart enriched with regional stem cells based on clonogenic properties and proliferation in culture in a medium with low serum content. Experiments on WAG rats with experimental ischemic myocardial damage showed that implantation of autologous regional stem cells into the left ventricle reduced the volume of cicatricial tissue, promoted angiogenesis in the damaged zone, and prevented the risk of heart failure development.

  20. The effect of supplementation of amino acids and taurine to modified KSOM culture medium on rat embryo development.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuomi; Morimoto, Kayoko; Shima, Kaoru; Yoshimura, Yuki; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Osamu; Matsuda, Junichiro; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2016-11-01

    The rat is widely used as a laboratory animal for research. In particular, genetically engineered rats are essential for production of animal models of several diseases. Although embryo manipulation techniques are needed to produce them, such technology for rat preimplantation embryos is not as advanced as it is for mouse embryos. One reason is that in vitro culture systems for preimplantation embryos are limited in rats. Therefore, we intended to develop a new culture system for rat preimplantation embryos focusing on supplementation of amino acids as nutrition to the culture media. First, we found that taurine, glycine, glutamate, and alanine were abundant in the oviductal fluid of Wistar rats. The profile of taurine and these three amino acids was unchanged during the estrous cycle and from Days 0 to 3 of pregnancy (Day 0; vaginal plug was confirmed). Second, we assessed the effect of phosphate and phenol red on the development of rat zygotes and confirmed that they caused two-cell block. Third, we examined the effect of changing the medium on zygote development because addition of amino acids into culture medium causes ammonium accumulation, which is detrimental to embryo development. Blastocyst formation was suppressed in cultures with no medium change (P = 0.004; decreased to approximately one-fourth of that with medium change). Fourth, we examined the effect of supplementation of these three amino acids and taurine to modified potassium simplex optimized medium (KSOM). The zygote development rates were increased by the three amino acids and taurine in a concentration-dependent manner at 48, 72, and 96 hours (P = 0.001, 0.005, and 0.009, respectively) in culture. Finally, we confirmed that blastocysts cultured in modified KSOM had the capacity to develop to full term after implantation. These results showed that not only the supply of nutrients but also removal of wastes and toxicants is important for culture of rat preimplantation embryos.

  1. Involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in early retinal neuropathy of streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats: therapeutic potential of brain-derived neurotrophic factor for dopaminergic amacrine cells.

    PubMed

    Seki, Masaaki; Tanaka, Takayuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki; Usui, Tomoaki; Fukuchi, Takeo; Ikeda, Kazuhito; Abe, Haruki; Takei, Nobuyuki

    2004-09-01

    Although neurotrophins have been assessed as candidate therapeutic agents for neural complications of diabetes, their involvement in diabetic retinopathy has not been fully characterized. We found that the protein and mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat retinas were reduced to 49% (P < 0.005) and 74% (P < 0.05), respectively, of those of normal control animals. In addition, dopaminergic amacrine cells appeared to be degenerating in the diabetic rat retinas, as revealed by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity. Overall TH protein levels in the retina were decreased to one-half that of controls (P < 0.01), reflecting reductions in the density of dopaminergic amacrine cells and the intensity of TH immunoreactivity within them. To confirm the neuropathological implications of BDNF reduction, we administered BDNF protein into the vitreous cavities of diabetic rats. Intraocular administration of BDNF rescued dopaminergic amacrine cells from neurodegeneration and counteracted the downregulation of TH expression, demonstrating its therapeutic potential. These findings suggest that the early retinal neuropathy of diabetes involves the reduced expression of BDNF and can be ameliorated by an exogenous supply of this neurotrophin. PMID:15331553

  2. Retinal remodeling in human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Pfeiffer, R L; Ferrell, W D; Watt, C B; Marmor, M; Marc, R E

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies. PMID:27020758

  3. Evaluation of a rat tracheal epithelial cell culture assay system to identify respiratory carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, V.E.; Arnold, J.T.; Arnold, J.V.; Mass, M.J. )

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate a short-term epithelial cell assay system to detect respiratory carcinogens, primary cultures of rat tracheal epithelial cells were exposed to a series of 17 compounds and scored for morphologically transformed cell colonies 28 days later. The test compounds included known carcinogens and noncarcinogens in volatile or liquid form. Tracheal epithelial cells were isolate from F344 rats, plated onto collagen-coated dishes, and exposed to the test compounds on day 1 for 24 hours. At day 30 the cultures were fixed, stained, and scored for colonies having a density greater than 1,300 cells/mm{sup 2}. With standardized protocols, such colonies are very infrequent in media and solvent control cultures. Concentration levels for each chemical were chosen over a range from nontoxic to toxic levels. Highly positive compounds in this assay included benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(l)aceanthrylene, 3-methylcholanthrene, and formaldehyde. Compounds which were negative in this assay included pyrene, benzo(e)pyrene, and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide. Examining the concordance of in vitro results with whole animal carcinogenesis studies revealed an accuracy of 88% with one false-positive and one false-negative compound. The results of these studies indicate that the rat tracheal epithelial cell assay may be useful in identifying potential respiratory carcinogens in our environment.

  4. The metabolism of malate by cultured rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, M.C.; Tildon, J.T.; Couto, R.; Stevenson, J.H.; Caprio, F.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Since malate is known to play an important role in a variety of functions in the brain including energy metabolism, the transfer of reducing equivalents and possibly metabolic trafficking between different cell types; a series of biochemical determinations were initiated to evaluate the rate of 14CO2 production from L-(U-14C)malate in rat brain astrocytes. The 14CO2 production from labeled malate was almost totally suppressed by the metabolic inhibitors rotenone and antimycin A suggesting that most of malate metabolism was coupled to the electron transport system. A double reciprocal plot of the 14CO2 production from the metabolism of labeled malate revealed biphasic kinetics with two apparent Km and Vmax values suggesting the presence of more than one mechanism of malate metabolism in these cells. Subsequent experiments were carried out using 0.01 mM and 0.5 mM malate to determine whether the addition of effectors would differentially alter the metabolism of high and low concentrations of malate. Effectors studied included compounds which could be endogenous regulators of malate metabolism and metabolic inhibitors which would provide information regarding the mechanisms regulating malate metabolism. Both lactate and aspartate decreased 14CO2 production from malate equally. However, a number of effectors were identified which selectively altered the metabolism of 0.01 mM malate including aminooxyacetate, furosemide, N-acetylaspartate, oxaloacetate, pyruvate and glucose, but had little or no effect on the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate. In addition, alpha-ketoglutarate and succinate decreased 14CO2 production from 0.01 mM malate much more than from 0.5 mM malate. In contrast, a number of effectors altered the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate more than 0.01 mM. These included methionine sulfoximine, glutamate, malonate, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and ouabain.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions retinitis pigmentosa retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of related eye disorders that ...

  6. Retinal hemorrhages in newborn.

    PubMed

    Govind, A; Kumari, S; Lath, N K

    1989-02-01

    Two hundred and fifty eight newborn babies were studied for the presence of retinal hemorrhages between 1-3 days of birth. The overall incidence of retinal hemorrhages was found to be 18.9%. It was observed that the incidence of retinal hemorrhages was higher in unassisted vaginal deliveries than in assisted births. Also, a two fold higher incidence was noted in term infants as compared to preterm babies. No association was seen with birth asphyxia.

  7. Mechanosensitive ion channels in cultured sensory neurons of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hawon; Shin, Jieun; Shin, Chan Young; Lee, Soon-Youl; Oh, Uhtaek

    2002-02-15

    Mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels are present in a variety of cells. However, very little is known about the ion channels that account for mechanical sensitivity in sensory neurons. We identified the two most frequently encountered but distinct types of MS channels in 1390 of 2962 membrane patches tested in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. The two MS channels exhibited different thresholds, thus named as low-threshold (LT) and high-threshold (HT) MS channels, and sensitivity to pressure. The two channels retained different single-channel conductances and current-voltage relationships: LT and HT channels elicited large- and small-channel conductance with outwardly rectifying and linear I-V relationships, respectively. Both LT and HT MS channels were permeable to monovalent cations and Ca2+ and were blocked by gadolinium, a blocker of MS channels. Colchicine and cytochalasin D markedly reduced the activities of the two MS channels, indicating that cytoskeletal elements support the mechanosensitivity. Both types of MS channels were found primarily in small sensory neurons with diameters of <30 microm. Furthermore, HT MS channels were sensitized by a well known inducer of mechanical hyperalgesia, prostaglandin E2, via the protein kinase A pathway. We identified two distinct types of MS channels in sensory neurons that probably give rise to the observed MS whole-cell currents and transduce mechanical stimuli to neural signals involved in somatosensation, including pain.

  8. Rat hippocampal neurons express genes for both rod retinal and olfactory cyclic nucleotide-gated channels: novel targets for cAMP/cGMP function.

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, P A; Zufall, F; Barnstable, C J

    1996-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are Ca(2+)-permeable, nonspecific cation channels that can be activated through direct interaction with cAMP and/or cGMP. Recent electrophysiological evidence for these channels in cultured hippocampal neurons prompted us to investigate the expression of CNG channel genes in hippocampus. PCR amplification detected the expression of transcripts for subunit 1 of both the rod photoreceptor (RCNGC1) and the olfactory receptor cell (OCNGC1) subtype of CNG channel in adult rat hippocampus. In situ hybridization detected expression of both channel subtypes in most principal neurons, including pyramidal cells of the CA1 through CA3 regions and granule cells of the dentate gyrus. From the hybridization patterns, we conclude that the two genes are colocalized in individual neurons. Comparison of the patterns of expression of type 1 cGMP-dependent protein kinase and the CNG channels suggests that hippocampal neurons can respond to changes in cGMP levels with both rapid changes in CNG channel activity and slower changes induced by phosphorylation. Future models of hippocampal function should include CNG channels and their effects on both electrical responses and intracellular Ca2+ levels. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8816819

  9. In vitro differentiation of rat spermatogonia into round spermatids in tissue culture

    PubMed Central

    Reda, A.; Hou, M.; Winton, T.R.; Chapin, R.E.; Söder, O.; Stukenborg, J.-B.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do the organ culture conditions, previously defined for in vitro murine male germ cell differentiation, also result in differentiation of rat spermatogonia into post-meiotic germ cells exhibiting specific markers for haploid germ cells? SUMMARY ANSWER We demonstrated the differentiation of rat spermatogonia into post-meiotic cells in vitro, with emphasis on exhibiting, protein markers described for round spermatids. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Full spermatogenesis in vitro from immature germ cells using an organ culture technique in mice was first reported 5 years ago. However, no studies reporting the differentiation of rat spermatogonia into post-meiotic germ cells exhibiting the characteristic protein expression profile or into functional sperm have been reported. STUDY DESIGN, SAMPLES/MATERIALS, METHODS Organ culture of testicular fragments of 5 days postpartum (dpp) neonatal rats was performed for up to 52 days. Evaluation of microscopic morphology, testosterone levels, mRNA and protein expression as measured by RT-qPCR and immunostaining were conducted to monitor germ cell differentiation in vitro. Potential effects of melatonin, Glutamax® medium, retinoic acid and the presence of epidydimal fat tissue on the spermatogenic process were evaluated. A minimum of three biological replicates were performed for all experiments presented in this study. One-way ANOVA, ANOVA on ranks and student's t-test were applied to perform the statistical analysis. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Male germ cells, present in testicular tissue pieces grown from 5 dpp rats, exhibited positive protein expression for Acrosin and Crem (cAMP (cyclic adenosine mono phosphate) response element modulator) after 52 days of culture in vitro. Intra-testicular testosterone production could be observed after 3 days of culture, while when epididymal fat tissue was added, spontaneous contractility of cultured seminiferous tubules could be observed after 21 days. However, no

  10. Leptin modulates norepinephrine-mediated melatonin synthesis in cultured rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Peliciari-Garcia, Rodrigo Antonio; Andrade-Silva, Jéssica; Cipolla-Neto, José; Carvalho, Carla Roberta de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Pineal melatonin synthesis can be modulated by many peptides, including insulin. Because melatonin appears to alter leptin synthesis, in this work we aimed to investigate whether leptin would have a role on norepinephrine- (NE-)mediated melatonin synthesis in cultured rat pineal glands. According to our data, cultured rat pineal glands express leptin receptor isoform b (Ob-Rb). Pineal expression of Ob-Rb mRNA was also observed in vivo. Administration of leptin (1 nM) associated with NE ( 1 µM) reduced melatonin content as well as arylalkylamine-N-acetyl transferase (AANAT) activity and expression in cultured pineal glands. Leptin treatment per se induced the expression of STAT3 in cultured pineal glands, but STAT3 does not participate in the leptin modulation of NE-mediated pineal melatonin synthesis. In addition, the expression of inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) was further induced by leptin challenge when associated with NE. In conclusion, leptin inhibition of pineal melatonin synthesis appears to be mediated by a reduction in AANAT activity and expression as well as by increased expression of Icer mRNA. Peptidergic signaling within the pineal gland appears to be one of the most important signals which modulates melatonin synthesis; leptin, as a member of this system, is not an exception.

  11. A sandwich-cultured rat hepatocyte system with increased metabolic competence evaluated by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Kienhuis, A S; Wortelboer, H M; Maas, W J; van Herwijnen, M; Kleinjans, J C S; van Delft, J H M; Stierum, R H

    2007-08-01

    A rapid decline of cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme activities remains a drawback of rat hepatocyte-based in vitro cultures. Consequently, judgment of the toxic potential of compounds that need bioactivation by CYP450s may not be adequate using this model. In the present study, an improved hepatocyte-based in vitro system was developed with special focus on metabolic competence. Therefore, a mixture of CYP450 inducers, phenobarbital, dexamethasone and beta-naphthoflavone, was added to culture medium of sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes. The resulting modified model was evaluated by comparing its genome-wide expression profiles with liver and a standard model without the inducer mixture. Metabolic capacity for CYP450 enzymes showed that the modified model resembled more closely the in vivo situation. Gene expression results revealed large differences between in vivo and both in vitro models. The slight differences between the two sandwich models were predominantly represented by gene expression changes in CYP450s. Importantly, in the modified model, expression ratios of the phase I and the majority of phase II genes more closely resembled liver in vivo. The CYP450 enzyme activities corresponded with gene expression data. In conclusion, for toxicological applications using sandwich-cultured hepatocytes, the modified model may be preferred. PMID:17336492

  12. Comparative effects of sodium channel blockers in short term rat whole embryo culture

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Mats F; Sköld, Anna-Carin; Ericson, Ann-Christin; Annas, Anita; Villar, Rodrigo Palma; Cebers, Gvido; Hellmold, Heike; Gustafson, Anne-Lee; Webster, William S

    2013-10-15

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect on the rat embryonic heart of two experimental drugs (AZA and AZB) which are known to block the sodium channel Nav1.5, the hERG potassium channel and the L-type calcium channel. The sodium channel blockers bupivacaine, lidocaine, and the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine were used as reference substances. The experimental model was the gestational day (GD) 13 rat embryo cultured in vitro. In this model the embryonic heart activity can be directly observed, recorded and analyzed using computer assisted image analysis as it responds to the addition of test drugs. The effect on the heart was studied for a range of concentrations and for a duration up to 3 h. The results showed that AZA and AZB caused a concentration-dependent bradycardia of the embryonic heart and at high concentrations heart block. These effects were reversible on washout. In terms of potency to cause bradycardia the compounds were ranked AZB > bupivacaine > AZA > lidocaine > nifedipine. Comparison with results from previous studies with more specific ion channel blockers suggests that the primary effect of AZA and AZB was sodium channel blockage. The study shows that the short-term rat whole embryo culture (WEC) is a suitable system to detect substances hazardous to the embryonic heart. - Highlights: • Study of the effect of sodium channel blocking drugs on embryonic heart function • We used a modified method rat whole embryo culture with image analysis. • The drugs tested caused a concentration dependent bradycardia and heart block. • The effect of drugs acting on multiple ion channels is difficult to predict. • This method may be used to detect cardiotoxicity in prenatal development.

  13. Screening retinal transplants with Fourier-domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin

    2009-02-01

    Transplant technologies have been studied for the recovery of vision loss from retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In several rodent retinal degeneration models and in patients, retinal progenitor cells transplanted as layers to the subretinal space have been shown to restore or preserve vision. The methods for evaluation of transplants are expensive considering the large amount of animals. Alternatively, time-domain Stratus OCT was previously shown to be able to image the morphological structure of transplants to some extent, but could not clearly identify laminated transplants. The efficacy of screening retinal transplants with Fourier-domain OCT was studied on 37 S334ter line 3 rats with retinal degeneration 6-67 days after transplant surgery. The transplants were morphologically categorized as no transplant, detachment, rosettes, small laminated area and larger laminated area with both Fourier-domain OCT and histology. The efficacy of Fourier-domain OCT in screening retinal transplants was evaluated by comparing the categorization results with OCT and histology. Additionally, 4 rats were randomly selected for multiple OCT examinations (1, 5, 9, 14 and 21days post surgery) in order to determine the earliest image time of OCT examination since the transplanted tissue may need some time to show its tendency of growing. Finally, we demonstrated the efficacy of Fourier-domain OCT in screening retinal transplants in early stages and determined the earliest imaging time for OCT. Fourier-domain OCT makes itself valuable in saving resource spent on animals with unsuccessful transplants.

  14. Characterization of cultured rat oligodendrocytes proliferating in a serum-free, chemically defined medium

    SciTech Connect

    Saneto, R.P.; de Vellis, J.

    1985-05-01

    A serumless, chemically defined medium has been developed for the culture of oligodendrocytes isolated from primary neonatal rat cerebral cultures. Combined together, insulin, transferrin, and fibroblast growth factor synergistically induced an essentially homogeneous population (95-98%) of cells expressing glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity to undergo cell division. Proliferating cells were characterized by several criteria: (i) ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy identified the cell type as an oligodendrocyte; (ii) biochemical assays showed expression of three oligodendrocyte biochemical markers, induction of both glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase, and presence of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase; and (iii) immunocytochemical staining showed cultures to be 95-98% positive for glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase, 90% for myelin basic protein, 60-70% for galactocerebroside, and 70% for A2B5.

  15. Effects of nerve growth factor on X-irradiated reaggregation cultures of rat brain cells.

    PubMed

    Dimberg, Y; Aspberg, A; Tottmar, O

    1993-12-01

    The effects of exogenously added nerve growth factor (NGF) on reaggregation cultures of foetal rat brain cells after X-irradiation with 2 Gy were studied. Irradiation caused decreased protein and DNA levels, which was not prevented by NGF. The activities of the cholinergic marker enzymes choline acetyl transferase and acetylcholine esterase were increased in irradiated cultures. However, no difference in the activities of these enzymes was found between irradiated and unirradiated NGF-treated cultures. Irradiation did not affect the activity of the marker enzyme for oligodendrocytes (2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase), but caused an increase in the astrocyte marker (glutamine synthetase) activity. This effect on astrocytes was prevented by NGF. PMID:7903341

  16. Functional analysis of retinal microglia and their effects on progenitors.

    PubMed

    Carter, Debra A; Balasubramaniam, Balini; Dick, Andrew D

    2013-01-01

    The identification of stem/progenitor cells within the retinal neural environment has opened up the possibility of therapy via cellular replacement and/or reprogramming of resident cell populations. Within the neuro-retinal niche, following injury or in disease states (including inflammation and degeneration), cellular responses affect tissue homeostasis, reduce cell density, disrupt tissue architecture, and produce scar formation. Microglia (resident retinal immune cell tissue macrophage) are key to the maintenance of retinal homeostasis and are implicated in responses that may influence the control and behavior of retinal progenitors. Factors to consider in the generation of a transplantable cell resource with good migratory and integrative capacity include their yield, purity, and functional viability. Utilizing human postmortem retina, we have created a research platform to isolate, culture, and characterize adult retinal microglia as well as analyze their effect on retinal progenitors. Here, we describe techniques using magnetic labeled bead cell separation to isolate pure populations of retinal CD133(+) precursor cells and CD11b(+) microglia from primary adult retinal cell suspensions (RCSs), enabling flow cytometric cell phenotypic and qPCR genotypic analysis, as well as functional analysis by real-time ratiometric calcium imaging.

  17. High speed optical holography of retinal blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzari, M.; Simonutti, M.; Degardin, J.; Sahel, J.-A.; Fink, M.; Paques, M.; Atlan, M.

    2016-08-01

    We performed non-invasive video imaging of retinal blood flow in a pigmented rat by holographic interferometry of near-infrared laser light backscattered by retinal tissue, beating against an off-axis reference beam sampled at a frame rate of 39 kHz with a high throughput camera. Local Doppler contrasts emerged from the envelopes of short-time Fourier transforms and the phase of autocorrelation functions of holograms rendered by Fresnel transformation. This approach permitted imaging of blood flow in large retinal vessels (30 microns diameter) over 400 by 400 pixels with a spatial resolution of 8 microns and a temporal resolution of 6.5 ms.

  18. Pericyte abundance affects sucrose permeability in cultures of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Fiona E; Hacking, Cindy

    2005-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier is a physical and metabolic barrier that restricts diffusion of blood-borne substances into brain. In vitro models of the blood-brain barrier are used to characterize this structure, examine mechanisms of damage and repair and measure permeability of test substances. The core component of in vitro models of the blood-brain barrier is brain microvascular endothelial cells. We cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMEC) from isolated rat cortex microvessels. After 2-14 days in vitro (DIV), immunohistochemistry of these cells showed strong labeling for zona occludens 1 (ZO-1), a tight junction protein expressed in endothelial cells. Pericytes were also present in these cultures, as determined by expression of alpha-actin. The present study was performed to test different cell isolation methods and to compare the resulting cell cultures for abundance of pericytes and for blood-brain barrier function, as assessed by 14C-sucrose flux. Two purification strategies were used. First, microvessels were preabsorbed onto uncoated plastic for 4 h, then unattached microvessels were transferred to coated culture ware. Second, microvessels were incubated with an antibody to platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1; CD31) precoupled to magnetic beads, and a magnetic separation procedure was performed. Our results indicate that immunopurification, but not preadsorption, was an effective method to purify microvessels and reduce pericyte abundance in the resulting cultures. This purification significantly reduced 14C-sucrose fluxes across cell monolayers. These data indicate that pericytes can interfere with the development of blood-brain barrier properties in in vitro models that utilize primary cultures of RBMECs.

  19. Regulation of pro-adrenocorticotropin-endorphin synthesis and secretion in cultured neonatal rat anterior pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, S.M.; Mains, R.E. )

    1987-08-01

    Previous work demonstrated that newborn rat anterior pituitary corticotropes display processing patterns for pro-ACTH/endorphin that are different from the adult. The synthesis and release of beta-endorphin-related peptides was examined in dispersed cell and explant cultures of newborn anterior pituitary to investigate corticotrope development further. The temporal pattern of pro-ACTH/endorphin processing differed significantly from adult rat melanotropes and AtT-20 cells. While pro-ACTH/endorphin processing begins within 30 min of synthesis in adult melanotropes and AtT-20 cells, pulse-labeling of newborn corticotropes in culture indicated that pro-ACTH/endorphin remained uncleaved for at least 90 min after synthesis. With further incubation, there was a decrease in radioactivity associated with the precursor and an equivalent rise in the radioactivity associated with beta-endorphin and beta-lipotropin. However, unprocessed precursor still remained in the cultured newborn anterior pituitary cells after a 25-h chase. Although intact pro-ACTH/endorphin from newborn corticotropes was very long-lived, the precursor did undergo oligosaccharide maturation and became endoglycosidase H resistant within 1 h after synthesis. Similar to the adult, pro-ACTH/endorphin synthesis was doubled in cultures of newborn anterior pituitary chronically treated with 10 nM CRF resulting in a 3- to 4-fold stimulation of secretion over the basal rate. However, unlike the AtT-20 cell or adult rat corticotrope, the proteolytic processing of pro-ACTH/endorphin in the newborn corticotrope was altered by chronic secretagogue treatment; less pro-ACTH/endorphin was converted to beta-endorphin in secretagogue-treated corticotropes than in controls. Thus processing of pro-ACTH/endorphin in the corticotrope is not mature by birth and can be regulated by chronic CRF treatment.

  20. Arsenite decreases CYP3A23 induction in cultured rat hepatocytes by transcriptional and translational mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Noreault, Trisha L.; Nichols, Ralph C.; Trask, Heidi W.; Wrighton, Steven A.; Sinclair, Peter R.; Evans, Ronald M.; Sinclair, Jacqueline F. . E-mail: JSINC@dartmouth.edu

    2005-12-01

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring, worldwide contaminant implicated in numerous pathological conditions in humans, including cancer and several forms of liver disease. One of the contributing factors to these disorders may be the alteration of cytochrome P450 (CYP) levels by arsenic. In rat and human hepatocyte cultures, arsenic, in the form of arsenite, decreases the induction of several CYPs. The present study investigated whether arsenite utilizes transcriptional or post-transcriptional mechanisms to decrease CYP3A23 in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. In these cultures, a 6-h treatment with 5 {mu}M arsenite abolished dexamethasone (DEX)-mediated induction of CYP3A23 protein and activity, but did not inhibit general protein synthesis. However, arsenite treatment only reduced DEX-induced levels of CYP3A23 mRNA by 30%. The effects of arsenite on CYP3A23 transcription were examined using a luciferase reporter construct containing 1.4 kb of the CYP3A23 promoter. Arsenite caused a 30% decrease in DEX-induced luciferase expression of this reporter. Since arsenite abolished induction of CYP3A23 protein, but caused only a small decrease in CYP3A23 mRNA, the effects of arsenite on translation of CYP3A23 mRNA were investigated. Polysomal distribution analysis showed that arsenite decreased translation by decreasing the DEX-mediated increase in CYP3A23 mRNA association with polyribosomes. Arsenite did not decrease intracellular glutathione or increase lipid peroxidation, suggesting that the effect of arsenite on CYP3A23 does not involve oxidative stress. Overall, the results suggest that low-level arsenite decreases both transcription and translation of CYP3A23 in primary rat hepatocyte cultures.

  1. Neuroprotective therapy for argon-laser-induced retinal injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Michael; Rosner, Mordechai; Solberg, Yoram; Turetz, Yosef

    1999-06-01

    Laser photocoagulation treatment of the central retina is often complicated by an immediate side effect of visual impairment, caused by the unavoidable laser-induced destruction of the normal tissue lying adjacent to the lesion and not affected directly by the laser beam. Furthermore, accidental laser injuries are at present untreatable. A neuroprotective therapy for salvaging the normal tissue might enhance the benefit obtained from treatment and allow safe perifoveal photocoagulation. We have developed a rat model for studying the efficacy of putative neuroprotective compounds in ameliorating laser-induced retinal damage. Four compounds were evaluated: the corticosteroid methylprednisolone, the glutamate-receptor blocker MK-801, the anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, and the calcim-overload antagonist flunarizine. The study was carried out in two steps: in the first, the histopathological development of retinal laser injuries was studied. Argon laser lesions were inflicted in the retinas of 18 pigmented rats. The animals were sacrificed after 3, 20 or 60 days and their retinal lesions were evaluated under the light microscope. The laser injury mainly involved the outer layers of the retina, where it destroyed significant numbers of photoreceptor cells. Over time, evidence of two major histopathological processes was observed: traction of adjacent nomral retinal cells into the central area of the lesion forming an internal retinal bulging, and a retinal pigmented epithelial proliferative reaction associated with subretinal neovascularization and invations of the retinal lesion site by phagocytes. The neuroprotective effects of each of the four compounds were verified in a second step of the study. For each drug tested, 12 rats were irradiated wtih argon laser inflictions: six of them received the tested agent while the other six were treated with the corresponding vehicle. Twenty days after laser expsoure, the rats were sacrificed and their lesions were

  2. Trichostatin A, a critical factor in maintaining the functional differentiation of primary cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Henkens, Tom . E-mail: Tom.Henkens@vub.ac.be; Papeleu, Peggy; Elaut, Greetje; Vinken, Mathieu; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara

    2007-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDI) have been shown to increase differentiation-related gene expression in several tumor-derived cell lines by hyperacetylating core histones. Effects of HDI on primary cultured cells, however, have hardly been investigated. In the present study, the ability of trichostatin A (TSA), a prototype hydroxamate HDI, to counteract the loss of liver-specific functions in primary rat hepatocyte cultures has been investigated. Upon exposure to TSA, it was found that the cell viability of the cultured hepatocytes and their albumin secretion as a function of culture time were increased. TSA-treated hepatocytes also better maintained cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated phase I biotransformation capacity, whereas the activity of phase II glutathione S-transferases (GST) was not affected. Western blot and qRT-PCR analysis of CYP1A1, CYP2B1 and CYP3A11 protein and mRNA levels, respectively, further revealed that TSA acts at the transcriptional level. In addition, protein expression levels of the liver-enriched transcription factors (LETFs) hepatic nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4{alpha}) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP{alpha}) were accordingly increased by TSA throughout culture time. In conclusion, these findings indicate that TSA plays a major role in the preservation of the differentiated hepatic phenotype in culture. It is suggested that the effects of TSA on CYP gene expression are mediated via controlling the expression of LETFs.

  3. Role of in vitro factors in ozone toxicity for cultured rat lung fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, D.G.; Morgan, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    Ozone toxicity for cultured rat lung fibroblasts was concentration dependent and was affected by the manner in which ozone was delivered to the cells, i.e. cultures were either rotated with a thin moving overlay of medium or were stationary with a fixed layer of medium between the cells and the gas phase. The influence of culture medium components and culture dish composition on the toxicity of ozone were also investigated. Cell viability, used to measure ozone toxicity, was quantified by the chromium-51 release assay, and by a viability index calculated from the percentage of cells stained with a vital dye combined with the decrease in cell number as determined by DNA measurements. During stationary ozone exposure, toxicity appeared to be mediated primarily by hydrogen peroxide and could be inhibited by catalase or fetal bovine serum when measured by the viability index. During rotated exposure, catalase and fetal bovine serum provided no protection when measured by the viability index, however, when measured by the chromium-51 release assay, fetal bovine serum was partially protective. The effect of ozone on the fibroblasts was not influenced by whether culture dishes were glass or plastic, or whether the culture medium was balanced salt solution or complete chemically-defined medium.

  4. Role of in vitro factors in ozone toxicity for cultured rat lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, D G; Morgan, D L

    1982-01-01

    Ozone toxicity for cultured rat lung fibroblasts was concentration dependent and was affected by the manner in which ozone was delivered to the cells, i.e. cultures were either rotated with a thin moving overlay of medium or were stationary with a fixed layer of medium between the cells and the gas phase. The influence of culture medium components and culture dish composition on the toxicity of ozone were also investigated. Cell viability, used to measure ozone toxicity, was quantified by the chromium-51 release assay, and by a viability index calculated from the percentage of cells stained with a vital dye combined with the decrease in cell number as determined by DNA measurements. During stationary ozone exposure, toxicity appeared to be mediated primarily by hydrogen peroxide and could be inhibited by catalase or fetal bovine serum when measured by the viability index. During rotated exposure, catalase and fetal bovine serum provided no protection when measured by the viability index, however, when measured by the chromium-51 release assay, fetal bovine serum was partially protective. The effect of ozone on the fibroblasts was not influenced by whether culture dishes were glass or plastic, or whether the culture medium was balanced salt solution or complete chemically-defined medium.

  5. Intravital video microscopy measurements of retinal blood flow in mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, Norman R; Watts, Megan N; Leskova, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in retinal blood flow can contribute to, or be a consequence of, ocular disease and visual dysfunction. Therefore, quantitation of altered perfusion can aid research into the mechanisms of retinal pathologies. Intravital video microscopy of fluorescent tracers can be used to measure vascular diameters and bloodstream velocities of the retinal vasculature, specifically the arterioles branching from the central retinal artery and of the venules leading into the central retinal vein. Blood flow rates can be calculated from the diameters and velocities, with the summation of arteriolar flow, and separately venular flow, providing values of total retinal blood flow. This paper and associated video describe the methods for applying this technique to mice, which includes 1) the preparation of the eye for intravital microscopy of the anesthetized animal, 2) the intravenous infusion of fluorescent microspheres to measure bloodstream velocity, 3) the intravenous infusion of a high molecular weight fluorescent dextran, to aid the microscopic visualization of the retinal microvasculature, 4) the use of a digital microscope camera to obtain videos of the perfused retina, and 5) the use of image processing software to analyze the video. The same techniques can be used for measuring retinal blood flow rates in rats. PMID:24429840

  6. Comparative effects of sodium channel blockers in short term rat whole embryo culture.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Mats F; Sköld, Anna-Carin; Ericson, Ann-Christin; Annas, Anita; Villar, Rodrigo Palma; Cebers, Gvido; Hellmold, Heike; Gustafson, Anne-Lee; Webster, William S

    2013-10-15

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect on the rat embryonic heart of two experimental drugs (AZA and AZB) which are known to block the sodium channel Nav1.5, the hERG potassium channel and the l-type calcium channel. The sodium channel blockers bupivacaine, lidocaine, and the l-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine were used as reference substances. The experimental model was the gestational day (GD) 13 rat embryo cultured in vitro. In this model the embryonic heart activity can be directly observed, recorded and analyzed using computer assisted image analysis as it responds to the addition of test drugs. The effect on the heart was studied for a range of concentrations and for a duration up to 3h. The results showed that AZA and AZB caused a concentration-dependent bradycardia of the embryonic heart and at high concentrations heart block. These effects were reversible on washout. In terms of potency to cause bradycardia the compounds were ranked AZB>bupivacaine>AZA>lidocaine>nifedipine. Comparison with results from previous studies with more specific ion channel blockers suggests that the primary effect of AZA and AZB was sodium channel blockage. The study shows that the short-term rat whole embryo culture (WEC) is a suitable system to detect substances hazardous to the embryonic heart.

  7. Stimulatory effect of thymic factor(s) on steroidogenesis in cultured rat granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Uzumcu, M; Akira, S; Lin, Y C

    1992-01-01

    Thymic cells from immature female rats were isolated and used for production of thymic cell culture conditioned medium (TCM). Granulosa cells were obtained from immature diethylstilbestrol (DES)-treated rats. TCM stimulated basal progesterone and estradiol secretion from the granulosa cells in a dose and time dependent manner. Maximal stimulation of progesterone production occurred at 48 hours of incubation, during which period TCM caused approximately 5 times more progesterone secretion than heart cell conditioned medium (HCM) or mock extract (ME). The maximum progesterone secretion by granulosa cells occurred when they were exposed to 48% TCM causing 7 times more progesterone secretion than controls. Under the same maximum stimulatory conditions, however, TCM only approximately doubled estradiol secretion compared to concentrations secreted in the presence of HCM or ME. Thus, the effect of TCM on progesterone secretion was more prominent than its effect on estradiol secretion. The stimulatory action of TCM was not mimicked by HCM, thymosin-alpha 1 or thymulin. Furthermore, the stimulatory action of TCM on steroidogenesis did not appear to be mediated by the cAMP system. The stimulatory factor(s) in TCM were heat, acid and acetone labile, but could not be sedimented by activated charcoal. Thus, the present study demonstrates that the secretory product(s) of thymic epithelial cells can stimulate steroidogenesis in cultured rat granulosa cells. Our data imply that thymic factor(s) may have a direct effect on ovarian function.

  8. Production of calcification inhibitors by rat calvaria and bone cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Ohya, K; Meyer, J L; Felix, R; Fleisch, H

    1988-07-01

    Inhibition of calcium phosphate crystal formation was assessed in conditioned medium from cultured rat calvaria and rat calvaria cells. The amount of inhibitor activity was measured by determining the amount of hydroxyapatite needed to induce calcium phosphate precipitation in a solution with a constant calcium phosphate supersaturation. Rat calvaria in culture released inhibitor activity. This activity was separated by chromatography on a Bio-Gel P4 column into a high molecular weight (HMW) fraction and a low molecular weight (LMW) fraction. The latter contained, among others, citrate and pyrophosphate (PPi), but the concentration of these was too low to account for the total activity observed. The identity of the HMW and the remaining LMW inhibitors are at present unknown. Various populations of calvaria cells also produced these two types of inhibitors, 20% of the LMW being due to PPi. Fibroblasts produced only the HMW type of inhibitors. These results suggest that cells might control the process of biologic calcification by regulating the amount of inhibitors they produce.

  9. Biomechanical properties of retinal glial cells: comparative and developmental data.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yun-Bi; Pannicke, Thomas; Wei, Er-Qing; Bringmann, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Habermann, Gunnar; Buse, Eberhard; Käs, Josef A; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    The biomechanical properties of Müller glial cells may have importance in understanding the retinal tissue alterations after retinal surgery with removal of the inner limiting membrane and during the ontogenetic development, respectively. Here, we compared the viscoelastic properties of Müller cells from man and monkey as well as from different postnatal developmental stages of the rat. We determined the complex Young's modulus E = E' + iE″ in a defined range of deforming frequencies (30, 100, and 200 Hz) using a scanning force microscope, where the real part E' reflects the elastic property (energy storage or elastic stiffness) and the imaginary part E″ reflects the viscous property (energy dissipation) of the cells. The viscoelastic properties were similar in Müller cells from man, monkey, and rat. In general, the elastic behavior dominated over the viscous behavior (E' > E″). The inner process of the Müller cell was the softest region, the soma the stiffest (Einnerprocess(')Eglia(')). These relations were also observed during the postnatal development of the rat. It is concluded that, generally, retinal cells display mechanics of elastic solids. In addition, the data indicate that the rodent retina is a reliable model to investigate retinal mechanics and tissue alterations after retinal surgery. During retinal development, neuronal branching and synaptogenesis might be particularly stimulated by the viscoelastic properties of Müller cell processes in the inner plexiform layer.

  10. Modern retinal laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Igor; Luttrull, Jeffrey K

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal lasers are a standard source of light to produce retinal tissue photocoagulation to treat retinovascular disease. The Diabetic Retinopathy Study and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study were large randomized clinical trials that have shown beneficial effect of retinal laser photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy and have dictated the standard of care for decades. However, current treatment protocols undergo modifications. Types of lasers used in treatment of retinal diseases include argon, diode, dye and multicolor lasers, micropulse lasers and lasers for photodynamic therapy. Delivery systems include contact lens slit-lamp laser delivery, indirect ophthalmocope based laser photocoagulation and camera based navigated retinal photocoagulation with retinal eye-tracking. Selective targeted photocoagulation could be a future alternative to panretinal photocoagulation. PMID:25892934

  11. Safety and Efficacy of Suicide Gene Therapy with Adenosine Deaminase 5-Fluorocytosine Silmutaneously in in Vitro Cultures of Melanoma and Retinal Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Sakkas, Antonios; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Domvri, Kalliopi; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Bougiouklis, Dimitris; Kakolyris, Stylianos; Zarampoukas, Thomas; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Meditskou, Soultana; Tsiouda, Theodora; Pezirkianidis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Local treatment as a treatment modality is gaining increased general acceptance over time. Novel drugs and methodologies of local administration are being investigated in an effort to achieve disease local control. Suicide gene therapy is a method that has been investigated as a local treatment with simultaneously distant disease control. In our current experiment we purchased HTB-70 (melanoma cell line, derived from metastatic axillary node) and CRL-2302 (human retinal epithelium) were from ATCC LGC Standards and Ancotil®, 2.5 g/250 ml (1 g/00ml) (5-Flucytosine) MEDA; Pharmaceuticals Ltd. UK. Adenosine Cytosine Deaminase (Ad.CD) was also used in order to convert the pro-drug 5-Flucytosine to the active 5-Fluoracil. Three different concentrations of 5-Flucytosine (5-FC) were administered (0.2ml, 0.8ml and 1.2ml). At indicated time-points (4h, 8h and 24h) cell viability and apoptosis were measured. Our concept was to investigate whether suicide gene therapy with Ad. CD-5-FC could be used with safety and efficiency as a future local treatment for melanoma located in the eye cavity. Indeed, our results indicated that in every 5-FC administration had mild cytotoxicity for the retinal cells, while increased apoptosis was observed for the melanoma cell line. PMID:24799955

  12. Dual signal transduction pathways activated by TSH receptors in rat primary tanycyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Bolborea, Matei; Helfer, Gisela; Ebling, Francis J P; Barrett, Perry

    2015-06-01

    Tanycytes play multiple roles in hypothalamic functions, including sensing peripheral nutrients and metabolic hormones, regulating neurosecretion and mediating seasonal cycles of reproduction and metabolic physiology. This last function reflects the expression of TSH receptors in tanycytes, which detect photoperiod-regulated changes in TSH secretion from the neighbouring pars tuberalis. The present overall aim was to determine the signal transduction pathway by which TSH signals in tanycytes. Expression of the TSH receptor in tanycytes of 10-day-old Sprague Dawley rats was observed by in situ hybridisation. Primary ependymal cell cultures prepared from 10-day-old rats were found by immunohistochemistry to express vimentin but not GFAP and by PCR to express mRNA for Dio2, Gpr50, Darpp-32 and Tsh receptors that are characteristic of tanycytes. Treatment of primary tanycyte/ependymal cultures with TSH (100  IU/l) increased cAMP as assessed by ELISA and induced a cAMP-independent increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 as assessed by western blot analysis. Furthermore, TSH (100  IU/l) stimulated a 2.17-fold increase in Dio2 mRNA expression. We conclude that TSH signal transduction in cultured tanycytes signals via Gαs to increase cAMP and via an alternative G protein to increase phosphorylation of ERK1/2. PMID:25878058

  13. Effect of glucose deprivation on rat glutamine synthetase in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rosier, F; Lambert, D; Mertens-Strijthagen, M

    1996-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase was purified from the cerebral cortex of adult rats and characterized. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies were raised against the enzyme, purified and their specific anti-(glutamine synthetase) activity determined. A primary astroglial culture was prepared from newborn Sprague-Dawley rats. Astrocytes at different ages of development were incubated in the presence and absence of glucose. In glucose-deprived conditions the specific activity of glutamine synthetase decreased. This decrease was more pronounced in 8-day-old than in 21-day-old cultures. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the reduction in activity was mainly related to a decrease in Vmax. By immunoprecipitation, it was shown that the number of enzyme molecules in astrocytes was decreased in glucose-deprived conditions. On addition of glucose, a total recovery of glutamine synthetase was obtained after 36 h in 8-day-old culture. Rates of degradation and synthesis were investigated. When compared with an incubation in the presence of glucose, glucose deprivation increased enzyme turnover, as estimated from the first-order disappearance of radioactivity from glutamine synthetase. Synthesis rate was estimated from the incorporation of [35S]methionine during a 2 h incubation period and was decreased in glucose-deprived conditions. Trichloroacetate-precipitable proteins changed only slightly in the experimental conditions, and total protein did not vary significantly during the experimental period. A mathematical model is presented which attempts to integrate degradation and synthesis in our experimental model. PMID:8615836

  14. Gel entrapment culture of rat hepatocytes for investigation of tetracycline-induced toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Chong; Meng Qin Schmelzer, Eva; Bader, Augustinus

    2009-07-15

    This paper aimed to explore three-dimensionally cultured hepatocytes for testing drug-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Gel entrapped rat hepatocytes were applied for investigation of the tetracycline-induced steatohepatitis, while hepatocyte monolayer was set as a control. The toxic responses of hepatocytes were systematically evaluated by measuring cell viability, liver-specific function, lipid accumulation, oxidative stress, adenosine triphosphate content and mitochondrial membrane potential. The results suggested that gel entrapped hepatocytes showed cell death after 96 h of tetracycline treatment at 25 {mu}M which is equivalent to toxic serum concentration in rats, while hepatocyte monolayer showed cell death at a high dose of 200 {mu}M. The concentration-dependent accumulation of lipid as well as mitochondrial damage were regarded as two early events for tetracycline hepatotoxicity in gel entrapment culture due to their detectability ahead of subsequent increase of oxidative stress and a final cell death. Furthermore, the potent protection of fenofibrate and fructose-1,6-diphosphate were evidenced in only gel entrapment culture with higher expressions on the genes related to {beta}-oxidation than hepatocyte monolayer, suggesting the mediation of lipid metabolism and mitochondrial damage in tetracycline toxicity. Overall, gel entrapped hepatocytes in three-dimension reflected more of the tetracycline toxicity in vivo than hepatocyte monolayer and thus was suggested as a more relevant system for evaluating steatogenic drugs.

  15. Chronic lithium treatment increased intracellular S100ß levels in rat primary neuronal culture.

    PubMed

    Emamghoreishi, Masoumeh; Keshavarz, Mojtaba; Nekooeian, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    S100ß a neurotrophic factor mainly released by astrocytes, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bipolar disorder. Thus, lithium may exert its neuroprotective effects to some extent through S100ß. Furthermore, the possible effects of lithium on astrocytes as well as on interactions between neurons and astrocytes as a part of its mechanisms of actions are unknown. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of lithium on S100β in neurons, astrocytes and a mixture of neurons and astrocytes. Rat primary astrocyte, neuronal and mixed neuro-astroglia cultures were prepared from cortices of 18-day's embryos. Cell cultures were exposed to lithium (1mM) or vehicle for 1day (acute) or 7 days (chronic). RT-PCR and ELISA determined S100β mRNA and intra- and extracellular protein levels. Chronic lithium treatment significantly increased intracellular S100β in neuronal and neuro-astroglia cultures in comparison to control cultures (P<0.05). Acute and chronic lithium treatments exerted no significant effects on intracellular S100β protein levels in astrocytes, and extracellular S100β protein levels in three studied cultures as compared to control cultures. Acute and chronic lithium treatments did not significantly alter S100β mRNA levels in three studied cultures, compared to control cultures. Chronic lithium treatment increased intracellular S100ß protein levels in a cell-type specific manner which may favor its neuroprotective action. The findings of this study suggest that lithium may exert its neuroprotective action, at least partly, by increasing neuronal S100ß level, with no effect on astrocytes or interaction between neurons and astrocytes.

  16. Motorcycle exhaust particulates enhance vasoconstriction in organ culture of rat aortas and involve reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Hui-Ping; Yang, Rong-Sen; Ueng, Tzuu-Huei; Lin-Shiau, Shoei-Yn; Liu, Shing-Hwa

    2003-09-01

    The effects of motorcycle exhaust particulate on vasoconstriction were determined using rat thoracic aortas under organ culture conditions treated with organic extracts of motorcycle exhaust particulate from a two-stroke engine. The motorcycle exhaust particulate extract (MEPE) induced a concentration-dependent enhancement of vasoconstriction elicited by phenylephrine in the organ cultures of both intact and endothelium-denuded aortas for 18 h. Nifedipine (an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker), manganese acetate (an inorganic Ca2+ channel blocker), and staurosporine (a nonselective protein kinase C inhibitor), but not the selective protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine, inhibited the enhancement of vasoconstriction by MEPE. Staurosporine has also been reported as a myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor, so we tested whether the MLCK pathway was involved in the effect of MEPE. The results showed that ML-9 (a selective MLCK inhibitor) could inhibit the enhancement of vasoconstriction by MEPE. The phosphorylation of a 20-kDa myosin light chain in a primary culture of rat vascular smooth muscle cells was also enhanced by MEPE. Moreover, we also examined the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the stimulatory effect of MEPE on vasoconstriction. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine significantly inhibited the enhancement of vasoconstriction by MEPE. A time-dependent increase in ROS production by MEPE was also detected in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells. These results indicate that MEPE induces a marked enhancement of vasoconstriction in aortas under organ culture conditions and imply that a ROS-Ca2+-MLCK pathway may be involved in this MEPE-induced response.

  17. Receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein stimulates bile acid synthesis by cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Junker, L.H.; Davis, R.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the lipoprotein-mediated stimulation of bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. Adding 280 micrograms/ml of cholesterol in the form of human or rat low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the culture medium increased bile acid synthesis by 1.8- and 1.6-fold, respectively. As a result of the uptake of LDL, the synthesis of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate was decreased and cellular cholesteryl ester mass was increased. Further studies demonstrated that rat apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) both stimulated bile acid synthesis 1.5-fold, as well as inhibited the formation of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate. Reductive methylation of LDL blocked the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, as well as the stimulation of bile acid synthesis, suggesting that these processes require receptor-mediated uptake. To identify the receptors responsible, competitive binding studies using 125I-labeled apoE-free LDL and 125I-labeled apoE-rich HDL were performed. Both apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL displayed an equal ability to compete for binding of the other, suggesting that a receptor or a group of receptors that recognizes both apolipoproteins is involved. Additional studies show that hepatocytes from cholestyramine-treated rats displayed 2.2- and 3.4-fold increases in the binding of apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL, respectively. These data show for the first time that receptor-mediated uptake of LDL by the liver is intimately linked to processes activating bile acid synthesis.

  18. Immunolocalization of nitric oxide synthase isoforms in human archival and rat tissues, and cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Antonio R; Zanella, Cesar A B; Zucchi, Fabiola C R; Dombroski, Thaís C D; Costa, Edmar T; Guethe, Liliane M; Oliveira, Alina O; Donatti, Ana L F; Neder, Luciano; Chimelli, Leila; De Nucci, Gilberto; Lee-Ho, Paulo; Murad, Ferid

    2011-05-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) exerts important physiological and pathological roles in humans. The study of NO requires the immunolocalization of its synthesizing enzymes, neuronal, endothelial and inducible NO synthases (NOS). NOS are labile to formalin-fixation and paraffin-embedding, which are used to prepare human archival tissues. This lability has made NOS immunohistochemical studies difficult, and a detailed protocol is not yet available. We describe here a protocol for the immunolocalization of NOS isoforms in human archival cerebellum and non-nervous tissues, and in rat tissues and cultured cells. Neuronal NOS antigenicity in human archival and rat nervous tissue sections was microwave-retrieved in 50 mM Tris-HCl buffer, pH 9.5, for 20 min at 900 W. Neuronal NOS was expressed in stellate, basket, Purkinje and granule cells in human and rat cerebellum. Archival and frozen human cerebellar sections showed the same neuronal NOS staining pattern. Archival cerebellar sections not subjected to antigen retrieval stained weakly. Antigenicity of inducible NOS in human lung was best retrieved in 10 mM sodium citrate buffer, pH 6.0, for 15 min at 900 W. Inflammatory cells in a human lung tuberculoma were strongly stained by anti-inducible NOS antibody. Anti-endothelial NOS strongly stained kidney glomeruli. Cultured PC12 cells were strongly stained by anti-neuronal NOS without antigen retrieving. The present immunohistochemistry protocol is easy to perform, timeless, and suitable for the localization of NOS isoforms in nervous and non-nervous tissues, in human archival and rat tissues. It has been extensively used in our laboratory, and is also appropriate for other antigens.

  19. Protein Profiling of Human Nonpigmented Ciliary Epithelium Cell Secretome: The Differentiation Factors Characterization for Retinal Ganglion Cell line

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Hui; Krishnamoorthy, Raghu R.; Jong, Shiang-Bin; Chu, Pei-Yu; Yang, Yuan-Han; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Sharon Chia-Ju; Dibas, Adnan; Yorio, Thomas; Chung, Tze-Wen; Tyan, Yu-Chang

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to characterize proteins secreted from the human nonpigmented ciliary epithelial (HNPE) cells, which have differentiated a rat retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5. Undifferentiated RGC-5 cells have been shown to express several marker proteins characteristic of retinal ganglion cells. However, RGC-5 cells do not respond to N-methyl-D aspartate (NMDA), or glutamate. HNPE cells have been shown to secrete numbers of neuropeptides or neuroproteins also found in the aqueous humor, many of which have the ability to influence the activity of neuronal cells. This paper details the profile of HNPE cell-secreted proteins by proteomic approaches. The experimental results revealed the identification of 132 unique proteins from the HNPE cell-conditioned SF-medium. The biological functions of a portion of these identified proteins are involved in cell differentiation. We hypothesized that a differentiation system of HNPE cell-conditioned SF-medium with RGC-5 cells can induce a differentiated phenotype in RGC-5 cells, with functional characteristics that more closely resemble primary cultures of rat retinal ganglion cells. These proteins may replace harsh chemicals, which are currently used to induce cell differentiation. PMID:21860587

  20. Elastase effect on the extracellular matrix of rat aortic smooth muscle cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, J.; Mogayzel, P.J. Jr.; Pratt, C.A.; Toselli, P.; Wolfe, B.L.; Faris, B.; Franzblau, C.

    1986-05-01

    The effect of porcine pancreatic elastase on the extracellular matrix (ECM) of neonatal rat aortic smooth muscle cell cultures was monitored both chemically and ultrastructurally. Initially, the elastin appeared as non-coalesced material closely associated with filaments, presumably microfibrils. The insoluble elastin accumulated in the ECM of cells in culture for 6 weeks accounted for 40-45% of the total protein. After exposure to elastase for 30-60 minutes, the elastin content was reduced to 14-20%. The reduction in the total protein content of the cultures after elastase treatment was due primarily to the loss of elastin. Although the amino acid compositions of the elastin isolated from cultures both before and after elastase treatment were similar, there were striking ultrastructural differences in the amorphous elastin. The elastin assumed a mottled appearance after elastase exposure, similar to that seen in in vivo emphysema models. Pulse experiments with /sup 3/H-valine demonstrated an increase in protein synthesis by the cells 20 hours after elastase exposure, suggesting the potential for elastin repair. The use of this culture system will aid in clarifying the role of elastolysis in pulmonary and vascular injuries.

  1. The development of a method for the preparation of rat intestinal epithelial cell primary cultures.

    PubMed

    Evans, G S; Flint, N; Somers, A S; Eyden, B; Potten, C S

    1992-01-01

    We describe a reproducible method for growing small intestinal epithelium (derived from the suckling rat intestine) in short-term (primary) cultures. Optimal culture conditions were determined by quantitative assays of proliferation (i.e. changes in cellularity and DNA synthesis). Isolation of the epithelia and, significantly, preservation of its three-dimensional integrity was achieved using a collagenase/dispase digestion technique. Purification of the epithelium was also facilitated by the use of a simple differential sedimentation method. The results presented below support the idea that proliferation of normal gut epithelium ex vivo is initially dependent upon the maintenance of the structural integrity of this tissue and upon factors produced by heterologous mesenchymal cells. Proliferation in vitro was also critically dependent upon the quality of the medium and constituents used. Cultures reached confluence within 10-14 days and consisted of epithelial colonies together with varying amounts of smooth-muscle-like cells. Cultures have been maintained for periods up to one month, but the longer-term potential for growth by sub-culturing has not been examined. Strategies for reducing the proliferation of these non-epithelial cells are also described.

  2. Neonicotinoid Insecticides Alter the Gene Expression Profile of Neuron-Enriched Cultures from Neonatal Rat Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Kimura-Kuroda, Junko; Nishito, Yasumasa; Yanagisawa, Hiroko; Kuroda, Yoichiro; Komuta, Yukari; Kawano, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Neonicotinoids are considered safe because of their low affinities to mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) relative to insect nAChRs. However, because of importance of nAChRs in mammalian brain development, there remains a need to establish the safety of chronic neonicotinoid exposures with regards to children’s health. Here we examined the effects of long-term (14 days) and low dose (1 μM) exposure of neuron-enriched cultures from neonatal rat cerebellum to nicotine and two neonicotinoids: acetamiprid and imidacloprid. Immunocytochemistry revealed no differences in the number or morphology of immature neurons or glial cells in any group versus untreated control cultures. However, a slight disturbance in Purkinje cell dendritic arborization was observed in the exposed cultures. Next we performed transcriptome analysis on total RNAs using microarrays, and identified significant differential expression (p < 0.05, q < 0.05, ≥1.5 fold) between control cultures versus nicotine-, acetamiprid-, or imidacloprid-exposed cultures in 34, 48, and 67 genes, respectively. Common to all exposed groups were nine genes essential for neurodevelopment, suggesting that chronic neonicotinoid exposure alters the transcriptome of the developing mammalian brain in a similar way to nicotine exposure. Our results highlight the need for further careful investigations into the effects of neonicotinoids in the developing mammalian brain. PMID:27782041

  3. Selective blockade of CaMKII-alpha inhibits NMDA-induced caspase-3-dependent cell death but does not arrest PARP-1 activation or loss of plasma membrane selectivity in rat retinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Dennis J

    2009-02-23

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-alpha (CaMKII-alpha) has been implicated in a number of receptor mediated events in neurons. Pharmacological blockade of CaMKII-alpha has been shown to prevent phosphorylation of NMDA-R2A and R2B receptor subunits, suggesting that this enzyme may be linked to receptor trafficking of glutamate receptors and serve as a regulatory protein for neuronal cell death. In the retina, inhibition of CaMKII-alpha has been reported to be neuroprotective against NMDA-induced cell death by preventing the activation of the caspase-3 dependent pathway. However, the effects of CaMKII-alpha blockade on the caspase-3 independent, PARP-1 dependent and the non-programmed cell death pathways have not previously been investigated. In the present study, blockade of CaMKII-alpha with the highly specific antagonist myristoylated autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide (AIP) was used in a rat in vivo model of retinal toxicity to compare the effects of on NMDA-induced caspase-3-dependent, PARP-1 dependent and the non-programmed (necrosis) cell death pathways. Results confirmed that AIP fully attenuates caspase-3 activation for at least 8 h following NMDA insult and also significantly improves retinal ganglion cell survival. However, this blockade had little effect on reducing the loss of plasma membrane selectivity (LPMS, e.g. necrosis) in cells located in the ganglion cell and inner nuclear layers and did not alter NMDA-induced PARP-1 hyperactivation, or prevent TUNEL labeling following a moderate NMDA-insult. These findings support a specific role for CaMKII-alpha in mediating the caspase-3 dependent cell death pathway and provide evidence that it is not directly linked to the signaling of either the PARP-1 dependent or the non-programmed cell death pathways.

  4. Neural Stem Cell-based Intraocular Administration of Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor Promotes Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival and Axon Regeneration after Optic Nerve Crush Injury in Rat: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Min; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Zhang, Yong-Gang; Gao, Yan-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is regarded as a multifunctional protein possessing neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties. PEDF has a very short half-life, and it would require multiple injections to maintain a therapeutically relevant level without a delivery system. However, multiple injections are prone to cause local damage or infection. To overcome this, we chose a cell-based system that provided sustained delivery of PEDF and compared the effect of weekly injections of PEDF and neural stem cell (NSC)-based intraocular administration of PEDF on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve injury. Methods: Seventy-two rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups: group with injections of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (n=24), group with weekly injections of PEDF (n=24), and group with NSC-based administration of PEDF (n=24). Western blot was used to analyze the PEDF protein level 2 weeks after injection. Retinal flat mounts and immunohistochemistry were employed to analyze RGC survival and axon regeneration 2 weeks and 4 weeks after injection. The data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA in SPSS (version 19.0). A P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The PEDF protein level in the group with NSC-based administration of PEDF increased compared with that in the groups with injections of PEDF and PBS (P<0.05). The PEDF-modified NSCs differentiated into GFAP-positive astrocytes andβ-tubulin-III-positive neurons. NSC-based administration of PEDF effectively increased RGC survival and improved the axon regeneration of the optic nerve compared with weekly injections of PEDF. Conclusion: Subretinal space transplantation of PEDF-secreting NSCs sustained high concentrations of PEDF, differentiated into neurons and astrocytes, and significantly promoted RGC survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve injury. PMID:27582587

  5. [Protective effects of total saponins of semen Ziziphi spinosae on cultured rat myocardial cells].

    PubMed

    Chen, X J; Yu, C L; Liu, J F

    1990-03-01

    The effects of total saponins of Semen Ziziphi spinosae (ZS) were observed on cultured neonatal rat myocardial cells injured by deprivation of oxygen and glucose (DOG) or treatment with chlorpromazine (CPZ) and mitomycin C (MMC). The increases of lactate dehydrogenase release from damaged myocardial cells induced by DOG, CPZ and MMC were attenuated by ZS (33 micrograms/ml) except 11 micrograms/ml which showed no effect on MMC (24 h) and CPZ (9 h)-induced injuries. These data suggest that ZS is an effective protective drug for myocardial cells. PMID:2125800

  6. Regulation of sulfotransferase gene expression by glucocorticoid hormones and xenobiotics in primary rat hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Runge-Morris, M

    1998-02-20

    In the rat liver, hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase-a (HST-a) and aryl sulfotransferase IV (ASTIV) represent two major rat hepatic sulfotransferases that are important to xenobiotic metabolism. Prototypic CYP1A1 and CYP2B/3A inducers regulate rat hepatic sulfotransferase gene expression although not necessarily in a coordinate direction. It has been previously reported that in vivo treatment with CYP1A1 inducer 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) suppresses rat hepatic HST-a mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, HST-a and ASTIV mRNA levels become suppressed or induced, respectively, following in vivo treatment with phenobarbital (PB)-like CYP2B/3A inducers or prototypic CYP3A inducers such as glucocorticoid hormones. In the whole animal, sulfotransferase gene expression is modulated by members of the hypothalamic/pituitary-adrenal gonadal hormone axis. However, studies in primary rat hepatocyte culture suggest that prototypic P450 inducers regulate HST-a and ASTIV gene expression directly at the level of the hepatocyte. Glucocorticoid-mediated sulfotransferase expression was compared with the regulation of tyrosine amino transferase (TAT), a gene that is transcriptionally regulated by ligand bound glucocorticoid receptor. It was found that lower doses of dexamethasone (DEX, 10(-7) M) produced concomitant increases in ASTIV and TAT mRNA expression, whereas HST-a mRNA expression continued to rise as the DEX dose was increased through 10(-5) M. When hepatocytes were co-incubated with DEX and antiglucocorticoid/antiprogestin RU-486, DEX-stimulated HST-a mRNA expression was not significantly inhibited by RU-486, but ASTIV and TAT mRNA expression were inhibited to a similar extent. The results suggested that ASTIV, like TAT, is likely regulated by a classical glucocorticoid receptor mediated mechanism, whereas HST-a is probably regulated by glucocorticoids via an alternative mechanism. In contrast to the positive effects of glucocorticoid hormones, HST-a and ASTIV

  7. [POLYPEPTIDES INFLUENCE ON TISSUE CELL CULTURES REGENERATION OF VARIOUS AGE RATS].

    PubMed

    Ryzhak, A P; Chalisova, N I; Lin'kova, N S; Khalimov, R I; Ryzhak, G A; Zhekalov, A N

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study of polypeptides extracted from the tissues of calves: Cortexin (from brain cortex), Epinorm (from pineal gland), Ventvil (from liver), Prostatilen (from prostate), Thymalin (from thymus), Chelohart (from heart), Chondrolux (from cartilage) on the relevant organotypic tissue cultures of young and old rats, in concentration 0,01-100 ng/ml was performed. Polypeptides specifically stimulated "young" and "old" cell cultures growth in concentration 20-50 ng/ml. This effect correlates with increasing of PCNA and decreasing of p53 expression in brain cortex, pineal gland, liver, prostate, heart, cartilage. Moreover, Thymalin activated CD5, CD20 expression--markers of B-cells differentiation. These data show that polypeptides isolated from different tissues have selective molecular activity on the regeneration of suitable tissues in aging.

  8. Distribution of phospholipase C isozymes in various rat tissues and cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, P.G.; Ryu, S.H.; Choi, W.C.; Lee, K.Y.; Rhee, S.G.

    1987-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies prepared against PLC-I or PLC-II enzyme did not cross-react with the other. Using a pair of antibodies which recognizes 2 different antigenic sites on the same molecule, radioimmunoassays were developed for the quantitation of PLC-I and PLC-II in homogenates of various tissues and cultured cells, prepared by homogenization in a 2 M KCl buffer. The contents of PLC enzymes were measured in 19 rat tissues, in human platelets and in 17 cultured cells. Results indicate that the concentration of PLC-I and PLC-II is very high in brain, PLC-I is localized mainly in brain and partly in seminal vesicles, PLC-II is found in most tissues and cells. PLC-I is highly localized even in brain: 5 different neuroblastoma did not contain PLC-I while 2 glioma and 1 astrocytoma contained significant amounts.

  9. Morphological changes in cultures of hippocampus following prenatal irradiation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdorf, G.; Shahar, A.; Cervos-Navarro, J.; Scheffler, A.; Sparenberg, A.; Skoberla, A. )

    1990-07-01

    The effect of prenatal irradiation was studied in organotypic cultures of hippocampus, prepared from newborn rats that had been exposed to whole-body irradiation of 1 Gy from a {sup 60}Co-source at day 13 of pregnancy. Light and electron microscopic observations showed remarkable damage to neuronal mitochondria accompanied by extensive swelling, vacuolation of the Golgi complex, and formation of multilamellar bodies and vesicles of the lysosomal type. In contrast to neuronal alterations, no delay in synaptogenesis or onset of myelination was observed based upon the absence of significant morphological changes in synapses and myelin sheaths. Using this tissue culture model it could be confirmed that prenatal exposure to irradiation, even at low doses, induces specific morphological changes in the brain.

  10. Pulse exposure of cultured rat neurons to aluminum-maltol affected the axonal transport system.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Y; Nakamura, Y; Miyamae, Y; Hashimoto, R; Takeda, M

    1998-08-01

    Although chronic aluminum neurotoxicity has been well established, the mechanism of the toxicity has not been elucidated yet. In order to simplify the study of the aluminum neurotoxicity, we employed the pulse exposure of cultured rat cortical neurons to 250 microM aluminum-maltol for 1 h at the early stage (6 h after plating), which resulted in abnormal distribution of neurofilament L (NFL) and fast axonal transported proteins, whereas the axonal transport of tubulin, actin, and clathrin were not impaired. Otherwise, the pulse exposure of neurons at the late stage (4 days after plating) to the same concentration of aluminum-maltol did not affect the cell morphology and the distribution of NFL. The pulse exposure of cultured neurons to aluminum-maltol at the early stage might affect the axonal transport system of NFL and fast axonal transported proteins. PMID:9756345

  11. Retinal and optic nerve diseases.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Eyal; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2003-11-01

    A variety of disease processes can affect the retina and/or the optic nerve, including vascular or ischemic disease, inflammatory or infectious disease, and degenerative disease. These disease processes may selectively damage certain parts of the retina or optic nerve, and the specific areas that are damaged may have implications for the design of potential therapeutic visual prosthetic devices. Outer retinal diseases include age-related macular degeneration, pathologic myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. Although the retinal photoreceptors may be lost, the inner retina is relatively well-preserved in these diseases and may be a target for retinal prosthetic devices. Inner retinal diseases include retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal venous occlusive disease, and retinopathy of prematurity. Other retinal diseases such as ocular infections (retinitis, endophthalmitis) may affect all retinal layers. Because the inner retinal cells, including the retinal ganglion cells, may be destroyed in these diseases (inner retinal or whole retinal), prosthetic devices that stimulate the inner retina may not be effective. Common optic nerve diseases include glaucoma, optic neuritis, and ischemic optic neuropathy. Because the ganglion cell nerve fibers themselves are damaged, visual prosthetics for these diseases will need to target more distal portions of the visual pathway, such as the visual cortex. Clearly, a sound understanding of retinal and optic nerve disease pathophysiology is critical for designing and choosing the optimal visual prosthetic device.

  12. The isolation and culture of endothelial colony-forming cells from human and rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Rajesh S; Vadivel, Arul; Zhong, Shumei; Zong, Shumei; McConaghy, Suzanne; Ohls, Robin; Yoder, Mervin C; Thébaud, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Blood vessels are crucial for the normal development, lifelong repair and homeostasis of tissues. Recently, vascular progenitor cell-driven 'postnatal vasculogenesis' has been suggested as an important mechanism that contributes to new blood vessel formation and organ repair. Among several described progenitor cell types that contribute to blood vessel formation, endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) have received widespread attention as lineage-specific 'true' vascular progenitors. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation of pulmonary microvascular ECFCs from human and rat lung tissue. Our technique takes advantage of an earlier protocol for the isolation of circulating ECFCs from the mononuclear cellular fraction of peripheral blood. We adapted the earlier protocol to isolate resident ECFCs from the distal lung tissue. After enzymatic dispersion of rat or human lung samples into a cellular suspension, CD31-expressing cells are positively selected using magnetic-activated cell sorting and plated in endothelial-specific growth conditions. The colonies arising after 1-2 weeks in culture are carefully separated and expanded to yield pure ECFC cultures after a further 2-3 weeks. The resulting cells demonstrate the defining characteristics of ECFCs such as (i) 'cobblestone' morphology of cultured cell monolayers; (ii) acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake and Ulex europaeus lectin binding; (iii) tube-like network formation in Matrigel; (iv) expression of endothelial cell-specific surface markers and the absence of hematopoietic or myeloid surface antigens; (v) self-renewal potential displayed by the most proliferative cells; and (vi) contribution to de novo vessel formation in an in vivo mouse implant model. Assuming typical initial cell adhesion and proliferation rates, the entire procedure can be completed within 4 weeks. Isolation and culture of lung vascular ECFCs will allow assessment of the functional state of these cells in experimental and human

  13. Neuroprotective Effect of Carnosine on Primary Culture of Rat Cerebellar Cells under Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Lopachev, A V; Lopacheva, O M; Abaimov, D A; Koroleva, O V; Vladychenskaya, E A; Erukhimovich, A A; Fedorova, T N

    2016-05-01

    Dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is a natural antioxidant, but its protective effect under oxidative stress induced by neurotoxins is studied insufficiently. In this work, we show the neuroprotective effect of carnosine in primary cultures of rat cerebellar cells under oxidative stress induced by 1 mM 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride (AAPH), which directly generates free radicals both in the medium and in the cells, and 20 nM rotenone, which increases the amount of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In both models, adding 2 mM carnosine to the incubation medium decreased cell death calculated using fluorescence microscopy and enhanced cell viability estimated by the MTT assay. The antioxidant effect of carnosine inside cultured cells was demonstrated using the fluorescence probe dichlorofluorescein. Carnosine reduced by half the increase in the number of ROS in neurons induced by 20 nM rotenone. Using iron-induced chemiluminescence, we showed that preincubation of primary neuronal cultures with 2 mM carnosine prevents the decrease in endogenous antioxidant potential of cells induced by 1 mM AAPH and 20 nM rotenone. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we showed that a 10-min incubation of neuronal cultures with 2 mM carnosine leads to a 14.5-fold increase in carnosine content in cell lysates. Thus, carnosine is able to penetrate neurons and exerts an antioxidant effect. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of the peptide transporter PEPT2 in rat cerebellar cells, which suggests the possibility of carnosine transport into the cells. At the same time, Western blot analysis showed no carnosine-induced changes in the level of apoptosis regulating proteins of the Bcl-2 family and in the phosphorylation of MAP kinases, which suggests that carnosine could have minimal or no side effects on proliferation and apoptosis control systems in normal cells. PMID:27297901

  14. The isolation and culture of endothelial colony-forming cells from human and rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Rajesh S; Vadivel, Arul; Zhong, Shumei; Zong, Shumei; McConaghy, Suzanne; Ohls, Robin; Yoder, Mervin C; Thébaud, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Blood vessels are crucial for the normal development, lifelong repair and homeostasis of tissues. Recently, vascular progenitor cell-driven 'postnatal vasculogenesis' has been suggested as an important mechanism that contributes to new blood vessel formation and organ repair. Among several described progenitor cell types that contribute to blood vessel formation, endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) have received widespread attention as lineage-specific 'true' vascular progenitors. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation of pulmonary microvascular ECFCs from human and rat lung tissue. Our technique takes advantage of an earlier protocol for the isolation of circulating ECFCs from the mononuclear cellular fraction of peripheral blood. We adapted the earlier protocol to isolate resident ECFCs from the distal lung tissue. After enzymatic dispersion of rat or human lung samples into a cellular suspension, CD31-expressing cells are positively selected using magnetic-activated cell sorting and plated in endothelial-specific growth conditions. The colonies arising after 1-2 weeks in culture are carefully separated and expanded to yield pure ECFC cultures after a further 2-3 weeks. The resulting cells demonstrate the defining characteristics of ECFCs such as (i) 'cobblestone' morphology of cultured cell monolayers; (ii) acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake and Ulex europaeus lectin binding; (iii) tube-like network formation in Matrigel; (iv) expression of endothelial cell-specific surface markers and the absence of hematopoietic or myeloid surface antigens; (v) self-renewal potential displayed by the most proliferative cells; and (vi) contribution to de novo vessel formation in an in vivo mouse implant model. Assuming typical initial cell adhesion and proliferation rates, the entire procedure can be completed within 4 weeks. Isolation and culture of lung vascular ECFCs will allow assessment of the functional state of these cells in experimental and human

  15. Effects of methylmercury on primary cultured rat hepatocytes: Cell injury and inhibition of growth factor stimulated DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tanno, Keiichi; Fukazawa, Toshiyuki; Tajima, Shizuko; Fujiki, Motoo )

    1992-08-01

    Many more studies deal with the toxicity of methylmercury on nervous tissue than on its toxicity to the liver. Methylmercury accumulates in the liver in higher concentrations than brain and the liver has the primary function of detoxifying methylmercury. According to recent studies, hepatocyte mitochondrial membranes are destroyed by methylmercury and DNA synthesis is inhibited by methylmercury during hepatocyte regeneration. Methylmercury alters the membrane ion permeability of isolate skate hepatocytes, and inhibits the metal-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase of primary cultured rat hepatocytes. However, little is known about the effect of methylmercury on hepatocyte proliferation in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. We therefore used the primary cultured rat hepatocytes to investigate the effects of methylmercury on cell injury and growth factor stimulate DNA synthesis. The primary effect of methylmercury is to inhibit hepatocyte proliferation rather than to cause direct cell injury. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Effects of culture supernatant from Lactobacillus pentosus strain S-PT84 on autonomic nerve activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Yoshinori; Izumo, Takayuki; Horii, Yuko; Shen, Jiao; Fujisaki, Yoshiyuki; Nakashima, Toshihiro; Tsuruoka, Nobuo; Nagai, Katsuya

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal administration of various lactobacilli has been reported to affect autonomic neurotransmission, blood pressure, blood glucose, and body weight in rats, however, the mechanisms of action of the lactobacilli remain to be clarified. Therefore, the effect of the culture supernatant of Lactobacillus pentosus strain S-PT84 on the autonomic nerve activity in urethane-anesthetized rats was investigated. Intraduodenal injection of the low-molecular-weight (LMW) fraction (molecules less than 10,000 Da) of the S-PT84 culture supernatant elevated the brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity and reduced the gastric vagal nerve activity. Moreover, intraoral administration of this LMW fraction increased the body temperature of rats above the interscapular brown adipose tissue. These results suggest that the LMW fraction of the S-PT84 culture supernatant affects the autonomic nerve activity and thermogenesis, and that the change in thermogenesis may be caused by the change in the sympathetic nerve activity of brown adipose tissue.

  17. PCR and Blood Culture for Detection of Escherichia coli Bacteremia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Heininger, Alexandra; Binder, Marlies; Schmidt, Sibylle; Unertl, Klaus; Botzenhart, Konrad; Döring, Gerd

    1999-01-01

    Critically ill patients often develop symptoms of sepsis and therefore require microbiological tests for bacteremia that use conventional blood culture (BC) techniques. However, since these patients frequently receive early empirical antibiotic therapy before diagnostic procedures are completed, examination by BC can return false-negative results. We therefore hypothesized that PCR could improve the rate of detection of microbial pathogens over that of BC. To test this hypothesis, male Wistar rats were challenged intravenously with 106 CFU of Escherichia coli. Blood was then taken at several time points for detection of E. coli by BC and by PCR with E. coli-specific primers derived from the uidA gene, encoding β-glucuronidase. In further experiments, cefotaxime (100 or 50 mg/kg of body weight) was administered intravenously to rats 10 min after E. coli challenge. Without this chemotherapy, the E. coli detection rate decreased at 15 min and at 210 min after challenge from 100% to 62% of the animals with PCR and from 100% to 54% of the animals with BC (P, >0.05). Chemotherapy decreased the E. coli detection rate at 25 min and at 55 min after challenge from 100% to 50% with PCR and from 100% to 0% with BC (P, <0.05). Thus, at clinically relevant serum antibiotic levels, PCR affords a significantly higher detection rate than BC in this rat model. The results suggest that PCR could be a useful adjunct tool supplementing conventional BC techniques in diagnosing bacteremia. PMID:10405388

  18. Production of Retinal Cells from Confluent Human iPS Cells.

    PubMed

    Reichman, Sacha; Goureau, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells could be used as an unlimited source of retinal cells for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. Although much progress has been made in the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards different retinal lineages, the production of retinal cells from hiPS cells for therapeutic approaches require the development of easy and standardized protocols. In this chapter, we describe a simple and effective protocol for retinal differentiation of hiPS cells bypassing embryoid body formation and the use of exogenous molecules and substrates. In 2 weeks, confluent hiPS cells cultured in pro-neural medium can generate both retinal pigmented epithelial cells and self-forming neural retina-like structures containing retinal progenitor cells. These progenitors can be differentiated into all retinal cell types, including retinal ganglion cells and precursors of photoreceptors, which could find important applications in regenerative medicine. This differentiation system and the resulting hiPS-derived retinal cells will also offer opportunity to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying human retinal development, and the establishment of in vitro models of human retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:25417064

  19. Production of Retinal Cells from Confluent Human iPS Cells.

    PubMed

    Reichman, Sacha; Goureau, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells could be used as an unlimited source of retinal cells for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. Although much progress has been made in the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards different retinal lineages, the production of retinal cells from hiPS cells for therapeutic approaches require the development of easy and standardized protocols. In this chapter, we describe a simple and effective protocol for retinal differentiation of hiPS cells bypassing embryoid body formation and the use of exogenous molecules and substrates. In 2 weeks, confluent hiPS cells cultured in pro-neural medium can generate both retinal pigmented epithelial cells and self-forming neural retina-like structures containing retinal progenitor cells. These progenitors can be differentiated into all retinal cell types, including retinal ganglion cells and precursors of photoreceptors, which could find important applications in regenerative medicine. This differentiation system and the resulting hiPS-derived retinal cells will also offer opportunity to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying human retinal development, and the establishment of in vitro models of human retinal degenerative diseases.

  20. Effect of methionine replacement by homocystine in cultures containing both malignant rat breast carcinosarcoma (Walker-256) cells and normal adult rat liver fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Halpern, B C; Ezzell, R; Hardy, D N; Clark, B R; Ashe, H; Halpern, R M; Smith, R A

    1975-01-01

    When malignant W-256 rat breast carcinosarcoma cells are mixed with an equal number of normal adult rat liver fibroblasts and allowed to grow in a medium containing sufficient L-methionine and an excess of vitamin B12 and of folic acid, the malignant cells outgrow the normal cells, and within 2 weeks the tissue culture flasks contain only neoplastic cells. However, when ample DL-homocystine or homocysteine replaces methionine in the medium containing the same amount of vitamin B12 and folic acid, and seeded with the same type and number of malignant and normal cells, the malignant cells die and the normal cells thrive. Substantiating this conclusion are the results of injections into rats of comparable numbers of cells from each group after 3 weeks of growth in tissue culture. Fatal malignancies are produced by the homocystein-cultivated cells.

  1. Metabolism of tobacco-specific nitrosamines by cultured rat nasal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Brittebo, E.B.; Castonguay, A.; Furuya, K.; Hecht, S.S.

    1983-09-01

    The metabolism of two nasal carcinogens, N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), was investigated using cultured nasal septa of F344 rats. The explants were cultured with 14C-labeled N-nitrosamines, and unbound metabolites present in the medium were quantitated by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results indicated that the mucosa of the nasal septum had a marked capacity to metabolize NNN and NNK to hydroxylated products which were released into the culture media. Extensive activation by alpha-carbon hydroxylation of NNN (preferentially 2'-carbon hydroxylation) and NNK was observed, whereas no deactivation by pyridine N-oxidation could be detected. Microautoradiographic studies of explants showed that binding of radioactivity occurred preferentially in the respiratory and olfactory epithelia and in the subepithelial glands of the nasal mucosa. The results suggest that reactive metabolites of NNN and NNK are formed within the target tissue rather than being transported from the liver to the nasal mucosa. The results also show that the culture of nasal septa can be used to ascertain the role of the nasal mucosa in the activation of nasal-specific carcinogens.

  2. Modulation of protein synthesis and secretion by substratum in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sudhakaran, P.R.; Stamatoglou, S.C.; Hughes, R.C.

    1986-12-01

    Hepatocytes isolated by perfusion of adult rat liver and cultured on substrata consisting of one or more of the major components of the liver biomatrix (fibronectin, laminin, type IV collagen) have been examined for the synthesis of defined proteins. Under these conditions, tyrosine amino transferase, a marker of hepatocyte function, is maintained at similar levels in response to dexamethasone over 5 days in culture on each substratum, and total cellular protein synthesis remains constant. By contrast, there is a rapid decrease in synthesis and secretion of albumin and a 3-7-fold increase in synthesis and section of ..cap alpha..-fetoprotein which are most marked on a laminin substratum, but least evident on type IV collagen, and an increased synthesis of fibronectin and type IV collagen. The newly synthesized matrix proteins are present in the cell layer as well as in cell secretions. The enhanced synthesis of fibronectin is less in cells seeded onto a fibronectin substratum than on laminin or type IV collagen substrata. These results indicate that hepatocytes cultured in serum-free medium on substrata composed of components of the liver biomatrix maintain certain functions of the differentiated state (tyrosine amino transferase), lose others (albumin secretion) and switch to increased synthesis of matrix components as well as fetal markers such as ..cap alpha..-fetoprotein. The magnitude of these effects depends on the substratum on which the hepatocytes are cultured.

  3. Preparation and culture of rat lens epithelial explants for studying terminal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zelenka, Peggy S; Gao, Chun Y; Saravanamuthu, Senthil S

    2009-01-01

    The anterior surface of the ocular lens is covered by a monolayer of epithelial cells, which proliferate in an annular zone underlying the ciliary body. Following division, these cells migrate posteriorly, where FGF diffusing from the retina induces them to differentiate into a posterior array of elongated lens fiber cells, which compose the bulk of the lens. Differentiation of lens epithelial cells into lens fibers can be induced in vitro by culturing explants of the central region of the anterior epithelium in the presence of FGF-2. Explants are prepared from lenses of neonatal rats by removing the lens from the eye and grasping the lens capsule on the posterior side with dissecting tweezers. The posterior capsule is then gently torn open and pressed down into the plastic bottom of a tissue culture dish. The peripheral regions of the explant are removed with a scalpel and the central area is then cultured in the presence of 100 ng/ml FGF-2 for as long as 2-3 weeks, depending on the parameters to be studied. Since epithelial cells in cultured explants differentiate in approximate synchrony over a period of days to weeks, the time course of signaling and gene expression can be determined using molecular, biochemical, and pharmacological techniques. Immunofluorescence microscopy is a powerful adjunct to these methods as it demonstrates the subcellular localization of proteins of interest and can reveal the physiological consequences of experimental manipulations of signaling pathways. PMID:19773734

  4. Lysophosphatidic acid does not cause blood/lymphatic vessel plasticity in the rat mesentery culture model.

    PubMed

    Sweat, Richard S; Azimi, Mohammad S; Suarez-Martinez, Ariana D; Katakam, Prasad; Murfee, Walter L

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind endothelial cell identity is crucial for the goal of manipulating microvascular networks. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and serum stimulation have been suggested to induce a lymphatic identity in blood endothelial cells in vitro. The objective of this study was to determine if LPA or serum induces blood-to-lymphatic vessel phenotypic transition in microvascular networks. The rat mesentery culture model was used to observe the effect of stimulation on blood and lymphatic microvascular networks ex vivo. Vascularized mesenteric tissues were harvested from adult Wistar rats and cultured with LPA or 10% serum for up to 5 days. Tissues were then immunolabeled with PECAM to identify blood vessels and LYVE-1 or Prox1 to identify lymphatic vessels. We show that while LPA caused capillary sprouting and increased vascular length density in adult microvascular networks, LPA did not cause a blood-to-lymphatic phenotypic transition. The results suggest that LPA is not sufficient to cause blood endothelial cells to adopt a lymphatic identity in adult microvascular networks. Similarly, serum stimulation caused robust angiogenesis and increased lymphatic/blood vessel connections, yet did not induce a blood-to-lymphatic phenotypic transition. Our study highlights an understudied area of lymphatic research and warrants future investigation into the mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of blood and lymphatic vessel identity. PMID:27401461

  5. Acid-sensing ion channels promote the inflammation and migration of cultured rat microglia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Wei; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Ni, Ming; Fang, Peng; Zhang, Pei-Wei; Shu, Qing; Fan, Hua; Zhou, Hai-Yun; Ni, Lan; Zhu, Ling-Qiang; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Fang

    2015-03-01

    Microglia, the major immune cells in central nervous system, act as the surveillance and scavenger of immune defense and inflammatory response. Previous studies suggest that there might be close relationship between acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and inflammation, however, the exact role of ASICs in microglia during inflammation remains elusive. In the present study, we identified the existence of ASICs in the primary cultured rat microglia and explored their functions. By using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), western blotting, and immunofluorescence experiments, we demonstrated that ASIC1, ASIC2a, and ASIC3 were existed in cultured and in situ rat microglia. After lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, the expressions of microglial ASIC1 and ASIC2a were upregulated. Meanwhile, ASIC-like currents and acid-induced elevation of intracellular calcium were increased, which could be inhibited by the nonspecific ASICs antagonist amiloride and specific homomeric ASIC1a blocker PcTx1. In addition, both inhibitors reduced the expression of inflammatory cytokines, including inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2 stimulated by LPS. Furthermore, we also observed significant increase in the expression of ASIC1 and ASIC2a in scrape-stimulated microglial migration. Amiloride and PcTx1 prevented the migration by inhibiting ERK phosphorylation. Taken together, these results suggest that ASICs participate in neuroinflammatory response, which will provide a novel therapeutic strategy for controlling the inflammation-relevant neuronal diseases.

  6. Evaluation of Cisplatin Neurotoxicity in Cultured Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia via Cytosolic Calcium Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Erol, Kevser; Yiğitaslan, Semra; Ünel, Çiğdem; Kaygısız, Bilgin; Yıldırım, Engin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Calcium homeostasis is considered to be important in antineoplastic as well as in neurotoxic adverse effects of cisplatin. Aims: This study aimed to investigate the role of Ca2+ in cisplatin neurotoxicity in cultured rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Study Design: Cell culture study. Methods: DRG cells prepared from 1-day old Sprague-Dawley rats were used to determine the role of Ca2+ in the cisplatin (10–600 μM) neurotoxicity. The cells were incubated with cisplatin plus nimodipine (1–3 μM), dizocilpine (MK-801) (1–3 μM) or thapsigargin (100–300 nM). Toxicity of cisplatinon DRG cells was determined by the MTT assay. Results: The neurotoxicity of cisplatin was significant when used in high concentrations (100–600 μM). Nimodipine (1 μM) but not MK-801 or thapsigargin prevented the neurotoxic effects of 200 μM of cisplatin. Conclusion: Voltage-dependent calcium channels may play a role in cisplatin neurotoxicity. PMID:27403382

  7. Dose-response analysis of phthalate effects on gene expression in rat whole embryo culture.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Joshua F; Verhoef, Aart; van Beelen, Vincent A; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Piersma, Aldert H

    2012-10-01

    The rat postimplantation whole embryo culture (WEC) model serves as a potential screening tool for developmental toxicity. In this model, cultured rat embryos are exposed during early embryogenesis and evaluated for morphological effects. The integration of molecular-based markers may lead to improved objectivity, sensitivity and predictability of WEC in assessing developmental toxic properties of compounds. In this study, we investigated the concentration-dependent effects of two phthalates differing in potency, mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) and monomethyl phthalate (MMP, less toxic), on the transcriptome in WEC to examine gene expression in relation with dysmorphogenesis. MEHP was more potent than MMP in inducing gene expression changes as well as changes on morphology. MEHP induced significant enrichment of cholesterol/lipid/steroid (CLS) metabolism and apoptosis pathways which was associated with developmental toxicity. Regulation of genes within CLS metabolism pathways represented the most sensitive markers of MEHP exposure, more sensitive than classical morphological endpoints. As shown in direct comparisons with toxicogenomic in vivo studies, alterations in the regulation of CLS metabolism pathways has been previously identified to be associated with developmental toxicity due to phthalate exposure in utero. Our results support the application of WEC as a model to examine relative phthalate potency through gene expression and morphological responses. Additionally, our results further define the applicability domain of the WEC model for developmental toxicological investigations.

  8. Diabetic embryopathy: studies using a rat embryo culture system and an animal model.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Shoichi

    2005-09-01

    The mechanism of diabetic embryopathy was investigated using in vitro experiments in a rat embryo culture system and in streptozotocin-induced diabetic pregnant rats. The energy metabolism in embryos during early organogenesis was characterized by a high rate of glucose utilization and lactic acid production (anaerobic glycolysis). Embryos uninterruptedly underwent glycolysis. When embryos were cultured with hypoglycemic serum, such embryos showed malformations in association with a significant reduction in glycolysis. In a diabetic environment, hyperglycemia caused an increased glucose flux into embryonic cells without a down-regulation of GLUT1 and an increased metabolic overload on mitochondria, leading to an increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Activation of the hexamine pathway, subsequently occurring with increased protein carbonylation and increased lipid peroxidation, also contributed to the increased generation of ROS. Hyperglycemia also caused a myo-inositol deficiency with a competitive inhibition of ambient glucose, which might have been associated with a diminished phosphoinositide signal transduction. In the presence of low activity of the mitochondrial oxidative glucose metabolism, the ROS scavenging system in the embryo was not sufficiently developed. Diabetes further weakened the antioxidant system, especially, the enzyme for GSH synthesis, gamma-GCS, thereby reducing the GSH concentration. GSH depletion also disturbed prostaglandin biosynthesis. An increased formation of ROS in a diminished GSH-dependent antioxidant system may, therefore, play an important role in the development of embryonic malformations in diabetes.

  9. Lysophosphatidic acid does not cause blood/lymphatic vessel plasticity in the rat mesentery culture model.

    PubMed

    Sweat, Richard S; Azimi, Mohammad S; Suarez-Martinez, Ariana D; Katakam, Prasad; Murfee, Walter L

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind endothelial cell identity is crucial for the goal of manipulating microvascular networks. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and serum stimulation have been suggested to induce a lymphatic identity in blood endothelial cells in vitro. The objective of this study was to determine if LPA or serum induces blood-to-lymphatic vessel phenotypic transition in microvascular networks. The rat mesentery culture model was used to observe the effect of stimulation on blood and lymphatic microvascular networks ex vivo. Vascularized mesenteric tissues were harvested from adult Wistar rats and cultured with LPA or 10% serum for up to 5 days. Tissues were then immunolabeled with PECAM to identify blood vessels and LYVE-1 or Prox1 to identify lymphatic vessels. We show that while LPA caused capillary sprouting and increased vascular length density in adult microvascular networks, LPA did not cause a blood-to-lymphatic phenotypic transition. The results suggest that LPA is not sufficient to cause blood endothelial cells to adopt a lymphatic identity in adult microvascular networks. Similarly, serum stimulation caused robust angiogenesis and increased lymphatic/blood vessel connections, yet did not induce a blood-to-lymphatic phenotypic transition. Our study highlights an understudied area of lymphatic research and warrants future investigation into the mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of blood and lymphatic vessel identity.

  10. Retinal vein occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... most often caused by hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ) and the formation of a blood clot. Blockage ... arteries that have been thickened or hardened by atherosclerosis cross over and place pressure on a retinal ...

  11. Retinal artery occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... eds. Textbook of Family Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 17. Duker JS. Retinal arterial ... M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2014:chap 6.18. Reiss GR, Sipperley ...

  12. Developmental features of rat cerebellar neural cells cultured in a chemically defined medium

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, V.; Ciotti, M.T.; Aloisi, F.; Levi, G.

    1986-01-01

    We studied some aspects of the differentiation of rat cerebellar neural cells obtained from 8-day postnatal animals and cultured in a serum-free, chemically defined medium (CDM). The ability of the cells to take up radioactive transmitter amino acids was analyzed autoradiographically. The L-glutamate analogue /sup 3/H-D-aspartate was taken up by astroglial cells, but not by granule neurons, even in late cultures (20 days in vitro). This is in agreement with the lack of depolarization-induced release of /sup 3/H-D-aspartate previously observed in this type of culture. In contrast, /sup 3/H-(GABA) was scarcely accumulated by glial-fibrillary-acidic-protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes, but taken up by glutamate-decarboxylase-positive inhibitory interneurons and was released in a Ca2+-dependent way upon depolarization: /sup 3/H-GABA evoked release progressively increased with time in culture. Interestingly, the expression of the vesicle-associated protein synapsin I was much reduced in granule cells cultured in CDM as compared to those maintained in the presence of serum. These data would indicate that in CDM the differentiation of granule neurons is not complete, while that of GABAergic neurons is not greatly affected. Whether the diminished differentiation of granule cells must be attributed only to serum deprivation or also to other differences in the composition of the culture medium remains to be established. /sup 3/H-GABA was avidly taken up also by a population of cells which were not recognized by antibodies raised against GFAP, glutamate decarboxylase, and microtubule-associated protein 2. These cells have been characterized as bipotential precursors of oligodendrocytes and of a subpopulation of astrocytes bearing a stellate shape and capable of high-affinity /sup 3/H-GABA uptake.

  13. Monolayer co-culture of rat heart cells and bovine adrenal chromaffin paraneurons.

    PubMed

    Trifaró, J M; Tang, R; Novas, M L

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes a method for the preparation of co-cultures of rat heart cells and bovine adrenal chromaffin paraneurons. The most suitable condition for heart cell isolation was when a combination of trypsin-DNAse I in Locke's solution was used for digestion. The best co-culture conditions were obtained when 10(6) heart cells were plated on 7- to 8-d-old adrenal chromaffin paraneuron cultures containing 0.5 x 10(6) cells per 35-mm diameter culture dishes. Measurements of DNA (heart cells and chromaffin paraneurons), monitoring of beating frequency (heart cells), and catecholamine (chromaffin paraneurons) levels and release indicated that both cell types remain viable and functional for several weeks. Heart cells started their characteristic contractile activity 24 h earlier when plated either on viable or lysed chromaffin paraneurons, an effect apparently due to faster surface adhesion of heart cells. The beating frequency of heart cells increased after treatment of co-cultures with either noradrenaline or nicotine, with the latter agent acting indirectly through the release of chromaffin paraneuron catecholamines. Propranolol produced a dose-related inhibition of the responses to either noradrenaline or nicotine, thus suggesting that the increase in myocyte's beating activity was mediated through beta-receptors. Anti-myosin and anti-dopamine-beta-hydroxylase immunostaining was used for cell type identification and for the demonstration of body-to-body and process-to-process contacts between adrenal chromaffin paraneurons and heart cells. This co-culture system will serve as a starting point of further studies directed to understand a) the influence of a cell type on the development and on the phenotypic characteristics of a second cell type and b) the interaction of cells derived from different organs and species.

  14. Inhibition of DNA synthesis by chemical carcinogens in cultures of initiated and normal proliferating rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Novicki, D.L.; Rosenberg, M.R.; Michalopoulos, G.

    1985-01-01

    Rat hepatocytes in primary culture can be stimulated to replicate under the influence of rat serum and sparse plating conditions. Higher replication rates are induced by serum from two-thirds partially hepatectomized rats. The effects of carcinogens and noncarcinogens on the ability of hepatocytes to synthesize DNA were examined by measuring the incorporation of (3H)thymidine by liquid scintillation counting and autoradiography. Hepatocyte DNA synthesis was not decreased by ethanol or dimethyl sulfoxide at concentrations less than 0.5%. No effect was observed when 0.1 mM ketamine, Nembutal, hypoxanthine, sucrose, ascorbic acid, or benzo(e)pyrene was added to cultures of replicating hepatocytes. Estrogen, testosterone, tryptophan, and vitamin E inhibited DNA synthesis by approximately 50% at 0.1 mM, a concentration at which toxicity was noticeable. Several carcinogens requiring metabolic activation as well as the direct-acting carcinogen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine interfered with DNA synthesis. Aflatoxin B1 inhibited DNA synthesis by 50% (ID50) at concentrations between 1 X 10(-8) and 1 X 10(-7) M. The ID50 for 2-acetylaminofluorene was between 1 X 10(-7) and 1 X 10(-6) M. Benzo(a)pyrene and 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene inhibited DNA synthesis 50% between 1 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-4) M. Diethylnitrosamine and dimethylnitrosamine (ID50 between 1 X 10(-4) and 5 X 10(-4) M) and 1- and 2-naphthylamine (ID50 between 1 X 10(-5) and 5 X 10(-4) M) caused inhibition of DNA synthesis at concentrations which overlapped with concentrations that caused measurable toxicity.

  15. Retinal detachment in pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Galin, M A; Poole, T A; Obstbaum, S A

    1979-07-01

    In a series of cataract patients excluding myopic individuals, under age 60 years, and cases in which vitreous loss occurred, retinal detachment was no less frequent after intracapsular cataract extraction and Sputnik iris supported lenses than in controls. Both groups were followed up for a minimum of two years. The detachments predominantly occurred from retinal breaks in areas of the retina that looked normal preoperatively. PMID:464014

  16. Hyperglycemia and Diabetes Downregulate the Functional Expression of TRPV4 Channels in Retinal Microvascular Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, Kevin; McNaughten, Jennifer; McGahon, Mary K; Kelly, Catriona; Kyle, Daniel; Yong, Phaik Har; McGeown, J Graham; Curtis, Tim M

    2015-01-01

    Retinal endothelial cell dysfunction is believed to play a key role in the etiology and pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Numerous studies have shown that TRPV4 channels are critically involved in maintaining normal endothelial cell function. In the current paper, we demonstrate that TRPV4 is functionally expressed in the endothelium of the retinal microcirculation and that both channel expression and activity is downregulated by hyperglycaemia. Quantitative PCR and immunostaining demonstrated molecular expression of TRPV4 in cultured bovine retinal microvascular endothelial cells (RMECs). Functional TRPV4 activity was assessed in cultured RMECs from endothelial Ca2+-responses recorded using fura-2 microfluorimetry and electrophysiological recordings of membrane currents. The TRPV4 agonist 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4-αPDD) increased [Ca2+]i in RMECs and this response was largely abolished using siRNA targeted against TRPV4. These Ca2+-signals were completely inhibited by removal of extracellular Ca2+, confirming their dependence on influx of extracellular Ca2+. The 4-αPDD Ca2+-response recorded in the presence of cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), which depletes the intracellular stores preventing any signal amplification through store release, was used as a measure of Ca2+-influx across the cell membrane. This response was blocked by HC067047, a TRPV4 antagonist. Under voltage clamp conditions, the TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A stimulated a membrane current, which was again inhibited by HC067047. Following incubation with 25 mM D-glucose TRPV4 expression was reduced in comparison with RMECs cultured under control conditions, as were 4αPDD-induced Ca2+-responses in the presence of CPA and ion currents evoked by GSK1016790A. Molecular expression of TRPV4 in the retinal vascular endothelium of 3 months' streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats was also reduced in comparison with that in age-matched controls. We conclude that hyperglycaemia and diabetes reduce the

  17. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis with high pixel density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieson, Keith; Loudin, James; Goetz, Georges; Huie, Philip; Wang, Lele; Kamins, Theodore I.; Galambos, Ludwig; Smith, Richard; Harris, James S.; Sher, Alexander; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases lead to blindness due to loss of the `image capturing' photoreceptors, while neurons in the `image-processing' inner retinal layers are relatively well preserved. Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight by electrically stimulating the surviving neurons. Most implants are powered through inductive coils, requiring complex surgical methods to implant the coil-decoder-cable-array systems that deliver energy to stimulating electrodes via intraocular cables. We present a photovoltaic subretinal prosthesis, in which silicon photodiodes in each pixel receive power and data directly through pulsed near-infrared illumination and electrically stimulate neurons. Stimulation is produced in normal and degenerate rat retinas, with pulse durations of 0.5-4 ms, and threshold peak irradiances of 0.2-10 mW mm-2, two orders of magnitude below the ocular safety limit. Neural responses were elicited by illuminating a single 70 µm bipolar pixel, demonstrating the possibility of a fully integrated photovoltaic retinal prosthesis with high pixel density.

  18. Photovoltaic Retinal Prosthesis with High Pixel Density.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, Keith; Loudin, James; Goetz, Georges; Huie, Philip; Wang, Lele; Kamins, Theodore I; Galambos, Ludwig; Smith, Richard; Harris, James S; Sher, Alexander; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases lead to blindness due to loss of the "image capturing" photoreceptors, while neurons in the "image processing" inner retinal layers are relatively well preserved. Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight by electrically stimulating surviving neurons. Most implants are powered through inductive coils, requiring complex surgical methods to implant the coil-decoder-cable-array systems, which deliver energy to stimulating electrodes via intraocular cables. We present a photovoltaic subretinal prosthesis, in which silicon photodiodes in each pixel receive power and data directly through pulsed near-infrared illumination and electrically stimulate neurons. Stimulation was produced in normal and degenerate rat retinas, with pulse durations from 0.5 to 4 ms, and threshold peak irradiances from 0.2 to 10 mW/mm(2), two orders of magnitude below the ocular safety limit. Neural responses were elicited by illuminating a single 70 μm bipolar pixel, demonstrating the possibility of a fully-integrated photovoltaic retinal prosthesis with high pixel density.

  19. Photovoltaic Retinal Prosthesis with High Pixel Density

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, Keith; Loudin, James; Goetz, Georges; Huie, Philip; Wang, Lele; Kamins, Theodore I.; Galambos, Ludwig; Smith, Richard; Harris, James S.; Sher, Alexander; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases lead to blindness due to loss of the “image capturing” photoreceptors, while neurons in the “image processing” inner retinal layers are relatively well preserved. Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight by electrically stimulating surviving neurons. Most implants are powered through inductive coils, requiring complex surgical methods to implant the coil-decoder-cable-array systems, which deliver energy to stimulating electrodes via intraocular cables. We present a photovoltaic subretinal prosthesis, in which silicon photodiodes in each pixel receive power and data directly through pulsed near-infrared illumination and electrically stimulate neurons. Stimulation was produced in normal and degenerate rat retinas, with pulse durations from 0.5 to 4 ms, and threshold peak irradiances from 0.2 to 10 mW/mm2, two orders of magnitude below the ocular safety limit. Neural responses were elicited by illuminating a single 70 μm bipolar pixel, demonstrating the possibility of a fully-integrated photovoltaic retinal prosthesis with high pixel density. PMID:23049619

  20. Prolonged Inner Retinal Photoreception Depends on the Visual Retinoid Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiwu; Pack, Weston; Khan, Naheed W.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to rods and cones, mammals have inner retinal photoreceptors called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), which use the photopigment melanopsin and mediate nonimage-forming visual responses, such as pupil reflexes and circadian entrainment. After photic activation, photopigments must be reverted to their dark state to be light-sensitive again. For rods and to some extent cones, photopigment regeneration depends on the retinoid cycle in the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By contrast, ipRGCs are far from the RPE, and previous work suggests that melanopsin is capable of light-dependent self-regeneration. Here, we used in vitro ipRGC recording and in vivo pupillometry to show that the RPE is required for normal melanopsin-based responses to prolonged light, especially at high stimulus intensities. Melanopsin-based photoresponses of rat ipRGCs were remarkably sustained when a functional RPE was attached to the retina, but became far more transient if the RPE was removed, or if the retinoid cycle was inhibited, or when Müller glia were poisoned. Similarly, retinoid cycle inhibition markedly reduced the steady-state amplitude of melanopsin-driven pupil reflexes in both mice and rats. However, melanopsin photoresponses in RPE-separated rat retinas became more sustained in the presence of an 11-cis-retinal analog. In conclusion, during prolonged illumination, melanopsin regeneration depends partly on 11-cis-retinal from the RPE, possibly imported via Müller cells. Implications for RPE-related eye diseases and the acne drug isotretinoin (a retinoid cycle inhibitor) are discussed. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) contain the photopigment melanopsin and drive subconscious physiological responses to light, e.g., pupillary constriction and neuroendocrine regulation. In darkness, each photopigment molecule in ipRGCs, as well as rod/cone photoreceptors, contains 11-cis-retinal (a

  1. Toxicity of Two Different Sized Lanthanum Oxides in Cultured Cells and Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the use of both nano- and micro-sized lanthanum has been increasing in the production of optical glasses, batteries, alloys, etc. However, a hazard assessment has not been performed to determine the degree of toxicity of lanthanum. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the toxicity of both nano- and micro-sized lanthanum oxide in cultured cells and rats. After identifying the size and the morphology of lanthanum oxides, the toxicity of two different sized lanthanum oxides was compared in cultured RAW264.7 cells and A549 cells. The toxicity of the lanthanum oxides was also analyzed using rats. The half maximal inhibitory concentrations of micro-La2O3 in the RAW264.7 cells, with and without sonication, were 17.3 and 12.7 times higher than those of nano-La2O3, respectively. Similar to the RAW264.7 cells, the toxicity of nano-La2O3 was stronger than that of micro-La2O3 in the A549 cells. We found that nano-La2O3 was absorbed in the lungs more and was eliminated more slowly than micro-La2O3. At a dosage that did not affect the body weight, numbers of leukocytes, and concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase and albumin in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids, the weight of the lungs increased. Inflammatory effects on BAL decreased over time, but lung weight increased and the proteinosis of the lung became severe over time. The effects of particle size on the toxicity of lanthanum oxides in rats were less than in the cultured cells. In conclusion, smaller lanthanum oxides were more toxic in the cultured cells, and sonication decreased their size and increased their toxicity. The smaller-sized lanthanum was absorbed more into the lungs and caused more toxicity in the lungs. The histopathological symptoms caused by lanthanum oxide in the lungs did not go away and continued to worsen until 13 weeks after the initial exposure. PMID:26191385

  2. Mycolactone-mediated neurite degeneration and functional effects in cultured human and rat DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sinisi, M; Fox, M; MacQuillan, A; Quick, T; Korchev, Y; Bountra, C; McCarthy, T; Anand, P

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycolactone is a polyketide toxin secreted by the mycobacterium Mycobacterium ulcerans, responsible for the extensive hypoalgesic skin lesions characteristic of patients with Buruli ulcer. A recent pre-clinical study proposed that mycolactone may produce analgesia via activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R). In contrast, AT2R antagonist EMA401 has shown analgesic efficacy in animal models and clinical trials for neuropathic pain. We therefore investigated the morphological and functional effects of mycolactone in cultured human and rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and the role of AT2R using EMA401. Primary sensory neurons were prepared from avulsed cervical human DRG and rat DRG; 24 h after plating, neurons were incubated for 24 to 96 h with synthetic mycolactone A/B, followed by immunostaining with antibodies to PGP9.5, Gap43, β tubulin, or Mitotracker dye staining. Acute functional effects were examined by measuring capsaicin responses with calcium imaging in DRG neuronal cultures treated with mycolactone. Results Morphological effects: Mycolactone-treated cultures showed dramatically reduced numbers of surviving neurons and non-neuronal cells, reduced Gap43 and β tubulin expression, degenerating neurites and reduced cell body diameter, compared with controls. Dose-related reduction of neurite length was observed in mycolactone-treated cultures. Mitochondria were distributed throughout the length of neurites and soma of control neurons, but clustered in the neurites and soma of mycolactone-treated neurons. Functional effects: Mycolactone-treated human and rat DRG neurons showed dose-related inhibition of capsaicin responses, which were reversed by calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine and phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-Methylxanthine, indicating involvement of cAMP/ATP reduction. The morphological and functional effects of mycolactone were not altered by Angiotensin II or AT2R antagonist EMA401. Conclusion Mycolactone

  3. Mechanism of riboflavin uptake by cultured human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE-19 cells: possible regulation by an intracellular Ca2+-calmodulin-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Said, Hamid M; Wang, Shuling; Ma, Thomas Y

    2005-07-15

    In mammalian cells (including those of the ocular system), the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin, RF) assumes an essential role in a variety of metabolic reactions and is critical for normal cellular functions, growth and development. Cells of the human retinal pigment epithelium (hRPE) play an important role in providing a sufficient supply of RF to the retina, but nothing is known about the mechanism of the vitamin uptake by these cells and its regulation. Our aim in the present study was to address this issue using the hRPE ARPE-19 cells as the retinal epithelial model. Our results show RF uptake in the hRPE to be: (1) energy and temperature dependent and occurring without metabolic alteration in the transported substrate, (2) pH but not Na+ dependent, (3) saturable as a function of concentration with an apparent Km of 80 +/- 14 nM, (4) trans-stimulated by unlabelled RF and its structural analogue lumiflavine, (5) cis-inhibited by the RF structural analogues lumiflavine and lumichrome but not by unrelated compounds, and (6) inhibited by the anion transport inhibitors 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) and 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (SITS) as well as by the Na+ -H+ exchange inhibitor amiloride and the sulfhydryl group inhibitor p-chloromercuriphenylsulphonate (p-CMPS). Maintaining the hRPE cells in a RF-deficient medium led to a specific and significant up-regulation in RF uptake which was mediated via changes in the number and affinity of the RF uptake carriers. While modulating the activities of intracellular protein kinase A (PKA)-, protein kinase C (PKC)-, protein tyrosine kinase (PTK)-, and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated pathways were found to have no role in regulating RF uptake, a role for the Ca2+ -calmodulin-mediated pathway was observed. These studies demonstrate for the first time the involvement of a specialized carrier-mediated mechanism for RF uptake by hRPE cells and show that the process is

  4. Organotypic slice cultures from rat brain tissue: a new approach for Naegleria fowleri CNS infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gianinazzi, C; Schild, M; Müller, N; Leib, S L; Simon, F; Nuñez, S; Joss, P; Gottstein, B

    2005-12-01

    The free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri is the aetiological agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a disease leading to death in the vast majority of cases. In patients suffering from PAM, and in corresponding animal models, the brain undergoes a massive inflammatory response, followed by haemorrhage and severe tissue necrosis. Both, in vivo and in vitro models are currently being used to study PAM infection. However, animal models may pose ethical issues, are dependent upon availability of specific infrastructural facilities, and are time-consuming and costly. Conversely, cell cultures lack the complex organ-specific morphology found in vivo, and thus, findings obtained in vitro do not necessarily reflect the situation in vivo. The present study reports infection of organotypic slice cultures from rat brain with N. fowleri and compares the findings in this culture system with in vivo infection in a rat model of PAM, that proved complementary to that of mice. We found that brain morphology, as present in vivo, is well retained in organotypic slice cultures, and that infection time-course including tissue damage parallels the observations in vivo in the rat. Therefore, organotypic slice cultures from rat brain offer a new in vitro approach to study N. fowleri infection in the context of PAM. PMID:16336733

  5. Organotypic slice cultures from rat brain tissue: a new approach for Naegleria fowleri CNS infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gianinazzi, C; Schild, M; Müller, N; Leib, S L; Simon, F; Nuñez, S; Joss, P; Gottstein, B

    2005-12-01

    The free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri is the aetiological agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a disease leading to death in the vast majority of cases. In patients suffering from PAM, and in corresponding animal models, the brain undergoes a massive inflammatory response, followed by haemorrhage and severe tissue necrosis. Both, in vivo and in vitro models are currently being used to study PAM infection. However, animal models may pose ethical issues, are dependent upon availability of specific infrastructural facilities, and are time-consuming and costly. Conversely, cell cultures lack the complex organ-specific morphology found in vivo, and thus, findings obtained in vitro do not necessarily reflect the situation in vivo. The present study reports infection of organotypic slice cultures from rat brain with N. fowleri and compares the findings in this culture system with in vivo infection in a rat model of PAM, that proved complementary to that of mice. We found that brain morphology, as present in vivo, is well retained in organotypic slice cultures, and that infection time-course including tissue damage parallels the observations in vivo in the rat. Therefore, organotypic slice cultures from rat brain offer a new in vitro approach to study N. fowleri infection in the context of PAM.

  6. A 90-Day Subchronic Toxicity Study of Submerged Mycelial Culture of Cordyceps cicadae (Ascomycetes) in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Lien; Yeh, Shu-Hsing; Lin, Ting-Wei; Chen, Chin-Chu; Chen, Chin-Shuh; Kuo, Chia-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps cicadae is a parasitic fungus that hibernates inside a host (Cicada flammata Dist.) and then grows its fruiting body on the surface of the insect. The complete insect/fungus combination of C. cicadae has been widely applied in Chinese traditional medicine. Recent studies have demonstrated that the medicinal benefits of cultured mycelia are as effective as those found in the wild. However, toxicological information regarding the chronic consumption of C. cicadae mycelia culture is not available. This study was conducted to evaluate the possible toxicity arising from repeated exposure to freeze-dried submerged mycelial culture of C. cicadae for 90 days. A total of eighty 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups (10 males and 10 females in each group). C. cicadae was administered daily to animals by gavage at doses of 0, 500, 1000, and 2000 mg/kg body weight for 90 days. No animal deaths occurred and no treatment-related clinical signs were observed during the study period. No statistical differences in body weight gain, relative organ weight, hematology, serum chemistry, and urinalysis were observed. Gross necropsy and histopathological findings indicated that there was no treatment-related abnormality. Based on the results, the no observed adverse effect level of C. cicadae whole broth is determined to be > 2000 mg/kg for male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. The results of this study provides support for the use of C. cicadae fermentation product as a safe agent in functional food. PMID:26559863

  7. [Reciprocal relation of proliferative activity in central and peripheral zones of splenic organ culture exposed to vilon in rats of various ages].

    PubMed

    Bykov, N M; Chalisova, N I; Zeziulin, P N

    2003-01-01

    There was studied in spleen organotypic tissue culture the effect of vilon on the development of of proliferative activity in central and peripheral fields of explants of rats of various age: 3 days, 3 weeks and 2 years old. Vilon stimulated cell proliferation both in young and old rats, in spite of all there are reciprocal relations of this process in central and peripheral fields in the spleen organotypic culture of rats of various age.

  8. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids. PMID:27511757

  9. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-08-10

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids.

  10. Amiodarone- and desethylamiodarone-induced myelinoid inclusion bodies and toxicity in cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Somani, P; Bandyopadhyay, S; Klaunig, J E; Gross, S A

    1990-01-01

    Hepatocytes isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats were incubated with various concentrations of either amiodarone or desethylamiodarone for 0 to 96 hr. Both drugs produced a concentration-dependent increase of lactate dehydrogenase release in the culture medium, which correlated well with cell death as measured by trypan blue exclusion test. Desethylamiodarone was more toxic than amiodarone in the cultured hepatocytes. Incubation with subtoxic concentrations of either amiodarone (7.6 microM) or desethylamiodarone (8 microM) for 24 hr resulted in the development of myelinoid inclusion bodies in the hepatocytes without any excess release of lactate dehydrogenase. In experimental protocols where the hepatocytes were exposed to either amiodarone or desethylamiodarone for up to 96 hr, there was an increase in lactate dehydrogenase and the percent volume-density of multilamellar inclusion bodies with cumulative drug exposure with time. A linear correlation between hepatocyte drug concentration and multilamellar inclusion bodies was found for both amiodarone and desethylamiodarone. These results demonstrate that both amiodarone and its major metabolite, desethylamiodarone, induce lysosomal inclusions, which, under appropriate conditions, can be dissociated from cell death. Withdrawal of the drug after 24 hr exposure did not result in disappearance of the inclusion bodies from the hepatocytes for up to 96 hr of tissue culture. The concentrations at which amiodarone- or desethylamiodarone-induced electron microscopic changes and hepatotoxicity were only two to five times as high as the usual serum drug levels in patients given antiarrhythmic therapy with amiodarone.

  11. Use of microgravity bioreactors for development of an in vitro rat salivary gland cell culture model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. L.; Moriarity, D. M.; Campbell, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    During development, salivary gland (SG) cells both secrete factors which modulate cellular behavior and express specific hormone receptors. Whether SG cell growth is modulated by an autocrine epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor-mediated signal transduction pathway is not clearly understood. SG tissue is the synthesis site for functionally distinct products including growth factors, digestive enzymes, and homeostasis maintaining factors. Historically, SG cells have proven difficult to grow and may be only maintained as limited three-dimensional ductal-type structures in collagen gels or on reconstituted basement membrane gels. A novel approach to establishing primary rat SG cultures is use of microgravity bioreactors originally designed by NASA as low-shear culture systems for predicting cell growth and differentiation in the microgravity environment of space. These completely fluid-filled bioreactors, which are oriented horizontally and rotate, have proven advantageous for Earth-based culture of three-dimensional cell assemblies, tissue-like aggregates, and glandular structures. Use of microgravity bioreactors for establishing in vitro models to investigate steroid-mediated secretion of EGF by normal SG cells may also prove useful for the investigation of cancer and other salivary gland disorders. These microgravity bioreactors promise challenging opportunities for future applications in basic and applied cell research.

  12. Effects of vigabatrin and of GABA on myelinated rat cerebellar cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hauw, J. J.; Boutry, J. M.; Sun, P.; Sazdovitch, V.; Duyckaerts, C.

    1989-01-01

    1 The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of high concentrations of vigabatrin (γ-vinyl GABA) and of GABA on myelin of the central nervous system cultures. 2 Explants of rat cerebellum were cultured for 14-19 days in vitro on collagen-coated coverslips in Leighton tubes. They were exposed for up to 14 days to 500 nmol ml-1 vigabatrin or to 1000 nmol ml-1 GABA. 3 Qualitative and quantitative blind examination of living cultures and of Sudan black B-stained slides showed mild toxicity of both drugs for myelinated fibres. No clear-cut differences could be demonstrated between the two compounds, although vigabatrin seemed slightly more toxic than GABA at these doses. 4 In electron microscopy, no patent intramyelinic oedema nor primary demyelination were seen. On the contrary, some degenerating myelinated fibres and astrocytic gliosis were seen in both experimental conditions. The changes involved axons as well as myelin sheaths. 5 The toxicity of GABA and vigabatrin was surprisingly mild in this very sensitive model. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:2757909

  13. Endocytosis of heat-denatured albumin by cultured rat Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brouwer, A.; Knook, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Purified Kupffer cells were obtained by centrifugal elutriation of sinusoidal cells isolated by pronase treatment of the rat liver. The endocytosis of radioactively labeled heat-aggregated colloidal albumin (CA /sup 125/I) was investigated in maintenance cultures of the purified Kupffer cells. The endocytic capacity of the cells was studied during 4 days of culture. Maximum uptake was observed after 24 hr of culture, with a gradual decline during the following days. When the uptake was measured after incubation with increasing concentrations of CA /sup 125/I, a saturation effect was observed. This finding and the observed high rate of uptake are strong indications that receptor sites on the cell membrane are involved in the mechanism of endocytosis. The uptake of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was inhibited by the metabolic inhibitors fluoride and antimycin A, indicating that endocytosis of CA /sup 125/I is dependent on energy derived from both glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. The mechanism of internalization may also require the action of microfilaments as well as intact microtubules, since both cytochalasin B and colchicine inhibited the uptake of CA /sup 125/I. The intracellular degradation of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was strongly inhibited by chloroquine but not by colchicine. The degradation of ingested CA /sup 125/I occurred within the Kupffer cell lysosomes.

  14. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Ted; Wang, Lele; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Sher, Alexander; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight to patients suffering from retinal degenerative disorders. Implanted electrode arrays apply patterned electrical stimulation to surviving retinal neurons, producing visual sensations. All current designs employ inductively coupled coils to transmit power and/or data to the implant. We present here the design and initial testing of a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis fabricated with a pixel density of up to 177 pixels/mm2. Photodiodes within each pixel of the subretinal array directly convert light to stimulation current, avoiding the use of bulky coil implants, decoding electronics, and wiring, and thereby reducing surgical complexity. A goggles-mounted camera captures the visual scene and transmits the data stream to a pocket processor. The resulting images are projected into the eyes by video goggles using pulsed, near infrared (~900 nm) light. Prostheses with three pixel densities (15, 55, and 177 pix/mm2) are being fabricated, and tests indicate a charge injection limit of 1.62 mC/cm2 at 25Hz. In vitro tests of the photovoltaic retinal stimulation using a 512-element microelectrode array have recorded stimulated spikes from the ganglion cells, with latencies in the 1-100ms range, and with peak irradiance stimulation thresholds varying from 0.1 to 1 mW/mm2. With 1ms pulses at 25Hz the average irradiance is more than 100 times below the IR retinal safety limit. Elicited retinal response disappeared upon the addition of synaptic blockers, indicating that the inner retina is stimulated rather than the ganglion cells directly, and raising hopes that the prosthesis will preserve some of the retina's natural signal processing.

  15. Retinal compensatory changes after light damage in albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Montalbán-Soler, Luis; Alarcón-Martínez, Luis; Jiménez-López, Manuel; Salinas-Navarro, Manuel; Galindo-Romero, Caridad; Bezerra de Sá, Fabrízio; García-Ayuso, Diego; Avilés-Trigueros, Marcelino; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the anatomic and functional changes triggered by light exposure in the albino mouse retina and compare them with those observed in the albino rat. Methods BALB/c albino mice were exposed to 3,000 lx of white light during 24 h and their retinas analyzed from 1 to 180 days after light exposure (ALE). Left pupil mydriasis was induced with topical atropine. Retinal function was analyzed by electroretinographic (ERG) recording. To assess retinal degeneration, hematoxylin and eosin staining, the TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) technique, and quantitative immunohistofluorescence for synaptophysin and protein kinase Cα (PKCα) were used in cross sections. Intravenous injection of horseradish peroxidase and Fluoro-Gold™ tracing were used in whole-mounted retinas to study the retinal vasculature and the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) population, respectively. Results Light exposure caused apoptotic photoreceptor death in the central retina. This death was more severe in the dorsal than in the ventral retina, sparing the periphery. Neither retinal vascular leakage nor retinal ganglion cell death was observed ALE. The electroretinographic a-wave was permanently impaired, while the b-wave decreased but recovered gradually by 180 days ALE. The scotopic threshold responses, associated with the inner retinal function, diminished at first but recovered completely by 14 days ALE. This functional recovery was concomitant with the upregulation of protein kinase Cα and synaptophysin. Similar results were obtained in both eyes, irrespective of mydriasis. Conclusions In albino mice, light exposure induces substantial retinal damage, but the surviving photoreceptors, together with compensatory morphological/molecular changes, allow an important restoration of the retinal function. PMID:22509098

  16. Retinal Electrophysiology Is a Viable Preclinical Biomarker for Drug Penetrance into the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Charng, Jason; He, Zheng; Vingrys, Algis J.; Fish, Rebecca L.; Gurrell, Rachel; Bui, Bang V.; Nguyen, Christine T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To examine whether retinal electrophysiology is a useful surrogate marker of drug penetrance into the central nervous system (CNS). Materials and Methods. Brain and retinal electrophysiology were assessed with full-field visually evoked potentials and electroretinograms in conscious and anaesthetised rats following systemic or local administrations of centrally penetrant (muscimol) or nonpenetrant (isoguvacine) compounds. Results. Local injections into the eye/brain bypassed the blood neural barriers and produced changes in retinal/brain responses for both drugs. In conscious animals, systemic administration of muscimol resulted in retinal and brain biopotential changes, whereas systemic delivery of isoguvacine did not. General anaesthesia confounded these outcomes. Conclusions. Retinal electrophysiology, when recorded in conscious animals, shows promise as a viable biomarker of drug penetration into the CNS. In contrast, when conducted under anaesthetised conditions confounds can be induced in both cortical and retinal electrophysiological recordings. PMID:27239335

  17. Effect of Purified Murine NGF on Isolated Photoreceptors of a Rodent Developing Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Maria Luisa; Balzamino, Bijorn Omar; Petrocchi Passeri, Pamela; Micera, Alessandra; Aloe, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    A number of different studies have shown that neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) support the survival of retinal ganglion neurons during a variety if insults. Recently, we have reported that that eye NGF administration can protect also photoreceptor degeneration in a mice and rat with inherited retinitis pigmentosa. However, the evidence that NGF acts directly on photoreceptors and that other retinal cells mediate the NGF effect could not be excluded. In the present study we have isolated retinal cells from rats with inherited retinitis pigmentosa (RP) during the post-natal stage of photoreceptor degenerative. In presence of NGF, these cells are characterized by enhanced expression of NGF-receptors and rhodopsin, the specific marker of photoreceptor and better cell survival, as well as neuritis outgrowth. Together these observations support the hypothesis that NGF that NGF acts directly on photoreceptors survival and prevents photoreceptor degeneration as previously suggested by in vivo studies. PMID:25897972

  18. Biophotons Contribute to Retinal Dark Noise.

    PubMed

    Li, Zehua; Dai, Jiapei

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of dark noise in retinal photoreceptors resulted in a long-lasting controversy over its origin and the underlying mechanisms. Here, we used a novel ultra-weak biophoton imaging system (UBIS) to detect biophotonic activity (emission) under dark conditions in rat and bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) retinas in vitro. We found a significant temperature-dependent increase in biophotonic activity that was completely blocked either by removing intracellular and extracellular Ca(2+) together or inhibiting phosphodiesterase 6. These findings suggest that the photon-like component of discrete dark noise may not be caused by a direct contribution of the thermal activation of rhodopsin, but rather by an indirect thermal induction of biophotonic activity, which then activates the retinal chromophore of rhodopsin. Therefore, this study suggests a possible solution regarding the thermal activation energy barrier for discrete dark noise, which has been debated for almost half a century. PMID:27059222

  19. Effect of low molecular weight epidermal material upon DNA synthesis in primary cultures of newborn rat keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Abler, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate inhibitors of replicative DNA synthesis from newborn rat epidermis. The strategy for this study was to assay epidermal extracts for inhibitors of DNA synthesis in primary cultures of newborn rat keratinocytes. DNA synthesis was measured as the incorporation of /sup 4/H-TdR into acid precipitable material. The low molecular weight fraction, LMWF (less than 10Kd), of an aqueous epidermal extract was found to contain activity that inhibits replicative DNA synthesis in primary cultures. The inhibitory activity of the LMWD was detected in a novel assay utilizing primary cultures that were synchronized at the G1/S boundary with the DNA polymerase alpha inhibitor, aphidicolin. LMWF caused a dose dependent inhibition of replicative DNA synthesis as measured by the incorporation of /sup 3/H-TdR into acid precipitable material. The magnitude of the inhibitory effect for a given dose of LMWF was dependent upon the duration of exposure to that dose. The results presented in this investigation suggest that newborn rat epidermis contains a small polypeptide factor that inhibits replicative DNA synthesis in primary culture of newborn rat keratinocytes.

  20. [Effect of adrenaline on the proliferation of the tunica media smooth muscle cells of rat aorta in culture].

    PubMed

    Blaes, N; Bourdillon, M C; Crouzet, B; Suplisson, A; Boissel, J P

    1980-03-24

    The proliferation of Rat medial aortic smooth muscle cells in secondary cultures is increased with adrenalin. The maximal effect is obtained after 3 days and the increase is dose-dependent. Thus adrenalin might be one of the factors responsible for the proliferation of smooth muscle cells that could play a key role in the formation of the atherosclerotic plaque in vivo.

  1. Regulation of Liver Enriched Transcription Factors in Rat Hepatocytes Cultures on Collagen and EHS Sarcoma Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Borlak, Jürgen; Singh, Prafull Kumar; Rittelmeyer, Ina

    2015-01-01

    Liver-enriched transcription factors (LETF) play a crucial role in the control of liver-specific gene expression and for hepatocytes to retain their molecular and cellular functions complex interactions with extra cellular matrix (ECM) are required However, during cell isolation ECM interactions are disrupted and for hepatocytes to regain metabolic competency cells are cultured on ECM substrata. The regulation of LETFs in hepatocytes cultured on different ECM has not been studied in detail. We therefore compared two common sources of ECM and evaluated cellular morphology and hepatocyte differentiation by investigating DNA binding activity of LETFs at gene specific promoters and marker genes of hepatic metabolism. Furthermore, we studied testosterone metabolism and albumin synthesis to assess the metabolic competence of cell cultures. Despite significant difference in morphological appearance and except for HNF1β (p<0.001) most LETFs and several of their target genes did not differ in transcript expression after Bonferroni adjustment when cultured on collagen or Matrigel. Nonetheless, Western blotting revealed HNF1β, HNF3α, HNF3γ, HNF4α, HNF6 and the smaller subunits of C/EBPα and C/EBPβ to be more abundant on Matrigel cultured cells. Likewise, DNA binding activity of HNF3α, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6 and gene expression of hepatic lineage markers were increased on Matrigel cultured hepatocytes. To further investigate hepatic gene regulation, the effects of Aroclor 1254 treatment, e.g. a potent inducer of xenobiotic defense were studied in vivo and in vitro. The gene expression of C/EBP-α increased in rat liver and hepatocytes cultured on collagen and this treatment induced DNA binding activity of HNF4α, C/EBPα and C/EBPβ and gene expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in vivo and in vitro. Taken collectively, two sources of ECM greatly affected hepatocyte morphology, activity of liver enriched transcription factors, hepatic gene expression and metabolic competency

  2. Visible-light OCT to quantify retinal oxygen metabolism (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao F.; Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Wenzhong; Soetikno, Brian T.

    2016-03-01

    We explored, both numerically and experimentally, whether OCT can be a good candidate to accurately measure retinal oxygen metabolism. We first used statistical methods to numerically simulate photon transport in the retina to mimic OCT working under different spectral ranges. Then we analyze accuracy of OCT oximetry subject to parameter variations such as vessel size, pigmentation, and oxygenation. We further developed an experimental OCT system based on the spectral range identified by our simulation work. We applied the newly developed OCT to measure both retinal hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) and retinal retinal flow. After obtaining the retinal sO2 and blood velocity, we further measured retinal vessel diameter and calculated the retinal oxygen metabolism rate (MRO2). To test the capability of our OCT, we imaged wild-type Long-Evans rats ventilated with both normal air and air mixtures with various oxygen concentrations. Our simulation suggested that OCT working within visible spectral range is able to provide accurate measurement of retinal MRO2 using inverse Fourier transform spectral reconstruction. We called this newly developed technology vis-OCT, and showed that vis-OCT was able to measure the sO2 value in every single major retinal vessel around the optical disk as well as in micro retinal vessels. When breathing normal air, the averaged sO2 in arterial and venous blood in Long-Evans rats was measured to be 95% and 72%, respectively. When we challenge the rats using air mixtures with different oxygen concentrations, vis-OCT measurement followed analytical models of retinal oxygen diffusion and pulse oximeter well.

  3. Metabolic effects of ethanol on primary cell cultures of rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Garriga, Judit; Fernández-Solá, Joaquim; Adanero, Ester; Urbano-Márquez, Alvaro; Cussó, Roser

    2005-01-01

    Individuals who have consumed alcohol chronically accumulate glycogen in their skeletal muscles. Changes in the energy balance caused by alcohol consumption might lead to alcoholic myopathy. Experimental models used in the past, such as with skeletal muscle biopsy samples of alcohol-dependent individuals or in animal models, do not distinguish between direct effects and indirect effects (i.e., alterations to the nervous or endocrine system) of alcohol. In the current study, we evaluated the direct effect of ethanol on skeletal muscle glycogen concentrations and related glycolytic pathways. We measured the changes in metabolite concentrations and enzyme activities of carbohydrate metabolism in primary cell cultures of rat skeletal muscle exposed to ethanol for two periods. The concentrations of glycolytic metabolites and the activities of several enzymes that regulate glucose and glycogen metabolism were measured. After a short exposure to ethanol (6 h), glucose metabolism slowed. After 48 h of exposure, glycogen accumulation was observed.

  4. Developmental stability of taurine's activation on glycine receptors in cultured neurons of rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zheng-Quan; Lu, Yun-Gang; Chen, Lin

    2008-01-01

    Taurine is an endogenous amino acid that can activate glycine and/or gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors in the central nervous system. During natural development, taurine's receptor target undergoes a shift from glycine receptors to GABA(A) receptors in cortical neurons. Here, we demonstrate that taurine's receptor target in cortical neurons remains stable during in vitro development. With whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we found that taurine always activated glycine receptors, rather than GABA(A) receptors, in neurons of rat auditory cortex cultured for 5-22 days. Our results suggest that the functional sensitivity of glycine and GABA(A) receptors to taurine is critically regulated by their developmental environments.

  5. Involvement of microtubules in lipoprotein degradation and utilization for steroidogenesis in cultured rat luteal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rajan, V.P.; Menon, K.M.

    1985-12-01

    Cells isolated from superovulated rat ovaries metabolize low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) of human or rat origin and use the lipoprotein-derived cholesterol as a precursor for progesterone production. Under in vitro conditions, both lipoproteins are internalized and degraded in the lysosomes, although degradation of HDL is of lower magnitude than that of LDL. In this report we have examined the role of cellular microtubules in the internalization and degradation of human LDL and HDL in cultured rat luteal cells. The microtubule depolymerizing agents colchicine, podophyllotoxin, vinblastine, and nocodazole as well as taxol, deuterium oxide, and dimethyl sulfoxide, which are known to rapidly polymerize cellular tubulin into microtubules, were used to block the function of microtubules. When these antimicrotubule agents were included in the incubations, degradation of the apolipoproteins of (/sup 125/I)iodo-LDL and (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL by the luteal cells was inhibited by 50-85% compared to untreated control values. Maximum inhibitory effects were observed when the cells were preincubated with the inhibitor for at least 4 h at 37 C before treatment with the labeled lipoprotein. Lipoprotein-stimulated progesterone production by luteal cells was also inhibited by 50% or more in the presence of antimicrotubule agents. However, basal and hCG-stimulated progesterone production were unaffected by these inhibitors. The binding of (/sup 125/I)iodo-LDL and (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL to luteal cell plasma membrane receptors was not affected by the microtubule inhibitors. Although binding was unaffected and degradation was impaired in the presence of the inhibitors, there was no detectable accumulation of undegraded lipoprotein within the cells during the 24 h of study.

  6. Stimulation of albumin gene transcription by insulin in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, C.E.; Kalinyak, J.E.; Hutson, S.M.; Jefferson, L.S.

    1987-02-01

    The first goal of the work reported here was to prepare single-stranded DNA sequences for use in studies on the regulation of albumin gene expression. A double-stranded rat albumin cDNA clone was subcloned into the bacteriophage vector M13mp7. Single-stranded recombinant clones were screened for albumin sequences containing either the mRNA strand or the complementary strand. Two clones were selected that contained the 1200 nucleotide long 3' end of the albumin sequence. DNA from the clone containing the mRNA strand was used as a template for DNA polymerase I to prepare a radiolabeled, single-stranded cDNA to albumin mRNA. This radiolabeled cDNA probe was used to quantitate the relative abundance of albumin mRNA in samples of total cellular RNA. DNA from the clone containing the complementary strand was used to measure relative rates of albumin gene transcription in isolated nuclei. The second goal was to use the single-stranded DNA probes to investigate the mechanism of the insulin-mediated stimulation of albumin synthesis in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. Addition of insulin to hepatocytes maintained in a chemically defined, serum-free medium for 40 h in the absence of any hormones resulted in a specific 1.5- to 2.5-fold stimulation of albumin gene transcription that was maximal at 3 h and was maintained above control values for at least 24 h. The rate of albumin gene transcription in nuclei isolated from livers of diabetic rats was reduced to 50% of the value recorded in control nuclei. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that insulin regulates synthesis of albumin at the level of gene transcription.

  7. Steroid Differentiation: The Safety Profile of Various Steroids on Retinal Cells in Vitro and their Implications for Clinical Use (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Zacharias, Leandro Cabral; Kenney, M. Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if potentially viable alternatives to the clinical use of intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide should be considered based on a comparative assessment of the in vitro effects of five commercially available corticosteroids. We hypothesized that dexamethasone, betamethasone, methylprednisolone, loteprednol etabonate, and fluocinolone acetonide, at clinically relevant doses, may show different levels of in vitro cytotoxicity to retinal cells. Methods: Cultures of human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) and rat embryonal neurosensory precursor retinal cells (R28) were treated with dexamethasone, betamethasone, methylprednisolone, loteprednol, or fluocinolone acetonide. Cell viability as a measure of cell death was determined by trypan blue dye exclusion assay. The mechanical effect of drug crystals was evaluated by solubilizing the steroid formulations. Mitochondrial dehydrogenase and membrane potential were assessed to measure cell damage. Results: Betamethasone, loteprednol, and methylprednisolone, in commercially available forms, caused significant cytotoxic changes to retinal cells in vitro at clinically relevant doses. This effect was less pronounced with solubilized betamethasone. Dexamethasone at concentrations up to 5 times the clinical dose of free drug injections and 1000 times greater than a drug implant did not cause decreased cell viability. Fluocinolone acetonide at doses 1000 times higher than observed with drug delivery systems showed no cytotoxic effect. Conclusions: Betamethasone, loteprednol, and methylprednisolone exhibited cytotoxicity at clinically relevant doses and do not appear to be good therapeutic options for intravitreal use. In comparison, dexamethasone and fluocinolone acetonide, which exhibited fewer cytotoxic effects than other steroids, may be potentially viable alternatives to triamcinolone acetonide for clinical use. PMID:25646032

  8. Pulmonary surfactant and its components inhibit secretion of phosphatidylcholine from cultured rat alveolar type II cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, L.G.; Wright, J.R.; Hawgood, S.; Gonzalez, R.; Venstrom, K.; Nellenbogen, J.

    1987-02-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is synthesized and secreted by alveolar type II cells. Radioactive phosphatidylcholine has been used as a marker for surfactant secretion. The authors report findings that suggest that surfactant inhibits secretion of /sup 3/H-labeled phosphatidylcholine by cultured rat type II cells. The lipid components and the surfactant protein group of M/sub r/ 26,000-36,000 (SP 26-36) inhibit secretion to different extents. Surfactant lipids do not completely inhibit release; in concentrations of 100 ..mu..g/ml, lipids inhibit stimulated secretion by 40%. SP 26-36 inhibits release with an EC/sub 50/ of 0.1 ..mu..g/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 ..mu..g/ml, SP 26-36 inhibits basal secretion and reduces to basal levels secretion stimulated by terbutaline, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and the ionophore A23187. The inhibitory effect of SP 26-36 can be blocked by washing type II cells after adding SP 26-36, by heating the proteins to 100/sup 0/C for 10 min, by adding antiserum specific to SP 26-36, or by incubating cells in the presence of 0.2 mM EGTA. SP 26-36 isolated from canine and human sources also inhibits phosphatidylcholine release from rat type II cells. Neither type I collagen nor serum apolipoprotein A-1 inhibits secretion. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that surfactant secretion is under feedback regulatory control.

  9. Infection of cultured rat myotubes and neurons from the spinal cord by rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Tsiang, H; de la Porte, S; Ambroise, D J; Derer, M; Koenig, J

    1986-01-01

    Rabies virus multiplication was investigated in cultured primary rat myotubes and neurons. The susceptibility of these two cell types to fixed rabies challenge virus strain (CVS) was monitored by fluorescence and virus titration. Differentiated rat myotubes were susceptible to rabies virus infection, and showed an increasing accumulation of viral material from day one to day four. However, these cells did not release infective viral particles, nor did they accumulate infectious virions in the cytoplasm. In contrast, infected neurons released large amounts of infectious particles. Electron microscopy observation of infected myotubes showed minor alterations and the presence of typical viral inclusions in the cytoplasm without mature virions assembling viral membranes. Competition binding experiments show that alpha-bungarotoxin inhibits rabies virus infection from 10(-5) to 10(-7) M, whereas lower toxin concentrations failed to have any effect. These data do not confirm the hypothesis of a fixed rabies virus amplification step at the site of the viral entry. On the other hand, the high susceptibility of peripheral neurons to rabies virus infection is an argument for the direct uptake of virions by these cells. The restrictive viral multiplication in the myotubes is an alternative explanation for the local persistence of rabies virus at the site of inoculation.

  10. Spheroidal aggregate culture of rat liver cells: histotypic reorganization, biomatrix deposition, and maintenance of functional activities

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Liver cells isolated from newborn rats and seeded on a non-adherent plastic substratum were found to spontaneously re-aggregate and to form, within a few days, spheroidal aggregates that eventually reached a plateaued diameter of 150-175 micron. Analyses on frozen sections from these spheroids by immunofluorescence microscopy using antibodies to various cytoskeletal elements and extracellular matrix components revealed a sorting out and a histotypic reorganization of three major cell types. A first type consisted of cells that segregated out on the aggregate surface forming a monolayer cell lining; a second type was identified as hepatocytes that regrouped in small islands often defining a central lumen; and a third group of cells reorganized into bile duct-like structures. This intercellular organization in the aggregates was paralleled by the accumulation of extracellular matrix components (laminin, fibronectin, and collagen) and their deposition following a specific pattern around each cell population structure. Determinations of albumin secretion and tyrosine aminotransferase induction by dexamethasone and glucagon at various times after the initiation of the cultures revealed a maintenance of the hepatocyte- differentiated functions for at least up to 2 mo at the levels measured at 3-5 d. It is concluded that cells dispersed as single cells from newborn rat liver conserve in part the necessary information to reconstruct a proper three-dimensional cyto-architecture and that the microenvironment so generated most likely represents a basic requirement for the optimal functioning of these differentiated cells. PMID:2411740

  11. Biosynthesis and secretion of alpha 1 acute-phase globulin in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, J; Kurdowska, A; Tran-Thi, T A; Budek, W; Koj, A; Decker, K; Heinrich, P C

    1985-01-15

    Experimental inflammation in rats led to a sevenfold increase in serum levels of alpha 1 acute-phase globulin. This increase is correlated with elevated levels of translatable mRNA for alpha 1 acute-phase globulin in the liver. Biosynthesis and secretion of alpha 1 acute-phase globulin were studied in rat hepatocyte primary cultures. An intracellular form of alpha 1 acute-phase globulin with an apparent relative molecular mass of 63 500 and a secreted form of 68 000 were found. The intracellular form of alpha 1 acute-phase globulin could be deglycosylated by endoglucosaminidase H treatment indicating that its oligosaccharide chains were of the high-mannose type. The secreted form of alpha 1 acute-phase globulin was not sensitive to endoglucosaminidase H, but was susceptible to the action of sialidase reflecting carbohydrate side-chains of the complex type. Pulse-chase experiments revealed a precursor-product relationship for the high-mannose and the complex type alpha 1 acute-phase globulin. In the hepatocyte medium newly synthesized alpha 1 acute-phase globulin was detected 30 min after the pulse. Unglycosylated alpha 1 acute-phase globulin was found in the cells as well as in the medium when the transfer of oligosaccharide chains onto the polypeptide chains was blocked by tunicamycin. Tunicamycin led to a marked delay in alpha 1 acute-phase globulin secretion. PMID:2578391

  12. Reactive oxygen species are involved in BMP-induced dendritic growth in cultured rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Lea, Charlotte; Sosa, Jose Carlo; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons; however, the downstream signaling molecules that mediate the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs are not well characterized. Here we test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling links BMP receptor activation to dendritic growth. In cultured rat sympathetic neurons, exposure to any of the three mechanistically distinct antioxidants, diphenylene iodinium (DPI), nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NGA) or desferroxamine (DFO), blocked de novo BMP-induced dendritic growth. Addition of DPI to cultures previously induced with BMP to extend dendrites caused dendritic retraction while DFO and NGA prevented further growth of dendrites. The inhibition of the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs by antioxidants was concentration-dependent and occurred without altering axonal growth or neuronal cell survival. Antioxidant treatment did not block BMP activation of SMAD 1,5 as determined by nuclear localization of these SMADs. While BMP treatment did not cause a detectable increase in intracellular ROS in cultured sympathetic neurons as assessed using fluorescent indicator dyes, BMP treatment increased the oxygen consumption rate in cultured sympathetic neurons as determined using the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer, suggesting increased mitochondrial activity. In addition, BMPs upregulated expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and either pharmacological inhibition or siRNA knockdown of NOX2 significantly decreased BMP-7 induced dendritic growth. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that ROS are involved in the downstream signaling events that mediate BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons, and suggest that ROS-mediated signaling positively modulates dendritic complexity in peripheral neurons.

  13. Neuroprotective Effects of Agmatine Against Cell Damage Caused by Glucocorticoids in Cultured Rat Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, M.-Y.; Wang, W.-P.; Bissette, G.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study the neuroprotective effects of agmatine against neuronal damage caused by glucocorticoids were examined in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Spectrophotometric measurements of lactate dehydrogenase activities, β-tubulin III immunocytochemical staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick-end-labeling assay (TUNEL) labeling and caspase-3 assays were carried out to detect cell damage or possible involved mechanisms. Our results show that dexamethasone and corticosterone produced a concentration-dependent increase of lactate dehydrogenase release in 12-day hippocampal cultures. Addition of 100 μM agmatine into media prevented the glucocorticoid-induced increase of lactate dehydrogenase release, an effect also shared with the specific N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist MK801 and glucocorticoid receptor antagonists mifepristone and spironolactone. Arcaine, an analog of agmatine with similar structure as agmatine, also blocked glucocorticoid-induced increase of lactate dehydrogenase release. Spermine and putrescine, the endogenous polyamine and metabolic products of agmatine without the guanidino moiety of agmatine, have no appreciable effect on glucocorticoid-induced injuries, indicating a structural relevance for this neuroprotection. Immunocytochemical staining with β-tubulin III confirmed the substantial neuronal injuries caused by glucocorticoids and the neuroprotective effects of agmatine against these neuronal injuries. TUNEL labeling demonstrated that agmatine significantly reduced TUNEL-positive cell numbers induced by exposure of cultured neurons to dexamethasone. Moreover, exposure of hippocampal neurons to dexamethasone significantly increased caspase-3 activity, which was inhibited by co-treatment with agmatine. Taken together, these results demonstrate that agmatine can protect cultured hippocampal neurons from glucocorticoid-induced neurotoxicity, through a possible blockade of

  14. Thrombin-induced activation of astrocytes in mixed rat hippocampal cultures is inhibited by soluble thrombomodulin.

    PubMed

    Niego, Be'eri; Samson, Andre L; Petersen, Karl-Uwe; Medcalf, Robert L

    2011-03-24

    Thrombin, a serine protease known for its role in coagulation, also induces a variety of protease activated receptor (PAR)-mediated responses in the central nervous system that contribute to many brain pathologies. Since the proteolytic specificity of thrombin is uniquely controlled by thrombomodulin (TM), we investigated the mechanisms by which thrombin and a recombinant soluble form of human TM (Solulin, INN: sothrombomodulin alpha; rhsTM) could influence rat hippocampal cultures. Treatment of hippocampal cultures with thrombin for up to 48h resulted in a significant morphological rearrangement with the formation of expansive cell-free areas (CFAs) and a reduction in cell viability; both effects were blocked by rhsTM. Treatment with the selective PAR-1 agonist, TRAP (SFLLRN) caused the formation of CFAs, suggesting that CFA formation involved PAR-1 signaling. Astrocytes prepared from PAR-1(-/-) mice also had an attenuated CFA response to thrombin. Thrombin-induced CFA formation was a consequence of cell movement and substantial changes in cell morphology, rather than due to cell detachment. Immunocytochemical and functional analyses revealed that the thrombin-sensitive cells within these hippocampal cultures were astrocytes. The effects of thrombin on CFA development were mediated by astrocyte-specific release of intracellular calcium and signalling through ERK1/2. rhsTM was able to attenuate thrombin-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Finally, astrocytes were shown to maintain thrombin-sensitivity following neuronal depletion with NMDA, a result which was confirmed with pure astrocyte cultures. Hence thrombin mediates PAR-1-induced activation of hippocampal astrocytes, but not neurons, in a process that can be modulated by rhsTM. PMID:21241677

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species are involved in BMP-Induced Dendritic Growth in Cultured Rat Sympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Lea, Charlotte; Sosa, Jose Carlo; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons; however, the downstream signaling molecules that mediate the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs are not well characterized. Here we test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling links BMP receptor activation to dendritic growth. In cultured rat sympathetic neurons, exposure to any of three mechanistically distinct antioxidants, diphenylene iodinium (DPI), nordihydroguiaretic acid (NGA) or desferroxamine (DFO), blocked de novo BMP-induced dendritic growth. Addition of DPI to cultures previously induced with BMP to extend dendrites caused dendritic retraction while DFO and NGA prevented further growth of dendrites. The inhibition of the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs by antioxidants was concentration-dependent and occurred without altering axonal growth or neuronal cell survival. Antioxidant treatment did not block BMP activation of SMAD 1,5 as determined by nuclear localization of these SMADs. While BMP treatment did not cause a detectable increase in intracellular ROS in cultured sympathetic neurons as assessed using fluorescent indicator dyes, BMP treatment increased the oxygen consumption rate in cultured sympathetic neurons as determined using the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer, suggesting increased mitochondrial activity. In addition, BMPs upregulated expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and either pharmacological inhibition or siRNA knockdown of NOX2 significantly decreased BMP-7 induced dendritic growth. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that ROS are involved in the downstream signaling events that mediate BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons, and suggest that ROS-mediated signaling positively modulates dendritic complexity in peripheral neurons. PMID:26079955

  16. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids pretreatment improves amyloid β-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in cultured rat hippocampal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Pallabi; Zaja, Ivan; Bienengraeber, Martin; Rarick, Kevin R; Terashvili, Maia; Canfield, Scott; Falck, John R; Harder, David R

    2014-02-15

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) has long been implicated as a causative protein in Alzheimer's disease. Cellular Aβ accumulation is toxic and causes mitochondrial dysfunction, which precedes clinical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease pathology. In the present study, we explored the possible use of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), epoxide metabolites of arachidonic acid, as therapeutic target against Aβ-induced mitochondrial impairment using cultured neonatal hippocampal astrocytes. Inhibition of endogenous EET production by a selective epoxygenase inhibitor, MS-PPOH, caused a greater reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential in the presence of Aβ (1, 10 μM) exposure versus absence of Aβ. MS-PPOH preincubation also aggravated Aβ-induced mitochondrial fragmentation. Preincubation of the cells with either 14,15- or 11,12-EET prevented this mitochondrial depolarization and fragmentation. EET pretreatment also further improved the reduction observed in mitochondrial oxygen consumption in the presence of Aβ. Preincubation of the cells with EETs significantly improved cellular respiration under basal condition and in the presence of the protonophore, carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP). The uncoupling of ATP synthase from the electron transfer chain that occurred in Aβ-treated cells was also prevented by preincubation with EETs. Lastly, cellular reactive oxygen species production, a hallmark of Aβ toxicity, also showed significant reduction in the presence of EETs. We have previously shown that Aβ reduces EET synthesis in rat brain homogenates and cultured hippocampal astrocytes and neurons (Sarkar P, Narayanan J, Harder DR. Differential effect of amyloid beta on the cytochrome P450 epoxygenase activity in rat brain. Neuroscience 194: 241-249, 2011). We conclude that reduction of endogenous EETs may be one of the mechanisms through which Aβ inflicts toxicity and thus supplementing the cells with exogenous EETs improves mitochondrial dynamics and

  17. Electrophysiological classification of P2X7 receptors in rat cultured neocortical astroglia

    PubMed Central

    Nörenberg, W; Schunk, J; Fischer, W; Sobottka, H; Riedel, T; Oliveira, JF; Franke, H; Illes, P

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: P2X7 receptors are ATP-gated cation channels mediating important functions in microglial cells, such as the release of cytokines and phagocytosis. Electrophysiological evidence that these receptors also occur in CNS astroglia is rare and rather incomplete. Experimental approach: We used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to search for P2X7 receptors in astroglial–neuronal co-cultures prepared from the cerebral cortex of rats. Key results: All the astroglial cells investigated responded to ATP with membrane currents, reversing around 0 mV. These currents could be also detected in isolated outside-out patch vesicles. The results of the experiments with the P2X [α,β-methylene ATP and 2′-3′-O-(4-benzoyl) ATP] and P2Y receptor agonists [adenosine 5′-O-(2-thiodiphosphate), uridine 5′-diphosphate, uridine 5′-triphosphate (UTP) and UDP-glucose] suggested the involvement of P2X receptors in this response. The potentiation of ATP responses in a low divalent cation or alkaline bath, but not by ivermectin, made it likely that a P2X7 receptor is operational. Blockade of the ATP effect by the P2X7 antagonists Brilliant Blue G, calmidazolium and oxidized ATP corroborated this assumption. Conclusions and implications: Rat cultured cortical astroglia possesses functional P2X7 receptors. It is suggested that astrocytic P2X7 receptors respond to high local ATP concentrations during neuronal injury. PMID:20649592

  18. Dose–response analysis of phthalate effects on gene expression in rat whole embryo culture

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Joshua F.; Verhoef, Aart; Beelen, Vincent A. van; Pennings, Jeroen L.A.; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2012-10-01

    The rat postimplantation whole embryo culture (WEC) model serves as a potential screening tool for developmental toxicity. In this model, cultured rat embryos are exposed during early embryogenesis and evaluated for morphological effects. The integration of molecular-based markers may lead to improved objectivity, sensitivity and predictability of WEC in assessing developmental toxic properties of compounds. In this study, we investigated the concentration-dependent effects of two phthalates differing in potency, mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) and monomethyl phthalate (MMP, less toxic), on the transcriptome in WEC to examine gene expression in relation with dysmorphogenesis. MEHP was more potent than MMP in inducing gene expression changes as well as changes on morphology. MEHP induced significant enrichment of cholesterol/lipid/steroid (CLS) metabolism and apoptosis pathways which was associated with developmental toxicity. Regulation of genes within CLS metabolism pathways represented the most sensitive markers of MEHP exposure, more sensitive than classical morphological endpoints. As shown in direct comparisons with toxicogenomic in vivo studies, alterations in the regulation of CLS metabolism pathways has been previously identified to be associated with developmental toxicity due to phthalate exposure in utero. Our results support the application of WEC as a model to examine relative phthalate potency through gene expression and morphological responses. Additionally, our results further define the applicability domain of the WEC model for developmental toxicological investigations. -- Highlights: ► We examine the effect of two phthalates on gene expression and morphology in WEC. ► MEHP is more potent than MMP in inducing gene expression changes and dysmorphogenesis. ► MEHP significantly disrupts cholesterol metabolism pathways in a dose-dependent manner. ► Specific phthalate-related mechanisms in WEC are relevant to mechanisms in vivo.

  19. Acetylation of retinal histones in diabetes increases inflammatory proteins: effects of minocycline and manipulation of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC).

    PubMed

    Kadiyala, Chandra Sekhar Rao; Zheng, Ling; Du, Yunpeng; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Kao, Hung-Ying; Miyagi, Masaru; Kern, Timothy S

    2012-07-27

    Histone acetylation was significantly increased in retinas from diabetic rats, and this acetylation was inhibited in diabetics treated with minocycline, a drug known to inhibit early diabetic retinopathy in animals. Histone acetylation and expression of inflammatory proteins that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy were increased likewise in cultured retinal Müller glia grown in a diabetes-like concentration of glucose. Both the acetylation and induction of the inflammatory proteins in elevated glucose levels were significantly inhibited by inhibitors of histone acetyltransferase (garcinol and antisense against the histone acetylase, p300) or activators of histone deacetylase (theophylline and resveratrol) and were increased by the histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberolylanilide hydroxamic acid. We conclude that hyperglycemia causes acetylation of retinal histones (and probably other proteins) and that the acetylation contributes to the hyperglycemia-induced up-regulation of proinflammatory proteins and thereby to the development of diabetic retinopathy.

  20. Glutathione S-transferase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activities in cultured rat hepatocytes treated with tocotrienol and tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Ong, F B; Wan Ngah, W Z; Shamaan, N A; Md Top, A G; Marzuki, A; Khalid, A K

    1993-09-01

    1. The effect of tocotrienol and tocopherol on glutathione S-transferase (GST) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. 2. Tocotrienol and tocopherol significantly decreased GGT activities at 5 days in culture but tocotrienol also significantly decreased GGT activities at 1-2 days. 3. Tocotrienol and tocopherol treatment significantly decreased GST activities at 3 days compared to the control but tocotrienol also decreased GST activities at 1-3 days. 4. Tocotrienol showed a more pronounced effect at a dosage of greater than 50 microM tocotrienol at 1-3 days in culture compared to the control.