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Sample records for cunhaporanga granitic complex

  1. Origin of late Archean granite: geochemical evidence from the Vermilion Granitic Complex of northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, W.C.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    The 2,700-Ma Vermilion Granitic Complex of northern Minnesota is a granite-migmatite terrane composed of supracrustal metasedimentary rocks, mafic rocks, tonalitic and granodioritic plutonic rocks, and granite. The metasedimentary rocks are predominantly graywacke, which has been regionally metamorphosed to garnet-sillimanite-muscovite-bearing biotite schist, and has locally undergone anatexis. The mafic rocks form early phases within the complex and are of two types: (1) basaltic amphibolite, and (2) monzodiorite and essexite rich in large ion lithophile elements (LILE). The members of the early plutonic suite form small bodies that intrude the metasedimentary rocks and mafic rocks, producing an early migmatite. The granite is of two distinct varieties: (1) white garnet-muscovite-biotite leucogranite (S-type; Chappell and White 1974) and (2) grayish-pink biotite-magnetite Lac La Croix Granite (I-type). The leucogranite occurs in the early migmatite and in paragneissic portions of the complex, whereas the Lac La Croix Granite is a late-stage intrusive phase that invades the early migmatite and metasediment (producing a late migmatite) and forms a batholith. This study focuses specifically on the origin of granite in the Vermilion Granitic Complex. Chemical mass-balance calculations suggest that the S-type two-mica leucogranite had a metagraywacke source, and that the I-type Lac La Croix Granite formed via partial fusion of calc-alkaline tonalitic material, which may have been similar to rocks of the early plutonic suite. This model is satisfactory for petrogenesis of similar Late Archean post-kinematic granites throughout the Canadian Shield. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Origin of late Archean granite: geochemical evidence from the Vermilion Granitic Complex of northern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Warren C.; Weiblen, P. W.

    1986-07-01

    The 2,700-Ma Vermilion Granitic Complex of northern Minnesota is a granite-migmatite terrane composed of supracrustal metasedimentary rocks, mafic rocks, tonalitic and granodioritic plutonic rocks, and granite. The metasedimentary rocks are predominantly graywacke, which has been regionally metamorphosed to garnet-sillimanite-muscovite-bearing biotite schist, and has locally undergone anatexis. The mafic rocks form early phases within the complex and are of two types: (1) basaltic amphibolite, and (2) monzodiorite and essexite rich in large ion lithophile elements (LILE). The members of the early plutonic suite form small bodies that intrude the metasedimentary rocks and mafic rocks, producing an early migmatite. The granite is of two distinct varieties: (1) white garnet-muscovite-biotite leucogranite ( S-type; Chappell and White 1974) and (2) grayish-pink biotite-magnetite Lac La Croix Granite ( I-type). The leucogranite occurs in the early migmatite and in paragneissic portions of the complex, whereas the Lac La Croix Granite is a late-stage intrusive phase that invades the early migmatite and metasediment (producing a late migmatite) and forms a batholith. This study focuses specifically on the origin of granite in the Vermilion Granitic Complex. Chemical mass-balance calculations suggest that the S-type two-mica leucogranite had a metagraywacke source, and that the I-type Lac La Croix Granite formed via partial fusion of calc-alkaline tonalitic material, which may have been similar to rocks of the early plutonic suite. This model is satisfactory for petrogenesis of similar Late Archean post-kinematic granites throughout the Canadian Shield.

  3. Petrological features of the Santa Teresa Granitic Complex Southeastern Uruguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzio, Rossana; Artur, Antonio Carlos

    1999-09-01

    The Santa Teresa Granitic Complex, located in the north-eastern region of the Rocha Department (Eastern Uruguay), is an epizonal Late-Brasiliano granite intruded in the low-grade metasedimentary sequence of the Rocha Group. Twelve different facies types, each with distinctive structural-petrographic features, were recognized during detailed mapping (1:50,000) of the central-eastern part of the granitic complex and form two magmatic suites. The Santa Teresa Calk-alkaline Suite is composed of mostly porphyritic 3a-3b granites with variable amounts of biotite, sphene, allanite, magnetite and microgranular enclaves and belongs to a middle to high potassium calk-alkaline series with high silica contents. In contrast, the Sierra de la Blanqueada Peraluminous Suite has a great variation of grain size, including 3a-3b granitic facies with variable content of muscovite, biotite, tourmaline, ilmenite and monazite. Zircon morphology was studied in both suites and also shows their calk-alkaline and peraluminous nature. The Santa Teresa Calk-alkaline Suite had a Late- to Post-orogenic setting whereas the Sierra de la Blanqueada Peraluminous Suite was formed during the crustal thickening related to a syn-collisional environment.

  4. Geochemistry and origin of granitic rocks, Scourian Complex, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pride, C.; Muecke, G. K.

    1982-11-01

    Concordant granite sheets from the granulite facies Scourian Complex, N.W. Scotland exhibit the following features: 1) a common planar fabric with their host pyroxene granulites; 2) the presence of an exsolved ternary feldspar phase; 3) a low-pressure, water-saturated minimum composition; 4) K/Rb ratios (450 1,350) distinctly higher than most upper crustal granites but similar to the surrounding granulites; 5) low absolute concentrations of the rare earth elements (REEs), light REE enrichment, and large positive Eu anomalies. It is proposed that the granite sheets have originated by anatexis of gneisses undergoing granulite facies metamorphism — gneisses that were already essentially dry and depleted in incompatible elements. Their unusual trace element chemistry may be explained by either disequilibrium melting and/or sub-solidus reequilibration of the granite sheets with the surrounding gneisses. Isotopic and trace element data suggest that cross-cutting, potash-rich pegmatites represent reworking of the granite sheets during a later amphibolitization.

  5. Age of granites of Wrangel Island metamorphic complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchitskaya, Marina; Sergeev, Sergey; Sokolov, Sergey; Tuchkova, Marianna

    2014-05-01

    Within huge arctic shelf of Eastern-Siberian and Chukchi seas the metamorphic basement (Wrangel complex, Berri Formation) is exposed only on the Wrangel Island. There are different points of views on the age of metamorphic rocks of Wrangel complex (Berri Formation): (1) Neoproterozoic (Kameneva, 1970; Ageev, 1979; Kos'ko et al., 1993, 2003), (2) Devonian (Til'man et al., 1964, 1970; Ganelin, 1989). Metamorphic basement is represented by stratified complex, composed of dislocated metavolcanic, metavolcaniclastic and metasedimentary rocks (schists, metasandstones, metaconglomerated) with single lenses and layers of carbonate rocks (Wrangel Island…, 2003). Among basement rocks in the central part of Wrangel Island there are felsic intrusive bodies. They form small tabular bodies from tens centimeters to 70-80 meters in thickness, rarely dikes and small stocks (up to 20 x 30 m) and are composed of granite-porphyres, rarely muscovite porphyr-like granites and granosyenites (Wrangel Island…, 2003). The age of intrusions allow to determine the age of basement formation. Earlier the age of intrusions was determined by different methods and correlated to the boundary between Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic: K-Ar 570-603 Ma, Pb-Pb 590±50 Ma (S.M. Pavlov, Institute of Precambrian Geology and Geochronology, USSR Academy of Sciences), Rb-Sr 475±31 Ma (I.M.Vasil'eva, Institute of Precambrian Geology and Geochronology, USSR Academy of Sciences), U-Pb 609, 633, 677 Ma (Geological Survey of Canada) (Wrangel Island…, 2003; Kos'ko et al., 1993; Cecile et al., 1991). In the lower part of metamorphic rocks of Wrangel complex there are conformable tabular bodies of gneissosed and foliated granitoides. The latter are meramorphosed and transformed in biotite-muscovite-feldspar-quartz-sericite and muscovite-feldspar-quartz-sericite gneisses and schists, where relics of primary minerals (quartz, plagioclase, potassium feldspar, rarely biotite and muscovite) and equigranular granitic

  6. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of Proterozoic granitic rocks from northern margin of the Chotanagpur Gneissic Complex (CGC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Bhupendra S.; Wanjari, Nishchal; Ahmad, Talat; Chaturvedi, Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    This study presents the geochemical characteristics of granitic rocks located on the northern margin of Chotanagpur Gneissic Complex (CGC), exposed in parts of Gaya district, Bihar and discusses the possible petrogenetic process and source characteristics. These granites are associated with Barabar Anorthosite Complex and Neo-proterozoic Munger-Rajgir group of rocks. The granitic litho-units identified in the field are grey, pink and porphyritic granites. On the basis of geochemical and petrographic characteristics, the grey and pink granites were grouped together as GPG while the porphyritic granites were named as PG. Both GPG and PG are enriched in SiO2, K2O, Na2O, REE (except Eu), Rb, Ba, HFSE (Nb, Y, Zr), depleted in MgO, CaO, Sr and are characterised by high Fe* values, Ga/Al ratios and high Zr saturation temperatures (GPGavg˜ 861 ∘C and PGavg˜ 835 ∘C). The REE patterns for GPG are moderately fractionated with an average (La/Yb)N˜ 4.55 and Eu/Eu* ˜ 0.58, than PG which are strongly fractionated with an average (La/Yb)N˜ 31.86 and Eu/Eu* ˜ 0.75. These features indicate that the granites have an A-type character. On the basis of geochemical data, we conclude that the granites are probably derived from a predominant crustal source with variable mantle involvement in a post-collisional setting.

  7. The geochemical characteristics of Haiyang A-type granite complex in Shandong, eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Ling, Ming-xing; Ding, Xing; Zhang, Hong; Li, Cong-ying; Liu, Dun-yi; Sun, Wei-dong

    2014-07-01

    Haiyang granite complex consists of K-feldspar granite and syenite, with a total exposure area of ~ 600 km2. The K-feldspar granite is metaluminous (A/CNK = 0.70 to 0.99) and the syenite is slightly peraluminous (A/CNK = 1.01 to 1.10), both of which have typical characteristics of A-type granite with high total alkali contents and FeOT/(FeOT + MgO) ratios. Zircon U-Pb age are 116.8 ± 1.7 Ma and 115.8 ± 2.2 Ma, for the K-feldspar granite and the syenite, respectively. This is consistent with field observation that the syenite intruded into the K-feldspar granite. Varied zircon O isotope (5.65-7.78‰ for K-feldspar granite and 4.68-7.08‰ for syenite) with peak values that are marginally higher than those of mantle zircon reflects important mantle contributions. These together with large variation of zircon εHf(t) values of K-feldspar granite (- 22.4 to - 15.6) and syenite (- 24.6 to - 13.5), can best be explained by the involvement of at least two components, e.g., enriched lithospheric mantle +/- subducted materials, and upwelling asthenosphere. Apatite has right decline REE pattern. The apatite from K-feldspar granite has higher Cl contents than those of syenite, implying more influence from a subduction released fluid in K-feldspar granite source. This distinction is supported by the systematically higher oxygen fugacity of K-feldspar granite as indicated by zircon Ce4 +/Ce3 + ratios. In the Yb/Ta-Y/Nb, Ce/Nb-Y/Nb diagrams, both K-feldspar granite and syenite plot in A1-type, with K-feldspar granite plotting closer to A2. In the Nb-Y-3Ga and Nb-Y-Ce charts, syenite plots near the boundary between A1 and A2, whereas some K-feldspar granite samples plot in A2 field, indicating a tendency of transition originally from A2 to A1. In general A1 granites form in intraplate settings, whereas A2 granite forms in post-collision. It is likely that mantle components metasomatized by subduction released fluids are easier to be partially melted, forming K-feldspar granite

  8. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of a peralkaline granite complex from the Midian Mountains, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, N. B. W.; Marriner, G. F.

    1980-10-01

    A zoned intrusion with a biotite granodiorite core and arfvedsonite granite rim represents the source magma for an albitised granite plug near its eastern margin and radioactive siliceous veins along its western margin. A study of selected REE and trace elements of samples from this complex reveals that the albitised granite plug has at least a tenfold enrichment in Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta, Y, Th, U and Sr, and a greatly enhanced heavy/light REE ratio compared with the peralkaline granite. The siliceous veins have even stronger enrichment of these trace elements, but a heavy/light REE ratio and negative eu anomaly similar to the peralkaline granite. It is suggested that the veins were formed from acidic volatile activity and the plug from a combination of highly fractionated magma and co-existing alkaline volatile phase. The granodiorite core intrudes the peralkaline granite and has similar trace element geochemistry. The peralkaline granite is probably derived from the partial melting of the lower crust in the presence of halide-rich volatiles, and the granodiorite from further partial melting under volatile-free conditions.

  9. Geochemical characteristics and origin of the Lebowa Granite Suite, Bushveld Complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, M.; Barker, F.; Hunter, D.; Knight, R.

    1996-01-01

    rocks and formed siliceous melting-precipitating cells (SMPCs) (see, e.g., Huppert and Sparks, 1988). This mass of siliceous magma blocked ascent of denser mafic magmas to higher levels in the crust; hence the RLS is confined to a series of circumferential lobes around the periphery of the Bushveld Complex. Diapirs rose from the SMPCs to form sheets of Nebo Granite, which ascended in the center of the Bushveld Complex and spread laterally along the upper contacts of the RLS lenses.

  10. The Neocene Magmatism in South Gangdese, Tibet and its tectonic significance: Evidences from Namuru Granitic Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, G.; Mo, X.

    2011-12-01

    There are lots of granitic intrusions in the western Gangdese, Tibet. Namuru granite complex is one of the typical intrusions with various gabbro inclusions and mafic micro-granular enclaves (shortly MME). Field investigation has found the gradually transitional relationship between the gabbro inclusions and granite with abundant MMEs. It is lithologically biotite granite and few granodiorite for Namuru complex. The chemical analyses show that the SiO2 varies from 65-76%, average 73% for the granite and 48.5-55.6%, average 51%. The total alkali contents are high in both the granite (K2O+Na2O= 5.50%~8.71%) and mafic rocks (4.42~6.7%). The REE pattern is flat and slightly declining with no clearly Eu anomaly with the total content from up to 284.75ppm and lowest of 105.35ppm in the granite and up to 120.38ppm, and lowest 72.48×10-6 in the gabbro rocks. The normalized trace element spider is quite similar in the both with K element enriched and Nb, Ti depleted. Zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating for 4 samples both granite and gabbro inclusions gave the age of 46.11±0.78Ma, 45.47±0.4Ma, 46.7±2.9Ma and 45.4±1.4Ma respectively, falling into a range of 45.4-46.7Ma of crystalling age. All the characters indicated that magma mixing had happened between granite and mafic magma during the Neocene (45.4-46.7Ma), forming the vast granitic and gabbro rocks as an important magmatic event in western Gangdese. It happens to be consistent with the duration (40.0-52.5Ma) for the known magma mixing and underplating in eastern to middle Gangdese, such as Quxu and Xigarze. It probably represents the giant magma event with magma mixing and underplating in Gangdese during early Neocene. Therefore it was inferred, on the basis of magmatic rocks, that the collision between India-Eurasian continents are acting simultaneously in both eastern and western Gangdese in Eocene, resulting in basaltic magma underplating below and then magma mixing along whole Gangdese belt and formation of the

  11. Southern complex: geology, geochemistry, mineralogy, and mineral chemistry of selected uranium- and thorium-rich granites

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Four major rock groups are defined in the Southern Complex: the Bell Creek Granite (BCG), the Clotted Granitoids (CGR), the Albite Granite (AGR), and the Migmatite Complex. Metatexites of the Migmatite Complex are the oldest rocks and include paleosome of a metasedimentary and metavolcanic protolith represented by Banded Iron Formation, Banded Amphibolite, and Banded Gneisses, and interlayered or crosscutting leucogranites. The CGR span the range from metatexite to diatexite and represent in-situ partial melting of metapelitic layers in the protolith during intrusion of the BCG. The BCG cuts the migmatites, is locally cut by the CGR, and was derived by partial melting of a dominantly metasedimentary protolith at some depth below the presently exposed migmatites during a regional tectonothermal event. The Albite Granite is a 2km diameter, muscovite-fluorite-columbite-bearing intrusive stock that cuts all other major units. The thorium history of the BCG is a function of the history of monazite. The thorium history of the CGR is also dominated by monazite but the thorium content of this unit cannot be entirely accounted for by original restite monazite. The uranium history of the BCG and CGR was dominated by magmatic differentiation and post magmatic, metamorphic and supergene redistributions and is largely independent of the thorium history. The thorium and uranium history of the AGR was dominated by magmatic/deuteric processes unlike the BCG and CGR.

  12. Abundance and distribution of boron in the Hauzenberg (Bavaria) granite complex

    SciTech Connect

    Sauerer, A.; Troll, G. )

    1990-01-01

    Hercynian S-type granites from the Hauzenberg igneous complex show a range of boron concentration from 1 to 12 ppm. The whole-rock boron data are not significantly correlated with concentrations of other trace elements (Zr, Rb, Ba, Sr, Ni, V, Co, Cu, Zn, F); neither is boron correlated with the major elements (except with sodium) or with the differentiation index (DI). The boron budget in the rock-forming minerals (plagioclase, alkali feldspar, quartz, biotite, muscovite) of the tourmaline-free granites reveals that the highest concentrations of boron occur in muscovite, whereas the greatest amount of boron is incorporated in plagioclase (57-69%) due to its high modal amount. Boron in plagioclase increases with the extent of of sericitization (obtained by X-ray diffractometry). Muscovite in a pegmatite contains more than 50% of the total boron. The areal distribution of boron within the complex is neither uniform nor random; an increase of boron concentrations from granodioritic to granitic rocks is indicated, whereas the late differentiates are depleted in boron.

  13. Origin and interaction of some alkalic and silicic plutons in the Vermilion Granitic Complex, NE Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, G.W.; Nabelek, P.I.; Bauer, R.L.; Glascock, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    Alkalic gabbros and tonalites comprise a significant portion of the Archaean crust in the Vermilion Granitic Complex of NE Minnesota. The origin of these and associated rocks has been modeled using major and trace element approaches. Samples of the alkalic gabbro collected from three different intrusions have similar major element, REE, and transition metal concentrations. The REE patterns of these rocks can be modeled as the result of 1% to 3% melting of an undepleted garnet herzolite mantle with REE concentrations three times that of chondrites. However, their Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//CaO ratios of 2 - 3, Sr content of 900-1400 ppm and Ba of 100 - 1600 ppm suggest that the source may have been an enriched, metasomatized mantle. The hornblendites associated with these alkalic rocks have REE patterns which are consistent with crystallization and accumulation from the gabbroic magma. Major and trace element modeling suggest that the granitic dikes which are common throughout the area may be residual liquids formed by 60% crystallization of plagioclase, biotite, hornblende and apatite from the nearby tonalites such as the Burntside of Wakemup Bay plutons. Porphyritic hornblende monzonites composed of centimeter sized hornblende crystals floating in a granitic matrix occur locally. The field relations as well as the major and trace element data are consistent with the formation of these monzonitic rocks by mixing of the granite with partially consolidated hornblendite. These results suggest a complex interaction between alkalic gabbros and tonalites involving fractionation and mixing during the development of the Archaean crust of NE Minnesota.

  14. Palaeomagnetism of the Ezhimala Granite-Granophyre-Gabbro Complex, Southwest Coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Mathew; Perrin, Mireille; Radhakrishna, Tallavjhala; Dautria, Jean Marie; Camps, Pierre; Balasubramonium, G.

    2010-05-01

    The igneous complex at Ezhimala, southwestern coast of India, consists mainly of granite, granophyre and gabbro and is cut by dolerites. It occurs as a linear ridge with a NNW-SSE trend. This complex is considered to be Precambrian in age, following Rb-Sr determinations at 678 Ma. Paleomagnetic samples were collected from one site in the doleritic dyke and six sites in the complex, out of which three are from gabbro, two from granophyre and one from granite. The high-temperature susceptibility measurements on selected specimens from each site have indicated magnetite as the main carrier of magnetization. Samples were subjected to detailed step-wise alternating field demagnetisation. After removal of a secondary viscous component, a characteristic mean remanent magnetization could be estimated for all samples. The mean directions per sites are very well defined with 95 confidence circles between 2.5° and 5.0° (kappa between 243 and 580). The mean paleomagnetic direction associated with the complex corresponds to D/I = 308.6/-58.9 (k = 473 and α95 = 3.1°) with a paleopole position at 66.0°W/19.4°N. This direction is almost identical to the direction obtained from the cross-cutting doleritic dyke with D/I = 301.8/-62.9 (kappa = 755 and α95 = 1.9°), and similar to 90 Ma poles derived from other areas in south western India (St. Mary Group of Islands, leucogabbro dykes of central and north Kerala and dykes of the Coimbatore-Agali area). Therefore palaeomagnetic analysis of the complex strongly suggests a Cretaceous age for the Ezhimala complex and would indicate a much more widespread magmatic activity around 90 Ma along the south western coast of India. Geochemical studies and Ar-Ar dating of the complex are in progress to confirm the paleomagnetic observation.

  15. The Paleoproterozoic Singo granite in south-central Uganda revealed as a nested igneous ring complex using geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Katumwehe, Andrew B.; Atekwana, Estella A.; Le Pera, Alan K.; Achang, Mercy

    2016-04-01

    We used high-resolution airborne magnetic and radiometric data and satellite gravity data to investigate the form of occurrence of the Paleoproterozoic Singo granite in west-central Uganda. This granitic body covers an area of ∼700 km2, intrudes Paleoproterozoic crystalline rocks and overlain by Paleoproterozoic-Mesoproterozoic sedimentary rocks, both of which belong to the Rwenzori terrane, and it is host to hydrothermally-formed economic minerals such as gold and tungsten. Our analysis provided unprecedented geometrical details of the granitic body and revealed the following: (1) the margins of the Singo granite are characterized by a higher magnetic signature compared to the interior of the granitic body as well as the surroundings. These anomalies are apparent in both the total magnetic field and horizontal derivative images and define eight overlapping ring features. (2) the depth continuation of these magnetic anomalies define outward but steeply-dipping features as indicated by the tilt images extracted from the airborne magnetic data. This is further supported by forward modeling of the magnetic and gravity data. (3) the Singo granite is characterized by relatively high and evenly-distributed equivalent concentration of Uranium (eU) and Thorium (eTh) compared to the surroundings and this is apparent in the Potassium (K)-eTh-eU radiometric ternary image. (4) the granitic body is defined by a gravity low anomaly that persisted to a depth of three km as shown by the Bouguer anomaly image and its five km upward continuation. We used these observations to identify this granitic body as a nested igneous ring complex and we refer to it as the Singo Igneous Ring Complex (SIRC). We further interpreted the eight ring structures as individual igneous ring complexes aligned in an E-W and NE-SW direction and these were developed due to repeated calderas collapse. Additionally, we interpreted the ring-shaped magnetic anomalies as due to hydrothermally-altered margins

  16. The Early Jurassic Bokan Mountain peralkaline granitic complex (southeastern Alaska): geochemistry, petrogenesis and rare-metal mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dostal, Jaroslav; Kontak, Daniel J.; Karl, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The Early Jurassic (ca. 177 Ma) Bokan Mountain granitic complex, located on southern Prince of Wales Island, southernmost Alaska, cross-cuts Paleozoic igneous and metasedimentary rocks of the Alexander terrane of the North American Cordillera and was emplaced during a rifting event. The complex is a circular body (~3 km in diameter) of peralkaline granitic composition that has a core of arfvedsonite granite surrounded by aegirine granite. All the rock-forming minerals typically record a two-stage growth history and aegirine and arfvedsonite were the last major phases to crystalize from the magma. The Bokan granites and related dikes have SiO2 from 72 to 78 wt. %, high iron (FeO (tot) ~3-4.5 wt. %) and alkali (8-10 wt.%) concentrations with high FeO(tot)/(FeO(tot)+MgO) ratios (typically >0.95) and the molar Al2O3/(Na2O+K2O) ratio Nd values which are indicative of a mantle signature. The parent magma is inferred to be derived from an earlier metasomatized lithospheric mantle by low degrees of partial melting and generated the Bokan granitic melt through extensive fractional crystallization. The Bokan complex hosts significant rare-metal (REE, Y, U, Th, Nb) mineralization that is related to the late-stage crystallization history of the complex which involved the overlap of emplacement of felsic dikes, including pegmatite bodies, and generation of orthomagmatic fluids. The abundances of REE, HFSE, U and Th as well as Pb and Nd isotopic values of the pluton and dikes were modified by orthomagmatic hydrothermal fluids highly enriched in the strongly incompatible trace elements, which also escaped along zones of structural weakness to generate rare-metal mineralization. The latter was deposited in two stages: the first relates to the latest stage of magma emplacement and is associated with felsic dikes that intruded along the faults and shear deformations, whereas the second stage involved ingress of hydrothermal fluids that both remobilized and enriched the initial

  17. Petrography and physicomechanical properties of rocks from the Ambela granitic complex, NW Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Arif, Mohammad; Bukhari, S Wajid Hanif; Muhammad, Noor; Sajid, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Petrography and physicomechanical properties of alkali granites, alkali quartz syenite, and nepheline syenite from Ambela, NW Pakistan, have been investigated. Whereas the alkali quartz syenite and most of the alkali granites are megaporphyritic, the nepheline syenite and some of the alkali granites are microporphyritic. Their phenocryst shape and size and abundance of groundmass are also different. The values of unconfined compressive strength (UCS) are the lowest and highest for megaporphyritic alkali granite and alkali quartz syenite, respectively. However, all the four rock types are moderately strong. Correspondingly, their specific gravity and water absorption values are within the permissible range for use as construction material. The UCS for the alkali quartz syenite is the highest, most probably because (i) it has roughly equal amounts of phenocryst and groundmass, (ii) it displays maximum size contrast between phenocryst and groundmass, (iii) its phenocrysts are highly irregular, and (iv) it contains substantial amounts of quartz.

  18. Petrography and Physicomechanical Properties of Rocks from the Ambela Granitic Complex, NW Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Mohammad; Bukhari, S. Wajid Hanif; Muhammad, Noor; Sajid, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Petrography and physicomechanical properties of alkali granites, alkali quartz syenite, and nepheline syenite from Ambela, NW Pakistan, have been investigated. Whereas the alkali quartz syenite and most of the alkali granites are megaporphyritic, the nepheline syenite and some of the alkali granites are microporphyritic. Their phenocryst shape and size and abundance of groundmass are also different. The values of unconfined compressive strength (UCS) are the lowest and highest for megaporphyritic alkali granite and alkali quartz syenite, respectively. However, all the four rock types are moderately strong. Correspondingly, their specific gravity and water absorption values are within the permissible range for use as construction material. The UCS for the alkali quartz syenite is the highest, most probably because (i) it has roughly equal amounts of phenocryst and groundmass, (ii) it displays maximum size contrast between phenocryst and groundmass, (iii) its phenocrysts are highly irregular, and (iv) it contains substantial amounts of quartz. PMID:23861654

  19. Dynamic Topology and Spatio-Temporal Complexity of Stick-Slip Events in Natural Faulted Westerly Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, H.; Thompson, B. D.; Young, R.

    2011-12-01

    The patterns of acoustic events prior to and after a stick-slip event are transformed to complex networks and the characteristics of the networks are measured. The patterns are the result of acoustic emission monitoring through loading a cylindrical sample of Westerly granite containing a natural fault [1].Two approaches are implemented in construction of the networks. In the first approach the network is constructed based on nearest neighbour events while the interactions of the main fault with the second and third faults are inspected through analyzing the spatial communities of the networks. The second approach uses a network method on phase space of time series (i.e., constructing a smooth manifold) obtained from the waveforms of over occurrence rank of events [2]. With the later implementation, we characterize the source mechanism of events while we compare the characteristics of the obtained networks (i.e., motif distribution and eigenvector of Laplacian) with the inferred source mechanism from the inverse moment tensor approach. Our results show the correlation of motifs rank evolution with source mechanism. Furthermore, with respect to the shape of triangles (as well as stretching and folding) over spatial complex networks and based on the first approach, the 3 point nodes motif distributions are extended to consider possible statistical geometry of events. Thus, the spatio-temporal complexity and possible coupling of events in time and space in terms of network parameters is inferred. We compare our results with the recent analysis of networks motifs from pure shear rupture associated with sudden variation of contact strings [3]. Keyword:, Stick-sllip; Westerly granite, Acoustic Emission Patterns; Complex Networks, and Motifs Ref. [1] Thompson, B.D., D.A. Lockner and R.P. Young, Premonitory acoustic emissions and stick slip in natural and smooth faulted Westerly granite,J. Geophysical Research, Vol 114, B02205, doi: 10.1029/2008jb005753, 2009. [2] J. F

  20. Hydrothermal metasomatism of a peralkaline granite pegmatite, Khaldzan Buragtag massif, Mongolian Altai; complex evolution of REE-Nb minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagiński, Bogusław; Jokubauskas, Petras; Domańska-Siuda, Justyna; Kartashov, Pavel; Macdonald, Ray

    2016-09-01

    The low-temperature hydrothermal alteration of certain rare-metal minerals is recorded in a quartz-epidote metasomatite from the Tsakhirin Khuduk occurrence in the Khaldzan-Buragtag Nb-REE-Zr deposit, Mongolian Altai. A peralkaline granitic pegmatite was metasomatized by hydrothermal fluids released from associated intrusions, with the formation of, inter alia, chevkinite-(Ce), fergusonite-(Nd) and minerals of the epidote group. The textural pattern indicates recrystallization and coarsening of these phases. Later, low-temperature alteration by fluids resulted in the chevkinite-(Ce) being replaced by complex titanite-TiO2 -cerite-(Ce)-hingganite-hydroxylbastnasite-( Ce) assemblages. Calcite formed late-stage veins and patches. The hydrous fluids were poor in F and CO2 but had high Ca contents.

  1. Measurement and interpretation of strain in the syntectonic Solı´s de Mataojo Granitic Complex, Uruguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyhantçabal, Pedro; Heimann, Adriana; Miranda, Sara

    2001-05-01

    The Neoproterozoic Solı´s de Mataojo Granitic Complex is an intrusive body, elongate north-south, emplaced in the Sarandı´ del Yı´-Arroyo Solı´s Grande Shear Zone. In the present work, a quantification of the magmatic strain has been made by analysis of fabric, enclave geometry and minor structures. Structural evidence indicates that deformation began in the magmatic state and continued through the sub-solidus stage. The observed distribution of magmatic foliations and lineations, the fabric, the geometry of the enclaves and the late to post-magmatic structures, are related to a non-coaxial flattening regime that took place after the emplacement, and late in the magmatic history. These structures reveal that magmatic strain involved a shortening of the order of 80% with a simple shear component ( γ) between 3 and 4.5. The solid-state deformation records an additional mean γ of 2.7.

  2. Metasedimentary melting in the formation of charnockite: Petrological and zircon U-Pb-Hf-O isotope evidence from the Darongshan S-type granitic complex in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Shu-Juan; Li, Xian-Hua; Huang, Hui-Qing; Deng, Xi-Guang

    2015-12-01

    Charnockites are Opx-bearing igneous rocks commonly found in high-grade metamorphic terranes. Despite being volumetrically minor, they show a wide range in both bulk geochemistry and intensive parameters. They form a characteristic component of the AMCG (anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-granite) suite, but their association with typical S-type granites is less well-known. The Darongshan S-type granitic complex (DSGC) in Guangxi Province, southern China, contains granites varying in mafic silicate mineral assemblages from Bt + Crd (Darongshan suite) to Opx + Grt + Bt + Crd (Jiuzhou suite) and Opx + Crd ± Bt (Taima suite), corresponding to a geochemical transition from magnesian calc-alkalic to ferroan calc-alkalic. However, its genesis, even the accurate age of intrusion, remains highly contentious despite intensive research. In order to understand the genesis of charnockite and its genetic relationship with S-type granite; here, we first determined zircon U-Pb ages of each suite using a SIMS on the basis of a detailed petrological study. Zircon U-Pb ages show that all suites of the complex were emplaced contemporaneously at ca. 249 Ma. Monazite apparent U-Pb ages are indistinguishable from zircon U-Pb ages within analytical error. Further in situ zircon Hf-O isotope analyses reveal that the granitic complex was dominantly derived from reduced melting metasedimentary rocks (δ18Ozircon = ca. 11‰; εHf(t)zircon = ca. - 10; Δlog FMQ ≤ 0; Mn in apatite oxybarometer) with rare material input from the mantle. The variation in δ18O (7.8‰-12.9‰) is more likely a result of hybridization, whereas that in εHf(t) (- 31.9 to - 1.8) is a result of both hybridization and disequilibrium melting. The variation in mineralogy and geochemistry may be interpreted as a result of entrainment of peritectic garnets from biotite-dehydration melting. Nevertheless, heat input from mantle through basaltic intrusion/underplating is considered to play a major role in high

  3. Zircon morphology and U-Pb geochronology of seven metaluminous and peralkaline post-orogenic granite complexes of the Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, John Nicholas; Stoeser, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    The U-Pb zircon method was used to determine the ages of seven metaluminous-to-peralkaline post-orogenic granites located throughout the Late Proterozoic Arabian Shield of Saudi Arabia. Zircons from the metaluminous rocks are prismatic, with length-to-width ratios of about 2-4:1 and small pyramidal terminations. In contrast, zircons from three of the four peralkaline complexes either lack well developed prismatic faces (are pseudo-octahedral) or are anhedral. Some of the zircons from the peralkaline granites contain inherited radiogenic lead. This complicates interpretation of the isotopic data and. in many cases, may make the U-Pb method unsuitable for determining the age of a peralkaline granite. Zircons in the metaluminous granites do not contain inheritance and thus, best-fit chords calculated through the data have upper concordia intercepts that indicate the age of intrusion, and lower intercepts that indicate simple episodic lead loss. The results show that these granites were emplaced during multiple intrusive episodes from 670 to 510 Ma (Late Proterozoic to Cambrian).

  4. Bokan Mountain peralkaline granitic complex, Alexander terrane (southeastern Alaska): evidence for Early Jurassic rifting prior to accretion with North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dostal, Jaroslav; Karl, Susan M.; Keppie, J. Duncan; Kontak, Daniel J.; Shellnutt, J. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The circular Bokan Mountain complex (BMC) on southern Prince of Wales Island, southernmost Alaska, is a Jurassic peralkaline granitic intrusion about 3 km in diameter that crosscuts igneous and metasedimentary rocks of the Alexander terrane. The BMC hosts significant rare metal (rare earth elements, Y, U, Th, Zr, and Nb) mineralization related to the last stage of BMC emplacement. U–Pb (zircon) and 40Ar/39Ar (amphibole and whole-rock) geochronology indicates the following sequence of intrusive activity: (i) a Paleozoic basement composed mainly of 469 ± 4 Ma granitic rocks; (ii) intrusion of the BMC at 177 ± 1 Ma followed by rapid cooling through ca. 550 °C at 176 ± 1 Ma that was synchronous with mineralization associated with vertical, WNW-trending pegmatites, felsic dikes, and aegirine–fluorite veins and late-stage, sinistral shear deformation; and (iii) intrusion of crosscutting lamprophyre dikes at >150 Ma and again at ca. 105 Ma. The peralkaline nature of the BMC and the WNW trend of associated dikes suggest intrusion during NE–SW rifting that was followed by NE–SW shortening during the waning stages of BMC emplacement. The 177 Ma BMC was synchronous with other magmatic centres in the Alexander terrane, such as (1) the Dora Bay peralkaline stock and (2) the bimodal Moffatt volcanic suite located ~30 km north and ~100 km SE of the BMC, respectively. This regional magmatism is interpreted to represent a regional extensional event that precedes deposition of the Late Jurassic – Cretaceous Gravina sequence that oversteps the Wrangellia and Alexander exotic accreted terranes and the Taku and Yukon–Tanana pericratonic terranes of the Canadian–Alaskan Cordillera.

  5. Contrasting zircon morphology and UPb systematics in peralkaline and metaluminous post-orogenic granite complexes of the Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikof, J.N.; Stoeser, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    Uzircon ages are reported for seven metaluminous-to-peralkaline post-orogenic granites from the Late Proterozoic Arabian Shield of Saudi Arabia. Zircons from the metaluminous rocks are prismatic, with length-to-width ratios of ??? 2-4: 1 and small pyramidal terminations. In contrast, zircons from three of the four peralkaline complexes either lack well-developed prismatic faces (are pseudo-octahedral) or are anhedral. Some zircons from the peralkaline granites contain inherited radiogenic Pb and have very high common Pb contents (206Pb/204Pb < 150), making the UPb method poorly suited for determining the age of these rocks. Zircons in the metaluminous granites do not contain inheritance and yield well-defined concordia intercepts. The span of ages of the seven complexes (670-470 Ma) indicates that post-orogenic granitic magmatism was not a singular event in the Arabian Shield but rather occurred as multiple intrusive episodes from the Late Proterozoic to the Middle Ordovician. ?? 1989.

  6. Vertical structure of a caldera-filling pyroclastics and post-caldera granitic sill: the Middle Miocene Kumano Acidic Rocks emplaced in the Paleogene Shimanto accretionary complex, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, T.; Geshi, N.; Oikawa, T.; Shinjoe, H.; Miura, D.; Koizumi, N.

    2009-04-01

    A 600m all-core drilling penetrated a volcano-plutonic complex associated with middle Miocene Kumano caldera, Kii Peninsula, Southwest Japan. It shows us the vertical cross section of the caldera-filling pyroclastic deposit and granitic sill intruded inside the caldera. The drilling site is located in the southern rim of the north body of Kumano igneous complex. The drilling core consists of the granite porphyry intrusion (Kumano Granite Porphyry) in the upper part (from surface to 464.3 m depth) and the welded tuff (Owase-Shirahama Pyroclastic Rocks) beneath them (464.3 and 600 m depth), which are associated with the caldera formation. The welded tuff in the core sample consists mainly of well-sorted coarse-grained volcanic ash of crystal fragments and lithic fragments. Subordinate amount of pumice fragment more than 10 cm across are scattered. Though most part of the welded tuff in the core sample is massive as observed in the surface outcrops, some parts show remarkable bedding structure. These structural characters suggest that the welded tuff is a pile of many flow units with several 10s meters thick each, which consists of basal pumice-concentrated bed, main massive tuff, and upper bedding part. The lower intrusion boundary of the Kumano Granite Porphyry is exposed at 464.3 m deep, where the granite porphyry intrudes into the host welded tuff with about 10 m thick chilled margin, in which the granite porphyry has very-fine groundmass. The groundmass texture of the granite porphyry shows systematic variation with the distance from the intrusion contact. Within about 20 m from the contact, the groundmass consists of very-fine crystals and entirely shows volcanic rock texture. For 150 m above them, the groundmass consists mainly of quartz and plagioclase and shows equigranular texture. In the upper part (less than 300m deep), the groundmass shows graphic texture with quartz and alkali feldspar. The vertical variation of the groundmass texture indicates upward

  7. Role of magma pressure, tectonic stress and crystallization progress in the emplacement of syntectonic granites. The A-type Estrela Granite Complex (Carajás Mineral Province, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, C. E. M.; Barbey, P.; Boullier, A. M.

    2001-12-01

    The Archaean, syntectonic, A-type Estrela Granite Complex (Carajás Mineral Province, Brazil) consists of three plutons emplaced in a greenstone sequence under low-pressure conditions (180< P<310 MPa). It is composed mainly of annite-, ferropargasite (±hedenbergite)- and ilmenite-bearing monzogranites. The contact aureole is affected by a subvertical penetrative schistosity conformable with the limits of the plutons. Meso- to microstructures and mineral reactions in the granites indicate that deformation occurred in a continuum from above-solidus to low- T subsolidus conditions. Two distinct planar structures are observed: (i) a concentrical primary foliation (S 0) corresponding to rhythmic, isomodal, phase layering associated with a faint grain shape fabric; it is horizontal in the centre and vertical towards the edges of the plutons; and (ii) a steep to subvertical foliation (S 1) associated with the deformation of S 0 and accompanied with emplacement of synplutonic dykes and veins of leucocratic granites and pegmatites. Emplacement, differentiation and consolidation of the Estrela Granite Complex are considered to result from a continuous evolution under decreasing temperatures in a single-stage strained crust (transpression), with two main periods. (1) The first period is controlled by body forces, and it corresponds to inflation with magma ponding. As long as the rheology is melt dominated, magma pressure is the critical parameter and almost no strain is recorded. With decreasing T, magmas crystallize and differentiate leading to a concentrical magmatic phase layering. The growing magmatic bodies are mechanically decoupled from the country rocks and their evolution depends on internal magma chamber processes. (2) For higher amount of crystallization (residual melt fraction F<0.5), the role of magma pressure becomes insignificant. Establishment of a continuous crystal framework leads to the coupling of plutons with their surroundings, and deformation in

  8. LA-SF-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb geochronology of granitic rocks from the central Bundelkhand greenstone complex, Bundelkhand craton, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sanjeet K.; Verma, Surendra P.; Oliveira, Elson P.; Singh, Vinod K.; Moreno, Juan A.

    2016-03-01

    The central Bundelkhand greenstone complex in Bundelkhand craton, northern India is one of the well exposed Archaean supracrustal amphibolite, banded iron formation (BIF) and felsic volcanic rocks (FV) and associated with grey and pink porphyritic granite, tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG). Here we present high precision zircon U-Pb geochronological data for the pinkish porphyritic granites and TTG. The zircons from the grey-pinkish porphyritic granite show three different concordia ages of 2531 ± 21 Ma, 2516 ± 38 Ma, and 2514 ± 13 Ma, which are interpreted as the best estimate of the magmatic crystallization age for the studied granites. We also report the concordia age of 2669 ± 7.4 Ma for a trondhjemite gneiss sample, which is so far the youngest U-Pb geochronological data for a TTG rock suite in the Bundelkhand craton. This TTG formation at 2669 Ma is also more similar to Precambrian basement TTG gneisses of the Aravalli Craton of north western India and suggests that crust formation in the Bundelkhand Craton occurred in a similar time-frame to that recorded from the Aravalli craton of the North-western India.

  9. Pluton-dyke relationships in a Variscan granitic complex from AMS and gravity modelling. Inception of the extensional tectonics in the South Armorican Domain (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrillot, P.; Faure, M.; Martelet, G.; Chen, Y.; Augier, R.

    2011-11-01

    The Carnac granitic Complex (South Armorican Domain, Western France) was emplaced during Late Carboniferous times in the deepest Variscan unit, roofed by two major extensional shear zones. Through the acquisition and interpretation of field data, Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility and gravity data, emphasized by petrological and structural observations, we address the emplacement model and possible magmatic processes involved between dyking to massive plutonism in a synkinematic context. Gravity modelling highlights an overall eastward thinning of the pluton, and several deep zones in the western part of the complex, interpreted as the pluton feeder zones. The internal granitic fabric, developed in a sub-solidus state, shows marked planar-linear anisotropy, consistent with a vertical shortening in the WNW-ESE regional stretching regime and eastward magma spreading. This study documents the occurrence of numerous NNE-SSW trending dykes within the eastern part of the pluton, suggesting that this granitic Complex formed by the coalescence of dykes oriented perpendicular to the regional stretching direction, and thus interpreted as large-scale “tension gashes”. The synkinematic character of the Carnac Complex intrusion, recently dated at ca. 319 ± 6 Ma, thus times the inception of the late-orogenic extensional deformation experienced in the whole South Armorican Domain.

  10. The relationship between forceful and passive emplacement: The interplay between tectonic strain and magma supply in the Rosses Granitic Complex, NW Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Carl

    2009-03-01

    The Rosses Granitic Complex, NW Ireland, part of the late Caledonian (c. 400 Ma) Donegal Batholith, provides the opportunity to study the interplay between relative tectonic strain and magma supply rates in the wall of a major tectonic shear zone. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements, structural analysis and examination of key intrusive relationships were used to assess the accommodation of magma, associated deformation and magma flow pathways in this complex. In this case the varying emplacement styles, switching from forceful to passive, indicate that relative tectonic strain and magma supply rates were not constant. In the earliest component (a suite of microgranite sheets), AMS reveals subtle fabrics discordant to the sheet margins and is interpreted as post-emplacement deformation fabrics. The concordance of these fabrics to the next component of the complex, the main pluton (G1 and G2 monzogranite), indicates that this deformation was caused by the forceful emplacement of the pluton. AMS fabrics in G1 and G2 reveal a dome shaped foliation with an east-west lineation, indicating an east-west oriented magma transport direction. Outcrops of small stocks or cupolas similar to G2, east of the main pluton, link it to similar lithologies in the Main Donegal Granite further to the east via a partially exposed lateral feeder. This suggests east to west emplacement. The next component, a suite of subvertical porphyritic felsite dykes, is shown (from AMS and visible shearing fabrics) to have been emplaced passively under east-west tension. The final component comprises G3 and G4 of the main pluton, which passively cut all earlier components and contains significant amounts of aplite, pegmatite and greisen. These are interpreted to be cupolas or stocks emanating from an unexposed sheet probably similar in composition and mode of emplacement to G1 and G2. Thus, a general model is put forward where initially forceful subhorizontal sheets extending

  11. Geochemical constraints on the evolution of mafic and felsic rocks in the Bathani volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sequence of Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Ashima; Gogoi, Bibhuti; Ahmad, Mansoor; Ahmad, Talat

    2014-06-01

    The Bathani volcanic and volcano-sedimentary (BVS) sequence is a volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sequence, best exposed near Bathani village in Gaya district of Bihar. It is located in the northern fringe of the Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex (CGGC). The volcano-sedimentary unit comprises of garnet-mica schist, rhyolite, tuff, banded iron formation (BIF) and chert bands with carbonate rocks as enclaves within the rhyolite and the differentiated volcanic sequence comprises of rhyolite, andesite, pillow basalt, massive basalt, tuff and mafic pyroclasts. Emplacement of diverse felsic and mafic rocks together testifies for a multi-stage and multi-source magmatism for the area. The presence of pillow basalt marks the eruption of these rocks in a subaqueous environment. Intermittent eruption of mafic and felsic magmas resulted in the formation of rhyolite, mafic pyroclasts, and tuff. Mixing and mingling of the felsic and mafic magmas resulted in the hybrid rock andesite. Granites are emplaced later, cross-cutting the volcanic sequence and are probably products of fractional crystallization of basaltic magma. The present work characterizes the geochemical characteristics of the magmatic rocks comprising of basalt, andesite, rhyolite, tuff, and granite of the area. Tholeiitic trend for basalt and calc-alkaline affinities of andesite, rhyolite and granite is consistent with their generation in an island arc, subduction related setting. The rocks of the BVS sequence probably mark the collision of the northern and southern Indian blocks during Proterozoic period. The explosive submarine volcanism may be related to culmination of the collision of the aforementioned blocks during the Neoproterozoic (1.0 Ga) as the Grenvillian metamorphism is well established in various parts of CGGC.

  12. Genesis of emulsion texture due to magma mixing: a case study from Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex of Eastern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Bibhuti; Saikia, Ashima; Ahmad, Mansoor

    2016-04-01

    The emulsion texture is a rare magma mixing feature in which rounded bodies of one magmatic phase remain dispersed in the other coherent phase (Freundt and Schmincke, 1992). This type of special texture in hybrid rocks can significantly contribute toward understanding the mechanisms facilitating magma mixing and magma chamber dynamics involving two disparate magmas as the exact processes by which mixing occurs still remain unclear. Recent developments in microfluidics have greatly helped us to understand the complex processes governing magma mixing occurring at micro-level. Presented work uses some of the results obtained from microfluidic experiments with a view to understand the formation mechanism of emulsions preserved in the hybrid rocks of the Ghansura Rhyolite Dome (GRD) of Proterozoic Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex (CGGC), Eastern India. The GRD has preserved hybrid rocks displaying emulsion texture that formed due to the interaction of a phenocryst-rich basaltic magma and host rhyolite magma. The emulsions are more or less spherical in shape and dominantly composed of amphibole having biotite rinds set in a matrix of biotite, plagioclase, K-feldspar and quartz. Amphibole compositions were determined from the core of the emulsions to the rim with a view to check for cationic substitutions. The amphibole constituting the emulsions is actinolite in composition, and commonly shows tschermakite (Ts) and pargasite (Prg) substitutions. From petrographical and mineral-chemical analyses we infer that when mafic magma, containing phenocrysts of augite, came in contact with felsic magma, diffusion of cations like H+, Al3+and others occurred from the felsic to the mafic system. These cations reacted with the clinopyroxene phenocrysts in the mafic magma to form amphibole (actinolite) crystals. The formation of amphibole crystals in the mafic system greatly increased the viscosity of the system allowing the amphibole crystals to venture into the adjacent felsic

  13. Provenance of granites used to build the Santa Maria de Valdeiglesias Monastery, Pelayos de la Presa (Madrid, Spain), and conservation state of the monumental complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, R.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Vazquez-Calvo, C.; Perez-Monserrat, E. M.; Varas-Muriel, M. J.; Lopez-Arce, P.

    2012-04-01

    The construction of the Cistercian Monastery began at 1180, in an initial Late Romanesque style in which the Church was erected; later on, in 1258, the church underwent a severe fire, only the apse stood standing. The church was reconstructed at the end of the 13th century in Mudejar style. Gothic style was used later on, in the 16th century, for the reconstruction of the funerary chapel, and Renaissance style for the Plateresque door in between the church and the sacristy. At the end of the 16th century, the main door to access the church was built in Baroque style. In 1836, the Ecclesiastical Confiscations resulted on transfer the Monastery into particular owners. This fact favoured its abandon and ruin state until 1979, when architect Mariano Garcia Benito purchased the property and started the conservation and consolidation of the complex, beginning with the Bell Tower. Natural stone materials used in the Monastery are igneous (granite) and metamorphic rocks (gneiss and schist), and artificial stone materials are bricks and mortars, both joint and rendering ones. Granite is the most abundant material used in the complex, with a structural/reinforcing role in elements such as lintels, jambs, buttresses, or bottom areas of the walls with greater sizes and better dimensioned. Some pillars are granite built, from the large ashlars of the sacristy, to the rubble-work of the Mozarab chapel. Two types of monzogranite can be differentiated in relation to distinct constructive stages: the coarse texture monzogranite is used in the first building stages, while the fine texture monzogranite was employed mainly from 17th century on. Petrophysical characteristics of these granites are different but show a good quality to be used in construction. Nevertheless, the abandon and partial ruin of the complex, the devastating fire events (the second one in 1743) leaded to the decay acceleration of the monumental complex, being nowadays the church in ruin, with no roofs and walls

  14. Geophysical interpretation of U, Th, and rare earth element mineralization of the Bokan Mountain peralkaline granite complex, Prince of Wales Island, southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCafferty, Anne E.; Stoeser, Douglas B.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2014-01-01

    A prospectivity map for rare earth element (REE) mineralization at the Bokan Mountain peralkaline granite complex, Prince of Wales Island, southeastern Alaska, was calculated from high-resolution airborne gamma-ray data. The map displays areas with similar radioelement concentrations as those over the Dotson REE-vein-dike system, which is characterized by moderately high %K, eU, and eTh (%K, percent potassium; eU, equivalent parts per million uranium; and eTh, equivalent parts per million thorium). Gamma-ray concentrations of rocks that share a similar range as those over the Dotson zone are inferred to locate high concentrations of REE-bearing minerals. An approximately 1300-m-long prospective tract corresponds to shallowly exposed locations of the Dotson zone. Prospective areas of REE mineralization also occur in continuous swaths along the outer edge of the pluton, over known but undeveloped REE occurrences, and within discrete regions in the older Paleozoic country rocks. Detailed mineralogical examinations of samples from the Dotson zone provide a means to understand the possible causes of the airborne Th and U anomalies and their relation to REE minerals. Thorium is sited primarily in thorite. Uranium also occurs in thorite and in a complex suite of ±Ti±Nb±Y oxide minerals, which include fergusonite, polycrase, and aeschynite. These oxides, along with Y-silicates, are the chief heavy REE (HREE)-bearing minerals. Hence, the eU anomalies, in particular, may indicate other occurrences of similar HREE-enrichment. Uranium and Th chemistry along the Dotson zone showed elevated U and total REEs east of the Camp Creek fault, which suggested the potential for increased HREEs based on their association with U-oxide minerals. A uranium prospectivity map, based on signatures present over the Ross-Adams mine area, was characterized by extremely high radioelement values. Known uranium deposits were identified in the U-prospectivity map, but the largest tract occurs

  15. Zircon U-Pb age, Hf isotopic compositions and geochemistry of the Silurian Fengdingshan I-type granite Pluton and Taoyuan mafic-felsic Complex at the southeastern margin of the Yangtze Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yufang; Ma, Changqian; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Shiming; She, Zhenbing; Liu, Lei; Xu, Haijin

    2013-09-01

    This work presents an integrated study of zircon U-Pb ages and Hf isotope along with whole-rock geochemistry on Silurian Fengdingshan I-type granites and Taoyuan mafic-felsic intrusive Complex located at the southeastern margin of the Yangtze Block, filling in a gap in understanding of Paleozoic I-type granites and mafic-intermediate igneous rocks in the eastern South China Craton (SCC). The Fengdingshan granite and Taoyuan hornblende gabbro are dated at 436 ± 5 Ma and 409 ± 2 Ma, respectively. The Fengdingshan granites display characteristics of calc-alkaline I-type granite with high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7093-0.7127, low ɛNd(t) values ranging from -5.6 to -5.4 and corresponding Nd model ages (T2DM) of 1.6 Ga. Their zircon grains have ɛHf(t) values ranging from -2.7 to 2.6 and model ages of 951-1164 Ma. The Taoyuan mafic rocks exhibit typical arc-like geochemistry, with enrichment in Rb, Th, U and Pb and depletion in Nb, Ta. They have initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7053-0.7058, ɛNd(t) values of 0.2-1.6 and corresponding T2DM of 1.0-1.1 Ga. Their zircon grains have ɛHf(t) values ranging from 3.2 to 6.1 and model ages of 774-911 Ma. Diorite and granodiorite from the Taoyuan Complex have initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7065-0.7117, ɛNd(t) values from -5.7 to -1.9 and Nd model ages of 1.3-1.6 Ga. The petrographic and geochemical characteristics indicate that the Fengdingshan granites probably formed by reworking of Neoproterozoic basalts with very little of juvenile mantle-derived magma. The Taoyuan Complex formed by magma mixing and mingling, in which the mafic member originated from a metasomatized lithospheric mantle. Both the Fengdingshan and Taoyuan Plutons formed in a post-orogenic collapse stage in an intracontinental tectonic regime. Besides the Paleozoic Fengdingshan granites and Taoyuan hornblende gabbro, other Neoproterozoic and Indosinian igneous rocks located along the southeastern and western margin of the Yangtze Block also exhibit decoupled

  16. Zircon U-Pb ages of the metamorphic supracrustal rocks of the Xinghuadukou Group and granitic complexes in the Argun massif of the northern Great Hinggan Range, NE China, and their tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guang; Chen, Yuchuan; Chen, Yanjing; Zeng, Qingtao

    2012-04-01

    The basement of the Argun massif in the northern Great Hinggan Range consists of the metamorphic supracrustal rocks of the Xinghuadukou Group and associated granitic complexes. The metamorphic supracrustal rocks were previously interpreted as Paleoproterozoic, while the granitic complexes were considered Mesoproterozoic in age. This paper presents new zircon LA-MC-ICP-MS U-Pb ages of biotite-plagioclase leptynite and biotite schist from the Xinghuadukou Group in the Lulin Forest area, Heilongjiang Province; zircon SHRIMP U-Pb ages of biotite-plagioclase gneiss from the Xinghuadukou Group in Lulin Forest; and quartz diorite and monzogranite from the granitic complexes in Mohe County, Heilongjiang Province. New geochronological data from the three metasedimentary rock samples of the Xinghuadukou Group can be preliminarily divided into five groups: (1) 2017-2765 Ma, (2) 1736-1942 Ma, (3) 1359-1610 Ma, (4) 749-1239 Ma, and (5) 448-716 Ma. Except for the zircons of the 448-716 Ma group belonging to a metamorphic origin, the other age groups had the youngest age of 749 ± 17 Ma, indicating that the Xinghuadukou Group formed during the Neoproterozoic era (at least <749 Ma). These detrital zircon ages cluster at ca. 2.0-1.8 Ga and ca. 1.0-0.80 Ga, suggesting that the Argun massif had connections with both Columbia and Rodinia and implying that the provenance of the Xinghuadukou Group metamorphosed sediments must be characteristic of felsic-intermediate igneous rocks with ages of ca. 2.0-1.8 Ga and ca. 1.0-0.80 Ga. The quartz diorite and monzogranite from the granitic complexes of the basement within the Argun massif yielded weighted mean ages of 516 ± 10 Ma and 504 ± 9 Ma, respectively, indicating that these rocks emplaced in the Early Paleozoic. Considering the geochemical and chronological data together, we propose that the Xinghuadukou Group was most likely deposited in a back-arc basin environment, whereas the granitic complexes emplaced in a post-collisional setting

  17. Lunar granites with unique ternary feldspars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, G.; Stoeser, D. B.; Marvin, U. B.; Bower, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    An unusually high concentration of granitic fragments, with textures ranging from holocrystalline to glassy, occurs throughout Boulder 1, a complex breccia of highland rocks from Apollo 17, Station 2. Among the minerals included in the granites are enigmatic K-Ca-rich feldspars that fall in the forbidden region of the ternary diagram. The great variability in chemistry and texture is probably the result of impact degradation and melting of a granitic source-rock. Studies of the breccia matrix suggest that this original granitic source-rock may have contained more pyroxenes and phosphates than most of the present clasts contain. Petrographic observations on Apollo 15 KREEP basalts indicate that granitic liquids may be produced by differentiation without immiscibility, and the association of the granites with KREEP-rich fragments in the boulder suggests that the granites represent a residual liquid from the plutonic fractional crystallization of a KREEP-rich magma. Boulder 1 is unique among Apollo 17 samples in its silica-KREEP-rich composition. We conclude that the boulder represents a source-rock unlike the bedrock of South Massif.

  18. The geology and petrogenesis of the southern closepet granite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayananda, M.; Mahabaleswar, B.; Oak, K. A.; Friend, C. R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The Archaean Closepet Granite is a polyphase body intruding the Peninsular Gneiss Complex and the associated supracrustal rocks. The granite out-crop runs for nearly 500 km with an approximate width of 20 to 25 km and cut across the regional metamorphic structure passing from granulite facies in the South and green schist facies in the north. In the amphibolite-granulite facies transition zone the granite is intimately mixed with migmatites and charnockite. Field observations suggests that anatexis of Peninsular gneisses led to the formation of granite melt, and there is a space relationship between migmatite formation, charnockite development and production and emplacement of granite magma. Based on texture and cross cutting relationships four major granite phases are recognized: (1) Pyroxene bearing dark grey granite; (2) Porphyritec granite; (3) Equigranular grey granite; and (4) Equigranular pink granite. The granite is medium to coarse grained and exhibit hypidiomorphic granular to porphyritic texture. The modal composition varies from granite granodiorite to quartz monzonite. Geochemical variation of the granite suite is consistent with either fractional crystallization or partial melting, but in both the cases biotite plus feldspar must be involved as fractionating or residual phases during melting to account trace element chemistry. The trace element data has been plotted on discriminant diagrams, where majority of samples plot in volcanic arc and within plate, tectonic environments. The granite show distinct REE patterns with variable total REE content. The REE patterns and overall abundances suggests that the granite suite represents a product of partial melting of crustal source in which fractional crystallization operated in a limited number of cases.

  19. Isotopic, major and trace element constraints on the sources of granites in an 1800-Ma-old igneous complex near St. Cloud, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    A suite of basic to granitic rocks was emplaced near St. Cloud, MN about 1800 Ma ago. These are strongly LREE enriched and were derived from LREE enriched sources. Nd-Sm systematics suggest that LREE enrichment occurred during the Early Proterozoic. Initial Pb ratios for basic rocks through granites are similar to inferred 1800 Ma old mantle Pb, and suggest sources that became U/Pb enriched during the Proterozoic or latest Archean. These sources had long-term Th/U ratios similar to inferred mantle or average crustal values. Oxygen isotopes indicate that granitic rocks incorporated a small previous crustal component. Petrogenetic modeling suggest these processes: Granodiorite represents an evolved high Mg-andesite or a partial melt of a basic precursor distinct from the nearby basic rocks. Granites and quartz monzonites were derived at temperatures of ca. 800-950 (e.g. water-undersaturated) and at 15 to 20 km depth. The sources are inferred to have been quartz saturated with respect to tholeiite. Because granites have similar isotopic histories as basic, sources of granites were ultimately derived from the mantle. REE and Nd isotope systematics allow these scenarios: (1) 40-75% of the Nd in the rocks was derived from continental crust recycled into the mantle. (2) The mantle source had a chondritic REE geochemistry but was enriched in LREE shortly before melting. (3) The rocks were in fact derived by melting a basic lower crust that included a small fraction of intercalated sedimentary rocks.

  20. Radiological implications of granite of northern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Asghar, M; Tufail, M; Sabiha-Javied; Abid, A; Waqas, M

    2008-09-01

    Granite is an igneous rock that contains natural radioactivity of primordial radionuclides. In Pakistan, granite is distributed in a vast area called the Ambela Granitic Complex (AGC) in North West Frontier Province (NWFP). Granite is a hard rock that exists in different colours and is used to decorate floors, kitchen counter tops, etc. The use of granite in a building as a decor material is a potential source of radiation dose; therefore, natural radioactivity has been measured in 20 granite samples of the AGC with an HPGe (high purity germanium) based gamma ray spectrometer. The average specific activities and their range (given in parentheses) for primordial radionuclides (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th were 1218 (899-1927), 659 (46-6120) and 598 (92-3214) Bq kg(-1), respectively. The measured activity concentrations were used for the assessment of hazard indices and radiation dose which were evaluated based on the permissible limits defined for these parameters. The measured specific activities and the derived quantities, hazard indices and radiation dose, have been compared with those given in the literature for these parameters.

  1. U-Pb-Hf zircon study of two mylonitic granite complexes in the Talas-Fergana fault zone, Kyrgyzstan, and Ar-Ar age of deformations along the fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopelko, D.; Seltmann, R.; Apayarov, F.; Belousova, E.; Izokh, A.; Lepekhina, E.

    2013-09-01

    A 2000 km long dextral Talas-Fergana strike-slip fault separates eastern terranes in the Kyrgyz Tien Shan from western terranes. The aim of this study was to constrain an age of dextral shearing in the central part of the fault utilizing Ar-Ar dating of micas. We also carried out a U-Pb-Hf zircon study of two different deformed granitoid complexes in the fault zone from which the micas for Ar dating were separated. Two samples of the oldest deformed Neoproterozoic granitoids in the area of study yielded U-Pb zircon SHRIMP ages 728 ± 11 Ma and 778 ± 11 Ma, characteristic for the Cryogenian Bolshoi Naryn Formation, and zircon grains analyzed for their Lu-Hf isotopic compositions yielded εHf(t) values from -11.43 to -16.73, and their calculated tHfc ages varied from 2.42 to 2.71 Ga. Thus varying Cryogenian ages and noticeable heterogeneity of Meso- to Paleoproterozoic crustal sources was established for mylonitic granites of the Bolshoi Naryn Formation. Two samples of mylonitized pegmatoidal granites of the Kyrgysh Complex yielded identical 206Pb/238U ages of 279 ± 5 Ma corresponding to the main peak of Late-Paleozoic post-collisional magmatism in the Tien Shan (Seltmann et al., 2011), and zircon grains analyzed for their Lu-Hf isotopic compositions yielded εHf(t) values from -11.43 to -16.73, and calculated tHfc ages from 2.42 to 2.71 Ga indicating derivation from a Paleoproterozoic crustal source. Microstructural studies showed that ductile/brittle deformation of pegmatoidal granites of the Kyrgysh Complex occurred at temperatures of 300-400 °C and caused resetting of the K-Ar isotope system of primary muscovite. Deformation of mylonitized granites of the Bolshoi Naryn Formation occurred under high temperature conditions and resulted in protracted growth and recrystallization of micas. The oldest Ar-Ar muscovite age of 241 Ma with a well defined plateau from a pegmatoidal granite of the Kyrgysh Complex is considered as a “minimum” age of dextral motions

  2. RESEARCH PAPERS : Palaeomagnetism of the Ross of Mull granite complex, western Scotland: lower Palaeozoic apparent polar wander of the Orthotectonic Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, J. D. A.

    1998-01-01

    The Ross of Mull granite complex was emplaced near the western margin of the Orthotectonic Caledonides of Scotland in early-mid-Silurian times. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility reflects the post-tectonic character of the pluton and contrasts with magnetic fabrics in adjoining country rocks which record the regional D3 deformation. Palaeomagnetic study identifies two dominant magnetizations. An `A' component is magnetite-resident with distributed blocking temperatures (100-500°C) and normal polarity (D/I=339/-50°, 30 samples, α95=5.6°, palaeomagnetic pole at 12°E, 1°S, dp/dm=5.0/7.5°) it was probably acquired during initial cooling. A `B' magnetization (unblocking temperatures 500-580°C, D/I=195/+21°, 40 samples, α95=4.3°, palaeomagnetic pole at 339°E, 22°S, dp/dm=2.4/4.5°) is of dual polarity and comparable to magnetizations widely recorded in the Younger Granite Suite of the Scottish Caledonides. It does not correlate with the timing of regional isotopic closure as defined by K/Ar thermochron ages and appears to have been imparted during a regional thermochemical event at low temperatures (~250-150°C) and a late stage of cooling of the orogen (~420-410 Ma). Metamorphic facies in the aureole and adjoining country rocks record examples of both A and B magnetizations, together with a low-blocking-temperature (0-350°C) component acquired during late Palaeozoic/early Mesozoic rifting in the Hebridean Basin. Palaeomagnetic poles from the Orthotectonic Caledonides define a late to post-tectonic magnetization record equivalent to a general east to west apparent polar wander trend of late Ordovician-Lower Devonian age. A short-term reversal of this trend is identified during the earlier part of Silurian times so that mid-late Silurian poles are located in a similar position to late Ordovician poles. The overall path coincides with the contemporaneous record from the Paratectonic Caledonides of England and Wales from c. 455 Ma. It is therefore concluded

  3. Geochemistry and 207Pb/ 206Pb zircon ages of granitoids from the southern portion of the Tamboril-Santa Quitéria granitic-migmatitic complex, Ceará Central Domain, Borborema Province (NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo, Carlos E. G.; Costa, Felipe G.; Pinéo, Tercyo R. G.; Cavalcante, José C.; Moura, Candido A. V.

    2012-02-01

    The Tamboril-Santa Quitéria Complex is an important Neoproterozoic granitic-migmatitic unit from the Ceará Central Domain that developed from ca. 650 to 610 Ma. In general the granitoids range in composition from diorite to granite with predominance (up to 85%) of granitic to monzogranitic composition with biotite as the main mafic AFM phase. Geochemical and 207Pb/ 206Pb evaporation zircon geochronology studies were applied in a group of these abundant monzogranitic rocks from the region of Novo Oriente in the southern portion of the Ceará Central Domain. In this area the granitoids are weakly peraluminous biotite granitoids and deformed biotite granitoids of high-K calc-alkaline and ferroan composition, which we interpreted as primary magmas (segregated diatexites) derived from the partial melting of crustal material. The close temporal relation of this magmatism with local eclogitic and regional high temperature metamorphism in Ceará Central Domain point out to an orogenic setting, arguably emplaced during the collisional stage. Subordinate coeval juvenile mantle incursions are also present. This crustally derived magmatism is the primary product of the continental thickening that resulted from the collision between the rocks represented by the Amazonian-West African craton (São Luiz cratonic fragment) to the northwest and the Paleoproterozoic-Archean basement of the Borborema Province to the southeast along the Transbrasiliano tectonic corridor.

  4. Origin of peralkaline granites of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radain, A. A. M.; Fyfe, W. S.; Kerrich, R.

    1982-01-01

    Small volumes of peralkaline granites were generated as the final phase of a Pan African calc-alkaline igneous event which built the Arabian Peninsula. The peralkaline granites are closely associated with trends or sutures related to ophiolites. Peralkaline rocks are chemically heterogeneous, with anomalous abundances of Zr (average 2,150 ppm±2,600 1σ), Y (200±190), and Nb (105±100), representing up to ten-fold enrichments of these elements relative to abundances in calc alkaline granite counterparts. Large enrichments of some rare earth elements and fluorine are also present. The peralkaline granites have scattered whole rock 18O values, averaging 8.7±0.6% in the Hadb Aldyaheen Complex and 10.7±1% in the Jabal Sayid Complex. Quartz-albite fractionations of 0.5 to 1.5% signify that the heavier whole rock δ-values probably represent the oxygen isotope composition of the peralkaline magma. Small variable enrichments of 18O, in conjunction with slightly elevated 87Sr/86Sr initial ratios relative to broadly contemporaneous calc alkaline granites, are both suggestive of a small degree of involvement of crustal, or crustal derived material in the peralkaline magmas. It is proposed that the peculiar magma genesis is associated with a relaxation event which followed continental collision and underthrusting of salt rich sediments.

  5. Petrogenesis of Archean lamprophyres in the southern Vermilion Granitic Complex, northeastern Minnesota, with implications for the nature of their mantle source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesley McCall, G.; Nabelek, Peter I.; Bauer, Robert L.; Glascock, Michael D.

    1990-07-01

    Petrogenetic modeling of major and trace element and isotopic data is used: 1. to define probable modes of petrogenesis of Archean spessartitic lamprophyric rocks in the southern portion of the Vermilion Granitic Complex (VGC) of northeastern Minnesota, and 2. to place constraints on the nature of the mantle source of these rocks. The lamprophyres range from olto qtz-normative and are associated with cumulate hornblendites and pyroxenites. The silica-rich lamprophyres are shown to be the result of low-pressure fractionation upon emplacement. On the other hand, the composition range of the ol-normative lamprophyres is explained by approximately 40% polybaric fractionation of elinopyroxene + olivine yielding ne-normative liquids. The fractionation explains low Cr, Ni and Sc concentrations compared to primary mantle-derived melts. Modeling of the lamprophyre MgO-FeO compositions using the olivine saturation surface (Hanson and Langmuir 1978) suggests that the 0.42 to 0.55 Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratios of most of the lamprophyres can be explained by the high-pressure fractionation. The model parent melt composition is similar to sanukitoid-type rocks found in Japan and elsewhere in the Superior Province. The lamprophyres have ɛ{/Nd 2700} values of +1.4 to +2.0, indicating derivation from a depleted mantle source. Growth curves on an ɛ Nd vs. age diagram are consistent with the extraction of the lamprophyres from a depleted source (Sm/Nd>chondrite) just prior to 2700 Ma, the accepted age of the VGC. The lamprophyres have fractionated REE patterns (Ce/Ybn=10 15) that indicate genesis by a) 1% to 3% fusion of a pristine garnet lherzolite or b) ˜10% fusion of an enriched mantle source. However, consideration of the pressure of melting and elemental plots of Al and Ti indicate that garnet was not a residual phase during lamprophyre genesis. Thus, the enrichment of the LREE (80 100 x chondrite), Sr (580 1400 ppm), and Ba (590 1600 ppm) indicate derivation from an enriched mantle

  6. Petrogenesis of synorogenic diorite-granodiorite-granite complexes in the Damara Belt, Namibia: Constraints from U-Pb zircon ages and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, S.; Kröner, A.; Hauff, F.; Masberg, P.

    2015-01-01

    the granite, this rock type cannot be considered as a fractionation product of the quartz diorites and therefore represents likely a melting product of the underlying felsic basement. We also report data from two quartz diorite samples collected in the north and east of the Palmental area. They plot off the trends defined by the other quartz diorites. Palaeoproterozoic Nd model ages of 2.1 Ga and distinct Pb isotopic data indicate a Palaeoproterozoic mean crustal residence age for the source material. We conclude that these samples belong to the nearby Goas and Okongava quartz diorites. For these rocks, based on a previous model and a comparison with results from amphibolite-dehydration melting experiments, a high-K meta-tholeiite melted at 1000-1050 °C is a likely source. Isotopic data obtained on samples of the Palmental complex make a Pan African subduction zone setting unlikely for these rocks. It is concluded that the most primitive Palmental quartz diorites recording moderately evolved Nd and Sr isotope data (εNd(t): -2.7, 87Sr/86Sr: 0.706) reflect an isotope composition typical of aged subcrustal lithospheric mantle.

  7. Mineralogical and chemical evolution of a rare-element granite-pegmatite system: Harney Peak Granite, Black Hills, South Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Laul, J. C.

    1987-03-01

    The Harney Peak Granite (1.7 b.y.) in the Black Hills, South Dakota, is a well-exposed granite complex surrounded by a rare-element pegmatite field (barren to Nb-, Ta-, Be, Li-enriched pegmatites). It consists of a multitude of large and small sills and dikes, which exhibit great variation in texture, mineralogy and geochemistry. This granite is moderately to strongly peraluminous with the following mineralogy: plagioclase (An 0-An 21) + potassium feldspar (Or 70-96) + quartz + muscovite ± apatite ± biotite ± garnet ± tourmaline. The granitic intrusions in the interior of the complex have similar K/Rb ratios (> 190), whereas this ratio decreases and is more variable for intrusions which are structurally higher or along the perimeter of the complex. Substitutions of (Fe, Mn)Mg -1 in the ferromagnesian minerals, NaCa -1 in plagioclase and RbK -1 in muscovite and potassium feldspar increase in the perimeter granites and vary systematically with K/Rb. These more evolved intrusions are commonly enriched in incompatible elements such as Nb, Li, Cs, Be, and B and depleted in Ba, Ca, and Sr relative to the interior, primitive granites. Biotite-bearing assemblages are common in the interior granites but are replaced by tourmaline-bearing granites in the more evolved intrusions. A series of discontinuous reactions may explain this assemblage transition. Observations and trace element modeling suggest that: (1) within individual units volatile transfer mechanisms have resulted in mineral and chemical segregation; (2) 75-80% fractional crystallization of a primitive biotite-muscovite granite was the dominant mechanism in producing the more evolved tourmaline-bearing granites; and (3) extreme fractional crystallization aided by high volatile activity produced the associated rare-element pegmatites.

  8. The GRANIT spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Baessler, Stefan; Beau, M; Kreuz, Michael; Nesvizhevsky, V.; Kurlov, V; Pignol, G; Protasov, K.; Vezzu, Francis; Voronin, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The existence of quantum states of matter in a gravitational field was demonstrated recently in the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble, in a series of experiments with ultra cold neutrons (UCN). UCN in low quantum states is an excellent probe for fundamental physics, in particular for constraining extra short-range forces; as well as a tool in quantum optics and surface physics. The GRANIT is a follow-up project based on a second-generation spectrometer with ultra-high energy resolution, permanently installed in ILL. It has been constructed in framework of an ANR grant; and will become operational in 2011.

  9. Fractal patterns of fractures in granites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Velde, B.; Dubois, J.; Moore, D.; Touchard, G.

    1991-01-01

    Fractal measurements using the Cantor's dust method in a linear one-dimensional analysis mode were made on the fracture patterns revealed on two-dimensional, planar surfaces in four granites. This method allows one to conclude that: 1. (1)|The fracture systems seen on two-dimensional surfaces in granites are consistent with the part of fractal theory that predicts a repetition of patterns on different scales of observation, self similarity. Fractal analysis gives essentially the same values of D on the scale of kilometres, metres and centimetres (five orders of magnitude) using mapped, surface fracture patterns in a Sierra Nevada granite batholith (Mt. Abbot quadrangle, Calif.). 2. (2)|Fractures show the same fractal values at different depths in a given batholith. Mapped fractures (main stage ore veins) at three mining levels (over a 700 m depth interval) of the Boulder batholith, Butte, Mont. show the same fractal values although the fracture disposition appears to be different at different levels. 3. (3)|Different sets of fracture planes in a granite batholith, Central France, and in experimental deformation can have different fractal values. In these examples shear and tension modes have the same fractal values while compressional fractures follow a different fractal mode of failure. The composite fracture patterns are also fractal but with a different, median, fractal value compared to the individual values for the fracture plane sets. These observations indicate that the fractal method can possibly be used to distinguish fractures of different origins in a complex system. It is concluded that granites fracture in a fractal manner which can be followed at many scales. It appears that fracture planes of different origins can be characterized using linear fractal analysis. ?? 1991.

  10. Lead isotopic evidence for mixed sources of Proterozoic granites and pegmatites, Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, Eirik J.; Walker, Richard J.; Nabelek, Peter I.; Russ-Nabelek, Carol

    1993-10-01

    The lead isotopic compositions of K-feldspars separated from the ca. 1700 Ma Harney Peak Granite complex and spatially associated granitic pegmatites indicate that these rocks were derived from at least two sources. It has been reported previously that the core of the Harney Peak Granite complex is dominated by relatively lower/ gd18O (avg. 11.5 %.) granites, whereas higher / gd18O (avg. 13.2%.) granites occur around the periphery of the complex. The higher δ 18O granites and one simple pegmatite have low values of 207Pb /204Pb for their 206Pb /204Pb Thus, they likely were derived from a source with a short crustal residence time. This source may have been the pelitic schists into which the Harney Peak Granite complex and pegmatites were intruded. Feldspars from granites with lower / gd18O values have significantly higher 207Pb /204Pb for their 206Pb /204Pb . The data define a linear array with a slope equivalent to an age of ca. 2.6 Ga with t 2 defined to be 1.7 Ga. Such a slope could represent a mixing array or a secondary isochron for the source. These low δ18O granites could have been derived from a source with a high U/ Pb and with a crustal residence beginning before the Proterozoic. The source (s) of these granites may have been a sediment derived from late Archean continental crust. The highly evolved Tin Mountain pegmatite has lead isotopic systematics intermediate between those of the two granite groups, suggesting either a mixed source or contamination. Two late Archean granites, the Little Elk Granite and the Bear Mountain Granite, had precursors with high U/Pb and low Th/U histories. The Th/U history of the Bear Mountain Granite is too low for this rock to have been an important component of the source of the Proterozoic granites. However, crustal rocks with lead isotopic compositions similar to those of the Little Elk Granite were an important source of lead for some of the Proterozoic granitic rocks.

  11. Climax granite test results

    SciTech Connect

    Ramspott, L.D.

    1980-01-15

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) program, is carrying out in situ rock mechanics testing in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This summary addresses only those field data taken to date that address thermomechanical modeling for a hard-rock repository. The results to be discussed include thermal measurements in a heater test that was conducted from October 1977 through July 1978, and stress and displacement measurements made during and after excavation of the canister storage drift for the Spent Fuel Test (SFT) in the Climax granite. Associated laboratory and field measurements are summarized. The rock temperature for a given applied heat load at a point in time and space can be adequately modeled with simple analytic calculations involving superposition and integration of numerous point source solutions. The input, for locations beyond about a meter from the source, can be a constant thermal conductivity and diffusivity. The value of thermal conductivity required to match the field data is as much as 25% different from laboratory-measured values. Therefore, unless we come to understand the mechanisms for this difference, a simple in situ test will be required to obtain a value for final repository design. Some sensitivity calculations have shown that the temperature field is about ten times more sensitive to conductivity than to diffusivity under the test conditions. The orthogonal array was designed to detect anisotropy. After considering all error sources, anisotropic efforts in the thermal field were less than 5 to 10%.

  12. Mo-mineralized porphyries are relatively hydrous and differentiated: insights from the Permian-Triassic granitic complex in the Baituyingzi Mo-Cu district, eastern Inner Mongolia, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Jianming; Zeng, Qingdong; Wang, Jingbin; Wang, Yuwang; Hu, Ruizhong; Zhou, Lingli; Wu, Guanbin

    2016-12-01

    Mo-Cu mineralization in the Baituyingzi district of eastern Inner Mongolia occurs within a granitic complex. This paper presents and discusses zircon U-Pb ages and whole-rock geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data from the granitic complex as potential indicators for porphyry Mo fertility. The U-Pb ages indicate that five units of the granitic complex were emplaced between 265.2 ± 0.7 and 246.5 ± 1.0 Ma. Constrained by crosscutting dikes, Mo-Cu mineralization was probably related to the Baituyingzi monzogranite porphyry dated at 248.2 ± 0.64 Ma. The intrusions belong to high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic series that are characterized by highly fractionated rare earth element (REE) patterns and strong enrichments of large ion lithophile elements, relative to high-field strength elements. Apart from the ˜246-Ma dike that shows negative ɛNd (t) values (-14.9 to -13.1), the intrusions have ɛNd(t) values ranging from -3.9 to 1.0, relatively young depleted mantle model ages (811 to 1183 Ma), 206Pb/204Pb of 18.137-18.335, and 207Pb/204Pb of 15.591-15.625, which are consistent with a juvenile lower crustal origin. Among the intrusions, the ˜248-Ma porphyry and the ˜246-Ma dike show adakite-like characteristics (e.g., Sr/Y = 44.9-185) and listric-shaped REE patterns that indicate amphibole fractionation and a hydrous magma source. However, the porphyry exhibits a higher differentiation index (81.4-91.5) and a steeper REE profile (e.g., LaN/YbN = 25.6-87.0) than those of the ˜246-Ma dike, which suggests that it is highly differentiated. We propose that the complex was generated by the partial melting of juvenile mafic lower crust (containing minor old crustal relicts) that was triggered by collision between the North China Craton and Siberian Craton. As indicated by the Th/Nb, Th/Yb, Ba/Th, and Ba/La ratios of the intrusions, the crust may have been derived from the melting of the fertile mantle wedge that was metasomatized by various amounts of slab-derived fluids

  13. Petrogenetic modeling of a potential uranium source rock, Granite Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, J.S.; Miesch, A.T.

    1981-01-01

    Previous studies of the granite of Lankin Dome have led to the conclusion that this granite was a source for the sandstone-type uranium deposits in the basins that surround the Granite Mountains, Wyo. Q-mode factor analysis of 29 samples of this granite shows that five bulk compositions are required to explain the observed variances of 33 constituents in these samples. Models presented in this paper show that the origin of the granite can be accounted for by the mixing of a starting liquid with two ranges of solid compositions such that all five compositions are granitic. There are several features of the granite of Lankin Dome that suggest derivation by partial melting and, because the proposed source region was inhomogeneous, that more than one of the five end members may have been a liquid. Data for the granite are compatible with derivation from rocks similar to those of the metamorphic complex that the granite intrudes. Evidence for crustal derivation by partial melting includes a strongly peraluminous nature, extremely high differentiation indices, high contents of incompatible elements, generally large negative Eu anomalies, and high initial lead and strontium isotopic ratios. If the granite of Lankin Dome originated by partial melting of a heterogeneous metamorphic complex, the initial magma could reasonably have been composed of a range of granitic liquids. Five variables were not well accounted for by a five-end-member model. Water, CO 2 , and U0 2 contents and the oxidation state of iron are all subject to variations caused by near-surface processes. The Q-mode factor analysis suggests that these four variables have a distribution determined by postmagmatic processes. The reason for failure of Cs0 2 to vary systematically with the other 33 variables is not known. Other granites that have lost large amounts of uranium possibly can be identified by Q-mode factor analysis.

  14. The Evaluation of Complex Borehole Geophysics and Corescanning: for Detailed Characterization of Oriented Fracture Sets, Zones, and Hydraulic Flow on Different Scales. A Case Study: Moragy Granite, Mecsek Mts., Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maros, G.; Zilahi-Sebess, L.; Dudko, A.; Koroknai, Z.

    2005-12-01

    Our presentation outlines the methodology to determine the relationship between fractures and flow systems, and it tries to homogenize the results deriving from methods of different resolutions in a geological model. The granite suffered multi-phase brittle deformation during the Alpine orogene, the fractures renewed several times and were filled with multi-generation infillings. The cores were scanned with the ImaGeo system, the fractures were oriented, characterized in detail from geological and geophysical point of views, and structurally evaluated. A structural model was sketched (Maros et al 2004). The results were refined by the information received from geophysical data, primarily from well-logging (Zilahi-Sebess et al 2003), but radar measurements, crosshole velocity tomography were also used (Toros et al 2004). Transmissivity in granite: 10-6-10-12, main fractures: 10-6-10-5 m2/s. Porous and fracture flow models were set up (Benedek et al 2003, Balla et al 2004). Correlations were found between the core-logging and the well-logging: acoustic openness, density, acoustic velocity, resistivity versus fracture frequency, fracture zones versus HPF influx places. The complex evaluation made the determination of the size and dip of fracture zones more precise. The flow characteristics of individual fractures and fracture zones, however, are influenced by their unique features; no parameter-group can be selected that definitely produces permeable or impermeable fractures. The interpretation of the observations carried out on different scales can be done in several ways. One method is to use methods of different resolutions densely enough to be representative. We examined the relation of information deriving from high resolution methods and the well-logging. On the basis of the depth-trends it is possible to extrapolate the information around the borehole. The relationship with the geophysical surveys is possible through the resistivity and acoustic measurements

  15. The main features of the interaction of mantle magmas with granulite complexes of the lower crust and their relationship with granitic melts (exemplified by the Early Caledonides of the West Baikal Region, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, Alexandr; Khromykh, Sergei; Mekhonoshin, Alexei; Volkova, Nina; Travin, Alexei; Mikheev, Evgeny; Vladimirova, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Granulite complexes occurring in the Early Caledonian southern folded framing of the Siberian Craton are deeply eroded fragments of the Vendian-Early Paleozoic accretionary prism, which is an indicator of the early stages of the Paleo-Asian Ocean (Gladkochub et al., 2010). The main feature of the granulite complexes is a wide development of gabbro-pyroxenites composing tectonic plates, synmetamorphic intrusive bodies, and numerous disintegrated fragments (boudins and enclaves), immersed in a metamorphic matrix. The volume of basites reaches 5-10 %, which allows us to consider mantle magmatism as a heat source for the granulite metamorphism. The most studied polygon is Chernorud granulite zone, which is a part of the Olkhon metamorphic terrane, West Baikal Region. Just this polygon was used for considering the problems of interaction of mantle magmas with lower crust granulite complexes and their relationship with granitic melts. The Chernorud Zone is a typical example of the accretionary prism with a predominance of metabasalts (70-80 %), subordinate amounts of marbles, quartzites and metapelites that have been subjected to granulite facies metamorphism and viscoelastic flow of rock masses. Study of two-pyroxene granulites (metabasalts) and garnet-sillimanite gneisses (metapelites) allows us to estimate P-T metamorphic conditions (P = 7.7-8.6 kbar, T = 770-820°C) and their U-Pb metamorphic age (530-500 Ma). Metabasalts correspond in their geochemistry to the island-arc tholeiitic series (Volkova et al., 2010; Gladkochub et al., 2010). Sin-metamorphic gabbro-pyroxenites formed in two stages: 1) Chernorud complex - tectonic slices and body's exhumed from deep earth crust levels (10-12 kb) and composed of arc tholeiitic series rocks (age T ≥ 500 Ma); 2) Ulan-Khargana complex - supply magmatic canals and fragmented tabular intrusions. This rocks composition corresponds to subalkaline petrochemical series (OIB) and U/Pb age is equal to 485±10 Ma (Travin et al., 2009

  16. New data on the age and geodynamic interpretation of the Kalba-Narym granitic batholith, eastern Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, P. D.; Khromykh, S. V.; Vladimirov, A. G.; Navozov, O. V.; Travin, A. V.; Karavaeva, G. S.; Kruk, N. N.; Murzintsev, N. G.

    2015-06-01

    Geological and new geochronological data are summarized for the Kalba-Narym granitic batholith in eastern Kazakhstan, and their geodynamic interpretation is suggested. In the structure of the batholith, we consider (from late to early) the Kunush plagiogranitic complex, the Kalguta granodiorite-granitic association, and the Kalba granitic, Monastery leucogranitic, and Kainda granitic complexes. The granitic complexes of the Kalba-Narym batholith were formed between the Carboniferous-Permian and the Early-Middle Permian (˜30 Ma). New data indicate that formation of the Kalba-Narym batholith was related to the activity of the Tarim mantle plume. Heating of the lithosphere by the plume coincided with postcollision collapse of the orogenic structure and led to the crust melting and formation of the studied granitic complexes in a relatively short period.

  17. Vermont granite workers' mortality study.

    PubMed

    Costello, J; Graham, W G

    1988-01-01

    A cohort mortality study was carried out in Vermont granite workers who had been employed between the years 1950 and 1982. The cohort included men who had been exposed to high levels of granite dust prior to 1938-1940 (average cutters to 40 million parts/cubic foot), and those employed at dust levels after 1940, which on average were less than 10 million parts/cubic foot. Deaths were coded by a qualified nosologist and standardized mortality ratios were calculated. The results confirm previous studies that show that death rates from silicosis and tuberculosis, the major health threats in the years before 1940, were essentially eliminated after dust controls. However, we found excessive mortality rates from lung cancer in stone shed workers who had been employed prior to 1930, and hence had been exposed to high levels of granite dust. When information was available, 100% of those dying from lung cancer had been smokers.

  18. Rapakivi granites in the geological history of the earth. Part 1, magmatic associations with rapakivi granites: Age, geochemistry, and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, A. M.

    2009-06-01

    Rapakivi granites characteristic practically of all old platforms are greatly variable in age and irregularly distributed over the globe. Four types of magmatic associations, which include rapakivi granites, are represented by anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-rapakivi granite, anorthosite-mangerite-rapakivi-peralkaline granite, gabbro-rapakivi granite-foidite, and rapakivi granite-shoshonite rock series. Granitoids of these associations used to be divided into the following three groups: (1) classical rapakivi granites from magmatic associations of the first three types, which correspond to subalkaline high-K and high-Fe reduced A2-type granites exemplifying the plumasitic trend of evolution; (2) peralkaline granites of the second magmatic association representing the highly differentiated A1-type reduced granites of Na-series, which are extremely enriched in incompatible elements and show the agpaitic trend of evolution; and (3) subalkaline oxidized granites of the fourth magmatic association ranging in composition from potassic A2-type granites to S-granites. Magmatic complexes including rapakivi granites originated during the geochronological interval that spanned three supercontinental cycles 2.7-1.8, 1.8-1.0 and 1.0-0.55 Ga ago. The onset and end of each cycle constrained the assembly periods of supercontinents and the formation epochs of predominantly anorthosite-charnockite complexes of the anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-rapakivi granite magmatic association. Peak of the respective magmatism at the time of Grenvillian Orogeny signified the transition from the tectonics of small lithospheric plates to the subsequent plate tectonics of the current type. The outburst of rapakivi granite magmatism was typical of the second cycle exclusively. The anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-rapakivi granite magmatic series associated with this magmatism originated in back-arc settings, if we consider the latter in a broad sense as corresponding to the rear parts of

  19. New methodical developments for GRANIT

    SciTech Connect

    Baessler, Stefan; Nesvizhevsky, V.; Toperverg, B; Zhernenkov, K.; Gagarski, A; Lychagin, E; Muzychka, A; Strelkov, A; Mietke, A

    2011-01-01

    New methodical developments for the GRANIT spectrometer address further improvements of the critical parameters of this experimental installation, as well as its applications to new fields of research. Keeping in mind an extremely small fraction of ultra cold neutrons (UCN) that could be bound in gravitational quantum states, we look for methods to increase statistics due to: developing UCN sources with maximum phase-space density, counting simultaneously a large fraction of neutrons using position-sensitive detectors, and decreasing detector backgrounds. Also we explore an eventual application of the GRANIT spectrometer beyond the scope of its initial goals, for instance, for reflectometry with UCN.

  20. Status of LLNL granite projects

    SciTech Connect

    Ramspott, L.D.

    1980-12-31

    The status of LLNL Projects dealing with nuclear waste disposal in granitic rocks is reviewed. This review covers work done subsequent to the June 1979 Workshop on Thermomechanical Modeling for a Hardrock Waste Repository and is prepared for the July 1980 Workshop on Thermomechanical-Hydrochemical Modeling for a Hardrock Waste Repository. Topics reviewed include laboratory determination of thermal, mechanical, and transport properties of rocks at conditions simulating a deep geologic repository, and field testing at the Climax granitic stock at the USDOE Nevada Test Site.

  1. Silicified Granites (Bleeding Stone and Ochre Granite) as Global Heritage Stones Resources from Avila (Central of Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Talegon, Jacinta; Iñigo, Adolfo C.; Vicente-Tavera, Santiago; Molina-Ballesteros, Eloy

    2015-04-01

    Silicified Granites have been widely used to build the main Romanesque monuments in the 12 th century of Avila city that was designated a World Heritage Site by the UNESCO in 1985. The stone was used in the Cathedral (12 th century); churches located interior and exterior of the Walls (e.g. Saint Vincent; Saint Peter). During the Renaissance and Gothic period, 15 th century Silicified Granites have been used mainly to buid ribbed vaults in Avila city (e.g. Royal Palace of the Catholic Monarchs, and Chapel of Mosén Rubí). Silicified Granites are related to an intermediate and upper parts of a complex palaeoweathering mantle developed on the Iberian Hercynian Basement (the greatest part of the western Iberian Peninsula and its oldest geological entity). In the Mesozoic the basement underwent tropical weathering processes. The weathered mantle were truncated by the Alpine tectonic movements during the Tertiary, and Its remnants were unconformably covered by more recent sediments and are located in the west and south part of the Duero Basin and in the north edge of the Ambles Valley graben. For the weathering profiles developed on the Hercynian Basement is possible to define three levels from bottom to top: 1) Lower level (biotitic granodiorite/porphyry and aplite dykes); 2) Intermediate level (ochre granite); 3) Upper level (red/white granite). The lower level has been much used as a source of ornamental stone, Avila Grey granite. The porphyry and applite dykes are mainly used to built the Walls of the City. The intermediate level is called Ochre granite or Caleño and was formed from the previous level through a tropical weathering process that, apart from variations in the petrophysical characteristics of the stone, has been accompanied by important mineralogical changes (2:1 and 1:1 phyllosilicates) and decreases in the contents of the most mobile cations. The upper level has received several names, Bleeding stone, Red and White granite or Silcrete and was formed

  2. Experimental study of physical and chemical melting conditions of rare-metal granites at the Voznesenka ore cluster, Primorye region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksyuk, A. M.; Konyshev, A. A.; Korzhinskaya, V. S.; Shapovalov, Yu. B.

    2016-09-01

    The melting of two basic granite varieties in the Voznesenka Complex such as Yaroslavka biotite granite and Voznesenka Li-F granite was subject to experimental studies to analyze and to compare the conditions of their physicochemical formation. The experiments were conducted at 550-700°C and 50-500 MPa in pure water and in 0.1 and 1 m HF aqueous fluorine-bearing solutions. The melting temperature of Voznesenka Li-F granites was 60-70°C lower than that of Yaroslavka biotite granites. The temperature decreased by almost 100°C from the completion of biotite granite crystallization to the completion of Li-F granite crystallization.

  3. The Wuluma granite, Arunta Block, central Australia: An example of in situ, near-isochemical granite formation in a granulite-facies terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, W. J.; Flood, R. H.; Vernon, R. H.; Shaw, S. E.

    1989-06-01

    The Wuluma granite is a small, elongate, relatively undeformed pluton in the Proterozoic Strangways Metamorphic Complex, central Australia. The complex constitutes a supracrustal assemblage that underwent granulite-facies metamorphism 1800 Ma ago. Metamorphism was associated with at least three phases of folding that ultimately produced upright, regional, doubly plunging F 3 folds and isobaric cooling ensued. Generation of the Wuluma granite occurred at ˜ 1750 Ma, based on RbSr isotopic data, during syn-D 3 regional retrogression and rehydration of the terrane. Contacts between the granite and gneisses are invariably gradational. At the pluton margin, banded gneisses grade along strike into granite containing abundant biotite schlieren that parallel regional structures. Granite and pegmatite dykes cut these rocks. Inwards from the contact, the granite is more homogeneous, containing diffuse parallel schlieren and small aligned rectangular feldspar crystals, indicating flow of magma. Rafts of unmelted granofels form a ghost layering; they mimic macroscopic F 3 folds and show only minor retrogressive metamorphic effects. At the pluton core, the granite is homogeneous and structurally isotropic, containing some subrounded granofelsic inclusions, very diffuse schlieren and disaggregated pegmatite dykes. Thus, it appears that an isoclinally folded, vertical body of quartzofeldspathic gneiss was melted "in situ" to form the pluton, which did not break away from the source. The body resembles a tapered diapir and we term this type of pluton a regional migmatite terrane granite. Geochemical data are consistent with the granite forming by anatexis of quartzofeldspathic migmatitic gneisses with appropriate composition. The chemical similarity of both rock types implies derivation of the granite by either partial melting and retention of residual material in the magma or more complete melting, followed by solidification virtually in situ. The latter interpretation is

  4. Granitic magma emplacement and deformation during early-orogenic syn-convergent transtension: The Staré Sedlo complex, Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomek, Filip; Žák, Jiří; Chadima, Martin

    2015-07-01

    The Late Devonian Staré Sedlo complex, Bohemian Massif, was emplaced as a subhorizontal sheeted sill pluton into a transtension zone. The transtensional setting is documented by strong constrictional fabric, corroborated by the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), with variably developed subhorizontal magmatic to solid-state foliation suggesting vertical shortening. Intrusive contacts of the granitoids with metapelitic screens and tapered sill tips indicate that magma wedging was the dominant process of sill propagation. The sills exhibit two intrusive styles, ranging from thin lit-par-lit injections to widely spaced meter-thick sills. These two styles are interpreted as reflecting variable viscosities of intruding magma where low-viscosity magma percolated along foliation planes whereas high-viscosity magma produced more localized thicker sills. We propose that the magma/host rock system in transtension must have evolved from initial crack tip propagation and vertical expansion due to new magma additions through conduit flow to ductile thinning after the magma input had ceased. The sill emplacement and their subsequent deformation are then interpreted as recording early-orogenic syn-convergent sinistral transtension along the rear side of an upper-crustal wedge, which was extruded both upward and laterally in response to subduction and continental underthrusting.

  5. Genesis of a zoned granite stock, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Travis

    1977-01-01

    A composite epizonal stock of biotite granite has intruded a diverse assemblage of metamorphic rocks in the Serpentine Hot Springs area of north-central Seward Peninsula, Alaska. The metamorphic rocks include amphibolite-facies orthogneiss and paragneiss, greenschist-facies fine-grained siliceous and graphitic metasediments, and a variety of carbonate rocks. Lithologic units within the metamorphic terrane trend generally north-northeast and dip moderately toward the southeast. Thrust faults locally juxtapose lithologic units in the metamorphic assemblage, and normal faults displace both the metamorphic rocks and some parts of the granite stock. The gneisses and graphitic metasediments are believed to be late Precambrian in age, but the carbonate rocks are in part Paleozoic. Dating by the potassium-argon method indicates that the granite stock is Late Cretaceous. The stock has sharp discordant contacts, beyond which is a well-developed thermal aureole with rocks of hornblende hornfels facies. The average mode of the granite is 29 percent plagioclase, 31 percent quartz, 36 percent K-feldspar, and 4 percent biotite. Accessory minerals include apatite, magnetite, sphene, allanite, and zircon. Late-stage or deuteric minerals include muscovite, fluorite, tourmaline, quartz, and albite. The stock is a zoned complex containing rocks with several textural facies that are present in four partly concentric zones. Zone 1 is a discontinuous border unit, containing fine- to coarse-grained biotite granite, that grades inward into zone 2. Zone 2 consists of porphyritic biotite granite with oriented phenocrysts of pinkish-gray microcline in a coarse-grained equigranular groundmass of plagioclase, quartz, and biotite. It is in sharp, concordant to discordant contact with rocks of zone 3. Zone 3 consists of seriate-textured biotite granite that has been intruded by bodies of porphyritic biotite granite containing phenocrysts of plagioclase, K-feldspar, quartz, and biotite in an

  6. Timing of Early Proterozoic collisional and extensional events in the granulite-gneiss-charnockite-granite complex, Lake Baikal, USSR: A U-Pb, Rb-Sr, and Sm-Nd isotopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Aftalion, M. ); Bibikova, E.V. ); Bowes, D.R. ); Hopwood, A.M. ); Perchuk, L.L. )

    1991-11-01

    In the Sharyzhalgay Complex of the Lake Baikal region in eastern Siberia Early Proterozoic collisional and extensional events were separated by ca. 100 m.yr. The earlier collisional event, associated with the development of granulites and gneisses as the result of high-grade dynamothermal metamorphism, took place close to 1965 {plus minus} 4 Ma. A {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb vs. {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb isochron for zircon from five size fractions and a six point Rb-Sr whole-rock errorchron give generally corresponding ages of 1956 {plus minus} 8 and 1963 {plus minus} 163 Ma, respectively. The later extensional event, associated with charnockitization due to the uprise of fluids and heat in a regime corresponding to the middle to upper crustal levels of a Basin and Range-type province, was initiated in the 1880-1860 Ma period. The event was continued with magmatic emplacement of granitic masses into the deep levels of caldera-like structures, possibly during the upper time range of lower concordia intercept ages of 1817 +30/{minus}32 and 1797 +40/{minus}44 Ma for two distinctly different zircon populations in a pyroxene-bearing granodiorite interpreted as an evolved (and contaminated) product of the mantle-derived magma that was the source of CO{sub 2} involved in the charnockitization. Upper intercept ages of 2784 +48/{minus}45 and 2775 +61/{minus}55 Ma indicate late Archean crust at depth as the source region of the incorporated zircon. T{sub DM} ages from Sm-Nd isotopic data show that the protolith of the lithologically layered supracrustal assemblage, subsequently polyphase deformed and polymetamorphosed in Early Proterozoic times, was also formed in Early Proterozoic (not Archean) times.

  7. Emanation of radon from household granite.

    PubMed

    Kitto, Michael E; Haines, Douglas K; Arauzo, Hernando Diaz

    2009-04-01

    Emanation of radon (222Rn) from granite used for countertops and mantels was measured with continuous and integrating radon monitors. Each of the 24 granite samples emitted a measurable amount of radon. Of the two analytical methods that utilized electret-based detectors, one measured the flux of radon from the granite surfaces, and the other one measured radon levels in a glass jar containing granite cores. Additional methods that were applied utilized alpha-scintillation cells and a continuous radon monitor. Measured radon flux from the granites ranged from 2 to 310 mBq m-2 s-1, with most granites emitting <20 mBq m-2 s-1. Emanation of radon from granites encapsulated in airtight containers produced equilibrium concentrations ranging from <0.01 to 11 Bq kg-1 when alpha-scintillation cells were used, and from <0.01 to 4.0 Bq kg-1 when the continuous radon monitor was used.

  8. Thermomechanical properties of Stripa granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myer, L.

    1982-09-01

    The Stripa material properties testing program was initiated to study, by laboratory testing, the thermomechanical behavior of the Stripa rock mass and to provide material properties for input into numerical programs for simulation of the in situ heater experiments at Stripa. Measurement of elastic moduli and coefficients of thermal expansion of dry, intact samples of Stripa granite was completed in fiscal year 1980. A summary of the most significant findings resulting from tests on six samples are presented.

  9. Riftogenic A-type granites of the Polar Urals, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udoratina, Oksana; Kulikova, Ksenia; Shuysky, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    There are granitoids-markers of the riftogenic geodynamic setting in the Polar Urals. Isotope-geochronological and petrographic-petrogeochemical data on granitoids indicate the post-collisional conditions of their formation. Granitoids along with other alkaline massifs North Urals mark rifting in this part of the Urals. These granitoids formed after the collision peak of Timanides formation, after 520 Ma in the absolute chronology, when the intensity of magmatism fell sharply and only small volumes of rhyolite and A-type granites were formed. Granitoid massifs occur within the Northern Urals fragment of the Central Ural uplift composed of preuralide complexes. According to the recent data (U-Pb, SIMS) for single zircon the granitoids of the massifs (hereinafter Ma): Syadatayakhinsky (516±2, 503±6.3), Ochetinsky (500±5), Ingilorsky (487.3±6.9, 503±5), the northern part of Gerdizsky (496.2±7.1), Marunkeu Ridge (495±2.4) and part of massifs of kharbeysky complex of Laptayugansky and Evyugansky domes (497±3 and 487.1±2.1) were formed in the Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician time. Within rare metal ore deposits of Taykeyusky ore unit, except for older granitoids with ages 600-560-540 Ma, the granitoids occur with the following ages: Longotyugansky (512±8, 482±8, 511±11), Taykeusky (513±3.4, 518.6±3.9, 477±12), Ust-Mramorny (516±16). There are the following situation localization of granites in the area of the Central Urals uplift: 1) in Ochetinsky and Syadatayakhinsky blocks without significant tectonic deformations among greenschist metamorphites; 2) in the areas of intense tectonic transformations (Longotyugansky, Taykeusky, Ust-Mramorny), but also among greenschist metamorphites; 3) in highly metamorphized rocks (Marunkeu Ridge, Ingilorsky, Gerdizsky, small bodies of Kharbeysky complex). Granitoids differ by the material and structural-textural features of the rocks. Some are massive with preserved granite fabric (1), the other have clearly expressed

  10. Late Paleozoic granitic rocks of the Chukchi Peninsula: Composition and location in the structure of the Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchitskaya, M. V.; Sokolov, S. D.; Kotov, A. B.; Natapov, L. M.; Belousova, E. A.; Katkov, S. M.

    2015-07-01

    An Early Carboniferous (352-359 Ma) U-Pb (TIMS, SIMS) age is established for granitic rocks of the Kibera pluton, quartz sienites of the Kuekvun pluton, and granites from the pebbles in the basement of Carboniferous rocks of the Kuul and Kuekvun uplifts in the Central Chukotka region. These data support the suggestion of granitic magmatism to occur in the region in the Late Paleozoic. The petrogeochemistry of most granitic rocks of the Kibera and Kuekvun plutons is similar to that of I-type granites, and their age coincides with tectonic events of Ellesmerian Orogeny in the Arctic region at the Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous boundary. The Devonian-Early Carboniferous granitic complexes extend to the territories of the Arctic Alaska, Yukon, and Arctic Canada, which indicates a common geological evolution within the Chukotka-Arctic Alaska block, which experienced a motion away from Arctic Canada.

  11. GRANITE PEAK ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, Donald F.; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    The Granite Peak Roadless Area occupies an area of about 5 sq mi in the southern part of the Trinity Alps of the Klamath Mountains, about 12 mi north-northeast of Weaverville, California. Rock and stream-sediment samples were analyzed. All streams draining the roadless area were sampled and representative samples of the rock types in the area were collected. Background values were established for each element and anomalous values were examined within their geologic settings and evaluated for their significance. On the basis of mineral surveys there seems little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources.

  12. Dirty or Tidy ? Contrasting peraluminous granites in a collapsing Orogen: Examples from the French Massif Central

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaros, Arnaud; Pichavant, Michel; Moyen, Jean-François; Cuney, Michel; Deveaud, Sarah; Gloaguen, Eric; Melleton, Jérémie

    2013-04-01

    Post collisional collapse commonly enhances crustal melting. Such melting typically produces peraluminous granitic magmas. In the French Massif Central, a mid-crustal segment of the western Variscan belt, two large granitic bodies were produced during the collapse of the Variscan Belt. The St Sylvestre Leucogranitic Complex (SSyL) in the western part of the Massif Central and the Velay Migmatitic Complex (VMC) in the Eastern part. Although these two complexes are formed in similar geodynamic context they present meaningful petrological and geochemical differences. The VMC (~305 Ma) is clearly intrusive in migmatitic terranes. The migmatitic host recorded two successive melting events M3 (720 °C and 5kb) dated between 335 and 315 Ma and M4 (850°C and 4 kb) dated at 305 Ma. The compositions of the VMC are strictly H2O-undersaturated and ranges from leucogranitic to granodioritic. Three main successive granite types have been distinguished (1) A heterogeneous banded biotite granite, (2) A main biotite-cordierite granite, where cordierite can be prismatic, as cockade or pseudomorphic (3) a late magmatic with large K-feldspar phenocryst and prismatic cordierite. The compositions of the VMC granites are quite similar to typical Australian S-type granites in the sense that they also show a positive correlation between ferromagnesian abundance and aluminosity. The SSyL (~320 Ma) is intrusive in upper greenschist facies to upper amphibolite migmatitic metasediment and orthogneiss (~3kb). The compositional variety observed in the SSyL suggests a continuous trend from a moderately mafic, peraluminous magma (cd- and sill- granite) to a H2O saturated granite ("two-mica" granite) facies and finally to an extremely felsic, H2O-saturated magma. Three granitic units have been recognized in the SSyL: (1) the western "Brame Unit" composed of the less evolved cd- and sill- granite facies (2) the central "St Sylvestre Unit", composed mainly by U-rich two-mica granite, intruded by two

  13. FROGS (Friends of Granites) report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Calvin

    This VGP News, which is devoted to petrology, is a good one for noting the existence of FROGS. FROGS is, as the name suggests, an informal organization of people whose research relates in one way or another to granitic rocks. Its purpose has been to promote communication among geoscientists with different perspectives and concerns about felsic plutonism. Initially, a major focus was experimental petrology and integration of field-oriented and lab-oriented viewpoints; now that there is the opportunity to communicate with the Eos readership, an obvious additional goal will be to bring together volcanic and plutonic views of felsic magmatism.FROGS first gathered in late 1982 under the guidance of E-an Zen and Pete Toulmin (both at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Reston, Va.), who saw a need for greater interaction among those interested in granites and for renewed, focused experimental investigations. They produced two newsletters (which were sent out by direct mail) and organized an informal meeting at the Geological Society of America meeting at Indianapolis, Ind., and then turned over the FROG reins to Sue Kieffer (USGS, Flagstaff, Ariz.) and John Clemens (Arizona State University, Tempe). They generated another newsletter, which was directly mailed to a readership that had grown beyond 200.

  14. 6. Photocopied August 1971 from Photo 13731, Granite Folder #1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopied August 1971 from Photo 13731, Granite Folder #1, Engineering Department, Utah Power and Light Co., Salt Lake City, Utah. GRANITE STATION, MAY 24, 1915. - Utah Power Company, Granite Hydroelectric Plant, Holladay, Salt Lake County, UT

  15. A-type granite and the Red Sea opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Robert G.; DeBari, Susan; Peterman, Zell

    1992-03-01

    Miocene-Oligocene A-type granite intrudes the eastern side of the Red Sea margin within the zone of extension from Jiddah, Saudi Arabia south to Yemen. The intrusions developed in the early stages of continental extension as Arabia began to move slowly away from Africa (around 30-20 Ma). Within the narrow zone of extension silicic magmas formed dikes, sills, small plutons and extrusive equivalents. In the Jabal Tirf area of Saudi Arabia these rocks occur in an elongate zone consisting of late Precambrian basement to the east, which is gradually invaded by mafic dikes. The number of dikes increases westward until an igneous complex is produced parallel to the present Red Sea axis. The Jabal Tirf igneous complex consists of diabase and rhyolite-granophyre sills (20-24 Ma). Although these are intrusine intrusive rocks their textures indicate shallow depths of intrusion (< 1 km). To the south, in the Yemen, contemporaneous with alkali basaltic eruptions (26-30 Ma) and later silicic eruptions, small plutons, dikes, and stocks of alkali granite invaded thick (1500 m) volcanic series, at various levels and times. Erosion within the uplifted margin of Yemen suggests that the maximum depth of intrusion was less than 1-2 km. Granophyric intrusions (20-30 Ma) within mafic dike swarms similar to the Jabal Tirf complex are present along the western edge of the Yemen volcanic plateau, marking a north-south zone of continental extension. The alkali granites of Yemen consist primarily of perthitic feldspar and quartz with some minor alkali amphiboles and acmite. These granites represent water-poor, hypersolvus magmas generated from parent alkali basalt magmas. The granophyric, two-feldspar granites associated with the mafic dike swarms and layered gabbros formed by fractional crystallization from tholeiitic basalt parent developed in the early stages of extension. Initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios of these rocks and their bulk chemistry indicate that production of peralkaline and

  16. A-type granite and the Red Sea opening

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, R.G.; DeBari, S.; Peterman, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Miocene-Oligocene A-type granite intrudes the eastern side of the Red Sea margin within the zone of extension from Jiddah, Saudi Arabia south to Yemen. The intrusions developed in the early stages of continental extension as Arabia began to move slowly away from Africa (around 30-20 Ma). Within the narrow zone of extension silicic magmas formed dikes, sills, small plutons and extrusive equivalents. In the Jabal Tirf area of Saudi Arabia these rocks occur in an elongate zone consisting of late Precambrian basement to the east, which is gradually invaded by mafic dikes. The number of dikes increases westward until an igneous complex is produced parallel to the present Red Sea axis. The Jabal Tirf igneous complex consists of diabase and rhyolite-granophyre sills (20-24 Ma). Although these are intrusine intrusive rocks their textures indicate shallow depths of intrusion (< 1 km). To the south, in the Yemen, contemporaneous with alkali basaltic eruptions (26-30 Ma) and later silicic eruptions, small plutons, dikes, and stocks of alkali granite invaded thick (1500 m) volcanic series, at various levels and times. Erosion within the uplifted margin of Yemen suggests that the maximum depth of intrusion was less than 1-2 km. Granophyric intrusions (20-30 Ma) within mafic dike swarms similar to the Jabal Tirf complex are present along the western edge of the Yemen volcanic plateau, marking a north-south zone of continental extension. The alkali granites of Yemen consist primarily of perthitic feldspar and quartz with some minor alkali amphiboles and acmite. These granites represent water-poor, hypersolvus magmas generated from parent alkali basalt magmas. The granophyric, two-feldspar granites associated with the mafic dike swarms and layered gabbros formed by fractional crystallization from tholeiitic basalt parent developed in the early stages of extension. Initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of these rocks and their bulk chemistry indicate that production of peralkaline and

  17. Fracture process zone in granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zang, A.; Wagner, F.C.; Stanchits, S.; Janssen, C.; Dresen, G.

    2000-01-01

    In uniaxial compression tests performed on Aue granite cores (diameter 50 mm, length 100 mm), a steel loading plate was used to induce the formation of a discrete shear fracture. A zone of distributed microcracks surrounds the tip of the propagating fracture. This process zone is imaged by locating acoustic emission events using 12 piezoceramic sensors attached to the samples. Propagation velocity of the process zone is varied by using the rate of acoustic emissions to control the applied axial force. The resulting velocities range from 2 mm/s in displacement-controlled tests to 2 ??m/s in tests controlled by acoustic emission rate. Wave velocities and amplitudes are monitored during fault formation. P waves transmitted through the approaching process zone show a drop in amplitude of 26 dB, and ultrasonic velocities are reduced by 10%. The width of the process zone is ???9 times the grain diameter inferred from acoustic data but is only 2 times the grain size from optical crack inspection. The process zone of fast propagating fractures is wider than for slow ones. The density of microcracks and acoustic emissions increases approaching the main fracture. Shear displacement scales linearly with fracture length. Fault plane solutions from acoustic events show similar orientation of nodal planes on both sides of the shear fracture. The ratio of the process zone width to the fault length in Aue granite ranges from 0.01 to 0.1 inferred from crack data and acoustic emissions, respectively. The fracture surface energy is estimated from microstructure analysis to be ???2 J. A lower bound estimate for the energy dissipated by acoustic events is 0.1 J. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Archaean greenstone belts and associated granitic rocks - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhaeusser, Carl R.

    2014-12-01

    Archaean greenstone belts and associated granitic rocks comprise some of the most diverse rock types on the Earth's surface and were formed during the early stages of the development of the planet from Eoarchaean to Neoarchaean times - a period extending back from about 4000 to 2500 million years ago. Because of their great age, these rocks have received unprecedented attention from a wide spectrum of Earth scientists striving to learn more about the evolution of the Earth, including its crust, hydrosphere, atmosphere, the commencement of life, and the nature and distribution of mineral deposits. The knowledge gained thus far has accumulated incrementally, beginning with solid field-based studies, the latter being supplemented with increasingly advanced technological developments that have enabled scientists to probe fundamental questions of Earth history. Archaean granite-greenstone terranes display considerable variability of lithologies and geotectonic events, yet there are unifying characteristics that distinguish them from other geological environments. Most greenstone belts consist of a wide variety of volcanic and sedimentary rocks that reflect different evolutionary conditions of formation and all have invariably been influenced by subsequent geotectonic factors, including the intrusion of ultramafic, mafic and granitic complexes, resulting in widespread deformation, metamorphism, metasomatism, as well as mineralization. Geochemical and isotopic age determinations have shown how complex these ancient rocks are and efforts at understanding the nature and evolution of the hydrosphere, atmosphere and primitive life have made Archaean terranes exciting environments in which to study. Conflicting views as to the nature, history and origin of many of the rock types and events in Archaean terranes has been ongoing and stimulating. This review attempts to describe the main lithotypes and other characteristics of granite-greenstone belt geology and points to some

  19. Th-REE- and Nb-Ta-accessory minerals in post-collisional Ediacaran felsic rocks from the Katerina Ring Complex (S. Sinai, Egypt): An assessment for the fractionation of Y/Nb, Th/Nb, La/Nb and Ce/Pb in highly evolved A-type granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, J. A.; Molina, J. F.; Bea, F.; Abu Anbar, M.; Montero, P.

    2016-08-01

    The relationships of Y/Nb, Th/Nb, La/Nb and Ce/Pb ratios in A-type felsic rocks from the Ediacaran Katerina Ring Complex, northernmost Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS; S. Sinai, Egypt), are investigated in this work to understand their behavior during generation of highly evolved granitic magmas and to explore the nature of magma sources. Textural and compositional relationships of cognate Th-REE- and Nb-Ta-accessory minerals in Katerina felsic rocks show that chevkinite-group minerals (CGM), monazite, thorite, allanite and xenotime formed from residual liquids in quartz syenite porphyries, quartz monzonites and peralkaline granites, whereas in aluminous granites, allanite and monazite crystallized early, and thorite and columbite formed from residual liquids. Relationships of Y/Nb, Th/Nb, La/Nb and Ce/Pb ratios with Zr/Hf ratios in the aluminous granites and with Be abundances in the peralkaline granites suggest a decrease in La/Nb and Ce/Pb ratios in the former, and in Y/Nb and La/Nb ratios in the latter with crystallization progress. This contrasts with absence of systematic variations of Th/Nb and Ce/Pb ratios in the peralkaline compositions and of Y/Nb ratio in the aluminous ones. In this latter, Th/Nb ratio can present a significant decrease only in highly evolved compositions. An analysis of Y/Nb, Th/Nb, La/Nb and Ce/Pb relationships in worldwide OIB and subduction-related magmatic suites reveals that A-type felsic rocks with (Th/Nb)N < 1.3, (La/Nb)N < 1.3, and (Ce/Pb)N > 1 may have A1-type affinity, and those with (Th/Nb)N > 2, (La/Nb)N > 2, and (Ce/Pb)N < 1 tend to present A2-type affinity. The crystal fractionation of Th-LREE- and Nb-Ta-accessory minerals and mixing of components derived from the two granite groups may cause deviations from these compositional limits that can be evaluated using constraints imposed by Th/Nb-La/Nb, Ce/Pb-Th/Nb and Ce/Pb-La/Nb relationships in OIB and subduction-related magmatic suites. Three mantle sources might have been

  20. CO2 laser cutting of natural granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, A.; Mejías, A.; Soto, R.; Quintero, F.; del Val, J.; Boutinguiza, M.; Lusquiños, F.; Pardo, J.; Pou, J.

    2016-01-01

    Commercial black granite boards (trade name: "Zimbabwe black granite") 10 mm thick, were successfully cut by a 3.5 kW CO2 laser source. Cutting quality, in terms of kerf width and roughness of the cut wall, was assessed by means of statistically planned experiments. No chemical modification of the material in the cutting walls was detected by the laser beam action. Costs associated to the process were calculated, and the main factors affecting them were identified. Results reported here demonstrate that cutting granite boards could be a new application of CO2 laser cutting machines provided a supersonic nozzle is used.

  1. Potassium-argon dating of the cape granite and a granitized xenolith at sea point.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, G D; Basson, H H; Verbeek, A A

    1968-11-01

    Ages obtained by potassium-argon dating are reported for the total rock, light mineral fraction and heavy mineral fractions of the Cape Granite, and of a granitized xenolith derived from the Malmesbury sediments. These ages lie between 430 and 554 million years. The heavy mineral fractions from each rock type show the oldest age, 540 (granite) and 554 (xenolith) million years. These ages are interpreted as lower limits, and the granite age confirms the age of 553 million years found by rubidium-strontium dating. The coincidence of the ages of the different fractions of the granite and xenolith samples is discussed in the light of the different suggestions about the age of the Malmesbury sediments. The conclusion is reached that all pre-granitization history has been eliminated. The possibility of the use of argon retention as a measure of metamorphic activity is suggested.

  2. AMS studies in Portuguese variscan granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant'Ovaia, Helena; Martins, Helena; Noronha, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    A large volume of Variscan granitic rocks outcrop in Central Iberian Zone which are well documented concerning geological mapping, petrography and geochemistry but whose magnetic characteristics and fabric remain unknown. In this study we summarize the available AMS data from approximately 644 sampling stations (5152 samples) on different massifs of Variscan Portuguese granites. Despite their different geological, petrographic and geochemical characteristics, magnetic susceptibility (K) values obtained for the majority of the studied granites range from 15 to 300 × 10-6 SI. The dominant paramagnetic behaviour of the granite bodies reflects the presence of ilmenite as the main iron oxide. This feature indicates the reduced conditions involved in the granite melt formation during the Variscan orogeny. The two-mica granites show K values ranging between 15 to 70 × 10-6 SI which are lower than values displayed by the biotite-rich facies scattered within the interval of 70 and 300 × 10-6 SI. The magnetite-bearing granites are scarce but represented in Lavadores, Gerês and Manteigas. Even so, only the Lavadores body could be considered as a true magnetite-type granite (K >3.0 × 10-3 SI) in face of its K, comprised between 1550 and 19303 × 10-6 SI. Magnetic anisotropy can be used as a "marker" for the deformation experienced by granite mushes during their crustal emplacement and further cooling. Magnetic anisotropy can thus be correlated with the finite deformation of a rock, as record by mineral fabrics. Post-tectonic granites, such as those from Vila Pouca de Aguiar, Pedras Salgadas, Caria, Vila da Ponte, Chaves and Lamas de Olo, have a magnetic anisotropy <2.5% which corresponds to a deformation hardly visible to the naked eye. Nevertheless, at microscopic scale, these granites display almost ubiquitous magmatic to submagmatic microstructures (rare wavy extinction in quartz, erratic subgrain boundaries in quartz and, eventually, folded or kinked biotites). For

  3. Grusification of granite (scheme based on the study of granites from Sudety Mts., SW Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajdas, Bartlomiej; Michalik, Marek

    2014-05-01

    Gruses that are developed on the Karkonosze granite (three outcrops) and the Izera granite (one outcrop) were investigated using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope equipped with EDS and electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction, IR spectrometry, chemical analysis (ICP-AES and ICP-MS), hydrogen and oxygen isotopic ratio determination and K-Ar dating. Three groups of samples were distinguished according to the degree of grusification (group I - compact granite; group II - friable granite; group III - granitic grus). The results of the examination allowed to present the simplified scheme of the grusification: 1. Development of microcracks (caused by tectonic stress, mechanical upload or magma cooling processes) promote circulation of hydrothermal fluids in granites; 2. The presence of the microcracks in granite facilitate the circulation of low-temperature fluids (low-temperature hydrothermal or weathering fluids). Fluids cause hydration and expansion of primary biotite (vermiculitization), what leads to development of secondary cracks in a rock. Fluids can also induce advanced alteration of plagioclases into clay minerals (mainly smectite or vermiculite). Expansion of biotite during vermiculitization is the most important factor in grusification. Other processes of alteration also contribute to grusification. Hydrothermal fluids in granite contribute the increase of alteration degree of primary minerals (e.g. sericitization and albitization of feldspar, chloritization or muscovitization of biotite, decomposition of monazite-(Ce) and formation of secondary REE phosphates). If primary biotite is subjected to muscovitization or chloritization, complete grusification of granite does not occur because of lack of vermiculitation.

  4. Granite Exfoliation, Cosumnes River Watershed, Somerset, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, I. Q.; Neiss-Cortez, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the Sierra Nevada foothills of California there are many exposed granite plutons within the greater Sierra Nevada batholith. As with most exposed parts of the batholith, these granite slabs exfoliate. It is important to understand exfoliation for issues of public safety as it can cause rock slides near homes, roads, and recreation areas. Through observation, measuring, and mapping we characterize exfoliation in our Cosumnes River watershed community.

  5. Neutrons and Granite: Transport and Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bedrossian, P J

    2004-04-13

    In typical ground materials, both energy deposition and radionuclide production by energetic neutrons vary with the incident particle energy in a non-monotonic way. We describe the overall balance of nuclear reactions involving neutrons impinging on granite to demonstrate these energy-dependencies. While granite is a useful surrogate for a broad range of soil and rock types, the incorporation of small amounts of water (hydrogen) does alter the balance of nuclear reactions.

  6. Rheology of Granitic Magmas During Ascent and Emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petford, Nick

    Considerable progress has been made over the past decade in understanding the static rheological properties of granitic magmas in the continental crust. Changes in H2O content, CO2 content, and oxidation state of the interstitial melt phase have been identified as important compositional factors governing the rheodynamic behavior of the solid/fluid mixture. Although the strengths of granitic magmas over the crystallization interval are still poorly constrained, theoretical investigations suggest that during magma ascent, yield strengths of the order of 9 kPa are required to completely retard the upward flow in meter-wide conduits. In low Bagnold number magma suspensions with moderate crystal contents (solidosities 0.1 0.3), viscous fluctuations may lead to flow differentiation by shear-enhanced diffusion. AMS and microstructural studies support the idea that granite plutons are intruded as crystal-poor liquids ( 50%), with fabric and foliation development restricted to the final stages of emplacement. If so, then these fabrics contain no information on the ascent (vertical transport) history of the magma. Deformation of a magmatic mush during pluton emplacement can enhance significantly the pressure gradient in the melt, resulting in a range of local macroscopic flow structures, including layering, crystal alignment, and other mechanical instabilities such as shear zones. As the suspension viscosity varies with stress rate, it is not clear how the timing of proposed rheological transitions formulated from simple equations for static magma suspensions applies to mixtures undergoing shear. New theories of magmas as multiphase flows are required if the full complexity of granitic magma rheology is to be resolved.

  7. Igneous petrogenesis and tectonic setting of granitic rocks from the eastern Blue Ridge, Alabama Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, M.S. . Geology Dept.); Allison, D.T. . Geology Dept.); Tull, J.F. . Geology Dept.); Bieler, D.B. . Geology Dept.)

    1994-03-01

    A span of 150 my of orogenic activity is recorded within the granitic rocks of the eastern Blue Ridge of Alabama (EBR). Four discrete episodes of plutonism can be differentiated, each event exhibiting distinct field relations and geochemical signatures. (1) Penobscotian stage: this initial stage of plutonic activity is represented by the Elkahatchee Quartz Diorite (EQD), a premetamorphic (495 Ma) batholith and the largest intrusive complex (880 km[sup 2]) exposed in the Blue Ridge. Calc-alkaline I-type tonalite-granodiorite are the principal lithologies, with subordinate cumulate hbl-bt diorite, metadacite, granite and trondhjemite. The parental tonalitic magmas are interpreted to have been derived from a subducted MORB source under eclogite to get amphibolite conditions. (2) Taconic stage: the Kowaliga augen gneiss (KAG) and the Zana granite gneiss (ZG) are 460 Ma granitic bodies that reside in the SE extremity and structurally highest portion of the EBR. Both of these bodies are pre-metamorphic with strongly elongate sill- and pod-like shapes concordant with S[sub 1] foliation. Granite and granodiorite comprise the bulk of the KAG. (3) Acadian stage: Rockford Granite (RG), Bluff springs Granite (BSG, 366 Ma), and Almond Trondhjemite represent a suite of pre- to syn-metamorphic granitic intrusions. (4) late-Acadian stage: The Blakes Ferry pluton (BFP) is a post-kinematic pluton displaying spectacular by schlieren igneous flow structures, but no metamorphic fabric. The pluton's age can be bracketed between a 366 Ma age on the BSG and a 324 Ma K-Ar muscovite age on the BFP. BFP's petrogenesis has involved partial melting a MORB source followed by assimilation of metasedimentary host rock.

  8. The adsorption behavior of U(VI) on granite.

    PubMed

    Fan, Q H; Hao, L M; Wang, C L; Zheng, Z; Liu, C L; Wu, W S

    2014-03-01

    The effects of pH, counter ions and temperature on the adsorption of U(VI) on Beishan granite (BsG) were investigated in the presence and absence of fulvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA). The adsorption edge of U(VI) on BsG suggested that U(VI) adsorption was mainly controlled by ion exchange and outer-sphere complexation at low pH, whereas inner-sphere complex was the dominant adsorption species in the pH range of 4.0-9.0. Above pH 9.0, Na2U2O7 might play an important role in the rise of U(VI) adsorption again. Counter ions such as Cl(-), SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) can provoke U(VI) adsorption on BsG to some extent, which was directly correlated to the complexing ability of U(VI)-ligand. More noticeably, the large enhancement of U(VI) adsorption in the presence of phosphate can be attributed to the ternary complex formation (BsG-PO4-UO2), precipitation ((UO2)3(PO4)2(s)) and secondary phase (Na-autunite). Both FA and HA can slightly increase U(VI) adsorption at low pH, whereas they strongly inhibited U(VI) adsorption at high pH range. Artificial synthesized granite (AsG) prepared in the laboratory is impossible to use as an analogue of natural granite because of the large difference in the adsorption and surface properties.

  9. Formation of a Granite Bodies in Depleted Granulite Terranes: the Wuluma Granite, Central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavaure, S.; Sawyer, E. W.

    2009-05-01

    The Wuluma Granite (ca.17 km2) is hosted by Palaeoproterozoic, granulite facies metasedimentary and metaigneous rocks. It is believed to have formed by in situ partial melting of quartzo-feldspathic gneisses at 1728±3 Ma due to the influx of an externally derived aqueous fluid after the granulite facies metamorphism. We have reinvestigated the Wuluma Granite and find that most contacts between the granite and the host granulites are intrusive, not gradational. Granite occurs as thin (<1m) subconcordant sheets and dykes in country rocks that contain fresh orthopyroxene and cordierite without much replacement by hydrous minerals. Screens of country rock are common within the granite, and many contain metapelitic rocks that have leucosome and melanosome structures similar those found in the country rocks. Although some of the migmatite structures in the screens still contain garnet, cordierite and orthopyroxene, in most these minerals are replaced by biotite. Biotite is the only ferromagnesian mineral in the thinnest screens of country rock. All the screens contain subconcordant sheets and dykes of granite; typically a narrow selvedge is developed between the intrusive granite and the rocks of the screen; selvedges are either rich in biotite or in quartz depending on the host rock type. Schlieren are common throughout the granite and represent the last vestiges of the country rocks in the granite; there is much morphological and mineralogical variation among the schlieren. The Wuluma granite consists of innumerable thin (less than a metre) subparallel sheets and cross-cutting dykes, that are distinguished by variations in grain size, microstructure and the proportion of minerals present. The earliest phase to be porphyritic and rich in biotite, whereas the last is leucocratic, coarse grained and locally forms dykes up to 20m wide. The centre of the granite contains large (1 cm) crystals of garnet and, more rarely, cordierite. However, in many places these have been

  10. Compositional evolution and substitutions in disseminated and nodular tourmaline from leucocratic granites: Examples from the Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buriánek, David; Novák, Milan

    2007-04-01

    Two distinct textural types of tourmaline have been distinguished in leucocratic granites of the Bohemian Massif (Moldanubicum, Saxothuringicum): (i) commonly euhedral disseminated tourmaline (DT) crystallized during relatively early stage of the granite consolidation, and (ii) typically interstitial nodular tourmaline (NT) formed during the stage transitional from late solidus to early subsolidus crystallization. The following substitutions (exchange vectors) participated in tourmaline from the studied granites: (1) X□ YAl XNa - 1 YR 2+- 1 in the DT granites from the Moldanubicum; (2) X□ YAl 3WO 2XNa - 1 YR 2+- 3 W(OH) - 2 and (6) XNa YR 2+WF X□ - 1 YAl - 1 WOH - 1 in the DT and NT granites from the Saxothuringicum. Tourmaline in the NT granites from the Moldanubicum yielded a complicated pattern indicating participation of several substitutions such as (1), (2) and (3) X□ YAl 2WO XNa - 1 YR 2+- 2 W(OH) - 1 . Very similar chemical compositions and similar fractionation trends in both DT and NT tourmaline types indicate crystallization in a quasi-closed system from early solidus to early subsolidus stage of granite consolidation. Substitutions in tourmaline from NT granites in the Moldanubicum are more similar to substitutions in tourmaline from Li-poor granitic pegmatites in the same region relative to tourmaline from DT granites. Plotting up EMP analyses of tourmaline indicates that a combination of two ternary diagrams Al-Fe-Mg and Na-Ca- X-site vacancy, coupled with simple plots involving single cations (elements) such as Na/Al, F/Na, Fe/Mg, characterizes both their chemical composition as well as the probable substitution mechanisms. Complex diagrams such as R1 + R2 versus R3 do not enable a proper investigation of the compositional evolution in the X-site and W-site and oversimplify the real substitutions. As a consequence the use of specific diagrams for specific tourmaline compositions (e.g., Ca-rich, Li-rich) is recommended.

  11. Are cumulate granites characteristic of migmatitic gneiss domes? An example from the Fosdick Mountains of Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Caitlin R.; Yakymchuk, Chris; Brown, Michael; Fanning, C. Mark; Korhonen, Fawna J.; Piccoli, Philip M.; Siddoway, Christine S.

    2014-05-01

    In the Fosdick migmatite-granite complex, Cretaceous granites yield U-Pb zircon crystallization ages of 117-102 Ma, corresponding to the timing of doming during a regional transition from transpression to transtension that facilitated exhumation of the complex. The results of P-T phase equilibria modeling and occurrence of leucosome-bearing normal-sense shear zones are consistent with suprasolidus conditions during the early stages of exhumation. Commonly, leucosomes in normal-sense shear zones and sub-horizontal sheeted granites within the complex have coarse blocky plagioclase or K-feldspar grains with interstitial quartz, suggesting a cumulate origin. The Cretaceous granites have whole rock Sr and Nd and zircon Hf and O isotope compositions consistent with derivation from regionally-associated source materials comprising a Devonian-Carboniferous calc-alkaline granodiorite suite (dominant component) and a Cambrian metaturbidite sequence (minor component). However, the major and trace element chemistry of these granites is highly variable and inconsistent with melt compositions expected from simple anatexis of such source materials. Furthermore, major element compositions are inconsistent with those of cotectic granites and more variable than those reported from melt inclusions. The granites typically have large positive Eu anomalies and the overall geochemistry is consistent with the early accumulation of feldspar and quartz, and drainage of fractionated melt. These granites are interpreted to record the collapse of sub-horizontal partially-crystallized layers of magma by filter pressing during vertical shortening associated with dome exhumation, leaving behind cumulate-rich residues. Consequently, the extracted melt is expected to be more evolved and variable than compositions of experimental melts and melt inclusions in peritectic minerals. A potential sink for melt complementary to the cumulate granites is represented by the Cretaceous Byrd Coast Granite suite

  12. Thermometers and thermobarometers in granitic systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, J.L.; Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; Mazdab, F.; ,

    2008-01-01

    The ability to determine the thermal and barometric history during crystallization and emplacement of granitic plutons has been enhanced by several new calibrations applicable to granitic mineral assemblages. Other existing calibrations for granitic plutons have continued to be popular and fairly robust. Recent advances include the trace element thermometers Ti-in-quartz, Ti-in-zircon, and Zr-in-sphene (titanite), which need to be further evaluated on the roles of reduced activities due to lack of a saturating phase, the effect of pressure dependence (particularly for the Ti-in-zircon thermometer), and how resistive these thermometers are to subsolidus reequilibration. As zircon and sphene are also hosts to radiogenic isotopes, these minerals potentially also provide new insights into the temperature - time history of magmas. When used in conjunction with pressure-sensitive mineral equilibria in the same rocks, a complete assessment of the P-T-t (pressure-temperature-time) path is possible given that the mineralogy of plutons can reflect crystallization over a range of pressure and temperature during ascent and emplacement and that many intrusions are now seen as forming over several millions of years during the protracted history of batholith construction. Accessory mineral saturation thermometers, such as those for zircon, apatite, and allanite, provide a different and powerful perspective, specifically that of the temperature of the onset of crystallization of these minerals, which can allow an estimate of the range of temperature between the liquidus and solidus of a given pluton. In assessment of the depth of crystallization and emplacement of granitic plutons, the Al-in-hornblende remains popular for metaluminous granites when appropriately corrected for temperature. For peraluminous granites, potential new calibrations exist for the assemblages bearing garnet, biotite, plagioclase, muscovite, and quartz. Other thermometers, based on oxygen abundance, and

  13. Reconnaissance geology and geochronology of the Precambrian of the Granite Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterman, Zell E.; Hildreth, Robert A.

    1978-01-01

    The Precambrian of the western part of the Granite Mountains, Wyoming, contains a metamorphic complex of gneisses, schists, and amphibolites that were derived through amphibolite-grade metamorphism from a sedimentary-volcanic sequence perhaps similar to that exposed in the southeastern Wind River Mountains. Whole-rock Rb-Sr dating places the time of metamorphism at 2,860?80 million years. A high initial 87Sr/ 86 S r ratio of 0.7048 suggests that either the protoliths or the source terrane of the sedimentary component is several hundred million years older than the time of metamorphism. Following an interval of 300:t100 million years for which the geologic record is lacking or still undeciphered, the metamorphic complex was intruded by a batholith and satellite bodies of medium- to coarse-grained, generally massive biotite granite and related pegmatite and aplite. The main body of granite is dated at 2,550?60 million years by the Rb-Sr method. Limited data suggest that diabase dikes were emplaced and nephrite veins were formed only shortly after intrusion of the granite. Emplacement of the granite at about 2,550 million years ago appears to be related to a major period of regional granitic plutonism in the Precambrian of southern and western Wyoming. Granites, in the strict sense, that are dated between 2,450 and 2,600 million years occur in the Teton Range, the Sierra Madre, the Medicine Bow Mountains and the Laramie Range. This episode of granitic plutonism occured some 50 to 100 million years later than the major tonalitic to granitic plutonism in the Superior province of northern Minnesota and adjacent Ontario-the nearest exposed Precambrian W terrane that is analogous to the Wyoming province. Initial 87Sr / 86Sr ratios of some of the Wyoming granites are higher than expected if the rocks had been derived from juvenile magmas and it is likely that older crustal rocks were involved to some degree in the generation of these granites. Slightly to highly disturbed

  14. Do S-type granites commonly sample infracrustal sources? New results from an integrated O, U-Pb and Hf isotope study of zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, Sarah K.; Gillespie, Martin R.; Graham, Colin M.; Hinton, Richard W.; Oliver, Grahame J. H.; Kelly, Nigel M.

    2010-07-01

    In contrast to I-type granites, which commonly comprise infracrustal and supracrustal sources, S-type granites typically incorporate predominantly supracrustal sources. The initial aim of this study was to identify the sources of three Scottish Caledonian (~460 Ma) S-type granites (Kemnay, Cove and Nigg Bay) by conducting oxygen, U-Pb and Hf isotope analyses in zircon in order to characterise one potential end-member magma involved in the genesis of the voluminous late Caledonian (~430-400 Ma) I-type granites. Field, whole-rock geochemical and isotopic data are consistent with the generation of the S-type granites by melting their Dalradian Supergroup country rocks. While Hf isotope compositions of magmatic zircon, U-Pb data of inherited zircons, and high mean zircon δ18O values of 9.0 ± 2.7‰ (2SD) and 9.8 ± 2.0‰ for the Kemnay and Cove granites support this model, the Nigg Bay Granite contains zircons with much lower δ18O values (6.8 ± 2.1‰), similar to those found in Scottish I-type granites. This suggests that the Nigg Bay Granite contains low-δ18O material representing either altered supracrustal material, or more likely, an infracrustal source component with mantle-like δ18O. Mixing trends in plots of δ18O vs. ɛHf for S-type granite zircons indicate involvement of at least two sources in all three granites. This pilot study of Scottish Caledonian S-type granites demonstrates that, while field and whole-rock geochemical data are consistent with local melting of only supracrustal sources, the oxygen isotopic record stored in zircon reveals a much more complex petrogenetic evolution involving two or more magma sources.

  15. OVERALL VIEW OF QUARRY, FACING NORTH, WITH UNQUARRIED GRANITE OUTCROP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF QUARRY, FACING NORTH, WITH UN-QUARRIED GRANITE OUTCROP IN BACKGROUND - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 3, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  16. Generation of Late Mesozoic Qianlishan A2-type granite in Nanling Range, South China: Implications for Shizhuyuan W-Sn mineralization and tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuxiao; Li, He; Sun, Weidong; Ireland, Trevor; Tian, Xufeng; Hu, Yongbin; Yang, Wubin; Chen, Chen; Xu, Deru

    2016-12-01

    The Late Mesozoic Qianlishan granitic complex in the western Nanling Range, South China is associated with the Shizhuyuan giant W-Sn-Mo-Bi polymetallic deposit. It mainly consists of three phases of intrusions, P-1 porphyritic biotite granite, P-2 equigranular biotite granite and P-3 granite porphyry. All three phases of granite contain quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar and Fe-rich biotite. They have geochemical affinities of A-type granites, e.g., high FeOT/(FeOT + MgO) ratios (0.84-0.99), total alkali (Na2O + K2O, 7.50-9.04 wt.%), high Ga/Al ratios (10,000*Ga/Al > 2.6) and high Zr + Nb + Y + Ce concentrations (> 350 ppm). High Y/Nb ratios (> 1.2) suggest that the Qianlishan complex belongs to A2-type granite. Zircon U-Pb ages indicate a short age interval decreasing from 158-157 Ma, to 158-155 Ma and to 154 Ma for the P-1, P-2 and P-3 granites, respectively. These ages are similar to the mineralization age of the Shizhuyuan tungsten polymetallic deposit, within error. The Qianlishan granites were generated at low oxygen fugacity conditions based on the low values of zircon Ce4 +/Ce3 + ratios (1.53-198) and significantly negative Eu anomalies (EuN/EuN*, 0.03-0.13) in apatite. New zircon εHf(t) values for the P-3 granite range from - 13.0 to - 4.4, similar to those previously obtained for the P-1 and P-2 granites. Both the granite and apatite grains therein are characterized by high F but low Cl concentrations, suggesting the influx of a high F/Cl component. The P-2 granites especially contain higher F contents (1840-8690 ppm) and W (7-158 ppm) and Sn (6-51 ppm) concentrations and with stronger evolution features. Positive trends between F and W and Sn of Qianlishan complex indicate that high F source is crucial for mineralization of W and Sn. We consider that the lithospheric mantle source may have been metasomatized by subduction fluids in the far end of subduction zones to produce the A2 feature of the Qianlishan granite and the fluorine was introduced through

  17. Silurian granites of northern Kazakhstan: U-Pb age and tectonic position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letnikov, F. A.; Kotov, A. B.; Degtyarev, K. E.; Sal'Nikova, E. B.; Levchenkov, O. A.; Shershakova, M. M.; Shershakov, A. V.; Rizvanova, N. G.; Makeev, A. F.; Tolkachev, M. D.

    2009-06-01

    The isotopic-geochronological studies of zircons from granites of the Borovoe, Makinsk, and Zhukei massifs located in the eastern part of the Precambrian Kokchetav median massif revealed that they were formed during the relatively brief period from 431 to 423 Ma ago, which allowed them to be united into the Early Silurian Borovoe Complex.

  18. Geochemistry, geochronology, and origin of the Neoarchean Planalto Granite suite, Carajás, Amazonian craton: A-type or hydrated charnockitic granites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feio, G. R. L.; Dall'Agnol, R.; Dantas, E. L.; Macambira, M. J. B.; Gomes, A. C. B.; Sardinha, A. S.; Oliveira, D. C.; Santos, R. D.; Santos, P. A.

    2012-10-01

    New whole-rock geochemistry and LA-MC-ICPMS and Pb-evaporation geochronological data were obtained on zircon from the Neoarchean Planalto suite granites and associated charnockitic rocks of the Canaã area of the Carajás province, eastern Amazonian craton, Brazil. The Pb-evaporation ages of three samples from the Planalto suite are around 2730 Ma (2733 ± 2 Ma, 2731 ± 1 Ma and 2736 ± 4 Ma), whereas U-Pb LA-MC-ICPMS concordia ages obtained for these samples are 2729 ± 17 Ma, 2710 ± 10 Ma, and 2706 ± 5 Ma, respectively. An orthopyroxene quartz gabbro associated with the Pium complex and Planalto suite yielded a U-Pb concordia age of 2735 ± 5 Ma, interpreted as its crystallization age. The Planalto suite granites and the charnockitic rocks associated with the Mesoarchean Pium complex were probably crystallized at 2730 ± 10 Ma. The Planalto granites have ferroan character and are similar geochemically to reduced A-type granites. In previous studies, they have been classified as such, despite the fact that they are syntectonic. The tectonic setting and the association between the Planalto suite and charnockitic series led us to classify these biotite-hornblende granites as hydrated granites of the charnockitic series. The Planalto suite and the Neoarchean charnockitic magmas were more probably derived by partial melting of mafic to intermediate tholeiitic orthopyroxene-bearing rocks similar to those of the Pium complex. At 2.76 Ga, upwelling of asthenospheric mantle in an extensional setting propitiated the formation of the Carajás basin. Later on, at ca. 2.73 Ga, heat input associated with underplate of mafic magma induced partial melting of mafic to intermediate lower crustal rocks, originating the Planalto and charnockitic magmas. The emplacement of these magmas occurred under active regional stress and resultant major shear zones found in the Canaã dos Carajás area. The close association between the Planalto suite and charnockitic rocks suggests that they

  19. Paleoproterozoic gabbro-diorite-granite magmatism of the Batomga Rise (NE Aldan Shield): Sm-Nd isotope geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, V. K.; Bogomolov, E. S.; Glebovitskii, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    The geochemical similarity and almost simultaneous (2055-2060 Ma) formation of Utakachan gabbro-amphibolite, Jagdakin granodiorite-diorite, Khoyunda granitoid, and Tygymyt leucogranite complexes, which inruded metamorphic formations of the Batomga Group are evidence of their formaton from unified magmatic source. All this makes it possibble to combine aforementioned complexes into the unified Early Proterozoic diferentiated gabbro-diorite-granite complex.

  20. 7. Photocopied August 1971 from Photo 13729, Granite Station Special ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopied August 1971 from Photo 13729, Granite Station Special Folder, Engineering Department, Utah Power and Light Co., Salt Lake City, Utah. GRANITE HYDRO-ELECTRIC PLANT (1500KW) STATION. PENSTOCK AND SPILWAY, NOVEMBER 1914. - Utah Power Company, Granite Hydroelectric Plant, Holladay, Salt Lake County, UT

  1. 9. Photocopied August 1971 from Photo 13730, Granite Folder #1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopied August 1971 from Photo 13730, Granite Folder #1, Engineering Department, Utah Power and Light Co., Salt Lake City, Utah. GRANITE STATION: WESTINGHOUSE 750 K.V.A., 2- PHASE GENERATORS AND SWITCHBOARD, MAY 24, 1915. - Utah Power Company, Granite Hydroelectric Plant, Holladay, Salt Lake County, UT

  2. 8. Photocopied August 1971 from Photo 11479, Granite Station Special ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopied August 1971 from Photo 11479, Granite Station Special Folder, Engineering Department, Utah Power and Light Co., Salt Lake City, Utah. GRANITE HYDRO-ELECTRIC PLANT (1500 KW) STATION. PENSTOCK AND SPILWAY, NOVEMBER 1914. - Utah Power Company, Granite Hydroelectric Plant, Holladay, Salt Lake County, UT

  3. The origin of granites and related rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Michael; Piccoli, Philip M.

    1995-01-01

    This Circular is a compilation of abstracts for posters and oral presentations given at the third Hutton symposium on the Origin of granites and related rocks. The symposium was co-sponsored by the Department of Geology, University of Maryland at College Park; the U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia; and the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism and Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington.

  4. The global age distribution of granitic pegmatites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCauley, Andrew; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2014-01-01

    An updated global compilation of 377 new and previously published ages indicates that granitic pegmatites range in age from Mesoarchean to Neogene and have a semi-periodic age distribution. Undivided granitic pegmatites show twelve age maxima: 2913, 2687, 2501, 1853, 1379, 1174, 988, 525, 483, 391, 319, and 72 Ma. These peaks correspond broadly with various proxy records of supercontinent assembly, including the age distributions of granites, detrital zircon grains, and passive margins. Lithium-cesium-tantalum (LCT) pegmatites have a similar age distribution to the undivided granitic pegmatites, with maxima at 2638, 1800, 962, 529, 485, 371, 309, and 274 Ma. Lithium and Ta resources in LCT pegmatites are concentrated in the Archean and Phanerozoic. While there are some Li resources from the Proterozoic, the dominantly bimodal distribution of resources is particularly evident for Ta. This distribution is similar to that of orogenic gold deposits, and has been interpreted to reflect the preservation potential of the orogenic belts where these deposits are formed. Niobium-yttrium-fluorine (NYF) pegmatites show similar age distributions to LCT pegmatites, but with a strong maximum at ca. 1000 Ma.

  5. Granite School District First Grade Reading Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castner, Myra H.; And Others

    A comparative study of first-grade reading instructional methods was undertaken with the support of the Granite School District Exemplary Center for Reading Instruction. This study was conducted in 19 schools of the district and involved approximately 1,295 students. Nine hypotheses concerning the various approaches used in reading instruction…

  6. Voluminous granitic magmas from common basaltic sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Ratajeski, K.; Hankins, W.B.; Glazner, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Granitic-rhyolitic liquids were produced experimentally from moderately hydrous (1.7-2.3 wt% H2O) medium-to-high K basaltic compositions at 700 MPa and f O2 controlled from Ni-NiO -1.3 to +4. Amount and composition of evolved liquids and coexisting mineral assemblages vary with fO2 and temperature, with melt being more evolved at higher fO2s, where coexisting mineral assemblages are more plagioclase- and Fe-Ti oxide-rich and amphibole-poor. At fO2 of Ni-NiO +1, typical for many silicic magmas, the samples produce 12-25 wt% granitic-rhyolitic liquid, amounts varying with bulk composition. Medium-to-high K basalts are common in subduction-related magmatic arcs, and near-solidus true granite or rhyolite liquids can form widely, and in geologically significant quantities, by advanced crystallization-differentiation or by low-degree partial remelting of mantle-derived basaltic sources. Previously differentiated or weathered materials may be involved in generating specific felsic magmas, but are not required for such magmas to be voluminous or to have the K-rich granitic compositions typical of the upper continental crust. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  7. Sorption of Eu(III) on granite: EPMA, LA-ICP-MS, batch and modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Yusuke; Maeda, Koushi; Aoi, Yusuke; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Aosai, Daisuke; Mizuno, Takashi

    2013-11-19

    Eu(III) sorption on granite was assessed using combined microscopic and macroscopic approaches in neutral to acidic conditions where the mobility of Eu(III) is generally considered to be high. Polished thin sections of the granite were reacted with solutions containing 10 μM of Eu(III) and were analyzed using EPMA and LA-ICP-MS. On most of the biotite grains, Eu enrichment up to 6 wt % was observed. The Eu-enriched parts of biotite commonly lose K, which is the interlayer cation of biotite, indicating that the sorption mode of Eu(III) by the biotite is cation exchange in the interlayer. The distributions of Eu appeared along the original cracks of the biotite. Those occurrences indicate that the prior water-rock interaction along the cracks engendered modification of biotite to possess affinity to the Eu(III). Batch Eu(III) sorption experiments on granite and biotite powders were conducted as functions of pH, Eu(III) loading, and ionic strength. The macroscopic sorption behavior of biotite was consistent with that of granite. At pH > 4, there was little pH dependence but strong ionic strength dependence of Eu(III) sorption. At pH < 4, the sorption of Eu(III) abruptly decreased with decreased pH. The sorption behavior at pH > 4 was reproducible reasonably by the modeling considering single-site cation exchange reactions. The decrease of Eu(III) sorption at pH < 4 was explained by the occupation of exchangeable sites by dissolved cationic species such as Al and Fe from granite and biotite in low-pH conditions. Granites are complex mineral assemblages. However, the combined microscopic and macroscopic approaches revealed that elementary reactions by a single mineral phase can be representative of the bulk sorption reaction in complex mineral assemblages.

  8. Conventional U-Pb dating versus SHRIMP of the Santa Barbara Granite Massif, Rondonia, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparrenberger, I.; Bettencourt, Jorge S.; Tosdal, R.M.; Wooden, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    The Santa Ba??rbara Granite Massif is part of the Younger Granites of Rondo??nia (998 - 974 Ma) and is included in the Rondo??nia Tin Province (SW Amazonian Craton). It comprises three highly fractionated metaluminous to peraluminous within-plate A-type granite units emplaced in older medium-grade metamorphic rocks. Sn-mineralization is closely associated with the late-stage unit. U-Pb monazite conventional dating of the early-stage Serra do Cicero facies and late-stage Serra Azul facies yielded ages of 993 ?? 5 Ma and 989 ?? 13 Ma, respectively. Conventional multigrain U-Pb isotope analyses of zircon demonstrate isotopic disturbance (discordance) and the preservation of inherited older zircons of several different ages and thus yield little about the ages of Sn-granite magmatism. SHRIMP U-Pb ages for the Santa Ba??rbara facies association yielded a 207Pb/206Pb weighted-mean age of 978 ?? 13 Ma. The textural complexity of the zircon crystals of the Santa Ba??rbara facies association, the variable concentrations of U, Th and Pb, as well as the mixed inheritance of zircon populations are major obstacles to using conventional multigrain U-Pb isotopic analyses. Sm-Nd model ages and ??Nd (T) values reveal anomalous isotopic data, attesting to the complex isotopic behaviour within these highly fractionated granites. Thus, SHRIMP U-Pb zircon and conventional U-Pb monazite dating methods are the most appropriate to constrain the crystallization age of the Sn-bearing granite systems in the Rondo??nia Tin Province.

  9. Identification of granite varieties from colour spectrum data.

    PubMed

    Araújo, María; Martínez, Javier; Ordóñez, Celestino; Vilán, José Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The granite processing sector of the northwest of Spain handles many varieties of granite with specific technical and aesthetic properties that command different prices in the natural stone market. Hence, correct granite identification and classification from the outset of processing to the end-product stage optimizes the management and control of stocks of granite slabs and tiles and facilitates the operation of traceability systems. We describe a methodology for automatically identifying granite varieties by processing spectral information captured by a spectrophotometer at various stages of processing using functional machine learning techniques.

  10. Assessment of radiological hazard of commercial granites from Extremadura (Spain).

    PubMed

    Guillén, J; Tejado, J J; Baeza, A; Corbacho, J A; Muñoz, J G

    2014-06-01

    The term "commercial granite" comprises different natural stones with different mineralogical components. In Extremadura, western Spain, "commercial granites" can be classified in three types: granite s.s. (sensus stricti), granodiorite, and diorite. The content of naturally occurring radionuclides depended of the mineralogy. Thus, the (40)K content increased as the relative content of alkaline feldspar increased but decreased as the plagioclase content increased. The radioactive content decreased in the following order: granite s.s. > granodiorite > diorite. In this work, the radiological hazard of these granites as building material was analyzed in terms of external irradiation and radon exposure. External irradiation was estimated based on the "I" index, ranged between 0.073 and 1.36. Therefore, these granites can be use as superficial building materials with no restriction. Radon exposure was estimated using the surface exhalation rates in polished granites. The exhalation rate in granites depends of their superficial finishes (different roughness). For distinct mechanical finishes of granite (polish, diamond sawed, bush-hammered and flamed), the surface exhalation rate increased with the roughness of the finishes. Thermal finish presented the highest exhalation rate, because the high temperatures applied to the granite may increase the number of fissures within it. The exhalation rates in polished granites varied from 0.013 to 10.4 Bq m(-2) h(-1).

  11. Retention of Anionic Species on Granite: Influence of Granite Composition - 12129

    SciTech Connect

    Videnska, Katerina; Havlova, Vaclava

    2012-07-01

    Technetium (Tc-99, T{sub 1/2} = 2.1.10{sup 5} yrs) and selenium (Se-79, T{sub 1/2} = 6.5.10{sup 4} yrs) belong among fission products, being produced by fission of nuclear fuel. Both elements can significantly contribute to risk due to their complicated chemistry, long life times, high mobility and prevailing anionic character. Therefore, knowledge of migration behaviour under different conditions can significantly improve input into performance and safety assessment models. Granite is considered as a potential host rock for deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in many countries. Granitic rocks consist usually of quartz, feldspar, plagioclase (main components), mica, chlorite, kaolinite (minor components). The main feature of the rock is advection governed transport in fractures, complemented with diffusion process from fracture towards undisturbed rock matrix. The presented work is focused on interaction of anionic species (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) with granitic rock. Furthermore, the importance of mineral composition on sorption of anionic species was also studied. The batch sorption experiments were conducted on the crushed granite from Bohemian Massive. Five fractions with defined grain size were used for static batch method. Mineral composition of each granitic fraction was evaluated using X-ray diffraction. The results showed differences in composition of granitic fractions, even though originating from one homogenized material. Sorption experiments showed influence of granite composition on adsorption of both TcO4{sup -} and SeO3{sup 2-} on granitic rock. Generally, Se(IV) showed higher retention than Tc(VII). Se(VI) was not almost sorbed at all. Fe containing minerals are pronounced as a selective Se and Tc sorbent, being reduced on their surface. As micas in granite are usually enriched in Fe, increased sorption of anionic species onto mica enriched fractions can be explained by this reason. On the other hand

  12. New perspectives on the origin and emplacement of the Late Jurassic Fanos granite, associated with an intra-oceanic subduction within the Neotethyan Axios-Vardar Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michail, Maria; Pipera, Kyriaki; Koroneos, Antonios; Kilias, Adamantios; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2016-10-01

    The Fanos granite occurs in the Peonias subzone of the eastern Axios-Vardar zone in northern Greece. The Fanos granite is Late Jurassic (158 ± 1 Ma) and trends N-S, intruding the Mesozoic back-arc Guevgueli ophiolitic complex. The intrusive character of the eastern contact of the Fanos granite with the host ophiolitic complex is well preserved. In turn the western contact is overprinted by a few meters thick, west- to southwest-directed semi-ductile thrust zone, of Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous age. The Fanos granite is dominated by the typical, isotropic granitoid fabric, although in some places the initial magmatic flow fabric is preserved. The main deformation recognized in the Fanos granite occurred in brittle regime and expressed by Tertiary thrust faults and Neogene-Quaternary normal to oblique normal faults. The origin as well as the possible tectonic setting of the Fanos granite is the main topics that we address in our study. Rock samples of the Fanos granite along with the adjusted Kotza Dere quartz diorite were analyzed for major and trace elements and for Sr and Nd isotopes (only the quartz diorite). The geochemical data show that the granite has peraluminous characteristics, high-K calc-alkaline affinities, and I-type features. The Sr initial isotopic values of the Fanos granite are rather low (0.7053-0.7056) while for the quartz diorite range from 0.7066 to 0.7068. The Nd initial isotopic values range from 0.51235 to 0.51240 for the granite and from 0.51222 to 0.51233 for the quartz diorite. The source of the granitic melt is interpreted to be meta-basaltic amphibolites. These amphibolites are the metamorphic products of enriched mantle melts that underplated the oceanic lithosphere. Taking into account our and published structural and geochemical data for the Fanos granite along with the tectonic data of the broader Axios-Vardar zone, we suggest that the studied granitic rocks were formed during an intra-oceanic subduction within the Neotethyan

  13. Silicosis in West Country Granite Workers

    PubMed Central

    Hale, L. W.; Sheers, G.

    1963-01-01

    The granite industry in Cornwall and Devon is briefly described, especially the production of dust in dressing the stone. In 1951, 210 granite masons were examined (about 84% of the total at that time) and 37 (17·6%) showed silicosis. These men were followed up for 10 years. No silicosis was seen in men with less than 15 years' exposure, but after this time the risk increased to 11 out of 14 in those with over 35 years' exposure. Nine deaths occurred, two of which were due to silicosis. Radiological progression was observed in 13 of the 28 survivors. It was not necessarily associated with additional exposure but was related to age. More young men progressed. In 1961, 132 of the granite masons (about 93% of the total at that time) were re-examined and nine new cases of silicosis were found to have developed during the 10-year interval. The exposure in the 1961 cases was comparable with that of similar cases in 1951. Thus the risk has not been much reduced over this period. Pulmonary tuberculosis occurred in eight of the 37 cases of silicosis in 1951, and between 1951 and 1961 a further five cases were diagnosed, four being from one locality. This was by far the most frequent and disabling complication. Only one case of progressive massive fibrosis was seen. More extensive use of protective antituberculous chemotherapy is advocated, and also better dust control. Images PMID:14046159

  14. Geochronology, geochemistry and tectonic implications of Late Triassic granites in the Mongolian Altai Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Batulzii; Boldbaatar, Enkhjargal; Zorigtkhuu, Oyun-Erdene; Yin, An

    2016-03-01

    Although the closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean in western China and western Mongolia occurred in the Late Carboniferous and Early Permian, widespread intra-continental magmatism continued to occur across this region from the Late Permian to the end of the Triassic. In this study we document field relationships and geochemical characterization of a Late Triassic felsic intrusive complex in the western Mongolian Altai. The plutonic complex occurs as sills, dikes, and small stocks and its composition varies from biotite granite, two-mica granite, to leucogranite. Structurally, the plutonic complex occurs in the hanging wall of a segment of the regionally extensively (>1500 km long) Irtysh-Ertix-Bulgan thrust zone. As the plutonic bodies both cut and are deformed by the shear fabrics in this regional thrust shear zone, the duration of felsic magmatism and regional thrusting was temporally overlapping. This suggests that magmatism was coeval with crustal thickening. Major- and trace-element data and isotopic analysis of granitoid samples from our study area indicate that the felsic intrusions were derived from partial melting of meta-sediments, with the biotite and two-mica granite generated through vapor-absent melting and the leucogranite from flux melting. Although the Mongolian Altai intrusions were clearly originated from anatexis, coeval granite in the Chinese Altai directly west of our study area in the hanging wall of the Irtysh-Ertix-Bulgan thrust was derived in part from mantle melting. To reconcile these observations, we propose a Himalayan-style intracontinental-subduction model that predicts two geologic settings for the occurrence of felsic magmatism: (1) along the intracontinental thrust zone where granite was entirely generated by anatexis and (2) in the hanging wall of the intracontinental thrust where convective removal and/or continental subduction induced mantle melting.

  15. Origin and evolution of Pliocene Pleistocene granites from the Larderello geothermal field (Tuscan Magmatic Province, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dini, A.; Gianelli, G.; Puxeddu, M.; Ruggieri, G.

    2005-04-01

    Extensive, mainly acidic peraluminous magmatism affected the Tuscan Archipelago and the Tuscan mainland since late Miocene, building up the Tuscan Magmatic Province (TMP) as the Northern Apennine fold belt was progressively thinned, heated and intruded by mafic magmas. Between 3.8 and 1.3 Ma an intrusive complex was built on Larderello area (Tuscan mainland) by emplacement of multiple intrusions of isotopically and geochemically distinct granite magmas. Geochemical and isotopic investigations were carried out on granites cored during drilling exploration activity on the Larderello geothermal field. With respect to the other TMP granites the Larderello intrusives can be classified as two-mica granites due to the ubiquitous presence of small to moderate amounts of F-rich magmatic muscovite. They closely resemble the almost pure crustal TMP acidic rocks and do not show any of the typical petrographic features commonly observed in the TMP hybrid granites (enclaves, patchy zoning of plagioclase, amphibole clots). On the basis of major and trace elements, as well as REE patterns, two groups of granites were proposed: LAR-1 granites (3.8-2.3 Ma) originated by biotite-muscovite breakdown, and LAR-2 granites (2.3-1.3 Ma) generated by muscovite breakdown. At least three main crustal sources (at 14-23 km depth), characterized by distinct ɛNd( t) and 87Sr/ 86Sr values, were involved at different times, and the magmas produced were randomly emplaced at shallow levels (3-6 km depth) throughout the entire field. The partial melting of a biotite-muscovite-rich source with low ɛNd( t) value (about -10.5) produced the oldest intrusions (about 3.8-2.5 Ma). Afterwards (2.5-2.3 Ma), new magmas were generated by another biotite-rich source having a distinctly higher ɛNd( t) value (-7.9). Finally, a muscovite-rich source with high ɛNd( t) (about -8.9) gave origin to the younger group of granites (2.3-1.0 Ma). The significant Sr isotope disequilibrium recorded by granites belonging to

  16. Early Permian East-Ujimqin mafic-ultramafic and granitic rocks from the Xing'an-Mongolian Orogenic Belt, North China: Origin, chronology, and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yinhang; Teng, Xuejian; Li, Yanfeng; Li, Min; Zhang, Tianfu

    2014-12-01

    The East-Ujimqin complex, located north of the Erenhot-Hegenshan fault, North China, is composed of mafic-ultramafic and granitic rocks including peridotite, gabbro, alkali granite, and syenite. We investigated the tectonic setting, age, and anorogenic characteristics of the Xing'an-Mongolian Orogenic Belt (XMOB) through field investigation and microscopic and geochemical analyses of samples from the East-Ujimqin complex and LA-MC-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating of gabbro and alkali granite. Petrographic and geochemical studies of the complex indicate that this multiphase plutonic suite developed through a combination of fractional crystallization, assimilation processes, and magma mixing. The mafic-ultramafic rocks are alkaline and have within-plate geochemical characteristics, indicating anorogenic magmatism in an extensional setting and derivation from a mantle source. The mafic-ultramafic magmas triggered partial melting of the crust and generated the granitic rocks. The granitic rocks are alkali and metaluminous and have high Fe/(Fe + Mg) characteristics, all of which are common features of within-plate plutons. Zircon U-Pb geochronological dating of two samples of gabbro and alkali granite yielded ages of 280.8 ± 1.5 and 276.4 ± 0.7 Ma, placing them within the Early Permian. The zircon Hf isotopic data give inhomogeneous εHf(t) values of 8.2-14.7 for gabbroic zircons and extraordinary high εHf(t) values (8.9-12.5) for the alkali granite in magmatic zircons. Thus, we consider the East-Ujimqin mafic-ultramafic and granitic rocks to have been formed in an extensional tectonic setting caused by asthenospheric upwelling and lithospheric thinning. The sources of mafic-ultramafic and granitic rocks could be depleted garnet lherzolite mantle and juvenile continental lower crust, respectively. All the above indicate that an anorogenic magma event may have occurred in part of the XMOB during 280-276 Ma.

  17. Natural radioactivity of granites used as building materials.

    PubMed

    Pavlidou, S; Koroneos, A; Papastefanou, C; Christofides, G; Stoulos, S; Vavelides, M

    2006-01-01

    Sixteen kinds of different granites, used as building materials, imported to Greece mainly from Spain and Brazil, were sampled and their natural radioactivity was measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. The activity concentrations of (238)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K of granites are presented and compared to those of other building materials as well as other granite types used all over the world. In order to assess the radiological impact from the granites investigated, the absorbed and the effective doses were determined. Although the annual effective dose is higher than the limit of 1mSvy(-1) for some studied granites, they could be used safely as building materials, considering that their contribution in most of the house constructions is very low. An attempt to correlate the relatively high level of natural radioactivity, shown by some of the granites, with their constituent radioactive minerals and their chemical composition, was also made.

  18. Preface to special issue: Granite magmatism in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; de Pinho Guimarães, Ignez; Nardi, Lauro Valentim Stoll

    2016-07-01

    Granites are important both to the geologic evolution and to the economy of Brazil. Deposits of precious and rare metals, such as Au, Sn and many others, are directly or indirectly associated with granites, especially in the geologically under-explored Amazon region. On the opposite eastern side of the country, expanding exploitation of natural granite as dimension stone makes Brazil currently the world's second largest exporter of granite blocks. Granites are a major constituent of the Brazilian Archean-Proterozoic cratonic domains (the Amazon and São Francisco cratons) and their surrounding Neoproterozoic fold belts. The granites are thus fundamental markers of the major events of crustal generation and recycling that shaped the South American Platform. As a result, Brazilian granites have received great attention from the national and international community, and a number of influential meetings focused on the study of granites were held in the country in the last three decades. These meetings include the two International Symposia on Granites and Associated Mineralization (Salvador, January 21-31, 1987, and August 24-29, 1997), the Symposium on Rapakivi Granites and Related Rocks (Belém, August 2-5, 1995) and the Symposium on Magmatism, Crustal Evolution, and Metallogenesis of the Amazonian Craton (Belém, August 2006). Special issues dedicated to contributions presented at these meetings in the Journal of South American Earth Sciences (Sial et al., 1998), Lithos (Stephens et al., 1999), Canadian Mineralogist (Dall'Agnol and Ramo, 2006), Precambrian Research (Ramo et al., 2002) and Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências (Dall'Agnol and Bettencourt, 1997; Sial et al., 1999a) are still important references on the knowledge of Brazilian granites and granite petrology in general.

  19. Petrogenesis of A-type granites and origin of vertical zoning in the Katharina pluton, Gebel Mussa (Mt. Moses) area, Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzir, Y.; Eyal, M.; Litvinovsky, B. A.; Jahn, B. M.; Zanvilevich, A. N.; Valley, J. W.; Beeri, Y.; Pelly, I.; Shimshilashvili, E.

    2007-05-01

    The central pluton within the Neoproterozoic Katharina Ring Complex (area of Gebel Mussa, traditionally believed to be the biblical Mt. Sinai) shows a vertical compositional zoning: syenogranite makes up the bulk of the pluton and grades upwards to alkali-feldspar granites. The latters form two horizontal subzones, an albite-alkali feldspar (Ab-Afs) granite and an uppermost perthite granite. These two varieties are chemically indistinguishable. Syenogranite, as compared with alkali-feldspar granites, is richer in Ca, Sr, K, Ba and contains less SiO 2, Rb, Y, Nb and U; Eu/Eu* values are 0.22-0.33 for syenogranite and 0.08-0.02 for alkali-feldspar granites. The δ18O (Qtz) is rather homogeneous throughout the pluton, 8.03-8.55‰. The δ18O (Afs) values in the syenogranite are appreciably lower relative to those in the alkali-feldspar granites: 7.59-8.75‰ vs. 8.31-9.12‰. A Rb-Sr isochron ( n = 9) yields an age of 593 ± 16 Ma for the Katharina Ring Complex (granite pluton and ring dikes). The alkali-feldspar granites were generated mainly by fractional crystallization of syenogranite magma. The model for residual melt extraction and accumulation is based on the estimated extent of crystallization (˜ 50 wt.%), which approximates the rigid percolation threshold for silicic melts. The fluid-rich residual melt could be separated efficiently by its upward flow through the rigid clusters of crystal phase. Crystallization of the evolved melt started with formation of hypersolvus granite immediately under the roof. Fluid influx from the inner part of the pluton to its apical zone persisted and caused increase of PH2O in the magma below the perthite granite zone. Owing to the presence of F and Ca in the melt, PH2O of only slightly more than 1 kbar allows crystallization of subsolvus Ab-Afs granite. Abundance of turbid alkali feldspars and their 18O/ 16O enrichment suggest that crystallization of alkali-feldspar granites was followed by subsolvus fluid-rock interaction

  20. Characterization of Climax granite ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Isherwood, D.; Harrar, J.; Raber, E.

    1982-08-01

    The Climax ground water fails to match the commonly held views regarding the nature of deep granitic ground waters. It is neither dilute nor in equilibrium with the granite. Ground-water samples were taken for chemical analysis from five sites in the fractured Climax granite at the Nevada Test Site. The waters are high in total dissolved solids (1200 to 2160 mg/L) and rich in sodium (56 to 250 mg/L), calcium (114 to 283 mg/L) and sulfate (325 to 1060 mg/L). Two of the samples contained relatively high amounts of uranium (1.8 and 18.5 mg/L), whereas the other three contained uranium below the level of detection (< 0.1 mg/L). The pH is in the neutral range (7.3 to 8.2). The differences in composition between samples (as seen in the wide range of values for the major constituents and total dissolved solids) suggest the samples came from different, independent fracture systems. However, the apparent trend of increasing sodium with depth at the expense of calcium and magnesium suggests a common evolutionary chemical process, if not an interconnected system. The waters appear to be less oxidizing with depth (+ 410 mV at 420 m below the surface vs + 86 mV at 565 m). However, with Eh measurements on only two samples, this correlation is questionable. Isotopic analyses show that the waters are of meteoric origin and that the source of the sulfate is probably the pyrite in the fracture-fill material. Analysis of the measured water characteristics using the chemical equilibrium computer program EQ3 indicates that the waters are not in equilibrium with the local mineral assemblage. The solutions appear to be supersaturated with respect to the mineral calcite, quartz, kaolinite, muscovite, k-feldspar, and many others.

  1. Strain localization during deformation of Westerly granite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodsky, N. S.; Spetzler, H. A.

    1984-01-01

    A specimen of Westerly granite was cyclically loaded to near failure at 50 MPa confining pressure. Holographic interferometry provided detailed measurements of localized surface deformations during loading and unloading. The data are consistent with deformation occurring primarily elastically at low differential stress; in conjunction with one incipient fault zone between approximately 350 and 520 MPa differential stress; and in conjunction with a second incipient fault zone above 580 MPa and/or during creep. During unloading only one fault zone, that which is active at the intermediate stress levels during loading, is seen to recede.

  2. GRANITE CHIEF WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harwood, David S.; Federspiel, Francis E.

    1984-01-01

    The Granite Chief Wilderness study area encompasses 57 sq mi near the crest of the Sierra Nevada 6 mi west of Tahoe City, California. Geologic, geochemical, and mines and prospect studies were carried out to assess the mineral-resource potential of the area. On the basis of the mineral-resource survey, it is concluded that the area has little promise for the occurrence of precious or base metals, oil, gas, coal, or geothermal resources. Sand, gravel, and glacial till suitable for construction materials occur in the area, but inaccessability and remoteness from available markets preclude their being shown on the map as a potential resource.

  3. SIMFUEL dissolution studies in granitic groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollila, K.

    1992-08-01

    The dissolution behaviour of an unirradiated chemical analogue of spent nuclear fuel, SIMFUEL, has been studied in synthetic, granitic groundwater under anoxic conditions. The release of U and the minor components Mo, Ru, Sr, Ba, La, Zr, Ce, Y, Rh, Pd and Nd was monitored during static (batch) leaching experiments. For molybdenum, ruthenium, strontium and barium, the leaching results (the total experimental time of 300 days) show a trend to congruent dissolution with the UO 2 matrix. The release rates of lanthanum, zirconium and cerium are higher relative to uranium. Sorption, colloidal and/or precipitation phenomena appear to play an important role under these experimental conditions.

  4. Rare accessory uraninite in a Sierran granite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snetsinger, K. G.; Polkowski, G.

    1977-01-01

    One grain of uraninite was found in a single thin-section of Sierran granite. Electron and ion microprobe analysis were used to determine the composition. Since the U-Pb age calculated for the uraninite does not differ greatly from the K-Ar age of the unit in which it occurs, it is suggested that the mineral is primary and not reworked from a preexisting rock. No uraninite has been detected in heavy mineral concentrates from other rocks of the local area.

  5. Multivariate analyses of Erzgebirge granite and rhyolite composition: implications for classification of granites and their genetic relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Hans-Jürgen; Davis, John C.; Tischendorf, Gerhard; Seltmann, Reimar

    1999-06-01

    High-precision major, minor and trace element analyses for 44 elements have been made of 329 Late Variscan granitic and rhyolitic rocks from the Erzgebirge metallogenic province of Germany. The intrusive histories of some of these granites are not completely understood and exposures of rock are not adequate to resolve relationships between what apparently are different plutons. Therefore, it is necessary to turn to chemical analyses to decipher the evolution of the plutons and their relationships. A new classification of Erzgebirge plutons into five major groups of granites, based on petrologic interpretations of geochemical and mineralogical relationships (low-F biotite granites; low-F two-mica granites; high-F, high-P 2O 5 Li-mica granites; high-F, low-P 2O 5 Li-mica granites; high-F, low-P 2O 5 biotite granites) was tested by multivariate techniques. Canonical analyses of major elements, minor elements, trace elements and ratio variables all distinguish the groups with differing amounts of success. Univariate ANOVA's, in combination with forward-stepwise and backward-elimination canonical analyses, were used to select ten variables which were most effective in distinguishing groups. In a biplot, groups form distinct clusters roughly arranged along a quadratic path. Within groups, individual plutons tend to be arranged in patterns possibly reflecting granitic evolution. Canonical functions were used to classify samples of rhyolites of unknown association into the five groups. Another canonical analysis was based on ten elements traditionally used in petrology and which were important in the new classification of granites. Their biplot pattern is similar to that from statistically chosen variables but less effective at distinguishing the five groups of granites. This study shows that multivariate statistical techniques can provide significant insight into problems of granitic petrogenesis and may be superior to conventional procedures for petrological

  6. Multivariate analyses of Erzgebirge granite and rhyolite composition: Implications for classification of granites and their genetic relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forster, H.-J.; Davis, J.C.; Tischendorf, G.; Seltmann, R.

    1999-01-01

    High-precision major, minor and trace element analyses for 44 elements have been made of 329 Late Variscan granitic and rhyolitic rocks from the Erzgebirge metallogenic province of Germany. The intrusive histories of some of these granites are not completely understood and exposures of rock are not adequate to resolve relationships between what apparently are different plutons. Therefore, it is necessary to turn to chemical analyses to decipher the evolution of the plutons and their relationships. A new classification of Erzgebirge plutons into five major groups of granites, based on petrologic interpretations of geochemical and mineralogical relationships (low-F biotite granites; low-F two-mica granites; high-F, high-P2O5 Li-mica granites; high-F, low-P2O5 Li-mica granites; high-F, low-P2O5 biotite granites) was tested by multivariate techniques. Canonical analyses of major elements, minor elements, trace elements and ratio variables all distinguish the groups with differing amounts of success. Univariate ANOVA's, in combination with forward-stepwise and backward-elimination canonical analyses, were used to select ten variables which were most effective in distinguishing groups. In a biplot, groups form distinct clusters roughly arranged along a quadratic path. Within groups, individual plutons tend to be arranged in patterns possibly reflecting granitic evolution. Canonical functions were used to classify samples of rhyolites of unknown association into the five groups. Another canonical analysis was based on ten elements traditionally used in petrology and which were important in the new classification of granites. Their biplot pattern is similar to that from statistically chosen variables but less effective at distinguishing the five groups of granites. This study shows that multivariate statistical techniques can provide significant insight into problems of granitic petrogenesis and may be superior to conventional procedures for petrological interpretation.

  7. Effectiveness of granite cleaning procedures in cultural heritage: A review.

    PubMed

    Pozo-Antonio, J S; Rivas, T; López, A J; Fiorucci, M P; Ramil, A

    2016-11-15

    Most of the Cultural Heritage built in NW Iberian Peninsula is made of granite which exposition to the environment leads to the formation of deposits and coatings, mainly two types: biological colonization and sulphated black crusts. Nowadays, another form of alteration derives from graffiti paints when these are applied as an act of vandalism. A deep revision needs to be addressed considering the severity of these deterioration forms on granite and the different cleaning effectiveness achieved by cleaning procedures used to remove them. The scientific literature about these topics on granite is scarcer than on sedimentary carbonate stones and marbles, but the importance of the granite in NW Iberian Peninsula Cultural Heritage claims this review centred on biological colonization, sulphated black crusts and graffiti on granite and their effectiveness of the common cleaning procedures. Furthermore, this paper carried out a review of the knowledge about those three alteration forms on granite, as well as bringing together all the major studies in the field of the granite cleaning with traditional procedures (chemical and mechanical) and with the recent developed technique based on the laser ablation. Findings concerning the effectiveness evaluation of these cleaning procedures, considering the coating extraction ability and the damage induced on the granite surface, are described. Finally, some futures research lines are pointed out.

  8. Detail of south granite pier revealing riveted truss ends and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of south granite pier revealing riveted truss ends and iron footing plates on top of granite cap stones. View north - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  9. Experimental methods of determining thermal properties of granite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of thermal properties of granite using the block method is discussed and compared with other methods. Problems that limit the accuracy of contact method in determining thermal properties of porous media are evaluated. Thermal properties of granite is determined in the laboratory with a...

  10. IRETHERM: The geothermal energy potential of Irish radiothermal granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Thomas; Jones, Alan; Muller, Mark; Feely, Martin; Brock, Andrew; Long, Mike; Waters, Tim

    2014-05-01

    The IRETHERM project is developing a strategic understanding of Ireland's deep geothermal energy potential through integrated modelling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. One aspect of IRETHERM's research focuses on Ireland's radiothermal granites, where increased concentrations of radioelements provide elevated heat-production (HP), surface heat-flow (SHF) and subsurface temperatures. An understanding of the contribution of granites to the thermal field of Ireland is important to assessing the geothermal energy potential of this low-enthalpy setting. This study focuses on the Galway granite in western Ireland, and the Leinster and the buried Kentstown granites in eastern Ireland. Shallow (<250 m) boreholes were drilled into the exposed Caledonian Leinster and Galway granites as part of a 1980's geothermal project. These studies yielded HP = 2-3 μWm-3 and HF = 80 mWm-2 at the Sally Gap borehole in the Northern Units of the Leinster granite, to the SW of Dublin. In the Galway granite batholith, on the west coast of Ireland, the Costelloe-Murvey granite returned HP = 7 μWm-3 and HF = 77 mWm-2, measured at the Rossaveal borehole. The buried Kentstown granite, 35 km NW of Dublin, has an associated negative Bouguer anomaly and was intersected by two mineral exploration boreholes at depths of 660 m and 490 m. Heat production is measured at 2.4 μWm-3 in core samples taken from the weathered top 30 m of the granite. The core of this study consists of a program of magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data acquisition across the three granite bodies, over three fieldwork seasons. MT and AMT data were collected at 59 locations along two profiles over the Leinster granite. Preliminary results show that the northern units of the Leinster granite (40 km SW of Dublin) extend to depths of 2-5 km. Preliminary results from the southern profile suggest a greater thickness of granite to a depth of 6-9 km beneath the Tullow pluton, 75 km SW of

  11. Geochemistry of late Cretaceous granitoids from northeastern Washington: implication for genesis of two-mica Cordilleran granites

    SciTech Connect

    Asmerom, Y.; Ikramuddin, M.; Kinart, K.

    1988-05-01

    Mesozoic two-mica granites and I-type granodiorites from northeastern Washington have initial /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios around 0.7100, similar to many other Cordilleran granitoids. Metapelite and calcsilicate country rocks, equivalent to the Belt Supergroup, have measured /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios in the range of 0.91 to 0.98. Unlike many of their Cordilleran counterparts, the northeastern Washington two-mica granites are enriched in U, Rb, and other incompatible elements, and therefore cannot have been derived from depleted lower crust sedimentary sources. Both the two-mica granites and the I-type granodiorites have similar rare-earth-element and trace-element enrichment patterns. Trace-elements modeling shows that it is feasible to derive the two-mica granites by 60% partial melting of a granodiorite-like source. The close association of Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes and older I-type granodiorites with two-mica granites supports this model.

  12. Anomalously low strength of serpentinite sheared against granite and implications for creep on the Hayward and Calaveras Faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, David A.; Ponce, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Serpentinized ophiolitic rocks are juxtaposed against quartzofeldspathic rocks at depth across considerable portions of the Hayward and Calaveras Faults. The marked compositional contrast between these rock types may contribute to fault creep that has been observed along these faults. To investigate this possibility, we are conducting hydrothermal shearing experiments to look for changes in frictional properties resulting from the shear of ultramafic rock juxtaposed against quartzose rock units. In this paper we report the first results in this effort: shear of bare-rock surfaces of serpentinite and granite, and shear of antigorite-serpentinite gouge between forcing blocks of granitic rock. All experiments were conducted at 250°C. Serpentinite sheared against granite at 50 MPa pore-fluid pressure is weaker than either rock type separately, and the weakening is significantly more pronounced at lower shearing rates. In contrast, serpentinite gouge sheared dry between granite blocks is as strong as the bare granite surface. We propose that the weakening is the result of a solution-transfer process involving the dissolution of serpentine minerals at grain-to-grain contacts. Dissolution of serpentine is enhanced by modifications to pore-fluid chemistry caused by interaction of the fluid with the quartz-bearing rocks. The compositional differences between serpentinized ultramafic rocks of the Coast Range Ophiolite and quartzofeldspathic rock units such as those of the Franciscan Complex may provide the mechanism for aseismic slip (creep) in the shallow crust along the Hayward, Calaveras, and other creeping faults in central and northern California.

  13. Enigmatic reticulated filaments in subsurface granite.

    PubMed

    Miller, A Z; Hernández-Mariné, M; Jurado, V; Dionísio, A; Barquinha, P; Fortunato, E; Afonso, M J; Chaminé, H I; Saiz-Jimenez, C

    2012-12-01

    In the last few years, geomicrobiologists have focused their researches on the nature and origin of enigmatic reticulated filaments reported in modern and fossil samples from limestone caves and basalt lava tubes. Researchers have posed questions on these filaments concerning their nature, origin, chemistry, morphology, mode of formation and growth. A tentative microbial origin has been elusive since these filaments are found as hollow tubular sheaths and could not be affiliated to any known microorganism. We describe the presence of similar structures in a 16th century granite tunnel in Porto, Northwest Portugal. The reticulated filaments we identify exhibit fine geometry surface ornamentation formed by cross-linked Mn-rich nanofibres, surrounded by a large amount of extracellular polymeric substances. Within these Mn-rich filaments we report for the first time the occurrence of microbial cells.

  14. Permeability reduction in granite under hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of impermeable fault seals between earthquake events is a feature of many models of earthquake generation, suggesting that earthquake recurrence may depend in part on the rate of permeability reduction of fault zone materials under hydrothermal conditions. In this study, permeability measurements were conducted on intact, fractured, and gouge-bearing Westerly granite at an effective pressure of 50 MPa and at temperatures from 150?? to 500??C, simulating conditions in the earthquake-generating portions of fault zones. Pore fluids were cycled back and forth under a 2 MPa pressure differential for periods of up to 40 days. Permeability of the granite decreased with time t, following the exponential relation k = c(10-rt). For intact samples run between 250?? and 500??C the time constant for permeability decrease r was proportional to temperature and ranged between 0.001 and 0.1 days-1 (i.e., between 0.4 and 40 decades year-1 loss of permeability). Values of r for the lower-temperature experiments differed little from the 250??C runs. In contrast, prefractured samples showed higher rates of permeability decrease at a given temperature. The surfaces of the fractured samples showed evidence of dissolution and mineral growth that increased in abundance with both temperature and time. The experimentally grown mineral assemblages varied with temperature and were consistent with a rock-dominated hydrothermal system. As such mineral deposits progressively seal the fractured samples, their rates of permeability decrease approach the rates for intact rocks at the same temperature. These results place constraints on models of precipitation sealing and suggest that fault rocks may seal at a rate consistent with earthquake recurrence intervals of typical fault zones.

  15. Uranium-lead isotope systematics and apparent ages of zircons and other minerals in precambrian granitic rocks, Granite Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludwig, K. R.; Stuckless, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    Zircon suites from the two main types of granite in the Granite Mountains, Wyoming, yielded concordia-intercept ages of 2,640??20 m.y. for a red, foliated granite (granite of Long Creek Mountain) and 2,595??40 m.y. for the much larger mass of the granite of Lankin Dome. These ages are statistically distinct (40??20 m.y. difference) and are consistent with observed chemical and textural differences. The lower intercepts of the zircon chords of 50??40 and 100+ 75 m.y. for the granite of Long Creek Mountain and granite of Lankin Dome, respectively, are not consistent with reasonable continuous diffusion lead-loss curves but do correspond well with the known (Laramide) time of uplift of the rocks. Epidote, zircon, and apatite from silicified and epidotized zones in the granites all record at least one postcrystallization disturbance in addition to the Laramide event and do not define a unique age of silicification and epidotization. The lower limit of ???2,500 m.y. provided by the least disturbed epidote, however, suggests that these rocks were probably formed by deuteric processes shortly after emplacement of the granite of the Lankin Dome. The earlier of the two disturbances that affected the minerals of the silicified-epidotized rock can be bracketed between 1,350 and 2,240 m.y. ago and is probably the same event that lowered mineral K-Ar and ages in the region. Zircon suites from both types of granite show well-defined linear correlations among U content, common-Pb content, and degree of discordance. One of the zircon suites has an extremely high common-Pb content (up to 180 ppm) and exhibits a component of radiogenic-Pb loss that is apparently unrelated to radiation damage. ?? 1978 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Late-orogenic, post-orogenic, and anorogenic granites: Distinction by major-element and trace-element chemistry and possible origins

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.J.W.; Greenberg, J.K. )

    1990-05-01

    Granites classified into four categories based solely on tectonics of occurrence and associated rock types also have compositional characteristics that are consistent within groups and different among groups. Orogenically related granites include late-orogenic varieties (LO) associated with calc-alkaline batholiths, and post-orogenic varieties (PO), which occur in broad zones of isolated diapiric plutons in recently deformed orogenic belts. Inclined REE patterns, moderate Sr contents, and K{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} relationships show that late-orogenic granites formed by fractionation of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and amphibole from calcalkaline magmas. Flatter REE patterns and K{sub 2}O contents near 5%, plus the absence of associated magmatic rocks, indicate that the post-orogenic granites developed by partial melting of subduction-produced mafic/intermediate magmatic rocks. Both the late- and post-orogenic granites can be part of material newly added to continental crust as a result of orogeny. Anorogenic granites in anorthosite/rapakivi complexes (AR) or alkaline ring complexes (RC) have LIL contents too high to have been equilibrated with a mafic mineral assemblage. These anorogenic rocks probably formed by partial melting of preexisting sialic crust and do not represent new crustal increment.

  17. Radon exhalation from granites used in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    al-Jarallah, M

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of radon exhalation for a total of 50 selected samples of construction materials used in Saudi Arabia were taken using a radon gas analyzer. These materials included sand, aggregate, cement, gypsum, hydrated lime, ceramics and granite. It was found that the granite samples were the main source of radon emanations. A total of 32 local and imported granite samples were tested. It was found that the radon exhalation rates per unit area from these granite samples varied from not detectable to 10.6 Bq m-2 h-1 with an average of 1.3 Bq m-2 h-1. The linear correlation coefficient between emanated radon and radium content was 0.92. The normalized radon exhalation rates from 2.0 cm thick granite samples varied from not detectable to 0.068 (Bq m-2 h-1)/(Bq kg-1) with an average of 0.030 (Bq m-2 h-1)/(Bq kg-1). The average radon emanation of the granite samples was found to be 21% of the total radium concentration. Therefore, granite can be a source of indoor radon as well as external gamma-radiation from the uranium decay series.

  18. Origin and age of the Eisenkappel gabbro to granite suite (Carinthia, SE Austrian Alps).

    PubMed

    Miller, C; Thöni, M; Goessler, W; Tessadri, R

    2011-07-01

    The northern part of the Karawanken plutonic belt is a gabbro-granite complex located just north of the Periadriatic lineament near the Slovenian-Austrian border. Petrographic and geochemical studies of the Eisenkappel intrusive complex indicate that this multiphase plutonic suite developed by a combination of crystal accumulation, fractional crystallization and assimilation processes, magma mixing and mingling. The mafic rocks are alkaline and have within-plate geochemical characteristics, indicating anorogenic magmatism in an extensional setting and derivation from an enriched mantle source. The mafic melts triggered partial melting of the crust and the formation of granite. The granitic rocks are alkalic, metaluminous and have the high Fe/Fe + Mg characteristics of within-plate plutons. Temperature and pressure conditions, derived from amphibole-plagioclase and different amphibole thermobarometers, suggest that the analysed Eisenkappel gabbros crystallized at around 1000 ± 20 °C and 380-470 MPa, whereas the granitic rock crystallized at T ≤ 800 ± 20 °C and ≤ 350 MPa. Mineral-whole rock Sm-Nd analyses of two cumulate gabbros yielded 249 ± 8.4 Ma and 250 ± 26 Ma (εNd: + 3.6), garnet-whole rock Sm-Nd analyses of two silicic samples yielded well-constrained ages of 238.4 ± 1.9 Ma and 242.1 ± 2.1 Ma (εNd: - 2.6).

  19. Origin and age of the Eisenkappel gabbro to granite suite (Carinthia, SE Austrian Alps)

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C.; Thöni, M.; Goessler, W.; Tessadri, R.

    2011-01-01

    The northern part of the Karawanken plutonic belt is a gabbro–granite complex located just north of the Periadriatic lineament near the Slovenian–Austrian border. Petrographic and geochemical studies of the Eisenkappel intrusive complex indicate that this multiphase plutonic suite developed by a combination of crystal accumulation, fractional crystallization and assimilation processes, magma mixing and mingling. The mafic rocks are alkaline and have within-plate geochemical characteristics, indicating anorogenic magmatism in an extensional setting and derivation from an enriched mantle source. The mafic melts triggered partial melting of the crust and the formation of granite. The granitic rocks are alkalic, metaluminous and have the high Fe/Fe + Mg characteristics of within-plate plutons. Temperature and pressure conditions, derived from amphibole-plagioclase and different amphibole thermobarometers, suggest that the analysed Eisenkappel gabbros crystallized at around 1000 ± 20 °C and 380–470 MPa, whereas the granitic rock crystallized at T ≤ 800 ± 20 °C and ≤ 350 MPa. Mineral-whole rock Sm–Nd analyses of two cumulate gabbros yielded 249 ± 8.4 Ma and 250 ± 26 Ma (εNd: + 3.6), garnet-whole rock Sm–Nd analyses of two silicic samples yielded well-constrained ages of 238.4 ± 1.9 Ma and 242.1 ± 2.1 Ma (εNd: − 2.6). PMID:26525511

  20. Geology of Nicholson's point granite, Natal Metamorphic Province, South Africa: the chemistry of charnockitic alteration and origin of the granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grantham, G. H.; Allen, A. R.; Cornell, D. H.; Harris, C.

    1996-10-01

    In the Port Edward area of southern Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa, charnockitic aureoles up to ˜4 m in width are developed adjacent to contacts with Port Edward enderbite and pegmatites intruded into the normally garnetiferous Nicholson's Point granite. Other mineralogical differences between the aureoles and the granite include increased myrmekite and significantly less biotite in the former and the replacement of pyrite by pyrrhotite in the charnockitic rocks. No significant differences in major element chemistry between the garnet-biotite Nicholson's Point granite and charnockitic Nicholson's Point granite are seen, except possibly for higher CaO and TiO 2 in the charnockite. Higher Rb, Th, Nb and Y contents in the garnet-biotite granite suggest that these elements have been locally depleted from garnet-biotite granite during char nockitisation. This depletion is considered to be related to the reduction in biotite. Strontium and Ba contents are significantly higher in the charnockite. Generally higher S contents in the charnockite suggest S metasomatism, with S possibly being added from the enderbite. No differences in δ18O isotope data are seen between the garnetiferous and hypersthene bearing granite. In the charnockite the LREEs are weakly depleted whereas the HREEs show greater depletion compared to the garnetiferous granite. The depletions in REEs are thought to be related to the breakdown of garnet. Europium is marginally enriched or unchanged in the charnockite relative to the garnetiferous granite. Two-pyroxene thermometry on the Port Edward enderbite suggests that it was intruded at temperatures of ˜1000-1100°C. The replacement of pyrite by pyrrhotite is also consistent with a thermal auroele. Consequently the charnockitic zones developed around the intrusions of Port Edward enderbite may result from the thermally driven dehydration of biotite. The aureoles developed adjacent to pegmatites are not considered to have resulted from heat but probably

  1. Petrogenesis of pegmatites and granites in southwestern Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Tomascak, P.B.; Walker, R.J.; Krogstad, E.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Granitic pegmatites occurring near the town of Topsham in southwestern Maine are mineralogically diverse, featuring abundant dikes and contain rare earth element minerals as well as one pegmatite that contains Li minerals. The pegmatite series crops out near the Brunswick granite, a texturally diverse granitic pluton, and lies 13 km southeast of the Mississippian age Sebago batholith. Areas intruded by pegmatites that possess such different mineral assemblages are globally rare. The origins of these mixed'' pegmatite series have not been comprehensively investigated. There is no known pattern of regional zonation (mineral/chemical) among Topsham series pegmatites, hence simple fractionation processes are probably not responsible for the compositional variations. The authors are attempting to clarify pegmatite petrogenesis using common Pb isotopic ratios of feldspars and Sm-Nd isotopic data from whole rocks and minerals. Pb isotopic ratios from leached feldspars reflect the Pb ratios of the source from which they were derived. The range of Pb isotopic compositions of alkali feldspars from 7 granitic pegmatites is as follows: [sup 206]Pb/[sup 204]Pb = 18.5-19.1; [sup 207]Pb/[sup 204]Pb = 15.53-15.69; [sup 208]Pb/[sup 204]Pb = 38.3-38.6. The Brunswick granite has K-feldspars with [sup 206]Pb/[sup 204]Pb = 18.40-18.47, [sup 207]/[sup 204]Pb = 15.64-15.66 and [sup 208]Pb/[sup 204]Pb = 38.29-38.39. The Pb isotopic compositions of both pegmatites and granites are significantly more radiogenic than existing data for the Sebago granite and argue against the consanguinity of Topsham pegmatites and the Sebago batholith. These data instead support a genetic link between the pegmatites and the Brunswick granite, which ranges from a fine-grained two-mica granite to a garnet-bearing pegmatitic leucogranite.

  2. Pb and O isotopic constraints on the source of granitic rocks from Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, R.A.; Barr, S.M.; Longstaffe, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    Pb isotopic compositions of leached feldspars from twenty-three plutons in Cape Breton Island can be divided into two groups: anorthosite, syenite, and granite in the Blair River Complex, which have the least radiogenic compositions on the Island, and granitic rocks from terranes (Aspy, Bras d'Or, and Mira) to the south. Pb isotopic data for the Blair River Complex (206Pb/204Pb = 17.399-18.107; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.505-15.560; 208Pb/204Pb = 36.689-37.733) are consistent with an old source region ultimately derived from the mantle and contaminated by sialic crust. Oxygen isotopic compositions of syenite in the Blair River Complex (??18O = +8.0 to +8.5 permil) are slightly higher than anorthosite (+7.0 to +8.3 permil); a Silurian granite in the Blair River Complex has ??18O = +7.5 permil. Cambrian to Devonian plutons in the Aspy, Bras d'Or, and Mira terranes are more radiogenic (206Pb/204Pb = 18.192-18.981; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.574-15.712; 208Pb/ 204Pb =37.815-38.936) than the Blair River Complex and were generated from source regions having a predominant crustal Pb signature (high ??). The ??18O values of granites and granodiorites in the Aspy terrane (+7.5 to +9.2 permil; avg = +8.6 permil) and Bras d'Or (+3.7 to +11.3 permil; avg = +9.4 permil) are also consistent with involvement of sialic crust. Many Late Proterozoic granites from the Mira terrane have anomalously low ??18O values (+0.2 to +5.9 permil), perhaps produced from protoliths that had undergone hydrothermal alteration prior to melting. Paleozoic granitic rocks from the Aspy, Bras d'Or, and Mira terranes cannot be uniquely distinguished on the basis of their Pb and O isotopic compositions. The granitic rocks could have been generated during terrane amalgamation from combinations of unradiogenic (Grenville-like) and more radiogenic (Avalon-like) sources.

  3. Deep drilling at the Siljan Ring impact structure: oxygen-isotope geochemistry of granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, S.C.; Valley, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    The Siljan Ring is a 362-Ma-old impact structure formed in 1700-Ma-old I-type granites. A 6.8-km-deep borehole provides a vertical profile through granites and isolated horizontal diabase sills. Fluid-inclusion thermometry, and oxygen-isotope compositions of vein quartz, granite, diabase, impact melt, and pseudotachylite, reveal a complex history of fluid activity in the Siljan Ring, much of which can be related to the meteorite impact. In granites from the deep borehole, ??18O values of matrix quartz increase with depth from near 8.0 at the surface to 9.5??? at 5760 m depth. In contrast, feldspar ??18O values decrease with depth from near 10 at the surface to 7.1??? at 5760 m, forming a pattern opposite to the one defined by quartz isotopic compositions. Values of ??18O for surface granites outside the impact structure are distinct from those in near-surface samples from the deep borehole. In the deep borehole, feldspar coloration varies from brick-red at the surface to white at 5760 m, and the abundances of crack-healing calcite and other secondary minerals decrease over the same interval. Superimposed on the overall decrease in alteration intensity with depth are localized fracture zones at 4662, 5415, and 6044 m depth that contain altered granites, and which provided pathways for deep penetration of surface water. The antithetic variation of quartz and feldspar ??18O values, which can be correlated with mineralogical evidence of alteration, provides evidence for interaction between rocks and impact-heated fluids (100-300?? C) in the upper 2 km of the pluton. Penetration of water to depths below 2 km was restricted by a general decrease in impact-fracturing with depth, and by a 60-m-thick diabase sill at 1500 m depth that may have been an aquitard. At depths below 4 km in the pluton, where water/rock ratios were low, oxygen isotopic compositions preserve evidence for limited high-temperature (>500?? C) exchange between alkali feldspar and fluids. The high

  4. Newly discovered uranium mineralization at 2.0 Ma in the Menggongjie granite-hosted uranium deposit, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jin-Cheng; Hu, Rui-Zhong; Fayek, Mostafa; Bi, Xian-Wu; Shi, Shao-Hua; Chen, You-Wei

    2017-04-01

    The southeastern part of the Nanling metallogenic province, South China contains numerous economically important granite-hosted, hydrothermal vein-type uranium deposits. The Miao'ershan (MES) uranium ore field is one of the most important uranium sources in China, hosts the largest Chanziping carbonaceous-siliceous-pelitic rock-type uranium deposit and several representative granite-hosted uranium deposits. The geology and geochemistry of these deposits have been extensively studied. However, accurate and precise ages for the uranium mineralization are scarce because uranium minerals in these deposits are usually fine-grained, and may have formed in several stages, thus hindering the understanding of the uranium metallogenesis of this province. The Menggongjie (MGJ) uranium deposit is one of the largest granite-hosted uranium deposits in the MES ore field. Uranium mineralization in this deposit occurs at the central part of the MES granitic complex, accompanied with silicification, fluorination, K-metasomatism and hematitization. The ore minerals are dominated by uraninite, occurring in quartz or fluorite veinlets along fractures in altered granite. In-situ SIMS U-Pb dating on the uraninite yields the U-Pb isotopic age of 1.9 ± 0.7 Ma, which is comparable to the chemical U-Th-Pbtol uraninite age of 2.3 ± 0.1 Ma. Such ages agree well with the eruption ages of the extension-related Quaternary volcanics (2.1-1.2 Ma) in South China, suggesting that the uranium mineralization have formed at an extensional setting, possibly related to the Quaternary volcanic activities. Therefore, our robust, new dating results of the MGJ uranium deposit make it the youngest granite-hosted uranium deposit reported so far in South China and the mineralization event represents a newly identified mineralization epoch.

  5. 9. VIEW NORTH, ACROSS DECK AT EAST SIDE SHOWING GRANITE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW NORTH, ACROSS DECK AT EAST SIDE SHOWING GRANITE BLOCK PAVING, EXPANSION JOINT AND NORTH SIDE PIPE RAILING - Route 1 Extension, South Street Viaduct, Spanning Conrail & Wheeler Point Road at South Street, Newark, Essex County, NJ

  6. 6. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY, INTERIOR SHOWING ORIGINAL GRANITE COLUMNS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY, INTERIOR SHOWING ORIGINAL GRANITE COLUMNS AND COLUMN BRICKFACED AFTER THE GREAT FIRE 1904 - Old U.S. Appraisers Stores, Gay & Lombard Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  7. 10. Lighthouse boathouse and granite wharf, view north northeast, southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Lighthouse boathouse and granite wharf, view north northeast, southwest and southeast sides of boathouse, west and south sides of dock - Whitehead Light Station, Whitehead Island, East northeast of Tenants Harbor, Spruce Head, Knox County, ME

  8. 8. July, 1970 DETAIL OF BRICK SIDEWALK AND GRANITE CURB, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. July, 1970 DETAIL OF BRICK SIDEWALK AND GRANITE CURB, LOOKING EAST ON NORTH SIDE OF INDIA STREET FROM DRIVEWAY OF 31 INDIA STREET - India Street Neighborhood Study, 15-45 India Street, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  9. 7. July, 1970 DETAIL OF BRICK SIDEWALK AND GRANITE CURB, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. July, 1970 DETAIL OF BRICK SIDEWALK AND GRANITE CURB, LOOKING EAST ON NORTH SIDE OF INDIA STREET FROM DRIVEWAY OF 31 INDIA STREET - India Street Neighborhood Study, 15-45 India Street, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  10. Lift Off (Granite City C. U. School District 9)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodall, Robert C.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Describes and evaluates the ESEA Title I program in Granite City (Illinois) target area schools which provide preschool classes, remedial reading, and supportive health and counseling services. The programs are considered to be efficient. (DM)

  11. Detail of track girder, south portal and granite piers at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of track girder, south portal and granite piers at low tide. View Northwest - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  12. Lithium Isotopes; a Potential aid to Understanding Granite Petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, C.; Chappell, B.; Bennett, V.

    2002-12-01

    Significant enrichment in 6Li occurs during the weathering of continental crustal materials to clays, contributing to depleted δ7Li in the resultant sedimentary rocks. As such Li isotopes potentially provide a unique perspective on the nature of crustal components involved granite genesis. Carboniferous-Permian granites of the New England Batholith (NEB), Australia, emplaced in a Devonian-Triassic arc setting, are subdivided into 5 major supersuites1. Bundarra and Hillgrove are both S-types, interpreted to be derived from strongly weathered arc rocks1, and immature greywackes2, respectively. Moonbi, Uralla and Clarence River represent three distinct I-type supersuites. Moonbi granites are high-K and strongly oxidised. Uralla granites are medium-high-K, and more reduced. Clarence River are low-K, isotopically primitive granites, equivalent to arc magmas. Li isotopes were evaluated using MC-ICP-MS analysis under conditions of reduced RF power. This 'cool' plasma technique yields precision equivalent to TIMS (2\\sigma SD; 0.5‰ , 680W; 0.7‰ , 800W)3. Overall variations of ~10‰ δ 7Li are observed, greater than the differences observed in arc lavas worldwide (δ 7Li = ~2 to 7‰ ). Clarence River granites typically have δ7Li > 4‰ , similar to lavas from sediment poor island arcs (e.g. Izu-Bonin and Kuriles). Bundarra granites have low δ7Li, consistent with involvement of more strongly weathered source components. The higher δ7Li (< 4.9‰ ) observed for Hillgrove supports the inferred derivation from immature arc sediments2. Moonbi and Uralla overlap with the lighter values observed for arc lavas. The slightly heavier values for Uralla granites are consistent with the greater involvement of sedimentary components in the latter. Although no simple delineation exists between NEB S- and I-type granites, Li isotopes provide important insights into the nature of the crustal components involved in granite magma-genesis. 1Shaw, S.E. and Flood, R.H. 1981. JGR, 86

  13. Hydrothermal modification of host rock geochemistry within Mo-Cu porphyry deposits in the Galway Granite, western Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolometti, Gavin; McCarthy, Will

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal alteration of host rock is a process inherent to the formation of porphyry deposits and the required geochemical modification of these rocks is regularly used to indicate proximity to an economic target. The study involves examining the changes in major, minor and trace elements to understand how the quartz vein structures have influenced the chemistry within the Murvey Granite that forms part of the 380-425Ma Galway Granite Complex in western Ireland. Molybdenite mineralisation within the Galway Granite Complex occurred in close association with protracted magmatism at 423Ma, 410Ma, 407Ma, 397Ma and 383Ma and this continues to be of interest to active exploration. The aim of the project is to characterize hydrothermal alteration associated with Mo-Cu mineralisation and identify geochemical indicators that can guide future exploration work. The Murvey Granite intrudes metagabbros and gneiss that form part of the Connemara Metamorphic complex. The intrusion is composed of albite-rich pink granite, garnetiferous granite and phenocrytic orthoclase granite. Minor doleritic dykes post-date the Murvey Granite, found commonly along its margins. Field mapping shows that the granite is truncated to the east by a regional NW-SE fault and that several small subparallel structures host Mo-Cu bearing quartz veins. Petrographic observations show heavily sericitized feldspars and plagioclase and biotite which have undergone kaolinization and chloritisation. Chalcopyrite minerals are fine grained, heavily fractured found crystallized along the margins of the feldspars and 2mm pyrite crystals. Molybdenite are also seen along the margins of the feldspars, crystallized whilst the Murvey Granite cooled. Field and petrographic observations indicate that mineralisation is structurally controlled by NW-SE faults from the selected mineralization zones and conjugate NE-SW cross cutting the Murvey Granite. Both fault orientations exhibit quartz and disseminated molybdenite

  14. Activity concentrations and dose rates from decorative granite countertops.

    PubMed

    Llope, W J

    2011-06-01

    The gamma radiation emitted from a variety of commercial decorative granites available for use in U.S. homes has been measured with portable survey meters as well as an NaI(Th) gamma spectrometer. The (40)K, U-nat, and (232)Th activity concentrations were determined using a full-spectrum analysis. The dose rates that would result from two different arrangements of decorative granite slabs as countertops were explored in simulations involving an adult anthropomorphic phantom.

  15. Natural radioactivity content of granite tiles used in Greece.

    PubMed

    Papaefthymiou, H

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K activity concentrations in commercial granite tiles imported in Greece were performed using gamma-ray spectrometry. The activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K ranged from 1 to 434, 2 to 239 and 71 to 1576 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The calculated activity concentration index (I) values for all granite samples examined were found to be within the EC limit values for superficial and other materials with restricted use.

  16. Radionuclide Transport in Fracture-Granite Interface Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q; Mori, A

    2007-09-12

    In situ radionuclide migration experiments, followed by excavation and sample characterization, were conducted in a water-conducting shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland to study diffusion paths of radionuclides in fractured granite. In this work, we employed a micro-scale mapping technique that interfaces laser ablation sampling with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA/ICP-MS) to measure the fine-scale (micron-range) distribution of actinides ({sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 237}Np) in the fracture-granite interface zones. Long-lived {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 237}Np were detected in flow channels, as well as in the adjacent rock matrix, using the sensitive, feature-based mapping of the LA/ICP-MS technique. The injected sorbing actinides are mainly located within the advective flowing fractures and the immediately adjacent regions. The water-conducting fracture studied in this work is bounded on one side by mylonite and the other by granitic matrix regions. These actinides did not penetrate into the mylonite side as much as the relatively higher-porosity granite matrix, most likely due to the low porosity, hydraulic conductivity, and diffusivity of the fracture wall (a thickness of about 0.4 mm separates the mylonite region from the fracture) and the mylonite region itself. Overall, the maximum penetration depth detected with this technique for the more diffusive {sup 237}Np over the field experimental time scale of about 60 days was about 10 mm in the granitic matrix, illustrating the importance of matrix diffusion in retarding radionuclide transport from the advective fractures. Laboratory tests and numerical modeling of radionuclide diffusion into granitic matrix was conducted to complement and help interpret the field results. Measured apparent diffusivity of multiple tracers in granite provided consistent predictions for radionuclide transport in the fractured granitic rock.

  17. Hydraulic fracturing in granite under geothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solberg, P.; Lockner, D.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental hydraulic fracturing of granite under geothermal conditions produces tensile fracture at rapid fluid injection rates and shear fracture at slow injection rates and elevated differential stress levels. A sudden burst of acoustic emission activity accompanies tensile fracture formation whereas the acoustic emission rate increases exponentially prior to shear fracture. Temperature does not significantly affect the failure mechanism, and the experimental results have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing. A critical result of these experiments is that fluid injection at intermediate rates and elevated differential stress levels increases permeability by more than an order of magnitude without producing macroscopic fractures, and low-level acoustic emission activity occurs simultaneously near the borehole and propagates outward into the specimen with time. Permeability measurements conducted at atmospheric pressure both before and after these experiments show that increased permeability is produced by permanent structural changes in the rock. Although results of this study have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing, they suggest that fluid injection at certain rates in situ may markedly increase local permeability. This could prove critical to increasing the efficiency of heat exchange for geothermal energy extraction from hot dry rock. ?? 1980.

  18. Mortality experience of Vermont granite workers

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.K.; Wegman, D.H.; Monson, R.R.; Froines, J.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison was made between the chief cause of death among 969 deceased white male granite workers in Vermont and the causes of death among other individuals not in that occupation. Tuberculosis deaths were ten times the number predicted, based on the U.S. white male experience. Of the 65 tuberculosis deaths, 48 were silicotuberculosis and 16 were pulmonary tuberculosis. A notable increase was found for deaths due to all respiratory diseases, with 28 deaths due to silicosis. Excluding deaths due to silicosis and tuberculosis left a small excess of emphysema-related deaths. For 25 men in the respiratory disease category whose cause of death was not listed as silicosis, ten had evidence of silicosis in their x-ray records suggesting some misdiagnoses may have occurred. An excess of lung cancer deaths was noted among sawyers and polishers, suggesting possible effects of abrasive exposures. No tuberculosis deaths were noted in men who started work in the post dust control period, after 1950. There was an excess of suicide deaths before 1970.

  19. Numerical Experiments on Ductile Fracture in Granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Weinberg, R. F.

    2006-12-01

    Ceramics and, by analogy rocks, are brittle at low temperatures, however, at high temperature and high pressure a second ductile mode of fracture based on dislocation and/or diffusion processes predominates. For ceramics 0.5-0.7 times the melting temperature suffice to create creep/ductile fracture which occurs typically after long time of deformation 104-1010 s (1). Ductile creep fractures make up for the low stress by profiting from accumulated strain and diffusion during slow creep deformation. Creep fractures typically nucleate on grain or phase boundaries, rigid or soft inclusions. Ultimately, the localized inhomogeneous damaged zone, begin to spread laterally and coalesce to create or follow a propagating shear band. The creep fracture sequence of crack nucleation, growth and coalescence relies on a mechanism of self-organization of fluids into a shear band during deformation and converts macroscopically to the crack like propagation of localized shear zones. Numerical experiments are used to test the ductile fracture hypothesis for the segregation and transfer of melts in granites. Ref: (1) C. Ghandi, M. F. Ashby, Acta Metallurgica 27, 1565 (1979).

  20. Thermal history of Apollo 12 granite and KREEP-rich rock: Clues from Pb/Pb ages of zircon in lunar breccia 12013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-Cheng; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Wang, Ru-Cheng; Li, Qiu-Li; Li, Xian-Hua; Patchen, Allan D.; Liu, Yang

    2012-10-01

    With the mafic to ultramafic petrology of the Moon, the presence of granite appears anomalous. However, fragments of rocks with a definite granitic textures and mineralogy have been recovered from the maria, where their ages point to an ultimate origin in the highlands. Apollo 12 mare breccia 12013 is one of these unique lunar rocks, containing abundant granitic components. It consists of a black portion, composed mainly of fragments of plagioclase and noritic rock, with minor fragments of granitic rock, and a gray portion that is dominated by an overall granitic component. Zircon grains from this breccia were studied by combining cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging and micron-scale, ion-microprobe dating techniques. Zircon grains from the black portion have a large age variation (4.0-4.3 Ga). A few of them exhibit complex age zoning within individual grains, corresponding to CL zoning. Zircon grains from the gray portion show no CL zoning features but also have a large age variation between different grains (4.2-4.3 Ga). In this study, we suggest that the large age variations of zircon in 12013, among different grains and within individual grains were caused by post-crystallization impact events, and most of them are not original crystallization ages. The 4.3-Ga zircon age probably represents the minimum crystallization age of the granitic component in 12013, similar to lunar granites from the Apollo 14 and 17 landing sites. This old crystallization age also implies that various REE patterns of lunar granites might not be entirely related to their crystallization ages. Based on comparison with the 207Pb/206Pb ages for zircon from the Apollo 12, 14, and 17 landing sites, we suggest that there was at least one pre-3.9 Ga major impact event on the Moon, at ˜4.2 Ga.

  1. Highly fractionated S-type granites from the giant Dahutang tungsten deposit in Jiangnan Orogen, Southeast China: geochronology, petrogenesis and their relationship with W-mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lan-Chun; Jiang, Shao-Yong

    2014-08-01

    . The granites show bulk rock εNd(t) values in the range of - 9.37 to - 5.92 and zircon εHf(t) values from - 8.44 to - 2.13, with late Mesoproterozoic TDMC ages for both Nd and Hf isotopes. Geochemical and isotopic data suggest that these highly fractionated S-type granites G1 and G2-G4 were originated from two episodes of partial melting of different protoliths which have analogous components of metamorphosed pelitic rocks from the Neoproterozoic Shuangqiaoshan Group, which are enriched in tungsten. Extreme fractional crystallization resulted in further enrichment of tungsten in the evolved granitic magma. The new presented data together with previously published data suggest that the Dahutang granitic complex was likely to be formed during lithospheric thinning and asthenospheric upwelling process in Eastern China.

  2. Magnetic Properties of the Precambrian Granitic Rocks in Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, N.; Jackson, M.; Kogiso, T.; Sato, M.; Seita, K.; Tsunakawa, H.

    2008-12-01

    It has been known that granitic rocks have stable components of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) as well as unstable NRM. It is noted that remanent magnetization of plagioclase crystals in granitic and basaltic rocks can yield reliable paleomagnetic data (e.g. Wu et al., 1974; Geissman et al., 1988; Tarduno et al., 2001; Wakabayashi et al., 2006). The acquisition process of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) of granitic rocks is not well-understood because the size of magnetic grains varies from less than a few μm to hundreds of μm and parts of them are included in each crystal of granitic rocks. Thus we have made rock-magnetic studies and microscopic observations on granitic rocks and their separated crystals. Samples used in this study are collected from multiple sites of the Sacred Heart Granite (2.6 Ga U-Pb zircon ages) and the St. Cloud Granite and Granodiorite (1.8 Ga U-Pb zircon age) in Minnesota. For most of the bulk samples from granitic rocks, the Verwey transition at 120 K is clearly recognized. Susceptibility- temperature (χ-T) curves show an abrupt drop at about 580°C. Hysteresis parameters of bulk samples are distributed along a mixing line between the multi-domain (MD) and pseudo-single-domain (PSD) areas on the Day plot. Saturation isothermal remanence (SIRM) cooling and warming curves indicate that low-temperature memories range in a few to several tens % of the initial SIRM. These results indicate the MD magnetite grains dominate the magnetic properties but more or less PSD (or single-domain (SD)) magnetite grains are present in the granitic rocks. The separated crystals of feldspar and quartz show the Verwey transition at 120 K and the Curie temperature of about 580°C. Hysteresis properties of them are similar to those of bulk samples. These suggest that the MD and PSD (or SD) magnetite are included in both feldspar and quartz, suggesting that those magnetite grains primarily formed during the initial formation of the granitic rocks. We

  3. The H2O Content of Granite Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, O.; Cesare, B.; Remusat, L.; Acosta-Vigil, A.; Poli, S.

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of H2O contents of natural granites has been an on-going challenge owing to the extremely fugitive character of H2O during cooling and ascent of melts and magmas. Here we approach this problem by studying granites in their source region (i.e. the partially melted continental crust) and we present the first NanoSIMS analyses of anatectic melt inclusions (MI) hosted in peritectic phases of migmatites and granulites. These MI which totally crystallized upon slow cooling represent the embryos of the upper-crustal granites. The approach based on the combination of MI and NanoSIMS has been here tested on amphibolite-facies migmatites at Ronda (S Spain) that underwent fluid-present to fluid-absent melting at ~700 °C and ~5 kbar. Small (≤ 5 µm) crystallized MI trapped in garnet have been remelted using a piston-cylinder apparatus and they show leucogranitic compositions. We measure high and variable H2O contents (mean of 6.5±1.4 wt%) in these low-temperature, low-pressure granitic melts. We demonstrate that, when the entire population from the same host is considered, MI reveal the H2O content of melt in the specific volume of rock where the host garnet grew. Mean H2O values for the MI in different host crystals range from 5.4 to 9.1 wt%. This range is in rather good agreement with experimental models for granitic melts at the inferred P-T conditions. Our study documents for the first time the occurrence of H2O heterogeneities in natural granitic melts at the source region. These heterogeneities are interpreted to reflect the birth of granitic melts under conditions of "mosaic" equilibrium, where the distinct fractions of melt experience different buffering assemblages at the micro-scale, with concomitant differences in melt H2O content. These results confirm the need for small-scale geochemical studies on natural samples to improve our quantitative understanding of crustal melting and granite formation. The same approach adopted here can be applied to

  4. The H2O content of granite embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, Omar; Cesare, Bernardo; Remusat, Laurent; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio; Poli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of H2O contents of natural granites has been an on-going challenge owing to the extremely fugitive character of H2O during cooling and ascent of melts and magmas. Here we approach this problem by studying granites in their source region (i.e. the partially melted continental crust) and we present the first NanoSIMS analyses of anatectic melt inclusions (MI) hosted in peritectic phases of migmatites and granulites. These MI which totally crystallized upon slow cooling represent the embryos of the upper-crustal granites [1, 2, 3]. The approach based on the combination of MI and NanoSIMS has been here tested on amphibolite-facies migmatites at Ronda (S Spain) that underwent fluid-present to fluid-absent melting at ~700 °C and ~5 kbar. Small (≤ 5 µm) crystallized MI trapped in garnet have been remelted using a piston-cylinder apparatus and they show leucogranitic compositions. We measure high and variable H2O contents (mean of 6.5±1.4 wt%) in these low-temperature, low-pressure granitic melts. We demonstrate that, when the entire population from the same host is considered, MI reveal the H2O content of melt in the specific volume of rock where the host garnet grew. Mean H2O values for the MI in different host crystals range from 5.4 to 9.1 wt%. This range is in rather good agreement with experimental models for granitic melts at the inferred P-T conditions. Our study documents for the first time the occurrence of H2O heterogeneities in natural granitic melts at the source region [3]. These heterogeneities are interpreted to reflect the birth of granitic melts under conditions of "mosaic" equilibrium, where the distinct fractions of melt experience different buffering assemblages at the micro-scale, with concomitant differences in melt H2O content. These results confirm the need for small-scale geochemical studies on natural samples to improve our quantitative understanding of crustal melting and granite formation. The same approach adopted here can

  5. Episodic Growth and Solidification of the Vinalhaven Intrusive Complex, Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.; Hawkins, D. P.; Wark, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    The Silurian Vinalhaven intrusive complex is about 12 km in diameter and consists mainly of cg granite, a thick section of inward-dipping gabbro-diorite sheets in the SE half of the complex, and a core of fg granite. The lowest exposed part of the complex occurs on its S margin. Along its NW margin, granite intrudes the older, cogenetic Vinalhaven rhyolite, which consists of effusive and pyroclastic units of largely high-silica rhyolite. It is probable that plutonic rocks coeval with the exposed rhyolite units occur at depth and younger rhyolite units, coeval with the plutonic complex, were eroded. The complex was fed by multiple replenishments of isotopically distinct basaltic and granitic magmas. Basaltic replenishments typically produced gabbroic sheets that ponded on granitic crystal mush at the base of a silicic chamber. Where basalt encountered only crystal-rich granitic magma, it locally remelted and mixed with granite, producing bodies of porphyry with corroded phenocrysts and mafic enclaves. CL and Ti zoning in quartz phenocrysts records corrosion followed by growth of high T rims (based on Ti-in-qtz thermometer of Wark and Watson, 2006). Fg granitic dikes and the fg granitic core of the complex represent silicic replenishments. Contact relationships between these dikes and the surrounding granite provide insight into the rheology of the granite at the time of intrusion. Where the resident granitic magma was crystal rich, aphyric magma in the dikes intimately mixed and commingled with the resident cg granite mush. Convective mixing was important in the silicic magma chambers. Where mafic sheets are present in granite, upward gradations through hybrid rocks back into granite and the occurrence of mafic enclaves in granite far above the mafic sheets demonstrate mixing within overlying silicic magma. Complex CL and Ti zoning in the cores of granitic quartz far from the mafic input also records thermal perturbations caused by the mafic input. The oldest

  6. Groundwater chemistry of a nuclear waste reposoitory in granite bedrock

    SciTech Connect

    Rydberg, J.

    1981-09-01

    This report concerns the prediction of the maximum dissolution rate for nuclear waste stored in the ground. That information is essential in judging the safety of a nuclear waste repository. With a limited groundwater flow, the maximum dissolution rate coincides with the maximum solubility. After considering the formation and composition of deep granite bedrock groundwater, the report discusses the maximum solubility in such groundwater of canister materials, matrix materials and waste elements. The parameters considered are pH, Eh and complex formation. The use of potential-pH (Pourbaix) diagrams is stressed; several appendixes are included to help in analyzing such diagrams. It is repeatedly found that desirable basic information on solution chemistry is lacking, and an international cooperative research effort is recommended. The report particularly stresses the lack of reliable data about complex formation and hydrolysis of the actinides. The Swedish Nuclear Fuel Safety (KBS) study has been used as a reference model. Notwithstanding the lack of reliable chemical data, particularly for the actinides and some fission products, a number of essential conclusions can be drawn about the waste handling model chosen by KBS. (1) Copper seems to be highly resistant to groundwater corrosion. (2) Lead and titanium are also resistant to groundwater, but inferior to copper. (3) Iron is not a suitable canister material. (4) Alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) is not a suitable canister material if groundwater pH goes up to or above 10. Alumina is superior to copper at pH < 9, if there is a risk of the groundwater becoming oxidizing. (5) The addition of vivianite (ferrous phosphate) to the clay backfill around the waste canisters improves the corrosion resistance of the metal canisters, and reduces the solubility of many important waste elements. This report does not treat the migration of dissolved species through the rock.

  7. Determination of Matrix Diffusion Properties of Granite

    SciTech Connect

    Holtta, Pirkko; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Huittinen, Nina; Poteri, Antti

    2007-07-01

    Rock-core column experiments were introduced to estimate the diffusion and sorption properties of Kuru Grey granite used in block-scale experiments. The objective was to examine the processes causing retention in solute transport through rock fractures, especially matrix diffusion. The objective was also to estimate the importance of retention processes during transport in different scales and flow conditions. Rock-core columns were constructed from cores drilled into the fracture and were placed inside tubes to form flow channels in the 0.5 mm gap between the cores and the tube walls. Tracer experiments were performed using uranin, HTO, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 131}I, {sup 22}Na and {sup 85}Sr at flow rates of 1-50 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. Rock matrix was characterized using {sup 14}C-PMMA method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray micro analysis (EDX) and the B.E.T. method. Solute mass flux through a column was modelled by applying the assumption of a linear velocity profile and molecular diffusion. Coupling of the advection and diffusion processes was based on the model of generalised Taylor dispersion in the linear velocity profile. Experiments could be modelled applying a consistent parameterization and transport processes. The results provide evidence that it is possible to investigate matrix diffusion at the laboratory scale. The effects of matrix diffusion were demonstrated on the slightly-sorbing tracer breakthrough curves. Based on scoping calculations matrix diffusion begins to be clearly observable for non-sorbing tracer when the flow rate is 0.1 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. The experimental results presented here cannot be transferred directly to the spatial and temporal scales that prevail in an underground repository. However, the knowledge and understanding of transport and retention processes gained from this study is transferable to different scales from laboratory to in-situ conditions. (authors)

  8. Multiple origins for the Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous high-K calc-alkaline I-type granites in northwestern Fujian province, SE China and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guo-Chang; Jiang, Yao-Hui; Liu, Zheng; Ni, Chun-Yu; Qing, Long; Zhang, Qiao; Zhu, Shu-Qi

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive study of zircon U-Pb dating and in situ Hf isotopes, whole-rock major and trace element geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopes was carried out for three late Mesozoic granitic plutons (Waitun, Shipi and Taiyuan) in northwestern Fujian province, SE China. We assess the origin of the granites and their relationship to the evolution of the late Mesozoic volcanic-intrusive complex belt in SE China. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating shows that three plutons were emplaced in the Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (168-109 Ma), in which the Waitun and Shipi plutons are intrusive complexes. All the plutons are composed of high-K calc-alkaline I-type granites with a great diversity in elemental and isotopic compositions. The granites have SiO2 contents of 68.3-78.5 wt.%, showing a gradual decrease in initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.7181 to 0.7091) and increase in εNd (T) (- 16.7 to - 8.1) and εHf (T) (in-situ zircon) (- 20.6 to - 6.9) with decreasing emplacement ages. Geochemical data suggest that the Middle Jurassic ( 168 Ma) Waitun granites are of purely crustal origin, derived by partial melting of a mixed source of Paleoproterozoic metaigneous ( 78%) and metasedimentary ( 22%) rocks at a depth of 30-40 km triggered by underplating of basaltic magma. Mixing of such crustal melts with about 10% basaltic magma could account for the origin of the Late Jurassic ( 161 Ma) Waitun granites. The Late Jurassic ( 156 Ma) Shipi and Early Cretaceous ( 134 Ma) Taiyuan granites were produced by extensive fractional crystallization of primary crustal melts, the source of which show relatively high proportion ( 82%) of metaigneous rocks. The Early Cretaceous ( 109 Ma) Shipi granites were generated by partial melting of a mixed source of Paleoproterozoic metaigneous ( 92%) and metasedimentary ( 8%) rocks at a depth of 30 km plus additional ( 15%) input from coeval basaltic magma. The granites were formed in a continental arc setting induced by northwestward subduction of the Paleo

  9. Overview of granitic rocks in the Bradfield Canal area, southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R.D. )

    1993-04-01

    Granitic rocks in the Bradfield Canal area of southeastern Alaska are part of the Coast plutonic-metamorphic complex and include rocks representing several different periods of magmatic activity. Units belonging to the previously named Admiralty-Revillagigedo, great tonalite sill, Coast Mountains, and Groundhog Basin-Cone Mountain belts are present. The Texas Creek Granodiorite is located in the southeastern part of the area and is probably 212 Ma or somewhat older. It consists mainly of locally deformed and altered calc-alkalic biotite-hornblende granodiorite and is closely associated with important mineral deposits. Distinguishing features include primary epidote, accessory garnet, and locally a distinctive plagioclase-porphyritic texture. Northeast of the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt lies the northwest-trending great tonalite sill belt. These rocks are 58--55 Ma and consist of calc-alkalic, generally well-foliated and locally lineated biotite-hornblende and hornblende tonalite, quartz diorite, and granodiorite. The Coast Mountains belt granitic rocks are the most extensive in the area. The granite has been explored for U, Th, and REE deposits. The Coast plutonic-metamorphic complex records dynamothermal and regional contact metamorphic events related to the regional plutonism. Most of the lengthy and complicated magmatic and metamorphic history of the complex is related to Late Cretaceous collision of the Alexander and Wrangellia terranes and juxtaposition of the Gravina overlap assemblage to the west (Superterrane II) against the Yukon prong and Stikine terrane to the east (Superterrane I). An exception is the Texas Creek Granodiorite, which is related to a pre-accretionary Jurassic arc in the Stikine terrane.

  10. Decrepitometry of fluid inclusions in quartz from the guadalcazar granite of Mexico; principles and application to mineral exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chryssoulis, S. L.; Rankin, A. H.

    1988-01-01

    A simple acoustic decrepitometric method, with which samples of granite quartz are heated to about 600°C while the number of decrepitations are counted, has been developed to study rock samples derived from the mineralized guadalcazar granite in Mexico. Decrepitation temperatures for individual inclusions have also been determined by observing the point at which they rupture upon heating using a microscope heating stage. Decrepitation temperatures of individual fluid inclusions in granite quartz are influenced by a variety of factors notably size, shape, composition, homogenization temperature and proximity to the surface. There is a positive correlation between total decrepitation activity and fluid inclusion abundances (determined optically using point counting methods). Decrepitographs show a period of low intensity decrepitation activity below 390°C followed by a period of intensive decrepitation up to 570°C. The onset of massive decrepitation at around 390°C is constant for all samples, but variations in decrepitation activity often occur between mineralized and barren samples. These variations reflect complex differences in the fluid inclusion populations, but illustrate the potential for applying simple audio-decrepitometry as an aid to mineral exploration in granite terrains.

  11. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

    2009-02-18

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2005 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2005 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, the age-1 and older fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Age-0 Chinook salmon are more difficult to distinguish between wild and non-adclipped hatchery fish and therefore classified as unknown rearing. The total annual hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 0.34 times greater in 2005 than in 2004. The wild spring/summer Chinook catch was 0.34 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 0.67 times less than in 2004. Wild steelhead trout catch was 0.72 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 1,152 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2005, the Snake River trap captured 219 hatchery and 44 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 110 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on June 3. The trap was out of operation for a total of one day due to heavy debris. FPC requested that the trap be restarted on June 15 through June 22 to collect and PIT tag age-0 Chinook salmon. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 1.06 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.26 times greater than in 2004. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2005 was 1.41 times greater and wild steelhead trout collection was 1.27 times greater than the previous year. Trap operations

  12. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

    2009-02-18

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2003 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2003 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 2.1 times less in 2003 than in 2002. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.7 times less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.1 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 579 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2003, the Snake River trap captured five hatchery and 13 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 36 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant differences in catch between 2003 and the previous year were due mainly to low flows during much of the trapping season and then very high flows at the end of the season, which terminated the trapping season 12 days earlier than in 2002. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 27. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 16.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.7 times greater than in 2002. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2003 was 5.6% less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout collection was 19.2% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 24 due to high

  13. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

    2009-02-18

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2004 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2004 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 1.1 times greater in 2004 than in 2003. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.2 times greater than in 2003. Wild steelhead trout catch was 1.6 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 978 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2004, the Snake River trap captured 23 hatchery and 18 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 60 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on June 4. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 10.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 19.0% less than in 2003. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2004 was 20.0% less and wild steelhead trout collection was 22.3% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on May 28 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because wild Chinook catch was very low, hatchery Chinook catch was very high, and the weekly quota of PIT tagged hatchery Chinook had been met. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km

  14. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

    2009-02-18

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2002 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2002 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11.4 times greater in 2002 than in 2001. The wild Chinook catch was 15.5 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 2.9 times greater than in 2001. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.8 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 3,996 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2002, the Snake River trap captured 69 hatchery and 235 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 114 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant increase in catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery Chinook production and a more normal spring runoff. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on June 7. The trap was out of operation for a total of four days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 4.2 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 2.4 times greater than in 2001. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the 2001 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on May 29 due to high flows. The trap was out of operation for four days due to high flow or debris. The increase

  15. Geology of the Andover Granite and surrounding rocks, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castle, Robert O.

    1964-01-01

    Field and petrographic studies of the Andover Granite and surrounding rocks have afforded an opportunity for an explanation of its emplacement and crystallization. The investigation has contributed secondarily to an understanding of the geologic history of southeastern New England, particularly as it is revealed in the Lawrence, Wilmington, South Groveland, and Reading quadrangles of Massachusetts. The Andover Granite and Sharpners Pond Tonalite together comprise up to 90 percent of the Acadian(?) subalkaline intrusive series cropping out within the area of study. The subalkaline series locally invades a sequence of early to middle Paleozoic and possibly Precambrian metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks. Much of the subalkaline series and most of the Andover Granite is confined between two prominent east-northeast trending faults or fault systems. The northern fault separates the mildly metamorphosed Middle Silurian(?) Merrimack Group on the north from a highly metamorphosed and thoroughly intruded Ordovician(?) sequence on the south. The southern 'boundary '' fault is a major structural discontinuity characterized by penetrative, diffuse shearing over a zone one-half mile or more in width. The magmatic nature of the Andover Granite is demonstrated by: (1) sharply crosscutting relationships with surrounding rocks; (2) the occurrence of tabular-shaped xenoliths whose long directions parallel the foliation within the granite and whose internal foliation trends at a high angle to that of the granite; (3) continuity with the clearly intrusive Sharpners Pond Tonalite; (4) the compositional uniformity of the granite as contrasted with the compositional diversity of the rocks it invades; (5) its modal and normative correspondence with (a) calculated norms of salic extrusives and (b) that of the ternary (granite) minimum for the system NaAlSi3O8-KAlSi3O8-SiO2. Orogenic granites, as represented by the Andover, contrast with post-orogenic granites, represented locally by

  16. Prevalence of dry methods in granite countertop fabrication in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Margaret L; Johnson, Andrew C

    2012-01-01

    Granite countertop fabricators are at risk of exposure to respirable crystalline silica, which may cause silicosis and other lung conditions. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of exposure control methods, especially wet methods, in granite countertop fabrication in Oklahoma to assess how many workers might be at risk of overexposure to crystalline silica in this industry. Granite fabrication shops in the three largest metropolitan areas in Oklahoma were enumerated, and 47 of the 52 shops participated in a survey on fabrication methods. Countertop shops were small businesses with average work forces of fewer than 10 employees. Ten shops (21%) reported using exclusively wet methods during all fabrication steps. Thirty-five shops (74%) employing a total of about 200 workers reported using dry methods all or most of the time in at least one fabrication step. The tasks most often performed dry were edge profiling (17% of shops), cutting of grooves for reinforcing rods (62% of shops), and cutting of sink openings (45% of shops). All shops reported providing either half-face or full-face respirators for use during fabrication, but none reported doing respirator fit testing. Few shops reported using any kind of dust collection system. These findings suggest that current consumer demand for granite countertops is giving rise to a new wave of workers at risk of silicosis due to potential overexposure to granite dust.

  17. Earth's youngest exposed granite and its tectonic implications: the 10-0.8 Ma Kurobegawa Granite.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hisatoshi; Yamada, Ryuji; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji; Horie, Kenji; Hokada, Tomokazu

    2013-01-01

    Although the quest for Earth's oldest rock is of great importance, identifying the youngest exposed pluton on Earth is also of interest. A pluton is a body of intrusive igneous rock that crystallized from slowly cooling magma at depths of several kilometers beneath the surface of the Earth. Therefore, the youngest exposed pluton represents the most recent tectonic uplift and highest exhumation. The youngest exposed pluton reported to date is the Takidani Granodiorite (~ 1.4 Ma) in the Hida Mountain Range of central Japan. Using LA-ICP-MS and SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating methods, this study demonstrates that the Kurobegawa Granite, also situated in the Hida Mountain Range, is as young as ~ 0.8 Ma. In addition, data indicate multiple intrusion episodes in this pluton since 10 Ma with a ~ 2-million-year period of quiescence; hence, a future intrusion event is likely within 1 million years.

  18. The mechanism of ascent and emplacement of granite magma during transpression: a syntectonic granite paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.; Solar, G. S.

    1999-10-01

    We propose a model for syntectonic ascent and emplacement of granite magma based on structural relations in part of the northern Appalachians. In the study area in western Maine, strain was distributed heterogeneously during Devonian Acadian transpression. Metasedimentary rocks (migmatites at high grades) record two contrasting types of finite strain in zones that alternate across strike. Rocks in both types of zones have a penetrative, moderately-to-steeply NE-plunging mineral elongation lineation defined by bladed muscovite (fibrolite/sillimanite at high grades). In `straight' belts of enhanced deformation rocks have S > L fabrics that record apparent flattening-to-plane strain (apparent flattening zones, AFZs), but rocks between these belts have L > S fabrics that record apparent constriction (apparent constriction zones, ACZs). At metamorphic grades above the contemporary solidus, rocks in AFZs developed stromatic structure in migmatite, which suggests that percolative flow of melt occurred along the evolving flattening fabric. Stromatic migmatites are intruded by concordant to weakly discordant, m-scale composite sheet-like bodies of granite to suggest magma transport in planar conduits through the AFZ rocks. Inhomogeneous migmatite is found in the intervening ACZs, which suggests migration of partially molten material through these zones en masse, probably by melt-assisted granular flow. Inhomogeneous migmatites are intruded by irregular m-scale bodies of granite that vary from elongate to sub-circular in plan view and seem cylindrical in three dimensions. These bodies apparently plunge to the northeast, parallel to the regional mineral elongation lineation, to suggest magma transport in pipe-like conduits through the ACZ rocks. We postulate that the form of magma ascent conduits was deformation-controlled, and was governed by the contemporaneous strain partitioning. Magma ascent in planar and pipe-like conduits through migmatites is possible because oblique

  19. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Brimmer, Arnold F.

    1994-10-01

    This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead trout O. mykiss smolts during the 1994 spring outmigration at migrant traps on the Snake River, Clearwater River, and Salmon River. The 1994 snowpack was among the lowest since the beginning of the present drought, and the subsequent runoff was very poor. All hatchery chinook salmon released above Lower Granite Dam were marked with a fin clip in 1994. Total annual (hatchery + wild) chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 1.5 times greater than in 1993. Hatchery and wild steelhead trout catches were similar to 1993. The Snake River trap collected 30 age 0 chinook salmon. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Clearwater River trap was 3.5 times higher than in 1993, and wild chinook salmon catch was 4.2 times higher. Hatchery steelhead trout trap catch was less than half of 1993 numbers because the trap was fishing near the north shore during the majority of the hatchery steelhead movement due to flow augmentations from Dworshak. Wild steelhead trout trap catch was 2 times higher than in 1993. The Salmon River trap was operated for about a month longer in 1994 than in 1993 due to extremely low flows. Hatchery chinook salmon catch was 1.4 times greater in 1994 than the previous year. Wild chinook salmon catch was slightly less in 1994. The 1994 hatchery steelhead trout collection did not change significantly from 1993 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 1994 was 59% of the 1993 catch. Fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993, cumulative interrogation data is not comparable with the prior five years (1988-1992).

  20. Late Permian to Early Oligocene granitic magmatism of the Phan Si Pan uplift area, NW Vietnam: their relationship to Phanerozoic crustal evolution of Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, T. T.; Shellnutt, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Phan Si Pan uplift area of NW Vietnam is a part of the Archean to Paleoproterozoic Yangtze Block, Southwest China. This area is of particular interest because it experienced a number of Phanerozoic crustal building events including the Emeishan Large Igneous Province, the India-Eurasia collision and Ailaoshan - Red River Fault displacement. In the Phan Si Pan uplift area, there are at least three different geochronological complexes, including: (1) Late Permian, (2) Eocene and (3) Early Oligocene. (1) The Late Permian silicic rocks are alkali ferroan A1-type granitic rocks with U/Pb ages of 251 ± 3 to 254 ± 3 Ma. The Late Permian silicic rocks of Phan Si Pan uplift area intrude the upper to middle crust and are considered to be part of the ELIP that was displaced during the India-Eurasian collision along the Ailaoshan-Red River Fault shear zone and adjacent structures (i.e. Song Da zone). Previous studies suggest the Late Permian granitic rocks were derived by fractional crystallization of high - Ti basaltic magma. (2) The Eocene rocks are alkali ferroan A1-type granites (U/Pb ages 49 ± 0.9 Ma) and are spatially associated with the Late Permian granitic rocks. The trace element ratios of this granite are similar to the Late Permian rocks (Th/Nb=0.2, Th/Ta = 2.5, Nb/U = 24, Nb/La =1.2, Sr/Y=1). The origin of the Eocene granite is uncertain but it is possible that it formed by fractional crystallization of a mafic magma during a period of extension within the Yangtze Block around the time of the India-Eurasia collision. (3) The Early Oligocene granite is characterized as a peraluminous within-plate granite with U/Pb ages of 31.3 ± 0.4 to 34 ± 1 Ma. The Early Oligocene granite has trace element ratios (Th/Nb = 2.1, Th/Ta = 22.6, Nb/U = 4.4, Nb/La = 0.4, Sr/Y = 60.4) similar to crust melts. The high Sr/Y ratio (Sr/Y = 20 - 205) indicates a lower crust source that was garnet-bearing. The Phan Si Pan uplift was neither a subduction zone nor an arc environment

  1. Nature and time of emplacement of a pegmatoidal granite within the Delhi Fold Belt near Bayalan, Rajasthan, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, N.; Sen, J.; Pal, T.; Ghosh, T.

    2009-04-01

    The study area is situated about 70 km south east of Ajmer, in Rajasthan, India around the village Bayala (26o 02' 19 N''; 74o 21' 01'') within the Ajmer district of Central Rajasthan. The area is along the eastern flank of the central portion of the Precambrian South Delhi Fold Belt (SDFB) and it stratigraphically belongs to the Bhim Group of rocks. Basement rocks of Archaean age, commonly known as the Banded gneissic Complex (BGC), is exposed to the east, where the rocks of the Bhim Group rests unconformably over BGC. To the west gneissic basement rocks of mid-Proterozoic times underlie the Bhim Group and have been referred to as the Beawar gneiss (BG). The Bhim Group of rocks comprises of metamorphosed marls and calc-silicate gneisses with minor amounts of quartzites and pelitic schists, indicative of its shallow marine origin. Within the Bhim Group, a pegmatoidal granite has intruded the calc silicate gneisses of the area. The pegmatoidal granite body is elliptical in outline with the long dimension(20 km) trending N-S and covers an area of 300 sq. km. approximately. This granite have so far been mapped as basement rocks (BG) surrounding the Beawar town (26o 06' 05'' N; 74o 19' 03'' E), 50 km south east of Ajmer. Rafts of calc-silicate gneisses, belonging to the Bhim Group, are seen to be entrapped within granite. Fragments of BG and its equivalents have also been found as caught up blocks within this pegmatoidal granite body near Andheri Devari, a small hamlet east of Beawar. The objective of the study was to map this pegmatoidal body, and decipher the mechanism and time of emplacement of this granite. A detailed structural mapping of the area in a 1:20000 scale spread over a 30 sq. km area in the vicinity of Bayala was carried out to analyse the geometry and the time of emplacement of the pegmatitic granite. The ridges of calc silicates and marbles adjoining the area were studied for the structural analyses of the Delhi fold belt rocks of the area. The calc

  2. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  3. Transpressional granite-emplacement model: Structural and magnetic study of the Pan-African Bandja granitic pluton (West Cameroon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandjo, A. F. Yakeu; Njanko, T.; Njonfang, E.; Errami, E.; Rochette, P.; Fozing, E.

    2016-02-01

    The Pan-African NE-SW elongated Bandja granitic pluton, located at the western part of the Pan-African belt in Cameroon, is a K-feldspar megacryst granite. It is emplaced in banded gneiss and its NW border underwent mylonitization. The magmatic foliation shows NE-SW and NNE-SSW strike directions with moderate to strong dip respectively in its northern and central parts. This mostly, ferromagnetic granite displays magnetic fabrics carried by magnetite and characterized by (i) magnetic foliation with best poles at 295/34, 283/33 and 35/59 respectively in its northern, central and southern parts and (ii) a subhorizontal magnetic lineation with best line at 37/8, 191/9 and 267/22 respectively in the northern, central and southern parts. Magnetic lineation shows an `S' shape trend that allows to (1) consider the complete emplacement and deformation of the pluton during the Pan-African D 2 and D 3 events which occurred in the Pan-African belt in Cameroon and (2) reorganize Pan-African ages from Nguiessi Tchakam et al. (1997) compared with those of the other granitic plutons in the belt as: 686 ±17 Ma (Rb/Sr) for D 1 age of metamorphism recorded in gneiss; and the period between 604-557 Ma for D 2-D 3 emplacement and deformation age of the granitic pluton in a dextral ENE-WSW shear movement.

  4. Nature of the Yucatan Block Basement as Derived From Study of Granitic Clasts in the Impact Breccias of Chicxulub Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera-Sanchez, P.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Perez-Cruz, L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2008-05-01

    The tectonic and petrologic nature of the basement of the Yucatan Block is studied from analyses of basement clasts present in the impact suevitic breccias of Chicxulub crater. The impact breccias have been sampled as part of the drilling projects conducted in the Yucatan peninsula by Petroleos Mexicanos, the National University of Mexico and the Chicxulub Scientific Drilling Project. Samples analyzed come mainly from the Yaxcopoil-1, Tekax, and Santa Elena boreholes, and partly from Pemex boreholes. In this study we concentrate on clasts of the granites, granodiorites and quartzmonzonites in the impact breccias. We report major and trace element geochemical and petrological data, which are compared with data from the granitic and volcanic rocks from the Maya Mountains in Belize and from the Swannee terrane in Florida. Basement granitic clasts analyzed present intermediate to acidic sub-alkaline compositions. Plots of major oxides (e.g., Al2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2 and CaO) and trace elements (e.g., Th, Y, Hf, Nb and Zr) versus silica allow separation of samples into two major groups, which can be compared to units in the Maya Mountains and in Florida basement. The impact suevitic breccia samples have been affected by alteration likely related to the hydrothermal processes associated with the crater melt sheet. Cloritization, seritization and fenitization alterations are recognized, due to the long term hydrothermalism. Krogh et al. (1993) reported U-Pb dates on zircons from the suevitic breccias, which gave dates of 545 +/- 5 Ma and 418 +/- 6 Ma, which were interpreted in terms of the deep granitic metamorphic Yucatan basement. The younger date correlates with the age for the Osceola Granite and the St. Lucie metamorphic complex of the Swannee terrane in the Florida peninsula. The intrusive rocks in the Yucatan basement may be related to approx. 418 Ma ago collisional event in the Late Silurian.

  5. SilMush: A procedure for modeling of the geochemical evolution of silicic magmas and granitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertogen, Jan; Mareels, Joyce

    2016-07-01

    A boundary layer crystallization modeling program is presented that specifically addresses the chemical fractionation in silicic magma systems and the solidification of plutonic bodies. The model is a Langmuir (1989) type approach and does not invoke crystal settling in high-viscosity silicic melts. The primary aim is to model a granitic rock as a congealed crystal-liquid mush, and to integrate major element and trace element modeling. The procedure allows for some exploratory investigation of the exsolution of H2O-fluids and of the fluid/melt partitioning of trace elements. The procedure is implemented as a collection of subroutines for the MS Excel spreadsheet environment and is coded in the Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) language. To increase the flexibility of the modeling, the procedure is based on discrete numeric process simulation rather than on solution of continuous differential equations. The program is applied to a study of the geochemical variation within and among three granitic units (Senones, Natzwiller, Kagenfels) from the Variscan Northern Vosges Massif, France. The three units cover the compositional range from monzogranite, over syenogranite to alkali-feldspar granite. An extensive set of new major element and trace element data is presented. Special attention is paid to the essential role of accessory minerals in the fractionation of the Rare Earth Elements. The crystallization model is able to reproduce the essential major and trace element variation trends in the data sets of the three separate granitic plutons. The Kagenfels alkali-feldspar leucogranite couples very limited variation in major element composition to a considerable and complex variation of trace elements. The modeling results can serve as a guide for the reconstruction of the emplacement sequence of petrographically distinct units. Although the modeling procedure essentially deals with geochemical fractionation within a single pluton, the modeling results bring up a

  6. Granite microcracks: Structure and connectivity at different depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Fan; Dong, Yan-Hui; Xu, Zhi-Fang; Zhou, Peng-Peng; Wang, Li-Heng; Tong, Shao-Qing; Duan, Rui-Qi

    2016-07-01

    Granite is one rock type used to host high-level radioactive waste repositories, and the structure of microcracks in the rock can influence its hydraulic characteristics. Thus, a quantitative analysis of granite microcracks is relevant for understanding the hydrogeological characteristics of the rocks surrounding geological repositories. The analysis can also contribute scientific data to a seepage model for low permeability rocks and materials with microscopic pores. In this study, seven granite core samples were drilled from different depths up to 600 m in Alxa, Inner Mongolia, China. Using a grid survey method and image processing technology, micrographs were converted into binary images of microcracks. The geometric parameters of the microcracks, including their quantity, width, cranny ratio, crack intersections and dimensional parameters of the fracture network, were analyzed in order to fully describe their spatial distribution. In addition, the morphological characteristics and elemental compositions of the microcracks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDS), and the natural moisture content was also determined through heated. Finally, two-dimensional microcrack network seepage models of the granite samples were simulated using the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which revealed the influence of the microcrack structure on their connectivity. The results show that the growth and development of microcracks in the granite samples generally decreases as sampling depth increases in this study area. Connectivity is positively correlated with a number of the geometric parameters: the quantity of microcracks, the cranny ratio, the number of crack intersections and dimensional parameters of the fracture network, which is revealed in the two-dimensional microcrack network seepage models for these granite samples.

  7. Assessing exposure to granite countertops--Part 1: Radiation.

    PubMed

    Myatt, Theodore A; Allen, Joseph G; Minegishi, Taeko; McCarthy, William B; Stewart, James H; Macintosh, David L; McCarthy, John F

    2010-05-01

    Humans are continuously exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Known sources include radon, soil, cosmic rays, medical treatment, food, and building products such as gypsum board and concrete. Little information exists about radiation emissions and associated doses from natural stone finish materials such as granite countertops in homes. To address this knowledge gap, gross radioactivity, gamma ray activity, and dose rate were determined for slabs of granite marketed for use as countertops. Annual effective radiation doses were estimated from measured dose rates and human activity patterns while accounting for the geometry of granite countertops in a model kitchen. Gross radioactivity, gamma activity, and dose rate varied significantly among and within slabs of granite with ranges for median levels at the slab surface of ND to 3000 cpm, ND to 98,000 cpm, and ND to 1.5E-4 mSv/h, respectively. The maximum activity concentrations of the (40)K, (232)Th, and (226)Ra series were 2715, 231, and 450 Bq/kg, respectively. The estimated annual radiation dose from spending 4 h/day in a hypothetical kitchen ranged from 0.005 to 0.18 mSv/a depending on the type of granite. In summary, our results show that the types of granite characterized in this study contain varying levels of radioactive isotopes and that their observed emissions are consistent with those reported in the scientific literature. We also conclude from our analyses that these emissions are likely to be a minor source of external radiation dose when used as countertop material within the home and present a negligible risk to human health.

  8. Magnetic Properties of Hydrothermalized A-type Red Granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, R. I. F.; Nédélec, A.; Peschler, A.; Archanjo, C. J.; Poitrasson, F.; Bouchez, J. L.

    Hydrothermalized A-type granites are commonly identified by their pink to red-brick colour attributed to tiny flakes of hematite in the alkali feldspars. These inclusions can be of interest in magnetic studies, but their timing and process of formation are still unclear. Formation of chlorite after biotite is the commonest effect of hydrother- malization and may occur quite early after crystallization due to late-magmatic or externally-derived fluids. The reddish colour appears at a later stage. Five cases of A-type granites were investigated for their magnetic mineralogy and properties. The selected cases range from nearly unmodified granites (Panafrican stratoid granites of Madagascar) to strongly hydrothermalized ones (Meruoca, Brazil; Tana, Corsica); in- termediate cases are : Mount Scott (Oklahoma), Bushveld (granitic core kindly pro- vided by R.G. Cawthorn) and. Hydrothermal alteration is often associated to a de- crease of the magnetic susceptibility magnitude (K) and of the anisotropy degree (P). It also strongly affects the rockt's bulk coercivity parameters, since alteration changes the relative amounts of coarse-grained primary magnetite, fine-grained PSD to SD sec- ondary magnetite, and hematite. Correspondingly, most samples plot away from the magnetite trend in the Dayt's diagram, but the different groups identified after coer- civity parameters do not directly correlate with whole-rock colour. In addition, IRM- acquisition curves and thermal demagnetization of tri-axial IRM show that hematite occurs in almost all analysed samples despite their colour. Various hematite coercivity ranges are also evidenced. In fact, hematite can be formed either in feldspar crys- tals or after magnetite. Tiny hematite within feldspars can appear either by exsolu- tion process or, more likely, by precipitation from a fluid phase. For these reasons, hematite inclusions may carry a remanence acquired shortly after granite crystalliza- tion or, conversely, a recent

  9. Multiple sources for the origin of the early Cretaceous Xinxian granitic batholith and its tectonic implications for the western Dabie orogen, eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Zhaowen; Chen, Maohong; Yu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the petrogenesis of the Xinxian granitic batholith and its tectonic implications for the Dabie orogen. Two Xinxian granites yield Early Cretaceous 238U/206Pb ages of 122.7 ± 1.3 Ma and 123.6 ± 2.2 Ma. The granites are metaluminous differentiated I-type granites, with A/NKC ranging from 0.90 to 0.96. The chondrite-normalised REE patterns display significant LREE/HREE enrichments with moderate negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Euδ = 0.30 ~ 0.85). The granites show enrichments in large-ion lithophile elements (LILEs, e.g. Rb, K, Th and U) and depletions in Sr, Ba and high field strength elements (HFSEs, e.g. Nb, Ta and Ti). Inherited zircons of different age (Neoproterozoic, one Early Proterozoic, one Archean and two Triassic inherited metamorphic zircons) are identified. The Early Cretaceous magmatic zircons contain enriched Hf isotopes with ɛ Hf ( t) values ranging from -26.9 to -18.7 (average = -22.5), more enriched than their probable alleged source, i.e. the Dabie Complex, represented by the Neoproterozoic and Triassic inherited zircons. Thus, the Archean and Early Proterozoic crustal materials may represent an enriched end member source for the parental magma of the Xinxian granites. Provenance analysis of the magmatic zircons in the North China and Yangtze blocks demonstrates that the Early Proterozoic inherited zircon in Xinxian has North China affinity. Thus, we proposed a multiple-sourced petrogenetic model for the Xinxian granitic batholith, which suggests that the batholith was formed by the remelting of a mixed crustal assemblage, including the Archean and Early Proterozoic crust of the North China Block, the Neoproterozoic crust of the Yangtze Block, as well as some Triassic collision-related ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks.

  10. Metalliferous deposits near Granite Mountain, eastern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Thomas P.; Elliott, R.L.

    1969-01-01

    New deposits of lead, zinc, and silver were found in a large altered zone 18 miles long and 2 to 5 miles wide near Quartz Creek west of Granite Mountain in the eastern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. New deposits of molybdenum, bismuth, and silver were found associated with a previously reported occurrence of uranium, copper, lead, and zinc minerals in the upper Peace River drainage northeast of Granite Mountain. Both groups of deposits are associated spatially with felsic plutonic rocks and occur near the western edge of a late Mesozoic province of volcanic plutonic rocks. Both groups of deposits warrant further investigation as possible exploration target areas.

  11. Effets d'échelle dans la fracturation des granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genter, Albert; Castaing, Christian

    1997-09-01

    A multi-scale fracture-system characterization was made at the surface of a well-exposed granite (Jabal Qutan, Saudi Arabia) and in a buried granite known only through drilling (Soultz-sous-Forêts, France). At outcrop scale the fractures are seen to lie in irregularly distributed clusters that form highly fractured zones alternating with non-fractured zones. The fracture spacing is governed by a power law to three decades revealing a self-similar fractal character. At massif scale the regional fractures and faults show a more regular spacing indicating a periodic organization characterized by a lognormal-type distribution.

  12. Hercynian Granite and Related Mineralisation in Beni Snouss, Western Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacera, Hadj Mohamed; Abdelhak, Boutaleb

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this research is to describe the mineralisation related to the Hercynian granite located in western Algeria by combining geologic, tectonic, mineralogical and fluid inclusion studies. Quartz veins bearing sulphides occur in close spatial association with granitoids, which, representing hydrothermal activities associated with them. Visible but rare gold occurs in a very small quantity connected with arsenopyrite. Barite veins and stock works are developed in the granites where are observed at Mallal and Bouabdous. The vein varies in thickness from a few centimetres up to 2 meters, and their length varies from 10 up to up 100 m. Most of veins are N50 - N75 and 60 to 90 dip.

  13. Threshold Differences on Figure and Ground: Gelb and Granit (1923)

    PubMed Central

    Kinateder, Max

    2017-01-01

    In 1923, Gelb and Granit, using a method of adjustment for a small red light, reported a lower threshold for the target when presented on a ground region than on an adjacent figural region. More recent work in perceptual organization has found precisely the opposite—a processing advantage seems to go to items presented on the figure, not the ground. Although Gelb and Granit continue to be cited for their finding, it has not previously been available as an English translation. Understanding their methodology and results is important for integrating early Gestalt theory with more recent investigations. PMID:28286640

  14. The Swedish Bohus granite - a stone with a fascinating history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouenborg, Björn; Eliasson, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    One of the most well-known and well spread Swedish stone types used as building stones is the Bonus granite. It outcrops in an area north of Gothenburgh (SW Sweden), along the coastline, approximately 35 km wide and 85 km long. The granite continues into Norway as the Iddefjord granite. The Bohus granite is one of Sweden's youngest granites. Isotopic dating shows that the magma cooled at about 920 M years ago and thus marking the end of the Sveconorwegian orogoney. It is a composite granite massif area with several granitic intrusions but with rather homogeneous mineralogy. However, colour and texture varies quite a lot and the colour ranges from red to reddish grey although some pure grey varieties occur sparsely. The grain size ranges from medium grained to coarse grained and even with some porphyric parts. Quarrying in an industrial scale started 1842. The merchant A C Kullgren opened the first quarry and produced stones for the construction of the 86 km long Trollhättan channel connecting lake Vänern and the Atlantic ocean in the SW Sweden The stone was used for constructing harbors and wharves along the channel. Several quarries opened in the late 1800 around 1870 - 1890 and the export increased steadily with deliveries to Germany, Denmark, Holland, England and even to South America. The stone industries in Bohuslän (Bohus county), at its peak in 1929, engaged around 7 000 employees. During the depression in 1930 almost all of them became unemployed. However, as a curiosity, production and export continued to Germany for construction of Germania, the future World capital city ("Welthauptstadt Germania"), planned by Adolf Hitler and Albert Speer. About 500 stone workers were kept employed for this project during the late thirties. Today several varieties are still produced: Evja/Ävja, Tossene, Brastad, Näsinge, Broberg, Nolby, Allemarken and Skarstad. However, the number of stone workers is far from that of the early 1900. The Swedish production is mainly

  15. Production of hybrid granitic magma at the advancing front of basaltic underplating: Inferences from the Sesia Magmatic System (south-western Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigoi, Silvano; Quick, James E.; Demarchi, Gabriella; Klötzli, Urs S.

    2016-05-01

    The Permian Sesia Magmatic System of the southwestern Alps displays the plumbing system beneath a Permian caldera, including a deep crustal gabbroic complex, upper crustal granite plutons and a bimodal volcanic field dominated by rhyolitic tuff filling the caldera. Isotopic compositions of the deep crustal gabbro overlap those of coeval andesitic basalts, whereas granites define a distinct, more radiogenic cluster (Sri ≈ 0.708 and 0.710, respectively). AFC computations starting from the best mafic candidate for a starting melt show that Nd and Sr isotopic compositions and trace elements of andesitic basalts may be modeled by reactive bulk assimilation of ≈ 30% of partially depleted crust and ≈ 15%-30% gabbro fractionation. Trace elements of the deep crustal gabbro cumulates require a further ≈ 60% fractionation of the andesitic basalt and loss of ≈ 40% of silica-rich residual melt. The composition of the granite plutons is consistent with a mixture of relatively constant proportions of residual melt delivered from the gabbro and anatectic melt. Chemical and field evidence leads to a conceptual model which links the production of the two granitic components to the evolution of the Mafic Complex. During the growth of the Mafic Complex, progressive incorporation of packages of crustal rocks resulted in a roughly steady state rate of assimilation. Anatectic granite originates in the hot zone of melting crust located above the advancing mafic intrusion. Upward segregation of anatectic melts facilitates the assimilation of the partially depleted restite by stoping. At each cycle of mafic intrusion and incorporation, residual and anatectic melts are produced in roughly constant proportions, because the amount of anatectic melt produced at the roof is a function of volume and latent heat of crystallization of the underplated mafic melt which in turn produces proportional amounts of hybrid gabbro cumulates and residual melt. Such a process can explain the

  16. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Brimmer, Arnold F.

    2000-04-01

    This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka, during the 1998 spring outmigration at migrant traps on the Snake and Salmon rivers. All hatchery chinook salmon released above Lower Granite Dam 19 1998 were marked with a fin-clip. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 226% of the 1997 number and 110% of the 1996 catch. The wild chinook catch was 120% of the 1997 catch but was only 93% of 1996. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 501% of 1997 numbers but only 90% of the 1996 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 569% of 1997 and 125% of the 1996 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 106 age-0 chinook salmon. During 1998, for the first time, the Snake River trap captured a significant number of hatchery sockeye salmon (1,552) and hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch (166). Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations began on March 8 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on June 12. The trap was out of operation for 34 d during the season due to high flow and debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 476% and wild chinook salmon catch was 137% of 1997 numbers and 175% and 82% of 1996 catch, respectively. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 1998 was 96% of the 1997 catch and 13% of the 1996 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 1998 was 170% of the 1997 catch and 37% of the 1996 numbers. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. For fish tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 1998 detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge. For hatchery and

  17. Influence of phosphate on mobility and adsorption of REEs during weathering of granites in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanematsu, Kenzo; Kon, Yoshiaki; Imai, Akira

    2015-11-01

    The Permo-Jurassic North Thai (NT) Granites and the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene Western Province (WP) Granites in Thailand are contrasting in terms of tectonic settings and chemical compositions. The NT Granites, which are dominated by S-type features, are characterized by lower SiO2 contents and higher P2O5 contents than the WP Granites in this study. In order to compare the mobility and adsorption of rare earth elements (REEs) during weathering of the two granite suites, geochemical analyses were conducted on the granite and weathered granites. The weathered WP Granites show wider ranges of REEs + Y (REY) contents, percentages of ion-exchangeable REY and Ce anomalies than the weathered NT Granites. These results indicate that REEs were less mobile during weathering of the NT Granites than those of the WP Granites. The low mobility of REEs can be explained by the occurrences of residual monazite and secondary REE phosphates which immobilize REEs during weathering. Therefore, in the weathered NT Granites, REEs are mostly contained in the phosphate minerals. In contrast, the weathered WP Granites are dominated by ion-exchangeable REEs (adsorbed REEs) which are likely to exist on the surface of clays. Previous studies and our study results suggest that the ion-exchangeable REEs in the weathered granites were probably sourced from weatherable allanite, titanite, apatite and/or REE fluorocarbonate, and rarely from monazite and zircon, which are resistant to weathering. The weathered granites of low phosphate contents potentially show high percentages of ion-exchangeable REY, although they can be influenced by the degree of hydrothermal alteration or weathering of granites.

  18. Zircon crystal morphology and internal structures as a tool for constraining magma sources: Examples from northern Portugal Variscan biotite-rich granite plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brites Martins, Helena C.; Simões, Pedro P.; Abreu, Joana

    2014-09-01

    In northern Portugal, large volumes of granitoids were emplaced during the last stage (D3) of the Variscan orogeny and display a wide range of petrological signatures. We studied the morphologies and internal structures of zircons from syn-, late- and post-D3 granitoids. The sin-D3 granitoids include the Ucanha-Vilar, Lamego, Felgueiras, Sameiro, and Refoios do Lima plutons, the late- and post-D3 granitoids are represented by the Vieira do Minho and the Vila Pouca de Aguiar plutons, respectively. Typological investigations after Pupin (1980) along with scanning electron microprobe imaging reveal that the external morphology of zircon changes consistently with a decrease in the crystallization temperature. Zircon populations from the Refoios do Lima and the Vieira do Minho granites show gradual changes in the internal morphologies and their typologic evolution trends are consistent with their mainly crustal origin. The Sameiro, Felgueiras, Lamego and Ucanha-Vilar granites have more complex internal and external morphology and typological evolution trends that cross the domain of the calc-alkaline to the aluminous granites compatible with a mixing process. Finally, the morphological types of the Vila Pouca de Aguiar granites are found both in calc-alkaline and sub-alkaline granites and their typological evolutionary trends follow the calc-alkaline/sub-alkaline trend, suggesting crustal sources with some mantle contribution.

  19. Alteration and arenization processes of granitic waste rock piles from former uranium Mines in Limousin, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzari, Aisha; Boekhout, Flora; Gérard, Martine; Galoisy, Laurence; Phrommavanh, Vannapha; Descostes, Michael

    2014-05-01

    France counts approximately 200 former uranium mines, 50 of which are located in the Limousin region. Mining activities between 1945 and 2001 have generated close to 200 000 tons of waste rocks in the Limousin, with uranium levels corresponding essentially to the geological background. Waste rock piles from three former mining sites in this region, were selected according to their age, uranium content and petrological signature. These sites are part of the two-mica granitic complex of St Sylvestre massif, formed 324 million years ago. Granitic blocks that build up the waste rock piles have experienced different processes and intensities of alteration before their emplacement at the surface. These processes are responsible for the petrological heterogeneity throughout the waste rock pile at the time of construction. It is important to make a distinction within waste rocks between natural-cut-off waste rocks and economic-cut-off waste rocks. The latter represents a minority and is linked to stock prices. Natural-cut-off waste rocks contain about 20 ppm of uranium; economic-cut-off waste rocks contain about 100 to 300 ppm of uranium. The aims of this study are to 1) assess the neo-formation of U-bearing minerals hosted by these rocks, and 2) to characterize the weathering processes since the construction of the rock piles, including both mechanical and chemical processes. The structure of the waste rocks piles, from metric blocks to boulders of tens centimeters, induces an enhanced weathering rate, compared to a granitic massif. Mechanical fracturing and chemical leaching by rainwater (arenization) of the waste rocks produce a sandy-silty alteration phase. Silty-clay weathering aureoles of submetric-granitic blocks evolving into technic soil are mainly located below growing birch trees. Sampling on the rock piles was restricted to surface rocks. Samples collected consist mainly of granites, and rare lamprophyres with a high radiometric signal, thereby especially

  20. Geochemical study of granites from Chinmen (Quemoy) and Hong Kong, southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li-Min; Chen, Ju-Chin

    Eighteen granite samples from Chinmen and 31 granite samples from Hong Kong were chemically analyzed. All granite specimens contain essentially quartz, potash-feldspar and albite with a minor amount of biotite. Chinmen granites are chemically similar to Hong Kong granites and both show the characteristics of S-type granite defined by Chappell and White (1974), indicating that Chinmen and Hong Kong granites originated from continental crustal material. Negative europium anomalies observed in Chinmen and Hong Kong granites suggest that both Chinmen and Hong Kong granites have evolved through magmatic differentiation with Ca-rich plagioclase being separated out in the early stage of the differentiation. It is inferred that the parental magmas of Chinmen and Hong Kong granites were derived from partially melted SiO 2, Na 2O, K 2O-enriched material during the Yenshan orogeny in southeastern China in Late Mesozoic, associated with the rapid spreading of the Pacific plate. The Chinmen granites are relatively higher in Al, Ca, Na, Ni and Sc but lower in Fe, K, Ba, Hf, Y and Ce when compared with Hong Kong granites, indicating that there might be slight differences in the parental crustal material and/or differentiation process.

  1. 76 FR 62758 - Wallowa-Whitman and Umatilla National Forests, Oregon Granite Creek Watershed Mining Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... Forest Service Wallowa-Whitman and Umatilla National Forests, Oregon Granite Creek Watershed Mining Plans... of mining Plans of Operation in the Granite Creek Watershed Mining Plans analysis area on the Whitman... proposed mining Plans in the portions of the Granite Creek Watershed under their administration. As...

  2. Ancient granite gneiss in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zartman, R.E.; Norton, J.J.; Stern, T.W.

    1964-01-01

    Granite gneiss, with an age of approximately 2.5 billion years, in the Black Hills, South Dakota , provides a link betweeen ancient rocks in western Wyoming and Montana and in eastern North and South Dakota and Minnesota. The discovery suggests that early Precambrian rocks covered an extensive area in northcentral United States and were not restricted to several small nuclei.

  3. 74. The Butte Water Company Building (124 Weat Granite) was ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. The Butte Water Company Building (124 Weat Granite) was built in 1907 for the Montana Independant Telephone Company, which occupied it until 1918. Since then, it has been occupied by the Butte Water Company, and has not been altered substantially. It was designed by George H. Shanley. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  4. Lithological strength but chemical weakness controls granitic tor formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroeven, A. P.; Goodfellow, B. W.; Skelton, A.; Jansson, K. N.; Hättestrand, C.

    2010-12-01

    The origins of tors have long inspired wonder and are usually attributed to differential weathering according to variations in bedrock joint spacing and/or initial regolith depths. In this study, we investigate the origins of granitic tors in the Cairngorm Mountains, NE Scotland. Specifically, we examine whether: (i) joint spacing correlates with bedrock chemistry, mineralogy, or texture, and (ii) tor size correlates with any of these lithological attributes and/or topographic parameters such as slope, surface curvature, and tor position. Presently, our results indicate that: (i) bedrock joint spacing increases with feldspar crystal size, (ii) tor dimensions increase with joint spacing, particularly along the axis perpendicular to the regional foliation, and (iii) there is a strong positive correlation between joint spacing and tor volume. In addition, the largest tors occur where granite contains comparatively moderate quantities of biotite. If more biotite is present, then grusification, largely driven by the oxidation of Fe in biotite, proceeds too rapidly for large tors to form. Conversely, in granites containing lower quantities of biotite, it appears that the potential for differential weathering between exposed and regolith-covered bedrock is insufficient to produce large tors. Both lithological strength and chemical weakness therefore contribute to granitic tor formation.

  5. Electrical properties of granite with implications for the lower crust.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olhoeft, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    The electrical properties of granite appear to be dominantly controlled by the amount of free water in the granite and by temperature. Minor contributions to the electrical properties are provided by hydrostatic and lithostatic pressure, structurally bound water, oxygen fugacity, and other parameters. The effect of sulphur fugacity may be important but is experimentally unconfirmed. In addition to changing the magnitude of electrical properties, the amount and chemistry of water in granite significantly changes the temperature dependence of the electrical properties. With increasing temperature, changes in water content retain large, but lessened, effects on electrical properties. Near room temperature, a monolayer of water will decrease the electrical resistivity by an order of magnitude. Several weight-percent water may decrease the electrical resistivity by as much as nine orders of magnitude and decrease the thermal activation energy by a factor of five. At elevated temperatures just below granitic melting, a few weight-percent water may still decrease the resistivity by as much as 3 orders of magnitude and the activation energy by a factor of two.-Author

  6. Chemical composition and origin of black patinas on granite.

    PubMed

    Silva, Benita; Aira, Noelia; Martínez-Cortizas, Antonio; Prieto, Beatriz

    2009-12-15

    Black patinas from the surfaces of granite outcrops (including some with engravings) and granite buildings were analysed. Rock samples were also taken from areas of the same surfaces where there were no black patinas. The constituent elements of the granite rocks, elements of essentially biological origin (C, N, H) and other minor elements, including some typical from pollution, were all determined. The ratios between the concentrations of each element in the patinas and in the corresponding rock samples without patina were calculated in order to determine which elements form the patinas. The data were then examined by hierarchical cluster analysis and principal components analysis to establish the factors that determine the differences between samples. It was found that the elements that differentiate the patinas from the samples of rock without patina are those unrelated to granite, which indicates that, at least from a geochemical point of view, the rocky substrate does not affect patina formation. In all patinas analysed, the concentrations of carbon were higher than in the corresponding samples without patina; there were also relatively higher concentrations of sulphur, phosphorus, chlorine, calcium, etc. in some patinas, depending on the situation of the outcrop or monument.

  7. Detail of typical subdeck of granite pier showing humanscale arched ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of typical subdeck of granite pier showing human-scale arched openings in pies. Note remnants of fender system. View north - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  8. Granite School District's Comprehensive Counseling and Guidance Program in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Judy

    This paper discusses the development of the Utah Model for Comprehensive Counseling and Guidance, and specifically, its application in the Granite School Districts Guidance Program. This model adopted the National Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (NOICC) competencies as its desired program content, which focuses on student outcomes.…

  9. Monte Carlo simulations for generic granite repository studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Shaoping; Lee, Joon H; Wang, Yifeng

    2010-12-08

    In a collaborative study between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the DOE-NE Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign project, we have conducted preliminary system-level analyses to support the development of a long-term strategy for geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. A general modeling framework consisting of a near- and a far-field submodel for a granite GDSE was developed. A representative far-field transport model for a generic granite repository was merged with an integrated systems (GoldSim) near-field model. Integrated Monte Carlo model runs with the combined near- and farfield transport models were performed, and the parameter sensitivities were evaluated for the combined system. In addition, a sub-set of radionuclides that are potentially important to repository performance were identified and evaluated for a series of model runs. The analyses were conducted with different waste inventory scenarios. Analyses were also conducted for different repository radionuelide release scenarios. While the results to date are for a generic granite repository, the work establishes the method to be used in the future to provide guidance on the development of strategy for long-term disposal of high-level radioactive waste in a granite repository.

  10. Flow Chart for Mineral Separation from Granitic Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mursky, Gregory

    1987-01-01

    Provided is a flow chart for the separation and purification of major, minor, and accessory minerals from granitic rocks. With careful use of heavy liquids, and a Franz Isodynamic Magnetic Separator, it is possible to obtain mineral concentrates with a purity of 95 percent or better. (Author/RH)

  11. Detail of west span showing connection of superstructure to granite ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of west span showing connection of superstructure to granite pier at low tide. Photograph articulates subdeck support members. View southeast - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  12. 8. Granite quay wall at foot of Pier 10 (west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Granite quay wall at foot of Pier 10 (west end), view to north, at low tide. - Charlestown Navy Yard, Pier 10, Between Piers 9 & 11 along Mystic River on Charlestown Waterfront at eastern edge of Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  13. Multi-Bandwidth GPR Profiles of Granite in New Hampshire: Attributes of Fracture Horizons and Wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcone, S. A.; Campbell, S. W.

    2012-12-01

    Sheet and tectonic fractures transport water and facilitate erosion on geologic time scales. We discuss ground-penetrating radar profiles of fractures recorded with 150, 350, 600 and 1000 MHz pulse dominant frequencies, and quantitative data obtained from their horizons and pulse wavelet attributes. We recorded the profiles along dirt roads and bare rock transects, beneath which include the mid Ordovician Oliverian granodiorite and binary granite of western New Hampshire and just north of the Presidential Range, respectively, and the late Devonian biotite granite just west of the Presidential Range. The overriding till is characterized by numerous diffractions, and from 0 to about 5 m thick. We use a known relative dielectric permittivity of 6.6 for granodiorite and assume the same for the other types to calibrate depth from the reflection time scale. Dielectric permittivity values for the till range from about 13-21. The sheet fracture responses are up to 25 m deep while the deepest tectonic fracture horizon extends to at least 35 m depth. Some horizons are associated with numerous diffractions originating along their length, while others have very few. The less clear horizons recorded in seasonal profiles of the binary granite suggest grusification, a possible factor to help explain the greater height of the more durable metamorphic Presidential Range. Sheet fracture spacing can be closer than one meter, with horizons comprised of thin layer responses because the wavelets, even at 1000 MHz, are similar to the transmitted wavelet. Therefore, the fractures are likely less than a few cm thick, as is apparent from quarry wall exposures, and from models that predict that even one mm fractures are detectable. The wavelet phase structure generally indicates a higher dielectric medium, which could mean calcite, and more likely water, but this structure is not consistent along individual horizons. The higher frequency profiles reveal a complex fracture network that

  14. Characterization of granite matrix porosity and pore-space geometry by in situ and laboratory methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, M.; Siegesmund, S.; Vollbrecht, A.; Mazurek, M.

    2001-07-01

    Most available studies of interconnected matrix porosity of crystalline rocks are based on laboratory investigations; that is, work on samples that have undergone stress relaxation and were affected by drilling and sample preparation. The extrapolation of the results to in situ conditions is therefore associated with considerable uncertainty, and this was the motivation to conduct the `in situ Connected Porosity' experiment at the Grimsel Test Site (Central Swiss Alps). An acrylic resin doped with fluorescent agents was used to impregnate the microporous granitic matrix in situ around an injection borehole, and samples were obtained by overcoring. The 3-D structure of the pore-space, represented by microcracks, was studied by U-stage fluorescence microscopy. Petrophysical methods, including the determination of porosity, permeability and P-wave velocity, were also applied. Investigations were conducted both on samples that were impregnated in situ and on non-impregnated samples, so that natural features could be distinguished from artefacts. The investigated deformed granites display complex microcrack populations representing a polyphase deformation at varying conditions. The crack population is dominated by open cleavage cracks in mica and grain boundary cracks. The porosity of non-impregnated samples lies slightly above 1 per cent, which is 2-2.5 times higher than the in situ porosity obtained for impregnated samples. Measurements of seismic velocities (Vp) on spherical rock samples as a function of confining pressure, spatial direction and water saturation for both non-impregnated and impregnated samples provide further constraints on the distinction between natural and induced crack types. The main conclusions are that (1) an interconnected network of microcracks exists in the whole granitic matrix, irrespective of the distance to ductile and brittle shear zones, and (2) conventional laboratory methods overestimate the matrix porosity. Calculations of

  15. Stream water chemistry in a gabbro/granite watershed, Quabbin reservation, central Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, J.B. Jr.; Gallant, J.; Christensen, C.; Mengason, M. . School of Natural Science)

    1993-03-01

    While monitoring pH-alkalinity relationships in tributaries of the Quabbin Reservoir, the authors have discovered an anomalous brook whose waters become progressively more acidic downstream. The watershed's bedrock is roughly half Prescott hornblende gabbro and half Cooleyville granitic gneiss with the contact crossing the watershed diagonally; gabbroic bedrock dominates the stream's upper reaches. Outcrop density and topography suggest relatively thin till cover (< [approximately]2m). All parts of the stream get some contribution from both bedrock types, through gabbro contribution diminishes smoothly downstream. Springs in gabbro (pH [approximately]7, alk 20--30mg/1, cond [approximately]50[mu]mho) and in granite (pH [approximately]5, alk 2--6 mg/1, cond [approximately]15[mu]mho) retain these characteristics through dry and wet seasons; the stream's response to high rain events is more complex and can be used to estimate where surface water and groundwater each make their greatest contributions. Each point along the brook can be assigned a value of %gabbro characterizing the bedrock proportions in the watershed upstream of it; plots of major cations, alkalinity and conductivity vs. %gabbro show strong positive correlation. Two-week leaching experiments (initial pH = 4) with A, B and C soil horizons from both sides of the contact show greatest rises (to pH = 5.5) in gabbro soils distant from the contact, and progressively smaller increases crossing the contact to granite soils (pH rises to 4.5). The data suggest that bedrock and soil chemistry are primarily responsible for stream chemistry; topography and residence time here play secondary roles.

  16. The density of dry and hydrous granitic magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malfait, W. J.; Sanchez-Valle, C.; Seifert, R.; Petitgirard, S.; Perrillat, J.

    2011-12-01

    Large volumes of granitic magmas form through partial melting of the lower crust and are subsequently emplaced in the higher crustal levels [1]. In addition, granite-like liquids may form through partial melting of subducted sediments [2] or as an end-product of magmatic differentiation [3]. Moreover, water rich magmas of granitic composition are a major source of explosive volcanism. The physical properties of granitic melts, and particularly their density, are key controls on the migration rate and emplacement depth of granitic intrusions. However, because of the high viscosity of granitic liquids, density and compressibility measurements with the sink/float method and sound velocity measurements are challenging. As a result, the density and compressibility of dry and volatile-bearing granitic liquids is poorly constrained, particularly for the pressure-temperature conditions relevant for their formation and emplacement. In this study, we present in situ experimental data on the density of dry and hydrous haplogranitic melts (5 and 10 wt% water) at pressure and temperature conditions relevant for the crust and the subducting slab (1.0-2.7 GPa, 1350-1720 K). The experiments were performed with a panoramic Paris-Edinburgh press installed at the ID27 beamline of ESRF. The samples were contained in a cylindrical diamond capsule, capped with a platinum disk on either side, surrounded by hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and placed inside a graphite heater and boron epoxy gasket. Pressure and temperature were determined from the X-ray diffraction patterns of hBN and platinum using the double-isochore method [4]. The density of the melts was determined from the X-ray absorption contrast between the sample and the diamond capsule (Mo edge, 20 keV). The molten state of the sample at the condition of the density measurements was verified by X-ray diffraction. The run products were analyzed by electron microprobe and infrared spectroscopy to verify the chemical composition and

  17. Evolution of silicic magma in the upper crust: the mid-Tertiary Latir volcanic field and its cogenetic granitic batholith, northern New Mexico, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    Structural and topographic relief along the eastern margin of the Rio Grande rift, northern New Mexico, provides a remarkable cross-section through the 26-Ma Questa caldera and cogenetic volcanic and plutonic rocks of the Latir field. Exposed levels increase in depth from mid-Tertiary depositional surfaces in northern parts of the igneous complex to plutonic rocks originally at 3-5 km depths in the S. Erosional remnants of an ash-flow sheet of weakly peralkaline rhyolite (Amalia Tuff) and andesitic to dactitic precursor lavas, disrupted by rift-related faults, are preserved as far as 45 km beyond their sources at the Questa caldera. Broadly comagmatic 26 Ma batholithic granitic rocks, exposed over an area of 20 by 35 km, range from mesozonal granodiorite to epizonal porphyritic granite and aplite; shallower and more silicic phases are mostly within the caldera. Compositionally and texturally distinct granites defined resurgent intrusions within the caldera and discontinuous ring dikes along its margins: a batholithic mass of granodiorite extends 20 km S of the caldera and locally grades vertically to granite below its flat-lying roof. A negative Bouguer gravity anomaly (15-20 mgal), which encloses exposed granitic rocks and coincides with boundaries of the Questa caldera, defined boundaries of the shallow batholith, emplaced low in the volcanic sequence and in underlying Precambrian rocks. Paleomagnetic pole positions indicate that successively crystallised granitic plutons cooled through Curie temperatures during the time of caldera formation, initial regional extension, and rotational tilting of the volcanic rocks. Isotopic ages for most intrusions are indistinguishable from the volcanic rocks. These relations indicate that the batholithic complex broadly represents the source magma for the volcanic rocks, into which the Questa caldera collapsed, and that the magma was largely liquid during regional tectonic disruption. -from Author

  18. ASTEROIDAL GRANITE-LIKE MAGMATISM 4.53 GYR AGO

    SciTech Connect

    Terada, Kentaro; Bischoff, Addi

    2009-07-10

    Constraining the timescales for the evolution of planetary bodies in our solar system is essential for a complete understanding of planet-forming processes. However, frequent collisions between planetesimals in the early solar system obscured and destroyed much of the primitive features of the old, first-generation planetary bodies. The presence of differentiated, achondritic clasts in brecciated chondrites and of chondritic fragments in achondritic breccias clearly witness multiple processes such as metamorphism, magmatism, fragmentation, mixing, and reaccretion. Here, we report the results of ion microprobe Pb-Pb dating of a granite-like fragment found in a meteorite, the LL3-6 ordinary chondrite regolith breccia Adzhi-Bogdo. Eight spot analyses of two phosphate grains and other co-genetic phases of the granitoid give a Pb-Pb isochron age of 4.48 {+-} 0.12 billion years (95% confidence) and a model age of 4.53 {+-} 0.03 billion years (1{sigma}), respectively. These ages represent the crystallization age of a parental granite-like magma that is significantly older than those of terrestrial (4.00-4.40 Gyr) and lunar granites (3.88-4.32 Gyr) indicating that the clast in Adzhi-Bogdo is the oldest known granitoid in the solar system. This is the first evidence that granite-like formation is not only a common process on Earth, but also occurred on primitive asteroids in the early solar system 4.53 Gyr ago. Thus, the discovery of granite magmatism recorded in a brecciated meteorite provides an innovative idea within the framework of scenarios for the formation and evolution of planetary bodies and possibly exoplanetary bodies.

  19. Fracture controls on valley persistence: the Cairngorm Granite pluton, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, A. M.; Gillespie, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Valleys are remarkably persistent features in many different tectonic settings, but the reasons for this persistence are rarely explored. Here, we examine the structural controls on valleys in the Cairngorms Mountains, Scotland, part of the passive margin of the eastern North Atlantic. We consider valleys at three scales: straths, glens and headwater valleys. The structural controls on valleys in and around the Cairngorm Granite pluton were examined on satellite and aerial photographs and by field survey. Topographic lineaments, including valleys, show no consistent orientation with joint sets or with sheets of microgranite and pegmatitic granite. In this granite landscape, jointing is not a first-order control on valley development. Instead, glens and headwater valleys align closely to quartz veins and linear alteration zones (LAZs). LAZs are zones of weakness in the granite pluton in which late-stage hydrothermal alteration and hydro-fracturing have greatly reduced rock mass strength and increased permeability. LAZs, which can be kilometres long and >700 m deep, are the dominant controls on the orientation of valleys in the Cairngorms. LAZs formed in the roof zone of the granite intrusion. Although the Cairngorm pluton was unroofed soon after emplacement, the presence of Old Red Sandstone (ORS) outliers in the terrain to the north and east indicates that the lower relief of the sub-ORS basement surface has been lowered by <500 m. Hence, the valley patterns in and around the Cairngorms have persisted through >1 km of vertical erosion and for 400 Myr. This valley persistence is a combined product of regionally low rates of basement exhumation and of the existence of LAZs in the Cairngorm pluton and sub-parallel Caledonide fractures in the surrounding terrain with depths that exceed 1 km.

  20. Gamma-ray spectrometry of granitic suites of the Paranaguá Terrane, Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihermann, Jessica Derkacz; Ferreira, Francisco José Fonseca; Cury, Leonardo Fadel; da Silveira, Claudinei Taborda

    2016-09-01

    The Paranaguá Terrane, located in the coastal portion of the states of Santa Catarina, Paraná and São Paulo in Southern Brazil is a crustal segment constituted mainly by an igneous complex, with a variety of granitic rocks inserted into the Serra do Mar ridge. The average altitude is approximately 1200 m above sea level, with peaks of up to 1800 m. Due to the difficulty of accessing the area, a shortage of outcrops and the thick weathering mantle, this terrane is understudied. This research aims to evaluate the gamma-ray spectrometry data of the granitic suites of the Paranaguá Terrane, in correspondence with the geological, petrographical, lithogeochemical, relief and mass movement information available in the literature. Aerogeophysical data were acquired along north-south lines spaced at 500 m, with a mean terrain clearance of 100 m. These data cover potassium (K, %), equivalent in thorium (eTh, ppm) and equivalent in uranium (eU, ppm). After performing a critical analysis of the data, basic (K, eU, eTh) and ternary (R-K/G-eTh/B-eU) maps were generated and then superimposed on the digital elevation model (DEM). The investigation of the radionuclide mobility across the relief and weathering mantle consisted of an analysis of the schematic profiles of elevation related with each radionuclide; a comparison of the K, eU and eTh maps with their 3D correspondents; and the study of mass movements registered in the region. A statistical comparison of lithogeochemical (K, U, Th) and geophysical (K, eU, eTh) data showed consistency in all the granitic suites studied (Morro Inglês, Rio do Poço and Canavieiras-Estrela). Through gamma-ray spectrometry, it was possible to establish relationships between scars (from mass movements) and the gamma-ray responses as well as the radionuclide mobility and the relief and to map the granitic bodies.

  1. Zarzalejo granite (Spain). A nomination for 'Global Heritage Stone Resource'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire Lista, David Martin; Fort, Rafael; José Varas-Muriel, María

    2015-04-01

    Zarzalejo granite is quarried in the Sierra de Guadarrama (Spanish Central System) foothills, in and around Zarzalejo village, in the province of Madrid, Spain. It is an inequigranular monzogranite medium-to-coarse grained, with a slight porphyritic texture (feldspar phenocrysts) and mafic micro-grained enclaves. In this abstract the candidacy of Zarzalejo granite as a "Global Heritage Resource Stone" (GHSR) is presented. This stone ideally fits the newly proposed designation as it has been used in many heritage buildings and its good petrophysical properties and durability have allowed well preserved constructions such as a Roman road, San Pedro Church in Zarzalejo (1492), Descalzas Reales Monastery in Madrid (1559-1564) and the San Lorenzo del Escorial Royal Monastery (1563-1584), to be declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. This level of construction has been a landmark in the extraction and proliferation of historic quarries created due to the high demand that such colossal monuments and buildings with granite, have required for their construction. In the mid-20th century, More, Zarzalejo granite has also been used in restoration works including the Royal Palace and the Reina Sofía Museum (2001-2005), both buildings in Madrid, Spain. Extraction of granite ashlars from tors has been a very frequent activity in the Zarzalejo neighbourhood until mid-twentieth century. So there is also a need to preserve these historic quarries. This type of stone has created a landscape that has been preserved as an open-air museum today where you can see the marks left in the granite due to historic quarry operations. The granite industry has been one of the main pillars of the Zarzalejo regional economy. For centuries, the local community have been engaged in quarrying and have created a cultural landscape based on its building stone. A quarryman monument has been erected in Zarzalejo in honor of this traditional craft as well as an architecture museum at San Lorenzo del

  2. Migration of (75)Se(IV) in crushed Beishan granite: Effects of the iron content.

    PubMed

    He, Jiangang; Ma, Bin; Kang, Mingliang; Wang, Chunli; Nie, Zhe; Liu, Chunli

    2017-02-15

    The diffusion of selenite (labeled with (75)Se) in compacted Beishan granite (BsG) was investigated using the in-diffusion capillary method at pH values from ∼2.0 to ∼11.0 under oxic and anoxic conditions. The results indicate that the apparent diffusion coefficient (Da) values of selenite in BsG always reached the minimum at approximately pH 5. Unexpectedly, the Da values under oxic conditions are nearly one order of magnitude lower than those under the anoxic conditions. Further characterization reveals the existence of redox-sensitive Fe(II)-containing components, which can be responsible for the great difference in Da values. Fe(2p) X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that more Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide coating is formed on the granite's surface under aerobic conditions than is formed under anaerobic conditions. Correspondingly, Se(3d) spectra indicate that more selenium is sorbed under oxic conditions, and the sorbed amount always reached the maximum at pH values from ∼4 to ∼5. A linear combination fit of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy data revealed that Se(0) was formed under anoxic condition and that selenite preferred to form inner-sphere complexes with Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide. Overall, this study indicates that natural Fe-bearing minerals can greatly attenuate selenite diffusion and the retardation would be enhanced under aerobic conditions.

  3. Petrology and Li-Be-B geochemistry of muscovite-biotite granite and associated pegmatite near Yellowknife, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretz, R.; Loop, J.; Hartree, R.

    1989-06-01

    Prosperous granite (Rb-Sr 2520±25 Ma) occurs as several plutons (1 380 km2 outcrop area) in a thick succession of metamorphosed greywacke-mudstone of the Yellowknife Supergroup. The average mineral content of the Sparrow pluton (in vol.%) is quartz (32), plagioclase (31), K-feldspar (24), muscovite (9), biotite (3), and apatite (<1). Average trace-element concentrations (in ppm) are Li (140), Be (4), B (28), Zn (47), Rb (250), Sr (76), Zr (75) and Ba (360). The central portion of the pluton is slightly richer in K, Sr, and Ba than the margin. Li is concentrated in mica (Li in biotite/Li in muscovite=4.7), and Be and B in muscovite and plagioclase. Countless pegmatite dikes occur in the Sparrow pluton and in schist-hornfels to the east; the outer limit is marked by the cordierite isograd, 9 km from the granite contact. Dikes vary greatly in size (1 km to a few cm in length), in mineral content (quartz, albite, K-feldspar, muscovite, tourmaline, beryl, spodumene), in major element composition (especially the Na∶K ratio), and in trace-element content (Li 18 5000 ppm, Be 5 260 ppm, B 20 150 ppm). Compared with Prosperous granite, the pegmatite bodies are richer in P and Rb, and poorer in Ti, Fe, Mg, Zr, and Ba. Dikes rich in tourmaline, beryl, and spodumene occur in overlapping zones situated progressively farther from the centre of the Sparrow pluton. The composition of tourmaline is related to host rock; the highest concentrations of Fe and Zn occur in crystals from pegmetite and the highest concentrations of Mg and V occur in crystals from tourmalinized schist, while those from granite and quartz veins occupy on intermediate position. Complex compositional zoning is present in some tourmaline crystals in pegmatite. Estimates of temperature (500° 600° C) and pressure (2 4 kb) of granite emplacement, based on the distribution of andalusite and sillimanite in the contact rocks, suggest that the final stage of granite emplacement occurred at sub-solidus conditions

  4. Subsolidus physical and chemical mixing of granite and gabbro during mylonitization, South Victoria Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachel Walcott, C.; Craw, Dave

    1993-12-01

    At Dromedary Massif, Southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, a suite of coarse-grained granite dykes cross-cuts a gabbro pluton which has been partially metamorphosed at amphibolite facies. During regional deformation, strain has been inhomogeneously distributed through the gabbro pluton and has been concentrated in granite dykes. In zones of relatively high strain, the granite dykes have developed a mylonitic fabric. A high strain gradient between granitic mylonite and metagabbroic host rock has induced isochemical mylonitization of the margin of the host. This grain size reduction allowed chemical diffusion between granitic and metagabbroic mylonites, resulting in a marginal zone of biotite-rich mylonite with intermediate composition. Biotite-rich mylonite decoupled from metagabbroic mylonite and flowed with granitic mylonite. Continued folding and transposition of granitic mylonite and biotite-rich mylonite has produced compositionally banded mylonite zones through thorough and irreversible mixing of the two lithologies.

  5. Late Paleozoic vertical crustal growth of Western Junggar, Xinjiang in China: evidence from petrology and Nd isotope in charnockites and alkaline granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, W. S.; Sun, M.; Zhang, L. F.; Zhao, G. C.; Malpas, J.

    2003-04-01

    This abstract reports our new petrographic, mineralogical, geochemical and Nd isotope studies on the charnockites and alkaline granites in the western Junggar of Xinjiang, China. During the 1997 field excursion, we for the first time discovered charnockites in the Miaergou alkaline granite batholith, one of the six largest intrusive A-type bodies in the western Junggar of Xinjiang, Northwest China. The batholith is located in the southwestern part of the East-Central Asian Orogenic Belt, which is characterized by the presence of voluminous Paleozoic to Mesozoic granitoids with positive ɛNd(t) values. In spatial distribution, the batholith occurs as a ring-like igneous complex, which intrudes the early-Carboniferous volcanic sedimentary rocks of low-grade metamorphism. It is mainly composed of charnockite, quartz diorite, alkaline granite, potash feldspar granite, syenite and rare tourmaline-bearing intermediate-mafic dykes. Charnockites occur only within the diorite. A large amount of gabbroic, dioritic and leucogranitic enclaves are found in a zone between the alkaline granite and diorite. Petrographic and mineralogical studies indicate that the charnockites were derived from partial melting of the lower crust and crystallized under P-T conditions of 5.44˜5.63 ± 1.0 kbar and 700˜800^oC. Zircons from a charnockite sample and an alkaline granite sample yielded concordant U-Pb TIMS ages of 305.3 ± 1. 1 Ma and 274.1 ± 2.9 Ma, respectively, interpreted as the age of the emplacement of the charnockites and alkaline granites. Two-pyroxene granulites, biotite-spinel-cordierite gneisses and sillimanlite-biotite gneisses occur as enclaves within the charnockites. The two-pyroxene granulite enclaves are considered to be restites of partial melting of the previous lower crust at ˜845^oC, whereas the xenoliths of biotite-spinel-cordierite and sillimanlite-biotite gneisses were metamorphosed at low-pressure amphibolite- to granulite-facies, which were related to the

  6. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Brimmer, Arnold F.; Putnam, Scott A.

    2001-06-01

    This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 1999 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. All hatchery chinook salmon released above Lower Granite Dam were marked with a fin clip in 1999. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 440% of the 1998 number. The wild chinook catch was 603% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 93% of 1998 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 68% of 1998 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 62 age-0 chinook salmon. During 1998 the Snake River trap captured 173 hatchery and 37 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 130 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations began on March 14 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on May 25. The trap was out of operation for 18 d during the season due to high flow and debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 214%, and wild chinook salmon catch was 384% of 1998 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 1999 was 210% of the 1998 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 1999 was 203% of the 1998 catch. Trap operations began on March 14 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on May 21. The trap was out of operation for 17 d during the season due to high flow and debris.

  7. The generation of voluminous S-type granites in the Moldanubian unit, Bohemian Massif, by rapid isothermal exhumation of the metapelitic middle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žák, Jiří; Verner, Kryštof; Finger, Fritz; Faryad, Shah Wali; Chlupáčová, Marta; Veselovský, František

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents new structural, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), petrological, and geochronological data to examine the link between LP-HT metamorphism and S-type granite formation in the Moldanubian unit, Bohemian Massif. We first describe the intrusive relationships of an S-type granite to its host cordierite-bearing migmatites, superbly exposed in the Rácov locality, northeastern Moldanubian batholith. The knife-sharp contacts and rectangular stoped blocks establish that the migmatites cooled and were exhumed above the brittle-ductile transition prior to the granite emplacement. The U-Pb monazite geochronology combined with P-T estimations constrain the age and depth of migmatization at ~ 329 Ma and ~ 21 km (T ≈ 730 °C). The migmatite complex was then exhumed at a rate of 6-7 mm y-1 to a depth of < 9 km where it was intruded by the granite at ~ 327 Ma. These data indicate that the hot fertile metapelitic middle crust in this part of the Moldanubian unit, newly defined as the Pelhřimov complex, underwent rapid isothermal decompression at ~ 329-327 Ma, giving rise to biotite melting and generation of large volumes of S-type granite magma. We propose that the rapid ~ 329-327 Ma exhumation of the Pelhřimov complex may have been partly assisted by the crustal-scale Přibyslav mylonite zone, which delineates the underlying western edge of the Brunia microplate underthrust beneath the eastern half of the Moldanubian unit during the early Carboniferous. The front edge of Brunia thus acted as a rigid backstop at depth, localizing the exhumation of the Pelhřimov complex and separating the hot fertile middle crust to the west from the already cooled overthrust complexes to the east. The magnetic fabric of the granite around the migmatite blocks further reveals that the Pelhřimov complex was shortened vertically and extended in the ~ WNW-ESE direction during and after its exhumation, implying that the SSE-directed underthrusting of Brunia along the

  8. Granitoid magmatism of Alarmaut granite-metamorphic dome, West Chukotka, NE Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchitskaya, M. V.; Sokolov, S. D.; Bondarenko, G. E.; Katkov, S. M.

    2009-04-01

    .L. Phanerozoic granite-metamorphic domes at Russian North-East. Paper 2. Magmatism, metamorphism and migmatization in Late Mesozoic domes // Pacific geology. 1996. V. 15. № 1. P. 84-93. (in Russian) 13. Bering Strait Geologic Field Party, Koolen metamorphic complex, NE Russia: implications for the tectonic evolution of the Bering Strait region // Tectonics, vol. 16, no. 5, p. 713-729 14. Bondarenko G.E., Luchitskaya M.V. Mesozoic tectonic evolution of Alarmaut rise // Byul. MOIP. Otd. Geol. V. 78. Is. 3. P. 25-38. (in Russian) 15. Katkov S.M., Strikland A., Miller E.L. Age of granite batholiths in the Anyui-Chukotka Foldbelt // Doklady. Earth Sciences. 2007. Vol. 414. № 4. P. 515-518. 16. Amato J.M., Wright J.E. Potassic mafic magtism in the Kigluaik gneiss dome, northern Alaska: a geochemical study of arc magmatism in an extensional tectonic setting // J. Geophys. Res. 1997. Vol.102. N B4. P.8065-8084 17. Tikhomirov P.L., Luchitskaya M.V., Kravchenko-Berezhnoy I.R. Comparison of Cretaceous granitoids of the Chaun tectonic zone to those of the Taigonos Peninsula, NE Asia: rock chemistry, composition of rock forming minerals, and conditions of formation // Stephan Mueller series. Geology and Tectonic Origins of Northeast Russia: A Tribute to Leonid Parfenov (in press) 28. Velikoslavinsky S.D. Geochemical typification of acid magmatic rocks of leading geodynamic settings // Petrology. 2003. V. 11. № 4. P.363-380. (in Russian) 19. Pearce J.A. Sources and settings of granitic rocks // Episodes. 1996. V. 19. N. 4. P. 120-125

  9. The origin and nature of thermal evolution during Granite emplacement and differentiation and its influence on upper crustal dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwaldt, R.; Toulkeridis, T.; Todt, W.

    2014-12-01

    Structural geological, geochemical and geochronological data were compiled with the purpose to exercise models for the construction of upper crustal batholith. Models for pulsed intrusion of small magma batches over long timescales versus transfer of larger magma bodies on a shorter time scales are able to predict a different thermal, metamorphic, and rheological state of the crust. For this purpose we have applied the chronostratigraphic framework for magma differentiation on three granite complexes namely the St. Francois Mountain granite pluton (Precambrian), the Galway granite (Cambrian), and the Sithonia Plutonic Complex (Eocene). These plutons have similar sizes and range in composition from quartz diorites through granodiorites and granites to alkali granites, indicating multiple intrusive episodes. Thermobarometric calculations imply an upper crustal emplacement. Geochemical, isotopic and petrological data indicate a variety of pulses from each pluton allowing to be related through their liquid line of decent, which is supported by fractional crystallization of predominantly plagioclase, K-feldspar, biotite, hornblende and some minor accessory mineral phases, magma mingling and mixing as well as crustal contamination. To obtain the temporal relationship we carried out high-precision CA-TIMS zircon geochronology on selected samples along the liquid line of decent. The obtained data indicate a wide range of rates: such as different pulses evolved on timescales of about only 10-30ka, although, the construction time of the different complexes ranges from millions of years with prolonged tectonically inactive phases to relatively short lived time ranges of about ~300 ka. For a better understanding how these new data were used and evaluated in order to reconstruct constraints on the dynamics of the magmatic plumbing system, we integrated the short-lived, elevated heat production, due to latent heat of crystallization, into a 2D numerical model of the thermal

  10. Natural radioactivity levels of granites used in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cetin, E; Altinsoy, N; Orgün, Y

    2012-08-01

    Thirty granite samples commonly used in Turkey were surveyed for natural radioactivity. Concentrations of natural radionuclides in all samples were determined by gamma-ray spectroscopy with hyper-pure germanium detector. The activity concentrations measured for (226)Ra and (232)Th ranged from 0.7±0.1 to 186±1 Bq kg(-1), and from 0.5±0.1 to 249±2 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The activity concentrations obtained for (40)K varied from minimum detectable activity (0.4 Bq kg(-1)) to 1935±11 Bq kg(-1). The radium equivalent activity (Ra(eq)), the absorbed dose rate (D), the external hazard index (H(ex)) and the annual effective dose equivalent were also calculated and compared with the international recommended values. Granite samples were also analysed mineralogically. It was observed that the presence of large amount orthoclase and radiogenic accessory minerals are the sources of high activity concentration levels.

  11. Preliminary report on a glass burial experiment in granite

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Zhu, B.F.; Robinson, R.S.; Wicks, G.G.

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary results of a two-year burial experiment in granite are discussed. Three compositions of simulated alkali borosilicate waste glasses were placed in boreholes approximately 350 meters deep. The glass sample configurations include mini-cans (stainless steel rings into which glass has been cast) and pineapple slices (thin sections from cylindrical blocks). Assemblies of these glass samples were prepared by stacking them together with granite, compacted bentonite and metal rings to provide several types of interfaces that are expected to occur in the repository. The assemblies were maintained at either ambient mine temperature (8 to 10/sup 0/C) or 90/sup 0/C. The glasses were analyzed before burial and after one month storage at 90/sup 0/C. The most extensive surface degradation occurred on the glasses interfaced with bentonite. In general, very little attack was observed on glass surfaces in contact with the other materials. The limited field and laboratory data are compared.

  12. Sequence of mineral assemblages in differentiated granitic pegmatites.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The sequence of mineral assemblages in internally zoned granitic pegmatites recognized by Cameron et al. (1949) is modified here to account for an observed vertical component, especially in feldspar compositions, in addition to the recognized outer contact-to-inner core differentiation process, and the importance of primary lithium minerals other than spodumene, such as petalite. The zonal patterns of 11 well-known granitic pegmatites are consistent with this revised sequence, with additional explanations for the repeated monomineralic zones of quartz or pollucite, etc. The crystallization history of zoned pegmatites is described in general terms, beginning with the magmatic crystallization which produces the outer zones. Aqueous fluid is exsolved continuously from the magma as relatively anhydrous phases precipitate, and plays an important role in the formation of the inner zones; its evolution is thought to be a major cause of pegmatite differentiation.-J.E.S.

  13. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Verhey, Peter; Morrill, Charles; Mensik, Fred

    1999-01-01

    The 1999 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by high spring flows and spill, low levels of debris, cool water temperatures, increased hatchery chinook numbers, and an overall decrease in numbers of smolts collected and transported. A total of 5,882,872 juvenile salmonids were collected at Lower Granite. Of these, 5,466,057 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 5,232,105 by barge and 233,952 by truck. An additional 339,398 fish were bypassed back to the river. A total of 117,609 salmonids were examined in daily samples. Nine research projects conducted by four agencies impacted a total of 440,810 smolts (7.5% of the total collected) of which 247,268 were PIT tagged and 572 were recorded as incidental mortalities.

  14. Lower granite GIS data description and collection guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J.L.; Evans, B.J.; Perry, E.M.

    1995-12-01

    The Lower Granite Geographic Information System (GIS) was developed jointly by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) Walla Walla District and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The goal of the project is to use GIS technology to analyze impacts of the drawdown mitigation option on the physical and biological environment of the Lower Granite Reservoir. The drawdown mitigation option is based on the hypothesis that faster juvenile salmon travel to the ocean would result in higher juvenile survival and greater smolt-to-adult return ratios; to accomplish this, reservoir elevations would be lowered to increase channel velocities. Altering the elevation of the reservoirs on the Snake River is expected to have a variety of impacts to the Physical environment including changes to water velocity, temperature, dissolved gases, and turbidity. The GIS was developed to evaluate these changes and the resulting impacts on the anadromous and resident fish of the Snake River, as well as other aquatic organisms and terrestrial wildlife residing in the adjacent riparian areas. The Lower Granite GIS was developed using commercial hardware and software and is supported by a commercial relational database. Much of the initial system development involved collecting and incorporating data describing the river channel characteristics, hydrologic properties, and aquatic ecology. Potentially meaningful data for the Lower Granite GIS were identified and an extensive data search was performed. Data were obtained from scientists who are analyzing the habitats, limnology, and hydrology of the Snake River. The next six sections of this document describe the bathymetry, fish abundance, substrate, sediment chemistry, and channel hydrology data.

  15. Getting granite dikes out of the source region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Allan M.

    1995-01-01

    Whether a dike can propagate far from a magma reservoir depends upon the competition between the rate at which propagation widens the dike and the rate at which freezing constricts the aperture available for magma flow. Various formulations are developed for a viscous fluid at temperature T(sub m) intruding a growing crack in an elastic solid. The initial solid temperature equals T(sub m) at the source and decreases linearly with distance from the source. If T(sub m) is the unique freezing temperature of the fluid, dike growth is initially self-similar and an essentially exact solution is obtained; if T(sub m) is above the solidus temperature, the solution is approximate but is designed to overestimate the distance the dike may propagate. The ability of a dike to survive thermally depends primarily upon a single parameter that is a measure of the ratio of the dike frozen margin thickness to elastic thickness. Perhaps more intuitively, one may define a minimum distance from the essentially solid reservoir wall to the point at which the host rock temperature drops below the solidus, necessary for dikes to propagate far into subsolidus rock. It is concluded that for reasonable material properties and source conditions, most basalt dikes will have little difficulty leaving the source region, but most rhyolite dikes will be halted by freezing soon after the magma encounters rock at temperatures below the magma solidus. While these results can explain why granitic dikes are common near granitic plutons but rare elsewhere, the potentially large variation in magmatic systems makes it premature to rule out the possibility that most granites are transported through the crust in dikes. Nonetheless, these results highlight difficulties with such proposals and suggest that it may also be premature to rule out the possibility that most granite plutons ascend as more equidimensional bodies.

  16. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program; 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Verhey, Peter; Witalis, Shirley; Morrill, Charles

    1998-01-01

    The 1997 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by high spring flows, extensive spill, cool spring and early summer water temperatures and comparatively low numbers of fish, particularly yearling chinook. The Fish Passage Center's Smolt Monitoring Program is designed to provide a consistent, real-time database of fish passage and document the migrational characteristics of the many stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin.

  17. A Bibliography on the Chemical Weathering of Granitic Rocks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    vol. 210, p. 832. Brunner, H. 1969. (Weathering types on the granite gneisses (Peninsular gneiss) of the Eastern Mysore-Plateau, South India...flats, Northern Queensland , Australia. Geological Society of America Bulletin, vol. 77, pp. 205-206. Coleman, S. M. 1982. Chemical weathering of... basalts and andesites." evidence from weathering rinds. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1246, 51 p. Collier, D. 1961. {Discussion of the process

  18. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Verhey, Peter; Ross, Doug; Morrill, Charles

    1998-12-01

    The 1998 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by relatively moderate spring flows and spill, moderate levels of debris, cool spring, warm summer and fall water temperatures, and increased chinook numbers, particularly wild subyearling chinook collected and transported. The Fish Passage Center's Smolt Monitoring Program is designed to provide a consistent, real-time database on fish passage and document the migrational characteristics of the many stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin.

  19. 76. The Silver Bow County Courthouse, 19101912, at West Granite ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. The Silver Bow County Courthouse, 1910-1912, at West Granite and Montana Streets, was designed by Link and Haire. The building has a dressed sandstone foundation, brick walls, and sandstone trim, parapet and columns. It was used as a barracks for the State militia when the city was placed under martial law following the dynamiting of the Old Miners' Union Hall in September, 1914. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  20. Static and kinetic friction of granite at high normal stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1970-01-01

    Frictional sliding on ground surfaces of granite, angle of sliding planes 30?? and 45??, was investigated as a function of confining pressure. Over the normal stress range of 2-12 kb, the static frictional shear stress ??s follows the relationship ??s = 0??5 + 0?? ??n and the kinetic frictional shear stress ??k was calculated to be ??k = 0??25 + 0??47 ??n. ?? 1970.

  1. Granite petrogenesis revealed by combined gravimetric and radiometric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartèse, Romain; Boulvais, Philippe; Poujol, Marc; Vigneresse, Jean-Louis

    2011-03-01

    In peneplaned terranes, it is often impossible to get a full 3D view of geological objects. In the case of granitic plutons, for which intrusive relationships between constituent units can provide first order information regarding their petrogenesis, this lack of 3D field evidence is a major issue. Indirect observations can be provided by geophysical surveys. Here, we interpret field gravity data and airborne gamma ray radiometric maps with whole rock geochemistry data in order to obtain information on granite petrogenesis. First, we test our proposed combined geophysical and geochemical approach on the Huelgoat Variscan intrusion (Armorican Massif, France) and we show that ternary radiometric maps are a good proxy for the distribution of K, U and Th radioelements. Then, we apply our method to the Lizio and Questembert Variscan granitic intrusions (Armorican Massif) and show that some features characteristic of the intrusions, such as the feeding zones, can be localised by geophysical imaging. Indeed, radiometric maps constitute a frozen image of the latest stage of the magmatic building of plutons.

  2. New contributions to granite characterization by ultrasonic testing.

    PubMed

    Cerrillo, C; Jiménez, A; Rufo, M; Paniagua, J; Pachón, F T

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound evaluation permits the state of rocks to be determined quickly and cheaply, satisfying the demands faced by today's producers of ornamental stone, such as environmental sustainability, durability and safety of use. The basic objective of the present work is to analyse and develop the usefulness of ultrasound testing in estimating the physico-mechanical properties of granite. Various parameters related to Fast Fourier Transform (FFTs) and attenuation have been extracted from some of the studies conducted (parameters which have not previously been considered in work on this topic, unlike the ultrasonic pulse velocity). The experimental study was carried out on cubic specimens of 30 cm edges using longitudinal and shear wave transducers and equipment which extended the normally used natural resonance frequency range up to 500 kHz. Additionally, a validation study of the laboratory data has been conducted and some methodological improvements have been implemented. The main contribution of the work is the analysis of linear statistical correlations between the aforementioned new ultrasound parameters and physico-mechanical properties of the granites that had not previously been studied, i.e., resistance to salt crystallization and breaking load for anchors. Being properties that directly affect the durability and safety of use of granites, these correlations consolidate ultrasonics as a nondestructive method well suited to this type of material.

  3. Study of natural radioactivity in Mansehra granite, Pakistan: environmental concerns.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Aziz Ahmed; Jadoon, Ishtiaq Ahmed Khan; Wajid, Ali Abbas; Attique, Ahsan; Masood, Adil; Anees, Muhammad; Manzoor, Shahid; Waheed, Abdul; Tubassam, Aneela

    2014-03-01

    A part of Mansehra Granite was selected for the assessment of radiological hazards. The average activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were found to be 27.32, 50.07 and 953.10 Bq kg(-1), respectively. These values are in the median range when compared with the granites around the world. Radiological hazard indices and annual effective doses were estimated. All of these indices were found to be within the criterion limits except outdoor external dose (82.38 nGy h(-1)) and indoor external dose (156.04 nGy h(-1)), which are higher than the world's average background levels of 51 and 55 nGy h(-1), respectively. These values correspond to an average annual effective dose of 0.867 mSv y(-1), which is less than the criterion limit of 1 mSv y(-1) (ICRP-103). Some localities in the Mansehra city have annual effective dose higher than the limit of 1 mSv y(-1). Overall, the Mansehra Granite does not pose any significant radiological health hazard in the outdoor or indoor.

  4. Assessing exposure to granite countertops--Part 2: Radon.

    PubMed

    Allen, Joseph G; Minegishi, Taeko; Myatt, Theodore A; Stewart, James H; McCarthy, John F; Macintosh, David L

    2010-05-01

    Radon gas ((222)Rn) is a natural constituent of the environment and a risk factor for lung cancer that we are exposed to as a result of radioactive decay of radium ((226)Ra) in stone and soil. Granite countertops, in particular, have received recent media attention regarding their potential to emit radon. Radon flux was measured on 39 full slabs of granite from 27 different varieties to evaluate the potential for exposure and examine determinants of radon flux. Flux was measured at up to six pre-selected locations on each slab and also at areas identified as potentially enriched after a full-slab scan using a Geiger-Muller detector. Predicted indoor radon concentrations were estimated from the measured radon flux using the CONTAM indoor air quality model. Whole-slab average emissions ranged from less than limit of detection to 79.4 Bq/m(2)/h (median 3.9 Bq/m(2)/h), similar to the range reported in the literature for convenience samples of small granite pieces. Modeled indoor radon concentrations were less than the average outdoor radon concentration (14.8 Bq/m(3); 0.4 pCi/l) and average indoor radon concentrations (48 Bq/m(3); 1.3 pCi/l) found in the United States. Significant within-slab variability was observed for stones on the higher end of whole slab radon emissions, underscoring the limitations of drawing conclusions from discrete samples.

  5. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Morrill, Charles; Ross, Doug; Mensik, Fred

    2000-01-01

    The 2000 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by lower than average spring flows and spill, low levels of debris, cool water temperatures, increased unclipped yearling and subyearling chinook smolts, and 8,300,546 smolts collected and transported compared to 5,882,872 in 1999. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above Lower Granite Dam, we can no longer accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. Although some table titles in this report still show ''wild'' column headings, the numbers in these columns for 1999 and 2000 include wild and unclipped hatchery origin smolts. The increases over previous years reflect the increased supplementation. A total of 8,300,546 juvenile salmonids were collected at Lower Granite Dam. Of these, 187,862 fish were bypassed back to the river and 7,950,648 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 7,778,853 by barge and 171,795 by truck. A total of 151,344 salmonids were examined in daily samples. Nine research projects conducted by four agencies impacted a total of 1,361,006 smolts (16.4% of the total collection).

  6. δ30Si systematics in a granitic saprolite, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ziegler, Karen; Chadwick, Oliver A.; White, Arthur F.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    Granite weathering and clay mineral formation impart distinct and interpretable stable Si isotope (δ30Si) signatures to their solid and aqueous products. Within a saprolite, clay minerals have δ30Si values ∼2.0‰ more negative than their parent mineral and the δ30Si signature of the bulk solid is determined by the ratio of primary to secondary minerals. Mineral-specific weathering reactions predominate at different depths, driving changes in differing δ30Sipore watervalues. At the bedrock-saprolite interface, dissolution of plagioclase and hornblende creates δ30Sipore water signatures more positive than granite by up to 1.2‰; these reactions are the main contributor of Si to stream water and determine its δ30Si value. Throughout the saprolite, biotite weathering releases Si to pore waters but kaolinite overgrowth formation modulates its contribution to pore-water Si. The influence of biotite on δ30Sipore water is greatest near the bedrock where biotite-derived Si mixes with bulk pore water prior to kaolinite formation. Higher in the saprolite, biotite grains have become more isolated by kaolinite overgrowth, which consumes biotite-derived Si that would otherwise influence δ30Sipore water. Because of this isolation, which shifts the dominant source of pore-water Si from biotite to quartz, δ30Sipore water values are more negative than granite by up to 1.3‰ near the top of the saprolite.

  7. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Brimmer, Arnold F.

    1993-11-01

    This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead trout 0. mykiss smolts during the 1992 spring outmigration at migrant traps on the Snake River and the Clearwater River. Annual chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was the second lowest since the beginning of this project. The low trap catch wall due to extremely poor trap efficiency associated with severe low flows. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was similar to 1988 through 1991. Wild steelhead trout catch was 35% less than in 1991. Operations at the Snake River trap and a new screw trap were extended through the end of July to collect summer-migrating age-0 chinook. The differentiation of age-0 chinook from spring and Bummer chinook (age-1) using physical characteristics was again employed in 1992. The Snake River trap and the screw trap collected 20 and 18 age-0 chinook salmon, respectively, due to extremely low discharge. Chinook salmon catch at the Clearwater River trap was the highest since trap operation began in 1984. Hatchery steelhead trout trap catch was 23% lower than in 1991. Wild steelhead trout trap catch wall the highest since trap operation began. Fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at three dams with PIT-tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, and McNary dams). Cumulative interrogation, for fish marked at the Snake River trap, was not calculated for chinook salmon due to a lack of data over the entire migration season. The rates for hatchery steelhead trout and wild steelhead trout were 44.9% and 72.9% respectively. Cumulative interrogation at the three dams for fish PIT-tagged at the Clearwater River trap was 55.1% for chinook salmon, 60.4% for hatchery steelhead trout, and 73.1% for wild steelhead trout. Cumulative interrogations for hatchery steelhead tagged at the Snake River trap and recovered at the downstream dams was about 50% less than in previous years.

  8. Increase vs. decrease in the strength of granitic rocks subjected to heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Török, Anita; Török, Ákos

    2015-04-01

    Accidental fire generally causes catastrophic loss in granitic structures or tunnels excavated in granitic rocks. It is necessary to measure strength of materials at various degrees to understand the mechanical behaviour of such stone structures or tunnels. Our laboratory experiments were aimed to detect indirect tensile strength and uniaxial compressive strength of granitic rocks that were subjected to temperatures of up to 600°C. For control measurements ultrasonic pulse velocity was also recorded. The studied rocks included three granites: a Hungarian dark pink granite (Mórágy), an Austrian greyish granite (Mauthausen) and a common pinkish Spanish granite (Rosa Beta). Cylindrical tests specimens of the three granites were subjected to 300°C and 600°C, respectively. Compressive strength test and tensile strength test results were compared to strength values obtained at room temperature. Our test results show that two of the studied granites (Hungarian and the Spanish one) have higher strength at 300°C that at room temperature. To the contrary ultrasonic pulse velocity decreased for all the three granites from room temperature to 300°C. The tensile strength of the granites did not show such a clear trend, however Hungarian granite has a slightly increased tensile strength at 300°C than at room temperature. At 600°C the compressive strength, tensile strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity dropped but not at the same rate. Our experiments showed that a given and limited temperature increase can have a positive effect on strength of granites rather than an adverse effect on a short-term.

  9. Bluish granites from Extremadura (Spain): a radiological evaluation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Dolores; Neves, Luís.; Peinado, Mercedes; Pereira, Alcides; Rodríguez, Leticia; António Blanco, José

    2010-05-01

    We have found in the area of Trujillo (Extremadura, Spain) a variety of striking bluish granites, outcropping within the Plasenzuela pluton. They are all quarried under different names and are characterized by leucocratic minerals such as quartz, feldspar (both potassium and plagioclase), sometimes giving a fenocrystic texture and muscovite, with some biotite. As accessory phases, idiomorphic tourmaline is found. Recently a bluish phosphate distributed in the whole rock was detected, included within most mineral phases and fillings from stressed structures that are cutting the rock. We attribute the bluish color of the granites to this phosphate. Although biotite is almost always transformed to chlorite, the rock gives an excellent response to be polished. Physico-mechanical properties make this bluish granite a perfect option for most applications. Absorption coefficient is rather low and alteration by thermal changes has not been observed. A secondary facies with yellow colour also occurs, spatially close to the topographic surface, and probably represents an alteration product of the original granite. This facies is also commercialized as ornamental stone. A radiological survey was carried out in the field, using a gamma ray spectrometer. The radiological background is quite homogeneous in the pluton, without significant differences between gamma ray fluxes of both facies (altered and non altered). The average contents of U, Th and K2O determined in situ with the spectrometer are 7.4 ppm, 0.8 ppm and 3.67%, respectively (n=15). Using U as a Ra proxy, the I index of the EU technical document 112 can be determined, and results in a value of 0.64 for the referred composition. This implies that the rock can be used without any restrictions for building purposes. However, a marked difference was observed in radon exhalation tests carried out in laboratorial facilities. The dominant blue variety shows radon exhalation rates comprised between 0.02 and 0.04 Bq.kg-1.h-1

  10. Review of geomechanics data from French nuclear explosions in the Hoggar granite, with some comparisons to tests in US granite

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.

    1983-05-01

    Numerous unclassified reports on the French nuclear explosions in the Hoggar (1961-1966) were reviewed from the standpoint of geomechanics. The following aspects of the tests are summarized: spectral content of the tests compared to U.S. results; shock front positions with time; cavity radius as a function of yield, coupling, density of rock, rock shear strength, and overburden; radial pressure, tangential pressure and peak velocity as a function of distance and yield; pressure vs. time at various distances; mechanical properties of granite; scaling laws for acceleration, velocity and displacement as a function of yield and distance for all Hoggar shots; extent of tunnel damage as a function of distance and yield; time to collapse of chimney as a function of yield, or cavity radius; extent of granite crushing and disking as a function of distance and yield cavity height relation to cavity radius; faulting and jointing on the Taourirt Tan Afella massif; and influence of water content on cavity radius vs. yield. Whenever possible, these French data are compared to corresponding data obtained in the U.S. granite events Hard Hat, Shoal, and Piledriver. The following results emerge from the comparison: (1) agreement is found between the French and U.S. experience for: mechanical properties of the granites, rock damage due to the blast, and yield-scaled peak values of acceleration, velocity and displacement; and (2) lack of agreement exists for: cavity size, chminey height, and time to cavity collapse. Average spacing of rock joints also was about 5 times greater in the Hoggar.

  11. Interactions between extensional shear zones and syn-tectonic granitic intrusions: the example of Ikaria Island (Cyclades, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Valentin; Beaudoin, Alexandre; Jolivet, Laurent; Arbaret, Laurent; Augier, Romain; Rabillard, Aurelien

    2014-05-01

    The Aegean domain is an ideal place to investigate the development of Metamorphic Core Complex (MCC) and to study the role of syn-tectonic granites on their development. MCCs of the Aegean domain are dynamically associated with a few major detachments, especially the North Cycladic Detachment System (NCDS) and the West Cycladic Detachment System (WCDS), which have accommodated a large part of the crustal thinning during the Oligocene and Miocene. The NCDS extends toward the East within the Simav Detachment that has exhumed the northern high-temperature part of the Menderes massif. The transition between the NCDS and the Simav Detachments is located above a major tear in the Aegean slab whose effects on lithospheric deformation are far from understood. The Aegean granitoids were emplaced during the Middle Miocene within a zone of high-temperature during the episode of slab tearing and recorded increments of extensional tectonics within this complex zone. Ikaria Island (Cyclades, Greece) is a metamorphic dome intruded by three Miocene granitoid plutons (one I-type intrusion, two S-type ones) including the largest pluton of the Aegean domain. However, geometry, structures and kinematics are still debated with several recent yet conflicting studies. We have reconsidered the geology of Ikaria to settle the geological and structural context of these plutons. The intrusion depth of the Raches granite has been estimated at 10-15 km by the Al-in-hornblende barometer. Our field study has led to the identification of two major structures: the Gialiskari and Kalamos detachments, which we interpret as belonging to the NCDS. A study of deformation in the granites has highlighted a continuum during cooling that can be described in three stages: i) magmatic deformation, ii) high-temperature ductile deformation from late magmatic stage until complete crystallization of the granite, iii) low-temperature brittle deformation. Throughout this evolution, the same top-to-the-NE shearing

  12. Strength and permeability of an ultra-large specimen of granitic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Thorpe, R.K.; Watkins, D.J.; Ralph, W.E.

    1983-03-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to measure the mechanical and transport properties of a 1-m-diameter by 2-m-high specimen of jointed granitic rock. Uniaxial loading was applied and radial permeability tests were made at various stress levels. Ultimate strength of the specimen was estimated prior to loading by testing small 52 mm diameter cores with similar fracture patterns. It was found that deformabilities of the large and small specimens were similar; however, the uniaxial strength of the large core was about 10% of that predicted. Although the large core contained a complex joint system, its overall permeability was dominated by a single open fracture normal to the axis. Using a simple parallel-plate analog, changes in the equivalent single-fracture aperture under load were significantly less than closures measured by means of linear variable differential transformers situated across the main fracture. 11 references.

  13. Chaotic Mixing of Granitic and Basaltic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decampos, C.; Ingrisch, W. E.; Perugini, D.; Dingwell, D. B.; Poli, G.

    2008-12-01

    , changing with depth, in complex chaotic patterns. The general morphology of experimental flow patterns matches theoretical predictions well. We will present the chemical analytical evaluation of these experiments in the context of the effectiveness of the interplay between convection and diffusion, under chaotic dynamics, in enhancing mixing in silicate melts. The results are strong evidence that the treatment of or testing for mixing based solely on the presence of straight lines on inter-elemental plots is flawed.

  14. Li isotope geochemical study on weathering of granite in Longnan, Jiangxi Province, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Xu, Z.; Zhao, T.; Yu, C.; Zhou, L.

    2015-12-01

    .22μg/g. Our study indicates that Li isotope composition of residual material is dominanted by the extent of granite weathering. However complex processes, including adsorption and desorption of clay minerals, fluid flow and interaction, and atmospheric input control the Li isotopic composition of residual materials during deep weathering and pedogenic processes.

  15. Miocene rapakivi granites in the southern Death Valley region, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calzia, James P.; Ramo, O.T.

    2005-01-01

    Rapakivi granites in the southern Death Valley region, California, include the 12.4-Ma granite of Kingston Peak, the ca. 10.6-Ma Little Chief stock, and the 9.8-Ma Shoshone pluton. All of these granitic rocks are texturally zoned from a porphyritic rim facies, characterized by rapakivi textures and miarolitic cavities, to an equigranular aplite core. These granites crystallized from anhydrous and peraluminous to metaluminous magmas that were more oxidized and less alkalic than type rapakivi granites from southern Finland. Chemical and isotope (Nd–Sr–Pb) data suggest that rapakivi granites of the southern Death Valley region were derived by partial melting of lower crustal rocks (possibly including Mesozoic plutonic component) with some mantle input as well; they were emplaced at shallow crustal levels (4 km) in an actively extending orogen.

  16. Miocene rapakivi granites in the southern Death Valley region, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calzia, J.P.; Ramo, O.T.

    2005-01-01

    Rapakivi granites in the southern Death Valley region, California, include the 12.4-Ma granite of Kingston Peak, the ca. 10.6-Ma Little Chief stock, and the 9.8-Ma Shoshone pluton. All of these granitic rocks are texturally zoned from a porphyritic rim facies, characterized by rapakivi textures and miarolitic cavities, to an equigranular aplite core. These granites crystallized from anhydrous and peraluminous to metaluminous magmas that were more oxidized and less alkalic than type rapakivi granites from southern Finland. Chemical and isotope (Nd-Sr-Pb) data suggest that rapakivi granites of the southern Death Valley region were derived by partial melting of lower crustal rocks (possibly including Mesozoic plutonic component) with some mantle input as well; they were emplaced at shallow crustal levels (4 km) in an actively extending orogen.

  17. Importance of lunar granite and KREEP in very high potassium (VHK) basalt petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Clive R.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of five very high potassium (VHK) basalts from Apollo 14 breccia 14303 shows the presence of a KREEP component. An assimilation and fractional crystallization model is presented to describe the basalt evolution. The influence of granite assimilation on the basalt evolution is discussed. The presence of VHK basalts containing only a granite signature and those with both granite and KREEP signatures suggests that there are at least two different VHK basalt flows at the Apollo 14 site.

  18. New U Pb SHRIMP zircon age for the Schurwedraai alkali granite: Implications for pre-impact development of the Vredefort Dome and extent of Bushveld magmatism, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, I. T.; De Waal, S. A.; Armstrong, R. A.

    2005-12-01

    The Schurwedraai alkali granite is one of a number of prominent ultramafic-mafic and felsic intrusions in the Neoarchaean to Palaeoproterozoic sub-vertical supracrustal collar rocks of the Vredefort Dome, South Africa. The alkali granite intruded the Neoarchaean Witwatersrand Supergroup and has a peralkaline to peraluminous composition. A new zircon SHRIMP crystallization age of 2052 ± 14 Ma for the Schurwedraai alkali granite places it statistically before the Vredefort impact event at 2023 ± 4 Ma and within the accepted emplacement interval of 2050-2060 Ma of the Bushveld magmatic event. The presence of the alkali granite and associated small ultramafic-mafic intrusions in the Vredefort collar rocks extends the southern extremity of Bushveld-related intrusions to some 120 km south of Johannesburg and about 150 km south of the current outcrop area of the Bushveld Complex. The combined effect of these ultramafic-mafic and felsic bodies may have contributed to a pronouncedly steep pre-impact geothermal gradient in the Vredefort area, and to the amphibolite-grade metamorphism observed in the supracrustal collar rocks of the Vredefort Dome.

  19. Oxygen isotope studies of early Precambrian granitic rocks from the Giants Range batholith, northeastern Minnesota, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viswanathan, S.

    1974-01-01

    Oxygen isotope studies of granitic rocks from the 2.7 b.y.-old composite Giants Range batholith show that: (1) ??(O18)quartz values of 9 to 10 permil characterize relatively uncontaminated Lower Precambrian, magmatic granodiorites and granites; (2) granitic rocks thought to have formed by static granitization have ??(O18)quartz values that are 1 to 2 permil higher than magmatic granitic rocks; (3) satellite leucogranite bodies have values nearly identical to those of the main intrusive phases even where they transect O18-rich metasedimentary wall rocks; (4) oxygen isotopic interaction between the granitic melts and their O18-rich wall rocks was minimal; and (5) O18/O18 ratios of quartz grains in a metasomatic granite are largely inherited from the precursor rock, but during the progression - sedimentary parent ??? partially granitized parent ??? metasomatic granite ??? there is gradual decrease in ??(O18)quartz by 1 to 2 permil. ?? 1974.

  20. Determination of geochemical affinities of granitic rocks from the Aue-Schwarzenberg zone (Erzgebirge, Germany) by multivariate statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forster, H.-J.; Davis, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Variscan granites of the Erzgebirge region can be effectively classified into five genetically distinct major groups by canonical analysis of geochemical variables. The same classification procedure, when applied to small plutons in the Aue-Schwarzenberg granite zone (ASGZ), shows that all ASGZ granites have compositional affinities to low-F biotite or low-F two-mica granite groups. This suggests that the ASGZ granites were emplaced during the first, late-collisional stage of silicic magmatism in the region, which occurred between about 325 and 318 Ma. The numerous biotite granite bodies in the zone are geochemically distinct from both the neighboring Kirchberg granite pluton and the spatially displaced Niederbobritzsch biotite granite massif. Instead, these bodies seem to constitute a third sub-group within the low-F biotite granite class. The ASGZ biotite granites represent three or more genetically distinct bodies, thus highlighting the enormous compositional variability within this group of granites. Least evolved samples of two-mica granites from the ASGZ apparently reflect the assimilation of low-grade metamorphic country rocks during emplacement, altering the original composition of the melts by enhancing primary Al content. The same genesis is implied for the rare "cordierite granite" facies of the Bergen massif, the type pluton for the low-F two-mica granite group in the Erzgebirge.

  1. Magmatic and crustal differentiation history of granitic rocks from Hf-O isotopes in zircon.

    PubMed

    Kemp, A I S; Hawkesworth, C J; Foster, G L; Paterson, B A; Woodhead, J D; Hergt, J M; Gray, C M; Whitehouse, M J

    2007-02-16

    Granitic plutonism is the principal agent of crustal differentiation, but linking granite emplacement to crust formation requires knowledge of the magmatic evolution, which is notoriously difficult to reconstruct from bulk rock compositions. We unlocked the plutonic archive through hafnium (Hf) and oxygen (O) isotope analysis of zoned zircon crystals from the classic hornblende-bearing (I-type) granites of eastern Australia. This granite type forms by the reworking of sedimentary materials by mantle-like magmas instead of by remelting ancient metamorphosed igneous rocks as widely believed. I-type magmatism thus drives the coupled growth and differentiation of continental crust.

  2. Marginal continental and within-plate neoproterozoic granites and rhyolites of Wrangel Island, Arctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchitskaya, M. V.; Moiseev, A. V.; Sokolov, S. D.; Tuchkova, M. I.; Sergeev, S. A.; O'Sullivan, P. B.; Verzhbitskii, V. E.; Malyshev, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents new data on the U-Pb zircon age, as well as results of isotopic geochemical analysis, of granites and rhyolites from Wrangel Island. The U-Pb age estimates of granites and rhyolites are grouped into two clusters ( 690-730 and 590-610 Ma), which imply that these rocks crystallized in the Late Neoproterozoic. Granitic rocks dated back to 690-730 Ma are characterized by negative ɛNd( t) values and Paleoproterozoic Sm-Nd model age. The older inherited zircons corroborate the ancient age of their crustal source. The granitic rocks pertain to involved peraluminous granites of type I, which form at a continental margin of the Andean type and can be compared with coeval granites and orthogneisses from the Seward Peninsula in Alaska. Rhyolites and granites 590-610 Ma in age are distinguished by a moderately positive ɛNd( t) and Mesoproterozoic model age. It is suggested that they have a heterogeneous magma source comprising crustal and mantle components. The geochemical features of granites and rhyolites correspond to type A granites. Together with coeval OIB-type basalts, they make up a riftogenic bimodal association of igneous rocks, which are comparable with orthogneisses (565 Ma) and gabbroic rocks (540 Ma) of Seward Peninsula in Alaska.

  3. Differential rates of feldspar weathering in granitic regoliths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Bullen, T.D.; Schulz, M.S.; Blum, A.E.; Huntington, T.G.; Peters, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    Differential rates of plagioclase and K-feldspar weathering commonly observed in bedrock and soil environments are examined in terms of chemical kinetic and solubility controls and hydrologic permeability. For the Panola regolith, in the Georgia Piedmont Province of southeastern United States, petrographic observations, coupled with elemental balances and 87Sr/86Sr ratios, indicate that plagioclase is being converted to kaolinite at depths > 6 m in the granitic bedrock. K-feldspar remains pristine in the bedrock but subsequently weathers to kaolinite at the overlying saprolite. In contrast, both plagioclase and K-feldspar remain stable in granitic bedrocks elsewhere in Piedmont Province, such as Davis Run, Virginia, where feldspars weather concurrently in an overlying thick saprolite sequence. Kinetic rate constants, mineral surface areas, and secondary hydraulic conductivities are fitted to feldspar losses with depth in the Panola and Davis Run regoliths using a time-depth computer spreadsheet model. The primary hydraulic conductivities, describing the rates of meteoric water penetration into the pristine granites, are assumed to be equal to the propagation rates of weathering fronts, which, based on cosmogenic isotope dating, are 7 m/106 yr for the Panola regolith and 4 m/106 yr for the Davis Run regolith. Best fits in the calculations indicate that the kinetic rate constants for plagioclase in both regoliths are factors of two to three times faster than K-feldspar, which is in agreement with experimental findings. However, the range for plagioclase and K-feldspar rates (kr = 1.5 x 10-17 to 2.8 x 10-16 mol m-2 s-1) is three to four orders of magnitude lower than for that for experimental feldspar dissolution rates and are among the slowest yet recorded for natural feldspar weathering. Such slow rates are attributed to the relatively old geomorphic ages of the Panola and Davis Run regoliths, implying that mineral surface reactivity decreases significantly with

  4. Early Mesozoic deep-crust reworking beneath the central Lhasa terrane (South Tibet): Evidence from intermediate gneiss xenoliths in granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiang; Zheng, Jian-Ping; Xiong, Qing; Yang, Jing-Sui; Wu, Yuan-Bao; Zhao, Jun-Hong; Griffin, William L.; Dai, Hong-Kun

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the rheological behavior of the Tibetan Plateau and its response to geodynamic processes requires a clear knowledge of the composition, evolution and lithological properties of the deep crust. Here we present U-Pb-Hf isotopes of zircons, bulk-rock geochemistry and mineral compositions for seven intermediate gneiss xenoliths and their host Early Mesozoic granites (205 ± 6 Ma) in the central Lhasa terrane to probe the deep crust beneath Southern Tibet. The xenoliths contain plagioclase, amphibole, titanite, allanite, quartz, biotite and muscovite, with accessory Fe-Ti oxides, apatite and zircon. Bulk-rock and mineral geochemistry suggests that these xenoliths have a magmatic origin and experienced deformation and amphibolite-facies metamorphism (equilibration at pressures of 0.46-0.83 GPa and temperatures of 650 °C), before they were captured by the host granite at 205 Ma. Zircons in these xenoliths show complex microstructures, including inherited cores, magmatic or metamorphic bands, and high U-Th hydrothermal rims. Inherited zircon cores record U-Pb ages from 2277 Ma to 517 Ma. Igneous zircons show a range of concordant U-Pb ages, suggesting a protracted magmatism from 236 Ma to 203 Ma. Metamorphic zircon zones record the timing of amphibolite-facies metamorphism from 224 to 192 Ma, while the high U-Th hydrothermal rims show a subsequent fluid activity until 150 Ma. Unradiogenic Hf isotopic compositions of both xenoliths and host granites [xenolith εHf(t) = - 11.2 to 0; host granite εHf(t) = - 17.3 to - 3.3] indicate that the Early Mesozoic deep crust in the central Lhasa terrane originated mainly from ancient (i.e., Proterozoic) crust, with little or no interaction with juvenile magmas. This study suggests a possible continental differentiation mechanism during crustal reworking; progressive melting may initiate from the lower mafic crust (at ca. 236 Ma) and gradually migrate into the sediment-rich upper crust (until ca. 203 Ma). The reworking

  5. Modeling and Analysis of Granite Matrix Pore Structure and Hydraulic Characteristics in 2D and 3D Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdik, L.; Polak, M.; Zaruba, J.; Vanecek, M.

    2010-12-01

    A geological environment labeled as a Granite massif represents in terms of groundwater flow and transport a distinct hydrogeological environment from that of sedimentary basins, the characterisation of which is generally more complex and uncertain. Massifs are composed of hard crystalline rocks with the very low effective porosity. Due to their rheological properties such rocks are predisposed to brittle deformation resulting from changes in stress conditions. Our specific research project (Research on the influence of intergrangular porosity on deep geological disposal: geological formations, methodology and the development of measurement apparatus) is focussed on the problem of permeable zones within apparently undisturbed granitic rock matrix. The project including the both laboratory and in-situ tracer tests study migration along and through mineral grains in fresh and altered granite. The objective of the project is to assess whether intergranular porosity is a general characteristic of the granitic rock matrix or subject to significant evolution resulting from geochemical and/or hydrogeochemical processes, geotechnical and/or mechanical processes. Moreover, the research is focussed on evaluating methods quantifying intergranular porosity by both physical testing and mathematical modelling using verified standard hydrological software tools. Groundwater flow in microfractures and intergranular pores in granite rock matrix were simulated in three standard hydrogeological modeling programs with completely different conceptual approaches: MODFLOW (Equivalent Continuum concept), FEFLOW (Discrete Fracture and Equivalent Continuum concepts) and NAPSAC (Discrete Fracture Network concept). Specialized random fracture generators were used for creation of several 2D and 3D models in each of the chosen program. Percolation characteristics of these models were tested and analyzed. Several scenarios of laboratory tests of the rock samples permeability made in triaxial

  6. Ultrasonic evaluation of the physical and mechanical properties of granites.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, G; Lourenço, P B; Alves, C A S; Pamplona, J

    2008-09-01

    Masonry is the oldest building material that survived until today, being used all over the world and being present in the most impressive historical structures as an evidence of spirit of enterprise of ancient cultures. Conservation, rehabilitation and strengthening of the built heritage and protection of human lives are clear demands of modern societies. In this process, the use of nondestructive methods has become much common in the diagnosis of structural integrity of masonry elements. With respect to the evaluation of the stone condition, the ultrasonic pulse velocity is a simple and economical tool. Thus, the central issue of the present paper concerns the evaluation of the suitability of the ultrasonic pulse velocity method for describing the mechanical and physical properties of granites (range size between 0.1-4.0 mm and 0.3-16.5 mm) and for the assessment of its weathering state. The mechanical properties encompass the compressive and tensile strength and modulus of elasticity, and the physical properties include the density and porosity. For this purpose, measurements of the longitudinal ultrasonic pulse velocity with distinct natural frequency of the transducers were carried out on specimens with different size and shape. A discussion of the factors that induce variations on the ultrasonic velocity is also provided. Additionally, statistical correlations between ultrasonic pulse velocity and mechanical and physical properties of granites are presented and discussed. The major output of the work is the confirmation that ultrasonic pulse velocity can be effectively used as a simple and economical nondestructive method for a preliminary prediction of mechanical and physical properties, as well as a tool for the assessment of the weathering changes of granites that occur during the serviceable life. This is of much interest due to the usual difficulties in removing specimens for mechanical characterization.

  7. Hydrothermal REE and Zr Ore Forming Processes in Peralkaline Granitic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gysi, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Anorogenic peralkaline igneous systems display extreme enrichment of REE and Zr with a hydrothermal overprint leading to post-magmatic metal mobilization. Strange Lake in Canada, for example, is a mid-Proterozoic peralkaline granitic intrusion and host to a world-class REE-Zr deposit with >50 Mt ore (>1.5 wt.% REE and >3 wt.% Zr). In contrast to porphyry systems, peralkaline systems are poorly understood and hydrothermal metal mobilization models are only in the early stage of their development. This is partly due to the paucity of thermodynamic data for REE-bearing minerals and aqueous species, and the complexity of the hydrothermal fluids (enrichment of F, P and Cl), which make it difficult to develop thermodynamic models of metal partitioning. This study aims to show the link between alteration stages and metal mobilization using Strange Lake as a natural laboratory and combine these observations with numerical modeling. Four types of alteration were recognized at Strange Lake: i) alkali (i.e. K and Na) metasomatism related to interaction with NaCl-bearing orthomagmatic fluids, ii) acidic alteration by HCl-HF-bearing fluids originating from the pegmatites followed by iii) aegirinization of the border of the pegmatites and surrounding granites and by iv) pervasive Ca-F-metasomatism. The acidic alteration accounts for most of the hydrothermal metal mobilization in and outward from the pegmatites, whereas the Ca-F-metasomatism led to metal deposition and resulted from interaction of an acidic F-rich fluid with a Ca-bearing fluid. Numerical simulations of fluid-rock reactions with saline HCl-HF-bearing fluids at 400 °C to 250 °C indicate that temperature, availability of F/Cl and pH limit the mobility of Zr and REE. Fluids with pH <2 led to the formation of quartz and fluorite in the core of the pegmatites and to an increase in the stability of REE chloride species favorable for REE mobilization. The mobilization of Zr was favored at low temperature with the

  8. Lead-alpha age determinations of granitic rocks from Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matzko, John J.; Jaffe, H.W.; Waring, C.L.

    1957-01-01

    Lead-alpha activity age determinations were made on zircon from seven granitic rocks of central and southeastern Alaska. The results of the age determinations indicate two periods of igneous intrusion, one about 95 million years ago, during the Cretaceous period, and another about 53 million years ago, during the early part of the Tertiary. The individual ages determined on zircon from 2 rocks from southeastern Alaska and 1 from east-central Alaska gave results of 90, 100, and 96 million years; those determined on 4 rocks from central Alaska gave results of 47, 56, 58, and 51 million years.

  9. The effect of dilatancy on velocity anisotropy in Westerly granite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soga, N.; Mizutani, H.; Spetzler, H.; Martin, R. J., III

    1978-01-01

    Jacketed samples of Westerly granite were fractured at confining pressures up to 1 kbar, and compressional and horizontally as well as vertically polarized shear velocities were measured in orthogonal directions perpendicular to the compression axis. Changes occurring with increased strain are described, and the velocity data were analyzed by application of the Anderson et al (1974) approach. Observed and calculated velocities are found to be in good agreement, and the degree of dilatancy was determined from the differences between the strains measured perpendicularly to the compression axis and the estimated elastic strains in those directions.

  10. The geochemical and Srsbnd Nd isotopic characteristics of Paleozoic fractionated S-types granites of north Queensland: Implications for S-type granite petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, David C.; Bultitude, Robert J.

    2013-03-01

    Moderately to strongly fractionated S-type granites crop out extensively (> 2500 km2) in the central and eastern parts of the Hodgkinson Province, north Queensland, Australia. The granites have been subdivided in two major supersuites: the garnet-bearing Whypalla and cordierite-bearing Cooktown Supersuites; and a number of minor suites—including the extremely fractionated Wangetti and Mount Alto Suites. Early formed magmatic tourmaline is a feature of the Wangetti and Mount Alto granites. Almost all of the S-type granites contain metasedimentary enclave material, while microdioritic enclaves are mostly notably absent. The S-type granites are felsic with a moderate SiO2 range (68-77%). Most elements are negatively correlated with increasing differentiation, including TiO2, FeOtot, MgO, CaO, Ba, Sr, Th, LREE, Eu, Zr, Hf, and ratios such as K/Rb; many decrease to very low levels. There are very few positively correlated elements: Rb, U, and to some extent Na2O. Geochemical differences between supersuites include higher CaO, Ba, Sr, Pb, and lower Rb, Sn, B, V in the Whypalla Supersuite. Geochemical variation within the granites is largely due to extensive crystal fractionation. Some of the S-type granites have FeO* and MgO contents of 2.5-3.0% or more indicating they do not represent simple sedimentary melts, but rather represent the presence of both cumulate and restitic material. Variable Nd and Sr signatures (ɛNd between - 2 and - 6.5; initial Sr ratios between 0.709 and 0.715), suggest multiple components. The S-type granites intrude a very extensive, siliciclastic turbidite sequence that is isotopically evolved (e.g., ɛNd mostly - 12.0 to - 15.0 at 270 Ma), and generally too mature (too CaO poor) to produce S-type granites. Isotopic and chemical modeling show that although magma-mixing is permissible, the levels permissible (< ca. 20-25% basaltic input), are not large enough to explain the signature of the granites. Instead the data suggest that the S

  11. Fluid inclusions in the Stripa granite and their possible influence on the groundwater chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D.K.; Lindblom, S.; Donahoe, R.J.; Barton, C.C.

    1989-01-01

    Fluid inclusions in quartz and calcite of the Proterozoic Stripa granite, central Sweden, demonstrate that the rock and its fracture fillings have a complex evolutionary history. The majority of inclusions indicate formation during a hydrothermal stage following emplacement of the Stripa pluton. Total salinities of quartz inclusions range from 0-18 eq.wt% NaCl for unfractured rock and from 0-10 eq.wt% for fractured rock. Vein calcites contain up to 25 eq.wt% NaCl but the inclusion size is larger and the population density is lower. Homogenization temperatures are 100-150??C for unfractured rock and 100-250?? for fractured rock. Pressure corrections, assuming immediate post-emplacement conditions of 2 kbar, give temperatures about 160??C higher. Measurements of fluid-inclusion population-densities in quartz range from about 108 inclusions/cm3 in grain quartz to 109 inclusions/cm3 in vein quartz. Residual porosity from inclusion densities has been estimated to be at least 1% which is two orders of magnitude greater than the flow porosity. Breakage and leaching of fluid inclusions is proposed as an hypothesis for the origin of major solutes (Na-Ca-Cl) in the groundwater. Evidence for the hypothesis is based on (1) mass balance-only a small fraction of the inclusions need to leak to account for salt concentrations in the groundwater, (2) chemical signatures- Br Cl ratios of fluid inclusion leachates (0.0101) match those ratios for the deep groundwaters (0.0107), (3) leakage mechanisms-micro-stresses from isostatic rebound or mining activities acting on irregular-shaped inclusions could cause breakage and provide connection with the flow porosity, and (4) experimental studies-water forced through low permeability granites leach significant quantities of salt. This hypothesis is consistent with the available data although alternate hypotheses cannot be excluded. ?? 1989.

  12. Metamorphic signature of the Gneiss Canyon Shear Zone, Lower Granite Gorge, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.; Williams, M.L. . Dept. of Geology and Geography)

    1992-01-01

    The Proterozoic orogen in Arizona consists of structural blocks separated by NE trending shear zones. The Gneiss Canyon Shear Zone (GCSZ) is important because it appears to define in part the boundary between the amphibolite facies Yavapai Province and the granulite facies Mojave Province. An early NW striking foliation is clearly visible in many samples from the Lower Granite Gorge (LGG). In Travertine Canyon, east of the GCSZ, pelitic schists contain And-Sil-Crd-Bi and Gar-Sil-Sta-Bi. Mafic rocks exhibit complex phase relations between cummingtonite, anthophyllite, gedrite, garnet, and cordierite. The coexistence of cordierite-cummingtonite is indicative of low pressure metamorphism. Microprobe analyses of garnets reveal prograde growth zoning profiles. Temperature and pressure estimates of peak metamorphism are 550--600 C and 3 kb. Just east of the GCSZ, pelitic assemblages contain Gar-Bi [+-] Sil [+-] Mus, and garnet zoning profiles are flat in the cores. In Spencer Canyon, west of the GCSZ, samples commonly contain Gar-Bi-Sil-Crd, and in many samples cordierite is being replaced by sillimanite. Thermobarometric calculations yield temperature and pressure estimates of 650 C and 3.5 kb. Mineral assemblages and quantitative thermobarometry suggest higher peak metamorphic temperature west of the GCSZ but relatively constant pressures across the LGG. On the east side of the GCSZ, temperatures increase toward the Shear Zone, probably due to the presence of extensive dikes, pods, and veins of variably deformed granite. Peak mineral assemblages are syntectonic with respect to the NE-striking GCSZ fabric. If a suture exists in the LGG, the GCSZ fabrics apparently reflect post-accretionary tectonism, with accretion occurring prior to the peak of metamorphism.

  13. Origin and tectonic implications of the ∼200 Ma, collision-related Jerai pluton of the Western Granite Belt, Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Azmiah; Ghani, Azman A.; Zaw, Khin; Osman, Syamir; Quek, Long Xiang

    2016-09-01

    Triassic granitoids (∼200-225 Ma) are widespread in the Western Belt of Peninsular Malaysia. The Main Range granite is the biggest batholith in the Western Belt composed of peraluminous to metaluminous granite and granodiorite and displays typical ilmenite-series characteristics. Jerai granitic pluton occurs at the northwestern part of the Main Range granite batholith. The Jerai granite can be divided into three facies: (i) biotite-muscovite granite; (ii) tourmaline granite; and (iii) pegmatite and aplopegmatite. Biotite-muscovite granite accounts for 90% of the Jerai pluton, and the rest is tourmaline granite. Geochemical data reveal that pegmatite and tourmaline granite are more differentiated than biotite-muscovite granite. Both pegmatite and tourmaline granite have a higher SiO2 content (70.95-83.94% versus 69.45-73.35%) and a more pronounced peraluminous character. The U-Pb zircon geochronology of the Jerai granite gave an age ranging from 204 ± 4.3 Ma, 205 ± 4 Ma and 205 ± 2 Ma for pegmatite biotite-muscovite granite and tourmaline granite, respectively. The biotite-muscovite Jerai granites are similar to S-type Main Range granite, but the tourmaline granite has a signature of late-stage hydrothermal fluid interaction such as tourmaline quartz pods, the accumulation of large pegmatitic K-feldspar, pronounced peraluminous character, higher SiO2 content. Age evidence of these two granitic facies suggest that they are from the same magma.

  14. Structural record of mechanisms of granite intrusion in the Achaean gneisses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perchuk, L. L.; van Reenen, D. D.

    2009-04-01

    orientation of strong liniation and small folds axes in granulite facies complexes (see a micro model in Fig. 1a). Despite the fact that these structures are located more than hundred kilometers apart, they are characterized by similar orientation of foliation and lineations that are the evidence for their simultaneous formation. This conclusion is well supported by isotopic geochronological data (Boshoff et al., 2006; van Reenen et al., 2007). Numerical modeling (Fig. 1b-d) of this movement strongly supports this mechanism and suggests that the formation of sheath folds as the result of granite magma generation from gneisses of similar bulk composition reminds boiling of viscose liquids. This study was financially supported by NRF SA and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project nos. 06-05-64098 and 08-05-00354, and Russian President's Program for the support of leading scientific schools, grant NSh-1949.2008.5. References. Boshoff, R., Van Reenen, D.D., Smit, C.A. еt al., 2006. J. Geology, 114, 699. Davidson, A. Journal of Geodynamics. 1984, 1, 433-444. Gerya, T.V., Perchuk, L.L., Van Reenen, D.D. et al. 2000. J. Geodynamics, 30, 17. Gerya T.V., Perchuk L.L., Maresch W.V et al., 2002. Europ. J Mineral., 14, 687-699. Macgregor A.M. Transactions of Geological Society of South Africa. 1951. V. 54. P. 27-71. Perchuk L.L., 1989. In Evolution of Metamorphic Belts. Geol. Soc. Lond. Spec. Pub. 42, P. 275. Perchuk, L.L., Podladchikov, Yu.Yu., Polyakov, A.N., 1992. J. Metam. Geol., 10, 311. Perchuk L.L., van Reenen D.D., Smit C.A., Boshoff, G. A. Belyanin, Yapaskurt V.O. Petrology, 2008, V. 16, No. 7, Р. 652-678. Ramberg H. Gravity, deformation and the Earth's crust. Academic Press. London-New-York-Toronto-San Francisco. 1981. 296 p. Smit, C.A. & Van Reenen, D.D., 1997. Journal of Geology, 105, 37-57. Van Reenen, D.D., Boshoff, R., Smit, C.A. et al., 2007, Gondwana Research (in press). To observe this Figure please contact the first author llp@geol.msu.ru Figure 1

  15. An Early Neoproterozoic gabbro-granite association in the Bureya Continental Massif (Central Asian fold belt): First geochemical and geochronological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, A. A.; Ovchinnikov, R. O.; Kudryashov, N. M.; Sorokina, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    The fact that gneissose granites and gabbros of the Nyatygran Complex in the Bureya Continental Massif are not Palaeoproterozoic in age, as previously thought, but Neoproterozoic, 933 Ma is proved. New data with the first direct evidence of Early Neoproterozoic magmatism in continental massifs composing the Bureya-Jiamusi Superterrane are given. At the moment, the obtained age estimates are the oldest for the magmatic rocks of this superterrane.

  16. Preliminary report on the geology and gold mineralization of the South Pass granite-greenstone terrain, Wind River Mountains, western Wyoming (US)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausel, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    The South Pass granite-greenstone terrain lies near the southern tip of the Wind River Mountains of western Wyoming. This Archean supracrustal pile has been Wyoming's most prolific source of gold and iron ore. From 1962 to 1983, more than 90 million tons of iron ore were recovered from oxide-facies banded iron formation, and an estimated 325,000 ounces of gold were mined from metagreywacke-hosted shears and associated placers. Precambrian rocks at South Pass are unconformably overlain by Paleozoic sediments along the northeast flank, and a Tertiary pediment buries Archean supracrustals on the west and south. To the northwest, the supracrustals terminate against granodiorite of the Louis Lake batholith; to the east, the supracrustals terminate against granite of the Granite Mountains batholith. The Louis Lake granodiorite is approximately 2,630 + or - 20 m.y. old, and the Granite Mountains granite averages 2,600 m.y. old. The geometry of the greenstone belt is best expressed as a synform that has been modified by complex faulting and folding. Metamorphism is amphibolite grade surrounding a small island of greenschist facies rocks. The younger of the Archean supracrustal successions is the Miners Delight Formation. This unit yielded a Rb-Sr isochron of 2,800 m.y. A sample of galena from the Snowbird Mine within the Miners Delight Formation yielded a model age averaging 2,750 m.y. The Snowbird mineralization appears to be syngenetic and is hosted by metavolcanics of calc-alkaline affinity. Discussion follows.

  17. A generalized law for brittle deformation of Westerly granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    A semiempirical constitutive law is presented for the brittle deformation of intact Westerly granite. The law can be extended to larger displacements, dominated by localized deformation, by including a displacement-weakening break-down region terminating in a frictional sliding regime often described by a rate- and state-dependent constitutive law. The intact deformation law, based on an Arrhenius type rate equation, relates inelastic strain rate to confining pressure Pc, differential stress ????, inelastic strain ??i, and temperature T. The basic form of the law for deformation prior to fault nucleation is In ????i = c - (E*/RT) + (????/a??o)sin-??(???? i/2??o) where ??o and ??o are normalization constants (dependent on confining pressure), a is rate sensitivity of stress, and ?? is a shape parameter. At room temperature, eight experimentally determined coefficients are needed to fully describe the stress-strain-strain rate response for Westerly granite from initial loading to failure. Temperature dependence requires apparent activation energy (E* ??? 90 kJ/mol) and one additional experimentally determined coefficient. The similarity between the prefailure constitutive law for intact rock and the rate- and state-dependent friction laws for frictional sliding on fracture surfaces suggests a close connection between these brittle phenomena.

  18. Desorption of cesium from granite under various aqueous conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Li, Ming-Hsu; Wei, Yuan-Yaw; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2010-12-01

    In this work the desorption of cesium ions from crushed granite in synthetic groundwater (GW) and seawater (SW) was investigated. Results were compared with those obtained in deionized water (DW) and in two kinds of extraction solutions, namely: MgCl(2) and NaOAc (sodium acetate). In general, the desorption rate of Cs from crushed granite increased proportionally with initial Cs loadings. Also, amounts of desorbed Cs ions followed the tendency in the order SW>GW>NaOAc approximately equal MgCl(2)>DW solutions. This indicated that the utilization of extraction reagents for ion exchange will underestimate the Cs desorption behavior. Fitting these experimental data by Langmuir model showed that these extraction reagents have reduced Cs uptake by more than 90%, while only less than 1% of adsorbed Cs ions are still observed in GW and SW solutions in comparison to those in DW. Further SEM/EDS mapping studies clearly demonstrate that these remaining adsorbed Cs ions are at the fracture areas of biotite.

  19. Permeability Evolution of Granite Gneiss During Triaxial Creep Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Xu, W. Y.; Wang, H. L.; Wang, W.; Wang, R. B.

    2016-09-01

    Permeability is an important factor for seepage analysis of rock material, and a key factor in ensuring the safety of underground works. In this study, the permeability evolution of granite gneiss during triaxial creep tests was investigated. In the context of an underground oil storage cavern in China, a series of hydro-mechanical coupling creep tests were conducted on rock cores of granite gneiss at three different pore pressures to reveal the effect of pore pressure on the permeability evolution and to investigate the correlation between the permeability and volumetric strain during the creep process. During the creep tests, the permeability decreases in the initial loading phase. At all deviatoric stress levels, the permeability remains stable in the steady creep stage and increases rapidly in the accelerated creep stage. Based on the test data, the initial permeability, steady permeability and peak permeability at various stress levels are defined. The effect of pore pressure on the permeability is captured by a linear model. In addition, the relationship between permeability and volumetric strain can be described as a process divided into three phases, with different functions in each phase.

  20. Autoradiographic study of actinide sorption on climax stock granite

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, G.W.; O'Kelley, G.D.; Allard, B.

    1980-06-01

    An autoradiographic technique that employed an arrangement for placing in firm contact Polaroid sheet film, a scintillator screen, and the radioactive face of a specimen was applied to a study of the sorption of americium, neptunium, plutonium, and uranium on Climax Stock granite under varying conditions of pH and Eh. Qualitative agreement was found between the sorption of americium on crushed, pure minerals and on the minerals comprising the specimen of Climax Stock granite. The observations also supported a mechanism for reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) and Pu(VI) to Pu(IV) by Fe(II)-containing minerals. There was no evidence for reduction of U(VI) by the Fe(II)-containing minerals, although the uranium, assumed to be present as UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/, appeared to be the only actinide species to exhibit sorption by a simple, cation-exchange mechanism at particular mineral sites. Some implications of these results for nuclear waste isolation are discussed briefly.

  1. A petrologic assessment of internal zonation in granitic pegmatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, David

    2014-01-01

    Cameron et al. (1949) devised the nomenclature and delineated the patterns of internal zonation within granitic pegmatites that are in use today. Zonation in pegmatites is manifested both in mineralogy and in fabric (mineral habits and rock texture). Although internal zonation is a conspicuous and distinctive attribute of pegmatites, there has been no thorough effort to explain that mineralogical and textural evolution in relation to the zoning sequence presented by Cameron et al. (1949), or in terms of the comprehensive petrogenesis of pegmatite bodies (pressure, temperature, and whole-rock composition). This overview of internal zonation within granitic pegmatites consists of four principal parts: (1) a historic review of the subject, (2) a summary of the current understanding of the pegmatite-forming environment, (3) the processes that determine mineralogical and textural zonation in pegmatites, and (4) the applications of those processes to each of the major zones of pegmatites. Based on the concepts presented in London (2008), the fundamental determinates of the internal evolution of pegmatite zones are: (1) the bulk composition of melt, (2) the magnitude of liquidus undercooling prior to the onset of crystallization, (3) subsolidus isothermal fractional crystallization, by which eutectic or minimum melts fractionate by sequential, non-eutectic crystallization, (4) constitutional zone refining via the creation of a boundary layer liquid, chemically distinct from but continuous with the bulk melt at the crystallization front, and (5) far-field chemical diffusion, the long-range and coordinated diffusion of ions, particularly of alkalis and alkaline earths, through melt.

  2. U-Pb geochronology of zircon and monazite from Mesoproterozoic granitic gneisses of the northern Blue Ridge, Virginia and Maryland, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Burton, W.C.; Lyttle, P.T.; Nelson, A.E.; Southworth, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    Mesoproterozoic granitic gneisses comprise most of the basement of the northern Blue Ridge geologic province in Virginia and Maryland. Lithology, structure, and U-Pb geochronology have been used to subdivide the gneisses into three groups. The oldest rocks, Group 1, are layered granitic gneiss (1153 ?? 6 Ma), hornblende monzonite gneiss (1149 ?? 19 Ma), porphyroblastic granite gneiss (1144 ?? 2 Ma), coarse-grained metagranite (about 1140 Ma), and charnockite (>1145 Ma?). These gneisses contain three Proterozoic deformational fabrics. Because of complex U-Pb systematics due to extensive overgrowths on magmatic cores, zircons from hornblende monzonite gneiss were dated using the sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP), whereas all other ages are based on conventional U-Pb geochronology. Group 2 rocks are leucocratic and biotic varieties of Marshall Metagranite, dated at 1112??3 Ma and 1111 ?? 2 Ma respectively. Group 3 rocks are subdivided into two age groups: (1) garnetiferous metagranite (1077 ?? 4 Ma) and quartz-plagioclase gneiss (1077 ?? 4 Ma); (2) white leucocratic metagranite (1060 ?? 2 Ma), pink leucocratic metagranite (1059 ?? 2), biotite granite gneiss (1055 ?? 4 Ma), and megacrystic metagranite (1055 ?? 2 Ma). Groups 2 and 3 gneisses contain only the two younger Proterozoic deformational fabrics. Ages of monazite, seprated from seven samples, indicate growth during both igneous and metamorphic (thermal) events. However, ages obtained from individual grains may be mixtures of different age components, as suggested by backscatter electron (BSE) imaging of complexly zoned grains. Analyses of unzoned monazite (imaged by BSE and thought to contain only one age component) from porphyroblastic granite gneiss yield ages of 1070, 1060, and 1050 Ma. The range of ages of monazite (not reset to a uniform date) indicates that the Grenville granulite event at about 1035 Ma did not exceed about 750??C. Lack of evidence for 1110 Ma growth of monazite in

  3. Middle Triassic magma mixing in an active continental margin: Evidence from mafic enclaves and host granites from the Dewulu pluton in West Qinling, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Mo, X.; Yu, X.

    2015-12-01

    The Qinling-Dabie-Sulu orogen was formed through the collision of the North and South China blocks, but the precise timing of the closure of the Paleo-Tethys ocean between the two blocks remains debated. Large volumes of Triassic granites associated with mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) were emplaced in the Qinling terrane. This paper presents field observations, petrography, geochronology and geochemistry of the MMEs and their host granites from the Dewulu pluton in West Qinling. The host rocks comprise granodiorite and granodioritic porphyry, and the The MMEs range in composition from gabbroic diorite to diorite. Zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb ages suggest that the granites and MMEs were coeval at ca. 245 Ma. The granites are relatively enriched in LILE and depleted in HFSE, and have evolved Sr-Nd-Pb and zircon Hf isotopic compositions [initial 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7070-0.7076, ɛNd(t) = -7.5 to -6.8, ɛHf(t) = -8.2 to -4.2], indicative of an origin from the amphibolitic lower crust. The near-primitive gabbro-dioritic MMEs bear a remarkable geochemical resemblance to the high-magnesium andesite (HMA), such as moderate SiO2 (~55 wt.%), low FeOT/MgO (~0.75), high Cr (268-308 ppm) and MgO (8.58-8.77 wt.%) with Mg# of ~70. Additionally, they exhibit lower initial 87Sr/86Sr, higher ɛNd(t) and ɛHf(t), and more radiogenic Pb isotopes than the dioritic MMEs which share similar isotopic compositions with the granites. These features, together with the presence of the specific minerals in the MMEs (e.g., felsic xenocrysts and acicular apatite), point to mixing process between the lower crust-derived magmas and the melts produced by the reaction of the subducting sediment-derived components and the overlying mantle. Taking into account the regional occurrence of synchronous plutonic-volcanic complexes (250-234 Ma) ranging from basaltic to granitic variants, we suggest that the Dewulu pluton formed in an active continental margin in response to the local extension triggered by the

  4. The "granite pump": LP/HT metamorphism and exhumation in the Montagne Nore (S-France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, W.; Doublier, M. P.; Doerr, W.; Stein, E.

    2003-04-01

    The Montagne Noire at the southern margin of the French Massif Central represents an exceptional case of a hot metamorphic core complex evolved from a thrust stack in a foreland position. The core of the structure (Zone Axiale) exposes granites and LP/HT gneisses up to anatectic grade. The hot core is encased by ENE-trending shear zones, which define a dextral pull-apart structure. Ductile extension is documented by top WSW shearing in the W, and ENE shearing in the E part of the Zone Axiale (eg, MATTE et al., 1998). Extension in ENE and reduction of the metamorphic profile are accompanied by NNW-directed contraction ("pinched pull-apart"). Palaeozoic sediments on the southern flank of the Zone Axiale exhibit only greenschist to diagenetic grades of metamorphism. Conodont alteration index (WIEDERER et al., 2002) and illite crystallinity (Doublier, this meeting) reveal a decrease of metamorphic temperature away from the hot core. Metamorphic isograds cut across the axial planes of D1 nappes. These features suggest that metamorphism was imposed by the rising hot core. Accordingly, the palaeozoic sediments show a tectonic evolution which closely resembles that of the gneissic core (extension top ENE, contraction in NNW). Structures relating to stacking (D1) have survived at the southern margin of the Montagne Noire. U-Pb studies (TIMS on single zircon and monazite) reveal peak metamorphism and magmatism already at c. 315 Ma (KLAMA et al., 2001), i.e., only <10 Ma after the end of flysch deposition in latest Visean/Early Namurian time (<= 323 Ma). The coincidence, within error, of the U-Pb ages and earlier Ar/Ar ages (MALUSKI et al., 1991) suggest rapid cooling. Synchronous granite emplacement and metamorphism is best explained by advective heating. Since granites are not generated in foreland settings, we propose derivation of the melts from areas of thickened crust adjacent to the N. Transport and emplacement of granites was essentially driven by the hydraulic

  5. Visualization of microcrack anisotropy in granite affected by afault zone, using confocal laser scanning microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Celia T.; Shimizu, Ichiko

    2004-01-02

    Brittle deformation in granite can generate a fracture system with different patterns. Detailed fracture analyses at both macroscopic and microscopic scales, together with physical property data from a drill-core, are used to classify the effects of reverse fault deformation in four domains: (1) undeformed granite, (2) fractured granite with cataclastic seams, (3) fractured granite from the damage zone, and (4) foliated cataclasite from the core of the fault. Intact samples from two orthogonal directions, horizontal (H) and vertical (V), from the four domains indicate a developing fracture anisotropy toward the fault, which is highly developed in the damage zone. As a specific illustration of this phenomenon, resin impregnation, using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) technique is applied to visualize the fracture anisotropy developed in the Toki Granite, Japan. As a result, microcrack networks have been observed to develop in H sections and elongate open cracks in V sections, suggesting that flow pathways can be determined by deformation.

  6. IRETHERM: Magnetotelluric studies of Irish radiothermal granites and their geothermal energy potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, T. F.; Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Feely, M.

    2013-12-01

    The IRETHERM project seeks to develop a strategic understanding of Ireland's deep geothermal energy potential through integrated modeling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. One aspect of IRETHERM's research focuses on Ireland's radiothermal granites, where increased concentrations of radioelements provide elevated heat-production (HP), heat-flow (HF) and subsurface temperatures. An understanding of the contribution of granites to the thermal field of Ireland is of key importance in assessing the geothermal energy potential of this low-enthalpy setting. This study focuses on the Leinster granite, the Galway granite and the buried Kentstown granite. Shallow (<250 m) boreholes were drilled into the exposed Caledonian Leinster and Galway granites as part of an early 1980's EU-funded geothermal project. These studies yielded HP = 2-3 μWm-3 and HF = 80 mWm-2 at the Sally Gap borehole in the Northern Units of the Leinster granite. In the Galway granite batholith, the Costelloe-Murvey granite returned HP = 7 μWm-3 and HF = 77 mWm-2, measured at the Ros a Mhil borehole. The lower heat-flow encountered at the Ros a Mhil borehole suggests that the associated high heat production does not extend to great depth. The buried Kentstown granite has associated with it a significant negative Bouguer anomaly and was intersected by two mineral exploration boreholes at depths of 660 m and 485 m. Heat production has been measured at 2.4 μWm-3 in core samples taken from the weathered top 30m of the granite. The core of this study consists of an ambitious program of magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data acquisition across the three granite bodies, extending over three fieldwork seasons. MT and AMT data were collected at 59 locations along two profiles over the Leinster granite. Preliminary results show that the northern units of the Leinster granite extend to depths of 2-5 km. Over the Galway granite, MT and AMT data have been collected at a total

  7. Mobility of heavy metals through granitic soils using mini column infiltration test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarime, Nur'Aishah; Yaacob, W. Z. W.

    2014-09-01

    This study is about the mobility of cadmium through compacted granitic soils. Two granitic soils namely the Broga (BGR) and Kajang (KGR) granitic soils were collected in Selangor, Malaysia. Physical and chemical tests were applied for both granitic soils to determine the physical and chemical properties of soil materials. Physical test results shows granitic soils (BGR and KGR) have high percentage of sand ranging between 54%-63% and 46%-54% respectively, an intermediate and intermediate to high plasticity index as well as high specific gravity ie; 2.50-2.59 and 2.45-2.66 respectively. For chemical test, granitic soils shows acidic pH values ranged from 5.35-5.85 for BGR and pH 5.32-5.54 for KGR. For organic matter, SSA and CEC test, it shows low values ranged from 0.22%-0.34% and 0.39%- 0.50% respectively for organic matter test, 17.96 m2/g-21.93 m2/g and 25.76 m2/g-26.83 m2/g respectively for SSA test and 0.79 meq/100g-1.35 meq/100g and 1.31 meq/100g-1.35 meq/100g respectively for CEC test. Mini column infiltration test was conducted to determine the retention of cadmium while flowing through granite soils. This test conducted based on the falling head permeability concepts. Different G-force ranging from 231G to 1442G was used in this test. The breakthrough curves show the concentration of Cd becomes higher with the increasing of G-force for both granitic samples (BGR and KGR). The selectivity sorption for both granites ranked in the following decreasing order of; 231G>519G>923G>1442G. Results demonstrated that granitic soils also have low buffering capacity due to low resist of pH changes.

  8. Mineralogical Control on Microbial Diversity in a Weathered Granite?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleeson, D.; Clipson, N.; McDermott, F.

    2003-12-01

    Mineral transformation reactions and the behaviour of metals in rock and soils are affected not only by physicochemical parameters but also by biological factors, particularly by microbial activity. Microbes inhabit a wide range of niches in surface and subsurface environments, with mineral-microbe interactions being generally poorly understood. The focus of this study is to elucidate the role of microbial activity in the weathering of common silicate minerals in granitic rocks. A site in the Wicklow Mountains (Ireland) has been identified that consists of an outcrop surface of Caledonian (ca. 400 million years old) pegmatitic granite from which large intact crystals of variably weathered muscovite, plagioclase, K-feldspar and quartz were sampled, together with whole-rock granite. Culture-based microbial approaches have been widely used to profile microbial communities, particularly from copiotrophic environments, but it is now well established that for oligotrophic environments such as those that would be expected on weathering faces, perhaps less than 1% of microbial diversity can be profiled by cultural means. A number of culture-independent molecular based approaches have been developed to profile microbial diversity and community structure. These rely on successfully isolating environmental DNA from a given environment, followed by the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify the typically small quantities of extracted DNA. Amplified DNA can then be analysed using cloning based approaches as well as community fingerprinting systems such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) and ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA). Community DNA was extracted and the intergenic spacer region (ITS) between small (16S) and large (23S) bacterial subunit rRNA genes was amplified. RISA fragments were then electrophoresed on a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel. Banding patterns suggest that

  9. 76 FR 60493 - Settlement Agreements for Recovery of Past Response Costs; Granite Timber Post and Pole Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... AGENCY Settlement Agreements for Recovery of Past Response Costs; Granite Timber Post and Pole Site, Philipsburg, Granite County, MT AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice and Request for... Mark Metesh (Settling Party), regarding the Granite Timber Site (Site), located 5 miles south...

  10. 50. The apartment building on the left (164166 West Granite) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. The apartment building on the left (164-166 West Granite) was built about 1885-1886, and was used as a combination of residence and rooming house. It is one of the few remaining wood-frame structures dating from the beginning of Butte's economic and building development. Modifications, both interior and exterior, have been minimal, and the historic integrity of the structure has been retained. The Courthouse Grocery on the right (ca. 1887), is another early wood-frame building, and was also originally used as a residence and rooming house. It was modified in the early 20th century to accomodate commercial use on the ground floor, but the historic fabric of the structure is largely intact. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  11. New observations on the quartz monzodiorite-granite suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvin, U. B.; Holmberg, B. B.; Lindstrom, M. M.; Martinez, R. R.

    Five new fragments of quartz monzodiorite (QMD) were identified in particles from soil 15403, which was collected from the boulder sampled as rock 15405, an impact-melt breccia containing clasts of KREEP basalt, QMD, granite, and a more primitive alkali norite. Petrographic and geochemical studies of the fragments show considerable variation in modal proportions and bulk composition. This heterogeneity is due to unrepresentative sampling in small fragments of coarse-grained rocks. Variations in the proportions of accessory minerals have marked effects on incompatible-trace-element concentrations and ratios. Semiquantitative calculations support the derivation of QMD from 60-percent fractional crystallization of a KREEP basalt magma as suggested by Hess (1989). Apollo 15 KREEP basalt cannot be the actual parent magma because the evolved rocks predate volcanic KREEP basalts. It is suggested that ancient KREEP basalt magmas have crystallized as plutons, with alkali norite clasts offering the only direct evidence of this precursor.

  12. Orphan Strontium-87 in Abyssal Peridotites: Daddy Was a Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Jonathan E.; Hart, Stanley R.; Dick, Henry J. B.

    1993-12-01

    The 87Sr/86Sr ratios in some bulk abyssal and alpine peridotites are too high to be binary mixtures of depleted mantle and seawater components. The apparent excess, or "orphan," 87Sr appears to be separated from its radioactive parent. Such observations were widely held to be analytical artifacts. Study of several occurrences of orphan 87Sr shows that the orphan component in abyssal peridotite is located in the alteration products of olivine and enstatite in the peridotite. The orphan 87Sr is most likely introduced by infiltration of low-temperature (<200^circC) seawater bearing suspended detrital particulates. These particulates include grains of detrital clay that are partly derived from continental (that is, granitic) sources and thus are highly radiogenic. Orphan 87Sr and other radiogenic isotopes may provide a tracer for low-temperature seawater penetrating into the oceanic crust.

  13. Orphan strontium-87 in abyssal peridotites: daddy was a granite.

    PubMed

    Snow, J E; Hart, S R; Dick, H J

    1993-12-17

    The (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios in some bulk abyssal and alpine peridotites are too high to be binary mixtures of depleted mantle and seawater components. The apparent excess, or "orphan," (87)Sr appears to be separated from its radioactive parent. Such observations were widely held to be analytical artifacts. Study of several occurrences of orphan (87)Sr shows that the orphan component in abyssal peridotite is located in the alteration products of olivine and enstatite in the peridotite. The orphan (87)Sr is most likely introduced by infiltration of low-temperature (<200 degrees C) seawater bearing suspended detrital particulates. These particulates include grains of detrital clay that are partly derived from continental (that is, granitic) sources and thus are highly radiogenic. Orphan (87)Sr and other radiogenic isotopes may provide a tracer for low-temperature seawater penetrating into the oceanic crust.

  14. Laboratory Simulation of Flow through Single Fractured Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. K.; Singh, D. N.; Ranjith, P. G.

    2015-05-01

    Laboratory simulation on fluid flow through fractured rock is important in addressing the seepage/fluid-in-rush related problems that occur during the execution of any civil or geological engineering projects. To understand the mechanics and transport properties of fluid through a fractured rock in detail and to quantify the sources of non-linearity in the discharge and base pressure relationship, fluid flow experiments were carried out on a cylindrical sample of granite containing a `single rough walled fracture'. These experiments were performed under varied conditions of confining pressures, σ 3 (5-40 MPa), which can simulate the condition occurring about 1,000 m below in the earth crust, with elevated base pressure, b p (up to 25 MPa) and by changing fracture roughness. The details of the methodologies involved and the observations are discussed here. The obtained results indicate that most of the data in the Q verses b p plot, fall on the straight line and the flow through the single fracture in granite obeys Darcy's law or the well-known "cubic law" even at high value of b p (=4 MPa) and σ 3 (=5 MPa) combination. The Reynolds number is quite sensitive to the b p, σ 3 and fracture roughness, and there is a critical b p, beyond which transition in flow occurs from laminar to turbulent. It is believed that such studies will be quite useful in identifying the limits of applicability of well know `cubic law', which is required for precise calculation of discharge and/or aperture in any practical issues and in further improving theoretical/numerical models associated with fluid flow through a single fracture.

  15. Geochemistry of biotite granites from the Lamas de Olo Pluton, northern Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Susana; Gomes, Maria; Teixeira, Rui; Corfu, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    In the Central Iberian Zone (CIZ) extensive crustal recycling occurred during the post-thickening extension stage of the Variscan orogeny (~330-290 Ma). After the ductile deformation phase D3 (~320-300 Ma), characterized by the intrusion of large volumes of highly peraluminous granitic magmas, rapid and drastic tectonic changes at about 300 Ma gave rise to the brittle phase of deformation D4 that controlled the emplacement of Fe-K subalkaline granites (296-290 Ma; Dias et al. 1998). The Lamas de Olo Pluton (LOP) is controlled by NE-SW and NW-SE fracture systems, probably related to the Régua-Verin fault zone (Pereira, 1989). The LOP is a medium to coarse-grained, porphyritic biotite granite, accompanied by medium- to fine grained, porphyritic biotite granite (Alto dos Cabeços- AC) and a more leucocratic, fine-grained, slightly porphyritic biotite-muscovite granite (Barragens- BA). The contacts between LO and AC are generally diffuse, whereas those to BA are sharp. In fact, the BA granite can occur in dykes and sills cutting LO and AC. Microgranular enclaves and xenoliths are very rare. The LOP intrudes the Douro Group, presumably of Precambrian to Cambrian age, and two-mica granites from the Vila Real composite massif. The LOP granites consist of quartz, microcline, plagioclase, biotite, zircon, titanite, tourmaline apatite, fluorite, ilmenite, magnetite, and rutile, with muscovite in BA granite and rare allanite in the LO and AC granites. The plagioclase composition is of oligoclase (An12) - andesine (An35) for LO granite, albite (An9) - andesine (An30) for CA granite and albite (An5) - oligoclase (An20) for BA granite. There are decreases in: a) anorthite content from phenocryst to matrix plagioclase; b) Ba content from phenocryst to matrix microcline in all granites. The Fe2+ biotite has a composition similar to that of biotite from calc-alkaline to sub-alkaline rock series. The LO and AC granites are meta- to peraluminous with ASI variable between 1.05 and 1

  16. Major magmatic events in Mt Meredith, Prince Charles Mountains: First evidence for early Palaeozoic syntectonic granites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gongurov, N.A.; Laiba, A.A.; Beliatsky, B.V.

    2007-01-01

    Precambrian rocks at Mt Meredith underwent granulite-facies metamorphism M1. Zircon isotope dating for two orthogneisses revealed the following age signatures: 1294±3 and 957±4Ma; 1105±5 and 887±2Ma. The oldest ages could reflect the time of orthogneiss protolith crystallization and the latest age determinations date Grenvillian metamorphism. The metamorphic rocks were intruded by two-mica and garnet-biotite granites. The granites and host rocks underwent amphibolite-facies metamorphism M2. Zircon isotope analysis of the two-mica granites showed age estimation within 550-510Ma and zircon dating of the garnet-biotite granites revealed the ages of 1107±5, 953±8, and 551±4Ma. As Pan-African age signatures were obtained from only the granite samples, it is possible to suggest that the granites were formed at the time of 510-550Ma and the zircons with greater age values were captured by granites from the host rocks.

  17. Earth's youngest exposed granite and its tectonic implications: the 10–0.8 Ma Kurobegawa Granite

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hisatoshi; Yamada, Ryuji; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji; Horie, Kenji; Hokada, Tomokazu

    2013-01-01

    Although the quest for Earth's oldest rock is of great importance, identifying the youngest exposed pluton on Earth is also of interest. A pluton is a body of intrusive igneous rock that crystallized from slowly cooling magma at depths of several kilometers beneath the surface of the Earth. Therefore, the youngest exposed pluton represents the most recent tectonic uplift and highest exhumation. The youngest exposed pluton reported to date is the Takidani Granodiorite (~ 1.4 Ma) in the Hida Mountain Range of central Japan. Using LA-ICP-MS and SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating methods, this study demonstrates that the Kurobegawa Granite, also situated in the Hida Mountain Range, is as young as ~ 0.8 Ma. In addition, data indicate multiple intrusion episodes in this pluton since 10 Ma with a ~ 2-million-year period of quiescence; hence, a future intrusion event is likely within 1 million years. PMID:23419636

  18. New U/Pb ages from granite and granite gneiss in the Ruby geanticline and southern Brooks Range, Alaska ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, W.W.; Stern, T.W.; Arth, Joseph G.; Carlson, C.

    1987-01-01

    New U/Pb zircon ages from the Ray Mountains of central Alaska clarify the plutonic history of the Ruby geanticline and support earlier suggestions that the Ruby geanticline and S Brooks Range were once parts of the same tectonostratigraphic terrane. U/Pb zircon ages of 109 to 112 Ma from the Ray Mountains pluton confirm previously reported mid-Cretaceous K/Ar ages and rule out the possibility that the earliest intrusive phase of the pluton is older than mid-Cretaceous K/Ar ages and rule out the possibility that the earliest intrusive phase of the pluton is older than mid- Cretaceous. New U/Pb zircon ages from 4 granite gneiss samples in the Ray Mountains indicate a Devonian protolith age of 390+ or -12 Ma and suggest that the Ruby geanticline, like the S Brooks Range, underwent a major plutonic event in mid-Paleozoic time.-Authors

  19. Cambro-Ordovician Granites in the Araçuaí Belt, in Brazil: snapshots from a late orogenic collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Campos, Cristina P.; Mendes, Júlio Cesar; de Medeiros, Silvia Regina; Ludka, Isabel P.

    2014-05-01

    Along the Brazilian Coast, surrounding the São Francisco Craton and adjacent mobile belts, deep segments of a Neoproterozoic orogen (Araçuaí-West Congo) generated over 120 Ma of successive magmatic episodes of granitic magmatism. The c.630-585 Ma calc-alkaline magmatic arc consists of metatonalite to metagranodiorite, with metadioritic to noritic facies and enclaves. During the syn-collisional and crustal thickening stage (c. 585 to 560 Ma) S-type metagranites have been built by dehydration melting of a diverse package of sediments. Around 545-525 Ma late orogenic crustal remelting formed mostly non-foliated garnet-cordierite leucogranites. In the post-orogenic stage (c. 510-480 Ma) inversely zoned calc-alkaline to alkaline plutons intruded previous units. This work will focus on the youngest post-orogenic magmatism. It will present the state of the art by reviewing structural measurements, detailed mapping of flow patterns and additional geochemical and isotopic data. The architecture of around 10 plutons, ranging from c. 20 to 200 km2 in surface area, unravels deep mushroom- to funnel-like magma chambers and/or conduits. Available data point towards different compositional domains, which are interfingered in complex concentric layers, so that, each pluton depicts a unique internal flow pattern. In the silica-richer structures concentric fragmented or folded layers of granite, in a hybrid K-gabbroic/dioritic matrix, contrast with predominantly homogeneous K-basaltic to gabbroic regions. These may be separated by magmatic shear zones where mixing is enhanced, also resulting in hybrid compositions. Sharp and pillow-like contacts between granitic and K-basaltic rocks locally depict a frozen-in situation of different intrusive episodes. In the silica-poorer plutonic bodies gradational contacts are more frequent and may be the result of convection enhanced diffusion. For all plutons, however, mostly sub-vertical internal contacts between most- and least

  20. Pliocene obducted, rotated and migrated ultramafic rocks and obduction-induced anatectic granite, SW Seram and Ambon, Eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linthout, Kees; Helmers, Hendrik

    Geochemistry, petrography and thermobarometry of the ultramafic and associated rocks of SW Seram and Ambon indicate that they were obducted as weakly depleted oceanic lithosphere which was formed about 10 Ma prior to obduction. Occurrences of cordierite-bearing granite are closely associated with the ultramafic rocks. Petrography and geochemical analysis based on major, RE and other trace elements, indicate that the granite is of the S-type, containing a significant restite component; a VAG signal is interpreted as inherited from the partly melted and included Palaeozoic metasediments. The granite magma was formed as a consequence of the obduction of very hot mantle peridotite inflicting high-grade metamorphism and partial anatexis on the Palaeozoic continental substratum. The oldest age in the literature for cordierite-bearing dacite, connected to this partial anatexis, sets the minimum age of the obduction event at 4.4 Ma. The obduction took place at the eastern end of the Banda Arc, near the NE margin of the Weber Deep, where SW Seram must have been at that time. The ophiolite as part of the Buru-Seram Microplate, rotated and migrated about 400 km westward to its present position. Since the Early Pliocene, the rate of upheaval in Kaibobo (SW Seram) has averaged about 260 cm Ka -1, but may well have been over 1000 cm Ka -1 in the early period immediately after the formation of the granite melt. As the average uplift rate over the same period for Central Seram was previously estimated at 110 cm Ka -1, strongly differential upheaval prevailed in Seram in the Early Pliocene. It is postulated that young oceanic lithosphere has been created by transtensional pull-apart in the easternmost part of the Banda Sea Plate due to oblique convergence of the northward moving Australian Plate, of which fragments gradually became incorporated in the regime of the westbound SW Pacific Plates. Obduction was effected during the strong Pliocene rotation of the Buru-Seram Microplate

  1. Vapor phase exsolution as a controlling factor in hydrogen isotope variation in granitic rocks: the Notch Peak granitic stock, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nabelek, P.I.; O'Neil, J.R.; Papike, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Notch Peak granitic stock, western Utah, is comprised of three concentric sequentially intruded rock types, from granite at the rim, to quartz monzonite I, to quartz monzonite II at the core. The ??18O values of whole rocks vary about an average of 9.4 (SMOW), irrespective of the rock type and position relative to contact, suggesting that the three magmas had the same parent. The whole rock ??D values in the stock range from -100 to -55. ??D values increase toward the cores of both quartz monzonite I and quartz monzonite II, resulting in concentric contours. The ??D contours of quartz monzonite II cross-cut those of quartz monzonite I, suggesting little isotopic interaction between these bodies and the absence of a late pervasive fluid phase. There is a positive correlation between ??D values and water content of the samples, where samples from each body define a distinct field. The positive correlation is explained by isotopic fractionation attendant on vapor exsolution from the crystallizing magma. An observed increase in ??D with the degree of chloritization, a trend opposite to that observed in systems where participation of meteoric water has been demonstrated, is the result of subsolidus interaction with the exsolved fluids. These results show that large variations in the hydrogen isotope ratios of a granitoid can arise by exsolution of a vapor phase from the melt on crystallization. In general, magmas with larger modal amount of primary hydrous phases will tend to have higher ??D values than those with small amounts of hydrous phases. Furthermore, the relatively high ??D values of chlorites at Notch Peak confirm the applicability of classical concepts of closed-system deuteric alteration to some granitoid bodies. Thus, meteoric water interaction need not be always invoked to explain hydrogen isotope variation and deuteric alteration in granitoids. ?? 1983.

  2. Contribution of Portuguese two-mica granites to stone built heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Angela; Begonha, Arlindo

    2013-04-01

    The present study deals with the importance of the application of natural stone in monuments in urban setting, both as the main building material during the historical evolution of a city and as a means to increase the public awareness of the social role of geological resources of a specific region. The City of Oporto, World Heritage of the Humanity , has been selected to illustrate the use of the local granite since ancient times to the present day, a two-mica peraluminous granite ,classified as syn-tectonic relatively to the third tectonic deformation phase of the Hercynian orogeny, included in an expressive group that occurs extensively in northern Portugal . The Oporto granite has been the object of several geochemical, structural and geotechnical approaches. Despite the urban development, outcrops of this granite can be observed in different areas of the city, side by side with the urban constructions, and particularly in the imposing and intensely fractured escarpments carved by the river Douro. Oporto monumental heritage goes back to Roman occupation and the profile has been developed by the construction of granite buildings, following history and the social evolution, of an impressive grey architecture according to different styles of granite work that characterize the city in all its aspects, namely the old city wall, the medieval and baroque churches, the neoclassic houses but also the small humble habitations. The Oporto granite is always affected by weathering processes and the buildings exhibit various aspects of stone decay such as granular desintegration, plates, flakes, black crusts, thin black layers, efflorescences and biological colonization. The description of selected sites within the historical centre , where it is possible to recognize the importance of the granite in the character of the city, aims to call the attention to the inextricable role of geology in built heritage and in the culture, as well as to diagnose the deterioration

  3. Experiments and Simulations of Penetration into Granite by an Aluminum Shaped Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M J; Randers-Pehrson, G; Kuklo, R M; Rambur, T A; Switzer, L L; Summes, M A

    2003-07-27

    This paper describes experimental results and numerical simulations of jet penetration into granite from an aluminum lined shaped charge. Several penetration versus standoff experiments were conducted into an in-situ granite formation located in the Climax Ridge region of the Nevada Test Site. Simulations of the jet penetration were modeled with a two dimensional arbitrary lagrange eulerian hydrocode. The effects of variations in the granite flow stress, porosity, and EOS have been evaluated. The work described in this paper is a continuation of our studies on jet penetration and modeling into high strength concrete.

  4. Peralkaline and peraluminous granites and related mineral deposits of the Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, James E.

    1983-01-01

    Existing geochemical and geologic data for many parts of the Arabian Shield were compiled as a basis for evaluating the resource potential of the granites of the Shield. Commodities associated with granites that have potential for economic mineral deposits include tin, tungsten, molybdenum, beryllium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, uranium, thorium, rare-earth elements, and fluorite. Prospecting methods useful in discriminating those granites having significant economic potential include reconnaissance geologic mapping, petrographic and mineralogic studies, geochemical sampling of rock and wadi sediment, and radiometric surveying.

  5. Plutonium partitioning in three-phase systems with water, colloidal particles, and granites: new insights into distribution coefficients.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jinchuan; Lin, Jianfeng; Zhou, Xiaohua; Li, Mei; Zhou, Guoqing

    2014-03-01

    The traditional sorption experiments commonly treated the colloid-associated species of low-solubility contaminants as immobile species resulted from the centrifugation or ultrafiltration, and then solid/liquid distribution coefficients (Ks/d) were determined. This may lead to significantly underestimated mobility of the actinides in subsurface environments. Accordingly, we defined a new distribution coefficient (Ks/d+c) to more adequately describe the mobile characteristics of colloidal species. The results show that under alkaline aqueous conditions the traditional Ks/d was 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than the Ks/d+c involving the colloidal species of (239)Pu. The colloid/liquid distribution coefficients Kc/d≫0 (∼10(6)mL/g) revealed strong competition of the colloidal granite particles with the granite grains for Pu. The distribution percentages of Pu in the three-phase systems, depending on various conditions such as particle concentrations, Na(+) concentrations, pH and time, were determined. Moreover, we developed the thermodynamic and kinetic complexation models to explore the interaction of Pu with the particle surfaces.

  6. Mortality of Yearling Chinook Salmon Prior to Arrival at Lower Granite Dam, on the Snake River : Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgi, Albert E.

    1991-10-01

    Efforts have been initiated to develop a research plan that will provide insight into causes of, and ultimately solutions to, the apparent excessive mortality of juvenile chinook upstream from Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River. In the context of the proposed salmon stock listings under the Endangered Species Act, issues that potentially affect wild stocks of spring chinook salmon probably warrant immediate consideration and resolution. Mark-recapture data at Lower Granite Dam indicate that few yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) smolts survive to that site after release from various hatcheries. Upriver stocks of yearling spring and summer chinook exhibit pronounced losses en route to the dam. In 1989 and 1990, only about 8 to 18% of PIT-tagged representatives from McCall or Sawtooth hatchery were detected at the dam. General survival indices for these stocks indicate that perhaps only 15 to 35% of the yearlings survived to that site. This suggests these stocks may sustain as much mortality traversing this unobstructed reach of river as the general population would passing through the entire hydroelectric complex.

  7. Carboniferous granites on the northern margin of Gondwana, Anatolide-Tauride Block, Turkey - Evidence for southward subduction of Paleotethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candan, O.; Akal, C.; Koralay, O. E.; Okay, A. I.; Oberhänsli, R.; Prelević, D.; Mertz-Kraus, R.

    2016-06-01

    Carboniferous metagranites with U-Pb zircon crystallization ages of 331-315 Ma crop out in the Afyon zone in the northern margin of the Anatolide-Tauride Block, which is commonly regarded as part of Gondwana during the Late Palaeozoic. They are peraluminous, calc-alkaline and are characterized by increase in Rb and Ba, decrease in Nb-Ta, and enrichment in Sr and high LILE/HFSE ratios compatible with a continental arc setting. The metagranites intrude a metasedimentary sequence of phyllite, metaquartzite and marble; both the Carboniferous metagranites and metasedimentary rocks are overlain unconformably by Lower Triassic metaconglomerates, metavolcanics and Upper Triassic to Cretaceous recrystallized limestones. The low-grade metamorphism and deformation occurred at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. There is no evidence for Carboniferous deformation and metamorphism in the region. Carboniferous arc-type granites and previously described Carboniferous subduction-accretion complexes on the northern margin of the Anatolide-Tauride Block suggest southward subduction of Paleotethys under Gondwana during the Carboniferous. Considering the Variscan-related arc granites in Pelagonian and Sakarya zones on the active southern margin of Laurasia, a dual subduction of Paleotethys can be envisaged between Early Carboniferous and Late Permian. However, the southward subduction was short-lived and by the Late Permian the Gondwana margin became passive.

  8. Fluid fractionation of tungsten during granite-pegmatite differentiation and the metal source of peribatholitic W quartz veins: Evidence from the Karagwe-Ankole Belt (Rwanda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulsbosch, Niels; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Dewaele, Stijn; Muchez, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The identification of a magmatic source for granite-associated rare metal (W, Nb, Ta and Sn) mineralisation in metasediment-hosted quartz veins is often obscured by intense fluid-rock interactions which metamorphically overprinted most source signatures in the vein system. In order to address this recurrent metal sourcing problem, we have studied the metasediment-hosted tungsten-bearing quartz veins of the Nyakabingo deposit of the Karagwe-Ankole belt in Central Rwanda. The vein system (992 ± 2 Ma) is spatiotemporal related to the well-characterised B-rich, F-poor G4 leucogranite-pegmatite suite (986 ± 10 Ma to 975 ± 8 Ma) of the Gatumba-Gitarama area which culminated in Nb-Ta-Sn mineralisation. Muscovite in the Nyakabingo veins is significantly enriched in granitophile elements (Rb, Cs, W and Sn) and show alkali metal signatures equivalent to muscovite of less-differentiated pegmatite zones of the Gatumba-Gitarama area. Pegmatitic muscovite records a decrease in W content with increasing differentiation proxies (Rb and Cs), in contrast to the continuous enrichment of other high field strength elements (Nb and Ta) and Sn. This is an indication of a selective redistribution for W by fluid exsolution and fluid fractionation. Primary fluid inclusions in tourmaline of these less-differentiated pegmatites demonstrate the presence of medium to low saline, H2O-NaCl-KCl-MgCl2-complex salt (e.g. Rb, Cs) fluids which started to exsolve at the G4 granite-pegmatite transition stage. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry shows significant tungsten enrichment in these fluid phases (∼5-500 ppm). Fractional crystallisation has been identified previously as the driving mechanism for the transition from G4 granites, less-differentiated biotite, biotite-muscovite towards muscovite pegmatites and eventually columbite-tantalite mineralised pegmatites. The general absence of tungsten mineralisation in this magmatic suite, including the most differentiated

  9. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Mesoarchean granites from the Canaã dos Carajás area, Carajás Province, Brazil: Implications for the origin of Archean granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feio, G. R. L.; Dall'Agnol, R.

    2012-12-01

    Four Mesoarchean (2.93 to 2.83 Ga) granite units, which encompass the Canaã dos Carajás, Bom Jesus, Cruzadão and Serra Dourada granites, were recognized in the Canaã dos Carajás area of the Archean Carajás Province. The Mesoarchean units are composed dominantly of biotite leucomonzogranites. They are compared with the Neoarchean Planalto suite (2.73 Ga) which encompasses biotite-hornblende monzogranites to syenogranites. The Canaã dos Carajás, Bom Jesus and the variety of the Cruzadão granite with higher (La/Yb)N are geochemically more akin to the calc-alkaline granites, whereas the other varieties of the Cruzadão granite are transitional between calc-alkaline and alkaline granites. The Serra Dourada granite has an ambiguous geochemical character with some features similar to those of calc-alkaline granites and other peraluminous granites. The Planalto granites have ferroan character, are similar geochemically to reduced A-type granites and show a strong geochemical contrast with the Mesoarchean studied granites. The Mesoarchean granites described in the Canaã dos Carajás area are geochemically distinct to those of the Rio Maria domain of the Carajás Province. The Canaã dos Carajás and Bom Jesus granites are similar to the high-Ca granites, whereas the Cruzadão and Serra Dourada are more akin to the low-CaO granites of the Yilgarn craton. The geochemical characteristics of the Mesoarchean studied granites approach those of the biotite granite group of Dharwar but the latter are enriched in HFSE and HREE compared to the Canaã dos Carajás granites. The Neoarchean Planalto suite granite has no counterpart in the Mesoarchean Rio Maria domain of the Carajás Province, neither in the Yilgarn and Dharwar cratons. Geochemical modeling suggests that partial melting of a source similar in composition to an Archean basaltic andesite of the Carajás Province could give origin to the Bom Jesus and Cruzadão granites. In the case of the Bom Jesus granite the

  10. Mantle hydrous-fluid interaction with Archaean granite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słaby, E.; Martin, H.; Hamada, M.; Śmigielski, M.; Domonik, A.; Götze, J.; Hoefs, J.; Hałas, S.; Simon, K.; Devidal, J.-L.; Moyen, J.-F.; Jayananda, M.

    2012-04-01

    Water content/species in alkali feldspars from late Archaean Closepet igneous bodies as well as growth and re-growth textures, trace element and oxygen isotope composition have been studied (Słaby et al., 2011). Both processes growth and re-growth are deterministic, however they differ showing increasing persistency in element behaviour during interaction with fluids. The re-growth process fertilized domains and didn't change their oxygen-isotope signature. Water speciation showed persistent behaviour during heating at least up to 600oC. Carbonate crystals with mantle isotope signature are associated with the recrystallized feldspar domains. Fluid-affected domains in apatite provide evidence of halide exchange. The data testify that the observed recrystallization was a high-temperature reaction with fertilized, halide-rich H2O-CO2 mantle-derived fluids of high water activity. A wet mantle being able to generate hydrous plumes, which appear to be hotter during the Archean in comparison to the present time is supposed by Shimizu et al. (2001). Usually hot fluids, which can be strongly carbonic, precede asthenospheric mantle upwelling. They are supposed to be parental to most recognized compositions, which can be derived by their immiscible separation into saline aqueous-silicic and carbonatitic members (Klein-BenDavid et al., 2007). The aqueous fractions are halogen-rich with a significant proportion of CO2. Both admixed fractions are supposed to be fertile. The Closepet granite emplaced in a major shear zone that delimitates two different terrains. Generally such shear zones, at many places, are supposed to be rooted deep into the mantle. The drain, that favoured and controlled magma ascent and emplacement, seemed to remain efficient after granite crystallization. In the southern part of the Closepet batholiths an evidence of intensive interaction of a lower crust fluid (of high CO2 activity) is provided by the extensive charnockitization of amphibolite facies (St

  11. Slow Slip Events on a 760 mm Long Granite Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mclaskey, G.; Yamashita, F.

    2015-12-01

    We describe slow slip events and dynamic rupture events generated on a newly constructed large-scale biaxial friction apparatus at Cornell University that provide insights into the mechanisms of aseismic and seismic slip. We find that, under nominally similar experimental conditions, the 760 mm long granite sample sometimes slips in dynamic stick-slip events and sometimes relieves accumulated shear stress through slow slip events. To provide insights into this curious behavior and the underlying mechanisms, fault slip and shear stress are each measured at 8 locations along the 760 mm long fault. This allows us to map slow slip fronts and the nucleation and propagation of dynamic fault rupture. The granite sample is also instrumented with an array of piezoelectric sensors that are the laboratory equivalent of a seismic network. When the sample is loaded relatively slowly, at 0.03 MPa/s, slow slip occurs on large sections of the fault and the slow slipping region soon expands to the sample boundary. In this case, stress is released in a slow slip event with peak slip velocities < 2 mm/s. Alternatively, when one end of the sample is loaded rapidly (4 MPa/s), or the sample is allowed to heal in stationary contact for a few minutes, slow slip initiates near the load point and accelerates to slip velocities exceeding 200 mm/s before the slow slipping region expands all the way to the sample boundary. This produces a dynamic slip event (stick-slip). The dynamic slip events radiate seismic waves equivalent to a M = -2.5 earthquake. In contrast, the laboratory-generated slow slip events are predominantly aseismic and produce only bursts of tiny and discrete seismic events (M = -6) reminiscent of swarms of microseismicity. The experiments illustrate how a single fault can slide slowly and aseismically or rapidly and dynamically depending on stress state and loading conditions. We compare the behavior observed on this Cornell apparatus to the behavior of other large

  12. Localization of dilatancy in Ohshima granite under constant uniaxial stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagidani, Takashi; Ehara, Shoji; Nishizawa, Osamu; Kusunose, Kinichiro; Terada, Makoto

    1985-07-01

    The localization of dilatancy during creep of Ohshima granite under uniaxial compression was observed. Hypocenters of 3933 acoustic emission (AE) events were accurately located. It was found that the mechanical behavior of Ohshima granite was controlled by the localization of microcracks. During the stage of loading up to the creep stress, which is 83% of the average short-term fracture strength, the hypocenters of AE events were randomly distributed throughout the specimen. As soon as the primary creep began, abrupt migration and clustering of AE hypocenters into several near-surface zones were observed. AE events formed volumetric concentrations. This migration and clustering strongly suggested the rapid localized development of dilatancy at the very beginning of the primary creep stage. The distribution of AE hypocenters observed in this stage was unchanged until final faulting. By the end of the primary creep stage, AE events began to concentrate into one of these clusters, while the activities of other clusters gradually decayed. This change spread broadly and continuously in time during the creep. In the most active cluster, clustering of AE events by itself gave rise to more AE events. The shape of this cluster was spheroidal with the long axis parallel to the loading axis. No evidence directly related to planar focusing of dilatancy was found. Surface strains were mapped. The axial strain distributions in the loading interval showed that the state of stress within the sample was homogeneous. A large change in both axial and circumferential strain fields occurred during the early stage of the primary creep. After this drastic change, the pattern of strain distribution remained unchanged in the subsequent stage of the creep. The accelerated increase in one of the circumferential strain gauges during the tertiary creep stage showed strongly localized deformation preceding faulting. The development of localized dilatancy identified by hypocenter locations was

  13. Assessment of terrestrial gamma radiation doses for some Egyptian granite samples.

    PubMed

    El Arabi, A M; Ahmed, N K; Salahel Din, K

    2008-01-01

    External exposures of population to ionising radiation due to naturally occurring radionuclides in sixty-three granite samples from three different locations in south eastern desert of Egypt were considered in this article. Average outdoor gamma dose rates in air were 190, 290 and 330 nGy h(-1) for Elba, Qash Amir and Hamra Dome granites, respectively. The corresponding doses in indoor air are 270, 400 and 470 nGy h(-1), respectively. These average values give rise to annual effective dose (outdoor, indoor and in total) 0.24, 1.4 and 1.6 mSv for Elba granite. For Qash Amir and Hamra Dome granites the corresponding values were 0.35, 2 and 2.3 mSv and 0.41, 2.3 and 2.7 mSv, respectively.

  14. Quantum states of neutrons in the gravitational and centrifugal potentials in a new GRANIT spectrometer

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    We will discuss the scientific program to be studied in a new gravitational spectrometer GRANIT in a broad context of quantum states (quantum behaviour) of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in gravitational [1] and centrifugal [2] potentials, as well as applications of these phenomena/spectrometer to various domains of physics, ranging from studies of fundamental short-range interactions and symmetries to neutron quantum optics and reflectometry using UCN. All these topics, as well as related instrumental and methodical developments have been discussed during dedicated GRANIT-2010 Workshop [3]. The GRANIT spectrometer has been recently installed at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France [4] and could become operational in near future. 1. V.V. Nesvizhevsky et al (2002), Nature 415, 297. 2. V.V. Nesvizhevsky et al (2010), Nature Physics 6, 114. 3. GRANIT-2010, Les Houches, 14-19 february 2010. 4. M. Kreuz et al (2009), NIM 611, 326.

  15. Revisiting the block method for evaluating thermal conductivities of clay and granite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of thermal conductivities of porous media using the contact method is revisited and revalidated with consideration of thermal contact resistance. Problems that limit the accuracy of determination of thermal conductivities of porous media are discussed. Thermal conductivities of granite...

  16. Petrology, major and trace element geochemistry, geochronology, and isotopic composition of granitic intrusions from the vicinity of the Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, Anna; Schulz, Toni; Buchwaldt, Robert; Koeberl, Christian

    2013-09-01

    The Bosumtwi crater is 10.5 km in diameter, 1.07 Ma old, well preserved impact structure located in Ghana (centered at 06°30‧N, 01°25‧W). It was excavated in rocks of the Early Proterozoic Birimian Supergroup, part of the West African craton. Here, we present a full and detailed characterization of the three granitoid complexes and one mafic dike in the vicinity of the Bosumtwi crater in terms of petrology, major and trace element geochemistry, geochronology, and isotopic composition. This allows us to characterize magmatic evolution of the West African Craton in this area and better understand the geological framework and target rocks of the impact. This study shows that the similar composition (strongly peraluminous muscovite granites and granodiorites) and age (between 2092 ± 6 Ma and 2098 ± 6 Ma) of all granitic intrusions in the proximity of the Bosumtwi crater suggest that they are co-genetic. Granitoids were probably formed as a result of anatexis of TTGs (or rocks derived from them) at relatively low pressure and temperature. We propose that the intrusions from the Bosumtwi area are genetically related to the Banso granite occurring to the east of the crater and can be classified as basin-type, late-stage granitoids. Also a mafic dike located to the NE of the Bosumtwi crater seems to be genetically related to those felsic intrusions. Based on those findings a revised version of the geological map of the Bosumtwi crater area is proposed.

  17. Experimental melts from crustal rocks: A lithochemical constraint on granite petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhao, Zi-Fu

    2016-12-01

    Many studies of experimental petrology have devoted to partial melting of crustal rocks. In order to provide lithochemical constraints on granite petrogenesis, this paper presents a compilation and synthesis of available experimental data for the major element compositions of felsic melts derived from partial melting of natural or synthetic materials in the compositional range of crustal rocks. The experimental melts are categorized into four types according to the species of hydrous minerals in starting materials: (I) amphibole-bearing; (II) amphibole- and biotite-bearing; (III) biotite-bearing; and (IV) biotite- and muscovite-bearing. If dehydration melting takes place at normal crustal conditions (P = 5-10 kbar, T ≤ 1000 °C), experimental melts are rich in SiO2 but poor in MgO + FeOT except those from amphibole-bearing sources. A comprehensive comparison of compositions between experimental melts and starting materials indicates that geochemical fractionation is variable for different major elements and their ratios. Source composition and melting temperature exert stronger controls on the compositional variations of experimental melts than pressure and fluid. By comparing the experimental melts with natural granites, the following insights into granite petrogenesis can be got: (1) while peritectic assemblage entrainment may be the dominant mechanism for the compositional variations of garnet/cordierite-rich S-type granites, fractional crystallization of diverse melts from heterogeneous metasedimentary precursors probably governs the compositional variations of garnet/cordierite-poor S-type granites; (2) relatively K2O-rich mafic to intermediate rocks are appropriate sources for calc-alkaline I-type granites. The compositional variations of calc-alkaline granites are jointly controlled by peritectic assemblage entrainment and subsequent fractional crystallization; (3) while dehydration melting at T > 950 °C is appropriate for the production of ferroan and

  18. Determination of Granites' Mineral Specific Porosities by PMMA Method and FESEM/EDAX

    SciTech Connect

    Leskinen, A.; Penttinen, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Alanso, U.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Missana, T.; Patelli, Alessandro

    2007-07-01

    Over extended periods, long-lived radionuclides (RN) or activation products within geologic disposal sites may be released from the fuel and migrate to the geo/biosphere. In the bedrock, contaminants will be transported along fractures by advection and retarded by sorption on mineral surfaces and by molecular diffusion into stagnant pore water in the matrix along a connected system of pores and micro-fissures. The objective of this paper was to determine the connective porosity and mineral-specific porosities for three granite samples by {sup 14}C methyl-methacrylate ({sup 14}C-PMMA) autoradiography. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analyses (FESEM/EDAX) were performed in order to study the pore apertures of porous regions in greater detail and to identify the corresponding minerals. Finally, the porosity results were used to evaluate the diffusion coefficients of RNs from previous experiments which determined apparent diffusion coefficients for the main minerals in three granite samples by the Rutherford Backscattering technique. The total porosity of the Grimsel granite (0.75%) was significantly higher than the porosities of the El Berrocal and Los Ratones granites (0.3%). The porosities of the Grimsel granite feldspars were two to three times higher than the porosities of the El Berrocal and Los Ratones granites feldspars. However, there was no significant difference between the porosities of the dark minerals. A clear difference was found between the various quartz grains. Quartz crystals were non-porous in the El Berrocal and Los Ratones granites when measured by the PMMA method, but the quartz crystals in the Grimsel granite showed 0.5% intra granular porosity. The apparent diffusion coefficients calculated for uranium diffusion within Grimsel granite on different minerals were very similar (2.10{sup -13} {+-} 0.5 m{sup 2}/s), but differences within both Spanish granites were found from one mineral to another (9 {+-} 1.10{sup -14} m

  19. Effects of strain rate and surface cracks on the mechanical behaviour of Balmoral Red granite.

    PubMed

    Mardoukhi, Ahmad; Mardoukhi, Yousof; Hokka, Mikko; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    2017-01-28

    This work presents a systematic study on the effects of strain rate and surface cracks on the mechanical properties and behaviour of Balmoral Red granite. The tensile behaviour of the rock was studied at low and high strain rates using Brazilian disc samples. Heat shocks were used to produce samples with different amounts of surface cracks. The surface crack patterns were analysed using optical microscopy, and the complexity of the patterns was quantified by calculating the fractal dimensions of the patterns. The strength of the rock clearly drops as a function of increasing fractal dimensions in the studied strain rate range. However, the dynamic strength of the rock drops significantly faster than the quasi-static strength, and, because of this, also the strain rate sensitivity of the rock decreases with increasing fractal dimensions. This can be explained by the fracture behaviour and fragmentation during the dynamic loading, which is more strongly affected by the heat shock than the fragmentation at low strain rates.This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  20. Effects of strain rate and surface cracks on the mechanical behaviour of Balmoral Red granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardoukhi, Ahmad; Mardoukhi, Yousof; Hokka, Mikko; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a systematic study on the effects of strain rate and surface cracks on the mechanical properties and behaviour of Balmoral Red granite. The tensile behaviour of the rock was studied at low and high strain rates using Brazilian disc samples. Heat shocks were used to produce samples with different amounts of surface cracks. The surface crack patterns were analysed using optical microscopy, and the complexity of the patterns was quantified by calculating the fractal dimensions of the patterns. The strength of the rock clearly drops as a function of increasing fractal dimensions in the studied strain rate range. However, the dynamic strength of the rock drops significantly faster than the quasi-static strength, and, because of this, also the strain rate sensitivity of the rock decreases with increasing fractal dimensions. This can be explained by the fracture behaviour and fragmentation during the dynamic loading, which is more strongly affected by the heat shock than the fragmentation at low strain rates. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  1. Strength and permeability tests on ultra-large Stripa granite core

    SciTech Connect

    Thorpe, R.; Watkins, D.J.; Ralph, W.E.; Hsu, R.; Flexser, S.

    1980-09-01

    This report presents the results of laboratory tests on a 1 meter diameter by 2 meters high sample of granitic (quartz monzonite) rock from the Stripa mine in Sweden. The tests were designed to study the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the rock. Injection and withdrawal permeability tests were performed at several levels of axial stress using a borehole through the long axis of the core. The sample was pervasively fractured and its behavior under uniaxial compressive stress was very complicated. Its stress-strain behavior at low stresses was generally similar to that of small cores containing single healed fractures. However, this large core failed at a peak stress of 7.55 MPa, much less than the typical strength measured in small cores. The complex failure mechanism included a significant creep component. The sample was highly permeable, with flows-per-unit head ranging from 0.11 to 1.55 cm/sup 2//sec. Initial application of axial load caused a decrease in permeability, but this was followed by rapid increase in conductivity coincident with the failure of the core. The hydraulic regime in the fracture system was too intricate to be satisfactorily modeled by simple analogs based on the observed closure of the principal fractures. The test results contribute to the data base being compiled for the rock mass at the Stripa site, but their proper application will require synthesis of results from several laboratory and in situ test programs.

  2. Assessment of occupational exposure in a granite quarry and processing factory.

    PubMed

    Tejado, J J; Guillén, J; Baeza, A

    2016-09-01

    Workers in the granite industry face an occupational hazard: silicosis due to the crystalline silica present in inhalable dust. As granite can also present a variable, and occasionally significant, content of naturally occurring radionuclides, they may also face a radiological hazard. In order to assess the risk, a granite industry with a quarry and processing factory was selected to assess the occupational exposure. Three main potential pathways were observed: external irradiation, inhalation of granite dust, and radon exposure. The external dose rate was similar to that in a nearby farming area. A slight increment (0.016-0.076 mSv yr(-1)) was observed in the quarry and stockpile, due to quarry faces and granite blocks. The effective dose due to granite dust inhalation was 0.182  ±  0.009 mSv yr(-1) in the worst case scenario (3 mg m(-3) dust load in air and no use of filter masks). Thus, the mean value of the effective dose from these two pathways was 0.26 mSv yr(-1), lower than the reference level of 1 mSv yr(-1) for the general population. The annual mean value of radon concentration in the indoor air was 33 Bq m(-3). However, during granite processing works the radon concentration can increase up to 216 Bq m(-3), due to mechanical operations (sawing, polishing, sanding, etc). This radon concentration was below the 600 Bq m(-3) reference level for action in working places. Therefore, workers in this granite factory face no significant additional radiological exposure, and no-one needs to be designated as occupationally exposed and subject to individual dosimetry.

  3. Effects of magma mingling in the granites of Mount Desert Island, Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Seaman, S.J.; Ramsey, P.C. )

    1992-07-01

    Textures and compositional relationships associated with dark-colored, fine-grained enclaves in the Cadillac Mountain and Somesville granites, Mount Desert Island, Maine, preserve abundant evidence for contamination of host granitic magmas by enclave liquids. Fine-grained enclaves, which apparently represent chilled magmatic droplets, have affected the composition and texture of the host granites by three possible mechanisms: (1) crystallization of feldspar-quartz-hornblende pegmatite pods from fluids of enclave origin in the granite surrounding enclaves, and the disaggregation of the pods and dispersion of crystals into the granite; (2) ionic exchange between enclaves and granitic magmas; (3) the generation around enclaves of rinds consisting of an inner alkali feldspar-quartz zone and an outer zone of hornblende-enriched granite. Thermal calculations suggest that the alkali feldspar-quartz zones of the rinds surrounding enclaves may result from resorption of alkali feldspar and quartz crystals in the granitic magma by heat of cooling and crystallization of enclave material. The interaction between the hot enclave and the alkali feldspar-quartz composition liquid may be analogous to that between a pluton and meteoric water in a hydrothermal system. The segregation of alkali feldspar-quartz and hornblende-rich zones may result from the minimum melt composition fluid migrating toward the enclave, leaving behind unmelted hornblende, as part of a convection circuit set up by the enclave. Alternatively, hornblende-rich zones concentric to and outside of the alkali feldspar-quartz rinds may record limit of movement of a front of hydrous fluid driven from the enclave boundary down a thermal gradient.

  4. Investigation of Naturally Occurring Radio Nuclides in Shir-kuh Granites

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarei, Mohammad Mehdi; Zarei, Mojtaba

    2011-12-26

    One of the principle natural radiation resources is Granite which can be dangerous for human because of its radiations. Based on this fact, in this research we attempt to specify the activity amount of these natural radio nuclides, existing in Shir-kuh Granite of Yazd state. To specify the activity amount of this natural radio nuclides, it has been applied the measurement method of Gamma spectroscopy using high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector.

  5. The transition from an Archean granite-greenstone terrain into a charnockite terrain in southern India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condie, K. C.; Allen, P.

    1983-01-01

    In southern India, it is possible to study the transition from an Archean granite-greenstone terrain (the Karnataka province) into high grade charnockites. The transition occurs over an outcrop width of 20-35 km and appears to represent burial depths ranging from 15 to 20 km. Field and geochemical studies indicate that the charnockites developed at the expense of tonalites, granites, and greenstones. South of the transition zone, geobarometer studies indicate burial depths of 7-9 kb.

  6. Laboratory Particle Velocity Experiments on Indiana Limestone and Sierra White Granite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    resemble the pulses generated in Sierra White granite. 27 25o 2. 20 Dry ( Test 598) 20 --- .... Saturated (Test 601) .............. Saturated/Frozen (Test...ps, which is about the same as the wave speed in Sierra White granite. 29 15 0 .........i ......... Dry ( Test 598) - Saturated (Test 601) 120...Comparison of displacement histories at 30-mm range in Indiana limestone (16% porosity) for three different pore conditions. 30 10 Dry ( Test 598

  7. Strontium isotopes as tracers of water-rocks interactions, mixing processes and residence time indicator of groundwater within the granite-carbonate coastal aquifer of Bonifacio (Corsica, France).

    PubMed

    Santoni, S; Huneau, F; Garel, E; Aquilina, L; Vergnaud-Ayraud, V; Labasque, T; Celle-Jeanton, H

    2016-12-15

    This study aims at identifying the water-rock interactions and mixing rates within a complex granite-carbonate coastal aquifer under high touristic pressure. Investigations have been carried out within the coastal aquifer of Bonifacio (southern Corsica, France) mainly composed of continental granitic weathering products and marine calcarenite sediments filling a granitic depression. A multi-tracer approach combining physico-chemical parameters, major ions, selected trace elements, stable isotopes of the water molecule and (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios measurements is undertaken for 20 groundwater samples during the low water period in November 2014. 5 rock samples of the sedimentary deposits and surrounding granites are also analysed. First, the water-rock interactions processes governing the groundwater mineralization are described in order to fix the hydrogeochemical background. Secondly, the flow conditions are refined through the quantification of inter aquifer levels mixing, and thirdly, the kinetics of water-rock interaction based on groundwater residence time from a previous study using CFCs and SF6 are quantified for the two main flow lines. A regional contrast in the groundwater recharge altitude allowed the oxygene-18 to be useful combined with the (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios to differentiate the groundwater origins and to compute the mixing rates, revealing the real extension of the watershed and the availability of the resource. The results also highlight a very good correlation between the groundwater residence time and the spatial evolution of (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios, allowing water-rock interaction kinetics to be defined empirically for the two main flow lines through the calcarenites. These results demonstrate the efficiency of strontium isotopes as tracers of water-rock interaction kinetics and by extension their relevance as a proxy of groundwater residence time, fundamental parameter documenting the long term sustainability of the hydrosystem.

  8. Assessment of natural radioactivity in commercial granites used in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Onargan, Turgay; Gür, Filiz; Kaya, Erol; Güneri, Sinem

    2012-01-01

    The activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in twelve different domestic and imported tiling rocks (granites) used as building materials in Turkey were determined by employing high-resolution γ-ray spectrometry. The samples were evaluated to assess the radiation hazard for people by comparing the results with the control values recommended by the European Commission. The measured activity concentrations ranged from 7 to 136 Bq kg(-1), 9 to 138 Bq kg(-1) and 541 to 1277 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. Applying dose criteria recommended by the European Commission([15]), two of the samples showed higher Ra(eq) values than the limit dose of 370 Bq kg(-1), equivalent to a γ-dose of 1.5 mSv y(-1). The calculated gamma-index (I(γ)) values for all the 12 samples were lower than the recommended dose criterion. In some of the samples; however, the H(ex) and H(in) values were more than unity. The absorbed dose rates (D) for all the samples, except for four samples, were located within the range values recommended by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR)([3]). Annual effective dose (AED) values, except for one sample, were greater than the world average value of UNSCEAR([3]).

  9. Cavity Radius Scaling for Chemical Explosions in Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroujkova, A. F.; Vorobiev, O.; Carnevale, M.

    2015-12-01

    It was long argued that the far-field seismic amplitudes from explosions are determined by the volume change in the source region, mainly due to a formation of the explosive cavities (e.g. Denny and Johnson, 1991). Weston Geophysical performed measurements of the cavities left by small chemical explosions in hard rock in New England. The comparison of the measured cavity sizes with historical data from nuclear and chemical explosions in hard rock (e.g. granite) shows that the cavity radii scale as W1/3 and appear to be depth independent because the rock strength significantly exceeds the overburden pressure for all possible explosion depths. The cavity sizes produced by nuclear explosions in softer rock (e.g. alluvium) deviate from the cubic root scaling and depend on the confining pressure. Cavity size calculations as a function of yield using hydrodynamic simulations with GEODYN, an Eulerian hydrodynamic code developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, support these observations. We investigate the effects of the cavity size as well as the extent of the damage zones on seismic radiation.

  10. Granite rock outcrops: an extreme environment for soil nematodes?

    PubMed

    Austin, Erin; Semmens, Katharine; Parsons, Charles; Treonis, Amy

    2009-03-01

    We studied soil nematode communities from the surface of granite flatrock outcrops in the eastern Piedmont region of the United States. The thin soils that develop here experience high light intensity and extreme fluctuations in temperature and moisture and host unique plant communities. We collected soils from outcrop microsites in Virginia (VA) and North Carolina (NC) in various stages of succession (Primitive, Minimal, and Mature) and compared soil properties and nematode communities to those of adjacent forest soils. Nematodes were present in most outcrop soils, with densities comparable to forest soils (P > 0.05). Nematode communities in Mature and Minimal soils had lower species richness than forest soils (P < 0.05) and contained more bacterial-feeders and fewer fungal-feeders (P < 0.05). Primitive soils contained either no nematodes (NC) or only a single species (Mesodorylaimus sp., VA). Nematode communities were similar between Mature and Minimal soils, according to trophic group representation, MI, PPI, EI, SI, and CI (P > 0.05). Forest soils had a higher PPI value (P < 0.05), but otherwise community indices were similar to outcrop soils (P > 0.05). Outcrop nematode communities failed to group together in a Bray-Curtis cluster analysis, indicating higher variability in community structure than the Forest soils, which did cluster together. A high proportion of the nematodes were extracted from outcrop soils in coiled form (33-89%), indicating that they used anhydrobiosis to persist in this unique environment.

  11. Weathering profiles in granites, Sierra Norte (Córdoba, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, Alicia; Martínez, Estela; Pettinari, Gisela; Herrero, Silvana

    2005-09-01

    Two weathering profiles evolved on peneplain-related granites in Sierra Norte, Córdoba province, were examined. Several weathering levels, of no more than 2 m thickness, were studied in these profiles. They had developed from similar parent rock, which had been exposed to hydrothermal processes of varying intensity. Fracturing is the most notable feature produced by weathering; iron oxides and silica subsequently filled these fractures, conferring a breccia-like character to the rock. The clay minerals are predominantly illitic, reflecting the mineral composition of the protolith. Smaller amounts of interstratified I/S RO type are also present, as well as scarce caolinite+chlorite that originated from the weathering of feldspar and biotite, respectively. The geochemical parameters define the weathering as incipient, in contrast to the geomorphological characteristics of Sierra Norte, which point to a long weathering history. This apparent incompatibility could be due to the probable erosion of the more weathered levels of the ancient peneplains, of which only a few relicts remain. Similar processes have been described at different sites in the Sierras Pampeanas. Reconstruction and dating of the paleosurfaces will make it possible to set time boundaries on the weathering processes studied and adjust the paleographic and paleoclimatic interpretations of this great South American region.

  12. Operation of the Lower Granite Dam Adult Trap, 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, Jerrel R.

    2009-01-01

    During 2008 we operated the adult salmonid trap at Lower Granite Dam from 7 March through 25 November, except during a short summer period when water temperatures were too high to safely handle fish. We collected and handled a total of 20,463 steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and radio-tagged 34 of the hatchery steelhead. We took scale samples from 3,724 spring/summer Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha for age and genetic analysis. We collected and handled a total of 8,254 fall Chinook salmon. Of those fish, 2,520 adults and 942 jacks were transported to Lyons Ferry Hatchery on the Snake River in Washington. In addition, 961 adults and 107 jacks were transported to the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery on the Clearwater River in Idaho. The remaining 3,724 fall Chinook salmon were passed upstream. Scales samples were taken from 780 fall Chinook salmon tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and collected by the sort-by-code system.

  13. Multispectral analysis of limestone, dolomite, and granite, Mill Creek, Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C.; Watson, K.

    1970-01-01

    Spectral reflectance and thermal emission data were collected at the Mill Creek, Oklahoma test site during NASA missions 132 and 133 in June 1970. The data were collected by three aircraft flown several times during the diurnal cycle at altitudes of 150 to 17,000 m above mean terrain. Reflectance of the main rock types (limestone, dolomite, and granite) was determined from the data collected using a 12-channel multispectral scanner during mission 133 and from thermal infrared images recorded during mission 132 on an RS-7 scanner from 17,000 m above terrain. A preliminary rock recognition map was generated automatically using data collected from 900 m above terrain. The discrimination provided by the map is reasonably accurate. Misidentification occurred in areas of unusually high dolomite reflectivity. High altitude thermal infrared (10 to 12 micrometers) images show regional folds and faults distinguished by the presence of thermally contrasting materials. Linear and curvilinear structural features two to three times smaller than the nominal 17 m resolution could be detected.

  14. Geochemical and geochronological study of the non-granitic pegmatite body "La Panchita", Oaxaca state, Southern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchepetilnikova, Valentina; Solé, Jesús; Solari, Luigi; Abdullin, Fanis

    2014-05-01

    The La Panchita pegmatite body intrudes a >10 m thick pyroxenite dike that in turn is cutting the central portion of ~1Ga Oaxacan Complex rocks, Southern Mexico. The Oaxacan Complex is the largest exposure in Mexico of Neoproterozoic basement rocks metamorphosed up to the granulite facies during the Grenville orogeny. This Complex has multiple intrusions of pegmatite bodies along its extension, some mineralogically simple, some complex. As for the mineralogy, the La Panchita pegmatite is distinct from other pegmatites of the Oaxacan Complex. It contains unusual minerals for a pegmatite, like scapolite and calcite, and it is a non-granitic pegmatite, as suggested before. This work presents preliminary geochemical and geochronological results of this pegmatite body and a discussion about its possible origin. The geochronological study shows that the time of emplacement of this pegmatite is 981.4 ± 7.4 Ma and it is post-tectonic with respect to the granulite facies metamorphic event of the Oaxacan Complex. The geochemical study shows that the pegmatite La Panchita formed during the evolution of an anorogenic magmatic source of carbonatitic-alkaline composition related to a post-Grenvillian rifting event. Medium to low-temperature thermochronometers (K-Ar, fission track and U-Th-He) from this pegmatite are under progress and the results will be given at the meeting.

  15. 152Eu depth profiles in granite and concrete cores exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    PubMed

    Shizuma, K; Iwatani, K; Hasai, H; Hoshi, M; Oka, T

    1997-06-01

    Two granite and two concrete core samples were obtained within 500 m from the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, and the depth profile of 152Eu was measured to evaluate the incident neutron spectrum. The granite cores were obtained from a pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge located 101 m from the hypocenter and from a granite rock in the Shirakami Shrine (379 m); the concrete cores were obtained from a gate in the Gokoku Shrine (398 m) and from a pillar top of the Hiroshima bank (250 m). The profiles of the specific activities of the cores were measured to a depth of 40 cm from the surface using low background germanium (Ge) spectrometers. According to the measured depth profiles, relaxation lengths of incident neutrons were derived as 13.6 cm for Motoyasu Bridge pillar (granite), 12.2 cm for Shirakami Shrine core (granite), and 9.6 cm for concrete cores of Gokoku Shrine and Hiroshima Bank. In addition, a comparison of the granite cores in Hiroshima showed good agreement with Nagasaki data. Present results indicates that the depth profile of 152Eu reflects incident neutrons not so high but in the epithermal region.

  16. Transitional I S type characteristic in the Main Range Granite, Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Azman A.; Searle, Michael; Robb, Laurence; Chung, Sun-Lin

    2013-10-01

    The dominantly Triassic Main Range Granite of Peninsular Malaysia that occurs west of the Paleo-Tethyan Bentong-Raub suture zone was regarded exclusively as an S-type granite. The Main Range dominantly biotite granites are of batholithic proportion and host one of the world's largest tin provinces. The S-type characteristics include high initial 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios (>0.710), a narrow range in silica, presence of ilmenite and occasional cordierite and andalusite, and the presence of pelitic or quartzose meta-sedimentary xenoliths. However, the present review shows that the Main Range Granites also have many features that are more characteristic of I-type granites such as the very large scale of plutonism, the presence of primary titanite and amphibole, occurrence of hornblende-bearing mafic enclaves, increasing peraluminosity towards the more differentiated end-members of the suite and decreasing P2O5 with increasing SiO2 contents. The moderately peraluminous nature of the bulk Main Range Granite, without containing cordierite, Fe-Mg garnet or sillimanite, is consistent with derivation from a meta-sedimentary protolith that was itself undersaturated with respect to Al2SiO5.

  17. Petrogenesis of selected A-type granitic intrusions from Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Tharwat; Asran, Asran; Amron, Taha; Hauzenberger, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The Pan-African orogeny in the Arabian-Nubian Shield was terminated by intrusion of A-type granites (~ 595 Ma; Greenberg, 1981) and its volcanic equivalents. Subsequent to the intrusions of these granitic bodies the shield was exhumed. Eroded A-type granite pebbles were found in the molasse sediments that were deposited in intermountain basins. Therefore the A-type granites provide information about the last stage of the Pan-African geochemical system. Preliminary whole-rock geochemical data of three granitic intrusions (Kadabora, Um Naggat and El shiekh Salem) from the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt; indicate that all of them are peraluminous and with A-type characteristics. These intrusions show low CaO content (average 0.43 %wt), high FeOT/MgO ratio (10.46-121.88), high Na2O+K2O (average 8.04 %wt), marked enrichment of high field strength elements (Y, Nb and Ga except Zr), depletion in MgO (0.01-0.11 %wt) and with low concentration of Sr and Ba. The studied granitoids were emplaced in within plate tectonic regime. References: Greenberg, J.K. (1981): Characteristic and origin of Egyptian younger granites. Bull. Geol. Soc. Am. Part 1, v.92: 224-232.

  18. Study of the contaminant transport into granite microfractures using nuclear ion beam techniques.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ursula; Missana, Tiziana; Patelli, Alessandro; Rigato, Valentino; Rivas, Pedro

    2003-03-01

    Hydrated bentonite is a very plastic material and it is expected to enter in the rock microfractures at the granite/bentonite boundary of a deep geological high-level waste repository. This process is enhanced by the high swelling pressure of the clay. Since bentonite has a very good sorption capability for many radionuclides, the displacement of the clay might lead to a "clay-mediated" contaminant transport into the rock. The aim of this work is to study the contaminant transport into granite microfractures using nuclear ion beam techniques, and to determine to what extent the clay can favour it. To do so, bentonite previously doped with uranium, cesium and europium was put in contact with the surface of granite sheets. Granite sheets contacted with non-doped bentonite and with radionuclide solutions were also prepared as references. This allowed analysing the differences in the diffusion behaviour of the three systems: clay, radionuclides and clay plus radionuclides. A combination of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and other nuclear ion-beam techniques such as particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and microPIXE was used to study the depth and lateral distribution of clay and contaminants inside granite. It was also tried to evaluate not only the diffusion depth and diffusion coefficients but also the different areas of the granite where the diffusants have a preferential access.

  19. Weathering-associated bacteria from the Damma glacier forefield: physiological capabilities and impact on granite dissolution.

    PubMed

    Frey, Beat; Rieder, Stefan R; Brunner, Ivano; Plötze, Michael; Koetzsch, Stefan; Lapanje, Ales; Brandl, Helmut; Furrer, Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    Several bacterial strains isolated from granitic rock material in front of the Damma glacier (Central Swiss Alps) were shown (i) to grow in the presence of granite powder and a glucose-NH(4)Cl minimal medium without additional macro- or micronutrients and (ii) to produce weathering-associated agents. In particular, four bacterial isolates (one isolate each of Arthrobacter sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Leifsonia sp., and Polaromonas sp.) were weathering associated. In comparison to what was observed in abiotic experiments, the presence of these strains caused a significant increase of granite dissolution (as measured by the release of Fe, Ca, K, Mg, and Mn). These most promising weathering-associated bacterial species exhibited four main features rendering them more efficient in mineral dissolution than the other investigated isolates: (i) a major part of their bacterial cells was attached to the granite surfaces and not suspended in solution, (ii) they secreted the largest amounts of oxalic acid, (iii) they lowered the pH of the solution, and (iv) they formed significant amounts of HCN. As far as we know, this is the first report showing that the combined action of oxalic acid and HCN appears to be associated with enhanced elemental release from granite, in particular of Fe. This suggests that extensive microbial colonization of the granite surfaces could play a crucial role in the initial soil formation in previously glaciated mountain areas.

  20. Cassiterite exsolution with ilmenite lamellae in magnetite from the Huashan metaluminous tin granite in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ru Cheng; Yu, A.-Peng; Chen, Jun; Xie, Lei; Lu, Jian-Jun; Zhu, Jin-Chu

    2012-05-01

    Sn4+ is generally the dominant form of tin in magnetite-series granites as shown by the presence of cassiterite or its incorporation into Ti-bearing minerals such as biotite and titanite. Little is known about the behavior of tin in magnetite. The Huashan granite is an oxidized tin granite in the Nanling Range, southern China, where it contains magnetite as the dominant Fe oxide mineral. It is included in biotite as an early phase and also as interstitial grains spatially associated with ilmenite, cassiterite, Sn-rich titanite (SnO2 up to 5.9 wt.%), fluorite and apatite. This association indicates that tin enrichment occurred during the late stage of magma crystallization. Ilmenite lamellae display a trellis structure consistent with features of the "oxy-exsolution" process of Sn-bearing titanomagnetite precursor. Micro-inclusions of cassiterite (<1 μm in size) are found only within ilmenite lamellae. This suggests that magnetite with cassiterite inclusions is likely an indicator mineral of oxidized tin granites. Although rare in nature, Sn-bearing magnetite from weathered granites where concentrated in stream sediments, may serve as a strategic tracer for tin exploration in granite districts and in placer deposits, in general.

  1. Granites related to tin mineralization at Mt. Pleasant, New Brunswick, Canada: subvolcanic analogues of topaz rhyolites

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.P.; Sinclair, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two type of fluorine-rich (>2000 ppm F) high-silica (>74 wt. % SiO/sub 2/) granite are present in the environs of the Mt. Pleasant Tungsten Mine. Both are subvolcanic in character and Devono-Carboniferous in age. An older fine-grained granite contains biotite (+/-chlorite) and is associated with the earlier W-Mo stockwork/breccia ore bodies. It is intruded by topaz- and fluorite-bearing granite porphyry/porphyritic granite to which later Sn-polymetallic base metal mineralization appears to be related. Major element characteristics (SiO/sub 2/ > 75 wt. %; Na/sub 2/O > 3.2 wt. %; K/sub 2/O/Na/sub 2/O > 1; TiO/sub 2/ < 0.2 wt. %; CaO < 0.7 wt. %; MgO < 0.2 wt. %; P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ < 0.05 wt. %) identify both phases as anorogenic granites. Trace element contents however permit their separation and identify the later granites with Rb > 800 ppm, Li > 100 ppm, Cs > 20 ppm, Ta > 15 ppm, F > 4000 ppm, and distinctive flat REE patterns with large negative Eu anomalies as the intrusive equivalents of topaz rhyolites. Such unique REE distributions suggest that melt depolymerization resulting from the enhanced solubility of fluorine may play a pivotal role in the evolution of these felsic magmas.

  2. Experimental simulations of anatexis and assimilation involving metapelite and granitic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, David; Morgan, George B.; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    Assimilation of foreign material into a granitic magma body entails mixing between two end-member components: the initially solid assimilant, and the original magma, whose composition is mostly represented by a granitic liquid. In this study, we assess the interactions between a haplogranite liquid made to the composition of the minimum at 200 MPa H2O (Ab38.23Or28.72Qtz33.04Crn00.01) with a schist composed of muscovite and quartz with minor biotite and garnet and traces of ilmenite, plagioclase, apatite, and graphite, from 700° to 800°C at 200 MPa ± aqueous-carbonic fluid. The primary focus of this work is to assess the changes in compositions of granitic liquids that form in each reservoir as a result of the assimilation of schist by granitic magma. Before doing so, we evaluate the experimental database for the compositions of granitic liquids in equilibrium with peraluminous mineral assemblages. Most experiments that entail partial melting of peraluminous mineral assemblages begin with finely milled powders. This method yields melt pools (glass) too small for accurate analysis by electron beam methods. As a result, most published analyses of glasses from such experiments are more aluminous and less sodic than their actual compositions. The analytical errors are large, up to 50% relative to the mean value for some elements. In addition, the experimental melts are commonly more hydrous than reported, and vapor-saturated, even in experiments that are cited as "vapor" or "fluid-absent." Experiments that combine sand-sized mineral grains and powdered granitic glass yield the best approach to chemical equilibrium and facilitate accurate analysis of the glass. Glasses from such experiments define the compositions of liquids that may be derived either from the anatexis of aluminous metasediments, or by the assimilation of aluminous rocks into a granitic magma whose composition is approximately represented by the minimum composition in the haplogranite system Ab

  3. Suitability of hyperspectral imaging technique to evaluate the effectiveness of the cleaning of a crustose lichen developed on granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo-Antonio, J. S.; Fiorucci, M. P.; Rivas, T.; López, A. J.; Ramil, A.; Barral, D.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effectiveness of the laser cleaning of a complex biogenic patina, a crustose lichen, by means of hyperspectral imaging techniques. Samples of a Hercynian granite from NW Spain colonised by an endolithic crustose lichen ( Pertusaria amara) were collected and cleaned following three procedures: a scalpel, the third harmonic of a Nd:YVO4 ns laser and the scalpel followed by the laser. The suitability of the hyperspectral camera as a non-destructive, online, fast and in situ monitoring technique to assess the effectiveness of the cleaning was evaluated using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and colour measurements in CIELAB space. The hyperspectral imaging technique allowed us to measure the reflectivity variations of the cleaned surfaces in a non-invasive way, allowing the identification of the cleaning effectiveness of each procedure. Nevertheless, the results of the hyperspectral imaging technique must be validated by conventional techniques.

  4. Rapakivi Granite: An architectural emblem of St Petersburg and its utilisation in other world cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulakh, Andrey; Gavrilenko, Vladimir; Panova, Helen

    2015-04-01

    The wide-ranging utilisation of Rapakivi Granite in St Petersburg is typified by the the famous Alexander Column, and 114 stone columns of St Isaac's Cathedralas well as the pedestal of the Nicholas I monument, and portals and basements of buildings of the Admiralty, General Staff, Senate and Synod. The stone is also frequently seen among pavement slabs and in parapets of embankments and bridges around the city. This list of examples where Rapakivi Granite has been used could be expanded further. All Rapakivi Granites used in the buildings of St.Petersburg were quarried from the so-called Vyborg massif. At present it has been found that the massif occupies an area of about 18 000 km2. In the past granite of the Vyborg massif was worked from several quarries in the vicinity of Fredrikshamn (Hamina) in Finland for use in St Peterburg. The best known granite quarries are at Piterlaks (Piuterlahti) and Gimmekyul (Hämeenkylä). Sometimes Rapakivi Granite form Finland differs in appearance from typical varieties. Thus columns of a classical portal in the house at N 7 in Pochtamtskaya Street are hewn from this greyish variety. Other examples are the plinth of the General Staff and Trade Store buildings. After the 1960s varieties from the Leningrad district, and Korosten (Ukraine) massifs were used in St Petersburg. Today it is possible to find examples of Rapakivi Granite from Finland in cities in the USA, South Africa, United Kingdom and Germany. It is a long used stone as demonstrated by its cultural heritage. It is also used as an ornamental or decorative stone in modern architecture. References: 1) Bulakh, A.G., Abakumova, N.B., and Romanovsky, J.V. St Petersburg: a History in Stone. 2010. Print House of St Petersburg State University. 173 p. (In English). 2) Tutakova, A.Ya., Romanovskiy, A.Z., Bulakh, A.G., and Leer, V.I. Dimension Stone of the Leningrad Region. Granites of the Karelia Isthmus in Architecture of the Modern St Petersburg. 2011. St Petersburg. 78 p

  5. Differential weathering of basaltic and granitic catchments from concentration-discharge relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, Daniel E.; Caves, Jeremy K.; Moon, Seulgi; Thomas, Dana L.; Hartmann, Jens; Chamberlain, C. Page; Maher, Kate

    2016-10-01

    A negative feedback between silicate weathering rates and climate is hypothesized to play a central role in moderating atmospheric CO2 concentrations on geologic timescales. However, uncertainty regarding the processes that regulate the operation of the negative feedback limits our ability to interpret past variations in the ocean-atmosphere carbon cycle. In particular, the mechanisms that determine the flux of weathered material for a given climatic state are still poorly understood. Here, we quantify the processes that determine catchment-scale solute fluxes for two lithologic end-members-basalt and granite-by applying a recently developed solute production model that links weathering fluxes to both discharge and the reactivity of the weathering material. We evaluate the model against long-term monitoring of concentration-discharge relationships from basaltic and granitic catchments to determine the parameters associated with solute production in each catchment. Higher weathering rates in basaltic catchments relative to granitic catchments are driven by differing responses to increases in runoff, with basaltic catchments showing less dilution with increasing runoff. In addition, results from the solute production model suggest that thermodynamic constraints on weathering reactions could explain higher concentrations in basaltic catchments at lower runoff compared to granitic catchments. To understand how the response to changing discharge controls weathering fluxes under different climatic states, we define basalt/granite weatherability as the ratio of the basalt catchment flux to the granite catchment flux. This weatherability is runoff-dependent and increases with increasing runoff. For HCO3- and SiO2(aq) fluxes, for modern global runoff, the derived mean basalt/granite weatherability is 2.2 (1.3-3.7, 2σ) and 1.7 (1.6-2.1, 2σ), respectively. Although we cannot determine the array of individual processes resulting in differences among catchments, the relative

  6. Yingmailai Granitic Intrusion in the Southern Tianshan:Magnetite-series or Ilmenite-series?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The Yingmailai granitic intrusion is located in the middle part of the southern Tianshan. It consists predominantly of biotite K-feldspar granite with minor two-mica K-feldspar granite. They have similar whole-rock geochemical characteristics, but distinct mineralogy. Opaque minerals in biotite K-feldspar granite are ilmenite, whereas they are magnetite in two-mica K-feldspar granite. Primary muscovite has been recognized in two-mica K-feldspar granite, which is characterized by high Mg/Fe in biotite, An contents of plagioclase and Ab contents of perthite. According to Ishihara's classification(1977), biotite K-feldspar granite can undoubtedly be classified to ilmenite-series. For instance, opaque oxide minerals are less than 1 vol%, in which ilmenite is unique recognized; Fe-rich biotite (high FeO+Fe2O3) and low MgO, high FeO+Fe2O3/ FeO+Fe2O3+MgO ratio (0.957~0.980), low Mg numbers (<0.6), mostly Fe2+>1.1, and low Fe3+/(Fe3++Fe2+). Although some characteristics, e.g., presence of magnetite and Mg-rich biotite, suggest magnetite-series, it should be noted that the magnetite in two-mica K-feldspar granite is formed by post magmatism. In combination with low Fe3+/(Fe3++Fe2+)ratio and presence of indicating mineral—muscovite, it can be inferred that it also belongs to ilmenite-series. The factors which control the appearance of secondary magnetite are sudden change of fO2, pressure, temperature during magma emplacement rather than their source. In addition, Yingmailai granitic intrusion's characteristics, such as mineralogy, CaO(wt%)<3.7, w(Na2O)/w(K2O)<1, high SiO2 and (87Sr/86Sr)t, low temperature during the process of forming, indicate S type granitoids, suggesting that ilmenite-series defined by Ishihara (1977) correspond to S-type granite in the south Tienshan. This research also suggests that the south Tianshan had not experienced within plate during early Permian.

  7. Mobility of heavy metals through granitic soils using mini column infiltration test

    SciTech Connect

    Zarime, Nur 'Aishah; Yaacob, W. Z.W.

    2014-09-03

    This study is about the mobility of cadmium through compacted granitic soils. Two granitic soils namely the Broga (BGR) and Kajang (KGR) granitic soils were collected in Selangor, Malaysia. Physical and chemical tests were applied for both granitic soils to determine the physical and chemical properties of soil materials. Physical test results shows granitic soils (BGR and KGR) have high percentage of sand ranging between 54%–63% and 46%–54% respectively, an intermediate and intermediate to high plasticity index as well as high specific gravity ie; 2.50–2.59 and 2.45–2.66 respectively. For chemical test, granitic soils shows acidic pH values ranged from 5.35–5.85 for BGR and pH 5.32–5.54 for KGR. For organic matter, SSA and CEC test, it shows low values ranged from 0.22%–0.34% and 0.39%– 0.50% respectively for organic matter test, 17.96 m{sup 2}/g–21.93 m{sup 2}/g and 25.76 m{sup 2}/g–26.83 m{sup 2}/g respectively for SSA test and 0.79 meq/100g–1.35 meq/100g and 1.31 meq/100g–1.35 meq/100g respectively for CEC test. Mini column infiltration test was conducted to determine the retention of cadmium while flowing through granite soils. This test conducted based on the falling head permeability concepts. Different G-force ranging from 231G to 1442G was used in this test. The breakthrough curves show the concentration of Cd becomes higher with the increasing of G-force for both granitic samples (BGR and KGR). The selectivity sorption for both granites ranked in the following decreasing order of; 231G>519G>923G>1442G. Results demonstrated that granitic soils also have low buffering capacity due to low resist of pH changes.

  8. [Analysis of X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and plasma mass spectrometry of the Guidong granite body and its implications to granite evolution].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Wei; Chen, Guo-Neng; Peng, Zhuo-Lun

    2013-07-01

    The Guidong composite granite body (CGB) located in the north Guangdong Province consists of numerous rock bodies formed respectively in the early and late Jurassic and early Cretaceous. Analysis of the granites of different period with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and plasma mass spectrometry indicates: (1) From the top of a granite body downwards, the felsic components of rock decrease, while the mafic and sigmaREE, LREE/HREE, (La/Yb)N, as well as delta Eu value increase, suggesting the material differentiation in the in-situ melting of crustal rocks and crystallisation of magma; (2) From old to young of the different period granite-massifs in the Guidong CGB, the felsic compositions totally decrease, and the mafic components, sigmaEE, LREE/HREE, (La/Yb)N, and delta Eu value increase as well, implying multiple crustal melting (remelting) events in the Mesozoic in this area; and (3) Primitive mantle-normalized spider diagram for trace elements of Guidong CGB suggests high maturity of the crust involved in the in-situ melting.

  9. Two-mica andalusite-bearing granite with no primary muscovite: constraints on the origin of post-magmatic muscovite in two-mica granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puziewicz, Jacek; Pietranik, Anna

    2016-12-01

    The two-mica granite from Gęsiniec (Strzelin Granitic Massif, SW Poland) consists of quartz, K-feldspar, normally zoned plagioclase (30 ± 7 % An), subordinate biotite and muscovite and magmatic andalusite. Andalusite crystallised before the outer parts of plagioclase grains were formed. Biotite has constant Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratio of approximately 0.81. Five textural types of muscovite occur in the granite: (1) muscovite replacing andalusite, (2) embayed interstitial muscovite, (3) muscovite forming aggregates with biotite, (4) muscovite accompanying biotite and chlorite in microfissures and (5) fine muscovite forming fringes at the contact between larger muscovite plates and K-feldspar. They are commonly associated with albite. Crystallisation of muscovite started significantly below the granite solidus, mostly by the replacement of andalusite. Formation of muscovite continued during cooling of host rock. The growth of individual plates was initiated at different undercoolings and the plates whose crystallisation was frozen at different stages of growth occur. Those that were formed earlier are richer in titanium and iron relative to the later ones. As the rock contains no Ti and Fe saturating phases, the content of Ti and Mg in muscovite depends on their local availability. The homogeneous Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratio of biotite indicates that it was re-equilibrated at the post-magmatic stage.

  10. Long-lived Paleoproterozoic granitic magmatism in the Seridó-Jaguaribe domain, Borborema Province-NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollanda, Maria Helena B. M.; Archanjo, Carlos J.; Souza, Laécio C.; Dunyi, Liu; Armstrong, Richard

    2011-12-01

    The northeastern part of the Borborema Province is dominated by Paleoproterozoic migmatitic tonalitic to granitic orthogneisses (Caicó Complex) that are the basement for younger, metavolcanosedimentary rock assemblages. Within this complex gneissified, porphyritic metagranitoid rocks (the G2-type augen gneisses) are fairly common and supposed to define a synorogenic magmatism at c. 2.0 Ga. New U-Pb (SHRIMP) on zircons and Sm-Nd data shows that these augen gneisses do not differ significantly from the metaplutonic rocks of the basement complex regarding their nature and emplacement age of the primary magmas. U-Pb ages cluster in a time interval between 2.17 and 2.25 Ga and are correlated with Nd parameters (older tDM model ages and negative initial ɛNd values) indicating an origin from recycling of an older, probably Neoarchean crust. The regional host rocks that accommodate the augen gneiss could be c. 2.4-2.3 Ga supracrustal sequences presently preserved as small remnants in the Caicó Complex. The Paleoproterozoic magmatic activity extends to the Late Paleoproterozoic with the intrusion of the Serra Negra pluton (now a coarse augen gneiss) which yielded a (semi) concordant U-Pb age of c. 1.75 Ga. This magmatic activity, until now unsuspected in the Caicó Complex, was probably related to crustal extension and rifting over large areas that include the NE Brazil and the Nigerian shield in Africa.

  11. Radon emanation during compression, fracturing and heating of granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pili, E.; Nicolas, A.; Girault, F.; Schubnel, A.; Fortin, J.; Passelègue, F. X.; Richon, P.

    2013-12-01

    Radon emanation during compression, fracturing and heating of granites É. Pili1,2, A. Nicolas3, F. Girault3, A. Schubnel3, J. Fortin3, F. Passelègue3, P. Richon1 1CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon, France 2Institut de Physique du Globe, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 1 rue Jussieu, F-75005 Paris, France 3Ecole Normale Supérieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris, France Precursory radon emissions have been reported previously in various seismically active areas. Nevertheless such observations, only partially understood, are the subject of much skepticism. Radon-222 is a radioactive gas, daughter of radium-226 from alpha-decay in the uranium-238 decay chain that is naturally present in rocks and soils. Its escape is facilitated by preferential pathways such as fractures. Its half-life is 3.8 days only. As a consequence, radon may accumulate during short period only, and is thought to be released prior, during and after earthquakes as stress is discharged and new fluid pathways are made available. However, the physical processes involved in radon emanation during stress variations remain mostly unknown in the field and poorly studied in the laboratory. Here, we investigate radon emanation from various granite samples: Isla Craig, Westerly, La Peyratte and various leucogranites. Radon emanation and diffusion length, measured first on intact samples, are compared with measurements performed after heating at 850°C. Despite extensive thermal fracturing, radon emanation decreases irreversibly after heating compared to intact sample, and the higher the heating temperature the smaller the radon emanation. This is explained by the disappearance of water-film at grain boundaries, which plays an important role in radon percolation through the porous space, and then, at higher temperatures, by dehydration and melting of biotites where radium is concentrated. The recoil range of radon is likely shorter in melted biotites than in intact ones. The effect of mechanical fracturing on radon

  12. Tin-carrier minerals in metaluminous granites of the western Nanling Range (southern China): Constraints on processes of tin mineralization in oxidized granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ru Cheng; Xie, Lei; Chen, Jun; Yu, Apeng; Wang, Lubin; Lu, Jianjun; Zhu, Jinchu

    2013-09-01

    Huashan, Guposhan and Qitianling are three similar and representative metaluminous A-type tin granites in the western Nanling Range, China. They all have a high oxidization state with magnetite as the dominant Fe-Ti oxide. This study presents an understanding of systematic mineralogy of Sn-bearing minerals (biotite, titanite, magnetite and cassiterite) in the three granites. Biotite has an annite composition and both electron-microprobe and LA-ICP-MS analyses indicate trace amounts of tin in biotite (approximately 100-20 ppm). Chloritization of biotite is accompanied by formation of Sn-rich rutile and cassiterite. Titanite has a long history of crystallization from the early-magmatic stage through the late-magmatic stage to the hydrothermal stage. Owing to its solid-solution relationship with malayaite (CaSnSiO5), titanite always contains tin to various extents. Early-magmatic titanite contains about 0.5 wt.% SnO2, while the late-magmatic titanite is markedly enriched in tin (on average 14.8 and 3.4 SnO2 in titanite from the Qitianling and Huashan granites, respectively). Magnetite grains typically display a trellis structure with ilmenite lamellae, where microinclusions of cassiterite (<1 μm in size) are present. This is likely consistent with features of the "oxy-exsolution" process of Sn-bearing titanomagnetite precursor. Cassiterite may be observed as late-magmatic phase, but most commonly appears as an alteration product of other primary minerals. All tin-bearing minerals in the three granites record a complete process of tin mineralization in granite. The features of tin in primary biotite, titanite and magnetite reflect an initial enrichment during the early stage of magmatic crystallization of the Huashan, Guposhan and Qitianling granites. Association of interstitial Sn-titanite and cassiterite suggests further tin enrichment related to fractional crystallization of granitic magmas. Fluids and alteration of primary minerals play an important role in the

  13. Lithium and boron in late-orogenic granites - Isotopic fingerprints for the source of crustal melts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, Rolf L.; Meixner, Anette; Förster, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-04-01

    Geochemically diverse late- and post-Variscan granites of the Erzgebirge-Vogtland, the Saxon Granulite Massif, and Thuringia (Germany) formed by anatectic melting of Palaeozoic sedimentary successions and associated mafic to felsic volcanic rocks. The compositional diversity of the least evolved of these granites is largely inherited from the protoliths. We present Li and B-isotopic data of these granites and compare them with the isotopic composition of their protoliths, to investigate whether (i) there exist systematic differences in the Li and B-isotopic composition among different granite types and (ii) Li and B-isotopic compositions provide information on the granite sources complementary to information from the isotopic composition of Sr, Nd, and Pb and the trace-element signatures. Low-F biotite and two-mica granite types have flat upper continental crust (UCC)-normalized trace-element pattern with variable enrichments in Li, Rb, Cs, Sn, and W and depletions in Sr, Ba, and Eu. These signatures are least pronounced for the Niederbobritzsch biotite granite, which has the largest contribution of mafic material, and most pronounced for the two-mica granites. The granites show a relatively narrow range of δ7Li values (-3.0 to -0.5) and a broad range of δ11B values (-13.4 to +20.1). The δ11B values are lower in rocks with distinctly higher contents of Li, Rb, Cs, and Sn. The high δ11B of the Niederbobritzsch granite may be explained by the melting of former altered oceanic crust in its source. Relative to UCC, intermediate-F to high-F low-P granites show strong depletions in Sr, Ba, Eu as well as Zr and Hf, strong enrichments in Li, Rb, and Cs as well as Nb, Sn, Ta, and W, and REE pattern with stronger enrichments for HREE than for LREE. These granites show narrow ranges of δ7Li (-2.0 to +1.6) and δ11B values (-14.7 to -9.1), reflecting the smaller variability of the Li and B-isotopic composition in their source lithologies. The anomalously high δ7Li value

  14. Fault growth and acoustic emissions in confined granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, David A.; Byerlee, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The failure process in a brittle granite was studied by using acoustic emission techniques to obtain three dimensional locations of the microfracturing events. During a creep experiment the nucleation of faulting coincided with the onset of tertiary creep, but the development of the fault could not be followed because the failure occurred catastrophically. A technique has been developed that enables the failure process to be stabilized by controlling the axial stress to maintain a constant acoustic emission rate. As a result the post-failure stress-strain curve has been followed quasi-statically, extending to hours the fault growth process that normally would occur violently in a fraction of a second. The results from the rate-controlled experiments show that the fault plane nucleated at a point on the sample surface after the stress-strain curve reached its peak. Before nucleation, the microcrack growth was distributed throughout the sample. The fault plane then grew outward from the nucleation site and was accompanied by a gradual drop in stress. Acoustic emission locations showed that the fault propagated as a fracture front (process zone) with dimensions of 1 to 3 cm. As the fracture front passed by a given fixed point on the fault plane, the subsequent acoustic emission would drop. When growth was allowed to progress until the fault bisected the sample, the stress dropped to the frictional strength. These observations are in accord with the behavior predicted by Rudnicki and Rice's bifurcation analysis but conflict with experiments used to infer that shear localization would occur in brittle rock while the material is still hardening.

  15. Mechanical amorphization during experimental shearing of synthetic granite gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. C.; Hadizadeh, J.; Tullis, T. E.; Goldsby, D. L.

    2009-04-01

    Frictional sliding experiments performed in a rotary shear machine at 25 MPa normal stress on 2-mm thick layers of simulated Westerly granite gouge (initial particle size 1-85 µm) have produced heterogeneous microstructures comprising comminuted material with internal layering. In SEM/BSE individual layers comprise grains of rounded and sub-rounded quartz and feldspar particles that vary in size from 20nm on one side to about 300nm on the other. Characterization of the gouge ultrastructure has been undertaken by analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Areas were selected from high-magnification SEM images and thinned in a focused ion beam instrument (FIB). This sampling procedure produces material of even electron transparency with perfect spatial registration to the optical and SEM microstructures. The sub-micrometre-scale laminar variation of grain size and porosity is confirmed by STEM. Shards of both feldspar and quartz are progressively comminuted to form the texture in which larger grains are surrounded by finer-comminuted matrix material. Grains of both of the latter primary mineral constituents are routinely less than 100 nm in size. Most significantly, the finest grained, least porous zones comprise small grain fragments embedded within an amorphous silicate matrix. By extension, one can infer that observation of these zones throughout the gouge is consistent with extensive amorphization during the shearing. The internal layering of the brecciated fragments, with asymmetric particle size and porosity grading, indicates that Y-slip surfaces localize displacement until particles that line the slip surface are reduced to a critical size that enables mechanically induced amorphization. Fluctuations in friction recorded during formation of this microstructure can be reasonably related to cyclic softening-hardening related to porosity loss and amorphization, with subsequent brecciation of the gouge during slip on multiple Y-slip surfaces.

  16. Bioweathering and biotransformation of granitic rock minerals by actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Hesham

    2009-11-01

    Actinomycetes inhabiting granitic rocks at St. Katherine, Egypt were investigated for their bioweathering potential. Actinomycete counts ranged between 174 and 360 colony forming units per gram. Counts were positively correlated to rock porosity (r = 0.65) and negatively correlated to rock salinity (r = -0.56). Sixty-six actinomycete isolates originating from rocks could be assigned into eight genera, with a high frequency of Nocardioides and Streptomyces. Organic acids were produced by 97% of the isolates. Strains belonging to Actinopolyspora, Actinomadura, Kitasatospora, Nocardioides, and Kibdelosporangium showed the highest acid production indices. Representatives from all eight genera could precipitate metals Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd, and Ag up to concentrations of 2.5 mM each. An actinomycete consortium of two Nocardioides strains and one Kibdelosporangium strain was studied for its potential to cause rock weathering in batch experiments. Results indicated a high ability of the consortium to leach the metals Cu, Zn, and Fe up to 2.6-, 2.1-, and 1.3-fold, respectively, compared to the control after 4 weeks. The pH significantly decreased after 1 week, which was parallel to an increased release of phosphate and sulfate reaching a 2.2- and 2.5-fold increase, respectively, compared to control. Highly significant weight loss (p = 0.005) was achieved by the consortium, indicating a potential multiple role of actinomycetes in weathering by acid production, metal leaching, and solubilization of phosphate and sulfate. This study emphasizes the diverse and unique abilities of actinomycetes inhabiting rock surfaces which could be of potential biotechnological applications, such as in the bioremediation of metal-contaminated environments and metal biorecovery.

  17. Seismic anisotropy in granite at the Underground Research Laboratory, Manitoba

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, G.M.; Crampin, S.; Young, R.P.

    2000-05-01

    The Shear-Wave Experiment at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Underground Research Laboratory was probably the first controlled-source shear-wave survey in a mine environment. Taking place in conjunction with the excavation of the Mine-by test tunnel at 420 m depth, the shear-wave experiment was designed to measure the in situ anisotropy of the rockmass and to use shear waves to observe excavation effects using the greatest variety of raypath directions of any in situ shear-wave survey to date. Inversion of the shear-wave polarizations shows that the anisotropy of the in situ rockmass is consistent with hexagonal symmetry with an approximate fabric orientation of strike 023{degree} and dip 35{degree}. The in situ anisotropy is probably due to microcracks with orientations governed by the in situ stress field and to mineral alignment within the weak gneissic layering. However, there is no unique interpretation as to the cause of the in situ anisotropy as the fabric orientation agrees approximately with both the orientation expected from extensive-dilatancy anisotropy and that of the gneissic layering. Eight raypaths with shear waves propagating wholly or almost wholly through granodiorite, rather than granite, do not show the expected shear-wave splitting and indicate a lower in situ anisotropy, which may be due to the finer grain size and/or the absence of gneissic layering within the granodiorite. These results suggest that shear waves may be used to determine crack and mineral orientations and for remote monitoring of a rockmass. This has potential applications in mining and waste monitoring.

  18. Program Plan: field radionuclide migration studies in Climax granite

    SciTech Connect

    Isherwood, D.; Raber, E.; Coles, D.; Stone, R.

    1980-11-01

    This Program Plan describes the field radionuclide migration studies we plan to conduct in the Climax granite at the Nevada Test Site. Laboratory support studies are included to help us understand the geochemical and hydrologic processes involved in the field. The Program Plan begins with background information (Section 1) on how this program fits into the National Waste Terminal Storage Program Plan and discusses the needs for field studies of this type. The objectives stated in Section 2 are in direct response to these needs, particularly the need to determine whether laboratory studies accurately reflect actual field conditions and the need for field testing to provide a data base for verification of hydrologic and mass transport models. The technical scope (Section 3) provides a work breakdown structure that integrates the various activities and establishes a base for the technical approach described in Section 4. Our approach combines an interactive system of field and laboratory migration experiments with the use of hydrologic models for pre-test predictions and data interpretation. Section 5 on program interfaces identifies how information will be transferred to other related DOE projects. A schedule of activities and major milestones (Section 6) and the budget necessary to meet the project objectives (Section 7) are included in the Program Plan. Sections 8 and 9 contain brief descriptions of how the technical and program controls will be established and maintained and an outline of our quality assurance program. This program plan is an initial planning document and provides a general description of activities. An Engineering Test Plan containing detailed experimental test plans, an instrumentation plan and equipment design drawings will be published as a separate document.

  19. Brother is high Sr/Y two-mica granite and sister is leucogranite: twin granites in the Northern Himalayan Gneiss Domes, southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, L.; Gao, L.; Xie, K.

    2011-12-01

    Leucogranites in the Himalayan orogen is widely considered as the type example of crustal melts, which provides a probe to investigate the interplay among high-grade metamorphism, crustal anatexis, and tectonic transition in large-scale collisional belts. Whether the leucogranite was a daughter product from a more primitive granitic melt is an interesting question that deserves careful examination to address the above issue. We report a new suite of two-mica granite (TMG) and leucogranite (LG) in the Yardoi gneiss dome (YGD) in the easternmost of the Northern Himalayan Gneiss Domes (NHGD), south of the Yarlung-Tsangpo suture. SHRIMP and LA-ICP-MS zircon U/Pb dating show that TMG and LG formed at ~17.7 Ma to ~20.0 Ma and at ~17.1 Ma, respectively. Both suites of granite have high Na/K (>1.30) ratios. The TMGs are characterized by (1) high Sr (>450 ppm), low Rb (<95 ppm) and Y (<6 ppm), and high Sr/Y (>86) ratios; (2) no Eu anomalies; and (3) low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (<0.7098) and higher ɛNd (>-8.5) values. In contrast, the LGs have (1) lower Sr (<130 ppm) and higher Rb (92-130 ppm); (2) pronounced negative Eu anomalies with Eu/Eu*<0.55; and (3) relatively higher Sr (87Sr/86Sr(t) =0.7136-0.7148) and unradiogenic Nd (ɛNd(t)=-7.7~-11.1). These data demonstrate that these Mid-Miocene granites have major and trace element and radiogenic isotope compositions similar to those of >35 Ma granites, but significantly different from those granites of similar ages in the High Himalaya as well as in the NHGD. High Sr/Y and relatively unradiogenic Sr isotope compositions in the TMGs could be derived from partial melting of mafic materials formed during previous compressional thickening event which was triggered by the input of juvenile heat and material associated with the Miocene E-W extension. An AFC process (plagioclase fractional crystallization and contamination by crustal materials) could be a primary factor leading to the formation of these LGs. Concurrence of high Sr

  20. [Study on the fine structure of K-feldspar of Qichun granite].

    PubMed

    Du, Deng-Wen; Hong, Han-Lie; Fan, Kan; Wang, Chao-Wen; Yin, Ke

    2013-03-01

    Fine structure of K-feldspar from the Qichun granite was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry methods to understand the evolution of the granitic magmatism and its correlation to molybdenite mineralization. The XRD results showed that K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has higher ordering index and triclinicity and is namely microcline with triclinic symmetry. K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively lower ordering index and has widening [131] peak and is locally triclinic ordering. K-feldspar of the late cretaceous granite has lowest ordering index and sharp [131] peak and is honiogeneously monoclinic. The FTIR results showed that the IR spectra of the Qichun K-feldspar are similar to that of orthoclase reported by Farmer (1974). The 640 cm-1 absorption band increases while the 540 cm-' absorption band decreases with increase in K-feldspar ordering index, also, the 1,010 cm-1 absorption band separates into 1,010 and 1,046 cm-1 absorption bands, with a change in the band shape from widening to sharp outline. The ICP-MS results suggested that K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively higher metal elements and rare earth elements, and the granite exhibits better mineralization background, K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has markedly lower Sr and Ba, indicating that the alteration fluid originated from the granitic magmatism, and hence, potassic alteration is a good indicator for molybdenite exploration.

  1. Granite disposal of U.S. high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Lee, Joon H.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Goldstein, Barry; Hansen, Francis D.; Price, Ronald H.; Lord, Anna Snider

    2011-08-01

    This report evaluates the feasibility of disposing U.S. high-level radioactive waste in granite several hundred meters below the surface of the earth. The U.S. has many granite formations with positive attributes for permanent disposal. Similar crystalline formations have been extensively studied by international programs, two of which, in Sweden and Finland, are the host rocks of submitted or imminent repository license applications. This report is enabled by the advanced work of the international community to establish functional and operational requirements for disposal of a range of waste forms in granite media. In this report we develop scoping performance analyses, based on the applicable features, events, and processes (FEPs) identified by international investigators, to support generic conclusions regarding post-closure safety. Unlike the safety analyses for disposal in salt, shale/clay, or deep boreholes, the safety analysis for a mined granite repository depends largely on waste package preservation. In crystalline rock, waste packages are preserved by the high mechanical stability of the excavations, the diffusive barrier of the buffer, and favorable chemical conditions. The buffer is preserved by low groundwater fluxes, favorable chemical conditions, backfill, and the rigid confines of the host rock. An added advantage of a mined granite repository is that waste packages would be fairly easy to retrieve, should retrievability be an important objective. The results of the safety analyses performed in this study are consistent with the results of comprehensive safety assessments performed for sites in Sweden, Finland, and Canada. They indicate that a granite repository would satisfy established safety criteria and suggest that a small number of FEPs would largely control the release and transport of radionuclides. In the event the U.S. decides to pursue a potential repository in granite, a detailed evaluation of these FEPs would be needed to inform site

  2. Charnockites and granites of the western Adirondacks, New York, USA: a differentiated A-type suite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, P.R.

    1992-01-01

    Granitic rocks in the west-central Adirondack Highlands of New York State include both relatively homogeneous charnockitic and hornblende granitic gneisses (CG), that occur in thick stratiform bodies and elliptical domes, and heterogeneous leucogneisses (LG), that commonly are interlayered with metasedimentary rocks. Major- and trace-element geochemical analyses were obtained for 115 samples, including both types of granitoids. Data for CG fail to show the presence of more than one distinct group based on composition. Most of the variance within the CG sample population is consistent with magmatic differentiation combined with incomplete separation of early crystals of alkali feldspar, plagioclase, and pyroxenes or amphibole from the residual liquid. Ti, Fe, Mg, Ca, P, Sr, Ba, and Zr decrease with increasing silica, while Rb and K increase. Within CG, the distinction between charnockitic (orthopyroxene-bearing) and granitic gneisses is correlated with bulk chemistry. The charnockites are consistently more mafic than the hornblende granitic gneisses, although forming a continuum with them. The leucogneisses, while generally more felsic than the charnockites and granitic gneisses, are otherwise geochemically similar to them. The data are consistent with the LG suite being an evolved extrusive equivalent of the intrusive CG suite. Both CG and LG suites are metaluminous to mildly peraluminous and display an A-type geochemical signature, enriched in Fe, K, Ce, Y, Nb, Zr, and Ga and depleted in Ca, Mg, and Sr relative to I- and S-type granites. Rare earth element patterns show moderate LREE enrichment and a negative Eu anomaly throughout the suite. The geochemical data suggest an origin by partial melting of biotite- and plagioclase-rich crustal rocks. Emplacement occurred in an anorogenic or post-collisional tectonic setting, probably at relatively shallow depths. Deformation and granulite-facies metamorphism with some partial melting followed during the Ottawan phase

  3. Determination of the amount of Peroxy in granite rock using the Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tregloan-Reed, J. J.; Tarnas, J.; Plante, Z.; Freund, F. T.

    2015-12-01

    We present a series of laboratory experiments which provide evidence for peroxy defects in granite, coupled with a determination of the peroxy defect concentration. When peroxy defects are activated they become defect electrons (positive holes) in the oxygen anion sub-lattice. This in essence converts the granite sample to a p-type semiconductor. Our preliminary results of the thermoelectric (Seebeck) effect for granite show that positive charge carriers are being generated (positive gradient: see Figure) in the granite sample and that the concentration of peroxy defects in the granite sample is 1137 ± 20 ppm. The Seebeck coefficient (α) is the gradient between the voltage (V) and the temperature (T), such that α = V /T . One end of the granite sample was placed in a furnace and heated. At 300ºC the peroxy defect spins decouple, while at 430ºC the peroxy defects dissociate, producing positive holes. When the positive holes are activated their mobility increases and they move towards the cool end of the granite sample through diffusion. This induces a potential difference linked to a thermal gradient between the two ends of the sample. We then fitted the coefficients of two first order polynomials and a point of inflection using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. This was done to statistically estimate the uncertainties in the coefficients from a Bayesian statistical analysis. The best fit and corresponding standarderror of the reflection point was found to be 426 ± 5ºC. This is in excellent agreement to values, around 430ºC, found in the literature. We then find α = 18.50 ± 0.18 μV K-1 above 426 ± 5ºC, which equates to a carrier concentration of 1.16 × 1020 cm-3 compared to the carrier concentrations of heavily doped semiconductors, which are on the order of 1021 cm-3. This then gives a peroxy defect concentration of 1137 ± 20 ppm.

  4. Contamination in mafic mineral-rich calc-alkaline granites: a geochemical and Sr-Nd isotope study of the Neoproterozoic Piedade Granite, SE Brazil.

    PubMed

    Leite, Renato J; Janasi, Valdecir A; Martins, Lucelene

    2006-06-01

    The Piedade Granite (approximately 600 Ma) was emplaced shortly after the main phase of granite magmatism in the Agudos Grandes batholith, Apiaí-Guaxupé Terrane, SE Brazil. Its main units are: mafic mineral-rich porphyritic granites forming the border (peraluminous muscovite-biotite granodiorite-monzogranite MBmg unit) and core (metaluminous titanite-bearing biotite monzogranite BmgT unit) and felsic pink inequigranular granite (Bmg unit) between them. Bmg has high LaN/YbN (up to 100), Th/U (> 10) and low Rb, Nb and Ta, and can be a crustal melt derived from deep-seated sources with residual garnet and biotite. The core BmgT unit derived from oxidized magmas with high Mg# (approximately 45), Ba and Sr, fractionated REE patterns (LaN/YbN = 45), 87Sr/86Sr(t) approximately 0.710, epsilonNd(t) approximately -12 to -14, interpreted as being high-K calc-alkaline magmas contaminated with metasedimentary rocks that had upper-crust signature (high U, Cs, Ta). The mafic-rich peraluminous granites show a more evolved isotope signature (87Sr/86Sr(t) = 0.713-0.714; epsilonNd(t) = -14 to -16), similar to Bmg, and Mg# and incompatible trace-element concentrations intermediate between Bmg and BmgT. A model is presented in whichMBmgis envisaged as the product of contamination between a mafic mineral-rich magma consanguineous with BmgT and pure crustal melts akin to Bmg.

  5. Chemical and isotopic studies of granitic Archean rocks, Owl Creek Mountains, Wyoming: Geochronology of an Archean granite, Owl Creek Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hedge, C.E.; Simmons, K.R.; Stuckless, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Rubidium-strontium analyses of whole-rock samples of an Archean granite from the Owl Creek Mountains, Wyo., indicate an intrusive age of 2640 {plus minus} 125 Ma. Muscovite-bearing samples give results suggesting that these samples were altered about 2300 Ma. This event may have caused extensive strontium loss from the rocks as potassium feldspar was altered to muscovite. Alteration was highly localized in nature as evidence by unaffected rubidium-strontium mineral ages in the Owl Creek Mountains area. Furthermore, the event probably involved a small volume of fluid relative to the volume of rock because whole-rock {delta}{sup 18}O values of altered rocks are not distinct from those of unaltered rocks. In contrast to the rubidium-strontium whole-rock system, zircons from the granite have been so severely affected by the alteration event, and possibly by a late-Precambrian uplift event, that the zircon system yields little usable age information. The average initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr (0.7033 {plus minus} 0.0042) calculated from the isochron intercept varies significantly. Calculated initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios for nine apparently unaltered samples yield a range of 0.7025 to 0.7047. These calculated initial ratios correlate positively with whole-rock {delta}{sup 18}O values; and, therefore, the granite was probably derived from an isotopically heterogeneous source. The highest initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio is lower than the lowest reported for the metamorphic rocks intruded by the granite as it would have existed at 2640 Ma. Thus, the metamorphic sequence, at its current level of exposure, can represent no more than a part of the protolith for the granite.

  6. Geothermal potential of Caledonian granites underlying Upper Palaeozoic sedimentary basins astride the Iapetus Suture Zone in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritschle, Tobias; Daly, J. Stephen; Whitehouse, Martin J.; McConnell, Brian; Buhre, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    Upper Palaeozoic sedimentary basins in Ireland overlie crystalline rocks within the Caledonian Iapetus Suture Zone. Beneath these basins, Lower Palaeozoic rocks, formed and deformed during the Caledonian orogenic cycle, were intruded by c. 420-390 Ma late-tectonic granites at various tectonic levels. These include the subsurface Kentstown and Glenamaddy granites discovered by mineral exploration drilling. While these granites comprise actual targets for Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) exploration, several others likely exist based on geophysical considerations. In order to test the regional geothermal potential, the buried granites as well as analogue exposed rocks are being investigated geochemically. The geothermal potential of the intrusives depends on their heat production rate (HPR), which is calculated using rock density and concentrations of the heat producing elements (HPE) uranium, thorium and potassium. In spite of their close spacing and similar ages, the whole-rock geochemistry of the granites varies significantly, but with no obvious geographical control (Fritschle et al., 2013; 2014). The granite HPR values range from 1.4 μW/m3 for the Dhoon Granite (Isle of Man) to 4.9 μW/m3 for the Drogheda Granite (Ireland). This compares with the average HPR for a 'typical' granite of 2.7 μW/m3 (Goldstein et al., 2009). It is demonstrated that an elevated HPR of a granite can be related to enrichment in one of the HPE alone (e.g., uranium-enrichment in the Foxdale Granite (Isle of Man), or thorium-enrichment in the Drogheda Granite). Enrichment in HPE in a granite may occur due to different reasons including hydrothermal (re-) distribution of uranium, or the assimilation of thorium-rich wall-rocks. Hence, the distribution of the HPE in particular minerals, veins and source lithologies, along with the petrophysical characteristics of the sedimentary basins and the granites' petrogenesis, are currently being investigated as possible mechanisms controlling their

  7. Origin and evolution of the granitic intrusions in the Brusque Group of the Dom Feliciano Belt, south Brazil: Petrostructural analysis and whole-rock/isotope geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueck, Mathias; Basei, Miguel Angelo Stipp; Castro, Neivaldo Araújo de

    2016-08-01

    In the southern Brazilian state of Santa Catarina the Dom Feliciano Belt, formed by the tectonic juxtaposition of different crustal blocks during the Brasiliano-Pan African Orogenic cycle, can be divided into three domains. In the central domain, three granitic suites intrude the metavolcanosedimentary sequence of the Brusque Group: São João Batista (SJBS), Valsungana (VS) and Nova Trento (NTS), from the oldest to the youngest. This extensive magmatism, here referred to as granitic intrusions in the Brusqe Group (GIBG), is coeval with the thermal peak in the host metamorphic successions, but postdates its main foliation. A progressive deformation starting from the magmatic stage throughout the cooling history points to the influence of the late stages of deformation recorded in the Brusque Group. The SJBS consists of gray to white leucocratic, equigranular granites, with aluminous minerals such as muscovite, garnet and tourmaline. The porphyritic VS is the largest of the suites and is characterized by its cm-sized K-feldspar megacrysts in a coarse-grained biotite-rich matrix. The granites from the NTS are equigranular, light gray to pink in color and have biotite as the main mafic mineral, but magmatic muscovite, tourmaline and hornblende can occur as well. Geochemically, the GIBG are mildly peraluminous and show a calc-alkaline affinity. Most intrusions have a high REE fractionation, but some SJBS granites show a characteristic pattern with no fractionation and strong negative Eu anomalies ("seagull pattern"). Elevated Sr(i) values, between 0.707 and 0.735, and negative εNd values as low as -24 points to the melting of old evolved crust. The Nd (TDM) ages are scattered between 1.54 and 2.76 Ga, with a predominance of values around 2.0 Ga. The GIBG have a strong crustal signature that most closely connects, within the regional units, to that of the metasedimentary rocks of the Brusque Group and its crystalline basement, the Camboriú Complex. All three suites

  8. Contrasting Sources Of Granites In The Fosdick Migmatite Dome, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Brown, M.; Korhonen, F.; Siddoway, C. S.

    2007-12-01

    The Fosdick Mountains in Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctica comprise a migmatite dome 80x15km composed of paragneiss, orthogneiss and associated granites. The dome represents exposed middle-crust that experienced a polymetamorphic evolution associated with the active margin of Gondwana during the Devonian-Carboniferous and the Cretaceous. Research to date has focused on the metamorphic and structural evolution of the dome, with little attention to the origin and petrogenesis of the granites and migmatite leucosomes. Here, we report new geochemical and Sr-Nd isotope data for granites and migmatite leucosomes from the dome that bear on the source and petrogenesis of the parent melts (see also Saito et al., 2007, isaes.confex.com, 2.PS-38). We have obtained whole-rock major and trace element, and Sr-Nd isotope data for a suite of samples comprising paragneiss and orthogneiss, leucosome from paragneiss, and various types of granite from within the migmatite dome, and for possible protolith lithologies from outside the dome. Possible protoliths are Devonian biotite- and hornblende- bearing Ford Granodiorite and pre-Upper Ordovician Swanson Formation metapelites. Geochemical and isotopic compositions of the paragneiss and orthogneiss are comparable to those of the Swanson Formation metapelites and the Ford Granodiorite, respectively, consistent with previous interpretations regarding the protoliths of the gneisses (Siddoway et al., 2004, GSA SP380). Granites and leucosomes within the dome are silicic (71-78 wt % SiO2) and slightly peraluminous (1.02-1.18 alumina saturation index), and are granite sensu stricto in terms of normative mineralogy. The major element composition of granites and leucosomes is broadly similar to those of high-pressure experimental melts produced from granodiorite sources (Skjerlie and Johnston, 1993, J. Pet.34; Patin~{o}-Douce, 1997, Geol.25) and sedimentary sources (Montel and Vielzeuf, 1997, CMP128; Koester et al., 2002, J. Pet.43). Our data

  9. Geochronology, geochemistry, and petrology of the Precambrian Sandia granite, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, A.

    1985-01-01

    The Precambrian Sandia granite of north-central New Mexico belongs to the 1.2-1.6 Ga crustal province of the western USA. The granite shows an intrusive contact with the metamorphic country rocks. The Rb-Sr whole rock isochron age of the country rocks is 1.61 +/- 0.06 Ga, (/sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr)/sub 0/ = 0.705 +/- 0.001. The culmination of the intrusion of the Sandia granite took place at 1.44 +/- 0.04 GA. (/sup 87/Sr//sup 86/)/sub 0/ = 0.7054 +/- 0.0005. Rb-Sr ages on biotite-whole rock pairs and an /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar dating of a biotite from the granite indicate final cooling to 300-350/sup 0/C at 1.33 Ga. This suggests slow cooling of the granite at rates which averaged 4/sup 0/C/Ma for about 100 Ma after its emplacement; during this period the Rb-Sr isotope system perhaps remained partially open. The Sandia granite shows compositional variation from granodiorite to quartz monzonite in both the northern and southern blocks. The field geology, petrology, and geochemistry of the two blocks suggest that they form a single pluton. Both the Sandia granite and mesocratic, two pyroxene granulite xenoliths therein give an ..delta../sup 18/O value of +8.0 +/- 0.5% indicating (meta)igneous source ricks for each of them. These values tend to rule out Condie's (1978) favored hypothesis for magma generation of 30-50% partial melting of siliceous gradulites. Rather, they favor an alternative hypothesis, equally satisfactory from the geochemical viewpoint, involving 5-10% melt of a gabbroic or two-pyroxene granulite parent rock in the lower crust. The Sandia granite, and by implication, the other high-Ca granitic rocks of the western USA thus do not seem to represent addition of new mantle-derived materials to the middle-late Proterozoic crust of this section of the continent.

  10. Origin of miarolitic pegmatites in the Königshain granite/Lusatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Rainer; Davidson, Paul

    2016-09-01

    In this study we examine an interesting occurrence of miarolitic pegmatites in the Königshain granite of the Lusatia region of the Bohemian Massif. This granite is characterized by the extensive development of micro-sized miarolitic pegmatites (typically with diameters of 5 to 15 mm) irregularly distributed through its upper levels, and larger miarolitic pegmatites (up to 1 m) in the uppermost levels. This granite also shows evidence of varied forms of transport of extremely volatile rich residual melts/fluids, in the form of more or less discrete inter-granular melt bodies, and associated magmatic quartz veins formed in tectonic fissures. Together, these provide evidence for the origin of miarolitic pegmatites, both in the specific case of Königshain, and more generally. Our evidence suggests that miarolitic pegmatites form from volatile- and alkali-rich residual melts, ranging from 10 to 50% H2O, far more than typical granitic melts, but far more silicate components than aqueous fluids or vapor suggested by some authors. Using melt inclusions in quartz from the aplitic and graphic granite zones in miarolitic pegmatites in the Königshain granite, we show that two different inclusion populations are present. We provide evidence that the first inclusion population are those related to the primary granite at the level of intrusion, and the second were trapped during the re-crystallization of the granite wall rocks by silicate-rich supercritical fluids moving through the solid crystal framework with a porosity < 25 and a permeability > 0 (see Clarke et al., 2013). Our results show that a significant volume fraction of the miarolitic pegmatites was not created by a pegmatite-forming fluid, but formed in-situ by re-crystallization of wall-rocks, triggered by highly reactive volatiles exsolved from the pegmatite-forming melts. Evidence is also presented which suggests the nature and speed of emplacement of the Königshain granite. This evidence may explain the unusual

  11. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions as indicators of granite genesis in the New England Batholith, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Shaw, S.E.; Flood, R.H.

    1977-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope studies of a number of granite suites and mineral separates from the New England Batholith indicate that ??O18 can be used to discriminate the major granite protoliths. The granite suites previously subdivided on the basis of mineralogical and geochemical criteria into S-type (sedimentary) and I-type (igneous) have ??O18 values consistently higher in the S-type granites (10.4-12.5) than in the spatially related I-type plutons (7.7-9.9). There appears to be a systematic variation in ??O18 from the most S-type to the most I-type granites, the dividing point between the two occuring at ??O18 equal to 10. A group of leucocratic granites that form about half of the batholith and difficult to classify mineralogically and geochemically is found to have low ??O18 values (6.4-8.1), suggesting an affinity to the most I-type granites. A single leucogranite pluton with minor muscovite has a ??O18 of 9.6 which is significantly higher than other leucogranites indicating a different origin perhaps involving amphibole fractionation. The behavior of ??D in the plutonic rocks is much less systematic than ??O18. Excluding samples collected adjacent to major faults, the ??D values show a rough positive correlation with water content similar to, but less pronounced than, the trend previously observed in the Berridale Batholith, southeastern Australia. This relation is considered to reflect an interaction between meteoric water and the granites, the largest effect being observed in samples with the least amount of water. Of note is the generally lower ??D values of the upper Paleozoic New England Batholith compared with the Silurian Berridale Batholith. This difference may be related to a near equatorial paleolatitude of 22 ??S in the Silurian and near polar paleolatitudes in the late Carboniferous that have been inferred for these regions. Granite samples collected from near major faults, and one ignimbrite sample of rhyodacite composition, have very low ??D

  12. Damage and Plastic Deformation Modeling of Beishan Granite Under Compressive Stress Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Wang, C. P.; Liu, J. F.; Liu, J.; Wang, J.; Jia, Y.; Shao, J. F.

    2015-07-01

    Based on experimental investigations, we propose a coupled elastoplastic damage model to simulate the mechanical behavior of granite under compressive stress conditions. The granite is taken from the Beishan area, a preferable region for China's high-level radioactive waste repository. Using a 3D acoustic emission monitoring system in mechanical tests, we focus on the cracking process and its influence on the macroscopic mechanical behavior of the granite samples. It is verified that the crack propagation coupled with fractional sliding along the cracks is the principal mechanism controlling the failure process and nonlinear mechanical behavior of granite under compressive stress conditions. Based on this understanding, the coupled elastoplastic damage model is formulated in the framework of the thermodynamics theory. In the model, the coupling between damage and plastic deformation is simulated by introducing the independent damage variable in the plastic yield surface. As a preliminary validation of the model, a series of numerical simulations are performed for compressive tests conducted under different confining pressures. Comparisons between the numerical and simulated results show that the proposed model can reproduce the main features of the mechanical behavior of Beishan granite, particularly the damage evolution under compressive stress conditions.

  13. Measurements of natural radioactivity and the resulting radiation doses from commercial granites.

    PubMed

    Aydarous, A Sh; Zeghib, Sadek; Al-Dughmah, Mohammed

    2010-12-01

    Saudi Arabia is becoming a relatively large market for local and foreign marble and granite use in dwellings. Due to increasing concern about environmental radiological protection, different types of locally widely used granite tiles were collected from different suppliers in the Jeddah province, Saudi Arabia. The analysis for these granite tiles for gamma radiation was conducted by means of a high-resolution HPGe gamma-spectroscopy system. The activity concentrations of (232)Th, (226)Ra and 40K in the selected granite samples ranged from 4.9 to 144, 9.7 to 133 and 168 to 1806 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The data were compared with other granite types and building materials used all over the world. The absorbed dose rates, effective dose rates, radium equivalent activities as well as the radiation hazard indices were estimated. The radium equivalent activities (Ra(eq)) are lower than the limit of 370 Bq kg(-1) set by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (Exposure to radiation from the natural radioactivity in building materials. Report by a Group of Experts of the OECD, Nuclear Energy Agency, OECD, Paris, 1979) except in three samples.

  14. [Spectral characteristics and implication of granite from pozaiying molybdenite deposits in west of Guangdong].

    PubMed

    An, Yan-Fei; Zhong, Li-li; Zhou, Yang-Zhang; Chen, Qing; Li, Xing-yuan

    2014-06-01

    Some granite samples from Pozaiying molybdenite deposits in the west of Guangdong were retrieved to characterize the spectral signature of XRD, FT-NIR and Raman. The results show that compared to the Porphyry granite and granite in the far zone, the signal of XRD and Raman of granite in near zone is weaker while the signal of FT-NIR is stronger. The authors' analyses indicate that the FWHM of quartz (101) peak in XRD, Sericite peak (4 529 cm(-1)) in FT-NIR and quartz peak in Raman shift from the latter are higher than those of former two. Those spectral characteristics indicate that compared with other samples, the content of petrogenetic mineral in samples from near zone is lower while the content of alteration mineral is higher, and its crystallinity and crystallization temperatures are both lower. The authors' studies suggest that there may be an alteration zone, embracing the granite-porphyry, which comprised low temperature mineral, and the quartz-porphyry which related to molybdenite mineralization belongs to the zone near Guanshanzhang mass.

  15. Hydrogen analysis for granite using proton-proton elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, T; Sasa, K; Ohshima, H; Kimura, H; Tajima, Y; Takahashi, T; Ishii, S; Yamato, Y; Kurosawa, M

    2008-07-01

    In an effort to develop DS02, a new radiation dosimetry system for the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, measurements of neutron-induced activities have provided valuable information to reconstruct the radiation situation at the time of the bombings. In Hiroshima, the depth profile of (152)Eu activity measured in a granite pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge (128 m from the hypocenter) was compared with that calculated using the DS02 methodology. For calculation of the (152)Eu production due to the thermal-neutron activation reaction, (151)Eu(n,gamma)(152)Eu, information on the hydrogen content in granite is important because the transport and slowing-down process of neutrons penetrating into the pillar is strongly affected by collisions with the protons of hydrogen. In this study, proton-proton elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry has been used to deduce the proton density in the Motoyasu pillar granite. Slices of granite samples were irradiated by a 20 MeV proton beam, and the energies of scattered and recoil protons were measured with a coincidence method. The water concentration in the pillar granite was evaluated to be 0.30 +/- 0.07%wt. This result is consistent with earlier data on adsorptive water (II) and bound water obtained by the Karl Fisher method.

  16. Determination of Tensile Strength and Fracture Toughness of Granite Using Notched Three-Point-Bend Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yusuo; Hu, Xiaozhi

    2017-01-01

    Direct tensile strength and fracture toughness of rock and concrete, important properties for many applications, are cumbersome to measure directly. In this study, granite is chosen as an example to show how the tensile strength and fracture toughness can be measured from small three-point-bend samples of a single size but with different notches. An existing fracture mechanics model has been extended to include the stable fictitious crack growth before peak loads, which is then linked to the granite grain size. Both tensile strength and fracture toughness of granite can be estimated by the maximum load measurements from those notched three-point-bend samples. In total, 72 three-point-bend granite samples with different notches have been tested, and the estimated tensile strength and fracture toughness are compared with those available in the literature. The modified fracture mechanics model is then used to predict the fracture behaviour of smaller samples of the same granite. The theoretical prediction is confirmed by the experimental results of those smaller samples. Finally, the fracture model and its relation with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard on fracture toughness are discussed.

  17. Demonstration Of A Portable Approach For Rb-Sr Geochronology On The Boulder Creek Granite: Implications For Planetary Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, F.; Nowicki, K.; Whitaker, T.

    2011-12-01

    We have succeeded at producing a Rubidium-Strontium (Rb-Sr) geochronology measurement of the Boulder Creek Granite of 1.369±0.144 Ga (MSWD=1; actual value 1.34±0.07 Ga [0]) in under 5 hours using a laser desorption resonance ionization mass spectrometer (LDRIMS) that can be miniaturized for portable use. The LDRIMS approach would enable new in-situ radiometric measurements for the Moon and Mars that would significantly improve geologic interpretation of these complex surfaces and constrain impactor flux throughout the solar system. Models of the age error based on existing Rb-Sr measurements of Mars meteorites using 100-1000 LDRIMS measurements at ±0.1% (1σ) accuracy show that analytical uncertainties <±50 Ma are possible [1]. The LDRIMS technique avoids the interference and mass resolution issues associated with other geochronology measurements [2]. Our current prototype can measure the isotope ratio of lab standards with 10 ppm net Sr or Rb to a precision of ±0.1% (1σ), with a sensitivity of 1:1010 in ~15 minutes. The speed of the LDRIMS measurement allows thousands of samples to be measured in significantly shorter periods of time than traditional methods, with little or no sample preparation. This abstract focuses on samples of the Boulder Creek Granite from Elephant Butte located in Boulder, Colorado, composed of a "gneissic quartz monzonite and granodiorite with local facies of aplite, alaskite, hornblende diorite, and pegmatite" [3]. We rough cut a block of Boulder Creek Granite to fit our sample holder, verifying that a range of quartz, plagioclase, hornblende and biotite were visible, and placing it in our sample chamber. 3000 laser desorption shots were acquired at each of 97 spots manually separated in a rastering fashion by ~300-500 μm. For this initial experiment, no attempt was made to localize desorption to a single mineral, or identify the mineral under desorption. The age error of ±144 m.y. is consistent with our analytical models for a

  18. An early Paleozoic monzonorite-granite suite in the South China block: implications for the intracontinental felsic magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenjing; Xu, Xisheng

    2017-01-01

    Large granitoid complexes within the continental crust are believed to be closely linked to mantle-derived magmas based on field observations and isotopic studies. However, details on the contribution of mantle-derived magmas in the generation of felsic magmas deep in the lower to middle crust, especially the interaction between the mantle-derived mafic magmas and the generated felsic melts, are not well constrained by petrological and mineralogical studies. Here we present a detailed study of an early Paleozoic monzonorite-granite suite from the South China Block and comparison with the other coeval magmatic rocks ( 22,000km2) in the region, to provide more details on the underplating/intraplating of mantle-derived magmas and the generation of felsic magmas in intracontinental settings. It is shown that the monzonorite has signatures of both mantle-derived magmas (substantial contents of MgO, Cr, and Ni; presence of olivine and orthopyroxene) and crust-derived magmas (substantial contents of SiO2, K2O, Rb, Ba, and light rare-earth elements; presence of K-feldspar, quartz and low-calcium plagioclase). Interestingly, the monzonorite, granite and the mafic microgranular enclaves (MME) are remarkably uniform in Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions, with high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7081-0.7098), low ɛNd (t) values (-6.8 to -6.3) and low zircon ɛHf (t) values (-8.0 to -7.4). An integrated study of petrological, mineralogical, and geochemical data of the monzonorite-granite suite and coeval magmatic rocks from the same region makes it clear that the input of crustal components is essential to explain the unusual signatures of the monzonorite. Petrogenetic modelling and isotopic compositions suggest that the contribution of mantle-derived mafic magmas in the generation of crust-derived felsic magmas is represented by heat input and minor mass input, and in the meantime, we prefer to explain the unusual geochemical signatures of the monzonorite by selective contamination

  19. Glacial modification of granite tors in the Cairngorms, Scotland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, A.M.; Phillips, W.M.

    2006-01-01

    A range of evidence indicates that many granite tors in the Cairngorms have been modified by the flow of glacier ice during the Pleistocene. Comparisons with SW England and the use of a space-time transformation across 38 tor groups in the Cairngorms allow a model to be developed for progressive glacial modification. Tors with deeply etched surfaces and no, or limited, block removal imply an absence of significant glacial modification. The removal of superstructure and blocks, locally forming boulder trains, and the progressive reduction of tors to stumps and basal slabs represent the more advanced stages of modification. Recognition of some slabs as tor stumps from which glacial erosion has removed all superstructure allows the original distribution of tors to be reconstructed for large areas of the Cairngorms. Unmodified tors require covers of non-erosive, cold-based ice during all of the cold stages of the Middle and Late Pleistocene. Deformation beneath cold-based glacier ice is capable of the removal of blocks but advanced glacial modification requires former wet-based glacier ice. The depth of glacial erosion at former tor sites remains limited largely to the partial or total elimination of the upstanding tor form. Cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages (Phillips et al., 2006) together with data from weathering pit depths (Hall and Phillips, 2006), from the surfaces of tors and large erratic blocks require that the glacial entrainment of blocks from tors occurred in Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 4-2, 6 and, probably, at least one earlier phase. The occurrence of glacially modified tors on or close to, the main summits of the Cairngorms requires full ice cover over the mountains during these Stages. Evidence from the Cairngorms indicates that tor morphology can be regarded as an important indicator of former ice cover in many formerly glaciated areas, particularly where other evidence of ice cover is sparse. Recognition of the glacial modification of tors is important

  20. Trace-element compositions and Br/Cl ratios of fluid inclusions in the Tsushima granite, Japan: Significance for formation of granite-derived fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosawa, Masanori; Sasa, Kimikazu; Shin, Ki-Choel; Ishii, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    Fluid inclusions in quartz samples from a miarolitic cavity, two quartz veins, and a hydrothermal ore vein in the Tsushima granite, Japan, were analyzed by particle-induced X-ray emission to examine the chemistry and process of formation of hydrothermal fluids in an island-arc granite. Most of the inclusions were polyphase or vapor, and there were smaller numbers of two-phase aqueous inclusions. The inclusions contained Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ge, Br, Rb, Sr, Ba, and Pb. For each inclusion, there was a strong positive correlation between Cl content and contents of other elements identified. Concentration ranges for most elements (other than Rb and Ge) in polyphase inclusions from the miarolitic cavity were comparable to those from cavities in alkaline granites; those from the ore vein were comparable to large-scale continental hydrothermal ore deposits. The lower Rb and higher Ge contents in the polyphase inclusions of the Tsushima granite may be characteristic of hydrothermal fluids from calc-alkaline granites in an island-arc setting. Br/Cl ratios (by weight) for the vapor and two-phase inclusions were 0.0013-0.0030 and differed among the three geological settings. Br/Cl ratios of polyphase inclusions increased with increasing Cl content in single-crystal and polycrystalline quartz, and high values of more than 0.0100 were found. The high Br/Cl ratios and the differences among the geological settings sampled may be due to pressure dependences of partitioning of Cl and Br between fluid and magma during fluid segregation and between liquid and vapor during boiling. Using a simple model based on these dependences, we calculated Br/Cl ratios greater than 0.01 in brine generated at pressures <0.89 kbar. Differences in Br/Cl ratios in polyphase and vapor inclusions from each geological setting were attributed to mixing between two end-member fluids: a high Br/Cl fluid generated at low pressure and a low Br/Cl fluid generated at high pressure. Br/Cl ratios of

  1. Minerals Associated with Biofilms Occurring on Exposed Rock in a Granitic Underground Research Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. Ann; Kamineni, D. Choudari; Sawicki, Jerzy A.; Beveridge, Terry J.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock requires the effects of microbial action to be investigated. The Underground Research Laboratory excavated in a pluton of the Canadian Shield provides a unique opportunity to study these effects. Three biofilms kept moist by seepage through fractures in granitic rock faces of the Underground Research Laboratory have been examined. The biofilms contained a variety of gram-negative and gram-positive morphotypes held together by an organic extracellular matrix. Nutrient levels in the groundwater were low, but energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has shown biogeochemical immobilization of several elements in the biofilms; some of these elements were concentrated from extremely dilute environmental concentrations, and all elements were chemically complexed together to form amorphous or crystalline fine-grained minerals. These were seen by transmission electron microscopy to be both associated with the surfaces of the bacteria and scattered throughout the extracellular matrix, suggesting their de novo development through bacterial surface-mediated nucleation. The biofilm consortia are thought to concentrate elements both by passive sorption and by energy metabolism. By Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, one of the biofilms showed that iron was both oxidized and precipitated as ferrihydrite or hematite aerobically and reduced and precipitated as siderite anaerobically. We believe that some Archean banded-iron formations could have been formed in a manner similar to this, as it would explain the deposition of hematite and siderite in close proximity. This biogeochemical development of minerals may also affect the transport of material in waste disposal sites. Images PMID:16349374

  2. An investigation of cathodoluminescence in albite from the A-type Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect

    Dalby, Kim N.; Anderson, Alan J.; Mariano, Anthony N.; Gordon, Robert A.; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Wirth, Richard

    2009-12-15

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) reveals red and blue colors within single, non-turbid albite (Ab{sub 98-99}) grains from the Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia. A 720 nm X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) peak characterizes red CL regions, while a 280 nm XEOL feature dominates blue CL regions. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence results indicate that red CL and the 720 nm XEOL peak intensities relate to total Fe concentrations. The relationship between red CL and Fe content is confirmed by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The XEOL technique is used to exclude the Fe K-edge as the cause of red CL. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicate that Fe in both the red and blue CL regions is Fe{sup 3+}, and that red CL activation may relate to the Si-Al order of the feldspar and to the distribution of Fe on tetrahedral sites. The CL textures, combined with EMPA and LA-ICPMS analyses, indicate that blue CL albite (Ab98) regions contain higher concentrations of Ca, Ti, Pb and rare earth elements, and were replaced, in part, by a more Fe-rich, trace element depleted albite (Ab99) which displays red CL. Complex diffraction contrasts and amorphous deposits identified in transmission electron microscope images suggest that aqueous fluids have reacted with both red and blue CL regions. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures of up to 430 C provide a lower estimate of the fluid temperature.

  3. Coupled THMC modelling of single fractures in novaculite and granite for DECOVALEX-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, A.; Chittenden, N.; Fedors, R. W.; Lang, P. S.; McDermott, C.; Neretnieks, I. E.; Pan, P.; Šembara, J.; Brusky, I.; Watanabe, N.; Lu, R.; Yasuhara, H.

    2015-12-01

    The host rock immediately surrounding a nuclear waste repository has the potential to undergo a complex set of physical and chemical processes starting from construction of the facility until many years after completion. Understanding the relevant processes of fracture evolution may be key to supporting the attendant safety arguments for such a facility. In the present phase of the international research project DECOVALEX, the experimental work of Yasuhara et al [1,2] has been examined, wherein artificial fractures in novaculite and granite are subject to a mechanical confining pressure, variable fluid flows and different applied temperatures. Differential pressures across the samples were measured to determine permeability and hence hydraulic aperture evolution, while at the same time the chemical composition of the outflows were continually sampled. For the novaculite experiments, the fracture surfaces' topography were characterised using a high-resolution laser profilometer (see Figure 1), and post-experimental characterisation of the aperture was performed using a Wood's metal fracture cast. This paper presents a synthesis of the ongoing work of six separate research teams. A range of approaches are presented including 2D and 3D high resolution coupled THMC models. Homogenised 'single compartment' models of the fracture have also been adopted, attempting to upscale the processes so that they could be used in larger network or effective continuum models. Particular attention is given to the competing roles of aqueous geochemistry, pressure solution, stress corrosion and pure mechanics in order to reproduce the experimental observations. The results of the work show that while good, physically plausible representations of the experiment can be obtained, there is considerable uncertainty in the relative importance of the various processes and that the parameterisation of these processes can be closely linked to the physical interpretation of the fracture surface

  4. Mineralogy and geochemistry of the Paleoproterozoic, tin-mineralized Bom Jardim granite of the Velho Guilherme Suite, eastern Amazonian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarão, Claudio Nery; Cordovil Pinho, Sabrina Cristina; de Paiva, Antonio Lima; Galarza, Marco Antônio

    2012-10-01

    The Bom Jardim granite is located to the south of São Felix do Xingu town and is intrusive in the intermediate to felsic volcanic rocks of the Uatumã Group. It is formed dominantly of coarse- to medium-grained isotropic monzogranite and syenogranite, both affected by intense late- to post-magmatic alteration. Biotite, generally chloritized, is the main primary mafic phase, with rare amphibole being found in the monzogranite. Hydrothermally altered and greisenized rocks, containing small primary concentrations of cassiterite + wolframite, as well as quartz veins with millimeter- to centimeter-sized crystals of wolframite + pyrite + fluorite occur in pervasively altered cupolas. Presently, alluvial cassiterite and wolframite (±columbite, tantalite) are mined in the Pedra Preta mine, located in the northern part of the pluton. SEM data showed that Sn-W mineralization is dominantly associated with syenogranite and greisenized rocks. EDS Semi-quantitative analysis revealed that the zircon crystals of the Bom Jardim granite are characteristically enriched in Hf, Y, U, and Th and display Zr/Hf ratios decreasing from monzogranite/leucomonzogranite toward syenogranite and greisenized syenogranite rocks, suggesting that magmatic differentiation significantly contributed for this particular feature. The Bom Jardim granite is slightly peraluminous and displays geochemical affinities with A-type granites. The Bom Jardim granite varieties evolved dominantly by fractional crystallization and their REE patterns are similar to those of the tin-specialized granites of the Velho Guilherme suite. It is concluded that the more evolved granites and associated greisenized rocks of the Bom Jardim pluton are tin-specialized granites. The similarities observed between the granites of the Velho Guilherme suite and the Bom Jardim granite allow to include the latter in this important granite suite.

  5. Water-rock interaction on the development of granite gneissic weathered profiles in Garhwal Lesser Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyshnavi, S.; Islam, R.

    2015-07-01

    The development and sustainability of weathered profiles are very difficult in the Himalaya due to its complex lithology, tectonic history and fast erosion. Despite this, two weathered profiles namely WPa (weathered profile a) and WPb (weathered profile b) which have sustained erosion are developed on porphyry granite gneiss and granite gneissic lithology in Alaknanda valley of the Garhwal Lesser Himalaya. Systematic sampling of these two weathered profiles was done from bottom to top and they were chemically analysed to understand the elemental mobility in each profile. Major, trace and rare earth element studies show dissimilar behaviour with the advancement of weathering. In WPa profile, the CIA value of LAR (LAR) is 50 which reveals that the rock has not suffered any alteration but in WPb profile, the CIA value of LAR is 64 which indicates significant amount of chemical alteration. A-CN-K projection also exhibits similar behaviour. Further, the relative mobility of all the major and trace elements show variable elemental distribution in both the profiles. Enrichment of Mg, Fe, Ti, Al, Co, Ni, Zr, LREE and depletion of Na, K, P, Ca, Si, LILE and HFSE are observed in WPa profile; while the depletion of Na, K, Ca, P, Si, HREE and enhancement of Fe, Mn, Ti, Sc, Co, Zr, LREE are noticed in WPb profile. The rare earth elements also show a dissimilar mobilization pattern in both the profiles due to their strong dependency on lithology, and corresponding climate and tectonic interaction. Contrasting elemental mobility in both the profiles depict the major role in disparity of lithological characters and subsequent development of fractures produced by the major thrust system (Ramgarh thrust) which made an easy passage for rain water, thus causing the development of a chemically altered profile in the Lesser Himalayan region. Further, the present study infers the climate and tectonic milieu which is responsible for the development of such weathered profiles in Himalayan

  6. Schlieren-bound Magmatic Structures Formed by the Unmixing of Granitic Magmas: A Case Study from Pothole Dome, Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardill, K. E.; Paterson, S. R.; Memeti, V.

    2015-12-01

    There is ongoing debate regarding the mobility of crystal mush zones in granitic magmas and their ability to mix and interact with intrusive batches to form compositional heterogeneity in plutons. Magmatic structures, localized zones of compositional diversity, enable evaluation of the significance of magmatic flow and convection vs. chemical diffusion in magmatic systems by determining their mode of formation. With further study, magmatic structures are potentially powerful tools recording syn-emplacement tectonic activity. Pothole Dome, in the Cathedral Peak Granodiorite of the Tuolumne Intrusive Complex is an ideal location to investigate magmatic structures since a variety of plumes, pipes, mafic ellipsoids, and schlieren troughs are densely clustered. Previous workers have established patterns in the orientations of different Pothole Dome magmatic structures that are indicative of a broad pattern of movement and younging directions at the kilometer scale. Preliminary whole-rock geochemical and isotopic data compare variations between the normal Cathedral magmas and a plume, trough, tube, potassium feldspar cluster and granitic dyke to investigate plausible mechanisms for the formation of the distinct compositional diversity formed in the structures. Schlieren, abundant in biotite, hornblende, apatite, sphene and zircon show relatively high levels of titanium, calcium and magnesium relative to the feldspar cluster and dyke. Schlieren are also enriched in minor elements including Zr, Y, Sr and Ce relative to the felsic structures. Both elemental and isotopic data for schlieren defining the plumes and troughs and the late leucogranitic dikes and k-feldspar clusters all plot outside the typical mixing line for Cathedral Peak Granodiorite compositions. We postulate that this may be a result of an unmixing process during physical flow of previously mixed populations of chemically distinct crystals in the Cathedral Peak.

  7. Planning and drilling geothermal energy extraction hole EE-2: a precisely oriented and deviated hole in hot granitic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Helmick, C.; Koczan, S.; Pettitt, R.

    1982-04-01

    During the preceding work (Phase I) of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Project at Fenton Hill, two holes were drilled to a depth of nearly 3048 m (10,000 ft) and connected by a vertical hydraulic fracture. In this phase, water was pumped through the underground reservoir for approximately 417 days, producing an energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t). Energy Extraction Hole No. 2 (EE-2) is the first of two deep holes that will be used in the Engineering-Resource Development System (Phase II) of the ongoing HDR Project of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This phase of the work consists of drilling two parallel boreholes, inclined in their lower, open-hole sections at 35/sup 0/ to the vertical and separated by a vertical distance of 366 m (1200 ft) between the inclined parts of the drill holes. The holes will be connected by a series of vertical, hydraulically produced fractures in the Precambrian granitic rock complex. EE-2 was drilled to a depth of 4660 m (15,289 ft), where the bottom-hole temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F). Directional drilling techniques were used to control the azimuth and deviation of the hole. Upgrading of the temperature capability of existing hardware, and development of new equipment was necessary to complete the drilling of the hole in the extremely hot, hard, and abrasive granitic formation. The drilling history and the problems with bits, directional tools, tubular goods, cementing, and logging are described. A discussion of the problems and recommendations for overcoming them are also presented.

  8. Mafic inclusions in Yosemite granites and Lassen Pk lavas: records of complex crust-mantle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, J.B. Jr.; Flinn, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This study compares three small-scale magmatic systems dominated by mafic/felsic interaction that appear to be analogs to the evolution of their larger host systems: mafic inclusions from modern Lassen Pk lavas along with inclusions and related synplutonic dike materials from granitoids in the Tuolumne Intrusive Series. Each system represents quickly chilled mafic melt previously contaminated by digestion of rewarmed, super-solidus felsic hosts. Contaminants occur in part as megacrysts of reworked oligoclase with lesser hb and biot. Within each group MgO-variation diagrams for Fe, Ca, Ti, Si are strikingly linear (r>.96); alkalis are decidedly less regular, and many hybrid rocks show a curious, pronounced Na enrichment. Field data, petrography, and best fit modeling suggests this may result from flow concentration of oligoclase xenocrysts within contaminated synplutonic dikes, and is preserved in the inclusions when dike cores chill as pillows in their felsic host. Dissolution of mafic inclusions erases these anomalies and creates a more regular series of two-component mafic-felsic mixtures in the large host system. The inclusions and dikes thus appear to record a variety of late-stage mafic-felsic interactive processes that earlier and on a larger scale created much of the compositional variety of their intermediate host rocks.

  9. The role of microcracking in shear-fracture propagation in granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Microcracking related to the formation of a laboratory shear fracture in a cylinder of Westerly granite has been investigated using image-analysis computer techniques. Well away from the fracture, the deformed granite has about twice the crack density of undeformed granite. The microcrack density increases dramatically in a process zone that surrounds the fracture tip, and the fracture tip itself has more than an order of magnitude increase in crack density over the undeformed rock. Microcrack densities are consistently higher on the dilational side of the shear than on the compressional side. The preferred orientation and uneven distribution of microcracks in the process zone tends to pull the propagation fracture tip towards the dilational side. As a result, the propagating shear follows the microcrack trend for some distance and then changes direction in order to maintain an overall in-plane propagation path. -from Authors

  10. Seismogenic faulting in the Meruoca granite, NE Brazil, consistent with a local weak fracture zone.

    PubMed

    Moura, Ana Catarina A; De Oliveira, Paulo H S; Ferreira, Joaquim M; Bezerra, Francisco H R; Fuck, Reinhardt A; Do Nascimento, Aderson F

    2014-12-01

    A sequence of earthquakes occurred in 2008 in the Meruoca granitic pluton, located in the northwestern part of the Borborema Province, NE Brazil. A seismological study defined the seismic activity occurring along the seismically-defined Riacho Fundo fault, a 081° striking, 8 km deep structure. The objective of this study was to analyze the correlation between this seismic activity and geological structures in the Meruoca granite. We carried out geological mapping in the epicentral area, analyzed the mineralogy of fault rocks, and compared the seismically-defined Riacho Fundo fault with geological data. We concluded that the seismically-defined fault coincides with ∼E-W-striking faults observed at outcrop scale and a swarm of Mesozoic basalt dikes. We propose that seismicity reactivated brittle structures in the Meruoca granite. Our study highlights the importance of geological mapping and mineralogical analysis in order to establish the relationships between geological structures and seismicity at a given area.

  11. Seismogenic faulting in the Meruoca granite, NE Brazil, consistent with a local weak fracture zone.

    PubMed

    Moura, Ana Catarina A; Oliveira, Paulo H S DE; Ferreira, Joaquim M; Bezerra, Francisco H R; Fuck, Reinhardt A; Nascimento, Aderson F DO

    2014-10-24

    A sequence of earthquakes occurred in 2008 in the Meruoca granitic pluton, located in the northwestern part of the Borborema Province, NE Brazil. A seismological study defined the seismic activity occurring along the seismically-defined Riacho Fundo fault, a 081° striking, 8 km deep structure. The objective of this study was to analyze the correlation between this seismic activity and geological structures in the Meruoca granite. We carried out geological mapping in the epicentral area, analyzed the mineralogy of fault rocks, and compared the seismically-defined Riacho Fundo fault with geological data. We concluded that the seismically-defined fault coincides with ∼E-W-striking faults observed at outcrop scale and a swarm of Mesozoic basalt dikes. We propose that seismicity reactivated brittle structures in the Meruoca granite. Our study highlights the importance of geological mapping and mineralogical analysis in order to establish the relationships between geological structures and seismicity at a given area.

  12. Laboratory grown subaerial biofilms on granite: application to the study of bioreceptivity.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Nion, Daniel; Silva, Benita; Troiano, Federica; Prieto, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Simulated environmental colonisation of granite was induced under laboratory conditions in order to develop an experimental protocol for studying bioreceptivity. The experimental set-up proved suitable for producing subaerial biofilms by inoculating granite blocks with planktonic multi-species phototrophic cultures derived from natural biofilms. The ability of four different cultures to form biofilms was monitored over a three-month growth period via colour measurements, quantification of photosynthetic pigments and EPS, and CLSM observations. One of the cultures under study, which comprised several taxa including Bryophyta, Charophyta, Chlorophyta and Cyanobacteria, was particularly suitable as an inoculum, mainly because of its microbial richness, its rapid adaptability to the substratum and its high colonisation capacity. The use of this culture as an inoculum in the proposed experimental set-up to produce subaerial biofilms under laboratory conditions will contribute to standardising the protocols involved, thus enabling more objective assessment of the bioreceptivity of granite in further experiments.

  13. Strain behavior of a granite and a Graywacke sandstone in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schock, R. N.; Louis, H.

    1982-09-01

    Westerly granite and Lance graywacke sandstone were deformed with one of the principal stresses tensile at the same time that the principal strains were monitored. Both rocks exhibited inelastic behavior prior to failure. Pronounced dilatancy and softening in shear took place in the granite. When Young's modulus varied, it did so continuously between compression and tensile stress states with no apparent discontinuity at zero axial stress, implying that cracks played the same role in tension as in compression. Failure was observed whenever the tensile stress exceeded a critical value, in agreement with predictions from Griffiths' failure criterion. The sandstone exhibited approximately twice as much strain per unit stress change as the granite and showed evidence of grain-to-grain movement as well as crack closure, results consistent with comparisons determined earlier when all stresses are compressive.

  14. Strain behavior of a granite and a graywacke sandstone in tension

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, R.N.; Louis, H.

    1982-09-10

    Westerly granite and Lance graywacke sandstone were deformed with one of the principal stresses tensile at the same time that the principal strains were monitored. Both rocks exhibited inelastic behavior prior to failure. Pronounced dilatancy and softening in shear took place in the granite. When Young's modulus varied, it did so continuously between compression and tensile stress states with no apparent discontinuity at zero axial stress, implying that cracks played the same role in tension as in compression. Failure was observed whenever the tensile stress exceeded a critical value, in agreement with predictions from Griffiths' failfure criterion. The sandstone exhibited approximately twice as much strain per unit stress change as the granite and showed evidence of grain-to-grain movement as well as crack closure, results consistent with comparisons determined earlier when all stresses are compressive.

  15. Comparative study of ornamental granite cleaning using femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, T.; Lopez, A. J.; Ramil, A.; Pozo, S.; Fiorucci, M. P.; Silanes, M. E. López de; García, A.; Aldana, J. R. Vazquez de; Romero, C.; Moreno, P.

    2013-08-01

    Granite has been widely used as a structural and ornamental element in public works and buildings. In damp climates it is almost permanently humid and its exterior surfaces are consequently biologically colonized and blackened We describe a comparative analysis of the performance of two different laser sources in removing biological crusts from granite surfaces: nanosecond Nd:YVO4 laser (355 nm) and femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser at its fundamental wavelength (790 nm) and second harmonic (395 nm). The granite surface was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, attenuated total reflection - Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and profilometry, in order to assess the degree of cleaning and to characterize possible morphological and chemical changes caused by the laser sources.

  16. Subaerial biofilms on granitic historic buildings: microbial diversity and development of phototrophic multi-species cultures.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Nion, D; Rodríguez-Castro, J; López-Rodríguez, M C; Fernández-Silva, I; Prieto, B

    2016-07-01

    Microbial communities of natural subaerial biofilms developed on granitic historic buildings of a World Heritage Site (Santiago de Compostela, NW Spain) were characterized and cultured in liquid BG11 medium. Environmental barcoding through next-generation sequencing (Pacific Biosciences) revealed that the biofilms were mainly composed of species of Chlorophyta (green algae) and Ascomycota (fungi) commonly associated with rock substrata. Richness and diversity were higher for the fungal than for the algal assemblages and fungi showed higher heterogeneity among samples. Cultures derived from natural biofilms showed the establishment of stable microbial communities mainly composed of Chlorophyta and Cyanobacteria. Although most taxa found in these cultures were not common in the original biofilms, they are likely common pioneer colonizers of building stone surfaces, including granite. Stable phototrophic multi-species cultures of known microbial diversity were thus obtained and their reliability to emulate natural colonization on granite should be confirmed in further experiments.

  17. Chronology and petrogenesis of a 1.8 g lunar granitic clast:14321,1062

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Bansal, B. M.; Wiesmann, H.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Wooden, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Geochronological, isotopic, and trace element data for a pristine granite clast from Apollo 14 breccia 14321 obtained using Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and (Ar-39)-(Ar-40) methods are presented. Trace element data for a possibly related evolved rock, the quartz-monodiorite clast from breccia 15404 are also presented, and the relationship between these two rock types is discussed. The concordancy of the Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd internal isochron ages and especially the Rb-Sr model age strongly suggest that the granite clast formed 4.1 AE ago. It probably crystallized slowly in the crust and was later excavated and brecciated about 3.88 AE ago, as indicated by the Ar-Ar age. A two-stage model involving crystal fractionation followed by silicate liquid immiscibility is proposed for the lunar granite genesis.

  18. Radiation dose to workers due to the inhalation of dust during granite fabrication.

    PubMed

    Zwack, L M; McCarthy, W B; Stewart, J H; McCarthy, J F; Allen, J G

    2014-03-01

    There has been very little research conducted to determine internal radiation doses resulting from worker exposure to ionising radiation in granite fabrication shops. To address this issue, we estimated the effective radiation dose of granite workers in US fabrication shops who were exposed to the maximum respirable dust and silica concentrations allowed under current US regulations, and also to concentrations reported in the literature. Radiation doses were calculated using standard methods developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The calculated internal doses were very low, and below both US occupational standards (50 mSv yr(-1)) and limits applicable to the general public (1 mSv yr(-1)). Workers exposed to respirable granite dust concentrations at the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) respirable dust permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 5 mg m(-3) over a full year had an estimated radiation dose of 0.062 mSv yr(-1). Workers exposed to respirable granite dust concentrations at the OSHA silica PEL and at the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Value for a full year had expected radiation doses of 0.007 mSv yr(-1) and 0.002 mSv yr(-1), respectively. Using data from studies of respirable granite dust and silica concentrations measured in granite fabrication shops, we calculated median expected radiation doses that ranged from <0.001 to 0.101 mSv yr(-1).

  19. "Gris Quintana": a Spanish granite from the Past into the Future.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Tejado, Juan; Mota, M. Isabel; Pereira, Dolores

    2014-05-01

    "Gris Quintana" is a medium-grained, biotite and amphibole granodiorite extracted in the Pluton of Quintana de la Serena (Extremadura, Spain). It is a constant light grey granite from the Hercynian geologic with excellent physicomechanical and physicochemical properties. The granodiorite is composed of plagioclase, biotite, quartz and alkali feldspar, with accessory allanite, titanite, apatite, zircon and ilmenite, mostly as inclusions within the biotite crystals. This commercial variety is extracted from many quarries in the late Hercynian plutons located in the Iberian Massif in Spain period (transition between Central Iberian and Ossa-Moren Zones), having large reserves of granite. Many of the quarries have their own transformation factory (high production zone), with which the sector is offered an endless variety of finishes and constructive rock typologies. A wide range of solutions to architects and designers are offered. Gris Quintana granite is one of the materials with highest technological benefits that are used in arquitecture. "Gris Quintana" granite has been used since ancient times, not only at a regional, but also at national and international level: paving, building (structural, exterior façadas, interior uses), urban decoration and funeral art. It can be found in monuments and more recently, in buildings of different styles and uses, that stand out in beauty and splendor, lasting in time. Some singular works in "Gris Quintana" granite all over the world: extension to the "Congreso de Diputados" (Parliament) in Madrid, "Puerta de San Vicente" in Madrid, Andalucia Parliament columns in Sevilla, New Senate Buiding in Madird, "Gran Vía" pavement in Madrid, "Teatro Real façade" in Madrid… "Gris Quintana" granite accomplishes all the requirements for its nomination as Global Heritage Stone Resource, for both its use in construction and for artistic purposes.

  20. Petrochemical and isotopic studies of Transhimalayan granites in Ladakh, NW India

    SciTech Connect

    Srimal, N.; Basu, A.R.; Sinha, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    The India-Asia collision zone in the Transhimalayan Indus and Shyok Tectonic Belts (STB) of Ladakh, NW India is characterized by two major granitic batholiths. The northern, Karakoram Granitic batholith and the southern, Ladakh Granitic batholith are separated by thrust-bound belts of ophiolite, flysch and calc-alkaline volcanics of Mesozoic to Tertiary age. The KGC can be divided into three zones: a northern zone of metaluminous to mildly peraluminous granodiorite, diorite and tonalite with normative corundum, a southern zone of peraluminous two-mica and garnet bearing granites with normative corundum 1.8-3.3%, K/Rb=200-310, Rb/Sr > 0.3 and initial /sup 87/Sr/ /sup 86/Sr > 0.7113, and a central zone with variable K/Rb, Rb/Sr and initial /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios showing characteristics of both the northern and the southern zones. Field and characteristics of both the northern and the southern zones. Field and geochemical data indicate that: 1) the northern granites of the KGC represent an older magmatic arc derived largely from igneous sources with a small admixture of evolved crustal components and 2) the southern granites of the KGC are derived by partial melting of mature crustal material. Preliminary work in the LGC indicate varying source contamination reflected in variable initial /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios (.7041-.7072) and in correlated /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr vs. delta /sup 18/O plot. The authors data suggest: 1) multiple accretion of Gondwanic fragments in the Mesozoic and Tertiary along the southern margin of Asia, 2) absence of extensive crustal anatexis in the source region of the Ladakh batholith, and 3) remobilization of old sutures and crustal anatexis as a result of India-Asia collision.

  1. Analyses of SRS waste glass buried in granite in Sweden and salt in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.P.; Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Lodding, A.R.

    1991-12-31

    Simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste glass forms have been buried in the granite geology of the Stirpa mine in Sweden for two years. Analyses of glass surfaces provided a measure of the performance of the waste glasses as a function of time. Similar SRS waste glass compositions have also been buried in salt at the WIPP facility in Carlsbad, New Mexico for a similar time period. Analyses of the SRS waste glasses buried in-situ in granite will be presented and compared to the performance of these same compositions buried in salt at WIPP.

  2. Analyses of SRS waste glass buried in granite in Sweden and salt in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.P. ); Wicks, G.G. ); Clark, D.E. ); Lodding, A.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste glass forms have been buried in the granite geology of the Stirpa mine in Sweden for two years. Analyses of glass surfaces provided a measure of the performance of the waste glasses as a function of time. Similar SRS waste glass compositions have also been buried in salt at the WIPP facility in Carlsbad, New Mexico for a similar time period. Analyses of the SRS waste glasses buried in-situ in granite will be presented and compared to the performance of these same compositions buried in salt at WIPP.

  3. Map Showing Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology of the Granite Park Area, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hereford, Richard; Burke, Kelly J.; Thompson, Kathryn S.

    2000-01-01

    View to west-northwest showing map area and setting of Granite Park; Grand Canyon, Arizona. The Colorado River flows from right to left. Granite Park Wash is the light-colored area in foreground of photograph. The debris fan of 209 Mile Canyon is at left center. Pleistocene gravel is exposed in the steep, light-colored bank above 209 Mile Rapids at left edge of photograph. The black-colored ledge that forms the dark cliff at upper right of photograph is the basalt flow of Hamblin (1994). Sand dunes, debris fans, and terraces of the Colorado River cover the lower half of this area shown in this photograph.

  4. Effect of Pressure and Stress on Water Transport in Intact and Fractured Gabbro and Granite

    SciTech Connect

    Trimmer, D.; Bonner, B.; Heard, H.C.; Duba, A.

    1980-12-10

    New laboratory data are reported on the effect of confining pressure (to 60 MPa), pore-water pressure (to 30 MPa), and stress difference (to 0.88 of the fracture stress) on permeability of intact and fractured White Lake gneissic granite. Westerly granite, and Creighton gabbro. Permeabilities as low as 10/sup -24/ m/sup 2/ (10/sup -2/ darcy) have been measured using a transient technique. Fracture displacement, electrical conductance, compressional velocity, and pulse amplitude are determined simultaneously. The loads applied to the 0.15-m-diameter by 0.28-m-length test sample are controlled automatically, and most data are taken by microprocessor. Tests on the intact gneissic granite indicated permeabilities of 10/sup -22/ to 10/sup -24/ m/sup 2/ that appeared to be unaffected either by effective pressure or by stress. The granite yielded permeabilities of 4 +- 10/sup -20/ m/sup 2/ that decreased by a factor of 2 as effective pressure increased to 25 MPa and varied by a factor of 2 as stress was increased to 0.5 of the fracture stress. Permeability of the gabbro linearly decreased from 2 x 10/sup -22/ to 8 x 10/sup -24/ m/sup 2/ with effective pressures to 25 MPa. Loading of the gabbro up to 0.88 of the fracture stress increased permeability by a factor of 7. The introduction of a throughgoing fracture increased the apparent permeability by 10/sup 6/ to 10/sup 9/ over the intact values in both granite and gabbro. When compared to the initial value, compressional velocities increased by 5% with pressure to 30 MPa in the gneissic granite. For granite, pressurization from 2 to 25 MPa increased the velocity and pulse amplitude by 5 and 30%, and decreased the conductance by 50%. Velocity, amplitude, and conductance were weakly dependent on pressure in gabbro. The addition of stress decreased velocity and amplitude while increasing conductance markedly on both granite and gabbro.

  5. Pattern of elemental release during the granite dissolution can be changed by aerobic heterotrophic bacterial strains isolated from Damma Glacier (central Alps) deglaciated granite sand.

    PubMed

    Lapanje, Aleš; Wimmersberger, Celine; Furrer, Gerhard; Brunner, Ivano; Frey, Beat

    2012-05-01

    Colonisation and weathering of freshly deglaciated granite are key processes in initial soil formation and development. We have obtained 438 isolates from granite sand covering glacial toe, 284 isolates at 22°C and 154 at 4°C incubation temperatures, respectively, to obtain cultures for the investigation of their weathering capabilities under laboratory conditions. The isolation of bacteria from granite sand was performed on rich-, intermediate- and low-nutrient-content solid media. Isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. According to the genera-associated weathering capabilities described in the literature and according to their abundance in our culture collection, we selected eight strains to analyse their effects on the weathering dynamics of granite sand during the batch culture experiment. Analysis of culturable bacteria showed higher species richness among isolates from 22°C than from 4°C incubations. In the R2A and 1/100 Ravan media, we observed the highest species richness of isolates obtained at 22°C and 4°C incubation temperatures, respectively. The obtained 16S rRNA sequences revealed the presence of alpha-, beta- and gamma-proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The most numerous group of isolates was distantly related to Collimonas representatives, and according to the sequences of the 16S rRNA genes, they can form a new genus. Isolates from this group had the capability of causing increased dissolution rates for Fe, W, Ni and Rb. In general, at each sampling during the 30-day experiment, every strain showed a unique weathering profile resulting from differential rates of the dissolution and the precipitation of different minerals in the batch culture. Consequently, the presence of different strains, their growth stage and changes in proportions of strains in the bacterial community can affect further soil development and the successive colonisation by plants.

  6. Chemical and isotopic studies of granitic Archean rocks, Owl Creek Mountains, Wyoming: Uranium-thorium-lead systematics of an Archean granite from the Owl Creek Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Stuckless, J.S.; Nkomo, I.T.; Butt, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    Isotopic analyses of apparently unaltered whole-rock samples of a granite from the Owl Creek Mountains, Wyo., yield a lead-lead isochron age of 2730 {plus minus} 35 Ma, which is somewhat older than the age obtained by the rubidium-strontium whole-rock method. Thorium-lead data for the same samples deviate markedly from an isochronal relation; however, calculated initial {sup 208}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratios correlate with whole-rock {delta}{sup 18}O values and lead to the conclusion that the {sup 232}Th-{sup 208}Pb data are not colinear because of an originally heterogeneous granitic magma. Relationships in the {sup 207}Pb/{sup 235}U-{sup 206}Pb/{sup 238}U system show that uranium was mobilized during early Laramide time or shortly before, such that most surface and shallow drill-core samples lost 60-80 percent of their uranium, and some fractured, deeper drill-core samples gained from 50 to 10,000 percent uranium. Fission-track maps show that much uranium is located along edges and cleavages of biotite and magnetic where it is readily accessible to oxidizing ground water. Furthermore, qualitative comparisons of uranium distribution in samples with excess radiogenic lead and in samples with approximately equilibrium amounts of uranium and lead suggest that the latter contain more uranium in these readily accessible sites. Unlike other granites that have uranium distributions and isotopic systematics similar to those observed in this study, the granite of the Owl Creek Mountains is not associated with economic uranium deposits.

  7. 76 FR 40722 - Granite Reliable Power, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Granite Reliable Power, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based... above-referenced proceeding of Granite Reliable Power, LLC's application for market-based rate...

  8. Sorption and diffusion of selenium oxyanions in granitic rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikonen, Jussi; Voutilainen, Mikko; Söderlund, Mervi; Jokelainen, Lalli; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Martin, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    The processes controlling diffusion and sorption of radionuclides have been studied extensively in the laboratory, whereas, only a few in-situ experiments have been carried out in order to study in-situ diffusion over the long-term (several years). This is largely due to the fact that in-situ experiments are typically time consuming and cost intensive, and it is commonly accepted that laboratory scale tests are well-established approaches to characterizing the properties of geological media. In order to assess the relevance of laboratory experiments, the Swiss National Cooperative for Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra) have been conducting extensive experiments in the Underground Rock Laboratory (URL) at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in order to study radionuclide transport and retention in-situ. One of the elements used in these experiments is non-radioactive selenium, as an analog for the radiotoxic isotope Se-79, which is present in radioactive waste. In this work, two laboratory through-diffusion experiments using selenium as a tracer were carried out in block (decimeter) scale rock specimens to support one of the ongoing radionuclide transport and retention in-situ experiment at the GTS mentioned above. The though-diffusion tests of selenium were performed under atmospheric conditions in both Kuru grey granite (KGG) and Grimsel granodiorite (GG). The decrease of selenium concentration in an inlet hole drilled into each of the rock samples and the breakthrough of selenium into sampling holes drilled around the inlet were analyzed using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The effective diffusion (De) and distribution coefficients (Kd) of selenium were then determined from the changes of selenium concentration in the inlet and sampling holes using a Time-Domain Diffusion (TDD) simulations. In addition, Kd of selenium was measured by batch sorption experiments as a function of pH and Se concentration in atmospheric conditions and nitrogen

  9. Ratamah specialized granite, Midyan region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; rock types, geochemistry and rare-metal distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douch, Colin J.

    Detailed prospecting at Ratamah (29°07'N, 35°20'E), after reconnaissance prospecting suggested that it was a tin-mineralizing granite, showed that much of the exposed portion of the pluton is albite-bearing alkali-feldspar granite forming a 10 m-thick roof zone above albite-free alkali-feldspar granite. Lenses of albite—amphibole microgranite in marginal contact zones are associated with faults. Albite-bearing granite is enriched in Fe 2O 3, Na 2O, F, La and W compared with albite-free granite. Microgranite is strongly enriched in Al 2O 3, FeO, Na 2O, MnO and Be, La, Nb, Sn, Y, Zr and F. Albitization is thought to have resulted from deuteric and hydrothermal reaction following soda enrichment in residual phases of the crystallizing magma.

  10. Biofouling of granite-rapakivi in St. Petersburg monuments and in the quarry in Russia and Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, Dmitry; Panova, Elena; Alampieva, Elena; Olhovaya, Elena; Popova, Tatyana; Vlasov, Alexey; Zelenskaya, Marina

    2013-04-01

    Granite-rapakivi was widely used in the architecture of St. Petersburg: the facades of buildings, embankments of rivers and canals, bridges, sculptural monuments, pedestals, facing the metro stations. This stone is rapidly destroyed due to the peculiarities of its structure. Biofouling of granite is insufficiently studied. Cause the destruction of granite can be bacteria, microscopic algae, fungi, mosses, lichens, higher plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. They often form specific lithobiotic communities that contribute to the destruction of granite-rapakivi. The objects of research were monuments of St. Petersburg (granite sculpture, facades, facing embankments) as well as granite-rapakivi quarries in Russia and Finland, where the stone was quarried for use in St. Petersburg. Sampling was carried out from the most typical biofouling sites. Different methods were applied for the study of damaged granite: petrographic analysis, light and scanning electron microscopy, methods for detection and identification of microorganisms, X-ray microprobe analysis. As result the main forms of granite destruction were described: fractures, ovoid weathering, granular disintegration, surface films, crusts and layers, pitting and fouling. Lichens, mosses, herbaceous and micromycetes were dominated on the granite-rapakivi in quarries. For example, in a Monferran quarry (Virolahti region) the complicated lithobiotic community was revealed. It included 30 species of micromycetes, 31 species of lichens, 10 species of moss. Bacteriological analysis showed the dominance of bacteria Bacillus, and actinomycetes in microbial biofilms. More than 100 species of plants were found on the granite embankments in St. Petersburg. They were confined to the cracks, seams of granite blocks. Plants and mosses were common to the granite embankments of rivers and canals in the central (historical) part of the city. Dimensions of mosses depend on the area of the deepening which they occupy. The most

  11. Episodic growth of a Late Cretaceous and Paleogene intrusive complex of pegmatitic leucogranite, Ruby Mountains core complex, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, K.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Barnes, C.G.; Premo, W.R.; Snoke, A.W.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Gneissic pegmatitic leucogranite forms a dominant component (>600 km3) of the midcrustal infrastructure of the Ruby Mountains-East Humboldt Range core complex (Nevada, USA), and was assembled and modified episodically into a batholithic volume by myriad small intrusions from ca. 92 to 29 Ma. This injection complex consists of deformed sheets and other bodies emplaced syntectonically into a stratigraphic framework of marble, calc-silicate rocks, quartzite, schist, and other granitoids. Bodies of pegmatitic granite coalesce around host-rock remnants, which preserve relict or ghost stratigraphy, thrusts, and fold nappes. Intrusion inflated but did not disrupt the host-rock structure. The pegmatitic granite increases proportionally downward from structurally high positions to the bottoms of 1-km-deep canyons where it constitutes 95%-100% of the rock. Zircon and monazite dated by U-Pb (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe, SHRIMP) for this rock type cluster diffusely at ages near 92, 82(?), 69, 38, and 29 Ma, and indicate successive or rejuvenated igneous crystallization multiple times over long periods of the Late Cretaceous and the Paleogene. Initial partial melting of unexposed pelites may have generated granite forerunners, which were remobilized several times in partial melting events. Sources for the pegmatitic granite differed isotopically from sources of similar-aged interleaved equigranular granites. Dominant Late Cretaceous and fewer Paleogene ages recorded from some pegmatitic granite samples, and Paleogene-only ages from the two structurally deepest samples, together with varying zircon trace element contents, suggest several disparate ages of final emplacement or remobilization of various small bodies. Folded sills that merge with dikes that cut the same folds suggest that there may have been in situ partial remobilization. The pegmatitic granite intrusions represent prolonged and recurrent generation, assembly, and partial melting modification of a

  12. Episodic growth of a Late Cretaceous and Paleogene intrusive complex of pegmatitic leucogranite, Ruby Mountains core complex, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, Keith A.; Wooden, J.L.; Barnes, C.G.; Premo, W.R.; Snoke, A.W.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Gneissic pegmatitic leucogranite forms a dominant component (>600 km3) of the midcrustal infrastructure of the Ruby Mountains–East Humboldt Range core complex (Nevada, USA), and was assembled and modified episodically into a batholithic volume by myriad small intrusions from ca. 92 to 29 Ma. This injection complex consists of deformed sheets and other bodies emplaced syntectonically into a stratigraphic framework of marble, calc-silicate rocks, quartzite, schist, and other granitoids. Bodies of pegmatitic granite coalesce around host-rock remnants, which preserve relict or ghost stratigraphy, thrusts, and fold nappes. Intrusion inflated but did not disrupt the host-rock structure. The pegmatitic granite increases proportionally downward from structurally high positions to the bottoms of 1-km-deep canyons where it constitutes 95%–100% of the rock. Zircon and monazite dated by U-Pb (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe, SHRIMP) for this rock type cluster diffusely at ages near 92, 82(?), 69, 38, and 29 Ma, and indicate successive or rejuvenated igneous crystallization multiple times over long periods of the Late Cretaceous and the Paleogene. Initial partial melting of unexposed pelites may have generated granite forerunners, which were remobilized several times in partial melting events. Sources for the pegmatitic granite differed isotopically from sources of similar-aged interleaved equigranular granites. Dominant Late Cretaceous and fewer Paleogene ages recorded from some pegmatitic granite samples, and Paleogene-only ages from the two structurally deepest samples, together with varying zircon trace element contents, suggest several disparate ages of final emplacement or remobilization of various small bodies. Folded sills that merge with dikes that cut the same folds suggest that there may have been in situ partial remobilization. The pegmatitic granite intrusions represent prolonged and recurrent generation, assembly, and partial melting modification of a

  13. Geology of the Silsilah ring complex, and associated tin mineralization, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia - a synopsis.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    A tin greisen deposit is associated with an alkali-feldspar granite that forms part of a ring complex at Jabal as Silsilah. The petrological and geochemical characteristics of the Fawwarah alkali-feldspar granite resemble those of granites located elsewhere that are also associated with deposits of Sn, W and rare metals. The alkali-feldspar granite is peraluminous, incompatible trace-element-enriched, and is characterized by a flat chondrite-normalized REE pattern that includes a very large, negative Eu anomaly. The distinctive mineralogy of the alkali-feldspar granite includes zinnwaldite and topaz. Differentiation and mineral fractionation controlled magma evolution while components of the ring complex were sequentially emplaced. Evolution of the ring complex and its associated tin deposit concluded with local, intense alteration of the Fawwarah alkali-feldspar granite to a cassiterite-bearing greisen. Samples of greisens suggest that the locus of economic tin deposits is not restricted to the two known, strongly mineralized greisens.-J.A.Z.

  14. Magnetic fabric transposition in folded granite sills in Variscan orogenic wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Závada, Prokop; Calassou, Thibaud; Schulmann, Karel; Hrouda, František; Štípská, Pavla; Hasalová, Pavlína; Míková, Jitka; Magna, Tomáš; Mixa, Petr

    2017-01-01

    New approach involving evaluation of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) data in stereoplots and Jelínek's Pj-T space, Vollmer's eigenvalue and microstructural analyses is proposed to discriminate between homogeneous and superposed deformation in granites. This method is used to decipher the internal AMS fabric and microstructural evolution of a folded array of granitic sills. The studied major sill shows a fabric and microstructural zonality marked by submagmatic and high-temperature Type I planar-linear fabric developed at sill margins, and the transpositional Type II subsolidus fabrics that formed at high to medium temperature deformation in the sill core. While Type I fabric is associated with dip slip magnetic lineations, Type II subsolidus fabrics are marked by subhorizontal magnetic lineations striking parallel to the long axis of the sill. The structural reconstruction of the fabrics in the granite and the host rocks as well as new U-Pb zircon ages suggest coeval emplacement of horizontal and vertical sills accounting for significant weakening of the host rock-magma multilayer. The model of folding of such multilayer and extrusion of residual magma parallel to axial planes is discussed with respect to structural record in other syn-contractional granite sill arrays forming sheeted plutons worldwide.

  15. Pioneering fungi from the Damma glacier forefield in the Swiss Alps can promote granite weathering.

    PubMed

    Brunner, I; Plötze, M; Rieder, S; Zumsteg, A; Furrer, G; Frey, B

    2011-05-01

    Fungi were isolated from fine granitic sediments, which were collected at 15 sampling points within a 20 m × 40 m area in front of the Damma glacier in the central Swiss Alps. From the 45 fungal isolates grown on nutrient-rich agar media at 4 °C, 24 isolates were selected for partial sequencing and identification based on the small subunit ribosomal DNA. Sequencing data revealed that the isolated fungi represented three fungal phyla and 15 species. The weathering potential of 10 of the 15 fungal species was tested with dissolution experiments using powdered granite material (<63 μm). The results showed that the zygomyceteous species Mucor hiemalis, Umbelopsis isabellina and Mortierella alpina dissolved the granite powder most efficiently due to the release of a variety of organic acids, mainly citrate, malate and oxalate. In particular, the high concentrations of Ca, Fe, Mg and Mn in the solutions clustered well with the high amounts of exuded citrate. This is the first report on fungi that were isolated from a non-vegetated glacier forefield in which the fungi's capabilities to dissolve granite minerals were examined.

  16. Impact of environmental dewatering of Lower Granite and Little Goose reservoirs on benthic invertebrates and macrophytes

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, C.E.

    1993-09-01

    An investigation into the effects of dewatering on the benthic fauna in Lower Granite and Little Goose reservoirs was undertaken. Benthos in both the soft bottom regions of the reservoirs as well as those inhabiting the rock rip-rap along the shoreline were studied. These organisms provide an important food resource for both migrating salmonids and resident fish species; thus, impacts of contemplated dewatering schemes require evaluation. The results of these studies indicate that there were no significant, long-term impacts to the soft bottom benthos as a result of dewatering in Little Goose Reservoir. In fact, higher numbers of some taxa indicate that there may have been a washout of these organisms from Lower Granite Reservoir with subsequent deposition in the upper reaches of Little Goose Reservoir. This should be accompanied by a coincident decrease in these organisms in Lower Granite Reservoir. However, we did not have pre-dewatering samples from Lower Granite Reservoir with which we could compare post-filling samples to determine if the dewatering resulted in lower benthic populations.

  17. Trace-element geochemistry of postorogenic granites from the northeastern Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, John S.; Knight, R.J.; VanTrump, G.; Budahn, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Concentrations determined for all of the trace elements included in this study of postorogenic granites from the northeastern Arabian Shield are best described by log-normal distributions. The trace elements are divided into two groups: (1) compatible lithophile and siderophile elements (strontium, cobalt, scandium, manganese, europium, and titanium) and (2) incompatible lithophile elements (uranium, thorium, tantalum, rubidium, and rare-earth elements, except europium). The compatible elements exhibit greatest concentrations in the metaluminous postorogenic granites, and concentrations decrease with increasing degree of magma evolution. Economic potential for these elements and other geochemically similar elements is considered to be low. The concentrations of the incompatible elements increase with increasing degree of magma evolution and are greatest in the peralkaline and peraluminous granites. There is some geologic evidence that pegmatite and vein-forming processes were operative toward the end stage of postorogenic magmatism in the northeastern Arabian Shield, and therefore there is some probability for economic potential for these elements. It is suggested that such potential is greatest where highly evolved postorogenic granites intruded volatile (generally water )-rich country rocks.

  18. Building Capacity through Sustainable Engagement: Lessons for the Learning Community from the "GraniteNet" Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arden, Catherine; McLachlan, Kathryn; Cooper, Trevor

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports an exploration into critical success factors for the sustainability of the partnership between the University of Southern Queensland and the Stanthorpe community during the GraniteNet Phoenix Project--the first phase of a three-phase participatory action research project conducted during 2007-2008. The concepts of learning…

  19. The Advanced Placement English Program in Salt Lake and Granite School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stratopoulos, Irene Chachas

    The main purposes in examining and evaluating the Advanced Placement English Program in Salt Lake and Granite School Districts were to identify the essential curriculum features of the program, to make suggestions for curriculum improvement, and to determine whether or not the quality of the AP English Program surpassed that of the conventional…

  20. A-type stratoid granites of Madagascar: evidence of Rodinia rifting at ca 790 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelec, Anne; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Bouchez, Jean-Luc

    2015-04-01

    The so-called stratoid granites are sheet-like granites emplaced as conformable sills in the Precambrian basement of central Madagascar. Most of them have A-type affinities (Nédélec et al. 1995). They are everywhere characterized by the same structural pattern evidencing two stages of deformation. The first one (foliations mildly dipping to the west and lineations trending WSW) is regarded as the consequence of synkinematic magma emplacement. The second stage, characterized by interference folds, steeply dipping foliations and subhorizontal lineations trending to the north, corresponds to a more or less pronounced reworking in ductile conditions, regarded as the result of Late Pan-African transcurrent tectonics. To the north of Antananarivo, the stratoid granites are associated with comagmatic quartz-syenites. New U-Pb zircons ages obtained by in situ analyses reveal two group of ages: upper intercept ages of ca 790 Ma, and younger ages of ca 550 Ma corresponding to crystal rims. These new data question the geological significance of former TIMS ages of ca 630 Ma formerly obtained from the same rocks (Paquette & Nédélec 1998). It is suggested that the stratoid granites and syenites were emplaced during a crustal thinning event corresponding to an early Rodinia rifting stage. The Pan-African imprint on these rocks is therefore limited to reheating, tectonic reworking and deep fluid transfer in the vicinity of Late-Neoproterozoic shear zones at ca 550 Ma (Nédélec et al. 2014).

  1. Petrology and chemistry of two 'large' granite clasts from the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, P. H.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.; Shirley, D. N.; Wasson, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    Pristine granite clasts in Apollo-14 breccias 14321 and 14303 have estimated masses of 1.8 and 0.17 g, respectively. The 14321 clast is about 60 percent K-feldspar and 40 percent quartz, with traces of extremely Mg-poor mafic silicates and ilmenite. The 14303 clast is roughly 33 percent plagioclase, 32 percent K-feldspar, 23 percent quartz, 11 percent pyroxene, and 1 percent ilmenite; pyroxene and ilmenite are moderately Mg-rich; plagioclase and pyroxene are strongly zoned. Both clasts are severely brecciated, but monomict (pristine). Both have abundant graphic integrowths of K-feldspar with quartz. Unlike the majority of similar earth rocks, both clasts are devoid of hydrous phases. The bulk composition of the 14321 clast is similar to those of several other lunar granitic samples, but the 14303 clast is unique: it bears as close a resemblance to KREEP as it does to other lunar granites. Silicate liquid immiscibility may explain why the granites are low in REE relative to KREEP.

  2. Evaluation of CO2 Sorption Capacity of Granite for CO2 Geological Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, T.; Sato, Y.; Lin, H.; Sasaki, K.; Takahashi, T.; Inomata, H.; Hashida, T.

    2007-03-01

    Anthropogenic effects on climate can be mitigated through various measures. Among them being CO2 sequestration into geological reservoirs including deep saline aquifers, depleted oil/gas reservoirs and coal seams are interested in a powerful means for drastically reducing emissions of CO2. When CO2 would be injected into geological reservoir, it should be necessary to know the potential of CO2 storing into the reservoir. In this study, amount of CO2 sorption of granite was to evaluate experimentally at temperatures 50, 70, 100 and 200°C and pressure up to 20 MPa using a magnetic suspension balance (MSB), which allows to measure under supercritical condition. As a result, we confirmed that the granite have the potential of CO2 sorption. Sorption isotherms obtained from the MSB experiment showed that amount of CO2 sorption increased with the increasing pressure and decreased with the increasing temperature for all experimental conditions. Especially, amount of CO2 sorption at 50°C compared with that at other temperatures (70, 100 and 200°C) increased rapidly in the vicinity of the critical state. In addition, the granite showed a maximum of CO2 sorption into granite could reach up to about 1.0% by weight at 50°C and 14.4MPa. The present results may provide a fundamental knowledge for the development of CO2 geological sequestration technology.

  3. Geochronology of the Xihuashan composite granitic body and tungsten mineralization, Jiangxi province, south China.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, E.H.; Rytuba, J.J.; Xu, Keqin

    1987-01-01

    One of the goals of this visit was to collect samples of different granitic rocks in the pluton for radiometric dating to establish the geochronology of intrusion, alteration, and mineralization. This report summarises geochronologic studies during a visit by Chinese and US scientists to the Xihuashan mine.-after Authors

  4. Trace-element contents of postorogenic granites of the eastern Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, J.S.; Vaughn, R.B.; VanTrump, George

    1986-01-01

    The regional trends for the chemical data and geochemical correlations over the large area sampled, suggest that the postorogenic granites were derived from a single protolith that formed by the mixing of oceanic sediments from the west, continental sediments from the east.

  5. Estimation of the indoor radon and the annual effective dose from granite samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, P.; Srinuttrakul, W.; Kewsuwan, P.

    2015-05-01

    Inhalation of radon and thoron daughters increases the risk of lung cancer. The main sources of indoor radon are building materials. The aim of this research is to estimate the indoor radon and the annual effective dose from the building materials. Eighteen granite samples bought from the markets in Thailand were measured using an ionization chamber (ATMOS 12 DPX) for the radon concentration in air. Radon exhalation rates were calculated from the radon concentration in chamber. The indoor radon from the granite samples ranged from 10.04 to 55.32 Bq·m-2·h-1 with an average value of 20.30 Bq·m-2·h-1 and the annual effective dose ranged from 0.25 to 1.39 mSv·y-1 with an average value of 0.48 mSv·y-1. The results showed that the annual effective doses of three granite samples were higher than the annual exposure limit for the general public (1 mSv·y-1) recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In addition, the relationship between the colours and radon exhalation rates of granite samples was also explained.

  6. Dependency of hydromechanical properties of monzonitic granite on confining pressure and fluid pressure under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanling; Xu, Weiya; Lui, Zaobao; Chao, Zhiming; Meng, Qingxiang

    2016-05-01

    Monzonitic granite is a low-permeability rock. Monzonitic granite formations are ideal for underground storage of oil due to their low permeability and high mechanical strength. In this study, a series of coupled hydromechanical triaxial tests are carried out using monzonitic granite specimens. The influence of confining and fluid pressures on stress, strain, and permeability is investigated. Failure characteristics under different confining and fluid pressures are discussed based on the analysis of macro fracture planes and micro scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The test results show that the change of permeability with stress and strain reflects the deformation stages of compaction, compression, crack propagation, coalesce, and failure of cracks. Due to the low porosity, the change of permeability is small in the initial phases of compaction and compression, whereas there is a significant increase in permeability when new cracks start to develop and coalesce. Confining pressures have a significant impact on the strength and permeability, particularly the crack damage stress of the rock. Compared with confining pressure, the effect of fluid pressure on rock strength and crack damage stress is small. For the monzonitic granite specimens tested, changing the confining pressure results in different failure modes, whereas the fluid pressure has a relatively small effect on the failure modes.

  7. A comparison of fracture transmissivities in granite water wells before and after hydrofracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, David

    2016-02-01

    In many regions of the world, crystalline bedrock aquifers are the only choice for groundwater supply. This is the case in northern Wisconsin, located in the upper Midwest of the continental United States. Here, groundwater flow to wells occurs only through fractures in the granitic basement. Although hydrofracturing of these wells is common and generally increases well yield, the precise mechanism for the increased yields remained unknown. Stressed and ambient flow logs were obtained in two 305-m-deep granitic boreholes in northern Wisconsin prior to hydrofracturing. From those logs, it was determined that nearly all of the groundwater flow to the boreholes occurred in less than 10 fractures in the upper 80 m, with no measureable contribution below that depth. Following hydrofracturing of the boreholes, stressed and ambient flow logs were again obtained. The transmissivity of the two boreholes increased by factors of 8.6 and 63 times. It was found that (1) the fractures that had contributed flow to the boreholes increased in transmissivity, (2) although the applied pressures were large enough in some instances to create new fractures, those new fractures did not increase the borehole transmissivities significantly, and (3) fractures without measureable flow before hydrofracturing remained without measureable flow. Hydrofracturing increases yield in granitic boreholes; however, that increase seems to only occur in fractures where flow was pre-existing and in the upper 80 m of the boreholes. These observations suggest that efforts to enhance yield in granitic aquifers should be focused on the upper part of the borehole.

  8. In-situ investigation of the influence of the long-term shear strength of faults on the regional stress field in a granite rock mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Bruno; Cornet, Francois; Lamas, Luís; Muralha, José

    2016-04-01

    A case study is presented to show how stress field measurements may be used to assess the long-term rheological behaviour of an equivalent geo-material. The example concerns a granitic rock mass at the km3 scale, where an underground hydropower scheme including a new 10 km long power conduit and a powerhouse complex will be constructed. For design of the underground cavern and hydraulic pressure tunnel, several in situ stress measurements were carried out, using hydraulic borehole testing, overcoring and flat jack techniques. A first continuum mechanics model, with a homogenous material, was developed to integrate the several in situ test results and to assess the regional stress field. This model is based on elasticity and relaxation of the elastic properties measured through laboratory tests conducted on cores. Results of integration show that the long-term behavior of this granite rock mass differs markedly from the short-term behaviour as defined by laboratory tests. This suggests that the in-situ stress field depends mostly on the softer material that fills up the faults and hence results from the shear stress relaxation over a large number of pre-existing fractures and faults. A second continuum mechanics model, with consideration of two fault planes located nearby the hydraulic tests, was studied. This model is based on elasticity for the overall rock mass, with the elastic properties extracted from laboratory measurements, and visco-elasticity with small long-term shear strength for the two fault planes. Results show that the overall granite rock mass may be viewed as a combination of stiff elastic blocks separated by soft low strength material, leading to a fairly large scale homogeneous axisymmetrical stress field with vertical axis. Advantages and limitations of the two modelling approaches are discussed.

  9. Experimental constraints on the Qitianling granite in south China: phase equilibria and petrogenetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fangfang; Scaillet, Bruno; Wang, Rucheng; Erdmann, Saskia; Chen, Yan; Faure, Michel; Liu, Hongsheng; Xie, Lei; Wang, Bo; Zhu, Jinchu

    2016-04-01

    In South China, the huge distribution of the Mesozoic metallogenic province reflects the abundant magmatism and associated mineralizations which occurred during that period. Building up the phase equilibrium diagrams of representative Mesozoic granites allows us to better understand Mesozoic magmatic events, an approach so far little applied to granites of South China. The Qitianling ganite is a representative Jurassic A-type metaluminous pluton which is associated with tin mineralization in South China. The dominant rock-types are hornblende-biotite monzonitic granites, biotite±hornblende bearing granites and fine-grained biotite-bearing granites. Three metaluminous granite samples (QTL38C, QTL14A and QTL13), of varying mafic character but all bearing hornblende, were chosen for constraining crystallization and magma generation conditions of the Qitianling composite batholith. Crystallization experiments were performed in the 100-700 MPa range, albeit mainly at 200 MPa, at an fO2 at NNO-1 or NNO +2.5, in a temperature range 700°C to 900°C. At 200 MPa, the water content in melt varies between 3 wt% and 6.5 wt% (water-saturated). Experimental results show that under H2O-saturated conditions and at NNO-1, ilmenite, magnetite and pyroxene are the liquidus phases, followed by hornblende, biotite and plagioclase. Hornblende is present only in the most mafic sample (QTL38C), below 900°C and above 5 wt% H2O. In contrast, for H2O-saturated conditions and at NNO+2.5, magnetite, pyroxene crystallize first, followed by biotite while ilmenite is rarely observed. Petrographic observations of natural samples show that magnetite and ilmenite coexist, whereas pyroxene is never observed. The Fe# value (Fe/Mg+Fe) of natural amphibole goes up to 0.69, being on average at 0.67. Experiments indicate that the crystallization of pyroxene occurs at early magmatic stages, but it breaks down to hornblende and biotite at low temperatures, explaining its absence in natural assemblages

  10. Late-Archaean Potassic Granite from the Bundelkhand Craton, Central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Saheli; Saha, Lopamudra; Nasipuri, Pritam; Pati, Jayanta Kumar; Patole, Vishal

    2014-05-01

    Late-Archaean granitoids, show wide range of compositional variation: (i) TTG like granitoids with strongly fractionated REE patterns, which can be both Na-rich and K-Mg-rich (Sanukitoids) (ii) K-rich, Mg-poor biotite granites with less fractionated REE patterns and showing negative Eu-anomalies (type area, the Closepet Granite, Eastern Dharwar Craton, India). Amongst them Late-Archaean Sanukitoid or K-rich Closepet-type granitoids are most widely reported from the Archaean Cratons world-wide: Superior Province, Canada, Pilbara Craton, Yilgarn Craton, Antarctica, Limpopo Belt, Dharwar Craton. Several models proposed so far for the origin of these granitoids mostly include partial melting of hydrated basalts, reaction of slab melts with mantle wedge peridotites, re-melting of an enriched mantle and then mixing of the resulting melt with the anatectic melt generated during the melting of continental crust in subduction zone settings. The Closepet-type potassic biotite-rich granites were mostly produced by re-melting of TTG-like continental basements most likely in a subduction zone setting. Most of the proposed models suggest such partial melting to have taken place in garnet-stability field and some in orthopyroxene-stability field. In this study we report late-Archaean (~2.61-2.5 Ga) potassic granite from the Bundelkhand Craton in central India. The Late-Archaean granitoids recorded from the craton are intrusive into the high-grade supracrustal rocks of the craton. They are classified as coarse grained grey, pink porphyritic granite, medium granied pink granite, granite porphyry and fine-grained pink granite. The supracrustal rocks of the craton have been metamorphosed at ~2.78 Ga under high-pressure conditions (~17-18 kbar)- medium temperature (600ºC) in a subduction zone setting. The intrusions of the granitoids at ~2.6-2.5 Ga mark the stability of the craton. The pink-porphyritic granite studied here preserves plagioclase-potash feldspar

  11. The Pan-African high-K calc-alkaline peraluminous Elat granite from southern Israel: geology, geochemistry and petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyal, M.; Litvinovsky, B. A.; Katzir, Y.; Zanvilevich, A. N.

    2004-10-01

    Calc-alkaline leucocratic granites that were emplaced at the late post-collision stage of the Pan-African orogeny are abundant in the northern half of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. Commonly, they are referred to as the Younger Granite II suite. In southern Israel such rocks are known as Elat granite. Studies of these rocks enable to recognize two types of granites: coarse-grained, massive Elat granite (EG), and fine- to medium-grained Shahmon gneissic granite (SGG). Both granite types are high-K and peraluminous ( ASI ranges from 1.03 to 1.16). They are similar in modal composition, mineral and whole-rock chemistry. Within the EG, a noticeable distinction in whole-rock chemistry and mineral composition is observed between rocks making up different plutons. In particular, the granite of Wadi Shelomo, as compared to the Rehavam pluton, is enriched in SiO 2, FeO∗, K 2O, Ba, Zr, Th, LREE and impoverished in MgO, Na 2O, Sr, and HREE. The Eu/Eu∗ values in the granite are low, up to 0.44. Mass-balance calculations suggest that chemical and mineralogical variations were caused by fractionation of ˜16 wt.% plagioclase from the parental Rehavam granite magma at temperature of 760-800 °C (muscovite-biotite geothermometer). The Rb-Sr isochrons yielded a date of 623 ± 24 Ma for the EG, although high value of age-error does not allow to constrain time of emplacement properly. The Rb-Sr date for SGG is 640 ± 9 Ma; however, it is likely that this date points to the time of metamorphism. A survey of the literature shows that peraluminous, high-K granites, similar to the EG, are abundant among the Younger Granite II plutons in the Sinai Peninsula and Eastern Desert, Egypt. They were emplaced at the end of the batholithic (late post-collision) stage. The most appropriate model for the generation of the peraluminous granitic magma is partial melting of metapelite and metagreywacke.

  12. Origin, distribution and glaciological implications of Jurassic high heat production granites in the Weddell Sea rift, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leat, Phil T.; Jordan, Tom A. R. M.; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Flowerdew, Michael; R, Riley, Teal; Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Whitehouse, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The distribution of heat flow in Antarctic continental crust is critical to understanding ice sheet nucleation, growth and basal rheology and hydrology. We identify a group of High Heat Production granites intruded into Palaeozoic sedimentary sequences which may contribute to locally high heat flow beneath the central part of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Four of the granite plutons are exposed above ice sheet level at Pagano Nunatak, Pirrit Hills, Nash Hills and Whitmore Mountains. A new U-Pb zircon age from Pirrit Hills of 177.9 ± 2.3 Ma confirms earlier Rb-Sr dating that suggested an Early-Middle Jurassic age for the granites, coincident with the Karoo-Ferrar large igneous province and the first stage of Gondwana break-up. Our recently-acquired aerogeophysical data indicate that the plutons are distributed unevenly over 1000 km2 and were intruded into the actively extending, locally transcurrent, Jurassic Weddell Sea Rift [1]. In the NW part of the rift, the Pirrit Hills, Nash Hills and Whitmore Mountains granites form small isolated intrusions within weakly deformed upper crust. In the SE part of the rift, where granite intrusion was strongly structurally controlled within transtensional structures, the Pagano Nunatak granite is the only outcrop of a probably multiphase, ca 180 km long granite intrusion. The granites are weakly peraluminous, S-type and have Th and U abundances up to 61 and 19 ppm respectively. Heat production of analysed granite samples is ca. 2.9-9.1 µWm-3, toward the upper limit of values for High Heat Production granites globally. The granites are thought to have been generated during mafic underplating of the Weddell Rift during eruption of the contemporaneous Karoo-Ferrar magmatism [2]. The high Th and U abundances may be related to fractionation of the high Th-U Ferrar basaltic magmas combined with assimilation of pelitic sedimentary rocks. The granites correspond to an area of West Antarctica that may have heat flow significantly above

  13. The pulmonary toxicity of talc and granite dust as estimated from an in vivo hamster bioassay.

    PubMed

    Beck, B D; Feldman, H A; Brain, J D; Smith, T J; Hallock, M; Gerson, B

    1987-02-01

    A short-term animal bioassay was used to assess the toxicity of occupational dusts. We quantified pulmonary responses in hamsters exposed to granite (12% quartz) and talc (quartz and asbestos-free) dust collected from worksites. Personal samples collected on workers showed similar quartz content and particle-size distributions to the high-volume samples collected for bioassays, thus demonstrating that the particulates were representative of worker exposure. We measured biochemical and cellular indicators of injury in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) of animals exposed to dust suspensions by intra-tracheal instillation. The assays measured release of cytoplasmic and lysosomal enzymes into the cell-free supernatant of BAL; levels of albumin and red blood cells; changes in macrophage and polymorphonuclear neutrophil cell numbers; and in situ macrophage phagocytosis. Dose-response (0.15, 0.75, and 3.75 mg/100 g body wt) and time-course (1-14 days postexposure) studies were performed. One day after exposure, both talc and granite dust resulted in elevated enzyme levels, pulmonary edema, and increased cell numbers in BAL. Macrophage phagocytosis was also inhibited. Based on earlier studies, response levels were either intermediate between nontoxic iron oxide and toxic alpha-quartz or comparable with alpha-quartz. The response to granite dust diminished fairly rapidly over time. By contrast, after talc exposure, there was a more persistent elevation in enzyme levels, and macrophage phagocytosis remained depressed. These results indicate that, when a similar mass was deposited in the lungs, talc caused more lung injury than did granite. Better estimates of exposure-dose relationships in talc and granite workers as well as longer-term animal studies are required to evaluate the harmfulness of these work environments at present-day exposure levels.

  14. Reutilization of granite powder as an amendment and fertilizer for acid soils.

    PubMed

    Barral Silva, M T; Silva Hermo, B; García-Rodeja, E; Vázquez Freire, N

    2005-11-01

    The properties of granite powders--a granite manufacturing waste product-were analyzed to assess their potential use as amendments and fertilizers on acid soils. Two types of powders were characterized: one produced during cutting of granite with a diamond-edged disc saw, comprising only rock powder, the other produced during cutting with a multi-blade bandsaw, containing calcium hydroxide and metal filings added during the cutting procedure. The acid neutralizing capacity of the granite powders was assessed in short- (2-3 h) and medium-term (1-30 d) experiments. The powders showed a buffering capacity at around pH 8, which corresponded to the rapid dissolution of basic cations, and another buffering effect at pH<4.5, attributable to the dissolution of Fe and Al. The acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) determined in the short-term experiments, to a final pH of 4.5, varied between 5 and 61 cmol H+kg(-1) powder. The ANC to pH 4.5 obtained in the medium-term experiments was much higher than that obtained in the short-term experiments, reaching a maximum ANC value of 200 cmol H+kg(-1) powder. There was no great difference in the neutralizing capacity determined at between 1 and 30 d. The most abundant elements in acid solutions obtained at the end of medium-term experiments were Mg and Ca for disc saw powders, whereas Ca and Fe (at pH<5) were the most soluble elements in the bandsaw powders. The rapid release of these cations suggests the possible effective use of the granite powders as a source of nutrients on being added to acid soils.

  15. Geology and mineralogy of the Alakha spodumene granite porphyry deposit, Gorny Altai, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annikova, I. Yu.; Vladimirov, A. G.; Smirnov, S. Z.; Gavryushkina, O. A.

    2016-09-01

    The Alakha lithium-tantalum deposit in the southern Altai, Russia, is represented by a stock of spodumene-bearing granite porphyry localized in the Kalba-Narym-Koktogai lithium-tantalum rare-metal granitic belt, unique in extent (more than 1000 km). This belt is a part of the Altai accretionary-collisional system. Judging from forecasting, the Alakha deposit can be regarded as an uneroded proxy of a pegmatite body both in dimensions and mean Li2O and Ta2O5 contents (0.98 wt % and 114 ppm, respectively); however, the oregenerating potential of this deposit remains insufficiently studied and had not yet been claimed. In this paper, we attempt to fill this gap with a detailed mineralogical study, which allows us to provide insights into the crystallization of Li-bearing high-silicic magma and redistribution of components during magmatic and postmagmatic processes. Accessory mineral assemblages in muscovite-spodumene-K-feldspar granite porphyry and muscovite albitite—the main petrographic rock varieties of the Alakha stock—turned out to be almost identical. A significant similarity in the chemistry of major rock-forming minerals is established for spodumene granite porphyry of the Alakha stock and spodumene pegmatites from large deposits, which makes it possible to suggest that they are close in the petrogenetic mechanism of their formation. The mineral assemblages of muscovite albitite in the apical portion of the Alakha stock are connected by gradual transition with those of spodumene granite porphyry. Such a transition is caused by postmagmatic metasomatic alteration of the latter.

  16. Ultrasonic characterization of granites obtained from industrial quarries of Extremadura (Spain).

    PubMed

    del Río, L M; López, F; Esteban, F J; Tejado, J J; Mota, M; González, I; San Emeterio, J L; Ramos, A

    2006-12-22

    The industry of ornamental rocks, such as granites, represents one of the most important industrial activities in the region of Extremadura, SW Spain. A detailed knowledge of the intrinsic properties of this natural stone and its environmental evolution is a required goal in order to fully characterize its quality. In this work, two independent NDT acoustic techniques have been used to measure the acoustic velocity of longitudinal waves in different prismatic granitic-samples of industrial quarries. A low-frequency transceiver set-up, based on a high-voltage BPV Steinkamp instrument and two 50 kHz probes, has been used to measure pulse travel times by ultrasonic through-transmission testing. In complementary fashion, an Erudite MK3 test equipment with an electromagnetic vibrator and two piezoelectric sensors has also been employed to measure ultrasonic velocity by means of a resonance-based method, using the same types of granite varieties. In addition, a comprehensive set of physical/mechanical properties have also been analyzed, according to Spanish regulations in force, by means of alternative methods including destructive techniques such as strength, porosity, absorption, etc. A large number of samples, representing the most important varieties of granites from quarries of Extremadura, have been analyzed using the above-mentioned procedures. Some results obtained by destructive techniques have been correlated with those found using ultrasonic techniques. Our experimental setting allowed a complementary characterization of granite samples and a thorough validation of the different techniques employed, thus providing the industry of ornamental rocks with a non-destructive tool that will facilitate a more detailed insight on the properties of the rocks under study.

  17. Adsorption of Se species on crushed granite: a direct linkage with its internal iron-related minerals.

    PubMed

    Jan, Yi-Lin; Wang, Tsing-Hai; Li, Ming-Hsu; Tsai, Shih-Chin; Wei, Yuan-Yaw; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of selenium species on crushed granite is investigated directly linking to its internal iron-related minerals. Experimental results demonstrated that granite has higher affinity toward Se(IV) adsorption than Se(VI) adsorption. Se(IV) adsorption on granite is insensitive to background electrolytes while the effect of ionic strength on Se(VI) adsorption is not observed, which is attributed to the overloading of Se(VI) ions. Results of chemical sequential extraction showed that the removal of crystalline iron oxides dramatically reduces Se(IV) adsorption, which corresponds to the disappearance of goethite signal within XRD pattern. Based on our results, it is proposed that goethite within granite dominates Se adsorption in crushed granite. Although these goethites probably stem from some sample preparation processes including drilling in situ, crushing, washing and drying granite samples in laboratory, the formation of goethite enhances the granite affinity toward Se species adsorption. Images of SEM/EDS furthermore revealed that goethite is embedded within the fractures. In addition, quantification by standard addition method by spiking goethite suspension indicates that only around 20% of goethite minerals are available during Se(IV) adsorption.

  18. The Age of the Tres Piedras Granite, New Mexico, USA: A Case of Large Scale Isotopic Homogenization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, R.; Holm, C.; Odom, L.

    2004-12-01

    The Tres Piedras Granite, exposed in the Tusas Mountain within the crystalline province of Eastern Rio Arriba Country, New Mexico, USA, is a granitic gneiss, which exhibits relict igneous textural features. The present study has obtained U-Pb zircon ages and Rb-Sr whole rock ages for the Tres Piedras Granite. The zircons removed from the Tres Piedras Granite delineate a chord that represents concordia at 1654 Ma and 98 Ma with a concordant point at 1654 Ma. Although there is no dated activity for this region at approximately 98 Ma, the episodic Pb loss is preferred because 1650 Ma diffusion analysis will not fit the data points. Rb - Sr whole rock data points obtained from the Tres Piedras Granite yields a distinct isochron for each outcrop sampled. The age and apparent initial Sr 87/ Sr86 ratios of the Tres Piedras Granite outcrops (approximately 50 square meters of collecting area at each exposure) are as follows: Tres Piedras Granite Type Locality: 1493 +/- 21 Ma and 0.7183 +/- 0.0006; Tres Piedras Granite - Tusas River Canyon: 1501 +/- 44Ma and 0.7145 +/- 0.0013; and Tres Piedras Granite - Tusas Mountain: 1661 +/- 17 Ma and 0.7102 +/- 0.0071. If the concordant zircon point at 1654 Ma indicated the time of crystallization, then some type of disturbance must have occurred in the Rb-Sr isotopic system of the Tres Piedras Granite to cause the Type locality and Tusas River Canyon isochron ages to differ from the zircon discordia intercept age. This difference is explained by large-scale isotope homogenization (during metamorphism) of Sr on the scale of kilometers. The metamorphic effect is also evident in thin section of the granites from the Type Locality and Tusas River Canyon. The feldspars are altered to mica and some of the quartz have been recrystallized to finer grains where as those from the Tusas Mountain are unaltered and have large grains of quartz and feldspars. Finally Lanzirotti and Hanson (1997) have dated the age of regional metamorphism from the

  19. The Age of the Tres Piedras Granite, New Mexico, USA: A Case of Large Scale Isotopic Homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, R.; Holm, C.; Odom, L.

    2003-04-01

    The Tres Piedras Granite, exposed in the Tusas Mountain within the crystalline province of Eastern Rio Arriba Country, New Mexico, USA, is a granitic gneiss, which exhibits relict igneous textural features. The present study has obtained U-Pb zircon ages and Rb-Sr whole rock ages for the Tres Piedras Granite. The zircons removed from the Tres Piedras Granite delineate a chord that represents concordia at 1654 Ma and 98 Ma with a concordant point at 1654 Ma. Although there is no dated activity for this region at approximately 98 Ma, the episodic Pb loss is preferred because 1650 Ma diffusion analysis will not fit the data points. Rb-Sr whole rock data points obtained from the Tres Piedras Granite yields a distinct isochron for each outcrop sampled. The age and apparent initial Sr87/Sr86 ratios of the Tres Piedras Granite outcrops (approximately 50 square meters of collecting area at each exposure) are as follows: Tres Piedras Granite Type Locality: 1493 +/- 21 Ma and 0.7183 +/- 0.0006; Tres Piedras Granite -- Tusas River Canyon: 1501 +/- 44 Ma and 0.7145 +/- 0.0013; and Tres Piedras Granite -- Tusas Mountain: 1661 +/- 17 Ma and 0.7102 +/- 0.0071. If the concordant zircon point at 1654 Ma indicated the time of crystallization, then some type of disturbance must have occurred in the Rb-Sr isotopic system of the Tres Piedras Granite to cause the Type locality and Tusas River Canyon isochron ages to differ from the zircon discordia intercept age. This difference is explained by large-scale isotope homogenization (during metamorphism) of Sr on the scale of kilometers. The metamorphic effect is also evident in thin section of the granites from the Type Locality and Tusas River Canyon. The feldspars are altered to mica and some of the quartz have been recrystallized to finer grains where as those from the Tusas Mountain are unaltered and have large grains of quartz and feldspars. Finally Lanzirotti and Hanson (1997) have dated the age of regional metamorphism from the

  20. Cause of large negative Eu anomaly in the highly evolved A-type granites with REE tetrad pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Asahara, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Lee, M.; Lee, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    REE tetrad pattern with strongly large negative Eu anomaly is one of the specific geochemical phenomena observed in the highly evolved, fractionated granite or A-type granite. The large negative Eu anomaly from the highly evolved or fractionated granites related with REE tetrad effect was discussed in a lot of literatures (e.g. [1] Muecke and Clarke, 1981; [2] Irber, 1999; [3] Jahn et al., 2001). Recently, Lee et al.[4] also suggested that Eu anomalies and REE tetrad pattern from the highly fractionated A-type Muamsa and Weolaksan granites in the Okcheon Metamorphic Belt, Korea, might be associated with a fractionation between the residual melt and a coexisting aqueous high temperature fluid. Their origin and geochemical significance are ongoing yet. In order to clarify cause of large negative Eu anomaly in the granite with REE tetrad effect more clearly, we reanalyzed REE abundance of the Muamsa and Weolaksan granites using MC-ICP-MS at the origins laboratory of the University of Chicago. We also measured REE abundances of the constituent minerals using quadruple ICP-MS at the Korea Polar Research Institute. In this report, we show the re-analyzed REE data from the whole rock as well as new REE data from constituent minerals of the granite with REE tetrad effect. Then, we discuss the cause of large negative Eu anomaly in the highly evolved granite with REE tetrad effect. Especially, the granites with very large negative Eu anomaly also show large negative Ce anomaly. Lee et al. [4] mentioned that negative Ce anomalies were formed after granite emplacement. However, our new data indicate that negative Ce anomaly might be formed during the same geochemical process with very large negative Eu anomaly. This suggests that the REE tetrad effect may be related with a change of oxidation state during a magma evolution. Therefore, we will discuss REE tetrad effect, negative Eu and Ce anomaly as an indicator for the change of oxidation state of magma during the emplacement

  1. Crustal structure of the Archaean granite-greenstone terrane in the northern portion of the Kaapvaal Craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debeer, J. H.; Stettler, E. H.; Barton, J. M., Jr.; Vanreenen, D. D.; Bearncombe, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Recent investigations of the electrical resistivity, gravity and aeromagnetic signatures of the various granite-greenstone units in the northern portion of the Kaapvaal craton have revealed three features of significance: (1) the Archean greenstone belts are shallow features, rarely exceeding 5 km in depth; (2) the high resistivity upper crustal layer typical of the lower grade granite-greenstone terranes is absent in the granulite facies terrane; and (3) the aeromagnetic lineation patterns allow the granite-greenstone terrane to be subdivided into geologically recognizable tectono-metamorphic domains on the basis of lineation frequency and direction. A discussion follows.

  2. Large-scale modeling of reactive solute transport in fracture zones of granitic bedrocks.

    PubMed

    Molinero, Jorge; Samper, Javier

    2006-01-10

    Final disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep repositories located in fractured granite formations is being considered by several countries. The assessment of the safety of such repositories requires using numerical models of groundwater flow, solute transport and chemical processes. These models are being developed from data and knowledge gained from in situ experiments such as the Redox Zone Experiment carried out at the underground laboratory of Aspö in Sweden. This experiment aimed at evaluating the effects of the construction of the access tunnel on the hydrogeological and hydrochemical conditions of a fracture zone intersected by the tunnel. Most chemical species showed dilution trends except for bicarbonate and sulphate which unexpectedly increased with time. Molinero and Samper [Molinero, J. and Samper, J. Groundwater flow and solute transport in fracture zones: an improved model for a large-scale field experiment at Aspö (Sweden). J. Hydraul. Res., 42, Extra Issue, 157-172] presented a two-dimensional water flow and solute transport finite element model which reproduced measured drawdowns and dilution curves of conservative species. Here we extend their model by using a reactive transport which accounts for aqueous complexation, acid-base, redox processes, dissolution-precipitation of calcite, quartz, hematite and pyrite, and cation exchange between Na+ and Ca2+. The model provides field-scale estimates of cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and redox potential of groundwater recharge. It serves also to identify the mineral phases controlling the solubility of iron. In addition, the model is useful to test the relevance of several geochemical processes. Model results rule out calcite dissolution as the process causing the increase in bicarbonate concentration and reject the following possible sources of sulphate: (1) pyrite dissolution, (2) leaching of alkaline sulphate-rich waters from a nearby rock landfill and (3) dissolution of

  3. Igneous phenocrystic origin of K-feldspar megacrysts in granitic rocks from the Sierra Nevada batholith

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Sisson, T.W.

    2008-01-01

    Study of four K-feldspar megacrystic granitic plutons and related dikes in the Sierra Nevada composite batholith indicates that the megacrysts are phenocrysts that grew in contact with granitic melt. Growth to megacrystic sizes was due to repeated replenishment of the magma bodies by fresh granitic melt that maintained temperatures above the solidus for extended time periods and that provided components necessary for K-feldspar growth. These intrusions cooled 89-83 Ma, are the youngest in the range, and represent the culminating magmatic phase of the Sierra Nevada batholith. They are the granodiorite of Topaz Lake, the Cathedral Peak Granodiorite, the Mono Creek Granite, the Whitney Granodiorite, the Johnson Granite Porphyry, and the Golden Bear Dike. Megacrysts in these igneous bodies attain 4-10 cm in length. All have sawtooth oscillatory zoning marked by varying concentration of BaO ranging generally from 3.5 to 0.5 wt%. Some of the more pronounced zones begin with resorption and channeling of the underlying zone. Layers of mineral inclusions, principally plagioclase, but also biotite, quartz, hornblende, titanite, and accessory minerals, are parallel to the BaO-delineated zones, are sorted by size along the boundaries, and have their long axes preferentially aligned parallel to the boundaries. These features indicate that the K-feldspar megacrysts grew while surrounded by melt, allowing the inclusion minerals to periodically attach themselves to the faces of the growing crystals. The temperature of growth of titanite included within the K-feldspar megacrysts is estimated by use of a Zr-in-titanite geothermometer. Megacryst-hosted titanite grains all yield temperatures typical of felsic magmas, mainly 735-760 ??C. Titanite grains in the granodiorite hosts marginal to the megacrysts range to lower growth temperatures, in some instances into the subsolidus. The limited range and igneous values of growth temperatures for megacryst-hosted titanite grains support the

  4. Geological, fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies of Mo mineralization, Galway Granite, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, V.; Feely, M.; Högelsberger, H.; Jenkin, G. R. T.; Fallick, A. E.

    1992-09-01

    Mo mineralization within the Galway Granite at Mace Head and Murvey, Connemara, western Ireland, has many features of classic porphyry Mo deposits including a chemically evolved I-type granite host, associated K- and Si-rich alteration, quartz vein(Mace Head) and granite-hosted (Murvey) molybdenite, chalcopyrite, pyrite and magnetite mineralization and a gangue assemblage which includes quartz, muscovite and K-feldspar. Most fluid inclusions in quartz veins homogenize in the range 100 350°C and have a salinity of 1 13 eq. wt.% NaCl. They display Th-salinity covariation consistent with a hypothesis of dilution of magmatic water by influx of meteoric water. CO2-bearing inclusions in an intensely mineralized vein at Mace Head provide an estimated minimum trapping temperature and pressure for the mineralizing fluid of 355°C and 1.2 kb and are interpreted to represent a H2O-CO2 fluid, weakly enriched in Mo, produced in a magma chamber by decompression-activated unmixing from a dense Mo-bearing NaCl-H2O-CO2 fluid. δ34S values of most sulphides range from c. 0‰ at Murvey to 3 4‰ at Mace Head and are consistent with a magmatic origin. Most quartz vein samples have δ18O of 9 10.3‰ and were precipitated from a hydrothermal fluid with δ18O of 4.6 6.7‰. Some have δ18O of 6 7‰ and reflect introduction of meteoric water along vein margins. Quartz-muscovite oxygen isotope geothermometry combined with fluid inclusion data indicate precipitation of mineralized veins in the temperature range 360 450°C and between 1 and 2 kb. Whole rock granite samples display a clear δ18O-δD trend towards the composition of Connemara meteoric waters. The mineralization is interpreted as having been produced by highlyfractionated granite magma; meteoric water interaction postdates the main mineralizing event. The differences between the Mace Head and Murvey mineralizations reflect trapping of migrating mineralizing fluid in structural traps at Mace Head and precipitation of

  5. Effects of slip, slip rate, and shear heating on the friction of granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanpied, M.L.; Tullis, T.E.; Weeks, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    The stability of fault slip is sensitive to the way in which frictional strength responds to changes in slip rate and in particular to the effective velocity dependence of steady state friction ????ss/?? ln V. This quantity can vary substantially with displacement, temperature and slip rate. To investigate the physical basis for this behavior and the possible influence of shear heating, we slid initially bare granite surfaces in unconfined rotary shear to displacements of hundreds of millimeters at normal stresses, ??n, of 10 and 25 MPa and at room temperature. We imposed step changes in slip rate within the range 10-2 to 103.5 ??m/s and also monitored frictional heating with thermistors embedded in the granite. The transient response of ?? to slip rate steps was fit to a rate- and state-dependent friction law using two state variables to estimate the values of several parameters in the constitutive law. The first 20 mm of slip shows rising friction and falling ????ss/?? ln V; further slip shows roughly constant friction, ????ss/?? ln V and parameter values, suggesting that a steady state condition is reached on the fault surface. At V ??? 10 ??m/s, ????ss/?? ln V = -0.004 ?? 0.001. At higher rates the response is sensitive to normal stress: At ??n = 25 MPa granite shows a transition to effective velocity strengthening (????ss/?? ln V = 0.008 ?? 0.004) at the highest slip rates tested. At 10 MPa granite shows a less dramatic change to ????ss/?? ln V ??? 0 at the highest rates. The maximum temperature measured in the granite is ???60??C at 25 MPa and 103.5 ??m/s. Temperatures are in general agreement with a numerical model of heat conduction which assumes spatially homogeneous frictional heating over the sliding surface. The simplest interpretation of our measurements of ????ss/?? ln V is that the granite is inherently veocity weakening (?????ss/??? In V 0 mimics velocity strengthening. These results have implications for the frictional behavior of faults during

  6. Geotechnical properties of weathered and hydrothermally decomposed granite and their influence on slope stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuro, K.; Scholz, M.

    2003-04-01

    Weathering and alternation in granite has a deep inpact on both geotechnical properties of the rock as well as of the rock mass. In a granite rock mass, the discontinuity pattern together with joint cohesion and friction plays a major role especially when prone to sliding. These pheneomena could be exclusively studied at the Königshainer Berge Tunnel Project (Lausitz, Germany) where 3.5 km of tunnel and several kilometers of road cuts have been built in connection with the extension of the German Federal Freeway A4 to the Polish border. The two tubes provided an unique cross section through zones of intensive weathering and hydrothermal alteration within two-mica granites. During running excavation works, these zones could be studied intensively by proceeding a detailed engineering geological documentation, rock mass classification and rock and soil sampling, testing and monitoring. The main topics of the extensive field studies and laboratory work were the characterization of each weathering stage with rock or soil properties such as mineral composition, compressive and tensile strength, young´s modulus, specific destruction work, cohesion, friction angle etc. One of the main observations was the increase of pore volume with the degree of weathering and therefore a distinct decrease of most of the rock properties. A second topic was to get an idea of the distribution of the weathering zones in the rock mass along the tunnel section and the road cuts that are prone to sliding, and to evaluate the common geological model of granite weathering in dependence of discontinnuity pattern and depth. Some parts of the granites underwent two stages of hydrothermal alteration before beeing under surface conditions. Therefore it was necessary to distinguish between the effect of weathering and hydrothermal alteration on mineralogy as well as on geotechnical rock properties. Only after the endogene alteration processes had finished, the rock has been exposed to the exogene

  7. Early to late Yanshanian I-type granites in Fujian Province, SE China: Implications for the tectonic setting and Mo mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Long; Ni, Pei; Yan, Jun; Wu, Chang-Zhi; Dai, Bao-Zhang; Xu, Ying-Feng

    2017-04-01

    The Cathaysia Block is the southeastern part of the South China Block in Southeast (SE) China, and it hosts voluminous late Mesozoic I-, S-, and A-type granitoids, as well as minor highly fractionated granites. We present here zircon U-Pb age data and Nd-Hf isotopic data for the Dayang and Juzhou granites, together with new petrological and geochemical analyses. The Dayang pluton consists of fine-grained two-mica monzonitic granites in which the plagioclases exhibit zoning and poikilitic textures. In contrast, the Juzhou pluton consists of medium- to coarse-grained biotite K-feldspar granites that lack zoning and poikilitic textures. The emplacement ages are 143 ± 2.3 Ma for the Dayang pluton and 133 ± 2.1 Ma for the Juzhou pluton according to zircon U-Pb isotope analyses. The Dayang and Juzhou granites are both metaluminous and belong to the shoshonitic series. The Dayang granite exhibits very flat REE patterns, showing the tetrad effect, and the spidergrams show striking negative Ba, Sr, Nb, and Ti anomalies and a positive Ta anomaly. In contrast, the Juzhou granite has sloping REE patterns, but like the Dayang granite it also has striking negative Ba, Sr, Nb, Ta, and Ti anomalies. Petrographic and geochemical evidence indicates that the Dayang granite is a highly fractionated I-type granite and that the Juzhou granite is a typical I-type granite. The tetrad effect in the Dayang granite can be interpreted in terms of melt-rock interactions at a late stage of magma evolution, whereas the main mechanism during the evolution of the Juzhou magma was fractionation of plagioclase, biotite, hornblende, apatite, zircon, and allanite. Nd-Hf isotope data suggest that the Dayang and Juzhou granites were both formed partial melting of Paleoproterozoic basement rock and juvenile material (underplating basalts or Mayuan Group amphibolites), with the Juzhou granite having a greater contribution from juvenile material than the Dayang granite. Our new data, together with

  8. Multiseasonal and geobotanical approach in remote detection of greisenization areas in the Serra da Pedra Branca Granite, Goias State, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Almeidafilho, R.

    1983-01-01

    Multiseasonal analysis of LANDSAT multispectral images in CCT format permitted the mapping of lithologic facies in the Pedra Branca Granite, using geobotanical associations, which occur in the form of variations in the density of cerrado vegetation, as well as the predominance of certain distinctive vegetation species. Dry season images did not show very good results in lithological differentiation due to anomalous illumination conditions related to the low solar elevation and the homogeneity in the vegetation cover, specially the grasses that become dry during this season. Rainy season