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Sample records for cumulus-oocyte complex maturation

  1. Morphological dynamics of cumulus-oocyte complex during oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Sato, E

    1998-01-01

    The recent advances on the cytoplasmic regulators of the induction of germinal vesicle break down, maturation and degeneration of oocytes, and glycosaminoglycan composition during cumulus expansion of cumulus-oocyte complexes are discussed. A) Inactive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are present in the oocytes at germinal vesicle (GV) stage, and are activated with germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), and remain highly active throughout maturation in porcine oocytes. Inactive MAPKs are localized in the cytoplasm of GV-arrested oocytes and active MAPKs were detected in the GV just before GVBD. B) Cumulus expansion of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) was reduced by oocy tectomy. The profile of total glycosaminoglycan synthesis was attributed to hyaluronic acid rather than chondroitin sulfate in intact COCs and oocytectomy reduced hyaluronic acid synthesis. C) The abnormalities of chromosomes and alpha-tubulin morphology were observed in the oocytes of c-mos deficient mice. MAPK activity of c-mos deficient oocytes did not significantly fluctuate throughout maturation and was clearly lower than that of wild-type oocytes. One of the most drastic abnormalities in c-mos knockout mouse oocytes was their entrance into the interphase instead of second meiosis after first polar body emission. D) Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction-Southern blot hybridization demonstrated positive expression of Fas in intraovarian mouse oocytes. In contrast, expression of Fas ligand was detected in granulosa cells. These findings were histologically confirmed by in situ hybridization with Fas- and FasL-specific probes. Co-culture of intact and zona-free eggs and granulosa cells demonstrated positive TUNEL staining only zona-free eggs.

  2. Immature oocyte quality and maturational competence of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Gabriel Martin; Dalvit, Gabriel Carlos; Achi, María Verónica; Miguez, Marcelo Sergio; Cetica, Pablo Daniel

    2009-12-01

    Porcine immature oocyte quality (i.e., that of live oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage) was evaluated according to features of the surrounding cumulus, aiming to establish maturational competence of different subpopulations of such cumulus-oocyte complexes. Six subpopulations were identified: A1 (with a dense cumulus), A2 (with a translucent cumulus), B1 (with the corona radiata), B2 (partly naked oocytes), C (naked oocytes), D (with a dark cumulus). The percent incidence of live oocyte in these subpopulations changed significantly as related to cumulus features, however the occurrence of oocytes in the germinal vesicle stage was lower in class D only. Similar metaphase II rates achieved in A1, A2, B1 and B2 classes after in vitro maturation suggest that the nucleus may in fact mature in vitro, in spite of the different accompanying cumulus features which are typical of these classes. In contrast, a higher cytoplasmic maturation rate obtained in class A may indicate a stronger dependence of this variable upon cumulus features than that shown by nuclear maturation. When different types of cumulus expansion after in vitro maturation were considered (i.e., fully expanded cumulus, partly expanded cumulus, and partly naked oocyte), no differences were found in the percent of oocytes reaching metaphase II or cytoplasmic maturation. It is concluded that morphological features of the collected porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (rather than cumulus behavior during culture) may be useful for selection of potentially competent oocytes for in vitro fertilization and embryo production. PMID:20067032

  3. Growth hormone pathway gene expression varies in porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes during in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guiyu; Liu, Shujuan; Jiang, Yunliang; Yang, Honghua; Li, Jinlian

    2008-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) plays important roles in oocyte development and facilitates the successful production of competent oocytes in many species both in vivo and in vitro. However, the mechanism of GH action on oocyte maturation is not well known. In this paper, the temporospatial messenger ribonucleic acid expression patterns of GH and several other GH-related factors were quantitatively analyzed in porcine cumulus-oocytes complex throughout in vitro maturation (IVM). GH expression was decreased in oocytes during IVM while absent in cumulus cells. GH receptor, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and IGF-1 receptor expressions were also downregulated in oocytes. In cumulus cells, the expression of IGF-1 decreased significantly while IGF-1 receptor expression remained constant. The transcripts of Janus kinase 2 increased in both oocytes and cumulus cells during IVM. The current precise gene expression information provides further evidence to explain the complex network of GH signaling involved in IVM of porcine oocyte.

  4. Identification of hyaluronic acid-binding proteins and their expressions in porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes during in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Masaki; Miyahayashi, Yasunori; Naganuma, Takako; Kimura, Naoko; Sasada, Hiroshi; Sato, Eimei

    2002-10-01

    Hyaluronic acid-binding proteins (HABPs) are necessary for expansion of the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) during oocyte maturation. In this study, to obtain the detailed information of HABPs during cumulus expansion, we examined the expression of HABPs in porcine COCs during in vitro maturation (IVM). After maturation culture, proteins were extracted from porcine COCs and separated by SDS-PAGE and then transferred to polyvinylidene fluoride membranes. After transfer, the membranes were subjected to ligand blotting with biotinylated hyaluronic acid (bHA) or fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled hyaluronic acid (FITC-HA). Furthermore, the extracted proteins were subjected to immunoprecipitation, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence analysis to dissect the HABPs. Ligand blotting with FITC-HA could detect HABPs. Using this ligand-blotting method, 13 and 14 bands of HABPs were detected in porcine COCs after 0 and 48 h in culture, respectively. Of these, the level of expression of 85-kDa HABP increased with cumulus expansion during IVM and was newly detected after culture. Immunoprecipitation, Western blotting, and immunofluorescent analysis confirmed that the 85-kDa HABP corresponded to CD44 and that it existed on/in the membrane of cumulus cells. The present results indicated that HABP expressed in porcine COCs during IVM, particularly CD44, may form a network of the matrices in the extracellular space of the oocyte with cumulus expansion during IVM.

  5. Expression of bone morphogenetic proteins and receptors in porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes during in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guiyu; Guo, Bingran; Pan, Dengke; Mu, Yulian; Feng, Shutang

    2008-03-01

    In vitro oocyte growth is the essential technology which enables oocytes to achieve maturation and acquire the competence for subsequent manipulation. There is increasing evidence that members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily are expressed in a variety of cell types within the ovary in a developmental stage-related manner and function as crucial factors in oocyte growth and follicular development. However, the expression of TGF-beta family members has been studied extensively in follicular compartment cells in the ovaries while poorly explored in the cumulus-oocytes complex (COC) within culture systems. Using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we investigated the temporal and spatial expression patterns of several bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-4, BMP-6, BMP-15 and GDF-9), as well as BMP receptors (BMPRIA, BMPRIB, BMPRII and ActRII), in porcine COCs throughout in vitro maturation (IVM). In oocytes, the transcription of BMP-6, BMP-15, GDF-9 and BMPRII were down-regulated, while BMP-4, BMPRIA and BMPRIB remained unchanged during IVM. In cumulus cells, BMP-4 mRNA expression increased significantly, while BMP-6 and ActRII was down-regulated during IVM. Nevertheless, mRNAs of BMPRIA, BMPRIB and BMPRII were constantly expressed in cumulus cells in the process. However, BMP-15 was absent in cumulus cells and ActRII was not detected in oocytes. In addition, hardly any transcription of BMP-2, BMP-5, BMP-7, ActRIA was found in porcine COCs throughout IVM. These data demonstrate a complex BMP-signaling system for member gene expression within porcine COCs during IVM and indicate the need for further functional characterization of these factors during oocyte maturation.

  6. Motility contrast imaging of live porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ran; Turek, John; Machaty, Zoltan; Nolte, David

    2013-02-01

    Freshly-harvested porcine oocytes are invested with cumulus granulosa cells in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). The cumulus cell layer is usually too thick to image the living oocyte under a conventional microscope. Therefore, it is difficult to assess the oocyte viability. The low success rate of implantation is the main problem for in vitro fertilization. In this paper, we demonstrate our dynamic imaging technique called motility contrast imaging (MCI) that provides a non-invasive way to monitor the COCs before and after maturation. MCI shows a change of intracellular activity during oocyte maturation, and a measures dynamic contrast between the cumulus granulosa shell and the oocytes. MCI also shows difference in the spectral response between oocytes that were graded into quality classes. MCI is based on shortcoherence digital holography. It uses intracellular motility as the endogenous imaging contrast of living tissue. MCI presents a new approach for cumulus-oocyte complex assessment.

  7. The effect of FF-MAS on porcine cumulus-oocyte complex maturation, fertilization and pronucleus formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Faerge, Inger; Strejcek, Frantisek; Laurincik, Jozef; Rath, Detlef; Niemann, Heiner; Schellander, Karl; Rosenkranz, Christine; Hyttel, Poul Maddox; Grøndahl, Christian

    2006-08-01

    Follicular fluid meiosis-activating sterol (FF-MAS) has been isolated from the follicular fluid (FF) of several species including man. FF-MAS increases the quality of in vitro oocyte maturation, and thus the developmental potential of oocytes exposed to FF-MAS during in vitro maturation is improved. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of FF-MAS on porcine oocyte maturation and pronucleus formation in vitro. Porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were isolated from abattoir ovaries and in vitro matured for 48 h in NCSU 37 medium supplemented with 1 mg/l cysteine, 10 ng/ml epidermal growth factor and 50 microM 2-mercaptoethanol with or without 10% porcine follicular fluid (pFF). For the first 22 h, 1 mM db-cAMP and 10 I.E PMSG/hCG was added. The medium was supplemented with 1 microM, 3 microM, 10 microM, 30 microM or 100 microM FF-MAS dissolved in ethanol. After maturation the COCs were denuded mechanically using a fine glass pipette under constant pH and in vitro fertilized with fresh semen (5 x 10(5) spermatozoa/ml). The presumptive zygotes were evaluated 18 h after fertilization. The addition of pFF increased the monospermic as well as the polyspermic penetration of oocytes. In the absence of pFF, the addition of FF-MAS decreased the polyspermic penetration rate, whereas FF-MAS in combination with pFF decreased monospermic and increased polyspermic penetration. The degeneration rate of ova decreased in the presence of FF-MAS irrespective of the presence or absence of pFF. In the absence of pFF, FF-MAS at 3-10 microM increased the number of zygotes with advanced maternal pronuclear stages. In supraphysiological doses, i.e. 30-100 microM, FF-MAS dose-dependently and reversibly inhibited nuclear maturation in the absence of pFF.

  8. Up-regulation of 3'5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate-specific phosphodiesterase in the porcine cumulus-oocyte complex affects steroidogenesis during in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Sasseville, Maxime; Côté, Nancy; Gagnon, Marie-Claude; Richard, François J

    2008-11-01

    The 3'5'-cyclic GMP (cGMP) pathway is known to influence ovarian functions, including steroidogenesis, ovulation, and granulosa cell proliferation. We show here that cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity increased in a gonadotropin-dependent manner more than 3-fold in the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) after 24 h in vitro maturation (IVM) and up to 5-fold after 48 h. Further characterization of this increase demonstrated that the activity was located primarily in cumulus cells, and was sensitive to sildenafil and zaprinast, two inhibitors specific to both type 5 and 6 PDEs. RT-PCR experiments showed that the mRNAs for cGMP-degrading PDEs 5A and 6C are present in the COC before and after 30 h IVM. Western blotting confirmed the presence of PDE 5A in the COC. Western blotting of PDE 6C revealed a significant up-regulation in the COC during IVM. Isolation and analysis of detergent-resistant membranes suggested that PDE 6C protein, along with half of the total sildenafil-sensitive cGMP-degradation activity, is associated with detergent-resistant membrane in the COC after 30 h IVM. Treatment of porcine COC with sildenafil during IVM caused a significant decrease in gonadotropin-stimulated progesterone secretion. Together, these results constitute the first report exploring the contribution of cGMP-PDE activity in mammalian COC, supporting a functional clustering of the enzyme, and providing the first evidence of its role in steroidogenesis.

  9. Comparative importance of fatty acid beta-oxidation to nuclear maturation, gene expression, and glucose metabolism in mouse, bovine, and porcine cumulus oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Paczkowski, Melissa; Silva, Elena; Schoolcraft, William B; Krisher, Rebecca L

    2013-05-01

    The objective of these experiments was to evaluate the importance of fatty acid beta-oxidation (FAO) in the cumulus oocyte complex (COC) during in vitro maturation (IVM) to oocyte nuclear maturation and gene expression in both the oocyte and cumulus cells in three species with differing amounts of oocyte intracellular lipids (mouse, low; bovine, moderate; porcine, high). We inhibited FAO using etomoxir at 0, 10, 25, 100, or 250 μM. Completion of oocyte nuclear maturation was inhibited after COC exposure to 250 μM etomoxir in mouse oocytes, 100 μM etomoxir in bovine oocytes, and as little as 10 μM etomoxir in porcine oocytes (P < 0.05). When FAO was inhibited in mouse and porcine COCs resulting in inhibition of meiosis, the abundance of FAO, glycolytic, and oxidative stress gene transcripts were decreased in oocytes and cumulus cells (P < 0.05), although to a much greater extent in the pig. In bovine oocytes and cumulus cells, FAO gene transcripts were increased and glycolytic gene expression altered following meiotic inhibition due to etomoxir. Etomoxir, at doses that did not inhibit nuclear maturation in bovine and murine COCs, increased glucose consumption (P < 0.05), suggesting glucose metabolism is increased to meet the metabolic demands of the COCs when fatty acid metabolism is compromised. Our data demonstrates that FAO is essential to oocyte nuclear maturation in all three species. Sensitivity of nuclear maturation to FAO inhibition reflects the amount of lipid present in the ooplasm and may suggest a relative reliance on this metabolic pathway.

  10. Cellular and molecular events during oocyte maturation in mammals: molecules of cumulus-oocyte complex matrix and signalling pathways regulating meiotic progression.

    PubMed

    Kimura, N; Hoshino, Y; Totsukawa, K; Sato, E

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian oocytes acquire their intrinsic ability in a stepwise manner through ovarian folliculogenesis, ultimately reaching the competence to undergo complete oocyte maturation at the final stage of Graafian follicle development. The fully-grown oocyte is tightly surrounded by compact layers of specialized granulosa cells (cumulus cells) to form a cumulus-oocyte complex (COC). After a preovulatory gonadotrophin surge, the COCs rapidly organize a special muco-elastic extracellular matrix (ECM) consisting of large amounts of hyaluronan (HA) and HA binding matrix glycoproteins. Simultaneously, the oocytes undergo meiotic resumption and cytoplasmic modification and attain the fertilizable metaphase II (MII) stage. These cellular events that immediately occur in COCs in the ovulatory phase are strictly regulated by pituitary hormones, steroids, growth factors and so on. Knowledge of the efficient mechanisms and the downstream cascades of the key molecules controlling oocyte maturation may gradually lead to improvement of the present oocyte/ embryo culture systems and gamete biotechnology. Recent studies by our group imply that i) the interaction of HA-CD44 identified in the porcine COC matrix is likely to participate in gap junctional communication and meiotic progression, and that ii) phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (P13-K) and Akt contribute to the progress of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)-induced meiosis in mice. Furthermore, this review focuses on the current understanding of biosynthetic regulation, the presumptive role of COC matrix molecules and the signalling pathways for meiotic modulators, such as the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, the P13-K/Akt pathway and the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway.

  11. The new system of shorter porcine oocyte in vitro maturation (18 hours) using ≥8 mm follicles derived from cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Seong-Sung; Yoon, Junchul David; Cheong, Seung-A; Jeon, Yubyeol; Lee, Eunsong; Hyun, Sang-Hwan

    2014-01-15

    Despite recent efforts to improve in vitro maturation (IVM) systems for porcine oocytes, developmental competence of in vitro-matured oocytes is still suboptimal compared with those matured in vivo. In this study, we compared oocytes obtained from large (≥8 mm; LF) and medium (3-7 mm; MF) sized follicles in terms of nuclear maturation, intracellular glutathione and reactive oxygen species levels, gene expression, and embryo developmental competence after IVM. In the control group, cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were aspirated from MF and matured for 22 hours with hormones and subsequently matured for 18 to 20 hours without hormones at 39 °C, 5% CO2 in vitro. In the LF group, COCs were obtained from follicles larger than 8 mm and were subjected to IVM for only 18 hours. The ovaries have LF were averagely obtained with 1.7% per day during 2012 and it was significantly higher in the winter season. The results of the nuclear stage assessment of the COCs from the LFs are as follows: before IVM (0 hours); germinal vesicle stage (15.2%), metaphase I (MI) stage (55.4%), anaphase and telophase I stages (15.8%), and metaphase II (MII) stage (13.6%). After 6 hours IVM; germinal vesicle (4.2%), MI (43.6%), anaphase and telophase I (9.4%), and MII (42.8%). After 18-hour IVM; MI (9.7%) and MII (90.3%). Oocytes from LF showed a significant (P < 0.001) increase in intracellular glutathione (1.41 vs. 1.00) and decrease in reactive oxygen species (0.8 vs. 1.0) levels compared with the control. The cumulus cells derived from LFs showed lower (P < 0.1) mRNA expression of COX-2 and TNFAIP6, and higher (P < 0.1) mRNA expression of PCNA and Nrf2 compared with the control group-derived cumulus cells. After parthenogenetic activation, in vitro fertilization and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using matured oocytes from LFs, the embryo development was significantly improved (greater blastocyst formation rates and total cell numbers in blastocysts) compared with the control group

  12. Effects of co-culture of cumulus oocyte complexes with denuded oocytes during in vitro maturation on the developmental competence of cloned bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Ha, A-N; Fakruzzaman, M; Lee, K-L; Bang, J-I; Deb, G-K; Wang, Z; Kong, I-K

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of co-culture of immature cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) with denuded immature oocytes (DO) during in vitro maturation on the developmental competence and quality of cloned bovine embryos. We demonstrated that developmental competence, judged by the blastocyst formation rate, was significantly higher in the co-cultured somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT+DO, 37.1 ± 1.1%) group than that in the non-co-cultured somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT-DO, 25.1 ± 0.9%) group and was very similar to that in the control IVF (IVF, 38.8 ± 2.8%) group. Moreover, the total cell number per blastocyst in the SCNT+DO group (101.7 ± 6.2) was higher than that in the SCNT-DO group (81.7 ± 4.3), while still less than that in the IVF group (133.3 ± 6.0). Furthermore, our data showed that mRNA levels of the methylation-related genes DNMT1 and DNMT3a in the SCNT+DO group were similar to that in the IVF group, while they were significantly higher in the SCNT-DO group. Similarly, while the mRNA levels of the deacetylation-related genes HDAC2 and HDAC3 were significantly higher in the SCNT-DO group, they were comparable between the IVF and SCNT+DO groups. However, the mRNA levels of HDAC1 and DNMT3B were significantly higher in the SCNT+DO group than in the other groups. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that co-culture of COCs with DO improves the in vitro developmental competence and quality of cloned embryos, as evidenced by increased total cell number.

  13. A role of lipid metabolism during cumulus-oocyte complex maturation: impact of lipid modulators to improve embryo production.

    PubMed

    Prates, E G; Nunes, J T; Pereira, R M

    2014-01-01

    Oocyte intracellular lipids are mainly stored in lipid droplets (LD) providing energy for proper growth and development. Lipids are also important signalling molecules involved in the regulatory mechanisms of maturation and hence in oocyte competence acquisition. Recent studies show that LD are highly dynamic organelles. They change their shape, volume, and location within the ooplasm as well as their interaction with other organelles during the maturation process. The droplets high lipid content has been correlated with impaired oocyte developmental competence and low cryosurvival. Yet the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In particular, the lipid-rich pig oocyte might be an excellent model to understand the role of lipids and fatty acid metabolism during the mammalian oocyte maturation and their implications on subsequent monospermic fertilization and preimplantation embryo development. The possibility of using chemical molecules to modulate the lipid content of oocytes and embryos to improve cryopreservation as well as its biological effects during development is here described. Furthermore, these principles of lipid content modulation may be applied not only to germ cells and embryo cryopreservation in livestock production but also to biomedical fundamental research.

  14. Metabolic differences in bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes matured in vitro in the presence or absence of follicle-stimulating hormone and bone morphogenetic protein 15.

    PubMed

    Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Mottershead, David G; Gardner, David K; Gilchrist, Robert B; Thompson, Jeremy G

    2012-10-01

    Bidirectional communication between cumulus cells and the oocyte is necessary to achieve oocyte developmental competence. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 15 (rhBMP15) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) supplementation on bovine cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) metabolism during maturation. Bovine COCs were matured in the presence of absence of FSH, rhBMP15, or both for 23 h. The addition of FSH and rhBMP15 increased blastocyst development (without rhBMP15 and FSH, 28.4% ± 7.4%; with FSH and rhBMP15, 51.5% ± 5.4%; P < 0.05). Glucose uptake and lactate production was significantly increased by greater than 2-fold with FSH (P < 0.05), whereas rhBM15 supplementation did not increase these levels. rhBMP15 supplementation (regardless of FSH) significantly decreased ADP levels in COCs, leading to an increase in ATP:ADP ratios (P < 0.05). Indicators of mitochondrial activity and cellular REDOX, oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD(++)) and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H), levels within the oocyte of COCs were significantly higher with rhBMP15 alone, whereas the presence of FSH diminished the rhBMP15 effect. Regardless of treatment, no changes in REDOX state (FAD(++):NAD(P)H). The significant increase in FAD(++) and NAD(P)H in COCs with rhBMP15 was mediated via cumulus cells, because no differences were found in denuded oocytes cultured in the presence or absence of FSH, rhBMP15, or both. The present study demonstrates that a principal metabolic consequence of FSH supplementation of COCs is to alter the glycolytic rate of cumulus cells, whereas that of rhBMP15 is to regulate oxidative phosphorylation in the oocyte, even though it acts via cumulus cells. These effects are tempered when FSH and rhBMP15 are present together but, nonetheless, yield the best oocyte developmental competence.

  15. Differential expression dynamics of Growth differentiation factor9 (GDF9) and Bone morphogenetic factor15 (BMP15) mRNA transcripts during in vitro maturation of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Kathirvel, Muralidharan; Soundian, Eswari; Kumanan, Vijayarani

    2013-12-01

    The present study has evaluated the association of growth differentiation factor9 (GDF9) and bone morphogenetic protein15 (BMP15) mRNA expression in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) of buffalo ovary during in vitro maturation (IVM). GDF9 and BMP15 are expressed specifically in mammalian oocytes and also participate in cumulus-oocyte crosstalk. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) technique was applied to investigate the relative abundance (RA) of GDF9 and BMP15 mRNA transcripts throughout the IVM process. Relative mRNA expression pattern of these specific genes were assessed in oocytes and cumulus cells at 0, 6, 12 and 24 h of in vitro culture. Our results revealed that RA of GDF9 during different hours of IVM showed significant reduction between 0 h and 24 h of maturation in oocytes and BMP15 transcript increased significantly (P<0.05) between 6 h and 12 h and decreased again between 12 h and 24. In cumulus cells, GDF9 remained stable during IVM upto 12 h of maturation and decreased significantly between 12 h and 24 h of maturation. Conversely, significant reduction of BMP15 was observed between 0 h and 6 h, stayed stable upto 12 h and became undetectable at 24 h of maturation. In conclusion, these two genes were differentially expressed during the period of oocyte maturation process and notably, BMP15 expression pattern is associated specifically with the period of cumulus cell expansion.

  16. Proteolytic activity of the 26S proteasome is required for the meiotic resumption, germinal vesicle breakdown, and cumulus expansion of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes matured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yi, Young-Joo; Nagyova, Eva; Manandhar, Gaurishankar; Procházka, Radek; Sutovsky, Miriam; Park, Chang-Sik; Sutovsky, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The resumption of oocyte meiosis in mammals encompasses the landmark event of oocyte germinal vesicle (GV) breakdown (GVBD), accompanied by the modification of cell-to-cell communication and adhesion between the oocyte and surrounding cumulus cells. The concomitant cumulus expansion relies on microfilament-cytoskeletal remodeling and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. We hypothesized that this multifaceted remodeling event requires substrate-specific proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP). We evaluated meiotic progression, cytoskeletal dynamics, and the production of cumulus ECM in porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) cultured with or without 10-200 microM MG132, a specific proteasomal inhibitor, for the first 22 h of in vitro maturation, followed by 22 h of culture with or without MG132. Treatment with 10 microM MG132 arrested 28.4% of oocytes in GV stage (vs. 1.3% in control), 43.1% in prometaphase I, and 16.2% in metaphase I, whereas 83.7% of control ova reached metaphase II (0% of MG132 reached metaphase II). The proportion of GV-stage ova increased progressively to >90% with increased concentration of MG132 (20-200 microM). Furthermore, MG132 blocked the extrusion of the first polar body and degradation of F-actin-rich transzonal projections (TZP) interconnecting cumulus cells with the oocyte. The microfilament disruptor cytochalasin E (CE) prevented cumulus expansion but accelerated the breakdown of TZPs. Ova treated with a combination of 10 microM MG132 and 10 microM CE underwent GVBD, despite the inhibition of proteasomal activity. However, 90.0% of cumulus-free ova treated with 10 microM MG132 remained in GV stage, compared with 16.7% GV ova in control. Cumulus expansion, retention of hyaluronic acid, and the deposition of cumulus ECM relying on the covalent transfer of heavy chains of inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor (IalphaI) were also inhibited by MG132. Cumulus expansion in control COCs was accompanied by the degradation of ubiquitin

  17. Interactions between oocytes and cumulus cells during in vitro maturation of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes in a chemically defined medium: effect of denuded oocytes on cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Appeltant, R; Somfai, T; Nakai, M; Bodó, S; Maes, D; Kikuchi, K; Van Soom, A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify interactions between oocytes and cumulus cells (CCs) on the level of cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation during IVM of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in a chemically defined medium using a system that allows individual tracking of oocytes. Especially, the influence of oocyte-secreted factors was investigated by the aid of addition of denuded oocytes (DOs) as a possible approach to improve the IVM system. The basic maturation medium was porcine oocyte medium with addition of gonadotropins only during the first 20 hours of IVM. During IVM, COCs were kept fixed to the bottom of culture dish by adhesive Cell-Tak coating, which enabled individual tracking of COCs during IVM. Size changes in COCs during IVM were measured by digital image analysis. Cumulus expansion in a porcine oocyte medium of intact COCs increased in a typical manner until 20 hours and decreased in size subsequently until 48 hours of IVM (P < 0.05). Removal of oocytes from COCs by oocytectomy allowed the expansion of CCs to some extent, although their expansion ability was lower than that of COCs (P < 0.05). Addition of DOs (COCs to DOs ratio of 9:16) did not improve cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation rates of intact COCs (P > 0.05) but did enhance cumulus expansion of oocytectomized complexes (P < 0.05). Furthermore, removal of CCs before IVM increased oocyte maturation rates compared with COCs (52.3% and 32.9%, respectively) (P < 0.05) and a similar effect was observed in COCs when the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone was added to the IVM medium: carbenoxolone repressed the expansion of COCs at 20 hours of IVM. In conclusion, the porcine oocyte enhances cumulus expansion both by gap junctional communications and presumably by oocyte-secreted factor production. Nevertheless, the presence of oocytes is not a prerequisite for this process. In return, CCs maintain meiotic arrest in cumulus-enclosed oocytes during the initial culture

  18. Interactions between oocytes and cumulus cells during in vitro maturation of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes in a chemically defined medium: effect of denuded oocytes on cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Appeltant, R; Somfai, T; Nakai, M; Bodó, S; Maes, D; Kikuchi, K; Van Soom, A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify interactions between oocytes and cumulus cells (CCs) on the level of cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation during IVM of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in a chemically defined medium using a system that allows individual tracking of oocytes. Especially, the influence of oocyte-secreted factors was investigated by the aid of addition of denuded oocytes (DOs) as a possible approach to improve the IVM system. The basic maturation medium was porcine oocyte medium with addition of gonadotropins only during the first 20 hours of IVM. During IVM, COCs were kept fixed to the bottom of culture dish by adhesive Cell-Tak coating, which enabled individual tracking of COCs during IVM. Size changes in COCs during IVM were measured by digital image analysis. Cumulus expansion in a porcine oocyte medium of intact COCs increased in a typical manner until 20 hours and decreased in size subsequently until 48 hours of IVM (P < 0.05). Removal of oocytes from COCs by oocytectomy allowed the expansion of CCs to some extent, although their expansion ability was lower than that of COCs (P < 0.05). Addition of DOs (COCs to DOs ratio of 9:16) did not improve cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation rates of intact COCs (P > 0.05) but did enhance cumulus expansion of oocytectomized complexes (P < 0.05). Furthermore, removal of CCs before IVM increased oocyte maturation rates compared with COCs (52.3% and 32.9%, respectively) (P < 0.05) and a similar effect was observed in COCs when the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone was added to the IVM medium: carbenoxolone repressed the expansion of COCs at 20 hours of IVM. In conclusion, the porcine oocyte enhances cumulus expansion both by gap junctional communications and presumably by oocyte-secreted factor production. Nevertheless, the presence of oocytes is not a prerequisite for this process. In return, CCs maintain meiotic arrest in cumulus-enclosed oocytes during the initial culture

  19. Patterns of intercellular connectivity in the mammalian cumulus-oocyte complex.

    PubMed

    Albertini, D F; Rider, V

    1994-02-01

    Electron and fluorescence microscopic techniques have been used in a complementary fashion to study the patterns of follicle cell-oocyte interactions within cumulus-oocyte-complexes of various mammals. The principal findings are: (1) two distinct types of transzonal processes exist that are distinguishable on the basis of cytoskeletal composition; (2) in some of the species examined (pig, goat, primate), corkscrew-shaped processes rich in tubulin, traverse the zona pellucida and are invaginated into the oocyte cortex; (3) actin-rich processes either ramify as a network at the outer surface of the zona pellucida or penetrate the zona and make contact with the oolemma in a species specific manner. These results are discussed with respect both to the need to employ complementary optical methods in assessing connectivity patterns within COC and to the possible role that extracellular matrix-cell interactions play in the homeostatic control of oocyte growth and maturation.

  20. Influence of epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor 1 on nuclear maturation and fertilization of buffalo cumulus oocyte complexes in serum free media and their subsequent development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Purohit, G N; Brady, M S; Sharma, S S

    2005-07-01

    The in vitro maturation, fertilization and development of Indian water buffalo (Bubalus sp.) cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) to blastocysts were studied during culture, either in serum free tissue culture medium 199 (TCM 199) or Waymouth MB (WM). Based on different supplements added to these media, the experimental groups included: (a) no supplement (control); (b) hormones (FSH, LH and oestradiol) (c) Epidermal growth factor (EGF); (d) IGF-1; and (e) EGF + IGF-1. Experiments were conducted to note three end points: (1) nuclear maturation 24 h after culture (eight replicates); (2) fertilization 24 h after insemination (10 replicates); (3) development to blastocysts (nine replicates). The oocytes were cultured in groups of up to five per drop. Using a two-way (5 x 2) factorial model with interactions, the results were compared using generalized linear models with binomial errors and the logit link function. In experiment 1, the proportion of oocytes reaching metaphase II was higher for all the supplement treatments than the control treatment (t = 3.68, p < 0.0001). The proportion of oocytes reaching metaphase II was 74.7, 63.2, 64.7 and 81% with hormone (chi2 = 17.23, p < 0.0001), EGF (chi2 = 7.07, p = 0.007), IGF-1 (chi2 = 19.21, p = 0.002) and EGF + IGF-1 (chi2 = 33.04, p < 0.0001) supplementation, respectively, compared to 46.6% in the control (no supplement) group. Media did not have an effect on outcome. In experiment 2, the proportion of oocytes fertilized was significantly higher with hormones (31.0%, chi2 = 12.5, p = 0.0004), IGF-1 (35.7%, chi2 = 20.53, p < 0.0001), and the EGF + IGF-1 combination (49.7%, chi2 = 51.35, p < 0.0001) compared to control (16.2%). No significant effect of media was seen. In experiment 3, the proportion of oocytes that cleaved at 48 h after culturing was significantly higher for all supplement treatments compared to control. IGF-1 supplementation was the only treatment that did not produce a significantly higher rate of progression

  1. Bone morphogenetic protein 15 and fibroblast growth factor 10 enhance cumulus expansion, glucose uptake, and expression of genes in the ovulatory cascade during in vitro maturation of bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Caixeta, Ester S; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Gilchrist, Robert B; Thompson, Jeremy G; Price, Christopher A; Machado, Mariana F; Lima, Paula F; Buratini, José

    2013-07-01

    Oocyte-secreted factors (OSFs) regulate differentiation of cumulus cells and are of pivotal relevance for fertility. Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) and fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) are OSFs and enhance oocyte competence by unknown mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that BMP15 and FGF10, alone or combined in the maturation medium, enhance cumulus expansion and expression of genes in the preovulatory cascade and regulate glucose metabolism favouring hyaluronic acid production in bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). BMP15 or FGF10 increased the percentage of fully expanded COCs, but the combination did not further stimulate it. BMP15 increased cumulus cell levels of mRNA encoding a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10), ADAM17, amphiregulin (AREG), and epiregulin (EREG) at 12 h of culture and of prostaglandin (PG)-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), pentraxin 3 (PTX3) and tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 6 (TNFAIP6 (TSG6)) at 22 h of culture. FGF10 did not alter the expression of epidermal growth factor-like factors but enhanced the mRNA expression of PTGS2 at 4 h, PTX3 at 12 h, and TNFAIP6 at 22 h. FGF10 and BMP15 stimulated glucose consumption by cumulus cells but did not affect lactate production or levels of mRNA encoding glycolytic enzymes phosphofructokinase and lactate dehydrogenase A. Each growth factor increased mRNA encoding glucosamine:fructose-6-PO4 transaminases, key enzymes in the hexosamine pathway leading to hyaluronic acid production, and BMP15 also stimulated hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) mRNA expression. This study provides evidence that BMP15 and FGF10 stimulate expansion of in vitro-matured bovine COCs by driving glucose metabolism toward hyaluronic acid production and controlling the expression of genes in the ovulatory cascade, the first acting upon ADAM10, ADAM17, AREG, and EREG and the second on downstream genes, particularly PTGS2.

  2. Dual effects of hydrogen sulfide donor on meiosis and cumulus expansion of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Nevoral, Jan; Petr, Jaroslav; Gelaude, Armance; Bodart, Jean-Francois; Kucerova-Chrpova, Veronika; Sedmikova, Marketa; Krejcova, Tereza; Kolbabova, Tereza; Dvorakova, Marketa; Vyskocilova, Alena; Weingartova, Ivona; Krivohlavkova, Lenka; Zalmanova, Tereza; Jilek, Frantisek

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been revealed to be a signal molecule with second messenger action in the somatic cells of many tissues, including the reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to address how exogenous H2S acts on the meiotic maturation of porcine oocytes, including key maturation factors such as MPF and MAPK, and cumulus expansion intensity of cumulus-oocyte complexes. We observed that the H2S donor, Na2S, accelerated oocyte in vitro maturation in a dose-dependent manner, following an increase of MPF activity around germinal vesicle breakdown. Concurrently, the H2S donor affected cumulus expansion, monitored by hyaluronic acid production. Our results suggest that the H2S donor influences oocyte maturation and thus also participates in the regulation of cumulus expansion. The exogenous H2S donor apparently affects key signal pathways of oocyte maturation and cumulus expansion, resulting in faster oocyte maturation with little need of cumulus expansion.

  3. Growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins in interactions of cumulus-oocyte complex, spermatozoa and oviduct.

    PubMed

    Einspanier, R; Gabler, C; Bieser, B; Einspanier, A; Berisha, B; Kosmann, M; Wollenhaupt, K; Schams, D

    1999-01-01

    The expression and localization of selected growth factor systems and extracellular matrix (ECM) components that may influence oocyte maturation and fertilization within the mammalian oviduct are reported. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) systems could be detected by use of RT-PCR, RNase protection assay (RPA) and immunohistochemistry in bovine follicles, bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) and bovine and marmoset oviducts. Two different subtypes of the FGF receptor (FGFR-1 and -2) were identified in distinct cell types, indicating a functional difference. A complete epidermal growth factor (EGF) system was found in the porcine, but not in the bovine, oviduct. There were additional differences between bovine and primate oviducts: FGF-1/2 and FGFR were increased in the marmoset around ovulation, in contrast to an increase in FGF-1 in the cow. Immunohistochemistry revealed accumulation and storage of FGF and VEGF on the surface of the epithelium, possibly due to their binding property on heparanglycoproteins. Other ECM components, matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), were found to be modulated in the ovarian follicle, COC and oviduct during the cycle. An oviduct-mediated depletion of sperm surface proteins (BSP1-3) was discovered as well as a sperm-induced novel oviductal mRNA related to an anti-oxidant protein family. Associated systems of growth factors and ECM components can be suggested as paracrine or autocrine mediators during fertilization in a species-, cycle- and tissue-dependent manner.

  4. Effect of oil overlay on inhibition potential of roscovitine in sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Crocomo, L F; Marques Filho, W C; Ulian, C M V; Branchini, N S; Silva, D T; Ackermann, C L; Landim-Alvarenga, F C; Bicudo, S D

    2015-06-01

    Inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases, as roscovitine, have been used to prevent the spontaneous resumption of meiosis in vitro and to improve the oocyte developmental competence. In this study, the interference of oil overlay on the reversible arrest capacity of roscovitine in sheep oocytes as well as its effects on cumulus expansion was evaluated. For this, cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were cultured for 20 h in TCM 199 with 10% foetal bovine serum (Control) containing 75 μm roscovitine (Rosco). Subsequently, they were in vitro matured (IVM) for further 18 h in inhibitor-free medium with LH and FSH. The culture was performed in Petri dishes under mineral oil (+) or in 96 well plates without oil overlay (-) at 38.5°C and 5% CO2 . At 20 and 38 h, the cumulus expansion and nuclear maturation were evaluated under stereomicroscope and by Hoechst 33342 staining, respectively. No group presented cumulus expansion at 20 h. After additional culture with gonadotrophins, a significant rate of COCs from both Control groups (+/-) exhibited total expansion while in both Rosco groups (+/-) the partial expansion prevailed. Among the oocytes treated with roscovitine, 65.2% were kept at GV in the absence of oil overlay while 40.6% of them reached MII under oil cover (p < 0.05). This meiotic arrest was reversible, and proper meiosis progression also occurred in the Control groups (+/-). So, the culture system without oil overlay improved the meiotic inhibition promoted by roscovitine without affecting the cumulus expansion rate or the subsequent meiosis progression.

  5. Small RNA profile of the cumulus-oocyte complex and early embryos in the pig.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cai-Xia; Du, Zhi-Qiang; Wright, Elane C; Rothschild, Max F; Prather, Randall S; Ross, Jason W

    2012-11-01

    Small RNA represent several unique noncoding RNA classes that have important function in the development of germ cells and early embryonic development. Deep sequencing was performed on small RNA from cumulus cells (recovered from germinal vesicle [GV] and metaphase II-arrested [MII] oocytes), GV and MII oocytes, in vitro fertilization-derived embryos at 60 h postfertilization (4- to 8-cell stage), and Day 6 blastocysts. Additionally, a heterologous miRNA microarray method was also used to identify miRNA expressed in the oocyte during in vitro maturation. Similar to the results of expression analysis of other species, these data demonstrate dynamic expression regulation of multiple classes of noncoding RNA during oocyte maturation and development to the blastocyst stage. Mapping small RNA to the pig genome indicates dynamic distribution of small RNA organization across the genome. Additionally, a cluster of miRNA and Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) was discovered on chromosome 6. Many of the small RNA mapped to annotated repetitive elements in the pig genome, of which the SINE/tRNA-Glu and LINE/L1 elements represented a large proportion. Two piRNA (piR84651 and piR16993) and seven miRNA (MIR574, MIR24, LET7E, MIR23B, MIR30D, MIR320, and MIR30C) were further characterized using quantitative RT-PCR. Secretory carrier membrane protein 4 (SCAMP4) was predicted to be subject to posttranscriptional gene regulation mediated by small RNA, by annotating small RNA reads mapped to exonic regions in the pig genome. Consistent with the prediction results, SCAMP4 was further confirmed to be differentially expressed at both transcriptional and translational levels. These data establish a small RNA expression profile of the pig cumulus-oocyte complex and early embryos and demonstrate their potential capacity to be utilized for predictions of functional posttranscriptional regulatory events.

  6. Effect of heat stress on the survival and development of in vitro cultured bovine preantral follicles and on in vitro maturation of cumulus-oocyte complex.

    PubMed

    Paes, V M; Vieira, L A; Correia, H H V; Sa, N A R; Moura, A A A; Sales, A D; Rodrigues, A P R; Magalhães-Padilha, D M; Santos, F W; Apgar, G A; Campello, C C; Camargo, L S A; Figueiredo, J R

    2016-09-01

    The deleterious effect of heat stress (HS) on competence of oocytes from antral follicles is well recognized, but there is a lack of data regarding its impact on the viability and growth of preantral follicles. In this study, we used in vitro preantral follicle cultures to investigate the effects of HS on the following parameters: survival and development of primordial follicles after in vitro culture of ovarian fragments (experiment I); growth and antrum formation of isolated advanced secondary follicles (experiment II); and maturation rates after in vitro maturation (IVM) of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from antral follicles (>2-6 mm) grown in vivo (experiment III). Furthermore, the following end points were evaluated in all experiments: follicle/oocyte survival, reactive oxygen species (ROS), estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) production, as well as mRNA expression for select genes related to stress (HSP70) and apoptosis (MCL1 and BAX). In all experiments, HS consisted of exposing the structures (ovarian fragments, isolated preantral follicles and COCs) to 41 °C for 12 hours and then to 38.5 °C until the end of the culture (7 days for experiments I and II and 24 hours for experiment III). The temperature for the control group was held at 38.5 °C for the entire culture period. Heat stress increased (P < 0.05) the percentage of developing follicles (intermediate, primary, and secondary follicles) at 12 hours and increased levels of ROS at all evaluated time points (12, 24 hours, and D7), when compared to the control (experiment I). Heat stress did not affect (P > 0.05) any identified end points when preantral follicles were cultured in their isolated form (experiment II). However, in experiment III, HS decreased (P < 0.05) both the rates of metaphase II after 24 hours and E2 production at 12 hours of IVM. Moreover, HS increased (P < 0.0001) levels of P4 after IVM and ROS production at every evaluated time point, compared with the

  7. Daily differential expression of melatonin-related genes and clock genes in rat cumulus-oocyte complex: changes after pinealectomy.

    PubMed

    Coelho, L A; Peres, R; Amaral, F G; Reiter, R J; Cipolla-Neto, J

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the maturational stage (immature and mature ovaries) differences of mRNA expression of melatonin-forming enzymes (Aanat and Asmt), melatonin membrane receptors (Mt1 and Mt2) and putative nuclear (Rorα) receptors, and clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Cry2) in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) from weaning Wistar rats. We also examined the effects of pinealectomy and of melatonin pharmacological replacement on the daily expression of these genes in COC. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that in oocytes, the mRNA expression of Asmt, Mt2, Clock, Bmal1, Per2, and Cry1 were higher (P < 0.05) in immature ovaries than in the mature ones. In cumulus cells, the same pattern of mRNA expression for Asmt, Aanat, Rorα, Clock, Per1, Cry1, and Cry2 genes was observed. In oocytes, pinealectomy altered the daily mRNA expression profiles of Asmt, Mt1, Mt2, Clock, Per1, Cry1, and Cry2 genes. In cumulus cells, removal of the pineal altered the mRNA expression profiles of Mt1, Mt2, Rorα, Aanat, Asmt, Clock, Bmal1, Per2, Cry1, and Cry2 genes. Melatonin treatment partially or completely re-established the daily mRNA expression profiles of most genes studied. The mRNA expression of melatonin-related genes and clock genes in rat COC varies with the maturational stage of the meiotic cellular cycle in addition to the hour of the day. This suggests that melatonin might act differentially in accordance with the maturational stage of cumulus/oocyte complex. In addition, it seems that circulating pineal melatonin is very important in the design of the daily profile of mRNA expression of COC clock genes and genes related to melatonin synthesis and action.

  8. Absence of seasonal changes in FSHR gene expression in the cat cumulus-oocyte complex in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Rebecca J; Howard, JoGayle; Wildt, David E; Comizzoli, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Domestic cat oocytes are seasonally sensitive to FSH. Compared with those collected during the breeding season, oocytes from the nonbreeding (NB) season require more FSH during in vitro maturation to achieve comparable developmental competence. This study tested the hypothesis that this seasonal variation was due to altered expression of FSH receptors (FSHR) and/or FSH-induced genes. Relative expression levels of FSHR mRNA and FSH-enhanced gene estrogen receptor β (ESR2) were measured by qPCR in whole ovaries and immature cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) isolated from cat ovaries during the natural breeding vs NB seasons. Expression levels of FSH-induced genes prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), early growth response protein-1 (EGR1), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were examined in mature COCs from both seasons that were a) recovered in vivo or b) matured in vitro with conventional (1 μg/ml) or high (10 μg/ml) FSH concentrations. Overall, FSHR mRNA levels were lower in whole ovaries during the NB compared with breeding season but were similar in immature COCs, whereas ESR2 levels did not differ in either group between intervals. We observed changes in PTGS2, EGR1, and EGFR mRNA expression patterns across maturation in COCs within but not between the two seasons. The lack of seasonal differentiation in FSH-related genes was not consistent with the decreased developmental capacity of oocytes fertilized during the NB season. These findings reveal that the seasonal decrease in cat oocyte sensitivity to FSH occurs both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, this decline is unrelated to changes in expression of FSHR mRNA or mRNA of FSH-induced genes in COCs from antral follicles.

  9. Non-invasive assessment of porcine oocyte quality by supravital staining of cumulus-oocyte complexes with lissamine green B.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Rahul; Li, Shun; Fischer, Konrad; Kind, Alexander; Flisikowska, Tatiana; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Rottmann, Oswald; Schnieke, Angelika

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of lissamine green B (LB) staining of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) as a non-invasive method of predicting maturational and developmental competence of slaughterhouse-derived porcine oocytes cultured in vitro. Cumulus cells of freshly aspirated COCs were evaluated either morphologically on the basis of thickness of cumulus cell layers, or stained with LB, which penetrates only non-viable cells. The extent of cumulus cell staining was taken as an inverse indicator of membrane integrity. The two methods of COC grading were then examined as predictors of nuclear maturation and development after parthenogenetic activation. In both cases LB staining proved a more reliable indicator than morphological assessment (P < 0.05). The relationship between LB staining and cumulus cell apoptosis was also examined. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay for DNA fragmentation revealed that oocytes within COCs graded as low quality by either LB staining or visual morphology showed significantly greater DNA fragmentation (P < 0.05) than higher grades, and that LB and visual grading were of similar predictive value. Expression of the stress response gene TP53 showed significantly higher expression in COCs graded as low quality by LB staining. However expression of the apoptosis-associated genes BAK and CASP3 was not significantly different between high or low grade COCs, suggesting that mRNA expression of BAK and CASP3 is not a reliable method of detecting apoptosis in porcine COCs. Evaluation of cumulus cell membrane integrity by lissamine green B staining thus provides a useful new tool to gain information about the maturational and developmental competence of porcine oocytes. PMID:27172057

  10. Nonesterified Fatty Acid-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Cattle Cumulus Oocyte Complexes Alters Cell Metabolism and Developmental Competence.

    PubMed

    Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Wu, Linda L Y; Purdey, Malcolm; Abell, Andrew D; Goldys, Ewa M; MacMillan, Keith L; Thompson, Jeremy G; Robker, Rebecca L

    2016-01-01

    Reduced oocyte quality has been associated with poor fertility of high-performance dairy cows during peak lactation, due to negative energy balance. We examined the role of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), known to accumulate within follicular fluid during under- and overnutrition scenarios, in causing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress of in vitro maturated cattle cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). NEFA concentrations were: palmitic acid (150 μM), oleic acid (200 μM), and steric acid (75 μM). Abattoir-derived COCs were randomly matured for 24 h in the presence of NEFAs and/or an ER stress inhibitor, salubrinal. Total and hatched blastocyst yields were negatively impacted by NEFA treatment compared with controls, but this was reversed by salubrinal. ER stress markers, activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4) and heat shock protein 5 (Hspa5), but not Atf6, were significantly up-regulated by NEFA treatment within whole COCs but reversed by coincubation with salubrinal. Likewise, glucose uptake and lactate production, measured in spent medium samples, showed a similar pattern, suggesting that cumulus cell metabolism is sensitive to NEFAs via an ER stress-mediated process. In contrast, while mitochondrial DNA copy number was recovered in NEFA-treated oocytes, oocyte autofluorescence of the respiratory chain cofactor, FAD, was lower following NEFA treatment of COCs, and this was not reversed by salubrinal, suggesting the negative impact was via reduced mitochondrial function. These results reveal the significance of NEFA-induced ER stress on bovine COC developmental competence, revealing a potential therapeutic target for improving oocyte quality during peak lactation. PMID:26658709

  11. Effect of oocytectomy on glycosaminoglycan composition during cumulus expansion of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Inoue, M; Sato, E

    1996-12-01

    To investigate the role of oocytes in the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans during cumulus expansion, we analyzed the amount and composition of glycosaminoglycans in porcine intact and oocytectomized cumulus-oocyte complexes. Follicular fluid induced cumulus expansion in intact and oocytectomized cumulus-oocyte complexes cultured for over 24 h, but the degree of expansion in oocytectomized complexes reached only 76% of that in intact complexes after 24 h in culture. There were no differences in the amounts of [3H]glucosamine incorporated into each type of complex. Metabolic labeling studies on glycosaminoglycans with [3H]glucosamine and [35S]sulfate showed that the amounts of 3H- and 35S-labeled glycosaminoglycans increased, and rapidly so, from 16 h in culture. The 3H-labeled glycosaminoglycans at these high levels were digested by Streptomyces hyaluronidase or chondroitinase ABC, and the rate of increase in 3H-labeled glycosaminoglycans was reduced by oocytectomy. In contrast, the increased levels of 35S-labeled glycosaminoglycans were affected only by chondroitinase ABC, and oocytectomy was ineffective. In conclusion, follicular fluid promotes cumulus expansion, and the oocyte plays an essential role in the acute synthesis of hyaluronic acid, but not chondroitin sulfate, during cumulus expansion stimulated in vitro.

  12. A new approach for the oocyte genotoxicity assay: adaptation of comet assay on mouse cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Greco, F; Perrin, J; Auffan, M; Tassistro, V; Orsière, T; Courbiere, B

    2015-07-01

    Conventional genotoxicity tests are technically difficult to apply to oocytes, and results obtained on somatic cells cannot be extrapolated to gametes. We have previously described a comet assay (original-CA) on denuded mouse oocytes, but, in vivo, oocytes are not isolated from their surrounding follicular cells. Our objective was to develop a comet assay on cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC-CA) for a more physiological approach to study the genotoxicity of environmental factors on oocytes. For COC-CA, whole COC were exposed directly to exogenous agents after ovulation and removal from oviducts. Three conditions were studied: a negative control group, and two positive control groups, one of which was exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the other group was incubated with cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs). With both tests, DNA damage was significant in the presence of both H2O2 and CeO2 NPs compared with the negative control. COC-CA offers an interesting tool for assaying the genotoxicity of environmental agents towards germinal cells. Furthermore, COC-CA is less time-consuming and simplifies the protocol of the original-CA, because COC-CA is easier to perform without the washing-out procedure.

  13. Gene Expression of Monocarboxylate Transporters and Oocyte-secreted Factors in Bovine Cumulus-oocyte Complexes Selected by Brilliant Cresyl Blue.

    PubMed

    Lopes, E F; Marques, L S; Duranti, R G; de Oliveira, A T D; Lopes, R F F; Rodrigues, J L

    2015-10-01

    Oocyte selection based on the brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) staining test has been successfully used to differentiate between competent and incompetent bovine oocytes. Here, the expression of genes involved in transport of monocarboxylates (Mct1-4) and oogenesis specific genes (Bmp15, Gdf9 and Has2) in BCB+ and BCB- selected immature and mature bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) was evaluated. In order to find specific molecular markers to characterize successful oocyte maturation, our study was also aimed at identifying the expression of Mcts and oogenesis specific genes in denuded oocytes and cumulus cells. Immature COCs morphological appropriate were (i) stained with 26 mm BCB for 90 min before IVM, (ii) exposed to same incubation conditions as stained COCs, but without BCB (holding group) or (iii) transferred into a maturation medium immediately after morphological selection (control group). mRNA expression was investigated by RT-PCR in COCs before and after IVM. No relationship was observed in the relative expression of Has2, Gdf9, Bmp15 or Mct1, 2 and 4 transcripts between BCB+ and BCB- COCs. Transcripts analysis showed that Gdf9 and Bmp15 in BCB+, BCB- and holding groups were up-regulated (p < 0.05) before IVM, while Has2 was up-regulated (p < 0.01) after IVM in the control group. Other genes remained stable during maturation (Mct1, 2 and 4). Our results showed, for the first time, Mct1, 2 and 4 expression in bovine COCs. Mct1 and Mct4 transcripts were present in denuded oocytes and cumulus cell, while Mct2 was detected only in cumulus cells. These differences between the three isoforms in localization suggest unique roles for each in monocarboxylate transport during maturation.

  14. Effects of needle tip bevel and aspiration procedure on the morphology and developmental capacity of bovine compact cumulus oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Bols, P E; Ysebaert, M T; Van Soom, A; de Kruif, A

    1997-04-15

    Effects of the needle tip bevel and the aspiration procedure on the morphology of cumulusoocyte-complexes (COCs) and the developmental capacity of the oocytes after IVF were studied in 2 in vitro oocyte pick-up (OPU) simulations using a disposable ovum pick-up needle guidance system. In Experiment 1, the influence of the length of the needle bevel was investigated using a short and a long bevelled 20-g disposable needle. After being aspirated from slaughterhouse ovaries, the retrieved COCs were divided into 3 categories: 1) oocytes surrounded by a compact cumulus, 2) oocytes with an expanded cumulus, 3) partially naked oocytes. In Experiment 2, the influence of 5 different levels of aspiration vacuum for 3 different needle diameters (18-g, 19-g, 20-g) and 2 different needle bevels (long, short) was tested on the recovery and on the morphology of the cumulus investment of a fixed number of previously scored compact cumulus oocytes complexes (CCOCs), retrieved after slicing slaughterhouse ovaries. The re-retrieved COCs were allocated to Categories 1 and 3. The results show that the length of the needle bevel has a significant effect on oocyte recovery, in favor of the long-bevelled needle. As soon as higher aspiration vacua are used, a decrease of the number of CCOCs can be observed, which is less prominent for the short-bevelled needle compared to the long-bevelled one. The final number of blastocysts is similar for both needle types. In Experiment 2, the disposable needle system proved to be highly effective since nearly 80% of the CCOCs were retrieved. At low aspiration vacuum, up to 90% of the CCOCs withstand the aspiration procedure undamaged. Increasing the aspiration vacuum results in a decrease of the number of CCOCs, which is less pronounced using thinner needles. Averaged over all needle types, the prevalence of blastocysts expressed relative to the number of recovered oocytes decreases with higher aspiration vacuum. PMID:16728071

  15. Individual bovine in vitro embryo production and cumulus cell transcriptomic analysis to distinguish cumulus-oocyte complexes with high or low developmental potential.

    PubMed

    Bunel, A; Jorssen, E P; Merckx, E; Leroy, J L; Bols, P E; Sirard, M A

    2015-01-15

    Studying cumulus cell (CC) transcriptome is of great interest as it could provide a noninvasive method to assess oocyte quality. In cattle, the search for quality markers has not been done with cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) cultured individually from maturation to blastocyst stage. Here, differences between high- and low-potential COCs were examined by transcriptomic analysis of CC biopsies obtained from COCs of 2 to 6 mm follicles (n = 249; eight replicates) before individual in vitro maturation, fertilization, and culture until Day 8 after fertilization. Each COC was individually tracked and categorized based on his fate: embryo at blastocyst stage (CC-Blast) or embryo arrested at 2- to 8-cell stage (CC-2-8-cells). Average blastocyst rates were 27.7% for individual culture and 31.2% for group control (not significantly different). For transcriptomic analysis, five cumulus biopsies per replicate were pooled for each fate. Three CC replicates underwent transcriptomic analysis using RNA microarray assay. Some clear differences in gene expression between the CC-Blast and the CC-2-8-cell groups were identified. Considering a 1.5-fold change (P < 0.05), 68 genes were differentially expressed between the CC-Blast and CC-2-8-cells. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction validations were performed for 12 selected genes: six upregulated genes for each COC fate. Higher expression of 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 9 (AGPAT9) (lipid metabolism), Chloride intracellular channel 3 (CLIC3), Keratin 8 (KRT8), and Lumican (LUM) (molecular transport) was observed in CC-2-8-cells (P < 0.05). The CC-Blast fate analysis revealed a significantly higher expression of Glycine amidinotransferase (L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase) (GATM) (posttranslational modification, amino acid metabolism, and free radical scavenging). This newly identified set of genes could provide new markers to distinguish COCs associated with good quality embryos from COCs

  16. Differential gene expression in cumulus oocyte complexes collected by ovum pick up from repeat breeder and normally fertile Holstein Friesian heifers.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Roberto; Cambuli, Caterina; Capoferri, Rossana; Giannino, Laura; Lukaj, Aleksander; Duchi, Roberto; Lazzari, Giovanna; Galli, Cesare; Feligini, Maria; Galli, Andrea; Bongioni, Graziella

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether perturbed gene expression during cumulus oocyte development causes repeat breeding in cattle. In this study, a repeat breeder was defined as a normal estrous cycling animal that did not become pregnant after three inseminations despite the absence of clinically detectable reproductive disorders. Transcripts of genes extracted from cumulus oocyte complexes (COC) that were collected from three repeat breeder and three normally fertile Holstein Friesian heifers were compared. Up to 40 COC were collected from each heifer by means of repeated sessions of ovum pick up in the absence of hormonal stimulation; immediately plunged into liquid nitrogen; and stored at -80°C until analysis. For each heifer, RNA was extracted from the pooled COC and hybridized on GeneChip(®) Bovine Gene Array (Affymetrix). Analysis of gene expression profiles of repeat breeder and control COC showed that 178 genes were differentially expressed (log2 fold change>1.5). Of these genes, 43 (24%) were up-regulated and 135 (76%) were down-regulated in repeat breeder relative to control heifers. This altered pattern of expression occurred in genes involved in several cellular biological processes and cellular components such as metabolism, angiogenesis, substrate/ion transport, regulation/signaling, cell adhesion and cytoskeleton. From these, 13 genes potentially involved in cumulus oocyte growth were subjected to validation by qRT-PCR and nine genes (annexin A1, ANXA1; lactoferrin, LTF; interferon stimulated exonuclease 20kDa, ISG20/HEM45; oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1, OLR1; fatty acid desaturase 2, FADS2; glutathione S-transferase A2 and A4, GSTA2 and GSTA4; glutathione peroxidase 1, GPX1; endothelin receptor type A, EDNRA) were confirmed to be differentially expressed. This study identified potential marker genes for fertility in dairy cattle.

  17. Estrus synchronization and ovarian hyper-stimulation treatments have negligible effects on cumulus oocyte complex gene expression whereas induction of ovulation causes major expression changes.

    PubMed

    Agca, Cansu; Yakan, Akin; Agca, Yuksel

    2013-02-01

    The effects of exogenous hormones, used for estrus synchronization and ovarian hyper stimulation, on cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) gene expression in sexually mature rats were determined using microarrays. Gene expression in COCs collected from GnRH (G(trt)), GnRH + eCG (G + E(trt)), and GnRH + eCG + hCG (G + E + H(trt)) treatments were compared to COCs from naturally cycling (NC) rats before the preovulatory luteninizing hormone surge. There was no significant difference in gene expression among NC, G(trt), and G + E(trt); however, over 2,600 genes were significantly different between NC and G + E + H(trt) (P < 0.05). Genes upregulated in G + E + H(trt) encode for: proteins that are involved in prostaglandin synthesis (Ptgs2, Pla2g4a, and Runx1) and cholesterol biosynthesis (Hmgcr, Sc4mol, and Dhcr24); receptors that allow cholesterol uptake (Ldlr and Scarb1), regulate progesterone synthesis (Star), and inactivate estrogen (Sult1e1); and downstream effectors of LH signal (Pgr, Cebpb, Creb3l1, Areg, Ereg, and Adamts1). Conversely, G + E + H(trt) downregulated genes encoding proteins involved in: DNA replication and cell cycle progression (Ccne2, Orc5l, Rad50, and Mcm6); reproductive developmental process; and granulosa cell expansion (Gdf9, Bmp15, Amh, Amhr2, Bmpr1b, Tgfb2, Foxl2, Pde3a, Esr2, Fshr, Ybx2, Ccnd2, Ccnb1ip1, and Zp3); maternal effect genes required for embryo development (Zar1, Npm2, Nlrp5, Dnmt1, H1foo, and Zfp57); amino acid degradation; and ketogenesis (Hmgcs2, and Cpt1b). These results from the rat show that hormones used for estrus synchronization (G(trt)) and ovarian hyper stimulation (G + E(trt)) had minimal effects on gene expression, whereas induction of ovulation (G + E + H(trt)) caused major changes in gene expression of rat COCs. This study provides comprehensive information about regulated genes during late follicle development and ovulation induction.

  18. Effect of temporary meiosis block during prematuration of bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes on pregnancy rates in a commercial setting for in vitro embryo production.

    PubMed

    Guemra, Samuel; da Silva Santo, Eriko; Zanin, Renato; Monzani, Paulo Sergio; Sovernigo, Tobias Canan; Ohashi, Otávio Mitio; Verde Leal, Cláudia Lima; Adona, Paulo Roberto

    2014-04-15

    Ovum pick up (OPU) associated with in vitro production (IVP) of embryos has been shown as an important tool in cattle breeding to increase the number of descendants from animals of high genetic value. In herds maintained distant from the laboratory, collecting cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) and transporting them to the laboratory may take several hours and decrease COCs viability, representing a challenge for commercial settings. In this study, a prematuration culture to induce temporary meiosis block was evaluated in a commercial scale IVP setting as a strategy to transport bovine OPU-derived COCs from Nelore and Brangus donors. Effects on embryo yield and pregnancy rates were assessed. Viable COCs from each donor were destined to one of the experimental groups (control, blocks 1 and 2). Control group COCs were placed in cryotubes with 1 mL TCM199-HEPES. In block groups (1 and 2), COCs were placed in cryotubes with 300 μL TCM 199 + 12 μM butyrolactone I (block medium). All groups were gassed and kept in a thermos bottle for 4 hours at 36 °C. Next, COCs in the control group were transferred to IVM medium and block 1 group to block medium, and cultured for 22 hours and 15 hours, respectively, at 38.5 °C and 5% CO2 in air. Block 2 COCs were kept in the cryotubes and in the thermos bottle for another 15 hours at 36 °C to simulate long-term transport conditions. After meiosis block in prematuration culture, blocks 1 and 2 COCs were matured in vitro for 22 hours as for the control group. After IVM, COCs in all groups were submitted to IVF and IVC, and blastocyst rates were evaluated on day 7. Embryos were transferred and pregnancy rates evaluated at 60 days of gestation. The mean total number of COCs retrieved by OPU did not differ between Nelore and Brangus donors (16.8 and 17.2, respectively, P > 0.05), but Nelore donors produced more viable COCs than Brangus (10.1 and 7.6, respectively, P < 0.05) and more embryos/cow (3.8 and 2.7, respectively, P

  19. The effects of superoxide dismutase addition to the transport medium on cumulus-oocyte complex apoptosis and IVF outcome in cats (Felis catus).

    PubMed

    Cocchia, Natascia; Corteggio, Annunziata; Altamura, Gennaro; Tafuri, Simona; Rea, Silviana; Rosapane, Isabella; Sica, Alessandro; Landolfi, Francesco; Ciani, Francesca

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of superoxide dismutase (SOD) addition to the ovary transport medium (4°C, 3-72 h) on ovarian cell viability and apoptosis and in vitro embryo production (IVEP) in domestic cats. The ovaries collected from 76 mixed-breed domestic queens were randomly assigned to the control or SOD-treated groups and incubated for 3, 24, 48 or 72 h. The ovaries were then subjected to the following: (1) fixed in formalin to assess the incidence of apoptosis (fragmented DNA in situ detection kit), (2) stored at -196°C in liquid nitrogen to evaluate the expression of the pro-apoptotic Bax gene and the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene (RT-PCR), and (3) used to obtain the cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in order to test the cell viability (carboxyfluorescein or trypan blue staining) and IVEP. The incidence of apoptosis appeared to be higher in the control compared with the SOD-treated ovaries. The ovarian expression of Bax was lower and the Bcl-2 expression was higher in the SOD-treated group compared with the control group. The presence of SOD in the transport medium increased the viability of COCs and IVEP compared with the control medium. In summary, the supplementation of the ovary transport medium with SOD reduced cellular apoptosis and enhanced COC survival and IVEP in domestic cats. PMID:25726378

  20. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction to detect glass or ice formation in the vitrified bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes and morulae.

    PubMed

    Anzar, Muhammad; Grochulski, Pawel; Bonnet, Brennan

    2014-01-01

    Vitrification of bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) is not as successful as bovine embryos, due to oocyte's complex structure and chilling sensitivity. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD), a powerful method to study crystal structure and phase changes, was used to detect the glass or ice formation in water, tissue culture medium (TCM)-199, vitrification solution 2 (VS2), and vitrified bovine COCs and morulae. Data revealed Debye's rings and peaks associated with the hexagonal ice crystals at 3.897, 3.635, 3.427, 2.610, 2.241, 1.912 and 1.878 Å in both water and TCM-199, whereas VS2 showed amorphous (glassy) appearance, at 102K (-171°C). An additional peak of sodium phosphate monobasic hydrate (NaH2PO4.H2O) crystals was observed at 2.064 Å in TCM-199 only. All ice and NaH2PO4.H2O peaks were detected in the non-vitrified (control) and vitrified COCs, except two ice peaks (3.145 and 2.655 Å) were absent in the vitrified COCs. The intensities of majority of ice peaks did not differ between the non-vitrified and vitrified COCs. The non-vitrified bovine morulae in TCM-199 demonstrated all ice- and NaH2PO4.H2O-associated Debye's rings and peaks, found in TCM-199 alone. There was no Debye's ring present in the vitrified morulae. In conclusion, SXRD is a powerful method to confirm the vitrifiability of a solution and to detect the glass or ice formation in vitrified cells and tissues. The vitrified bovine COCs exhibited the hexagonal ice crystals instead of glass formation whereas the bovine morulae underwent a typical vitrification.

  1. Expression of cumulus-oocyte complex genes and embryonic development in goats subjected to progestogen-based estrus synchronization.

    PubMed

    Thammasiri, Jiratti; Navanukraw, Chainarong; Uriyapongson, Suthipong; Khanthusaeng, Vilaivan; Kamollirt, Chuchat

    2016-07-15

    The objective was to investigate the effect of short-term (7 days) and long-term (14 days) progesterone-based estrus synchronization on number of follicles, progesterone concentrations, cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) gene expression, and embryonic development in goats. Nulliparous Thai-native goats (n = 45) were randomly assigned to one of two estrus synchronization treatments. Goats were treated with intravaginal sponges containing 60-mg medroxyprogesterone acetate (MAP; Synchrogest esponjas, Spain) during 7 or 14 days (short-term or long-term protocol, respectively). Multiple follicular development was induced by intramuscularly injections of 300-IU eCG in both groups (1 day before sponge withdrawal). An ovariectomy was performed at 24 hours after sponge removal to evaluate number of follicle and collect oocyte for IVF. Oocyte quality (healthy or nonhealthy) was determined by morphology of COCs before IVM. Recovery of COCs and total cellular RNA isolation were applied to determine apoptosis-related gene expression. After IVF, embryos were evaluated during the eight-day culture as numbers of cleaved oocyte, morula, and blastocyst embryo. Total numbers of follicles and oocytes were similar for both treatments. Plasma progesterone concentrations were not different during MAP insertion period (P > 0.05). However, goats that received the short-term protocol had a greater number of 4 to 6-mm follicle, healthy oocytes, cleaved oocytes, and morula embryos than goats that received the long-term protocol (P < 0.01). In addition, the expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 messenger RNA was greater (P < 0.05) in COCs derived from the 7 days MAP-treated when compared to the 14 days MAP-treated goats. These data highlight that the 7-day progestin-based treatment may contribute to quality of oocytes and embryonic development in goats.

  2. Altered Theca and Cumulus Oocyte Complex Gene Expression, Follicular Arrest and Reduced Fertility in Cows with Dominant Follicle Follicular Fluid Androgen Excess

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Adam F.; Pohlmeier, William E.; Sargent, Kevin M.; Cole, Brizett D.; Vinton, Rebecca J.; Kurz, Scott G.; McFee, Renee M.; Cushman, Robert A.; Cupp, Andrea S.; Wood, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    Aspiration of bovine follicles 12–36 hours after induced corpus luteum lysis serendipitously identified two populations of cows, one with High androstenedione (A4; >40 ng/ml; mean = 102) and another with Low A4 (<20 ng/ml; mean = 9) in follicular fluid. We hypothesized that the steroid excess in follicular fluid of dominant follicles in High A4 cows would result in reduced fertility through altered follicle development and oocyte maternal RNA abundance. To test this hypothesis, estrous cycles of cows were synchronized and ovariectomy was performed 36 hours later. HPLC MS/MS analysis of follicular fluid showed increased dehydroepiandrosterone (6-fold), A4 (158-fold) and testosterone (31-fold) in the dominant follicle of High A4 cows. However, estrone (3-fold) and estradiol (2-fold) concentrations were only slightly elevated, suggesting a possible inefficiency in androgen to estrogen conversion in High A4 cows. Theca cell mRNA expression of LHCGR, GATA6, CYP11A1, and CYP17A1 was greater in High A4 cows. Furthermore, abundance of ZAR1 was decreased 10-fold in cumulus oocyte complexes from High A4 cows, whereas NLRP5 abundance tended to be 19.8-fold greater (P = 0.07). There was a tendency for reduction in stage 4 follicles in ovarian cortex samples from High A4 cows suggesting that progression to antral stages were impaired. High A4 cows tended (P<0.07) to have a 17% reduction in calving rate compared with Low A4 cows suggesting reduced fertility in the High A4 population. These data suggest that the dominant follicle environment of High A4 cows including reduced estrogen conversion and androgen excess contributes to infertility in part through altered follicular and oocyte development. PMID:25330369

  3. Formulation and stability evaluation of 3D alginate beads potentially useful for cumulus-oocyte complexes culture.

    PubMed

    Dorati, Rossella; Genta, Ida; Ferrari, Michela; Vigone, Giulia; Merico, Valeria; Garagna, Silvia; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Conti, Bice

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian follicle encapsulation in synthetic or natural matrixes based on biopolymers is potentially a promising approach to in vitro maturation (IVM) process, since it maintains follicle 3D organisation by preventing its flattening and consequent disruption of gap junctions, preserving the functional relationship between oocyte and companion follicle cells. The aim of the work was to optimise physico-chemical parameters of alginate microcapsules for perspective IVM under 3D environments. On this purpose alginate and cross-linking agent concentrations were investigated. Alginate concentration between 0.75% and 0.125% w/w and Mg(2+), Ba(2+), Ca(2+ )at concentration between 100 and 20 mM were tested. Follicle encapsulation was obtained by on purpose modified diffusion setting gelation technique, and evaluated together with beads, chemical and mechanical stability in standard and stressing conditions. Beads permeability was tested towards albumin, fetuin, pyruvate, glucose, pullulan. Results demonstrated that 0.25% alginate cross-linked in 100 mM CaCl2 beads is suitable to follicle encapsulation. PMID:26791322

  4. In vitro fertilization and development of bovine oocytes matured in serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Hoshi, M; Leibfried-Rutledge, M L; First, N L

    1991-02-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of supplementation of serum (fetal calf serum), gonadotropins (LH, FSH, prolactin) and estradiol-17 beta (E2) to culture medium during in vitro maturation of bovine cumulus oocyte complexes on subsequent fertilization and development to the blastocyst stage in vitro. Serum supplementation during bovine oocyte maturation was not required but hormonal supplementation, gonadotropins (LH + FSH) and E2, enhanced the fertilizability and developmental ability of bovine oocytes matured in vitro. The addition of prolactin to maturation medium containing LH, FSH, and E2 did not further enhance frequencies of fertilization and development. PMID:2009327

  5. In vitro fertilization and development of bovine oocytes matured in serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Hoshi, M; Leibfried-Rutledge, M L; First, N L

    1991-02-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of supplementation of serum (fetal calf serum), gonadotropins (LH, FSH, prolactin) and estradiol-17 beta (E2) to culture medium during in vitro maturation of bovine cumulus oocyte complexes on subsequent fertilization and development to the blastocyst stage in vitro. Serum supplementation during bovine oocyte maturation was not required but hormonal supplementation, gonadotropins (LH + FSH) and E2, enhanced the fertilizability and developmental ability of bovine oocytes matured in vitro. The addition of prolactin to maturation medium containing LH, FSH, and E2 did not further enhance frequencies of fertilization and development.

  6. Bone morphogenetic protein 15 in the pro-mature complex form enhances bovine oocyte developmental competence.

    PubMed

    Sudiman, Jaqueline; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Ritter, Lesley J; White, Melissa A; Mottershead, David G; Thompson, Jeremy G; Gilchrist, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    Developmental competence of in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes needs to be improved and this can potentially be achieved by adding recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) or growth differentiation factor (GDF9) to IVM. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a purified pro-mature complex form of recombinant human BMP15 versus the commercially available bioactive forms of BMP15 and GDF9 (both isolated mature regions) during IVM on bovine embryo development and metabolic activity. Bovine cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) were matured in vitro in control medium or treated with 100 ng/ml pro-mature BMP15, mature BMP15 or mature GDF9 +/- FSH. Metabolic measures of glucose uptake and lactate production from COCs and autofluorescence of NAD(P)H, FAD and GSH were measured in oocytes after IVM. Following in vitro fertilisation and embryo culture, day 8 blastocysts were stained for cell numbers. COCs matured in medium +/- FSH containing pro-mature BMP15 displayed significantly improved blastocyst development (57.7±3.9%, 43.5±4.2%) compared to controls (43.3±2.4%, 28.9±3.7%) and to mature GDF9+FSH (36.1±3.0%). The mature form of BMP15 produced intermediate levels of blastocyst development; not significantly different to control or pro-mature BMP15 levels. Pro-mature BMP15 increased intra-oocyte NAD(P)H, and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were increased by both forms of BMP15 in the absence of FSH. Exogenous BMP15 in its pro-mature form during IVM provides a functional source of oocyte-secreted factors to improve bovine blastocyst development. This form of BMP15 may prove useful for improving cattle and human artificial reproductive technologies.

  7. Protein neosynthesis by porcine oocytes matured in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meinecke, B; Schröter, D

    1996-01-01

    The protein pattern of individual porcine oocytes matured as intact cumulus oocyte complexes either in vivo or in vitro with or without FSH and LH for 43 h were investigated. The synthesis of a 53 kDa polypeptide ceased 21 h after hCG administration whereas a 44 kDa polypeptide were consistently absent in the protein patterns of nearly all of the in vivo maturing oocytes. Further on, a polypeptide with a relative molecular weight of 46000 persisted throughout maturation. A precipitous increase in the synthesis of two other proteins with relative molecular weights of 38000 and 28000, respectively, was observed at 9 and 21 h after hCG injection. In in vitro matured oocytes with or without FSH and LH the synthesis of the 53 kDa band decreased after a culture period of 9h. Further on, the production of the 44 kDa polypeptide ceased only in oocytes incubated in FSH and LH supplemented media after 21 h of culture. On the other hand, the two proteins of Mr 38000 and 28000 appeared only in most of the protein profiles of oocytes cultured with FSH and LH for 43 h. The production of the 46 kDa polypeptide during a 21 h culture period was significantly affected by the presence of additional granulosa cells in connection with the cumulus oocyte complex. Neither the appearance nor the disappearance of the 5 investigated bands was influenced by the presence or absence of the germinal vesicle after 21 h of culture. It is concluded that at least the addition of FSH and LH to the culture medium is necessary for cumulus oocytes complexes to synthesize a protein pattern closely corresponding to that produced by in vivo matured oocytes.

  8. Influence of the duration of in vitro maturation and gamete co-incubation on the efficiency of in vitro embryo development in Italian Mediterranean buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Gasparrini, Bianca; De Rosa, Anna; Attanasio, Laura; Boccia, Lucia; Di Palo, Rossella; Campanile, Giuseppe; Zicarelli, Luigi

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the duration of oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) and gamete co-incubation on the in vitro embryo (IVEP) production efficiency in River buffalo. In Experiment 1, abattoir-derived cumulus oocyte complexes were fixed at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24 h after the start of in vitro maturation to study the kinetics of nuclear maturation. In Experiment 2, cumulus oocyte complexes were fertilized in vitro following in vitro maturation for 18, 21, 24, 27 or 30 h. After 20 h of gamete co-incubation, presumptive zygotes were denuded and cultured in vitro in synthetic oviduct fluid (SOF) medium. In Experiment 3, following in vitro maturation and fertilization, presumptive zygotes were removed from fertilization drops at 8, 12, 16 and 20 h post-insemination (pi) and placed in culture as described above. Representative samples of oocytes were fixed at 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 h to evaluate the sperm penetration rate and the incidence of polyspermy at different co-incubation times. The main conclusions of the study are that: (1) the majority of buffalo oocytes accomplish nuclear maturation between 21 and 24 h after the start of in vitro maturation; (2) both cleavage and blastocyst rates linearly decrease with increasing duration of in vitro maturation (from 18 to 30 h); (3) sperm-oocyte incubation for at least 16 h is required for maximum blastocyst yields. PMID:17481834

  9. Calreticulin is required for development of the cumulus oocyte complex and female fertility

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhiro, Keizo; Satouh, Yuhkoh; Nozawa, Kaori; Isotani, Ayako; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Hirashima, Yumiko; Matsumura, Hiroyuki; Takumi, Kazuhiro; Miyano, Takashi; Okabe, Masaru; Benham, Adam M.; Ikawa, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Calnexin (CANX) and calreticulin (CALR) chaperones mediate nascent glycoprotein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we report that these chaperones have distinct roles in male and female fertility. Canx null mice are growth retarded but fertile. Calr null mice die during embryonic development, rendering indeterminate any effect on reproduction. Therefore, we conditionally ablated Calr in male and female germ cells using Stra8 (mcKO) and Zp3 (fcKO) promoter-driven Cre recombinase, respectively. Calr mcKO male mice were fertile, but fcKO female mice were sterile despite normal mating behavior. Strikingly, we found that Calr fcKO female mice had impaired folliculogenesis and decreased ovulatory rates due to defective proliferation of cuboidal granulosa cells. Oocyte-derived, TGF-beta family proteins play a major role in follicular development and molecular analysis revealed that the normal processing of GDF9 and BMP15 was defective in Calr fcKO oocytes. These findings highlight the importance of CALR in female reproduction and demonstrate that compromised CALR function leads to ovarian insufficiency and female infertility. PMID:26388295

  10. Influence of co-culture with denuded oocytes during in vitro maturation on fertilization and developmental competence of cumulus-enclosed porcine oocytes in a defined system.

    PubMed

    Appeltant, Ruth; Somfai, Tamás; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro; Maes, Dominiek; Van Soom, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Co-culture of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) with denuded oocytes (DOs) during in vitro maturation (IVM) was reported to improve the developmental competence of oocytes via oocyte-secreted factors in cattle. The aim of the present study was to investigate if addition of DOs during IVM can improve in vitro fertilization (IVF) and in vitro culture (IVC) results for oocytes in a defined in vitro production system in pigs. The maturation medium was porcine oocyte medium supplemented with gonadotropins, dbcAMP and β-mercaptoethanol. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were matured without DOs or with DOs in different ratios (9 COC, 9 COC+16 DO and 9 COC+36 DO). Consequently; oocytes were subjected to IVF as intact COCs or after denudation to examine if DO addition during IVM would affect cumulus or oocyte properties. After fertilization, penetration and normal fertilization rates of zygotes were not different between all tested groups irrespective of denudation before IVF. When zygotes were cultured for 6 days, no difference could be observed between all treatment groups in cleavage rate, blastocyst rate and cell number per blastocyst. In conclusion, irrespective of the ratio, co-culture with DOs during IVM did not improve fertilization parameters and embryo development of cumulus-enclosed porcine oocytes in a defined system.

  11. Developmental competence of different quality bovine oocytes retrieved through ovum pick-up following in vitro maturation and fertilization.

    PubMed

    Saini, N; Singh, M K; Shah, S M; Singh, K P; Kaushik, R; Manik, R S; Singla, S K; Palta, P; Chauhan, M S

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, oocytes retrieved from cross bred Karan Fries cows by ovum pick-up technique were graded into Group 1 and Group 2, based on the morphological appearance of the individual cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). To analyze whether the developmental potential of the COCs bears a relation to morphological appearance, relative expression of a panel of genes associated with; (a) cumulus-oocyte interaction (Cx43, Cx37, GDF9 and BMP15), (b) fertilization (ZP2 and ZP3), (c) embryonic development (HSF1, ZAR1 and bFGF) and (d) apoptosis and survival (BAX, BID and BCL-XL, MCL-1, respectively) was studied at two stages: germinal vesicle (GV) stage and after in vitro maturation. The competence was further corroborated by evaluating the embryonic progression of the presumed zygotes obtained from fertilization of the graded COCs. The gene expression profile and development rate in pooled A and B grade (Group 1) COCs and pooled C and D grade (Group 2) COCs were determined and compared according to the original grades. The results of the study demonstrated that the morphologically characterized Group 2 COCs showed significantly (P<0.05) lower expression for most of the genes related to cumulus-oocyte interplay, fertilization and embryonic development, both at GV stage as well as after maturation. Group 1 COCs also showed greater expression of anti-apoptotic genes (BCL-XL and MCL1) both at GV stage and after maturation, while pro-apoptotic genes (BAX and BID) showed significantly (P<0.05) elevated expression in poor quality COCs at both the stages. The cleavage rate in Group 1 COCs was significantly higher than that of Group 2 (74.46±7.06 v. 31.57±5.32%). The development of the presumed zygotes in Group 2 oocytes proceeded up to 8- to 16-cell stages only, while in Group 1 it progressed up to morulae (35.38±7.11%) and blastocyst stages (9.70±3.15%), indicating their better developmental potential.

  12. Birth after human chorionic gonadotropin-primed oocyte in vitro maturation and fertilization with testicular sperm in a normo-ovulatory patient

    PubMed Central

    González-Ortega, Claudia; Piña-Aguilar, Raul Eduardo; Cancino-Villareal, Patricia; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Antonio Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we present a case of in vitro maturation (IVM) with surgical retrieved testicular sperm in a normo-ovulatory female. Human chorionic gonadotropin-primed IVM, testicular biopsy for sperm retrieval and intracytoplasmic sperm injection with fresh sperm were performed. Fourteen cumulus-oocyte complexes were obtained in germinal vesicle or metaphase I stage, eight oocytes reached metaphase II, seven presumptive zygotes were obtained, and three cleavage stages embryos in day 2 were transferred producing a singleton pregnancy. A single healthy newborn was obtained. Our results suggest that IVM may be an alternative for in vitro fertilization in normo-ovulatory women even if surgical retrieval of sperm is needed. Further research is required to depict contributing factors to the success of IVM in indications different from polycystic ovaries syndrome and the role of male gamete. PMID:27803591

  13. Hormone-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha-converting enzyme/A disintegrin and metalloprotease-17 impacts porcine cumulus cell oocyte complex expansion and meiotic maturation via ligand activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yasuhisa; Kawashima, Ikkou; Yanai, Yoshiari; Nishibori, Masahide; Richards, Joanne S; Shimada, Masayuki

    2007-12-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like growth factors, amphiregulin (AREG) and epiregulin (EREG), are expressed in murine cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) where they impact the function of cumulus cells and oocyte maturation during LH-mediated ovulation. Because TNFalpha-converting enzyme (TACE)/a disintegrin and metalloprotease-17 (ADAM17) is essential for ectodomain shedding of AREG and EREG from the surface of other cell types, the expression and function of TACE/ADAM17 was analyzed in a porcine COC culture system in which FSH- and LH-mediated expansion and oocyte meiotic maturation have been well characterized and shown to occur between 20 and 40 h. In this model, Areg, Ereg, and Tace/Adam17 mRNAs increased significantly with maximal levels observed between 5 and 20 h of culture with FSH plus LH. TACE/ADAM17 protein and protease activity were up-regulated markedly at 10 h and maintained to 40 h. Treatment of COCs with the TACE/ADAM17-selective inhibitor TNFalpha-processing inhibitor-2 (TAPI-2) significantly suppressed in a time-dependent manner downstream targets of EGF receptor activation such as ERK1/2 phosphorylation, Ptgs2, Has2, and Tnfaip6 mRNA expression, hormone-induced COC expansion, and meiotic maturation of the oocytes. Addition of EGF to COCs cultured in the presence of FSH/LH reversed the inhibitory effects of TAPI-2 on these ovulation-related processes. Gonadotropin-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was also inhibited in rat granulosa cells treated with TAPI-2 or after transfection with Tace/Adam17 small interfering RNA. Induced expression of Tnfaip6 mRNA was also reduced by Tace/Adam17 small interfering RNA. Thus, TACE/ADAM17 is induced and the activity is involved in porcine COC expansion as well as oocyte meiotic maturation through the activation of EGF receptor in cumulus cells.

  14. Effect of FSH and LH hormones on oocyte maturation of buffalo and gene expression analysis of their receptors and Cx43 in maturing oocytes.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Alok; Gupta, S C; Gupta, Neelam

    2010-08-01

    Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) are commonly added to maturation media to improve cumulus expansion known to be a predictor of oocyte maturation. Therefore, effects of various concentrations of FSH (1000 ng/ml), LH (1000 ng/ml) and FSH + LH (1000 ng/ml each) in comparison with control (without FSH + LH) cultured oocytes were investigated. FSH and LH (1000 ng/ml each) induced significantly more cumulus expansion and polar body numbers, as compared with control and treatments of 1000 ng/ml FSH and 1000 ng/ml LH alone. Expression of FSH receptor (r), LHr and Cx43 mRNAs was determined by real-time PCR in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) and denuded oocytes at different maturation times. Expression of all three genes was higher in COCs compared with denuded oocytes, confirming the importance of cumulus cells in oocyte maturation. FSHr and connexin 43 (Cx43) mRNA abundance in both COCs and denuded oocytes was highest at 0-6 h of maturation and decreased subsequently. However, LHr mRNA abundance increased from 6 h up to 24 h of maturation. The study concluded that FSH, LH receptors and Cx43 gene expression regulation is an index related to oocyte maturation. PMID:20128947

  15. Effect of melatonin on maturation capacity and fertilization of Nili-Ravi buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nagina, G.; Asima, A.; Nemat, U.; Shamim, A.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of melatonin supplementation of in vitro maturation media on in vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) rate of buffalo oocytes. Cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs) were aspirated from follicles of 2-8 mm diameter. In experiment I, COCs were matured in IVM medium supplemented with 0 (control), 250, 500, and 1000 μM melatonin for 22-24 hours in CO2 incubator at 38.5°C with 5% CO2 and at 95% relative humidity. The maturation rate did not differ in media supplemented with melatonin at 250 μM, 500 μM, 1000 μM and control (0 μM). In experiment II, the matured oocytes were fertilized in 50 μl droplets of Tyrode’s Albumin Lactate Pyruvate (TALP) medium having 10 ug/ml heparin for sperm (2 million/ml) capacitation. The fertilization droplets were then kept for incubation at 5% CO2, 39°C and at 95% relative humidity for 18 hours. The fertilization rate was assessed by sperm penetration and pronuclear formation. Fertilization rate was improved when maturation medium was supplemented with 250 μM melatonin compared to control. In conclusion, melatonin supplementation to serum free maturation media at 250 μM improved the fertilization rate of buffalo oocytes. PMID:27540514

  16. Effect of melatonin on maturation capacity and fertilization of Nili-Ravi buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) oocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagina, G; Asima, A; Nemat, U; Shamim, A

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of melatonin supplementation of in vitro maturation media on in vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) rate of buffalo oocytes. Cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs) were aspirated from follicles of 2-8 mm diameter. In experiment I, COCs were matured in IVM medium supplemented with 0 (control), 250, 500, and 1000 μM melatonin for 22-24 hours in CO2 incubator at 38.5°C with 5% CO2 and at 95% relative humidity. The maturation rate did not differ in media supplemented with melatonin at 250 μM, 500 μM, 1000 μM and control (0 μM). In experiment II, the matured oocytes were fertilized in 50 μl droplets of Tyrode's Albumin Lactate Pyruvate (TALP) medium having 10 ug/ml heparin for sperm (2 million/ml) capacitation. The fertilization droplets were then kept for incubation at 5% CO2, 39°C and at 95% relative humidity for 18 hours. The fertilization rate was assessed by sperm penetration and pronuclear formation. Fertilization rate was improved when maturation medium was supplemented with 250 μM melatonin compared to control. In conclusion, melatonin supplementation to serum free maturation media at 250 μM improved the fertilization rate of buffalo oocytes. PMID:27540514

  17. Metal Ion-dependent Heavy Chain Transfer Activity of TSG-6 Mediates Assembly of the Cumulus-Oocyte Matrix*

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, David C.; Birchenough, Holly L.; Ali, Tariq; Rugg, Marilyn S.; Waltho, Jon P.; Ievoli, Elena; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Enghild, Jan J.; Richter, Ralf P.; Salustri, Antonietta; Milner, Caroline M.; Day, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    The matrix polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) has a critical role in the expansion of the cumulus cell-oocyte complex (COC), a process that is necessary for ovulation and fertilization in most mammals. Hyaluronan is organized into a cross-linked network by the cooperative action of three proteins, inter-α-inhibitor (IαI), pentraxin-3, and TNF-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6), driving the expansion of the COC and providing the cumulus matrix with its required viscoelastic properties. Although it is known that matrix stabilization involves the TSG-6-mediated transfer of IαI heavy chains (HCs) onto hyaluronan (to form covalent HC·HA complexes that are cross-linked by pentraxin-3) and that this occurs via the formation of covalent HC·TSG-6 intermediates, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we have determined the tertiary structure of the CUB module from human TSG-6, identifying a calcium ion-binding site and chelating glutamic acid residue that mediate the formation of HC·TSG-6. This occurs via an initial metal ion-dependent, non-covalent, interaction between TSG-6 and HCs that also requires the presence of an HC-associated magnesium ion. In addition, we have found that the well characterized hyaluronan-binding site in the TSG-6 Link module is not used for recognition during transfer of HCs onto HA. Analysis of TSG-6 mutants (with impaired transferase and/or hyaluronan-binding functions) revealed that although the TSG-6-mediated formation of HC·HA complexes is essential for the expansion of mouse COCs in vitro, the hyaluronan-binding function of TSG-6 does not play a major role in the stabilization of the murine cumulus matrix. PMID:26468290

  18. Metal Ion-dependent Heavy Chain Transfer Activity of TSG-6 Mediates Assembly of the Cumulus-Oocyte Matrix.

    PubMed

    Briggs, David C; Birchenough, Holly L; Ali, Tariq; Rugg, Marilyn S; Waltho, Jon P; Ievoli, Elena; Jowitt, Thomas A; Enghild, Jan J; Richter, Ralf P; Salustri, Antonietta; Milner, Caroline M; Day, Anthony J

    2015-11-27

    The matrix polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) has a critical role in the expansion of the cumulus cell-oocyte complex (COC), a process that is necessary for ovulation and fertilization in most mammals. Hyaluronan is organized into a cross-linked network by the cooperative action of three proteins, inter-α-inhibitor (IαI), pentraxin-3, and TNF-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6), driving the expansion of the COC and providing the cumulus matrix with its required viscoelastic properties. Although it is known that matrix stabilization involves the TSG-6-mediated transfer of IαI heavy chains (HCs) onto hyaluronan (to form covalent HC·HA complexes that are cross-linked by pentraxin-3) and that this occurs via the formation of covalent HC·TSG-6 intermediates, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we have determined the tertiary structure of the CUB module from human TSG-6, identifying a calcium ion-binding site and chelating glutamic acid residue that mediate the formation of HC·TSG-6. This occurs via an initial metal ion-dependent, non-covalent, interaction between TSG-6 and HCs that also requires the presence of an HC-associated magnesium ion. In addition, we have found that the well characterized hyaluronan-binding site in the TSG-6 Link module is not used for recognition during transfer of HCs onto HA. Analysis of TSG-6 mutants (with impaired transferase and/or hyaluronan-binding functions) revealed that although the TSG-6-mediated formation of HC·HA complexes is essential for the expansion of mouse COCs in vitro, the hyaluronan-binding function of TSG-6 does not play a major role in the stabilization of the murine cumulus matrix.

  19. Effect of perfluorooctane sulfonate on viability, maturation and gap junctional intercellular communication of porcine oocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, A; Salazar, Z; Arenas, E; Betancourt, M; Ducolomb, Y; González-Márquez, H; Casas, E; Teteltitla, M; Bonilla, E

    2016-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a broadly used man-made surfactant whose long half-life has led to bioaccumulation. This perfluorinated compound is ubiquitous in human body fluids. PFOS concentrations as high as 26μM in plasma have been reported in occupationally exposed populations, and high levels of PFOS in human follicular fluid have been associated with subfertility. However, the effect of PFOS on the maturation of oocytes in mammals has not been reported to date. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of PFOS during oocyte maturation. Results indicate that PFOS inhibits oocyte viability (Lethal Concentration50=32μM) and maturation (inhibition of maturation50=22μM) at physiologically relevant concentrations. In order to evaluate the mechanisms of oocyte maturation inhibition by PFOS, gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between oocytes and granulosa cells was assessed. GJIC between granulosa cells and the oocyte was significantly affected during the first 8h of maturation. However, the inhibitory effect of PFOS on GJIC was not due to an alteration on the expression of connexin genes Cx43, Cx45 and Cx60. These findings suggest that occupationally exposed populations could be at risk, and that PFOS might affect oocyte maturation by interfering the GJIC in the cumulus-oocyte complexes during the first hours of maturation.

  20. Effect of polyvinylpyrrolidone on bovine oocyte maturation in vitro and subsequent fertilization and embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin-Tae; Tosca, Lucie; Huang, Tian-Hua; Xu, Lan; Niwa, Koji; Chian, Ri-Cheng

    2007-08-01

    The exact role of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in culture medium for oocyte maturation is still largely unknown. Bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) were cultured in in-vitro maturation (IVM) medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), 0.3% PVP (K-90) or 10% serum substitute supplement (SSS) respectively. The rates of oocyte maturation, fertilization and early embryonic development were evaluated. In addition, the status of DNA fragmentation in the oocytes was determined by comet assay, and the ratio of trophectoderm (TE) cells and inner cell mass (ICM) in blastocysts was determined by differential staining. Furthermore, the percentage of apoptotic cells in the blastocysts was examined by TUNEL assay. The results indicated that the effect of PVP in IVM medium was similar to FBS in terms of oocyte maturation and subsequent embryonic development. However, the addition of SSS in IVM medium retarded further embryonic development and resulted in more oocyte DNA fragmentation and a higher ratio of TE cells and ICM in the blastocysts. However, the number of apoptotic cells in blastocysts was similar among the three groups. These results suggest for the first time that the addition of PVP in oocyte maturation medium is not only a suitable substitute for serum but is also beneficial to in-vitro oocyte maturation. PMID:17697497

  1. Oocyte-secreted factors in oocyte maturation media enhance subsequent development of bovine cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianmin; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Bo; Liu, Jun; Luo, Yan; Guo, Zekun; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2014-04-01

    Successful in vitro maturation (IVM) and oocyte quality both affect the subsequent development of cloned embryos derived from somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Developmental competence is usually lower in oocytes matured in vitro compared with those that matured in vivo, possibly due to insufficient levels of oocyte-secreted factors (OSFs) and disrupted oocyte-cumulus communication. This study investigated the effects of OSFs secreted by denuded oocytes (DOs) during IVM on the subsequent developmental competence of cloned bovine embryos. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from antral follicles of slaughtered-cow ovaries collected from an abattoir were divided into four groups: COCs co-cultured with and without DOs in maturation media used for SCNT, as well as COCs co-cultured with and without DOs in maturation media used for in vitro fertilization (IVF). Based on the developmental competence and embryo quality of bovine embryos generated from these four groups, we found that co-culturing the COCs with DOs enhanced the in vitro development of IVF and cloned bovine embryos, and potentially generated more high-quality cloned blastocysts that possessed locus-specific histone modifications at levels similar to in vitro-fertilized embryos. These results strongly suggest that co-culturing COCs with DOs enhances subsequent developmental competence of cloned bovine embryo.

  2. Estimation of the optimal timing of fertilization for embryo development of in vitro-matured bovine oocytes based on the times of nuclear maturation and sperm penetration.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Keisuke; Kang, Sung-Sik; Huang, Weiping; Yanagawa, Yojiro; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Nagano, Masashi

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this research was to estimate the optimal timing for fertilization to achieve proper embryonic development of in vitro-matured bovine oocytes. First, cumulus-oocyte complexes were subjected to in vitro maturation (IVM) for 14-22 hr. The timing when 50% of oocytes reached metaphase II stage was estimated to be 17.5 hr after IVM start. Next, using oocytes subjected to IVM for 12-30 hr, sperm penetration was examined after 4-18 hr of in vitro fertilization (IVF). A significant negative correlation between IVM duration and the timing when 50% of oocytes were penetrated by sperm after IVF start was observed (P<0.01). Finally, oocytes subjected to 12-30 hr of IVM were inseminated and cultured for 6 days to examine embryonic development. In the group with 22 hr of IVM, the percentages of cleaved embryos and blastocysts were the highest values in all groups. According to the regression equation describing the time from nuclear maturation to sperm penetration (x) and the percentage of blastocysts (y) (y=7.23x - 0.297x(2), P<0.01), the blastocyst rate peaked when sperm penetration occurred at 12.2 hr after achieving nuclear maturation. In conclusion, under the present IVM/IVF conditions, it was estimated that oocytes acquired their highest developmental competence at about 30 hr after IVM start, and thus, the optimal IVM duration was calculated to be about 21 hr.

  3. In vitro maturation, fertilization and embryo development after ultrarapid freezing of immature human oocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Zhang, L; Wang, X

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the rates of maturation, fertilization and embryo development of ultrarapidly frozen immature oocytes (immature cumulus-oocyte complexes; COCs) obtained from antral follicles in ovaries of patients with chocolate ovarian cysts. The COCs were cryopreserved by a vitrification method using 5.5 mol ethylene glycol l (-1) plus 1.0 mol sucrose l (-1) in Dulbecco's PBS (DPBS). The survival, maturation and fertilization rates, and the percentage of embryos developing to the two-cell stage were 59, 64, 70 and 71%, respectively. No significant differences were noted in the rates of maturation, fertilization and embryo development between control and cryopreserved oocytes. Two embryos that developed from cryopreserved oocytes of the oocyte donor programme were selected for transfer into the uterus of a recipient with premature ovarian failure, after the recipient had received steroid replacement. A biochemical pregnancy occurred in the recipient after embryo transfer. These results indicate that immature oocytes can survive after cryopreservation and subsequently can be cultured to mature oocytes that are capable of undergoing fertilization in vitro and developing into embryos.

  4. Growth hormone and in vitro maturation of rhesus macaque oocytes and subsequent embryo development

    PubMed Central

    Nyholt de Prada, Jenna K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to use a nonhuman primate model to examine the effects of growth hormone (GH) on oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM). Methods Immunocytochemistry confirmed the presence of GH receptors in rhesus cumulus oocyte complexes and the cytoplasm of embryonic blastomeres. Recombinant human GH (r-hGH) was added to IVM medium and cumulus expansion, nuclear maturation, cytoplasmic maturation and embryo development were analyzed. Results Cumulus expansion was highest in the presence of 1 and 10 ng/ml r-hGH. The addition of r-hGH during IVM increased the percentage of embryos progressing to at least the 9–16 cell stage. In a separate study, 100 ng/ml r-hGH was supplemented to IVM and embryo culture medium and no effect was observed. Conclusions The presence of GH receptors along with increased cumulus expansion and embryos progressing to the 9–16 cell stage supports the hypothesis that r-hGH may be involved in oocyte maturation. PMID:18278582

  5. Capturing Complexity through Maturity Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Jean; Dillon, Gayle

    2004-01-01

    The impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) on the process and products of education is difficult to assess for a number of reasons. In brief, education is a complex system of interrelationships, of checks and balances. This context is not a neutral backdrop on which teaching and learning are played out. Rather, it may help, or…

  6. Production of lion (Panthera leo) blastocysts after in vitro maturation of oocytes and intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Lorena; Hribal, Romy; Stagegaard, Julia; Zahmel, Jennifer; Jewgenow, Katarina

    2015-04-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques are becoming widely applied to the breeding of endangered species, but establishing reliable protocols for the production of embryos in vitro is challenging because of the scarcity of sample material. In our study, we applied an assisted reproductive technique protocol for IVM and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), developed in the domestic cat, to oocytes retrieved from ovaries of four 2-year-old lionesses (Panthera leo) eight hours postmortem. In total, 68 cumulus-oocyte complexes of good quality were randomly distributed and cultured for 32 to 34 hours in two different maturation culture media, consisting of Medium 199 with Earle's salts, 3 mg/mL BSA, 0.1 mg/mL cysteine, 1.4 mg/mL sodium pyruvate, 0.6 mg/mL sodium lactate, 0.15 mg/mL l-glutamine, and 0.055 mg/mL gentamicin. Hormonal supplementation of IVM_1 was 0.02 IU/mL FSH and 0.05 IU/mL LH; IVM_2 consisted of 1.64 IU/mL FSH, 1.06 IU/mL LH, and 1 μg/mL 17ß-estradiol. Differences in hormonal supplementation did not produce significant differences in oocyte maturation rates, which were 39.4% in IVM_1 and 34.3% in IVM_2. Matured oocytes were microinjected with homologous frozen-thawed spermatozoa, and subsequent cleavage rates were 30.8% and 58.3%, respectively. Half of the embryos derived from oocytes matured in IVM_1 developed into blastocysts, whereas only 28.6% of embryos from oocytes matured in IVM_2 reached the blastocyst stage. Morula stages were present from Day 6 onward, and blastocyst stages from Day 9 on, indicating a slower developmental speed in comparison with domestic cats. This is the first report of in vitro-produced blastocysts using ICSI in the lion, and the results report that IVM and ICSI can be successfully performed with cumulus-oocyte complexes retrieved from ovaries after eight hours of shipping, obtaining competent embryos in culture.

  7. Glucosamine supplementation during in vitro maturation inhibits subsequent embryo development: possible role of the hexosamine pathway as a regulator of developmental competence.

    PubMed

    Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Mitchell, Megan; Cetica, Pablo; Dalvit, Gabriel; Pantaleon, Marie; Lane, Michelle; Gilchrist, Robert B; Thompson, Jeremy G

    2006-05-01

    Glucose concentration during cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) maturation influences several functions, including progression of oocyte meiosis, oocyte developmental competence, and cumulus mucification. Glucosamine (GlcN) is an alternative hexose substrate, specifically metabolized through the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway, which provides the intermediates for extracellular matrix formation during cumulus cell mucification. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of GlcN on meiotic progression and oocyte developmental competence following in vitro maturation (IVM). The presence of GlcN during bovine IVM did not affect the completion of nuclear maturation and early cleavage, but severely perturbed blastocyst development. This effect was subsequently shown to be dose-dependent and was also observed for porcine oocytes matured in vitro. Hexosamine biosynthesis upregulation using GlcN supplementation is well known to increase O-linked glycosylation of many intracellular signaling molecules, the best-characterized being the phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. We observed extensive O-linked glycosylation in bovine cumulus cells, but not oocytes, following IVM in either the presence or the absence of GlcN. Inhibition of O-linked glycosylation significantly reversed the effect of GlcN-induced reduction in developmental competence, but inhibition of PI3K signaling had no effect. Our data are the first to link hexosamine biosynthesis, involved in cumulus cell mucification, to oocyte developmental competence during in vitro maturation.

  8. In vivo and in vitro maturation of oocytes collected from superstimulated wood bison (Bison bison athabascae) during the anovulatory and ovulatory seasons.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Miriam P; Palomino, J Manuel; Anzar, Muhammad; Mapletoft, Reuben J; Adams, Gregg P

    2016-10-01

    Experiments were done to compare the in vivo and in vitro maturational characteristics of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) collected from live wood bison. In Experiment 1 (anovulatory season), follicular ablation was done to synchronize follicle wave emergence among bison on Day -1, and FSH was given on Days 0 and 2. Bison were then assigned to 5 groups (n=5/group) in which COC were collected by transvaginal follicle aspiration on Day 4 and either fixed immediately with no maturation (control), matured in vitro for 24 or 30h, or collected on Day 5 after in vivo maturation for 24 or 30h (i.e., after hCG treatment). In Experiment 2 (ovulatory season), bison were treated as described for Experiment 1, but PGF2α (cloprostenol) was given to control the luteal phase on Days -9 and 3. In both experiments, cumulus cell expansion was more extensive following in vivo than in vitro maturation, and the percentage of fully expanded COC was highest in the in vivo 30h groups. Nuclear maturation occurred more rapidly in vitro; 60-70% of oocytes were at the MII stage 24h after in vitro maturation while only 25-27% of oocytes had reached the MII stage after 24h of in vivo maturation. In conclusion, nuclear maturation occurred more rapidly during in vitro vs. in vivo maturation, but was associated with less cumulus expansion than in vivo maturation. In vivo oocyte maturation was more complete at 30 vs. 24h after hCG treatment. Season had no effect on the maturational capacity of wood bison oocytes. PMID:27601321

  9. In vivo and in vitro maturation of oocytes collected from superstimulated wood bison (Bison bison athabascae) during the anovulatory and ovulatory seasons.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Miriam P; Palomino, J Manuel; Anzar, Muhammad; Mapletoft, Reuben J; Adams, Gregg P

    2016-10-01

    Experiments were done to compare the in vivo and in vitro maturational characteristics of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) collected from live wood bison. In Experiment 1 (anovulatory season), follicular ablation was done to synchronize follicle wave emergence among bison on Day -1, and FSH was given on Days 0 and 2. Bison were then assigned to 5 groups (n=5/group) in which COC were collected by transvaginal follicle aspiration on Day 4 and either fixed immediately with no maturation (control), matured in vitro for 24 or 30h, or collected on Day 5 after in vivo maturation for 24 or 30h (i.e., after hCG treatment). In Experiment 2 (ovulatory season), bison were treated as described for Experiment 1, but PGF2α (cloprostenol) was given to control the luteal phase on Days -9 and 3. In both experiments, cumulus cell expansion was more extensive following in vivo than in vitro maturation, and the percentage of fully expanded COC was highest in the in vivo 30h groups. Nuclear maturation occurred more rapidly in vitro; 60-70% of oocytes were at the MII stage 24h after in vitro maturation while only 25-27% of oocytes had reached the MII stage after 24h of in vivo maturation. In conclusion, nuclear maturation occurred more rapidly during in vitro vs. in vivo maturation, but was associated with less cumulus expansion than in vivo maturation. In vivo oocyte maturation was more complete at 30 vs. 24h after hCG treatment. Season had no effect on the maturational capacity of wood bison oocytes.

  10. In vitro embryo production in goats: Slaughterhouse and laparoscopic ovum pick up-derived oocytes have different kinetics and requirements regarding maturation media.

    PubMed

    Souza-Fabjan, Joanna Maria G; Locatelli, Yann; Duffard, Nicolas; Corbin, Emilie; Touzé, Jean-Luc; Perreau, Christine; Beckers, Jean François; Freitas, Vicente José F; Mermillod, Pascal

    2014-05-01

    A total of 3427 goat oocytes were used in this study to identify possible differences during in vitro embryo production from slaughterhouse or laparoscopic ovum pick up (LOPU) oocytes. In experiment 1, one complex, one semi-defined, and one simplified IVM media were compared using slaughterhouse oocytes. In experiment 2, we checked the effect of oocyte origin (slaughterhouse or LOPU) on the kinetics of maturation (18 vs. 22 vs. 26 hours) when submitted to semi-defined or simplified media. In experiment 3, we determined the differences in embryo development between slaughterhouse and LOPU oocytes when submitted to both media and then to IVF or parthenogenetic activation (PA). Embryos from all groups were vitrified, and their viability evaluated in vitro after thawing. In experiment 1, no difference (P > 0.05) was detected among treatments for maturation rate (metaphase II [MII]; 88% on average), cleavage (72%), blastocyst from the initial number of cumulus oocyte complexes (46%) or from the cleaved ones (63%), hatching rate (69%), and the total number of blastomeres (187). In experiment 2, there was no difference of MII rate between slaughterhouse oocytes cultured for 18 or 22 hours, whereas the MII rate increased significantly (P < 0.05) between 18 and 22 hours for LOPU oocytes in the simplified medium. Moreover, slaughterhouse oocytes cultured in simplified medium matured significantly faster than LOPU oocytes at 18 and 22 hours (P < 0.05). In experiment 3, cleavage rate was significantly greater (P < 0.001) in all four groups of embryos produced by PA than IVF. Interestingly, PA reached similar rates for slaughterhouse oocytes cultured in both media, but improved (P < 0.05) the cleavage rate of LOPU oocytes. Slaughterhouse oocytes had acceptable cleavage rate after IVF (∼67%), whereas LOPU oocytes displayed a lower one (∼38%), in contrast to cleavage after PA. The percentage of blastocysts in relation to cleaved embryos was not affected by the origin of the

  11. In vitro maturation of oocytes via the pre-fabricated self-assembled artificial human ovary

    PubMed Central

    Robins, Jared C.; Ferruccio, Toni-Marie; Moore, Richard; Steinhoff, Margaret M.; Morgan, Jeffrey R.; Carson, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Create a 3-Dimensional artificial human ovary to mature human oocytes. Methods Theca and granulosa cells were isolated from antral follicles of reproductive-aged women, seeded into micro-molded gels and self-assembled into complex 3D microtissues. Immunohistochemistry and live-dead staining confirmed theca cell identity and cellular viability at one week respectively. Placement of granulosa cell spheroids or cumulus-oocyte complexes into theca cell honeycomb openings resulted in creation of an artificial human ovary. Oocytes from this construct were assessed for polar body extrusion. Results Theca and granulosa cells self-assembled into complex microtissues, remaining viable for one week. At 72 h after artificial human ovary construction, theca cells completely surrounded the granulosa spheroids or COCs without stromal invasion or disruption. Polar body extrusion occurred in one of three COCs assessed. Conclusions An artifical human ovary can be created with self-assembled human theca and granulosa cell microtissues, and used for IVM and future oocyte toxicology studies. PMID:20737203

  12. Heat stress and antioxidant enzyme activity in bubaline ( Bubalus bubalis) oocytes during in vitro maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waiz, Syma Ashraf; Raies-ul-Haq, Mohammad; Dhanda, Suman; Kumar, Anil; Goud, T. Sridhar; Chauhan, M. S.; Upadhyay, R. C.

    2016-09-01

    In vitro environments like heat stress usually increase the production of reactive oxygen species in bubaline oocytes which have been implicated as one of the major causes for reduced developmental competence. Oocytes during meiotic maturation are sensitive to oxidative stress, and heat stress accelerates cellular metabolism, resulting in the higher production of free radicals. Therefore, the aim of present work was to assess the impact of heat stress during meiotic maturation on bubaline cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC), denuded oocytes (DO), and cumulus cell mass in terms of their oxidative status. Accordingly, for control group, COC were matured at 38.5 °C for complete 24 h of meiotic maturation and heat stress of 40.5 and 41.5 °C was applied to COC during the first 12 h of maturation and then moved to 38.5 °C for rest of the 12 h. In another group, COC after maturation were denuded from the surrounding cumulus cells by manual pipetting. Results indicated that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxides, and nitric oxide (NO) was significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in the oocytes subjected to heat stress (40.5 and 41.5 °C) during meiotic maturation compared to the oocytes matured under standard in vitro culture conditions (38.5 °C). Also, the antioxidant enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were significantly ( P < 0.05) increased in all the treatment groups compared to the control group. Therefore, the present study clearly establishes that heat stress ensues oxidative stress in bubaline oocytes which triggers the induction of antioxidant enzymatic defense system for scavenging the ROS.

  13. Heat stress and antioxidant enzyme activity in bubaline (Bubalus bubalis) oocytes during in vitro maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waiz, Syma Ashraf; Raies-ul-Haq, Mohammad; Dhanda, Suman; Kumar, Anil; Goud, T. Sridhar; Chauhan, M. S.; Upadhyay, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro environments like heat stress usually increase the production of reactive oxygen species in bubaline oocytes which have been implicated as one of the major causes for reduced developmental competence. Oocytes during meiotic maturation are sensitive to oxidative stress, and heat stress accelerates cellular metabolism, resulting in the higher production of free radicals. Therefore, the aim of present work was to assess the impact of heat stress during meiotic maturation on bubaline cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC), denuded oocytes (DO), and cumulus cell mass in terms of their oxidative status. Accordingly, for control group, COC were matured at 38.5 °C for complete 24 h of meiotic maturation and heat stress of 40.5 and 41.5 °C was applied to COC during the first 12 h of maturation and then moved to 38.5 °C for rest of the 12 h. In another group, COC after maturation were denuded from the surrounding cumulus cells by manual pipetting. Results indicated that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxides, and nitric oxide (NO) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the oocytes subjected to heat stress (40.5 and 41.5 °C) during meiotic maturation compared to the oocytes matured under standard in vitro culture conditions (38.5 °C). Also, the antioxidant enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in all the treatment groups compared to the control group. Therefore, the present study clearly establishes that heat stress ensues oxidative stress in bubaline oocytes which triggers the induction of antioxidant enzymatic defense system for scavenging the ROS.

  14. Maturation of pig oocytes in vitro in a medium with pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Figueroa, H; Gonzales-Molfino, H M

    2005-06-01

    The aim of in vitro maturation oocyte systems is to produce oocytes of comparable quality to those derived in vivo. The present study was designed to examine the surface morphological changes of the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) and nuclear maturation in a culture system containing pyruvate. Ovaries were obtained from a slaughterhouse and transported to the laboratory within 2 h at 35-39 degrees C,and rinsed three times in 0.9% NaCl. The COCs were harvested from the ovaries and in vitro maturation was evaluated in San Marcos (SM) medium, a chemically defined culture system containing 22.3 mM sodium pyruvate. Oocytes were cultured in SM, SM + porcine follicular fluid (pFF) and in SM + pFF + gonadotropins (eCG and hCG) for 20-22 h and then without hormonal supplements for an additional 20-22 h. After culture, the degree of cumulus expansion and frequency of nuclear maturation were determined. Oocytes matured in SM (40.9%) and SM + pFF (42.9%) showed moderate cumulus expansion, whereas oocytes matured in SM + pFF + gonadotropins (54.6%) showed high cumulus expansion. The maturation rate of cultured oocytes, measured in function of the presence of the polar corpuscle, did not differ significantly between SM (40.9 +/- 3.6%) and SM + pFF (42.9 +/- 3.7%). These results indicate that pig oocytes can be successfully matured in a chemically defined medium and suggest a possible bifunctional role of pyruvate as an energy substrate and as an antioxidant protecting oocytes against the stress of the in vitro environment.

  15. Altered theca and cumulus oocyte complex gene expression, follicular arrest and reduced fertility in cows with dominant follicle follicular fluid androgen excess

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To date, animal models with naturally occurring androgen excess have not been identified. Serendipitously, we discovered two subpopulations of cows with dramatically different follicular fluid androgen concentrations in dominant follicles within our research herd. In the cow, androstenedione is the...

  16. Cognitive Complexity and Career Maturity among College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winer, Jane L.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Investigated the role of cognitive complexity in the career maturity of college students. Results generally supported the prediction that career maturity would be positively associated with cognitive complexity. (Author)

  17. Progesterone regulation of AVEN protects bovine oocytes from apoptosis during meiotic maturation.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Lynne C; Hensey, Carmel; Fair, Trudee

    2013-12-01

    Inhibition of progesterone (P4) synthesis by cumulus cells during bovine in vitro oocyte maturation (IVM) causes a decrease in subsequent embryo development, indicating that P4 intracellular signaling within the cumulus oocyte complex (COC) is important for oocyte developmental competence. The aim of the present study was to further elucidate, on a protein level, the downstream signaling pathway involved in P4 regulation of oocyte developmental competence. COCs were subjected to IVM for 24 h in the presence or absence of trilostane, aglepristone, or promegestone (R5020). These altered IVM conditions resulted in dynamic changes in protein expression of the progesterone receptors and the cell death-regulated proteins AVEN, BCL-xL, and active caspase 3. In addition, AVEN protein localization, caspase 3 activation, and mitochondrial distribution were studied by immunofluorescence. Inhibition of progesterone synthesis (trilostane treatment) resulted in changes in AVEN localization within the COC, corresponding to caspase 3 activation and altered mitochondrial distribution. AVEN was also found to bind BCL-xL in COCs, but this interaction was lost following treatment with trilostane.

  18. Modulation of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway influences porcine oocyte in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, G M; Ferretti, E L; Gutnisky, C; Dalvit, G C; Cetica, P D

    2013-08-01

    Glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) activities were modulated in porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) during in vitro maturation (IVM) by the addition of inhibitors or stimulators of key enzymes of the pathways to elucidate their relative participation in oocyte maturation. The activities of glycolysis and PPP were evaluated by lactate production per COC and by the brilliant cresyl blue test, respectively. Glucose uptake per COC and the oocyte maturation rate were also evaluated. Lactate production, glucose uptake and the percentage of oocytes reaching metaphase II decreased in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of the pharmacological (NaF) or the physiological (ATP) inhibitors of glycolysis (p < 0.05). The addition of the physiological stimulator of glycolysis (AMP) caused no effect on lactate production, glucose uptake or the meiotic maturation rate. The pharmacological (6-AN) and the physiological (NADPH) inhibitors of PPP induced a dose-dependent decrease in the percentage of oocytes with high PPP activity and in the nuclear maturation rate (p < 0.05). The physiological stimulator of PPP (NADP) caused no effect on the percentage of oocytes with high PPP activity. The glycolytic and PPP activities of porcine COCs and maturational competence of oocytes seem to be closely related events. This study shows for the first time the regulatory effect of ATP and NADPH as physiological inhibitors of glycolysis and PPP in porcine COCs, respectively. Besides, these pathways seem to reach their maximum activities in porcine COCs during IVM because no further increases were achieved by the presence of AMP or NADP.

  19. Ganglioside GD1a promotes oocyte maturation, furthers preimplantation development, and increases blastocyst quality in pigs

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Jin-Woo; PARK, Hyo-Jin; CHAE, Sung-Kyu; AHN, Jae-Hyun; DO, Geon-Yeop; CHOO, Young-Kug; PARK, Joung Jun; JUNG, Bae Dong; KIM, Sun-Uk; CHANG, Kyu-Tae; KOO, Deog-Bon

    2016-01-01

    Gangliosides are key lipid molecules required for the regulation of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and cell signaling, including signaling of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has long been considered a potential regulator of meiotic and cytoplasmic maturation in mammalian oocytes. However, there is no report on the direct effect of ganglioside GD1a in porcine oocyte maturation. In this study, we first investigated a functional link between GD1a and meiotic maturation during in vitro maturation (IVM) of porcine embryos. Moreover, we confirmed the effect of exogenous GD1a treatment on blastocyst development, quality, and fertilization rate in early embryonic development. First, we observed that the protein level of ST3GAL2, a GD1a synthesizing enzyme, significantly increased (P < 0.01) in cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COCs) during IVM progress. The proportion of arrested germinal vesicles (GV) increased in oocytes treated with EGF+GD1a (41.6 ± 1.5%) at the IVM I stage. Upon completion of meiotic maturation, the proportion of metaphase II (M II) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the EGF+GD1a (89.9 ± 3.6%) treated group. After IVF, the percentage of penetrated oocytes was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the EGF+GD1a (89.1 ± 2.3%) treated group than in the control group. Furthermore, exogenous GD1a treatment improved the developmental competence and quality of blastocysts during preimplantation embryo development stage. These results suggest that ganglioside GD1a may play an important role in IVM mechanisms of porcine maturation capacity. Furthermore, our findings will be helpful for better promoting the embryo development and blastocyst quality in pigs. PMID:26860251

  20. Impact of gonadotropins on oocyte maturation, fertilisation and developmental competence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemei; Tsai, Tony; Qiao, Jie; Zhang, Zhan; Feng, Huai L

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the dose-dependent effects of gonadotropins, either singly (Bravelle (B), Luveris (L), Menupur (M), Repronex (R), Gonal-F (G), Follism (F) and Norvarel (N)) or in combination (Menupur+Bravelle; Repronext+Bravelle; and Bravelle+Norvarel), on rates of oocyte maturation, fertilisation and early embryo development in vitro in an animal model. Bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were purchased commercially and cultured in TCM-199 with 10% fetal bovine serum supplemented with varying concentrations of gonadotropin (0, 5, 10, 20, 40IU or United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) mL-1) for 24 and 48h according to current IVF clinical stimulation protocols. All gonadotropins enhanced oocyte maturation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Individually, Gonal-F (Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany), Follism (Merck Co, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA) and Repronext (Ferring, Parsippany, NJ, USA) promoted oocyte maturation; in combination, they effectively enhanced COC expansion and increased the maturation competence of MII oocytes. However, high concentrations of gonadotropins may result in maturation arrest. Specific combinations of gonadotropins may change the rate of early embryonic development (8-16-cells) and morula-blastocyst formation. These data provide support for the responsiveness of bovine oocytes to gonadotropins in vitro and the need to consider variations in the relative concentrations and ratio of combinations (FSH/LH or human chorionic gonadotropin) for optimisation of oocyte developmental competence. The results of the present study could be applied to therapeutic clinical stimulation protocols and help improve IVF success rates.

  1. Increasing the cAMP concentration during in vitro maturation of pig oocytes improves cumulus maturation and subsequent fertilization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Appeltant, R; Beek, J; Vandenberghe, L; Maes, D; Van Soom, A

    2015-02-01

    Porcine IVF faces various problems such as incomplete cytoplasmic maturation of the oocyte and polyspermy. Previous studies proved the importance of cAMP in regulating nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation of oocytes. This study investigated the effect of the cAMP-modulating agents 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and dibutyryl cAMP sodium salt (dbcAMP) on several parameters during in vitro production of porcine embryos. First, we wanted to see if oocyte collection in IBMX could meiotically arrest oocytes and, as such, improve synchronization of nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation. To this end, cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were collected from gilts in HEPES-buffered Tyrode balanced salt solution medium with 0.5-mM IBMX or without IBMX. At the end of oocyte collection, the effect of IBMX on chromatin configuration was evaluated. However, no differences could be observed in nuclear configuration between IBMX- and IBMX+ oocytes (P > 0.05). Second, we added dbcAMP during IVM to improve cytoplasmic maturation and evaluated cumulus expansion (lack of adhesion), a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin-like repeats (ADAMTS-1) levels in cumulus cells, fertilization, and blastocyst rates. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were matured in modified North Carolina State University medium 37 with or without 1-mM dbcAMP. Frozen-thawed, epididymal, boar spermatozoa were used for IVF. After IVF, presumed zygotes were cultured for 7 days in North Carolina State University medium 23. Penetration rate decreased in dbcAMP+ (57.3%) compared with dbcAMP- (67.8%), but the polyspermy rate also decreased (43.3% vs. 53.4%, respectively) leading to an increased normal fertilization rate (56.7% vs. 46.6%, respectively; P < 0.05). Only 7.2% of the COCs showed adhesion in dbcAMP+ which was lower than 15.7% in dbcAMP- (P < 0.05) probably because of an upregulation of the ADAMTS-1 protein by dbcAMP. When the adherent oocytes were removed during maturation, no difference could be

  2. The effect of pre-treatment with a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist on reproductive functions in mature cycling rats.

    PubMed

    Raziel, A; Ron-el, R; Dekel, N

    1995-03-01

    In order to investigate the performance of follicles in a rat model in which gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) was used for hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis suppression, three groups of mature cycling rats were studied. One group was treated with buserelin followed by pregnant mare's serum gonadotrophin (PMSG), and the second group was treated with PMSG alone. Both these hormonally treated groups received human chorionic gonadotropin for induction of ovulation. The third group received no hormonal treatment. The average number of ovulated oocytes recovered from rat oviducts pre-treated with GnRHa was significantly higher than that in rats treated with the gonadotrophin alone, in spite of the larger number of pre-ovulatory follicles present in the gonadotrophin-treated group. The morphology of both the pre-ovulatory and the post-ovulatory cumulus-oocyte complexes in the three groups appeared similar. No difference in the capacity of follicles of the three groups to synthesize progesterone in vitro in response to luteinizing hormone could be observed. We conclude that ovarian morphology and function are not impaired by pre-treatment with buserelin.

  3. Phosphorylation pattern of the p90rsk and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) molecule: comparison of in vitro and in vivo matured porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Schuon, C; Ebeling, S; Meinecke, B

    2007-08-01

    The overall objective was to elucidate the phosphorylation pattern and activity of the kinase p90rsk, a substrate of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), during in vitro and in vivo maturation of pig oocytes. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were collected from slaughtered pigs and matured in vitro (0, 22, 26, 30, 34, 46 h) with and without the MEK inhibitor U0126. For in vivo maturation, gilts were stimulated with equine chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG) (600-800 IU). Maturation was induced 72 h later with hCG (500 IU). Oocytes were obtained surgically (0, 22, 30 h). The samples were submitted to electrophoresis and protein blotting analysis. Enhanced chemiluminescence was used for visualization. In vitro matured oocytes were further submitted to a commercially available radioactive kinase assay to determine kinase activity. It was shown that oocytes, as well as cumulus cells, already possess a partially phosphorylated p90rsk at the time of removal from follicles, with a further phosphorylation of the molecule occurring between 22-24 h after the initiation of culture, and in vivo maturation. The phosphorylation of p90rsk coincides with the phosphorylation of MAPK and can be prevented by U0126, indicating a MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of p90rsk. Phosphorylation of the in vivo matured oocytes occurred shown as a band of less than 200 kDa. This is presumably a molecule complex, with MAPK not being a component. Therefore, the p90rsk molecule in vivo exists as a dimer. Determination of kinase activity demonstrated decreasing enzyme activities. This led to the conclusion that the assay is not specific for p90rsk, instead measuring p70S6 kinase activities.

  4. Bovine OPU-derived oocytes can be matured in vitro for 16-28 h with similar developmental capacity.

    PubMed

    Merton, J S; de Roos, A P W; Koenen, E P C; Roelen, B A J; Vos, P L A M; Mullaart, E; Knijn, H M

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimal maturation culture period of ovum pick up (OPU)-derived cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs) in relation to their developmental capacity. Embryo production, embryo cryotolerance, post-transfer embryonic survival and calf characteristics such as gestation length, birthweight and sex ratio were investigated. This retrospective study covers the analyses of ovum pick up -in vitro production and calving results from a commercial programme that took place between March 1994 and September 2004. Donors were both heifers (of which approximately 90% pregnant) and cows (of which approximately 10% pregnant). Embryo production analyses were based on 7800 OPU sessions conducted from January 1995 until January 1999. Analyses of calving rate were based on 13 468 embryo transfers performed during January 1995 until May 2002. Analyses on calf characteristics were based on 2162 calves born between March 1994 and September 2004. The in vitro maturation culture period ranged from 16 to 28 h. The mean production rate of transferable embryos was 16.5% (1.2 embryos per OPU session). Length of maturation culture period did not affect the production of transferable embryos. Mean calving rate was 40.9% and 38.7% for fresh and frozen/thawed embryos, respectively. Calving rate was not affected by the maturation culture period. Mean birthweight, gestation length and proportion of male calves were 46 kg, 281.9 days and 52.8%, respectively. Maturation culture period did not affect these variables. In conclusion, this study shows that the in vitro maturation culture period within the range of 16-28 h does not affect in vitro embryo production, embryo cryotolerance, post-transfer embryonic survival and calf characteristics, suggesting that all COC batches collected by OPU on the same day, can be fertilized in one IVF session without a significant loss in the production from oocyte to calf.

  5. Specific antibody against the Aujeszky's disease virus in the complex cumulus oophorus-oocyte of sows.

    PubMed

    Jerábek, J; Horký, D; Trávník, P; Rodák, L

    1989-01-01

    Oocytes collected from sows vaccinated and revaccinated with an inactivated vaccine against Aujeszky's disease (AD) were examined for the presence of specific antibodies of the IgG class against AD virus in the complex cumulus oophorus-oocyte by means of immunocytochemical methods. No specific antibody of the IgG class was detected in the cumulus-oocyte complexes collected from sows before vaccination. On the other hand, the specific IgG antibody was found in all immunocytochemically examined complexes cumulus-oocyte collected from revaccinated sows. The specific antibody of the IgG class against AD virus and the porcine IgG were immunocytochemically visualized under both light and electron microscopes as a fine granular product disseminated in oocytes and follicular cells.

  6. Supplements to in vitro maturation media affect the production of bovine blastocysts and their apoptotic index but not the proportions of matured and apoptotic oocytes.

    PubMed

    Warzych, E; Peippo, J; Szydlowski, M; Lechniak, D

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of different supplements to the basic IVM medium (TCM199) on the efficiency of cattle oocyte maturation and blastocyst production, and the incidence of apoptosis in both oocytes and blastocysts. Two protein supplements (FBS and fafBSA) and a macromolecule (PVP40) were compared in a 3 treatmentsx9 replicates design. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) aspirated from slaughterhouse ovaries were matured for 24h in TCM199 medium supplemented with 10% FBS, 6% fafBSA or 4% PVP40 (50-70 COCs in each treatment/replicate), then inseminated and cultured in vitro for 8 days. Immature and mature oocytes as well as Day 8 blastocysts were subjected to TUNEL analysis. Cleavage rate was monitored on Day 2 post-insemination (pi), whereas blastocyst yield on Day 8 pi. The composition of maturation media did not affect zygotic cleavage rate on Day 2 (on average 71.0%), however the blastocyst rate on Day 8 pi was significantly lower (P<0.001) for embryos derived from oocytes matured with PVP40 (16.0%) than for those matured with FBS (22.4%) or fafBSA (22.1%). The rate of TUNEL positive oocytes differed significantly between immature (1.4%) and mature (11.2%) oocytes (P<0.01). Supplements to maturation medium were not related to the incidence of apoptosis in mature oocytes (11.2%) and the rate of oocytes at the second metaphase stage (71.5%). Cumulus cell expansion was reduced by maturation in medium supplemented with PVP40. This macromolecule was also correlated with higher apoptotic index in blastocysts (5.8%) when compared to FBS (3.2%) and fafBSA (3.1%; P<0.001). In conclusion, lower blastocyst rate and elevated apoptotic index in embryos derived from oocytes matured with PVP40 may suggest that synthetic macromolecule provides less balanced environment for oocyte maturation and therefore should be treated with caution.

  7. Effects of Crocin Supplementation during In Vitro Maturation of Mouse Oocytes on Glutathione Synthesis and Cytoplasmic Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mokhber Maleki, Elham; Eimani, Hussein; Bigdeli, Mohammad Reza; Golkar Narenji, Afsane; Abedi, Reyhane

    2016-01-01

    Background Crocin is an active ingredient of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) and its antioxidant properties have been previously investigated. This carotenoid scavenges free radicals and stimulates glutathione (GSH) synthesis; consequently, it may protect cells against oxidative stress. The aim of this research is to protect oocytes from oxidative stress by the addition of a natural source antioxidant. Materials and Methods In the present in vitro experimental study, we collected cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) from mouse ovaries of euthanized, 6-8 week-old female Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice. Oocytes were subjected to in vitro maturation (IVM) in the presence of either crocin (5 or 10 μg/ml), 5 mM buthionine-[S-R]- sulfoximine (BSO), or the combination of crocin plus BSO. Oocytes that matured in vitro in a medium without crocin or BSO supplements were considered as controls. Following 16-18 hours of IVM, matured oocytes (n=631) were fertilized by capacitated sperm from NMRI male mice, and cultured in vitro for up to 96 hours to assess preimplantation embryonic development. The levels of GSH in metaphase II (MII) oocytes after IVM (n=240) were also assessed by the 5, 5-dithio-bis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB)-GSH reductase recycling assay. Results Supplementation of IVM media with 10 µg/ml crocin significantly (P<0.05) increased nuclear maturation, preimplantation development and GSH concentrations compared with the control group. Maturation of oocytes in IVM medium supplemented with BSO alone or the combination of 5 µg/ml crocin and BSO drastically decreased GSH concentrations and subsequently resulted in low rates of maturation, fertilization and blastocyst development. However, the combination of 10 µg/ml crocin with 5 mM BSO increased the level of nuclear maturation which was comparable to the control group. Conclusion Supplementation of IVM media with crocin can improve nuclear maturation rates and subsequent developmental potential of mouse

  8. Vitrification and Subsequent In Vitro Maturation of Mouse Preantral Follicles in Presence of Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Oryan Abkenar, Zahra; Ganji, Roya; Eghbal Khajehrahimi, Amir; Bahadori, Mohammad Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue or follicles has been proposed as an alternative method for fertility preservation. Although successful vitrification of follicles has been reported in several mammalian species, the survival rate is generally low. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) on in vitro preantral follicle development after vitrification. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, preantral follicles with diameter of 150-180 µm were mechanically isolated from ovaries of 18-21 days old NMRI mice. Follicles were vitrified and warmed, then cultured in a-minimal essential medium (α-MEM) without growth factor supplementation as control group (group I), while supplemented with 20 ng/ml FGF (group II), 20 ng/ml EGF (group III), and 20 ng/ml FGF +20 ng/ml EGF (group IV). After 12 days, human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG)/EGF was added to culture medium, and after 18-20 hours, the presence of cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) and oocyte maturation were assessed. The chi-square (Χ2) test was used to analyze survival and ovulation rates of the follicles. Results Our results showed that the rate of metaphase II (MII) oocytes in FGF group increased in comparison with control and other treatment groups (p<0.027), but there was no difference between control with EGF and EGF+FGF groups in oocyte maturation rate (p>0.05). There was a significant decrease in survival rate of follicles in EGF+FGE group in comparison with other groups (p<0.008). After in vitro ovulation induction, the follicles in EGF group showed a higher ovulation rate (p<0.008) than those cultured in other groups. Conclusion FGF has beneficial effect on oocyte maturation, and EGF increases COCs number in vitro. Combination of EGF and FGE decreases the number of survived follicles. PMID:24611145

  9. In vitro oocyte maturation, fertilization and culture after ovum pick-up in an endangered gazelle (Gazella dama mhorr).

    PubMed

    Berlinguer, F; González, R; Succu, S; del Olmo, A; Garde, J J; Espeso, G; Gomendio, M; Ledda, S; Roldan, E R S

    2008-02-01

    The recovery of immature oocytes followed by in vitro maturation, fertilization and culture (IVMFC) allows the rescue of biological material of great genetic value for the establishment of genetic resource banks of endangered species. Studies exist on sperm cryopreservation of endangered Mohor gazelle (Gazella dama mhorr), but no work has been carried out yet on oocyte collection, fertilization and culture in this or related species. The purpose of this study was to develop a protocol for ovarian stimulation for the recovery of oocytes and subsequent IVMFC in the Mohor gazelle using frozen-thawed spermatozoa. Ovum pick-up was performed after ovarian stimulation with a total dose of 5.28 mg of ovine FSH. A total of 35 oocytes were recovered from 56 punctured follicles (62%) (N=6 females). Out of 29 cumulus-oocyte complexes matured in vitro, 3% were found at germinal vesicle stage, 7% at metaphase I, 21% were degenerated, and 69% advanced to metaphase II. Fertilization and cleavage rates of matured oocytes were 40 and 30%, respectively. Embryos cleaved in vitro up to the 6-8 cell stage but none progressed to the blastocyst stage, suggesting the existence of a developmental block and the need to improve culture conditions. Although more studies are needed to improve hormonal stimulation and oocyte harvesting, as well as IVMFC conditions, this study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of in vitro fertilization with frozen-thawed semen of in vitro matured oocytes collected by ovum pick-up from FSH-stimulated endangered gazelles.

  10. Expression and cellular distribution of zona pellucida glycoproteins in canine oocytes before and after in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, Bartosz; Piotrowska, Hanna; Bukowska, Dorota; Woźna, Magdalena; Ciesiółka, Sylwia; Wojtanowicz-Markiewicz, Katarzyna; Włodarczyk, Renata; Jopek, Karol; Jeseta, Michal; Bruska, Małgorzata; Nowicki, Michał; Jaśkowski, Jędrzej M; Brüssow, Klaus-Peter; Zabel, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    This study was aimed at investigating zona pellucida glycoproteins (ZP) ZP2, ZP3 mRNA expression as well as ZP3, ZP4 (ZPB) protein distribution before and after in vitro maturation (IVM) in canine oocytes. The cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were recovered from 27 anoestrous mongrel bitches and matured for 72 h in TCM199 medium. The canine COCs were analysed before and after IVM. Using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR), both groups of oocytes were analysed for detection of ZP2 and ZP3 mRNA profiles as well as using confocal microscopic analysis for observation of ZP3 and ZP4 protein distribution. In post-IVM canine oocytes an increase in transcript content of ZP2 and ZP3 genes as well as a decrease in ZP3 and ZP4 protein levels were observed when compared with pre-IVM oocytes. Moreover, the ZP4 protein before IVM was significantly distributed in the peripheral area of cytoplasm, whereas after IVM it was localized rather than in the entire cytoplasm. In contrast, the ZP3 protein was found both before and after IVM was distributed in the peripheral area of the cytoplasm. In conclusion, we suggest that the expression of ZP2 and ZP3 genes is associated with the maturation stage of canine oocytes, as higher mRNAs levels were found after IVM. However, a decreased expression of ZP3 and ZP4 proteins after IVM suggests maturation-dependent down-regulation of these protein translations, which may result in disturbed fertilization.

  11. In vitro oocyte maturation, fertilization and culture after ovum pick-up in an endangered gazelle (Gazella dama mhorr).

    PubMed

    Berlinguer, F; González, R; Succu, S; del Olmo, A; Garde, J J; Espeso, G; Gomendio, M; Ledda, S; Roldan, E R S

    2008-02-01

    The recovery of immature oocytes followed by in vitro maturation, fertilization and culture (IVMFC) allows the rescue of biological material of great genetic value for the establishment of genetic resource banks of endangered species. Studies exist on sperm cryopreservation of endangered Mohor gazelle (Gazella dama mhorr), but no work has been carried out yet on oocyte collection, fertilization and culture in this or related species. The purpose of this study was to develop a protocol for ovarian stimulation for the recovery of oocytes and subsequent IVMFC in the Mohor gazelle using frozen-thawed spermatozoa. Ovum pick-up was performed after ovarian stimulation with a total dose of 5.28 mg of ovine FSH. A total of 35 oocytes were recovered from 56 punctured follicles (62%) (N=6 females). Out of 29 cumulus-oocyte complexes matured in vitro, 3% were found at germinal vesicle stage, 7% at metaphase I, 21% were degenerated, and 69% advanced to metaphase II. Fertilization and cleavage rates of matured oocytes were 40 and 30%, respectively. Embryos cleaved in vitro up to the 6-8 cell stage but none progressed to the blastocyst stage, suggesting the existence of a developmental block and the need to improve culture conditions. Although more studies are needed to improve hormonal stimulation and oocyte harvesting, as well as IVMFC conditions, this study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of in vitro fertilization with frozen-thawed semen of in vitro matured oocytes collected by ovum pick-up from FSH-stimulated endangered gazelles. PMID:18022681

  12. Effect of temporary nuclear arrest by phosphodiesterase 3-inhibitor on morphological and functional aspects of in vitro matured mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Vanhoutte, Leen; Nogueira, Daniela; Gerris, Jan; Dhont, Marc; De Sutter, Petra

    2008-06-01

    The present study aimed to analyze detailed morphological and functional characteristics of mouse in vitro matured oocytes after a pre-maturation culture (PMC) by temporary nuclear arrest with the specific phosphodiesterase 3-inhibitor (PDE3-I) Cilostamide. In a first experiment the lowest effective dose of Cilostamide was determined. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs), isolated from small antral follicles, were exposed to different concentrations of Cilostamide (ranging from 0 (control) to 10 microM) for 24 hr. Afterwards, oocytes were removed from PDE3-I-containing medium and underwent in vitro maturation (IVM) for 16-18 hr. A concentration of 1 microM Cilostamide was the lowest effective dose for maximum level of inhibition and reversibility of meiosis inhibition. This concentration was used in further experiments to evaluate oocyte quality following IVM in relation to different parameters: kinetics of meiotic progression, metaphase II (MII) spindle morphology, aneuploidy rate, fertilization, and embryonic developmental rates. The results were compared to nonarrested (in vitro control) and in vivo matured oocytes (in vivo control). Following withdrawal of the inhibitor, the progression of meiosis was more synchronous and accelerated in arrested when compared to nonarrested oocytes. A PMC resulted in a significant increase in the number of oocytes constituting a MII spindle of normal morphology. None of the oocytes exposed to PDE3-I showed numerical chromosome alterations. In addition, fertilization and embryonic developmental rates were higher in the PMC group compared to in vitro controls, but lower than in vivo controls. These results provide evidence that induced nuclear arrest by PDE3-I is a safe and reliable method to improve oocyte quality after IVM.

  13. Maintenance of meiotic arrest in bovine oocytes using the S-enantiomer of roscovitine: effects on maturation, fertilization and subsequent embryo development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Coy, Pilar; Romar, Raquel; Payton, Rebecca R; McCann, Lisa; Saxton, Arnold M; Edwards, J Lannett

    2005-01-01

    The overall objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of the S-enantiomer of roscovitine (inhibitor of p34cdc2/cyclin B kinase) to maintain bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage for extended times after removal from antral follicles without compromising subsequent maturation, fertilization and embryo development. Oocytes were cultured in 0, 12.5, 25 or 50 micromol/l S-roscovitine for 24 h. Hoechst staining showed that 50 micromol/l S-roscovitine maintained >90% of oocytes at the GV stage and inhibited gonadotropin-induced cumulus expansion. Fewer oocytes underwent nuclear maturation after in vitro maturation (Hoechst staining) when cultured in 50 micromol/l S-roscovitine for 66 versus 21 or 42 h. Zona pellucida (ZP) hardening (pronase resistance), cortical granule types (lens culinaris agglutinin-fluorescein isothiocyanate), nuclear maturation and fertilization with frozen-thawed spermatozoa (Hoechst staining) were assessed after culture of oocytes in 50 micromol/l S-roscovitine for 0, 24 or 48 h. Neither ZP hardening, nor nuclear maturation nor fertilization were altered by roscovitine culture for 48 h. A higher proportion of oocytes had a type III cortical granule pattern (premature translocation to the oolemma) after roscovitine culture for 48 h. However, embryo development was not compromised as cleavage, development to 8-16 cell and blastocyst stages were at least comparable in control and roscovitine-treated oocytes. In conclusion, the studies have shown that S-roscovitine reversibly maintained bovine oocytes at the GV stage for 48 h. However, maintenance of oocytes in static culture for 48 h was not sufficient to improve development above non-treated controls. PMID:15615895

  14. Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) Inhibition during Porcine In Vitro Maturation Modifies Oocyte Protein S-Nitrosylation and In Vitro Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Aguirregomezcorta, Jon; Santa, Ángela Patricia; García-Vázquez, Francisco Alberto; Coy, Pilar; Matás, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a molecule involved in many reproductive processes. Its importance during oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) has been demonstrated in various species although sometimes with contradictory results. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of NO during IVM of cumulus oocyte complexes and its subsequent impact on gamete interaction in porcine species. For this purpose, IVM media were supplemented with three NOS inhibitors: NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and aminoguanidine (AG). A NO donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), was also used. The effects on the cumulus cell expansion, meiotic resumption, zona pellucida digestion time (ZPdt) and, finally, on in vitro fertilization (IVF) parameters were evaluated. The oocyte S-nitrosoproteins were also studied by in situ nitrosylation. The results showed that after 42 h of IVM, AG, L-NAME and L-NMMA had an inhibitory effect on cumulus cell expansion. Meiotic resumption was suppressed only when AG was added, with 78.7% of the oocytes arrested at the germinal vesicle state (P<0.05). Supplementation of the IVM medium with NOS inhibitors or NO donor did not enhance the efficiency of IVF, but revealed the importance of NO in maturation and subsequent fertilization. Furthermore, protein S-nitrosylation is reported for the first time as a pathway through which NO exerts its effect on porcine IVM; therefore, it would be important to determine which proteins are nitrosylated in the oocyte and their functions, in order to throw light on the mechanism of action of NO in oocyte maturation and subsequent fertilization. PMID:25542028

  15. Kinetics of nuclear maturation and effect of holding ovaries at room temperature on in vitro maturation of camel (Camelus dromedarius) oocytes.

    PubMed

    Wani, N A; Nowshari, M A

    2005-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate kinetics of in vitro nuclear maturation and the effect of storing ovaries at room temperature on initial chromatin configuration and in vitro maturation of dromedary camel oocytes. Cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) were collected from slaughterhouse ovaries and matured in vitro for 4-48h. At every 4h interval (starting from 0 to 48 h), groups of oocytes were fixed, stained and evaluated for the status of nuclear chromatin. Oocytes were categorized as germinal vesicle (GV), diakinesis (DK), metaphase-I (M-I), anaphase-I (A-I), metaphase-II (M-II) stage and those with degenerated, fragmented, activated or without a visible chromatin as others. At the start of culture, 74% (66/89) oocytes were at GV stage, 13% (12/89) at DK and 12% (11/89) were classified as others. Germinal vesicle breakdown started spontaneously in culture and at 20 h of culture 97% oocytes had already completed this process. After 8 and 16 h of maturation the highest proportion of oocytes (42%, 48/114 and 41%, 51/123) were at DK and M-I stage, respectively. The proportions of oocytes reaching M-II stage at 32 (42%, 50/118), 36 (45%, 47/104), 40 (49%, 57/117), 44 (52%, 103/198) and 48 h (46%, 55/120) of culture were not different from each other (P>0.05). The proportion of oocytes categorized as others, however, increased after 40 h of culture and was higher (P<0.05) at 48 h compared with other maturation periods. There was no difference (P>0.05) in the proportion of oocytes reaching M-II stage from the ovaries collected and stored in normal saline solution (NSS) at room temperature for 12h (43%, 64/148) and those collected in warm NSS (37 degrees C) and processed immediately after arrival in laboratory (49%, 57/117). However, low number of oocytes reached M-II stage from ovaries collected in warm NSS but stored at room temperature (29%, 37/128) compared with other two groups (P<0.05). It may be concluded that dromedary oocytes require 32-44h of in vitro

  16. Pentose phosphate pathway activity: effect on in vitro maturation and oxidative status of bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gutnisky, Cynthia; Dalvit, Gabriel C; Thompson, Jeremy G; Cetica, Pablo D

    2014-08-01

    The relationship between pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) activity in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) and oxidative and mitochondrial activity in bovine oocytes was evaluated with the aim of analysing the impact of two inhibitors (NADPH and 6-aminonicotinamide (6-AN)) and a stimulator (NADP) of the key enzymes of the PPP on the maturation rate, oxidative and mitochondrial activity and the mitochondrial distribution in oocytes. The proportion of COCs with measurable PPP activity (assessed using brilliant cresyl blue staining), glucose uptake, lactate production and meiotic maturation rate diminished when 6-AN (0.1, 1, 5 and 10mM for 22h) was added to the maturation medium (P<0.05). The addition of NADPH did not modify glucose uptake or lactate production, but reduced PPP activity in COCs and meiotic maturation rates (P<0.05). The presence of NADP (0.0125, 0.125, 1.25 and 12.5mM for 22h of culture) in the maturation medium had no effect on PPP activity in COCs, glucose uptake, lactate production and meiotic maturation rate. However, in the absence of gonadotropin supplementation, NADP stimulated both glucose uptake and lactate production at 12.5mM (the highest concentration tested; P<0.05). NADP did not modify cleavage rate, but decreased blastocyst production (P<0.05). During IVM, oocyte oxidative and mitochondrial activity was observed to increase at 15 and 22h maturation, which was also related to progressive mitochondrial migration. Inhibiting the PPP with 6-AN or NADPH led to reduced oxidative and mitochondrial activity compared with the respective control groups and inhibition of mitochondrial migration (P<0.05). Stimulation of the PPP with NADP increased oxidative and mitochondrial activity at 9h maturation (P<0.05) and delayed mitochondrial migration. The present study shows the significance of altering PPP activity during bovine oocyte IVM, revealing that there is a link between the activity of the PPP and the oxidative status of the oocyte.

  17. Phosphofructokinase and malate dehydrogenase participate in the in vitro maturation of porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Breininger, E; Vecchi Galenda, B E; Alvarez, G M; Gutnisky, C; Cetica, P D

    2014-12-01

    Oocyte maturation depends on the metabolic activity of cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) that performs nutritive and regulatory functions during this process. In this work, the enzymes [phosphofructokinase (PFK) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH)] were tested to elucidate the metabolic profile of porcine COCs during the in vitro maturation (IVM). Enzymatic activity was expressed in U/COC and U/mg protein (specific activity) as mean ± SEM. In vitro maturation was performed with 2-oxoglutarate (5, 10 and 20 mm) or hydroxymalonate (30, 60 and 100 mm) inhibitors of PFK and MDH, respectively. The PFK and MDH activities (U) remained constant during maturation. For PFK, the U were (2.48 ± 0.23) 10(-5) and (2.54 ± 0.32) 10(-5) , and for MDH, the U were (4.72 ± 0.42) 10(-5) and (4.38 ± 0.25) 10(-5) for immature and in vitro matured COCs, respectively. The specific activities were significantly lower after IVM, for PFK (4.29 ± 0.48) 10(-3) and (0.94 ± 0.12) 10(-3) , and for MDH (9.08 ± 0.93) 10(-3) and (1.89 ± 0.10) 10(-3) for immature and in vitro matured COCs, respectively. In vitro maturation percentages and enzymatic activity diminished with 20 mm 2-oxoglutarate or 60 mm hydroxymalonate (p < 0.05). Viability was not affected by any concentration of the inhibitors evaluated. The U remained unchanged during IVM; however, the increase in the total protein content per COC provoked a decrease in the specific activity of both enzymes. Phosphofructokinase and MDH necessary for oocyte IVM would be already present in the immature oocyte. The presence of inhibitors of these enzymes impairs the meiotic maturation. Therefore, the participation of these enzymes in the energy metabolism of the porcine oocyte during IVM is confirmed in this study.

  18. Effect of anti-Mullerian hormone in culture medium on quality of mouse oocytes matured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihui; Shao, Li; Xu, Yixin; Cui, Yigui; Liu, Jiayin; Chian, Ri-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) is thought to reflect the growth of follicles and the ovarian function. However, the role of AMH in culture medium during in vitro maturation (IVM) on oocyte quality and subsequent development potential is unclear. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of recombinant human AMH (rh-AMH) supplemented into IVM medium on oocyte quality. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were obtained from ICR mice and cultured in vitro with the different concentrations (0-1,000 ng/ml) of rh-AMH. Following 16-18 h of culture, quantitative PCR and ELISA were performed to analyze GDF9 and BMP15 mRNA expression and protein production from the oocytes. Subsequently, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and early embryonic development were employed to further evaluate the quality of in vitro matured oocytes. The results showed that AMH was only expressed in cumulus cells but not in the oocytes. However, AMH most specific receptor, AMHR-II, was expressed in both oocytes and cumulus cells. The levels of GDF9 and BMP15 expression and blastocyst formation rate were significantly increased (p<0.05) when the IVM medium was supplemented with 100 ng/ml of rh-AMH. With AdH1-SiRNA/AMH for knocking down of AMH expression during IVM significantly reduced (p<0.05) the levels of GDF9 and BMP15 expression and blastocysts formation rate. These results suggest that AHM improves oocytes quality by up-regulating GDF9 and BMP15 expressions during IVM.

  19. Effect of Anti-Mullerian Hormone in Culture Medium on Quality of Mouse Oocytes Matured In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yihui; Shao, Li; Xu, Yixin; Cui, Yigui; Liu, Jiayin; Chian, Ri-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) is thought to reflect the growth of follicles and the ovarian function. However, the role of AMH in culture medium during in vitro maturation (IVM) on oocyte quality and subsequent development potential is unclear. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of recombinant human AMH (rh-AMH) supplemented into IVM medium on oocyte quality. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were obtained from ICR mice and cultured in vitro with the different concentrations (0–1,000 ng/ml) of rh-AMH. Following 16–18 h of culture, quantitative PCR and ELISA were performed to analyze GDF9 and BMP15 mRNA expression and protein production from the oocytes. Subsequently, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and early embryonic development were employed to further evaluate the quality of in vitro matured oocytes. The results showed that AMH was only expressed in cumulus cells but not in the oocytes. However, AMH most specific receptor, AMHR-II, was expressed in both oocytes and cumulus cells. The levels of GDF9 and BMP15 expression and blastocyst formation rate were significantly increased (p<0.05) when the IVM medium was supplemented with 100 ng/ml of rh-AMH. With AdH1-SiRNA/AMH for knocking down of AMH expression during IVM significantly reduced (p<0.05) the levels of GDF9 and BMP15 expression and blastocysts formation rate. These results suggest that AHM improves oocytes quality by up-regulating GDF9 and BMP15 expressions during IVM. PMID:24932501

  20. Activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase blocks cumulus cell expansion through inhibition of protein synthesis during in vitro maturation in Swine.

    PubMed

    Santiquet, Nicolas; Sasseville, Maxime; Laforest, Martin; Guillemette, Christine; Gilchrist, Robert B; Richard, François J

    2014-08-01

    The serine/threonine kinase 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a heterotrimeric protein known as a metabolic switch, is involved in oocyte nuclear maturation in mice, cattle, and swine. The present study analyzed AMPK activation in cumulus cell expansion during in vitro maturation (IVM) of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC). 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) is a well-known activator of AMPK. It inhibited oocyte meiotic resumption in COC. Moreover, cumulus cell expansion did not occur in the presence of AICAR, demonstrating its marked impact on cumulus cells. Activation of AMPK was supported by AICAR-mediated phosphorylation of alpha AMPK subunits. Furthermore, the presence of AICAR increased glucose uptake, a classical response to activation of this metabolic switch in response to depleted cellular energy levels. Neither nuclear maturation nor cumulus expansion was reversed by glucosamine, an alternative substrate in hyaluronic acid synthesis, through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, which ruled out possible depletion of substrates. Both increased gap junction communication and phosphodiesterase activity in COC are dependent on protein synthesis during the initial hours of IVM; however, both were inhibited in the presence of AICAR, which supports the finding that activation of AMPK by AICAR mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. Moreover, this protein synthesis inhibition was equivalent to that of the well-known protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, as observed on cumulus expansion and protein concentration. Finally, the phosphorylation level of selected kinases was investigated. The pattern of raptor phosphorylation is supportive of activation of AMPK-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. In conclusion, AICAR-mediated AMPK activation in porcine COC inhibited cumulus cell expansion and protein synthesis. These results bring new considerations to the importance of this kinase in ovarian

  1. Effect of recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone on in vitro maturation of porcine oocytes evaluated by the subsequent in vitro development of embryos obtained by in vitro fertilization, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, or parthenogenetic activation.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, M A; Alfonso, J; García-Mengual, E; Salvador, I; Duque, C C; Molina, I

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of recombinant human (rh) FSH and LH on in vitro maturation of pig oocytes compared with a conventional hormonal supplement based on equine (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotropins (hCG), as evaluated by the developmental ability of 3 types of pig embryos obtained by in vitro fertilization (IVF), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), or artificial activation (ATA). In Exp. 1, one cumulus-oocyte complex group (A group) was supplemented with rh-FSH and rh-LH (0.1 IU/mL each), and the other group (B group) was supplemented with PMSG and hCG (10 IU/mL each). No differences in nuclear maturation between the A and B groups were observed (68.5 vs. 71.4%, respectively). No differences were detected between hormonal treatments in the rates of cleavage or blastocyst formation of ATA, IVF, and ICSI embryos. Total cell number of the embryos was not significantly different in any experimental group (A: 31.1, 28.5, and 19.8 vs. B: 25.2, 25.5, and 20.6 for ATA, IVF, and ICSI embryos, respectively). In Exp. 2, the effects of different concentrations of rh-FSH and rh-LH (0.5, 0.1, or 0.05 IU/mL) in maturation medium on nuclear maturation and in vitro development of embryos obtained by IVF were studied. No effect of different hormonal concentrations on blastocyst formation rates was observed (8.5, 13.0, and 5.7%, respectively). Blastocyst cell number was not different in any experimental group. In conclusion, the results obtained here permit us to substitute PMSG and hCG with rh-FSH and rh-LH and to produce pig embryos obtained by IVF, ICSI, or ATA.

  2. Influence of caffeine pretreatment on biphasic in vitro maturation of dog oocytes.

    PubMed

    Salavati, Mazdak; Ghafari, Fataneh; Zhang, Tiantian; Fouladi-Nashta, Ali A

    2013-10-15

    Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors have been utilized for in vitro maturation (IVM) of oocytes to manipulate the meiotic resumption and progression. Premature chromatin condensation and DNA replication of the oocytes, immediately after the decrease in the cAMP level, are the difficulties in canine IVM. Caffeine, a nonselective competitive PDE inhibitor, due to its structural similarity to adenosine molecule maintains the cAMP level by occupying PDE enzymes such as PDE-3A inside the oocyte and PDE-4 and PDE-5 in the cumulus cells. In this study, the effects of 12-hour caffeine pretreatment in a biphasic IVM protocol were assessed on maturation rates of canine oocytes. Sixty hours of culture after a 12-hour of 10 mM caffeine pretreatment resulted in 16.9% ± 2.4 of the oocytes reaching metaphase II stage (MII) and 25.9% ± 5.2 degeneration rate compared with the control group with 2.2% ± 2.2 MII and 37.6% ± 4.3 degeneration rates (P < 0.05). Caffeine pretreatment induced higher mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK1 and MAPK3) phosphorylation and maturation-promoting factor activity at 12 hours and activated MAPK1 and maturation-promoting factor at 48 hours after culture in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Fresh canine COCs were also analyzed before IVM using brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) staining. Oocytes showed difference in meiotic resumption (MI-MII) (BCB+ = 16.11% ± 5.5, BCB- = 9.86% ± 5.0; P < 0.05) after 60 hours of culture following 12-hour caffeine pretreatment. The BCB+ canine oocytes had higher MII rate than the BCB- group under caffeine pretreatment (10.2% ± 2.9 vs. 1.1% ± 1.1, respectively; P < 0.05). Results indicated that 12-hour caffeine pretreatment of canine COCs improves the MII maturation rates at 72 hours and BCB+ oocytes have higher competency in vitro for nuclear maturation. PMID:23921184

  3. Redox and anti-oxidant state within cattle oocytes following in vitro maturation with bone morphogenetic protein 15 and follicle stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Purdey, Malcolm; Brown, Hannah M; Abell, Andrew D; Mottershead, David G; Cetica, Pablo D; Dalvit, Gabriel C; Goldys, Ewa M; Gilchrist, Robert B; Gardner, David K; Thompson, Jeremy G

    2015-04-01

    The developmental competence of cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) can be increased during in vitro oocyte maturation with the addition of exogenous oocyte-secreted factors, such as bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15), in combination with hormones. FSH and BMP15, for example, induce different metabolic profiles within COCs-namely, FSH increases glycolysis while BMP15 stimulates FAD and NAD(P)H accumulation within oocytes, without changing the redox ratio. The aim of this study was to investigate if this BMP15-induced NAD(P)H increase was due to de novo NADPH production. Cattle COCs were cultured with FSH and/or recombinant human BMP15, resulting in a significant decrease in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity (P < 0.05). Inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) during this process decreased NAD(P)H intensity threefold in BMP15-treated oocytes, suggesting that BMP15 stimulates IDH and NADPH production via the tricarboxylic acid cycle. As NADPH is a reducing agent, reduced glutathione (GSH), H2O2, and mitochondrial activity were also measured to assess the general redox status of the oocyte. FSH alone decreased GSH levels whereas the combination of BMP15 and FSH sustained higher levels. Expression of genes encoding glutathione-reducing enzymes were also lower in oocytes cultured in the presence of FSH alone. BMP15 supplementation further promoted mitochondrial localization patterns that are consistent with enhanced developmental competence. Metabolomics revealed significant consumption of glutamine and production of alanine by COCs matured with both FSH and BMP15 compared to the control (P < 0.05). Hence, BMP15 supplementation differentially modulates reductive metabolism and mitochondrial localization within the oocyte. In comparison, FSH-stimulation alone decreases the oocytes' ability to regulate cellular stress, and therefore utilizes other mechanisms to improve developmental competence.

  4. Effects of cumulus cells on rabbit oocyte in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y; Cao, C; Zhang, M; Fang, F; Liu, Y; Zhang, Y; Ding, J; Zhang, X

    2008-08-01

    Cumulus cells (CCs) are of great importance in oocyte development and maturation in many species, but detailed influence of CCs has not been extensively examined, especially on rabbit. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of CCs and the elongation of in vitro maturation (IVM) time on rabbit oocyte nuclear and ooplasmic maturation and survival. Cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) and naked oocytes (NOs) were recovered directly from rabbits super-ovulated with eCG. Corona-enclosed oocytes (COs) and denuded oocytes (DOs) were obtained from COCs after removing a part or whole of CCs. The oocytes were cultured in the following seven groups. (i) Cumulus cell enclosed oocytes (CEOs) were cultured alone (CEOs); (ii) COs were cultured alone (COs); (iii) DOs were cultured alone (DOs); (iv) NOs were cultured alone; (v) DOs were co-cultured with COCs [DOs(COCs)]; (vi) DOs were co-cultured with CCs [DOs(CCs)]; (vii) NOs were co-cultured with CCs [NOs(CCs)]. After the oocytes were cultured for 24 and 30 h, the nuclear maturation was evaluated by first polar body (PB1) extrusion while the ooplasmic maturation was evaluated by the cleavage rate after parthenogenetic activation. The results showed that the nuclear maturation rate of CEOs, COs, DOs(COCs) and DOs(CCs) after 24 h incubation were significantly different from each other (p < or = 0.05), the rate of DOs(CCs) was similar to that of DOs (p > or = 0.05). The cleavage rates in the first two groups were significantly higher than those of the others (p < 0.05). For oocytes cultured for 30 h, the nuclear maturation rates were significantly different for each culture model (p < 0.05). The cleavage rates in first two groups were significantly higher than those of others (p < 0.05). Both the nuclear and cleavage rates significantly increased when the culture time of DOs(COCs) was prolonged from 24 to 30 h. DOs(CCs) nuclear maturation was significantly improved when the culture time was prolonged from 24 to 30 h

  5. MADS-complexes regulate transcriptome dynamics during pollen maturation

    PubMed Central

    Verelst, Wim; Twell, David; de Folter, Stefan; Immink, Richard; Saedler, Heinz; Münster, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Background Differentiation processes are responsible for the diversity and functional specialization of the cell types that compose an organism. The outcome of these processes can be studied at molecular, physiologic, and biochemical levels by comparing different cell types, but the complexity and dynamics of the regulatory processes that specify the differentiation are largely unexplored. Results Here we identified the pollen-specific MIKC* class of MADS-domain transcription factors as major regulators of transcriptome dynamics during male reproductive cell development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Pollen transcript profiling of mutants deficient in different MIKC* protein complexes revealed that they control a transcriptional switch that directs pollen maturation and that is essential for pollen competitive ability. We resolved the functional redundancy among the MIKC* proteins and uncovered part of the underlying network by identifying the non-MIKC* MADS-box genes AGL18 and AGL29 as downstream regulators of a subset of the MIKC* MADS-controlled genes. Conclusion Our results provide a first, unique, and compelling insight into the complexity of a transcription factor network that directs cellular differentiation during pollen maturation, a process that is essential for male reproductive fitness in flowering plants. PMID:18034896

  6. Females with reduced fertility have excess androstenedione in follicular fluid, altered theca gene expression and increased VEGFA164b, maternal effect, and microRNA processing mRNA levels in cumulus-oocyte complexes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ovarian dysfunction contributes significantly to female infertility. However, the intrinsic and exogenous factors that result in abnormal ovarian function are poorly defined. Thus, we have established a cow model of fertility to identify mechanisms regulating follicular growth, steroidogenesis and o...

  7. Syntactic Maturity: The Complex Sentence in Intermediate Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrott, Carl L.

    This paper begins with a literature review of research on syntactic maturity, defined as the developmental stages from one- and two-word utterances to the hierarchical structures of adult speech, and seeks to answer questions in the context of past and current research in this area. It attempts to study some of the ramifications of the movement…

  8. Influence of Grape Maturity on Complex Carbohydrate Composition of Red Sparkling Wines.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lapuente, Leticia; Apolinar-Valiente, Rafael; Guadalupe, Zenaida; Ayestarán, Belén; Pérez-Magariño, Silvia; Williams, Pascale; Doco, Thierry

    2016-06-22

    This paper studied how grape maturity affected complex carbohydrate composition during red sparkling wine making and wine aging. Grape ripening stage (premature and mature grapes) showed a significant impact on the content, composition, and evolution of polysaccharides and oligosaccharides of sparkling wines. Polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose, mannoproteins, rhamnogalacturonans II, and oligosaccharides in base wines increased with maturity. For both maturity stages, polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose, and the glucuronic acid glycosyl residue of the oligosaccharides were the major carbohydrates detected in all vinification stages. The total glycosyl content of oligosaccharides decreased during the whole period of aging on yeast lees. The reduction of polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose and rhamnogalacturonans type II during the aging was more pronounced in mature samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the polysaccharide and oligosaccharide composition of red sparkling wines.

  9. Influence of Grape Maturity on Complex Carbohydrate Composition of Red Sparkling Wines.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lapuente, Leticia; Apolinar-Valiente, Rafael; Guadalupe, Zenaida; Ayestarán, Belén; Pérez-Magariño, Silvia; Williams, Pascale; Doco, Thierry

    2016-06-22

    This paper studied how grape maturity affected complex carbohydrate composition during red sparkling wine making and wine aging. Grape ripening stage (premature and mature grapes) showed a significant impact on the content, composition, and evolution of polysaccharides and oligosaccharides of sparkling wines. Polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose, mannoproteins, rhamnogalacturonans II, and oligosaccharides in base wines increased with maturity. For both maturity stages, polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose, and the glucuronic acid glycosyl residue of the oligosaccharides were the major carbohydrates detected in all vinification stages. The total glycosyl content of oligosaccharides decreased during the whole period of aging on yeast lees. The reduction of polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose and rhamnogalacturonans type II during the aging was more pronounced in mature samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the polysaccharide and oligosaccharide composition of red sparkling wines. PMID:27226011

  10. Melatonin enhances the in vitro maturation and developmental potential of bovine oocytes denuded of the cumulus oophorus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue-Ming; Min, Jiang-Tao; Du, Wei-Hua; Hao, Hai-Sheng; Liu, Yan; Qin, Tong; Wang, Dong; Zhu, Hua-Bin

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of melatonin on the in vitro maturation (IVM) and developmental potential of bovine oocytes denuded of the cumulus oophorus (DOs). DOs were cultured alone (DOs) or with 10-9 M melatonin (DOs + MT), cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were cultured without melatonin as the control. After IVM, meiosis II (MII) rates of DOs, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, apoptotic rates and parthenogenetic blastocyst rates of MII oocytes were determined. The relative expression of ATP synthase F0 Subunit 6 and 8 (ATP6 and ATP8), bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP-15) and growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF-9) mRNA in MII oocytes and IFN-tau (IFN-τ), Na+/K+-ATPase, catenin-beta like 1 (CTNNBL1) and AQP3 mRNA in parthenogenetic blastocysts were quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results showed that: (1) melatonin significantly increased the MII rate of DOs (65.67 ± 3.59 % vs. 82.29 ± 3.92%; P < 0.05), decreased the ROS level (4.83 ± 0.42 counts per second (c.p.s) vs. 3.78 ± 0.29 c.p.s; P < 0.05) and apoptotic rate (36.99 ± 3.62 % vs. 21.88 ± 2.08 %; P < 0.05) and moderated the reduction of relative mRNA levels of ATP6, ATP8, BMP-15 and GDF-9 caused by oocyte denudation; (2) melatonin significantly increased the developmental rate (24.17 ± 3.54 % vs. 35.26 ± 4.87%; P < 0.05), and expression levels of IFN-τ, Na+/K+-ATPase, CTNNBL1 and AQP3 mRNA of blastocyst. These results indicated that melatonin significantly improved the IVM quality of DOs, leading to an increased parthenogenetic blastocyst formation rate and quality. PMID:24869483

  11. Post-vitrification survival and in vitro maturation rate of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) oocytes: effect of ethylene glycol concentration and exposure time.

    PubMed

    Dhali, A; Manik, R S; Das, S K; Singla, S K; Palta, P

    2000-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of ethylene glycol concentration and time of exposure to equilibration solution on the post-thaw morphological appearance and the in vitro maturation rate of buffalo oocytes. Vitrification solution-I (VS-I) consisted of 4.5M ethylene glycol (EG), 3.4M dimethyl sulphoxide, 5. 56mM glucose, 0.33mM sodium pyruvate and 0.4% w/v bovine serum albumin in Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline (DPBS), whereas vitrification solution-II (VS-II) contained 3.5M EG, with other constituents at same concentrations as in VS-I. The equilibration solutions-I and II were prepared by 50% dilution (v/v) of VS-I and VS-II, respectively, in DPBS. Prior to vitrification, the cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were exposed to equilibration solution-I or II for 1 or 3min at room temperature (25-30 degrees C). Groups of four to five oocytes were then placed in 15microl of respective vitrification solution, and immediately loaded into 0. 25ml French straws, each containing 150microl of 0.5M sucrose in DPBS. The straws were placed in liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) vapour for 2min, plunged and stored in LN(2) for at least 7 days. The straws were thawed by keeping in warm water at 28 degrees C for 20s, and the oocytes were equilibrated for 5min in 0.5M sucrose for one-step dilution. The percentage of oocytes found to be morphologically normal varied from 89 to 96% for the two equilibration solutions and the two exposure times. Among the damaged oocytes, cracking of zona pellucida was the abnormality observed most frequently. The nuclear maturation rate of oocytes equilibrated in equilibration solutions-I and II for 1 (28 and 24%, respectively) or 3min (32 and 33%, respectively) did not differ significantly. These results show that it is possible to cryopreserve buffalo oocytes by vitrification using a combination of 3.5M EG and 3.4M DMSO with an exposure time of 3min.

  12. Hormonal stimulation and oocyte maturational competence in prepuberal Mediterranean Italian buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Presicce, Giorgio Antonio; Senatore, Elena Maria; De Santis, Giuseppe; Stecco, Romana; Terzano, Giuseppina Maria; Borghese, Antonio; De Mauro, Guillermo Javier

    2002-04-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the best combined hormonal treatment to utilize in order to obtain a high number of good quality in vivo and in vitro matured oocytes from prepuberal Mediterranean Italian buffalo calves (Bubalus bubalis). Transvaginal ultrasound follicular aspiration was employed to recover oocytes from antral follicles. Fifteen barn housed buffalo calves, between 5 and 9 months of age were used in this study and randomly divided into control (Group A) and treated groups. A commercially available preparation of 2000 IU eCG was administered to animals in the treatment groups, followed by 2000 IU of hCG given either 12 h (Group B), or 24 h (Group C) before ovum pick up (OPU). From the time of administration of eCG treatments, the best timing for hCG administration before OPU was determined and integrated with the administration of 500 IU of FSH-LH in a decreasing dosage protocol over 4 days (Group D). Expanded cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) recovered from all groups were immediately fixed for later aceto-orcein staining. All other COCs were processed for in vitro maturation using standard procedures and then fixed and stained for assessment of nuclear maturation. Collectively, hormonal stimulation did not increase the number of ovarian antral follicles available compared to the control group (P > 0.05), but did result in higher output of medium (Group B: 9.8 +/- 7.1; Group C: 3.4 +/- 6.7; Group D: 15.6 +/- 4.9 versus Group A: 1.6 +/- 2.2) and large follicles (Group B: 44.8 +/- 22.9; Group C: 8.7 +/- 6.1; Group D: 70.2 +/- 10 versus Group A: 6.1 +/- 6.3). Administration of hCG 12 h before follicle aspiration proved to be the best strategy to obtain high numbers of immature and mature oocytes from antral follicles (P < 0.05; Group B: 70.8 +/- 12 and Group D: 82 +/- 12.6 versus Group A: 43.6 +/- 13.9 and Group C: 27.2 +/- 13.9). A significantly higher number of expanded COCs was obtained from hormonally stimulated groups compared to the

  13. Maturation of embryonic tissues in a lymph node: a new approach for bioengineering complex organs.

    PubMed

    Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Lagasse, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Given our recent finding that the lymph node (LN) can serve as an in vivo factory to generate complex structures like liver, pancreas, and thymus, we investigated whether LN could also support early development and maturation from several mid-embryonic (E14.5/15.5) mouse tissues including brain, thymus, lung, stomach, and intestine. Here we observed brain maturation in LN by showing the emergence of astrocytes with well-developed branching processes. Thymus maturation in LN was monitored by changes in host immune cells. Finally, newly terminally differentiated mucus-producing cells were identified in ectopic tissues generated by transplantation of lung, stomach and intestine in LN. Thus, we speculate the LN offers a unique approach to study the intrinsic and extrinsic differentiation potential of cells and tissues during early development, and provides a new site for bioengineering complex body parts.

  14. Maturation of embryonic tissues in a lymph node: a new approach for bioengineering complex organs.

    PubMed

    Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Lagasse, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Given our recent finding that the lymph node (LN) can serve as an in vivo factory to generate complex structures like liver, pancreas, and thymus, we investigated whether LN could also support early development and maturation from several mid-embryonic (E14.5/15.5) mouse tissues including brain, thymus, lung, stomach, and intestine. Here we observed brain maturation in LN by showing the emergence of astrocytes with well-developed branching processes. Thymus maturation in LN was monitored by changes in host immune cells. Finally, newly terminally differentiated mucus-producing cells were identified in ectopic tissues generated by transplantation of lung, stomach and intestine in LN. Thus, we speculate the LN offers a unique approach to study the intrinsic and extrinsic differentiation potential of cells and tissues during early development, and provides a new site for bioengineering complex body parts. PMID:25531035

  15. Maturation of embryonic tissues in a lymph node: a new approach for bioengineering complex organs

    PubMed Central

    Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Lagasse, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Given our recent finding that the lymph node (LN) can serve as an in vivo factory to generate complex structures like liver, pancreas, and thymus, we investigated whether LN could also support early development and maturation from several mid-embryonic (E14.5/15.5) mouse tissues including brain, thymus, lung, stomach, and intestine. Here we observed brain maturation in LN by showing the emergence of astrocytes with well-developed branching processes. Thymus maturation in LN was monitored by changes in host immune cells. Finally, newly terminally differentiated mucus-producing cells were identified in ectopic tissues generated by transplantation of lung, stomach and intestine in LN. Thus, we speculate the LN offers a unique approach to study the intrinsic and extrinsic differentiation potential of cells and tissues during early development, and provides a new site for bioengineering complex body parts. PMID:25531035

  16. Toward Rigorous Comprehension of Biological Complexity: Modeling, Execution, and Visualization of Thymic T-Cell Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Efroni, Sol; Harel, David; Cohen, Irun R.

    2003-01-01

    One of the problems biologists face is a data set too large to comprehend in full. Experimenters generate data at an ever-growing pace, each from their own niche of interest. Current theories are each able, at best, to capture and model only a small part of the data. We aim to develop a general approach to modeling that will help broaden biological understanding. T-cell maturation in the thymus is a telling example of the accumulation of experimental data into a large disconnected data set. The thymus is responsible for the maturation of stem cells into mature T cells, and its complexity divides research into different fields, for example, cell migration, cell differentiation, histology, electron microscopy, biochemistry, molecular biology, and more. Each field forms its own viewpoint and its own set of data. In this study we present the results of a comprehensive integration of large parts of this data set. The integration is performed in a two-tiered visual manner. First, we use the visual language of Statecharts, which makes specification precise, legible, and executable on computers. We then set up a moving graphical interface that dynamically animates the cells, their receptors, the different gradients, and the interactions that constitute thymic maturation. This interface also provides a means for interacting with the simulation. PMID:14597657

  17. The LGI1-ADAM22 protein complex directs synapse maturation through regulation of PSD-95 function.

    PubMed

    Lovero, Kathryn L; Fukata, Yuko; Granger, Adam J; Fukata, Masaki; Nicoll, Roger A

    2015-07-28

    Synapse development is coordinated by a number of transmembrane and secreted proteins that come together to form synaptic organizing complexes. Whereas a variety of synaptogenic proteins have been characterized, much less is understood about the molecular networks that support the maintenance and functional maturation of nascent synapses. Here, we demonstrate that leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated protein 1 (LGI1), a secreted protein previously shown to modulate synaptic AMPA receptors, is a paracrine signal released from pre- and postsynaptic neurons that acts specifically through a disintegrin and metalloproteinase protein 22 (ADAM22) to set postsynaptic strength. We go on to describe a novel role for ADAM22 in maintaining excitatory synapses through PSD-95/Dlg1/zo-1 (PDZ) domain interactions. Finally, we show that in the absence of LGI1, the mature synapse scaffolding protein PSD-95, but not the immature synapse scaffolding protein SAP102, is unable to modulate synaptic transmission. These results indicate that LGI1 and ADAM22 form an essential synaptic organizing complex that coordinates the maturation of excitatory synapses by regulating the functional incorporation of PSD-95.

  18. From metamorphosis to maturity in complex life cycles: equal performance of different juvenile life history pathways.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Benedikt R; Hödl, Walter; Schaub, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Performance in one stage of a complex life cycle may affect performance in the subsequent stage. Animals that start a new stage at a smaller size than conspecifics may either always remain smaller or they may be able to "catch up" through plasticity, usually elevated growth rates. We study how size at and date of metamorphosis affected subsequent performance in the terrestrial juvenile stage and lifetime fitness of spadefoot toads (Pelobates fuscus). We analyzed capture-recapture data of > 3000 individuals sampled during nine years with mark-recapture models to estimate first-year juvenile survival probabilities and age-specific first-time breeding probabilities of toads, followed by model selection to assess whether these probabilities were correlated with size at and date of metamorphosis. Males attained maturity after two years, whereas females reached maturity 2-4 years after metamorphosis. Age at maturity was weakly correlated with metamorphic traits. In both sexes, first-year juvenile survival depended positively on date of metamorphosis and, in males, also negatively on size at metamorphosis. In males, toads that metamorphosed early at a small size had the highest probability to reach maturity. However, because very few toadlets metamorphosed early, the vast majority of male metamorphs had a very similar probability to reach maturity. A matrix projection model constructed for females showed that different juvenile life history pathways resulted in similar lifetime fitness. We found that the effects of date of and size at metamorphosis on different juvenile traits cancelled each other out such that toads that were small or large at metamorphosis had equal performance. Because the costs and benefits of juvenile life history pathways may also depend on population fluctuations, ample phenotypic variation in life history traits may be maintained.

  19. Development of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryos from in vitro matured oocytes reconstructed with fetal skin fibroblast cells as donor nuclei.

    PubMed

    Meena, C R; Das, S K

    2006-07-01

    The present study was carried out to explore the feasibility of using buffalo fetal skin fibroblasts as donor nuclei and to find out the developmental competence of embryos following transfer of these nuclei to in vitro matured enucleated buffalo oocytes. Skin cells were isolated from 1 to 2-month-old fetuses obtained from slaughterhouse, by enzymatic digestion (0.5% w/v trypsin +0.05% w/v collagenase in Dulbecco's PBS) for 15-20 min. The cells were washed 4 times with Dulbecco's PBS and then once with RPMI-1640+10% FBS by centrifugation at 600 x g. The cells were then cultured in the same medium in a CO2 incubator (5% CO2 in air) at 38.5 degrees C for 2-3 days. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) collected from slaughterhouse buffalo ovaries were subjected to IVM in the IVM medium (TCM-199 + 5 microg/ml FSH-P + 10 microg/ml LH+10% FBS) for 20-22 h in a CO2 incubator (5% CO2 in air) at 38.5 degrees C. Oocytes were denuded with 0.1% trypsin followed by repeated pipetting and then enucleated by aspirating the first polar body with 10-15% of nearby cytoplasm with a micromanipulator. Two different types of donor cells (growing cells and those arrested with cytochalasin-B) were used for reconstruction of oocytes. The reconstructs were electro fused and incubated in the activation medium (TCM-199 + 8 microg/ml cytochalasin-B+10% FBS) for 4 h. These were then cultured in IVC medium (TCM-199+10% FBS) in a CO2 incubator (5% CO2 in air) at 38.5 degrees C for 48 h. The cleaved embryos were then co-cultured with buffalo oviduct cells in embryo development media (EDM). Out of 119 denuded matured oocytes which were enucleated and reconstructed with growing cells, 78 (65.5%) were electro fused, activated and cultured, out of which 4 (5.1%) reconstructs cleaved and developed to 2-cell stage, 3 (3.8%) reached to 4-cell stage and 3 (3.8%) reached to 8-cell stage. In the synchronized group, out of 62 denuded matured oocytes which were reconstructed with cytochalasin-B blocked cells, 40

  20. Maturation of suprathreshold auditory nerve activity involves cochlear CGRP-receptor complex formation.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Ian M; Bussey-Gaborski, Rhiannon; Holt, Joseph C; Jordan, Paivi M; Luebke, Anne E

    2016-07-01

    In adult animals, the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is contained in cochlear efferent fibers projecting out to the cochlea, and contributes to increased suprathreshold sound-evoked activity in the adult auditory nerve. Similarly, CGRP applied to the lateral-line organ (hair cell organ) increases afferent nerve activity in adult frogs (post-metamorphic day 30), yet this increase is developmentally delayed from post-metamorphic day 4-30. In this study, we discovered that there was also a developmental delay in increased suprathreshold sound-evoked activity auditory nerve between juvenile and adult mice similar to what had been observed previously in frog. Moreover, juvenile mice with a targeted deletion of the αCGRP gene [CGRP null (-/-)] did not show a similar developmental increase in nerve activity, suggesting CGRP signaling is involved. This developmental delay is not due to a delay in CGRP expression, but instead is due to a delay in receptor formation. We observed that the increase in sound-evoked nerve activity is correlated with increased formation of cochlear CGRP receptors, which require three complexed proteins (CLR, RAMP1, RCP) to be functional. CGRP receptor formation in the cochlea was incomplete at 1 month of age (juvenile), but complete by 3 months (adult), which corresponded to the onset of suprathreshold enhancement of sound-evoked activity in wild-type animals. Taken together, these data support a model for cochlear function that is enhanced by maturation of CGRP receptor complexes. PMID:27440744

  1. Cysteamine supplementation during in vitro maturation of slaughterhouse- and opu-derived bovine oocytes improves embryonic development without affecting cryotolerance, pregnancy rate, and calf characteristics.

    PubMed

    Merton, J S; Knijn, H M; Flapper, H; Dotinga, F; Roelen, B A J; Vos, P L A M; Mullaart, E

    2013-09-01

    Optimization of ovum pick up (OPU) followed by in vitro embryo production (IVP) is strongly driven by the needs of both beef and dairy cattle breeders to enhance genetic improvement. The rapidly growing use of genomic selection in cattle has increased the interest in using OPU-IVP technology to increase the number of embryos and offspring per donor, thus allowing enhanced selection intensity for the next generation. The aim of this study was to optimize embryo production through supplementation of cysteamine during in vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro culture (IVC) of both slaughterhouse- and OPU-derived oocytes. The effects on embryo production and on embryo cryotolerance, post-transfer embryo survival, and calf characteristics, including gestation length, birth weight, perinatal mortality, and sex ratio were studied. In study 1, immature slaughterhouse-derived cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were matured in IVM medium supplemented with or without 0.1 mM cysteamine, fertilized and cultured for 7 days in 0.5 ml SOFaaBSA. In study 2, cysteamine was present during both IVM (0.1 mM) and IVC (0.01, 0.05, 0.1 mM) from Days 1 to 4. In study 3, OPU-derived COCs were matured in medium supplemented with or without 0.1 mM cysteamine in a 2 × 2 factorial design (OPU week and cysteamine treatment). Embryos were evaluated for stage and grade on Day 7 and, depending on the number of transferable embryos and recipients available, the embryos were transferred either fresh or frozen-thawed at a later date. The presence of cysteamine during IVM significantly increased the embryo production rate with slaughterhouse-derived COCs (24.0% vs. 19.4%). The higher number of embryos at Day 7 was due to an increased number of blastocysts, whereas the distribution of embryos among different quality grades and cryotolerance was not affected. Embryo production rate was negatively affected when cysteamine was present during both the processes of IVM and IVC during Days 1 to 4 of culture (13

  2. Exposure to androgens during in vitro maturation does not affect the developmental potential of porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Herrick, J R; Pope, W F

    2002-10-01

    Administration of exogenous androgens to pigs during the period of follicular development has been shown to positively affect ovulation rate and embryonic survival. The mechanisms of these actions are not known, but may include direct effects of androgens on the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC). The objective of this experiment was to assess the effects on embryonic development in vitro of exposure of COC to 0.26 and 2.6 microM testosterone (T) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) during IVM. For IVM, COC were cultured for 44-46 h in protein-free tissue culture medium (TCM) 199 containing 10 IU/ml hCG and eCG and 10 ng/ml EGF. Oocytes were then stripped of cumulus cells, coincubated with 1 x 10(5) sperm/ml in modified TALP for 6 h, and cultured for 8 days in NCSU23. The proportions of oocytes that cleaved (Day 2) or developed to the morula (Day 6) or blastocyst (Day 6-8) stage were not different (P > 0.20) between oocytes exposed to androgens and oocytes not exposed to androgens. These results indicate that exposure to androgens during IVM does not affect the ability of oocytes to cleave or develop up to the blastocyst stage in vitro.

  3. Patterns of (3H) thymidine incorporation differ in immature rats and mature, cycling rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, A.N.

    1986-02-01

    By the time follicular development has progressed to the preovulatory stage, granulosa cells abutting the basement membrane no longer incorporate (3H) thymidine (3H-TdR). The purpose of this experiment was to determine when, during the course of follicular growth, cell proliferation in these mural granulosa cells ceases. Autoradiographs were prepared following continuous 3H-TdR infusion in vivo, or incubation with 3H-TdR in vitro. In cycling rats, the concentration of silver grains over mural regions of the granulosa layer was lower than over antral regions of most follicles with greater than 1000 cells in the largest cross section (LCS). This centripetal labeling pattern became more striking as follicular size increased. By proestrus, only the cells of the discus proligerus (cumulus and the portion of the follicular wall supporting the cumulus oocyte complex) continued to incorporate 3H-TdR. In contrast to cycling rats, centripetal labeling patterns were not seen in ovaries of prepubertal rats, even in follicles of the same size. The difference in follicular growth patterns between these two types of animals suggests an influence of cyclic gonadotropin surges on the control of granulosa cell proliferation.

  4. CO2 sensitivity of the complexity of phrenic neurograms in the piglet during early maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akay, Metin

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of hypercapnia on the dynamics of the phrenic neurogram in the piglet in two different age groups: 3-7 days (n = 11) and 10-16 days (n = 9). The phrenic neurogram was recorded from 17 piglets (3-16 days old) during control (40% O2 with 3-5% end-tidal CO2), mild hypercapnia (40% O2 with 7% CO2) and severe hypercapnia (40% O2 with 15% CO2) and analyzed using the approximate entropy (ApEn) method. The mean values of the approximate entropy (complexity) of phrenic neurograms during the first 7 days of the postnatal age were 1.56 ± 0.1 (standard deviation) during normal breathing, 1.51 ± 0.1 during mild hypercapnia and 1.37 ± 0.08 during severe hypercapnia. These values for the 10-16 days age group were 1.51 ± 0.1 during control, 1.49 ± 0.11 during mild hypercapnia and 1.38 ± 0.05 during severe hypercapnia. The mean values of phrenic neurogram durations during the first 7 days of the postnatal age were 0.82 ± 0.03 (standard deviation) s during normal breathing, 0.85 ± 0.007 s during mild hypercapnia and 0.65 ± 0.05 s during severe hypercapnia. These values for the 10-16 days age group were 0.97 ± 0.09 s during control, 1.10 ± 0.05 during mild hypercapnia and 0.78 ± 0.05 s during severe hypercapnia. Our results show that the complexity values of the phrenic neurogram were significantly decreased when the CO2 concentration was shifted from control or mild to severe hypercapnia (p < 0.05) for both the 3-7 days old and the 10-16 days old groups. In addition, the duration of the phrenic neurogram decreased when the concentration was shifted from control or mild to severe hypercapnia (p < 0.05). But no significant changes in the duration of the phrenic neurogram were observed between control and mild hypercapnia concentration. These results suggest that severe hypercapnia can be characterized with a significant decrease of the complexity values and durations of the phrenic neurogram during inspiration during early

  5. The Flavivirus Precursor Membrane-Envelope Protein Complex: Structure and Maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Long; Lok, Shee-Mei; Yu, I-Mei; Zhang, Ying; Kuhn, Richard J.; Chen, Jue; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2008-09-17

    Many viruses go through a maturation step in the final stages of assembly before being transmitted to another host. The maturation process of flaviviruses is directed by the proteolytic cleavage of the precursor membrane protein (prM), turning inert virus into infectious particles. We have determined the 2.2 angstrom resolution crystal structure of a recombinant protein in which the dengue virus prM is linked to the envelope glycoprotein E. The structure represents the prM-E heterodimer and fits well into the cryo-electron microscopy density of immature virus at neutral pH. The pr peptide {beta}-barrel structure covers the fusion loop in E, preventing fusion with host cell membranes. The structure provides a basis for identifying the stages of its pH-directed conformational metamorphosis during maturation, ending with release of pr when budding from the host.

  6. Involvement of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 in Maturation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells during Reprogramming of Mouse and Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Khazaie, Niusha; Massumi, Mohammad; Wee, Ping; Salimi, Mahdieh; Mohammadnia, Abdulshakour; Yaqubi, Moein

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a reliable source for the study of regenerative medicine, drug discovery, and developmental biology. Despite extensive studies on the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs, the efficiency of reprogramming is still low. Here, we used a bioinformatics and systems biology approach to study the two gene regulatory waves governing the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs. Our results revealed that the maturation phase of reprogramming was regulated by a more complex regulatory network of transcription factors compared to the initiation phase. Interestingly, in addition to pluripotency factors, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) members Ezh2, Eed, Jarid2, Mtf2, and Suz12 are crucially recruited during the maturation phase of reprogramming. Moreover, we found that during the maturation phase of reprogramming, pluripotency factors, via the expression and induction of PRC2 complex members, could silence the lineage-specific gene expression program and maintain a ground state of pluripotency in human and mouse naïve iPSCs. The findings obtained here provide us a better understanding of the gene regulatory network (GRN) that governs reprogramming, and the maintenance of the naïve state of iPSCs.

  7. Involvement of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 in Maturation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells during Reprogramming of Mouse and Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Khazaie, Niusha; Massumi, Mohammad; Wee, Ping; Salimi, Mahdieh; Mohammadnia, Abdulshakour; Yaqubi, Moein

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a reliable source for the study of regenerative medicine, drug discovery, and developmental biology. Despite extensive studies on the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs, the efficiency of reprogramming is still low. Here, we used a bioinformatics and systems biology approach to study the two gene regulatory waves governing the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs. Our results revealed that the maturation phase of reprogramming was regulated by a more complex regulatory network of transcription factors compared to the initiation phase. Interestingly, in addition to pluripotency factors, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) members Ezh2, Eed, Jarid2, Mtf2, and Suz12 are crucially recruited during the maturation phase of reprogramming. Moreover, we found that during the maturation phase of reprogramming, pluripotency factors, via the expression and induction of PRC2 complex members, could silence the lineage-specific gene expression program and maintain a ground state of pluripotency in human and mouse naïve iPSCs. The findings obtained here provide us a better understanding of the gene regulatory network (GRN) that governs reprogramming, and the maintenance of the naïve state of iPSCs. PMID:26938987

  8. Antibody response and antibody affinity maturation in cats with experimental proliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Bishop, S A; Bailey, M; Lucke, V M; Stokes, C R

    1992-07-01

    An experimental model of proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) in the cat, which closely resembles human proliferative forms of GN, has been used to study the role of antibody and antibody affinity in the development of immune complex-mediated renal disease. The serum IgG and IgM antibody response to antigen, average antibody affinity (avidity) and affinity heterogeneity of the IgG and IgM populations was assessed at varying times after commencement of chronic immunization with the antigen, human serum albumin (HSA), by enzyme immunoassay. Cats could be classified according to whether they were "low", "intermediate" or "high" IgG responders, by quantification of serum IgG values. Cats with the lowest serum IgG values failed to develop glomerulonephritis. However, there was no relationship between actual IgG values and the severity of the induced disease. In contrast to IgG, there was no division of cats into low or high IgM anti-HSA responders. Again, cats with the lowest IgM values failed to develop GN, but, more interestingly, a late, marked increase in serum IgM anti-HSA occurred only in cats that developed clinical signs of GN (anterior uveitis and nephrotic syndrome). Maturation of average, functional IgG affinity (avidity) for HSA following chronic immunization was clearly demonstrated for all cats. At the end of the experiment, all cats had IgG of high affinity for HSA and the average affinity heterogeneity of the IgG populations was less than in measurements taken earlier. Values of IgG affinity at the end of the experiment were very similar both in cats which developed GN and in those which remained clinically, biochemically and pathologically normal. In contrast to IgG antibody, some cats developed IgM of increased affinity, whilst others produced antibody of reduced affinity, following chronic immunization. There was no correlation between the development of disease and the production of either low or high affinity IgM antibody. Data indicated that an

  9. Tel2 structure and function in the Hsp90-dependent maturation of mTOR and ATR complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Takai, Hiroyuki; Xie, Yihu; de Lange, Titia; Pavletich, Nikola P.

    2010-09-20

    We reported previously that the stability of all mammalian phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinases (PIKKs) depends on their interaction with Tel2, the ortholog of yeast Tel2 and Caenorhabditis elegans Clk-2. Here we provide evidence that Tel2 acts with Hsp90 in the maturation of PIKK complexes. Quantitative immunoblotting showed that the abundance of Tel2 is low compared with the PIKKs, and Tel2 preferentially bound newly synthesized ATM, ATR, mTOR, and DNA-PKcs. Tel2 complexes contained, in addition to Tti1-Tti2, the Hsp90 chaperone, and inhibition of Hsp90 interfered with the interaction of Tel2 with the PIKKs. Analysis of in vivo labeled nascent protein complexes showed that Tel2 and Hsp90 mediate the formation of the mTOR TORC1 and TORC2 complexes and the association of ATR with ATRIP. The structure of yeast Tel2, reported here, shows that Tel2 consists of HEAT-like helical repeats that assemble into two separate {alpha}-solenoids. Through mutagenesis, we identify a surface patch of conserved residues involved in binding to the Tti1-Tti2 complex in vitro. In vivo, mutation of this conserved patch affects cell growth, levels of PIKKs, and ATM/ATR-mediated checkpoint signaling, highlighting the importance of Tti1-Tti2 binding to the function of Tel2. Taken together, our data suggest that the Tel2-Tti1-Tti2 complex is a PIKK-specific cochaperone for Hsp90.

  10. The control of dendritic cell maturation by pH-sensitive polyion complex micelles.

    PubMed

    Boudier, Ariane; Aubert-Pouëssel, Anne; Louis-Plence, Pascale; Gérardin, Corine; Jorgensen, Christian; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Bégu, Sylvie

    2009-01-01

    Double-hydrophilic block copolymer micelles were designed as vectors for ex vivo dendritic cell engineering to improve the delivery of therapeutic molecules in such immune cells. Polymethacrylic acid-b-polyethylene oxide (PMAA(2100)-b-POE(5000))/poly-L-lysine micelles were optimised and showed a hydrodynamic diameter of 30 nm with a peculiar core organised with hydrogen bonds as well as hydrophobic domains. The micelles proved high stability in physiological conditions (pH and ionic strength) and were also able to disassemble under acidic conditions mimicking acidic endolysosomes. The efficient endocytosis of the optimised micelles tested on bone marrow-derived dendritic cells was monitored by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and microscopy analysis. Finally, the micelle biocompatibility permitted a complete control of the dendritic cell-maturation process widening the therapeutical potential of such engineered dendritic cells for cancer vaccines as well as for immunomodulation in autoimmune diseases.

  11. The Arabidopsis Chloroplast Stromal N-Terminome: Complexities of Amino-Terminal Protein Maturation and Stability.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Elden; Kim, Jitae; Bhuiyan, Nazmul H; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2015-11-01

    Protein amino (N) termini are prone to modifications and are major determinants of protein stability in bacteria, eukaryotes, and perhaps also in chloroplasts. Most chloroplast proteins undergo N-terminal maturation, but this is poorly understood due to insufficient experimental information. Consequently, N termini of mature chloroplast proteins cannot be accurately predicted. This motivated an extensive characterization of chloroplast protein N termini in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates and mass spectrometry, generating nearly 14,000 tandem mass spectrometry spectra matching to protein N termini. Many nucleus-encoded plastid proteins accumulated with two or three different N termini; we evaluated the significance of these different proteoforms. Alanine, valine, threonine (often in N-α-acetylated form), and serine were by far the most observed N-terminal residues, even after normalization for their frequency in the plastid proteome, while other residues were absent or highly underrepresented. Plastid-encoded proteins showed a comparable distribution of N-terminal residues, but with a higher frequency of methionine. Infrequent residues (e.g. isoleucine, arginine, cysteine, proline, aspartate, and glutamate) were observed for several abundant proteins (e.g. heat shock proteins 70 and 90, Rubisco large subunit, and ferredoxin-glutamate synthase), likely reflecting functional regulation through their N termini. In contrast, the thylakoid lumenal proteome showed a wide diversity of N-terminal residues, including those typically associated with instability (aspartate, glutamate, leucine, and phenylalanine). We propose that, after cleavage of the chloroplast transit peptide by stromal processing peptidase, additional processing by unidentified peptidases occurs to avoid unstable or otherwise unfavorable N-terminal residues. The possibility of a chloroplast N-end rule is discussed. PMID:26371235

  12. Mature DIABLO/Smac Is Produced by the IMP Protease Complex on the Mitochondrial Inner Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Burri, Lena; Strahm, Yvan; Hawkins, Christine J.; Gentle, Ian E.; Puryer, Michelle A.; Verhagen, Anne; Callus, Bernard; Vaux, David; Lithgow, Trevor

    2005-01-01

    DIABLO/Smac is a mitochondrial protein that can promote apoptosis by promoting the release and activation of caspases. To do so, DIABLO/Smac must first be processed by a mitochondrial protease and then released into the cytosol, and we show this in an intact cellular system. We propose that the precursor form of DIABLO/Smac enters the mitochondria through a stop-transfer pathway and is processed to its active form by the inner membrane peptidase (IMP) complex. Catalytic subunits of the mammalian IMP complex were identified based on sequence conservation and functional complementation, and the novel sequence motif RX5P in Imp1 and NX5S in Imp2 distinguish the two catalytic subunits. DIABLO/Smac is one of only a few specific proteins identified as substrates for the IMP complex in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. PMID:15814844

  13. The role of canopy structural complexity in wood net primary production of a maturing northern deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    Hardiman, Brady S; Bohrer, Gil; Gough, Christopher M; Vogel, Christoph S; Curtisi, Peter S

    2011-09-01

    The even-aged northern hardwood forests of the Upper Great Lakes Region are undergoing an ecological transition during which structural and biotic complexity is increasing. Early-successional aspen (Populus spp.) and birch (Betula papyrifera) are senescing at an accelerating rate and are being replaced by middle-successional species including northern red oak (Quercus rubra), red maple (Acer rubrum), and white pine (Pinus strobus). Canopy structural complexity may increase due to forest age, canopy disturbances, and changing species diversity. More structurally complex canopies may enhance carbon (C) sequestration in old forests. We hypothesize that these biotic and structural alterations will result in increased structural complexity of the maturing canopy with implications for forest C uptake. At the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS), we combined a decade of observations of net primary productivity (NPP), leaf area index (LAI), site index, canopy tree-species diversity, and stand age with canopy structure measurements made with portable canopy lidar (PCL) in 30 forested plots. We then evaluated the relative impact of stand characteristics on productivity through succession using data collected over a nine-year period. We found that effects of canopy structural complexity on wood NPP (NPPw) were similar in magnitude to the effects of total leaf area and site quality. Furthermore, our results suggest that the effect of stand age on NPPw is mediated primarily through its effect on canopy structural complexity. Stand-level diversity of canopy-tree species was not significantly related to either canopy structure or NPPw. We conclude that increasing canopy structural complexity provides a mechanism for the potential maintenance of productivity in aging forests. PMID:21939078

  14. The role of canopy structural complexity in wood net primary production of a maturing northern deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    Hardiman, Brady S; Bohrer, Gil; Gough, Christopher M; Vogel, Christoph S; Curtisi, Peter S

    2011-09-01

    The even-aged northern hardwood forests of the Upper Great Lakes Region are undergoing an ecological transition during which structural and biotic complexity is increasing. Early-successional aspen (Populus spp.) and birch (Betula papyrifera) are senescing at an accelerating rate and are being replaced by middle-successional species including northern red oak (Quercus rubra), red maple (Acer rubrum), and white pine (Pinus strobus). Canopy structural complexity may increase due to forest age, canopy disturbances, and changing species diversity. More structurally complex canopies may enhance carbon (C) sequestration in old forests. We hypothesize that these biotic and structural alterations will result in increased structural complexity of the maturing canopy with implications for forest C uptake. At the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS), we combined a decade of observations of net primary productivity (NPP), leaf area index (LAI), site index, canopy tree-species diversity, and stand age with canopy structure measurements made with portable canopy lidar (PCL) in 30 forested plots. We then evaluated the relative impact of stand characteristics on productivity through succession using data collected over a nine-year period. We found that effects of canopy structural complexity on wood NPP (NPPw) were similar in magnitude to the effects of total leaf area and site quality. Furthermore, our results suggest that the effect of stand age on NPPw is mediated primarily through its effect on canopy structural complexity. Stand-level diversity of canopy-tree species was not significantly related to either canopy structure or NPPw. We conclude that increasing canopy structural complexity provides a mechanism for the potential maintenance of productivity in aging forests.

  15. Fenestrated stent grafts for the treatment of complex aortic aneurysm disease: A mature treatment paradigm.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, George S; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Antoniou, George A; Giannoukas, Athanasios D; Lazarides, Miltos K; Moll, Frans L

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of fenestrated stent grafts (SGs) to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) with short proximal necks began in 1999. Nowadays, the whole visceral aorta can be treated totally by endovascular means. The established use of fenestrated devices to treat complex AAAs as a first-line management option has been previously reported. An up-to-date evaluation of the literature was performed including all types of publications regarding the use of fenestrated technology to repair complex AAAs. Fenestrated repair is now an established alternative to hybrid/chimney/snorkel repairs. However, specific criteria and prerequisites are required for the use and improvement of this method. Multiple device morphologies have been used incorporating the visceral arteries in various combinations. This modular strategy connects different devices (bridging covered stents and bifurcated SGs) with the aortic main body, thus excluding the aneurysm from the circulation. Precise deployment of the fenestrated SG is mandatory for successful visceral vessel revascularization. Accurate SG sizing and customization, a high level of technical skill, and facilities with modern imaging techniques including 3D road mapping and dedicated hybrid rooms are required. Most experience has been with the custom-made Zenith Cook platform, although off-the-shelf devices have been recently implanted. More complex repairs have been performed over the last few years, but device complexity has also increased. Perioperative, mid-term, and a few recently reported long-term results are encouraging. Secondary interventions remain the main problem, similar to that observed after traditional endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). PMID:27013644

  16. Fenestrated stent grafts for the treatment of complex aortic aneurysm disease: A mature treatment paradigm.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, George S; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Antoniou, George A; Giannoukas, Athanasios D; Lazarides, Miltos K; Moll, Frans L

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of fenestrated stent grafts (SGs) to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) with short proximal necks began in 1999. Nowadays, the whole visceral aorta can be treated totally by endovascular means. The established use of fenestrated devices to treat complex AAAs as a first-line management option has been previously reported. An up-to-date evaluation of the literature was performed including all types of publications regarding the use of fenestrated technology to repair complex AAAs. Fenestrated repair is now an established alternative to hybrid/chimney/snorkel repairs. However, specific criteria and prerequisites are required for the use and improvement of this method. Multiple device morphologies have been used incorporating the visceral arteries in various combinations. This modular strategy connects different devices (bridging covered stents and bifurcated SGs) with the aortic main body, thus excluding the aneurysm from the circulation. Precise deployment of the fenestrated SG is mandatory for successful visceral vessel revascularization. Accurate SG sizing and customization, a high level of technical skill, and facilities with modern imaging techniques including 3D road mapping and dedicated hybrid rooms are required. Most experience has been with the custom-made Zenith Cook platform, although off-the-shelf devices have been recently implanted. More complex repairs have been performed over the last few years, but device complexity has also increased. Perioperative, mid-term, and a few recently reported long-term results are encouraging. Secondary interventions remain the main problem, similar to that observed after traditional endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR).

  17. Effects of in-vitro or in-vivo matured ooplasm and spindle-chromosome complex on the development of spindle-transferred oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chenhui; Li, Tao; Zeng, Yanhong; Hong, Pingping; Xu, Yanwen; Zhou, Canquan

    2014-12-01

    To study the effects of in-vitro matured ooplasm and spindle-chromosome complex (SCC) on the development of spindle-transferred oocytes, reciprocal spindle transfer was conducted between in-vivo and in-vitro matured oocytes. The reconstructed oocytes were divided into four groups according to their different ooplasm sources and SCC, artificially activated and cultured to the blastocyst stage. Oocyte survival, activation and embryo development after spindle transfer manipulation were compared between groups. Survival, activation, and cleavage rates of reconstructed oocytes after spindle transfer manipulation did not differ significantly among the four groups. The eight-cell stage embryo formation rates on day 3 and the blastocyst formation rate on day 6 were not significantly different between the in-vitro and in-vivo matured SCC groups when they were transplanted into in-vivo matured ooplasm. The rate of eight-cell stage embryo formation with in-vitro matured ooplasm was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than that of embryos with in-vivo matured ooplasm, and none of the embryos developed to the blastocyst stage. Therefore, SCC matured in vitro effectively supported the in-vitro development of reconstructed oocytes. Ooplasm matured in vitro, however, could not support the development of reconstructed oocytes, and may not be an appropriate source of ooplasm donation for spindle transfer.

  18. Immune complex relay by subcapsular sinus macrophages and non-cognate B cells drives antibody affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Tri Giang; Green, Jesse A.; Gray, Elizabeth E.; Xu, Ying; Cyster, Jason G.

    2009-01-01

    Subcapsular sinus (SCS) macrophages capture antigens from lymph and present them intact for B cell encounter and follicular delivery. However, the properties of SCS macrophages are poorly defined. Here we show SCS macrophage development depended on lymphotoxin-α1β2 and the cells had low lysosomal enzyme expression and retained opsonized antigens on their surface. Intravital imaging revealed immune complexes moving along macrophage processes into the follicle. Moreover, non-cognate B cells relayed antigen opsonized by newly produced antibodies from the subcapsular sinus to the germinal center and affinity maturation was impaired when this transport process was disrupted. Thus, we characterize SCS macrophages as specialized antigen-presenting cells functioning at the apex of an antigen transport chain that promotes humoral immunity. PMID:19503106

  19. Nicotine and elevated body temperature reduce the complexity of the genioglossus and diaphragm EMG signals in rats during early maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkurt, David; Akay, Yasemin M.; Akay, Metin

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we examined the effect of nicotine exposure and increased body temperature on the complexity (dynamics) of the genioglossus muscle (EMGg) and the diaphragm muscle (EMGdia) to explore the effects of nicotine and hyperthermia. Nonlinear dynamical analysis of the EMGdia and EMGg signals was performed using the approximate entropy method on 15 (7 saline- and 8 nicotine-treated) juvenile rats (P25-P35) and 19 (11 saline- and 8 nicotine-treated) young adult rats (P36-P44). The mean complexity values were calculated over the ten consecutive breaths using the approximate entropy method during mild elevated body temperature (38 °C) and severe elevated body temperature (39-40 °C) in two groups. In the first (nicotine) group, rats were treated with single injections of nicotine enough to produce brain levels of nicotine similar to those achieved in human smokers (2.5 (mg kg-1)/day) until the recording day. In the second (control) group, rats were treated with injections of saline, beginning at postnatal 5 days until the recording day. Our results show that warming the rat by 2-3 °C and nicotine exposure significantly decreased the complexity of the EMGdia and EMGg for the juvenile age group. This reduction in the complexity of the EMGdia and EMGg for the nicotine group was much greater than the normal during elevated body temperatures. We speculate that the generalized depressive effects of nicotine exposure and elevated body temperature on the respiratory neural firing rate and the behavior of the central respiratory network could be responsible for the drastic decrease in the complexity of the EMGdia and EMGg signals, the outputs of the respiratory neural network during early maturation.

  20. Uukuniemi virus glycoproteins accumulate in and cause morphological changes of the Golgi complex in the absence of virus maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Gahmberg, N; Kuismanen, E; Keränen, S; Pettersson, R F

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the transport of the Uukuniemi virus membrane glycoproteins in baby hamster kidney and chick embryo cells by using a temperature-sensitive mutant (ts12). Uukuniemi virus assembles in the Golgi complex, where both glycoproteins G1 and G2 and nucleocapsid protein N accumulate (E. Kuismanen, B. Bång, M. Hurme, and R. F. Pettersson, J. Virol. 51:137-146, 1984). At the restrictive temperature (39 degrees C), the glycoproteins of ts12 were transported to the Golgi complex as in wild-type, virus-infected cells, whereas the nucleocapsid protein failed to accumulate there. Pulse-chase labeling followed by immunoprecipitation and treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H showed that G1 synthesized at 39 degrees C in ts12-infected cells had an altered mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, suggesting a lack of terminal glycosylation. The typical Uukuniemi virus-induced vacuolization and expansion of the Golgi complex could be seen also in ts12-infected cells at 39 degrees C, although no virus particles were formed. This suggests that the morphological changes were induced by the Uukuniemi virus glycoproteins. In wild-type virus- or ts12-infected cells, G1 and G2 could not be chased out from the Golgi complex even after 6 h of treatment with cycloheximide. The glycoproteins were thus retained in the Golgi even under conditions when no virus maturation took place and when nucleocapsids did not accumulate in the Golgi region. Accordingly, the glycoproteins of Uukuniemi virus were found to have properties resembling those of Golgi-specific proteins. This virus model system may be useful in studying the synthesis and transport of membrane proteins that are transported to and retained in the Golgi. Images PMID:3512854

  1. Follicle Structure Influences the Availability of Oxygen to the Oocyte in Antral Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Clark, A. R.; Stokes, Y. M.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of an oocyte to successfully mature is highly dependent on intrafollicular conditions, including the size and structure of the follicle. Here we present a mathematical model of oxygen transport in the antral follicle. We relate mean oxygen concentration in follicular fluid of bovine follicles to the concentration in the immediate vicinity of the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC). The model predicts that the oxygen levels within the antral follicle are dependent on the size and structure of the follicle and that the mean level of dissolved oxygen in follicular fluid does not necessarily correspond to that reaching the COC. PMID:22162722

  2. Vaccinia mature virus fusion regulator A26 protein binds to A16 and G9 proteins of the viral entry fusion complex and dissociates from mature virions at low pH.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Jung; Shih, Ao-Chun; Tang, Yin-Liang; Chang, Wen

    2012-04-01

    Vaccinia mature virus enters cells through either endocytosis or plasma membrane fusion, depending on virus strain and cell type. Our previous results showed that vaccinia virus mature virions containing viral A26 protein enter HeLa cells preferentially through endocytosis, whereas mature virions lacking A26 protein enter through plasma membrane fusion, leading us to propose that A26 acts as an acid-sensitive fusion suppressor for mature virus (S. J. Chang, Y. X. Chang, R. Izmailyan R, Y. L. Tang, and W. Chang, J. Virol. 84:8422-8432, 2010). In the present study, we investigated the fusion suppression mechanism of A26 protein. We found that A26 protein was coimmunoprecipitated with multiple components of the viral entry-fusion complex (EFC) in infected HeLa cells. Transient expression of viral EFC components in HeLa cells revealed that vaccinia virus A26 protein interacted directly with A16 and G9 but not with G3, L5 and H2 proteins of the EFC components. Consistently, a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-A26 fusion protein, but not GST, pulled down A16 and G9 proteins individually in vitro. Together, our results supported the idea that A26 protein binds to A16 and G9 protein at neutral pH contributing to suppression of vaccinia virus-triggered membrane fusion from without. Since vaccinia virus extracellular envelope proteins A56/K2 were recently shown to bind to the A16/G9 subcomplex to suppress virus-induced fusion from within, our results also highlight an evolutionary convergence in which vaccinia viral fusion suppressor proteins regulate membrane fusion by targeting the A16 and G9 components of the viral EFC complex. Finally, we provide evidence that acid (pH 4.7) treatment induced A26 protein and A26-A27 protein complexes of 70 kDa and 90 kDa to dissociate from mature virions, suggesting that the structure of A26 protein is acid sensitive.

  3. Correct Assembly of the Bacteriophage T5 Procapsid Requires Both the Maturation Protease and the Portal Complex.

    PubMed

    Huet, Alexis; Duda, Robert L; Hendrix, Roger W; Boulanger, Pascale; Conway, James F

    2016-01-16

    The 90-nm-diameter capsid of coliphage T5 is organized with T=13 icosahedral geometry and encloses a double-stranded DNA genome that measures 121kbp. Its assembly follows a path similar to that of phage HK97 but yielding a larger structure that includes 775 subunits of the major head protein, 12 subunits of the portal protein and 120 subunits of the decoration protein. As for phage HK97, T5 encodes the scaffold function as an N-terminal extension (∆-domain) to the major head protein that is cleaved by the maturation protease after assembly of the initial prohead I form and prior to DNA packaging and capsid expansion. Although the major head protein alone is sufficient to assemble capsid-like particles, the yield is poor and includes many deformed structures. Here we explore the role of both the portal and the protease in capsid assembly by generating constructs that include the major head protein and a combination of protease (wild type or an inactive mutant) and portal proteins and overexpressing them in Escherichia coli. Our results show that the inactive protease mutant acts to trigger assembly of the major head protein, probably through binding to the ∆-domain, while the portal protein regulates assembly into the correct T=13 geometry. A cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of prohead I including inactivated protease reveals density projecting from the prohead interior surface toward its center that is compatible with the ∆-domain, as well as additional internal density that we assign as the inactivated protease. These results reveal complexity in T5 beyond that of the HK97 system.

  4. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) as a Tool for Dissecting the Molecular Mechanisms for Maturation of the Shigella Type III Secretion Needle Tip Complex

    PubMed Central

    Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Picking, William D.

    2012-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) provides a powerful tool for monitoring intermolecular interactions and a sensitive technique for studying Å-level protein conformational changes. One system that has particularly benefited from the sensitivity and diversity of FRET measurements is the maturation of the Shigella type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) needle tip complex. The Shigella T3SA delivers effector proteins into intestinal cells to promote bacterial invasion and spread. The T3SA is comprised of a basal body that spans the bacterial envelope and a needle with an exposed tip complex that matures in response to environmental stimuli. FRET measurements demonstrated bile salt binding by the nascent needle tip protein IpaD and also mapped resulting structural changes which led to the recruitment of the translocator IpaB. At the needle tip IpaB acts as a sensor for host cell contact but prior to secretion, it is stored as a heterodimeric complex with the chaperone IpgC. FRET analyses showed that chaperone binding to IpaB’s N-terminal domain causes a conformational change in the latter. These FRET analyses, with other biophysical methods, have been central to understanding T3SA maturation and will be highlighted, focusing on the details of the FRET measurements and the relevance to this particular system. PMID:23203116

  5. Attempts at in vitro fertilization and culture of in vitro matured oocytes in sei ( Balaenoptera borealis) and Bryde's ( B. edeni) whales.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, M M U; Suzuki, Y; Watanabe, H; Matsuoka, K; Fujise, Y; Ishikawa, H; Ohsumi, S; Fukui, Y

    2009-02-01

    The cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COCs) recovery rates with respect to reproductive status per sei (Balaenoptera borealis) and Bryde's (B. edeni) whales were determined in Experiment 1. The number of COCs recovered ranged from 16.0 to 30.6 and from 6.7 to 26.8 per sei and Bryde's whales, respectively. The effects of COCs grades and protein supplementation in embryo culture medium on development of in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos were evaluated in sei and Bryde's whales in Experiment 2. The COCs were classified into either Grade A (COCs with five or more layers of compact cumulus cells) or Grade B (COCs with less than five layers of compact or expanded cumulus cells) before being cultured for IVM. The cleavage (12.0 to 19.5%), 4-cell (8.0 to 12.0%) and 8-cell (4.0 to 8.0%) formation rates in sei whales did not vary significantly between embryos derived from either grade A or B oocytes and between embryos cultured in either fetal whale serum (FWS)- or bovine serum albumin (BSA)-supplemented medium. The cleavage (4.0 to 14.8%), 4-cell (0.0 to 7.5%) and 8-cell (0.0 to 2.6%) formation rates in Bryde's whales did not vary significantly between embryos derived from either grade A or B oocytes and between embryos cultured in either FWS- or BSA-supplemented medium. The grade B oocytes cultured in FWS-supplemented medium developed to morula stage (1.1%) in sei whales. In conclusion, the present study indicates that IVF in sei whales is possible to achieve cleaved embryos developing to morula stage. This is the first in vitro embryo production attempt in sei and Bryde's whales.

  6. Vaccination of metastatic colorectal cancer patients with matured dendritic cells loaded with multiple major histocompatibility complex class I peptides.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Brian; Ko, Andrew; Venook, Alan; Margolin, Kim; Zeh, Herbert; Lotze, Michael; Schillinger, Brian; Liu, Weihong; Lu, Ying; Mitsky, Peggie; Schilling, Marta; Bercovici, Nadege; Loudovaris, Maureen; Guillermo, Roy; Lee, Sun Min; Bender, James; Mills, Bonnie; Fong, Lawrence

    2007-10-01

    Developing a process to generate dendritic cells (DCs) applicable for multicenter trials would facilitate cancer vaccine development. Moreover, targeting multiple antigens with such a vaccine strategy could enhance the efficacy of such a treatment approach. We performed a phase 1/2 clinical trial administering a DC-based vaccine targeting multiple tumor-associated antigens to patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). A qualified manufacturing process was used to generate DC from blood monocytes using granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and IL-13, and matured for 6 hours with Klebsiella-derived cell wall fraction and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). DCs were also loaded with 6 HLA-A*0201 binding peptides derived from carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), MAGE, and HER2/neu, as well as keyhole limpet hemocyanin protein and pan-DR epitope peptide. Four planned doses of 35x10(6) cells were administered intradermally every 3 weeks. Immune response was assessed by IFN-gamma enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT). Matured DC possessed an activated phenotype and could prime T cells in vitro. In the trial, 21 HLA-A2+ patients were apheresed, 13 were treated with the vaccine, and 11 patients were evaluable. No significant treatment-related toxicity was reported. T-cell responses to a CEA-derived peptide were detected by ELISPOT in 3 patients. T cells induced to CEA possessed high avidity T-cell receptors. ELISPOT after in vitro restimulation detected responses to multiple peptides in 2 patients. All patients showed progressive disease. This pilot study in advanced CRC patients demonstrates DC-generated granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and IL-13 matured with Klebsiella-derived cell wall fraction and IFN-gamma can induce immune responses to multiple tumor-associated antigens in patients with advanced CRC.

  7. Career Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crites, John O.

    1973-01-01

    Research in the field of Career Maturity is reviewed and summarized, with particular attention to Super's Career Pattern Study, Gribbons and Lohnes' Career Development Study, and Crites' Vocational Development Project. Crites' organization and revision into a hierarchical structure of the five dimensions of vocational maturity proposed in Supers'…

  8. Virus Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Veesler, David; Johnson, John E.

    2013-01-01

    We examined virus maturation of selected non-enveloped and enveloped ssRNA viruses; retroviruses; bacteriophages and herpes virus. Processes associated with maturation in the RNA viruses range from subtle (noda and picornaviruses) to dramatic (tetraviruses and togaviruses). The elaborate assembly and maturation pathway of HIV is discussed in contrast to the less sophisticated but highly efficient processes associated with togaviruses. Bacteriophage assembly and maturation are discussed in general terms with specific examples chosen for emphasis. Finally the herpes viruses are compared with bacteriophages. The data support divergent evolution of noda, picorna and tetraviruses from a common ancestor and divergent evolution of alpha and flaviviruses from a common ancestor. Likewise, bacteriophages and herpes viruses almost certainly share a common ancestor in their evolution. Comparing all the viruses, we conclude that maturation is a convergent process that is required to solve conflicting requirements in biological dynamics and function. PMID:22404678

  9. Maturation of the cellular and humoral immune responses to persistent infection in horses by equine infectious anemia virus is a complex and lengthy process.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S A; Cook, S J; Lichtenstein, D L; Issel, C J; Montelaro, R C

    1997-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) provides a natural model system by which immunological control of lentivirus infections may be studied. To date, no detailed study addressing in parallel both the humoral and cellular immune responses induced in horses upon infection by EIAV has been conducted. Therefore, we initiated the first comprehensive characterization of the cellular and humoral immune responses during clinical progression from chronic disease to inapparent stages of EIAV infection. Using new analyses of antibody avidity and antibody epitope conformation dependence that had not been previously employed in this system, we observed that the humoral immune response to EIAV required a 6- to 8-month period in which to fully mature. During this time frame, EIAV-specific antibody evolved gradually from a population characterized by low-avidity, nonneutralizing, and predominantly linear epitope specificity to an antibody population with an avidity of moderate to high levels, neutralizing activity, and predominantly conformational epitope specificity. Analyses of the cell-mediated immune response to EIAV revealed CD4+ and CD8+ major histocompatibility complex-restricted, EIAV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity apparent within 3 to 4 weeks postinfection, temporally correlating with the resolution of the primary viremia. After resolution of the initial viremia, EIAV-specific CTL activity differed greatly among the experimentally infected ponies, with some animals having readily detectable CTL activity while others had little measurable CTL activity. Thus, in contrast to the initial viremia, it appeared that no single immune parameter correlated with the resolution of further viremic episodes. Instead, immune control of EIAV infection during the clinically inapparent stage of infection appears to rely on a complex combination of immune system mechanisms to suppress viral replication that effectively functions only after the immune system has evolved to a

  10. The Arabidopsis Chloroplast Stromal N-Terminome: Complexities of Amino-Terminal Protein Maturation and Stability1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Elden; Kim, Jitae; Bhuiyan, Nazmul H.; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein amino (N) termini are prone to modifications and are major determinants of protein stability in bacteria, eukaryotes, and perhaps also in chloroplasts. Most chloroplast proteins undergo N-terminal maturation, but this is poorly understood due to insufficient experimental information. Consequently, N termini of mature chloroplast proteins cannot be accurately predicted. This motivated an extensive characterization of chloroplast protein N termini in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates and mass spectrometry, generating nearly 14,000 tandem mass spectrometry spectra matching to protein N termini. Many nucleus-encoded plastid proteins accumulated with two or three different N termini; we evaluated the significance of these different proteoforms. Alanine, valine, threonine (often in N-α-acetylated form), and serine were by far the most observed N-terminal residues, even after normalization for their frequency in the plastid proteome, while other residues were absent or highly underrepresented. Plastid-encoded proteins showed a comparable distribution of N-terminal residues, but with a higher frequency of methionine. Infrequent residues (e.g. isoleucine, arginine, cysteine, proline, aspartate, and glutamate) were observed for several abundant proteins (e.g. heat shock proteins 70 and 90, Rubisco large subunit, and ferredoxin-glutamate synthase), likely reflecting functional regulation through their N termini. In contrast, the thylakoid lumenal proteome showed a wide diversity of N-terminal residues, including those typically associated with instability (aspartate, glutamate, leucine, and phenylalanine). We propose that, after cleavage of the chloroplast transit peptide by stromal processing peptidase, additional processing by unidentified peptidases occurs to avoid unstable or otherwise unfavorable N-terminal residues. The possibility of a chloroplast N-end rule is discussed. PMID:26371235

  11. Trypanosoma brucei spliced leader RNA maturation by the cap 1 2'-O-ribose methyltransferase and SLA1 H/ACA snoRNA pseudouridine synthase complex.

    PubMed

    Zamudio, Jesse R; Mittra, Bidyottam; Chattopadhyay, Arnab; Wohlschlegel, James A; Sturm, Nancy R; Campbell, David A

    2009-03-01

    Kinetoplastid flagellates attach a 39-nucleotide spliced leader (SL) upstream of protein-coding regions in polycistronic RNA precursors through trans splicing. SL modifications include cap 2'-O-ribose methylation of the first four nucleotides and pseudouridine (psi) formation at uracil 28. In Trypanosoma brucei, TbMTr1 performs 2'-O-ribose methylation of the first transcribed nucleotide, or cap 1. We report the characterization of an SL RNA processing complex with TbMTr1 and the SLA1 H/ACA small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP) particle that guides SL psi(28) formation. TbMTr1 is in a high-molecular-weight complex containing the four conserved core proteins of H/ACA snoRNPs, a kinetoplastid-specific protein designated methyltransferase-associated protein (TbMTAP), and the SLA1 snoRNA. TbMTAP-null lines are viable but have decreased SL RNA processing efficiency in cap methylation, 3'-end maturation, and psi(28) formation. TbMTAP is required for association between TbMTr1 and the SLA1 snoRNP but does not affect U1 small nuclear RNA methylation. A complex methylation profile in the mRNA population of TbMTAP-null lines indicates an additional effect on cap 4 methylations. The TbMTr1 complex specializes the SLA1 H/ACA snoRNP for efficient processing of multiple modifications on the SL RNA substrate.

  12. Effects of selected endocrine disruptors on meiotic maturation, cumulus expansion, synthesis of hyaluronan and progesterone by porcine oocyte-cumulus complexes.

    PubMed

    Mlynarcíková, Alzbeta; Nagyová, Eva; Ficková, Mária; Scsuková, Sona

    2009-04-01

    In most mammals, before ovulation, cumulus cells synthesize a large amount of hyaluronan (HA) that is organized into an extracellular matrix (ECM), which provides an essential microenvironment for in vivo oocyte fertilization. This process is called cumulus expansion. The present study assessed effects of selected endocrine disruptors (bisphenol A, BPA; 4-chloro-3-methyl phenol, CMP; di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, DEHP; and benzyl butyl phthalate, BBP) in a range of 100pM-100microM, on follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-induced meiotic maturation and cumulus expansion of porcine oocyte-cumulus complexes (OCC) cultured in vitro. Moreover, FSH-stimulated production of hyaluronic acid (HA) and progesterone by cumulus cells was measured. Both phenols, BPA and CMP (100microM), significantly affected meiotic maturation of oocytes. The number of oocytes that underwent germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) (78.7% and 72.4%, respectively) as well as the rate of oocytes that reached metaphase II stage (MII) (50% and 53.6%, respectively) after 44h culture were decreased compared to control (89.6% for GVBD and 81.5% for MII). FSH-stimulated expansion of cumulus was altered by the highest concentration of BPA and CMP (70% and 64%, respectively vs. 80.3% in control). Although BPA did not alter FSH-stimulated HA synthesis by cumulus cells, its incorporation within the complex was reduced to a half of control value. Progesterone production by OCC was significantly changed in the presence of BPA or DEHP. Finally, our results provide valuable information that oocyte meiotic progression was adversely affected during in vitro culture with endocrine disruptors. PMID:19162163

  13. Late steps in cytoplasmic maturation of assembly-competent axonemal outer arm dynein in Chlamydomonas require interaction of ODA5 and ODA10 in a complex.

    PubMed

    Dean, Anudariya B; Mitchell, David R

    2015-10-15

    Axonemal dyneins are multisubunit enzymes that must be preassembled in the cytoplasm, transported into cilia by intraflagellar transport, and bound to specific sites on doublet microtubules, where their activity facilitates microtubule sliding-based motility. Outer dynein arms (ODAs) require assembly factors to assist their preassembly, transport, and attachment to cargo (specific doublet A-tubule sites). In Chlamydomonas, three assembly factors--ODA5, ODA8, and ODA10--show genetic interactions and have been proposed to interact in a complex, but we recently showed that flagellar ODA8 does not copurify with ODA5 or ODA10. Here we show that ODA5 and ODA10 depend on each other for stability and coexist in a complex in both cytoplasmic and flagellar extracts. Immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy reveal that ODA10 in flagella localizes strictly to a proximal region of doublet number 1, which completely lacks ODAs in Chlamydomonas. Studies of the in vitro binding of ODAs to axonemal doublets reveal a role for the ODA5/ODA10 assembly complex in cytoplasmic maturation of ODAs into a form that can bind to doublet microtubules.

  14. Effects of maturation and acidosis on the chaos-like complexity of the neural respiratory output in the isolated brainstem of the tadpole, Rana esculenta

    PubMed Central

    Samara, Ziyad; Fiamma, Marie-Noëlle; Bautin, Nathalie; Ranohavimparany, Anja; Le Coz, Patrick; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Darré, Pierre; Zelter, Marc; Poon, Chi-Sang; Similowski, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Human ventilation at rest exhibits mathematical chaos-like complexity that can be described as long-term unpredictability mediated (in whole or in part) by some low-dimensional nonlinear deterministic process. Although various physiological and pathological situations can affect respiratory complexity, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely elucidated. If such chaos-like complexity is an intrinsic property of central respiratory generators, it should appear or increase when these structures mature or are stimulated. To test this hypothesis, we employed the isolated tadpole brainstem model [Rana (Pelophylax) esculenta] and recorded the neural respiratory output (buccal and lung rhythms) of pre- (n = 8) and postmetamorphic tadpoles (n = 8), at physiologic (7.8) and acidic pH (7.4). We analyzed the root mean square of the cranial nerve V or VII neurograms. Development and acidosis had no effect on buccal period. Lung frequency increased with development (P < 0.0001). It also increased with acidosis, but in postmetamorphic tadpoles only (P < 0.05). The noise-titration technique evidenced low-dimensional nonlinearities in all the postmetamorphic brainstems, at both pH. Chaos-like complexity, assessed through the noise limit, increased from pH 7.8 to pH 7.4 (P < 0.01). In contrast, linear models best fitted the ventilatory rhythm in all but one of the premetamorphic preparations at pH 7.8 (P < 0.005 vs. postmetamorphic) and in four at pH 7.4 (not significant vs. postmetamorphic). Therefore, in a lower vertebrate model, the brainstem respiratory central rhythm generator accounts for ventilatory chaos-like complexity, especially in the postmetamorphic stage and at low pH. According to the ventilatory generators homology theory, this may also be the case in mammals. PMID:21325645

  15. The host Integrator complex acts in transcription-independent maturation of herpesvirus microRNA 3′ ends

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mingyi; Zhang, Wei; Shu, Mei-Di; Xu, Acer; Lenis, Diana A.; DiMaio, Daniel; Steitz, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus that produces microRNAs (miRNAs) by cotranscription of precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA) hairpins immediately downstream from viral small nuclear RNAs (snRNA). The host cell Integrator complex, which recognizes the snRNA 3′ end processing signal (3′ box), generates the 5′ ends of HVS pre-miRNA hairpins. Here, we identify a novel 3′ box-like sequence (miRNA 3′ box) downstream from HVS pre-miRNAs that is essential for miRNA biogenesis. In vivo knockdown and rescue experiments confirmed that the 3′ end processing of HVS pre-miRNAs also depends on Integrator activity. Interaction between Integrator and HVS primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) substrates that contain only the miRNA 3′ box was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and an in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) that we developed to localize specific transient RNA–protein interactions inside cells. Surprisingly, in contrast to snRNA 3′ end processing, HVS pre-miRNA 3′ end processing by Integrator can be uncoupled from transcription, enabling new approaches to study Integrator enzymology. PMID:26220997

  16. The host Integrator complex acts in transcription-independent maturation of herpesvirus microRNA 3' ends.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingyi; Zhang, Wei; Shu, Mei-Di; Xu, Acer; Lenis, Diana A; DiMaio, Daniel; Steitz, Joan A

    2015-07-15

    Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus that produces microRNAs (miRNAs) by cotranscription of precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA) hairpins immediately downstream from viral small nuclear RNAs (snRNA). The host cell Integrator complex, which recognizes the snRNA 3' end processing signal (3' box), generates the 5' ends of HVS pre-miRNA hairpins. Here, we identify a novel 3' box-like sequence (miRNA 3' box) downstream from HVS pre-miRNAs that is essential for miRNA biogenesis. In vivo knockdown and rescue experiments confirmed that the 3' end processing of HVS pre-miRNAs also depends on Integrator activity. Interaction between Integrator and HVS primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) substrates that contain only the miRNA 3' box was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and an in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) that we developed to localize specific transient RNA-protein interactions inside cells. Surprisingly, in contrast to snRNA 3' end processing, HVS pre-miRNA 3' end processing by Integrator can be uncoupled from transcription, enabling new approaches to study Integrator enzymology.

  17. The SMC-5/6 Complex and the HIM-6 (BLM) Helicase Synergistically Promote Meiotic Recombination Intermediate Processing and Chromosome Maturation during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ye; Sonneville, Remi; Agostinho, Ana; Meier, Bettina; Wang, Bin; Blow, J Julian; Gartner, Anton

    2016-03-01

    Meiotic recombination is essential for the repair of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) to generate crossovers (COs) during meiosis. The efficient processing of meiotic recombination intermediates not only needs various resolvases but also requires proper meiotic chromosome structure. The Smc5/6 complex belongs to the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) family and is closely related to cohesin and condensin. Although the Smc5/6 complex has been implicated in the processing of recombination intermediates during meiosis, it is not known how Smc5/6 controls meiotic DSB repair. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans we show that the SMC-5/6 complex acts synergistically with HIM-6, an ortholog of the human Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) during meiotic recombination. The concerted action of the SMC-5/6 complex and HIM-6 is important for processing recombination intermediates, CO regulation and bivalent maturation. Careful examination of meiotic chromosomal morphology reveals an accumulation of inter-chromosomal bridges in smc-5; him-6 double mutants, leading to compromised chromosome segregation during meiotic cell divisions. Interestingly, we found that the lethality of smc-5; him-6 can be rescued by loss of the conserved BRCA1 ortholog BRC-1. Furthermore, the combined deletion of smc-5 and him-6 leads to an irregular distribution of condensin and to chromosome decondensation defects reminiscent of condensin depletion. Lethality conferred by condensin depletion can also be rescued by BRC-1 depletion. Our results suggest that SMC-5/6 and HIM-6 can synergistically regulate recombination intermediate metabolism and suppress ectopic recombination by controlling chromosome architecture during meiosis.

  18. The SMC-5/6 Complex and the HIM-6 (BLM) Helicase Synergistically Promote Meiotic Recombination Intermediate Processing and Chromosome Maturation during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ye; Sonneville, Remi; Agostinho, Ana; Meier, Bettina; Wang, Bin; Blow, J. Julian; Gartner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is essential for the repair of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) to generate crossovers (COs) during meiosis. The efficient processing of meiotic recombination intermediates not only needs various resolvases but also requires proper meiotic chromosome structure. The Smc5/6 complex belongs to the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) family and is closely related to cohesin and condensin. Although the Smc5/6 complex has been implicated in the processing of recombination intermediates during meiosis, it is not known how Smc5/6 controls meiotic DSB repair. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans we show that the SMC-5/6 complex acts synergistically with HIM-6, an ortholog of the human Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) during meiotic recombination. The concerted action of the SMC-5/6 complex and HIM-6 is important for processing recombination intermediates, CO regulation and bivalent maturation. Careful examination of meiotic chromosomal morphology reveals an accumulation of inter-chromosomal bridges in smc-5; him-6 double mutants, leading to compromised chromosome segregation during meiotic cell divisions. Interestingly, we found that the lethality of smc-5; him-6 can be rescued by loss of the conserved BRCA1 ortholog BRC-1. Furthermore, the combined deletion of smc-5 and him-6 leads to an irregular distribution of condensin and to chromosome decondensation defects reminiscent of condensin depletion. Lethality conferred by condensin depletion can also be rescued by BRC-1 depletion. Our results suggest that SMC-5/6 and HIM-6 can synergistically regulate recombination intermediate metabolism and suppress ectopic recombination by controlling chromosome architecture during meiosis. PMID:27010650

  19. The SMC-5/6 Complex and the HIM-6 (BLM) Helicase Synergistically Promote Meiotic Recombination Intermediate Processing and Chromosome Maturation during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ye; Sonneville, Remi; Agostinho, Ana; Meier, Bettina; Wang, Bin; Blow, J Julian; Gartner, Anton

    2016-03-01

    Meiotic recombination is essential for the repair of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) to generate crossovers (COs) during meiosis. The efficient processing of meiotic recombination intermediates not only needs various resolvases but also requires proper meiotic chromosome structure. The Smc5/6 complex belongs to the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) family and is closely related to cohesin and condensin. Although the Smc5/6 complex has been implicated in the processing of recombination intermediates during meiosis, it is not known how Smc5/6 controls meiotic DSB repair. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans we show that the SMC-5/6 complex acts synergistically with HIM-6, an ortholog of the human Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) during meiotic recombination. The concerted action of the SMC-5/6 complex and HIM-6 is important for processing recombination intermediates, CO regulation and bivalent maturation. Careful examination of meiotic chromosomal morphology reveals an accumulation of inter-chromosomal bridges in smc-5; him-6 double mutants, leading to compromised chromosome segregation during meiotic cell divisions. Interestingly, we found that the lethality of smc-5; him-6 can be rescued by loss of the conserved BRCA1 ortholog BRC-1. Furthermore, the combined deletion of smc-5 and him-6 leads to an irregular distribution of condensin and to chromosome decondensation defects reminiscent of condensin depletion. Lethality conferred by condensin depletion can also be rescued by BRC-1 depletion. Our results suggest that SMC-5/6 and HIM-6 can synergistically regulate recombination intermediate metabolism and suppress ectopic recombination by controlling chromosome architecture during meiosis. PMID:27010650

  20. Chlamydomonas axonemal dynein assembly locus ODA8 encodes a conserved flagellar protein needed for cytoplasmic maturation of outer dynein arm complexes.

    PubMed

    Desai, Paurav B; Freshour, Judy R; Mitchell, David R

    2015-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii oda8 mutation blocks assembly of flagellar outer dynein arms (ODAs), and interacts genetically with ODA5 and ODA10, which encode axonemal proteins thought to aid dynein binding onto axonemal docking sites. We positionally cloned ODA8 and identified the gene product as the algal homolog of vertebrate LRRC56. Its flagellar localization depends on ODA5 and ODA10, consistent with genetic interaction studies, but phylogenomics suggests that LRRC56 homologs play a role in intraflagellar transport (IFT)-dependent assembly of outer row dynein arms, not axonemal docking. ODA8 distribution between cytoplasm and flagella is similar to that of IFT proteins and about half of flagellar ODA8 is in the soluble matrix fraction. Dynein extracted in vitro from wild type axonemes will rebind efficiently to oda8 mutant axonemes, without re-binding of ODA8, further supporting a role in dynein assembly or transport, not axonemal binding. Assays comparing preassembled ODA complexes from the cytoplasm of wild type and mutant strains show that dynein in oda8 mutant cytoplasm has not properly preassembled and cannot bind normally onto oda axonemes. We conclude that ODA8 plays an important role in formation and transport of mature dynein complexes during flagellar assembly.

  1. Mature area of new frontier Northeast British Columbia reveals new high potential in the structurally complex region of the western Canada sedimentary basin

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, A.N.; Varsek, J.L. )

    1993-09-01

    Northeast British Columbia has been extensively explored since the early fifties. Evaluated as a part of the Western Canada sedimentary basin, with a passive undeformed basement and only Laramide deformation, the basin must be considered mature. Recent work involving detailed stratigraphic analysis, extensive field observations, potential field data analysis, and deep crustal reflection seismic work lead to an exciting new view of this portion of the Western Canada basin. Situated over the middle Proterozoic continental margin, a complexly deformed and deeply truncated foreland forms a ramp against highly magnetic crystalline rocks. Dipping features within the Proterozoic intersect the Phanerozoic, producing local structure and uplift which has had a profound influence on Devonian reef paleogeography. A major contractional episode created previously unrecognized Devonian to Carboniferous folds and this discovery has led to a complete reinterpretation of the structural style and deformational history of the area. The structural complexity of the basin is increased by right lateral strike-slip faulting. This system is highlighted in the subsurface by a series of faults fanning out across the basin with displacements of up to 20 km in the Proterozoic foreland and accommodation continuing until the Cretaceous. Strike-slip deformation has generated an embayment in the Proterozoic continental margin and within the Phanerozoic shelf, indicating the occurrence of several previously unrecognized prospective shelf to basin transitions. The complex interplay of structure and paleogeography results in a series of play opportunities that could result in new giant discoveries.

  2. Chlamydomonas Axonemal Dynein Assembly Locus ODA8 Encodes a Conserved Flagellar Protein Needed for Cytoplasmic Maturation of Outer Dynein Arm Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Paurav B; Freshour, Judy R; Mitchell, David R

    2015-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii oda8 mutation blocks assembly of flagellar outer dynein arms (ODAs), and interacts genetically with ODA5 and ODA10, which encode axonemal proteins thought to aid dynein binding onto axonemal docking sites. We positionally cloned ODA8 and identified the gene product as the algal homolog of vertebrate LRRC56. Its flagellar localization depends on ODA5 and ODA10, consistent with genetic interaction studies, but phylogenomics suggests that LRRC56 homologs play a role in intraflagellar transport (IFT)-dependent assembly of outer row dynein arms, not axonemal docking. ODA8 distribution between cytoplasm and flagella is similar to that of IFT proteins and about half of flagellar ODA8 is in the soluble matrix fraction. Dynein extracted in vitro from wild type axonemes will rebind efficiently to oda8 mutant axonemes, without re-binding of ODA8, further supporting a role in dynein assembly or transport, not axonemal binding. Assays comparing preassembled ODA complexes from the cytoplasm of wild type and mutant strains show that dynein in oda8 mutant cytoplasm has not properly preassembled and cannot bind normally onto oda axonemes. We conclude that ODA8 plays an important role in formation and transport of mature dynein complexes during flagellar assembly. © 2014 The Authors. Cytoskeleton Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25558044

  3. Phagosome maturation: aging gracefully.

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Otilia V; Botelho, Roberto J; Grinstein, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Foreign particles and apoptotic bodies are eliminated from the body by phagocytic leucocytes. The initial stage of the elimination process is the internalization of the particles into a plasma membrane-derived vacuole known as the phagosome. Such nascent phagosomes, however, lack the ability to kill pathogens or to degrade the ingested targets. These properties are acquired during the course of phagosomal maturation, a complex sequence of reactions that result in drastic remodelling of the phagosomal membrane and contents. The determinants and consequences of the fusion and fission reactions that underlie phagosomal maturation are the topic of this review. PMID:12061891

  4. Expression of the gap junction gene connexin43 (Cx43) in preimplantation bovine embryos derived in vitro or in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wrenzycki, C; Herrmann, D; Carnwath, J W; Niemann, H

    1996-09-01

    In this study we have examined the presence of mRNA encoding connexin 43 (Cx43) in bovine embryos derived in vivo and in vitro. Cumulus-oocyte complexes, immature and matured oocytes liberated from cumulus cells, zygotes, 2-4-cell and 8-16-cell embryos, morulae, blastocysts and hatched blastocysts were produced in vitro from ovaries obtained from an abattoir using TCM 199 supplemented with hormones and 10% oestrous cow serum for maturation. Cumulus-oocyte complexes matured for 24 h were exposed to bull spermatozoa for 19 h and then cultured in TCM 199 supplemented with 10% oestrous cow serum to the desired developmental stage. Morulae and blastocysts derived in vivo were collected from superovulated donor cows. Total RNA was extracted from pools of 60-200 bovine oocytes or embryos using a modified phenol-chloroform extraction method and analysed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Before reverse transcription, aliquots of DNase-digested embryonic RNA were tested by polymerase chain reaction using bovine-specific primers to control for residual genomic DNA contamination. DNA-free, total RNA was reverse transcribed after preincubation with the Cx43 specific 3'primer. The resultant cDNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using Cx43 specific primers that define a 516 bp fragment of Cx43. The reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction product was verified by restriction enzyme analysis with Alu I and sequencing. Assays were repeated at least twice for each developmental stage and provided identical results between replicates. Cx43 transcripts were detected in bovine morulae and blastocysts grown in vivo. In contrast, whereas the early in vitro stages from cumulus-oocyte complexes to morulae expressed Cx43, blastocysts and hatched blastocysts did not have detectable concentrations of mRNA from this gene. Restriction enzyme cutting revealed three fragments of the predicted size (139, 177, 200 bp). The amplified product showed 100% identity

  5. Mechanics of bacteriophage maturation.

    PubMed

    Roos, Wouter H; Gertsman, Ilya; May, Eric R; Brooks, Charles L; Johnson, John E; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2012-02-14

    Capsid maturation with large-scale subunit reorganization occurs in virtually all viruses that use a motor to package nucleic acid into preformed particles. A variety of ensemble studies indicate that the particles gain greater stability during this process, however, it is unknown which material properties of the fragile procapsids change. Using Atomic Force Microscopy-based nano-indentation, we study the development of the mechanical properties during maturation of bacteriophage HK97, a λ-like phage of which the maturation-induced morphological changes are well described. We show that mechanical stabilization and strengthening occurs in three independent ways: (i) an increase of the Young's modulus, (ii) a strong rise of the capsid's ultimate strength, and (iii) a growth of the resistance against material fatigue. The Young's modulus of immature and mature capsids, as determined from thin shell theory, fit with the values calculated using a new multiscale simulation approach. This multiscale calculation shows that the increase in Young's modulus isn't dependent on the crosslinking between capsomers. In contrast, the ultimate strength of the capsids does increase even when a limited number of cross-links are formed while full crosslinking appears to protect the shell against material fatigue. Compared to phage λ, the covalent crosslinking at the icosahedral and quasi threefold axes of HK97 yields a mechanically more robust particle than the addition of the gpD protein during maturation of phage λ. These results corroborate the expected increase in capsid stability and strength during maturation, however in an unexpected intricate way, underlining the complex structure of these self-assembling nanocontainers.

  6. Market maturity

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, B.; Bowden, S.; Ellis, M

    1995-02-01

    The power sector in the Philipines provides one of the most mature independent power markets in Asia. Over the past five years, National Power Corp. (NPC), the government owned utility, has actively invited the power sector into power generation. Distribution has remained in the hands of private and rural cooperative utilities. Private utilities have been operating as full requirements customers of NPC while the growth in capacity additions by independent power producers (IPPs) has outpaced NPC`s for the second year in a row. With a recovering economy and regulatory reform proceeding, the outlook for independent power remains strong through the end of the decade. The Philipine Congress is now reviewing draft legislation that will decentralize NPC and begin the process of privatization and market-based reforms throughout the country`s power sector.

  7. Immunohistochemical localization of inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthase in porcine ovaries and effects of NO on antrum formation and oocyte meiotic maturation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yong; Fu, Zhuo; Zhang, Meijia; Xia, Guoliang; Yang, Jie; Xie, Huirong

    2004-07-30

    The present study is to investigate the immunolocalization of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, iNOS) in porcine ovary and the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on antrum formation and oocyte meiotic resumption. In Experiment 1, preantral follicles (250-300 microm in diameter) were cultured in 0 (Control), 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 or 1 mM sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a NO donor. In Experiment 2, the cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) aspirated from medium follicles (3-6 mm in diameter) were incubated in 0.1mM SNP or two inhibitors for NOS, 10 mM aminoguanidine bicarbonate salt (AG) or 1 mM Nomega-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), alone or concomitantly. In Experiment 3, ovarian tissues, corpus luteum (CL), corpus albican (CA) and COCs from small (1-2 mm in diameter), medium (3-6 mm) and large follicles (7-10 mm) were isolated, rinsed, fixed, paraffin embedded and stained by the conventional avidin-biotin complex method for the detection of eNOS and iNOS production. The results showed that 0.1mM SNP had no effect on antrum formation (P > 0.05) while 0.3, 0.5 or 1 mM significantly inhibited the antrum formation (P < 0.05). AG markedly inhibited porcine oocyte meiotic resumption (P < 0.05) while L-NAME inhibited first polar body (PB1) extrusion (P < 0.05). The immunoreactivity of eNOS in early antral follicles was restricted to oocyte and it increased from small, medium to large follicle-enclosed oocytes. Cumulus cells from large follicles showed weak eNOS immunoreactivity but those from small or medium follicles not. In CL, eNOS-positive staining was shown in granulosa lutein cells. In CA, it was in some parenchymal cells. In contrast, no immunoreactivity for iNOS was found in primordial, early antral follicle or the COCs aspirated from small and medium follicles. The large follicle-enclosed oocyte showed weak immunoreactivity. In CL, some granulosa lutein cells showed iNOS-positive cytoplasm. Such immunostaining was not found in CA. The results demonstrate

  8. Expression levels of the microRNA maturing microprocessor complex component DGCR8 and the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) components argonaute-1, argonaute-2, PACT, TARBP1, and TARBP2 in epithelial skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Sand, Michael; Skrygan, Marina; Georgas, Dimitrios; Arenz, Christoph; Gambichler, Thilo; Sand, Daniel; Altmeyer, Peter; Bechara, Falk G

    2012-11-01

    The microprocessor complex mediates intranuclear biogenesis of precursor microRNAs from the primary microRNA transcript. Extranuclear, mature microRNAs are incorporated into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) before interaction with complementary target mRNA leads to transcriptional repression or cleavage. In this study, we investigated the expression profiles of the microprocessor complex subunit DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8 (DGCR8) and the RISC components argonaute-1 (AGO1), argonaute-2 (AGO2), as well as double-stranded RNA-binding proteins PACT, TARBP1, and TARBP2 in epithelial skin cancer and its premalignant stage. Patients with premalignant actinic keratoses (AK, n = 6), basal cell carcinomas (BCC, n = 15), and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC, n = 7) were included in the study. Punch biopsies were harvested from the center of the tumors (lesional), from healthy skin sites (intraindividual controls), and from healthy skin sites in a healthy control group (n = 16; interindividual control). The DGCR8, AGO1, AGO2, PACT, TARBP1, and TARBP2 mRNA expression levels were detected by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The DGCR8, AGO1, AGO2, PACT, and TARBP1 expression levels were significantly higher in the AK, BCC, and SCC groups than the healthy controls (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the TARBP2 expression levels between groups (P > 0.05). This study indicates that major components of the miRNA pathway, such as the microprocessor complex and RISC, are dysregulated in epithelial skin cancer.

  9. Timing of maturation of a Neoproterozoic oceanic arc during Pan-African Orogeny: the Asmlil complex (Anti-Atlas, South Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, Antoine; Berger, Julien; Baele, Jean-Marc; Bruguier, Olivier; Diot, Hervé; Ennih, Nasser; Plissart, Gaëlle; Monnier, Christophe; Watlet, Arnaud; Vandycke, Sara

    2016-04-01

    produced by partial melting of a REE-depleted gabbronorite with cpx + garnet-rich residue, as typically observed in the basal crustal part of paleo-arc sections (e.g. Talkeetna, Kohistan arcs). Field observations, geochemical signatures, P-T estimates and new geochronological data allow to track the timing of Asmlil arc maturation. Combining our results to the entire Pan-African suture (Sirwa and Bou Azzer inliers), geochronological data clearly show that three distinct flare-ups give the tempo of arc magmatism during Pan-African Orogeny. First event is the early construction of the 755-745 My oceanic arc marked by intermediate volcanic to subvolcanic massifs. Second event occurred around 700 My and results from mafic products intruding previous arc. A last event also dated at 660-650 My in the Sirwa window marks the emplacement of hot hornblenditic arc-magmas into older arc massifs during the tectonic extrusion of the arc section. This late event is also related to intense melt production at different level of the arc contributing to differentiation of the whole arc complex. We thus interpreted the Asmlil complex as the final composite product of successive magmatic pulses during arc life cycle which can be compared to relatively long-lived and paced active arc systems (e.g. Aleutian, IBM arcs).

  10. Improved Oocyte Isolation and Embryonic Development of Outbred Deer Mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Kyu; He, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we improved the protocol for isolating cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from the outbred deer mice by using only one hormone (instead of the widely used combination of two hormones) with reduced dose. Moreover, we identified that significantly more metaphase II (MII) oocytes could be obtained by supplementing epidermal growth factor (EGF) and leukemia inhibition factor (LIF) into the previously established medium for in vitro maturation (IVM) of the COCs. Furthermore, we overcame the major challenge of two-cell block during embryonic development of deer mice after either in vitro fertilization (IVF) or parthenogenetic activation (PA) of the MII oocytes, by culturing the two-cell stage embryos on the feeder layer of inactivated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) in the medium of mouse embryonic stem cells. Collectively, this work represents a major step forward in using deer mice as an outbred animal model for biomedical research on reproduction and early embryonic development. PMID:26184014

  11. Biodynamic imaging of live porcine oocytes, zygotes and blastocysts for viability assessment in assisted reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    An, Ran; Wang, Chunmin; Turek, John; Machaty, Zoltan; Nolte, David D

    2015-03-01

    The success of assisted reproductive technologies relies on accurate assessment of reproductive viability at successive stages of development for oocytes and embryos. The current scoring system used to select good-quality oocytes relies on morphologically observable traits and hence is indirect and subjective. Biodynamic imaging may provide an objective approach to oocyte and embryo assessment by measuring physiologically-relevant dynamics. Biodynamic imaging is a coherence-gated approach to 3D tissue imaging that uses digital holography to perform low-coherence speckle interferometry to capture dynamic light scattering from intracellular motions. The changes in intracellular activity during cumulus oocyte complex maturation, before and after in vitro fertilization, and the subsequent development of the zygote and blastocyst provide a new approach to the assessment of preimplant candidates.

  12. Biodynamic imaging of live porcine oocytes, zygotes and blastocysts for viability assessment in assisted reproductive technologies

    PubMed Central

    An, Ran; Wang, Chunmin; Turek, John; Machaty, Zoltan; Nolte, David D.

    2015-01-01

    The success of assisted reproductive technologies relies on accurate assessment of reproductive viability at successive stages of development for oocytes and embryos. The current scoring system used to select good-quality oocytes relies on morphologically observable traits and hence is indirect and subjective. Biodynamic imaging may provide an objective approach to oocyte and embryo assessment by measuring physiologically-relevant dynamics. Biodynamic imaging is a coherence-gated approach to 3D tissue imaging that uses digital holography to perform low-coherence speckle interferometry to capture dynamic light scattering from intracellular motions. The changes in intracellular activity during cumulus oocyte complex maturation, before and after in vitro fertilization, and the subsequent development of the zygote and blastocyst provide a new approach to the assessment of preimplant candidates. PMID:25798318

  13. The CD2 isoform of protocadherin-15 is an essential component of the tip-link complex in mature auditory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Pepermans, Elise; Michel, Vincent; Goodyear, Richard; Bonnet, Crystel; Abdi, Samia; Dupont, Typhaine; Gherbi, Souad; Holder, Muriel; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Marlin, Sandrine; Zenati, Akila; Richardson, Guy; Avan, Paul; Bahloul, Amel; Petit, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Protocadherin-15 (Pcdh15) is a component of the tip-links, the extracellular filaments that gate hair cell mechano-electrical transduction channels in the inner ear. There are three Pcdh15 splice isoforms (CD1, CD2 and CD3), which only differ by their cytoplasmic domains; they are thought to function redundantly in mechano-electrical transduction during hair-bundle development, but whether any of these isoforms composes the tip-link in mature hair cells remains unknown. By immunolabelling and both morphological and electrophysiological analyses of post-natal hair cell-specific conditional knockout mice (Pcdh15ex38-fl/ex38-fl Myo15-cre+/−) that lose only this isoform after normal hair-bundle development, we show that Pcdh15-CD2 is an essential component of tip-links in mature auditory hair cells. The finding, in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state, of a PCDH15 frameshift mutation (p.P1515Tfs*4) that affects only Pcdh15-CD2, in profoundly deaf children from two unrelated families, extends this conclusion to humans. These results provide key information for identification of new components of the mature auditory mechano-electrical transduction machinery. This will also serve as a basis for the development of gene therapy for deafness caused by PCDH15 defects. PMID:24940003

  14. Effect of convective transport in porous media on the conditions of organic matter maturation and generation of hydrocarbons in trap rocks complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurie Khachay, Professor; Mindubaev, Mansur

    2016-04-01

    One of the main problems of the study of the intrusion thermal effects on the maturation of the organic matter is to estimate the volume, intensity, thermal effects of the intrusion and its redistribution in porous media by convection. A numerical algorithm for solving the problem of the developed convection in two-dimensional and three-dimensional models of the porous medium depending on the incline angle is developed. It is defined that the convective stability in the medium decreases with increasing incline angle. It was found that depending on the incline angle the structure of convection from many cells for a flat horizontal layer changes and it transfers to more elongated structures along the layer. It is shown that depending on the incline angles, invading sill and imbedding volume of the porous medium it can be realized either stationary or non-stationary convection that provides a principal different thermal conditions of hydrocarbons maturation in the motherboard porous medium. We give numerical examples of the influence of the incline angle on the flow structure inside the porous inclusion. By the stationary convection the volume of the boundary layers between the convective sells increases. That can lead to increasing of the part of motherboard rocks that are outer the temperature conditions of oil catalysis and as a consequence to the overestimation of the deposits.

  15. From Crescent to Mature Virion: Vaccinia Virus Assembly and Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang; Cooper, Tamara; Howley, Paul M.; Hayball, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) has achieved unprecedented success as a live viral vaccine for smallpox which mitigated eradication of the disease. Vaccinia virus has a complex virion morphology and recent advances have been made to answer some of the key outstanding questions, in particular, the origin and biogenesis of the virion membrane, the transformation from immature virion (IV) to mature virus (MV), and the role of several novel genes, which were previously uncharacterized, but have now been shown to be essential for VACV virion formation. This new knowledge will undoubtedly contribute to the rational design of safe, immunogenic vaccine candidates, or effective antivirals in the future. This review endeavors to provide an update on our current knowledge of the VACV maturation processes with a specific focus on the initiation of VACV replication through to the formation of mature virions. PMID:25296112

  16. The CcmFH complex is the system I holocytochrome c synthetase: engineering cytochrome c maturation independent of CcmABCDE.

    PubMed

    San Francisco, Brian; Sutherland, Molly C; Kranz, Robert G

    2014-03-01

    Cytochrome c maturation (ccm) in many bacteria, archaea and plant mitochondria requires eight membrane proteins, CcmABCDEFGH, called system I. This pathway delivers and attaches haem covalently to two cysteines (of Cys-Xxx-Xxx-Cys-His) in the cytochrome c. All models propose that CcmFH facilitates covalent attachment of haem to the apocytochrome; namely, that it is the synthetase. However, holocytochrome c synthetase activity has not been directly demonstrated for CcmFH. We report formation of holocytochromes c by CcmFH and CcmG, a periplasmic thioredoxin, independent of CcmABCDE (we term this activity CcmFGH-only). Cytochrome c produced in the absence of CcmABCDE is indistinguishable from cytochrome c produced by the full system I, with a cleaved signal sequence and two covalent bonds to haem. We engineered increased cytochrome c production by CcmFGH-only, with yields approaching those from the full system I. Three conserved histidines in CcmF (TM-His1, TM-His2 and P-His1) are required for activity, as are the conserved cysteine pairs in CcmG and CcmH. Our findings establish that CcmFH is the system I holocytochrome c synthetase. Although we discuss why this engineering would likely not replace the need for CcmABCDE in nature, these results provide unique mechanistic and evolutionary insights into cytochrome c biosynthesis.

  17. Health- and disease-associated species clusters in complex natural biofilms determine the innate immune response in oral epithelial cells during biofilm maturation.

    PubMed

    Langfeldt, Daniela; Neulinger, Sven C; Stiesch, Meike; Stumpp, Nico; Bang, Corinna; Schmitz, Ruth A; Eberhard, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify our hypothesis concerning the differential induction of various antimicrobial and immunomodulatory responses in oral epithelial cells by diverse bacterial species clusters. For this purpose, oral biofilms between 1 and 14 days of maturation (36 volunteers) were co-incubated with gingival epithelial cells. Subsequently, human β-defensin (hBD)-2, hBD-3, LL-37, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 mRNA expression profiles were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. The correlation between bacterial species and the host innate immune response was determined by relating these results to existing 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis by amplicon sequencing (Langfeldt et al. 2014. PLoS One 9: e87449). Data were analysed by multiple factor analysis. Transcription of hBD-2 and hBD-3 was significantly associated with the abundance of species of the Prevotella cluster and the absence of species of the Streptococcus cluster. IL-1β, -6, -8 and -10 mRNA syntheses were significant correlated with Leptotrichia species [Leptotrichia 302H02 (0.448, P < 0.0001), Leptotrichia nbw822e09c1 (0.214, P = 0.008) and Leptotrichia wadei (0.218, P = 0.007)] of the Prevotella cluster. In the third dimension IL-10 and members of the Prevotella cluster were negatively correlated, whereas hBD-3 and IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were positive correlated to axis 3, like members of the Proteobacteria cluster. In conclusion, distinct species of health- and disease-associated bacterial clusters induce antibacterial or immunomodulatory reactions in oral epithelial cells during early stages of bacteria-host interactions.

  18. Health- and disease-associated species clusters in complex natural biofilms determine the innate immune response in oral epithelial cells during biofilm maturation.

    PubMed

    Langfeldt, Daniela; Neulinger, Sven C; Stiesch, Meike; Stumpp, Nico; Bang, Corinna; Schmitz, Ruth A; Eberhard, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify our hypothesis concerning the differential induction of various antimicrobial and immunomodulatory responses in oral epithelial cells by diverse bacterial species clusters. For this purpose, oral biofilms between 1 and 14 days of maturation (36 volunteers) were co-incubated with gingival epithelial cells. Subsequently, human β-defensin (hBD)-2, hBD-3, LL-37, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 mRNA expression profiles were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. The correlation between bacterial species and the host innate immune response was determined by relating these results to existing 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis by amplicon sequencing (Langfeldt et al. 2014. PLoS One 9: e87449). Data were analysed by multiple factor analysis. Transcription of hBD-2 and hBD-3 was significantly associated with the abundance of species of the Prevotella cluster and the absence of species of the Streptococcus cluster. IL-1β, -6, -8 and -10 mRNA syntheses were significant correlated with Leptotrichia species [Leptotrichia 302H02 (0.448, P < 0.0001), Leptotrichia nbw822e09c1 (0.214, P = 0.008) and Leptotrichia wadei (0.218, P = 0.007)] of the Prevotella cluster. In the third dimension IL-10 and members of the Prevotella cluster were negatively correlated, whereas hBD-3 and IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were positive correlated to axis 3, like members of the Proteobacteria cluster. In conclusion, distinct species of health- and disease-associated bacterial clusters induce antibacterial or immunomodulatory reactions in oral epithelial cells during early stages of bacteria-host interactions. PMID:25212593

  19. The Asymmetry in the Mature Amino-Terminus of ClpP Facilitates a Local Symmetry Match in ClpAP and ClpXP Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bewley,M.; Graziano, V.; Griffin, K.; Flanagan, J.

    2006-01-01

    ClpP is a self-compartmentalized proteolytic assembly comprised of two, stacked, heptameric rings that, when associated with its cognate hexameric ATPase (ClpA or ClpX), form the ClpAP and ClpXP ATP-dependent protease, respectively. The symmetry mismatch is an absolute feature of this large energy-dependent protease and also of the proteasome, which shares a similar barrel-shaped architecture, but how it is accommodated within the complex has yet to be understood, despite recent structural investigations, due in part to the conformational lability of the N-termini. We present the structures of Escherichia coli ClpP to 1.9 Angstroms and an inactive variant that provide some clues for how this might be achieved. In the wild type protein, the highly conserved N-terminal 20 residues can be grouped into two major structural classes. In the first, a loop formed by residues 10-15 protrudes out of the central access channel extending {approx}12-15 Angstroms from the surface of the oligomer resulting in the closing of the access channel observed in one ring. Similar loops are implied to be exclusively observed in human ClpP and a variant of ClpP from Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the other ring, a second class of loop is visible in the structure of wt ClpP from E. coli that forms closer to residue 16 and faces toward the interior of the molecule creating an open conformation of the access channel. In both classes, residues 18-20 provide a conserved interaction surface. In the inactive variant, a third class of N-terminal conformation is observed, which arises from a conformational change in the position of F17. We have performed a detailed functional analysis on each of the first 20 amino acid residues of ClpP. Residues that extend beyond the plane of the molecule (10-15) have a lesser effect on ATPase interaction than those lining the pore (1-7 and 16-20). Based upon our structure-function analysis, we present a model to explain the widely disparate effects of individual

  20. Antisense Inhibition of the 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex in Tomato Demonstrates Its Importance for Plant Respiration and during Leaf Senescence and Fruit Maturation[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Wagner L.; Tohge, Takayuki; Osorio, Sonia; Lohse, Marc; Balbo, Ilse; Krahnert, Ina; Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Usadel, Björn; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants expressing a fragment of the gene encoding the E1 subunit of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex in the antisense orientation and exhibiting substantial reductions in the activity of this enzyme exhibit a considerably reduced rate of respiration. They were, however, characterized by largely unaltered photosynthetic rates and fruit yields but restricted leaf, stem, and root growth. These lines displayed markedly altered metabolic profiles, including changes in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and in the majority of the amino acids but unaltered pyridine nucleotide content both in leaves and during the progression of fruit ripening. Moreover, they displayed a generally accelerated development exhibiting early flowering, accelerated fruit ripening, and a markedly earlier onset of leaf senescence. In addition, transcript and selective hormone profiling of gibberellins and abscisic acid revealed changes only in the former coupled to changes in transcripts encoding enzymes of gibberellin biosynthesis. The data obtained are discussed in the context of the importance of this enzyme in both photosynthetic and respiratory metabolism as well as in programs of plant development connected to carbon–nitrogen interactions. PMID:22751214

  1. Effects of melatonin during IVM in defined medium on oocyte meiosis, oxidative stress, and subsequent embryo development.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Cunha, Maria Carolina; Mesquita, Lígia G; Bressan, Fabiana; Collado, Maite Del; Balieiro, Júlio C C; Schwarz, Kátia R L; de Castro, Fernanda C; Watanabe, Osnir Y; Watanabe, Yeda F; de Alencar Coelho, Lia; Leal, Cláudia L V

    2016-10-15

    Melatonin may have beneficial effects when used in oocyte maturation and embryo development culture. The effect of melatonin during IVM on meiosis resumption and progression in bovine oocytes and on expression of antioxidant enzymes, nuclear fragmentation and free radicals, as well as on embryo development were assessed. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were matured in vitro with melatonin (10(-9) and 10(-6) M), FSH (positive control), or without hormones (negative control) in defined medium. Maturation rates were evaluated at 6, 12, 18, and 24 hours. Transcripts for antioxidant enzymes (CuZnSOD, MnSOD, and glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4)) in oocytes and cumulus cells, nuclear fragmentation in cumulus cells (TUNEL) and reactive oxygen species levels in oocytes (carboxy-H2 difluorofluorescein diacetate) were determined at 24 hours IVM. Effect of treatments on embryo development was determined after in vitro fertilization and culture. At 12 hours, meiosis resumption rates in FSH and melatonin-treated groups were similar (69.6%-81.8%, P > 0.05). At 24 hours, most oocytes were in metaphase II, with FSH showing highest rates (90.0%, P < 0.05) compared with the other groups (51.6%-69.1%, P > 0.05). In cumulus cells, MnSOD expression was higher in FSH group (P < 0.05) whereas Cu,ZnSOD transcripts were more abundant in melatonin group (10(-6)M; P < 0.05). Nuclear fragmentation in cumulus cells was highest in controls (37.4%/10,000 cells; P < 0.05) and lower in FSH and 10(-6)M melatonin (29.4% and 25.6%/10,000 cells, respectively). Reactive oxygen species levels were lower in oocytes matured with 10(-6)M melatonin than in control and FSH groups (P < 0.05). Embryo development from oocytes matured only with melatonin was similar to those matured in complete medium (P > 0.05). In conclusion, although melatonin during IVM in a defined medium does not stimulate nuclear maturation progression it does stimulate meiosis resumption and such treated oocytes support

  2. Effects of melatonin during IVM in defined medium on oocyte meiosis, oxidative stress, and subsequent embryo development.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Cunha, Maria Carolina; Mesquita, Lígia G; Bressan, Fabiana; Collado, Maite Del; Balieiro, Júlio C C; Schwarz, Kátia R L; de Castro, Fernanda C; Watanabe, Osnir Y; Watanabe, Yeda F; de Alencar Coelho, Lia; Leal, Cláudia L V

    2016-10-15

    Melatonin may have beneficial effects when used in oocyte maturation and embryo development culture. The effect of melatonin during IVM on meiosis resumption and progression in bovine oocytes and on expression of antioxidant enzymes, nuclear fragmentation and free radicals, as well as on embryo development were assessed. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were matured in vitro with melatonin (10(-9) and 10(-6) M), FSH (positive control), or without hormones (negative control) in defined medium. Maturation rates were evaluated at 6, 12, 18, and 24 hours. Transcripts for antioxidant enzymes (CuZnSOD, MnSOD, and glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4)) in oocytes and cumulus cells, nuclear fragmentation in cumulus cells (TUNEL) and reactive oxygen species levels in oocytes (carboxy-H2 difluorofluorescein diacetate) were determined at 24 hours IVM. Effect of treatments on embryo development was determined after in vitro fertilization and culture. At 12 hours, meiosis resumption rates in FSH and melatonin-treated groups were similar (69.6%-81.8%, P > 0.05). At 24 hours, most oocytes were in metaphase II, with FSH showing highest rates (90.0%, P < 0.05) compared with the other groups (51.6%-69.1%, P > 0.05). In cumulus cells, MnSOD expression was higher in FSH group (P < 0.05) whereas Cu,ZnSOD transcripts were more abundant in melatonin group (10(-6)M; P < 0.05). Nuclear fragmentation in cumulus cells was highest in controls (37.4%/10,000 cells; P < 0.05) and lower in FSH and 10(-6)M melatonin (29.4% and 25.6%/10,000 cells, respectively). Reactive oxygen species levels were lower in oocytes matured with 10(-6)M melatonin than in control and FSH groups (P < 0.05). Embryo development from oocytes matured only with melatonin was similar to those matured in complete medium (P > 0.05). In conclusion, although melatonin during IVM in a defined medium does not stimulate nuclear maturation progression it does stimulate meiosis resumption and such treated oocytes support

  3. Increased expression of pentraxin 3 after in vivo and in vitro stimulation with gonadotropins in porcine oocyte-cumulus complexes and granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Nagyova, E; Kalous, J; Nemcova, L

    2016-07-01

    It has been previously shown that multimeric pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a key component of the cumulus oophorus extracellular matrix (ECM) in mice. In response to the ovulatory LH surge, the cumulus cells assemble a unique ECM that envelopes the oocyte and cumulus cell complex. Importantly, cumuli from PTX3(-/-) mice were defective in their ECM organization and their fertility was impaired. It has been demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 6 catalyzes the formation of heavy chains of (inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor) -hyaluronan complexes and these are then cross-linked via PTX3. This process is tightly regulated and requires the proteins to meet/interact in the correct order. Finally, in this way, the above-listed proteins form the cumulus oophorus ECM. We investigated whether PTX3 is expressed in the porcine preovulatory follicle. Porcine oocyte-cumulus complexes (OCC) and mural granulosa cells (MGC) from gilts were obtained either after stimulation in vivo with eCG/hCG (4, 8, 16, 24, and 32 h) or culture in vitro (4, 24, and 44 h) in FSH/LH-supplemented medium. The methods performed were real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot analysis, and immunostaining. The expression of PTX3 transcripts was significantly increased 24 h after either in vivo hCG stimulation or in vitro FSH/LH treatment in both OCC and MGC. Western blot analysis with PTX3 antibody revealed that not only matrix extracts from in vivo-stimulated gilts contain high levels of PTX3 protein but also matrix extracts of FSH/LH-stimulated OCC cultured in medium supplemented either with follicular fluid or with porcine serum. The localization of PTX3 in the cumulus oocyte complex was confirmed by immunostaining. In conclusion, PTX3 is produced by porcine OCC and MGC both in vivo and in vitro with gonadotropin stimuli inducing cumulus expansion.

  4. Transient exposure to sodium butyrate after germinal vesicle breakdown improves meiosis but not developmental competence in pig oocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Limei; Song, Guangqi; Gao, Fei; Guan, Jiyu; Tang, Bo; Li, Ziyi

    2012-05-01

    Oocyte maturation is a complex process during which epigenetic modifications are dramatically changed, especially histone acetylation and phosphorylation. We have investigated the effects of NaBu (sodium butyrate), a natural HDAC (histone deacetylase) inhibitor, on porcine oocyte maturation at different stages and subsequent embryonic development to improve IVF (in vitro fertilization) and embryo production. COCs (cumulus oocyte complexes) were cultured, IVM (in vitro maturation) supplemented with 1 mM NaBu before or after GVBD [GV (germinal vesicle) breakdown] during maturation. NaBu delayed oocyte meiosis in the GV and GVBD stages in an exposure-dependent manner. However, the short treatment with 1 mM NaBu after GVBD significantly improved the meiotic competence. No positive effects of NaBu on GSH levels and subsequent embryonic development following IVF were seen. Transient exposure to NaBu after GVBD improves meiotic competence, but not subsequently, probably by having an effect on histone acetylation during oocyte maturation.

  5. Data Product Maturity

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-25

    ... document, maturity levels are provided separately for each scientific data set (SDS) included with the data files. The data product ... indiscriminate use of these data products as the basis for research findings, journal publications, and/or presentations.   ...

  6. Recombinant human growth differentiation factor-9 improves oocyte reprogramming competence and subsequent development of bovine cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianmin; Hu, Guangdong; Wang, Yongsheng; Liang, Dong; Gao, Mingqing; Sun, Hongzheng; Zhang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    Previously, we found that oocyte-secreted factors (OSFs) secreted by denuded oocytes during in vitro maturation (IVM) enhance subsequent development of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. This treatment requires many oocytes during IVM. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate whether supplementing with recombinant growth differentiation factor-9 (GDF9), one of crucial OFSs, in oocyte maturation medium could improve developmental competence of bovine oocytes and subsequent development of cloned embryos. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from antral follicles of bovine ovaries collected from an abattoir were cultured with (SCNT+GDF9 group) or without (SCNT group) 200 ng/mL recombinant human GDF9 in oocyte maturation medium. After 22 h, metaphase II (MII) oocytes were used for SCNT. The presence of 200 ng/mL GDF9 significantly increased oocyte maturation rates, the cleavage rate, and blastocyst formation rates of bovine cloned embryos. The blastocyst total, inner cell mass (ICM) cell numbers, and ratio of ICM:TE were higher, whereas the rate of apoptosis in bovine cloned blastocysts was lower in the SCNT+GDF9 group than in the SCNT group. The histone modifications at various sites were also different between each group. These results suggest that COCs cultured with recombinant GDF9 in oocyte maturation medium improve oocyte developmental competence and subsequent developmental competence of cloned embryo in cattle.

  7. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.

  8. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core ismore » more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.« less

  9. An unexpected twist in viral capsid maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, Ilya; Gan, Lu; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Duda, Robert L.; Hendrix, Roger W.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, John E.

    2009-04-14

    Lambda-like double-stranded (ds) DNA bacteriophage undergo massive conformational changes in their capsid shell during the packaging of their viral genomes. Capsid shells are complex organizations of hundreds of protein subunits that assemble into intricate quaternary complexes that ultimately are able to withstand over 50 atm of pressure during genome packaging. The extensive integration between subunits in capsids requires the formation of an intermediate complex, termed a procapsid, from which individual subunits can undergo the necessary refolding and structural rearrangements needed to transition to the more stable capsid. Although various mature capsids have been characterized at atomic resolution, no such procapsid structure is available for a dsDNA virus or bacteriophage. Here we present a procapsid X-ray structure at 3.65 {angstrom} resolution, termed prohead II, of the lambda-like bacteriophage HK97, the mature capsid structure of which was previously solved to 3.44 {angstrom}. A comparison of the two largely different capsid forms has unveiled an unprecedented expansion mechanism that describes the transition. Crystallographic and hydrogen/deuterium exchange data presented here demonstrate that the subunit tertiary structures are significantly different between the two states, with twisting and bending motions occurring in both helical and -sheet regions. We also identified subunit interactions at each three-fold axis of the capsid that are maintained throughout maturation. The interactions sustain capsid integrity during subunit refolding and provide a fixed hinge from which subunits undergo rotational and translational motions during maturation. Previously published calorimetric data of a closely related bacteriophage, P22, showed that capsid maturation was an exothermic process that resulted in a release of 90 kJ mol{sup -1} of energy. We propose that the major tertiary changes presented in this study reveal a structural basis for an exothermic

  10. Bluetongue virus capsid assembly and maturation.

    PubMed

    Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Roy, Polly

    2014-08-01

    Maturation is an intrinsic phase of the viral life cycle and is often intertwined with egress. In this review we focus on orbivirus maturation by using Bluetongue virus (BTV) as a representative. BTV, a member of the genus Orbivirus within the family Reoviridae, has over the last three decades been subjected to intense molecular study and is thus one of the best understood viruses. BTV is a non-enveloped virus comprised of two concentric protein shells that encapsidate 10 double-stranded RNA genome segments. Upon cell entry, the outer capsid is shed, releasing the core which does not disassemble into the cytoplasm. The polymerase complex within the core then synthesizes transcripts from each genome segment and extrudes these into the cytoplasm where they act as templates for protein synthesis. Newly synthesized ssRNA then associates with the replicase complex prior to encapsidation by inner and outer protein layers of core within virus-triggered inclusion bodies. Maturation of core occurs outside these inclusion bodies (IBs) via the addition of the outer capsid proteins, which appears to be coupled to a non-lytic, exocytic pathway during early infection. Similar to the enveloped viruses, BTV hijacks the exocytosis and endosomal sorting complex required for trafficking (ESCRT) pathway via a non-structural glycoprotein. This exquisitely detailed understanding is assembled from a broad array of assays, spanning numerous and diverse in vitro and in vivo studies. Presented here are the detailed insights of BTV maturation and egress. PMID:25196482

  11. CHEMERIN (RARRES2) decreases in vitro granulosa cell steroidogenesis and blocks oocyte meiotic progression in bovine species.

    PubMed

    Reverchon, Maxime; Bertoldo, Michael J; Ramé, Christelle; Froment, Pascal; Dupont, Joëlle

    2014-05-01

    CHEMERIN, or RARRES2, is a new adipokine that is involved in the regulation of adipogenesis, energy metabolism, and inflammation. Recent data suggest that it also plays a role in reproductive function in rats and humans. Here we studied the expression of CHEMERIN and its three receptors (CMKLR1, GPR1, and CCRL2) in the bovine ovary and investigated the in vitro effects of this hormone on granulosa cell steroidogenesis and oocyte maturation. By RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry, we found CHEMERIN, CMKLR1, GPR1, and CCRL2 in various ovarian cells, including granulosa and theca cells, corpus luteum, and oocytes. In cultured bovine granulosa cells, INSULIN, IGF1, and two insulin sensitizers-metformin and rosiglitazone-increased rarres2 mRNA expression whereas they decreased cmklr1, gpr1, and cclr2 mRNA expression. Furthermore, TNF alpha and ADIPONECTIN significantly increased rarres2 and cmklr1 expression, respectively. In cultured bovine granulosa cells, human recombinant CHEMERIN (hRec, 200 ng/ml) reduced production of both progesterone and estradiol, cholesterol content, STAR abundance, CYP19A1 and HMGCR proteins, and the phosphorylation levels of MAPK3/MAPK1 in the presence or absence of FSH (10(-8) M) and IGF1 (10(-8) M). All of these effects were abolished by using an anti-CMKLR1 antibody. In bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes, the addition of hRec (200 ng/ml) in the maturation medium arrested most oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage, and this was associated with a decrease in MAPK3/1 phosphorylation in both oocytes and cumulus cells. Thus, in cultured bovine granulosa cells, hRec decreases steroidogenesis, cholesterol synthesis, and MAPK3/1 phosphorylation, probably through CMKLR1. Moreover, in cumulus-oocyte complexes, it blocked meiotic progression at the germinal vesicle stage and inhibited MAPK3/1 phosphorylation in both the oocytes and cumulus cells during in vitro maturation. PMID:24671882

  12. A Socioanalytic Model of Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Robert; Roberts, Brent W.

    2004-01-01

    K0 describes a point of view on maturity that departs from earlier treatments in two ways. First, it rejects the popular assumption from humanistic psychology that maturity is a function of self-actualization and stipulates that maturity is related to certain performance capacities--namely, the ability to form lasting relationships and to achieve…

  13. VARIABLES ASSOCIATED WITH VOCATIONAL MATURITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REICHMAN, WALTER

    EVIDENCE ABOUT THE CONSTRUCT VALIDITY OF PRESUMED VOCATIONAL MATURITY FACTOR SCORES WAS OBTAINED BY STUDYING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FACTORS OF VOCATIONAL MATURITY AND A GROUP OF CONCURRENT VARIABLES DEEMED RELEVANT TO VOCATIONAL MATURITY. THESE VARIABLES WERE CLASSIFIED INTO FIVE GROUPS--FAMILY SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS, ABILITY AND ACHIEVEMENT,…

  14. Intrafallopian transfer of gametes and early stage embryos for in vivo culture in cattle.

    PubMed

    Wetscher, F; Havlicek, V; Huber, T; Gilles, M; Tesfaye, D; Griese, J; Wimmers, K; Schellander, K; Müller, M; Brem, G; Besenfelder, U

    2005-07-01

    It may be possible to avoid inadequate in vitro culture conditions by incubating gametes or embryos in the oviducts for a short time. Ideally, an optimized procedure should be devised, combining in vitro and in vivo systems, in order to achieve synchronization in cattle. We transferred gametes as well as embryos in various stages of development and placed them into the oviducts. Embryos were recovered on Day 7 by flushing of oviducts and uterine horns. Blastocyst rates were determined on Day 7 and on Day 8. Experimental designs included transfer of in vitro matured cumulus oocyte complexes into previously inseminated heifers (COCs group), transfer of in vitro matured COCs simultaneously with capacitated spermatozoa (GIFTs group), transfer of four to eight cell stage embryos developed in vitro after IVM/IVF (Cleaved Stages group) and a group of solely in vitro produced embryos (IVP control group). Our results indicate that in vivo culture of IVM/IVF embryos in the homologous bovine oviduct has a positive influence on subsequent pre-implantation development. In addition, we have evidence that in vitro maturation and in vivo fertilization cannot be synchronized. PMID:15935840

  15. Interaction between differential gene expression profile and phenotype in bovine blastocysts originating from oocytes exposed to elevated non-esterified fatty acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeck, V; Rizos, D; Gutierrez-Adan, A; Pintelon, I; Jorssen, E; Dufort, I; Sirard, M A; Verlaet, A; Hermans, N; Bols, P E J; Leroy, J L M R

    2015-01-01

    Maternal metabolic disorders linked to lipolysis are major risk factors for reproductive failure. A notable feature of such disorders is increased non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations in the blood, which are reflected in the ovarian follicular fluid. Elevated NEFA concentrations impact on the maturing oocyte and even alter subsequent embryo physiology. The aetiological mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, in the present study, bovine in vitro maturing cumulus-oocyte complexes were exposed (24 h) to three different maturation treatments containing: (1) physiological (72 µM) NEFA concentrations (=control); (2) elevated (75 µM) stearic acid (SA) concentrations (=HIGH SA); and (3) elevated (425 µM) NEFA concentrations (=HIGH COMBI). Zygotes were fertilised and cultured following standard procedures. Transcriptomic analyses in resulting Day 7.5 blastocysts revealed that the major pathways affected are related to lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in HIGH COMBI embryos and to lipid metabolism and cell death in HIGH SA embryos. Furthermore, lower glutathione content and a reduced number of lipid droplets per cell were observed in HIGH SA-exposed oocytes and resulting morulae, respectively, compared with their HIGH COMBI-exposed counterparts. Vitrified embryos originating from HIGH SA-exposed oocytes tended to exhibit lower survival rates compared with controls. These data suggest possible mechanisms explaining why females across species suffering lipolytic disorders experience difficulties in conceiving.

  16. Trans-vaginal oocyte retrieval and subsequent in vitro production of embryos from a cow involuntarily culled.

    PubMed

    Shaw, D G; Bowles, C M; Raja, K; Lishman, A W

    1999-09-01

    A Holstein cow of high genetic merit, in late lactation (205 days) and diagnosed with salpingitis (after 4 infertile services and veterinary consultation), was subjected to 1 trans-vaginal oocyte collection attempt, prior to slaughter. Of an estimated 10 follicles punctured, a total of 4 cumulus-oocyte complexes were retrieved. These were matured in vitro in a maturation medium for 24 hours. After 24 hours maturation, the oocytes were fertilised in vitro with Percoll-processed frozen/thawed imported semen, of the owner's choice. Fertilisation was achieved in a modified Tyrode's medium. At 18 hours post-insemination, the presumptive zygotes were transferred into culture in vitro in Charles Rosenkran's amino-acid medium and supplemented on Day 4 post-insemination with 10% foetal calf serum. All in vitro procedures were conducted in 50 microl medium droplets, under oil, in a humidified incubator at 38.5 degrees C in 5% CO2 in air. Three of the potential zygotes cleaved and, by Day 7 of culture, these had developed to the morula stage. The embryos were frozen in 1.5 M ethylene glycol and later transferred non-surgically to synchronised Holstein recipient heifers. One morula resulted in the only pregnancy and subsequent birth of a healthy heifer calf. An independent commercial company confirmed parentage through standard blood-typing assays. The genetic salvage of oocytes, for in vitro production of embryos, has potential benefits to the producer.

  17. Propolis inhibits osteoclast maturation.

    PubMed

    Pileggi, Roberta; Antony, Kathryn; Johnson, Kristie; Zuo, Jian; Shannon Holliday, L

    2009-12-01

    Propolis, a natural product produced by the honey bee, has been successfully used in medicine as an anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial agent. Traumatic injuries to the teeth, especially avulsion injuries, present a challenging situation for the clinician because of post-treatment complications, such as inflammatory and/or replacement resorption. Agents that reduce osteoclast numbers and activity may be useful in the treatment of traumatic injuries to the teeth. In this study, we evaluated propolis as an anti-resorptive agent. Calcitriol-stimulated mouse marrow cultures, which contain both osteoclasts and osteoblasts, were exposed to the ethanol extracts of propolis or vehicle control and stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-activity to identify osteoclasts. A significant, dose-dependent reduction in multinuclear TRAP+ cells was demonstrated, although the propolis treatment accommodated cell growth and survival (P < 0.05). Propolis also reduced the formation of actin rings in pure cultures of RAW 264.7 osteoclast-like cells, suggesting that it exerts direct actions on osteoclast maturation. In summary, our data suggest that propolis inhibits late stages of osteoclast maturation including fusion of osteoclasts precursors to form giant cells and formation of actin rings. This supports the hypothesis that it may prove useful as a medicament to reduce resorption associated with traumatic injuries to the teeth. PMID:19843135

  18. Pitch perception prior to cortical maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Bonnie K.

    Pitch perception plays an important role in many complex auditory tasks including speech perception, music perception, and sound source segregation. Because of the protracted and extensive development of the human auditory cortex, pitch perception might be expected to mature, at least over the first few months of life. This dissertation investigates complex pitch perception in 3-month-olds, 7-month-olds and adults -- time points when the organization of the auditory pathway is distinctly different. Using an observer-based psychophysical procedure, a series of four studies were conducted to determine whether infants (1) discriminate the pitch of harmonic complex tones, (2) discriminate the pitch of unresolved harmonics, (3) discriminate the pitch of missing fundamental melodies, and (4) have comparable sensitivity to pitch and spectral changes as adult listeners. The stimuli used in these studies were harmonic complex tones, with energy missing at the fundamental frequency. Infants at both three and seven months of age discriminated the pitch of missing fundamental complexes composed of resolved and unresolved harmonics as well as missing fundamental melodies, demonstrating perception of complex pitch by three months of age. More surprisingly, infants in both age groups had lower pitch and spectral discrimination thresholds than adult listeners. Furthermore, no differences in performance on any of the tasks presented were observed between infants at three and seven months of age. These results suggest that subcortical processing is not only sufficient to support pitch perception prior to cortical maturation, but provides adult-like sensitivity to pitch by three months.

  19. CFD - Mature Technology?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, numerical methods and simulation tools for fluid dynamic problems have advanced as a new discipline, namely, computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Although a wide spectrum of flow regimes are encountered in many areas of science and engineering, simulation of compressible flow has been the major driver for developing computational algorithms and tools. This is probably due to a large demand for predicting the aerodynamic performance characteristics of flight vehicles, such as commercial, military, and space vehicles. As flow analysis is required to be more accurate and computationally efficient for both commercial and mission-oriented applications (such as those encountered in meteorology, aerospace vehicle development, general fluid engineering and biofluid analysis) CFD tools for engineering become increasingly important for predicting safety, performance and cost. This paper presents the author's perspective on the maturity of CFD, especially from an aerospace engineering point of view.

  20. Sperm Proteome Maturation in the Mouse Epididymis

    PubMed Central

    Skerget, Sheri; Rosenow, Matthew A.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Karr, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, transit through the epididymis, which involves the acquisition, loss and modification of proteins, is required to confer motility and fertilization competency to sperm. The overall dynamics of maturation is poorly understood, and a systems level understanding of the complex maturation process will provide valuable new information about changes occurring during epididymal transport. We report the proteomes of sperm collected from the caput, corpus and cauda segments of the mouse epididymis, identifying 1536, 1720 and 1234 proteins respectively. This study identified 765 proteins that are present in sperm obtained from all three segments. We identified 1766 proteins that are potentially added (732) or removed (1034) from sperm during epididymal transit. Phenotypic analyses of the caput, corpus and cauda sperm proteomes identified 60 proteins that have known sperm phenotypes when mutated, or absent from sperm. Our analysis indicates that as much as one-third of proteins with known sperm phenotypes are added to sperm during epididymal transit. GO analyses revealed that cauda sperm are enriched for specific functions including sperm-egg recognition and motility, consistent with the observation that sperm acquire motility and fertilization competency during transit through the epididymis. In addition, GO analyses revealed that the immunity protein profile of sperm changes during sperm maturation. Finally, we identified components of the 26S proteasome, the immunoproteasome, and a proteasome activator in mature sperm. PMID:26556802

  1. Oocyte expression, secretion and somatic cell interaction of mouse bone morphogenetic protein 15 during the peri-ovulatory period.

    PubMed

    Mester, Brigitta; Ritter, Lesley J; Pitman, Janet L; Bibby, Adrian H; Gilchrist, Robert B; McNatty, Kenneth P; Juengel, Jennifer L; McIntosh, C Joy

    2015-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) is a key intraovarian growth factor regulating mammalian fertility, yet expression and localisation of different BMP15 protein forms within ovarian follicles around the time of the preovulatory LH surge remains unclear. Using immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry, the present study identified that post-translationally processed BMP15 proregion and mature proteins are increasingly expressed and localised with cumulus and granulosa cells from mice treated with pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) + human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). However, this increased expression was absent in cumulus-oocyte complexes matured in vitro. Pull-down assays further revealed that the recombinant BMP15 proregion is capable of specific interaction with isolated granulosa cells. To verify an oocyte, and not somatic cell, origin of Bmp15 mRNA and coregulated growth differentiation factor 9 (Gdf9), in situ hybridisation and quantitative polymerase chain reaction results confirmed the exclusive oocyte localisation of Bmp15 and Gdf9, regardless of treatment or assay method. Relative oocyte expression levels of Bmp15 and Gdf9 decreased significantly after PMSG + hCG treatment; nevertheless, throughout all treatments, the Bmp15:Gdf9 mRNA expression ratio remained unchanged. Together, these data provide evidence that the preovulatory LH surge leads to upregulation of several forms of BMP15 protein secreted by the oocyte for putative sequestration and/or interaction with ovarian follicular somatic cells.

  2. Amphiregulin co-operates with bone morphogenetic protein 15 to increase bovine oocyte developmental competence: effects on gap junction-mediated metabolite supply.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, Satoshi; Ritter, Lesley J; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Mottershead, David G; Thompson, Jeremy G; Gilchrist, Robert B

    2014-06-01

    This study assessed the participation of amphiregulin (AREG) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) during maturation of bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) on cumulus cell function and their impact on subsequent embryo development. AREG treatment of COCs enhanced blastocyst formation and quality only when in the presence of BMP15. Expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 was enhanced by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) but not by AREG, which was reflected in the level of cumulus expansion. Although both FSH and AREG stimulated glycolysis, AREG-treated COCs had higher glucose consumption, lactate production and ratio of lactate production to glucose uptake. Autofluorescence levels in oocytes, indicative of NAD(P)H and FAD(++), were increased with combined AREG and BMP15 treatment of COCs. In contrast, these treatments did not alter autofluorescence levels when cumulus cells were removed from oocytes, even in the presence of other COCs, suggesting that oocyte-cumulus gap-junctional communication (GJC) is required. FSH contributed to maintaining GJC for an extended period of time. Remarkably, BMP15 was equally effective at maintaining GJC even in the presence of AREG. Hence, AREG stimulation of COC glycolysis and BMP15 preservation of GJC may facilitate efficient transfer of metabolites from cumulus cells to the oocyte thereby enhancing oocyte developmental competence. These results have implications for improving in vitro oocyte maturation systems.

  3. Negative energy balance affects imprint stability in oocytes recovered from postpartum dairy cows.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, Alan M; O'Gorman, Aoife; al Naib, Abdullah; Brennan, Lorraine; Daly, Edward; Duffy, Pat; Fair, Trudee

    2014-09-01

    Ovarian follicle development in post-partum, high-producing dairy cows, occurs in a compromised endogenous metabolic environment (referred to as negative energy balance, NEB). Key events that occur during oocyte/follicle growth, such as the vital process of genomic imprinting, may be detrimentally affected by this altered ovarian environment. Imprinting is crucial for placental function and regulation of fetal growth, therefore failure to establish and maintain imprints during oocyte growth may contribute to early embryonic loss. Using ovum pick-up (OPU), oocytes and follicular fluid samples were recovered from cows between days 20 and 115 post-calving, encompassing the NEB period. In a complimentary study, cumulus oocyte complexes were in vitro matured under high non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations and in the presence of the methyl-donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Pyrosequencing revealed the loss of methylation at several imprinted loci in the OPU derived oocytes. The loss of DNA methylation was observed at the PLAGL1 locus in oocytes, following in vitro maturation (IVM) in the presence of elevated NEFAs and SAM. Finally, metabolomic analysis of postpartum follicular fluid samples revealed significant differences in several branched chain amino acids, with fatty acid profiles bearing similarities to those characteristic of lactating dairy cows. These results provide the first evidence that (1) the postpartum ovarian environment may affect maternal imprint acquisition and (2) elevated NEFAs during IVM can lead to the loss of imprinted gene methylation in bovine oocytes.

  4. Regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase 3/1 activity during meiosis resumption in mammals

    PubMed Central

    PROCHAZKA, Radek; BLAHA, Milan

    2015-01-01

    In vivo, resumption of oocyte meiosis occurs in large ovarian follicles after the preovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH). The LH surge leads to the activation of a broad signaling network in mural granulosa cells equipped with LH receptors. The signals generated in the mural granulosa cells are further augmented by locally produced peptides or steroids and transferred to the cumulus cell compartment and the oocyte itself. Over the last decade, essential progress has been made in the identification of molecular events associated with the final maturation and ovulation of mammalian oocytes. All new evidence argues for a multiple roles of mitogen-activated protein kinase 3/1 (MAPK3/1) in the gonadotropin-induced ovulation processes. However, the knowledge of gonadotropin-induced signaling pathways leading to MAPK3/1 activation in follicular cells seems limited. To date, only the LH-induced transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor/MAPK3/1 pathway has been described in granulosa/cumulus cells even though other mechanisms of MAPK3/1 activation have been detected in other types of cells. In this review, we aimed to summarize recent advances in the elucidation of gonadotropin-induced mechanisms leading to the activation of MAPK3/1 in preovulatory follicles and cultured cumulus-oocyte complexes and to point out a specific role of this kinase in the processes accompanying final maturation of the mammalian oocyte. PMID:26688146

  5. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Levinson, Alex; Mater, J.; Drummond, R.

    2010-04-28

    The integration of automation associated with electricity resources (including transmission and distribution automation and demand-side resources operated by end-users) is key to supporting greater efficiencies and incorporating variable renewable resources and electric vehicles into the power system. The integration problems faced by this community are analogous to those faced in the health industry, emergency services, and other complex communities with many stakeholders. To highlight this issue and encourage communication and the development of a smart grid interoperability community, the GridWise Architecture Council (GWAC) created an Interoperability Context-Setting Framework. This "conceptual model" has been helpful to explain the importance of organizational alignment in addition to technical and informational interface specifications for "smart grid" devices and systems. As a next step to building a community sensitive to interoperability, the GWAC is investigating an interoperability maturity model (IMM) based on work done by others to address similar circumstances. The objective is to create a tool or set of tools that encourages a culture of interoperability in this emerging community. The tools would measure status and progress, analyze gaps, and prioritize efforts to improve the situation.

  6. Ovum pick up and in vitro embryo production in cows superstimulated with an individually adapted superstimulation protocol.

    PubMed

    De Roover, R; Genicot, G; Leonard, S; Bols, P; Dessy, F

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this experiment was to apply an ovarian superstimulation protocol prior to ovum pick up (OPU), tailored to the individual donor response, to evaluate its advantages and disadvantages in terms of follicle numbers and diameters, the numbers of retrieved oocytes and day 7 cultured blastocysts. Ten adult non-lactating dairy cows were superstimulated with pFSH and subjected to ovum pick up-in vitro fertilisation (OPU-IVF) 6 times at 2-week intervals. On day 0 of each 2-week period, all follicles >8mm were ablated and an ear implant (Crestar, Intervet, Belgium) was inserted. On day 2, 48 h after follicle ablation the animals were administered six equal doses of pFSH, divided into morning and evening doses for 3 days. On day 7, 48 h following the last pFSH injection, follicle diameters were measured by ultrasound and all follicles were subjected to OPU. All cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC), regardless of their quality, were subjected to in vitro maturation-in vitro fertilisation-in vitro culture (IVM-IVF-IVC). The total dose of pFSH prior to the first OPU session was 300 microg per animal. During the following OPU sessions, the total pFSH dose was either kept unchanged, increased or reduced (+/-50 microg), according to the percentage of follicles of more than 11 mm in diameter, present in the previous session of that particular donor. The mean number of punctured follicles per session was 11.9 +/- 7.7 (mean +/- S.D.), with 16% of follicles exceeding 11 mm. These follicles yielded a mean of 5.6 +/- 4.1 cumulus oocyte complexes (COC), 32% of which had >/=3 layers of cumulus cells (quality 1 and 2). The recovery rate was 47%. Finally, all COC were subjected to IVM-IVF-IVC, which resulted in a mean of 2.0 +/- 2.3 blastocysts on day 7 postinsemination. The subtle changes in pFSH dose influenced the sizes but not the numbers of follicles, the latter parameter was influenced by the individual donor and the OPU session.

  7. Intrafollicular transfer of fresh and vitrified immature bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Sprícigo, José Felipe W; Sena Netto, Severino Bernardino; Muterlle, Carolle Vieira; Rodrigues, Sarah de Andrade Dias; Leme, Ligiane Oliveira; Guimarães, Ana Luiza; Caixeta, Felippe Manoel Costa; Franco, Maurício Machain; Pivato, Ivo; Dode, Margot Alves Nunes

    2016-11-01

    Embryo production by intrafollicular oocyte transfer (IFOT) represents an alternative for production of a large number of embryos without requiring any hormones and only basic laboratory handling. We aimed to (1) evaluate the efficiency of IFOT using immature oocytes (IFIOT) and (2) compare embryo development after IFIOT using fresh or vitrified immature oocytes. First, six IFIOTs were performed using immature oocytes obtained by ovum pickup. After insemination and uterine flush for embryo recovery, 21.3% of total transferred structures were recovered excluding the recipient's own oocyte or embryo, and of those, 26% (5.5% of transferred cumulus-oocyte complexes [COCs]) were morula or blastocyst. In the second study, we compared fresh and vitrified-warmed immature COCs. Four groups were used: (1) fresh immature COCs (Fresh-Vitro); (2) vitrified immature COCs (Vit-Vitro), with both groups 1 and 2 being matured, fertilized, and cultured in vitro; (3) fresh immature COCs submitted to IFIOT (Fresh-IFIOT); and (4) vitrified immature COCs submitted to IFIOT (Vit-IFIOT). Cumulus-oocyte complexes (n = 25) from Fresh-IFIOT or Vit-IFIOT groups were injected into dominant follicles (>10 mm) of synchronized heifers. After excluding one structure or blastocyst, the recovery rates per transferred oocyte were higher (P < 0.05) for Fresh-IFIOT (47.6%) than for Vit-IFIOT (12.0%). Blastocyst yield per initial oocyte was higher (P < 0.05) for Fresh-Vitro (42.1%) than for Fresh-IFIOT (12.9%). Vit-Vitro presented higher (P < 0.05) embryo development (6.3%), compared to Vit-IFIOT, which did not result in any extra embryo. Although IFOT did not improve developmental competence of vitrified oocytes, we achieved viable blastocysts and pregnancies produced after IFIOT of fresh bovine immature oocytes. Further work on this technique is warranted as an option both for research studies and for clinical bovine embryo production in the absence of laboratory facilities for IVF. PMID

  8. Influence of FSH and hCG on the resumption of meiosis of bovine oocytes surrounded by cumulus cells connected to membrana granulosa.

    PubMed

    van Tol, H T; van Eijk, M J; Mummery, C L; van den Hurk, R; Bevers, M M

    1996-10-01

    Cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) and cumulus oocyte complexes connected to a piece of the membrane granulosa (COCGs) were isolated from bovine antral follicles with a diameter of 2 to 8 mm. After culture of COCGs without gonadotrophic hormones for 22 hr approximately 50% of the oocytes were still in the germinal vesicle (GV) stage. Histology of the COCGs showed that the pieces of the membrana granulosa were free of thecal cells and parts of the basal membrane. This indicates that the membrana granulosa solely inhibits the progression of meiosis. To investigate the effect of gonadotropins on the resumption of meiosis of oocytes from small and medium sized antral follicles, COCs and COCGs were cultured with or without rec-hFSH or hCG. Addition of 0.05 IU rec-hFSH to the culture medium of COCGs resulted in germinal vesicle breakdown in 97.8% of the oocytes compared to 46% in the control group, and an increase of the diameter of the COCs (479 microns vs. 240 microns in the control group). Addition of 0.05 IU hCG to the culture medium had no effect on nuclear maturation (47.2% GV vs. 48.5% GV in the control group) nor on cumulus expansion (246 microns vs. 240 microns in the control group). RT-PCR on cDNA of the follicular wall, cumulus cells, granulosa cells, COCs, and oocytes revealed that mRNA for FSH receptor was present in all cell types except oocytes. mRNA of the LH receptor was detected exclusively in thecal cells. Nucleotide sequence analysis and alignment of the cloned PCR products showed the presence of two isoforms of the FSH receptor mRNA and two isoforms of the LH receptor mRNA. It is concluded that, in vitro, resumption of meiosis of oocytes, originating from small and medium sized antral follicles and meiotically arrested by the membrana granulosa, is triggered by FSH and not by LH. This is supported by the fact that receptors for FSH, but not for LH, are transcribed in the cumulus and granulosa cells of these follicles. PMID:8914080

  9. Work Maturity Skills Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankard, Bettina; And Others

    This teaching guide is a part of those materials developed for the Work Maturity Skills Training Program. (The Work Maturity Skills Training Program is a set of individualized competency-based units that are designed to help participants develop the competencies they need to find and retain jobs.) Following a brief description of the purpose and…

  10. Career Education and Career Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trebilco, Geoffrey R.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the relationships between career maturity and career curriculum in 38 Melbourne metropolitan secondary schools (N=2280 students) using an Australian adaption of the Career Development Inventory. Results confirmed that schools with career education programs achieved higher gains in student career maturity. (JAC)

  11. Effect of trans-10 cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid on bovine oocyte competence and fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Lapa, M; Marques, C C; Alves, S P; Vasques, M I; Baptista, M C; Carvalhais, I; Silva Pereira, M; Horta, A E M; Bessa, R J B; Pereira, R M

    2011-10-01

    The reproductive performance of dairy cows may be improved by feeding conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplements during early lactation. The mechanism of action of t10,c12 CLA is not clearly known. Our objective was to investigate the effect of t10,c12 CLA on oocyte maturation and lipid composition of cumulus oocyte complexes (COC). The developmental potential of oocytes incubated in in vitro maturation (IVM) medium supplemented with t10,c12 CLA to the blastocyst stage and embryo quality were also assessed. In experiment 1, abattoir-derived oocytes were matured in TCM199 + 10% serum supplemented with 100 μM t10,c12 CLA (t10,c12 CLA n = 672) or without it (control n = 672). Mature oocytes were either stained for chromatin configuration or inseminated and cultured for embryo development assessment. In experiment 2, COC and IVM culture media were subjected to fatty acid (FA) analysis prior and after maturation with t10,c12 CLA or without it (control). Total lipids and FA profiles in oocytes, cumulus cells and culture media were determined by gas chromatography. t10,c12 CLA supplementation to IVM medium improved (p = 0.05) embryo quality evaluated morphologically. This effect was associated with t10,c12 CLA presence (3.1 ± 0.7%, p = 0.04) and lower levels of arachidonic acid in FA profile of t10,c12 CLA mature oocytes (immature oocytes = 4.4 ± 1.9%, t10,c12 CLA mature oocytes = 1.0 ± 0.7%, p = 0.05). Differences in myristic and eicotrienoic acids, saturated and unsaturated FA concentrations between oocytes and cumulus cells were detected (p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, the presence of t10,c12 CLA during maturation interfered on lipid metabolism improving bovine oocyte competence to develop into higher quality embryos.

  12. Feasibility of Optimizing Recovery and Reserves from a Mature and Geological Complex Multiple Turbidite Offshore Calif. Reservoir through the Drilling and Completion of a Trilateral Horizontal Well, Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc.

    2001-04-04

    The intent of this project was to increase production and extend the economic life of this mature field through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and drilling technology, demonstrating the efficacy of these technologies to other small operators of aging fields. Two study periods were proposed; the first to include data assimilation and reservoir characterization and the second to drill the demonstration well. The initial study period showed that a single tri-lateral well would not be economically efficient in redevelopment of Carpinteria's multiple deep water turbidite sand reservoirs, and the study was amended to include the drilling of a series of horizontal redrills from existing surplus well bores on Pacific Operators' Platform Hogan.

  13. Epigenetic mechanisms in pubertal brain maturation

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Kathleen E.; Rodgers, Ali B.; Morgan, Christopher P.; Bale, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    Puberty is a critical period of development during which the reemergence of gonadotropin releasing hormone secretion from the hypothalamus triggers a cascade of hormone-dependent processes. Maturation of specific brain regions including the prefrontal cortex occurs during this window, but the complex mechanisms underlying these dynamic changes are not well understood. Particularly, the potential involvement of epigenetics in this programming has been under-examined. The epigenome is known to guide earlier stages of development, and it is similarly poised to regulate vital pubertal-driven brain maturation. Further, as epigenetic machinery is highly environmentally responsive, its involvement may also lend this period of growth to greater vulnerability to external insults, resulting in reprogramming and increased disease risk. Importantly, neuropsychiatric diseases commonly present in individuals during or immediately following puberty, and environmental perturbations including stress may precipitate disease onset by disrupting the normal trajectory of pubertal brain development via epigenetic mechanisms. In this review, we discuss epigenetic processes involved in pubertal brain maturation, the potential points of derailment, and the importance of future studies for understanding this dynamic developmental window and gaining a better understanding of neuropsychiatric disease risk. PMID:24239720

  14. The AGU Data Management Maturity Model Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    In September 2014, the AGU Board of Directors approved two initiatives to help the Earth and space sciences community address the growing challenges accompanying the increasing size and complexity of data. These initiatives are: 1) Data Science Credentialing: development of a continuing education and professional certification program to help scientists in their careers and to meet growing responsibilities and requirements around data science; and 2) Data Management Maturity (DMM) Model: development and implementation of a data management maturity model to assess process maturity against best practices, and to identify opportunities in organizational data management processes. Each of these has been organized within AGU as an Editorial Board and both Boards have held kick off meetings. The DMM model Editorial Board will recommend strategies for adapting and deploying a DMM model to the Earth and space sciences create guidance documents to assist in its implementation, and provide input on a pilot appraisal process. This presentation will provide an overview of progress to date in the DMM model Editorial Board and plans for work to be done over the upcoming year.

  15. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the...

  16. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the...

  17. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will...

  18. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will...

  19. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the...

  20. The presence of corpus luteum may have a negative impact on in vitro developmental competency of bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hajarian, Hadi; Shahsavari, Mohammad H; Karami-shabankareh, Hamed; Dashtizad, Mojtaba

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of the presence or absence of corpus luteum (CL) on in vitro developmental competence of bovine oocytes. In experiment 1, cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) were collected from slaughterhouse ovaries and divided according to the presence (CL(+) oocytes) or absence (CL(-) oocytes) of a CL in the ovary. Control oocytes (C group) were obtained from ovaries which were not selected toward the presence or absence of CL. All oocytes were submitted to in vitro maturation, fertilization and culture. In experiment 2, the oocytes from the CL(+) and CL(-) ovaries were divided into grown (BCB(+)) and growing (BCB(-)) categories by means of the brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) test. The oocytes from all groups (CL(+)/BCB(+), CL(-)/BCB(+), CL(+)/BCB(-), CL(-)/BCB(-) and control oocytes) were subjected to in vitro embryo production. In experiment 1, the cleavage and blastocyst rates of CL(-) oocytes were higher than those of CL(+) oocytes (83.9% and 43% vs. 69.3% and 22.5%, respectively). In experiment 2, there was less BCB(+) oocytes (more competent oocytes) in the group of CL(+) oocytes than in the group of CL(-) oocytes. Furthermore, developmental competence of all CL(+) oocytes (CL(+)/BCB(+) and CL(+)/BCB(-)) was lower than that of all CL(-) oocytes (CL(-)/BCB(+) and CL(-)/BCB(-)). Thus, the presence of a corpus luteum in the ovary may have negative effects on developmental competence of ipsilateral oocytes. PMID:26952753

  1. Cumulus cell gene expression associated with pre-ovulatory acquisition of developmental competence in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Bunel, A; Nivet, A L; Blondin, P; Vigneault, C; Richard, F J; Sirard, M A

    2014-01-01

    The final days before ovulation impact significantly on follicular function and oocyte quality. This study investigated the cumulus cell (CC) transcriptomic changes during the oocyte developmental competence acquisition period. Six dairy cows were used for 24 oocyte collections and received FSH twice daily over 3 days, followed by FSH withdrawal for 20, 44, 68 and 92 h in four different oestrous cycles for each of the six cows. Half of the cumulus-oocyte complexes were subjected to in vitro maturation, fertilisation and culture to assess blastocyst rate. The other half of the CC underwent microarray analysis (n=3 cows, 12 oocyte collections) and qRT-PCR (n=3 other cows, 12 oocyte collections). According to blastocyst rates, 20 h of FSH withdrawal led to under-differentiated follicles (49%), 44 and 68 h to the most competent follicles (71% and 61%) and 92 h to over-differentiated ones (51%). Ten genes, from the gene lists corresponding to the three different follicular states, were subjected to qRT-PCR. Interestingly, CYP11A1 and NSDHL gene expression profiles reflected the blastocyst rate. However most genes were associated with the over-differentiated status: GATM, MAN1A1, VNN1 and NRP1. The early period of FSH withdrawal has a minimal effect on cumulus gene expression, whereas the longest period has a very significant one and indicates the beginning of the atresia process.

  2. Effect of donor age on the developmental competence of bovine oocytes retrieved by ovum pick up.

    PubMed

    Su, L; Yang, S; He, X; Li, X; Ma, J; Wang, Y; Presicce, G A; Ji, W

    2012-04-01

    To study the effect of donor age on oocyte developmental competence and steroid profiles, the crossbred cow (Murray Grey × Brahman) in Yunnan province of China were selected and divided into three groups according to its age. The three groups were young cows (n = 12; 12 months old), middle-aged cows (n = 15; parity: ≤3 calvings; age: 7-8 years old) and old cows (n = 10; parity: ≥8 calvings; age: ≥15 years old). Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were collected by 10 consecutive ovum pick up (OPU) sessions with a 4-day interval between each session, followed by in vitro maturation, fertilization and embryo development. Results showed that cleavage rates (CR) and blastocyst rates (BR) were higher in the young cows than those in the middle-aged and old cows (p < 0.05). CR and BR from COCs of the first and the fourth OPU sessions were lower than those from other sessions in the young cows and the middle-aged cows (p < 0.05), whereas the similar phenomenon was not observed in the old cows. Plasma concentrations of oestradiol were higher, and plasma concentrations of progesterone were lower before and during OPU sessions in the young cows compared with those in the same period in the middle-aged cows or the old cows (p < 0.01). In conclusion, donor age of oocytes could affect developmental competence of oocytes recovered by OPU through the action of steroid hormonal balance on follicle development.

  3. Comparison of hCG triggering versus hCG in combination with a GnRH agonist: a prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Decleer, W.; Osmanagaoglu, K.; Seynhave, B.; Kolibianakis, S.; Tarlatzis, B.; Devroey, P.

    2014-01-01

    A prospective randomized controlled trial comparing two groups of ICSI (intra-cytoplasmatic sperm injection) patients with a different form of triggering the final oocyte maturation has been performed. All patients received an ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilisation (IVF) using an antagonist protocol using recombinant-FSH (rec-FSH) and Ganirelix. 120 Patients were randomized into two groups with similar clinical parameters. The first group had triggering with hCG, whereas the second group received a combination of hCG + GnRH agonist (Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone). As the primary endpoint, the number of metaphase II oocytes were analysed, the secondary endpoints were the number of cumulus oocyte complexes (COC), the number of fertilized oocytes, embryo morphology, pregnancy rate and the number of cryopreserved embryos. The mean number of MII oocytes in the hCG triggered group was 9.2 compared with 10.3 in the hCG-GnRH agonist group. There was no statistically significant difference in the number of COCs or pregnancy rates. However, the number of patients who received at least one embryo of excellent quality was significantly higher (p = 0.001) in the group with the combined triggering (45 out of 61 patients or 73.8%) versus the group with hCG triggering alone (28 out of 59 patients or 47.5%). The number of cryopreserved embryos was also higher in this group. PMID:25593695

  4. Lipopolysaccharide initiates inflammation in bovine granulosa cells via the TLR4 pathway and perturbs oocyte meiotic progression in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bromfield, John J.; Sheldon, I. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Infections of the reproductive tract or mammary gland with Gram-negative bacteria perturb ovarian function, follicular growth and fecundity in cattle. We hypothesised that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria stimulates an inflammatory response by ovarian granulosa cells that is mediated by TLR4. The present study tested the capacity of bovine ovarian granulosa cells to initiate an inflammatory response to pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and determined subsequent effects on the in vitro maturation of oocytes. Granulosa cells elicited an inflammatory response to PAMPs (LPS, lipoteichoic acid, peptidoglycan or Pam3CSK4) with accumulation of the cytokine IL-6, and the chemokine IL-8, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Granulosa cells responded acutely to LPS with rapid phosphorylation of TLR signaling components, p38 and ERK, and increased expression of IL6 and IL8 mRNA, although nuclear translocation of p65 was not evident. Targeting TLR4 with siRNA, attenuated granulosa cell accumulation of IL-6 in response to LPS. Endocrine function of granulosa cells is regulated by FSH, but here FSH also enhanced responsiveness to LPS, increasing IL-6 and IL-8 accumulation. Furthermore, LPS stimulated IL-6 secretion and expansion by cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs), and increased rates of meiotic arrest and germinal vesicle breakdown failure. In conclusion, bovine granulosa cells initiate an innate immune response to LPS via the TLR4 pathway leading to inflammation and to perturbation of meiotic competence. PMID:21990308

  5. Advanced studies on ovary physiology in China in the past 30 years.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Xun

    2016-08-25

    Follicular development and differentiation are sequential events which are tightly regulated by endocrine hormones, intraovarian regulators and cell-cell interactions. Balanced cell proliferation and apoptosis play an important role in the selection of dominant follicle. Primordial germ cell migration and homing within the gonadal ridge requires regulation by integrated signals, such as the oocyte-secreted polypeptide growth factors, the growth and differentiation factor 9, the bone morphogenetic proteins, stem cell factor (SCF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), the transcription factor Wilms' tumour 1 (Wt1), and involves the contact of primordial germ cells with extra-cellular matrix proteins and cellular substrates and attraction by the developing gonads. Maturation of cumulus-oocyte complexes and ovulation are directly controlled by luteinizing hormone (LH) and require activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase in granulosa cells. In this review, the key molecules involved in the cell-cell interaction and signal transduction during follicular development, differentiation and ovulation will be summarized, mainly focusing on the signaling factors produced by oocyte and the somatic cells. PMID:27546498

  6. AMPK: a master energy regulator for gonadal function.

    PubMed

    Bertoldo, Michael J; Faure, Melanie; Dupont, Joëlle; Froment, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    From C. elegans to mammals (including humans), nutrition and energy metabolism significantly influence reproduction. At the cellular level, some detectors of energy status indicate whether energy reserves are abundant (obesity), or poor (diet restriction). One of these detectors is AMPK (5' AMP-activated protein kinase), a protein kinase activated by ATP deficiency but also by several natural substances such as polyphenols or synthetic molecules like metformin, used in the treatment of insulin resistance. AMPK is expressed in muscle and liver, but also in the ovary and testis. This review focuses on the main effects of AMPK identified in gonadal cells. We describe the role of AMPK in gonadal steroidogenesis, in proliferation and survival of somatic gonadal cells and in the maturation of oocytes or spermatozoa. We discuss also the role of AMPK in germ and somatic cell interactions within the cumulus-oocyte complex and in the blood testis barrier. Finally, the interface in the gonad between AMPK and modification of metabolism is reported and discussion about the role of AMPK on fertility, in regards to the treatment of infertility associated with insulin resistance (male obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome). PMID:26236179

  7. New methods for gamete rescue from gonads of nondomestic felids.

    PubMed

    Jewgenow, K; Blottner, S; Lengwinat, T; Meyer, H H

    1997-01-01

    Methods for rescuing oocytes and spermatozoa post mortem are described, which were adapted from domestic cat as a model. Ovaries were mechanically processed for large-scale recovery of oocytes. Numbers of intact cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) per animal and of preantral follicles per ovary were 18 +/- 2 and 2892 +/- 665 in domestic cats, respectively. Similar results were obtained from 13 individuals of 6 nondomestic felids: 16 +/- 2 COCs and 1867 +/- 1144 follicles. Preantral follicles were cultured for at least 7 days. Intact COCs were maturated for 24 h and fertilized in vitro with homologous or heterologous (from domestic cat) spermatozoa. Spermatozoa were collected from caudae epididymides (n = 11; five nondomestic species) and cryopreserved (n = 8) using a programmed freezer. The reproductive competence of oocytes collected post mortem was demonstrated by development to embryos (> or = 8 cells) in vitro. Spermatogenic efficiency of males was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of mitotic and meiotic testicular cells as well as by estimation of testosterone concentration in testes. The results demonstrate the possibility of retrospective assessment of male and female reproductive capacity. In conclusion, the described methods could be a useful part of gamete rescue programmes for endangered felids. PMID:9404269

  8. AMPK: a master energy regulator for gonadal function

    PubMed Central

    Bertoldo, Michael J.; Faure, Melanie; Dupont, Joëlle; Froment, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    From C. elegans to mammals (including humans), nutrition and energy metabolism significantly influence reproduction. At the cellular level, some detectors of energy status indicate whether energy reserves are abundant (obesity), or poor (diet restriction). One of these detectors is AMPK (5′ AMP-activated protein kinase), a protein kinase activated by ATP deficiency but also by several natural substances such as polyphenols or synthetic molecules like metformin, used in the treatment of insulin resistance. AMPK is expressed in muscle and liver, but also in the ovary and testis. This review focuses on the main effects of AMPK identified in gonadal cells. We describe the role of AMPK in gonadal steroidogenesis, in proliferation and survival of somatic gonadal cells and in the maturation of oocytes or spermatozoa. We discuss also the role of AMPK in germ and somatic cell interactions within the cumulus-oocyte complex and in the blood testis barrier. Finally, the interface in the gonad between AMPK and modification of metabolism is reported and discussion about the role of AMPK on fertility, in regards to the treatment of infertility associated with insulin resistance (male obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome). PMID:26236179

  9. Maturation of human auditory cortex: implications for speech perception.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jean K

    2002-05-01

    This project traced the maturation of the human auditory cortex from midgestation to young adulthood, using immunostaining of axonal neurofilaments to determine the time of onset of rapid conduction. The study identified 3 developmental periods, each characterized by maturation of a different axonal system. During the perinatal period (3rd trimester to 4th postnatal month), neurofilament expression occurs only in axons of the marginal layer. These axons drive the structural and functional development of cells in the deeper cortical layers, but do not relay external stimuli. In early childhood (6 months to 5 years), maturing thalamocortical afferents to the deeper cortical layers are the first source of input to the auditory cortex from lower levels of the auditory system. During later childhood (5 to 12 years), maturation of commissural and association axons in the superficial cortical layers allows communication between different subdivisions of the auditory cortex, thus forming a basis for more complex cortical processing of auditory stimuli. PMID:12018354

  10. Novel maturity parameters for mature to over-mature source rocks and oils based on the distribution of phenanthrene series compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zixiang; Wang, Yongli; Wu, Baoxiang; Wang, Gen; Sun, Zepeng; Xu, Liang; Zhu, Shenzhen; Sun, Lina; Wei, Zhifu

    2016-03-01

    Pyrolysis experiments of a low-mature bitumen sample originated from Cambrian was conducted in gold capsules. Abundance and distribution of phenanthrene series compounds in pyrolysis products were measured by GC-MS to investigate their changes with thermal maturity. Several maturity parameters based on the distribution of phenanthrene series compounds have been discussed. The results indicate that the distribution changes of phenanthrene series compounds are complex, and cannot be explained by individual reaction process during thermal evolution. The dealkylation cannot explain the increase of phenanthrene within the EasyRo range of 0.9% ∼ 2.1%. Adding of phenanthrene into maturity parameters based on the methylphenanthrene isomerization is unreasonable, even though MPI 1 and MPI 2 could be used to some extent. Two additional novel and an optimized maturation parameters based on the distribution of phenanthrene series compounds are proposed and their relationships to EasyRo% (x) are established: log(MPs/P) = 0.19x + 0.08 (0.9% < EasyRo% < 2.1%); log(MPs/P) = 0.64x - 0.86 (2.1% < EasyRo% < 3.4%); log(DMPs/TMPs) = 0.71x - 0.55 (0.9% < EasyRo% < 3.4%); log(MTR) = 0.84x - 0.75 (0.9% < EasyRo% < 3.4%). These significant positive correlations are strong argument for using log(MPs/P), log(DMPs/TMPs) and log(MTR) as maturity parameters, especially for mature to over-mature source rocks. PMID:27441263

  11. Effects of FGF10 on bovine oocyte meiosis progression, apoptosis, embryo development and relative abundance of developmentally important genes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pomini Pinto, R F; Fontes, P K; Loureiro, B; Sousa Castilho, A C; Sousa Ticianelli, J; Montanari Razza, E; Satrapa, R A; Buratini, J; Moraes Barros, C

    2015-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF10) acts at the cumulus oocyte complex, increasing the expression of cumulus cell expansion-related genes and oocyte competency genes. We tested the hypothesis that addition of FGF10 to the maturation medium improves oocyte maturation, decreases the percentage of apoptotic oocytes and increases development to the blastocyst stage while increasing the relative abundance of developmentally important genes (COX2, CDX2 and PLAC8). In all experiments, oocytes were matured for 22 h in TCM-199 supplemented with 0, 2.5, 10 or 50 ng/ml FGF10. In Experiment 1, after maturation, oocytes were stained with Hoechst to evaluate meiosis progression (metaphase I, intermediary phases and extrusion of the first polar body) and submitted to the TUNEL assay to evaluate apoptosis. In Experiment 2, oocytes were fertilized and cultured to the blastocyst stage. Blastocysts were frozen for analysis of COX2, CDX2 and PLAC8 relative abundance. In Experiment 1, 2.5 ng/ml FGF10 increased (p < 0.05) the percentage of oocytes with extrusion of the first polar body (35%) compared to 0, 10 and 50 ng/ml FGF10 (21, 14 and 12%, respectively) and FGF10 decreased the percentage of oocytes that were TUNEL positive in all doses studied. In Experiment 2, there was no difference in the percentage of oocytes becoming blastocysts between treatments and control. Real-time RT-PCR showed a tendency of 50 ng/ml FGF10 to increase the relative abundance of COX2 and PLAC8 and of 10 ng/ml FGF10 to increase CDX2. In conclusion, the addition of FGF10 to the oocyte maturation medium improves oocyte maturation in vitro, decreases the percentage of apoptotic oocytes and tends to increase the relative abundance of developmentally important genes. PMID:25495767

  12. Developmental competence and embryo quality of small oocytes from pre-pubertal goats cultured in IVM medium supplemented with low level of hormones, insulin-transferrin-selenium and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Hammami, S; Morató, R; Romaguera, R; Roura, M; Catalá, M G; Paramio, M T; Mogas, T; Izquierdo, D

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS) and L-ascorbic acid (AA) supplementation and the hormonal level during in vitro maturation (IVM) of small oocytes from pre-pubertal goat on the blastocyst yield and quality. Concretely, we used four maturation media: conventional IVM medium (CM), growth medium (GM: CM+ITS+AA and low level of hormones), modified CM (mCM: CM with low level of hormones) and modified GM (mGM: CM+ITS+AA and normal level of hormones). Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were classified into two categories according to oocyte diameter: <125 μm and ≥ 125 μm. Large oocytes were matured 24 h in CM (Treatment A). Small oocytes were matured randomly in six experimental groups: Treatment B: 24 h in CM; Treatment C: 12 h in GM and 12 h in CM; Treatment D: 24 h in mGM; Treatment E: 12 h in mGM and 12 h in CM; Treatment F: 12 h in mCM and 12 h in CM; and Treatment G: 12 h in GM and 12 h in mGM. After IVM, oocytes were fertilized and cultured for 8 days. The blastocyst quality was assessed by the survival following vitrification/warming and the mean cell number. When different maturation media were combined, the blastocyst rate did not improve. The large oocytes produced the highest blastocysts yield. However, the culture of small oocytes in GM (53.3%) enhanced the post-warming survival of blastocysts compared to large oocytes matured in CM (35.7%). In conclusion, IVM of pre-pubertal goat small oocytes in GM would be useful to improve the quality of in vitro-produced blastocysts.

  13. Paraoxonase 1 and HDL maturation.

    PubMed

    Gugliucci, Alejandro; Menini, Teresita

    2015-01-15

    Understanding the kinetics and function of paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is becoming an important issue in atherosclerosis. Low PON1 activity has been consistently linked with an increased risk of major cardiovascular events in the setting of secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. Recent studies have shown that there is a specific interaction of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-apoAI-PON1 on HDL surface that seems to be germane to atherogenesis. MPO specifically inhibits PON1 and PON1 mitigates MPO effects. Surprisingly, very little is known about the routes by which PON1 gets integrated into HDL or its fate during HDL remodeling in the intravascular space. We have developed a method that assesses PON1 activity in the individual HDL subclasses with the aid of which we have shown that PON1 is present across the HDL particle range and preferentially in HDL3, confirming data from ultracentrifugation (UC) studies. Upon HDL maturation ex vivo PON1 is activated and it shows a flux to both smaller and larger HDL particles as well as to VLDL and sdLDL. At the same time apoE, AI and AII are shifted across particle sizes. PON1 activation and flux across HDL particles are blocked by CETP and LCAT inhibitors. In a group of particles with such a complex biology as HDL, knowledge of the interaction between apo-lipoproteins, lipids and enzymes is key for an increased understanding of the yet multiple unknown features of its function. Solving the HDL paradox will necessitate the development of techniques to explore HDL function that are practical and well adapted to clinical studies and eventually become useful in patient monitoring. The confluence of proteomic, functional studies, HDL subclasses, PON1 assays and zymogram will yield data to draw a more elaborate and comprehensive picture of the function of HDL. It must be noted that all these studies are static and conducted in the fasting state. The crucial phase will be achieved when human kinetic studies (both in the fasting and post

  14. Craniofacial levels and the morphological maturation of the human skull

    PubMed Central

    Bastir, Markus; Rosas, Antonio; O’Higgins, Paul

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that the human skull achieves adult size through a superior–inferior gradient of maturation. Because the basicranium matures in size before the face, it has been suggested that the form of the basicranium might have ontogenetic knock-on effects on that of the face. However, although sequential spatially organized maturation of size is well described in the cranium, the maturation of skull shape is not. Knowledge of the maturation of shape is important, nevertheless, because it is claimed that the early determination of the spatial configuration of basicranial components, where the facial skeleton attaches, is relevant in the spatio-temporal ontogenetic cascade from basicranium to face. This paper examines the ontogeny of various components of the human skull in 28 individuals from the longitudinal Denver Growth Study. Sixty-six landmarks and semilandmarks were digitized on 228 X-rays and analysed using geometric morphometric methods. Bootstrapped confidence intervals for centroid size support previous studies suggesting a supero-inferior gradient of growth maturation (size over time), while developmental maturation (shape over time) is more complex. A sequence of shape maturation is described, in which the earliest structure to mature in shape was the midline cranial base (7–8 years), followed by the lateral cranial floor (11–12), midline neurocranium (9–10) and facial and mandibular structures (15–16). The absolute ages of shape maturation of the latter three depended on the criterion of maturity used, which was not the case for the basicranial components. Additionally, ontogenetic dissociations were found between the maturation of size and shape of the midline cranial base and lateral floor, possibly underlining its role as structural ‘interface’ between brain and facial ontogeny. These findings imply potential for bidirectional developmental influences between the lateral cranial floor and the face until about 11–12 years. The

  15. Developmental Issues in Career Maturity and Career Decision Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Wendy; Creed, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    Reports cross-sectional data from 1,971 Australian adolescents who completed the Career Decision Scale and the Career Development Inventory. Results illustrate a developmental progression in career maturity, although a less uniform pattern emerged with gender differences. Findings regarding career indecision also presented a complex picture and…

  16. Astaxanthin Normalizes Epigenetic Modifications of Bovine Somatic Cell Cloned Embryos and Decreases the Generation of Lipid Peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Wu, H; Zhuo, W W; Mao, Q F; Lan, H; Zhang, Y; Hua, S

    2015-10-01

    Astaxanthin is an extremely common antioxidant scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocking lipid peroxidation. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of astaxanthin supplementation on oocyte maturation, and development of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were cultured in maturation medium with astaxanthin (0, 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 mg/l), respectively. We found that 0.5 mg/l astaxanthin supplementation significantly increased the proportion of oocyte maturation. Oocytes cultured in 0.5 mg/l astaxanthin supplementation were used to construct SCNT embryos and further cultured with 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 1.5 mg/l astaxanthin. The results showed that the supplementation of 0.5 mg/l astaxanthin significantly improved the proportions of cleavage and blastulation, as well as the total cell number in blastocysts compared with the control group, yet this influence was not concentration dependent. Chromosomal analyses revealed that more blastomeres showed a normal chromosomal complement in 0.5 mg/l astaxanthin treatment group, which was similar to that in IVF embryos. The methylation levels located on the exon 1 of the imprinted gene H19 and IGF2, pluripotent gene OCT4 were normalized, and global DNA methylation, H3K9 and H4K12 acetylation were also improved significantly, which was comparable to that in vitro fertilization (IVF) embryos. Moreover, we also found that astaxanthin supplementation significantly decreased the level of lipid peroxidation. Our findings showed that the supplementation of 0.5 mg/l astaxanthin to oocyte maturation medium and embryo culture medium improved oocyte maturation, SCNT embryo development, increased chromosomal stability and normalized the epigenetic modifications, as well as inhibited overproduction of lipid peroxidation.

  17. Myelin inhibits oligodendroglial maturation and regulates oligodendrocytic transcription factor expression.

    PubMed

    Plemel, Jason R; Manesh, Sohrab B; Sparling, Joseph S; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2013-09-01

    Myelin loss is a hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS) and promoting central nervous system myelin repair has become a major therapeutic target. Despite the presence of oligodendrocytes precursors cells (OPCs) in chronic lesions of MS, remyelination often fails. The mechanism underlying this failure of remyelination remains unknown, but it is hypothesized that environmental cues act to inhibit the maturation/differentiation of oligodendroglia, preventing remyelination. The rate of CNS remyelination is correlated to the speed of phagocytosis of myelin debris, which is present following demyelination and trauma. Thus, myelin debris could inhibit CNS remyelination. Here, we demonstrate that OPCs cultured on myelin were robustly inhibited in their maturation, as characterized by the decreased expression of immature and mature oligodendrocytes markers, the impaired production of myelin gene products, as well as their stalled morphological complexity relative to OPCs cultured on a control substrate. OPCs in contact with myelin stopped proliferating and decreased the expression of OPC markers to a comparable degree as cells grown on a control substrate. The expression of two transcription factors known to prevent OPC differentiation and maturation were increased in cells that were in contact with myelin: inhibitor of differentiation family (ID) members 2 and 4. Overexpression of ID2 and ID4 in OPCs was previously reported to decrease the percentage of cells expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers. However, knockdown of ID2 and/or ID4 in OPCs did not increase oligodendroglial maturation on or off of myelin, suggesting that contact with myelin regulates additional regulatory elements.

  18. Motivational Maturity and Helping Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haymes, Michael; Green, Logan

    1977-01-01

    Maturity in conative development (type of motivation included in Maslow's needs hierarchy) was found to be predictive of helping behavior in middle class white male college students. The effects of safety and esteem needs were compared, and the acceptance of responsibility was also investigated. (GDC)

  19. Steps to Maturity Program. Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nanaimo School District #68 (British Columbia).

    In fall 1989, the Nanaimo (British Columbia) School District No. 68 asked five people, selected from the school system and community, to evaluate the "Steps to Maturity" Program (STMP), a district-wide family life education and affective development program that has developed gradually since 1972. The evaluation team interviewed a large number of…

  20. Enticing Mature Females into College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loseth, Lexie; Moreau, Linda

    Following a review of the literature on mature female students, this paper examines enrollment trends in a selection of colleges in Alberta (Canada) and presents the findings of a survey of returning women students at Red Deer College. The literature review highlights factors related to the personal and professional development of women graduates…

  1. Adolescent Maturation in Transitioning Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulroy, Kevin; Palacios, Anna; Reid, Robert E.

    This is a theoretical study of adolescent maturation within a cultural context. Personality development and disintegration due to the pressure of a dominant culture on a minority culture is considered. An attempt is made to understand how teachers might assist students to work out their psychological growth by story telling. The need for cultural…

  2. College Freshmen: Turmoil or Maturity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Stephen

    1988-01-01

    Administered the Personal Orientation Inventory, Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, a group Rorschach, and a biographical questionnaire to 24 randomly selected freshmen from a small Northwest liberal arts college. Results indicated that the young adults responded differently from either children or mature adults. Findings support contention that…

  3. The People Capability Maturity Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wademan, Mark R.; Spuches, Charles M.; Doughty, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    The People Capability Maturity Model[R] (People CMM[R]) advocates a staged approach to organizational change. Developed by the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute, this model seeks to bring discipline to the people side of management by promoting a structured, repeatable, and predictable approach for improving an…

  4. Rhetorical Maturity: Definition and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Susan

    Lawrence Kohlberg's stages of moral development, when applied to theories of teaching composition, support any method or material that refers to the age and prior experience of the writer and the newness of the task the writer is attempting. Rhetorical development and maturation in the ability to write and argue persuasively are partly conceptual…

  5. Maturation of Oocytes in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lonergan, Patrick; Fair, Trudee

    2016-01-01

    Only a fraction of oocytes present in the ovaries at birth are ever ovulated during the lifetime of a female mammal. In vitro maturation (IVM) offers the possibility to exploit what is a largely untapped biological resource. Although IVM is used routinely for the in vitro production of embryos in domestic species, especially cattle, its clinical use in human-assisted reproduction is still evolving. The successful recapitulation in vitro of the events associated with successful oocyte maturation is not always achieved, with the majority of immature oocytes typically failing to develop to the blastocyst stage. Evidence suggests that although culture conditions throughout in vitro embryo production may have a modest influence on the developmental potential of the early embryo, the quality of the oocyte at the start of the process is the key factor determining the proportion of oocytes developing to the blastocyst stage.

  6. Maturation of the adolescent brain

    PubMed Central

    Arain, Mariam; Haque, Maliha; Johal, Lina; Mathur, Puja; Nel, Wynand; Rais, Afsha; Sandhu, Ranbir; Sharma, Sushil

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is the developmental epoch during which children become adults – intellectually, physically, hormonally, and socially. Adolescence is a tumultuous time, full of changes and transformations. The pubertal transition to adulthood involves both gonadal and behavioral maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging studies have discovered that myelinogenesis, required for proper insulation and efficient neurocybernetics, continues from childhood and the brain’s region-specific neurocircuitry remains structurally and functionally vulnerable to impulsive sex, food, and sleep habits. The maturation of the adolescent brain is also influenced by heredity, environment, and sex hormones (estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone), which play a crucial role in myelination. Furthermore, glutamatergic neurotransmission predominates, whereas gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission remains under construction, and this might be responsible for immature and impulsive behavior and neurobehavioral excitement during adolescent life. The adolescent population is highly vulnerable to driving under the influence of alcohol and social maladjustments due to an immature limbic system and prefrontal cortex. Synaptic plasticity and the release of neurotransmitters may also be influenced by environmental neurotoxins and drugs of abuse including cigarettes, caffeine, and alcohol during adolescence. Adolescents may become involved with offensive crimes, irresponsible behavior, unprotected sex, juvenile courts, or even prison. According to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the major cause of death among the teenage population is due to injury and violence related to sex and substance abuse. Prenatal neglect, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption may also significantly impact maturation of the adolescent brain. Pharmacological interventions to regulate adolescent behavior have been attempted with limited success. Since several factors, including age, sex

  7. PERSISTENT WRIST PAIN IN A MATURE GOLFER

    PubMed Central

    Hazle, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Clients presenting with ulnar-sided wrist pain can provide diagnostic and management challenges for physical therapists. Symptoms in this region may originate from multiple structures. Integration of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging results is often required for optimal decision-making and patient management. To obtain the most informative imaging results, practitioners need an understanding of injury patterns and their detection by various imaging modalities. This case describes a mature golfer who presented with persistent ulnar-sided wrist pain and was eventually determined to have a fracture of the hook of the hamate accompanied by neighboring soft tissue involvement also contributing to his symptom complex. His history and the diagnostic process are detailed along with a brief discussion of his subsequent management post-operatively. Level of Evidence: 5 (Single Case Report) PMID:22893862

  8. Thermal Maturation of Gas Shale Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Sylvain; Horsfield, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Shale gas systems serve as sources, reservoirs, and seals for unconventional natural gas accumulations. These reservoirs bring numerous challenges to geologists and petroleum engineers in reservoir characterization, most notably because of their heterogeneous character due to depositional and diagenetic processes but also because of their constituent rocks' fine-grained nature and small pore size -- much smaller than in conventional sandstone and carbonate reservoirs. Significant advances have recently been achieved in unraveling the gaseous hydrocarbon generation and retention processes that occur within these complex systems. In addition, cutting-edge characterization technologies have allowed precise documentation of the spatial variability in chemistry and structure of thermally mature organic-rich shales at the submicrometer scale, revealing the presence of geochemical heterogeneities within overmature gas shale samples and, notably, the presence of nanoporous pyrobitumen. Such research advances will undoubtedly lead to improved performance, producibility, and modeling of such strategic resources at the reservoir scale.

  9. Maturity model for enterprise interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guédria, Wided; Naudet, Yannick; Chen, David

    2015-01-01

    Historically, progress occurs when entities communicate, share information and together create something that no one individually could do alone. Moving beyond people to machines and systems, interoperability is becoming a key factor of success in all domains. In particular, interoperability has become a challenge for enterprises, to exploit market opportunities, to meet their own objectives of cooperation or simply to survive in a growing competitive world where the networked enterprise is becoming a standard. Within this context, many research works have been conducted over the past few years and enterprise interoperability has become an important area of research, ensuring the competitiveness and growth of European enterprises. Among others, enterprises have to control their interoperability strategy and enhance their ability to interoperate. This is the purpose of the interoperability assessment. Assessing interoperability maturity allows a company to know its strengths and weaknesses in terms of interoperability with its current and potential partners, and to prioritise actions for improvement. The objective of this paper is to define a maturity model for enterprise interoperability that takes into account existing maturity models while extending the coverage of the interoperability domain. The assessment methodology is also presented. Both are demonstrated with a real case study.

  10. Developmental competence and gene expression of immature oocytes following liquid helium vitrification in bovine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Yi; Li, Xiao-Xia; Xu, Ya-Kun; Wu, Hua; Zheng, Jun-Jun; Yu, Xue-Li

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an effective ultra-rapid vitrification method and evaluate its effect on maturation, developmental competence and development-related gene expression in bovine immature oocytes. Bovine cumulus oocyte complexes were randomly allocated into three groups: (1) controls, (2) liquid nitrogen vitrification, and (3) liquid helium vitrification. Oocytes were vitrified and then warmed, the percentage of morphologically normal oocytes in liquid helium group (89.0%) was significantly higher (P<0.05) than that of the liquid nitrogen group (81.1%). When the vitrified-thawed oocytes were matured in vitro for 24h, the maturation rate in liquid helium group (50.6%) was higher (P<0.05) than liquid nitrogen group (42.6%). Oocytes of liquid helium vitrification had higher cleavage and blastocyst rates (41.1% and 10.0%) than that of liquid nitrogen vitrification (33.0% and 4.5%; P<0.05) after in vitro fertilization. Moreover, the expression of GDF9 (growth/differentiation factor-9), BAX (apoptosis factor) and ZAR1 (zygote arrest 1) was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) when the vitrified-thawed oocytes were matured 24h. The expression of these genes was altered after vitrification. Expression of GDF9 and BAX in the liquid helium vitrification group was not significantly different from that of the control, however there were significant differences between the liquid nitrogen vitrification group and control. In conclusion, it was feasible to use liquid helium for vitrifying bovine immature oocytes. There existed an association between the compromised developmental competence and the altered expression levels of these genes for the vitrified oocytes.

  11. Generation of Live Piglets from Cryopreserved Oocytes for the First Time Using a Defined System for In Vitro Embryo Production

    PubMed Central

    Somfai, Tamás; Yoshioka, Koji; Tanihara, Fuminori; Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Noguchi, Junko; Kashiwazaki, Naomi; Nagai, Takashi; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    We report the successful piglet production from cryopreserved oocytes for the first time by using a simple, high capacity vitrification protocol for preservation and a defined system for in vitro embryo production. Immature cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from prepubertal gilts were vitrified in microdrops and stored in liquid nitrogen. After warming, COCs were subjected to in vitro maturation (IVM), fertilization (IVF), and subsequent culture (IVC). Adjusting warmplate temperature to 42°C during warming prevented temperature drops in a medium below 34.0°C and significantly increased the percentage of oocyte survival and thus blastocyst yields obtained from total vitrified oocytes compared with that of warming at 38°C (87.1% vs 66.9% and 4.4% vs 2.7%, respectively). Nuclear maturation and fertilization of oocytes were not affected by vitrification and warming temperature. Blastocyst development on day 7 (day 0 = IVF) of the surviving oocytes after warming at 38°C and 42°C was not different but lower (P<0.05) than those of non-vitrified control oocytes (4.6%, 5.2% and 17.9%, respectively). However, blastocyst cell numbers in the control and vitrified groups were similar irrespective of warming temperature. Omitting porcine follicular fluid (pFF) from IVM medium (POM) did not affect maturation, fertilization and embryo development of vitrified-warmed oocytes. Transfer of blastocysts obtained on day 5 from vitrified oocytes matured either with or without pFF into 4 recipients (2 for each group) resulted in 4 pregnancies and the delivery of a total of 18 piglets. In conclusion, optimization of warming temperature was a key factor for achieving high survival rates, and surviving oocytes could be utilized in vitro using defined media. Using these modifications, live piglets could be obtained from cryopreserved oocytes for the first time. PMID:24844283

  12. Sterols in spermatogenesis and sperm maturation.

    PubMed

    Keber, Rok; Rozman, Damjana; Horvat, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a complex developmental program in which a diploid progenitor germ cell transforms into highly specialized spermatozoa. One intriguing aspect of sperm production is the dynamic change in membrane lipid composition that occurs throughout spermatogenesis. Cholesterol content, as well as its intermediates, differs vastly between the male reproductive system and nongonadal tissues. Accumulation of cholesterol precursors such as testis meiosis-activating sterol and desmosterol is observed in testes and spermatozoa from several mammalian species. Moreover, cholesterogenic genes, especially meiosis-activating sterol-producing enzyme cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14α-demethylase, display stage-specific expression patterns during spermatogenesis. Discrepancies in gene expression patterns suggest a complex temporal and cell-type specific regulation of sterol compounds during spermatogenesis, which also involves dynamic interactions between germ and Sertoli cells. The functional importance of sterol compounds in sperm production is further supported by the modulation of sterol composition in spermatozoal membranes during epididymal transit and in the female reproductive tract, which is a prerequisite for successful fertilization. However, the exact role of sterols in male reproduction is unknown. This review discusses sterol dynamics in sperm maturation and describes recent methodological advances that will help to illuminate the complexity of sperm formation and function.

  13. 7 CFR 51.2651 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2651 Mature. Mature means that the cherries have reached the stage of growth which will insure the...

  14. Intrinsic quality of goat oocytes already found denuded at collection for in vitro embryo production.

    PubMed

    Souza-Fabjan, Joanna Maria Gonçalves; Locatelli, Yann; Duffard, Nicolas; Corbin, Emilie; Batista, Ribrio Ivan Tavares Pereira; de Figueirêdo Freitas, Vicente José; Beckers, Jean-François; Mermillod, Pascal

    2016-11-01

    Although cumulus cells are essential for efficient oocyte maturation, the establishment of protocols that support IVD of embryos obtained from denuded oocytes (DOCs) is important for optimizing the use of reproductive biotechnologies. Thus, this study aimed to establish a protocol for IVD of goat DOC using different strategies of IVM and methods of oocyte activation. Four experiments were performed. Similar developmental competence of slaughterhouse DOC was obtained, regardless of maturation media (complex, semidefined or simplified). However, the ability to reach the blastocyst stage was affected by the activation method. Denuded oocytes subjected to parthenogenetic activation had greater (P < 0.05) development capacity, compared with those undergoing IVF with average cleavage rate of 83% and 75%, blastocyst rate of 49% and 28%, and blastocysts in relation to the cleaved embryos of 59% and 38, respectively. In addition, the quality of embryos evaluated after vitrification/warming was similar between parthenogenetic activation and IVF. Finally, we demonstrated that the coculture of cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) with DOC increased the competence of DOC at a ratio of 1:1 and 1:9 (DOC:COC). We believe that presence of cumulus cells (CCs) is not essential to the meiotic maturation, if at the time of removal of the oocyte from follicular environment, they already acquired competence to development. However, when the oocytes still need to acquire competence, the presence of CC may significantly contribute in their developmental capacity acquisition during IVM. Thus, regardless of the source, these oocytes will require longer time in IVM, contrary to what happens in the absence of CC. In conclusion, although DOC had a lower developmental potential, especially after IVF, they were able to produce blastocysts and the coculture of DOC with COC increased this developmental capacity. PMID:27453560

  15. Intrinsic quality of goat oocytes already found denuded at collection for in vitro embryo production.

    PubMed

    Souza-Fabjan, Joanna Maria Gonçalves; Locatelli, Yann; Duffard, Nicolas; Corbin, Emilie; Batista, Ribrio Ivan Tavares Pereira; de Figueirêdo Freitas, Vicente José; Beckers, Jean-François; Mermillod, Pascal

    2016-11-01

    Although cumulus cells are essential for efficient oocyte maturation, the establishment of protocols that support IVD of embryos obtained from denuded oocytes (DOCs) is important for optimizing the use of reproductive biotechnologies. Thus, this study aimed to establish a protocol for IVD of goat DOC using different strategies of IVM and methods of oocyte activation. Four experiments were performed. Similar developmental competence of slaughterhouse DOC was obtained, regardless of maturation media (complex, semidefined or simplified). However, the ability to reach the blastocyst stage was affected by the activation method. Denuded oocytes subjected to parthenogenetic activation had greater (P < 0.05) development capacity, compared with those undergoing IVF with average cleavage rate of 83% and 75%, blastocyst rate of 49% and 28%, and blastocysts in relation to the cleaved embryos of 59% and 38, respectively. In addition, the quality of embryos evaluated after vitrification/warming was similar between parthenogenetic activation and IVF. Finally, we demonstrated that the coculture of cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) with DOC increased the competence of DOC at a ratio of 1:1 and 1:9 (DOC:COC). We believe that presence of cumulus cells (CCs) is not essential to the meiotic maturation, if at the time of removal of the oocyte from follicular environment, they already acquired competence to development. However, when the oocytes still need to acquire competence, the presence of CC may significantly contribute in their developmental capacity acquisition during IVM. Thus, regardless of the source, these oocytes will require longer time in IVM, contrary to what happens in the absence of CC. In conclusion, although DOC had a lower developmental potential, especially after IVF, they were able to produce blastocysts and the coculture of DOC with COC increased this developmental capacity.

  16. Surfactin induces maturation of dendritic cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenwen; Liu, Haofei; Wang, Xiaoqing; Yang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Surfactin has multiple immune activities, such as triggering immune-related defense responses and enhancing humoral and cellular immune responses. Although, the mechanisms are still unclear. The maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) is essential for inducing downstream immune response. To shed light on the mechanisms of surfactin-induced immune activities, we verified the influences of surfactin on DCs maturation. The results showed that after stimulated with 20 μg/ml surfactin for 24 h, DCs were conferred morphologic and phenotypic characteristics of a mature state, showing an increased shape index and up-regulated expressions of major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) and CD40. Moreover, surfactin also induced DCs to release IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), indicating that DCs were functionally mature. In addition, the IκB-α level in surfactin-treated DCs was significantly reduced whereas the nuclear p65 level was notably increased, preliminarily indicating that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway might play an important role in surfactin-induced DCs maturation. PMID:27534429

  17. Cloacal Exstrophy with Mature Teratoma: A Rare Association in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Prashant Sadashiv; Kothari, Paras; Gupta, Abhaya; Gupta, Rahul; kekre, Geeta; Dikshit, Vishesh; Kamble, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Cloacal exstrophy is a very rare and complex malformation. We report a neonate of cloacal exstrophy with mature teratoma presenting as a component of exstrophy. To our knowledge this has not been reported in the literature. PMID:27123401

  18. 7 CFR 51.1904 - Maturity classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maturity classification. 51.1904 Section 51.1904... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Size and Maturity Classification § 51.1904 Maturity classification. Tomatoes which are characteristically red when ripe, but are not overripe or...

  19. 7 CFR 51.1904 - Maturity classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maturity classification. 51.1904 Section 51.1904 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Maturity Classification § 51.1904 Maturity classification. Tomatoes which are characteristically red...

  20. 7 CFR 51.1904 - Maturity classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maturity classification. 51.1904 Section 51.1904... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Size and Maturity Classification § 51.1904 Maturity classification. Tomatoes which are characteristically red when ripe, but are not overripe or...

  1. Career Maturity in High School Age Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Joan Daniels

    1982-01-01

    Examined career maturity in high school females by using a set of general career-maturity and gender-specific, career-related measures, and an alternate career-maturity criterion measure, career-planning involvement. Results indicated significant relationships between achievement orientation and occupational information and knowledge of women's…

  2. Toward a Concept of Psychosocial Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberger, Ellen; Sorensen, Aage B.

    The first in a series of related reports (see TM 000 775), this paper attempts to define a concept of psychosocial maturity which would be appropriate as a comprehensive educational goal. Biological, sociological, psychological and temporal formulations of maturity are discussed and compared. Am interdisciplinary model of maturity is evolved which…

  3. 7 CFR 51.1904 - Maturity classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity classification. 51.1904 Section 51.1904... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Size and Maturity Classification § 51.1904 Maturity classification. Tomatoes which are characteristically red when ripe, but are not overripe or...

  4. Slow maturation of planning in obstacle avoidance in humans.

    PubMed

    Corporaal, Sharissa H A; Swinnen, Stephan P; Duysens, Jacques; Bruijn, Sjoerd M

    2016-01-01

    Complex gait (e.g., obstacle avoidance) requires a higher cognitive load than simple steady-state gait, which is a more automated movement. The higher levels of the central nervous system, responsible for adjusting motor plans to complex gait, develop throughout childhood into adulthood. Therefore, we hypothesize that gait strategies in complex gait are likely to mature until adulthood as well. However, little is known about the maturation of complex gait from childhood into adolescence and adulthood. To address this issue, we investigated obstacle avoidance in forty-four 8- to 18-yr-old participants who walked at preferred speed along a 6-m walkway on which a planar obstacle (150% of step length, 1 m wide) was projected. Participants avoided the obstacle by stepping over this projection, while lower body kinematics were recorded. Results showed that step length and speed adjustments during successful obstacle avoidance were similar across all ages, even though younger children modified step width to a greater extent. Additionally, the younger children used larger maximal toe elevations and take-off distances than older children. Moreover, during unsuccessful trials, younger children deployed exaggerated take-off distances, which resulted in obstacle contact upon the consecutive heel strike. These results indicate that obstacle avoidance is not fully matured in younger children, and that the inability to plan precise foot placements is an important factor contributing to failures in obstacle avoidance.

  5. The Relationship Between Cognitive Career Maturity and Self-Reported Career Maturity of High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Bert W.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Investigated relationship between scores on measures of cognitive career maturity and self-reported career maturity in high school sophomores (N=391) and juniors (N=283). Results suggest that there is no relationship between measured career maturity competencies and self-reported career maturity competencies of high school students. (Author/NB)

  6. Sexual maturation of female Saguinus oedipus oedipus

    SciTech Connect

    Tardif, S.D.

    1982-01-01

    This study is an examination of the process of female sexual maturation in the cotton-top tamarin, Saguinus oedipus oedipus, a South-American primate of the family, Callitrichidae. Two types of questions are addressed. The first question is whether the type of social grouping in which a young female lives affects the rate of her sexual maturation. Specifically, is there a difference between the maturation rate of a female housed with a strange adult male and a female housed with her natal group (i.e., her parents and various siblings). Second, the effect of sexual maturation on various social interactions is examined. Specifically are male-female interactions in mated pairs and mother-daughter interactions in natal groups changed by the sexual maturation of the young females. The mother's presence was not related to the daughter's maturation age. However, whether the natal group, as a whole, inhibited maturation, or unrelated males accelerated maturation, or both, remains unknown. Most of the behavioral interactions involving maturing females were unchanged by maturation. There was some indication that certain behaviors were affected by maturation, but only if a strange unrelated male was present.

  7. Membrane remodeling during reticulocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Xinhua; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    The transition of reticulocytes into erythrocytes is accompanied by extensive changes in the structure and properties of the plasma membrane. These changes include an increase in shear resistance, loss of surface area, and acquisition of a biconcave shape. The processes by which these changes are effected have remained largely undefined. Here we examine how the expression of 30 distinct membrane proteins and their interactions change during murine reticulocyte maturation. We show that tubulin and cytosolic actin are lost, whereas the membrane content of myosin, tropomyosin, intercellular adhesion molecule-4, glucose transporter-4, Na-K-ATPase, sodium/hydrogen exchanger 1, glycophorin A, CD47, Duffy, and Kell is reduced. The degradation of tubulin and actin is, at least in part, through the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway. In regard to the protein-protein interactions, the formation of membrane-associated spectrin tetramers from dimers is unperturbed, whereas the interactions responsible for the formation of the membrane-skeletal junctions are weaker in reticulocytes, as is the attachment of transmembrane proteins to these structures. This weakness, in part, results from the elevated phosphorylation of 4.1R in reticulocytes, which leads to a decrease in shear resistance by reducing its interaction with spectrin and actin. These observations begin to unravel the mechanistic basis of crucial changes accompanying reticulocyte maturation. PMID:20038785

  8. Quality control of MHC class I maturation.

    PubMed

    Paulsson, Kajsa M; Wang, Ping

    2004-01-01

    Assembly of MHC class I molecules in the ER is regulated by the so-called loading complex (LC). This multiprotein complex is of definite importance for class I maturation, but its exact organization and order of assembly are not known. Evidence implies that the quality of peptides loaded onto class I molecules is controlled at multiple stages during MHC class I assembly. We recently found that tapasin, an important component of the LC, interacts with COPI-coated vesicles. Biochemical studies suggested that the tapa-sin-COPI interaction regulates the retrograde transport of immature MHC class I molecules from the Golgi network back to the ER. Also other findings now propose that in addition to the peptide-loading control, the quality control of MHC class I antigen presentation includes the restriction of export of suboptimally loaded MHC class I molecules to the cell surface. In this review, we use recent studies of tapasin to examine the efficiency of TAP, the LC constitution, ER quality control of class I assembly, and peptide optimization. The concepts of MHC class I recycling and ER retention are also discussed. PMID:14718384

  9. Cumulin, an Oocyte-secreted Heterodimer of the Transforming Growth Factor-β Family, Is a Potent Activator of Granulosa Cells and Improves Oocyte Quality.

    PubMed

    Mottershead, David G; Sugimura, Satoshi; Al-Musawi, Sara L; Li, Jing-Jie; Richani, Dulama; White, Melissa A; Martin, Georgia A; Trotta, Andrew P; Ritter, Lesley J; Shi, Junyan; Mueller, Thomas D; Harrison, Craig A; Gilchrist, Robert B

    2015-09-25

    Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) are oocyte-specific growth factors with central roles in mammalian reproduction, regulating species-specific fecundity, ovarian follicular somatic cell differentiation, and oocyte quality. In the human, GDF9 is produced in a latent form, the mechanism of activation being an open question. Here, we produced a range of recombinant GDF9 and BMP15 variants, examined their in silico and physical interactions and their effects on ovarian granulosa cells (GC) and oocytes. We found that the potent synergistic actions of GDF9 and BMP15 on GC can be attributed to the formation of a heterodimer, which we have termed cumulin. Structural modeling of cumulin revealed a dimerization interface identical to homodimeric GDF9 and BMP15, indicating likely formation of a stable complex. This was confirmed by generation of recombinant heterodimeric complexes of pro/mature domains (pro-cumulin) and covalent mature domains (cumulin). Both pro-cumulin and cumulin exhibited highly potent bioactivity on GC, activating both SMAD2/3 and SMAD1/5/8 signaling pathways and promoting proliferation and expression of a set of genes associated with oocyte-regulated GC differentiation. Cumulin was more potent than pro-cumulin, pro-GDF9, pro-BMP15, or the two combined on GC. However, on cumulus-oocyte complexes, pro-cumulin was more effective than all other growth factors at notably improving oocyte quality as assessed by subsequent day 7 embryo development. Our results support a model of activation for human GDF9 dependent on cumulin formation through heterodimerization with BMP15. Oocyte-secreted cumulin is likely to be a central regulator of fertility in mono-ovular mammals.

  10. Cumulin, an Oocyte-secreted Heterodimer of the Transforming Growth Factor-β Family, Is a Potent Activator of Granulosa Cells and Improves Oocyte Quality*

    PubMed Central

    Mottershead, David G.; Sugimura, Satoshi; Al-Musawi, Sara L.; Li, Jing-Jie; Richani, Dulama; White, Melissa A.; Martin, Georgia A.; Trotta, Andrew P.; Ritter, Lesley J.; Shi, Junyan; Mueller, Thomas D.; Harrison, Craig A.; Gilchrist, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) are oocyte-specific growth factors with central roles in mammalian reproduction, regulating species-specific fecundity, ovarian follicular somatic cell differentiation, and oocyte quality. In the human, GDF9 is produced in a latent form, the mechanism of activation being an open question. Here, we produced a range of recombinant GDF9 and BMP15 variants, examined their in silico and physical interactions and their effects on ovarian granulosa cells (GC) and oocytes. We found that the potent synergistic actions of GDF9 and BMP15 on GC can be attributed to the formation of a heterodimer, which we have termed cumulin. Structural modeling of cumulin revealed a dimerization interface identical to homodimeric GDF9 and BMP15, indicating likely formation of a stable complex. This was confirmed by generation of recombinant heterodimeric complexes of pro/mature domains (pro-cumulin) and covalent mature domains (cumulin). Both pro-cumulin and cumulin exhibited highly potent bioactivity on GC, activating both SMAD2/3 and SMAD1/5/8 signaling pathways and promoting proliferation and expression of a set of genes associated with oocyte-regulated GC differentiation. Cumulin was more potent than pro-cumulin, pro-GDF9, pro-BMP15, or the two combined on GC. However, on cumulus-oocyte complexes, pro-cumulin was more effective than all other growth factors at notably improving oocyte quality as assessed by subsequent day 7 embryo development. Our results support a model of activation for human GDF9 dependent on cumulin formation through heterodimerization with BMP15. Oocyte-secreted cumulin is likely to be a central regulator of fertility in mono-ovular mammals. PMID:26254468

  11. Sexual maturation in kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, S.D.; Scarnecchia, D.L.; Congleton, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    We used observational and experimental approaches to obtain information on factors affecting the timing of maturation of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka, a semelparous, landlocked salmon. Gonadal staging criteria were developed and applied to three kokanee populations in Idaho lakes and reservoirs. Testes were classified into three stages: immature (stage one, S1), maturing (S2), and mature (S3). Ovaries were classified into eight stages: immature (S1-S3), transitional (stage S4), maturing (S5-S7), and mature (S8). Males entered the maturing stage (S2) in February through April of the spawning year. Females entered maturing stage (S5) as early as July of the year before the spawning year, and as late as March of the spawning year. Three hatchery experiments demonstrated that attainment of a larger body size 10 to 16 months before spawning increased the likelihood of initiation of maturation in both sexes. No gonads in a state of regression were observed. A gonadosomatic index above 0.1 by early July was a good indicator of a maturing male, and a gonadosomatic index above 1.0 by early July was a good indicator of a maturing female. Instantaneous growth rates were not good predictors of maturation, but attaining a size threshold of 18 to 19 cm in the fall was a good predictor of maturation the following year. This improved knowledge of kokanee maturation will permit more effectively management of the species for age, growth and size at maturity as well as for contributions to fisheries. ?? 2008 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential influence of ampullary and isthmic derived epithelial cells on zona pellucida hardening and in vitro fertilization in ovine.

    PubMed

    Dadashpour Davachi, Navid; Zare Shahneh, Ahmad; Kohram, Hamid; Zhandi, Mahdi; Shamsi, Helia; Hajiyavand, Amir M; Saadat, Mozafar

    2016-03-01

    The central role of the oviduct, as the site of zona pellucida (ZP) maturation, fertilization and early embryogenesis, has been recognized. The objective of this study was to investigate whether ampullary and isthmic derived epithelial cells have different effects on in vitro ZP hardening, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and in vitro culture (IVC) of the resulting embryos. Cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) were matured in a coculture system with ampullary/isthmic epithelial cells, TCM199 supplemented with insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and epithelial derived growth factor (EGF) (GF treated group), conditioned media produced using ampullary (ACM), isthmic (ICM), COCs+ampullary, and COCs+isthmic epithelial cells, contactless culture system, oviductal fluid, GF+ACM/ICM, and drops of TCM199 (control), for 24h. The matured oocytes were randomly divided into two groups: Group I was subjected to ZP digestion; Group II underwent IVF. The duration of the ZP digestion, in a coculture system with ampullary epithelial cells (AE) was significantly increased (p<0.05), compared with other groups. Penetrated oocytes and monospermic fertilization were significantly increased (p<0.05) in the AE group. The mean number of spermatozoa per penetrated oocyte was reduced dramatically for the AE group (p<0.05). A significant increase (p<0.05) in the embryo development was observed in all treated groups, compared to the control. Results revealed that epithelial cells harvested from the ampullary segment of the oviduct had in vitro specialized role in ZP hardening and have subsequent IVF and IVC outcomes.

  13. Human macrophage polarization in vitro: maturation and activation methods compared.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Daphne Y S; Glim, Judith E; Stavenuiter, Andrea W D; Breur, Marjolein; Heijnen, Priscilla; Amor, Sandra; Dijkstra, Christine D; Beelen, Robert H J

    2014-09-01

    Macrophages form a heterogeneous cell population displaying multiple functions, and can be polarized into pro- (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages, by environmental factors. Their activation status reflects a beneficial or detrimental role in various diseases. Currently several in vitro maturation and activation protocols are used to induce an M1 or M2 phenotype. Here, the impact of different maturation factors (NHS, M-CSF, or GM-CSF) and activation methods (IFN-γ/LPS, IL-4, dexamethason, IL-10) on the macrophage phenotype was determined. Regarding macrophage morphology, pro-inflammatory (M1) activation stimulated cell elongation, and anti-inflammatory (M2) activation induced a circular appearance. Activation with pro-inflammatory mediators led to increased CD40 and CD64 expression, whereas activation with anti-inflammatory factors resulted in increased levels of MR and CD163. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was induced by activation with IFN-γ/LPS, and TGF-β production was enhanced by the maturation factors M-CSF and GM-CSF. Our data demonstrate that macrophage marker expression and cytokine production in vitro is highly dependent on both maturation and activation methods. In vivo macrophage activation is far more complex, since a plethora of stimuli are present. Hence, defining the macrophage activation status ex vivo on a limited number of markers could be indecisive. From this study we conclude that maturation with M-CSF or GM-CSF induces a moderate anti- or pro-inflammatory state respectively, compared to maturation with NHS. CD40 and CD64 are the most distinctive makers for human M1 and CD163 and MR for M2 macrophage activation and therefore can be helpful in determining the activation status of human macrophages ex vivo.

  14. Postradiation atrophy of mature bone

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun, H.; Howland, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The primary event of radiation damage to bone is atrophy and true necrosis of bone is uncommon. The postradiation atrophic changes of bone are the result of combined cellular and vascular damage, the former being more important. The damage to the osteoblast resulting in decreased matrix production is apparently the primary histopathologic event. Radiation damaged bone is susceptible to superimposed complications of fracture, infection, necrosis, and sarcoma. The primary radiographic evidence of atrophy, localized osteopenia, is late in appearing. Contrary to former views, the mature bone is quite radiosensitive and reacts quickly to even small doses of radiation. The differentiation of postirradiation atrophy and metastasis may be difficult. Biopsy should be the last resort because of the possibility of causing true necrosis in atrophic bone by trauma and infection.

  15. Maturation of the MOUTh Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski-Jaudon, Rita A.; Kolanowski, Ann M.; Winstead, Vicki; Jones-Townsend, Corteza; Azuero, Andres

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current article is to describe a personalized practice originally conceived as a way to prevent and minimize care-resistant behavior to provide mouth care to older adult with dementia. The original intervention, Managing Oral Hygiene Using Threat Reduction Strategies (MOUTh), matured during the clinical trial study into a relationship-centered intervention with emphasis on developing strategies that support residents behavioral health and staff involved in care. Relationships that were initially pragmatic (i.e., focused on the task of completing mouth care) developed into more personal and responsive relationships that involved deeper engagement between mouth care providers and nursing home (NH) residents. Mouth care was accomplished and completed in a manner enjoyable to NH residents and mouth care providers. The MOUTh intervention may also concurrently affirm the dignity and personhood of the care recipient because of its emphasis on connecting with older adults. PMID:26934969

  16. Retrovirus maturation-an extraordinary structural transformation.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Simone; Schur, Florian Km; Briggs, John Ag

    2016-06-01

    Retroviruses such as HIV-1 assemble and bud from infected cells in an immature, non-infectious form. Subsequently, a series of proteolytic cleavages catalysed by the viral protease leads to a spectacular structural rearrangement of the viral particle into a mature form that is competent to fuse with and infect a new cell. Maturation involves changes in the structures of protein domains, in the interactions between protein domains, and in the architecture of the viral components that are assembled by the proteins. Tight control of proteolytic cleavages at different sites is required for successful maturation, and the process is a major target of antiretroviral drugs. Here we will describe what is known about the structures of immature and mature retrovirus particles, and about the maturation process by which one transitions into the other. Despite a wealth of available data, fundamental questions about retroviral maturation remain unanswered. PMID:27010119

  17. Optimizing IV and V for Mature Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhman, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    NASA is intending for its future software development agencies to have at least a Level 3 rating in the Carnegie Mellon University Capability Maturity Model (CMM). The CMM has built-in Verification and Validation (V&V) processes that support higher software quality. Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) of software developed by mature agencies can be therefore more effective than for software developed by less mature organizations. How is Independent V&V different with respect to the maturity of an organization? Knowing a priori the maturity of an organization's processes, how can IV&V planners better identify areas of need choose IV&V activities, etc? The objective of this research is to provide a complementary set of guidelines and criteria to assist the planning of IV&V activities on a project using a priori knowledge of the measurable levels of maturity of the organization developing the software.

  18. Maturation of the mammalian secretome

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Jeremy C; Mateos, Alvaro; Pepperkok, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    A recent use of quantitative proteomics to determine the constituents of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex is discussed in the light of other available methodologies for cataloging the proteins associated with the mammalian secretory pathway. PMID:17472737

  19. Determinism and stochasticity during maturation of the zebrafish antibody repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ning; Weinstein, Joshua A.; Penland, Lolita; White, Richard A.; Fisher, Daniel S.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    It is thought that the adaptive immune system of immature organisms follows a more deterministic program of antibody creation than is found in adults. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the diversifying antibody repertoire in zebrafish over five developmental time points. We found that the immune system begins in a highly stereotyped state with preferential use of a small number of V (variable) D (diverse) J (joining) gene segment combinations, but that this stereotypy decreases dramatically as the zebrafish mature, with many of the top VDJ combinations observed in 2-wk-old zebrafish virtually disappearing by 1 mo. However, we discovered that, in the primary repertoire, there are strong correlations in VDJ use that increase with zebrafish maturity, suggesting that VDJ recombination involves a level of deterministic programming that is unexpected. This stereotypy is masked by the complex diversification processes of antibody maturation; the variation and lack of correlation in full repertoires between individuals appears to be derived from randomness in clonal expansion during the affinity maturation process. These data provide a window into the mechanisms of VDJ recombination and diversity creation and allow us to better understand how the adaptive immune system achieves diversity. PMID:21393572

  20. Differing roles of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases during mouse oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaojing; Zhang, Liang; Han, Longsen; Ge, Juan; Ma, Rujun; Zhang, Xuesen; Moley, Kelle; Schedl, Tim; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) modulate energy homeostasis in multiple tissues and cell types, under various nutrient conditions, through phosphorylation of the α subunit (PDHE1α, also known as PDHA1) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. However, the roles of PDKs in meiotic maturation are currently unknown. Here, by undertaking knockdown and overexpression analysis of PDK paralogs (PDK1–PDK4) in mouse oocytes, we established the site-specificity of PDKs towards the phosphorylation of three serine residues (Ser232, Ser293 and Ser300) on PDHE1α. We found that PDK3-mediated phosphorylation of Ser293-PDHE1α results in disruption of meiotic spindle morphology and chromosome alignment and decreased total ATP levels, probably through inhibition of PDH activity. Unexpectedly, we discovered that PDK1 and PDK2 promote meiotic maturation, as their knockdown disturbs the assembly of the meiotic apparatus, without significantly altering ATP content. Moreover, phosphorylation of Ser232-PDHE1α was demonstrated to mediate PDK1 and PDK2 action in meiotic maturation, possibly through a mechanism that is distinct from PDH inactivation. These findings reveal that there are divergent roles of PDKs during oocyte maturation and indicate a new mechanism controlling meiotic structure. PMID:25991547

  1. Differing roles of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases during mouse oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaojing; Zhang, Liang; Han, Longsen; Ge, Juan; Ma, Rujun; Zhang, Xuesen; Moley, Kelle; Schedl, Tim; Wang, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) modulate energy homeostasis in multiple tissues and cell types, under various nutrient conditions, through phosphorylation of the α subunit (PDHE1α, also known as PDHA1) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. However, the roles of PDKs in meiotic maturation are currently unknown. Here, by undertaking knockdown and overexpression analysis of PDK paralogs (PDK1-PDK4) in mouse oocytes, we established the site-specificity of PDKs towards the phosphorylation of three serine residues (Ser232, Ser293 and Ser300) on PDHE1α. We found that PDK3-mediated phosphorylation of Ser293-PDHE1α results in disruption of meiotic spindle morphology and chromosome alignment and decreased total ATP levels, probably through inhibition of PDH activity. Unexpectedly, we discovered that PDK1 and PDK2 promote meiotic maturation, as their knockdown disturbs the assembly of the meiotic apparatus, without significantly altering ATP content. Moreover, phosphorylation of Ser232-PDHE1α was demonstrated to mediate PDK1 and PDK2 action in meiotic maturation, possibly through a mechanism that is distinct from PDH inactivation. These findings reveal that there are divergent roles of PDKs during oocyte maturation and indicate a new mechanism controlling meiotic structure. PMID:25991547

  2. Embryonic Cardiac Chamber Maturation: Trabeculation, Conduction and Cardiomyocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Samsa, Leigh Ann; Yang, Betsy; Liu, Jiandong

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases are one of the most common human birth defects. Though some congenital heart defects can be surgically corrected, treatment options for other congenital heart diseases are very limited. In many congenital heart diseases, genetic defects lead to impaired embryonic heart development or growth. One of the key development processes in cardiac development is chamber maturation, and alterations in this maturation process can manifest as a variety of congenital defects including noncompaction, systolic dysfunction, diastolic dysfunction, and arrhythmia. During development, to meet the increasing metabolic demands of the developing embryo, the myocardial wall undergoes extensive remodeling characterized by the formation of muscular luminal protrusions called cardiac trabeculae, increased cardiomyocyte mass, and development of the ventricular conduction system. Though the basic morphological and cytological changes involved in early heart development are clear, much remains unknown about the complex biomolecular mechanisms governing chamber maturation. In this review, we highlight evidence suggesting that a wide variety of basic signaling pathways and biomechanical forces are involved in cardiac wall maturation. PMID:23720419

  3. Compost maturity assessment using physicochemical, solid-state spectroscopy, and plant bioassay analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D Senthil; Kumar, P Satheesh; Rajendran, N M; Anbuganapathi, G

    2013-11-27

    The vermicompost produced from flower waste inoculated with biofertilizers was subjected to compost maturity test: (i) physicochemical method (pH, OC, TN, C:N); (ii) solid state spectroscopic analysis (FTIR and (13)C CPMAS NMR); and (iii) plant bioassay (germination index). The pH of vermicompost was decreased toward neutral, C:N ratio < 20; reduced organic carbon with increased nitrogen indicates the compost attains maturity. The final vermicomposts result shows reduction of complex organic materials into simple minerals which indicates the maturity of the experimental vermicompost product than the control. The increased aliphatic portion incorporated with flower residues may be due to the synthesis of alkyl, O-alkyl, and COO groups by the microbes present in the gut of earthworm. Plant bioassays are considered the most conventional assessment of compost maturity analysis, and subsequently, it shows the effect of vermicompost maturity on the germination index of Vigna mungo .

  4. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model Beta Version

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Drummond, R.; Giroti, Tony; Houseman, Doug; Knight, Mark; Levinson, Alex; longcore, Wayne; Lowe, Randy; Mater, J.; Oliver, Terry V.; Slack, Phil; Tolk, Andreas; Montgomery, Austin

    2011-12-02

    The GridWise Architecture Council was formed by the U.S. Department of Energy to promote and enable interoperability among the many entities that interact with the electric power system. This balanced team of industry representatives proposes principles for the development of interoperability concepts and standards. The Council provides industry guidance and tools that make it an available resource for smart grid implementations. In the spirit of advancing interoperability of an ecosystem of smart grid devices and systems, this document presents a model for evaluating the maturity of the artifacts and processes that specify the agreement of parties to collaborate across an information exchange interface. You are expected to have a solid understanding of large, complex system integration concepts and experience in dealing with software component interoperation. Those without this technical background should read the Executive Summary for a description of the purpose and contents of the document. Other documents, such as checklists, guides, and whitepapers, exist for targeted purposes and audiences. Please see the www.gridwiseac.org website for more products of the Council that may be of interest to you.

  5. Arnold Gesell and the maturation controversy.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Thomas C

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the work of Arnold Lucius Gesell and argues that he not only paved the way for contemporary research in motor development, but that he and colleagues anticipated fundamental issues about growth that must be addressed by psychologists and neuroscientists who are committed to the advancement of developmental science. Arnold Lucius Gesell was a pioneer in developmental psychology when the field was in its infancy. He worked diligently for the rights of physically and mentally handicapped children to receive special education that would enable them to find gainful employment. Gesell's writings in books and popular magazines increased public awareness of and support for preschool education and better foster care for orphans. Despite these achievements, many of his successors have questioned his views about infant development. Developmental psychologists have criticized Gesell for proposing a stage theory of infant growth that has fallen into disfavor among contemporary researchers. His conception of development as a maturational process has been challenged for allegedly reducing complex behavioral, perceptual, and learning processes to genetic factors. The author rejects this overly simplistic interpretation and contends that Gesell's work continues to stand the test of time.

  6. Arnold Gesell and the maturation controversy.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Thomas C

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the work of Arnold Lucius Gesell and argues that he not only paved the way for contemporary research in motor development, but that he and colleagues anticipated fundamental issues about growth that must be addressed by psychologists and neuroscientists who are committed to the advancement of developmental science. Arnold Lucius Gesell was a pioneer in developmental psychology when the field was in its infancy. He worked diligently for the rights of physically and mentally handicapped children to receive special education that would enable them to find gainful employment. Gesell's writings in books and popular magazines increased public awareness of and support for preschool education and better foster care for orphans. Despite these achievements, many of his successors have questioned his views about infant development. Developmental psychologists have criticized Gesell for proposing a stage theory of infant growth that has fallen into disfavor among contemporary researchers. His conception of development as a maturational process has been challenged for allegedly reducing complex behavioral, perceptual, and learning processes to genetic factors. The author rejects this overly simplistic interpretation and contends that Gesell's work continues to stand the test of time. PMID:17549936

  7. Bovine ovarian cells have (pro)renin receptors and prorenin induces resumption of meiosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dau, Andressa Minussi Pereira; da Silva, Eduardo Pradebon; da Rosa, Paulo Roberto Antunes; Bastiani, Felipe Tusi; Gutierrez, Karina; Ilha, Gustavo Freitas; Comim, Fabio Vasconcellos; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard Dias

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of a receptor that binds prorenin and renin in human endothelial and mesangial cells highlights the possible effect of renin-independent prorenin in the resumption of meiosis in oocytes that was postulated in the 1980s.This study aimed to identify the (pro)renin receptor in the ovary and to assess the effect of prorenin on meiotic resumption. The (pro)renin receptor protein was detected in bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes, theca cells, granulosa cells, and in the corpus luteum. Abundant (pro)renin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) was detected in the oocytes and cumulus cells, while prorenin mRNA was identified in the cumulus cells only. Prorenin at concentrations of 10(-10), 10(-9), and 10(-8)M incubated with oocytes co-cultured with follicular hemisections for 15h caused the resumption of oocyte meiosis. Aliskiren, which inhibits free renin and receptor-bound renin/prorenin, at concentrations of 10(-7), 10(-5), and 10(-3)M blocked this effect (P<0.05). To determine the involvement of angiotensin II in prorenin-induced meiosis resumption, cumulus-oocyte complexes and follicular hemisections were treated with prorenin and with angiotensin II or saralasin (angiotensin II antagonist). Prorenin induced the resumption of meiosis independently of angiotensin II. Furthermore, cumulus-oocyte complexes cultured with forskolin (200μM) and treated with prorenin and aliskiren did not exhibit a prorenin-induced resumption of meiosis (P<0.05). Only the oocytes' cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels seemed to be regulated by prorenin and/or forskolin treatment after incubation for 6h. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to identify the (pro)renin receptor in ovarian cells and to demonstrate the independent role of prorenin in the resumption of oocyte meiosis in cattle.

  8. Postradiation atrophy of mature bone

    SciTech Connect

    Erguen, H.; Howland, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The growing number of oncological patients subjected to radiotherapy require the diagnostic radiologist to be aware of expected bone changes following irradiation and the differentiation of this entity from metastasis. The primary event of radiation damage to bone is atrophy and true necrosis of bone is uncommon. The postradiation atrophic changes of bone are the result of combined cellular and vascular damage, the former being more important. The damage to the osteoblast resulting in decreased matrix production is apparently the primary histopathologic event. Radiation damaged bone is susceptible to superimposed complications of fracture, infection, necrosis, and sarcoma. The primary radiographic evidence of atrophy, localized osteopenia, is late in appearing, mainly because of the relative insensitivity of radiographs in detecting demineralization. Contrary to former views, the mature bone is quite radiosensitive and reacts quickly to even small doses of radiation. In vivo midrodensitometric analysis and radionuclide bone and bone marrow scans can reveal early changes following irradiation. The differentiation of postirradiation atrophy and metastasis may be difficult. Biopsy should be the last resort because of the possibility of causing true necrosis in atrophic bone by trauma and infection.

  9. Postradiation atrophy of mature bone

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun, H.; Howland, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The growing number of oncological patients subjected to radiotherapy require the diagnostic radiologist to be aware of expected bone changes following irradiation and the differentiation of this entity from metastasis. The primary event of radiation damage to bone is atrophy and true necrosis of bone is uncommon. The postradiation atrophic changes of bone are the result of combined cellular and vascular damage, the former being more important. The damage to the osteoblast resulting in decreased matrix production is apparently the primary histopathologic event. Radiation damaged bone is susceptible to superimposed complications of fracture, infection, necrosis, and sarcoma. The primary radiographic evidence of atrophy, localized osteopenia, is late in appearing, mainly because of the relative insensitivity of radiographs in detecing demineralization. Contrary to former views, the mature bone is quite radiosensitive and reacts quickly to even small doses of radiation. In vivo midrodensitometric analysis and radionuclide bone and bone marrow scans can reveal early changes following irradiation. The differentiation of postirradiation atrophy and metastasis may be difficult. Biopsy should be the last resort because of the possibility of causing true necrosis in atrophic bone by trauma and infection.

  10. Motivational maturity and helping behavior.

    PubMed

    Haymes, M; Green, L

    1977-12-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the independent influences of conative development (the Maslow needs hierarchy) upon behavioral aspects of prosocial orientations. It provides a behavioral demonstration of conative effects in a helping paradigm, among college-age men. A comparison of the conative data across the ages of 15-22 provided a cross-sectional view of conative development itself. Conative maturity was found to be predictive of greater helping among college-age men. Situational demands were demonstrated which tended to mask, but not override, these predispositional influences on helping. The cross-sectional data on conative development point to probable movement to early esteem concerns among high school men who have reached the conative level of love and belonging. On the other hand, the stability across the years of 15-22 of proportion of safety concerns suggests fixation of such concerns in those exhibiting them in high school. Results are discussed in terms of conative growth for development of prosocial orientations.

  11. Ultrastructure of immature and mature human oocytes after cryotop vitrification

    PubMed Central

    PALMERINI, Maria Grazia; ANTINORI, Monica; MAIONE, Marta; CERUSICO, Fabrizio; VERSACI, Caterina; NOTTOLA, Stefania Annarita; MACCHIARELLI, Guido; KHALILI, Mohammad Ali; ANTINORI, Severino

    2014-01-01

    In vitro maturation of vitrified immature germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes is a promising fertility preservation option. We analyzed the ultrastructure of human GV oocytes after Cryotop vitrification (GVv) and compared it with fresh GV (GVc), fresh mature metaphase II (MIIc) and Cryotop-vitrified mature (MIIv) oocytes. By phase contrast microscopy and light microscopy, the oolemmal and cytoplasmic organization of fresh and vitrified oocytes did not show significant changes. GVv oocytes showed significant ultrastructural alterations of the microvilli in 40% of the samples; small vacuoles and occasional large/isolated vacuoles were abnormally present in the ooplasm periphery of 50% of samples. The ultrastructure of nuclei and mitochondria-vesicle (MV) complexes, as well as the distribution and characteristics of cortical granules (CGs), were comparable with those of GVc oocytes. MIIv oocytes showed an abnormal ultrastructure of microvilli in 30% of the samples and isolated large vacuoles in 70% of the samples. MV complexes were normal, but mitochondria-smooth endoplasmic reticulum aggregates appeared to be of reduced size. CGs were normally located under the oolemma but presented abnormalities in distribution and matrix electron density. In conclusion, Cryotop vitrification preserved main oocyte characteristics in the GV and MII stages, even if peculiar ultrastructural alterations appeared in both stages. This study also showed that the GV stage appears more suitable for vitrification than the MII stage, as indicated by the good ultrastructural preservation of important structures that are present only in immature oocytes, like the nucleus and migrating CGs. PMID:25168087

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of cyclic AMP response in bovine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, D R; Guillemette, C; Sirard, M A; Richard, F J

    2015-09-01

    Acquisition of oocyte developmental competence needs to be understood to improve clinical outcomes of assisted reproduction. The stimulation of cumulus cell concentration of cyclic adenosine 3'5'-monophosphate (cAMP) by pharmacological agents during in vitro maturation (IVM) participates in improvement of oocyte quality. However, precise coordination and downstream targets of cAMP signaling in cumulus cells are largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated better embryo development after cAMP stimulation for first 6 h during IVM. Using this model, we investigated cAMP signaling in cumulus cells through in vitro culture of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in the presence of cAMP raising agents: forskolin, IBMX, and dipyridamole (here called FID treatment). Transcriptomic analysis of cumulus cells indicated that FID-induced differentially expressed transcripts were implicated in cumulus expansion, steroidogenesis, cell metabolism, and oocyte competence. Functional genomic analysis revealed that protein kinase-A (PKA), extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and calcium (Ca(2+)) pathways as key regulators of FID signaling. Inhibition of PKA (H89) in FID-supplemented COCs or substitution of FID with calcium ionophore (A23187) demonstrated that FID activated primarily the PKA pathway which inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and was upstream of calcium signaling. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by FID supported a regulation by dual specific phosphatase (DUSP1) via PKA. Our findings imply that cAMP (FID) regulates cell metabolism, steroidogenesis, intracellular signaling and cumulus expansion through PKA which modulates these functions through optimization of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and coordination of calcium signaling. These findings have implications for development of new strategies for improving oocyte in vitro maturation leading to better developmental competence.

  13. New elements in the C-type natriuretic peptide signaling pathway inhibiting swine in vitro oocyte meiotic resumption.

    PubMed

    Santiquet, Nicolas; Papillon-Dion, Emilie; Djender, Nadjib; Guillemette, Christine; Richard, François J

    2014-07-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and its cognate receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR) B, have been shown to promote cGMP production in granulosa/cumulus cells. Once transferred to the oocyte through the gap junctions, the cGMP inhibits oocyte meiotic resumption. CNP has been shown to bind another natriuretic receptor, NPR-C. NPR-C is known to interact with and degrade bound CNP, and has been reported to possess signaling functions. Therefore, NPR-C could participate in the control of oocyte maturation during swine in vitro maturation (IVM). Here, we examine the effect of CNP signaling on meiotic resumption, the amount of cGMP and gap junctional communication (GJC) regulation during swine IVM. The results show an inhibitory effect of CNP in inhibiting oocyte meiotic resumption in follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-stimulated IVM. We also found that an NPR-C-specific agonist (cANP([4-23])) is likely to play a role in maintaining meiotic arrest during porcine IVM when in the presence of a suboptimal dose of CNP. Moreover, we show that, even if CNP can increase intracellular concentration of cGMP in cumulus-oocyte complexes, cANP((4-23)) had no impact on cGMP concentration, suggesting a potential cGMP-independent signaling pathway related to NPR-C activation. These data support a potential involvement of cANP((4-23)) through NPR-C in inhibiting oocyte meiotic resumption while in the presence of a suboptimal dose of CNP. The regulation of GJC was not altered by CNP, cANP((4-23)), or the combination of CNP and cANP((4-23)), supporting their potential contribution in sending signals to the oocytes. These findings offer promising insights in to new elements of the signaling pathways that may be involved in inhibiting resumption of meiosis during FSH-stimulated swine IVM.

  14. Transcriptomic analysis of cyclic AMP response in bovine cumulus cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, D. R.; Guillemette, C.; Sirard, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of oocyte developmental competence needs to be understood to improve clinical outcomes of assisted reproduction. The stimulation of cumulus cell concentration of cyclic adenosine 3′5′-monophosphate (cAMP) by pharmacological agents during in vitro maturation (IVM) participates in improvement of oocyte quality. However, precise coordination and downstream targets of cAMP signaling in cumulus cells are largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated better embryo development after cAMP stimulation for first 6 h during IVM. Using this model, we investigated cAMP signaling in cumulus cells through in vitro culture of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in the presence of cAMP raising agents: forskolin, IBMX, and dipyridamole (here called FID treatment). Transcriptomic analysis of cumulus cells indicated that FID-induced differentially expressed transcripts were implicated in cumulus expansion, steroidogenesis, cell metabolism, and oocyte competence. Functional genomic analysis revealed that protein kinase-A (PKA), extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and calcium (Ca2+) pathways as key regulators of FID signaling. Inhibition of PKA (H89) in FID-supplemented COCs or substitution of FID with calcium ionophore (A23187) demonstrated that FID activated primarily the PKA pathway which inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and was upstream of calcium signaling. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by FID supported a regulation by dual specific phosphatase (DUSP1) via PKA. Our findings imply that cAMP (FID) regulates cell metabolism, steroidogenesis, intracellular signaling and cumulus expansion through PKA which modulates these functions through optimization of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and coordination of calcium signaling. These findings have implications for development of new strategies for improving oocyte in vitro maturation leading to better developmental competence. PMID:26082143

  15. The Invasion and Reproductive Toxicity of QDs-Transferrin Bioconjugates on Preantral Follicle in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gaixia; Lin, Suxia; Law, Wing-Cheung; Roy, Indrajit; Lin, Xiaotan; Mei, Shujiang; Ma, Hanwu; Chen, Siping; Niu, Hanben; Wang, Xiaomei

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of QD has been extensively studied over the past decade. However, the potential toxicity of QDs impedes its use for clinical research. In this work, we established a preantral follicle in vitro culture system to investigate the effects of QD-Transferrin (QDs-Tf) bioconjugates on follicle development and oocyte maturation. The preantral follicles were cultured and exposed to CdTe/ZnTe QDs-Tf bioconjugates with various concentrations and the reproductive toxicity was assessed at different time points post-treatment. The invasion of QDs-Tf for oocytes was verified by laser scanning confocal microscope. Steroid production was evaluated by immunoassay. C-band Giemsa staining was performed to observe the chromosome abnormality of oocytes. The results showed that the QDs-Tf bioconjugates could permeate into granulosa cells and theca cells, but not into oocyte. There are no obvious changes of oocyte diameter, the mucification of cumulus-oocyte-complexes and the occurrence of aneulpoidy as compared with the control group. However, delay in the antrum formation and decrease in the ratio of oocytes with first polar body were observed in QDs-Tf-treated groups. The matured oocytes with first polar body decreased significantly by ~16% (from 79.6±10 % to 63±2.9 %) when the concentration of QDs-Tf bioconjugates exceeded 2.89 nmol·L-1 (P < 0.05). Our results implied that the CdTe/ZnTe QDs-Tf bioconjugates were reproductive toxic for follicle development, and thus also revealed that this in vitro culture system of preantral follicle is a highly sensitive tool for study on the reproductive toxicity of nanoparticles. PMID:22916073

  16. Fertilization capacity of cryopreserved Iberian ibex epididymal sperm in a heterologous in vitro fertilization assay.

    PubMed

    López-Saucedo, J; Santiago-Moreno, J; Fierro, R; Izquierdo, D; Coloma, M A; Catalá, M G; Jiménez, I; Paramio, M T

    2015-02-01

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) can be used to assess the fertilization capacity of sperm. Heterologous IVF may be useful when assessing that of wild animals as it is often difficult to obtain adequate numbers of naturally corresponding oocytes. The aim of the present study was to assess the fertilization capacity of frozen-thawed ibex epididymal spermatozoa via heterologous IVF involving the oocytes of prepubertal domestic goats. The effect on fertilization and embryo development of adding oestrous sheep serum (ESS) to the fertilization medium was also examined. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were matured in TCM-199 for 24-27 h at 38.5°C in a 5% CO2 in air atmosphere. Frozen-thawed epididymal spermatozoa were selected by density gradient centrifugation. After maturation, the oocytes were co-incubated with spermatozoa in synthetic oviductal fluid (SOF) with different concentrations of ESS: SOF-C (0%), SOF-2 (2%) and SOF-20 (20%). At 17 h post-insemination (hpi), zygotes with one female and one male pronucleus (2PN) were categorised as normal; zygotes with 3PN were recorded as polyspermic, and oocytes with 1PN as asynchronous. Cleavage and blastocyst development were assessed at 48 and 168 hpi respectively. The percentage of zygotes with 2PN was higher in the SOF-2 than in the SOF-20 treatment group (27.7% versus 2.9% P < 0.05). The percentage of blastocysts formed with the SOF-C, SOF-2 and SOF-20 treatments were 1.1%, 7.5% and 0% respectively. These results show that the presence of 2% ESS achieves better results than the use of no serum or the standard 20% concentration. Heterologous IVF may be an effective method for predicting the fertilization capacity of ibex spermatozoa, and therefore perhaps that of other wild mountain ungulates. PMID:24286139

  17. Fertilization capacity of cryopreserved Iberian ibex epididymal sperm in a heterologous in vitro fertilization assay.

    PubMed

    López-Saucedo, J; Santiago-Moreno, J; Fierro, R; Izquierdo, D; Coloma, M A; Catalá, M G; Jiménez, I; Paramio, M T

    2015-02-01

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) can be used to assess the fertilization capacity of sperm. Heterologous IVF may be useful when assessing that of wild animals as it is often difficult to obtain adequate numbers of naturally corresponding oocytes. The aim of the present study was to assess the fertilization capacity of frozen-thawed ibex epididymal spermatozoa via heterologous IVF involving the oocytes of prepubertal domestic goats. The effect on fertilization and embryo development of adding oestrous sheep serum (ESS) to the fertilization medium was also examined. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were matured in TCM-199 for 24-27 h at 38.5°C in a 5% CO2 in air atmosphere. Frozen-thawed epididymal spermatozoa were selected by density gradient centrifugation. After maturation, the oocytes were co-incubated with spermatozoa in synthetic oviductal fluid (SOF) with different concentrations of ESS: SOF-C (0%), SOF-2 (2%) and SOF-20 (20%). At 17 h post-insemination (hpi), zygotes with one female and one male pronucleus (2PN) were categorised as normal; zygotes with 3PN were recorded as polyspermic, and oocytes with 1PN as asynchronous. Cleavage and blastocyst development were assessed at 48 and 168 hpi respectively. The percentage of zygotes with 2PN was higher in the SOF-2 than in the SOF-20 treatment group (27.7% versus 2.9% P < 0.05). The percentage of blastocysts formed with the SOF-C, SOF-2 and SOF-20 treatments were 1.1%, 7.5% and 0% respectively. These results show that the presence of 2% ESS achieves better results than the use of no serum or the standard 20% concentration. Heterologous IVF may be an effective method for predicting the fertilization capacity of ibex spermatozoa, and therefore perhaps that of other wild mountain ungulates.

  18. Oocyte induction of EGF responsiveness in somatic cells is associated with the acquisition of porcine oocyte developmental competence.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Lesley J; Sugimura, Satoshi; Gilchrist, Robert B

    2015-06-01

    Oocytes progressively acquire the competence to support embryo development as oogenesis proceeds with ovarian folliculogenesis. The objectives of this study were to investigate oocyte-secreted factor (OSF) participation in the development of somatic cell epidermal growth factor (EGF) responsiveness associated with oocyte developmental competence. A well-established porcine model was employed using oocytes from small (<4 mm) vs medium sized (>4 mm) antral follicles, representing low vs moderate developmental competence, respectively. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were treated in vitro with inducers of oocyte maturation, and cumulus cell functions and oocyte developmental competence were assessed. COCs from small follicles responded to FSH but, unlike COCs from larger follicles, were incapable of responding to EGF family growth factors known to mediate oocyte maturation in vivo, exhibiting perturbed cumulus expansion and expression of associated transcripts (HAS2 and TNFAIP6). Low and moderate competence COCs expressed equivalent levels of EGF receptor (EGFR) mRNA; however, the former had less total EGFR protein leading to failed activation of phospho-EGFR and phospho-ERK1/2, despite equivalent total ERK1/2 protein levels. Native OSFs from moderate, but not from low, competence oocytes established EGF responsiveness in low competence COCs. Four candidate recombinant OSFs failed to mimic the actions of native OSFs in regulating cumulus expansion. Treatment with OSFs and EGF enhanced oocyte competence but only of the low competence COCs. These data suggest that developmental acquisition by the oocyte of capacity to regulate EGF responsiveness in the oocyte's somatic cells is a major milestone in the oocyte's developmental program and contributes to coordinated oocyte and somatic cell development.

  19. Carryover Effects of Acute DEHP Exposure on Ovarian Function and Oocyte Developmental Competence in Lactating Cows.

    PubMed

    Kalo, Dorit; Hadas, Ron; Furman, Ori; Ben-Ari, Julius; Maor, Yehoshua; Patterson, Donald G; Tomey, Cynthia; Roth, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    We examined acute exposure of Holstein cows to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and its carryover effects on ovarian function and oocyte developmental competence. Synchronized cows were tube-fed with water or 100 mg/kg DEHP per day for 3 days. Blood, urine and milk samples were collected before, during and after DEHP exposure to examine its clearance pattern. Ovarian follicular dynamics was monitored through an entire estrous cycle by ultrasonographic scanning. Follicular fluids were aspirated from the preovulatory follicles on days 0 and 29 of the experiment and analyzed for phthalate metabolites and estradiol concentration. The aspirated follicular fluid was used as maturation medium for in-vitro embryo production. Findings revealed that DEHP impairs the pattern of follicular development, with a prominent effect on dominant follicles. The diameter and growth rate of the first- and second-wave dominant follicles were lower (P < 0.05) in the DEHP-treated group. Estradiol concentration in the follicular fluid was lower in the DEHP-treated group than in controls, and associated with a higher number of follicular pathologies (follicle diameter >25 mm). The pattern of growth and regression of the corpus luteum differed between groups, with a lower volume in the DEHP-treated group (P < 0.05). The follicular fluid aspirated from the DEHP-treated group, but not the controls, contained 23 nM mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate. Culturing of cumulus oocyte complexes in the follicular fluid aspirated from DEHP-treated cows reduced the proportion of oocytes progressing to the MII stage, and the proportions of 2- to 4-cell-stage embryos (P < 0.04) and 7-day blastocysts (P < 0.06). The results describe the risk associated with acute exposure to DEHP and its deleterious carryover effects on ovarian function, nuclear maturation and oocyte developmental competence.

  20. In vitro Developmental Competence of Adult Sheep Oocytes Treated with Roscovitine.

    PubMed

    Crocomo, L F; Ariu, F; Bogliolo, L; Bebbere, D; Ledda, S; Bicudo, S D

    2016-04-01

    The efficiency of in vitro sheep embryo production is still low compared to that observed in vivo and in other species. In this context, meiotic inhibition strategies emerged as a promising alternative to improve this biotechnology. So, this study aimed to evaluate, for the first time, the effects of roscovitine on in vitro maturation of sheep oocytes and their subsequent embryo development. For this, cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were cultured for 6 h in the presence (Rosco) or absence (Control) of 75 μm roscovitine and, subsequently, in vitro matured (IVM) for 18 h with gonadotropins. At 0 (Immature), 6 and 24 h of culture, the nuclear status of oocytes was evaluated by Hoechst staining. Embryo cleavage and blastocyst formation were recorded 30 h after in vitro fertilization and on day 7 of culture, respectively. Blastocyst quality was evaluated by differential staining. At 6 h, the GV rate in the Rosco treatment (93.8%) was similar to that observed in the Immature oocytes (94.9%) and significantly higher compared to Control (41.3%). After IVM for 18 h, a high and similar proportion of oocytes from Rosco (93.6%) and Control (88.4%) reached the MII stage. In both treatments, approximately 70% of oocytes cleaved and 50% of them developed up to blastocyst. The mean percentage of blastocyst cells, embryoblast, trophoblast and pyknosis did also not differ between Control and Rosco. In conclusion, roscovitine, at the studied experimental conditions, was efficient to reversibly inhibit the meiosis of adult sheep oocytes without detrimental effect on development and quality of the in vitro produced embryos. PMID:26890275

  1. Importance of the GDF9 signaling pathway on cumulus cell expansion and oocyte competency in sheep.

    PubMed

    Varnosfaderani, Sh Rouhollahi; Ostadhosseini, S; Hajian, M; Hosseini, S M; Khashouei, E Asadi; Abbasi, H; Hosseinnia, P; Nasr-Esfahani, M H

    2013-09-15

    Acquisition of developmental competency in cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) is derived from endocrine hormones and oocyte secreted factors. The contribution of these factors in oocyte maturation and development is an active area of research. The objective of this research was to investigate whether growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) that is secreted by oocyte affects cumulus expansion and oocyte development in sheep. Immature ovine COCs were cultured in the presence of recombinant human GDF9 (rhGDF9), denuded oocytes, SB-431542, a specific inhibitor of activin-like kinase 4/5/7; or a combination of these factors. Routine in vitro maturation of COCs and denuded oocytes were used as external control samples. Cultured COCs were used for assessment of (1) cumulus expansion; (2) expression of cumulus-related transcripts including pentraxin 3, hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 6, prostaglandin synthase 2, B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2), and Bcl2-associated X (BAX); and (3) yield and quality of embryo development. It was observed that cumulus expansion was not affected by any of these treatments. HAS2 mRNA expression confirmed this observation. In the presence of exogenous GDF9, cleavage rate was reduced, blastocyst rate did not differ from other groups, and trophectoderm cell number significantly increased. This suggests that exogenous GDF9 could improve embryo quality. It was also observed that oocyte secreted factors reduced proapoptotic BAX mRNA, and BCL2 mRNA expression was not significantly different from other groups. This study provides evidence that GDF9 signaling might have a minor influence on ovine cumulus expansion and oocyte development and that other signaling pathway(s) might have a dominant role.

  2. Influence of hormonal and nonhormonal estrus synchronization methods on follicular and oocyte quality in primiparous lactating does at early postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Arias-Alvarez, M; García-García, R M; Torres-Rovira, L; González-Bulnes, A; Rebollar, P G; Lorenzo, P L

    2010-01-01

    High-yield lactating does need effective estrus synchronization methods to improve their reproductive outcome by enhancing ovarian function. The aim of the current work was to analyze ovarian follicular and oocyte characteristics of hormonal and nonhormonal estrus synchronization regimes in primiparous lactating rabbit does (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in the early postpartum period (Day 11). Females were randomly treated with either (1) a hormonal standard treatment with 25 IU equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) 48h before artificial insemination (eCG group) or (2) an alternative nonhormonal treatment consisting of doe-litter separation 24h before artificial insemination (Bio group). No significant differences were found in serum estradiol and progesterone concentrations between experimental groups. During the histologic study, the Bio group presented a higher number of primordial (P<0.05) and primary follicles (P=0.07) compared with that of the eCG group, whereas secondary and antral follicular populations were similar. Rates of late atretic follicles assessed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling technique were not different between treatments, but the eCG group showed a significantly higher number of mid-atretic follicles compared with that of the Bio group. Nuclear in vitro oocyte maturation (IVM), measured as metaphase II rate, and in vitro steroidogenic response of cumulus-oocyte complexes, measured by ELISA, did not show significant differences between treatments. However, confocal study showed that cytoplasmic maturation of oocytes, in terms of cortical granule migration rate, was significantly higher in the Bio group compared with that after the eCG treatment. In conclusion, transient doe-litter separation seems to improve ovarian response in terms of follicular health and oocyte competence compared with that after the eCG treatment. Therefore, a 24-h-long transient weaning could be an alternative nonhormonal method for

  3. Carryover Effects of Acute DEHP Exposure on Ovarian Function and Oocyte Developmental Competence in Lactating Cows

    PubMed Central

    Kalo, Dorit; Hadas, Ron; Furman, Ori; Ben-Ari, Julius; Maor, Yehoshua; Patterson, Donald G.; Tomey, Cynthia; Roth, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    We examined acute exposure of Holstein cows to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and its carryover effects on ovarian function and oocyte developmental competence. Synchronized cows were tube-fed with water or 100 mg/kg DEHP per day for 3 days. Blood, urine and milk samples were collected before, during and after DEHP exposure to examine its clearance pattern. Ovarian follicular dynamics was monitored through an entire estrous cycle by ultrasonographic scanning. Follicular fluids were aspirated from the preovulatory follicles on days 0 and 29 of the experiment and analyzed for phthalate metabolites and estradiol concentration. The aspirated follicular fluid was used as maturation medium for in-vitro embryo production. Findings revealed that DEHP impairs the pattern of follicular development, with a prominent effect on dominant follicles. The diameter and growth rate of the first- and second-wave dominant follicles were lower (P < 0.05) in the DEHP-treated group. Estradiol concentration in the follicular fluid was lower in the DEHP-treated group than in controls, and associated with a higher number of follicular pathologies (follicle diameter >25 mm). The pattern of growth and regression of the corpus luteum differed between groups, with a lower volume in the DEHP-treated group (P < 0.05). The follicular fluid aspirated from the DEHP-treated group, but not the controls, contained 23 nM mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate. Culturing of cumulus oocyte complexes in the follicular fluid aspirated from DEHP-treated cows reduced the proportion of oocytes progressing to the MII stage, and the proportions of 2- to 4-cell-stage embryos (P < 0.04) and 7-day blastocysts (P < 0.06). The results describe the risk associated with acute exposure to DEHP and its deleterious carryover effects on ovarian function, nuclear maturation and oocyte developmental competence. PMID:26154164

  4. Decision-Making Style and Vocational Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Susan D.; Strohmer, Douglas C.

    1982-01-01

    Examined the relationship between decision-making style, scholastic achievement, and vocational maturity for college students (N=64). Results did not support the hypothesized relationship between rationality and attitudinal and cognitive maturity. Scholastic achievement and lack of dependent decision style were found to be moderately predictive of…

  5. Motivation and Maturity Patterns in Marital Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, David C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Married couples rated their marital satisfaction and played interpersonal competitive games which revealed the success with which they interacted. Younger husbands who scored more maturely on the Stewart measure of psychosocial maturity belonged to more successful marriages, as did college-educated wives who showed less immaturity and more phallic…

  6. 7 CFR 29.6026 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity. 29.6026 Section 29.6026 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6026 Maturity. The degree of ripeness. (See chart.)...

  7. 13 CFR 120.933 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity. 120.933 Section 120.933 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Development Company Loan Program (504) 504 Loans and Debentures § 120.933 Maturity. From time to time, SBA will publish in...

  8. New definitions for cotton fiber maturity ratio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber maturity affects fiber physical, mechanical, and chemical properties, as well as the processability and qualities of yarn and fabrics. New definitions of cotton fiber maturity ratio are introduced. The influences of sampling, sample preparation, measurement method, and correlations am...

  9. The FMI: Dimensions of Follower Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Loren I.

    1976-01-01

    The Follower Maturity Index (FMI) is an instrument derived from leadership theory and based on observations of verbal and nonverbal behavior of followers in task groups. Dimensions of follower maturity--achievement, responsibility, experience, activity, dependence, variety, interests, perspective, position, and awareness--are discussed. For…

  10. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the stage of development which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. Before a mature apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of...

  11. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the stage of development which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. Before a mature apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of...

  12. Quantifying Semantic Linguistic Maturity in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansson, Kristina; Bååth, Rasmus; Löhndorf, Simone; Sahlén, Birgitta; Sikström, Sverker

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method to quantify "semantic linguistic maturity" (SELMA) based on a high dimensional semantic representation of words created from the co-occurrence of words in a large text corpus. The method was applied to oral narratives from 108 children aged 4;0-12;10. By comparing the SELMA measure with maturity ratings made by human…

  13. Vocational Maturity among Inner-City Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Peter E.; Hansen, James C.

    1970-01-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of the Vocational Development Inventory in measuring the vocational maturity of inner city boys. Intelligence test results were converted to standardized T scores. Mean vocational maturity scores indicate large differences which disappear when intelligence is controlled by analysis of convariance. A variety of…

  14. Career Maturity and College Student Persistence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Stephen R.; Cabrera, Alberto F.; Vogt, W. Paul

    1999-01-01

    A study examined the role of career maturity in the college persistence of 307 freshmen at a public, residential, four-year college. Results indicate that the My Vocational Situation instrument is reliable and valid, although theoretical formulations should be reexamined. Career maturity was positively associated with several variables important…

  15. 7 CFR 51.1865 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Fresh Tomatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1865 Mature. Mature means that the tomato has reached the stage of development which will insure a proper completion of the ripening process, and that...

  16. 7 CFR 51.1907 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Definitions § 51.1907 Mature. Mature means that the tomato has reached the stage of development which will insure a proper completion of the ripening process....

  17. Canopy temperature and maturity in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat units are a widely used indicator of maturity in cotton. It is generally assumed that it takes approximately 2200°F (1222°C) heat units for a cotton plant on the South High Plains of Texas to mature. This value is based on a typical planting date of May 15 with ample irrigation. As water for c...

  18. 7 CFR 51.1313 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. (b) Before a mature... process. Therefore, a statement of firmness should be given in order to indicate the stage of the ripening process. A description of the ground color should also be given. (1) The following terms should be...

  19. 7 CFR 51.1313 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. (b) Before a mature... process. Therefore, a statement of firmness should be given in order to indicate the stage of the ripening process. A description of the ground color should also be given. (1) The following terms should be...

  20. 7 CFR 51.1158 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus, Post Office Box 148... § 51.1158 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as...

  1. 7 CFR 51.767 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February...

  2. 7 CFR 51.767 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February...

  3. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus, Post Office Box 148... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February...

  4. 7 CFR 51.1158 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus, Post Office Box 148... § 51.1158 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as...

  5. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus, Post Office Box 148... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February...

  6. MicroRNA Expression during Bovine Oocyte Maturation and Fertilization.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Graham C; Tscherner, Allison; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Merico, Daniele; LaMarre, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Successful fertilization and subsequent embryo development rely on complex molecular processes starting with the development of oocyte competence through maturation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that function as gene regulators in many biological systems, including the oocyte and embryo. In order to further explore the roles of miRNAs in oocyte maturation, we employed small RNA sequencing as a screening tool to identify and characterize miRNA populations present in pools of bovine germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes, metaphase II (MII) oocytes, and presumptive zygotes (PZ). Each stage contained a defined miRNA population, some of which showed stable expression while others showed progressive changes between stages that were subsequently confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Bta-miR-155, bta-miR-222, bta-miR-21, bta-let-7d, bta-let-7i, and bta-miR-190a were among the statistically significant differentially expressed miRNAs (p < 0.05). To determine whether changes in specific primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts were responsible for the observed miRNA changes, we evaluated pri-miR-155, -222 and let-7d expression. Pri-miR-155 and -222 were not detected in GV oocytes but pri-miR-155 was present in MII oocytes, indicating transcription during maturation. In contrast, levels of pri-let-7d decreased during maturation, suggesting that the observed increase in let-7d expression was likely due to processing of the primary transcript. This study demonstrates that both dynamic and stable populations of miRNAs are present in bovine oocytes and zygotes and extend previous studies supporting the importance of the small RNA landscape in the maturing bovine oocyte and early embryo. PMID:26999121

  7. MicroRNA Expression during Bovine Oocyte Maturation and Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, Graham C.; Tscherner, Allison; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Merico, Daniele; LaMarre, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Successful fertilization and subsequent embryo development rely on complex molecular processes starting with the development of oocyte competence through maturation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that function as gene regulators in many biological systems, including the oocyte and embryo. In order to further explore the roles of miRNAs in oocyte maturation, we employed small RNA sequencing as a screening tool to identify and characterize miRNA populations present in pools of bovine germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes, metaphase II (MII) oocytes, and presumptive zygotes (PZ). Each stage contained a defined miRNA population, some of which showed stable expression while others showed progressive changes between stages that were subsequently confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Bta-miR-155, bta-miR-222, bta-miR-21, bta-let-7d, bta-let-7i, and bta-miR-190a were among the statistically significant differentially expressed miRNAs (p < 0.05). To determine whether changes in specific primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts were responsible for the observed miRNA changes, we evaluated pri-miR-155, -222 and let-7d expression. Pri-miR-155 and -222 were not detected in GV oocytes but pri-miR-155 was present in MII oocytes, indicating transcription during maturation. In contrast, levels of pri-let-7d decreased during maturation, suggesting that the observed increase in let-7d expression was likely due to processing of the primary transcript. This study demonstrates that both dynamic and stable populations of miRNAs are present in bovine oocytes and zygotes and extend previous studies supporting the importance of the small RNA landscape in the maturing bovine oocyte and early embryo. PMID:26999121

  8. Embryonic development after exposure of mouse oocyte to various amount of ovarian endometriotic fluid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hashin; Jeong, Mina; Kim, Seul Ki

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses the fertilization and blastocyst-forming rate in mice cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) after the exposure of human ovarian endometriotic fluid. Endometriotic fluid was obtained from a single patient by aspiration at the time of a laparoscopic cystectomy and serially diluted. COCs were obtained from 46-week-old female BDF1 mice. After exposure to ovarian endometriotic fluid for five minutes, the COCs were washed three times and the oocytes were then fertilized by mice sperm. The fertilization and blastocyst formation rate and the proportion of hatching/hatched blastocyst in the four treatment groups were not inferior to those in non-exposure group. PMID:27462598

  9. A Review of Factors Influencing Maturation of Atlantic Salmon Salmo salar with Focus on Water Recirculation Aquaculture System Environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maturation of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar is an extremely complex process, particularly in aquaculture systems, with many variables (known or otherwise) having the capacity to influence the timing and prevalence of maturation, and acting as promoters and/or inhibitors of sexual development. The vast...

  10. Late maturers at a performance disadvantage to their more mature peers in junior Australian football.

    PubMed

    Gastin, Paul B; Bennett, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents mature at different rates such that individuals competing in the same competition may differ in physical and biological maturity despite being of similar chronological age. Whether or not differences translate into on-field performance in competition is relatively unknown. This study investigated the influence of biological maturity on fitness and match running performance in junior Australian football. Eighty-seven under-15 years players were categorised into early (n = 20), average (n = 45) and late (n = 22) maturity groups based on self-reported and anthropometric assessment of biological maturity. Running movements during competition were collected using GPS (5 Hz) technology. Early maturers were heavier and taller than all other boys (P < 0.05), while biological maturity was significantly correlated to 20 m sprint (r = 0.53, P < 0.01). Total distance, high-intensity (>14.4 km · h(-1)) running distance and number of high-intensity efforts were significantly greater (20.8%, 53.6%, 31.7%, respectively; P < 0.01) in early compared to late maturers. Number of sprints and peak speed in competition were not different. Pubertal development and maturity status partially explained the differences between players in physical size, functional running fitness and match running performance. Late maturing players in this Australian football under-15 age group were at a physical and performance disadvantage to their earlier maturing peers.

  11. Mycobacterium avium subspecies impair dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Basler, Tina; Brumshagen, Christina; Beineke, Andreas; Goethe, Ralph; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease, a chronic, granulomatous enteritis of ruminants. Dendritic cells (DC) of the gut are ideally placed to combat invading mycobacteria; however, little is known about their interaction with MAP. Here, we investigated the interaction of MAP and the closely related M. avium ssp. avium (MAA) with murine DC and the effect of infected macrophages on DC maturation. The infection of DC with MAP or MAA induced DC maturation, which differed to that of LPS as maturation was accompanied by higher production of IL-10 and lower production of IL-12. Treatment of maturing DC with supernatants from mycobacteria-infected macrophages resulted in impaired DC maturation, leading to a semi-mature, tolerogenic DC phenotype expressing low levels of MHCII, CD86 and TNF-α after LPS stimulation. Though the cells were not completely differentiated they responded with an increased IL-10 and a decreased IL-12 production. Using recombinant cytokines we provide evidence that the semi-mature DC phenotype results from a combination of secreted cytokines and released antigenic mycobacterial components of the infected macrophage. Our results indicate that MAP and MAA are able to subvert DC function directly by infecting and indirectly via the milieu created by infected macrophages.

  12. Protein syntehsis during soybean seed maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, L.A.; Rinne, R.W.

    1987-04-01

    The authors previous work has demonstrated that physiological and biochemical changes specifically associated with soybean seed maturation can be separated from events associated with seed development. The objective of this study was to determine if soybean seed metabolism is altered during maturation drying at the level of protein synthesis. Seed harvested 35 days after flowering (0% seedling growth) were induced to mature (100% seedling growth) through controlled dehydration. Proteins labeled with (/sup 35/S)-methionine were extracted and analyzed by 1-D PAGE coupled with autoradiography and densitometry. Results show a 31 kD and 128 kD polypeptide synthesized de novo during dehydration and precocious maturation. The same two polypeptides are synthesized during natural dehydration and maturation (>60 days after flowering). Furthermore, these polypeptides persist during rehydration and germination of both precociously and naturally matured seed, but specifically disappear during early seedling growth. The authors are currently investigating the role of protein synthesis during soybean seed maturation and if it is required for establishment of a soybean seedling.

  13. From enzyme maturation to synthetic chemistry: the case of hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Artero, Vincent; Berggren, Gustav; Atta, Mohamed; Caserta, Giorgio; Roy, Souvik; Pecqueur, Ludovic; Fontecave, Marc

    2015-08-18

    Water splitting into oxygen and hydrogen is one of the most attractive strategies for storing solar energy and electricity. Because the processes at work are multielectronic, there is a crucial need for efficient and stable catalysts, which in addition have to be cheap for future industrial developments (electrolyzers, photoelectrochemicals, and fuel cells). Specifically for the water/hydrogen interconversion, Nature is an exquisite source of inspiration since this chemistry contributes to the bioenergetic metabolism of a number of living organisms via the activity of fascinating metalloenzymes, the hydrogenases. In this Account, we first briefly describe the structure of the unique dinuclear organometallic active sites of the two classes of hydrogenases as well as the complex protein machineries involved in their biosynthesis, their so-called maturation processes. This knowledge allows for the development of a fruitful bioinspired chemistry approach, which has already led to a number of interesting and original catalysts mimicking the natural active sites. More specifically, we describe our own attempts to prepare artificial hydrogenases. This can be achieved via the standard bioinspired approach using the combination of a synthetic bioinspired catalyst and a polypeptide scaffold. Such hybrid complexes provide the opportunity to optimize the system by manipulating both the catalyst through chemical synthesis and the protein component through mutagenesis. We also raise the possibility to reach such artificial systems via an original strategy based on mimicking the enzyme maturation pathways. This is illustrated in this Account by two examples developed in our laboratory. First, we show how the preparation of a lysozyme-{Mn(I)(CO)3} hybrid and its clean reaction with a nickel complex led us to generate a new class of binuclear Ni-Mn H2-evolving catalysts mimicking the active site of [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Then we describe how we were able to rationally design and

  14. Antioxidant defense in the follicular fluid of water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Cassano, E; Tosto, L; Balestrieri, M; Zicarelli, L; Abrescia, P

    1999-01-01

    Oxidative damages to the oocyte or follicular cells were suggested to trigger atresia. In water buffalo, loss of the blood-follicle barrier sieving effect on the diffusion of plasma haptoglobin was previously found to be associated with atretic oocytes. The redox status of water buffalo follicles was evaluated by measuring in follicular fluid both the total antioxidant capacity (TAC), expressed as Trolox equivalents, and the concentration of specific free radical scavengers, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Among follicles at random stages of the reproductive cycle (n = 74), a number (n = 32) were analyzed also for the cumulus-oocyte morphology or plasma haptoglobin penetration. The haptoglobin follicular concentration compatible with the barrier selectivity function was calculated to be less than 53% of the concentration in plasma. The data on TAC, retinol, alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, and uric acid fluctuated in a wide range. The relative (follicular vs. plasmatic) levels of alpha-tocopherol were found to be negatively correlated with those of retinol (p < 0.01). In the follicles, the alpha-tocopherol levels were 1.25 +/- 0.35 or 1.99 +/- 0.72 microM when the haptoglobin concentration was <53 or >53% of the concentration in plasma, respectively. The concentration of ascorbic acid or uric acid was higher (up to 10- or 30-fold, respectively) in follicular fluid than in plasma. Fluids containing haptoglobin >53% or associated with cumulus-oocyte complexes of bad quality displayed levels of uric acid about 20-fold higher than in plasma. The results suggest that a high penetration of haptoglobin in the follicle and cumulus-oocyte degradation is associated with alterations of the level of the major antioxidants, particularly with enhancement of the uric acid concentration.

  15. Ca2+ signaling differentiation during oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Machaca, Khaled

    2007-11-01

    Oocyte maturation is an essential cellular differentiation pathway that prepares the egg for activation at fertilization leading to the initiation of embryogenesis. An integral attribute of oocyte maturation is the remodeling of Ca2+ signaling pathways endowing the egg with the capacity to produce a specialized Ca2+ transient at fertilization that is necessary and sufficient for egg activation. Consequently, mechanistic elucidation of Ca2+ signaling differentiation during oocyte maturation is fundamental to our understanding of egg activation, and offers a glimpse into Ca2+ signaling regulation during the cell cycle.

  16. Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer using recipient oocytes recovered by ovum pick-up: effect of maternal lineage of oocyte donors.

    PubMed

    Brüggerhoff, Katja; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Wenigerkind, Hendrik; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Prelle, Katja; Schernthaner, Wolfgang; Alberio, Ramiro; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Brem, Gottfried; Hiendleder, Stefan; Wolf, Eckhard

    2002-02-01

    The efficiency of bovine nuclear transfer using recipient oocytes recovered by ultrasound-guided follicle aspiration (ovum pick-up [OPU]) was investigated. Oocyte donors were selected from 2 distinct maternal lineages (A and B) differing in 11 nucleotide positions of the mitochondrial DNA control region. A total of 1342 cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were recovered. The numbers of total COCs and class I/II COCs recovered from donors of lineage A were higher (P < 0.001) than those obtained from lineage B. Follicle aspiration once per week yielded a higher (P < 0.001) total number of COCs per session than aspiration twice per week, whereas the reproduction status of donors (heifer vs. cow) had no effect on OPU results. Of the 1342 oocytes recovered, 733 (55%) were successfully matured in vitro and used for nuclear transfer. Fusion was achieved in 550 (75%) karyoplast-cytoplast complexes (KCCs), resulting in 277 (50%) cleaved embryos on Day 3. On Day 7 of culture, 84 transferable embryos (15% based on fused KCCs) were obtained. After 38 transfers (10 single, 22 double, and 6 triple transfers), 9 recipients (8 double and 1 triple transfer) were diagnosed as pregnant on Day 28, corresponding to a pregnancy rate of 24%. The proportion of transferable embryos on Day 7 was significantly (P < 0.05) influenced by maternal lineage of oocyte donors and by the frequency of follicle aspiration. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of generating nuclear transfer embryos with defined cytoplasmic background. These will be valuable tools to experimentally dissect the effects of nuclear and cytoplasmic components on embryonic, fetal, and postnatal development.

  17. Gene expression in mouse ovarian follicle development in vivo versus an ex vivo alginate culture system.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Elizabeth M; Siletz, Anaar; Xu, Min; Woodruff, Teresa K; Shea, Lonnie D

    2011-08-01

    Ovarian follicle maturation results from a complex interplay of endocrine, paracrine, and direct cell-cell interactions. This study compared the dynamic expression of key developmental genes during folliculogenesis in vivo and during in vitro culture in a 3D alginate hydrogel system. Candidate gene expression profiles were measured within mouse two-layered secondary follicles, multi-layered secondary follicles, and cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). The expression of 20 genes involved in endocrine communication, growth signaling, and oocyte development was investigated by real-time PCR. Gene product levels were compared between i) follicles of similar stage and ii) COCs derived either in vivo or by in vitro culture. For follicles cultured for 4 days, the expression pattern and the expression level of 12 genes were the same in vivo and in vitro. Some endocrine (cytochrome P450, family 19, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (Cyp19a1) and inhibin βA subunit (Inhba)) and growth-related genes (bone morphogenetic protein 15 (Bmp15), kit ligand (Kitl), and transforming growth factor β receptor 2 (Tgfbr2)) were downregulated relative to in vivo follicles. For COCs obtained from cultured follicles, endocrine-related genes (inhibin α-subunit (Inha) and Inhba) had increased expression relative to in vivo counterparts, whereas growth-related genes (Bmp15, growth differentiation factor 9, and kit oncogene (Kit)) and zona pellucida genes were decreased. However, most of the oocyte-specific genes (e.g. factor in the germline α (Figla), jagged 1 (Jag1), and Nlrp5 (Mater)) were expressed in vitro at the same level and with the same pattern as in vivo-derived follicles. These studies establish the similarities and differences between in vivo and in vitro cultured follicles, guiding the creation of environments that maximize follicle development and oocyte quality. PMID:21610168

  18. Characterization of the constitutive pig ovary heat shock chaperone machinery and its response to acute thermal stress or to seasonal variations.

    PubMed

    Pennarossa, Georgia; Maffei, Sara; Rahman, Mahbubur M; Berruti, Giovanna; Brevini, Tiziana A L; Gandolfi, Fulvio

    2012-11-01

    Reduced oocyte competence causes the lower fertility reported in domestic sows during the warm months of the year. Somatic cells express heat shock proteins (HSPs) to protect themselves from damage caused by thermal stress. HSPs are classified as molecular chaperones and control the correct folding of newly synthesized or damaged proteins. The present work performed a comprehensive survey of the different components of the heat shock chaperone machinery in the pig ovary, which included the HSP40, HSP70, HSP90, and HSP110 families, as well as heat shock factors (HSF) 1 and 2. Pig ovarian follicles constitutively expressed different members of these families; therefore, we examined their ability to respond to heat stress. In order to take into account the role of the complex follicular architecture, whole pig ovaries were exposed to 41.5°C for 1 h. This exposure significantly disrupted oocyte maturation and determined the upregulation of the HSP70, HSP40, HSPH1, HSPA4, HSPA4L, HSF1, and HFS2 genes, whereas expression levels of HSP90A and HSP90B, as well as those of genes unrelated to heat stress were not altered. Unexpectedly HSP and HSF expression levels changed only in oocytes but not in cumulus cells. Cumulus-oocyte complexes isolated from ovaries collected in summer showed the same pattern as those collected in winter. We conclude that the HSP chaperone machinery is constitutively fully operational in the pig ovary. However, following thermal stimuli or seasonal variations, cumulus cell HS-related gene expression remains unchanged, and only oocytes activate a response, suggesting why this mechanism is insufficient to preserve their competence both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Detection of condensin I and II in maturing pig oocytes.

    PubMed

    Lisková, Lucie; Susor, Andrej; Pivonková, Katerina; Sasková, Adéla; Karabínová, Pavla; Kubelka, Michal

    2010-01-01

    The multiprotein complexes known as condensins (I and II) are major players in chromosome dynamics in mitotic and meiotic cells. Here, we report for the first time the detection of different condensin subunits from both complexes in mammalian oocytes. Using immunoblotting analysis we examined expression levels of condensin subunits during meiotic maturation of porcine oocytes. The expression of the core subunit structural maintenance of chromosomes 2 (SMC2), identical in both condensin complexes, did not change significantly during maturation. Similarly, there was no significant change in the expression of the chromosome associated protein (CAP)-H and CAP-H2 subunits, components of condensin I and II, respectively. Conversely, the expression profiles of CAP-G, CAP-D2 (condensin I) and CAP-D3 (condensin II) were more interesting. At least two isoforms of the CAP-D2 subunit were detected, along with three isoforms of the CAP-D3 and CAP-G subunits. We suggest that this diverse migration of subunit isoforms is due to post-translational modification. Earlier, it was reported that non-SMC proteins are phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 1. In the present study, we analysed the phosphorylation status of the three subunits in oocyte extracts using alkaline phosphatase treatment and we found that at least the fastest migrating form of CAP-D3 was likely to be phosphorylated in maturing porcine oocytes. In addition, the localisation of CAP-H and CAP-H2 subunits was examined using immunofluorescence staining with specific antibodies, as well as following microinjection of their enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged mRNA into germinal vesicle-stage oocytes. CAP-H was found in the cytoplasm, whereas CAP-H2 was localised within the nucleus.

  20. 7 CFR 51.1218 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Peaches Definitions § 51.1218 Mature. “Mature” means that the peach has reached the stage of growth which will ensure a proper completion of...

  1. 7 CFR 51.1218 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Peaches Definitions § 51.1218 Mature. “Mature” means that the peach has reached the stage of growth which will ensure a proper completion of...

  2. The Moral Maturity of Repeater Delinquents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petronio, Richard J.

    1980-01-01

    Differences in moral development (as conceived by Kohlberg) were examined in a sample of delinquent teenagers. The repeater group was not found, as had been hypothesized, to be lower on moral maturity than those who engaged in less delinquency. (GC)

  3. Survival of mature T cells depends on signaling through HOIP

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Kazumi; Kitamura, Akiko; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Chung, Doo Hyun; Kagami, Shoji; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Yasutomo, Koji

    2016-01-01

    T cell development in the thymus is controlled by a multistep process. The NF-κB pathway regulates T cell development as well as T cell activation at multiple differentiation stages. The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) is composed of Sharpin, HOIL-1L and HOIP, and it is crucial for regulating the NF-κB and cell death pathways. However, little is known about the roles of LUBAC in T-cell development and activation. Here, we show that in T-HOIPΔlinear mice lacking the ubiquitin ligase activity of LUBAC, thymic CD4+ or CD8+ T cell numbers were markedly reduced with severe defects in NKT cell development. HOIPΔlinear CD4+ T cells failed to phosphorylate IκBα and JNK through T cell receptor-mediated stimulation. Mature CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in T-HOIPΔlinear mice underwent apoptosis more rapidly than control T cells, and it was accompanied by lower CD127 expression on CD4+CD24low and CD8+CD24low T cells in the thymus. The enforced expression of CD127 in T-HOIPΔlinear thymocytes rescued the development of mature CD8+ T cells. Collectively, our results showed that LUBAC ligase activity is key for the survival of mature T cells, and suggest multiple roles of the NF-κB and cell death pathways in activating or maintaining T cell-mediated adaptive immune responses. PMID:27786304

  4. COPI is essential for Golgi cisternal maturation and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Midori; Suda, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteins synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are transported to the Golgi and then sorted to their destinations. For their passage through the Golgi, one widely accepted mechanism is cisternal maturation. Cisternal maturation is fulfilled by the retrograde transport of Golgi-resident proteins from later to earlier cisternae, and candidate carriers for this retrograde transport are coat protein complex I (COPI)-coated vesicles. We examined the COPI function in cisternal maturation directly by 4D observation of the transmembrane Golgi-resident proteins in living yeast cells. COPI temperature-sensitive mutants and induced degradation of COPI proteins were used to knockdown COPI function. For both methods, inactivation of COPI subunits Ret1 and Sec21 markedly impaired the transition from cis to medial and to trans cisternae. Furthermore, the movement of cisternae within the cytoplasm was severely restricted when COPI subunits were depleted. Our results demonstrate the essential roles of COPI proteins in retrograde trafficking of the Golgi-resident proteins and dynamics of the Golgi cisternae. PMID:27445311

  5. Asymmetric conformational maturation of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xunhai; Perera, Lalith; Mueller, Geoffrey A; DeRose, Eugene F; London, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase utilizes a metamorphic polymerase domain that is able to adopt two alternate structures that fulfill catalytic and structural roles, thereby minimizing its coding requirements. This ambiguity introduces folding challenges that are met by a complex maturation process. We have investigated this conformational maturation using NMR studies of methyl-labeled RT for the slower processes in combination with molecular dynamics simulations for rapid processes. Starting from an inactive conformation, the p66 precursor undergoes a unimolecular isomerization to a structure similar to its active form, exposing a large hydrophobic surface that facilitates initial homodimer formation. The resulting p66/p66' homodimer exists as a conformational heterodimer, after which a series of conformational adjustments on different time scales can be observed. Formation of the inter-subunit RH:thumb' interface occurs at an early stage, while maturation of the connection' and unfolding of the RH' domains are linked and occur on a much slower time scale. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06359.001 PMID:26037594

  6. Investigations of oocyte in vitro maturation within a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chin, Alexis Heng Boon; Chye, Ng Soon

    2004-02-01

    This study attempted to develop a 'less meiotically competent' murine model for oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM), which could more readily be extrapolated to human clinical assisted reproduction. Oocyte meiotic competence was drastically reduced upon shortening the standard duration of in vivo gonadotrophin stimulation from 48 h to 24 h, and by selecting only naked or partially naked germinal vesicle oocytes, instead of fully cumulus enclosed oocyte complexes. With such a less meiotically competent model, only porcine granulosa coculture significantly enhanced the oocyte maturation rate in vitro, whereas no significant enhancement was observed with macaque and murine granulosa coculture. Increased serum concentrations and the supplementation of gonadotrophins, follicular fluid and extracellular matrix gel within the culture medium did not enhance IVM under either cell-free or coculture conditions. Culture medium conditioned by porcine granulosa also enhanced the maturation rate, and this beneficial effect was not diminished upon freeze-thawing. Enhanced IVM in the presence of porcine granulosa coculture did not, however, translate into improved developmental competence, as assessed by in vitro fertilization and embryo culture to the blastocyst stage. PMID:15214575

  7. Defective maturation of dendritic cells in common variable immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Taylor, T H; Green, M R; Raeiszadeh, M; Workman, S; Webster, A D

    2006-01-01

    Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MdDCs) from many patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) have been shown recently to have reduced expression of surface molecules associated with maturity. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we now show that this is due to a partial failure to fix Class II DR molecules on the surface during procedures that induce full maturation in vitro in cells from normal subjects. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, CD86 and CD83 expression were expressed normally, but CD40 was reduced. These abnormalities are unlikely to be due to prior in vivo exposure of monocytes to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as addition of LPS to monocytes from normal subjects in vitro caused a different pattern of changes. CVID MdDCs retained Class II DR in the cytoplasm during maturation, showed increased internalization of cross-linked Class II DR surface molecules and were unable to polarize DR within a lipid raft at contact sites with autologous lymphocytes. These cells retained some features of monocytes, such as the ability to phagocytose large numbers of fixed yeast and fluorescent carboxylated microspheres and expression of surface CD14. These abnormalities, if reflected in vivo, could compromise antigen presentation and may be a fundamental defect in the mechanism of the antibody deficiency in a substantial subset of CVID patients. PMID:16907909

  8. The control of chlorophyll levels in maturing kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, Sarah M; Montefiori, Mirco; Jameson, Paula E; Allan, Andrew C

    2012-11-01

    Chlorophyll is present in many plant organs, including immature fruit where it is usually degraded during ripening. Mature green kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) are an exception, with high concentrations of chlorophyll remaining in the fruit flesh. In gold-fleshed kiwifruit (A. chinensis), chlorophyll is degraded to colourless catabolites upon fruit ripening, leaving yellow carotenoids visible. We have identified candidate genes for the control of chlorophyll degradation in kiwifruit and examined the transcript levels of these genes in maturing kiwifruit using quantitative real-time PCR. Results indicate that the biosynthesis and degradation, or turnover, of chlorophyll is transcriptionally regulated in green- and gold-fleshed kiwifruit. Both species of kiwifruit were found to have two homologues of the stay-green gene (SGR), a small protein that is postulated to aid in the dismantling of the light-harvesting complex, allowing free chlorophyll to enter the degradation pathway. However, with the exception of very mature green fruit, where degreening was observed, SGR2 was more highly expressed in gold fruit, indicating a potential regulatory step of chlorophyll degradation. When the SGR genes were over-expressed in tobacco leaves, degreening was observed. Our results show that chlorophyll degradation is differentially regulated in kiwifruit, and suggest that gold kiwifruit transcribe more degradation genes, leading to earlier and more sustained chlorophyll degradation in this fruit than in green kiwifruit.

  9. Effect of hemiplegia on skeletal maturation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C D; Vogtle, L; Stevenson, R D

    1994-11-01

    Children with cerebral palsy have been reported to have poor growth and delayed skeletal maturation, but it is unclear whether these effects are related to the underlying brain injury or to concomitant malnutrition. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of hemiplegic cerebral palsy on skeletal maturation and growth, with the unaffected side used as each subject's control. Bilateral hand-wrist radiographs were obtained for 19 children with spastic hemiplegia. Skeletal maturation was determined in a blinded fashion with the Fels method. The skeletal age of the affected (hemiplegic) side was less than that of the unaffected (control) side in all 19 subjects; the mean difference in skeletal age was 7.3 months (p < 0.001). The delay in skeletal maturation of the affected side correlated linearly with age and upper extremity function. These findings show that brain injury results in delayed skeletal maturation independent of malnutrition. This effect on skeletal maturation may explain, in part, the reason that some children with cerebral palsy grow poorly. PMID:7965443

  10. Review of Sexual Maturity in the Minipig.

    PubMed

    Howroyd, Paul C; Peter, Birgit; de Rijk, Eveline

    2016-06-01

    It is important to know whether the animals used in toxicology studies are sexually mature. As minipigs are being used increasingly in toxicity studies, we reviewed published data on the age of sexual maturity in the minipig. Maturity in females was assessed on the basis either of normal cycles of progesterone secretion or of the histological presence of corpora lutea and, in males, was assessed on the histological appearance of the seminiferous tubules and epididymides. In female Göttingen minipigs, the first progesterone peak was at 3.7 to 4.2 or 6.1 to 6.5 months of age. These animals were in the presence of a boar. In female Göttingen minipigs in toxicology studies, which were not in the presence of a boar, at least 1 corpus luteum in the ovaries was present in only 50% of the females by 6.5 months of age, while all were mature by 7.7 months of age. Histological maturity in the male Yucatan minipig is reported to be attained at about 4.4 months old, but in male Göttingen minipigs at about 2 months old, although the definition of maturity may have been different in the 2 studies.

  11. Color back projection for fruit maturity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Lee, Dah-Jye; Desai, Alok

    2013-12-01

    In general, fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes and dates are harvested before they fully ripen. After harvesting, they continue to ripen and their color changes. Color is a good indicator of fruit maturity. For example, tomatoes change color from dark green to light green and then pink, light red, and dark red. Assessing tomato maturity helps maximize its shelf life. Color is used to determine the length of time the tomatoes can be transported. Medjool dates change color from green to yellow, and the orange, light red and dark red. Assessing date maturity helps determine the length of drying process to help ripen the dates. Color evaluation is an important step in the processing and inventory control of fruits and vegetables that directly affects profitability. This paper presents an efficient color back projection and image processing technique that is designed specifically for real-time maturity evaluation of fruits. This color processing method requires very simple training procedure to obtain the frequencies of colors that appear in each maturity stage. This color statistics is used to back project colors to predefined color indexes. Fruit maturity is then evaluated by analyzing the reprojected color indexes. This method has been implemented and used for commercial production.

  12. Optical maturity variation in lunar spectra as measured by Moon Mineralogy Mapper data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nettles, J.W.; Staid, M.; Besse, S.; Boardman, J.; Clark, R.N.; Dhingra, D.; Isaacson, P.; Klima, R.; Kramer, G.; Pieters, C.M.; Taylor, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    High spectral and spatial resolution data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) instrument on Chandrayaan-1 are used to investigate in detail changes in the optical properties of lunar materials accompanying space weathering. Three spectral parameters were developed and used to quantify spectral effects commonly thought to be associated with increasing optical maturity: an increase in spectral slope ("reddening"), a decrease in albedo ("darkening"), and loss of spectral contrast (decrease in absorption band depth). Small regions of study were defined that sample the ejecta deposits of small fresh craters that contain relatively crystalline (immature) material that grade into local background (mature) soils. Selected craters are small enough that they can be assumed to be of constant composition and thus are useful for evaluating trends in optical maturity. Color composites were also used to identify the most immature material in a region and show that maturity trends can also be identified using regional soil trends. The high resolution M3 data are well suited to quantifying the spectral changes that accompany space weathering and are able to capture subtle spectral variations in maturity trends. However, the spectral changes that occur as a function of maturity were observed to be dependent on local composition. Given the complexity of space weathering processes, this was not unexpected but poses challenges for absolute measures of optical maturity across diverse lunar terrains. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Mature natural killer cells reset their responsiveness when exposed to an altered MHC environment

    PubMed Central

    Joncker, Nathalie T.; Shifrin, Nataliya; Delebecque, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    Some mature natural killer (NK) cells cannot be inhibited by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I molecules, either because they lack corresponding inhibitory receptors or because the host lacks the corresponding MHC I ligands for the receptors. Such NK cells nevertheless remain self-tolerant and exhibit a generalized hyporesponsiveness to stimulation through activating receptors. To address whether NK cell responsiveness is set only during the NK cell differentiation process, we transferred mature NK cells from wild-type (WT) to MHC I–deficient hosts or vice versa. Remarkably, mature responsive NK cells from WT mice became hyporesponsive after transfer to MHC I–deficient mice, whereas mature hyporesponsive NK cells from MHC I–deficient mice became responsive after transfer to WT mice. Altered responsiveness was evident among mature NK cells that had not divided in the recipient animals, indicating that the cells were mature before transfer and that alterations in activity did not require cell division. Furthermore, the percentages of NK cells expressing KLRG1, CD11b, CD27, and Ly49 receptors specific for H-2b were not markedly altered after transfer. Thus, the functional activity of mature NK cells can be reset when the cells are exposed to a changed MHC environment. These findings have important implications for how NK cell functions may be curtailed or enhanced in the context of disease. PMID:20819928

  14. Structural Maturation of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase—A Metamorphic Solution to Genomic Instability

    PubMed Central

    London, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT)—a critical enzyme of the viral life cycle—undergoes a complex maturation process, required so that a pair of p66 precursor proteins can develop conformationally along different pathways, one evolving to form active polymerase and ribonuclease H (RH) domains, while the second forms a non-functional polymerase and a proteolyzed RH domain. These parallel maturation pathways rely on the structural ambiguity of a metamorphic polymerase domain, for which the sequence–structure relationship is not unique. Recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies utilizing selective labeling techniques, and structural characterization of the p66 monomer precursor have provided important insights into the details of this maturation pathway, revealing many aspects of the three major steps involved: (1) domain rearrangement; (2) dimerization; and (3) subunit-selective RH domain proteolysis. This review summarizes the major structural changes that occur during the maturation process. We also highlight how mutations, often viewed within the context of the mature RT heterodimer, can exert a major influence on maturation and dimerization. It is further suggested that several steps in the RT maturation pathway may provide attractive targets for drug development. PMID:27690082

  15. Effect of Ca Ionophore On Blastocyst Production Following Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection in Caprine Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kharche, S D; Pathak, J; Agarwal, S; Kushwah, B; Sikarwar, Aks

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of calcium ionophore activation on blastocyst production following intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in in vitro-matured Caprine oocytes. A total of 470 in vitro-matured oocytes were selected and randomly divided in to three groups. Cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) recovered by slicing the Caprine ovaries were matured in TCM199 supplemented with 10% foetal bovine serum (FBS) + 10% follicular fluid + FSH (5 μg/ml) + LH (10 μg/ml) + estradiol (1 μg/ml) + EGF (10 ng/ml) + BSA (3 mg/ml) for 27 h in humidified atmosphere at 38.5°C with 5% CO2 in CO2 incubator. After 27 h of culture, selected COCs (n = 470) were separated from cumulus cells by treating with 0.1% hyaluronidase enzyme and passing repeatedly through a fine pipette and randomly divided into three groups. In group 1, (n = 168) matured oocytes were injected with injection micropipette without sperm as control. In group 2, (n = 152) capacitated spermatozoa were injected into cytoplasm of in vitro-matured oocytes through injection micropipette. In group 3, (n = 150) capacitated spermatozoa were injected into cytoplasm of in vitro-matured oocytes through injection micropipette and then activated with 5 μm Ca ionophore for 5 min. The oocytes of all groups were then culture in RVCL media for embryo development. The cleavage rate was observed after 48-72 h of injection. The cleavage rate and blastocyst production in group 1, 2 and 3 were 0.00 and 0.00, 18.42 and 3.57 and 61.33% and 16.30%, respectively. The result indicated that mechanical activation failed to induce cleavage in in vitro-matured Caprine oocytes, whereas chemical activation of intracytoplasmic sperm-injected in vitro-matured Caprine oocytes showed significantly higher cleavage rate and blastocyst production as compare to non-activated oocytes. PMID:27170442

  16. Effect of Ca Ionophore On Blastocyst Production Following Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection in Caprine Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kharche, S D; Pathak, J; Agarwal, S; Kushwah, B; Sikarwar, Aks

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of calcium ionophore activation on blastocyst production following intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in in vitro-matured Caprine oocytes. A total of 470 in vitro-matured oocytes were selected and randomly divided in to three groups. Cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) recovered by slicing the Caprine ovaries were matured in TCM199 supplemented with 10% foetal bovine serum (FBS) + 10% follicular fluid + FSH (5 μg/ml) + LH (10 μg/ml) + estradiol (1 μg/ml) + EGF (10 ng/ml) + BSA (3 mg/ml) for 27 h in humidified atmosphere at 38.5°C with 5% CO2 in CO2 incubator. After 27 h of culture, selected COCs (n = 470) were separated from cumulus cells by treating with 0.1% hyaluronidase enzyme and passing repeatedly through a fine pipette and randomly divided into three groups. In group 1, (n = 168) matured oocytes were injected with injection micropipette without sperm as control. In group 2, (n = 152) capacitated spermatozoa were injected into cytoplasm of in vitro-matured oocytes through injection micropipette. In group 3, (n = 150) capacitated spermatozoa were injected into cytoplasm of in vitro-matured oocytes through injection micropipette and then activated with 5 μm Ca ionophore for 5 min. The oocytes of all groups were then culture in RVCL media for embryo development. The cleavage rate was observed after 48-72 h of injection. The cleavage rate and blastocyst production in group 1, 2 and 3 were 0.00 and 0.00, 18.42 and 3.57 and 61.33% and 16.30%, respectively. The result indicated that mechanical activation failed to induce cleavage in in vitro-matured Caprine oocytes, whereas chemical activation of intracytoplasmic sperm-injected in vitro-matured Caprine oocytes showed significantly higher cleavage rate and blastocyst production as compare to non-activated oocytes.

  17. Comparison of maturity based on steroid and vanadyl porphyrin parameters: A new vanadyl porphyrin maturity parameter for higher maturities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararaman, Padmanabhan; Moldowan, J. Michael

    1993-03-01

    Correlations are demonstrated between steroid maturity parameters and the porphyrin maturity parameter (PMP) which is based on the ratio of specific vanadyl porphyrins C 28E /(C 28E + C 32D) measured by HPLC. Measurements from a global selection of > 100 rock extracts and oils show that PMP parallels changes in the C 29-sterane 20S/(20S + 20R) and tri/(tri + mono) aromatic steroid ratios, and that all three parameters appear to attain their maximum values at similar maturity levels. The triaromatic steroid side chain cracking parameter, TA I/(I + II), reaches approximately 20% of its maximum value when PMP has reached 100%. These results suggest that PMP is effective in the early to peak portion of the oil window. A new parameter, PMP-2, based on changes in the relative concentrations of two peaks in the HPLC fingerprint (vanadyl "etio" porphyrins), appears effective in assessing the maturity of source rocks beyond peak oil generation. In combination with PMP this parameter extends the effective range of vanadyl porphyrins parameters to higher maturities as demonstrated by a suite of oils from the Oriente Basin, Ecuador, South America.

  18. Development of sexual maturity in the ciliate Euplotes crassus: sources of variation in the timing of maturity.

    PubMed

    Dini, F; Nyberg, D

    1992-01-01

    The life styles of ciliated protists are particularly suitable for experimental analyses of certain aspects of developmental and genetic biology. The progression from sexual immaturity to maturity to senescence represents one of the most intriguing aspects of developmental programs. The extent to which progeny clones, their subclones, and testers used in the assay result in different lengths of immaturity has been investigated in Euplotes crassus. Six subclones from each of 12 progeny clones from a cross between stocks EC1 and EC2 were tested for maturity with stocks EC3, EC4, and EC5 on every transfer. Analysis of variance was used to partition the total variation in fissions to maturity into parts due to clones, subclones, and testers and the interactions between these levels. The error, interaction of subclones and testers, corresponds to a standard deviation of only 4.1 fissions, while the within clone within tester means range from 15.2 to 46.7 fissions; all levels except testers contribute significantly to the total variation. Most of the variability is attributable to clones (66%), the next most to error (16%), the next most to interaction of clones by testers (13%), and the least to subclones (5%). An a posteriori analysis examined whether the differences among clones were due to the cytoplasm of the clone ancestor (exconjugant), its mat (mating-type) locus genotype, or the mated pair it came from. None of these characteristics was able to interpret simply the large variability among clones. These results provide evidence that the transition from immaturity to maturity is quantitative and complex rather than a jump from one well-defined state to another.

  19. Cell autonomous phosphoinositide 3-kinase activation in oocytes disrupts normal ovarian function through promoting survival and overgrowth of ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Youn; Ebbert, Katherine; Cordeiro, Marilia H; Romero, Megan; Zhu, Jie; Serna, Vanida Ann; Whelan, Kelly A; Woodruff, Teresa K; Kurita, Takeshi

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we explored the effects of oocytic phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activation on folliculogensis by generating transgenic mice, in which the oocyte-specific Cre-recombinase induces the expression of constitutively active mutant PI3K during the formation of primordial follicles. The ovaries of neonatal transgenic (Cre+) mice showed significantly reduced apoptosis in follicles, which resulted in an excess number of follicles per ovary. Thus, the elevation of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate levels within oocytes promotes the survival of follicles during neonatal development. Despite the increase in AKT phosphorylation, primordial follicles in neonatal Cre+ mice remained dormant demonstrating a nuclear accumulation of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN). These primordial follicles containing a high level of nuclear PTEN persisted in postpubertal females, suggesting that PTEN is the dominant factor in the maintenance of female reproductive lifespan through the regulation of primordial follicle recruitment. Although the oocytic PI3K activity and PTEN levels were elevated, the activation of primordial follicles and the subsequent accumulation of antral follicles with developmentally competent oocytes progressed normally in prepubertal Cre+ mice. However, mature Cre+ female mice were anovulatory. Because postnatal day 50 Cre+ mice released cumulus-oocyte complexes with developmentally competent oocytes in response to super-ovulation treatment, the anovulatory phenotype was not due to follicular defects but rather endocrine abnormalities, which were likely caused by the excess number of overgrown follicles. Our current study has elucidated the critical role of oocytic PI3K activity in follicular function, as well as the presence of a PTEN-mediated mechanism in the prevention of immature follicle activation.

  20. Assessment of actin cytoskeleton and nuclei in bovine blastocysts developed under different culture conditions using a novel computer program.

    PubMed

    Kuzmany, A; Havlicek, V; Brem, G; Walter, I; Besenfelder, U

    2011-02-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects, in terms of nuclear material and actin cytoskeleton quantities (fluorescent pixel counts), of four different bovine blastocyst culturing techniques (in vitro, stepwise in vitro-to-in vivo, or purely in vivo). Cumulus oocyte complexes from abattoir-sourced ovaries were matured in vitro and allocated to four groups: IVP-group embryos developed up to blastocyst stage in vitro. Gamete intra-fallopian transfer (GIFT)-group oocytes were co-incubated with semen for 4 h before transfer to oviducts of heifers. Following in vitro fertilization, cleaved embryos (day 2 of embryo development, day 2-7 group) were transferred into oviducts on day 2. Multiple ovulation embryo transfer (MOET)-group embryos were obtained by superovulating and inseminating heifers; the heifers' genital tracts were flushed at day 7 of blastocyst development. Within each group, ten blastocysts were selected to be differentially dyed (for nuclei and actin cytoskeleton) with fluorescent stains. A novel computer program (ColorAnalyzer) provided differential pixel counts representing organelle quantities. Blastocysts developed only in vivo (MOET group) showed significantly more nuclear material than did blastocysts produced by any other technique. In terms of actin cytoskeleton quantity, blastocysts produced by IVP and by day 2-7 transfer did not differ significantly from each other. Gamete intra-fallopian transfer- and MOET-group embryos showed significantly larger quantities of actin cytoskeleton when compared with any other group and differed significantly from each other. The results of this study indicate that culturing under in vitro conditions, even with part time in vivo techniques, may adversely affect the quantity of blastocyst nuclear material and actin cytoskeleton. The software employed may be useful for culture environment evaluation/developmental competence assessment. PMID:20477985

  1. Fibroblast growth factor 17 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 enhance cumulus expansion and improve quality of in vitro-produced embryos in cattle.

    PubMed

    Machado, Mariana Fernandes; Caixeta, Ester Siqueira; Sudiman, Jaqueline; Gilchrist, Robert B; Thompson, Jeremy G; Lima, Paula Fernanda; Price, Christopher A; Buratini, José

    2015-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) and members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family are expressed by the oocyte and are involved in the control of cumulus cell function. We tested the hypothesis that FGF17, alone or combined with BMP15 in the maturation medium, enhances cumulus expansion, meiosis progression, embryonic development, and expression of mRNA encoding key genes regulating expansion (prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 [PTGS2], hyaluronan synthase 2 [HAS2], tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene 6 [TNFAIP6], and pentraxin 3 [PTX3]) and markers of oocyte developmental competence (phosphofructokinase [PFKP], gremlin [GREM1], versican [VCAN], and the genomic progesterone receptor [nPR]) in cumulus cells. Fibroblast growth factor 17 and BMP15 increased the percentage of fully expanded cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs), but there was no additive effect when both were combined. Neither FGF17 nor BMP15 altered the percentage of oocytes reaching meiosis II at the end of COC culture or cleavage and blastocyst rates after IVF. However, embryo quality, as assessed by the number of cells in the inner cell mass, was improved by the combination of FGF17 with BMP15. Fibroblast growth factor 17 alone did not alter gene expression in cumulus cells at the end of IVM, whereas BMP15 increased PTGS2 and PTX3 mRNA levels. The combination of FGF17 and BMP15 increased nPR mRNA abundance in cumulus cells but did not change the expression of other markers of developmental competence. This study provides novel evidence that FGF17 enhances cumulus expansion in bovine COCs submitted to IVM and that the supplementation of the IVM medium with FGF17 and BMP15 may improve embryo quality.

  2. Optimization of cryoprotectant treatment for the vitrification of immature cumulus-enclosed porcine oocytes: comparison of sugars, combinations of permeating cryoprotectants and equilibration regimens

    PubMed Central

    SOMFAI, Tamás; MEN, Nguyen Thi; NOGUCHI, Junko; KANEKO, Hiroyuki; KASHIWAZAKI, Naomi; KIKUCHI, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to optimize the cryoprotectant treatment for the preservation of immature porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) by solid surface vitrification. In each experiment, the vitrification solution consisted of 50 mg/ml polyvinyl pyrrolidone, 0.3 M of the actual sugar and in total 35% (v/v) of the actual permeating cryoprotectant (pCPA) combination. After warming, the COCs were subjected to in vitro maturation, fertilization and embryo culture. In Experiment 1, trehalose and sucrose were equally effective during vitrification and warming in terms of facilitating oocyte survival and subsequent embryo development. In Experiment 2, when equilibration was performed at 38.5 C in a total of 4% (v/v) pCPA for 15 min, the combination of ethylene glycol and propylene glycol (EG + PG = 1:1) was superior to EG and dimethyl sulfoxide (EG + DMSO = 1:1) in terms of oocyte survival after vitrification and the quality of resultant blastocysts. In Experiment 3, equilibration in 4% (v/v) pCPA for 15 min before vitrification was superior to that in 15% (v/v) CPA for 5 min for achievement of high survival rates irrespective of the pCPA combination used. In Experiment 4, when equilibration was performed in 4% EG + PG for 5 min, 15 min or 25 min, there was no difference in oocyte survival and subsequent embryo development after vitrification and warming; however, the developmental competence of cleaved embryos was tendentiously reduced when equilibration was performed for 25 min. In conclusion, trehalose and sucrose were equally effective in facilitating vitrification, and the optimum pCPA treatment was 5–15 min equilibration in 4% (v/v) of EG + PG followed by vitrification in 35% (v/v) EG + PG. PMID:26411536

  3. Breed influences on in vitro development of abattoir-derived bovine oocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a discrepancy in the reproductive performance between different cattle breeds. Using abattoir-derived ovaries and data base information we studied the effects of breed on in vitro fertilization and early embryo development. Methods The in vitro developmental competence of oocytes from cattle (n = 202) of Swedish Red (SR), Swedish Holstein (SH) and mixed beef breeds was compared, retrospectively tracing donors of abattoir-derived ovaries using a combination of the national animal databases and abattoir information. Age was significantly lower and carcass conformation score was higher in the beef breeds than in the dairy breeds. Cumulus oocyte complexes (n = 1351) were aspirated from abattoir-derived ovaries from animals of known breed (visual inspection confirmed through databases), age (databases), and abattoir information. Oocytes were matured, fertilized (frozen semen from two dairy bulls) and cultured according to conventional protocols. On day 8, blastocysts were graded and the number of nuclei determined. Results Cleavage rate was not different between the breeds but was significantly different between bulls. The percentage of blastocysts on day 8 was significantly higher when the oocyte donor’s breed was beef or SR than SH. There was no significant difference in blastocyst grades or stages between the breeds, but the number of nuclei in day 8 blastocysts was significantly lower in SH compared to the beef. Conclusions The use of abattoir-derived ovaries from animals whose background is traceable can be a valuable tool for research. Using this approach in the present study, oocyte donor breed was seen to affect early embryo development during in vitro embryo production, which may be a contributing factor to the declining fertility in some dairy breeds seen today. PMID:22682104

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction in oocytes of obese mothers: transmission to offspring and reversal by pharmacological endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linda L; Russell, Darryl L; Wong, Siew L; Chen, Miaoxin; Tsai, Te-Sha; St John, Justin C; Norman, Robert J; Febbraio, Mark A; Carroll, John; Robker, Rebecca L

    2015-02-15

    Over-nutrition in females causes altered fetal growth during pregnancy and permanently programs the metabolism of offspring; however, the temporal and mechanistic origins of these changes, and whether they are reversible, are unknown. We now show that, in obese female mice, cumulus-oocyte complexes exhibit endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, high levels of intracellular lipid, spindle abnormalities and reduced PTX3 extracellular matrix protein production. Ovulated oocytes from obese mice contain normal levels of mitochondrial (mt) DNA but have reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and high levels of autophagy compared with oocytes from lean mice. After in vitro fertilization, the oocytes of obese female mice demonstrate reduced developmental potential and form blastocysts with reduced levels of mtDNA. Blastocysts transferred to normal weight surrogates that were then analyzed at E14.5 showed that oocytes from obese mice gave rise to fetuses that were heavier than controls and had reduced liver and kidney mtDNA content per cell, indicating that maternal obesity before conception had altered the transmission of mitochondria to offspring. Treatment of the obese females with the ER stress inhibitor salubrinal or the chaperone inducer BGP-15 before ovulation increased the amount of the mitochondrial replication factors TFAM and DRP1, and mtDNA content in oocytes. Salubrinal and BGP-15 also completely restored oocyte quality, embryo development and the mtDNA content of fetal tissue to levels equivalent to those derived from lean mice. These results demonstrate that obesity before conception imparts a legacy of mitochondrial loss in offspring that is caused by ER stress and is reversible during the final stages of oocyte development and maturation. PMID:25670793

  5. Cell Autonomous Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Activation in Oocytes Disrupts Normal Ovarian Function Through Promoting Survival and Overgrowth of Ovarian Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Ebbert, Katherine; Cordeiro, Marilia H.; Romero, Megan; Zhu, Jie; Serna, Vanida Ann; Whelan, Kelly A.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explored the effects of oocytic phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activation on folliculogensis by generating transgenic mice, in which the oocyte-specific Cre-recombinase induces the expression of constitutively active mutant PI3K during the formation of primordial follicles. The ovaries of neonatal transgenic (Cre+) mice showed significantly reduced apoptosis in follicles, which resulted in an excess number of follicles per ovary. Thus, the elevation of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate levels within oocytes promotes the survival of follicles during neonatal development. Despite the increase in AKT phosphorylation, primordial follicles in neonatal Cre+ mice remained dormant demonstrating a nuclear accumulation of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN). These primordial follicles containing a high level of nuclear PTEN persisted in postpubertal females, suggesting that PTEN is the dominant factor in the maintenance of female reproductive lifespan through the regulation of primordial follicle recruitment. Although the oocytic PI3K activity and PTEN levels were elevated, the activation of primordial follicles and the subsequent accumulation of antral follicles with developmentally competent oocytes progressed normally in prepubertal Cre+ mice. However, mature Cre+ female mice were anovulatory. Because postnatal day 50 Cre+ mice released cumulus-oocyte complexes with developmentally competent oocytes in response to super-ovulation treatment, the anovulatory phenotype was not due to follicular defects but rather endocrine abnormalities, which were likely caused by the excess number of overgrown follicles. Our current study has elucidated the critical role of oocytic PI3K activity in follicular function, as well as the presence of a PTEN-mediated mechanism in the prevention of immature follicle activation. PMID:25594701

  6. Body composition, dietary carbohydrates and fatty acids determine post-fertilisation development of bovine oocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Adamiak, S J; Powell, K; Rooke, J A; Webb, R; Sinclair, K D

    2006-02-01

    This study assessed the interactive effects of carbohydrate type (fibre vs starch) and fatty acid (FA) supplementation (0% vs 6% calcium soaps of palm oil FA) on the post-fertilisation development of oocytes recovered from low and moderate body condition score (BCS) heifers. A secondary objective was to compare the FA composition of plasma to that of granulosa cells (GCs) and cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from these animals, and to relate these findings to the developmental potential of oocytes. Plasma, GCs and COCs were recovered from 32 heifers on day 5 of a synchronised oestrous cycle for FA analyses. Oocytes were also recovered on days 10 and 15 of the same cycle after short-term ovarian stimulation (FSH + GnRH), and matured, fertilised and cultured to the blastocyst stage in vitro. High levels of dietary starch increased (P < 0.01) plasma insulin but, together with dietary FA, reduced (P < 0.05) blastocyst yields in low, but not in moderate, BCS heifers. Diet-induced alterations to the FA content of plasma were less apparent in GCs and COCs. In summary, although dietary lipids increased the FA content of COCs, the selective uptake of saturated FAs at the expense of mainly polyunsaturated FAs within the follicular compartment ensured that the FA composition of COCs was largely unaffected by diet. However, the concentration of saturated FAs within COCs was inherently high, and so further increases in FA content may have impaired post-fertilisation development. The data establish a robust nutritional framework for more detailed studies into the mechanistic effects of dietary composition on the post-fertilisation developmental potential of oocytes. PMID:16452718

  7. Safety of brilliant cresyl blue staining protocols on human granulosa and cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Alcoba, Diego Duarte; Conzatti, Maiara; Ferreira, Gustavo Dias; Pimentel, Anita Mylius; Kussler, Ana Paula; Capp, Edison; von Eye Corleta, Helena; Brum, Ilma Simoni

    2016-02-01

    The selection of human immature oocytes destined for in vitro maturation (IVM) is performed according to their cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) morphology. In animal models, oocyte pre-selection with brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) staining improves fertilization and blastocyst rates and even increases the number of calves born. As the granulosa cells and cumulus cells (GCs and CCs) have a close relationship with the oocyte and are available in in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs, applying BCB staining to these cells may help to elucidate whether BCB shows toxicity to human oocytes and to determine the safest protocol for this dye. GCs and CCs were isolated from 24 patients who underwent controlled ovarian stimulation. After 48 h, cells were exposed to: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) with or without phenol red, DPBS and mDPBS for 60 min; 13, 20 and 26 μM BCB for 60 min; and 60, 90 or 120 min to 13 μM BCB. Cellular viability was tested using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and trypan blue assays. The 20 and 26 μM BCB exposures resulted in lower cell viability, similar to when cells were exposed to BCB for 90 or 120 min. GCs and CCs viabilities were equal among control group and 13 μM BCB group after 60 min. BCB staining was not toxic to GCs and CCs when the regime of 13 μM BCB for 60 min was used. Due to the close molecular/biochemical relationship between these cells and the gamete, we propose that it is unlikely that the use of BCB could interfere with the viability/health of human oocytes. PMID:25921213

  8. The in vitro and in vivo developmental capacity of selected porcine monospermic zygotes.

    PubMed

    Gil, M A; Gomis, J; Angel, M A; Sanchez-Osorio, J; Maside, C; Cuello, C; Parrilla, I; Roca, J; Vazquez, J M; Martinez, E A

    2013-01-15

    In this study, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo developmental capacity of selected monospermic zygotes produced in vitro. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were matured in vitro and inseminated with frozen-thawed spermatozoa. Thirteen hours after insemination, presumptive zygotes were centrifuged at 15,000 ×g for 20 minutes to polarize the lipids in the cytoplasm and permit the visualization of pronuclei. Then, the oocytes were individually classified as bipronuclear (2PN) or polypronuclear (three or more pronuclei, PPN). To examine embryo development, 102 selected zygotes were cultured for 7 days. There were no differences in cleavage rate (93.0% and 88.9% for 2PN and PPN zygotes, respectively). However, the blastocyst formation rate was higher (P < 0.003) in 2PN (80.7%) zygotes than in PPN (53.3%) zygotes. The control (noncentrifuged, nonselected zygotes) group showed lower (P < 0.003) cleavage rate and blastocyst formation than the 2PN and PPN zygotes. In a second experiment, 2PN zygotes and control zygotes were transferred (30 zygotes per transfer) by laparoscopy into the oviducts of recipient gilts (10 recipients per group) on the first day of standing estrus. The farrowing rates were 70% and 40% for transfers made with 2PN and control zygotes, respectively. The average number of piglets born per recipient farrowed did not differ between groups (4.9 ± 0.6 and 4.5 ± 1.2, respectively), but the efficiency (number of live piglets per total transferred embryos) was higher (P < 0.01) for 2PN zygotes than for the control group (9.3% and 4.0%, respectively). These results demonstrate the effectiveness of centrifugation for the selection of monospermic zygotes as a procedure to improve in vitro embryo production in pigs. In addition, the results indicate that the laparoscopic technique described here is a simple and effective procedure for transferring embryos into one oviduct.

  9. Safety of brilliant cresyl blue staining protocols on human granulosa and cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Alcoba, Diego Duarte; Conzatti, Maiara; Ferreira, Gustavo Dias; Pimentel, Anita Mylius; Kussler, Ana Paula; Capp, Edison; von Eye Corleta, Helena; Brum, Ilma Simoni

    2016-02-01

    The selection of human immature oocytes destined for in vitro maturation (IVM) is performed according to their cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) morphology. In animal models, oocyte pre-selection with brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) staining improves fertilization and blastocyst rates and even increases the number of calves born. As the granulosa cells and cumulus cells (GCs and CCs) have a close relationship with the oocyte and are available in in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs, applying BCB staining to these cells may help to elucidate whether BCB shows toxicity to human oocytes and to determine the safest protocol for this dye. GCs and CCs were isolated from 24 patients who underwent controlled ovarian stimulation. After 48 h, cells were exposed to: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) with or without phenol red, DPBS and mDPBS for 60 min; 13, 20 and 26 μM BCB for 60 min; and 60, 90 or 120 min to 13 μM BCB. Cellular viability was tested using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and trypan blue assays. The 20 and 26 μM BCB exposures resulted in lower cell viability, similar to when cells were exposed to BCB for 90 or 120 min. GCs and CCs viabilities were equal among control group and 13 μM BCB group after 60 min. BCB staining was not toxic to GCs and CCs when the regime of 13 μM BCB for 60 min was used. Due to the close molecular/biochemical relationship between these cells and the gamete, we propose that it is unlikely that the use of BCB could interfere with the viability/health of human oocytes.

  10. 3'5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent up-regulation of phosphodiesterase type 3A in porcine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Sasseville, Maxime; Côté, Nancy; Vigneault, Christian; Guillemette, Christine; Richard, François J

    2007-04-01

    The means by which cumulus cells react to gonadotropin stimulation and regulate the subsequent production and degradation of cAMP are largely unknown. In this article, we report that cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) type 3A (Pde3a) is transcriptionally regulated in porcine cumulus cells by a cAMP-dependent pathway during in vitro maturation (IVM). cAMP-PDE activity was increased in the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) after 10 h of IVM, and 78% of this increase was sensitive to a Pde3-specific inhibitor, cilostamide. Although no variation was observed in the oocyte, cilostamide-sensitive cAMP-PDE activity increased in the cumulus cells after IVM. This was supported by Western blotting, which showed that the intensity of a 135-kDa anti-Pde3a immunoreactive band was increased in COC after IVM. The Pde3a mRNA level was up-regulated 28-fold in the COC after 4 h of IVM and remained high up to 12 h. The mRNA up-regulation and increased activity were inhibited by an RNA synthesis inhibitor, alpha-amanitin. The cilostamide-sensitive increase in PDE activity was inhibited by a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. Pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) caused dose-dependent activation of Pde3. The PMSG-dependent increase in Pde3 activity and Pde3a mRNA were mimicked by the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin or prostaglandin E2. PMSG-dependent Pde3 activation was inhibited by the protein kinase A-specific inhibitor H89. Collectively, our results show for the first time that degradation of the intracellular cyclic nucleotide by Pde3a is transcriptionally up-regulated via a cAMP-dependent pathway in cumulus cells, suggesting that it has a functional role during the ovulatory gonadotropin surge.

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction in oocytes of obese mothers: transmission to offspring and reversal by pharmacological endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linda L; Russell, Darryl L; Wong, Siew L; Chen, Miaoxin; Tsai, Te-Sha; St John, Justin C; Norman, Robert J; Febbraio, Mark A; Carroll, John; Robker, Rebecca L

    2015-02-15

    Over-nutrition in females causes altered fetal growth during pregnancy and permanently programs the metabolism of offspring; however, the temporal and mechanistic origins of these changes, and whether they are reversible, are unknown. We now show that, in obese female mice, cumulus-oocyte complexes exhibit endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, high levels of intracellular lipid, spindle abnormalities and reduced PTX3 extracellular matrix protein production. Ovulated oocytes from obese mice contain normal levels of mitochondrial (mt) DNA but have reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and high levels of autophagy compared with oocytes from lean mice. After in vitro fertilization, the oocytes of obese female mice demonstrate reduced developmental potential and form blastocysts with reduced levels of mtDNA. Blastocysts transferred to normal weight surrogates that were then analyzed at E14.5 showed that oocytes from obese mice gave rise to fetuses that were heavier than controls and had reduced liver and kidney mtDNA content per cell, indicating that maternal obesity before conception had altered the transmission of mitochondria to offspring. Treatment of the obese females with the ER stress inhibitor salubrinal or the chaperone inducer BGP-15 before ovulation increased the amount of the mitochondrial replication factors TFAM and DRP1, and mtDNA content in oocytes. Salubrinal and BGP-15 also completely restored oocyte quality, embryo development and the mtDNA content of fetal tissue to levels equivalent to those derived from lean mice. These results demonstrate that obesity before conception imparts a legacy of mitochondrial loss in offspring that is caused by ER stress and is reversible during the final stages of oocyte development and maturation.

  12. Maturity Model for Advancing Smart Grid Interoperability

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Mark; Widergren, Steven E.; Mater, J.; Montgomery, Austin

    2013-10-28

    Abstract—Interoperability is about the properties of devices and systems to connect and work properly. Advancing interoperability eases integration and maintenance of the resulting interconnection. This leads to faster integration, lower labor and component costs, predictability of projects and the resulting performance, and evolutionary paths for upgrade. When specifications are shared and standardized, competition and novel solutions can bring new value streams to the community of stakeholders involved. Advancing interoperability involves reaching agreement for how things join at their interfaces. The quality of the agreements and the alignment of parties involved in the agreement present challenges that are best met with process improvement techniques. The GridWise® Architecture Council (GWAC) sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is supporting an effort to use concepts from capability maturity models used in the software industry to advance interoperability of smart grid technology. An interoperability maturity model has been drafted and experience is being gained through trials on various types of projects and community efforts. This paper describes the value and objectives of maturity models, the nature of the interoperability maturity model and how it compares with other maturity models, and experiences gained with its use.

  13. Intracellular Na+ regulates epithelial Na+ channel maturation.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, Elisa; Carattino, Marcelo D; Hughey, Rebecca P; Pilewski, Joseph M; Kleyman, Thomas R; Myerburg, Mike M

    2015-05-01

    Epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) function is regulated by the intracellular Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]i) through a process known as Na(+) feedback inhibition. Although this process is known to decrease the expression of proteolytically processed active channels on the cell surface, it is unknown how [Na(+)]i alters ENaC cleavage. We show here that [Na(+)]i regulates the posttranslational processing of ENaC subunits during channel biogenesis. At times when [Na(+)]i is low, ENaC subunits develop mature N-glycans and are processed by proteases. Conversely, glycan maturation and sensitivity to proteolysis are reduced when [Na(+)]i is relatively high. Surface channels with immature N-glycans were not processed by endogenous channel activating proteases, nor were they sensitive to cleavage by exogenous trypsin. Biotin chase experiments revealed that the immature surface channels were not converted into mature cleaved channels following a reduction in [Na(+)]i. The hypothesis that [Na(+)]i regulates ENaC maturation within the biosynthetic pathways is further supported by the finding that Brefeldin A prevented the accumulation of processed surface channels following a reduction in [Na(+)]i. Therefore, increased [Na(+)]i interferes with ENaC N-glycan maturation and prevents the channel from entering a state that allows proteolytic processing. PMID:25767115

  14. Calcium signaling differentiation during Xenopus oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    El-Jouni, Wassim; Jang, Byungwoo; Haun, Shirley; Machaca, Khaled

    2005-12-15

    Ca(2+) is the universal signal for egg activation at fertilization in all sexually reproducing species. The Ca(2+) signal at fertilization is necessary for egg activation and exhibits specialized spatial and temporal dynamics. Eggs acquire the ability to produce the fertilization-specific Ca(2+) signal during oocyte maturation. However, the mechanisms regulating Ca(2+) signaling differentiation during oocyte maturation remain largely unknown. At fertilization, Xenopus eggs produce a cytoplasmic Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(cyt)) rise that lasts for several minutes, and is required for egg activation. Here, we show that during oocyte maturation Ca(2+) transport effectors are tightly modulated. The plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA) is completely internalized during maturation, and is therefore unable to extrude Ca(2+) out of the cell. Furthermore, IP(3)-dependent Ca(2+) release is required for the sustained Ca(2+)(cyt) rise in eggs, showing that Ca(2+) that is pumped into the ER leaks back out through IP(3) receptors. This apparent futile cycle allows eggs to maintain elevated cytoplasmic Ca(2+) despite the limited available Ca(2+) in intracellular stores. Therefore, Ca(2+) signaling differentiates in a highly orchestrated fashion during Xenopus oocyte maturation endowing the egg with the capacity to produce a sustained Ca(2+)(cyt) transient at fertilization, which defines the egg's competence to activate and initiate embryonic development.

  15. GroEL-assisted and -unassisted refolding of mature and precursor adrenodoxin: the role of the precursor sequence.

    PubMed

    Bera, A K; Bernhardt, R

    1999-07-01

    We have performed refolding studies on a [2Fe-2S] protein, adrenodoxin (Adx), and its precursor form, preadrenodoxin. In vitro, mature Adx is expressed as a soluble active form in Escherichia coli, but precursor Adx is expressed in inclusion bodies. Both mature and precursor Adx refolded spontaneously from their denatured forms and the recovery levels of enzyme activities were 40 and 37% for mature and precursor Adx, respectively. Furthermore, the interaction between GroEL- and Gdn-HCl-denatured mature and precursor forms was investigated. In the case of mature Adx, the activity was increased in the presence of either GroEL, GroES, or bovine serum albumin and the refolding of mature Adx is a nonspecific process. However, the GroEL-mediated reaction is specific for precursor Adx under the experimental conditions used here. A higher electron transfer activity is obtained after ATP addition to the GroEL-containing refolding mixture, and GroEL-precursor complexes were found by gel chromatography studies. Our observation suggests that the small single-domain protein Adx (mature form) folded independently of the chaperonin GroEL. The contribution of the chaperonin complexes to the folding is toward the aggregation-sensitive precursor Adx, which in vitro folded 1.3- to 1.4-fold slower than mature Adx. This demonstrates that the presequence is responsible for the formation of inclusion bodies and for the in vitro recognition motif for GroEL binding.

  16. Need for speed: Sexual maturation precedes social maturation in gray mouse lemurs.

    PubMed

    Hohenbrink, Sarah; Zimmermann, Elke; Radespiel, Ute

    2015-10-01

    The life history of mammals underlies a fast-slow continuum, ranging from "slow" species with large body size, delayed sexual maturation, low fertility, and long lifespan, to "fast" species showing the opposite traits. Primates fall into the "slow" category, considering their relatively low offspring numbers and delayed juvenile development. However, social and sexual maturation processes do not necessarily have to be completed simultaneously. The comparison of the timeframes for sexual and social maturation is largely lacking for primates, with the prominent exception of humans. Here, we compare both maturation processes in a basal primate, the gray mouse lemur, which ranges in many aspects at the fast end of the slow-fast life history continuum among primates. We compared the patterns and frequencies of various social and solitary behaviors in young adults (YA, 12-13 months old) and older individuals (A, ≥2 years) of both sexes outside estrus. Observations were conducted during mix-sexed dyadic encounter experiments under controlled captive conditions (eight dyads per age class). Results indicate that although all young adults were sexually mature, social maturation was not yet completed in all behavioral domains: Age-dependent differences were found in the number of playing dyads, female marking behavior, female aggression, and social tolerance. Thus, this study provides a first indication that social maturation lags behind sexual maturation in an ancestral nocturnal primate model, indicating that these two developmental schemes may have been decoupled early and throughout the primate lineage. PMID:26119105

  17. Stacking the odds for Golgi cisternal maturation.

    PubMed

    Mani, Somya; Thattai, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    What is the minimal set of cell-biological ingredients needed to generate a Golgi apparatus? The compositions of eukaryotic organelles arise through a process of molecular exchange via vesicle traffic. Here we statistically sample tens of thousands of homeostatic vesicle traffic networks generated by realistic molecular rules governing vesicle budding and fusion. Remarkably, the plurality of these networks contain chains of compartments that undergo creation, compositional maturation, and dissipation, coupled by molecular recycling along retrograde vesicles. This motif precisely matches the cisternal maturation model of the Golgi, which was developed to explain many observed aspects of the eukaryotic secretory pathway. In our analysis cisternal maturation is a robust consequence of vesicle traffic homeostasis, independent of the underlying details of molecular interactions or spatial stacking. This architecture may have been exapted rather than selected for its role in the secretion of large cargo.

  18. Stacking the odds for Golgi cisternal maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Somya; Thattai, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    What is the minimal set of cell-biological ingredients needed to generate a Golgi apparatus? The compositions of eukaryotic organelles arise through a process of molecular exchange via vesicle traffic. Here we statistically sample tens of thousands of homeostatic vesicle traffic networks generated by realistic molecular rules governing vesicle budding and fusion. Remarkably, the plurality of these networks contain chains of compartments that undergo creation, compositional maturation, and dissipation, coupled by molecular recycling along retrograde vesicles. This motif precisely matches the cisternal maturation model of the Golgi, which was developed to explain many observed aspects of the eukaryotic secretory pathway. In our analysis cisternal maturation is a robust consequence of vesicle traffic homeostasis, independent of the underlying details of molecular interactions or spatial stacking. This architecture may have been exapted rather than selected for its role in the secretion of large cargo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16231.001 PMID:27542195

  19. [Relationship between sexual maturation and subcutaneous fat].

    PubMed

    García Llop, L A; Ramada Benedito, A; Rodríguez-Estecha, P

    1990-10-01

    Due to the great variability at the beginnings and the period of the puberty, authors have studied the modifications of the subcutaneous-fat and their relation with the sexual maturating. They have measured the skinfold thickness of biceps, triceps, subscapular and suprailiac in 358 boys from 10 to 15 years old and 424 girls from 8 to 14 years old inrelation to sexual maturating through the stages described by Tanner. It has been found more subcutaneous fat in girls than in boys (p less than 0.05). The boys increase their subcutaneous fat until the stage 3 (except the skinfold triceps) and decrease later (except the skinfold subscapular). In boys, the analysis of varianza, show that the variations are related with the sexual maturating and not with chronologic age. PMID:2278437

  20. Macrophage-induced thymic lymphocyte maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Van den Tweel, J G; Walker, W S

    1977-01-01

    Guinea-pig peritoneal macrophages were found to influence the functional maturation of thymic lymphocytes. Autologous thymic lymphocytes obtained from macrophage co-cultures responded to three different mitogens and were reduced in their ability to reassociate spontaneously with macrophages. Neither of these properties were found in thymic lymphocytes that had not been cultured with macrophages. These functional changes appeared to be specific for macrophages since thymic lymphocytes incubated with skin fibroblasts failed to respond to the test mitogens. Furthermore, they were not the result of either the inactivation, by macrophages, of a putative suppressor thymocyte or a soluble macrophage product. In addition to influencing the functional maturation of thymic lymphocytes, macrophages also appeared to play a direct role in inducing the mitogen response of functionally mature cells. PMID:304037

  1. Stacking the odds for Golgi cisternal maturation.

    PubMed

    Mani, Somya; Thattai, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    What is the minimal set of cell-biological ingredients needed to generate a Golgi apparatus? The compositions of eukaryotic organelles arise through a process of molecular exchange via vesicle traffic. Here we statistically sample tens of thousands of homeostatic vesicle traffic networks generated by realistic molecular rules governing vesicle budding and fusion. Remarkably, the plurality of these networks contain chains of compartments that undergo creation, compositional maturation, and dissipation, coupled by molecular recycling along retrograde vesicles. This motif precisely matches the cisternal maturation model of the Golgi, which was developed to explain many observed aspects of the eukaryotic secretory pathway. In our analysis cisternal maturation is a robust consequence of vesicle traffic homeostasis, independent of the underlying details of molecular interactions or spatial stacking. This architecture may have been exapted rather than selected for its role in the secretion of large cargo. PMID:27542195

  2. Management and Breeding Soundness of Mature Bulls.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Colin W

    2016-07-01

    Mature bulls must be fed a balanced ration, vaccinated appropriately, and undergo a breeding soundness evaluation to ensure they meet what is required of a short, but intense breeding season. To be classified as a satisfactory potential breeder, minimum standards for physical soundness, scrotal circumference, sperm motility, and sperm morphology must be achieved using an accepted bull-breeding soundness evaluation format. Sperm production requires approximately 70 days. Heat and stress are the most common insults to spermatogenesis, causing an increase in morphologic abnormalities with obesity-associated scrotal fat accumulation being the most frequent cause of elevated testicular temperature in mature bulls.

  3. Posttesticular sperm maturation, infertility, and hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Marjorie; Pollet-Villard, Xavier; Levy, Rachel; Drevet, Joël R; Saez, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol is a key molecule in the mammalian physiology of especial particular importance for the reproductive system as it is the common precursor for steroid hormone synthesis. Cholesterol is also a recognized modulator of sperm functions, not only at the level of gametogenesis. Cholesterol homeostasis regulation is crucial for posttesticular sperm maturation, and imbalanced cholesterol levels may particularly affect these posttesticular events. Metabolic lipid disorders (dyslipidemia) affect male fertility but are most of the time studied from the angle of endocrine/testicular consequences. This review will focus on the deleterious effects of a particular dyslipidemia, i.e., hypercholesterolemia, on posttesticular maturation of mammalian spermatozoa. PMID:26067871

  4. The maturation of ovulatory potential in man.

    PubMed

    Kulin, H E

    1980-01-01

    The maturation of the potential for ovulation in man is reviewed in the light of recent data quantitating gonadotropins and gonadal steroids in the prepubertal child. The primary limitations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis are seen as related to feedback control mechanisms. Based on preliminary data obtained in patients with gonadal dysgenesis, a hypothesis which links positive and negative feedback maturation is proposed. The development of full reproductive potential in man is clearly a process which extends over a decade or more.

  5. The Maturely, Immature Orientale Impact Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, J. T.; Lawrence, D. J.; Stickle, A. M.; Delen, O.; Patterson, G.; Greenhagen, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Lunar surface maturity is consistently examined using the NIR optical maturity parameter (OMAT) [1]. However, the NIR only provides a perspective of the upper microns of the lunar surface. Recent studies of Lunar Prospector (LP) and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter data sets are now demonstrating additional measures of maturity with sensitivities to greater depths (~2 m) in the regolith. These include thermal infrared, S-band radar, and epithermal neutron data sets [2-4]. Interestingly, each of these parameters is directly comparable to OMAT despite each measuring slightly different aspects of the regolith. This is demonstrated by Lawrence et al. [3] where LP-measured non-polar highlands epithermal neutrons trend well with albedo, OMAT, and the Christensen Feature (CF). Lawrence et al. [3] used these data to derive and map highlands hydrogen (H) which is dominantly a function of H-implantation. With this in mind, areas of enriched-H are mature, while areas of depleted H are immature. Surface roughness as measured by S-band radar [4], also provides a measure of maturity. In this case, the circular polarization ratio (CPR) is high when rough and immature, and low when smooth and mature. Knowing this, one can recognize areas in the non-polar lunar highlands that show contradictory measures of maturity. For example, while many lunar localities show consistently immature albedo, OMAT, CF, CPR, and H concentrations (e.g., Tycho), others do not. Orientale basin is the most prominent example, shown to have immature CPR, CF, and H concentrations despite a relatively mature albedo and OMAT values as well as an old age determination (~3.8 Ga). To better understand how the lunar regolith is weathering in the upper 1-2 m of regolith with time we examine the Orientale basin relative to other highlands regions. [1] Lucey et al. (2000) JGR, 105, 20377; [2] Lucey et al. (2013) LPSC, 44, 2890; [3] Lawrence et al. (2015) Icarus, j.icarus.2015.01.005; [4] Neish et al. (2013) JGR, 118

  6. Maturation of rat proximal tubule chloride permeability.

    PubMed

    Baum, Michel; Quigley, Raymond

    2005-12-01

    We have previously shown that neonate rabbit tubules have a lower chloride permeability but comparable mannitol permeability compared with adult proximal tubules. The surprising finding of lower chloride permeability in neonate proximals compared with adults impacts net chloride transport in this segment, which reabsorbs 60% of the filtered chloride in adults. However, this maturational difference in chloride permeability may not be applicable to other species. The present in vitro microperfusion study directly examined the chloride and mannitol permeability using in vitro perfused rat proximal tubules during postnatal maturation. Whereas there was no maturational change in mannitol permeability, chloride permeability was 6.3 +/- 1.3 x 10(-5) cm/s in neonate rat proximal convoluted tubule and 16.1 +/- 2.3 x 10(-5) cm/s in adult rat proximal convoluted tubule (P < 0.01). There was also a maturational increase in chloride permeability in the rat proximal straight tubule (5.1 +/- 0.6 x 10(-5) cm/s vs. 9.3 +/- 0.6 x 10(-5) cm/s, P < 0.01). There was no maturational change in bicarbonate-to-chloride permeabilities (P(HCO3)/P(Cl)) in the rat proximal straight tubules (PST) and proximal convoluted tubules (PCT) or in the sodium-to-chloride permeability (P(Na)/P(Cl)) in the proximal straight tubule; however, there was a significant maturational decrease in proximal convoluted tubule P(Na)/P(Cl) with postnatal development (1.31 +/- 0.12 in neonates vs. 0.75 +/- 0.06 in adults, P < 0.001). There was no difference in the transepithelial resistance measured by current injection and cable analysis in the PCT, but there was a maturational decrease in the PST (7.2 +/- 0.8 vs. 4.6 +/- 0.1 ohms x cm2, P < 0.05). These studies demonstrate there are maturational changes in the rat paracellular pathway that impact net NaCl transport during development. PMID:16051720

  7. Comparison of Career Maturity among Graduate Students and Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, Sue Saunders; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared the career maturity of graduate and undergraduate students (N=249) and investigated the relationship of gender to career maturity. Results indicated that achievement of career maturity tasks was similar for seniors and graduate students and that similar levels of career maturity were found between males and females. (LLL)

  8. Career Maturity in College Students with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Denise L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Compared levels of career maturity between college students (n=76) with and without learning disabilities and investigated factors associated with career maturity. Few differences in career maturity were found. However, different predictors of career maturity for the two groups emerged. Students with learning disabilities who received more…

  9. Coming or going? Un-BLOC-ing delivery and recycling pathways during melanosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Futter, Clare E; Cutler, Daniel F

    2016-08-01

    Melanosome biogenesis requires successive waves of cargo delivery from endosomes to immature melanosomes, coupled with recycling of the trafficking machinery. Dennis et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201605090) report differential roles for BLOC-1 and BLOC-3 complexes in delivery and recycling of melanosomal biogenetic components, supplying directionality to melanosome maturation.

  10. Yield response to planting date among soybean maturity groups for irrigated production in the US Midsouth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Planting date is one of the main factors affecting soybean (Glycine max L. (Merr.)) yield. Environmental conditions in the US Midsouth allow for planting dates from late March through early July, and maturity groups (MGs) ranging from 3 to 6. However, the complexity of the interaction among planting...

  11. In Favour of Mature-Aged Graduates (MAGs)--Tapping the Potential for Real Educational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uusimaki, Liisa

    2011-01-01

    Mature-aged graduates (MAGs) are characterised by significant life experience, including career change and an altruistic desire to benefit their prospective students. They are particularly well suited to the middle school environment with its focus on transition and its often complex student needs. Despite this, MAGs are currently underserviced by…

  12. T Lymphocyte Maturation Is Impaired in Healthy Young Individuals Carrying Trisomy 21 (Down Syndrome)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guazzarotti, Laura; Trabattoni, Daria; Castelletti, Eleonora; Boldrighini, Benedetta; Piacentini, Luca; Duca, Piergiorgio; Beretta, Silvia; Pacei, Michela; Caprio, Cristiana; Vigano, Alessandra; di Natale, Berardo; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Clerici, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Cytokine production, immune activation, T lymphocytes maturation, and serum IL-7 concentration were examined in 24 youngsters with Down syndrome and no acquired diseases (healthy Down syndrome [12 prepubertal, 13 pubertal]) and 42 age- and gender-matched controls (20 prepubertal, 22 pubertal). Results showed that a complex immune and impairment is…

  13. Evolution of green coffee protein profiles with maturation and relationship to coffee cup quality.

    PubMed

    Montavon, Philippe; Duruz, Eliane; Rumo, Gilbert; Pratz, Gudrun

    2003-04-01

    Coffee flavor is the product of a complex chain of chemical transformations. The green bean has only a faint odor that is not at all reminiscent of coffee aroma. It contains, however, all of the necessary precursors to generate the unmistakable coffee flavor during roasting. The levels and biochemical status of these precursors may vary in relation to genetic traits, environmental factors, maturation level, postharvest treatment, and storage. To improve our understanding of coffee flavor generation, the sensory and biochemical impact of maturation was assessed. Maturation clearly favored the development of high-quality flavor in the coffee brew. A specific subclass of green coffee beans, however, generated high-quality coffee flavor irrespective of maturation. Biochemical aspects were examined using a dynamic system: immature and mature green coffee suspensions were incubated under air or argon. On the analytical side, a specific pool of flavor precursors was monitored: chlorogenic acids, green coffee proteins, and free amino acids. A link between maturation, the redox behavior of green coffee suspensions, and their sensory scores was identified. Compared to ripe beans, unripe beans were found to be more sensitive to oxidation of chlorogenic acids. Aerobic incubation also triggered the fragmentation or digestion of the 11S seed storage protein and the release of free amino acids. PMID:12670177

  14. Evolution of green coffee protein profiles with maturation and relationship to coffee cup quality.

    PubMed

    Montavon, Philippe; Duruz, Eliane; Rumo, Gilbert; Pratz, Gudrun

    2003-04-01

    Coffee flavor is the product of a complex chain of chemical transformations. The green bean has only a faint odor that is not at all reminiscent of coffee aroma. It contains, however, all of the necessary precursors to generate the unmistakable coffee flavor during roasting. The levels and biochemical status of these precursors may vary in relation to genetic traits, environmental factors, maturation level, postharvest treatment, and storage. To improve our understanding of coffee flavor generation, the sensory and biochemical impact of maturation was assessed. Maturation clearly favored the development of high-quality flavor in the coffee brew. A specific subclass of green coffee beans, however, generated high-quality coffee flavor irrespective of maturation. Biochemical aspects were examined using a dynamic system: immature and mature green coffee suspensions were incubated under air or argon. On the analytical side, a specific pool of flavor precursors was monitored: chlorogenic acids, green coffee proteins, and free amino acids. A link between maturation, the redox behavior of green coffee suspensions, and their sensory scores was identified. Compared to ripe beans, unripe beans were found to be more sensitive to oxidation of chlorogenic acids. Aerobic incubation also triggered the fragmentation or digestion of the 11S seed storage protein and the release of free amino acids.

  15. Two Noninvasive Methods to Measure Female Maturation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozinetz, Claudia A.

    1986-01-01

    Data from a sample of 278 females, aged 7 to 13, were used to compare two methods of measuring maturation. The methods were self-assessment of secondary sex characteristics and prediction of adult height. Results are presented. (Author/MT)

  16. Career Maturity: A Priority for Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Manuel Alvarez

    2008-01-01

    This study reviews the current state of career maturity in secondary education--a period of education which is critical for development of this construct, when students are faced with ongoing academic and occupational decisions over the course of their studies. This paper is organized in three parts: first we focus on the concept, models,…

  17. Teaching Copywriting Students about the Mature Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drewniany, Bonnie

    Advertising educators have a responsibility to make students aware of the importance of the mature market (older people) and to teach them methods to reach this group. An assignment in a copywriting class asked students to write and design ads to promote blue jeans to adults over 50. The assignment accomplished three things: (1) helped students…

  18. Thermal maturity of carboniferous strata, Ouachita Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Houseknecht, D.W.; Matthews, S.M.

    1985-03-01

    The Ouachita Mountains, a relatively untested, potential hydrocarbon province, contain a thick Paleozoic section of apparently favorable source beds, reservoir beds, and trap configurations. To estimate the thermal maturity of these strata, vitrinite reflectance was measured on 89 samples collected mostly from Carboniferous rocks from throughout the Ouachita outcrop area.

  19. Job Search Manual for Mature Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Fred L.

    This document is designed to help mature persons find the "right" professional, managerial, or technical jobs. Section 1 introduces the materials. Section 2 shows job seekers how to write a general statement that defines the nature of the position desired and how to assess their skills, abilities, interests, work values, and personal qualities…

  20. Evaluating Hass Avocado Maturity Using Hyperspectral Imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The maturity of avocado fruit is usually assessed by measuring its dry matter content(DM), which is a destructive and time consuming process. The aim of this study is tointroduce a non-destructive and quick technique that can estimate the DM content of an avocado fruit. 'Hass' avocado fruits at diff...

  1. 24 CFR 242.27 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Maturity. 242.27 Section 242.27 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN......

  2. 24 CFR 242.27 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Maturity. 242.27 Section 242.27 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN......

  3. 24 CFR 242.27 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Maturity. 242.27 Section 242.27 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN......

  4. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the... apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness, depending upon the stage of the ripening process. The following terms are used for describing different stages of firmness of apples:...

  5. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the... apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness, depending upon the stage of the ripening process. The following terms are used for describing different stages of firmness of apples:...

  6. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the... apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness, depending upon the stage of the ripening process. The following terms are used for describing different stages of firmness of apples:...

  7. Prenatal Antecedents of Newborn Neurological Maturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Kivlighan, Katie T.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Rubin, Suzanne E.; Shiffler, Dorothy E.; Henderson, Janice L.; Pillion, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Fetal neurobehavioral development was modeled longitudinally using data collected at weekly intervals from 24 to 38 weeks gestation in a sample of 112 healthy pregnancies. Predictive associations between 3 measures of fetal neurobehavioral functioning and their developmental trajectories to neurological maturation in the first weeks after birth…

  8. Elevated Social Anxiety among Early Maturing Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenthal, Heidemarie; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W.; Babson, Kimberly A.; Gahr, Jessica L.; Trainor, Casey D.; Frala, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence is a key period in terms of the development of anxiety psychopathology. An emerging literature suggests that early pubertal maturation is associated with enhanced vulnerability for anxiety symptomatology, although few studies have examined this association with regard to social anxiety. Accordingly, the current study was designed to…

  9. 7 CFR 51.1313 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Winter Pears 1 Definitions § 51.1313 Mature. (a... also be given. (1) The following terms should be used for describing the ground color: Green, Light Green, Yellowish Green, and Yellow. (2) The following terms should be used for describing the...

  10. 7 CFR 51.1272 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Summer and Fall Pears 1 Definitions § 51.1272 Mature... also be given. (1) The following terms should be used for describing the ground color: Green, Light Green, Yellowish Green, and Yellow. (2) The following terms should be used for describing the...

  11. 7 CFR 989.213 - Maturity dockage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... between handler and tenderer, Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless, Monukka... dockage table applicable to lots of Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless... dockage factor for the preceding increment. (c) Maturity dockage table applicable to lots of Natural...

  12. 7 CFR 989.213 - Maturity dockage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... between handler and tenderer, Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless, Monukka... dockage table applicable to lots of Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless... dockage factor for the preceding increment. (c) Maturity dockage table applicable to lots of Natural...

  13. 7 CFR 989.213 - Maturity dockage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... between handler and tenderer, Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless, Monukka... dockage table applicable to lots of Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless... dockage factor for the preceding increment. (c) Maturity dockage table applicable to lots of Natural...

  14. 7 CFR 989.213 - Maturity dockage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... between handler and tenderer, Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless, Monukka... dockage table applicable to lots of Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless... dockage factor for the preceding increment. (c) Maturity dockage table applicable to lots of Natural...

  15. 7 CFR 989.213 - Maturity dockage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... between handler and tenderer, Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless, Monukka... dockage table applicable to lots of Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless... dockage factor for the preceding increment. (c) Maturity dockage table applicable to lots of Natural...

  16. Late Maturation of Auditory Perceptual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyck, Julia Jones; Wright, Beverly A.

    2011-01-01

    Adults can improve their performance on many perceptual tasks with training, but when does the response to training become mature? To investigate this question, we trained 11-year-olds, 14-year-olds and adults on a basic auditory task (temporal-interval discrimination) using a multiple-session training regimen known to be effective for adults. The…

  17. 7 CFR 51.2841 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... considered mature when harvested in accordance with good commercial practice at a stage which will not...

  18. 7 CFR 51.888 - Maturity requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, in the case of Arizona maturity..., Standardization Section, Room 2065-S, 14th and Independence Avenue, Washington, DC 20250 or at the National....5 Cardinal, Emperor, Perlette, Ribier, Olivette Blanche, Rish Baba, Red Malaga, and...

  19. 7 CFR 51.888 - Maturity requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, in the case of Arizona maturity..., Standardization Section, Room 2065-S, 14th and Independence Avenue, Washington, DC 20250 or at the National....5 Cardinal, Emperor, Perlette, Ribier, Olivette Blanche, Rish Baba, Red Malaga, and...

  20. 24 CFR 200.82 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maturity. 200.82 Section 200.82 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN...

  1. Neuropsychological and Early Maturational Correlates of Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denno, Deborah J.

    A study designed to examine biological, sociological, and early maturational correlates of intelligence collected data prospectively, from birth to 15 years of age, on a sample of 987 black children. Multiple indicators of eight independent and three dependent variables were tested in a structural equation model. Altogether, clear sex differences…

  2. 7 CFR 51.1272 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. (b) Before... the ripening process. Therefore, a statement of firmness should be given in order to indicate the stage of the ripening process. A description of the ground color should also be given. (1) The...

  3. 7 CFR 51.1272 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. (b) Before... the ripening process. Therefore, a statement of firmness should be given in order to indicate the stage of the ripening process. A description of the ground color should also be given. (1) The...

  4. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be... assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These tangerine maturity...

  5. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be... assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These tangerine maturity...

  6. 7 CFR 51.767 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These grapefruit maturity...

  7. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR Part 51. Copies may be... assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These tangerine maturity...

  8. 7 CFR 51.767 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These grapefruit maturity...

  9. Relative dental maturity and associated skeletal maturity in prehistoric native Americans of the Ohio valley area.

    PubMed

    Sciulli, Paul W

    2007-04-01

    Estimation of age-at-death of subadults in prehistoric skeletal samples based on modern reference standards rests on a number of assumptions of which many are untestable. If these assumptions are not met error of unknown magnitude and direction will be introduced to the subadult age estimates. This situation suggests that an independent estimate or estimates of age-related features, free of most of the assumptions made when using modern reference standards may be useful supplements in evaluating the age of subadults in prehistoric samples. The present study provides an internally consistent, population-specific measure of maturity for prehistoric Ohio valley Native Americans based on the seriation of dental development that may be used as a supplement to age-estimation. The developing dentition of 581 subadults from eight Ohio valley prehistoric-protohistoric groups was seriated within and among individuals resulting in a sequence of tooth development and a sequence of individuals from least to most mature. Dental maturity stages or sorting categories were then defined based on exclusive, easily observable, and highly repeatable tooth-formation stages. Tooth eruption (into occlusion), bone lengths, and fusion of skeletal elements are summarized by dental maturity stage. This procedure provides maturity estimates for skeletal features ordered by dental maturity stages derived from the same sample thus making explicit the relationship between dental and skeletal maturity.

  10. FSH Modulates PKAI and GPR3 Activities in Mouse Oocyte of COC in a Gap Junctional Communication (GJC)-Dependent Manner to Initiate Meiotic Resumption

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Guoliang

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have shown that cyclic adenosine-5′-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and G-protein-coupled receptor 3 (GPR3) are crucial for controlling meiotic arrest in oocytes. However, it is unclear how gonadotropins modulate these factors to regulate oocyte maturation, especially by gap junctional communication (GJC). Using an in vitro meiosis-arrested mouse cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) culture model, we showed that there is a close relationship between follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and the PKA type I (PKAI) and GPR3. The effect of FSH on oocyte maturation was biphasic, initially inhibitory and then stimulatory. During FSH-induced maturation, rapid cAMP surges were observed in both cumulus cells and oocyte. Most GJC between cumulus cells and oocyte ceased immediately after FSH stimulation and recommenced after the cAMP surge. FSH-induced maturation was blocked by PKAI activator 8-AHA-cAMP. Levels of PKAI regulatory subunits and GPR3 decreased and increased, respectively, after FSH stimulation. In the presence of the GJC inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX), FSH failed to induce the meiotic resumption and the changes in PKAI, GPR3 and cAMP surge in oocyte were no longer detected. Furthermore, GPR3 was upregulated by high cAMP levels, but not by PKAI activation. When applied after FSH stimulation, the specific phosphodiesterase 3A (PDE3A) inhibitor cilostamide immediately blocked meiotic induction, regardless of when it was administered. PKAI activation inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation in the oocytes of COCs, which participated in the initiation of FSH-induced meiotic maturation in vitro. Just before FSH-induced meiotic maturation, cAMP, PKAI, and GPR3 returned to basal levels, and PDE3A activity and MAPK phosphorylation increased markedly. These experiments show that FSH induces a transient increase in cAMP levels and regulates GJC to control PKAI and GPR3 activities, thereby creating an inhibitory phase. After

  11. Effect of Acrylamide on Oocyte Nuclear Maturation and Cumulus Cells Apoptosis in Mouse In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuzhen; Jiang, Ligang; Zhong, Tao; Kong, Shuhui; Zheng, Rongbin; Kong, Fengyun; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Lei; An, Liguo

    2015-01-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) is a chemical compound with severe neurotoxicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity. Recent studies showed that ACR impairs the function of reproductive organs, e.g., epididymis and testes. In vitro maturation of mouse oocyte is a sensitive assay to identify potential chemical hazard to female fertility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adverse effects of ACR on the nuclear maturation and cumulus cells apoptosis of mouse oocytes in vitro. Cumulus–oocyte complexes were incubated in a maturation medium containing 0, 5, 10 and 20 μM of ACR. Chromosome alignment and spindle morphology of oocytes was determined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Our results showed that oocytes exposed to different doses of ACR in vitro were associated with a significant decrease of oocyte maturation, significant increase of chromosome misalignment rate, occurrence of abnormal spindle configurations, and the inhibition of oocyte parthenogenetic activation. Furthermore, apoptosis of cumulus cells was determined by TUNEL and CASPASE-3 assay. Results showed that apoptosis in cumulus cells was enhanced and the expression of CASPASE-3 was increased after cumulus–oocyte complexes were exposed to ACR. Therefore, ACR may affect the nuclear maturation of oocytes via the apoptosis of cumulus cells in vitro. PMID:26275143

  12. Heme Oxygenase-1/Carbon Monoxide System and Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation and Maturation into Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Suliman, Hagir B.; Zobi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells into energetically efficient cardiomyocytes contributes to functional cardiac repair and is envisioned to ameliorate progressive degenerative cardiac diseases. Advanced cell maturation strategies are therefore needed to create abundant mature cardiomyocytes. In this study, we tested whether the redox-sensitive heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide (HO-1/CO) system, operating through mitochondrial biogenesis, acts as a mechanism for ES cell differentiation and cardiomyocyte maturation. Results: Manipulation of HO-1/CO to enhance mitochondrial biogenesis demonstrates a direct pathway to ES cell differentiation and maturation into beating cardiomyocytes that express adult structural markers. Targeted HO-1/CO interventions up- and downregulate specific cardiogenic transcription factors, transcription factor Gata4, homeobox protein Nkx-2.5, heart- and neural crest derivatives-expressed protein 1, and MEF2C. HO-1/CO overexpression increases cardiac gene expression for myosin regulatory light chain 2, atrial isoform, MLC2v, ANP, MHC-β, and sarcomere α-actinin and the major mitochondrial fusion regulators, mitofusin 2 and MICOS complex subunit Mic60. This promotes structural mitochondrial network expansion and maturation, thereby supporting energy provision for beating embryoid bodies. These effects are prevented by silencing HO-1 and by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species scavenging, while disruption of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial DNA depletion by loss of mitochondrial transcription factor A compromise infrastructure. This leads to failure of cardiomyocyte differentiation and maturation and contractile dysfunction. Innovation: The capacity to augment cardiomyogenesis via a defined mitochondrial pathway has unique therapeutic potential for targeting ES cell maturation in cardiac disease. Conclusion: Our findings establish the HO-1/CO system and redox regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis as

  13. A Drosophila model to image phagosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Shandala, Tetyana; Lim, Chiaoxin; Sorvina, Alexandra; Brooks, Douglas A

    2013-01-01

    Phagocytosis involves the internalization of extracellular material by invagination of the plasma membrane to form intracellular vesicles called phagosomes, which have functions that include pathogen degradation. The degradative properties of phagosomes are thought to be conferred by sequential fusion with endosomes and lysosomes; however, this maturation process has not been studied in vivo. We employed Drosophila hemocytes, which are similar to mammalian professional macrophages, to establish a model of phagosome maturation. Adult Drosophila females, carrying transgenic Rab7-GFP endosome and Lamp1-GFP lysosome markers, were injected with E. coli DH5α and the hemocytes were collected at 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after infection. In wild-type females, E. coli were detected within enlarged Rab7-GFP positive phagosomes at 15 to 45 minutes after infection; and were also observed in enlarged Lamp1-GFP positive phagolysosomes at 45 minutes. Two-photon imaging of hemocytes in vivo confirmed this vesicle morphology, including enlargement of Rab7-GFP and Lamp1-GFP structures that often appeared to protrude from hemocytes. The interaction of endosomes and lysosomes with E. coli phagosomes observed in Drosophila hemocytes was consistent with that previously described for phagosome maturation in human ex vivo macrophages. We also tested our model as a tool for genetic analysis using 14-3-3e mutants, and demonstrated altered phagosome maturation with delayed E. coli internalization, trafficking and/or degradation. These findings demonstrate that Drosophila hemocytes provide an appropriate, genetically amenable, model for analyzing phagosome maturation ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:24709696

  14. Effect of sheep and human follicular fluid on the maturation of sheep oocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, F J; Holm, P; Irvine, B; Seamark, R F

    1994-01-01

    This study examines the effect of sheep and human follicular fluid on the in vitro maturation (IVM) of sheep follicular oocytes. Oocyte cumulus complexes recovered post mortem were matured for 24 to 26 h at 38.6 degrees C, 5% CO(2) in air, in TCM-199 bicarbonate medium supplemented with 20% fetal calf serum (FCS) and, where stated, with maturation hormones, including FSH (5.0 microg/ml), LH (5.0 microg/ml) and estradiol (1 microg/ml), or with sheep follicular fluid recovered from large (>5 mm) or small (2 to 5 mm) ovarian follicles post mortem, or with human periovular follicular fluid obtained during routine IVF procedures. The matured oocytes were then denuded, and their maturation stage and developmental capacity were assessed by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and culture (IVC). It was found that inclusion of sheep or human follicular fluid or hormone supplements in the IVM media more than doubled the number of oocytes completing maturation (FCS alone 33%, compared with 76.2% for maturation hormones, 84.2% for fluid from large and 69.6% for fluid from small sheep follicles and 82.6% for human follicular fluid), and significantly increased fertilization rates (FCS alone 51.6%, compared with 71.9% for maturation hormones, 78.4% for fluid from the large and 75.7% for fluid from small sheep follicles and 73.1% for human follicular fluid) without discernible adverse effects on the development of the cleaving embryos to the morula or blastocyst stage in culture. Omission of FCS and supplements from the IVM medium resulted in a marked reduction (56%) in the number of oocytes maturing. This reduction could be offset to a large part, but not completely, by inclusion of human follicular fluid or human follicular fluid plus LH (5 microg/ml) in the medium. The results of this study show that addition of sheep or human follicular fluid to maturation medium can enhance rather than inhibit the maturation and fertilizability of sheep follicular oocytes in vitro. PMID:16727451

  15. The beneficial effects of cumulus cells and oocyte-cumulus cell gap junctions depends on oocyte maturation and fertilization methods in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cheng-Jie; Wu, Sha-Na; Shen, Jiang-Peng; Wang, Dong-Hui; Kong, Xiang-Wei; Lu, Angeleem; Li, Yan-Jiao; Zhou, Hong-Xia; Zhao, Yue-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Cumulus cells are a group of closely associated granulosa cells that surround and nourish oocytes. Previous studies have shown that cumulus cells contribute to oocyte maturation and fertilization through gap junction communication. However, it is not known how this gap junction signaling affects in vivo versus in vitro maturation of oocytes, and their subsequent fertilization and embryonic development following insemination. Therefore, in our study, we performed mouse oocyte maturation and insemination using in vivo- or in vitro-matured oocyte-cumulus complexes (OCCs, which retain gap junctions between the cumulus cells and the oocytes), in vitro-matured, denuded oocytes co-cultured with cumulus cells (DCs, which lack gap junctions between the cumulus cells and the oocytes), and in vitro-matured, denuded oocytes without cumulus cells (DOs). Using these models, we were able to analyze the effects of gap junction signaling on oocyte maturation, fertilization, and early embryo development. We found that gap junctions were necessary for both in vivo and in vitro oocyte maturation. In addition, for oocytes matured in vivo, the presence of cumulus cells during insemination improved fertilization and blastocyst formation, and this improvement was strengthened by gap junctions. Moreover, for oocytes matured in vitro, the presence of cumulus cells during insemination improved fertilization, but not blastocyst formation, and this improvement was independent of gap junctions. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that the beneficial effect of gap junction signaling from cumulus cells depends on oocyte maturation and fertilization methods. PMID:26966678

  16. Leveraging People-Related Maturity Issues for Achieving Higher Maturity and Capability Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buglione, Luigi

    During the past 20 years Maturity Models (MM) become a buzzword in the ICT world. Since the initial Crosby's idea in 1979, plenty of models have been created in the Software & Systems Engineering domains, addressing various perspectives. By analyzing the content of the Process Reference Models (PRM) in many of them, it can be noticed that people-related issues have little weight in the appraisals of the capabilities of organizations while in practice they are considered as significant contributors in traditional process and organizational performance appraisals, as stressed instead in well-known Performance Management models such as MBQA, EFQM and BSC. This paper proposes some ways for leveraging people-related maturity issues merging HR practices from several types of maturity models into the organizational Business Process Model (BPM) in order to achieve higher organizational maturity and capability levels.

  17. Assessment of banana fruit maturity by image processing technique.

    PubMed

    Surya Prabha, D; Satheesh Kumar, J

    2015-03-01

    Maturity stage of fresh banana fruit is an important factor that affects the fruit quality during ripening and marketability after ripening. The ability to identify maturity of fresh banana fruit will be a great support for farmers to optimize harvesting phase which helps to avoid harvesting either under-matured or over-matured banana. This study attempted to use image processing technique to detect the maturity stage of fresh banana fruit by its color and size value of their images precisely. A total of 120 images comprising 40 images from each stage such as under-mature, mature and over-mature were used for developing algorithm and accuracy prediction. The mean color intensity from histogram; area, perimeter, major axis length and minor axis length from the size values, were extracted from the calibration images. Analysis of variance between each maturity stage on these features indicated that the mean color intensity and area features were more significant in predicting the maturity of banana fruit. Hence, two classifier algorithms namely, mean color intensity algorithm and area algorithm were developed and their accuracy on maturity detection was assessed. The mean color intensity algorithm showed 99.1 % accuracy in classifying the banana fruit maturity. The area algorithm classified the under-mature fruit at 85 % accuracy. Hence the maturity assessment technique proposed in this paper could be used commercially to develop a field based complete automatic detection system to take decision on the right time of harvest by the banana growers. PMID:25745200

  18. On the maturation rate of the neutrophil.

    PubMed

    Zajicek, G; Shohat, M; Polliack, A

    1984-05-01

    Fifty-three maturing bone marrow cells of the granulocyte cell series stained with Giemsa stain and magnified 1,000 times were scanned by a "computerized microscope" consisting of a LSI-11/23 microprocessor and a black-and-white video camera attached to a "frame grabber ." Each sampled cell was digitized into 70 X 70 pixels, each pixel representing 0.04 micron of the real image. The pixel gray values ranged between 0 and 255. Zero stood for white, 255 represented black, while the numbers in between stood for the various shades of gray. The cells represented six different stages of granulocytic maturation: myeloblast, promyelocyte, myelocyte, metamyelocyte , band form, and polymorphonuclear granulocyte. A discriminant analysis program selected 19 features best distinguishing between the six different cell types and computed five canonical discriminant functions defining a Space in which maturation was studied. In the Space, distance between two cells serves as a measure of similarity. The closer two cells are, the more similar they are and vice versa. This measure was applied here to express the degree of similarity between the neutrophil maturation classes, and since they represent states in the neutrophil life history, it is applicable also as a yardstick for the quantitation of differentiation. In the Space, the life history of a cell is represented by a trajectory originating in the myeloblast and terminating in the granulocyte state. Displacement along the trajectory represents cell maturation that is expressed relatively to the least differentiated state of the myeloblast. The further a cell from this state the more mature it is. The same yardstick also serves for differentiation rate estimates represented in the Space by displacement velocities that are derived from the known "transit times" of a cell in each state. The methodology is also applied for cell production estimates. Unlike other "computerized microscopes" serving for cell classification, the

  19. Digestive capacity in weanling and mature horses.

    PubMed

    Earing, J E; Lawrence, L M; Hayes, S H; Brummer, M; Vanzant, E

    2013-05-01

    The ability of young and mature horses to digest DM, OM, and NDF was compared using 6 weanling colts and 6 mature (13.2 ± 3.0 yr) geldings. Each colt was paired with a gelding, and the pair was adapted to a diet containing 67% alfalfa cubes and 33% concentrate for 21 d. During the adaptation period, horses were accustomed to housing and all handling procedures. The adaptation period was also used to adjust the amount of feed offered to minimize orts and to maintain similar rates of intake within a pair. After the adaptation period, a 5-d fecal collection period using fecal collection harnesses ensued. The average age of the weanling colts at the start of the 5-d collection period was 181.8 ± 2.9 d. On the morning of the first collection day, Co-EDTA (9 mg Co/kg BW(0.75)) and ytterbium-labeled hay fiber (9 mg Yb/kg BW(0.75)) were added to the concentrate portion of the diet, and horses were closely observed for complete consumption of the markers before additional feed was offered. The fecal collection bags were emptied every 1 to 2 h, and each collection was weighed and subsampled for later measurement of Co and Yb concentrations, which were used to determine the mean retention time (MRT) of the fluid and particulate phases of digesta, respectively. The remaining feces for each horse were composited each day and then subsampled for measurement of DM digestibility (DMD), NDF digestibility (NDFD), and OM digestibility (OMD). During the fecal collection period, DMI was similar between colts and geldings (91.4 and 91.2 g/kg BW(0.75), respectively). There were no differences between colts and mature geldings for DMD, OMD, or NDFD. Across both ages, the MRT of the particulate phase was 24.9 h compared with 21.8 h for the fluid phase (P = 0.002). However, MRT for the particulate phase was not different between colts and mature geldings (24.7 and 25.2 h, respectively). There was no difference in the MRT for the fluid phase between colts and mature geldings (21.5 and 22

  20. Remotely sensing wheat maturation with radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1975-01-01

    The scattering properties of wheat were studied in the 8-18 GHz band as a function of frequency, polarization, incidence angle, and crop maturity. Supporting ground truth was collected at the time of measurement. The data indicate that the radar backscattering coefficient is sensitive to both radar system parameters and crop characteristics particularly at incidence angles near nadir. Linear regression analyses of the radar backscattering coefficient on both time and plant moisture content result in rather good correlation. Furthermore, by calculating the average time rate of change of the radar backscattering coefficient it is found that it undergoes rapid variations shortly before and after the wheat is harvested. Both of these analyses suggest methods for estimating wheat maturity and for monitoring the progress of harvest.

  1. Miniature Neurotransmission Regulates Drosophila Synaptic Structural Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ben Jiwon; Imlach, Wendy L.; Jiao, Wei; Wolfram, Verena; Wu, Ying; Grbic, Mark; Cela, Carolina; Baines, Richard A.; Nitabach, Michael N.; McCabe, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Miniature neurotransmission is the transsynaptic process where single synaptic vesicles spontaneously released from presynaptic neurons induce miniature postsynaptic potentials. Since their discovery over 60 years ago, miniature events have been found at every chemical synapse studied. However, the in vivo necessity for these small-amplitude events has remained enigmatic. Here, we show that miniature neurotransmission is required for the normal structural maturation of Drosophila glutamatergic synapses in a developmental role that is not shared by evoked neurotransmission. Conversely, we find that increasing miniature events is sufficient to induce synaptic terminal growth. We show that miniature neurotransmission acts locally at terminals to regulate synapse maturation via a Trio guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) and Rac1 GTPase molecular signaling pathway. Our results establish that miniature neurotransmission, a universal but often-overlooked feature of synapses, has unique and essential functions in vivo. PMID:24811381

  2. Visualizing Antibody Affinity Maturation in Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tas, Jeroen M.J.; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T.; Mano, Yasuko M.; Chen, Casie S.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC, and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with non-immunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  3. Maturation of the Human Papillomavirus 16 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Cardone, Giovanni; Moyer, Adam L.; Cheng, Naiqian; Thompson, Cynthia D.; Dvoretzky, Israel; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Buck, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Papillomaviruses are a family of nonenveloped DNA viruses that infect the skin or mucosa of their vertebrate hosts. The viral life cycle is closely tied to the differentiation of infected keratinocytes. Papillomavirus virions are released into the environment through a process known as desquamation, in which keratinocytes lose structural integrity prior to being shed from the surface of the skin. During this process, virions are exposed to an increasingly oxidative environment, leading to their stabilization through the formation of disulfide cross-links between neighboring molecules of the major capsid protein, L1. We used time-lapse cryo-electron microscopy and image analysis to study the maturation of HPV16 capsids assembled in mammalian cells and exposed to an oxidizing environment after cell lysis. Initially, the virion is a loosely connected procapsid that, under in vitro conditions, condenses over several hours into the more familiar 60-nm-diameter papillomavirus capsid. In this process, the procapsid shrinks by ~5% in diameter, its pentameric capsomers change in structure (most markedly in the axial region), and the interaction surfaces between adjacent capsomers are consolidated. A C175S mutant that cannot achieve normal inter-L1 disulfide cross-links shows maturation-related shrinkage but does not achieve the fully condensed 60-nm form. Pseudoatomic modeling based on a 9-Å resolution reconstruction of fully mature capsids revealed C-terminal disulfide-stabilized “suspended bridges” that form intercapsomeric cross-links. The data suggest a model in which procapsids exist in a range of dynamic intermediates that can be locked into increasingly mature configurations by disulfide cross-linking, possibly through a Brownian ratchet mechanism. PMID:25096873

  4. Mature brain tissue in the sacrococcygeal region

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Binod Bade; Ghimire, Pradeep; Ghartimagar, Dilasma; Jwarchan, Bishnu; Lalchan, Subita; Karmacharya, Mikesh

    2016-01-01

    Complete mature brain tissue in sacrococcygeal region is a rare congenital anomaly in a newborn, which usually is misdiagnosed for sacrococcygeal teratoma. Glial tumor-like ependymoma is also common in sacrococcygeal area but mostly appears later in life. We present a case of complete heterotopic brain tissue in the sacrococcygeal region. The patient underwent total excision of mass with coccygectomy. To our knowledge it is the second case being reported. PMID:27194682

  5. Maturation of Fetal Responses to Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisilevsky, B. S.; Hains, S. M. J.; Jacquet, A.-Y.; Granier-Deferre, C.; Lecanuet, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    Maturation of fetal response to music was characterized over the last trimester of pregnancy using a 5-minute piano recording of Brahms' Lullaby, played at an average of 95, 100, 105 or 110 dB (A). Within 30 seconds of the onset of the music, the youngest fetuses (28-32 weeks GA) showed a heart rate increase limited to the two highest dB levels;…

  6. Mature brain tissue in the sacrococcygeal region.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Binod Bade; Ghimire, Pradeep; Ghartimagar, Dilasma; Jwarchan, Bishnu; Lalchan, Subita; Karmacharya, Mikesh

    2016-01-01

    Complete mature brain tissue in sacrococcygeal region is a rare congenital anomaly in a newborn, which usually is misdiagnosed for sacrococcygeal teratoma. Glial tumor-like ependymoma is also common in sacrococcygeal area but mostly appears later in life. We present a case of complete heterotopic brain tissue in the sacrococcygeal region. The patient underwent total excision of mass with coccygectomy. To our knowledge it is the second case being reported. PMID:27194682

  7. A reference map of the Arabidopsis thaliana mature pollen proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Noir, Sandra; Braeutigam, Anne; Colby, Thomas; Schmidt, Juergen; Panstruga, Ralph . E-mail: panstrug@mpiz-koeln.mpg.de

    2005-12-02

    The male gametophyte (or pollen) plays an obligatory role during sexual reproduction of higher plants. The extremely reduced complexity of this organ renders pollen a valuable experimental system for studying fundamental aspects of plant biology such as cell fate determination, cell-cell interactions, cell polarity, and tip-growth. Here, we present the first reference map of the mature pollen proteome of the dicotyledonous model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana. Based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight, and electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we reproducibly identified 121 different proteins in 145 individual spots. The presence, subcellular localization, and functional classification of the identified proteins are discussed in relation to the pollen transcriptome and the full protein complement encoded by the nuclear Arabidopsis genome.

  8. Coexistent mesenteric and ovarian mature cystic teratomas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, D H

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the first documented case of coexistent mesenteric and gonadal teratomas in an adult female patient. Physical examination of a 51-year-old Korean woman referred for treatment of abdominal distension and pain revealed two masses in both the right upper abdomen and in the right pelvic region. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis showed the presence of well-defined, complex, fat-dense mass lesions in the upper abdomen and pelvic cavity. A large cystic mass located in the retroperitoneal space extending from the mesenteric border at the level of the transverse colon, and a goose-egg sized right ovarian mass were founded on exploratory laparotomy. The entire abdominal tumor was excised and total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. Examination of the macroscopic and microscopic findings led to diagnosis of mature cystic teratomas of the ovary and the mesentery. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:27352571

  9. Modulation of dendritic cell maturation and function by B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Hermine, Olivier; Tough, David F; Kaveri, Srini V

    2005-07-01

    Investigating the signals that regulate the function of dendritic cells (DC), the sentinels of the immune system, is critical to understanding the role of DC in the regulation of immune responses. Accumulating lines of evidence indicate that in addition to innate stimuli and T cell-derived signals, B lymphocytes exert a profound regulatory effect in vitro and in vivo on the Ag-presenting function of DC. The identification of B cells as a cellular source of cytokines, chemokines, and autoantibodies that are critically involved in the process of maturation, migration, and function of DC provides a rationale for immunotherapeutic intervention of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions by targeting B cells. Conversely, efficient cross-presentation of Ags by DC pulsed with immune complexes provides an alternative approach in the immunotherapy of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:15972625

  10. Chapter 8: Hsp90 and Client Protein Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Natalie; Mishra, Parul; Bolon, Daniel N.

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone that assists in the maturation of a limited set of substrate proteins that are collectively referred to as clients. The majority of identified Hsp90 clients are involved in signal transduction including many steroid hormone receptors and kinases. A handful of Hsp90 clients can be classified as non-signal transduction proteins including telomerase, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and antigenic peptides destined for major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Because Hsp90 clients are causative agents in cancer and cystic fibrosis, research on Hsp90 has intensified in recent years. We review the historical path of Hsp90 research within each class of client (kinase, hormone receptor, and non-signal transduction clients) and highlight current areas of active investigation. PMID:21898225

  11. Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein 6 Enhances Oocyte Reprogramming Potential and Subsequent Development of the Cloned Yak Embryos.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yangyang; He, Honghong; Cui, Yan; Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Li, Qin; Fan, Jiangfeng; He, Junfeng; Yu, Sijiu

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) supplementation in the medium during in vitro maturation (IVM) on the developmental potential of oocytes and in the subsequent development of cloned yak embryos. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were aspirated from the antral follicles of yak ovaries and cultured with different concentrations of recombinant human BMP6 in oocyte maturation medium. Following maturation, the metaphase II (MII) oocytes were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and these were cultured in vitro. The development of blastocysts and cell numbers were detected on day 8. The apoptosis and histone modifications of yak cloned blastocysts were evaluated by detecting the expression of relevant genes and proteins (Bax, Bcl-2, H3K9ac, H3K18ac, and H3K9me3) using relative quantitative RT-PCR or immunofluorescence. The presence of 100 ng/mL BMP6 significantly enhanced the oocyte maturation ratios (66.12 ± 2.04% vs. 73.11 ± 1.38%), cleavage rates (69.40 ± 1.03% vs. 78.16 ± 0.93%), and blastocyst formation rates (20.63 ± 1.32% vs. 28.16 ± 1.67%) of cloned yak embryos. The total blastocysts (85.24 ± 3.12 vs. 103.36 ± 5.28), inner cell mass (ICM) cell numbers (19.59 ± 2.17 vs. 32.20 ± 2.61), and ratio of ICM to trophectoderm (TE) (22.93 ± 1.43% vs. 31.21 ± 1.62%) were also enhanced (p < 0.05). The ratio of the Bax to the Bcl-2 gene was lowest in the SCNT + BMP6 groups (p < 0.05). The H3K9ac and H3K18ac levels were increased in SCNT + BMP6 groups (p < 0.05), whereas the H3K9me3 level was decreased; the differences in blastocysts were not significant (p > 0.05). These study results demonstrate that addition of oocyte maturation medium with recombinant BMP6 enhances yak oocyte developmental potential and the subsequent developmental competence of SCNT embryos, and provides evidence that BMP6 is an important determinant of mammalian oocyte

  12. Maturation modeling in Otway Basin, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, M.F.; Falvey, D.A.

    1983-02-01

    The Otway basin is a Jurassic to Pliocene sedimentary basin formed on the southern Australian continental margin. Its formation is associated with rifting and breakup of the Australian and Antarctic plates. Lithospheric cooling and contraction have probably produced post-breakup subsidence. Either lithospheric stretching or deep crustal metamorphism may have produced pre-breakup subsidence. These mechanisms have identifiable thermal histories. Organic diagenesis (specifically the reflectance of vitrinite in oil) is empirically determined by the thermal and depositional history of an organic sediment. Thus, the stages of hydrocarbon maturity of Otway basin sediments can be modeled. Depositional history is determined from ''geohistory analysis'' and thermal history depends on the subsidence mechanism applied to the basin. A paleo-heat-flow history derived from the deep crustal metamorphism model of subsidence produces a maturation profile with depth that is consistent with observed vitrinite reflectance data, although organic diagenesis modeling is relatively insensitive to precise details of thermal history. Depositional and maturation history modeling for the present day, 20 Ma ago, 40 Ma ago, and 60 Ma ago is applied to a seismic profile across the southern Australian continental shelf in the Otway basin as a demonstration of the projection backward in time of sedimentation and organic diagenesis.

  13. DNA damage response during mouse oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Alexandra; Baran, Vladimir; Sakakibara, Yogo; Brzakova, Adela; Ferencova, Ivana; Motlik, Jan; Kitajima, Tomoya S; Schultz, Richard M; Solc, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Because low levels of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) appear not to activate the ATM-mediated prophase I checkpoint in full-grown oocytes, there may exist mechanisms to protect chromosome integrity during meiotic maturation. Using live imaging we demonstrate that low levels of DSBs induced by the radiomimetic drug Neocarzinostatin (NCS) increase the incidence of chromosome fragments and lagging chromosomes but do not lead to APC/C activation and anaphase onset delay. The number of DSBs, represented by γH2AX foci, significantly decreases between prophase I and metaphase II in both control and NCS-treated oocytes. Transient treatment with NCS increases >2-fold the number of DSBs in prophase I oocytes, but less than 30% of these oocytes enter anaphase with segregation errors. MRE11, but not ATM, is essential to detect DSBs in prophase I and is involved in H2AX phosphorylation during metaphase I. Inhibiting MRE11 by mirin during meiotic maturation results in anaphase bridges and also increases the number of γH2AX foci in metaphase II.  Compromised DNA integrity in mirin-treated oocytes indicates a role for MRE11 in chromosome integrity during meiotic maturation. PMID:26745237

  14. Decelerating Mature Adipocyte Dedifferentiation by Media Composition.

    PubMed

    Huber, Birgit; Kluger, Petra J

    2015-12-01

    The establishment of adipose tissue test systems is still a major challenge in the investigation of cellular and molecular interactions responsible for the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases involving adipose tissue. Mature adipocytes are mainly involved in these pathologies, but rarely used in vitro, due to the lack of an appropriate culture medium which inhibits dedifferentiation and maintains adipocyte functionality. In our study, we showed that Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium/Ham's F-12 with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) reported for the culture of mature adipocytes favors dedifferentiation, which was accompanied by a high glycerol release, a decreasing release of leptin, and a low expression of the adipocyte marker perilipin A, but high expression of CD73 after 21 days. Optimized media containing FCS, biotin, pantothenate, insulin, and dexamethasone decelerated the dedifferentiation process. These cells showed a lower lipolysis rate, a high level of leptin release, as well as a high expression of perilipin A. CD73-positive dedifferentiated fat cells were only found in low quantity. In this work, we showed that mature adipocytes when cultured under optimized conditions could be highly valuable for adipose tissue engineering in vitro. PMID:26228997

  15. Conformational maturation of measles virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gombart, A F; Hirano, A; Wong, T C

    1993-01-01

    We have obtained a polyclonal antiserum, N-BE, against the denatured, amino-terminal half of the measles virus (MV) nucleocapsid (N) protein and a monoclonal antibody (MAb), N46, which recognizes a conformation-dependent epitope in the same region. Amino acid residues 23 to 239 were required and sufficient for the formation of the conformational epitope. Using these antibodies, we show that the N protein of MV is synthesized as a relatively unfolded protein which first appears in the free-protein pool. This nascent N protein undergoes a conformational change into a more folded mature form. This change does not require the participation of other viral proteins or genomic RNA. The mature N protein does not accumulate in the free-protein pool but is quickly and selectively incorporated into the viral nucleocapsids. The mature N protein is a target for interaction with the phosphoprotein (P protein) of MV. This interaction interferes with the recognition of the N protein by the N46 MAb. This suggests that the association with the P protein may mask the binding site for the N46 MAb or that it induces a conformational change in the N protein. Images PMID:7685410

  16. Technology Maturation of Integrated System Health Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Uckun, Serdar; Hicks, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Despite two decades of significant investments in R&D of Integrated System Health Management (ISHM), mission-critical applications of it in aerospace are few and far between. ISHM is subject to the general difficulty of transitioning technologies out of R&D labs and into practical applications. New and unproven methods such as ISHM introduce multiple mission risks (technology, schedule, cost), and may require a transition to unconventional and as-yet-unproven operations concepts in order to be effective. Laboratory and flight demonstrations are necessary but insufficient to adequately reduce those risks. What is needed is a solid business case before a new technology can be considered for fleetwide deployment. To address these problems, we recently applied a technology maturation assessment process developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to study the challenges of ISHM technology maturation. This application resulted in identification of the technologies (and technology maturation activities) that would result in the greatest risk reduction per investment dollar. Our approach and its results are described herein.

  17. Maturation of Shark Single-Domain (IgNAR) Antibodies: Evidence for Induced-Fit Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, R.L.; Dooley, H.; Verdino, P.; Flajnik, M.F.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Maryland U.

    2007-07-13

    Sharks express an unusual heavy-chain isotype called IgNAR, whose variable regions bind antigen as independent soluble domains. To further probe affinity maturation of the IgNAR response, we structurally characterized the germline and somatically matured versions of a type II variable (V) region, both in the presence and absence of its antigen, hen egg-white lysozyme. Despite a disulfide bond linking complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3, both germline and somatically matured V regions displayed significant structural changes in these CDRs upon complex formation with antigen. Somatic mutations in the IgNAR V region serve to increase the number of contacts with antigen, as reflected by a tenfold increase in affinity, and one of these mutations appears to stabilize the CDR3 region. In addition, a residue in the HV4 loop plays an important role in antibody-antigen interaction, consistent with the high rate of somatic mutations in this non-CDR loop.

  18. Prospects for In Vitro Myofilament Maturation in Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schwan, Jonas; Campbell, Stuart G

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from human stem cells are quickly becoming mainstays of cardiac regenerative medicine, in vitro disease modeling, and drug screening. Their suitability for such roles may seem obvious, but assessments of their contractile behavior suggest that they have not achieved a completely mature cardiac muscle phenotype. This could be explained in part by an incomplete transition from fetal to adult myofilament protein isoform expression. In this commentary, we review evidence that supports this hypothesis and discuss prospects for ultimately generating engineered heart tissue specimens that behave similarly to adult human myocardium. We suggest approaches to better characterize myofilament maturation level in these in vitro systems, and illustrate how new computational models could be used to better understand complex relationships between muscle contraction, myofilament protein isoform expression, and maturation. PMID:26085788

  19. Centriole maturation requires regulated Plk1 activity during two consecutive cell cycles.

    PubMed

    Kong, Dong; Farmer, Veronica; Shukla, Anil; James, Jana; Gruskin, Richard; Kiriyama, Shigeo; Loncarek, Jadranka

    2014-09-29

    Newly formed centrioles in cycling cells undergo a maturation process that is almost two cell cycles long before they become competent to function as microtubule-organizing centers and basal bodies. As a result, each cell contains three generations of centrioles, only one of which is able to form cilia. It is not known how this long and complex process is regulated. We show that controlled Plk1 activity is required for gradual biochemical and structural maturation of the centrioles and timely appendage assembly. Inhibition of Plk1 impeded accumulation of appendage proteins and appendage formation. Unscheduled Plk1 activity, either in cycling or interphase-arrested cells, accelerated centriole maturation and appendage and cilia formation on the nascent centrioles, erasing the age difference between centrioles in one cell. These findings provide a new understanding of how the centriole cycle is regulated and how proper cilia and centrosome numbers are maintained in the cells.

  20. Prospects for In Vitro Myofilament Maturation in Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Schwan, Jonas; Campbell, Stuart G

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from human stem cells are quickly becoming mainstays of cardiac regenerative medicine, in vitro disease modeling, and drug screening. Their suitability for such roles may seem obvious, but assessments of their contractile behavior suggest that they have not achieved a completely mature cardiac muscle phenotype. This could be explained in part by an incomplete transition from fetal to adult myofilament protein isoform expression. In this commentary, we review evidence that supports this hypothesis and discuss prospects for ultimately generating engineered heart tissue specimens that behave similarly to adult human myocardium. We suggest approaches to better characterize myofilament maturation level in these in vitro systems, and illustrate how new computational models could be used to better understand complex relationships between muscle contraction, myofilament protein isoform expression, and maturation.

  1. 7 CFR 51.1555 - Fairly well matured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....1555 Fairly well matured. Fairly well matured means that the skins of the potatoes are generally fairly firmly set and not more than 10 percent of the potatoes in the lot have more than one-fourth of the...

  2. 7 CFR 51.1555 - Fairly well matured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....1555 Fairly well matured. Fairly well matured means that the skins of the potatoes are generally fairly firmly set and not more than 10 percent of the potatoes in the lot have more than one-fourth of the...

  3. Morphology of preovulatory bovine follicles as related to oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    de Loos, F A; Bevers, M M; Dieleman, S J; Kruip, T A

    1991-03-01

    Thirty-three preovulatory bovine oocytes and their follicles were collected during the period of final maturation in normally cyclic cows. Cell density of the membrana granulosa, mitotic index of the membrana granulosa, and the occurrence of eosinophilic granulocytes around the basal membrane as well as the maturational stage of the oocyte were determined. Cell density decreased during the period of final maturation. Mitotic indices also decreased after an initial high level in the first hours of the final maturation. Eosinophilic granulocytes were only seen during the last hours of final maturation. The maturational stages of the oocytes were related to distinct maturational stages of the follicular wall as determined by morphological characteristics. We propose a scoring system for the maturity of the follicular wall based on cell density, presence of mitotic figures and the presence of eosinophilic granulocytes outside the vascular compartment. PMID:16726922

  4. Maturational Patterns of Sigma Frequency Power Across Childhood and Adolescence: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ian G.; Feinberg, Irwin

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To further evaluate adolescent brain maturation by determining the longitudinal trajectories of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sigma (11–15 Hz) power across childhood-adolescence. Methods: The maturational trend for sigma (11–15 Hz) power was evaluated in an accelerated longitudinal study of three overlapping age cohorts (n = 92) covering ages 6 to 18 y. Semiannually, sleep electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded from participants sleeping at home in their normal sleep environment while keeping their current school night schedules. Results: Sigma frequencies became faster with age. The frequency of the 11–15 Hz spectral peak increased linearly. Sigma frequency power (SFP) declined with age, but its trajectory was complex (cubic). Power in a group of low sigma subfrequencies declined with age. Power in a group of high sigma frequencies increased with age. Power in subfrequencies within 11–15 Hz also showed different trends across the night, with lower frequencies increasing across NREM periods and higher frequencies decreasing across NREM periods. The upper and lower boundaries for the sigma frequencies that changed across NREMPs shifted upward with age. Conclusions: We hypothesize that these maturational brain changes result from synaptic elimination which decreases sleep depth and streamlines circuits. SFP displays a maturational trajectory different from both delta and theta power. Theories on the function of sigma must be reconciled with its maturational trajectory. These findings further demonstrate the value of sleep EEG for studying noninvasively the complex developmental brain changes of adolescence. Citation: Campbell IG, Feinberg I. Maturational patterns of sigma frequency power across childhood and adolescence: a longitudinal study. SLEEP 2016;39(1):193–201. PMID:26285004

  5. Individual condition and stream temperature influence early maturation of rainbow and steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMillan, John R.; Dunham, J.B.; Reeves, G.H.; Mills, J.S.; Jordan, C.E.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative male phenotypes in salmonine fishes arise from individuals that mature as larger and older anadromous marine-migrants or as smaller and younger freshwater residents. To better understand the processes influencing the expression of these phenotypes we examined the influences of growth in length (fork length) and whole body lipid content in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish were sampled from the John Day River basin in northeast Oregon where both anadromous ("steelhead") and freshwater resident rainbow trout coexist. Larger males with higher lipid levels had a greater probability of maturing as a resident at age-1+. Among males, 38% were maturing overall, and the odds ratios of the logistic model indicated that the probability of a male maturing early as a resident at age-1+ increased 49% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 23-81%) for every 5 mm increase in length and 33% (95% CI = 10-61%) for every 0.5% increase in whole body lipid content. There was an inverse association between individual condition and water temperature as growth was greater in warmer streams while whole body lipid content was higher in cooler streams. Our results support predictions from life history theory and further suggest that relationships between individual condition, maturation, and environmental variables (e.g., water temperature) are shaped by complex developmental and evolutionary influences.

  6. Individual condition and stream temperature influence early maturation of rainbow and steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMillan, J.R.; Dunham, J.B.; Reeves, G.H.; Mills, J.S.; Jordan, C.E.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative male phenotypes in salmonine fishes arise from individuals that mature as larger and older anadromous marine-migrants or as smaller and younger freshwater residents. To better understand the processes influencing the expression of these phenotypes we examined the influences of growth in length (fork length) and whole body lipid content in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish were sampled from the John Day River basin in northeast Oregon where both anadromous ("steelhead") and freshwater resident rainbow trout coexist. Larger males with higher lipid levels had a greater probability of maturing as a resident at age-1+. Among males, 38% were maturing overall, and the odds ratios of the logistic model indicated that the probability of a male maturing early as a resident at age-1+ increased 49% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 23-81%) for every 5 mm increase in length and 33% (95% CI = 10-61%) for every 0. 5% increase in whole body lipid content. There was an inverse association between individual condition and water temperature as growth was greater in warmer streams while whole body lipid content was higher in cooler streams. Our results support predictions from life history theory and further suggest that relationships between individual condition, maturation, and environmental variables (e. g., water temperature) are shaped by complex developmental and evolutionary influences. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  7. On gonadic maturation and reproductive strategy in deep-sea benthic octopus Graneledone macrotyla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Ángel; Sieiro, María Pilar; Roura, Álvaro; Portela, Julio M.; del Río, José Luís

    2013-09-01

    The new information reported in this paper is based on five maturing and mature females of the large-tuberculate octopus Graneledone macrotyla. These specimens were caught in bottom trawl surveys ATLANTIS 2009 (February 24 to April 1, 2009) and ATLANTIS 2010 (March 9 to April 5, 2010) carried out off the Argentinean Economic Exclusive Zone. Capture depth ranged from 475 to 921 m and sea bottom temperature between 2.8 and 3.1 °C. Development of the complex ovary, oviducts, and oviducal glands during gonadic maturation is described. The absence of spermathecae in the oviducal glands and the presence of fertilized eggs inside the ovary suggested that fertilization took place within the ovary. Histological techniques showed the presence of four types of oocytes. Maturing oocyte size-frequency distribution was polymodal. Fluorescence reaction showed that atresia occurred in both early and later oocyte maturation stages. Atresia affected 48-55 % of the initial number of oocytes. The maximum observed potential fecundity was estimated at 250-300 eggs. G. macrotyla showed a group-synchronous ovulation pattern, regulative atresia, and a batching spawning pattern with a few egg batches spawned intermittently over an extended period of spawning.

  8. Identification of proliferative and mature β-cells in the islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Bader, Erik; Migliorini, Adriana; Gegg, Moritz; Moruzzi, Noah; Gerdes, Jantje; Roscioni, Sara S; Bakhti, Mostafa; Brandl, Elisabeth; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; Aichler, Michaela; Feuchtinger, Annette; Leitzinger, Christin; Zischka, Hans; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Jastroch, Martin; Tschöp, Matthias; Machicao, Fausto; Staiger, Harald; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Chmelova, Helena; Chouinard, Julie A; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Korsgren, Olle; Speier, Stephan; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-07-21

    Insulin-dependent diabetes is a complex multifactorial disorder characterized by loss or dysfunction of β-cells. Pancreatic β-cells differ in size, glucose responsiveness, insulin secretion and precursor cell potential; understanding the mechanisms that underlie this functional heterogeneity might make it possible to develop new regenerative approaches. Here we show that Fltp (also known as Flattop and Cfap126), a Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) effector and reporter gene acts as a marker gene that subdivides endocrine cells into two subpopulations and distinguishes proliferation-competent from mature β-cells with distinct molecular, physiological and ultrastructural features. Genetic lineage tracing revealed that endocrine subpopulations from Fltp-negative and -positive lineages react differently to physiological and pathological changes. The expression of Fltp increases when endocrine cells cluster together to form polarized and mature 3D islet mini-organs. We show that 3D architecture and Wnt/PCP ligands are sufficient to trigger β-cell maturation. By contrast, the Wnt/PCP effector Fltp is not necessary for β-cell development, proliferation or maturation. We conclude that 3D architecture and Wnt/PCP signalling underlie functional β-cell heterogeneity and induce β-cell maturation. The identification of Fltp as a marker for endocrine subpopulations sheds light on the molecular underpinnings of islet cell heterogeneity and plasticity and might enable targeting of endocrine subpopulations for the regeneration of functional β-cell mass in diabetic patients. PMID:27398620

  9. 48 CFR 32.304-4 - Guarantee amount and maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guarantee amount and... Guarantee amount and maturity. The agency may change the guarantee amount or maturity date, within the... guarantee amount or maturity date to meet any significant increase in financing need. (b) If the...

  10. 7 CFR 1427.174 - Maturity of seed cotton loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maturity of seed cotton loans. 1427.174 Section 1427..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COTTON Recourse Seed Cotton Loans § 1427.174 Maturity of seed cotton loans. Seed cotton loans mature on demand by CCC but no later than May 31...

  11. 7 CFR 1427.174 - Maturity of seed cotton loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maturity of seed cotton loans. 1427.174 Section 1427..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COTTON Recourse Seed Cotton Loans § 1427.174 Maturity of seed cotton loans. Seed cotton loans mature on demand by CCC but no later than May 31...

  12. 7 CFR 1427.174 - Maturity of seed cotton loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maturity of seed cotton loans. 1427.174 Section 1427..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COTTON Recourse Seed Cotton Loans § 1427.174 Maturity of seed cotton loans. Seed cotton loans mature on demand by CCC but no later than May 31...

  13. 7 CFR 1427.174 - Maturity of seed cotton loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maturity of seed cotton loans. 1427.174 Section 1427..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COTTON Recourse Seed Cotton Loans § 1427.174 Maturity of seed cotton loans. Seed cotton loans mature on demand by CCC but no later than May 31...

  14. 7 CFR 1427.174 - Maturity of seed cotton loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity of seed cotton loans. 1427.174 Section 1427..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COTTON Recourse Seed Cotton Loans § 1427.174 Maturity of seed cotton loans. Seed cotton loans mature on demand by CCC but no later than May 31...

  15. Sex Differences in a Causal Model of Career Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Suzanne

    1989-01-01

    Studied sex differences among high school students (N=318) in career development process to determine whether sex differences exist in way six independent variables interact in career maturity causal model of career maturity and to compare each variable's effect on career maturity. Results suggest significant sex differences consistent with…

  16. Career Maturity Determinants: Individual Development, Social Context, and Historical Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt-Rodermund, Eva; Silbereisen, Rainer K.

    1998-01-01

    Compares adolescents from East Germany who experienced an educational system offering little choice with adolescents from West Germany who experienced more leeway to investigate career maturity. East German adolescents reported more career maturity. Person-related variables predicted career maturity in both groups; family and peer context were…

  17. Career Maturity Aspects of the Kuder Occupational Interest Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigington, John H.

    1982-01-01

    Determined if selected scores from the Kuder Occupational Interest Survey (KOIS) could be indicative of client career maturity. The data for each subject included three scores from the KOIS and one measure of career maturity. Significant correlations were found between the KOIS scores and career maturity. (Author)

  18. The Effect of Career Education on Career Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omvig, Clayton P.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects of a career education program on students' career maturity as measured by the Career Maturity Inventory (CMI). Results indicate that the career education program had a positive effect in increasing students' levels of career maturity. (Author)

  19. Testing Crites' Model of Career Maturity: A Hierarchical Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallbrown, Fred H.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Investigated the construct validity of Crites' model of career maturity and the Career Maturity Inventory (CMI). Results from a nationwide sample of adolescents, using hierarchical factor analytic methodology, indicated confirmatory support for the multidimensionality of Crites' model of career maturity, and the construct validity of the CMI as a…

  20. The Relationship between Attitudinal and Behavioral Aspects of Career Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Keeley, Timothy J.

    1992-01-01

    Investigated whether a meaningful relationship existed between an attitudinal measure of career maturity and a measure of career maturity reflecting job performance-related behavioral competencies in African-American high school students (n=74). Only modest relationships were found between several career maturity attitudes and behavioral measures.…

  1. Career Maturity and Commitment to Work in University Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevill, Dorothy D.; Super, Donald E.

    1988-01-01

    Examined relationship between career maturity and commitment to work, sex, socioeconomic status, and college level among 372 undergraduates. Found commitment to work related to both attitudinal and cognitive factors of career maturity. Sex and socioeconomic status were not related to career maturity. (Author/NB)

  2. Unraveling chaotic attractors by complex networks and measurements of stock market complexity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongduo; Li, Ying

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel method for measuring the complexity of a time series by unraveling a chaotic attractor modeled on complex networks. The complexity index R, which can potentially be exploited for prediction, has a similar meaning to the Kolmogorov complexity (calculated from the Lempel-Ziv complexity), and is an appropriate measure of a series' complexity. The proposed method is used to research the complexity of the world's major capital markets. None of these markets are completely random, and they have different degrees of complexity, both over the entire length of their time series and at a level of detail. However, developing markets differ significantly from mature markets. Specifically, the complexity of mature stock markets is stronger and more stable over time, whereas developing markets exhibit relatively low and unstable complexity over certain time periods, implying a stronger long-term price memory process.

  3. Maintenance of meiotic arrest by increasing [cAMP]i may have physiological relevance in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Aktas, H; Wheeler, M B; First, N L; Leibfried-Rutledge, M L

    1995-11-01

    Invasive adenylate cyclase (iAC) reversibly inhibits spontaneous maturation of cumulus-enclosed bovine oocytes by increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP, [cAMP]i. In this study, physiological aspects of maintaining meiotic arrest in bovine oocytes by iAC were investigated. The maintenance of germinal vesicle arrest by iAC in both cumulus-enclosed and denuded bovine oocytes was concentration dependent (r2 = 0.857). Denuded bovine oocytes were more sensitive to maintenance of meiotic arrest by iAC then were cumulus-enclosed oocytes. At the highest concentration, 70% of the cumulus-enclosed and 90% of the denuded bovine oocytes were maintained in meiotic arrest. The iAC increased [cAMP]i in both intact cumulus-oocyte complexes and enclosed oocytes in a concentration-dependent manner (r2 = 0.795). Cumulus-enclosed oocytes maintained in meiotic arrest by iAC retained developmental competence when subsequently cultured in iAC-free medium and then fertilized. The [cAMP]i in bovine complexes decreased precipitously upon release from follicles and remained low for the next 125 min. However, the [cAMP]i of the enclosed oocytes did not change. Bovine oocytes commit to undergo meiosis in a progressive manner. Approximately 10% of the oocytes were already committed when aspirated. This proportion increased to 40% at 2 h and 70% at 5 h. Use of two inhibitors of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A provided further evidence that cAMP functions in mediating meiotic arrest in bovine oocytes. Bovine oocytes, therefore, are sensitive to different cAMP concentrations, and are developmentally competent after iAC-induced arrest, and complexes containing oocytes exhibit a decrease in [cAMP]i before spontaneous maturation. These results suggest that maintenance of meiotic arrest by iAC is accomplished through modulation of cellular machinery, and regulation of oocyte maturation by [cAMP]i may be physiologically relevant.

  4. Transient complex peroxisomal interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, Nina A.; Schrader, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria and peroxisomes are ubiquitous subcellular organelles that fulfill essential metabolic functions, rendering them indispensable for human development and health. Both are highly dynamic organelles that can undergo remarkable changes in morphology and number to accomplish cellular needs. While mitochondrial dynamics are also regulated by frequent fusion events, the fusion of mature peroxisomes in mammalian cells remained a matter of debate. In our recent study, we clarified systematically that there is no complete fusion of mature peroxisomes analogous to mitochondria. Moreover, in contrast to key division components such as DLP1, Fis1 or Mff, mitochondrial fusion proteins were not localized to peroxisomes. However, we discovered and characterized novel transient, complex interactions between individual peroxisomes which may contribute to the homogenization of the often heterogeneous peroxisomal compartment, e.g., by distribution of metabolites, signals or other “molecular information” via interperoxisomal contact sites. PMID:23336019

  5. Monotremes provide a key to understanding the evolutionary significance of epididymal sperm maturation.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Brett; Ecroyd, Heath W; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Jones, Russell C

    2011-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that mammalian spermatozoa are infertile when they leave the testes and require a period of maturation in both the epididymis and the female reproductive tract before acquiring the ability to fertilize an oocyte. However, the necessity for such a complex process of posttesticular sperm maturation appears to be unique to mammals because it is well established that these processes do not directly influence the fertilizing ability of the spermatozoa of birds, reptiles, and other lower vertebrates. Because of their key evolutionary position and form of reproduction, we contend that monotremes (platypus and echidna) provide a unique model for resolving why these processes are necessary. In the present review, we examine evidence that the epididymal maturation of monotreme spermatozoa is far less complex than in other mammals. However, a unique feature of the monotreme epididymis lies in its ability to promote the formation of elaborate sperm bundles that serve to greatly enhance the cells' motility. It is suggested that this intriguing cooperative strategy used by monotreme sperm represents an early form of epididymal maturation that appears to have been elaborated upon during the evolution of higher mammals, possibly as an adaptation for sperm competition.

  6. Monotremes provide a key to understanding the evolutionary significance of epididymal sperm maturation.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Brett; Ecroyd, Heath W; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Jones, Russell C

    2011-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that mammalian spermatozoa are infertile when they leave the testes and require a period of maturation in both the epididymis and the female reproductive tract before acquiring the ability to fertilize an oocyte. However, the necessity for such a complex process of posttesticular sperm maturation appears to be unique to mammals because it is well established that these processes do not directly influence the fertilizing ability of the spermatozoa of birds, reptiles, and other lower vertebrates. Because of their key evolutionary position and form of reproduction, we contend that monotremes (platypus and echidna) provide a unique model for resolving why these processes are necessary. In the present review, we examine evidence that the epididymal maturation of monotreme spermatozoa is far less complex than in other mammals. However, a unique feature of the monotreme epididymis lies in its ability to promote the formation of elaborate sperm bundles that serve to greatly enhance the cells' motility. It is suggested that this intriguing cooperative strategy used by monotreme sperm represents an early form of epididymal maturation that appears to have been elaborated upon during the evolution of higher mammals, possibly as an adaptation for sperm competition. PMID:21441429

  7. Performance, growth, and maturity of Nellore bulls.

    PubMed

    Costa e Silva, Luiz Fernando; Valadares Filho, Sebastião de Campos; Detmann, Edenio; Rotta, Polyana Pizzi; Zanetti, Diego; Villadiego, Faider Alberto Castaño; Pellizzoni, Samantha Gusmão; Pereira, Rafael Moura Guimarães

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the dry matter intake (DMI), digestibility, average daily gain (ADG), microbial efficiency, empty body weight (EBW) gain, and body composition of Nellore bulls. Additionally, Nellore bull maturity was estimated, and the prediction equation for DMI, suggested by the Brazilian nutrient requirements system (BR CORTE; Azevêdo et al. 2010), was evaluated. Thirty-three Nellore bulls, with a mean initial weight of 259 ± 25 kg and age of 14 ± 1 months, were used in this study. Five animals were slaughtered at the beginning of the experiment (control group), and the remaining 28 were divided into 4 groups, each slaughtered at 42-day intervals. Their diet was composed of corn silage and concentrate (55:45). The power model was used to estimate muscle tissue, bone tissue, crude protein (CP), mineral matter (MM), and water present in the empty body, while the exponential model was used to estimate adipose tissue and ether extract (EE) present in the empty body. When expressed in kilograms per day, differences were observed (P < 0.05) only for the intake of EE and neutral detergent fiber as a function of feedlot time periods. Although there was a difference in relation to nutrient intake, it did not affect (P > 0.05) digestibility, with the exception of EE digestibility. The equation suggested by BR CORTE correctly estimates the DMI of Nellore bulls. ADG was not affected (P > 0.05) by time spent in the feedlot. No differences were observed (P > 0.05) for microbial efficiency; a mean value of 142 g microbial crude protein/kg total digestible nutrients was achieved. The muscle and bone tissues, CP, MM, and water present in the empty body increased as the animal grew, although at a lower rate. The adipose tissue and EE present in the empty body increased their deposition rate when the animal reached its mature weight. Maturity is defined as when an animal reaches 22 % EE in the empty body, which

  8. Validation of the Psychological Work Maturity Scale in Chinese employees.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jiajin; Wang, Lei

    2010-12-01

    Psychological work maturity is an important concept in situational leadership theory. The present research revised the Psychological Work Maturity Scale for use in Chinese organizations. Three samples of full-time employees (Ns = 205, 266, and 283) from different companies and industries participated in the present study. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that a single-factor structure fit the data. The scale had acceptable reliabilities, convergent and criterion-related validities, and was shown to be an appropriate measure of psychological work maturity in Chinese employees. Maturity differences in several demographic variables were not found, but employees with longer tenure in Sample 2 scored higher on maturity, which shows that psychological work maturity may be dependent on personal development in the interaction with the varying situational factors, especially in the work domain. Implications for research and practice on psychological work maturity in China are discussed.

  9. Maturation of the Language Network: From Inter- to Intrahemispheric Connectivities

    PubMed Central

    Friederici, Angela D.; Brauer, Jens; Lohmann, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Language development must go hand-in-hand with brain maturation. Little is known about how the brain develops to serve language processing, in particular, the processing of complex syntax, a capacity unique to humans. Behavioral reports indicate that the ability to process complex syntax is not yet adult-like by the age of seven years. Here, we apply a novel method to demonstrate that the basic neural basis of language, as revealed by low frequency fluctuation stemming from functional MRI data, differs between six-year-old children and adults in crucial aspects. Although the classical language regions are actively in place by the age of six, the functional connectivity between these regions clearly is not. In contrast to adults who show strong connectivities between frontal and temporal language regions within the left hemisphere, children's default language network is characterized by a strong functional interhemispheric connectivity, mainly between the superior temporal regions. These data indicate a functional reorganization of the neural network underlying language development towards a system that allows a close interplay between frontal and temporal regions within the left hemisphere. PMID:21695183

  10. Impaired oligodendrocyte maturation in preterm infants: Potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, Erik; Heijnen, Cobi J; Benders, Manon J; van Bel, Frank; Fleiss, Bobbi; Gressens, Pierre; Nijboer, Cora H

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is an evolving challenge in neonatal health care. Despite declining mortality rates among extremely premature neonates, morbidity rates remain very high. Currently, perinatal diffuse white matter injury (WMI) is the most commonly observed type of brain injury in preterm infants and has become an important research area. Diffuse WMI is associated with impaired cognitive, sensory and psychological functioning and is increasingly being recognized as a risk factor for autism-spectrum disorders, ADHD, and other psychological disturbances. No treatment options are currently available for diffuse WMI and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are far from being completely understood. Preterm birth is associated with maternal inflammation, perinatal infections and disrupted oxygen supply which can affect the cerebral microenvironment by causing activation of microglia, astrogliosis, excitotoxicity, and oxidative stress. This intricate interplay of events negatively influences oligodendrocyte development, causing arrested oligodendrocyte maturation or oligodendrocyte cell death, which ultimately results in myelination failure in the developing white matter. This review discusses the current state in perinatal WMI research, ranging from a clinical perspective to basic molecular pathophysiology. The complex regulation of oligodendrocyte development in healthy and pathological conditions is described, with a specific focus on signaling cascades that may play a role in WMI. Furthermore, emerging concepts in the field of WMI and issues regarding currently available animal models are put forward. Novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying impeded oligodendrocyte maturation in diffuse WMI may aid the development of novel treatment options which are desperately needed to improve the quality-of-life of preterm neonates. PMID:26655283

  11. The importance of social dimension and maturation stage for the probabilistic maturation reaction norm in Poecilia reticulata.

    PubMed

    Diaz Pauli, B; Pauli, B D; Heino, M

    2013-10-01

    Maturation is an important event in an organism's life history, with important implications on dynamics of both wild and captive populations. The probabilistic maturation reaction norm (PMRN) has emerged as an important method to describe variation in maturation in wild fish. Because most PMRNs are based on age and size only, it is important to understand limitations of these variables in explaining maturation. We experimentally assessed (i) the sensitivity of age- and size-based PMRNs to unaccounted sources of plasticity, (ii) the role of social environment on maturation and (iii) the significance of estimating PMRNs early and late in the maturation process (initiation and completion of maturation, respectively). We reared male guppies (Poecilia reticulata) under laboratory conditions, subjected to two food levels and three different social cues. We found that growth and social environment affected the maturation in a way that could not be accounted for by their effect on age and size. PMRNs estimated for the initiation stage were less plastic (growth differences and social cues influenced the PMRN shape only little) than those for completion. The initiation of maturation is probably closer to the maturation 'decision' and allows determining factors influencing maturation decision most accurately.

  12. Composition of MHC class II-enriched lipid microdomains is modified during maturation of primary dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Setterblad, Niclas; Roucard, Corinne; Bocaccio, Claire; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Charron, Dominique; Mooney, Nuala

    2003-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen presenting cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule expression changes with maturation; immature DCs concentrate MHC class II molecules intracellularly, whereas maturation increases surface expression of MHC class II and costimulatory molecules to optimize antigen presentation. Signal transduction via MHC class II molecules localized in lipid microdomains has been described in B lymphocytes and in the THP-1 monocyte cell line. We have characterized MHC class II molecules throughout human DC maturation with particular attention to their localization in lipid-rich microdomains. Only immature DCs expressed empty MHC class II molecules, and maturation increased the level of peptide-bound heterodimers. Ligand binding to surface human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR induced rapid internalization in immature DCs. The proportion of cell-surface detergent-insoluble glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomain-clustered HLA-DR was higher in immature DCs despite the higher surface expression of HLA-DR in mature DCs. Constituents of HLA-DR containing microdomains included the src kinase Lyn and the cytoskeletal protein tubulin in immature DCs. Maturation modified the composition of the HLA-DR-containing microdomains to include protein kinase C (PKC)-delta, Lyn, and the cytoskeletal protein actin, accompanied by the loss of tubulin. Signaling via HLA-DR redistributed HLA-DR and -DM and PKC-delta as well as enriching the actin content of mature DC microdomains. The increased expression of HLA-DR as a result of DC maturation was therefore accompanied by modification of the spatial organization of HLA-DR. Such regulation could contribute to the distinct responses induced by ligand binding to MHC class II molecules in immature versus mature DCs.

  13. Protein synthesis inhibitors prevent both spontaneous and hormone-dependent maturation of isolated mouse oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, S.M. )

    1990-11-01

    The present study was carried out to examine the role of protein synthesis in mouse oocyte maturation in vitro. In the first part of this study, the effects of cycloheximide (CX) were tested on spontaneous meiotic maturation when oocytes were cultured in inhibitor-free medium. CX reversibly suppressed maturation of oocytes as long as maturation was either initially prevented by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX), or delayed by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). In the second part of this study, the actions of protein synthesis inhibitors were tested on hormone-induced maturation. CEO were maintained in meiotic arrest for 21-22 h with hypoxanthine, and germinal vesicle breakdown (GVB) was induced with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Three different protein synthesis inhibitors (CX, emetine (EM), and puromycin (PUR)) each prevented the stimulatory action of FSH on GVB in a dose-dependent fashion. This was accompanied by a dose-dependent suppression of 3H-leucine incorporation by oocyte-cumulus cell complexes. The action of these inhibitors on FSH- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced GVB was next compared. All three drugs lowered the frequency of GVB in the FSH-treated groups, below even that of the controls (drug + hypoxanthine); the drugs maintained meiotic arrest at the control frequencies in the EGF-treated groups. Puromycin aminonucleoside, an analog of PUR with no inhibitory action on protein synthesis, had no effect. The three inhibitors also suppressed the stimulatory action of FSH on oocyte maturation when meiotic arrest was maintained with the cAMP analog, dbcAMP.

  14. Stability and maturity of biowaste composts derived by small municipalities: Correlation among physical, chemical and biological indices.

    PubMed

    Oviedo-Ocaña, E R; Torres-Lozada, P; Marmolejo-Rebellon, L F; Hoyos, L V; Gonzales, S; Barrena, R; Komilis, D; Sanchez, A

    2015-10-01

    Stability and maturity are important criteria to guarantee the quality of a compost that is applied to agriculture or used as amendment in degraded soils. Although different techniques exist to evaluate stability and maturity, the application of laboratory tests in municipalities in developing countries can be limited due to cost and application complexities. In the composting facilities of such places, some classical low cost on-site tests to monitor the composting process are usually implemented; however, such tests do not necessarily clearly identify conditions of stability and maturity. In this article, we have applied and compared results of stability and maturity tests that can be easily employed on site (i.e. temperature, pH, moisture, electrical conductivity [EC], odor and color), and of tests that require more complex laboratory techniques (volatile solids, C/N ratio, self-heating, respirometric index, germination index [GI]). The evaluation of the above was performed in the field scale using 2 piles of biowaste applied compost. The monitoring period was from day 70 to day 190 of the process. Results showed that the low-cost tests traditionally employed to monitor the composting process on-site, such as temperature, color and moisture, do not provide consistent determinations with the more complex laboratory tests used to assess stability (e.g. respiration index, self-heating, volatile solids). In the case of maturity tests (GI, pH, EC), both the on-site tests (pH, EC) and the laboratory test (GI) provided consistent results. Although, stability was indicated for most of the samples, the maturity tests indicated that products were consistently immature. Thus, a stable product is not necessarily mature. Conclusively, the decision on the quality of the compost in the installations located in developing countries requires the simultaneous use of a combination of tests that are performed both in the laboratory and on-site.

  15. Stability and maturity of biowaste composts derived by small municipalities: Correlation among physical, chemical and biological indices.

    PubMed

    Oviedo-Ocaña, E R; Torres-Lozada, P; Marmolejo-Rebellon, L F; Hoyos, L V; Gonzales, S; Barrena, R; Komilis, D; Sanchez, A

    2015-10-01

    Stability and maturity are important criteria to guarantee the quality of a compost that is applied to agriculture or used as amendment in degraded soils. Although different techniques exist to evaluate stability and maturity, the application of laboratory tests in municipalities in developing countries can be limited due to cost and application complexities. In the composting facilities of such places, some classical low cost on-site tests to monitor the composting process are usually implemented; however, such tests do not necessarily clearly identify conditions of stability and maturity. In this article, we have applied and compared results of stability and maturity tests that can be easily employed on site (i.e. temperature, pH, moisture, electrical conductivity [EC], odor and color), and of tests that require more complex laboratory techniques (volatile solids, C/N ratio, self-heating, respirometric index, germination index [GI]). The evaluation of the above was performed in the field scale using 2 piles of biowaste applied compost. The monitoring period was from day 70 to day 190 of the process. Results showed that the low-cost tests traditionally employed to monitor the composting process on-site, such as temperature, color and moisture, do not provide consistent determinations with the more complex laboratory tests used to assess stability (e.g. respiration index, self-heating, volatile solids). In the case of maturity tests (GI, pH, EC), both the on-site tests (pH, EC) and the laboratory test (GI) provided consistent results. Although, stability was indicated for most of the samples, the maturity tests indicated that products were consistently immature. Thus, a stable product is not necessarily mature. Conclusively, the decision on the quality of the compost in the installations located in developing countries requires the simultaneous use of a combination of tests that are performed both in the laboratory and on-site. PMID:26216503

  16. Mature Microsatellites: Mechanisms Underlying Dinucleotide Microsatellite Mutational Biases in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baptiste, Beverly A.; Ananda, Guruprasad; Strubczewski, Noelle; Lutzkanin, Andrew; Khoo, Su Jen; Srikanth, Abhinaya; Kim, Nari; Makova, Kateryna D.; Krasilnikova, Maria M.; Eckert, Kristin A.

    2013-01-01

    Dinucleotide microsatellites are dynamic DNA sequences that affect genome stability. Here, we focused on mature microsatellites, defined as pure repeats of lengths above the threshold and unlikely to mutate below it in a single mutational event. We investigated the prevalence and mutational behavior of these sequences by using human genome sequence data, human cells in culture, and purified DNA polymerases. Mature dinucleotides (≥10 units) are present within exonic sequences of >350 genes, resulting in vulnerability to cellular genetic integrity. Mature dinucleotide mutagenesis was examined experimentally using ex vivo and in vitro approaches. We observe an expansion bias for dinucleotide microsatellites up to 20 units in length in somatic human cells, in agreement with previous computational analyses of germ-line biases. Using purified DNA polymerases and human cell lines deficient for mismatch repair (MMR), we show that the expansion bias is caused by functional MMR and is not due to DNA polymerase error biases. Specifically, we observe that the MutSα and MutLα complexes protect against expansion mutations. Our data support a model wherein different MMR complexes shift the balance of mutations toward deletion or expansion. Finally, we show that replication fork progression is stalled within long dinucleotides, suggesting that mutational mechanisms within long repeats may be distinct from shorter lengths, depending on the biochemistry of fork resolution. Our work combines computational and experimental approaches to explain the complex mutational behavior of dinucleotide microsatellites in humans. PMID:23450065

  17. Developmental "roots" in mature biological knowledge.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Robert F; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L

    2009-04-01

    Young children tend to claim that moving artifacts and nonliving natural kinds are alive, but neglect to ascribe life to plants. This research tested whether adults exhibit similar confusions when verifying life status in a speeded classification task. Experiment 1 showed that undergraduates encounter greater difficulty (reduced accuracy and increased response times) in determining life status for plants, relative to animals, and for natural and moving nonliving things, relative to artifacts and non-moving things. Experiment 2 replicated these effects in university biology professors. The professors showed a significantly reduced effect size for living things, as compared with the students, but still showed greater difficulty for plants than animals, even as no differences from the students were apparent in their responses to nonliving things. These results suggest that mature biological knowledge relies on a developmental foundation that is not radically overwritten or erased with the profound conceptual changes that accompany mastery of the domain. PMID:19399979

  18. Glioblastoma arising within a mediastinal mature teratoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liping; Jentoft, Mark E; Boland, Jennifer M

    2016-10-01

    Herein we present the case of a 42-year-old man who presented with an anterior mediastinal mass, which was found to represent a mature teratoma. Within it, there was a secondary somatic malignant glial neoplasm with mitotic activity and necrosis, compatible with glioblastoma. He experienced early local recurrence and lymph node metastasis, but is alive and well 3 1/2 years after diagnosis. Neither the teratoma nor the glioblastoma components had abnormalities of chromosome 12, which may implicate that this teratoma was more closely related to those arising along the midline of infants and children (type I germ cell tumor) than to the typically malignant testicular examples, which often contain mixed germ cell elements (type II germ cell tumor). PMID:27327191

  19. Exploration maturity key to ranking search areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    The study area of US Geological Survey Circular 1288, the world outside the US and Canada, was partitioned into 44 countries and country groups. Map figures such as Fig. 2 and graphs similar to Figs. 3 and 4 provide a visual summary of maturity of oil and gas exploration. From 1992 through 2001, exploration data show that in the study area the delineated prospective area expanded at a rate of about 50,000 sq miles/year, while the explored area grew at a rate of 11,000 sq miles/year. The delineated prospective area established by 1970 accounts for less than 40% of total delineated prospective area but contains 75% of the oil discovered to date in the study area. From 1991 through 2000, offshore discoveries accounted for 59% of the oil and 77% of the gas discovered in the study area.

  20. Anabolic actions of Notch on mature bone

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Ping, Yilin; Ma, Meng; Zhang, Demao; Liu, Connie; Zaidi, Samir; Gao, Song; Ji, Yaoting; Lou, Feng; Yu, Fanyuan; Lu, Ping; Stachnik, Agnes; Bai, Mingru; Wei, Chengguo; Zhang, Liaoran; Wang, Ke; Chen, Rong; New, Maria I.; Rowe, David W.; Yuen, Tony; Sun, Li; Zaidi, Mone

    2016-01-01

    Notch controls skeletogenesis, but its role in the remodeling of adult bone remains conflicting. In mature mice, the skeleton can become osteopenic or osteosclerotic depending on the time point at which Notch is activated or inactivated. Using adult EGFP reporter mice, we find that Notch expression is localized to osteocytes embedded within bone matrix. Conditional activation of Notch signaling in osteocytes triggers profound bone formation, mainly due to increased mineralization, which rescues both age-associated and ovariectomy-induced bone loss and promotes bone healing following osteotomy. In parallel, mice rendered haploinsufficient in γ-secretase presenilin-1 (Psen1), which inhibits downstream Notch activation, display almost-absent terminal osteoblast differentiation. Consistent with this finding, pharmacologic or genetic disruption of Notch or its ligand Jagged1 inhibits mineralization. We suggest that stimulation of Notch signaling in osteocytes initiates a profound, therapeutically relevant, anabolic response. PMID:27036007