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Sample records for curated mitochondrial genome

  1. Mitochondrial Disease Sequence Data Resource (MSeqDR): a global grass-roots consortium to facilitate deposition, curation, annotation, and integrated analysis of genomic data for the mitochondrial disease clinical and research communities.

    PubMed

    Falk, Marni J; Shen, Lishuang; Gonzalez, Michael; Leipzig, Jeremy; Lott, Marie T; Stassen, Alphons P M; Diroma, Maria Angela; Navarro-Gomez, Daniel; Yeske, Philip; Bai, Renkui; Boles, Richard G; Brilhante, Virginia; Ralph, David; DaRe, Jeana T; Shelton, Robert; Terry, Sharon F; Zhang, Zhe; Copeland, William C; van Oven, Mannis; Prokisch, Holger; Wallace, Douglas C; Attimonelli, Marcella; Krotoski, Danuta; Zuchner, Stephan; Gai, Xiaowu

    2015-03-01

    Success rates for genomic analyses of highly heterogeneous disorders can be greatly improved if a large cohort of patient data is assembled to enhance collective capabilities for accurate sequence variant annotation, analysis, and interpretation. Indeed, molecular diagnostics requires the establishment of robust data resources to enable data sharing that informs accurate understanding of genes, variants, and phenotypes. The "Mitochondrial Disease Sequence Data Resource (MSeqDR) Consortium" is a grass-roots effort facilitated by the United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation to identify and prioritize specific genomic data analysis needs of the global mitochondrial disease clinical and research community. A central Web portal (https://mseqdr.org) facilitates the coherent compilation, organization, annotation, and analysis of sequence data from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of individuals and families with suspected mitochondrial disease. This Web portal provides users with a flexible and expandable suite of resources to enable variant-, gene-, and exome-level sequence analysis in a secure, Web-based, and user-friendly fashion. Users can also elect to share data with other MSeqDR Consortium members, or even the general public, either by custom annotation tracks or through the use of a convenient distributed annotation system (DAS) mechanism. A range of data visualization and analysis tools are provided to facilitate user interrogation and understanding of genomic, and ultimately phenotypic, data of relevance to mitochondrial biology and disease. Currently available tools for nuclear and mitochondrial gene analyses include an MSeqDR GBrowse instance that hosts optimized mitochondrial disease and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) specific annotation tracks, as well as an MSeqDR locus-specific database (LSDB) that curates variant data on more than 1300 genes that have been implicated in mitochondrial disease and/or encode mitochondria-localized proteins. MSeqDR is

  2. Platyzoan mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Wey-Fabrizius, Alexandra R; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Herlyn, Holger; Hankeln, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Platyzoa is a putative lophotrochozoan (spiralian) subtaxon within the protostome clade of Metazoa, comprising a range of biologically diverse, mostly small worm-shaped animals. The monophyly of Platyzoa, the relationships between the putative subgroups Platyhelminthes, Gastrotricha and Gnathifera (the latter comprising at least Gnathostomulida, "Rotifera" and Acanthocephala) as well as some aspects of the internal phylogenies of these subgroups are highly debated. Here we review how complete mitochondrial (mt) genome data contribute to these debates. We highlight special features of the mt genomes and discuss problems in mtDNA phylogenies of the clade. Mitochondrial genome data seem to be insufficient to resolve the position of the platyzoan clade within the Spiralia but can help to address internal phylogenetic questions. The present review includes a tabular survey of all published platyzoan mt genomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  4. FMiR: A Curated Resource of Mitochondrial DNA Information for Fish.

    PubMed

    Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Rashid, Iliyas; Pathak, Ajey Kumar; Singh, Mahender; Pati, Rameshwar; Singh, Shri Prakash; Sarkar, Uttam Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome sequences have been widely used for evolutionary and phylogenetic studies. Among vertebrates, fish are an important, diverse group, and their mitogenome sequences are growing rapidly in public repositories. To facilitate mitochondrial genome analysis and to explore the valuable genetic information, we developed the Fish Mitogenome Resource (FMiR) database to provide a workbench for mitogenome annotation, species identification and microsatellite marker mining. The microsatellites are also known as simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and used as molecular markers in studies on population genetics, gene duplication and marker assisted selection. Here, easy-to-use tools have been implemented for mining SSRs and for designing primers to identify species/habitat specific markers. In addition, FMiR can analyze complete or partial mitochondrial genome sequence to identify species and to deduce relational distances among sequences across species. The database presently contains curated mitochondrial genomes from 1302 fish species belonging to 297 families and 47 orders reported from saltwater and freshwater ecosystems. In addition, the database covers information on fish species such as conservation status, ecosystem, family, distribution and occurrence downloaded from the FishBase and IUCN Red List databases. Those fish information have been used to browse mitogenome information for the species belonging to a particular category. The database is scalable in terms of content and inclusion of other analytical modules. The FMiR is running under Linux operating platform on high performance server accessible at URL http://mail.nbfgr.res.in/fmir.

  5. Genome Annotation and Curation Using MAKER and MAKER-P

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Michael S.; Holt, Carson; Moore, Barry; Yandell, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This unit describes how to use the genome annotation and curation tools MAKER and MAKER-P to annotate protein coding and non-coding RNA genes in newly assembled genomes, update/combine legacy annotations in light of new evidence, add quality metrics to annotations from other pipelines, and map existing annotations to a new assembly. MAKER and MAKER-P can rapidly annotate genomes of any size, and scale to match available computational resources. PMID:25501943

  6. [Comparison of mitochondrial genomes of bivalves].

    PubMed

    SONG, Wen-Tao; GAO, Xiang-Gang; LI, Yun-Feng; LIU, Wei-Dong; LIU, Ying; HE, Chong-Bo

    2009-11-01

    The structure and organization of mitochondrial genomes of 14 marine bivalves and two freshwater bivalves were analyzed using comparative genomics and bioinformatics methods. The results showed that the organization and gene order of the mitochondrial genomes of these bivalve species studied were different from each other. The size, organization, gene numbers, and gene order of mitochondrial genomes in bivalves at different taxa were different. Phylogenetic analysis using the whole mitochondrial genomes and all the coding genes showed different results-- phylogenetic analysis conducted using the whole mitochondrial genomes was consistent with the existing classification and phylogenetic analysis conducted using all coding genes not consistent with the existing classification.

  7. Mitochondrial Genome Structure of Photosynthetic Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Yurina, N P; Odintsova, M S

    2016-02-01

    Current ideas of plant mitochondrial genome organization are presented. Data on the size and structural organization of mtDNA, gene content, and peculiarities are summarized. Special emphasis is given to characteristic features of the mitochondrial genomes of land plants and photosynthetic algae that distinguish them from the mitochondrial genomes of other eukaryotes. The data published before the end of 2014 are reviewed.

  8. Mitochondrial genomes of parasitic flatworms.

    PubMed

    Le, Thanh H; Blair, David; McManus, Donald P

    2002-05-01

    Complete or near-complete mitochondrial genomes are now available for 11 species or strains of parasitic flatworms belonging to the Trematoda and the Cestoda. The organization of these genomes is not strikingly different from those of other eumetazoans, although one gene (atp8) commonly found in other phyla is absent from flatworms. The gene order in most flatworms has similarities to those seen in higher protostomes such as annelids. However, the gene order has been drastically altered in Schistosoma mansoni, which obscures this possible relationship. Among the sequenced taxa, base composition varies considerably, creating potential difficulties for phylogeny reconstruction. Long non-coding regions are present in all taxa, but these vary in length from only a few hundred to approximately 10000 nucleotides. Among Schistosoma spp., the long non-coding regions are rich in repeats and length variation among individuals is known. Data from mitochondrial genomes are valuable for studies on species identification, phylogenies and biogeography.

  9. Mitochondrial fusion and inheritance of the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hiroyoshi; Onoue, Kenta; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2010-03-01

    Although maternal or uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial genomes is a general rule, biparental inheritance is sometimes observed in protists and fungi,including yeasts. In yeast, recombination occurs between the mitochondrial genomes inherited from both parents.Mitochondrial fusion observed in yeast zygotes is thought to set up a space for DNA recombination. In the last decade,a universal mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been uncovered, using yeast as a model. On the other hand, an alternative mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been identified in the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum.A specific mitochondrial plasmid, mF, has been detected as the genetic material that causes mitochondrial fusion in P. polycephalum. Without mF, fusion of the mitochondria is not observed throughout the life cycle, suggesting that Physarum has no constitutive mitochondrial fusion mechanism.Conversely, mitochondria fuse in zygotes and during sporulation with mF. The complete mF sequence suggests that one gene, ORF640, encodes a fusogen for Physarum mitochondria. Although in general, mitochondria are inherited uniparentally, biparental inheritance occurs with specific sexual crossing in P. polycephalum.An analysis of the transmission of mitochondrial genomes has shown that recombinations between two parental mitochondrial genomes require mitochondrial fusion,mediated by mF. Physarum is a unique organism for studying mitochondrial fusion.

  10. BBP: Brucella genome annotation with literature mining and curation.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zuoshuang; Zheng, Wenjie; He, Yongqun

    2006-07-16

    Brucella species are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis in humans and animals. Sequences of four Brucella genomes have been published, and various Brucella gene and genome data and analysis resources exist. A web gateway to integrate these resources will greatly facilitate Brucella research. Brucella genome data in current databases is largely derived from computational analysis without experimental validation typically found in peer-reviewed publications. It is partially due to the lack of a literature mining and curation system able to efficiently incorporate the large amount of literature data into genome annotation. It is further hypothesized that literature-based Brucella gene annotation would increase understanding of complicated Brucella pathogenesis mechanisms. The Brucella Bioinformatics Portal (BBP) is developed to integrate existing Brucella genome data and analysis tools with literature mining and curation. The BBP InterBru database and Brucella Genome Browser allow users to search and analyze genes of 4 currently available Brucella genomes and link to more than 20 existing databases and analysis programs. Brucella literature publications in PubMed are extracted and can be searched by a TextPresso-powered natural language processing method, a MeSH browser, a keywords search, and an automatic literature update service. To efficiently annotate Brucella genes using the large amount of literature publications, a literature mining and curation system coined Limix is developed to integrate computational literature mining methods with a PubSearch-powered manual curation and management system. The Limix system is used to quickly find and confirm 107 Brucella gene mutations including 75 genes shown to be essential for Brucella virulence. The 75 genes are further clustered using COG. In addition, 62 Brucella genetic interactions are extracted from literature publications. These results make possible more comprehensive

  11. Mitochondrial helicases and mitochondrial genome maintenance

    PubMed Central

    de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C.; Aamann, Maria D.; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Stevnsner, Tinna V.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2010-01-01

    Helicases are essential enzymes that utilize the energy of nucleotide hydrolysis to drive unwinding of nucleic acid duplexes. Helicases play roles in all aspects of DNA metabolism including DNA repair, DNA replication and transcription. The subcellular locations and functions of several helicases have been studied in detail; however, the roles of specific helicases in mitochondrial biology remain poorly characterized. This review presents important recent advances in identifying and characterizing mitochondrial helicases, some of which also operate in the nucleus. PMID:20576512

  12. Disease model curation improvements at Mouse Genome Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Susan M.; Richardson, Joel E.; Davis, Allan P.; Wiegers, Thomas C.; Mattingly, Carolyn J.; Dolan, Mary E.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Blake, Judith A.; Eppig, Janan T.

    2012-01-01

    Optimal curation of human diseases requires an ontology or structured vocabulary that contains terms familiar to end users, is robust enough to support multiple levels of annotation granularity, is limited to disease terms and is stable enough to avoid extensive reannotation following updates. At Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI), we currently use disease terms from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) to curate mouse models of human disease. While OMIM provides highly detailed disease records that are familiar to many in the medical community, it lacks structure to support multilevel annotation. To improve disease annotation at MGI, we evaluated the merged Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and OMIM disease vocabulary created by the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) project. Overlaying MeSH onto OMIM provides hierarchical access to broad disease terms, a feature missing from the OMIM. We created an extended version of the vocabulary to meet the genetic disease-specific curation needs at MGI. Here we describe our evaluation of the CTD application, the extensions made by MGI and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of this approach. Database URL: http://www.informatics.jax.org/ PMID:22434831

  13. Evolution of gastropod mitochondrial genome arrangements

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Gastropod mitochondrial genomes exhibit an unusually great variety of gene orders compared to other metazoan mitochondrial genome such as e.g those of vertebrates. Hence, gastropod mitochondrial genomes constitute a good model system to study patterns, rates, and mechanisms of mitochondrial genome rearrangement. However, this kind of evolutionary comparative analysis requires a robust phylogenetic framework of the group under study, which has been elusive so far for gastropods in spite of the efforts carried out during the last two decades. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of five mitochondrial genomes of gastropods (Pyramidella dolabrata, Ascobulla fragilis, Siphonaria pectinata, Onchidella celtica, and Myosotella myosotis), and we analyze them together with another ten complete mitochondrial genomes of gastropods currently available in molecular databases in order to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships among the main lineages of gastropods. Results Comparative analyses with other mollusk mitochondrial genomes allowed us to describe molecular features and general trends in the evolution of mitochondrial genome organization in gastropods. Phylogenetic reconstruction with commonly used methods of phylogenetic inference (ME, MP, ML, BI) arrived at a single topology, which was used to reconstruct the evolution of mitochondrial gene rearrangements in the group. Conclusion Four main lineages were identified within gastropods: Caenogastropoda, Vetigastropoda, Patellogastropoda, and Heterobranchia. Caenogastropoda and Vetigastropoda are sister taxa, as well as, Patellogastropoda and Heterobranchia. This result rejects the validity of the derived clade Apogastropoda (Caenogastropoda + Heterobranchia). The position of Patellogastropoda remains unclear likely due to long-branch attraction biases. Within Heterobranchia, the most heterogeneous group of gastropods, neither Euthyneura (because of the inclusion of P. dolabrata) nor Pulmonata

  14. [The mitochondrial genome and aging].

    PubMed

    Meissner, C; Mohamed, S A; von Wurmb, N; Oehmichen, M

    2001-12-01

    There is a lot of evidence that age-associated alterations of the mitochondrial genome occur, especially in postmitotic tissues such as brain, heart and skeletal muscle. These alterations are supposed to be a result of an attack of free radicals generated as normal byproducts of oxidative phosphorylation and lead to damage of proteins, lipids, and DNA. The alterations of mtDNA include oxidative damage of base pairs, point mutations, large-scale deletions or duplications. The 4977 bp deletion or "common deletion" reveals an age-dependent accumulation in postmitotic tissues, but not in fast-dividing tissues such as blood cells. In addition, it is observed that a tissue-specific accumulation occurs with the highest abundance in the basal ganglia, followed by skeletal muscle, heart, and lowest in cerebellar tissue. Third, pathological alterations of specific tissue, like ischemia/reperfusion events, display a pronounced accumulation of the deletion compared to age-matched controls. Because there are many mtDNA mutations, further analysis of all alterations of mtDNA will elucidate its role in the phenomenon of aging. Despite some criticisms of this free radical theory of aging, there is a lot of experimental evidence to support the important role of mitochondria in organismal aging.

  15. The mastodon mitochondrial genome: a mammoth accomplishment.

    PubMed

    Roca, Alfred L

    2008-02-01

    The mitochondrial genome of an American mastodon was recently sequenced and used to root a phylogenetic analysis that included full mitochondrial genome sequences from woolly mammoths and the two living elephant genera. The study definitively established that mammoth and Asian elephant mitochondrial DNA lineages are more closely related than either is to African elephants. However, it also suggests that a complex evolutionary picture could ultimately emerge and points to similarities between the early evolution of the Elephantidae and that of the gorilla-human-chimpanzee clade.

  16. Network thermodynamic curation of human and yeast genome-scale metabolic models.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Verónica S; Quek, Lake-Ee; Nielsen, Lars K

    2014-07-15

    Genome-scale models are used for an ever-widening range of applications. Although there has been much focus on specifying the stoichiometric matrix, the predictive power of genome-scale models equally depends on reaction directions. Two-thirds of reactions in the two eukaryotic reconstructions Homo sapiens Recon 1 and Yeast 5 are specified as irreversible. However, these specifications are mainly based on biochemical textbooks or on their similarity to other organisms and are rarely underpinned by detailed thermodynamic analysis. In this study, a to our knowledge new workflow combining network-embedded thermodynamic and flux variability analysis was used to evaluate existing irreversibility constraints in Recon 1 and Yeast 5 and to identify new ones. A total of 27 and 16 new irreversible reactions were identified in Recon 1 and Yeast 5, respectively, whereas only four reactions were found with directions incorrectly specified against thermodynamics (three in Yeast 5 and one in Recon 1). The workflow further identified for both models several isolated internal loops that require further curation. The framework also highlighted the need for substrate channeling (in human) and ATP hydrolysis (in yeast) for the essential reaction catalyzed by phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase in purine metabolism. Finally, the framework highlighted differences in proline metabolism between yeast (cytosolic anabolism and mitochondrial catabolism) and humans (exclusively mitochondrial metabolism). We conclude that network-embedded thermodynamics facilitates the specification and validation of irreversibility constraints in compartmentalized metabolic models, at the same time providing further insight into network properties.

  17. MITOS: improved de novo metazoan mitochondrial genome annotation.

    PubMed

    Bernt, Matthias; Donath, Alexander; Jühling, Frank; Externbrink, Fabian; Florentz, Catherine; Fritzsch, Guido; Pütz, Joern; Middendorf, Martin; Stadler, Peter F

    2013-11-01

    About 2000 completely sequenced mitochondrial genomes are available from the NCBI RefSeq data base together with manually curated annotations of their protein-coding genes, rRNAs, and tRNAs. This annotation information, which has accumulated over two decades, has been obtained with a diverse set of computational tools and annotation strategies. Despite all efforts of manual curation it is still plagued by misassignments of reading directions, erroneous gene names, and missing as well as false positive annotations in particular for the RNA genes. Taken together, this causes substantial problems for fully automatic pipelines that aim to use these data comprehensively for studies of animal phylogenetics and the molecular evolution of mitogenomes. The MITOS pipeline is designed to compute a consistent de novo annotation of the mitogenomic sequences. We show that the results of MITOS match RefSeq and MitoZoa in terms of annotation coverage and quality. At the same time we avoid biases, inconsistencies of nomenclature, and typos originating from manual curation strategies. The MITOS pipeline is accessible online at http://mitos.bioinf.uni-leipzig.de. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome of Archangel pigeon.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hua; Liu, Bao-guang; Hu, Gong-zheng; Liu, Jian-hua; Yuan, Li; Pan, Yu-shan

    2016-01-01

    The Archangel pigeon mitochondrial DNA has 17,235 bp and its structural organization is conserved compared to those of other birds. In this study, we report the basic characteristics of the Archangel mitochondrial genome, including structural organization and base composition of the rRNAs, tRNAs and protein-coding genes, as well as characteristics of tRNAs. These features are applicable for the study of phylogenetic relationships in pigeons.

  19. Mitochondrial genome evolution in the social amoebae.

    PubMed

    Heidel, Andrew J; Glöckner, Gernot

    2008-07-01

    Most mitochondria contain a core set of genes required for mitochondrial function, but beyond this base there are variable genomic features. The mitochondrial genome of the model species Dictyostelium discoideum demonstrated that the social amoebae mitochondrial genomes have a size between those of metazoans and plants, but no comparative study of social amoebae mitochondria has been performed. Here, we present a comparative analysis of social amoebae mitochondrial genomes using D. discoideum, Dictyostelium citrinum, Dictyostelium fasciculatum, and Polysphondylium pallidum. The social amoebae mitochondria have similar sizes, AT content, gene content and have a high level of synteny except for one segmental rearrangement and extensive displacement of tRNAs. From the species that contain the rearrangement, it can be concluded that the event occurred late in the evolution of social amoebae. A phylogeny using 36 mitochondrial genes produced a well-supported tree suggesting that the pairs of D. discoideum/D. citrinum and D. fasciculatum/P. pallidum are sister species although the position of the root is not certain. Group I introns and endonucleases are variable in number and location in the social amoebae. Phylogenies of the introns and endonucleases suggest that there have been multiple recent duplications or extinctions and confirm that endonucleases have the ability to insert into new areas. An analysis of dN/dS ratios in mitochondrial genes revealed that among groups of genes, adenosine triphosphate synthase complex genes have the highest ratio, whereas cytochrome oxidase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase genes had the lowest ratio. The genetic codes of D. citrinum, P. pallidum, and D. fasciculatum are the universal code although D. fasciculatum does not use the TGA stop codon. In D. fasciculatum, we demonstrate for the first time that a mitochondrial genome without the TGA stop codon still uses the release factor RF2 that recognizes TGA

  20. The Mitochondrial Genome of Toxocara canis

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, D. Timothy J.; Hu, Min; Gasser, Robin B.

    2008-01-01

    Toxocara canis (Ascaridida: Nematoda), which parasitizes (at the adult stage) the small intestine of canids, can be transmitted to a range of other mammals, including humans, and can cause the disease toxocariasis. Despite its significance as a pathogen, the genetics, epidemiology and biology of this parasite remain poorly understood. In addition, the zoonotic potential of related species of Toxocara, such as T. cati and T. malaysiensis, is not well known. Mitochondrial DNA is known to provide genetic markers for investigations in these areas, but complete mitochondrial genomic data have been lacking for T. canis and its congeners. In the present study, the mitochondrial genome of T. canis was amplified by long-range polymerase chain reaction (long PCR) and sequenced using a primer-walking strategy. This circular mitochondrial genome was 14162 bp and contained 12 protein-coding, 22 transfer RNA, and 2 ribosomal RNA genes consistent for secernentean nematodes, including Ascaris suum and Anisakis simplex (Ascaridida). The mitochondrial genome of T. canis provides genetic markers for studies into the systematics, population genetics and epidemiology of this zoonotic parasite and its congeners. Such markers can now be used in prospecting for cryptic species and for exploring host specificity and zoonotic potential, thus underpinning the prevention and control of toxocariasis in humans and other hosts. PMID:18682828

  1. A 454 sequencing approach to dipteran mitochondrial genome research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The availability of complete mitochondrial genome data for Diptera, one of the largest Metazoan orders, in public databases is limited. Herein, we generated the complete or nearly complete mitochondrial genomes for Cochliomyia hominivorax, Haematobia irritans, Phormia regina and Sarcophaga crassipa...

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of Aplysia kurodai (Anaspidea: Aplysiidae).

    PubMed

    An, Haein; Jung, Daewui; Lee, JeaHyun; Kim, Chang-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Complete mitochondrial genome is sequenced from an opisthobranch gastropod Aplysia kurodai. Mitochondrial genome size of the species is 14,113 bp. The mitochondrial genome of A. kurodai contains 13 protein coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and 22 tRNA genes like mitochondrial genomes of congeneric species. The gene order of protein coding genes is identical to that of other Aplysia species. A+T content (65.9%) of the mitochondrial genome is included in the range for A+T content of congeneric species. This genome data provides evolutionary and systematic implications for the related species.

  3. Mitochondrial disease: maintenance of mitochondrial genome and molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongchon; Hamasaki, Naotaka

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for the aerobic ATP synthesis system that is responsible for about 80% of normal cellular energy demands. In addition to rare genetic disorders causing neuromyopathy, alterations of mtDNA have been found also in so-called common diseases such as heart failure, diabetes, and cancer. Although some of these alterations are inherited, some are considered to be generated and/or accumulated in somatic cells with age. One reason for the somatic mutations is that mtDNA is more vulnerable than is nuclear DNA. For example, mitochondrial respiratory chain produces a large amount of reactive oxygen species as inevitable byproducts of oxidative phosphorylation. However, the molecular mechanisms for maintenance of mitochondrial genome are much less elucidated than those for nuclear genome. In spite of its increasing importance, the molecular diagnosis of mitochondrial DNA-related diseases is well done only in very limited expert laboratories. In this chapter, we focus on maintenance of mtDNA in somatic cells, its clinical importance, and recent developments of molecular tests.

  4. The Database of Genomic Variants: a curated collection of structural variation in the human genome.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Jeffrey R; Ziman, Robert; Yuen, Ryan K C; Feuk, Lars; Scherer, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the Database of Genomic Variants (DGV; http://dgv.tcag.ca/) has provided a publicly accessible, comprehensive curated catalogue of structural variation (SV) found in the genomes of control individuals from worldwide populations. Here, we describe updates and new features, which have expanded the utility of DGV for both the basic research and clinical diagnostic communities. The current version of DGV consists of 55 published studies, comprising >2.5 million entries identified in >22,300 genomes. Studies included in DGV are selected from the accessioned data sets in the archival SV databases dbVar (NCBI) and DGVa (EBI), and then further curated for accuracy and validity. The core visualization tool (gbrowse) has been upgraded with additional functions to facilitate data analysis and comparison, and a new query tool has been developed to provide flexible and interactive access to the data. The content from DGV is regularly incorporated into other large-scale genome reference databases and represents a standard data resource for new product and database development, in particular for copy number variation testing in clinical labs. The accurate cataloguing of variants in DGV will continue to enable medical genetics and genome sequencing research.

  5. Gene Conversion Shapes Linear Mitochondrial Genome Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David Roy; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that gene conversion between the ends of linear mitochondrial chromosomes can cause telomere expansion and the duplication of subtelomeric loci. However, it is not yet known how widespread this phenomenon is and how significantly it has impacted organelle genome architecture. Using linear mitochondrial DNAs and mitochondrial plasmids from diverse eukaryotes, we argue that telomeric recombination has played a major role in fashioning linear organelle chromosomes. We find that mitochondrial telomeres frequently expand into subtelomeric regions, resulting in gene duplications, homogenizations, and/or fragmentations. We suggest that these features are a product of subtelomeric gene conversion, provide a hypothetical model for this process, and employ genetic diversity data to support the idea that the greater the effective population size the greater the potential for gene conversion between subtelomeric loci. PMID:23572386

  6. Chemical synthesis of the mouse mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Daniel G; Smith, Hamilton O; Hutchison, Clyde A; Venter, J Craig; Merryman, Chuck

    2010-11-01

    We describe a one-step, isothermal assembly method for synthesizing DNA molecules from overlapping oligonucleotides. The method cycles between in vitro recombination and amplification until the desired length is reached. As a demonstration of its simplicity and robustness, we synthesized the entire 16.3-kilobase mouse mitochondrial genome from 600 overlapping 60-mers.

  7. A Mitochondrial Genome of Rhyparochromidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) and a Comparative Analysis of Related Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Teng; Yang, Jie; Li, Yinwan; Cui, Ying; Xie, Qiang; Bu, Wenjun; Hillis, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The Rhyparochromidae, the largest family of Lygaeoidea, encompasses more than 1,850 described species, but no mitochondrial genome has been sequenced to date. Here we describe the first mitochondrial genome for Rhyparochromidae: a complete mitochondrial genome of Panaorus albomaculatus (Scott, 1874). This mitochondrial genome is comprised of 16,345 bp, and contains the expected 37 genes and control region. The majority of the control region is made up of a large tandem-repeat region, which has a novel pattern not previously observed in other insects. The tandem-repeats region of P. albomaculatus consists of 53 tandem duplications (including one partial repeat), which is the largest number of tandem repeats among all the known insect mitochondrial genomes. Slipped-strand mispairing during replication is likely to have generated this novel pattern of tandem repeats. Comparative analysis of tRNA gene families in sequenced Pentatomomorpha and Lygaeoidea species shows that the pattern of nucleotide conservation is markedly higher on the J-strand. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on mitochondrial genomes suggests that Rhyparochromidae is not the sister group to all the remaining Lygaeoidea, and supports the monophyly of Lygaeoidea. PMID:27756915

  8. Minimally destructive sampling of type specimens of Pyropia (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) recovers complete plastid and mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Hughey, Jeffery R; Gabrielson, Paul W; Rohmer, Laurence; Tortolani, Jacquie; Silva, Mayra; Miller, Kathy Ann; Young, Joel D; Martell, Craig; Ruediger, Erik

    2014-06-04

    Plant species, including algae and fungi, are based on type specimens to which the name of a taxon is permanently attached. Applying a scientific name to any specimen therefore requires demonstrating correspondence between the type and that specimen. Traditionally, identifications are based on morpho-anatomical characters, but recently systematists are using DNA sequence data. These studies are flawed if the DNA is isolated from misidentified modern specimens. We propose a genome-based solution. Using 4 × 4 mm(2) of material from type specimens, we assembled 14 plastid and 15 mitochondrial genomes attributed to the red algae Pyropia perforata, Py. fucicola, and Py. kanakaensis. The chloroplast genomes were fairly conserved, but the mitochondrial genomes differed significantly among populations in content and length. Complete genomes are attainable from 19(th) and early 20(th) century type specimens; this validates the effort and cost of their curation as well as supports the practice of the type method.

  9. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Gossypium hirsutum and Evolutionary Analysis of Higher Plant Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Su, Aiguo; Geng, Jianing; Grover, Corrinne E.; Hu, Songnian; Hua, Jinping

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondria are the main manufacturers of cellular ATP in eukaryotes. The plant mitochondrial genome contains large number of foreign DNA and repeated sequences undergone frequently intramolecular recombination. Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is one of the main natural fiber crops and also an important oil-producing plant in the world. Sequencing of the cotton mitochondrial (mt) genome could be helpful for the evolution research of plant mt genomes. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized 454 technology for sequencing and combined with Fosmid library of the Gossypium hirsutum mt genome screening and positive clones sequencing and conducted a series of evolutionary analysis on Cycas taitungensis and 24 angiosperms mt genomes. After data assembling and contigs joining, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of G. hirsutum was obtained. The completed G.hirsutum mt genome is 621,884 bp in length, and contained 68 genes, including 35 protein genes, four rRNA genes and 29 tRNA genes. Five gene clusters are found conserved in all plant mt genomes; one and four clusters are specifically conserved in monocots and dicots, respectively. Homologous sequences are distributed along the plant mt genomes and species closely related share the most homologous sequences. For species that have both mt and chloroplast genome sequences available, we checked the location of cp-like migration and found several fragments closely linked with mitochondrial genes. Conclusion The G. hirsutum mt genome possesses most of the common characters of higher plant mt genomes. The existence of syntenic gene clusters, as well as the conservation of some intergenic sequences and genic content among the plant mt genomes suggest that evolution of mt genomes is consistent with plant taxonomy but independent among different species. PMID:23940520

  10. The Aspergillus Genome Database, a curated comparative genomics resource for gene, protein and sequence information for the Aspergillus research community.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Martha B; Chibucos, Marcus C; Costanzo, Maria C; Crabtree, Jonathan; Inglis, Diane O; Lotia, Adil; Orvis, Joshua; Shah, Prachi; Skrzypek, Marek S; Binkley, Gail; Miyasato, Stuart R; Wortman, Jennifer R; Sherlock, Gavin

    2010-01-01

    The Aspergillus Genome Database (AspGD) is an online genomics resource for researchers studying the genetics and molecular biology of the Aspergilli. AspGD combines high-quality manual curation of the experimental scientific literature examining the genetics and molecular biology of Aspergilli, cutting-edge comparative genomics approaches to iteratively refine and improve structural gene annotations across multiple Aspergillus species, and web-based research tools for accessing and exploring the data. All of these data are freely available at http://www.aspgd.org. We welcome feedback from users and the research community at aspergillus-curator@genome.stanford.edu.

  11. A manual curation strategy to improve genome annotation: application to a set of haloarchael genomes.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2015-06-02

    Genome annotation errors are a persistent problem that impede research in the biosciences. A manual curation effort is described that attempts to produce high-quality genome annotations for a set of haloarchaeal genomes (Halobacterium salinarum and Hbt. hubeiense, Haloferax volcanii and Hfx. mediterranei, Natronomonas pharaonis and Nmn. moolapensis, Haloquadratum walsbyi strains HBSQ001 and C23, Natrialba magadii, Haloarcula marismortui and Har. hispanica, and Halohasta litchfieldiae). Genomes are checked for missing genes, start codon misassignments, and disrupted genes. Assignments of a specific function are preferably based on experimentally characterized homologs (Gold Standard Proteins). To avoid overannotation, which is a major source of database errors, we restrict annotation to only general function assignments when support for a specific substrate assignment is insufficient. This strategy results in annotations that are resistant to the plethora of errors that compromise public databases. Annotation consistency is rigorously validated for ortholog pairs from the genomes surveyed. The annotation is regularly crosschecked against the UniProt database to further improve annotations and increase the level of standardization. Enhanced genome annotations are submitted to public databases (EMBL/GenBank, UniProt), to the benefit of the scientific community. The enhanced annotations are also publically available via HaloLex.

  12. Agile data management for curation of genomes to watershed datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadharajan, C.; Agarwal, D.; Faybishenko, B.; Versteeg, R.

    2015-12-01

    A software platform is being developed for data management and assimilation [DMA] as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Genomes to Watershed Sustainable Systems Science Focus Area 2.0. The DMA components and capabilities are driven by the project science priorities and the development is based on agile development techniques. The goal of the DMA software platform is to enable users to integrate and synthesize diverse and disparate field, laboratory, and simulation datasets, including geological, geochemical, geophysical, microbiological, hydrological, and meteorological data across a range of spatial and temporal scales. The DMA objectives are (a) developing an integrated interface to the datasets, (b) storing field monitoring data, laboratory analytical results of water and sediments samples collected into a database, (c) providing automated QA/QC analysis of data and (d) working with data providers to modify high-priority field and laboratory data collection and reporting procedures as needed. The first three objectives are driven by user needs, while the last objective is driven by data management needs. The project needs and priorities are reassessed regularly with the users. After each user session we identify development priorities to match the identified user priorities. For instance, data QA/QC and collection activities have focused on the data and products needed for on-going scientific analyses (e.g. water level and geochemistry). We have also developed, tested and released a broker and portal that integrates diverse datasets from two different databases used for curation of project data. The development of the user interface was based on a user-centered design process involving several user interviews and constant interaction with data providers. The initial version focuses on the most requested feature - i.e. finding the data needed for analyses through an intuitive interface. Once the data is found, the user can immediately plot and download data

  13. Nonadaptive evolution of mitochondrial genome size.

    PubMed

    Boussau, Bastien; Brown, Jeremy M; Fujita, Matthew K

    2011-09-01

    Genomes vary greatly in size and complexity, and identifying the evolutionary forces that have generated this variation remains a major goal in biology. A controversial proposal is that most changes in genome size are initially deleterious and therefore are linked to episodes of decrease in effective population sizes. Support for this hypothesis comes from large-scale comparative analyses, but vanishes when phylogenetic nonindependence is taken into account. Another approach to test this hypothesis involves analyzing sequence evolution among clades where duplications have recently fixed. Here we show that episodes of fixation of duplications in mitochondrial genomes of the gecko Heteronotia binoei (two independent clades) and of mantellid frogs (five distinct branches) coincide with reductions in the ability of selection to purge slightly deleterious mutations. Our results support the idea that genome complexity can arise through nonadaptive processes in tetrapods.

  14. Analysis of three leafminers' complete mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Du, Yuzhou; Cao, Jingman; Huang, Fangneng

    2013-10-15

    Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard), and Liriomyza bryoniae (Kaltenbach), are three closely related and economically important leafminer pests in the world. This study examined the complete mitochondrial genomes of L. trifolii, L. huidobrensis and L. bryoniae, which were 16,141 bp, 16,236 bp and 16,183 bp in length, respectively. All of them displayed 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes and an A+T-rich region. The genomes were highly compact with only 60-68 bp of non-coding intergenic spacer. However, considerable differences in the A+T-rich region were detected among the three species. Results of this study also showed the two ribosomal RNA genes of the three species had very limited variable sites and thus should not provide much information in the study of population genetics of these species. Data generated from three leafminers' complete mitochondrial genomes should provide valuable information in studying phylogeny of Diptera, and developing genetic markers for species identification in leafminers.

  15. A Dynamic Mobile DNA Family in the Yeast Mitochondrial Genome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Baojun; Hao, Weilong

    2015-04-20

    Transposable elements (TEs) are an important factor shaping eukaryotic genomes. Although a significant body of research has been conducted on the abundance of TEs in nuclear genomes, TEs in mitochondrial genomes remain elusive. In this study, we successfully assembled 28 complete yeast mitochondrial genomes and took advantage of the power of population genomics to determine mobile DNAs and their propensity. We have observed compelling evidence of GC clusters propagating within the mitochondrial genome and being horizontally transferred between species. These mitochondrial TEs experience rapid diversification by nucleotide substitution and, more importantly, undergo dynamic merger and shuffling to form new TEs. Given the hyper mobile and transformable nature of mitochondrial TEs, our findings open the door to a deeper understanding of eukaryotic mitochondrial genome evolution and the origin of nonautonomous TEs. Copyright © 2015 Wu and Hao.

  16. Higher plant mitochondrial DNA: Genomes, genes, mutants, transcription, translation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains brief summaries of 63 presentations given at the International Workshop on Higher Plant Mitochondrial DNA. The presentations are organized into topical discussions addressing plant genomes, mitochondrial genes, cytoplasmic male sterility, transcription, translation, plasmids and tissue culture. (DT)

  17. Mitochondrial genomic investigation of flatfish monophyly.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Matthew A; López, J Andrés; Satoh, Takashi P; Chen, Wei-Jen; Miya, Masaki

    2014-11-10

    We present the first study to use whole mitochondrial genome sequences to examine phylogenetic affinities of the flatfishes (Pleuronectiformes). Flatfishes have attracted attention in evolutionary biology since the early history of the field because understanding the evolutionary history and patterns of diversification of the group will shed light on the evolution of novel body plans. Because recent molecular studies based primarily on DNA sequences from nuclear loci have yielded conflicting results, it is important to examine phylogenetic signal in different genomes and genome regions. We aligned and analyzed mitochondrial genome sequences from thirty-nine pleuronectiforms including nine that are newly reported here, and sixty-six non-pleuronectiforms (twenty additional clade L taxa [Carangimorpha or Carangimorpharia] and forty-six secondary outgroup taxa). The analyses yield strong support for clade L and weak support for the monophyly of Pleuronectiformes. The suborder Pleuronectoidei receives moderate support, and as with other molecular studies the putatively basal lineage of Pleuronectiformes, the Psettodoidei is frequently not most closely related to other pleuronectiforms. Within the Pleuronectoidei, the basal lineages in the group are poorly resolved, however several flatfish subclades receive consistent support. The affinities of Lepidoblepharon and Citharoides among pleuronectoids are particularly uncertain with these data.

  18. Atp8 is in the ground pattern of flatworm mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Egger, Bernhard; Bachmann, Lutz; Fromm, Bastian

    2017-05-26

    To date, mitochondrial genomes of more than one hundred flatworms (Platyhelminthes) have been sequenced. They show a high degree of similarity and a strong taxonomic bias towards parasitic lineages. The mitochondrial gene atp8 has not been confidently annotated in any flatworm sequenced to date. However, sampling of free-living flatworm lineages is incomplete. We addressed this by sequencing the mitochondrial genomes of the two small-bodied (about 1 mm in length) free-living flatworms Stenostomum sthenum and Macrostomum lignano as the first representatives of the earliest branching flatworm taxa Catenulida and Macrostomorpha respectively. We have used high-throughput DNA and RNA sequence data and PCR to establish the mitochondrial genome sequences and gene orders of S. sthenum and M. lignano. The mitochondrial genome of S. sthenum is 16,944 bp long and includes a 1,884 bp long inverted repeat region containing the complete sequences of nad3, rrnS, and nine tRNA genes. The model flatworm M. lignano has the smallest known mitochondrial genome among free-living flatworms, with a length of 14,193 bp. The mitochondrial genome of M. lignano lacks duplicated genes, however, tandem repeats were detected in a non-coding region. Mitochondrial gene order is poorly conserved in flatworms, only a single pair of adjacent ribosomal or protein-coding genes - nad4l-nad4 - was found in S. sthenum and M. lignano that also occurs in other published flatworm mitochondrial genomes. Unexpectedly, we unambiguously identified the full metazoan mitochondrial protein-coding gene complement including atp8 in S. sthenum and M. lignano. A subsequent search detected atp8 in all mitochondrial genomes of polyclad flatworms published to date, although the gene wasn't previously annotated in these species. Manual, but not automated genome annotation revealed the presence of atp8 in basally branching free-living flatworms, signifying both the importance of manual data curation and of diverse

  19. Sequencing and comparing whole mitochondrial genomes ofanimals

    SciTech Connect

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Macey, J. Robert; Medina, Monica

    2005-04-22

    Comparing complete animal mitochondrial genome sequences is becoming increasingly common for phylogenetic reconstruction and as a model for genome evolution. Not only are they much more informative than shorter sequences of individual genes for inferring evolutionary relatedness, but these data also provide sets of genome-level characters, such as the relative arrangements of genes, that can be especially powerful. We describe here the protocols commonly used for physically isolating mtDNA, for amplifying these by PCR or RCA, for cloning,sequencing, assembly, validation, and gene annotation, and for comparing both sequences and gene arrangements. On several topics, we offer general observations based on our experiences to date with determining and comparing complete mtDNA sequences.

  20. Complete mitochondrial genome of hydrothermal vent clam Calyptogena magnifica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Helu; Cai, Shanya; Zhang, Haibin; Vrijenhoek, Robert C

    2016-11-01

    The mitochondrial genome of the hydrothermal vent clam Calyptogena magnifica (Bivalvia, Veneroida, Vesicomyidae) is reported for the first time in this study. The total length of its mitochondrial genome is 19 738 bp with overall GC content of 31.6%. The mitochondrial genome consists of 36 genes, including 13 protein-coding sequences, 2 rRNA and 21 tRNA genes. Two distinct repeat motifs are located between tRNA(Trp) and ND6.

  1. A survey of locus-specific database curation. Human Genome Variation Society.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Richard G H; Phillips, Kate; Horaitis, Ourania

    2007-04-01

    It is widely accepted that curation of variation in genes is best performed by experts in those genes and their variation. However, obtaining funding for such variation is difficult even though up-to-date lists of variations in genes are essential for optimum delivery of genetic healthcare and for medical research. This study was undertaken to gather information on gene-specific databases (locus-specific databases) in an effort to understand their functioning, funding and needs. A questionnaire was sent to 125 curators and we received 47 responses. Individuals performed curation of up to 69 genes. The time curators spent curating was extremely variable. This ranged from 0 h per week up to 5 curators spending over 4 h per week. The funding required ranged from US$600 to US$45,000 per year. Most databases were stimulated by the Human Genome Organization-Mutation Database Initiative and used their guidelines. Many databases reported unpublished mutations, with all but one respondent reporting errors in the literature. Of the 13 who reported hit rates, 9 reported over 52,000 hits per year. On the basis of this, five recommendations were made to improve the curation of variation information, particularly that of mutations causing single-gene disorder: 1. A curator for each gene, who is an expert in it, should be identified or nominated. 2. Curation at a minimum of 2 h per week at US$2000 per gene per year should be encouraged. 3. Guidelines and custom software use should be encouraged to facilitate easy setup and curation. 4. Hits per week on the website should be recorded to allow the importance of the site to be illustrated for grant-giving purposes. 5. Published protocols should be followed in the establishment of locus-specific databases.

  2. Mitochondrial genome of Dasyatis bennettii (Chondrichthyes: Dasyatidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Baojuan; Zhang, Jie; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Zhang, Baowei

    2013-08-01

    Dasyatis bennettii is a bottom-dweller that inhabits in the coastal waters of the Indian and Pacific Oceans as well as the freshwaters of Southern China. In this study, we determined the complete mitochondrial genome of this species of stingrays. The results showed that the total length of the mitogenome was 17,668 bp as a circular DNA and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 1 control region. The base composition of the complete mitochondrial DNA was 31.1% A, 28.7% T, 26.7% C, and 13.5% G. All the genes in D. bennettii were distributed on the H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and eight tRNA genes which were encoded on the L-strand.

  3. Neurodegenerative Eye Disorders: Role of Mitochondrial Dynamics and Genomics.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Kuldeep; Dada, Rima; Dada, Tanuj

    2016-01-01

    As a major source of cellular energy, mitochondria are critical for optimal ocular function. They are also essential for cell differentiation and survival. Mitochondrial mutations and oxidative damage to the mitochondrial DNA are important factors underlying the pathology of many ocular disorders. With increasing age, mitochondrial DNA damage accumulates and results in several eye diseases. It is evident that the mitochondrial genome is more susceptible to stress and damage than the nuclear genome, as it lacks histone protection, a nucleotide excision repair system, and recombination repair, and it is the source and target of free radicals. Accumulation of mitochondrial mutations beyond a certain threshold explains the marked variations in phenotypes seen in mitochondrial diseases and the molecular mechanisms related to the pathogenesis of several chronic disorders in the eye. This review details the structure and function of mitochondria and the mitochondrial genome along with the mitochondrial involvement in various neurodegenerative ophthalmic disorders.

  4. Mitochondrial genome sequences from wild and cultivated barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    PubMed

    Hisano, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Mai; Yoshida, Hideya; Terachi, Toru; Sato, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-24

    Sequencing analysis of mitochondrial genomes is important for understanding the evolution and genome structures of various plant species. Barley is a self-pollinated diploid plant with seven chromosomes comprising a large haploid genome of 5.1 Gbp. Wild barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum) and cultivated barley (H. vulgare ssp. vulgare) have cross compatibility and closely related genomes, although a significant number of nucleotide polymorphisms have been reported between their genomes. We determined the complete nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial genomes of wild and cultivated barley. Two independent circular maps of the 525,599 bp barley mitochondrial genome were constructed by de novo assembly of high-throughput sequencing reads of barley lines H602 and Haruna Nijo, with only three SNPs detected between haplotypes. These mitochondrial genomes contained 33 protein-coding genes, three ribosomal RNAs, 16 transfer RNAs, 188 new ORFs, six major repeat sequences and several types of transposable elements. Of the barley mitochondrial genome-encoded proteins, NAD6, NAD9 and RPS4 had unique structures among grass species. The mitochondrial genome of barley was similar to those of other grass species in terms of gene content, but the configuration of the genes was highly differentiated from that of other grass species. Mitochondrial genome sequencing is essential for annotating the barley nuclear genome; our mitochondrial sequencing identified a significant number of fragmented mitochondrial sequences in the reported nuclear genome sequences. Little polymorphism was detected in the barley mitochondrial genome sequences, which should be explored further to elucidate the evolution of barley.

  5. Mitochondrial genome evolution in fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Complete mitochondrial genome sequences have become important tools for the study of genome architecture, phylogeny, and molecular evolution. Despite the rapid increase in available mitogenomes, the taxonomic sampling often poorly reflects phylogenetic diversity and is often also biased ...

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of Dugesia japonica (Platyhelminthes; order Tricladida).

    PubMed

    Sakai, Masato; Sakaizumi, Mitsuru

    2012-10-01

    We used two sequencing methods, namely long polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and primer walking, to determine the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Dugesia japonica and most of the mtDNA sequence of Dugesia ryukyuensis. The genome of D. japonica contained 36 genes including 12 of the 13 protein-coding genes characteristic of metazoan mitochondrial genomes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and 22 transfer RNA genes. The genome of D. ryukyuensis contained 33 genes, including 12 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and 19 transfer RNA genes. The gene order of the mitochondrial genome from the Dugesia species showed no clear homology with either the Neodermata or other free-living Rhabditophora. This indicates that the platyhelminths exhibit great variability in mitochondrial gene order. This is the first complete sequence analysis of the mitochondrial genome of a free-living member of Rhabditophora, which will facilitate further studies on the population genetics and genomic evolution of the Platyhelminthes.

  7. [Understanding mitochondrial genome fragmentation in parasitic lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera)].

    PubMed

    Dong, Wen-Ge; Guo, Xian-Guo; Jin, Dao-Chao; Xue, Shi-Peng; Qin, Feng; Simon, Song; Stephen, C Barker; Renfu, Shao

    2013-07-01

    Lice are obligate ectoparasites of mammals and birds. Extensive fragmentation of mitochondrial genomes has been found in some louse species in the families Pediculidae, Pthiridae, Philopteridae and Trichodectidae. For example, the mt genomes of human body louse (Pediculus humanus), head louse (Pediculus capitis), and public louse (Pthirus pubis) have 20, 20 and 14 mini-chromosomes, respectively. These mini-chromosomes might be the results of deletion and recombination of mt genes. The factors and mechanisms of mitochondrial genome fragmentation are currently unknown. The fragmentation might be the results of evolutionary selection or random genetic drift or it is probably related to the lack of mtSSB (mitochondrial single-strand DNA binding protein). Understanding the fragmentation of mitochondrial genomes is of significance for understanding the origin and evolution of mitochondria. This paper reviews the recent advances in the studies of mito-chondrial genome fragmentation in lice, including the phenomena of mitochondrial genome fragmentation, characteristics of fragmented mitochondrial genomes, and some factors and mechanisms possibly leading to the mitochondrial genome fragmentation of lice. Perspectives for future studies on fragmented mt genomes are also discussed.

  8. Simple sequence repeats in bryophyte mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao-Xian; Zhu, Rui-Liang; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are thought to be common in plant mitochondrial (mt) genomes, but have yet to be fully described for bryophytes. We screened the mt genomes of two liverworts (Marchantia polymorpha and Pleurozia purpurea), two mosses (Physcomitrella patens and Anomodon rugelii) and two hornworts (Phaeoceros laevis and Nothoceros aenigmaticus), and detected 475 SSRs. Some SSRs are found conserved during the evolution, among which except one exists in both liverworts and mosses, all others are shared only by the two liverworts, mosses or hornworts. SSRs are known as DNA tracts having high mutation rates; however, according to our observations, they still can evolve slowly. The conservativeness of these SSRs suggests that they are under strong selection and could play critical roles in maintaining the gene functions.

  9. Mitochondrial genome of Micrura bella (Nemertea: Heteronemertea), the largest mitochondrial genome known to phylum Nemertea.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chunyang; Shi-Chun, Sun

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Micrura bella was sequenced and analyzed. Being the largest mitogenome known to phylum Nemertea, the genome is 16 847 bp in length. It encodes 37 genes typical to metazoan mitogenomes and has the same gene arrangement with the other Heteronemertea mitogenomes sequenced to date. The genome has the maximal number of non-coding nucleotides (2037 bp at 25 sites) in Nemertea mitogenomes, among which two large non-coding regions were found (507 and 508 bp, respectively).

  10. The complete nucleotide sequence of goat (Capra hircus) mitochondrial genome. Goat mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Parma, Pietro; Pietro, Parma; Feligini, Maria; Maria, Feligini; Greeppi, Gianfranco; Gianfranco, Greppi; Enne, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Enne

    2003-06-01

    The goat mtDNA sequences reported to date are fragmentary. By using both in silico cloning procedure and conventional molecular biology techniques we have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the goat (Capra hircus) mitochondrial genome. The length of the sequence was 16.640 bp. Genes responsible for 12S and 16S rRNAs, 22 tRNAs and 13 protein-coding regions are found. The genome organization is conformed to those of other mitochondrial genomes. Comparison between the 13 protein coding genes of goat, cow and sheep reveals that the difference range from 1.2 to 12.2% with a mean of 7.3% between goat and cow and from 0 to 15.6% (mean 4.7%) between goat and sheep.

  11. The mitochondrial genome of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Tracey; Farrugia, Daniel; Barrett, Jeff; Chitwood, David J; Rowe, Janet; Subbotin, Sergei; Dowton, Mark

    2011-07-01

    We sequenced the entire coding region of the mitochondrial genome of Heterodera glycines. The sequence obtained comprised 14.9 kb, with PCR evidence indicating that the entire genome comprised a single, circular molecule of approximately 21-22 kb. The genome is the most T-rich nematode mitochondrial genome reported to date, with T representing over half of all nucleotides on the coding strand. The genome also contains the highest number of poly(T) tracts so far reported (to our knowledge), with 60 poly(T) tracts ≥ 12 Ts. All genes are transcribed from the same mitochondrial strand. The organization of the mitochondrial genome of H. glycines shows a number of similarities compared with Radopholus similis, but fewer similarities when compared with Meloidogyne javanica. Very few gene boundaries are shared with Globodera pallida or Globodera rostochiensis. Partial mitochondrial genome sequences were also obtained for Heterodera cardiolata (5.3 kb) and Punctodera chalcoensis (6.8 kb), and these had identical organizations compared with H. glycines. We found PCR evidence of a minicircular mitochondrial genome in P. chalcoensis, but at low levels and lacking a noncoding region. Such circularised genome fragments may be present at low levels in a range of nematodes, with multipartite mitochondrial genomes representing a shift to a condition in which these subgenomic circles predominate.

  12. [Research progress on mitochondrial genome structure in the phylum apicomplexa].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-mei; Li, Xiao-bing; Huang, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria are ubiquitous organelles in all eukaryotic cells which are essential for a series of cellular processes and signal transduction. The phylum Apicomplexa includes series of unicellular eukaryotes and some of them are clinically or economically important parasites. Recent studies have demonstrated that apicomplexan parasites' mitochondrial genomes exhibit remarkably diverse structures and they are ideal biological models to comprehend the evolution of mitochondrial genomes. This paper summarizes the mitochondrial genome structure of some representative apicomplexan, highlights their structure characteristics along with evolution process, and briefly describes their nuclear mitochondrial DNA and nuclear plastid DNA.

  13. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Yarrowia Lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Durstewitz, Gregor; Casaregola, Serge; Gaillardin, Claude; Brandt, Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    We here report the complete nucleotide sequence of the 47.9 kb mitochondrial (mt) genome from the obligate aerobic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. It encodes, all on the same strand, seven subunits of NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ND1-6, ND4L), apocytochrome b (COB), three subunits of cytochrome oxidase (COX1, 2, 3), three subunits of ATP synthetase (ATP6, 8 and 9), small and large ribosomal RNAs and an incomplete set of tRNAs. The Y. lipolytica mt genome is very similar to the Hansenula wingei mt genome, as judged from blocks of conserved gene order and from sequence homology. The extra DNA in the Y. lipolytica mt genome consists of 17 group 1 introns and stretches of A+Trich sequence, interspersed with potentially transposable GC clusters. The usual mould mt genetic code is used. Interestingly, there is no tRNA able to read CGN (arginine) codons. CGN codons could not be found in exonic open reading frames, whereas they do occur in intronic open reading frames. However, several of the intronic open reading frames have accumulated mutations and must be regarded as pseudogenes. We propose that this may have been triggered by the presence of untranslatable CGN codons. This sequence is available under EMBL Accession No. AJ307410. PMID:18628906

  14. The mitochondrial genome of Raphanus sativus and gene evolution of cruciferous mitochondrial types.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shengxin; Chen, Jianmei; Wang, Yankun; Gu, Bingchao; He, Jianbo; Chu, Pu; Guan, Rongzhan

    2013-03-20

    To explore the mitochondrial genes of the Cruciferae family, the mitochondrial genome of Raphanus sativus (sat) was sequenced and annotated. The circular mitochondrial genome of sat is 239,723 bp and includes 33 protein-coding genes, three rRNA genes and 17 tRNA genes. The mitochondrial genome also contains a pair of large repeat sequences 5.9 kb in length, which may mediate genome reorganization into two sub-genomic circles, with predicted sizes of 124.8 kb and 115.0 kb, respectively. Furthermore, gene evolution of mitochondrial genomes within the Cruciferae family was analyzed using sat mitochondrial type (mitotype), together with six other reported mitotypes. The cruciferous mitochondrial genomes have maintained almost the same set of functional genes. Compared with Cycas taitungensis (a representative gymnosperm), the mitochondrial genomes of the Cruciferae have lost nine protein-coding genes and seven mitochondrial-like tRNA genes, but acquired six chloroplast-like tRNAs. Among the Cruciferae, to maintain the same set of genes that are necessary for mitochondrial function, the exons of the genes have changed at the lowest rates, as indicated by the numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms. The open reading frames (ORFs) of unknown function in the cruciferous genomes are not conserved. Evolutionary events, such as mutations, genome reorganizations and sequence insertions or deletions (indels), have resulted in the non-conserved ORFs in the cruciferous mitochondrial genomes, which is becoming significantly different among mitotypes. This work represents the first phylogenic explanation of the evolution of genes of known function in the Cruciferae family. It revealed significant variation in ORFs and the causes of such variation.

  15. Complete mitochondrial genome of Saunders's gull Chroicocephalus saundersi (Charadriiformes, Laridae).

    PubMed

    Ryu, Shi Hyun; Hwang, Ui Wook

    2012-04-01

    Saunders's gull Chroicocephalus saundersi (Aves, Charadriiformes, Laridae) is a small-sized gull having black-colored head. In this study, the entire mitochondrial genome of C. saundersi is sequenced, which is 16,725 bp in length. The detailed characteristics of the mitochondrial genome are described here.

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome of a Asian lion (Panthera leo goojratensis).

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Fei; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Jian-ning

    2016-01-01

    The entire mitochondrial genome of this Asian lion (Panthera leo goojratensis) was 17,183 bp in length, gene composition and arrangement conformed to other lions, which contained the typical structure of 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs, 13 protein-coding genes and a non-coding region. The characteristic of the mitochondrial genome was analyzed in detail.

  17. Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of the Pezizomycete Pyronema confluens

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the ascomycete Pyronema confluens has been sequenced. The circular genome has a size of 191 kb and contains 48 protein-coding genes, 26 tRNA genes, and two rRNA genes. Of the protein-coding genes, 14 encode conserved mitochondrial proteins, and 31 encode predicted homing endonuclease genes. PMID:27174271

  18. Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of the Glass Sponge Oopsacas minuta

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Sébastien; Rocher, Caroline; Le Bivic, André

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Mediterranean glass sponge Oopsacas minuta. This 19-kb mitochondrial genome has 24 noncoding genes (22 tRNAs and 2 rRNAs) and 14 protein-encoding genes coding for 11 subunits of respiratory chain complexes and 3 ATP synthase subunits. PMID:26227597

  19. The Aspergillus Genome Database (AspGD): recent developments in comprehensive multispecies curation, comparative genomics and community resources.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Martha B; Cerqueira, Gustavo C; Inglis, Diane O; Skrzypek, Marek S; Binkley, Jonathan; Chibucos, Marcus C; Crabtree, Jonathan; Howarth, Clinton; Orvis, Joshua; Shah, Prachi; Wymore, Farrell; Binkley, Gail; Miyasato, Stuart R; Simison, Matt; Sherlock, Gavin; Wortman, Jennifer R

    2012-01-01

    The Aspergillus Genome Database (AspGD; http://www.aspgd.org) is a freely available, web-based resource for researchers studying fungi of the genus Aspergillus, which includes organisms of clinical, agricultural and industrial importance. AspGD curators have now completed comprehensive review of the entire published literature about Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus, and this annotation is provided with streamlined, ortholog-based navigation of the multispecies information. AspGD facilitates comparative genomics by providing a full-featured genomics viewer, as well as matched and standardized sets of genomic information for the sequenced aspergilli. AspGD also provides resources to foster interaction and dissemination of community information and resources. We welcome and encourage feedback at aspergillus-curator@lists.stanford.edu.

  20. Complete mitochondrial genome of the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang-Fei; Li, Jiong-Tang; Sun, Xiao-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a member of the Poeciliidae family, is one of the most popular aquarium fish. Here, we reported the complete mitochondrial genome of P. reticulata. The genome is 16,570 bp in length, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 2 ribosomal RNA genes. The structure of non-coding control region was also analyzed. Comparing the mitochondrial genome of P. reticulata with its congener Xiphophorus maculatus revealed the high sequence similarity and the identical gene structure. The complete mitochondrial genome of the guppy would help study the evolution of Poeciliidae family.

  1. A Human-Curated Annotation of the Candida albicans Genome

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Burkhard R; van het Hoog, Marco; d'Enfert, Christophe; Martchenko, Mikhail; Dungan, Jan; Kuo, Alan; Inglis, Diane O; Uhl, M. Andrew; Hogues, Hervé; Berriman, Matthew; Lorenz, Michael; Levitin, Anastasia; Oberholzer, Ursula; Bachewich, Catherine; Harcus, Doreen; Marcil, Anne; Dignard, Daniel; Iouk, Tatiana; Zito, Rosa; Frangeul, Lionel; Tekaia, Fredj; Rutherford, Kim; Wang, Edwin; Munro, Carol A; Bates, Steve; Gow, Neil A; Hoyer, Lois L; Köhler, Gerwald; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Newport, George; Znaidi, Sadri; Raymond, Martine; Turcotte, Bernard; Sherlock, Gavin; Costanzo, Maria; Ihmels, Jan; Berman, Judith; Sanglard, Dominique; Agabian, Nina; Mitchell, Aaron P; Johnson, Alexander D; Whiteway, Malcolm; Nantel, André

    2005-01-01

    Recent sequencing and assembly of the genome for the fungal pathogen Candida albicans used simple automated procedures for the identification of putative genes. We have reviewed the entire assembly, both by hand and with additional bioinformatic resources, to accurately map and describe 6,354 genes and to identify 246 genes whose original database entries contained sequencing errors (or possibly mutations) that affect their reading frame. Comparison with other fungal genomes permitted the identification of numerous fungus-specific genes that might be targeted for antifungal therapy. We also observed that, compared to other fungi, the protein-coding sequences in the C. albicans genome are especially rich in short sequence repeats. Finally, our improved annotation permitted a detailed analysis of several multigene families, and comparative genomic studies showed that C. albicans has a far greater catabolic range, encoding respiratory Complex 1, several novel oxidoreductases and ketone body degrading enzymes, malonyl-CoA and enoyl-CoA carriers, several novel amino acid degrading enzymes, a variety of secreted catabolic lipases and proteases, and numerous transporters to assimilate the resulting nutrients. The results of these efforts will ensure that the Candida research community has uniform and comprehensive genomic information for medical research as well as for future diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:16103911

  2. The mitochondrial genome of Baylisascaris procyonis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yue; Zhang, Zhihe; Niu, Lili; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Chengdong; Lan, Jingchao; Deng, Jiabo; Fu, Yan; Nie, Huaming; Yan, Ning; Yang, Deying; Hao, Guiying; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2011-01-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis (Nematoda: Ascaridida), an intestinal nematode of raccoons, is emerging as an important helminthic zoonosis due to serious or fatal larval migrans in animals and humans. Despite its significant veterinary and public health impact, the epidemiology, molecular ecology and population genetics of this parasite remain largely unexplored. Mitochondrial (mt) genomes can provide a foundation for investigations in these areas and assist in the diagnosis and control of B. procyonis. In this study, the first complete mt genome sequence of B. procyonis was determined using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based primer-walking strategy. The circular mt genome (14781 bp) of B. procyonis contained 12 protein-coding, 22 transfer RNA and 2 ribosomal RNA genes congruent with other chromadorean nematodes. Interestingly, the B. procyonis mtDNA featured an extremely long AT-rich region (1375 bp) and a high number of intergenic spacers (17), making it unique compared with other secernentean nematodes characterized to date. Additionally, the entire genome displayed notable levels of AT skew and GC skew. Based on pairwise comparisons and sliding window analysis of mt genes among the available 11 Ascaridida mtDNAs, new primer pairs were designed to amplify specific short fragments of the genes cytb (548 bp fragment) and rrnL (200 bp fragment) in the B. procyonis mtDNA, and tested as possible alternatives to existing mt molecular beacons for Ascaridida. Finally, phylogenetic analysis of mtDNAs provided novel estimates of the interrelationships of Baylisasaris and Ascaridida. The complete mt genome sequence of B. procyonis sequenced here should contribute to molecular diagnostic methods, epidemiological investigations and ecological studies of B. procyonis and other related ascaridoids. The information will be important in refining the phylogenetic relationships within the order Ascaridida and enriching the resource of markers for systematic, population genetic and

  3. The Mitochondrial Genome of Baylisascaris procyonis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yue; Zhang, Zhihe; Niu, Lili; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Chengdong; Lan, Jingchao; Deng, Jiabo; Fu, Yan; Nie, Huaming; Yan, Ning; Yang, Deying; Hao, Guiying; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2011-01-01

    Background Baylisascaris procyonis (Nematoda: Ascaridida), an intestinal nematode of raccoons, is emerging as an important helminthic zoonosis due to serious or fatal larval migrans in animals and humans. Despite its significant veterinary and public health impact, the epidemiology, molecular ecology and population genetics of this parasite remain largely unexplored. Mitochondrial (mt) genomes can provide a foundation for investigations in these areas and assist in the diagnosis and control of B. procyonis. In this study, the first complete mt genome sequence of B. procyonis was determined using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based primer-walking strategy. Methodology/Principal Findings The circular mt genome (14781 bp) of B. procyonis contained 12 protein-coding, 22 transfer RNA and 2 ribosomal RNA genes congruent with other chromadorean nematodes. Interestingly, the B. procyonis mtDNA featured an extremely long AT-rich region (1375 bp) and a high number of intergenic spacers (17), making it unique compared with other secernentean nematodes characterized to date. Additionally, the entire genome displayed notable levels of AT skew and GC skew. Based on pairwise comparisons and sliding window analysis of mt genes among the available 11 Ascaridida mtDNAs, new primer pairs were designed to amplify specific short fragments of the genes cytb (548 bp fragment) and rrnL (200 bp fragment) in the B. procyonis mtDNA, and tested as possible alternatives to existing mt molecular beacons for Ascaridida. Finally, phylogenetic analysis of mtDNAs provided novel estimates of the interrelationships of Baylisasaris and Ascaridida. Conclusions/Significance The complete mt genome sequence of B. procyonis sequenced here should contribute to molecular diagnostic methods, epidemiological investigations and ecological studies of B. procyonis and other related ascaridoids. The information will be important in refining the phylogenetic relationships within the order Ascaridida and

  4. Complete mitochondrial genome of a wild Siberian tiger.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujiao; Lu, Taofeng; Sun, Zhaohui; Guan, Weijun; Liu, Zhensheng; Teng, Liwei; Wang, Shuo; Ma, Yuehui

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) was sequenced, using muscle tissue obtained from a male wild tiger. The total length of the mitochondrial genome is 16,996 bp. The genome structure of this tiger is in accordance with other Siberian tigers and it contains 12S rRNA gene, 16S rRNA gene, 22 tRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, and 1 control region.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Yorkshire pig (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong; Yang, Hu; Ma, Haiming

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify the complete nucleotide sequence of mitochondrial genome in the Yorkshire pig. Sequence analysis indicates that the genome structure is in accordance with other pig breeds, and it contains 22 tRNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes and 1 control region (D-loop region). The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Yorkshire pig provides an important record set for further study on genetic mechanism.

  6. Mitochondrial genomes are retained by selective constraints on protein targeting

    PubMed Central

    Björkholm, Patrik; Harish, Ajith; Hagström, Erik; Ernst, Andreas M.; Andersson, Siv G. E.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are energy-producing organelles in eukaryotic cells considered to be of bacterial origin. The mitochondrial genome has evolved under selection for minimization of gene content, yet it is not known why not all mitochondrial genes have been transferred to the nuclear genome. Here, we predict that hydrophobic membrane proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genomes would be recognized by the signal recognition particle and targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum if they were nuclear-encoded and translated in the cytoplasm. Expression of the mitochondrially encoded proteins Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1, Apocytochrome b, and ATP synthase subunit 6 in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells confirms export to the endoplasmic reticulum. To examine the extent to which the mitochondrial proteome is driven by selective constraints within the eukaryotic cell, we investigated the occurrence of mitochondrial protein domains in bacteria and eukaryotes. The accessory protein domains of the oxidative phosphorylation system are unique to mitochondria, indicating the evolution of new protein folds. Most of the identified domains in the accessory proteins of the ribosome are also found in eukaryotic proteins of other functions and locations. Overall, one-third of the protein domains identified in mitochondrial proteins are only rarely found in bacteria. We conclude that the mitochondrial genome has been maintained to ensure the correct localization of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. Taken together, the results suggest that selective constraints on the eukaryotic cell have played a major role in modulating the evolution of the mitochondrial genome and proteome. PMID:26195779

  7. Ethics of modifying the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Bredenoord, A L; Dondorp, W; Pennings, G; De Wert, G

    2011-02-01

    Recent preclinical studies have shown the feasibility of specific variants of nuclear transfer to prevent mitochondrial DNA disorders. Nuclear transfer could be a valuable reproductive option for carriers of mitochondrial mutations. A clinical application of nuclear transfer, however, would entail germ-line modification, more specifically a germ-line modification of the mitochondrial genome. One of the most prominent objections against germ-line modification is the fear that it would become possible to alter 'essential characteristics' of a future person, thereby possibly violating the child's right to an open future. As only the nuclear DNA would contain the ingredients for individual characteristics, modification of the mtDNA is often considered less controversial than modification of the nuclear DNA. This paper discusses the tenability of this dichotomy. After having clarified the concept of germ-line modification, it argues that modification of the mtDNA is not substantively different from modification of the nuclear DNA in terms of its effects on the identity of the future person. Subsequently the paper assesses how this conclusion affects the moral evaluation of nuclear transfer to prevent mtDNA disorders. It concludes that the moral acceptability of germ-line modification does not depend on whether it alters the identity of the future child-all germ-line modifications do-but on whether it safeguards the child's right to an open future. If nuclear transfer to prevent mtDNA disorders becomes safe and effective, then dismissing it because it involves germ-line modification is unjustified.

  8. Mitochondrial genomics in Orthoptera using MOSAS.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, Nathan C; Hiatt, Kevin D; Valentine, Mark C; Song, Hojun; Whiting, Michael F

    2010-06-01

    We present complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) for three orthopterans (Xyleus modestus, Physemacris variolosa, and Ellipes minuta) and describe MOSAS (manipulation, organization, storage, and analysis of sequences), software we developed to facilitate annotation and analysis. We analyze the base composition, start and stop codons, non-coding regions, and gene order among these and 18 other orthopteran mitogenomes from GenBank and reconstruct a phylogeny of Orthoptera. We propose a tetranucleotide start codon for cox1, and hypothesize that the tRNA(Asp)-tRNA(Lys) rearrangement is a synapomorphy for Acridomorpha, but not Caelifera. We further describe MOSAS, user-friendly software we used for this analysis. MOSAS streamlines sequence data storage, organization, annotation, and alignment, and provides convenient search tools for dataset construction and a robust annotation engine particularly suited to annotating mitogenomes (available at http://mosas.byu.edu).

  9. From simple to supercomplex: mitochondrial genomes of euglenozoan protists

    PubMed Central

    Lukeš, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are double membrane organelles of endosymbiotic origin, best known for constituting the centre of energetics of a eukaryotic cell. They contain their own mitochondrial genome, which as a consequence of gradual reduction during evolution typically contains less than two dozens of genes. In this review, we highlight the extremely diverse architecture of mitochondrial genomes and mechanisms of gene expression between the three sister groups constituting the phylum Euglenozoa - Euglenida, Diplonemea and Kinetoplastea. The earliest diverging euglenids possess a simplified mitochondrial genome and a conventional gene expression, whereas both are highly complex in the two other groups. The expression of their mitochondrial-encoded proteins requires extensive post-transcriptional modifications guided by complex protein machineries and multiple small RNA molecules. Moreover, the least studied diplonemids, which have been recently discovered as a highly abundant component of the world ocean plankton, possess one of the most complicated mitochondrial genome organisations known to date. PMID:27018240

  10. Interpopulation hybrid breakdown maps to the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Christopher K; Burton, Ronald S

    2008-03-01

    Hybrid breakdown, or outbreeding depression, is the loss of fitness observed in crosses between genetically divergent populations. The role of maternally inherited mitochondrial genomes in hybrid breakdown has not been widely examined. Using laboratory crosses of the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus, we report that the low fitness of F(3) hybrids is completely restored in the offspring of maternal backcrosses, where parental mitochondrial and nuclear genomic combinations are reassembled. Paternal backcrosses, which result in mismatched mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, fail to restore hybrid fitness. These results suggest that fitness loss in T. californicus hybrids is completely attributable to nuclear-mitochondrial genomic interactions. Analyses of ATP synthetic capacity in isolated mitochondria from hybrid and backcross animals found that reduced ATP synthesis in hybrids was also largely restored in backcrosses, again with maternal backcrosses outperforming paternal backcrosses. The strong fitness consequences of nuclear-mitochondrial interactions have important, and often overlooked, implications for evolutionary and conservation biology.

  11. OntoMate: a text-mining tool aiding curation at the Rat Genome Database

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weisong; Laulederkind, Stanley J. F.; Hayman, G. Thomas; Wang, Shur-Jen; Nigam, Rajni; Smith, Jennifer R.; De Pons, Jeff; Dwinell, Melinda R.; Shimoyama, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is the premier repository of rat genomic, genetic and physiologic data. Converting data from free text in the scientific literature to a structured format is one of the main tasks of all model organism databases. RGD spends considerable effort manually curating gene, Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) and strain information. The rapidly growing volume of biomedical literature and the active research in the biological natural language processing (bioNLP) community have given RGD the impetus to adopt text-mining tools to improve curation efficiency. Recently, RGD has initiated a project to use OntoMate, an ontology-driven, concept-based literature search engine developed at RGD, as a replacement for the PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) search engine in the gene curation workflow. OntoMate tags abstracts with gene names, gene mutations, organism name and most of the 16 ontologies/vocabularies used at RGD. All terms/ entities tagged to an abstract are listed with the abstract in the search results. All listed terms are linked both to data entry boxes and a term browser in the curation tool. OntoMate also provides user-activated filters for species, date and other parameters relevant to the literature search. Using the system for literature search and import has streamlined the process compared to using PubMed. The system was built with a scalable and open architecture, including features specifically designed to accelerate the RGD gene curation process. With the use of bioNLP tools, RGD has added more automation to its curation workflow. Database URL: http://rgd.mcw.edu PMID:25619558

  12. OntoMate: a text-mining tool aiding curation at the Rat Genome Database.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weisong; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Hayman, G Thomas; Wang, Shur-Jen; Nigam, Rajni; Smith, Jennifer R; De Pons, Jeff; Dwinell, Melinda R; Shimoyama, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is the premier repository of rat genomic, genetic and physiologic data. Converting data from free text in the scientific literature to a structured format is one of the main tasks of all model organism databases. RGD spends considerable effort manually curating gene, Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) and strain information. The rapidly growing volume of biomedical literature and the active research in the biological natural language processing (bioNLP) community have given RGD the impetus to adopt text-mining tools to improve curation efficiency. Recently, RGD has initiated a project to use OntoMate, an ontology-driven, concept-based literature search engine developed at RGD, as a replacement for the PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) search engine in the gene curation workflow. OntoMate tags abstracts with gene names, gene mutations, organism name and most of the 16 ontologies/vocabularies used at RGD. All terms/ entities tagged to an abstract are listed with the abstract in the search results. All listed terms are linked both to data entry boxes and a term browser in the curation tool. OntoMate also provides user-activated filters for species, date and other parameters relevant to the literature search. Using the system for literature search and import has streamlined the process compared to using PubMed. The system was built with a scalable and open architecture, including features specifically designed to accelerate the RGD gene curation process. With the use of bioNLP tools, RGD has added more automation to its curation workflow. Database URL: http://rgd.mcw.edu. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Selfish drive can trump function when animal mitochondrial genomes compete

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hansong; O’Farrell, Patrick H.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes compete for transmission from mother to progeny. We explored this competition by introducing a second genome into Drosophila melanogaster to follow transmission. Competitions between closely related genomes favored those functional in electron transport, resulting in a host-beneficial purifying selection1. Contrastingly, matchups between distant genomes often favored those with negligible, negative or lethal consequences, indicating selfish selection. Exhibiting powerful selfish selection, a genome carrying a detrimental mutation displaced a complementing genome leading to population death after several generations. In a different pairing, opposing selfish and purifying selection counterbalanced to give stable transmission of two genomes. Sequencing of recombinant mitochondrial genomes revealed that the non-coding region, containing origins of replication, governs selfish transmission. Uniparental inheritance prevents encounters between distantly related genomes. Nonetheless, within each maternal lineage, constant competition among sibling genomes selects for super-replicators. We suggest that this relentless competition drives positive selection promoting change in the sequences influencing transmission. PMID:27270106

  14. Selfish drive can trump function when animal mitochondrial genomes compete.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hansong; O'Farrell, Patrick H

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial genomes compete for transmission from mother to progeny. We explored this competition by introducing a second genome into Drosophila melanogaster to follow transmission. Competitions between closely related genomes favored those functional in electron transport, resulting in a host-beneficial purifying selection. In contrast, matchups between distantly related genomes often favored those with negligible, negative or lethal consequences, indicating selfish selection. Exhibiting powerful selfish selection, a genome carrying a detrimental mutation displaced a complementing genome, leading to population death after several generations. In a different pairing, opposing selfish and purifying selection counterbalanced to give stable transmission of two genomes. Sequencing of recombinant mitochondrial genomes showed that the noncoding region, containing origins of replication, governs selfish transmission. Uniparental inheritance prevents encounters between distantly related genomes. Nonetheless, in each maternal lineage, constant competition among sibling genomes selects for super-replicators. We suggest that this relentless competition drives positive selection, promoting change in the sequences influencing transmission.

  15. Improved systematic tRNA gene annotation allows new insights into the evolution of mitochondrial tRNA structures and into the mechanisms of mitochondrial genome rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Jühling, Frank; Pütz, Joern; Bernt, Matthias; Donath, Alexander; Middendorf, Martin; Florentz, Catherine; Stadler, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are present in all types of cells as well as in organelles. tRNAs of animal mitochondria show a low level of primary sequence conservation and exhibit ‘bizarre’ secondary structures, lacking complete domains of the common cloverleaf. Such sequences are hard to detect and hence frequently missed in computational analyses and mitochondrial genome annotation. Here, we introduce an automatic annotation procedure for mitochondrial tRNA genes in Metazoa based on sequence and structural information in manually curated covariance models. The method, applied to re-annotate 1876 available metazoan mitochondrial RefSeq genomes, allows to distinguish between remaining functional genes and degrading ‘pseudogenes’, even at early stages of divergence. The subsequent analysis of a comprehensive set of mitochondrial tRNA genes gives new insights into the evolution of structures of mitochondrial tRNA sequences as well as into the mechanisms of genome rearrangements. We find frequent losses of tRNA genes concentrated in basal Metazoa, frequent independent losses of individual parts of tRNA genes, particularly in Arthropoda, and wide-spread conserved overlaps of tRNAs in opposite reading direction. Direct evidence for several recent Tandem Duplication-Random Loss events is gained, demonstrating that this mechanism has an impact on the appearance of new mitochondrial gene orders. PMID:22139921

  16. Analysis of mitochondrial respiratory-related genes reveals nuclear and mitochondrial genome cooperation in allotetraploid hybrid.

    PubMed

    Peng, L-Y; Wang, J; Tao, M; You, C-P; Ye, L; Xiao, J; Zhang, C; Liu, Y; Liu, S-J

    2014-01-01

    An allotetraploid hybrid lineage derived from the distant hybridization of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., ♀, 2n =100) × common carp (Cyprinus carpio L., ♂, 2n =100) was investigated for its mitochondrial and nuclear genome inheritance patterns. Based on liver transcriptomic data for this hybrid, red crucian carp, and common carp, we identified 94, 136, and 86 contigs corresponding to 41, 46, and 37 mitochondrial respiratory chain nuclear genes, respectively. Mitochondrial respiratory chain nuclear gene sequences from red crucian carp and common carp were both detected in the allotetraploid hybrid, indicating that both parental nuclear genomes were participated in the synthesis of mitochondrial respiratory protein complexes in the hybrid. For mitochondrial respiratory related genes, high sequence similarity (>90%) and a low nucleotide divergence rate (<0.2) between red crucian carp and common carp could be a critical factor allowing cooperation of the three genomes (red crucian carp mitochondrial genome, red crucian and common carp nuclear genomes) in the allotetraploid hybrid lineage. Interestingly, gene duplication events were identified in the allotetraploid hybrid, red crucian and common carp, as confirmed by analysis of orthologous gene trees for these fish. Our findings provide valuable information with which to study cooperation between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of other hybrids, and will provide basic genetic information of relevance to mitochondrial-related diseases in humans and animals.

  17. Complete Mitochondrial Genome of the Medicinal Mushroom Ganoderma lucidum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haimei; Chen, Xiangdong; Lan, Jin; Liu, Chang

    2013-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is one of the well-known medicinal basidiomycetes worldwide. The mitochondrion, referred to as the second genome, is an organelle found in most eukaryotic cells and participates in critical cellular functions. Elucidating the structure and function of this genome is important to understand completely the genetic contents of G. lucidum. In this study, we assembled the mitochondrial genome of G. lucidum and analyzed the differential expressions of its encoded genes across three developmental stages. The mitochondrial genome is a typical circular DNA molecule of 60,630 bp with a GC content of 26.67%. Genome annotation identified genes that encode 15 conserved proteins, 27 tRNAs, small and large rRNAs, four homing endonucleases, and two hypothetical proteins. Except for genes encoding trnW and two hypothetical proteins, all genes were located on the positive strand. For the repeat structure analysis, eight forward, two inverted, and three tandem repeats were detected. A pair of fragments with a total length around 5.5 kb was found in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, which suggests the possible transfer of DNA sequences between two genomes. RNA-Seq data for samples derived from three stages, namely, mycelia, primordia, and fruiting bodies, were mapped to the mitochondrial genome and qualified. The protein-coding genes were expressed higher in mycelia or primordial stages compared with those in the fruiting bodies. The rRNA abundances were significantly higher in all three stages. Two regions were transcribed but did not contain any identified protein or tRNA genes. Furthermore, three RNA-editing sites were detected. Genome synteny analysis showed that significant genome rearrangements occurred in the mitochondrial genomes. This study provides valuable information on the gene contents of the mitochondrial genome and their differential expressions at various developmental stages of G. lucidum. The results contribute to the understanding of the

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the liverwort Pleurozia purpurea reveals extremely conservative mitochondrial genome evolution in liverworts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Xue, Jiayu; Li, Libo; Liu, Yang; Qiu, Yin-Long

    2009-12-01

    Plant mitochondrial genomes have been known to be highly unusual in their large sizes, frequent intra-genomic rearrangement, and generally conservative sequence evolution. Recent studies show that in early land plants the mitochondrial genomes exhibit a mixed mode of conservative yet dynamic evolution. Here, we report the completely sequenced mitochondrial genome from the liverwort Pleurozia purpurea. The circular genome has a size of 168,526 base pairs, containing 43 protein-coding genes, 3 rRNA genes, 25 tRNA genes, and 31 group I or II introns. It differs from the Marchantia polymorpha mitochondrial genome, the only other liverwort chondriome that has been sequenced, in lacking two genes (trnRucg and trnTggu) and one intron (rrn18i1065gII). The two genomes have identical gene orders and highly similar sequences in exons, introns, and intergenic spacers. Finally, a comparative analysis of duplicated trnRucu and other trnR genes from the two liverworts and several other organisms identified the recent lateral origin of trnRucg in Marchantia mtDNA through modification of a duplicated trnRucu. This study shows that the mitochondrial genomes evolve extremely slowly in liverworts, the earliest-diverging lineage of extant land plants, in stark contrast to what is known of highly dynamic evolution of mitochondrial genomes in seed plants.

  19. Correcting Inconsistencies and Errors in Bacterial Genome Metadata Using an Automated Curation Tool in Excel (AutoCurE).

    PubMed

    Schmedes, Sarah E; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome data are invaluable for large-scale comparative genomic studies. Current sequencing technologies have made it feasible to sequence entire bacterial genomes with relative ease and time with a substantially reduced cost per nucleotide, hence cost per genome. More than 3,000 bacterial genomes have been sequenced and are available at the finished status. Publically available genomes can be readily downloaded; however, there are challenges to verify the specific supporting data contained within the download and to identify errors and inconsistencies that may be present within the organizational data content and metadata. AutoCurE, an automated tool for bacterial genome database curation in Excel, was developed to facilitate local database curation of supporting data that accompany downloaded genomes from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. AutoCurE provides an automated approach to curate local genomic databases by flagging inconsistencies or errors by comparing the downloaded supporting data to the genome reports to verify genome name, RefSeq accession numbers, the presence of archaea, BioProject/UIDs, and sequence file descriptions. Flags are generated for nine metadata fields if there are inconsistencies between the downloaded genomes and genomes reports and if erroneous or missing data are evident. AutoCurE is an easy-to-use tool for local database curation for large-scale genome data prior to downstream analyses.

  20. The little big genome: the organization of mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Iraselia; Jones, Edith; Ramos, Manuel; Innis-Whitehouse, Wendy; Gilkerson, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The small (16,569 base pair) human mitochondrial genome plays a significant role in cell metabolism and homeostasis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) contributes to the generation of complexes which are essential to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). As such, mtDNA is directly integrated into mitochondrial biogenesis and signaling and regulates mitochondrial metabolism in concert with nuclear-encoded mitochondrial factors. Mitochondria are a highly dynamic, pleiomorphic network that undergoes fission and fusion events. Within this network, mtDNAs are packaged into structures called nucleoids which are actively distributed in discrete foci within the network. This sensitive organelle is frequently disrupted by insults such as oxidants and inflammatory cytokines, and undergoes genomic damage with double- and single-strand breaks that impair its function. Collectively, mtDNA is emerging as a highly sensitive indicator of cellular stress, which is directly integrated into the mitochondrial network as a contributor of a wide range of critical signaling pathways. PMID:27814641

  1. Highly rearranged mitochondrial genome in Nycteria parasites (Haemosporidia) from bats

    PubMed Central

    Karadjian, Gregory; Hassanin, Alexandre; Saintpierre, Benjamin; Gembu Tungaluna, Guy-Crispin; Ariey, Frederic; Ayala, Francisco J.; Landau, Irene; Duval, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Haemosporidia parasites have mostly and abundantly been described using mitochondrial genes, and in particular cytochrome b (cytb). Failure to amplify the mitochondrial cytb gene of Nycteria parasites isolated from Nycteridae bats has been recently reported. Bats are hosts to a diverse and profuse array of Haemosporidia parasites that remain largely unstudied. There is a need to obtain more molecular data from chiropteran parasites. Such data would help to better understand the evolutionary history of Haemosporidia, which notably include the Plasmodium parasites, malaria’s agents. We use next-generation sequencing to obtain the complete mitochondrial genome of Nycteria parasites from African Nycteris grandis (Nycteridae) and Rhinolophus alcyone (Rhinolophidae) and Asian Megaderma spasma (Megadermatidae). We report four complete mitochondrial genomes, including two rearranged mitochondrial genomes within Haemosporidia. Our results open outlooks into potentially undiscovered Haemosporidian diversity. PMID:27528689

  2. IMGD: an integrated platform supporting comparative genomics and phylogenetics of insect mitochondrial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonhoon; Park, Jongsun; Choi, Jaeyoung; Jung, Kyongyong; Park, Bongsoo; Kim, Donghan; Lee, Jaeyoung; Ahn, Kyohun; Song, Wonho; Kang, Seogchan; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Seunghwan

    2009-01-01

    Background Sequences and organization of the mitochondrial genome have been used as markers to investigate evolutionary history and relationships in many taxonomic groups. The rapidly increasing mitochondrial genome sequences from diverse insects provide ample opportunities to explore various global evolutionary questions in the superclass Hexapoda. To adequately support such questions, it is imperative to establish an informatics platform that facilitates the retrieval and utilization of available mitochondrial genome sequence data. Results The Insect Mitochondrial Genome Database (IMGD) is a new integrated platform that archives the mitochondrial genome sequences from 25,747 hexapod species, including 112 completely sequenced and 20 nearly completed genomes and 113,985 partially sequenced mitochondrial genomes. The Species-driven User Interface (SUI) of IMGD supports data retrieval and diverse analyses at multi-taxon levels. The Phyloviewer implemented in IMGD provides three methods for drawing phylogenetic trees and displays the resulting trees on the web. The SNP database incorporated to IMGD presents the distribution of SNPs and INDELs in the mitochondrial genomes of multiple isolates within eight species. A newly developed comparative SNU Genome Browser supports the graphical presentation and interactive interface for the identified SNPs/INDELs. Conclusion The IMGD provides a solid foundation for the comparative mitochondrial genomics and phylogenetics of insects. All data and functions described here are available at the web site . PMID:19351385

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of the geophilomorph centipede Strigamia maritima.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Helen E; Lapraz, François; Rhodes, Adelaide C; Telford, Maximilian J

    2015-01-01

    Strigamia maritima (Myriapoda; Chilopoda) is a species from the soil-living order of geophilomorph centipedes. The Geophilomorpha is the most speciose order of centipedes with over a 1000 species described. They are notable for their large number of appendage bearing segments and are being used as a laboratory model to study the embryological process of segmentation within the myriapods. Using a scaffold derived from the recently published genome of Strigamia maritima that contained multiple mitochondrial protein-coding genes, here we report the complete mitochondrial genome of Strigamia, the first from any geophilomorph centipede. The mitochondrial genome of S. maritima is a circular molecule of 14,938 base pairs, within which we could identify the typical mitochondrial genome complement of 13 protein-coding genes and 2 ribosomal RNA genes. Sequences resembling 16 of the 22 transfer RNA genes typical of metazoan mitochondrial genomes could be identified, many of which have clear deviations from the standard 'cloverleaf' secondary structures of tRNA. Phylogenetic trees derived from the concatenated alignment of protein-coding genes of S. maritima and >50 other metazoans were unable to resolve the Myriapoda as monophyletic, but did support a monophyletic group of chilopods: Strigamia was resolved as the sister group of the scolopendromorph Scolopocryptos sp. and these two (Geophilomorpha and Scolopendromorpha), along with the Lithobiomorpha, formed a monophyletic group the Pleurostigmomorpha. Gene order within the S. maritima mitochondrial genome is unique compared to any other arthropod or metazoan mitochondrial genome to which it has been compared. The highly unusual organisation of the mitochondrial genome of Strigamia maritima is in striking contrast with the conservatively evolving nuclear genome: sampling of more members of this order of centipedes will be required to see whether this unusual organization is typical of the Geophilomorpha or results from a more

  4. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genome of Youxian sheldrake.

    PubMed

    He, Shao-Ping; Liu, Li-Li; Yu, Qi-Fang; Li, Si; He, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Youxian sheldrake is excellent native breeds in Hunan province in China. The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence plays an important role in the accurate determination of phylogenetic relationships among metazoans. This is the first study to determine the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Youxian sheldrake using PCR-based amplification and Sanger sequencing. The characteristic of the entire mitochondrial genome was analyzed in detail, the total length of the mitogenome is 16,605 bp, with the base composition of 29.21% A, 22.18% T, 32.84% C, 15.77% G in the Youxian sheldrake. It contained 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a major non-coding control region (D-loop region). The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Youxian sheldrake provided an important data for further study of the phylogenetics of poultry, and available data for the genetics and breeding.

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome and phylogeny of Pleistocene mammoth Mammuthus primigenius.

    PubMed

    Rogaev, Evgeny I; Moliaka, Yuri K; Malyarchuk, Boris A; Kondrashov, Fyodor A; Derenko, Miroslava V; Chumakov, Ilya; Grigorenko, Anastasia P

    2006-03-01

    Phylogenetic relationships between the extinct woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius), and the Asian (Elephas maximus) and African savanna (Loxodonta africana) elephants remain unresolved. Here, we report the sequence of the complete mitochondrial genome (16,842 base pairs) of a woolly mammoth extracted from permafrost-preserved remains from the Pleistocene epoch--the oldest mitochondrial genome sequence determined to date. We demonstrate that well-preserved mitochondrial genome fragments, as long as approximately 1,600-1700 base pairs, can be retrieved from pre-Holocene remains of an extinct species. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the Elephantinae clade suggests that M. primigenius and E. maximus are sister species that diverged soon after their common ancestor split from the L. africana lineage. Low nucleotide diversity found between independently determined mitochondrial genomic sequences of woolly mammoths separated geographically and in time suggests that north-eastern Siberia was occupied by a relatively homogeneous population of M. primigenius throughout the late Pleistocene.

  6. Complete mitochondrial genome of the aluminum-tolerant fungus Rhodotorula taiwanensis RS1 and comparative analysis of Basidiomycota mitochondrial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xue Qiang; Aizawa, Tomoko; Schneider, Jessica; Wang, Chao; Shen, Ren Fang; Sunairi, Michio

    2013-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Rhodotorula taiwanensis RS1, an aluminum-tolerant Basidiomycota fungus, was determined and compared with the known mitochondrial genomes of 12 Basidiomycota species. The mitochondrial genome of R. taiwanensis RS1 is a circular DNA molecule of 40,392 bp and encodes the typical 15 mitochondrial proteins, 23 tRNAs, and small and large rRNAs as well as 10 intronic open reading frames. These genes are apparently transcribed in two directions and do not show syntenies in gene order with other investigated Basidiomycota species. The average G+C content (41%) of the mitochondrial genome of R. taiwanensis RS1 is the highest among the Basidiomycota species. Two introns were detected in the sequence of the atp9 gene of R. taiwanensis RS1, but not in that of other Basidiomycota species. Rhodotorula taiwanensis is the first species of the genus Rhodotorula whose full mitochondrial genome has been sequenced; and the data presented here supply valuable information for understanding the evolution of fungal mitochondrial genomes and researching the mechanism of aluminum tolerance in microorganisms. PMID:23427135

  7. The i5k Workspace@NAL--enabling genomic data access, visualization and curation of arthropod genomes.

    PubMed

    Poelchau, Monica; Childers, Christopher; Moore, Gary; Tsavatapalli, Vijaya; Evans, Jay; Lee, Chien-Yueh; Lin, Han; Lin, Jun-Wei; Hackett, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The 5000 arthropod genomes initiative (i5k) has tasked itself with coordinating the sequencing of 5000 insect or related arthropod genomes. The resulting influx of data, mostly from small research groups or communities with little bioinformatics experience, will require visualization, dissemination and curation, preferably from a centralized platform. The National Agricultural Library (NAL) has implemented the i5k Workspace@NAL (http://i5k.nal.usda.gov/) to help meet the i5k initiative's genome hosting needs. Any i5k member is encouraged to contact the i5k Workspace with their genome project details. Once submitted, new content will be accessible via organism pages, genome browsers and BLAST search engines, which are implemented via the open-source Tripal framework, a web interface for the underlying Chado database schema. We also implement the Web Apollo software for groups that choose to curate gene models. New content will add to the existing body of 35 arthropod species, which include species relevant for many aspects of arthropod genomic research, including agriculture, invasion biology, systematics, ecology and evolution, and developmental research. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  8. The i5k Workspace@NAL—enabling genomic data access, visualization and curation of arthropod genomes

    PubMed Central

    Poelchau, Monica; Childers, Christopher; Moore, Gary; Tsavatapalli, Vijaya; Evans, Jay; Lee, Chien-Yueh; Lin, Han; Lin, Jun-Wei; Hackett, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The 5000 arthropod genomes initiative (i5k) has tasked itself with coordinating the sequencing of 5000 insect or related arthropod genomes. The resulting influx of data, mostly from small research groups or communities with little bioinformatics experience, will require visualization, dissemination and curation, preferably from a centralized platform. The National Agricultural Library (NAL) has implemented the i5k Workspace@NAL (http://i5k.nal.usda.gov/) to help meet the i5k initiative's genome hosting needs. Any i5k member is encouraged to contact the i5k Workspace with their genome project details. Once submitted, new content will be accessible via organism pages, genome browsers and BLAST search engines, which are implemented via the open-source Tripal framework, a web interface for the underlying Chado database schema. We also implement the Web Apollo software for groups that choose to curate gene models. New content will add to the existing body of 35 arthropod species, which include species relevant for many aspects of arthropod genomic research, including agriculture, invasion biology, systematics, ecology and evolution, and developmental research. PMID:25332403

  9. Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Daniel P.; Kane, Nolan C.; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2016-01-01

    This is the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence for sunflower and the first complete mitochondrial genome for any member of Asteraceae, the largest plant family, which includes over 23,000 named species. The master circle is 300,945-bp long and includes 27 protein-coding sequences, 18 tRNAs, and the 26S, 5S, and 18S rRNAs. PMID:27635002

  10. Diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders by concomitant next-generation sequencing of the exome and mitochondrial genome

    PubMed Central

    Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Smith, Laurie D.; Miller, Neil A.; Atherton, Andrea M.; Farrow, Emily G.; Strenk, Meghan E.; Soden, Sarah E.; Saunders, Carol J.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are notoriously difficult to diagnose due to extreme locus and allelic heterogeneity, with both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes potentially liable. Using exome sequencing we demonstrate the ability to rapidly and cost effectively evaluate both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes to obtain a molecular diagnosis for four patients with three distinct mitochondrial disorders. One patient was found to have Leigh syndrome due to a mutation in MT-ATP6, two affected siblings were discovered to be compound heterozygous for mutations in the NDUFV1 gene, which causes mitochondrial complex I deficiency, and one patient was found to have coenzyme Q10 deficiency due to compound heterozygous mutations in COQ2. In all cases conventional diagnostic testing failed to identify a molecular diagnosis. We suggest that additional studies should be conducted to evaluate exome sequencing as a primary diagnostic test for mitochondrial diseases, including those due to mtDNA mutations. PMID:23631824

  11. Taenia hydatigena: isolation of mitochondrial DNA, molecular cloning, and physical mitochondrial genome mapping.

    PubMed

    Yap, K W; Thompson, R C; Rood, J I; Pawlowski, I D

    1987-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA was isolated from Taenia hydatigena, T. crassiceps, and Echinococcus granulosus using a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide precipitation technique. The technique is simple, rapid, reproducible, and does not require extensive high speed ultracentrifugation. The advantage of using mitochondrial DNA from taeniid cestodes for comparative restriction analysis was demonstrated. Mitochondrial DNA of T. hydatigena was isolated as covalently closed circular molecules. These were linearized by single digestion with BamHI and the molecular weight was estimated from the linear form of 17.6 kb. The mitochondrial DNA of T. hydatigena is therefore similar in size and structure to that of many other animal species. The entire mitochondrial genome was cloned into pBR322 in Escherichia coli and a restriction map of the recombinant molecule was constructed. The potential of using the cloned mitochondrial genome as a probe in speciation studies as well as for providing functional information on the role of the cestode mitochondrion is discussed.

  12. PREPACT 2.0: Predicting C-to-U and U-to-C RNA Editing in Organelle Genome Sequences with Multiple References and Curated RNA Editing Annotation.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Henning; Knoop, Volker

    2013-01-01

    RNA editing is vast in some genetic systems, with up to thousands of targeted C-to-U and U-to-C substitutions in mitochondria and chloroplasts of certain plants. Efficient prognoses of RNA editing in organelle genomes will help to reveal overlooked cases of editing. We present PREPACT 2.0 (http://www.prepact.de) with numerous enhancements of our previously developed Plant RNA Editing Prediction & Analysis Computer Tool. Reference organelle transcriptomes for editing prediction have been extended and reorganized to include 19 curated mitochondrial and 13 chloroplast genomes, now allowing to distinguish RNA editing sites from "pre-edited" sites. Queries may be run against multiple references and a new "commons" function identifies and highlights orthologous candidate editing sites congruently predicted by multiple references. Enhancements to the BLASTX mode in PREPACT 2.0 allow querying of complete novel organelle genomes within a few minutes, identifying protein genes and candidate RNA editing sites simultaneously without prior user analyses.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome of Crassostrea gasar (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Cavaleiro, Nathalia P; Solé-Cava, Antonio M; Melo, Cláudio M R; de Almeida, Luiz G; Lazoski, Cristiano; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Crassostrea gasar was sequenced using the Ion Proton technology in combination with 454 Roche GS-FLX plataform data. We assembled a 17,686 bp complete circular mitochondrial genome, containing 13 protein-coding genes, a major non-coding region (MNR), two ribosomal RNA genes and 24 transfer RNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated amino acid sequences from mitochondria showed monophyletic clades formed with high bootstrap values. This is the first complete mitochondrial sequence of an oyster from South America. Mitogenome sequence was deposited in GenBank under the accession number KR856227.

  14. The genomic landscape of polymorphic human nuclear mitochondrial insertions

    PubMed Central

    Dayama, Gargi; Emery, Sarah B.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Mills, Ryan E.

    2014-01-01

    The transfer of mitochondrial genetic material into the nuclear genomes of eukaryotes is a well-established phenomenon that has been previously limited to the study of static reference genomes. The recent advancement of high throughput sequencing has enabled an expanded exploration into the diversity of polymorphic nuclear mitochondrial insertions (NumtS) within human populations. We have developed an approach to discover and genotype novel Numt insertions using whole genome, paired-end sequencing data. We have applied this method to a thousand individuals in 20 populations from the 1000 Genomes Project and other datasets and identified 141 new sites of Numt insertions, extending our current knowledge of existing NumtS by almost 20%. We find that recent Numt insertions are derived from throughout the mitochondrial genome, including the D-loop, and have integration biases that differ in some respects from previous studies on older, fixed NumtS in the reference genome. We determined the complete inserted sequence for a subset of these events and have identified a number of nearly full-length mitochondrial genome insertions into nuclear chromosomes. We further define their age and origin of insertion and present an analysis of their potential impact to ongoing studies of mitochondrial heteroplasmy and disease. PMID:25348406

  15. Rolling Circle Amplification of Complete Nematode Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sha; Hyman, Bradley C.

    2005-01-01

    To enable investigation of nematode mitochondrial DNA evolution, methodology has been developed to amplify intact nematode mitochondrial genomes in preparative yields using a rolling circle replication strategy. Successful reactions were generated from whole cell template DNA prepared by alkaline lysis of the rhabditid nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and a mermithid nematode, Thaumamermis cosgrovei. These taxa, representing the two major nematode classes Chromodorea and Enoplea, maintain mitochondrial genomes of 13.8 kb and 20.0 kb, respectively. Efficient amplifications were conducted on template DNA isolated from individual or pooled nematodes that were alive or stored at -80°C. Unexpectedly, these experiments revealed that multiple T. cosgrovei mitochondrial DNA haplotypes are maintained in our local population. Rolling circle amplification products can be used as templates for standard PCR reactions with specific primers that target mitochondrial genes or for direct DNA sequencing. PMID:19262866

  16. Rolling circle amplification of complete nematode mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sha; Hyman, Bradley C

    2005-06-01

    To enable investigation of nematode mitochondrial DNA evolution, methodology has been developed to amplify intact nematode mitochondrial genomes in preparative yields using a rolling circle replication strategy. Successful reactions were generated from whole cell template DNA prepared by alkaline lysis of the rhabditid nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and a mermithid nematode, Thaumamermis cosgrovei. These taxa, representing the two major nematode classes Chromodorea and Enoplea, maintain mitochondrial genomes of 13.8 kb and 20.0 kb, respectively. Efficient amplifications were conducted on template DNA isolated from individual or pooled nematodes that were alive or stored at -80 degrees C. Unexpectedly, these experiments revealed that multiple T. cosgrovei mitochondrial DNA haplotypes are maintained in our local population. Rolling circle amplification products can be used as templates for standard PCR reactions with specific primers that target mitochondrial genes or for direct DNA sequencing.

  17. Mitochondrial genome instability in colorectal adenoma and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Luiza F; Fonseca, Aline S; Muys, Bruna R; Plaça, Jessica R; Bueno, Rafaela B L; Lorenzi, Julio C C; Santos, Anemari R D; Molfetta, Greice A; Zanette, Dalila L; Souza, Jorge E S; Valente, Valeria; Silva, Wilson A

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is regarded as a hallmark of cancer progression. In the current study, we evaluated mitochondrial genome instability and copy number in colorectal cancer using Next Generation Sequencing approach and qPCR, respectively. The results revealed higher levels of heteroplasmy and depletion of the relative mtDNA copy number in colorectal adenocarcinoma. Adenocarcinoma samples also presented an increased number of mutations in nuclear genes encoding proteins which functions are related with mitochondria fusion, fission and localization. Moreover, we found a set of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, which cooperate in the same mitochondrial function simultaneously mutated in adenocarcinoma. In summary, these results support an important role for mitochondrial function and genomic instability in colorectal tumorigenesis.

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Synanceia verrucosa (Scorpaeniformes: Synanceiidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Wang, Jun; Luo, Jian; Chen, Guohua

    2016-11-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the Synanceia verrucosa has been sequenced. The mitochondrial genome is 16,506 bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and one control region. The gene order and the composition of S. verrucosa mitochondrial genome were similar to that of most other vertebrates. The overall nucleotides base composition of the heavy strand is A (31.01%), G (15.06%), C (25.60%), and T (28.34%). With the exception of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) and eight tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand. The tRNA-Ser2 gene lacked DHC arm and could not fold into a typical clover-leaf secondary structure. Seen from the phylogenetic tree, a stonefish (S. verrucosa), two lionfishes, and eight rockfishes from the same order (Scorpaeniformes) clustered into one branch.

  19. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Scorpaenopsis cirrhosa (Scorpaeniformes: Scorpaenidae).

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongjie; Wang, Daoru; Hu, Jing; Wang, Qian

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the Scorpaenopsis cirrhosa has been sequenced. The mitochondrial genome is 16 966 bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and 1 control region. The gene order and composition of S. cirrhosa mitochondrial genome was similar to that of most other vertebrates. The overall nucleotides base composition of the heavy strand is A (27.91%), G (17.71%), C (28.02%), and T (26.35%). With the exception of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) and eight tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand. The tRNA-Ser2 gene lacked DHC arm and could not fold into a typical clover-leaf secondary structure. Seen from the phylogenetic tree, S. cirrhosa, a stonefish and four rockfishes from the same order (Scorpaeniformes) clustered into one branch.

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Piaractus brachypomus (Characiformes: Characidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Huanpu; Li, Shuisheng; Xie, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Yong; Zhu, Chunhua; Deng, Siping; Li, Guangli; Huang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the Piaractus brachypomus is described in the present study. The mitochondrial genome is 16,561 bp long and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a control region. The P. brachypomus mitochondrial genome shows the similar gene order and composition with those of most other vertebrates. The nucleotide compositions of the light strand in descending order is 31.57% of A, 26.19% of C, 26.18% of T and 16.06% of G. With the exception of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) and eight tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand.

  1. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Drepane punctata (Perciformes: Drepanidae).

    PubMed

    Xie, Junfeng; Xie, Zhenzhen; Peng, Chen; Xu, Wen; Wang, Qing; Chen, Huapu; Li, Shuisheng; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Haoran

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the Drepane punctata was presented in our study. The mitochondrial genome is 16,397 bp long and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 16 tRNA genes and a control region. The gene order and composition of D. punctata mitochondrial genome was different from that of most other vertebrates. The nucleotide compositions of the light strand are 24.56% of A, 16.02% of C, 27.81% of T and 31.61% of G. With the exception of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) and five tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand.

  2. Molecular Poltergeists: Mitochondrial DNA Copies (numts) in Sequenced Nuclear Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Zeller, Raymond M.; Martin, William

    2010-01-01

    The natural transfer of DNA from mitochondria to the nucleus generates nuclear copies of mitochondrial DNA (numts) and is an ongoing evolutionary process, as genome sequences attest. In humans, five different numts cause genetic disease and a dozen human loci are polymorphic for the presence of numts, underscoring the rapid rate at which mitochondrial sequences reach the nucleus over evolutionary time. In the laboratory and in nature, numts enter the nuclear DNA via non-homolgous end joining (NHEJ) at double-strand breaks (DSBs). The frequency of numt insertions among 85 sequenced eukaryotic genomes reveal that numt content is strongly correlated with genome size, suggesting that the numt insertion rate might be limited by DSB frequency. Polymorphic numts in humans link maternally inherited mitochondrial genotypes to nuclear DNA haplotypes during the past, offering new opportunities to associate nuclear markers with mitochondrial markers back in time. PMID:20168995

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of Cephalothrix simula (Iwata) (Nemertea: Palaeonemertea).

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Xia; Sundberg, Per; Norenburg, Jon L; Sun, Shi-Chun

    2009-08-01

    The first complete mitochondrial genome sequence for a nemertean, Cephalothrix simula, was determined by conventional and long PCR and sequencing with primer walking methods. This circular genome is 16,296 bp in size and encodes 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, and 22 transfer RNAs) typically found in metazoans. All genes are encoded on H-strand except two tRNAs (trnT and trnP). It differs from those reported for other metazoans, but some gene junctions are shared with those of other protostomes. Structure of the mitochondrial genome of C. simula is mostly concordant with the partial mitochondrial genome known for Cephalothrix rufifrons, but notable differences include three large indel events and transposition of 2 tRNAs. Nucleotide composition of the mitochondrial genome of C. simula is highly A+T biased. The compositional skew is strongly reflected in the codon-usage patterns and the amino acid compositions of the mitochondrial proteins. An AT-rich noncoding region with potential to form stem-loop structures may be involved in the initiation of replication or transcription. Gene adjacencies and phylogenetic analysis based on the 12 concatenated amino acid sequences (except atp8) of mitochondrial protein-coding genes show that the nemertean is close to the coelomate lophotrochozoans, rather than the acoelomate platyhelminths.

  4. A comprehensive analysis of bilaterian mitochondrial genomes and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Bernt, Matthias; Bleidorn, Christoph; Braband, Anke; Dambach, Johannes; Donath, Alexander; Fritzsch, Guido; Golombek, Anja; Hadrys, Heike; Jühling, Frank; Meusemann, Karen; Middendorf, Martin; Misof, Bernhard; Perseke, Marleen; Podsiadlowski, Lars; von Reumont, Björn; Schierwater, Bernd; Schlegel, Martin; Schrödl, Michael; Simon, Sabrina; Stadler, Peter F; Stöger, Isabella; Struck, Torsten H

    2013-11-01

    About 2800 mitochondrial genomes of Metazoa are present in NCBI RefSeq today, two thirds belonging to vertebrates. Metazoan phylogeny was recently challenged by large scale EST approaches (phylogenomics), stabilizing classical nodes while simultaneously supporting new sister group hypotheses. The use of mitochondrial data in deep phylogeny analyses was often criticized because of high substitution rates on nucleotides, large differences in amino acid substitution rate between taxa, and biases in nucleotide frequencies. Nevertheless, mitochondrial genome data might still be promising as it allows for a larger taxon sampling, while presenting a smaller amount of sequence information. We present the most comprehensive analysis of bilaterian relationships based on mitochondrial genome data. The analyzed data set comprises more than 650 mitochondrial genomes that have been chosen to represent a profound sample of the phylogenetic as well as sequence diversity. The results are based on high quality amino acid alignments obtained from a complete reannotation of the mitogenomic sequences from NCBI RefSeq database. However, the results failed to give support for many otherwise undisputed high-ranking taxa, like Mollusca, Hexapoda, Arthropoda, and suffer from extreme long branches of Nematoda, Platyhelminthes, and some other taxa. In order to identify the sources of misleading phylogenetic signals, we discuss several problems associated with mitochondrial genome data sets, e.g. the nucleotide and amino acid landscapes and a strong correlation of gene rearrangements with long branches. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. IMG ER: A System for Microbial Genome Annotation Expert Review and Curation

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Chen, I-Min A.; Chu, Ken; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2009-05-25

    A rapidly increasing number of microbial genomes are sequenced by organizations worldwide and are eventually included into various public genome data resources. The quality of the annotations depends largely on the original dataset providers, with erroneous or incomplete annotations often carried over into the public resources and difficult to correct. We have developed an Expert Review (ER) version of the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system, with the goal of supporting systematic and efficient revision of microbial genome annotations. IMG ER provides tools for the review and curation of annotations of both new and publicly available microbial genomes within IMG's rich integrated genome framework. New genome datasets are included into IMG ER prior to their public release either with their native annotations or with annotations generated by IMG ER's annotation pipeline. IMG ER tools allow addressing annotation problems detected with IMG's comparative analysis tools, such as genes missed by gene prediction pipelines or genes without an associated function. Over the past year, IMG ER was used for improving the annotations of about 150 microbial genomes.

  6. Mitochondrial genome architecture in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sookoian, Silvia; Flichman, Diego; Scian, Romina; Rohr, Cristian; Dopazo, Hernán; Gianotti, Tomas Fernández; Martino, Julio San; Castaño, Gustavo O; Pirola, Carlos J

    2016-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, a decreased liver mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, and impaired energy metabolism. To understand the clinical implications of mtDNA diversity in the biology of NAFLD, we applied deep-coverage whole sequencing of the liver mitochondrial genomes. We used a multistage study design, including a discovery phase, a phenotype-oriented study to assess the mutational burden in patients with steatohepatitis at different stages of liver fibrosis, and a replication study to validate findings in loci of interest. We also assessed the potential protein-level impact of the observed mutations. To determine whether the observed changes are tissue-specific, we compared the liver and the corresponding peripheral blood entire mitochondrial genomes. The nuclear genes POLG and POLG2 (mitochondrial DNA polymerase-γ) were also sequenced. We observed that the liver mtDNA of patients with NAFLD harbours complex genomes with a significantly higher mutational (1.28-fold) rate and degree of heteroplasmy than in controls. The analysis of liver mitochondrial genomes of patients with different degrees of fibrosis revealed that the disease severity is associated with an overall 1.4-fold increase in mutation rate, including mutations in genes of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) chain. Significant differences in gene and protein expression patterns were observed in association with the cumulative number of OXPHOS polymorphic sites. We observed a high degree of homology (∼98%) between the blood and liver mitochondrial genomes. A missense POLG p.Gln1236His variant was associated with liver mtDNA copy number. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that OXPHOS genes contain the highest number of hotspot positions associated with a more severe phenotype. The variability of the mitochondrial genomes probably originates from a common germline source; hence, it may explain a fraction of the 'missing heritability

  7. Population structure of mitochondrial genomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wolters, John F; Chiu, Kenneth; Fiumera, Heather L

    2015-06-11

    Rigorous study of mitochondrial functions and cell biology in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae has advanced our understanding of mitochondrial genetics. This yeast is now a powerful model for population genetics, owing to large genetic diversity and highly structured populations among wild isolates. Comparative mitochondrial genomic analyses between yeast species have revealed broad evolutionary changes in genome organization and architecture. A fine-scale view of recent evolutionary changes within S. cerevisiae has not been possible due to low numbers of complete mitochondrial sequences. To address challenges of sequencing AT-rich and repetitive mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs), we sequenced two divergent S. cerevisiae mtDNAs using a single-molecule sequencing platform (PacBio RS). Using de novo assemblies, we generated highly accurate complete mtDNA sequences. These mtDNA sequences were compared with 98 additional mtDNA sequences gathered from various published collections. Phylogenies based on mitochondrial coding sequences and intron profiles revealed that intraspecific diversity in mitochondrial genomes generally recapitulated the population structure of nuclear genomes. Analysis of intergenic sequence indicated a recent expansion of mobile elements in certain populations. Additionally, our analyses revealed that certain populations lacked introns previously believed conserved throughout the species, as well as the presence of introns never before reported in S. cerevisiae. Our results revealed that the extensive variation in S. cerevisiae mtDNAs is often population specific, thus offering a window into the recent evolutionary processes shaping these genomes. In addition, we offer an effective strategy for sequencing these challenging AT-rich mitochondrial genomes for small scale projects.

  8. A 454 sequencing approach to dipteran mitochondrial genome research.

    PubMed

    Ramakodi, Meganathan P; Singh, Baneshwar; Wells, Jeffrey D; Guerrero, Felix; Ray, David A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of complete mitochondrial genome (mtgenome) data for Diptera, one of the largest metazoan orders, in public databases is limited. The advent of high throughput sequencing technology provides the potential to generate mtgenomes for many species affordably and quickly. However, these technologies need to be validated for dipterans as the members of this clade play important economic and research roles. Illumina and 454 sequencing platforms are widely used in genomic research involving non-model organisms. The Illumina platform has already been utilized for generating mitochondrial genomes without using conventional long range PCR for insects whereas the power of 454 sequencing for generating mitochondrial genome drafts without PCR has not yet been validated for insects. Thus, this study examines the utility of 454 sequencing approach for dipteran mtgenomic research. We generated complete or nearly complete mitochondrial genomes for Cochliomyia hominivorax, Haematobia irritans, Phormia regina and Sarcophaga crassipalpis using a 454 sequencing approach. Comparisons between newly obtained and existing assemblies for C. hominivorax and H. irritans revealed no major discrepancies and verified the utility of 454 sequencing for dipteran mitochondrial genomes. We also report the complete mitochondrial sequences for two forensically important flies, P. regina and S. crassipalpis, which could be used to provide useful information to legal personnel. Comparative analyses revealed that dipterans follow similar codon usage and nucleotide biases that could be due to mutational and selection pressures. This study illustrates the utility of 454 sequencing to obtain complete mitochondrial genomes for dipterans without the aid of conventional molecular techniques such as PCR and cloning and validates this method of mtgenome sequencing in arthropods.

  9. Mitochondrial genome of Japanese angel shark Squatina japonica (Chondrichthyes: Squatinidae).

    PubMed

    Chai, Aihong; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Furumitsu, Keisuke; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Squatina japonica belonging to the monogenetic family Squatinidae is endemic to the Northwest Pacific. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of S. japonica is 16,689 bp long and comprises 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 1 control region. The base composition of the genome is 31.10% A, 31.04% T, 24.42% C, and 13.43% G. The geographic clade and phylogenetic relationship of S. japonica are ambiguous. Therefore, studying the complete mitochondrial genome of S. japonica is highly important to understand the aforementioned aspect and to analyze the conservation genetics in the genus Squatina.

  10. Mitochondrial genome of longheaded eagle ray Aetobatus flagellum (Chondrichthyes: Myliobatidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Baojuan; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Furumitsu, Keisuke; Zhang, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Aetobatus flagellum is 20,201 bp long and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and 1 control region (CR). The base composition of the genome is 30.9% A, 28.2% T, 27.1% C and 13.8% G. Comparing mtDNA of elasmobranchs submitted in NCBI, our study not only identified the longest mitochondrial genome with 4490 bp CR in A. flagellum, but also strongly revealed that records in the northwest Pacific may belong to a separate species from those distributed in Indonesia.

  11. Association testing of the mitochondrial genome using pedigree data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyu; Dupuis, Josée; Larson, Martin G; Levy, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    In humans, mitochondria contain their own DNA (mtDNA) that is inherited exclusively from the mother. The mitochondrial genome encodes 13 polypeptides that are components of oxidative phosphorylation to produce energy. Any disruption in these genes might interfere with energy production and thus contribute to metabolic derangement. Mitochondria also regulate several important cellular activities including cell death and calcium homeostasis. Aided by sharply declining costs of high-density genotyping, hundreds of mitochondrial variants will soon be available in several cohorts with pedigree structures. Association testing of mitochondrial variants with disease traits using pedigree data raises unique challenges because of the difficulty in separating the effects of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, which display different modes of inheritance. Failing to correctly account for these effects might decrease power or inflate type I error in association tests. In this report, we sought to identify the best strategy for association testing of mitochondrial variants when genotype and phenotype data are available in pedigrees. We proposed several strategies to account for polygenic effects of the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes and we performed extensive simulation studies to evaluate type I error and power of these strategies. In addition, we proposed two permutation tests to obtain empirical P values for these strategies. Furthermore, we applied two of the analytical strategies to association analysis of 196 mitochondrial variants with blood pressure and fasting blood glucose in the pedigree rich, Framingham Heart Study. Finally, we discussed strategies for study design, genotyping, and data cleaning in association testing of mtDNA in pedigrees.

  12. Oxidative DNA damage causes mitochondrial genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Doudican, Nicole A; Song, Binwei; Shadel, Gerald S; Doetsch, Paul W

    2005-06-01

    Mitochondria contain their own genome, the integrity of which is required for normal cellular energy metabolism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by normal mitochondrial respiration can damage cellular macromolecules, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and have been implicated in degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging. We developed strategies to elevate mitochondrial oxidative stress by exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2) or utilizing mutants lacking mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (sod2Delta). Experiments were conducted with strains compromised in mitochondrial base excision repair (ntg1Delta) and oxidative damage resistance (pif1Delta) in order to delineate the relationship between these pathways. We observed enhanced ROS production, resulting in a direct increase in oxidative mtDNA damage and mutagenesis. Repair-deficient mutants exposed to oxidative stress conditions exhibited profound genomic instability. Elimination of Ntg1p and Pif1p resulted in a synergistic corruption of respiratory competency upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). Mitochondrial genomic integrity was substantially compromised in ntg1Delta pif1Delta sod2Delta strains, since these cells exhibit a total loss of mtDNA. A stable respiration-defective strain, possessing a normal complement of mtDNA damage resistance pathways, exhibited a complete loss of mtDNA upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). This loss was preventable by Sod2p overexpression. These results provide direct evidence that oxidative mtDNA damage can be a major contributor to mitochondrial genomic instability and demonstrate cooperation of Ntg1p and Pif1p to resist the introduction of lesions into the mitochondrial genome.

  13. The little brown bat nuclear genome contains an entire mitochondrial genome: Real or artifact?

    PubMed

    Shi, Huizhen; Xing, Yutong; Mao, Xiuguang

    2017-09-20

    Nuclear mitochondrial DNA sequences (NUMTs) have been documented in almost all eukaryotic genomes studied. Recently, with the number of sequenced genomes increasing, extremely large NUMTs, even a nearly entire mitochondrial genome, have been reported in some plants and animals. However, few such studies provided strong experimental evidences for these important discoveries. In this study using a computer-based search method an entire mitochondrial genome (NUMT-1) was found in the nuclear genome of a bat species (Myotis lucifugus). This super-large NUMT shared a same scaffold with a 754bp nuclear genomic sequence and a second NUMT (NUMT-2, 3292bp). If NUMT-1 was real, it will be the largest NUMT found in animals and this finding will provide valuable insights into the mode of generation of NUMTs in the nuclear genome. Unfortunately, although the initial sequencing technology of the published M. lucifugus genome makes the possibility of artifact less likely, our results from both the PCR amplification followed by Sanger sequencing and mapping method based on the whole-genome resequencing datasets suggested that the scaffold containing the entire mitochondrial genome was artifact possibly due to a misassembly of mitochondrial and the nuclear DNA sequences. Our current study highlights the necessity to validate the authenticity of extremely large NUMTs identified in previous searches on whole-genome sequence assemblies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Unique mitochondrial genome architecture in unicellular relatives of animals.

    PubMed

    Burger, Gertraud; Forget, Lise; Zhu, Yun; Gray, Michael W; Lang, B Franz

    2003-02-04

    Animal mtDNAs are typically small (approximately 16 kbp), circular-mapping molecules that encode 37 or fewer tightly packed genes. Here we investigate whether similarly compact mitochondrial genomes are also present in the closest unicellular relatives of animals, i.e., choanoflagellate and ichthyosporean protists. We find that the gene content and architecture of the mitochondrial genomes of the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis, the ichthyosporean Amoebidium parasiticum, and Metazoa are radically different from one another. The circular-mapping choanoflagellate mtDNA with its long intergenic regions is four times as large and contains two times as many protein genes as do animal mtDNAs, whereas the ichthyosporean mitochondrial genome totals >200 kbp and consists of several hundred linear chromosomes that share elaborate terminal-specific sequence patterns. The highly peculiar organization of the ichthyosporean mtDNA raises questions about the mechanism of mitochondrial genome replication and chromosome segregation during cell division in this organism. Considering that the closest unicellular relatives of animals possess large, spacious, gene-rich mtDNAs, we posit that the distinct compaction characteristic of metazoan mitochondrial genomes occurred simultaneously with the emergence of a multicellular body plan in the animal lineage.

  15. WikiGenomes: an open web application for community consumption and curation of gene annotation data in Wikidata

    PubMed Central

    Lelong, Sebastien; Burgstaller-Muehlbacher, Sebastian; Waagmeester, Andra; Diesh, Colin; Dunn, Nathan; Munoz-Torres, Monica; Stupp, Gregory S.; Wu, Chunlei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract With the advancement of genome-sequencing technologies, new genomes are being sequenced daily. Although these sequences are deposited in publicly available data warehouses, their functional and genomic annotations (beyond genes which are predicted automatically) mostly reside in the text of primary publications. Professional curators are hard at work extracting those annotations from the literature for the most studied organisms and depositing them in structured databases. However, the resources don’t exist to fund the comprehensive curation of the thousands of newly sequenced organisms in this manner. Here, we describe WikiGenomes (wikigenomes.org), a web application that facilitates the consumption and curation of genomic data by the entire scientific community. WikiGenomes is based on Wikidata, an openly editable knowledge graph with the goal of aggregating published knowledge into a free and open database. WikiGenomes empowers the individual genomic researcher to contribute their expertise to the curation effort and integrates the knowledge into Wikidata, enabling it to be accessed by anyone without restriction. Database URL: www.wikigenomes.org PMID:28365742

  16. WikiGenomes: an open web application for community consumption and curation of gene annotation data in Wikidata.

    PubMed

    Putman, Tim E; Lelong, Sebastien; Burgstaller-Muehlbacher, Sebastian; Waagmeester, Andra; Diesh, Colin; Dunn, Nathan; Munoz-Torres, Monica; Stupp, Gregory S; Wu, Chunlei; Su, Andrew I; Good, Benjamin M

    2017-01-01

    With the advancement of genome-sequencing technologies, new genomes are being sequenced daily. Although these sequences are deposited in publicly available data warehouses, their functional and genomic annotations (beyond genes which are predicted automatically) mostly reside in the text of primary publications. Professional curators are hard at work extracting those annotations from the literature for the most studied organisms and depositing them in structured databases. However, the resources don't exist to fund the comprehensive curation of the thousands of newly sequenced organisms in this manner. Here, we describe WikiGenomes (wikigenomes.org), a web application that facilitates the consumption and curation of genomic data by the entire scientific community. WikiGenomes is based on Wikidata, an openly editable knowledge graph with the goal of aggregating published knowledge into a free and open database. WikiGenomes empowers the individual genomic researcher to contribute their expertise to the curation effort and integrates the knowledge into Wikidata, enabling it to be accessed by anyone without restriction. www.wikigenomes.org.

  17. The mitochondrial genome of the venomous cone snail Conus consors.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Age; Kurz, Alexander; Stockwell, Tim; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Heidler, Juliana; Wittig, Ilka; Kauferstein, Silke; Mebs, Dietrich; Stöcklin, Reto; Remm, Maido

    2012-01-01

    Cone snails are venomous predatory marine neogastropods that belong to the species-rich superfamily of the Conoidea. So far, the mitochondrial genomes of two cone snail species (Conus textile and Conus borgesi) have been described, and these feed on snails and worms, respectively. Here, we report the mitochondrial genome sequence of the fish-hunting cone snail Conus consors and describe a novel putative control region (CR) which seems to be absent in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of other cone snail species. This possible CR spans about 700 base pairs (bp) and is located between the genes encoding the transfer RNA for phenylalanine (tRNA-Phe, trnF) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (cox3). The novel putative CR contains several sequence motifs that suggest a role in mitochondrial replication and transcription.

  18. The Mitochondrial Genome of the Venomous Cone Snail Conus consors

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, Age; Kurz, Alexander; Stockwell, Tim; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Heidler, Juliana; Wittig, Ilka; Kauferstein, Silke; Mebs, Dietrich; Stöcklin, Reto; Remm, Maido

    2012-01-01

    Cone snails are venomous predatory marine neogastropods that belong to the species-rich superfamily of the Conoidea. So far, the mitochondrial genomes of two cone snail species (Conus textile and Conus borgesi) have been described, and these feed on snails and worms, respectively. Here, we report the mitochondrial genome sequence of the fish-hunting cone snail Conus consors and describe a novel putative control region (CR) which seems to be absent in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of other cone snail species. This possible CR spans about 700 base pairs (bp) and is located between the genes encoding the transfer RNA for phenylalanine (tRNA-Phe, trnF) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (cox3). The novel putative CR contains several sequence motifs that suggest a role in mitochondrial replication and transcription. PMID:23236512

  19. Mitochondrial genomic variation associated with higher mitochondrial copy number: the Cache County Study on Memory Health and Aging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The mitochondria are essential organelles and are the location of cellular respiration, which is responsible for the majority of ATP production. Each cell contains multiple mitochondria, and each mitochondrion contains multiple copies of its own circular genome. The ratio of mitochondrial genomes to nuclear genomes is referred to as mitochondrial copy number. Decreases in mitochondrial copy number are known to occur in many tissues as people age, and in certain diseases. The regulation of mitochondrial copy number by nuclear genes has been studied extensively. While mitochondrial variation has been associated with longevity and some of the diseases known to have reduced mitochondrial copy number, the role that the mitochondrial genome itself has in regulating mitochondrial copy number remains poorly understood. Results We analyzed the complete mitochondrial genomes from 1007 individuals randomly selected from the Cache County Study on Memory Health and Aging utilizing the inferred evolutionary history of the mitochondrial haplotypes present in our dataset to identify sequence variation and mitochondrial haplotypes associated with changes in mitochondrial copy number. Three variants belonging to mitochondrial haplogroups U5A1 and T2 were significantly associated with higher mitochondrial copy number in our dataset. Conclusions We identified three variants associated with higher mitochondrial copy number and suggest several hypotheses for how these variants influence mitochondrial copy number by interacting with known regulators of mitochondrial copy number. Our results are the first to report sequence variation in the mitochondrial genome that causes changes in mitochondrial copy number. The identification of these variants that increase mtDNA copy number has important implications in understanding the pathological processes that underlie these phenotypes. PMID:25077862

  20. Mitochondrial genome sequence of the Tibetan wild ass (Equus kiang).

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongjun; Chen, Yu; Liu, Fuyu; Jiang, Chunhua; Gao, Yuqi

    2011-02-01

    The Tibetan wild ass, or kiang (Equus kiang) is endemic to the cold and hypoxic (4000-7000 m above sea level) climates of the montane and alpine grasslands of the Tibetan Plateau. We report here the complete nucleotide sequence of the E. kiang mitochondrial genome. Our results show that E. kiang mitochondrial DNA is 16,634 bp long, and predicted to encode all the 37 genes that are typical for vertebrates.

  1. Complete mitochondrial genome of Esox reichertii (Amur pike).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The whole mitochondrial genome of Esox reichertii (fish) was first sequenced and characterized. It was determined to be 16,909 bp long, which contains the control region (CR), the origin of light-strand replication (OL), 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal genes and 13 protein-coding genes. Overall base composition of the complete mitochondrial DNA was 28.65% A, 28.67% T, 27.28% C and 15.41% G, with 57.32%AT.

  2. Re-engineering the mitochondrial genomes in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Koob, Michael D; Yoo, Young Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are subcellular organelles composed of two discrete membranes in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They have long been recognized as the generators of energy for the cell and also have been known to associate with several metabolic pathways that are crucial for cellular function. Mitochondria have their own genome, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), that is completely separated and independent from the much larger nuclear genome, and even have their own system for making proteins from the genes in this mtDNA genome. The human mtDNA is a small (~16.5 kb) circular DNA and defects in this genome can cause a wide range of inherited human diseases. Despite of the significant advances in discovering the mtDNA defects, however, there are currently no effective therapies for these clinically devastating diseases due to the lack of technology for introducing specific modifications into the mitochondrial genomes and for generating accurate mtDNA disease models. The ability to engineer the mitochondrial genomes would provide a powerful tool to create mutants with which many crucial experiments can be performed in the basic mammalian mitochondrial genetic studies as well as in the treatment of human mtDNA diseases. In this review we summarize the current approaches associated with the correction of mtDNA mutations in cells and describe our own efforts for introducing engineered mtDNA constructs into the mitochondria of living cells through bacterial conjugation. PMID:21189990

  3. [Mitochondrial genome variation in domesticated sable (Martes zibellina)].

    PubMed

    Andrianov, B V; Sorokina, S Iu; Lazebniĭ, O E; Goryacheva, I I; Gorelova, T V; Kashtanov, S N

    2012-04-01

    The first comparison of mitochondrial variations in sables from captive and natural populations of the Urals, Central Siberia, Yakutia, Kamchatka, and Japan has been performed. The object of comparative analysis was a 427-bp 5' fragment of the mitochondrial control region, including the D-loop. Two main haplogroups of the sable mitochondrial genome have been found, which provides new data for reconstruction of the spread of the sable over its current range. Asymmetry of the haplotype abundances in the captive populations of sables has been detected. The mitochondrial haplotypes characteristic of sable breeds have been identified. The possible role of the frequent mitochondrial haplotypes of the captive population in the sable adaptation to the conditions of captivity is discussed.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Xupu goose.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qian; Cao, Rong; Jiang, Gui-Tao; Qiu, Lei; Hu, Guan-Bo; Dai, Qiu-Zhong; Zhang, Shi-Rui; Hou, De-Xing; He, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Xupu goose is one of the famous native breed in China. In this work we reported the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Xupu goose in Hunan Province for the first time. The total length of the mitogenome is 16,742 bp, with the base composition of 30.21% for A, 22.70% for T, 32.02% for C, 15.08% for G, in the order C > A > T > G feature occurring in the Xupu goose. And it is made up of two ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a non-coding control region (D-loop region). The characteristics of the mitochondrial genome were analyzed and discussed in detail. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Xupu goose will be useful for the phylogenetics of poultry, and be available as basic data for the genetics and breeding.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Daweishan Mini chicken.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming-Li; Ding, Su-Ping; Ye, Shao-Hui; Wang, Chun-Guang; He, Bao-Li; Yuan, Zhi-Dong; Liu, Li-Li

    2016-01-01

    Daweishan Mini chicken is a valuable chicken breed in China. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Daweishan Mini chicken using PCR amplification, sequencing and assembling has been obtained for the first time. The total length of the mitochondrial genome was 16,785 bp, with the base composition of 30.26% A, 23.73% T, 32.51% C, 13.51% G. It contained 37 genes (2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes) and a major non-coding control region (D-loop region). The protein start codons are ATG, except for COX1 that begins with GTG. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Daweishan Mini chicken provides an important data set for further investigation on the phylogenetic relationships within Gallus gallus.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Mustela eversmannii (Carnivora: Mustelidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangshuai; Yang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Honghai; Sun, Guolei; Zhao, Chao; Dou, Huashan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of Steppe polecat, Mustela eversmannii, was sequenced for the first time using muscle tissue. The mitochondrial genome is a circular molecule of 16 463 bp in length and overall base composition is A (32.7%), T (27.3%), C (26.1%), and G (13.9%), which indicates a strong A-T bias. A phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 13 protein-coding genes and two rRNA genes of 10 Mustela species' mitochondrial genomes using maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) demonstrated that these Mustela species were clustered into two clades and M. eversmannii was close to M. putorius.

  7. Complete mitochondrial genome of Nanjiang Yellow goat (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Li, Haijun; Meng, Xiangren; Zhang, Hao; Duan, Xiaoyue; Niu, Lili; Wang, Linjie; Li, Li; Zhang, Hongping; Wu, Hongda; Zhong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Nanjiang Yellow goat (Capra hircus) is the first cultured mutton breed in China. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Nanjiang Yellow goat has been identified for the first time. The total length of the mitochondrial genome was 16,639 bp, with the base composition of 33.54% A, 26.05% C, 13.11% G and 27.30% T. It contained 37 genes (22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 13 protein-coding genes) and a major non-coding control region (D-loop). Most of the genes have ATG initiation codons, whereas ND2, ND3 and ND5 start with ATA. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Nanjiang Yellow goat provides an important data set for further estimation on the phylogeographic structure of domestic goats.

  8. The complete mitochondrial genome of Acropora aculeus (cnidaria, scleractinia, acroporidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yidan; Yu, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Zhi; Huang, Bo

    2016-11-01

    The mitochondrial genome is typically a single circular chromosome in eukaryotes. In the present study, the sequenced mitochondrial genome of Acropora aculeus was of 18 532 bp in length, and encoded thirteen typical protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and two transfer RNA genes. All genes except trnM, rrnL, trnW, atp8, and cox2 were engulfed by the large intron of the nad5 gene. A unique initiation codon TTG presented in the nad3 gene. In the phylogenic tree, the tree length of genus Montipora/Astreopora was longest among all genus pairwise comparisons in the family Acroporidae, and it was also longer than the tree length of A. aculeus/other species. These results suggested that the mitochondrial genome evolution of genus Astreopora could be fastest in the family Acroporidae.

  9. Insect mitochondrial genomics: implications for evolution and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial (mt) genome is, to date, the most extensively studied genomic system in insects, outnumbering nuclear genomes tenfold and representing all orders versus very few. Phylogenomic analysis methods have been tested extensively, identifying compositional bias and rate variation, both within and between lineages, as the principal issues confronting accurate analyses. Major studies at both inter- and intraordinal levels have contributed to our understanding of phylogenetic relationships within many groups. Genome rearrangements are an additional data type for defining relationships, with rearrangement synapomorphies identified across multiple orders and at many different taxonomic levels. Hymenoptera and Psocodea have greatly elevated rates of rearrangement offering both opportunities and pitfalls for identifying rearrangement synapomorphies in each group. Finally, insects are model systems for studying aberrant mt genomes, including truncated tRNAs and multichromosomal genomes. Greater integration of nuclear and mt genomic studies is necessary to further our understanding of insect genomic evolution.

  10. Mitochondrial genome of the Peruvian scallop Argopecten purpuratus (Bivalvia: Pectinidae).

    PubMed

    Marín, Alan; Alfaro, Rubén; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome of the Peruvian scallop Argopecten purpuratus was determined. The length of the mitochondrial coding region is 15,608 bp. A typical bivalve mitochondrial composition was detected with 12 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 21 transfer RNA genes, with the absence of the atp8 gene. Fifty percent of the protein-coding genes use typical ATG start codon, whereas five genes utilize ATA as their start codon. Only one gene was found to utilize TTG as its start codon. The A. purpuratus mitogenome shows a significant similarity to that of A. irradians irradians, in length as well as in gene composition.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of the stomatopod crustacean Squilla mantis

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Charles E

    2005-01-01

    Background Animal mitochondrial genomes are physically separate from the much larger nuclear genomes and have proven useful both for phylogenetic studies and for understanding genome evolution. Within the phylum Arthropoda the subphylum Crustacea includes over 50,000 named species with immense variation in body plans and habitats, yet only 23 complete mitochondrial genomes are available from this subphylum. Results I describe here the complete mitochondrial genome of the crustacean Squilla mantis (Crustacea: Malacostraca: Stomatopoda). This 15994-nucleotide genome, the first described from a hoplocarid, contains the standard complement of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and a non-coding AT-rich region that is found in most other metazoans. The gene order is identical to that considered ancestral for hexapods and crustaceans. The 70% AT base composition is within the range described for other arthropods. A single unusual feature of the genome is a 230 nucleotide non-coding region between a serine transfer RNA and the nad1 gene, which has no apparent function. I also compare gene order, nucleotide composition, and codon usage of the S. mantis genome and eight other malacostracan crustaceans. A translocation of the histidine transfer RNA gene is shared by three taxa in the order Decapoda, infraorder Brachyura; Callinectes sapidus, Portunus trituberculatus and Pseudocarcinus gigas. This translocation may be diagnostic for the Brachyura. For all nine taxa nucleotide composition is biased towards AT-richness, as expected for arthropods, and is within the range reported for other arthropods. Codon usage is biased, and much of this bias is probably due to the skew in nucleotide composition towards AT-richness. Conclusion The mitochondrial genome of Squilla mantis contains one unusual feature, a 230 base pair non-coding region has so far not been described in any other malacostracan. Comparisons with other Malacostraca show that all

  12. Mitochondrial DNA insertions in the nuclear horse genome.

    PubMed

    Nergadze, S G; Lupotto, M; Pellanda, P; Santagostino, M; Vitelli, V; Giulotto, E

    2010-12-01

    The insertion of mitochondrial DNA in the nuclear genome generates numts, nuclear sequences of mitochondrial origin. In the horse reference genome, we identified 82 numts and showed that the entire horse mitochondrial DNA is represented as numts without gross bias. Numts were inserted in the horse nuclear genome at random sites and were probably generated during the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. We then analysed 12 numt loci in 20 unrelated horses and found that null alleles, lacking the mitochondrial DNA insertion, were present at six of these loci. At some loci, the null allele is prevalent in the sample analysed, suggesting that, in the horse population, the number of numt loci may be higher than 82 present in the reference genome. Contrary to humans, the insertion polymorphism of numts is extremely frequent in the horse population, supporting the hypothesis that the genome of this species is in a rapidly evolving state. © 2010 The Authors, Journal compilation © 2010 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA insertions in the nuclear Capra hircus genome.

    PubMed

    Ning, F Y; Fu, J; Du, Z H

    2017-01-23

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts), originating from mtDNA insertions into the nuclear genome, have been detected in many species. However, the distribution of numts in the newly published nuclear genome of domestic goat (Capra hircus) has not yet been explored. We used the entire goat mtDNA sequence and nuclear genome, to identify 118 numts using BLAST. Of these, 79 were able to map sequences to the genome. Further analysis showed that the size of the numts ranged from 318 to 9608 bp, and the homologous identity between numts and their respective corresponding mtDNA fragments varied between 65 and 99%. The identified Yunnan black goat numts covered nearly all the mitochondrial genes including mtDNA control region, and were distributed over all chromosomes with the exception of chromosomes 18, 21, and 25. The Y chromosome was excluded from our analysis, as sequence data are currently not available. Among the discovered 79 numts that we were able to map to the genome, 26 relatively complete mitochondrial genes were detected. Our results constitute valuable information for subsequent studies related to mitochondrial genes and goat evolution.

  14. Analysis of the whole mitochondrial genome: translation of the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine system to the diagnostic bench?

    PubMed

    Seneca, Sara; Vancampenhout, Kim; Van Coster, Rudy; Smet, Joél; Lissens, Willy; Vanlander, Arnaud; De Paepe, Boel; Jonckheere, An; Stouffs, Katrien; De Meirleir, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS), an innovative sequencing technology that enables the successful analysis of numerous gene sequences in a massive parallel sequencing approach, has revolutionized the field of molecular biology. Although NGS was introduced in a rather recent past, the technology has already demonstrated its potential and effectiveness in many research projects, and is now on the verge of being introduced into the diagnostic setting of routine laboratories to delineate the molecular basis of genetic disease in undiagnosed patient samples. We tested a benchtop device on retrospective genomic DNA (gDNA) samples of controls and patients with a clinical suspicion of a mitochondrial DNA disorder. This Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine platform is a high-throughput sequencer with a fast turnaround time and reasonable running costs. We challenged the chemistry and technology with the analysis and processing of a mutational spectrum composed of samples with single-nucleotide substitutions, indels (insertions and deletions) and large single or multiple deletions, occasionally in heteroplasmy. The output data were compared with previously obtained conventional dideoxy sequencing results and the mitochondrial revised Cambridge Reference Sequence (rCRS). We were able to identify the majority of all nucleotide alterations, but three false-negative results were also encountered in the data set. At the same time, the poor performance of the PGM instrument in regions associated with homopolymeric stretches generated many false-positive miscalls demanding additional manual curation of the data.

  15. Conflict between Translation Initiation and Elongation in Vertebrate Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xuhua; Huang, Huang; Carullo, Malisa; Betrán, Esther; Moriyama, Etsuko N.

    2007-01-01

    The strand-biased mutation spectrum in vertebrate mitochondrial genomes results in an AC-rich L-strand and a GT-rich H-strand. Because the L-strand is the sense strand of 12 protein-coding genes out of the 13, the third codon position is overall strongly AC-biased. The wobble site of the anticodon of the 22 mitochondrial tRNAs is either U or G to pair with the most abundant synonymous codon, with only one exception. The wobble site of Met-tRNA is C instead of U, forming the Watson-Crick match with AUG instead of AUA, the latter being much more frequent than the former. This has been attributed to a compromise between translation initiation and elongation; i.e., AUG is not only a methionine codon, but also an initiation codon, and an anticodon matching AUG will increase the initiation rate. However, such an anticodon would impose selection against the use of AUA codons because AUA needs to be wobble-translated. According to this translation conflict hypothesis, AUA should be used relatively less frequently compared to UUA in the UUR codon family. A comprehensive analysis of mitochondrial genomes from a variety of vertebrate species revealed a general deficiency of AUA codons relative to UUA codons. In contrast, urochordate mitochondrial genomes with two tRNAMet genes with CAU and UAU anticodons exhibit increased AUA codon usage. Furthermore, six bivalve mitochondrial genomes with both of their tRNA-Met genes with a CAU anticodon have reduced AUA usage relative to three other bivalve mitochondrial genomes with one of their two tRNA-Met genes having a CAU anticodon and the other having a UAU anticodon. We conclude that the translation conflict hypothesis is empirically supported, and our results highlight the fine details of selection in shaping molecular evolution. PMID:17311091

  16. Mitochondrial Genome Supports Sibling Species of Angiostrongylus costaricensis (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae)

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Song, Sze-Looi; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Goh, Share-Yuan; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Chow, Wan-Loo; Chan, Kok-Gan; Abrahams-Sandi, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Angiostrongylus costaricensis is a zoonotic parasitic nematode that causes abdominal or intestinal angiostrongyliasis in humans. It is endemic to the Americas. Although the mitochondrial genome of the Brazil taxon has been published, there is no available mitochondrial genome data on the Costa Rica taxon. We report here the complete mitochondrial genome of the Costa Rica taxon and its genetic differentiation from the Brazil taxon. The whole mitochondrial genome was obtained from next-generation sequencing of genomic DNA. It had a total length of 13,652 bp, comprising 36 genes (12 protein-coding genes—PCGs, 2 rRNA and 22 tRNA genes) and a control region (A + T rich non-coding region). It is longer than that of the Brazil taxon (13,585 bp). The larger mitogenome size of the Costa Rica taxon is due to the size of the control region as the Brazil taxon has a shorter length (265 bp) than the Costa Rica taxon (318 bp). The size of 6 PCGs and the start codon for ATP6, CYTB and NAD5 genes are different between the Costa Rica and Brazil taxa. Additionally, the two taxa differ in the stop codon of 6 PCGs. Molecular phylogeny based on 12 PCGs was concordant with two rRNA, 22 tRNA and 36 mitochondrial genes. The two taxa have a genetic distance of p = 16.2% based on 12 PCGs, p = 15.3% based on 36 mitochondrial genes, p = 13.1% based on 2 rRNA genes and p = 10.7% based on 22 tRNA genes, indicating status of sibling species. The Costa Rica and Brazil taxa of A. costaricensis are proposed to be accorded specific status as members of a species complex. PMID:26230642

  17. The complete mitochondrial genome of Dixella aestivalis (Diptera: Nematocera: Dixidae).

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Andrew G; Sivell, Duncan; Harbach, Ralph E

    2017-01-01

    Dixidae, meniscus midges, belong to the suborder Nematocera of the order Diptera. The family includes 197 known species classified in nine genera. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Dixella aestivalis (Meigen) from the United Kingdom is reported here, along with its annotation and comparison with the genome of an unidentified species of Dixella from China. The circular genome consists of 16 465 bp and has a gene content consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes and a non-coding, A + T-rich, control region. The mitochondrial genome of D. aestivalis can be used to identify genetic markers for species identification, and will be valuable for resolving phylogenetic relationships within the genus, family Dixidae and suborder Nematocera.

  18. Complete sequences of maternally inherited mitochondrial genomes in mussels Unio pictorum (Bivalvia, Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Soroka, M; Burzyński, A

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are frequently used to infer phylogenetic relationships. Some taxa are, however, poorly represented. To facilitate better understanding of the potential of mitochondrial genome data in freshwater mussels, we present here, for the first time, the mitochondrial sequences of 4 complete F-type mitochondrial genomes from the European freshwater bivalve Unio pictorum (Unionidae). These genomes are very compact (15,761 bp) but have a typical gene complement for bilaterian mitochondrial genomes and a very similar organization to other unionid genomes available in databases. Very low nucleotide diversity within the species suggests a small effective population size of Polish U. pictorum, a phenomenon of potential importance for environmental management policies.

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome of Iwatanemertes piperata (Nemertea: Heteronemertea).

    PubMed

    Shen, Chun-Yang; Sun, Wen-Yan; Sun, Shi-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Iwatanemertes piperata (Nemertea: Heteronemertea) was determined. The genome, which contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 22 transfer RNA genes, is 16,382 bp in length and has a base composition of G (25.87%), A (21.53%), T (40.64%) and C (11.95%). The gene order is identical to other Heteronemertea mitogenomes published to date.

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of Eremias przewalskii (Squamata: Lacertidae).

    PubMed

    Du, Yu; Qiu, Qing-Bo; Tong, Qing-Lin; Lin, Long-Hui

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the complete mitochondrial genome of Eremias przewalskii (Squamata: Lacertidae) is reported, which is a circular molecule of 18,225 bp in size. The base composition of mtDNA is as follows: 30.3% A, 27.9% T, 27.9% C and 13.9% G. The genome consists of 13 protein coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and one putative control region.

  1. DNA Precursor Metabolism and Mitochondrial Genome Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    mitochondrial thiamine pyrophosphate depletion, embryonic lethality, CNS malformations, and anemia. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 103, 15927–15932. List of papers...to facilitate deoxyribonucleotide transport, with diphosphates being the preferred substrates. Biesecker’s laboratory had generated knockout mice...transport ribonucleotides in reconstituted liposomes, with diphosphates again being the preferred substrates. That led us to speculate that the

  2. OGRe: a relational database for comparative analysis of mitochondrial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Daniel; Gibson, Andrew P.; Hudelot, Cendrine; Higgs, Paul G.

    2003-01-01

    Organellar Genome Retrieval (OGRe) is a relational database of complete mitochondrial genome sequences for over 250 Metazoan species. OGRe provides a resource for the comparative analysis of mitochondrial genomes at several levels. At the sequence level, OGRe allows the retrieval of any selected set of mitochondrial genes from any selected set of species. Species are classified using a taxonomic system that allows easy selection of related groups of species. Sequence alignments are also available for some species. At the level of individual nucleotides, the system contains information on base frequencies and codon usage frequencies that can be compared between organisms. At the level of whole genomes, OGRe provides several ways of visualizing information on gene order. Diagrams illustrating the genome arrangement can be generated for any selected set of species automatically from the information in the database. Searches can be done based on gene arrangement to find sets of species that have the same order as one another. Diagrams for pairwise comparison of species can be produced that show the positions of break-points in the gene order and use colour to highlight the sections of the genome that have moved. OGRe is available from http://www.bioinf.man.ac.uk/ogre. PMID:12519982

  3. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis Reveals Historical Lineages in Yellowstone Bison.

    PubMed

    Forgacs, David; Wallen, Rick L; Dobson, Lauren K; Derr, James N

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park is home to one of the only plains bison populations that have continuously existed on their present landscape since prehistoric times without evidence of domestic cattle introgression. Previous studies characterized the relatively high levels of nuclear genetic diversity in these bison, but little is known about their mitochondrial haplotype diversity. This study assessed mitochondrial genomes from 25 randomly selected Yellowstone bison and found 10 different mitochondrial haplotypes with a haplotype diversity of 0.78 (± 0.06). Spatial analysis of these mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes did not detect geographic population subdivision (FST = -0.06, p = 0.76). However, we identified two independent and historically important lineages in Yellowstone bison by combining data from 65 bison (defined by 120 polymorphic sites) from across North America representing a total of 30 different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes from one of the Yellowstone lineages represent descendants of the 22 indigenous bison remaining in central Yellowstone in 1902. The other mitochondrial DNA lineage represents descendants of the 18 females introduced from northern Montana in 1902 to supplement the indigenous bison population and develop a new breeding herd in the northern region of the park. Comparing modern and historical mitochondrial DNA diversity in Yellowstone bison helps uncover a historical context of park restoration efforts during the early 1900s, provides evidence against a hypothesized mitochondrial disease in bison, and reveals the signature of recent hybridization between American plains bison (Bison bison bison) and Canadian wood bison (B. b. athabascae). Our study demonstrates how mitochondrial DNA can be applied to delineate the history of wildlife species and inform future conservation actions.

  4. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis Reveals Historical Lineages in Yellowstone Bison

    PubMed Central

    Derr, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park is home to one of the only plains bison populations that have continuously existed on their present landscape since prehistoric times without evidence of domestic cattle introgression. Previous studies characterized the relatively high levels of nuclear genetic diversity in these bison, but little is known about their mitochondrial haplotype diversity. This study assessed mitochondrial genomes from 25 randomly selected Yellowstone bison and found 10 different mitochondrial haplotypes with a haplotype diversity of 0.78 (± 0.06). Spatial analysis of these mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes did not detect geographic population subdivision (FST = -0.06, p = 0.76). However, we identified two independent and historically important lineages in Yellowstone bison by combining data from 65 bison (defined by 120 polymorphic sites) from across North America representing a total of 30 different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes from one of the Yellowstone lineages represent descendants of the 22 indigenous bison remaining in central Yellowstone in 1902. The other mitochondrial DNA lineage represents descendants of the 18 females introduced from northern Montana in 1902 to supplement the indigenous bison population and develop a new breeding herd in the northern region of the park. Comparing modern and historical mitochondrial DNA diversity in Yellowstone bison helps uncover a historical context of park restoration efforts during the early 1900s, provides evidence against a hypothesized mitochondrial disease in bison, and reveals the signature of recent hybridization between American plains bison (Bison bison bison) and Canadian wood bison (B. b. athabascae). Our study demonstrates how mitochondrial DNA can be applied to delineate the history of wildlife species and inform future conservation actions. PMID:27880780

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Pampus chinensis (Perciformes: Stromateidae).

    PubMed

    Sun, Dandan; Cheng, Qiqun; Qiao, Huiying; Zhang, Heng; Chen, Ying

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of Pampus chinensis (Perciformes: Stromateidae) was determined. The mitogenome is 16,535 bp in length, which contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and 2 non-coding regions: origin of light-strand replication (OL) and control region (D-loop). The overall mtDNA nucleotide base composition of P. chinensis is A 29.72%, C 28.10%, G 15.34%, and T 26.84%, with an A + T content of 56.56%. Except for ND6 gene and eight tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes were encoded on the heavy strand. The mitochondrial genome of P. chinensis may be helpful to the studies on stock evaluation and conservation genetics of P. chinensis resource, as well as molecular phylogeny of Stromateidae.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Pampus argenteus (Perciformes: Stromateidae).

    PubMed

    Sun, Dandan; Cheng, Qiqun; Qiao, Huiying; Chen, Ying

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sequenced and annotated the complete mitochondrial genome of Pampus argenteus (Perciformes: Stromateidae). The mitogenome is 17,098 bp in length, which contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 23 tRNA genes and 2 non-coding regions: origin of light-strand replication (OL) and control region (D-loop). The overall nucleotide base composition of P. argenteus mtDNA is A 30.35%, C 25.55%, G 15.28% and T 28.82%, with an A + T content of 59.17%. Except for ND6 gene and eight tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes were encoded on the heavy strand. The mitochondrial genome of P. argenteus may be helpful to the studies on conservation genetics and stock evaluation of P. argenteus resource, as well as molecular phylogeny and species identification of Stromateidae.

  7. Complete mitochondrial genome of Florida pompano Trachinotus carolinus (Teleostei, Carangidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dianchang; Wang, Long; Guo, Huayang; Ma, Zhenhua; Zhang, Nan; Lin, Junda; Jiang, Shigui

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Florida pompano Trachinotus carolinus was determined by the overlapped polymerase chain reaction. The complete mitochondrial DNA sequence is 16,544 bp in length. It consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two rRNA genes and two non-coding regions. Overall base composition of its mitochondrial genome is estimated to be 28.68% for A, 16.27% for G, 26.00% for T, 29.06% for C, respectively, with a high A+T content (54.68%). The control region contains three conserved sequence blocks, a termination-associated sequence and a TATA box. The sequence data of T. carolinus can provide useful information for the studies on population structure, molecular systematic, stock evaluation and conservation genetics. It is also helpful to develop the rational management strategies for T. carolinus resource.

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome of the crested black macaque (Macaca nigra).

    PubMed

    Du, Li-Na; Shi, Fang-Lei; Liu, Zhi-Jin; Zhou, Qi-Hai

    2016-11-01

    The complete mitochondrial sequence of the crested black macaque (Macaca nigra) has been determined by mapping the raw data to previously published mitochondrial assemblies of the corresponding species. The total sequence length is 16,564 bp and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 D-loop control region. The base composition of mtDNA genome is 31.76% A, 25.27% T, 30.17% C, and 12.80% G, with an AT content of 57.03%. The arrangement of genes in M. nigra is identical to that of M. mulatta. All genes are encoded on the heavy strand with the exception of ND6 and eight tRNA genes. The mitochondrial genome of M. nigra presented here will contribute to a better understanding of the population genetics, help to protect its genetic diversity and resolve phylogenetic relationships within the family.

  9. Complete mitochondrial genome of Empoasca vitis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ningning; Wang, Mengxin; Cui, Lin; Chen, Xuexin; Han, Baoyu

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Empoasca vitis was sequenced. The length of the mitogenome is 15,154 bp with 78.35% AT content (GenBank accession No. KJ815009). The genome encode 37 typical mitochondrial genes including 22 transfer RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and an A+T-rich region. The gene arrangement is similar to that of Drosophila yakuba, the presumed ancestral insect mitochondrial gene arrangement. Except for cox2 using GTG as start codon, other protein-coding genes (PCGs) share the start codons ATN. Usual termination codon TAA and incomplete stop codon T are using by 13 protein-coding genes. The A+T-rich region has a length of 977 bp with the AT content high to 88.95%.

  10. Relaxation of yeast mitochondrial functions after whole-genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Huifeng; Guan, Wenjun; Pinney, David; Wang, Wen; Gu, Zhenglong

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential for cellular energy production in most eukaryotic organisms. However, when glucose is abundant, yeast species that underwent whole-genome duplication (WGD) mostly conduct fermentation even under aerobic conditions, and most can survive without a functional mitochondrial genome. In this study, we show that the rate of evolution for the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes was greater in post-WGD species than pre-WGD species. Furthermore, codon usage bias was relaxed for these genes in post-WGD yeast species. The codon usage pattern and the distribution of a particular transcription regulatory element suggest that the change to an efficient aerobic fermentation lifestyle in this lineage might have emerged after WGD between the divergence of Kluyveromyces polysporus and Saccharomyces castellii from their common ancestor. This new energy production strategy could have led to the relaxation of mitochondrial function in the relevant yeast species. PMID:18669479

  11. Complete mitochondrial genome of the fennec fox (Vulpes zerda).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiufeng; Zhao, Chao; Zhang, Honghai; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Lei; Sha, Weilai; Liu, Guangshuai

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of the fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) was sequenced using blood samples obtained from a female individual in Shanghai wildlife Park. Sequence analysis showed that the content of T (26.7%) in total composition was no more than C (27.2%), which is different from most of Canide individuals sequenced previously.

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome of Channa marulius (Perciformes: Channidae: Channa).

    PubMed

    Cui, Jun; Lashari, Punhal; Zhang, Songhao; Wang, Kai; Xu, Jian; Laghari, Muhammad Younis; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The traditional polymerase chain reaction method was employed to obtain the complete mitochondrial genome of Channa marulius from Pakistan. The mitogenome was determined to be 16,569 bp in length. It contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs and 22 tRNAs. This is the first report on the complete mitogenome sequence of C. marulius.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The first complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), from Guangzhou, China is presented. The circular mitogenome is 14,996 bp in length with an A+T content of 74.5%, and contains 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 tRNA genes ...

  14. Going Germline: Mitochondrial Replacement as a Guide to Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Adashi, Eli Y; Cohen, I Glenn

    2016-02-25

    Mitochondrial replacement (MR) serves as a crucial test case and learning guide for the scientific, ethical, and regulatory challenges of future reproductive breakthroughs. The lessons learned from the regulatory review process of MR over the last decade promise to enrich the emerging dialog over genome editing.

  15. Complete mitochondrial genome of Ostrea denselamellosa (Bivalvia, Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng; Li, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of the flat oyster, Ostrea denselamellosa, was determined using Long-PCR and genome walking techniques in this study. The total length of the mt genome sequence of O. denselamellosa was 16,227 bp, which is the smallest reported Ostreidae mt genome to date. It contained 12 protein-coding genes (lacking of ATP8), 23 transfer RNA genes, and two ribosomal RNA genes. A bias towards a higher representation of nucleotides A and T (60.7%) was detected in the mt genome of O. denselamellosa. The rrnL was split into two fragments (3' half, 711 bp; 5' half, 509 bp), which seems to be the unique characteristics of Ostreidae mt genomes.

  16. Mitochondrial genome function and maternal inheritance.

    PubMed

    Allen, John F; de Paula, Wilson B M

    2013-10-01

    The persistence of mtDNA to encode a small subset of mitochondrial proteins reflects the selective advantage of co-location of key respiratory chain subunit genes with their gene products. The disadvantage of this co-location is exposure of mtDNA to mutagenic ROS (reactive oxygen species), which are by-products of aerobic respiration. The resulting 'vicious circle' of mitochondrial mutation has been proposed to underlie aging and its associated degenerative diseases. Recent evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that oocyte mitochondria escape the aging process by acting as quiescent genetic templates, transcriptionally and bioenergetically repressed. Transmission of unexpressed mtDNA in the female germline is considered as a reason for the existence of separate sexes, i.e. male and female. Maternal inheritance then circumvents incremental accumulation of age-related disease in each new generation.

  17. Reducing the information gap on Loricarioidei (Siluriformes) mitochondrial genomics.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Daniel Andrade; Buckup, Paulo Andreas; Furtado, Carolina; Val, Adalberto Luis; Schama, Renata; Parente, Thiago Estevam

    2017-05-04

    The genetic diversity of Neotropical fish fauna is underrepresented in public databases. This distortion is evident for the order Siluriformes, in which the suborders Siluroidei and Loricarioidei share equivalent proportion of species, although far less is known about the genetics of the latter clade, endemic to the Neotropical Region. Recently, this information gap was evident in a study about the structural diversity of fish mitochondrial genomes, and hampered a precise chronological resolution of Siluriformes. It has also prevented molecular ecology investigations about these catfishes, their interactions with the environment, responses to anthropogenic changes and potential uses. Using high-throughput sequencing, we provide the nearly complete mitochondrial genomes for 26 Loricariidae and one Callichthyidae species. Structural features were highly conserved. A notable exception was identified in the monophyletic clade comprising species of the Hemiancistrus, Hypostomini and Peckoltia-clades, a ~60 nucleotide-long deletion encompassing the seven nucleotides at the 3' end of the Conserved Sequence Block (CSB) D of the control region. The expression of mitochondrial genes followed the usual punctuation pattern. Heteroplasmic sites were identified in most species. The retrieved phylogeny strongly corroborates the currently accepted tree, although bringing to debate the relationship between Schizolecis guntheri and Pareiorhaphis garbei, and highlighting the low genetic variability within the Peckoltia-clade, an eco-morphologically diverse and taxonomically problematic group. Herein we have launched the use of high-throughput mitochondrial genomics in the studies of the Loricarioidei species. The new genomic resources reduce the information gap on the molecular diversity of Neotropical fish fauna, impacting the capacity to investigate a variety of aspects of the molecular ecology and evolution of these fishes. Additionally, the species showing the partial CSB-D are

  18. The Mitochondrial Genome of Arctica islandica; Phylogeny and Variation

    PubMed Central

    Glöckner, Gernot; Heinze, Ivonne; Platzer, Matthias; Held, Christoph; Abele, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Arctica islandica is known as the longest-lived non-colonial metazoan species on earth and is therefore increasingly being investigated as a new model in aging research. As the mitochondrial genome is associated with the process of aging in many species and bivalves are known to possess a peculiar mechanism of mitochondrial genome inheritance including doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI), we aimed to assess the genomic variability of the A. islandica mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of A. islandica specimens from three different sites in the Western Palaearctic (Iceland, North Sea, Baltic Sea). We found the A. islandica mtDNA to fall within the normal size range (18 kb) and exhibit similar coding capacity as other animal mtDNAs. The concatenated protein sequences of all currently known Veneroidea mtDNAs were used to robustly place A. islandica in a phylogenetic framework. Analysis of the observed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) patterns on further specimen revealed two prevailing haplotypes. Populations in the Baltic and the North Sea are very homogenous, whereas the Icelandic population, from which exceptionally old individuals have been collected, is the most diverse one. Homogeneity in Baltic and North Sea populations point to either stronger environmental constraints or more recent colonization of the habitat. Our analysis lays the foundation for further studies on A. islandica population structures, age research with this organism, and for phylogenetic studies. Accessions for the mitochondrial genome sequences: KC197241 Iceland; KF363951 Baltic Sea; KF363952 North Sea; KF465708 to KF465758 individual amplified regions from different speciemen PMID:24312674

  19. Red Algal Mitochondrial Genomes Are More Complete than Previously Reported

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Christopher E.

    2017-01-01

    The enslavement of an alpha-proteobacterial endosymbiont by the last common eukaryotic ancestor resulted in large-scale gene transfer of endosymbiont genes to the host nucleus as the endosymbiont transitioned into the mitochondrion. Mitochondrial genomes have experienced widespread gene loss and genome reduction within eukaryotes and DNA sequencing has revealed that most of these gene losses occurred early in eukaryotic lineage diversification. On a broad scale, more recent modifications to organelle genomes appear to be conserved and phylogenetically informative. The first red algal mitochondrial genome was sequenced more than 20 years ago, and an additional 29 Florideophyceae mitochondria have been added over the past decade. A total of 32 genes have been described to have been missing or considered non-functional pseudogenes from these Florideophyceae mitochondria. These losses have been attributed to endosymbiotic gene transfer or the evolution of a parasitic life strategy. Here we sequenced the mitochondrial genomes from the red algal parasite Choreocolax polysiphoniae and its host Vertebrata lanosa and found them to be complete and conserved in structure with other Florideophyceae mitochondria. This result led us to resequence the previously published parasite Gracilariophila oryzoides and its host Gracilariopsis andersonii, as well as reevaluate reported gene losses from published Florideophyceae mitochondria. Multiple independent losses of rpl20 and a single loss of rps11 can be verified. However by reannotating published data and resequencing specimens when possible, we were able to identify the majority of genes that have been reported as lost or pseudogenes from Florideophyceae mitochondria. PMID:28175279

  20. CyanoBase and RhizoBase: databases of manually curated annotations for cyanobacterial and rhizobial genomes.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Takatomo; Okamoto, Shinobu; Katayama, Toshiaki; Nakao, Mitsuteru; Yoshimura, Hidehisa; Kajiya-Kanegae, Hiromi; Yamamoto, Sumiko; Yano, Chiyoko; Yanaka, Yuka; Maita, Hiroko; Kaneko, Takakazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2014-01-01

    To understand newly sequenced genomes of closely related species, comprehensively curated reference genome databases are becoming increasingly important. We have extended CyanoBase (http://genome.microbedb.jp/cyanobase), a genome database for cyanobacteria, and newly developed RhizoBase (http://genome.microbedb.jp/rhizobase), a genome database for rhizobia, nitrogen-fixing bacteria associated with leguminous plants. Both databases focus on the representation and reusability of reference genome annotations, which are continuously updated by manual curation. Domain experts have extracted names, products and functions of each gene reported in the literature. To ensure effectiveness of this procedure, we developed the TogoAnnotation system offering a web-based user interface and a uniform storage of annotations for the curators of the CyanoBase and RhizoBase databases. The number of references investigated for CyanoBase increased from 2260 in our previous report to 5285, and for RhizoBase, we perused 1216 references. The results of these intensive annotations are displayed on the GeneView pages of each database. Advanced users can also retrieve this information through the representational state transfer-based web application programming interface in an automated manner.

  1. Complete mitochondrial genome of Gallus domesticus (Galliformes: Phasianidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanghong; Wang, Binhua; Wang, Fang; Wu, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of Gallus domesticus was determined by long PCR and primer walking methods. The complete mitochondrial genome is 16,783 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes as well as a displacement loop (D-loop). The overall base composition of the genome is A(30.25%), T(23.79%), C(32.44%), G(13.52%), respectively. The mitogenome of G. domesticus displayed novel gene order arrangement compared with published Gallus gallus var. domesticus to date. The mitogenome would contribute to resolving phylogenetic position and interrelationships of Gallus.

  2. Complete mitochondrial DNA genome of tetraploid Carassius auratus gibelio.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Liang, Hong-Wei; Zou, Gui-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced from the tetraploid Carassius auratus gibelio in this study. The genome sequence was 16,576 bp in length. The mitochondrial genome contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs, and 2 non-coding regions (control region and origin of light-strand replication). All genes were encoded on the heavy strain except for ND6 and eight tRNA genes. The overall base composition is 31.61% A, 25.81% T, 26.62% G, 15.96% C, with an A+T bias of 57.42%. The complete mitogenome data provides useful genetic markers for the studies on the molecular identification, population genetics, phylogenetic analysis and conservation genetics.

  3. Phylogeny and evolution of Cervidae based on complete mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W-Q; Zhang, M-H

    2012-03-14

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences can be used to estimate phylogenetic relationships among animal taxa and for molecular phylogenetic evolution analysis. With the development of sequencing technology, more and more mitochondrial sequences have been made available in public databases, including whole mitochondrial DNA sequences. These data have been used for phylogenetic analysis of animal species, and for studies of evolutionary processes. We made phylogenetic analyses of 19 species of Cervidae, with Bos taurus as the outgroup. We used neighbor joining, maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian inference methods on whole mitochondrial genome sequences. The consensus phylogenetic trees supported monophyly of the family Cervidae; it was divided into two subfamilies, Plesiometacarpalia and Telemetacarpalia, and four tribes, Cervinae, Muntiacinae, Hydropotinae, and Odocoileinae. The divergence times in these families were estimated by phylogenetic analysis using the Bayesian method with a relaxed molecular clock method; the results were consistent with those of previous studies. We concluded that the evolutionary structure of the family Cervidae can be reconstructed by phylogenetic analysis based on whole mitochondrial genomes; this method could be used broadly in phylogenetic evolutionary analysis of animal taxa.

  4. Evolution of monoblepharidalean fungi based on complete mitochondrial genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bullerwell, C. E.; Forget, L.; Lang, B. F.

    2003-01-01

    We have determined the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of three chytridiomycete fungi, Monoblepharella15, Harpochytrium94 and Harpochytrium105. Our phylogenetic analysis based on concatenated mitochondrial protein sequences confirms the placement of Mono blepharella15 together with Harpochytrium spp. and Hyaloraphidium curvatum within the taxonomic order Monoblepharidales, with overwhelming support. These four mtDNA sequences encode the standard fungal mitochondrial gene complement and, like certain other chytridiomycete fungi, encode a reduced complement of 7–9 tRNAs, some of which require 5′-tRNA editing to be functional. Highly conserved sequence elements were identified upstream of almost all protein-coding genes in the mtDNAs of Monoblepharella15 and both Harpochytrium species. Finally, a guanosine residue is conserved upstream of the predicted ATG or GTG start codons of almost every protein-coding gene in these genomes. The appearance of this G residue correlates with the presence of a non-canonical cytosine residue at position 37 in the anticodon loop of the mitochondrial initiator tRNAs. Based on the unorthodox features in these four genomes, we propose that a 4 bp interaction between the CAUC anticodon of these tRNAs and GAUG/GGUG codons is involved in translation initiation in monoblepharidalean mitochondria. Intriguingly, a similar interaction may also be involved in mitochondrial translation initiation in the sea anemone Metridium senile. PMID:12626702

  5. Baboon phylogeny as inferred from complete mitochondrial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Zinner, Dietmar; Wertheimer, Jenny; Liedigk, Rasmus; Groeneveld, Linn F; Roos, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Baboons (genus Papio) are an interesting phylogeographical primate model for the evolution of savanna species during the Pleistocene. Earlier studies, based on partial mitochondrial sequence information, revealed seven major haplogroups indicating multiple para- and polyphylies among the six baboon species. The most basal splits among baboon lineages remained unresolved and the credibility intervals for divergence time estimates were rather large. Assuming that genetic variation within the two studied mitochondrial loci so far was insufficient to infer the apparently rapid early radiation of baboons we used complete mitochondrial sequence information of ten specimens, representing all major baboon lineages, to reconstruct a baboon phylogeny and to re-estimate divergence times. Our data confirmed the earlier tree topology including the para- and polyphyletic relationships of most baboon species; divergence time estimates are slightly younger and credibility intervals narrowed substantially, thus making the estimates more precise. However, the most basal relationships could not be resolved and it remains open whether (1) the most southern population of baboons diverged first or (2) a major split occurred between southern and northern clades. Our study shows that complete mitochondrial genome sequences are more effective to reconstruct robust phylogenies and to narrow down estimated divergence time intervals than only short portions of the mitochondrial genome, although there are also limitations in resolving phylogenetic relationships. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23180628

  6. Mitochondrial genome sequences effectively reveal the phylogeny of Hylobates gibbons.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yi-Chiao; Roos, Christian; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Inoue, Eiji; Shih, Chih-Chin; Pei, Kurtis Jai-Chyi; Vigilant, Linda

    2010-12-23

    Uniquely among hominoids, gibbons exist as multiple geographically contiguous taxa exhibiting distinctive behavioral, morphological, and karyotypic characteristics. However, our understanding of the evolutionary relationships of the various gibbons, especially among Hylobates species, is still limited because previous studies used limited taxon sampling or short mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences. Here we use mtDNA genome sequences to reconstruct gibbon phylogenetic relationships and reveal the pattern and timing of divergence events in gibbon evolutionary history. We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of 51 individuals representing 11 species belonging to three genera (Hylobates, Nomascus and Symphalangus) using the high-throughput 454 sequencing system with the parallel tagged sequencing approach. Three phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood, Bayesian analysis and neighbor-joining) depicted the gibbon phylogenetic relationships congruently and with strong support values. Most notably, we recover a well-supported phylogeny of the Hylobates gibbons. The estimation of divergence times using Bayesian analysis with relaxed clock model suggests a much more rapid speciation process in Hylobates than in Nomascus. Use of more than 15 kb sequences of the mitochondrial genome provided more informative and robust data than previous studies of short mitochondrial segments (e.g., control region or cytochrome b) as shown by the reliable reconstruction of divergence patterns among Hylobates gibbons. Moreover, molecular dating of the mitogenomic divergence times implied that biogeographic change during the last five million years may be a factor promoting the speciation of Sundaland animals, including Hylobates species.

  7. Mitochondrial Genome Sequences Effectively Reveal the Phylogeny of Hylobates Gibbons

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yi-Chiao; Roos, Christian; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Inoue, Eiji; Shih, Chih-Chin; Pei, Kurtis Jai-Chyi; Vigilant, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Background Uniquely among hominoids, gibbons exist as multiple geographically contiguous taxa exhibiting distinctive behavioral, morphological, and karyotypic characteristics. However, our understanding of the evolutionary relationships of the various gibbons, especially among Hylobates species, is still limited because previous studies used limited taxon sampling or short mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences. Here we use mtDNA genome sequences to reconstruct gibbon phylogenetic relationships and reveal the pattern and timing of divergence events in gibbon evolutionary history. Methodology/Principal Findings We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of 51 individuals representing 11 species belonging to three genera (Hylobates, Nomascus and Symphalangus) using the high-throughput 454 sequencing system with the parallel tagged sequencing approach. Three phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood, Bayesian analysis and neighbor-joining) depicted the gibbon phylogenetic relationships congruently and with strong support values. Most notably, we recover a well-supported phylogeny of the Hylobates gibbons. The estimation of divergence times using Bayesian analysis with relaxed clock model suggests a much more rapid speciation process in Hylobates than in Nomascus. Conclusions/Significance Use of more than 15 kb sequences of the mitochondrial genome provided more informative and robust data than previous studies of short mitochondrial segments (e.g., control region or cytochrome b) as shown by the reliable reconstruction of divergence patterns among Hylobates gibbons. Moreover, molecular dating of the mitogenomic divergence times implied that biogeographic change during the last five million years may be a factor promoting the speciation of Sundaland animals, including Hylobates species. PMID:21203450

  8. The mitochondrial genome sequence of the Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus)

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Webb; Drautz, Daniela I.; Janecka, Jan E.; Lesk, Arthur M.; Ratan, Aakrosh; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Packard, Mike; Zhang, Yeting; McClellan, Lindsay R.; Qi, Ji; Zhao, Fangqing; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Dalén, Love; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Ericson, Per G.P.; Huson, Daniel H.; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Murphy, William J.; Götherström, Anders; Schuster, Stephan C.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first two complete mitochondrial genome sequences of the thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus), or so-called Tasmanian tiger, extinct since 1936. The thylacine's phylogenetic position within australidelphian marsupials has long been debated, and here we provide strong support for the thylacine's basal position in Dasyuromorphia, aided by mitochondrial genome sequence that we generated from the extant numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus). Surprisingly, both of our thylacine sequences differ by 11%–15% from putative thylacine mitochondrial genes in GenBank, with one of our samples originating from a direct offspring of the previously sequenced individual. Our data sample each mitochondrial nucleotide an average of 50 times, thereby providing the first high-fidelity reference sequence for thylacine population genetics. Our two sequences differ in only five nucleotides out of 15,452, hinting at a very low genetic diversity shortly before extinction. Despite the samples’ heavy contamination with bacterial and human DNA and their temperate storage history, we estimate that as much as one-third of the total DNA in each sample is from the thylacine. The microbial content of the two thylacine samples was subjected to metagenomic analysis, and showed striking differences between a wild-captured individual and a born-in-captivity one. This study therefore adds to the growing evidence that extensive sequencing of museum collections is both feasible and desirable, and can yield complete genomes. PMID:19139089

  9. The mitochondrial genome sequence of the Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus).

    PubMed

    Miller, Webb; Drautz, Daniela I; Janecka, Jan E; Lesk, Arthur M; Ratan, Aakrosh; Tomsho, Lynn P; Packard, Mike; Zhang, Yeting; McClellan, Lindsay R; Qi, Ji; Zhao, Fangqing; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Dalén, Love; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Ericson, Per G P; Huson, Daniel H; Helgen, Kristofer M; Murphy, William J; Götherström, Anders; Schuster, Stephan C

    2009-02-01

    We report the first two complete mitochondrial genome sequences of the thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus), or so-called Tasmanian tiger, extinct since 1936. The thylacine's phylogenetic position within australidelphian marsupials has long been debated, and here we provide strong support for the thylacine's basal position in Dasyuromorphia, aided by mitochondrial genome sequence that we generated from the extant numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus). Surprisingly, both of our thylacine sequences differ by 11%-15% from putative thylacine mitochondrial genes in GenBank, with one of our samples originating from a direct offspring of the previously sequenced individual. Our data sample each mitochondrial nucleotide an average of 50 times, thereby providing the first high-fidelity reference sequence for thylacine population genetics. Our two sequences differ in only five nucleotides out of 15,452, hinting at a very low genetic diversity shortly before extinction. Despite the samples' heavy contamination with bacterial and human DNA and their temperate storage history, we estimate that as much as one-third of the total DNA in each sample is from the thylacine. The microbial content of the two thylacine samples was subjected to metagenomic analysis, and showed striking differences between a wild-captured individual and a born-in-captivity one. This study therefore adds to the growing evidence that extensive sequencing of museum collections is both feasible and desirable, and can yield complete genomes.

  10. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens).

    PubMed

    Song, Ying-Nan; Xiao, Gui-Bao; Li, Jiong-Tang

    2016-11-01

    The Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) is one of the popular aquarium fish. Serious attentions have been paid to the biodiversity of the fish. The mitochondrial genome of the Siamese fighting fish is reported to be 17 099 bp and includes 37 genes. The gene organization is similar to other fish mitogenomes. The control region is AT-rich and includes three tandem repeats. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that the fish is close to fish in the Macropodus genus. This mitogenome will assist in studying the mitochondrial variations and population structure in this fish and examine the evolutionary relationship among fish in the Osphronemidae family.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of Lota lota (Gadiformes: Gadidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Song, Na; Gao, Tianxiang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of Lota lota has been determined by long polymerase chain reaction and primer walking methods. The mitogenome is a circular molecule of 16,547 bp in length and contains 37 mitochondrial genes including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA), 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) and a control region as other bony fishes. Within the control region, we identified the termination-associated sequence domain (TAS), the central conserved sequence block domains (CSB-F and CSB-D), and the conserved sequence block domains (CSB-1, CSB-2 and CSB-3).

  12. Mitochondrial genome of the African lion Panthera leo leo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yue-ping; Wang, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the African lion P. leo leo was reported. The total length of the mitogenome was 17,054 bp. It contained the typical mitochondrial structure, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 1 control region; 21 of the tRNA genes folded into typical cloverleaf secondary structure except for tRNASe. The overall composition of the mitogenome was A (32.0%), G (14.5%), C (26.5%) and T (27.0%). The new sequence will provide molecular genetic information for conservation genetics study of this important large carnivore.

  13. MITOMAP: a human mitochondrial genome database--2004 update.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Marty C; Lott, Marie T; Nguyen, Kevin Cuong; Spolim, Syawal; Navathe, Shamkant B; Baldi, Pierre; Wallace, Douglas C

    2005-01-01

    MITOMAP (http://www.MITOMAP.org), a database for the human mitochondrial genome, has grown rapidly in data content over the past several years as interest in the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in human origins, forensics, degenerative diseases, cancer and aging has increased dramatically. To accommodate this information explosion, MITOMAP has implemented a new relational database and an improved search engine, and all programs have been rewritten. System administrative changes have been made to improve security and efficiency, and to make MITOMAP compatible with a new automatic mtDNA sequence analyzer known as Mitomaster.

  14. Complete mitochondrial genome of Malaysian Mahseer (Tor tambroides).

    PubMed

    Norfatimah, M Y; Teh, L K; Salleh, M Z; Mat Isa, M N; SitiAzizah, M N

    2014-09-15

    This is the first documentation of the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Malaysian Mahseer, Tor tambroides. The 16,690 bp mitogenome with GenBank accession number JX444718 contains 13 protein genes, 22 tRNAs, two rRNAs, and a noncoding control region (D-loop) as is typical of most vertebrates. The phylogenomic reconstruction of this newly generated data with 21 Cypriniformes GenBank accession ID concurs with the recognized status of T. tambroides within the subfamily Cyprininae. This is in agreement with previous hypotheses based on morphological and partial mitochondrial analyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of eastern lowland gorilla, Gorilla beringei graueri, and comparative mitochondrial genomics of Gorilla species.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-di; Gao, Li-zhi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we determined the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of eastern lowland gorilla, Gorilla beringei graueri for the first time. The total genome was 16,416 bp in length. It contained a total of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 1 control region (D-loop region). The base composition was A (30.88%), G (13.10%), C (30.89%) and T (25.13%), indicating that the percentage of A+T (56.01%) was higher than G+C (43.99%). Comparisons with the other publicly available Gorilla mitogenome showed the conservation of gene order and base compositions but a bunch of nucleotide diversity. This complete mitochondrial genome sequence will provide valuable genetic information for further studies on conservation genetics of eastern lowland gorilla.

  16. Unexpectedly Streamlined Mitochondrial Genome of the Euglenozoan Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Dobáková, Eva; Flegontov, Pavel; Skalický, Tomáš; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-11-20

    In this study, we describe the mitochondrial genome of the excavate flagellate Euglena gracilis. Its gene complement is reduced as compared with the well-studied sister groups Diplonemea and Kinetoplastea. We have identified seven protein-coding genes: Three subunits of respiratory complex I (nad1, nad4, and nad5), one subunit of complex III (cob), and three subunits of complex IV (cox1, cox2, and a highly divergent cox3). Moreover, fragments of ribosomal RNA genes have also been identified. Genes encoding subunits of complex V, ribosomal proteins and tRNAs were missing, and are likely located in the nuclear genome. Although mitochondrial genomes of diplonemids and kinetoplastids possess the most complex RNA processing machineries known, including trans-splicing and editing of the uridine insertion/deletion type, respectively, our transcriptomic data suggest their total absence in E. gracilis. This finding supports a scenario in which the complex mitochondrial processing machineries of both sister groups evolved relatively late in evolution from a streamlined genome and transcriptome of their common predecessor.

  17. Mitochondrial genome evolution in fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Gotzek, Dietrich; Clarke, Jessica; Shoemaker, DeWayne

    2010-10-07

    Complete mitochondrial genome sequences have become important tools for the study of genome architecture, phylogeny, and molecular evolution. Despite the rapid increase in available mitogenomes, the taxonomic sampling often poorly reflects phylogenetic diversity and is often also biased to represent deeper (family-level) evolutionary relationships. We present the first fully sequenced ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) mitochondrial genomes. We sampled four mitogenomes from three species of fire ants, genus Solenopsis, which represent various evolutionary depths. Overall, ant mitogenomes appear to be typical of hymenopteran mitogenomes, displaying a general A+T-bias. The Solenopsis mitogenomes are slightly more compact than other hymentoperan mitogenomes (~15.5 kb), retaining all protein coding genes, ribosomal, and transfer RNAs. We also present evidence of recombination between the mitogenomes of the two conspecific Solenopsis mitogenomes. Finally, we discuss potential ways to improve the estimation of phylogenies using complete mitochondrial genome sequences. The ant mitogenome presents an important addition to the continued efforts in studying hymenopteran mitogenome architecture, evolution, and phylogenetics. We provide further evidence that the sampling across many taxonomic levels (including conspecifics and congeners) is useful and important to gain detailed insights into mitogenome evolution. We also discuss ways that may help improve the use of mitogenomes in phylogenetic analyses by accounting for non-stationary and non-homogeneous evolution among branches.

  18. Mitochondrial genome evolution in fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Complete mitochondrial genome sequences have become important tools for the study of genome architecture, phylogeny, and molecular evolution. Despite the rapid increase in available mitogenomes, the taxonomic sampling often poorly reflects phylogenetic diversity and is often also biased to represent deeper (family-level) evolutionary relationships. Results We present the first fully sequenced ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) mitochondrial genomes. We sampled four mitogenomes from three species of fire ants, genus Solenopsis, which represent various evolutionary depths. Overall, ant mitogenomes appear to be typical of hymenopteran mitogenomes, displaying a general A+T-bias. The Solenopsis mitogenomes are slightly more compact than other hymentoperan mitogenomes (~15.5 kb), retaining all protein coding genes, ribosomal, and transfer RNAs. We also present evidence of recombination between the mitogenomes of the two conspecific Solenopsis mitogenomes. Finally, we discuss potential ways to improve the estimation of phylogenies using complete mitochondrial genome sequences. Conclusions The ant mitogenome presents an important addition to the continued efforts in studying hymenopteran mitogenome architecture, evolution, and phylogenetics. We provide further evidence that the sampling across many taxonomic levels (including conspecifics and congeners) is useful and important to gain detailed insights into mitogenome evolution. We also discuss ways that may help improve the use of mitogenomes in phylogenetic analyses by accounting for non-stationary and non-homogeneous evolution among branches. PMID:20929580

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome of Daurian ground squirrel, Spermophilus dauricus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guang-Yao; Huang, Hai-Jiao; Zhang, Ming-Hai

    2016-07-01

    The mitochondrial genome sequence of Daurian ground squirrel, Spermophilus dauricus, is determined and described for the first time in this study. The genome was a total of 16 512 bp in length and had a base composition of A (32.08%), G (12.53%), C (24.35%), and T (31.04%), indicating that the percentage of A + T (63.12%) is higher than G + C (36.88%). Similar to those reported from other animal mitochondrial genomes, it possessed a typically conserved structure, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 1 control region (D-loop). Most of these genes were found to locate on the H-strand except for the ND6 gene and 8 tRNA genes. The phylogenetic analysis showed Spermophilus dauricus formed the sister group to the Pteromyini tribe. This mitochondrial genome sequence would supply useful genetic resources to uncover Sciuridae family evolution.

  20. The mitochondrial genome of the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum).

    PubMed

    Williams-Newkirk, Amanda J; Burroughs, Mark; Changayil, Shankar S; Dasch, Gregory A

    2015-09-01

    Amblyomma americanum is an abundant tick in the southeastern, midwestern, and northeastern United States. It is a vector of multiple diseases, but limited genomic resources are available for it. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of a single female A. americanum collected in Georgia using the Illumina platform. The consensus sequence was 14,709 bp long, and the mean coverage across the assembly was >12,000×. All expected tick genomic features were present, including two "Tick-Box" motifs, and in the expected order for the Metastriata. Heteroplasmy rates were low compared to the most closely related tick for which data are available, Amblyomma cajennense. The phylogeny derived from the concatenated protein coding and rRNA genes from the 33 available tick mitochondrial genomes was consistent with those previously proposed for the Acari. This is the first complete mitochondrial sequence for A. americanum, which provides a useful reference for future studies of A. americanum population genetics and tick phylogeny. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. A linear mitochondrial genome of Cyclospora cayetanensis (Eimeriidae, Eucoccidiorida, Coccidiasina, Apicomplexa) suggests the ancestral start position within mitochondrial genomes of eimeriid coccidia.

    PubMed

    Ogedengbe, Mosun E; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; da Silva, Alexandre J; Arrowood, Michael J; Barta, John R

    2015-05-01

    The near complete mitochondrial genome for Cyclospora cayetanensis is 6184 bp in length with three protein-coding genes (Cox1, Cox3, CytB) and numerous lsrDNA and ssrDNA fragments. Gene arrangements were conserved with other coccidia in the Eimeriidae, but the C. cayetanensis mitochondrial genome is not circular-mapping. Terminal transferase tailing and nested PCR completed the 5'-terminus of the genome starting with a 21 bp A/T-only region that forms a potential stem-loop. Regions homologous to the C. cayetanensis mitochondrial genome 5'-terminus are found in all eimeriid mitochondrial genomes available and suggest this may be the ancestral start of eimeriid mitochondrial genomes. Copyright © 2015 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mitochondrial genomes of domestic animals need scrutiny.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ni-Ni; Fan, Long; Yao, Yong-Gang; Peng, Min-Sheng; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-11-01

    More than 1000 complete or near-complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences have been deposited in GenBank for eight common domestic animals (cattle, dog, goat, horse, pig, sheep, yak and chicken) and their close wild ancestors or relatives, as well. Nevertheless, few efforts have been performed to evaluate the sequence data quality. Herein, we conducted a phylogenetic survey of these complete or near-complete mtDNA sequences based on mtDNA haplogroup trees for the eight animals. We show that errors due to artificial recombination, surplus of mutations and phantom mutations do exist in 14.5% (194/1342) of mtDNA sequences and all of them should be treated with wide caution. We propose some caveats for future mtDNA studies of domestic animals.

  3. The mitochondrial genome in aging and senescence.

    PubMed

    Lauri, Andrea; Pompilio, Giulio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2014-11-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive decline in organism functions due to the impairment of all organs. The deterioration of both proliferative tissues in liver, skin and the vascular system, as well as of largely post-mitotic organs, such as the heart and brain could be attributed at least in part to cell senescence. In this review we examine the role of mitochondrial dysfunction and mtDNA mutations in cell aging and senescence. Specifically, we address how p53 and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) activity switch their roles from cytoprotective to detrimental and also examine the role of microRNAs in cell aging. The proposed role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), both as mutating agents and as signalling molecules, underlying these processes is also described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Recombination sequences in plant mitochondrial genomes: diversity and homologies to known mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, D B; Palmer, J D

    1984-01-01

    Several plant mitochondrial genomes contain repeated sequences that are postulated to be sites of homologous intragenomic recombination (1-3). In this report, we have used filter hybridizations to investigate sequence relationships between the cloned mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) recombination repeats from turnip, spinach and maize and total mtDNA isolated from thirteen species of angiosperms. We find that strong sequence homologies exist between the spinach and turnip recombination repeats and essentially all other mitochondrial genomes tested, whereas a major maize recombination repeat does not hybridize to any other mtDNA. The sequences homologous to the turnip repeat do not appear to function in recombination in any other genome, whereas the spinach repeat hybridizes to reiterated sequences within the mitochondrial genomes of wheat and two species of pokeweed that do appear to be sites of recombination. Thus, although intragenomic recombination is a widespread phenomenon in plant mitochondria, it appears that different sequences either serve as substrates for this function in different species, or else surround a relatively short common recombination site which does not cross-hybridize under our experimental conditions. Identified gene sequences from maize mtDNA were used in heterologous hybridizations to show that the repeated sequences implicated in recombination in turnip and spinach/pokeweed/wheat mitochondria include, or are closely linked to genes for subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase and 26S rRNA, respectively. Together with previous studies indicating that the 18S rRNA gene in wheat mtDNA is contained within a recombination repeat (3), these results imply an unexpectedly frequent association between recombination repeats and plant mitochondrial genes. Images PMID:6473104

  5. Stability of the mitochondrial genome requires an amino-terminal domain of yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanhong; Shadel, Gerald S.

    1999-01-01

    Mitochondrial RNA (mtRNA) polymerases are related to bacteriophage RNA polymerases, but contain a unique amino-terminal extension of unknown origin and function. In addition to harboring mitochondrial targeting information, we show here that the amino-terminal extension of yeast mtRNA polymerase is required for a mtDNA maintenance function that is separable from the known RNA polymerization activity of the enzyme. Deletion of 185 N-terminal amino acids from the enzyme results in a temperature-sensitive mitochondrial petite phenotype, characterized by increased instability and eventual loss of the mitochondrial genome. Mitochondrial transcription initiation in vivo is largely unaffected by this mutation and expression of just the amino-terminal portion of the protein in trans partially suppresses the mitochondrial defect, indicating that the amino-terminal extension of the enzyme harbors an independent functional domain that is required for mtDNA replication and/or stability. These results suggest that amino-terminal extensions present in mtRNA polymerases comprise functional domains that couple additional activities to the transcription process in mitochondria. PMID:10393945

  6. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of golden pompano Trachinotus ovatus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liyuan; Zhang, Dianchang; Guo, Huayang; Jiang, Shigui; Zhu, Caiyan

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Trachinotus ovatus was determined by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The mitogenome is 16,564 bp long and has the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and one control region. The overall base composition of mitogenome is estimated to be 29.0% for A, 28.9% for C, 26.2% for T, 15.9% for G, respectively, with a high A + T content (55.2%). With the exception of ND6 and eight tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand. The control region contains a dinucleotide repeat motif, (AT)5. This mitogenome sequence would play an important role in population genetics and the molecular taxonomy of T. ovatus.

  7. The organization and inheritance of the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin Jie; Butow, Ronald A

    2005-11-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes essential components of the cellular energy-producing apparatus, and lesions in mtDNA and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to numerous human diseases. Understanding mtDNA organization and inheritance is therefore an important goal. Recent studies have revealed that mitochondria use diverse metabolic enzymes to organize and protect mtDNA, drive the segregation of the organellar genome, and couple the inheritance of mtDNA with cellular metabolism. In addition, components of a membrane-associated mtDNA segregation apparatus that might link mtDNA transmission to mitochondrial movements are beginning to be identified. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of mtDNA maintenance and inheritance.

  8. [Mitochondrial Genome Variability in the Wolverine (Gulo gulo)].

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, B A; Derenko, M V; Denisova, G A

    2015-11-01

    The nucleotide sequence of an extended mitochondrial genome segment (11473 base pairs in size) was determined in the wolverine (Gulo gulo) from Magadan oblast. Phylogenetic and statistical analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of mustelids showed that the separation of the Gulo phylogenetic branch occurred at the Miocene--early Pliocene (about 5.6 million years ago (MYA)), while the formation of the species G. gulo took place in the Middle Pleistocene (181 and 234 thousand years ago (KYA), according to the results of molecular dating based on the variability of the extended mtDNA segment and the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, respectively). The molecular data were in agreement with the fossil records for wolverines.

  9. Rearrangement and evolution of mitochondrial genomes in parrots.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, Jessica R; Wright, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome rearrangements that result in control region duplication have been described for a variety of birds, but the mechanisms leading to their appearance and maintenance remain unclear, and their effect on sequence evolution has not been explored. A recent survey of mitochondrial genomes in the Psittaciformes (parrots) found that control region duplications have arisen independently at least six times across the order. We analyzed complete mitochondrial genome sequences from 20 parrot species, including representatives of each lineage with control region duplications, to document the gene order changes and to examine effects of genome rearrangements on patterns of sequence evolution. The gene order previously reported for Amazona parrots was found for four of the six independently derived genome rearrangements, and a previously undescribed gene order was found in Prioniturus luconensis, representing a fifth clade with rearranged genomes; the gene order resulting from the remaining rearrangement event could not be confirmed. In all rearranged genomes, two copies of the control region are present and are very similar at the sequence level, while duplicates of the other genes involved in the rearrangement show signs of degeneration or have been lost altogether. We compared rates of sequence evolution in genomes with and without control region duplications and did not find a consistent acceleration or deceleration associated with the duplications. This could be due to the fact that most of the genome rearrangement events in parrots are ancient, and additionally, to an effect of body size on evolutionary rate that we found for mitochondrial but not nuclear sequences. Base composition analyses found that relative to other birds, parrots have unusually strong compositional asymmetry (AT- and GC-skew) in their coding sequences, especially at fourfold degenerate sites. Furthermore, we found higher AT skew in species with control region duplications. One

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of Arctic Calanus hyperboreus (Copepoda, Calanoida) reveals characteristic patterns in calanoid mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghee; Lim, Byung-Jin; Min, Gi-Sik; Choi, Han-Gu

    2013-05-10

    Copepoda is the most diverse and abundant group of crustaceans, but its phylogenetic relationships are ambiguous. Mitochondrial (mt) genomes are useful for studying evolutionary history, but only six complete Copepoda mt genomes have been made available and these have extremely rearranged genome structures. This study determined the mt genome of Calanus hyperboreus, making it the first reported Arctic copepod mt genome and the first complete mt genome of a calanoid copepod. The mt genome of C. hyperboreus is 17,910 bp in length and it contains the entire set of 37 mt genes, including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs, and 22 tRNAs. It has a very unusual gene structure, including the longest control region reported for a crustacean, a large tRNA gene cluster, and reversed GC skews in 11 out of 13 protein-coding genes (84.6%). Despite the unusual features, comparing this genome to published copepod genomes revealed retained pan-crustacean features, as well as a conserved calanoid-specific pattern. Our data provide a foundation for exploring the calanoid pattern and the mechanisms of mt gene rearrangement in the evolutionary history of the copepod mt genome.

  11. Sessile snails, dynamic genomes: gene rearrangements within the mitochondrial genome of a family of caenogastropod molluscs.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, Timothy A; MacInnis, Martin J; Bieler, Rüdiger; Boore, Jeffrey L; Collins, Timothy M

    2010-07-19

    Widespread sampling of vertebrates, which comprise the majority of published animal mitochondrial genomes, has led to the view that mitochondrial gene rearrangements are relatively rare, and that gene orders are typically stable across major taxonomic groups. In contrast, more limited sampling within the Phylum Mollusca has revealed an unusually high number of gene order arrangements. Here we provide evidence that the lability of the molluscan mitochondrial genome extends to the family level by describing extensive gene order changes that have occurred within the Vermetidae, a family of sessile marine gastropods that radiated from a basal caenogastropod stock during the Cenozoic Era. Major mitochondrial gene rearrangements have occurred within this family at a scale unexpected for such an evolutionarily young group and unprecedented for any caenogastropod examined to date. We determined the complete mitochondrial genomes of four species (Dendropoma maximum, D. gregarium, Eualetes tulipa, and Thylacodes squamigerus) and the partial mitochondrial genomes of two others (Vermetus erectus and Thylaeodus sp.). Each of the six vermetid gastropods assayed possessed a unique gene order. In addition to the typical mitochondrial genome complement of 37 genes, additional tRNA genes were evident in D. gregarium (trnK) and Thylacodes squamigerus (trnV, trnLUUR). Three pseudogenes and additional tRNAs found within the genome of Thylacodes squamigerus provide evidence of a past duplication event in this taxon. Likewise, high sequence similarities between isoaccepting leucine tRNAs in Thylacodes, Eualetes, and Thylaeodus suggest that tRNA remolding has been rife within this family. While vermetids exhibit gene arrangements diagnostic of this family, they also share arrangements with littorinimorph caenogastropods, with which they have been linked based on sperm morphology and primary sequence-based phylogenies. We have uncovered major changes in gene order within a family of

  12. Sessile snails, dynamic genomes: gene rearrangements within the mitochondrial genome of a family of caenogastropod molluscs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Widespread sampling of vertebrates, which comprise the majority of published animal mitochondrial genomes, has led to the view that mitochondrial gene rearrangements are relatively rare, and that gene orders are typically stable across major taxonomic groups. In contrast, more limited sampling within the Phylum Mollusca has revealed an unusually high number of gene order arrangements. Here we provide evidence that the lability of the molluscan mitochondrial genome extends to the family level by describing extensive gene order changes that have occurred within the Vermetidae, a family of sessile marine gastropods that radiated from a basal caenogastropod stock during the Cenozoic Era. Results Major mitochondrial gene rearrangements have occurred within this family at a scale unexpected for such an evolutionarily young group and unprecedented for any caenogastropod examined to date. We determined the complete mitochondrial genomes of four species (Dendropoma maximum, D. gregarium, Eualetes tulipa, and Thylacodes squamigerus) and the partial mitochondrial genomes of two others (Vermetus erectus and Thylaeodus sp.). Each of the six vermetid gastropods assayed possessed a unique gene order. In addition to the typical mitochondrial genome complement of 37 genes, additional tRNA genes were evident in D. gregarium (trnK) and Thylacodes squamigerus (trnV, trnLUUR). Three pseudogenes and additional tRNAs found within the genome of Thylacodes squamigerus provide evidence of a past duplication event in this taxon. Likewise, high sequence similarities between isoaccepting leucine tRNAs in Thylacodes, Eualetes, and Thylaeodus suggest that tRNA remolding has been rife within this family. While vermetids exhibit gene arrangements diagnostic of this family, they also share arrangements with littorinimorph caenogastropods, with which they have been linked based on sperm morphology and primary sequence-based phylogenies. Conclusions We have uncovered major changes in gene

  13. Accelerated evolution of the mitochondrial genome in an alloplasmic line of durum wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat is not only an important crop but also an excellent plant species for nuclear mitochondrial interaction studies. To investigate the level of sequence changes introduced into the mitochondrial genome under the alloplasmic conditions, three mitochondrial genomes of Triticum-Aegilops species w...

  14. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M C; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J; Tan, Benita K T; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N; Martens, John W M; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Myklebost, Ola; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Bova, Steven G; Lakhani, Sunil R; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L; Purdie, Colin A; Thompson, Alastair M; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells.

  15. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M.C.; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R.; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R.; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J.; Tan, Benita K.T.; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N.; Martens, John W.M.; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E.; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L.; Purdie, Colin A.; Thompson, Alastair M.; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells. PMID:25963125

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome of Lasiopodomys mandarinus mandarinus (Arvicolinae, Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Li, Yangwei; Lu, Jiqi; Wang, Zhenlong

    2016-01-01

    Mandarin voles (Lasiopodomys mandarinus) is a subterranean rodent species that are often used as a model for studying subterranean hypoxic stress in mammals. Its subspecies L. m. mandarinus span in cropland in most area of north China and is regarded as an agricultural pest. In this paper, the complete mitochondrial genome of L. m. mandarinus has been determined. Our results showed that the mitochondrial genome of L. m. mandarinus is a circular molecule of 16,367 bp, which contents 13 protein-coding, 22 tRNAs and 2 rRNAs genes. The overall base composition of the heavy strand is 32.47% A, 27.04% T, 27.01% C, and 13.47% G. with an AT content of 59.51%.

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome of the mudskipper Boleophthalmus boddarti (Perciformes, Gobiidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu Ting; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd; Li, Zhe; Chen, Wei; Chen, Shi Xi; Hong, Wan Shu

    2016-01-01

    The Boddart's goggle-eyed mudskipper, Boleophthalmus boddarti (Perciformes, Gobiidae) is an amphibious fish, inhabiting brackish waters of estuaries and builds burrows in soft mud along the intertidal zone. In this paper, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of B. boddarti was firstly determined. The circle genome (16,727 bp) comprises 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and 1 control region. The overall base composition of B. boddarti is 29.1% for C, 28.9% for A, 25.9% for T, and 16.0% for G, with a slight A + T bias of 54.8%. The termination-associated sequence, conserved sequence block domains, and a 131-bp tandem repeat were found in the control region. It has the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement.

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome of Diaphania pyloalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    PubMed

    Kong, Weiqing; Yang, Jinhong

    2016-11-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Diaphania pyloalis Walker collected from China was reported and characterized. The mitogenome was 14,960 bp in length, including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and 1 short A + T-rich region. The A + T content of the mitochondrial genome is 80.77%. All protein-coding genes were initiated by an ATN codon, except for coxI gene which is initiated by CGA. Only coxII gene was terminated with a single T. There are 13 overlaps totaling 52 bp, and 13 intergenic spacer regions totaling 121 bp in the D. pyloalis mitogenome. The short A + T-rich region is 67 bp long, with 91.04% A + T content.

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Takifugu flavidus (Tetraodontiformes: Tetrodontidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongfu; Zhou, Qin; Liu, Haijin; Li, Chao; Tong, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Takifugu flavidus (Tetraodontiformes: Tetrodontidae) was obtained in this study. The mitogenome is 16,449 bp in size and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and 2 non-coding regions: origin of light-strand replication (OL) and control region (D-loop). The overall nucleotide composition of the heavy strand was 29.88% A, 25.81% T, 15.28% G and 29.03% C, with a slight AT bias of 55.69%. Except for ND6 gene and eight tRNA genes, other genes are encoded on the heavy strand. The mitochondrial genome data of T. flavidus should contribute to phylogenetic analysis and studies on genetic structure, as well as molecular phylogeny and species identification of Tetrodontidae.

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of Paracymoriza distinctalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; You, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Paracymoriza distinctalis (Leech, 1889) has been determined in this article. The mitochondrial genome of P. distinctalis was 15,354 bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and an A + T-rich region. All PCGs start with ATN codon, except for COI, which begins with CGA. Eleven PCGs stop with typical stop codon TAA. But ND5 and COII use incomplete stop codon T. All the 22 tRNAs have the typical clover-leaf structure except for tRNA(Ser)(AGN) lacking the dihydrouridine (DHU) stem. There were several conserved motifs in the intergenic region between tRNA(Ser)(UCN) and ND1 and the A + T-rich region of P. distinctalis.

  1. The complete mitochondrial genome of Lista haraldusalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Yu, Hai-Li; Li, Peng-Fei; You, Ping

    2015-01-01

    We have determined the complete mitochondrial genome of Lista haraldusalis Walker, 1859. The mitochondrial genome of L. haraldusalis is 15,213 bp in size with 81.5% A+T content. It consists of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (tRNA), 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and an A+T-rich region. All PCGs start with ATN codon, except for COI, which begins with TTAG. Eleven PCGs stop with typical stop codon TAA and TAG. But ND6 and COII use incomplete stop codon T. All of the 22 tRNAs have the typical cloverleaf structure except for tRNASer(AGN) lacking of the dihydrouridine (DHU) stem. The conserved motif ATACTA, poly-T stretch, ATAGA, ATTTA and microsatellite-like (AT)11 were found in the intergenic region between tRNASer(UCN) and ND1 and the A+T-rich region of L. haraldusalis, respectively.

  2. Complete mitochondrial genome of Undaria pinnatifida (Alariaceae, Laminariales, Phaeophyceae).

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Yong; Qu, Jie-Qiong; Feng, Yan-Jing; Liu, Cui; Chi, Shan; Liu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Undaria pinnatifida is one of the most important economic marine algae and key components of coastal ecosystems. Undaria pinnatifida owns a typical heteromorphic, diplohaplontic life cycle. We present the complete sequence of mitochondrial genome of U. pinnatifida, focusing on genome organization and phylogenetic relationship between different brown algae lineages. The size of U. pinnatifida mitochondrial DNA is 37,402 bp, including 3 rRNAs, 25 tRNAs, 35 proteins, as well as 3 ORFs. No intron is found and most genes are encoded on the H-strand. The phylogenetic trees (BI) constructed on 35 protein-coding genes from 17 species proved that Saccharina has a closer relationship with Laminaria than that with Undaria. The results supported the conclusion that Alariaceae is sister genus to the Laminariaceae. Above researches will facilitate the understanding of evolutionary relationship within brown algae.

  3. Mitochondrial genome interrogation for forensic casework and research studies.

    PubMed

    Roby, Rhonda K; Sprouse, Marc; Phillips, Nicole; Alicea-Centeno, Alessandra; Shewale, Shantanu; Shore, Sabrina; Paul, Natasha

    2014-04-24

    This unit describes methods used in the analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) for forensic and research applications. UNIT describes procedures specifically for forensic casework where the DNA from evidentiary material is often degraded or inhibited. In this unit, protocols are described for quantification of mtDNA before amplification; amplification of the entire control region from high-quality samples as well as procedures for interrogating the whole mitochondrial genome (mtGenome); quantification of mtDNA post-amplification; and, post-PCR cleanup and sequencing. The protocols for amplification were developed for high-throughput databasing applications for forensic DNA testing such as reference samples and population studies. However, these same protocols can be applied to biomedical research such as age-related disease and health disparities research.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of Sus cebifrons (Sus, Suidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Tang, Hong-Xia; Liu, Yong-Gang; Bai, Ming-Jie; Tang, Yan-Xia

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Sus cebifrons (Visayan warty pig). The total length of the mitogenome was 16,475 bp, and its overall base composition was estimated to be 35.0% for A, 25.8% for T, 26.2% for C and 13.0% for G, indicating an A-T (60.8%)-rich feature in Sus cebifrons mitogenome. It contained the typical structure of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a noncoding control region (D-loop region). The arrangement of these genes was the same as that found in other pigs. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Sus cebifrons would provide new genetic resources for pig domestication study.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Youxian duck.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qian; Qiu, Lei; Cao, Rong; Jiang, Gui-Tao; Dai, Qiu-Zhong; Zhang, Shi-Rui; Hou, De-Xing; He, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Youxian duck is one of the famous native breed in China. In this work we reported the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Youxian duck in Human Province for the first time. The total length of the mitogenome is 16,606 bp, with the base composition of 29.21% for A, 22.18% for T, 32.83% for C, 15.78% for G, in the order C > A > T > G feature occurring in the Youxian duck. It is made up of two ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and one non-coding control region (D-loop region). The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Youxian duck will be useful for the phylogenetics of poultry, and be available as basic data for the genetics and breeding.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Linwu duck.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qian; Jiang, Gui-Tao; Yun, Long; Li, Guo-Jun; Dai, Qiu-Zhong; Zhang, Shi-Rui; Hou, De-Xing; He, Xi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Linwu duck was first reported in Human Province, which was determined through PCR-based method. Linwu duck is one of the famous native breed in China. The total length of the mitogenome is 16,604 bp, with the base composition of 29.20% for A, 22.21% for T, 32.82% for C, 15.78% for G, in the order C > A > T > G feature occurring in the Linwu duck. It is made up of 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and one non-coding control region (D-loop region). The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Linwu duck in Human Province provides an important data for further study about genetic mechanism and breeding.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of Liobagrus kingi (Teleostei, Siluriformes: Amblycipitidae).

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiang-Yang; Li, Ying-Wen; Wang, Deng-Qiang; Tian, Hui-Wu; Xiong, Xing; Li, Shu-Hua; Chen, Da-Qing

    2013-08-01

    Liobagrus kingi is endemic to southwest China and listed as endangered species (IUCN 2012). Genetic diversity is necessary for conservation issue. In studying this, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of L. kingi has been obtained with PCR, which contains 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and a non-coding control region with the total length of 16,483 bp. The gene arrangement and composition are similar to that of other vertebrates. Most of the genes are encoded on heavy strand, except for eight tRNA and ND6 genes. Just like most other vertebrates, the against bias of G has a universality in different statistical results. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of L. kingi would contribute to better understand population genetics and protect its genetic diversity.

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Himalayan honey bee, Apis laboriosa.

    PubMed

    Chhakchhuak, Liansangmawii; De Mandal, Surajit; Gurusubramanian, Guruswami; Sudalaimuthu, Naganeeswaran; Gopalakrishnan, Chellappa; Mugasimangalam, Raja C; Senthil Kumar, Nachimuthu

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Himalayan bee Apis laboriosa, from Mizoram, India, has been sequenced using Illumina NextSeq500 platform and analysed. The mitogenome was assembled and found to be 15 266 bp in length and the gene arrangement is similar to other honey bee species. The A. laboriosa mitogenome comprises of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and an A + T-rich region of 346 bp. Based on the concatenated PCGs, in the phylogenetic tree, A. laboriosa is placed as a sister group along with the cavity nesting honey bees. The present study reports the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence of A. laboriosa, which will enhance our knowledge on Apinae mitogenomes and phylogeny.

  9. Complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Onychostoma sima (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang-Ping; Cheng, Chung-Yao; Ho, Chuan-Wen; Ueng, Yih-Tsong

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Onychostoma sima (Cypriniformes, Cyprinidae). This mitochondrial genome, consisting of 16,601 base pairs (bp), encoded 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs and a noncoding control region as those found in other vertebrates, with the gene synteny identical to that of typical vertebrates. Control region (D-Loop), of 934 bp lengths long, is located between tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Phe). The overall base composition of the heavy strand shows 24.30% of T, 28.28% of C, 31.31% of A and 16.11% of G, with a slight AT bias of 55.61%.

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of Java warty pig (Sus verrucosus).

    PubMed

    Fan, Jie; Li, Chun-Hong; Shi, Wei

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Java warty pig was reported for the first time. The total length of the mitogenome was 16,479 bp. It contained the typical structure, including 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 non-coding control region (D-loop region) as that of most other pigs. The overall composition of the mitogenome was estimated to be 34.9% for A, 26.1% for T, 26.0% for C and 13.0% for G showing an A-T (61.0%)-rich feature. The mitochondrial genome analyzed here will provide new genetic resource to uncover pigs' evolution.

  11. Systematically fragmented genes in a multipartite mitochondrial genome

    PubMed Central

    Vlcek, Cestmir; Marande, William; Teijeiro, Shona; Lukeš, Julius; Burger, Gertraud

    2011-01-01

    Arguably, the most bizarre mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is that of the euglenozoan eukaryote Diplonema papillatum. The genome consists of numerous small circular chromosomes none of which appears to encode a complete gene. For instance, the cox1 coding sequence is spread out over nine different chromosomes in non-overlapping pieces (modules), which are transcribed separately and joined to a contiguous mRNA by trans-splicing. Here, we examine how many genes are encoded by Diplonema mtDNA and whether all are fragmented and their transcripts trans-spliced. Module identification is challenging due to the sequence divergence of Diplonema mitochondrial genes. By employing most sensitive protein profile search algorithms and comparing genomic with cDNA sequence, we recognize a total of 11 typical mitochondrial genes. The 10 protein-coding genes are systematically chopped up into three to 12 modules of 60–350 bp length. The corresponding mRNAs are all trans-spliced. Identification of ribosomal RNAs is most difficult. So far, we only detect the 3′-module of the large subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA); it does not trans-splice with other pieces. The small subunit rRNA gene remains elusive. Our results open new intriguing questions about the biochemistry and evolution of mitochondrial trans-splicing in Diplonema. PMID:20935050

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome of Tetrastemma olgarum (Nemertea: Hoplonemertea).

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen-Yan; Shen, Chun-Yang; Sun, Shi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Tetrastemma olgarum is sequenced. It is 14,580 bp in length and contains 37 genes typical for metazoan mitogenomes. The gene order is identical to that of the previously published Hoplonemertea mitogenomes. All genes are encoded on the heavy strand except for trnT and trnP. The coding strand is AT-rich, accounting for 69.2% of overall nucleotide composition.

  13. Complete mitochondrial genome of Lamprotula coreana (Unionidae, Unionoida, Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hee; Kim, Sang Ki; Hwang, Ui Wook

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Lamprotula coreana, which is an endangered and endemic species in South Korea, was determined. Its length is 15,819 bp, which mainly consists of 13 protein-coding, 2 rRNA, and 22 tRNA genes. In addition, there were 26 noncoding regions (NC) found throughout the mitogenome of L. coreana, ranging in size from 3 bp to 287 bp.

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome of Amolops ricketti (Amphidia, Anura, Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Yongmin; Wu, Xiaoyou; Zhang, Huabin; Yan, Peng; Xue, Hui; Wu, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome from the South China torrent frog Amolops ricketti was determined. This mitogenome was 17,771 bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a control region (CR). All the protein-coding genes in A. ricketti were distributed on the H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and eight tRNA genes which were encoded on the L-strand.

  15. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Grundulus bogotensis (Humboldt, 1821).

    PubMed

    Isaza, Juan P; Alzate, Juan F; Maldonado-Ocampo, Javier A

    2016-05-01

    The Grundulus bogotensis is an Endangered fish in Colombia. In this study, we report the complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of G. bogotensis. The entire genome comprised 17.123 bases and a GC content of 39.84%. The mitogenome sequence of G. bogotensis would contribute to better understand population genetics, and evolution of this lineage. Molecule was deposited at the GenBank database under the accession number KM677190.

  16. Comparison of mitochondrial genome sequences of pangolins (Mammalia, Pholidota).

    PubMed

    Hassanin, Alexandre; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; van Vuuren, Bettine Jansen

    2015-04-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced for three species of pangolins, Manis javanica, Phataginus tricuspis, and Smutsia temminckii, and comparisons were made with two other species, Manis pentadactyla and Phataginus tetradactyla. The genome of Manidae contains the 37 genes found in a typical mammalian genome, and the structure of the control region is highly conserved among species. In Manis, the overall base composition differs from that found in African genera. Phylogenetic analyses support the monophyly of the genera Manis, Phataginus, and Smutsia, as well as the basal division between Maninae and Smutsiinae. Comparisons with GenBank sequences reveal that the reference genomes of M. pentadactyla and P. tetradactyla (accession numbers NC_016008 and NC_004027) were sequenced from misidentified taxa, and that a new species of tree pangolin should be described in Gabon.

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome of blood pheasant (Ithaginis cruentus).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Tu, Feiyun; Ma, Lele; Yan, Chaochao; Yang, Nan; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong; Ran, Jianghong

    2013-10-01

    The blood pheasant Ithaginis cruentus belongs to the family Phasianidae and distributes in the eastern Himalayas, India, Nepal, Bhutan and China. In this study, the total mitochondrial genome of I. cruentus was firstly determined. The genome is 16,683 bases in length. Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony methods were used to construct phylogenetic trees based on 12 concatenated protein-coding genes on the heavy strand. Phylogenetic analyses further confirmed that Ithaginis clearly diverged later than Arborophila, and Arborophila was a basal branch within Phasianidae.

  18. Complete mitochondrial genome of Lernaea cyprinacea (Copepoda: Cyclopoida).

    PubMed

    Su, Ying-Bing; Wang, Li-Xia; Kong, Sheng-Chao; Chen, Lu; Fang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Lernaea cyprinacea is 14,656 bp in size, containing 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA genes, two rRNA genes (12S and 16S), as well as two non-coding regions (NCRs, the control regions). The genome organization, nucleotide composition and codon usage do not differ significantly from other Copepodas. The complete mitogenome sequence information of L. cyprinacea provides useful data for further studies on phylogenetics, stock evaluation and conservation genetics.

  19. Complete mitochondrial genome of the ocellate river stingray (Potamotrygon motoro).

    PubMed

    Song, Hong-Mei; Mu, Xi-Dong; Wei, Min-Xia; Wang, Xue-Jie; Luo, Jian-Ren; Hu, Yin-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We determined the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Potamotrygon motoro from South American freshwater stingrays. The total length of P. motoro mitogenome is 17,448 bp, which consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and a control region, with the genome organization and gene order being identical to that of the typical vertebrate. The overall nucleotide composition is 32.3% A, 24.4% T, 30.5% C and 12.8% G. These data will provide useful molecular information for phylogenetic relationships within the family Potamotrygonidae species.

  20. Partial purification of mitochondrial ribosomes from broad bean and identification of proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Maffey, L; Degand, H; Boutry, M

    1997-04-28

    An approach towards the identification at the protein level of the ribosomal proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome of broad bean (Vicia faba) has been developed. After Triton X-100 treatment of isolated mitochondria, a fraction enriched in mitochondrial ribosomes was obtained by successive centrifugation, first onto a sucrose cushion, and then in a sucrose gradient. Mitochondrial translation products were labelled in isolated mitochondria with [35S]methionine and added to the enriched mitochondrial ribosomal proteins before separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Six spots, identified both by Coomassie blue staining and autoradiography, were analysed by protein micro-sequencing. Two of these were shown to correspond to ribosomal proteins S10 and S12. We conclude that these two proteins are encoded by the mitochondrial genome of broad bean and that the method described here can be used to identify other proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome.

  1. How rapidly does the human mitochondrial genome evolve?

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, N.; Kubacka, I.; Mackey, D.A. |

    1996-09-01

    The results of an empirical nucleotide-sequencing approach indicate that the evolution of the human mitochondrial noncoding D-loop is both more rapid and more complex than is revealed by standard phylogenetic approaches. The nucleotide sequence of the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome was determined for 45 members of a large matrilineal Leber hereditary optic neuropathy pedigree. Two germ-line mutations have arisen in members of one branch of the family, thereby leading to triplasmic descendants with three mitochondrial genotypes. Segregation toward the homoplasmic state can occur within a single generation in some of these descendants, a result that suggests rapid fixation of mitochondrial mutations as a result of developmental bottlenecking. However, slow segregation was observed in other offspring, and therefore no single or simple pattern of segregation can be generalized from the available data. Evidence for rare mtDNA recombination within the D-loop was obtained for one family member. In addition to these germ-line mutations, a somatic mutation was found in the D-loop of one family member. When this genealogical approach was applied to the nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial coding regions, the results again indicated a very rapid rate of evolution. 44 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. MicroScope--an integrated microbial resource for the curation and comparative analysis of genomic and metabolic data.

    PubMed

    Vallenet, David; Belda, Eugeni; Calteau, Alexandra; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Engelen, Stefan; Lajus, Aurélie; Le Fèvre, François; Longin, Cyrille; Mornico, Damien; Roche, David; Rouy, Zoé; Salvignol, Gregory; Scarpelli, Claude; Thil Smith, Adam Alexander; Weiman, Marion; Médigue, Claudine

    2013-01-01

    MicroScope is an integrated platform dedicated to both the methodical updating of microbial genome annotation and to comparative analysis. The resource provides data from completed and ongoing genome projects (automatic and expert annotations), together with data sources from post-genomic experiments (i.e. transcriptomics, mutant collections) allowing users to perfect and improve the understanding of gene functions. MicroScope (http://www.genoscope.cns.fr/agc/microscope) combines tools and graphical interfaces to analyse genomes and to perform the manual curation of gene annotations in a comparative context. Since its first publication in January 2006, the system (previously named MaGe for Magnifying Genomes) has been continuously extended both in terms of data content and analysis tools. The last update of MicroScope was published in 2009 in the Database journal. Today, the resource contains data for >1600 microbial genomes, of which ∼300 are manually curated and maintained by biologists (1200 personal accounts today). Expert annotations are continuously gathered in the MicroScope database (∼50 000 a year), contributing to the improvement of the quality of microbial genomes annotations. Improved data browsing and searching tools have been added, original tools useful in the context of expert annotation have been developed and integrated and the website has been significantly redesigned to be more user-friendly. Furthermore, in the context of the European project Microme (Framework Program 7 Collaborative Project), MicroScope is becoming a resource providing for the curation and analysis of both genomic and metabolic data. An increasing number of projects are related to the study of environmental bacterial (meta)genomes that are able to metabolize a large variety of chemical compounds that may be of high industrial interest.

  3. MicroScope—an integrated microbial resource for the curation and comparative analysis of genomic and metabolic data

    PubMed Central

    Vallenet, David; Belda, Eugeni; Calteau, Alexandra; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Engelen, Stefan; Lajus, Aurélie; Le Fèvre, François; Longin, Cyrille; Mornico, Damien; Roche, David; Rouy, Zoé; Salvignol, Gregory; Scarpelli, Claude; Thil Smith, Adam Alexander; Weiman, Marion; Médigue, Claudine

    2013-01-01

    MicroScope is an integrated platform dedicated to both the methodical updating of microbial genome annotation and to comparative analysis. The resource provides data from completed and ongoing genome projects (automatic and expert annotations), together with data sources from post-genomic experiments (i.e. transcriptomics, mutant collections) allowing users to perfect and improve the understanding of gene functions. MicroScope (http://www.genoscope.cns.fr/agc/microscope) combines tools and graphical interfaces to analyse genomes and to perform the manual curation of gene annotations in a comparative context. Since its first publication in January 2006, the system (previously named MaGe for Magnifying Genomes) has been continuously extended both in terms of data content and analysis tools. The last update of MicroScope was published in 2009 in the Database journal. Today, the resource contains data for >1600 microbial genomes, of which ∼300 are manually curated and maintained by biologists (1200 personal accounts today). Expert annotations are continuously gathered in the MicroScope database (∼50 000 a year), contributing to the improvement of the quality of microbial genomes annotations. Improved data browsing and searching tools have been added, original tools useful in the context of expert annotation have been developed and integrated and the website has been significantly redesigned to be more user-friendly. Furthermore, in the context of the European project Microme (Framework Program 7 Collaborative Project), MicroScope is becoming a resource providing for the curation and analysis of both genomic and metabolic data. An increasing number of projects are related to the study of environmental bacterial (meta)genomes that are able to metabolize a large variety of chemical compounds that may be of high industrial interest. PMID:23193269

  4. Complete male mitochondrial genome of Anodonta anatina (Mollusca: Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Soroka, Marianna; Burzyński, Artur

    2016-05-01

    Anodonta anatina is a freshwater mussel of the family Unionidae. These mussels have a unique mitochondria inheritance system named doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI). Under DUI males have two, potentially very divergent mitochondrial genomes: F-type inherited from mother and M-type inherited from father. F-type is present in soma whereas M-type is present in gonadal tissues and sperm. Here we report two M-type sequences of complete mitochondrial genomes from Anodonta anatina. They are 16,906 bp long and their sequences are similar (0.1% divergence). The genome organization is identical to the other Unionidean M-type genomes published to date. There are 38 genes, including the recently described M-type specific M ORF. The presence of tRNA-like repeat in one of the noncoding regions, suggests that the control region is located in this area. Nucleotide composition is quite extreme, with AT content (66.2%) higher than in any other of the six published Unionidean M genomes.

  5. Synonymous codon usage patterns in different parasitic platyhelminth mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Yang, D Y; Liu, T F; Nong, X; Huang, X; Xie, Y; Fu, Y; Zheng, W P; Zhang, R H; Wu, X H; Gu, X B; Wang, S X; Peng, X R; Yang, G Y

    2013-02-27

    We analyzed synonymous codon usage patterns of the mitochondrial genomes of 43 parasitic platyhelminth species. The relative synonymous codon usage, the effective number of codons (NC) and the frequency of G+C at the third synonymously variable coding position were calculated. Correspondence analysis was used to determine the major variation trends shaping the codon usage patterns. Among the mitochondrial genomes of 19 trematode species, the GC content of third codon positions varied from 0.151 to 0.592, with a mean of 0.295 ± 0.116. In cestodes, the mean GC content of third codon positions was 0.254 ± 0.044. A comparison of the nucleotide composition at 4-fold synonymous sites revealed that, on average, there was a greater abundance of codons ending on U (51.9%) or A (22.7%) than on C (6.3%) or G (19.14%). Twenty-two codons, including UUU, UUA and UUG, were frequently used. In the NC-plot, most of points were distributed well below or around the expected NC curve. In addition to compositional constraints, the degree of hydrophobicity and the aromatic amino acids also influenced codon usage in the mitochondrial genomes of these 43 parasitic platyhelminth species.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of Dixella sp. (Diptera: Nematocera, Dixidae).

    PubMed

    Kang, Zehui; Li, Xuankun; Yang, Ding

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, the first complete mitochondrial genome of the family Dixidae is reported. The complete mitochondrial genome of Dixella sp. is a circular molecule of 15,574 bp in length, containing all 37 genes including 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA genes (tRNAs), 2 ribosomal RNA genes (srRNA and lrRNA), and a long control region. Its gene arrangement is conserved with the ancestral gene order of Drosophila yakuba, which is considered to exhibit the ground pattern of Hexapoda mitochondrial genome. Most PCGs start with standard ATN codons, while COI uses CCG, ND1 uses TTG and ND5 uses GTG as start codons. All PCGs terminate in the common stop codons TAA, except for COII and ND5 which end with a single thymine stop codon. There is a 703 bp of the control region, located between srRNA and tRNA(lle)-tRNA(Gln)-tRNA(Met) (IQM) cluster, without conserved blocks or long tandem repeats.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genomes of Pseudosiderastrea spp (Cnidaria, Scleractinia, Siderastreidae).

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yaoyang; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2016-11-01

    The complete mitochondrial genomes of the Indo-Pacific scleractinians, Pseudosiderastrea formosa and P. tayamai, were sequenced. The mitochondrial genomes are 19,475 bp in length for both P. formosa and P. tayamai, representing the longest mitochondrial genome in the complex corals sequenced to date. The overall GC composition (36.3%) and the gene arrangement are similar to those of the other scleractinian corals, including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes (rnl and rns) and 2 tRNA genes (tRNA-Met and tRNA-Trp). All genes, except tRNA-Trp, tRNA-Met, rnl, cox1, and atp8, are engulfed by a large group I intron in the nad5 gene. The second group I intron (970 bp) encoding a putative homing endonuclease is inserted in the cox1 gene, where insertion site is different from those of robust corals. Genes were separated by intergenic spacer regions for a total of 2593 bp, of which the cytb-nad2 region may correspond to the putative control region.

  8. The mitochondrial genome of the stramenopile alga Chrysodidymus synuroideus. Complete sequence, gene content and genome organization.

    PubMed

    Chesnick, J M; Goff, M; Graham, J; Ocampo, C; Lang, B F; Seif, E; Burger, G

    2000-07-01

    This is the first report of a complete mitochondrial genome sequence from a photosynthetic member of the stramenopiles, the chrysophyte alga Chrysodidymus synuroideus. The circular-mapping mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of 34 119 bp contains 58 densely packed genes (all without introns) and five unique open reading frames (ORFs). Protein genes code for components of respiratory chain complexes, ATP synthase and the mitoribosome, as well as one product of unknown function, encoded in many other protist mtDNAs (YMF16). In addition to small and large subunit ribosomal RNAs, 23 tRNAs are mtDNA-encoded, permitting translation of all codons present in protein-coding genes except ACN (Thr) and CGN (Arg). The missing tRNAs are assumed to be imported from the cytosol. Comparison of the C.SYNUROIDEUS: mtDNA with that of other stramenopiles allowed us to draw conclusions about mitochondrial genome organization, expression and evolution. First, we provide evidence that mitochondrial ORFs code for highly derived, unrecognizable versions of ribosomal or respiratory genes otherwise 'missing' in a particular mtDNA. Secondly, the observed constraints in mitochondrial genome rearrangements suggest operon-based, co-ordinated expression of genes functioning in common biological processes. Finally, stramenopile mtDNAs reveal an unexpectedly low variability in genome size and gene complement, testifying to substantial differences in the tempo of mtDNA evolution between major eukaryotic lineages.

  9. Extensive Mitochondrial mRNA Editing and Unusual Mitochondrial Genome Organization in Calcaronean Sponges.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, Dennis V; Adamski, Marcin; Chevaldonné, Pierre; Adamska, Maja

    2016-01-11

    One of the unusual features of DNA-containing organelles in general and mitochondria in particular is the frequent occurrence of RNA editing [1]. The term "RNA editing" refers to a variety of mechanistically unrelated biochemical processes that alter RNA sequence during or after transcription [2]. The editing can be insertional, deletional, or substitutional and has been found in all major types of RNAs [3, 4]. Although mitochondrial mRNA editing is widespread in some eukaryotic lineages [5-7], it is rare in animals, with reported cases limited both in their scope and in phylogenetic distribution [8-11] (see also [12]). While analyzing genomic data from calcaronean sponges Sycon ciliatum and Leucosolenia complicata, we were perplexed by the lack of recognizable mitochondrial coding sequences. Comparison of genomic and transcriptomic data from these species revealed the presence of mitochondrial cryptogenes whose transcripts undergo extensive editing. This editing consisted of single or double uridylate (U) insertions in pre-existing short poly(U) tracts. Subsequent analysis revealed the presence of similar editing in Sycon coactum and the loss of editing in Petrobiona massiliana, a hypercalcified calcaronean sponge. In addition, mitochondrial genomes of at least some calcaronean sponges were found to have a highly unusual architecture, with nearly all genes located on individual and likely linear chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial coding sequences revealed accelerated rates of sequence evolution in this group. The latter observation presents a challenge for the mutational-hazard hypothesis [13], which posits that mRNA editing should not occur in lineages with an elevated mutation rate.

  10. New Views on Strand Asymmetry in Insect Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shu-Jun; Shi, Min; Chen, Xue-Xin; Sharkey, Michael J.; van Achterberg, Cornelis; Ye, Gong-Yin; He, Jun-Hua

    2010-01-01

    Strand asymmetry in nucleotide composition is a remarkable feature of animal mitochondrial genomes. Understanding the mutation processes that shape strand asymmetry is essential for comprehensive knowledge of genome evolution, demographical population history and accurate phylogenetic inference. Previous studies found that the relative contributions of different substitution types to strand asymmetry are associated with replication alone or both replication and transcription. However, the relative contributions of replication and transcription to strand asymmetry remain unclear. Here we conducted a broad survey of strand asymmetry across 120 insect mitochondrial genomes, with special reference to the correlation between the signs of skew values and replication orientation/gene direction. The results show that the sign of GC skew on entire mitochondrial genomes is reversed in all species of three distantly related families of insects, Philopteridae (Phthiraptera), Aleyrodidae (Hemiptera) and Braconidae (Hymenoptera); the replication-related elements in the A+T-rich regions of these species are inverted, confirming that reversal of strand asymmetry (GC skew) was caused by inversion of replication origin; and finally, the sign of GC skew value is associated with replication orientation but not with gene direction, while that of AT skew value varies with gene direction, replication and codon positions used in analyses. These findings show that deaminations during replication and other mutations contribute more than selection on amino acid sequences to strand compositions of G and C, and that the replication process has a stronger affect on A and T content than does transcription. Our results may contribute to genome-wide studies of replication and transcription mechanisms. PMID:20856815

  11. PREPACT 2.0: Predicting C-to-U and U-to-C RNA Editing in Organelle Genome Sequences with Multiple References and Curated RNA Editing Annotation

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Henning; Knoop, Volker

    2013-01-01

    RNA editing is vast in some genetic systems, with up to thousands of targeted C-to-U and U-to-C substitutions in mitochondria and chloroplasts of certain plants. Efficient prognoses of RNA editing in organelle genomes will help to reveal overlooked cases of editing. We present PREPACT 2.0 (http://www.prepact.de) with numerous enhancements of our previously developed Plant RNA Editing Prediction & Analysis Computer Tool. Reference organelle transcriptomes for editing prediction have been extended and reorganized to include 19 curated mitochondrial and 13 chloroplast genomes, now allowing to distinguish RNA editing sites from “pre-edited” sites. Queries may be run against multiple references and a new “commons” function identifies and highlights orthologous candidate editing sites congruently predicted by multiple references. Enhancements to the BLASTX mode in PREPACT 2.0 allow querying of complete novel organelle genomes within a few minutes, identifying protein genes and candidate RNA editing sites simultaneously without prior user analyses. PMID:23362369

  12. Manual curation and reannotation of the genomes of Clostridium difficile 630Δerm and Clostridium difficile 630.

    PubMed

    Dannheim, Henning; Riedel, Thomas; Neumann-Schaal, Meina; Bunk, Boyke; Schober, Isabel; Spröer, Cathrin; Chibani, Cynthia Maria; Gronow, Sabine; Liesegang, Heiko; Overmann, Jörg; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2017-01-09

    We resequenced the genome of Clostridium difficile 630Δerm (DSM 28645), a model strain commonly used for the generation of insertion mutants. The genome sequence was obtained by a combination of single-molecule real-time (SMRT) and Illumina sequencing technology. Detailed manual curation and comparison to the previously published genomic sequence revealed sequence differences including inverted regions and the presence of plasmid pCD630. Manual curation of our previously deposited genome sequence of the parental strain 630 (DSM 27543) led to an improved genome sequence. In addition, the sequence of the transposon Tn5397 was completely identified. We manually revised the current manual annotation of the initial sequence of strain 630 and modified either gene names, gene product names or assigned EC numbers of 57 % of genes. The number of hypothetical and conserved hypothetical proteins was reduced by 152. This annotation was used as a template to annotate the most recent genome sequences of the strains 630Δerm and 630. Based on the genomic analysis, several new metabolic features of C. difficile are proposed and could be supported by literature and subsequent experiments.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome of Southern pig-tailed macaque, Macaca nemestrina, and comparative mitochondrial genomics of Macaca species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Mei, Huixian; Luo, Xueting

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Southern pig-tailed, Macaca nemestrina for the first time. The genome is found to be 16,560 bp in length and has a base composition of A (32.25%), G (12.31%), C (30.51%), and T (24.93%), indicating that the percentage of A + T (57.18%) was higher than G + C (42.82%). Similar to other monkeys, it contains a typically conserved structure including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 1 control region (D-loop). Most of the genes were located on the H-strand except for the ND6 gene and 8 tRNA genes. To obtain a more complete understanding of the evolutionary history of Macaca genus, 11 mitochondrial genomes were used for phylogenetic analysis. This mitochondrial sequence reported here would be useful to uncover the monkey's evolution and add a new genetic resource for the genus Macaca.

  14. Mitochondrial genome diversity in dagger and needle nematodes (Nematoda: Longidoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Palomares-Rius, J. E.; Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, C.; Archidona-Yuste, A.; Blok, V. C.; Castillo, P.

    2017-01-01

    Dagger and needle nematodes included in the family Longidoridae (viz. Longidorus, Paralongidorus, and Xiphinema) are highly polyphagous plant-parasitic nematodes in wild and cultivated plants and some of them are plant-virus vectors (nepovirus). The mitochondrial (mt) genomes of the dagger and needle nematodes, Xiphinema rivesi, Xiphinema pachtaicum, Longidorus vineacola and Paralongidorus litoralis were sequenced in this study. The four circular mt genomes have an estimated size of 12.6, 12.5, 13.5 and 12.7 kb, respectively. Up to date, the mt genome of X. pachtaicum is the smallest genome found in Nematoda. The four mt genomes contain 12 protein-coding genes (viz. cox1-3, nad1-6, nad4L, atp6 and cob) and two ribosomal RNA genes (rrnL and rrnS), but the atp8 gene was not detected. These mt genomes showed a gene arrangement very different within the Longidoridae species sequenced, with the exception of very closely related species (X. americanum and X. rivesi). The sizes of non-coding regions in the Longidoridae nematodes were very small and were present in a few places in the mt genome. Phylogenetic analysis of all coding genes showed a closer relationship between Longidorus and Paralongidorus and different phylogenetic possibilities for the three Xiphinema species. PMID:28150734

  15. Mitochondrial genome diversity in dagger and needle nematodes (Nematoda: Longidoridae).

    PubMed

    Palomares-Rius, J E; Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, C; Archidona-Yuste, A; Blok, V C; Castillo, P

    2017-02-02

    Dagger and needle nematodes included in the family Longidoridae (viz. Longidorus, Paralongidorus, and Xiphinema) are highly polyphagous plant-parasitic nematodes in wild and cultivated plants and some of them are plant-virus vectors (nepovirus). The mitochondrial (mt) genomes of the dagger and needle nematodes, Xiphinema rivesi, Xiphinema pachtaicum, Longidorus vineacola and Paralongidorus litoralis were sequenced in this study. The four circular mt genomes have an estimated size of 12.6, 12.5, 13.5 and 12.7 kb, respectively. Up to date, the mt genome of X. pachtaicum is the smallest genome found in Nematoda. The four mt genomes contain 12 protein-coding genes (viz. cox1-3, nad1-6, nad4L, atp6 and cob) and two ribosomal RNA genes (rrnL and rrnS), but the atp8 gene was not detected. These mt genomes showed a gene arrangement very different within the Longidoridae species sequenced, with the exception of very closely related species (X. americanum and X. rivesi). The sizes of non-coding regions in the Longidoridae nematodes were very small and were present in a few places in the mt genome. Phylogenetic analysis of all coding genes showed a closer relationship between Longidorus and Paralongidorus and different phylogenetic possibilities for the three Xiphinema species.

  16. The mitochondrial genome from the thermal dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Maria Angélica G; Tambor, José Humberto M; Nobrega, Francisco G

    2007-07-01

    We present here the sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of the pathogenic thermodimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, agent of an endemic disease in most South American countries. The sequenced genome has 71 334 bp and is organized as a circular molecule with two gaps of unknown size flanking the middle exon of the nad5 gene. We located genes coding for the three subunits of the ATP synthase (atp6, atp8 and atp9), the apocytochrome b (cob), three subunits of the cytochrome c oxidase enzyme complex (cox1, cox2 and cox3), seven subunits of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ubiquinone oxidoreductase (nad1, nad2, nad3, nad4, nad5, nad6 and nad4L) and the large (rnl) and small (rns) subunits of ribosomal RNA. Two maturases and a ribosomal protein (rms5) are located inside introns. Twenty-five tRNAs were identified with acceptors for all 20 amino acids. Seven polypurine/polypyrimidine tracts (140-240 bp) have been found in this genome. All genes are in the same orientation over the genome, while their order is closest to the mitochondrial genomes from Penicillium marneffei and Aspergillus nidulans.

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome sequences of three bats species and whole genome mitochondrial analyses reveal patterns of codon bias and lend support to a basal split in Chiroptera.

    PubMed

    Meganathan, P R; Pagan, Heidi J T; McCulloch, Eve S; Stevens, Richard D; Ray, David A

    2012-01-15

    Order Chiroptera is a unique group of mammals whose members have attained self-powered flight as their main mode of locomotion. Much speculation persists regarding bat evolution; however, lack of sufficient molecular data hampers evolutionary and conservation studies. Of ~1200 species, complete mitochondrial genome sequences are available for only eleven. Additional sequences should be generated if we are to resolve many questions concerning these fascinating mammals. Herein, we describe the complete mitochondrial genomes of three bats: Corynorhinus rafinesquii, Lasiurus borealis and Artibeus lituratus. We also compare the currently available mitochondrial genomes and analyze codon usage in Chiroptera. C. rafinesquii, L. borealis and A. lituratus mitochondrial genomes are 16438 bp, 17048 bp and 16709 bp, respectively. Genome organization and gene arrangements are similar to other bats. Phylogenetic analyses using complete mitochondrial genome sequences support previously established phylogenetic relationships and suggest utility in future studies focusing on the evolutionary aspects of these species. Comprehensive analyses of available bat mitochondrial genomes reveal distinct nucleotide patterns and synonymous codon preferences corresponding to different chiropteran families. These patterns suggest that mutational and selection forces are acting to different extents within Chiroptera and shape their mitochondrial genomes.

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Hoffmann's two-toed sloth (Choloepus hoffmanni).

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaolei; Chen, Lingyun; Chen, Xi; Jia, Huijue

    2016-09-01

    The Hoffmann's two-toed sloth (Choloepus hoffmanni), a member of Folivora suborder, is found in the rainforest canopy of South America. Both the Hoffmann's two-toed sloth and human belong to Eutheria subclass. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of C. hoffmanni is reported . The whole mitochondrial genome is 16 466 bp in length, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 2 ribosomal RNA genes. Comparison between the mitochondrial genome of the C. hoffmanni and that of its congener Choloepus didactylus revealed a high similarity in their gene sequences. We also constructed a phylogenetic tree on the complete mitochondrial genomes of these two species and other 14 closely related species to show their phylogenic relationship. To conclude, we analyzed the complete mitochondrial genome of C. hoffmanni and its phylogenic relationship with other related species, which would facilitate our understanding of the evolution of eutherian mitochondrial genome.

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to nuclear genome instability: A link through iron-sulfur clusters

    PubMed Central

    Veatch, Joshua R.; McMurray, Michael A.; Nelson, Zara W.; Gottschling, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Mutations and deletions in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA), as well as instability of the nuclear genome, are involved in multiple human diseases. Here we report that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, loss of mtDNA leads to nuclear genome instability, through a process of cell cycle arrest and selection we define as a cellular crisis. This crisis is not mediated by the absence of respiration, but instead correlates with a reduction in the mitochondrial membrane potential. Analysis of cells undergoing this crisis identified a defect in iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) biogenesis, which requires normal mitochondrial function. We found that down-regulation of non-mitochondrial ISC protein biogenesis was sufficient to cause increased genomic instability in cells with intact mitochondrial function. These results suggest mitochondrial dysfunction stimulates nuclear genome instability by inhibiting the production of ISC-containing protein(s), which are required for maintenance of nuclear genome integrity. PMID:19563757

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of the three-spot seahorse, Hippocampus trimaculatus (Teleostei, Syngnathidae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Liao, Yun-Chih

    2013-12-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the three-spot seahorse was sequenced using a polymerase chain reaction-based method. The total length of mitochondrial DNA is 16,535 bp and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and a control region. The mitochondrial gene order of the three-spot seahorse also conforms to the distinctive vertebrate mitochondrial gene order. The base composition of the genome is A (32.7%), T (29.3%), C (23.4%), and G (14.6%) with an A + T-rich hallmark as that of other vertebrate mitochondrial genomes.

  1. Complete mitochondrial genome of Goniurosaurus luii (Squamata, Eublepharidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Min; Hou, Li-Xia; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Dan-Ni; Liu, Yu-Jie; Qin, Xin-Min

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Goniurosaurus luii has been determined in the present paper. The genome was 16,519 bp in length and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and 1 control region (CR). Its gene composition and order was similar to most other Squamate reptiles. The overall base composition of the genome in descending order was 34.11% A, 26. 01% C, 27.43% T, and 12.45% G, with a slight AT bias of 61.54%. CR was located between the tRNA-Pro and tRNA-Phe genes and was 1147 bp in length, some tandem repeat sequences and conserved elements (CSB2-3) were found in the control region.

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of domestic sheep, Ovis aries.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-di; Gao, Li-zhi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report a complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence of the Texel ewe, Ovis aries. The total genome is 16,615 bp in length and its overall base composition was estimated to be 33.68% for A, 27.36% for T, 25.86% for C, and 13.10% for G indicating an AT-rich (61.04%) feature in the O. aries mtgenome. It contains a total of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and a control region (D-loop region). Comparisons with other publicly available sheep mitogenomes revealed a bunch of nucleotide diversity. This complete mitgenome sequence would enlarge useful genomic information for further studies on sheep evolution and domestication that will enhance germplasm conservation and breeding programs of O. aries.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of diprotodontian marsupials based on complete mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Munemasa, Maruo; Nikaido, Masato; Donnellan, Stephen; Austin, Christopher C; Okada, Norihiro; Hasegawa, Masami

    2006-06-01

    Australidelphia is the cohort, originally named by Szalay, of all Australian marsupials and the South American Dromiciops. A lot of mitochondria and nuclear genome studies support the hypothesis of a monophyly of Australidelphia, but some familial relationships in Australidelphia are still unclear. In particular, the familial relationships among the order Diprotodontia (koala, wombat, kangaroos and possums) are ambiguous. These Diprotodontian families are largely grouped into two suborders, Vombatiformes, which contains Phascolarctidae (koala) and Vombatidae (wombat), and Phalangerida, which contains Macropodidae, Potoroidae, Phalangeridae, Petauridae, Pseudocheiridae, Acrobatidae, Tarsipedidae and Burramyidae. Morphological evidence and some molecular analyses strongly support monophyly of the two families in Vombatiformes. The monophyly of Phalangerida as well as the phylogenetic relationships of families in Phalangerida remains uncertain, however, despite searches for morphological synapomorphy and mitochondrial DNA sequence analyses. Moreover, phylogenetic relationships among possum families (Phalangeridae, Petauridae, Pseudocheiridae, Acrobatidae, Tarsipedidae and Burramyidae) as well as a sister group of Macropodoidea (Macropodidae and Potoroidae) remain unclear. To evaluate familial relationships among Dromiciops and Australian marsupials as well as the familial relationships in Diprotodontia, we determined the complete mitochondrial sequence of six Diprotodontian species. We used Maximum Likelihood analyses with concatenated amino acid and codon sequences of 12 mitochondrial protein genomes. Our analysis of mitochondria amino acid sequence supports monophyly of Australian marsupials+Dromiciops and monophyly of Phalangerida. The close relatedness between Macropodidae and Phalangeridae is also weakly supported by our analysis.

  4. Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Echinostoma hortense (Digenea: Echinostomatidae)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ze-Xuan; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yu-Ting; Chang, Qiao-Cheng; Su, Xin; Fu, Xue; Yue, Dong-Mei; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Chun-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Echinostoma hortense (Digenea: Echinostomatidae) is one of the intestinal flukes with medical importance in humans. However, the mitochondrial (mt) genome of this fluke has not been known yet. The present study has determined the complete mt genome sequences of E. hortense and assessed the phylogenetic relationships with other digenean species for which the complete mt genome sequences are available in GenBank using concatenated amino acid sequences inferred from 12 protein-coding genes. The mt genome of E. hortense contained 12 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 1 non-coding region. The length of the mt genome of E. hortense was 14,994 bp, which was somewhat smaller than those of other trematode species. Phylogenetic analyses based on concatenated nucleotide sequence datasets for all 12 protein-coding genes using maximum parsimony (MP) method showed that E. hortense and Hypoderaeum conoideum gathered together, and they were closer to each other than to Fasciolidae and other echinostomatid trematodes. The availability of the complete mt genome sequences of E. hortense provides important genetic markers for diagnostics, population genetics, and evolutionary studies of digeneans. PMID:27180575

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome of the medicinal fungus Ophiocordyceps sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Hu, Xiao-Di; Yang, Rui-Heng; Hsiang, Tom; Wang, Ke; Liang, De-Quan; Liang, Fan; Cao, De-Ming; Zhou, Fan; Wen, Ge; Yao, Yi-Jian

    2015-01-01

    As part of a genome sequencing project for Ophiocordyceps sinensis, strain 1229, a complete mitochondrial (mt) genome was assembled as a single circular dsDNA of 157,510 bp, one of the largest reported for fungi. Conserved genes including the large and small rRNA subunits, 27 tRNA and 15 protein-coding genes, were identified. In addition, 58 non-conserved open reading frames (ncORFs) in the intergenic and intronic regions were also identified. Transcription analyses using RNA-Seq validated the expression of most conserved genes and ncORFs. Fifty-two introns (groups I and II) were found within conserved genes, accounting for 68.5% of the genome. Thirty-two homing endonucleases (HEs) with motif patterns LAGLIDADG (21) and GIY-YIG (11) were identified in group I introns. The ncORFs found in group II introns mostly encoded reverse transcriptases (RTs). As in other hypocrealean fungi, gene contents and order were found to be conserved in the mt genome of O. sinensis, but the genome size was enlarged by longer intergenic regions and numerous introns. Intergenic and intronic regions were composed of abundant repetitive sequences usually associated with mobile elements. It is likely that intronic ncORFs, which encode RTs and HEs, may have contributed to the enlarged mt genome of O. sinensis. PMID:26370521

  6. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Asian golden cat, Catopuma temminckii.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kui-Hua; Deng, Jia-Bo; Yu, Jian-Qiu; Cai, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Yu-Liang; Peng, Rui

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the mitochondrial genome of Asian golden cat (Catopuma temminckii) is sequenced. The mitochondrial genome was 16,985 bp long, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 1 control region and 1 origin of light-strand replication. The overall base composition of the mitochondrial genome was 32.76% A, 27.49 % T, 25.75 % C, and 13.99 % G. The complete mitochondrial genome of Catopuma temminckii could contribute to understanding taxonomic status and phylogenetic relationship of genus Catopuma.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of Hydra vulgaris (Hydroida: Hydridae).

    PubMed

    Pan, Hong-Chun; Fang, Hong-Yan; Li, Shi-Wei; Liu, Jun-Hong; Wang, Ying; Wang, An-Tai

    2014-12-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Hydra vulgaris (Hydroida: Hydridae) is composed of two linear DNA molecules. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule 1 is 8010 bp long and contains six protein-coding genes, large subunit rRNA, methionine and tryptophan tRNAs, two pseudogenes consisting respectively of a partial copy of COI, and terminal sequences at two ends of the linear mtDNA, while the mtDNA molecule 2 is 7576 bp long and contains seven protein-coding genes, small subunit rRNA, methionine tRNA, a pseudogene consisting of a partial copy of COI and terminal sequences at two ends of the linear mtDNA. COI gene begins with GTG as start codon, whereas other 12 protein-coding genes start with a typical ATG initiation codon. In addition, all protein-coding genes are terminated with TAA as stop codon.

  8. The complete mitochondrial genome of Acanthosaura lepidogaster (Squamata: Agamidae).

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiu-Li; Du, Yu; Yao, Yun-Tao; Lin, Chi-Xian; Lin, Long-Hui

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we report the complete mitochondrial genome of Acanthosaura lepidogaster (Squamata, Agamidae), which is a circular molecule of 16 899 bp in size and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs, and a control region. The overall base composition is as follows: T (22.8%), C (30.5%), A (32.3%), and G (14.4%). We constructed a phylogeny that included for 10 species of Leiolepidinae lizards and one outgroup Leiocephalus personatus constructed in BEAST, based on 15 mitochondrial genes (12S, 16S, ND1, ND2, COI, COII, ATP8, ATP6, COIII, ND3, ND4L, ND4, ND5, ND6, and cytochrome b). The topology of the phylogenetic tree is broadly similar to that mentioned by Pyron et al.

  9. The mitochondrial genome of Pomacea maculata (Gastropoda: Ampullariidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Qianqian; Liu, Suwen; Song, Fan; Li, Hu; Liu, Jinpeng; Liu, Guangfu; Yu, Xiaoping

    2016-07-01

    The golden apple snail, Pomacea maculata Perry, 1810 (Gastropoda: Ampullariidae) is one of the most serious invasive alien species from the native range of South America. The mitochondrial genome of P. maculata (15 516 bp) consists of 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes, two rRNAs, and 22 tRNAs) and a non-coding region with a 16 bp repeat unit. Most mitochondrial genes of P. maculata are distributed on the H-strand, except eight tRNA genes, which are encoded on the L-strand. A phylogenetic analysis showed that there was a close relationship between P. maculata and another invasive golden apple snail species, Pomacea canaliculata (Lamarck, 1822).

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of Parara guttata (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae).

    PubMed

    Shao, Lili; Sun, QianQian; Hao, JiaSheng

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Parara guttata (Hesperiidae: Hesperiinae) is a circular molecule of 15,441 bp in length, containing 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes: 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs and a non-coding AT-rich region. Its gene order and arrangement are identical to the common type found in most lepidopteran mitogenomes. All PCGs start with a typical ATN codon except for COI and ND1 which use CGA and GTG as their start codons, respectively. Some PCGs harbor TAG (ND1) or incomplete termination codon T (COI, COII, ND5, ND4), while others use standard TAA as their termination codons. The 411-bp long AT-rich region contains a conserved motif ATAGA followed by a 19-bp poly-T stretch and a microsatellite-like (TA)5 element preceded by the ATTTA motif.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis).

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaolin; Tian, Hua; Zhu, Bin; Chang, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis) was determined by direct sequencing of PCR products. The Chinese sturgeon mitochondrial DNA is a circular molecule (16,688 bp in length) with the typical gene arrangement of vertebrate mtDNA, containing 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA and 22 transfer RNA genes, and a non-coding control region. Its control region contains 4.5 copies of unit with 82 bp long at 5' end, which has been reported before for this species. Phylogenetic tree based on 13 protein-coding genes confirmed that the complete mtDNA sequence of Chinese sturgeon was reported here for the first time.

  12. Mitochondrial genome inheritance and replacement in the human germline.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Don P; Hayama, Tomonari; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2017-08-01

    Mitochondria, the ubiquitous power packs in nearly every eukaryotic cell, contain their own DNA, known as mtDNA, which is inherited exclusively from the mother. The number of mitochondrial genomes varies depending on the cell's energy needs. The mature oocyte contains the highest number of mitochondria of any cell type, although there is little if any mtDNA replication after fertilization until the embryo implants. This has potential repercussions for mitochondrial replacement therapy (MRT; see description of currently employed methods below) used to prevent the transmission of mtDNA-based disorders. If only a few mitochondria with defective mtDNA are left in the embryo and undergo extensive replication, it might therefore thwart the purpose of MRT In order to improve the safety and efficacy of this experimental therapy, we need a better understanding of how and which mtDNA is tagged for replication versus transcription after fertilization of the oocyte. © 2017 The Authors.

  13. The evolutionary processes of mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes differ from those of nuclear genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpelainen, Helena

    2004-11-01

    This paper first introduces our present knowledge of the origin of mitochondria and chloroplasts, and the organization and inheritance patterns of their genomes, and then carries on to review the evolutionary processes influencing mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes. The differences in evolutionary phenomena between the nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes are highlighted. It is emphasized that varying inheritance patterns and copy numbers among different types of genomes, and the potential advantage achieved through the transfer of many cytoplasmic genes to the nucleus, have important implications for the evolution of nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes. Cytoplasmic genes transferred to the nucleus have joined the more strictly controlled genetic system of the nuclear genome, including also sexual recombination, while genes retained within the cytoplasmic organelles can be involved in selection and drift processes both within and among individuals. Within-individual processes can be either intra- or intercellular. In the case of heteroplasmy, which is attributed to mutations or biparental inheritance, within-individual selection on cytoplasmic DNA may provide a mechanism by which the organism can adapt rapidly. The inheritance of cytoplasmic genomes is not universally maternal. The presence of a range of inheritance patterns indicates that different strategies have been adopted by different organisms. On the other hand, the variability occasionally observed in the inheritance mechanisms of cytoplasmic genomes reduces heritability and increases environmental components in phenotypic features and, consequently, decreases the potential for adaptive evolution.

  14. Evolution of linear mitochondrial genomes in medusozoan cnidarians.

    PubMed

    Kayal, Ehsan; Bentlage, Bastian; Collins, Allen G; Kayal, Mohsen; Pirro, Stacy; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2012-01-01

    In nearly all animals, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) consists of a single circular molecule that encodes several subunits of the protein complexes involved in oxidative phosphorylation as well as part of the machinery for their expression. By contrast, mtDNA in species belonging to Medusozoa (one of the two major lineages in the phylum Cnidaria) comprises one to several linear molecules. Many questions remain on the ubiquity of linear mtDNA in medusozoans and the mechanisms responsible for its evolution, replication, and transcription. To address some of these questions, we determined the sequences of nearly complete linear mtDNA from 24 species representing all four medusozoan classes: Cubozoa, Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa, and Staurozoa. All newly determined medusozoan mitochondrial genomes harbor the 17 genes typical for cnidarians and map as linear molecules with a high degree of gene order conservation relative to the anthozoans. In addition, two open reading frames (ORFs), polB and ORF314, are identified in cubozoan, schyphozoan, staurozoan, and trachyline hydrozoan mtDNA. polB belongs to the B-type DNA polymerase gene family, while the product of ORF314 may act as a terminal protein that binds telomeres. We posit that these two ORFs are remnants of a linear plasmid that invaded the mitochondrial genomes of the last common ancestor of Medusozoa and are responsible for its linearity. Hydroidolinan hydrozoans have lost the two ORFs and instead have duplicated cox1 at each end of their mitochondrial chromosome(s). Fragmentation of mtDNA occurred independently in Cubozoa and Hydridae (Hydrozoa, Hydroidolina). Our broad sampling allows us to reconstruct the evolutionary history of linear mtDNA in medusozoans.

  15. Evolution of Linear Mitochondrial Genomes in Medusozoan Cnidarians

    PubMed Central

    Kayal, Ehsan; Bentlage, Bastian; Collins, Allen G.; Pirro, Stacy; Lavrov, Dennis V.

    2012-01-01

    In nearly all animals, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) consists of a single circular molecule that encodes several subunits of the protein complexes involved in oxidative phosphorylation as well as part of the machinery for their expression. By contrast, mtDNA in species belonging to Medusozoa (one of the two major lineages in the phylum Cnidaria) comprises one to several linear molecules. Many questions remain on the ubiquity of linear mtDNA in medusozoans and the mechanisms responsible for its evolution, replication, and transcription. To address some of these questions, we determined the sequences of nearly complete linear mtDNA from 24 species representing all four medusozoan classes: Cubozoa, Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa, and Staurozoa. All newly determined medusozoan mitochondrial genomes harbor the 17 genes typical for cnidarians and map as linear molecules with a high degree of gene order conservation relative to the anthozoans. In addition, two open reading frames (ORFs), polB and ORF314, are identified in cubozoan, schyphozoan, staurozoan, and trachyline hydrozoan mtDNA. polB belongs to the B-type DNA polymerase gene family, while the product of ORF314 may act as a terminal protein that binds telomeres. We posit that these two ORFs are remnants of a linear plasmid that invaded the mitochondrial genomes of the last common ancestor of Medusozoa and are responsible for its linearity. Hydroidolinan hydrozoans have lost the two ORFs and instead have duplicated cox1 at each end of their mitochondrial chromosome(s). Fragmentation of mtDNA occurred independently in Cubozoa and Hydridae (Hydrozoa, Hydroidolina). Our broad sampling allows us to reconstruct the evolutionary history of linear mtDNA in medusozoans. PMID:22113796

  16. Preliminary analysis of the mitochondrial genome evolutionary pattern in primates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Xingtao; Tao, Xingkui; Wang, Weiwei; Li, Ming

    2012-08-01

    Since the birth of molecular evolutionary analysis, primates have been a central focus of study and mitochondrial DNA is well suited to these endeavors because of its unique features. Surprisingly, to date no comprehensive evaluation of the nucleotide substitution patterns has been conducted on the mitochondrial genome of primates. Here, we analyzed the evolutionary patterns and evaluated selection and recombination in the mitochondrial genomes of 44 Primates species downloaded from GenBank. The results revealed that a strong rate heterogeneity occurred among sites and genes in all comparisons. Likewise, an obvious decline in primate nucleotide diversity was noted in the subunit rRNAs and tRNAs as compared to the protein-coding genes. Within 13 protein-coding genes, the pattern of nonsynonymous divergence was similar to that of overall nucleotide divergence, while synonymous changes differed only for individual genes, indicating that the rate heterogeneity may result from the rate of change at nonsynonymous sites. Codon usage analysis revealed that there was intermediate codon usage bias in primate protein-coding genes, and supported the idea that GC mutation pressure might determine codon usage and that positive selection is not the driving force for the codon usage bias. Neutrality tests using site-specific positive selection from a Bayesian framework indicated no sites were under positive selection for any gene, consistent with near neutrality. Recombination tests based on the pairwise homoplasy test statistic supported complete linkage even for much older divergent primate species. Thus, with the exception of rate heterogeneity among mitochondrial genes, evaluating the validity assumed complete linkage and selective neutrality in primates prior to phylogenetic or phylogeographic analysis seems unnecessary.

  17. The complete mitochondrial genome of Schizothorax pseudaksaiensis (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Bao, Mingming; Zhang, Xiujie; Xie, Congxin; Wan, Shiming; Cai, Lingang; Zhou, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Schizothorax pseudaksaiensis was cloned and sequenced in the present study. The genome was 16,582 bp in size, which had a mostly conserved structural organization in comparison with that of other teleost fish. It consisted of 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 2 ribosomal RNA genes), and 2 main non-coding regions (the control region and the origin of the light strand replication). All protein-coding genes started with ATG except for COX1, which began with GTG. However, the termination codons of 13 protein-coding genes varied with TAA, TA, T or TAG. The overall base composition of S. pseudaksaiensis in descending order was A 30.18%, C 27.08%, T 25.37% and G 17.37%, with a slight A + T bias. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence may provide useful information for phylogenetic analysis and studies of population genetics of S. pseudaksaiensis.

  18. Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Anoplocephala magna Solidifying the Species

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Aijiang

    2016-01-01

    The 2 species of the genus Anoplocephala (Anoplocephalidae), A. perfoliata and A. magna, are among the most important equine cestode parasites. However, there is little information about their differences at the molecular level. The present study revealed that the mitochondrial (mt) genome of A. magna was 13,759 bp in size and 700 bp shorter than that of A. perfoliata. The 2 species includes 2 rRNA, 22 tRNA, and 12 protein-coding genes each. The size of each of the 36 genes was the same as that of A. perfoliata, except for cox1, rrnL, trnC, trnS2(UCN), trnG, trnH, trnQ, and trnP. In the full mitochondrial genome, the sequence similarity was 87.1%. The divergence in the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of individual protein-coding genes ranged from 11.1% to 16% and 6.8% to 16.4%, respectively. The 2 noncoding regions of the mt genome of A. magna were 199 bp and 271 bp in length, while the equivalent regions in A. perfoliata were 875 bp and 276 bp, respectively. The results of this study support the proposal that A. magna and A. perfoliata are separate species, consistent with previous morphological analyses. PMID:27417096

  19. Mitochondrial and Nuclear Genomic Responses to Loss of LRPPRC Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Gohil, Vishal M.; Nilsson, Roland; Belcher-Timme, Casey A.; Luo, Biao; Root, David E.; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid advances in genotyping and sequencing technology have dramatically accelerated the discovery of genes underlying human disease. Elucidating the function of such genes and understanding their role in pathogenesis, however, remain challenging. Here, we introduce a genomic strategy to characterize such genes functionally, and we apply it to LRPPRC, a poorly studied gene that is mutated in Leigh syndrome, French-Canadian type (LSFC). We utilize RNA interference to engineer an allelic series of cellular models in which LRPPRC has been stably silenced to different levels of knockdown efficiency. We then combine genome-wide expression profiling with gene set enrichment analysis to identify cellular responses that correlate with the loss of LRPPRC. Using this strategy, we discovered a specific role for LRPPRC in the expression of all mitochondrial DNA-encoded mRNAs, but not the rRNAs, providing mechanistic insights into the enzymatic defects observed in the disease. Our analysis shows that nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins are not collectively affected by the loss of LRPPRC. We do observe altered expression of genes related to hexose metabolism, prostaglandin synthesis, and glycosphingolipid biology that may either play an adaptive role in cell survival or contribute to pathogenesis. The combination of genetic perturbation, genomic profiling, and pathway analysis represents a generic strategy for understanding disease pathogenesis. PMID:20220140

  20. Comparative Mitochondrial Genome Analysis of Eligma narcissus and other Lepidopteran Insects Reveals Conserved Mitochondrial Genome Organization and Phylogenetic Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Li-Shang; Zhu, Bao-Jian; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Cong-Fen; Liu, Chao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Eligma narcissus and compared it with 18 other lepidopteran species. The mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) was a circular molecule of 15,376 bp containing 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, two ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and an adenine (A) + thymine (T) − rich region. The positive AT skew (0.007) indicated the occurrence of more As than Ts. The arrangement of 13 PCGs was similar to that of other sequenced lepidopterans. All PCGs were initiated by ATN codons, except for the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene, which was initiated by the CGA sequence, as observed in other lepidopterans. The results of the codon usage analysis indicated that Asn, Ile, Leu, Tyr and Phe were the five most frequent amino acids. All tRNA genes were shown to be folded into the expected typical cloverleaf structure observed for mitochondrial tRNA genes. Phylogenetic relationships were analyzed based on the nucleotide sequences of 13 PCGs from other insect mitogenomes, which confirmed that E. narcissus is a member of the Noctuidae superfamily. PMID:27222440

  1. Comparative Mitochondrial Genome Analysis of Eligma narcissus and other Lepidopteran Insects Reveals Conserved Mitochondrial Genome Organization and Phylogenetic Relationships.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li-Shang; Zhu, Bao-Jian; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Cong-Fen; Liu, Chao-Liang

    2016-05-25

    In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Eligma narcissus and compared it with 18 other lepidopteran species. The mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) was a circular molecule of 15,376 bp containing 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, two ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and an adenine (A) + thymine (T) - rich region. The positive AT skew (0.007) indicated the occurrence of more As than Ts. The arrangement of 13 PCGs was similar to that of other sequenced lepidopterans. All PCGs were initiated by ATN codons, except for the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene, which was initiated by the CGA sequence, as observed in other lepidopterans. The results of the codon usage analysis indicated that Asn, Ile, Leu, Tyr and Phe were the five most frequent amino acids. All tRNA genes were shown to be folded into the expected typical cloverleaf structure observed for mitochondrial tRNA genes. Phylogenetic relationships were analyzed based on the nucleotide sequences of 13 PCGs from other insect mitogenomes, which confirmed that E. narcissus is a member of the Noctuidae superfamily.

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Mitochondrial Genomes in Eustigmatophyte Algae

    PubMed Central

    Ševčíková, Tereza; Klimeš, Vladimír; Zbránková, Veronika; Strnad, Hynek; Hroudová, Miluše; Vlček, Čestmír; Eliáš, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Eustigmatophyceae (Ochrophyta, Stramenopiles) is a small algal group with species of the genus Nannochloropsis being its best studied representatives. Nuclear and organellar genomes have been recently sequenced for several Nannochloropsis spp., but phylogenetically wider genomic studies are missing for eustigmatophytes. We sequenced mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of three species representing most major eustigmatophyte lineages, Monodopsis sp. MarTras21, Vischeria sp. CAUP Q 202 and Trachydiscus minutus, and carried out their comparative analysis in the context of available data from Nannochloropsis and other stramenopiles, revealing a number of noticeable findings. First, mitogenomes of most eustigmatophytes are highly collinear and similar in the gene content, but extensive rearrangements and loss of three otherwise ubiquitous genes happened in the Vischeria lineage; this correlates with an accelerated evolution of mitochondrial gene sequences in this lineage. Second, eustigmatophytes appear to be the only ochrophyte group with the Atp1 protein encoded by the mitogenome. Third, eustigmatophyte mitogenomes uniquely share a truncated nad11 gene encoding only the C-terminal part of the Nad11 protein, while the N-terminal part is encoded by a separate gene in the nuclear genome. Fourth, UGA as a termination codon and the cognate release factor mRF2 were lost from mitochondria independently by the Nannochloropsis and T. minutus lineages. Finally, the rps3 gene in the mitogenome of Vischeria sp. is interrupted by the UAG codon, but the genome includes a gene for an unusual tRNA with an extended anticodon loop that we speculate may serve as a suppressor tRNA to properly decode the rps3 gene. PMID:26872774

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome structure of snow leopard Panthera uncia.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lei; Wu, Xiaobing; Jiang, Zhigang

    2009-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) of snow leopard Panthera uncia was obtained by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique based on the PCR fragments of 30 primers we designed. The entire mtDNA sequence was 16 773 base pairs (bp) in length, and the base composition was: A-5,357 bp (31.9%); C-4,444 bp (26.5%); G-2,428 bp (14.5%); T-4,544 bp (27.1%). The structural characteristics [0] of the P. uncia mitochondrial genome were highly similar to these of Felis catus, Acinonyx jubatus, Neofelis nebulosa and other mammals. However, we found several distinctive features of the mitochondrial genome of Panthera unica. First, the termination codon of COIII was TAA, which differed from those of F. catus, A. jubatus and N. nebulosa. Second, tRNA(Ser) ((AGY)), which lacked the ''DHU'' arm, could not be folded into the typical cloverleaf-shaped structure. Third, in the control region, a long repetitive sequence in RS-2 (32 bp) region was found with 2 repeats while one short repetitive segment (9 bp) was found with 15 repeats in the RS-3 region. We performed phylogenetic analysis based on a 3 816 bp concatenated sequence of 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, ND2, ND4, ND5, Cyt b and ATP8 for P. uncia and other related species, the result indicated that P. uncia and P. leo were the sister species, which was different from the previous findings.

  4. A Comprehensive Characterization of Mitochondrial Genome in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xingyun; Wang, Weibin; Ruan, Guodong; Liang, Min; Zheng, Jing; Chen, Ye; Wu, Huiling; Fahey, Thomas J.; Guan, Minxin; Teng, Lisong

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear genetic alterations have been widely investigated in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), however, the characteristics of the mitochondrial genome remain uncertain. We sequenced the entire mitochondrial genome of 66 PTCs, 16 normal thyroid tissues and 376 blood samples of healthy individuals. There were 2508 variations (543 sites) detected in PTCs, among which 33 variations were novel. Nearly half of the PTCs (31/66) had heteroplasmic variations. Among the 31 PTCs, 28 specimens harbored a total of 52 somatic mutations distributed in 44 sites. Thirty-three variations including seven nonsense, 11 frameshift and 15 non-synonymous variations selected by bioinformatic software were regarded as pathogenic. These 33 pathogenic mutations were associated with older age (p = 0.0176) and advanced tumor stage (p = 0.0218). In addition, they tended to be novel (p = 0.0003), heteroplasmic (p = 0.0343) and somatic (p = 0.0018). The mtDNA copy number increased in more than two-third (46/66) of PTCs, and the average content in tumors was nearly four times higher than that in adjacent normal tissues (p < 0.0001). Three sub-haplogroups of N (A4, B4a and B4g) and eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms (mtSNPs) (A16164G, C16266T, G5460A, T6680C, G9123A, A14587G, T16362C, and G709A) were associated with the occurrence of PTC. Here we report a comprehensive characterization of the mitochondrial genome and demonstrate its significance in pathogenesis and progression of PTC. This can help to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying PTC and offer potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for future clinical practice. PMID:27735863

  5. A Comprehensive Characterization of Mitochondrial Genome in Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Su, Xingyun; Wang, Weibin; Ruan, Guodong; Liang, Min; Zheng, Jing; Chen, Ye; Wu, Huiling; Fahey, Thomas J; Guan, Minxin; Teng, Lisong

    2016-10-10

    Nuclear genetic alterations have been widely investigated in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), however, the characteristics of the mitochondrial genome remain uncertain. We sequenced the entire mitochondrial genome of 66 PTCs, 16 normal thyroid tissues and 376 blood samples of healthy individuals. There were 2508 variations (543 sites) detected in PTCs, among which 33 variations were novel. Nearly half of the PTCs (31/66) had heteroplasmic variations. Among the 31 PTCs, 28 specimens harbored a total of 52 somatic mutations distributed in 44 sites. Thirty-three variations including seven nonsense, 11 frameshift and 15 non-synonymous variations selected by bioinformatic software were regarded as pathogenic. These 33 pathogenic mutations were associated with older age (p = 0.0176) and advanced tumor stage (p = 0.0218). In addition, they tended to be novel (p = 0.0003), heteroplasmic (p = 0.0343) and somatic (p = 0.0018). The mtDNA copy number increased in more than two-third (46/66) of PTCs, and the average content in tumors was nearly four times higher than that in adjacent normal tissues (p < 0.0001). Three sub-haplogroups of N (A4, B4a and B4g) and eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms (mtSNPs) (A16164G, C16266T, G5460A, T6680C, G9123A, A14587G, T16362C, and G709A) were associated with the occurrence of PTC. Here we report a comprehensive characterization of the mitochondrial genome and demonstrate its significance in pathogenesis and progression of PTC. This can help to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying PTC and offer potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for future clinical practice.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the hornwort Phaeoceros laevis: retention of many ancient pseudogenes and conservative evolution of mitochondrial genomes in hornworts.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jia-Yu; Liu, Yang; Li, Libo; Wang, Bin; Qiu, Yin-Long

    2010-02-01

    Plants have large and complex mitochondrial genomes in comparison to other eukaryotes. In bryophytes, the mitochondrial genomes exhibit a mixed mode of conservative and dynamic evolution. Here, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome from hornwort Phaeoceros laevis, to investigate the level of conservation in mitochondrial genome evolution within hornworts. The circular molecule consists of 209,482 base pairs and represents the largest known mitochondrial genome of bryophytes. It contains 30 protein genes, 3 rRNA genes, and 21 tRNA genes, with 34 cis-spliced group II introns disrupting 16 protein genes. There are 11 pseudogenes in this genome, and nine of them are shared with the other fully sequenced hornwort chondriome from Megaceros aenigmaticus, a distant relative of P. laevis. These pseudogenes were likely formed during an early stage of hornwort evolution. The two hornwort chondriomes differ by four inversions and translocations, seven genes, and four introns in the genome structure and organization. At the sequence level, they are very similar, with the identity values ranging mostly from 80 to 95% in intergenic spacers, introns, and exons. These data indicate that mitochondrial genome evolution in hornworts is less conservative than in liverworts, but has not reached the dynamic level as seen in seed plants.

  7. Integrity of the yeast mitochondrial genome, but not its distribution and inheritance, relies on mitochondrial fission and fusion.

    PubMed

    Osman, Christof; Noriega, Thomas R; Okreglak, Voytek; Fung, Jennifer C; Walter, Peter

    2015-03-03

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for mitochondrial and cellular function. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mtDNA is organized in nucleoprotein structures termed nucleoids, which are distributed throughout the mitochondrial network and are faithfully inherited during the cell cycle. How the cell distributes and inherits mtDNA is incompletely understood although an involvement of mitochondrial fission and fusion has been suggested. We developed a LacO-LacI system to noninvasively image mtDNA dynamics in living cells. Using this system, we found that nucleoids are nonrandomly spaced within the mitochondrial network and observed the spatiotemporal events involved in mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, cells deficient in mitochondrial fusion and fission distributed and inherited mtDNA normally, pointing to alternative pathways involved in these processes. We identified such a mechanism, where we observed fission-independent, but F-actin-dependent, tip generation that was linked to the positioning of mtDNA to the newly generated tip. Although mitochondrial fusion and fission were dispensable for mtDNA distribution and inheritance, we show through a combination of genetics and next-generation sequencing that their absence leads to an accumulation of mitochondrial genomes harboring deleterious structural variations that cluster at the origins of mtDNA replication, thus revealing crucial roles for mitochondrial fusion and fission in maintaining the integrity of the mitochondrial genome.

  8. Integrity of the yeast mitochondrial genome, but not its distribution and inheritance, relies on mitochondrial fission and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Christof; Noriega, Thomas R.; Okreglak, Voytek; Fung, Jennifer C.; Walter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for mitochondrial and cellular function. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mtDNA is organized in nucleoprotein structures termed nucleoids, which are distributed throughout the mitochondrial network and are faithfully inherited during the cell cycle. How the cell distributes and inherits mtDNA is incompletely understood although an involvement of mitochondrial fission and fusion has been suggested. We developed a LacO-LacI system to noninvasively image mtDNA dynamics in living cells. Using this system, we found that nucleoids are nonrandomly spaced within the mitochondrial network and observed the spatiotemporal events involved in mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, cells deficient in mitochondrial fusion and fission distributed and inherited mtDNA normally, pointing to alternative pathways involved in these processes. We identified such a mechanism, where we observed fission-independent, but F-actin–dependent, tip generation that was linked to the positioning of mtDNA to the newly generated tip. Although mitochondrial fusion and fission were dispensable for mtDNA distribution and inheritance, we show through a combination of genetics and next-generation sequencing that their absence leads to an accumulation of mitochondrial genomes harboring deleterious structural variations that cluster at the origins of mtDNA replication, thus revealing crucial roles for mitochondrial fusion and fission in maintaining the integrity of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:25730886

  9. Curation of the genome annotation of Pichia pastoris (Komagataella phaffii) CBS7435 from gene level to protein function.

    PubMed

    Valli, Minoska; Tatto, Nadine E; Peymann, Armin; Gruber, Clemens; Landes, Nils; Ekker, Heinz; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Mattanovich, Diethard; Gasser, Brigitte; Graf, Alexandra B

    2016-09-01

    As manually curated and non-automated BLAST analysis of the published Pichia pastoris genome sequences revealed many differences between the gene annotations of the strains GS115 and CBS7435, RNA-Seq analysis, supported by proteomics, was performed to improve the genome annotation. Detailed analysis of sequence alignment and protein domain predictions were made to extend the functional genome annotation to all P. pastoris sequences. This allowed the identification of 492 new ORFs, 4916 hypothetical UTRs and the correction of 341 incorrect ORF predictions, which were mainly due to the presence of upstream ATG or erroneous intron predictions. Moreover, 175 previously erroneously annotated ORFs need to be removed from the annotation. In total, we have annotated 5325 ORFs. Regarding the functionality of those genes, we improved all gene and protein descriptions. Thereby, the percentage of ORFs with functional annotation was increased from 48% to 73%. Furthermore, we defined functional groups, covering 25 biological cellular processes of interest, by grouping all genes that are part of the defined process. All data are presented in the newly launched genome browser and database available at www.pichiagenome.org In summary, we present a wide spectrum of curation of the P. pastoris genome annotation from gene level to protein function.

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the budgerigar, Melopsittacus undulatus.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiaojing; Xu, Jun; Smith, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe the budgie's mitochondrial genome sequence, a resource that can facilitate this parrot's use as a model organism as well as for determining its phylogenetic relatedness to other parrots/Psittaciformes. The estimated total length of the sequence was 18,193 bp. In addition to the to the 13 protein and tRNA and rRNA coding regions, the sequence also includes a duplicated hypervariable region, a feature unique to only a few birds. The two hypervariable regions shared a sequence identity of about 86%.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of Hylarana guentheri (Amphidia, Anura, Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyou; Li, Yongmin; Zhang, Huabin; Jiang, Zhiyong; Xue, Hui; Yan, Peng; Wu, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Hylarana guentheri was determined. This mitogenome was 19,053 bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and a control region (CR). The following three distinctive features were observed: there was an additional non-coding region of 561 bp between nad5 and nad6; four different tandem repeats were characteristic of the CR region for this species; a pseudogene of tRNA-His (trnH) was found in the CR downstream region.

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome of Hoplobatrachus rugulosus (Anura: Dicroglossidae).

    PubMed

    Yu, Danna; Zhang, Jiayong; Zheng, Rongquan; Shao, Chen

    2012-10-01

    The mitochondrial genome of Hoplobatrachus rugulosus (Anura: Dicroglossidae) is a circular molecule of 20,309 bp in length, containing 39 genes (including the extra copy of ND5 and tRNA(Met) genes). The following four distinctive features are observed: the cluster of rearranged tRNA genes (TPF tRNA gene cluster), the translocation of tRNA(Leu(CUN)) and ND5 genes, the tandem duplication of tRNA(Met) genes (Met1 and Met2), and the duplicated d-loop-ND5 regions.

  13. Characterization of complete mitochondrial genomes of indigenous Mayans in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Fuzuki; Wang, Li; Sugiyama, Saburo; Kurosaki, Kunihiko; Granados, Julio; Gomez-Trejo, Celta; Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Ueda, Shintaroh

    2017-08-22

    The authors have previously published the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequences of two indigenous Mesoamerican populations, Mazahua (n = 25) and Zapotec (n = 88). This study determined the complete mitogenome sequences of nine unrelated individuals from the indigenous Maya population living in Mexico. Their mitogenome sequences could be classified into either of the haplogroups A2 and C1. Surprisingly, there were no mitogenome sequences (haplotypes) that the Maya, Mazahua, and Zapotec people share in common. This indicates that no genetic exchange, at least matrilineally, has occurred among them.

  14. Mitochondrial Pseudogenes in the Nuclear Genomes of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Hubert H.; Griffiths-Jones, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial pseudogenes in nuclear chromosomes (numts) have been detected in the genomes of a diverse range of eukaryotic species. However, the numt content of different genomes and their properties is not uniform, and study of these differences provides insight into the mechanisms and dynamics of genome evolution in different organisms. In the genus Drosophila, numts have previously only been identified on a genome-wide scale in the melanogaster subgroup. The present study extends the identification to 11 species of the Drosophila genus. We identify a total of 302 numts and show that the numt complement is highly variable in Drosophilids, ranging from just 4 in D. melanogaster to 67 in D. willistoni, broadly correlating with genome size. Many numts have undergone large-scale rearrangements in the nucleus, including interruptions, inversions, deletions and duplications of sequence of variable size. Estimating the age of the numts in the nucleus by phylogenetic tree reconstruction reveals the vast majority of numts to be recent gains, 90% having arisen on terminal branches of the species tree. By identifying paralogs and counting duplications among the extant numts we estimate that 23% of extant numts arose through post-insertion duplications. We estimate genus average rates of insertion of 0.75 per million years, and a duplication rate of 0.010 duplications per numt per million years. PMID:22412894

  15. The whole mitochondrial genome of the Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Li, Ruilei; Wang, Huawei; Yang, Liqin; Zhang, Baoming; Li, Yijiang; Hu, Jiansheng; Kong, Qingpeng

    2015-04-01

    Macaca fascicularis, known as the long-tailed macaque, is widely distributed in southern of East Asia and Southeast Asia. It was one of the most commonly used non-human primates in biomedical research. Thus, to illustrate the maternal phylogenetic status of M. fascicularis in primates based on the whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome and determine a reference sequence for future population genetic studies by taking mtDNA as molecular marker, in this study, the high quality whole mtDNA genome of M. fascicularis was amplified and sequenced. Our data showed that the whole mtDNA genome of M. fascicularis includes 16,571 base pairs (bps). Further phylogenetic analyses of M. fascicularis were performed by incorporating the 83 available whole mtDNA genomes belonging to 77 primate species with Tupaia belangeri as out-group. Our result supported that M. fascicularis belongs to Macaca. Cercopithecinae. Cercopithecidae. Anthropoidea. Primates, which has the closest genetic affinity with Macaca mulatta. In addition, the ancestral divergence between the tarsier and other primate species was supported with evidence from the whole mtDNA genomes.

  16. Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A and Mitochondrial Genome as Molecular Targets for Cisplatin-Based Cancer Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Kimitoshi; Wang, Ke-Yong; Takahashi, Mayu; Kurita, Tomoko; Yoshida, Yoichiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Harada, Yoshikazu; Kuma, Akihiro; Izumi, Hiroto; Matsumoto, Shinji

    2015-08-20

    Mitochondria are important cellular organelles that function as control centers of the energy supply for highly proliferative cancer cells and regulate apoptosis after cancer chemotherapy. Cisplatin is one of the most important chemotherapeutic agents and a key drug in therapeutic regimens for a broad range of solid tumors. Cisplatin may directly interact with mitochondria, which can induce apoptosis. The direct interactions between cisplatin and mitochondria may account for our understanding of the clinical activity of cisplatin and development of resistance. However, the basis for the roles of mitochondria under treatment with chemotherapy is poorly understood. In this review, we present novel aspects regarding the unique characteristics of the mitochondrial genome in relation to the use of platinum-based chemotherapy and describe our recent work demonstrating the importance of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) expression in cancer cells.

  17. Rapid evolutionary divergence of Gossypium barbadense and G. hirsutum mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingyong; Chen, Zhiwen; Grover, Corrinne E; Wang, Yumei; Li, Shuangshuang; Liu, Guozheng; Ma, Zhiying; Wendel, Jonathan F; Hua, Jinping

    2015-10-12

    The mitochondrial genome from upland cotton, G. hirsutum, was previously sequenced. To elucidate the evolution of mitochondrial genomic diversity within a single genus, we sequenced the mitochondrial genome from Sea Island cotton (Gossypium barbadense L.). Mitochondrial DNA from week-old etiolated seedlings was extracted from isolated organelles using discontinuous sucrose density gradient method. Mitochondrial genome was sequenced with Solexa using paired-end, 90 bp read. The clean reads were assembled into contigs using ABySS and finished via additional fosmid and BAC sequencing. Finally, the genome was annotated and analyzed using different softwares. The G. barbadense (Sea Island cotton) mitochondrial genome was fully sequenced (677,434-bp) and compared to the mitogenome of upland cotton. The G. barbadense mitochondrial DNA contains seven more genes than that of upland cotton, with a total of 40 protein coding genes (excluding possible pseudogenes), 6 rRNA genes, and 29 tRNA genes. Of these 75 genes, atp1, mttB, nad4, nad9, rrn5, rrn18, and trnD(GTC)-cp were each represented by two identical copies. A single 64 kb repeat was largely responsible for the 9 % difference in genome size between the two mtDNAs. Comparison of genome structures between the two mitochondrial genomes revealed 8 rearranged syntenic regions and several large repeats. The largest repeat was missing from the master chromosome in G. hirsutum. Both mitochondrial genomes contain a duplicated copy of rps3 (rps3-2) in conjunction with a duplication of repeated sequences. Phylogenetic and divergence considerations suggest that a 544-bp fragment of rps3 was transferred to the nuclear genome shortly after divergence of the A- and D- genome diploid cottons. These results highlight the insights to the evolution of structural variation between Sea Island and upland cotton mitochondrial genomes.

  18. GAMOLA2, a Comprehensive Software Package for the Annotation and Curation of Draft and Complete Microbial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Altermann, Eric; Lu, Jingli; McCulloch, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Expert curated annotation remains one of the critical steps in achieving a reliable biological relevant annotation. Here we announce the release of GAMOLA2, a user friendly and comprehensive software package to process, annotate and curate draft and complete bacterial, archaeal, and viral genomes. GAMOLA2 represents a wrapping tool to combine gene model determination, functional Blast, COG, Pfam, and TIGRfam analyses with structural predictions including detection of tRNAs, rRNA genes, non-coding RNAs, signal protein cleavage sites, transmembrane helices, CRISPR repeats and vector sequence contaminations. GAMOLA2 has already been validated in a wide range of bacterial and archaeal genomes, and its modular concept allows easy addition of further functionality in future releases. A modified and adapted version of the Artemis Genome Viewer (Sanger Institute) has been developed to leverage the additional features and underlying information provided by the GAMOLA2 analysis, and is part of the software distribution. In addition to genome annotations, GAMOLA2 features, among others, supplemental modules that assist in the creation of custom Blast databases, annotation transfers between genome versions, and the preparation of Genbank files for submission via the NCBI Sequin tool. GAMOLA2 is intended to be run under a Linux environment, whereas the subsequent visualization and manual curation in Artemis is mobile and platform independent. The development of GAMOLA2 is ongoing and community driven. New functionality can easily be added upon user requests, ensuring that GAMOLA2 provides information relevant to microbiologists. The software is available free of charge for academic use. PMID:28386247

  19. GAMOLA2, a Comprehensive Software Package for the Annotation and Curation of Draft and Complete Microbial Genomes.

    PubMed

    Altermann, Eric; Lu, Jingli; McCulloch, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Expert curated annotation remains one of the critical steps in achieving a reliable biological relevant annotation. Here we announce the release of GAMOLA2, a user friendly and comprehensive software package to process, annotate and curate draft and complete bacterial, archaeal, and viral genomes. GAMOLA2 represents a wrapping tool to combine gene model determination, functional Blast, COG, Pfam, and TIGRfam analyses with structural predictions including detection of tRNAs, rRNA genes, non-coding RNAs, signal protein cleavage sites, transmembrane helices, CRISPR repeats and vector sequence contaminations. GAMOLA2 has already been validated in a wide range of bacterial and archaeal genomes, and its modular concept allows easy addition of further functionality in future releases. A modified and adapted version of the Artemis Genome Viewer (Sanger Institute) has been developed to leverage the additional features and underlying information provided by the GAMOLA2 analysis, and is part of the software distribution. In addition to genome annotations, GAMOLA2 features, among others, supplemental modules that assist in the creation of custom Blast databases, annotation transfers between genome versions, and the preparation of Genbank files for submission via the NCBI Sequin tool. GAMOLA2 is intended to be run under a Linux environment, whereas the subsequent visualization and manual curation in Artemis is mobile and platform independent. The development of GAMOLA2 is ongoing and community driven. New functionality can easily be added upon user requests, ensuring that GAMOLA2 provides information relevant to microbiologists. The software is available free of charge for academic use.

  20. Mitochondrial gene order is not conserved in arthropods: prostriate and metastriate tick mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Black, W C; Roehrdanz, R L

    1998-12-01

    The entire mitochondrial genome was sequenced in a prostriate tick, Ixodes hexagonus, and a metastriate tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Both genomes encode 22 tRNAs, 13 proteins, and two ribosomal RNAs. Prostriate ticks are basal members of Ixodidae and have the same gene order as Limulus polyphemus. In contrast, in R. sanguineus, a block of genes encoding NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1), tRNA(Leu)(UUR), tRNA(Leu)(CUN), 16S rDNA, tRNA(Val), 12S rDNA, the control region, and the tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Gln) have translocated to a position between the tRNA(Glu) and tRNA(Phe) genes. The tRNA(Cys) gene has translocated between the control region and the tRNA(Met) gene, and the tRNA(Leu)(CUN) gene has translocated between the tRNA(Ser)(UCN) gene and the control region. Furthermore, the control region is duplicated, and both copies undergo concerted evolution. Primers that flank these rearrangements confirm that this gene order is conserved in all metastriate ticks examined. Correspondence analysis of amino acid and codon use in the two ticks and in nine other arthropod mitochondrial genomes indicate a strong bias in R. sanguineus towards amino acids encoded by AT-rich codons.

  1. Determination of the melon chloroplast and mitochondrial genome sequences reveals that the largest reported mitochondrial genome in plants contains a significant amount of DNA having a nuclear origin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The melon belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family, whose economic importance among vegetable crops is second only to Solanaceae. The melon has a small genome size (454 Mb), which makes it suitable for molecular and genetic studies. Despite similar nuclear and chloroplast genome sizes, cucurbits show great variation when their mitochondrial genomes are compared. The melon possesses the largest plant mitochondrial genome, as much as eight times larger than that of other cucurbits. Results The nucleotide sequences of the melon chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes were determined. The chloroplast genome (156,017 bp) included 132 genes, with 98 single-copy genes dispersed between the small (SSC) and large (LSC) single-copy regions and 17 duplicated genes in the inverted repeat regions (IRa and IRb). A comparison of the cucumber and melon chloroplast genomes showed differences in only approximately 5% of nucleotides, mainly due to short indels and SNPs. Additionally, 2.74 Mb of mitochondrial sequence, accounting for 95% of the estimated mitochondrial genome size, were assembled into five scaffolds and four additional unscaffolded contigs. An 84% of the mitochondrial genome is contained in a single scaffold. The gene-coding region accounted for 1.7% (45,926 bp) of the total sequence, including 51 protein-coding genes, 4 conserved ORFs, 3 rRNA genes and 24 tRNA genes. Despite the differences observed in the mitochondrial genome sizes of cucurbit species, Citrullus lanatus (379 kb), Cucurbita pepo (983 kb) and Cucumis melo (2,740 kb) share 120 kb of sequence, including the predicted protein-coding regions. Nevertheless, melon contained a high number of repetitive sequences and a high content of DNA of nuclear origin, which represented 42% and 47% of the total sequence, respectively. Conclusions Whereas the size and gene organisation of chloroplast genomes are similar among the cucurbit species, mitochondrial genomes show a wide variety of sizes, with a non

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of sable, Martes zibellina.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunzhu; Zhang, Honghai; Ma, Jianzhang; Liu, Zhonghua

    2012-06-01

    The complete mitogenome sequence of the Sable (NC_011579) was determined using long PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction). The genome was 16,523 bp in length and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and 1 control region. The gene composition and order of which was similar to most other mammals. The overall base composition of the heavy strand in descending order is A (32.0%), C (27. 6%), T (25.8%) and G (14.7%). The base compositions present clearly the A-C skew, which is most obviously in the control region and protein-coding genes. The extended termination-associated sequence domain, the central conserved domain, and the conserved sequence block domain are defined in the mitochondrial genome control region of Sable. This mitogenome sequence data would play an important role in phylogenetics and systematics of Martes zibellina.

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of Glandirana tientaiensis (Ranidae, Anura).

    PubMed

    Yan, Long; Geng, Zhang-Zhen; Yan, Peng; Wu, Xiao-Bing

    2016-01-01

    The Tiantai frog (Glandirana tientaiensis) is an endemic to China, which has been listed as an endangered species in IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. In this study, the complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial genome of G. tientaiensis is determined. The circle genome is 17,681 bp and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 1 control region. Comparing with the typical mtDNA of species in the family Ranidae, no distinctive rearrangement of mtDNA genes was found. Yet a obvious feature on the use of codon were observed, that 8 of 13 protein-conding genes ended with a single stop nucleotide T except for COI, ATPase 8, ND4L, ND6 and Cyt b.

  4. Complete mitochondrial genome of Sipunculus nudus (Sipuncula, Sipunculidae).

    PubMed

    Song, Su-Xia; Ding, Shao-Xiong; Yan, Qing-Pi; Qin, Ying-Xue

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of Sipunculus nudus collected from the coast of southeast China was determined. The complete mt genome was 15,376 bp in length, including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 23 tRNA genes, and a putative control region (CR). The overall base composition of the H-strand is 29.25% A, 28.78% T, 27.19% C, and 14.78% G, with an AT content of 58.03%. The mt DNA of Chinese S. nudus shared 73.6% and 60.2% identities with that of French S. nudus (GenBank accession number: FJ42,2961) and Chinese Phascolosoma esculenta (GenBank accession number: EF58,3817), respectively.

  5. Complete Mitochondrial Genome of a Tongue Worm Armillifer agkistrodontis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; He, Fu-Nan; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Zhang, Rui-Xiang; Ren, Yi-Jing; Hu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Armillifer agkistrodontis (Ichthyostraca: Pantastomida) is a parasitic pathogen, only reported in China, which can cause a zoonotic disease, pentastomiasis. A complete mitochondrial (mt) genome was 16,521 bp comprising 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 1 non-coding region (NCR). A phylogenetic tree drawn with the concatenated amino acid sequences of the 6 conserved PCGs (atp6, cox1-3, and nad2) showed that A. agkistrodontis and Armillifer armillatus constituted a clade Pentastomida which was a sister group of the Branchiura. The complete mt genome sequence of A. agkistrodontis provides important genetic markers for both phylogenetic and epidemiological studies of pentastomids. PMID:28095669

  6. Mitochondrial genome of the Mackerel scad Decapterus macarellus (Perciformes: Carangidae).

    PubMed

    Zou, Keshu; Chen, Zuozhi; Zhang, Peng; Li, Min

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequence was determined for the Mackerel scad Decapterus macarellus, one species of the economically important fish in Carangidae. The entire sequence of the genome was 16,544 bp in length, including the typical structure of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and 1 non-coding control region. Overall base compositions of the sequence were 27.3% of A, 30.4% of C, 25.3% of T and 17.0% of G, showing an obvious anti-G bias commonly observed in teleosts. The mitogenome of Decapterus macarellus had a quite high-sequence similarity (92.5%) with D. macrosoma, which was morphologically close to D. macarellus. The complete mitogenome sequence data of D. macarellus could provide useful information for taxonomic and phylogenetics studies.

  7. Hemipteran Mitochondrial Genomes: Features, Structures and Implications for Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Li-Yun; Qiao, Ge-Xia

    2015-01-01

    The study of Hemipteran mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) began with the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma dimidiata, in 2001. At present, 90 complete Hemipteran mitogenomes have been sequenced and annotated. This review examines the history of Hemipteran mitogenomes research and summarizes the main features of them including genome organization, nucleotide composition, protein-coding genes, tRNAs and rRNAs, and non-coding regions. Special attention is given to the comparative analysis of repeat regions. Gene rearrangements are an additional data type for a few families, and most mitogenomes are arranged in the same order to the proposed ancestral insect. We also discuss and provide insights on the phylogenetic analyses of a variety of taxonomic levels. This review is expected to further expand our understanding of research in this field and serve as a valuable reference resource. PMID:26039239

  8. In silico analysis of SSRs in mitochondrial genomes of fishes.

    PubMed

    Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Rashid, Iliyas; Pathak, Ajey Kumar; Singh, Mahender; Singh, Shri Prakash; Sarkar, Uttam Kumar

    2015-04-01

    The availability of fish mitochondrial (mt) genomes provides an opportunity to explore the simple sequence repeats. In the present study, mt genomes of 85 fish species reported from Indian subcontinent were downloaded from NCBI and computationally analysed for finding SSRs types, frequency of occurrence, mutation and evolutionary adaptation across species. A total of 92 microsatellites in different nucleotide combinations were detected in 59 species. 26 interspersed SSRs, mostly poly (AT)n were found in the D-loop regions in the species of Cyprinidae. Fifty-six SSRs of 12 bp fixed length were observed in eight genes only. Further, identical repeat motifs were found on the same location in ATP6 and ND4 genes, which were biased towards particular habitat. The comparison of ATP6 and ND4 gene sets to other homologous sequences showed point mutations. This study explores the SSRs discovery and their utility as marker for species and population identification.

  9. Complete Mitochondrial Genomes of New Zealand’s First Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Karen; Boocock, James; Prost, Stefan; Horsburgh, K. Ann; Jacomb, Chris; Walter, Richard; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Dogs accompanied people in their migrations across the Pacific Ocean and ultimately reached New Zealand, which is the southern-most point of their oceanic distribution, around the beginning of the fourteenth century AD. Previous ancient DNA analyses of mitochondrial control region sequences indicated the New Zealand dog population included two lineages. We sequenced complete mitochondrial genomes of fourteen dogs from the colonisation era archaeological site of Wairau Bar and found five closely-related haplotypes. The limited number of mitochondrial lineages present at Wairau Bar suggests that the founding population may have comprised only a few dogs; or that the arriving dogs were closely related. For populations such as that at Wairau Bar, which stemmed from relatively recent migration events, control region sequences have insufficient power to address questions about population structure and founding events. Sequencing mitogenomes provided the opportunity to observe sufficient diversity to discriminate between individuals that would otherwise be assigned the same haplotype and to clarify their relationships with each other. Our results also support the proposition that at least one dispersal of dogs into the Pacific was via a south-western route through Indonesia. PMID:26444283

  10. Complete Mitochondrial Genomes of New Zealand's First Dogs.

    PubMed

    Greig, Karen; Boocock, James; Prost, Stefan; Horsburgh, K Ann; Jacomb, Chris; Walter, Richard; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Dogs accompanied people in their migrations across the Pacific Ocean and ultimately reached New Zealand, which is the southern-most point of their oceanic distribution, around the beginning of the fourteenth century AD. Previous ancient DNA analyses of mitochondrial control region sequences indicated the New Zealand dog population included two lineages. We sequenced complete mitochondrial genomes of fourteen dogs from the colonisation era archaeological site of Wairau Bar and found five closely-related haplotypes. The limited number of mitochondrial lineages present at Wairau Bar suggests that the founding population may have comprised only a few dogs; or that the arriving dogs were closely related. For populations such as that at Wairau Bar, which stemmed from relatively recent migration events, control region sequences have insufficient power to address questions about population structure and founding events. Sequencing mitogenomes provided the opportunity to observe sufficient diversity to discriminate between individuals that would otherwise be assigned the same haplotype and to clarify their relationships with each other. Our results also support the proposition that at least one dispersal of dogs into the Pacific was via a south-western route through Indonesia.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Atylotus miser (Diptera: Tabanomorpha: Tabanidae), with mitochondrial genome phylogeny of lower Brachycera (Orthorrhapha).

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Li, Xuankun; Ding, Shuangmei; Wang, Ning; Mao, Meng; Wang, Mengqing; Yang, Ding

    2016-07-15

    Brachycera is a clade with over 80,000 described species and originated from the Mesozoic, and its larvae employ comprehensive feeding strategies. The phylogeny of the lower Brachycera has been studied intensively over the past decades. In order to supplement the lack of genetic data in this important group, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of Atylotus miser as well as the nearly complete mt genomes of another 11 orthorrhaphous flies. The mt genome of A. miser is 15,858bp, which is typical of Diptera, with 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and a 993bp control region. The rest of the orthorrhaphous mt genomes in our study have the similar structure with A. miser. Additionally, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of 20 mt genomes using Maximum-likelihood and Bayesian methods in order to reconstruct the evolutionary relationship of Orthorrhapha. The results show that all infraorders of Brachycera are monophyletic, and a relationship of Tabanomorpha+((Xylophagomorpha+Stratiomyomorpha)+Muscomorpha) has been proposed. Within Xylophagomorpha, Nemestrinoidae forms the sister group of Xylophagidae.

  12. The Large Mitochondrial Genome of Symbiodinium minutum Reveals Conserved Noncoding Sequences between Dinoflagellates and Apicomplexans

    PubMed Central

    Shoguchi, Eiichi; Shinzato, Chuya; Hisata, Kanako; Satoh, Nori; Mungpakdee, Sutada

    2015-01-01

    Even though mitochondrial genomes, which characterize eukaryotic cells, were first discovered more than 50 years ago, mitochondrial genomics remains an important topic in molecular biology and genome sciences. The Phylum Alveolata comprises three major groups (ciliates, apicomplexans, and dinoflagellates), the mitochondrial genomes of which have diverged widely. Even though the gene content of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes is reportedly comparable to that of apicomplexans, the highly fragmented and rearranged genome structures of dinoflagellates have frustrated whole genomic analysis. Consequently, noncoding sequences and gene arrangements of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes have not been well characterized. Here we report that the continuous assembled genome (∼326 kb) of the dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium minutum, is AT-rich (∼64.3%) and that it contains three protein-coding genes. Based upon in silico analysis, the remaining 99% of the genome comprises transcriptomic noncoding sequences. RNA edited sites and unique, possible start and stop codons clarify conserved regions among dinoflagellates. Our massive transcriptome analysis shows that almost all regions of the genome are transcribed, including 27 possible fragmented ribosomal RNA genes and 12 uncharacterized small RNAs that are similar to mitochondrial RNA genes of the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Gene map comparisons show that gene order is only slightly conserved between S. minutum and P. falciparum. However, small RNAs and intergenic sequences share sequence similarities with P. falciparum, suggesting that the function of noncoding sequences has been preserved despite development of very different genome structures. PMID:26199191

  13. First ancient mitochondrial human genome from a prepastoralist southern African.

    PubMed

    Morris, Alan G; Heinze, Anja; Chan, Eva K F; Smith, Andrew B; Hayes, Vanessa M

    2014-09-10

    The oldest contemporary human mitochondrial lineages arose in Africa. The earliest divergent extant maternal offshoot, namely haplogroup L0d, is represented by click-speaking forager peoples of southern Africa. Broadly defined as Khoesan, contemporary Khoesan are today largely restricted to the semidesert regions of Namibia and Botswana, whereas archeological, historical, and genetic evidence promotes a once broader southerly dispersal of click-speaking peoples including southward migrating pastoralists and indigenous marine-foragers. No genetic data have been recovered from the indigenous peoples that once sustained life along the southern coastal waters of Africa prepastoral arrival. In this study we generate a complete mitochondrial genome from a 2,330-year-old male skeleton, confirmed through osteological and archeological analysis as practicing a marine-based forager existence. The ancient mtDNA represents a new L0d2c lineage (L0d2c1c) that is today, unlike its Khoe-language based sister-clades (L0d2c1a and L0d2c1b) most closely related to contemporary indigenous San-speakers (specifically Ju). Providing the first genomic evidence that prepastoral Southern African marine foragers carried the earliest diverged maternal modern human lineages, this study emphasizes the significance of Southern African archeological remains in defining early modern human origins. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. Complete mitochondrial genome of Eruca sativa Mill. (Garden rocket).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yankun; Chu, Pu; Yang, Qing; Chang, Shengxin; Chen, Jianmei; Hu, Maolong; Guan, Rongzhan

    2014-01-01

    Eruca sativa (Cruciferae family) is an ancient crop of great economic and agronomic importance. Here, the complete mitochondrial genome of Eruca sativa was sequenced and annotated. The circular molecule is 247,696 bp long, with a G+C content of 45.07%, containing 33 protein-coding genes, three rRNA genes, and 18 tRNA genes. The Eruca sativa mitochondrial genome may be divided into six master circles and four subgenomic molecules via three pairwise large repeats, resulting in a more dynamic structure of the Eruca sativa mtDNA compared with other cruciferous mitotypes. Comparison with the Brassica napus MtDNA revealed that most of the genes with known function are conserved between these two mitotypes except for the ccmFN2 and rrn18 genes, and 27 point mutations were scattered in the 14 protein-coding genes. Evolutionary relationships analysis suggested that Eruca sativa is more closely related to the Brassica species and to Raphanus sativus than to Arabidopsis thaliana.

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of Acanthastrea maxima (Cnidaria, Scleractinia, Lobophylliidae).

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, Roberto; Vacherie, Benoît; Benzoni, Francesca; Barbe, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the scleractinian coral Acanthastrea maxima has been obtained, representing the first sequenced mitogenome of a member of the Lobophylliidae. The mitochondrial genome is 18,278  bp in length, the longest sequence among the robust corals sequenced mitogenome to date. The overall GC composition (33.7%) and the gene arrangement are similar to those of the other scleractinian corals, including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes (rnl and rns) and 2 tRNA genes (tRNA-Met and tRNA-Trp). All genes except tRNA-Trp, atp8, cox1, tRNA-Met and rnl are engulfed by a large group I intron in the nad5 gene. A second group I intron of 1077 bp in length is inserted in the cox1 gene and it encodes a putative homing endonuclease. There are four regions of gene overlaps totalling 22 bp and nine intergenic spacer regions for a total of 2220 bp, of which the cox3-cox2 region may correspond to the putative control region.

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Wugangtong white goose.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Gui-Tao; Lin, Qian; He, Ping; Zhang, Xu; Yun, Long; Li, Xia; Liu, Geng; Li, Chuang; He, Xi; Dai, Qiu-Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Wugangtong white goose is one of the famous native breed in Hunan province of China. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Wugangtong white goose was reported in Hunan Province first, which was determined through PCR-based method. The total length of the mitogenome is 16,741 bp. It contains the typical structure, including 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes and 1 non-coding control region (D-loop region) as that of most other vertebrates. The overall composition of the mitogenome was estimated to be 30.22% for A, 22.69% for T, 32.02% for C and 15.06% for G. All the protein initiation codons are ATG, except for COX1, COX2 and ND5 are GTG, ND6 is CTA. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Wugangtong white goose will provide an important data set for the study in genetic mechanism of Wugangtong goose in Hunan province.

  17. The complete mitochondrial genome of Gobiobotia filifer (Teleostei, Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Liu, Ya; Zhou, Jian; Gong, Quan; Li, Hua; Lai, Jiansheng; Li, Lianman

    2016-09-01

    The Gobiobotia filifer is a small economic fish which distributes in the upstream of Yangtze River and its distributaries. For the environmental pollution and overfishing, its population declined drastically in recent decades, so it is essential to protect its resource. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of G. filifer was determined with PCR technology, which contains 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA genes, and a non-coding control region with the total length of 16,613 bp. The order and composition of genes were similar to most of the other teleost fish. Most of the genes were encoded on heavy strand, except for ND6 genes and eight tRNAs. Just like most other vertebrates, the bias of G and C has been found in different genes/regions. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of G. filifer would contribute to better understand evolution of this lineage, population genetics, and will help administrative department to make rules and laws to protect this lineage.

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome of the tiger tail seahorse, Hippocampus comes (Teleostei, Syngnathidae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Lin, Han-Yang; Jang-Liaw, Nian-Hong; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Ho, Hsuan-Ching

    2013-06-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the tiger tail seahorse was sequenced using a polymerase chain reaction-based method. The total length of mitochondrial DNA is 16,525 bp and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA, 22 transfer RNA genes, and a control region. The mitochondrial gene arrangement of the tiger tail seahorse is also matching the one observed in the most vertebrate creatures. Base composition of the genome is A (32.8%), T (29.8%), C (23.0%), and G (14.4%) with an A+T-rich hallmark as that of other vertebrate mitochondrial genomes.

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Rhodeus shitaiensis (Teleostei, Cypriniformes, Acheilognathidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Chang, Chia-Hao

    2015-04-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the Rhodeus shitaiensis was determined by using a PCR-based method. The total length of mitochondrial DNA of this bitterling is 16,774 bp and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA, 22 transfer RNA genes, 1 replication origin region and 1 control region. The mitochondrial gene arrangement of the R. shitaiensis is also matching the one observed in the most vertebrate creatures. Base composition of the genome is A (28.7%), T (26.5%), C (27.4%) and G (17.4%) with an A + T rich hallmark as that of other vertebrate mitochondrial genomes.

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of the shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus (Chondrichthyes, Lamnidae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Tsai, An-Yi; Su, Pin-Xuan; Ho, Hsuan-Ching

    2015-06-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus) was determined by using a PCR-based method. The total length of mitochondrial DNA is 16,701 bp and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA, 22 transfer RNA genes, 1 replication origin region, and 1 control region. The mitochondrial gene arrangement of the tiger tail seahorse is also matching the one observed in the most vertebrate creatures. Base composition of the genome is A (28.8%), T (28.0%), C (28.0%), and G (15.2%) with an A + T rich hallmark as that of other vertebrate mitochondrial genomes.

  1. The whole mitochondrial genome of the Lesser Kestrel (Falco naumanni).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Hui-Feng; Ren, Li; Xu, Yu; Zeng, Yu-Jian; Miao, Ying-Lei; Luo, Hua-You; Wang, Kun-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Falconiformes include most of the predatory birds, they play crucial role in maintaining the balance of ecology system. To further illustrate the phylogenetic status for the species of Falconiformes, the entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome of Falco naumanni was amplified and sequenced, further phylogenetic analysis was performed by incorporating with other 8 entire mtDNA genomes representing 8 species of predatory birds by taking the Apus apus and Haematopus ater as out-groups. Our results indicated that the mtDNA genome of F. naumanni includes 17,370 base pairs in length, which has the similar organization and gene order with other mtDNA genomes of the species belonging to Falconiformes. Further phylogenetic analyses supported that the F. naumanni clustered with other species of Falconidae, which formed the sister group of Accipitridae, Cathartes aura located at the basal position with Haematopus ater. In addition, Pandion haliaetus was clustered with other species of Accipitridae, which was conflict with the traditional classification system by taking P. haliaetus as an independent Familia of Falconidae.

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Eimeria magna (Apicomplexa: Coccidia).

    PubMed

    Tian, Si-Qin; Cui, Ping; Fang, Su-Fang; Liu, Guo-Hua; Wang, Chun-Ren; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we determined the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Eimeria magna from rabbits for the first time, and compared its gene contents and genome organizations with that of seven Eimeria spp. from domestic chickens. The size of the complete mt genome sequence of E. magna is 6249 bp, which consists of 3 protein-coding genes (cytb, cox1 and cox3), 12 gene fragments for the large subunit (LSU) rRNA, and 7 gene fragments for the small subunit (SSU) rRNA, without transfer RNA genes, in accordance with that of Eimeria spp. from chickens. The putative direction of translation for three genes (cytb, cox1 and cox3) was the same as those of Eimeria species from domestic chickens. The content of A + T is 65.16% for E. magna mt genome (29.73% A, 35.43% T, 17.09 G and 17.75% C). The E. magna mt genome sequence provides novel mtDNA markers for studying the molecular epidemiology and population genetics of Eimeria spp. and has implications for the molecular diagnosis and control of rabbit coccidiosis.

  3. Mitochondrial genome of the blackfin tuna Thunnus atlanticus Lesson, 1831 (Perciformes, Scrombidae).

    PubMed

    Márquez, Edna J; Isaza, Juan P; Alzate, Juan F

    2016-05-01

    Blackfin tuna, Thunnus atlanticus is a widespread epipelagic oceanic species in the western Atlantic. So far the mitochondrial genome of this species remained unknown, although the mitogenomes of all congeners are known. The mitochondrial genome encodes for 13 proteins, 21 tRNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs and the gene synteny is conserved with other previously reported mitogenomes of tunas.

  4. Complete mitochondrial genome of the megamouth shark Megachasma pelagios (Chondrichthyes, Megachasmidae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Chiang, Wei-Chuan; Jang-Liaw, Nian-Hong

    2014-06-01

    Here we describe the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the megamouth shark, Megachasma pelagios, which is an extremely rare species of deepwater shark. The circle genome (16,694 bp) consists of 13 protein coding, 22 tRNA, 2 rRNA genes and 1 control region. It has the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement.

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome of the longfin mako shark, Isurus paucus (Chondrichthyes, Lamnidae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Chiang, Wei-Chuan; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Jang-Liaw, Nian-Hong; Shao, Kwang-Tsao

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the longfin mako, Isurus paucus, which is a pelagic shark found in temperate and tropical waters. The circle genome (16,704 bp) consists of 13 protein coding, 22 tRNA, 2 rRNA genes and 1 control region. It has the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement.

  6. The mitochondrial genome of the brachiopod Laqueus rubellus.

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Y; Endo, K; Tajima, F; Ueshima, R

    2000-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the 14,017-bp mitochondrial (mt) genome of the articulate brachiopod Laqueus rubellus is presented. Being one of the smallest of known mt genomes, it has an extremely compact gene organization. While the same 13 polypeptides, two rRNAs, and 22 tRNAs are encoded as in most other animal mtDNAs, lengthy noncoding regions are absent, with the longest apparent intergenic sequence being 54 bp in length. Gene-end sequence overlaps are prevalent, and several stop codons are abbreviated. The genes are generally shorter, and three of the protein-coding genes are the shortest among known homologues. All of the tRNA genes indicate size reduction in either or both of the putative TPsiC and DHU arms compared with standard tRNAs. Possession of a TV (TPsiC arm-variable loop) replacement loop is inferred for tRNA(R) and tRNA(L-tag). The DHU arm appears to be unpaired not only in tRNA(S-tct) and tRNA(S-tga), but also in tRNA(C), tRNA(I), and tRNA(T), a novel condition. All the genes are encoded in the same DNA strand, which has a base composition rich in thymine and guanine. The genome has an overall gene arrangement drastically different from that of any other organisms so far reported, but contains several short segments, composed of 2-3 genes, which are found in other mt genomes. Combined cooccurrence of such gene assortments indicates that the Laqueus mt genome is similar to the annelid Lumbricus, the mollusc Katharina, and the octocoral Sarcophyton mt genomes, each with statistical significance. Widely accepted schemes of metazoan phylogeny suggest that the similarity with the octocoral could have arisen through a process of convergent evolution, while it appears likely that the similarities with the annelid and the mollusc reflect phylogenetic relationships. PMID:10790399

  7. Population Genomic Analysis Reveals Highly Conserved Mitochondrial Genomes in the Yeast Species Lachancea thermotolerans

    PubMed Central

    Freel, Kelle C.; Friedrich, Anne; Hou, Jing; Schacherer, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of mitochondrial (mt) sequence data from various yeasts provides a tool to study genomic evolution within and between different species. While the genomes from a range of lineages are available, there is a lack of information concerning intraspecific mtDNA diversity. Here, we analyzed the mt genomes of 50 strains from Lachancea thermotolerans, a protoploid yeast species that has been isolated from several locations (Europe, Asia, Australia, South Africa, and North / South America) and ecological sources (fruit, tree exudate, plant material, and grape and agave fermentations). Protein-coding genes from the mtDNA were used to construct a phylogeny, which reflected a similar, yet less resolved topology than the phylogenetic tree of 50 nuclear genes. In comparison to its sister species Lachancea kluyveri, L. thermotolerans has a smaller mt genome. This is due to shorter intergenic regions and fewer introns, of which the latter are only found in COX1. We revealed that L. kluyveri and L. thermotolerans share similar levels of intraspecific divergence concerning the nuclear genomes. However, L. thermotolerans has a more highly conserved mt genome with the coding regions characterized by low rates of nonsynonymous substitution. Thus, in the mt genomes of L. thermotolerans, stronger purifying selection and lower mutation rates potentially shape genome diversity in contract to what was found for L. kluyveri, demonstrating that the factors driving mt genome evolution are different even between closely related species. PMID:25212859

  8. Asian-specific mitochondrial genome polymorphism (9-bp deletion) in Hungarian patients with mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Pentelenyi, Klara; Remenyi, Viktoria; Gal, Aniko; Milley, Gyorgy Mate; Csosz, Aranka; Mende, Balazs Gusztav; Molnar, Maria Judit

    2016-05-01

    A 9-bp deletion of the mtDNA is known as an anthropological marker of people with East-Asian origin. This 9-bp mtDNA deletion was analyzed in 1073 Hungarians with suspected mitochondrial disease and in 468 healthy control individuals. Fourteen cases with the 9-bp deletion were found in the cohort of mitochondrial patients, and one individual from 468 controls. In six cases the 9-bp deletion was present together with pathogenic major deletions in the mitochondrial genome. In one patient we found a frame shift mutation in the D-loop region, and in another family a pathogenic m.8322 A > G mutation in the tRNA(Lys) gene. Although the 9-bp deletion is common in the populations of the Pacific region and Asia, it is present in the Hungarian population as well. This 9-bp deletion may induce instability of the mtDNA and may provoke the introduction of other pathogenic mutations.

  9. Comparative mitochondrial genomics toward exploring molecular markers in the medicinal fungus Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Hao, Ai-Jing; Zhao, Yu-Xiang; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Jie

    2017-01-10

    Cordyceps militaris is a fungus used for developing health food, but knowledge about its intraspecific differentiation is limited due to lack of efficient markers. Herein, we assembled the mitochondrial genomes of eight C. militaris strains and performed a comparative mitochondrial genomic analysis together with three previously reported mitochondrial genomes of the fungus. Sizes of the 11 mitochondrial genomes varied from 26.5 to 33.9 kb mainly due to variable intron contents (from two to eight introns per strain). Nucleotide variability varied according to different regions with non-coding regions showing higher variation frequency than coding regions. Recombination events were identified between some locus pairs but seemed not to contribute greatly to genetic variations of the fungus. Based on nucleotide diversity fluctuations across the alignment of all mitochondrial genomes, molecular markers with the potential to be used for future typing studies were determined.

  10. Comparative mitochondrial genomics toward exploring molecular markers in the medicinal fungus Cordyceps militaris

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; Hao, Ai-Jing; Zhao, Yu-Xiang; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Jie

    2017-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a fungus used for developing health food, but knowledge about its intraspecific differentiation is limited due to lack of efficient markers. Herein, we assembled the mitochondrial genomes of eight C. militaris strains and performed a comparative mitochondrial genomic analysis together with three previously reported mitochondrial genomes of the fungus. Sizes of the 11 mitochondrial genomes varied from 26.5 to 33.9 kb mainly due to variable intron contents (from two to eight introns per strain). Nucleotide variability varied according to different regions with non-coding regions showing higher variation frequency than coding regions. Recombination events were identified between some locus pairs but seemed not to contribute greatly to genetic variations of the fungus. Based on nucleotide diversity fluctuations across the alignment of all mitochondrial genomes, molecular markers with the potential to be used for future typing studies were determined. PMID:28071691

  11. Tracing the evolution of streptophyte algae and their mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Turmel, Monique; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Six monophyletic groups of charophycean green algae are recognized within the Streptophyta. Although incongruent with earlier studies based on genes from three cellular compartments, chloroplast and nuclear phylogenomic analyses have resolved identical relationships among these groups, placing the Zygnematales or the Zygnematales + Coleochaetales as sister to land plants. The present investigation aimed at determining whether this consensus view is supported by the mitochondrial genome and at gaining insight into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) evolution within and across streptophyte algal lineages and during the transition toward the first land plants. We present here the newly sequenced mtDNAs of representatives of the Klebsormidiales (Entransia fimbriata and Klebsormidium spec.) and Zygnematales (Closterium baillyanum and Roya obtusa) and compare them with their homologs in other charophycean lineages as well as in selected embryophyte and chlorophyte lineages. Our results indicate that important changes occurred at the levels of genome size, gene order, and intron content within the Zygnematales. Although the representatives of the Klebsormidiales display more similarity in genome size and intron content, gene order seems more fluid and gene losses more frequent than in other charophycean lineages. In contrast, the two members of the Charales display an extremely conservative pattern of mtDNA evolution. Collectively, our analyses of gene order and gene content and the phylogenies we inferred from 40 mtDNA-encoded proteins failed to resolve the relationships among the Zygnematales, Coleochaetales, and Charales; however, they are consistent with previous phylogenomic studies in favoring that the morphologically complex Charales are not sister to land plants.

  12. Tracing the Evolution of Streptophyte Algae and Their Mitochondrial Genome

    PubMed Central

    Turmel, Monique; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Six monophyletic groups of charophycean green algae are recognized within the Streptophyta. Although incongruent with earlier studies based on genes from three cellular compartments, chloroplast and nuclear phylogenomic analyses have resolved identical relationships among these groups, placing the Zygnematales or the Zygnematales + Coleochaetales as sister to land plants. The present investigation aimed at determining whether this consensus view is supported by the mitochondrial genome and at gaining insight into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) evolution within and across streptophyte algal lineages and during the transition toward the first land plants. We present here the newly sequenced mtDNAs of representatives of the Klebsormidiales (Entransia fimbriata and Klebsormidium spec.) and Zygnematales (Closterium baillyanum and Roya obtusa) and compare them with their homologs in other charophycean lineages as well as in selected embryophyte and chlorophyte lineages. Our results indicate that important changes occurred at the levels of genome size, gene order, and intron content within the Zygnematales. Although the representatives of the Klebsormidiales display more similarity in genome size and intron content, gene order seems more fluid and gene losses more frequent than in other charophycean lineages. In contrast, the two members of the Charales display an extremely conservative pattern of mtDNA evolution. Collectively, our analyses of gene order and gene content and the phylogenies we inferred from 40 mtDNA-encoded proteins failed to resolve the relationships among the Zygnematales, Coleochaetales, and Charales; however, they are consistent with previous phylogenomic studies in favoring that the morphologically complex Charales are not sister to land plants. PMID:24022472

  13. Complete mitochondrial genomes of Trisidos kiyoni and Potiarca pilula: Varied mitochondrial genome size and highly rearranged gene order in Arcidae

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shao’e; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    We present the complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of Trisidos kiyoni and Potiarca pilula, both important species from the family Arcidae (Arcoida: Arcacea). Typical bivalve mtDNA features were described, such as the relatively conserved gene number (36 and 37), a high A + T content (62.73% and 61.16%), the preference for A + T-rich codons, and the evidence of non-optimal codon usage. The mitogenomes of Arcidae species are exceptional for their extraordinarily large and variable sizes and substantial gene rearrangements. The mitogenome of T. kiyoni (19,614 bp) and P. pilula (28,470 bp) are the two smallest Arcidae mitogenomes. The compact mitogenomes are weakly associated with gene number and primarily reflect shrinkage of the non-coding regions. The varied size in Arcidae mitogenomes reflect a dynamic history of expansion. A significant positive correlation is observed between mitogenome size and the combined length of cox1-3, the lengths of Cytb, and the combined length of rRNAs (rrnS and rrnL) (P < 0.001). Both protein coding genes (PCGs) and tRNA rearrangements is observed in P. pilula and T. kiyoni mitogenomes. This analysis imply that the complicated gene rearrangement in mitochondrial genome could be considered as one of key characters in inferring higher-level phylogenetic relationship of Arcidae. PMID:27653979

  14. Comparative analyses within Gyrodactylus (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) mitochondrial genomes and conserved polymerase chain reaction primers for gyrodactylid mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Ye, F; Easy, R H; King, S D; Cone, D K; You, P

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we describe the complete mitochondrial genomes of Gyrodactylus brachymystacis and Gyrodactylus parvae infecting rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and the invasive topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva), respectively. The two circular genomes have a common genome organization found in other Gyrodactylus species. Comparative analyses of mitochondrial genomes from six Gyrodactylus species were carried out to determine base composition, codon usage, transfer RNA and ribosomal RNA genes, major non-coding regions, and nucleotide diversity within the genus. We also provide the first universal models of the secondary structures of rrnS and rrnL for this group thereby promoting utilization of these genetic markers. Universal primers provided herein can be used to obtain more mitochondrial information for pathogen identification and may reveal different levels of molecular phylogenetic inferences for this lineage.

  15. The Aspergillus Genome Database: multispecies curation and incorporation of RNA-Seq data to improve structural gene annotations

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Gustavo C.; Arnaud, Martha B.; Inglis, Diane O.; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Binkley, Gail; Simison, Matt; Miyasato, Stuart R.; Binkley, Jonathan; Orvis, Joshua; Shah, Prachi; Wymore, Farrell; Sherlock, Gavin; Wortman, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    The Aspergillus Genome Database (AspGD; http://www.aspgd.org) is a freely available web-based resource that was designed for Aspergillus researchers and is also a valuable source of information for the entire fungal research community. In addition to being a repository and central point of access to genome, transcriptome and polymorphism data, AspGD hosts a comprehensive comparative genomics toolbox that facilitates the exploration of precomputed orthologs among the 20 currently available Aspergillus genomes. AspGD curators perform gene product annotation based on review of the literature for four key Aspergillus species: Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger. We have iteratively improved the structural annotation of Aspergillus genomes through the analysis of publicly available transcription data, mostly expressed sequenced tags, as described in a previous NAR Database article (Arnaud et al. 2012). In this update, we report substantive structural annotation improvements for A. nidulans, A. oryzae and A. fumigatus genomes based on recently available RNA-Seq data. Over 26 000 loci were updated across these species; although those primarily comprise the addition and extension of untranslated regions (UTRs), the new analysis also enabled over 1000 modifications affecting the coding sequence of genes in each target genome. PMID:24194595

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome of maritime striped squirrel Tamiops maritimus (Rodentia: Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Cong, Haiyan; Kong, Lingming; Motokawa, Masaharu; Wang, Wenquan; Li, Yuchun

    2017-03-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the maritime striped squirrel (Tamiops maritimus) was first sequenced and characterized. The genome was 16 523 bp in length, and the composition and the arrangement of genes were analogous to other rodents. The sequence of T. maritimus was used to construct phylogenetic tree with additional mitochondrial genomes of seven sciurid species available on GenBank. Phylogenetic result indicated that T. maritimus has a close relationship with T. swinhoei. Our mitochondrial genome data may provide information for species identification, diversity evaluation, and other studies about this genus.

  17. De novo assembly of the carrot mitochondrial genome using next generation sequencing of whole genomic DNA provides first evidence of DNA transfer into an angiosperm plastid genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sequence analysis of organelle genomes has revealed important aspects of plant cell evolution. The scope of this study was to develop an approach for de novo assembly of the carrot mitochondrial genome using next generation sequence data from total genomic DNA. Results Sequencing data from a carrot 454 whole genome library were used to develop a de novo assembly of the mitochondrial genome. Development of a new bioinformatic tool allowed visualizing contig connections and elucidation of the de novo assembly. Southern hybridization demonstrated recombination across two large repeats. Genome annotation allowed identification of 44 protein coding genes, three rRNA and 17 tRNA. Identification of the plastid genome sequence allowed organelle genome comparison. Mitochondrial intergenic sequence analysis allowed detection of a fragment of DNA specific to the carrot plastid genome. PCR amplification and sequence analysis across different Apiaceae species revealed consistent conservation of this fragment in the mitochondrial genomes and an insertion in Daucus plastid genomes, giving evidence of a mitochondrial to plastid transfer of DNA. Sequence similarity with a retrotransposon element suggests a possibility that a transposon-like event transferred this sequence into the plastid genome. Conclusions This study confirmed that whole genome sequencing is a practical approach for de novo assembly of higher plant mitochondrial genomes. In addition, a new aspect of intercompartmental genome interaction was reported providing the first evidence for DNA transfer into an angiosperm plastid genome. The approach used here could be used more broadly to sequence and assemble mitochondrial genomes of diverse species. This information will allow us to better understand intercompartmental interactions and cell evolution. PMID:22548759

  18. Structure and variation of the mitochondrial genome of fishes.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Takashi P; Miya, Masaki; Mabuchi, Kohji; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2016-09-07

    The mitochondrial (mt) genome has been used as an effective tool for phylogenetic and population genetic analyses in vertebrates. However, the structure and variability of the vertebrate mt genome are not well understood. A potential strategy for improving our understanding is to conduct a comprehensive comparative study of large mt genome data. The aim of this study was to characterize the structure and variability of the fish mt genome through comparative analysis of large datasets. An analysis of the secondary structure of proteins for 250 fish species (248 ray-finned and 2 cartilaginous fishes) illustrated that cytochrome c oxidase subunits (COI, COII, and COIII) and a cytochrome bc1 complex subunit (Cyt b) had substantial amino acid conservation. Among the four proteins, COI was the most conserved, as more than half of all amino acid sites were invariable among the 250 species. Our models identified 43 and 58 stems within 12S rRNA and 16S rRNA, respectively, with larger numbers than proposed previously for vertebrates. The models also identified 149 and 319 invariable sites in 12S rRNA and 16S rRNA, respectively, in all fishes. In particular, the present result verified that a region corresponding to the peptidyl transferase center in prokaryotic 23S rRNA, which is homologous to mt 16S rRNA, is also conserved in fish mt 16S rRNA. Concerning the gene order, we found 35 variations (in 32 families) that deviated from the common gene order in vertebrates. These gene rearrangements were mostly observed in the area spanning the ND5 gene to the control region as well as two tRNA gene cluster regions (IQM and WANCY regions). Although many of such gene rearrangements were unique to a specific taxon, some were shared polyphyletically between distantly related species. Through a large-scale comparative analysis of 250 fish species mt genomes, we elucidated various structural aspects of the fish mt genome and the encoded genes. The present results will be important for

  19. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Cheirotonus jansoni (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).

    PubMed

    Shao, L L; Huang, D Y; Sun, X Y; Hao, J S; Cheng, C H; Zhang, W; Yang, Q

    2014-02-20

    We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Cheirotonus jansoni (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), an endangered insect species from Southeast Asia. This long legged scarab is widely collected and reared for sale, although it is rare and protected in the wild. The circular genome is 17,249 bp long and contains a typical gene complement: 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 putative tRNA genes, and a non-coding AT-rich region. Its gene order and arrangement are identical to the common type found in most insect mitogenomes. As with all other sequenced coleopteran species, a 5-bp long TAGTA motif was detected in the intergenic space sequence located between trnS(UCN) and nad1. The atypical cox1 start codon is AAC, and the putative initiation codon for the atp8 gene appears to be GTC, instead of the frequently found ATN. By sequence comparison, the 2590-bp long non-coding AT-rich region is the second longest among the coleopterans, with two tandem repeat regions: one is 10 copies of an 88-bp sequence and the other is 2 copies of a 153-bp sequence. Additionally, the A+T content (64%) of the 13 protein-coding genes is the lowest among all sequenced coleopteran species. This newly sequenced genome aids in our understanding of the comparative biology of the mitogenomes of coleopteran species and supplies important data for the conservation of this species.

  20. Analysis of the complete Fischoederius elongatus (Paramphistomidae, Trematoda) mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Zhao, Yunyang; Wang, Lixia; Feng, Hanli; Tan, Li; Lei, Weiqiang; Zhao, Pengfei; Hu, Min; Fang, Rui

    2015-05-20

    Fischoederius elongates is an important trematode of Paramphistomes in ruminants. Animals infected with F. elongates often don't show obvious symptoms, so it is easy to be ignored. However it can cause severe economic losses to the breeding industry. Knowledge of the mitochondrial genome of F. elongates can be used for phylogenetic and epidemiological studies. The complete mt genome sequence of F. elongates is 14,120 bp in length and contains 12 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA genes and two non-coding regions (LNR and SNR). The gene arrangement of F. elongates is the same as other trematodes, such as Fasciola hepatica and Paramphistomum cervi. Phylogenetic analyses using concatenated amino acid sequences of the 12 protein-coding genes by Maximum-likelihood and Neighbor-joining analysis method showed that F. elongates was closely related to P. cervi. The complete mt genome sequence of F. elongates should provide information for phylogenetic and epidemiological studies for F. elongates and the family Paramphistomidae.

  1. Codon usage and bias in mitochondrial genomes of parasitic platyhelminthes

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Donald Peter; Blair, David

    2004-01-01

    Sequences of the complete protein-coding portions of the mitochondrial (mt) genome were analysed for 6 species of cestodes (including hydatid tapeworms and the pork tapeworm) and 5 species of trematodes (blood flukes and liver- and lung-flukes). A near-complete sequence was also available for an additional trematode (the blood flukeSchistosoma malayensis). All of these parasites belong to a large flatworm taxon named the Neodermata. Considerable variation was found in the base composition of the protein-coding genes among these neodermatans. This variation was reflected in statistically-significant differences in numbers of each inferred amino acid between many pairs of species. Both convergence and divergence in nucleotide, and hence amino acid, composition was noted among groups within the Neodermata. Considerable variation in skew (unequal representation of complementary bases on the same strand) was found among the species studied. A pattern is thus emerging of diversity in the mt genome in neodermatans that may cast light on evolution of mt genomes generally. PMID:15591833

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Huang Lang chicken.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qi-Fang; Liu, Li-Li; Fu, Chen-Xing; He, Shao-Ping; Li, Si; He, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Huang Lang chicken is the native breed of Hunan province in China. The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence plays an important role in the accurate determination of phylogenetic relationships among metazoans. It is the first time that the complete mt genome sequence of the Huang Lang chicken was reported in this work, which was determined through the polymerase chain reaction-based method. The total length of the mitogenome is 16,786 bp, with the base composition of 30.25% for A, 23.71% for T, 32.53% for C and 13.51% for G, in the order C > A > T > G feature occurs in the Huang Lang chicken. It contains the typical structure, including two ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 non-coding control region (D-loop region). The complete mt genome sequence of the Huang Lang chicken provided an important data for further study on the genetic mechanism.

  3. Mitochondrial genome sequences of Nematocera (lower Diptera): evidence of rearrangement following a complete genome duplication in a winter crane fly.

    PubMed

    Beckenbach, Andrew T

    2012-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of eight representatives of lower Diptera, suborder Nematocera, along with nearly complete sequences from two other species, are presented. These taxa represent eight families not previously represented by complete mitochondrial DNA sequences. Most of the sequences retain the ancestral dipteran mitochondrial gene arrangement, while one sequence, that of the midge Arachnocampa flava (family Keroplatidae), has an inversion of the trnE gene. The most unusual result is the extensive rearrangement of the mitochondrial genome of a winter crane fly, Paracladura trichoptera (family Trichocera). The pattern of rearrangement indicates that the mechanism of rearrangement involved a tandem duplication of the entire mitochondrial genome, followed by random and nonrandom loss of one copy of each gene. Another winter crane fly retains the ancestral diperan gene arrangement. A preliminary mitochondrial phylogeny of the Diptera is also presented.

  4. Trypanosomal TAC40 constitutes a novel subclass of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins specialized in mitochondrial genome inheritance.

    PubMed

    Schnarwiler, Felix; Niemann, Moritz; Doiron, Nicholas; Harsman, Anke; Käser, Sandro; Mani, Jan; Chanfon, Astrid; Dewar, Caroline E; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Jackson, Christopher B; Pusnik, Mascha; Schmidt, Oliver; Meisinger, Chris; Hiller, Sebastian; Warscheid, Bettina; Schnaufer, Achim C; Ochsenreiter, Torsten; Schneider, André

    2014-05-27

    Mitochondria cannot form de novo but require mechanisms allowing their inheritance to daughter cells. In contrast to most other eukaryotes Trypanosoma brucei has a single mitochondrion whose single-unit genome is physically connected to the flagellum. Here we identify a β-barrel mitochondrial outer membrane protein, termed tripartite attachment complex 40 (TAC40), that localizes to this connection. TAC40 is essential for mitochondrial DNA inheritance and belongs to the mitochondrial porin protein family. However, it is not specifically related to any of the three subclasses of mitochondrial porins represented by the metabolite transporter voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), the protein translocator of the outer membrane 40 (TOM40), or the fungi-specific MDM10, a component of the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES). MDM10 and TAC40 mediate cellular architecture and participate in transmembrane complexes that are essential for mitochondrial DNA inheritance. In yeast MDM10, in the context of the ERMES, is postulated to connect the mitochondrial genomes to actin filaments, whereas in trypanosomes TAC40 mediates the linkage of the mitochondrial DNA to the basal body of the flagellum. However, TAC40 does not colocalize with trypanosomal orthologs of ERMES components and, unlike MDM10, it regulates neither mitochondrial morphology nor the assembly of the protein translocase. TAC40 therefore defines a novel subclass of mitochondrial porins that is distinct from VDAC, TOM40, and MDM10. However, whereas the architecture of the TAC40-containing complex in trypanosomes and the MDM10-containing ERMES in yeast is very different, both are organized around a β-barrel protein of the mitochondrial porin family that mediates a DNA-cytoskeleton linkage that is essential for mitochondrial DNA inheritance.

  5. Trypanosomal TAC40 constitutes a novel subclass of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins specialized in mitochondrial genome inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Schnarwiler, Felix; Niemann, Moritz; Doiron, Nicholas; Harsman, Anke; Käser, Sandro; Mani, Jan; Chanfon, Astrid; Dewar, Caroline E.; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Jackson, Christopher B.; Pusnik, Mascha; Schmidt, Oliver; Meisinger, Chris; Hiller, Sebastian; Warscheid, Bettina; Schnaufer, Achim C.; Ochsenreiter, Torsten; Schneider, André

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria cannot form de novo but require mechanisms allowing their inheritance to daughter cells. In contrast to most other eukaryotes Trypanosoma brucei has a single mitochondrion whose single-unit genome is physically connected to the flagellum. Here we identify a β-barrel mitochondrial outer membrane protein, termed tripartite attachment complex 40 (TAC40), that localizes to this connection. TAC40 is essential for mitochondrial DNA inheritance and belongs to the mitochondrial porin protein family. However, it is not specifically related to any of the three subclasses of mitochondrial porins represented by the metabolite transporter voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), the protein translocator of the outer membrane 40 (TOM40), or the fungi-specific MDM10, a component of the endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES). MDM10 and TAC40 mediate cellular architecture and participate in transmembrane complexes that are essential for mitochondrial DNA inheritance. In yeast MDM10, in the context of the ERMES, is postulated to connect the mitochondrial genomes to actin filaments, whereas in trypanosomes TAC40 mediates the linkage of the mitochondrial DNA to the basal body of the flagellum. However, TAC40 does not colocalize with trypanosomal orthologs of ERMES components and, unlike MDM10, it regulates neither mitochondrial morphology nor the assembly of the protein translocase. TAC40 therefore defines a novel subclass of mitochondrial porins that is distinct from VDAC, TOM40, and MDM10. However, whereas the architecture of the TAC40-containing complex in trypanosomes and the MDM10-containing ERMES in yeast is very different, both are organized around a β-barrel protein of the mitochondrial porin family that mediates a DNA–cytoskeleton linkage that is essential for mitochondrial DNA inheritance. PMID:24821793

  6. Complete mitochondrial genome of a Wild Amur Moose (Alces alces cameloides).

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanze; Feng, Yuan; Wang, Hongcheng; Yang, Yong; Duan, Yubao; Zhou, Zhengyan; Zhang, Minghai

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome (mt DNA) of Amur Moose (Alces alces cameloides) was sequenced, using muscle tissue obtained from a male Amur moose. The total length of the mitochondrial genome is 16,305 bp. The genome structure of Amur moose is similar to other moose and it contains 12S rRNA gene, 16S rRNA gene, 22 tRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, and 1 control region.

  7. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Greek marsh frog Pelophylax cretensis (Anura, Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Hofman, Sebastian; Pabijan, Maciej; Osikowski, Artur; Szymura, Jacek M

    2016-05-01

    We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of the Greek marsh frog Pelophylax cretensis, a water frog species endemic to the island of Crete. The genome sequence was 17,829 bp in size, and the gene order and contents were identical to those of previously reported mitochondrial genomes of other water frog species. This is the first complete mitogenome (i.e. including control region) described for western Palaearctic water frogs.

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome of the black giant squirrel Ratufa bicolor (Rodentia: Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingming; Wang, Wenquan; Cong, Haiyan; Liu, Zexin; Li, Yuchun

    2015-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of black giant squirrel (Ratufa bicolor) from Hainan Island was sequenced and characterized in detail. The 16,563 bp genome was composed of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and 2 non-coding regions. The mitochondrial genome of R. bicolor presented in this report will be useful for species identification, conversation and clarifying the controversial taxonomic status of genus Ratufa.

  9. Neogastropod phylogenetic relationships based on entire mitochondrial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Regina L; Grande, Cristina; Zardoya, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Background The Neogastropoda is a highly diversified group of predatory marine snails (Gastropoda: Caenogastropoda). Traditionally, its monophyly has been widely accepted based on several morphological synapomorphies mostly related with the digestive system. However, recent molecular phylogenetic studies challenged the monophyly of Neogastropoda due to the inclusion of representatives of other caenogastropod lineages (e.g. Littorinimorpha) within the group. Neogastropoda has been classified into up to six superfamilies including Buccinoidea, Muricoidea, Olivoidea, Pseudolivoidea, Conoidea, and Cancellarioidea. Phylogenetic relationships among neogastropod superfamilies remain unresolved. Results The complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes of seven Neogastropoda (Bolinus brandaris, Cancellaria cancellata, Conus borgesi, Cymbium olla, Fusiturris similis, Nassarius reticulatus, and Terebra dimidiata) and of the tonnoidean Cymatium parthenopeum (Littorinimorpha), a putative sister group to Neogastropoda, were sequenced. In addition, the partial sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the calyptraeoidean Calyptraea chinensis (Littorinimorpha) was also determined. All sequenced neogastropod mt genomes shared a highly conserved gene order with only two instances of tRNA gene translocation. Phylogenetic relationships of Neogastropoda were inferred based on the 13 mt protein coding genes (both at the amino acid and nucleotide level) of all available caenogastropod mitochondrial genomes. Maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) phylogenetic analyses failed to recover the monophyly of Neogastropoda due to the inclusion of the tonnoidean Cymatium parthenopeum within the group. At the superfamily level, all phylogenetic analyses questioned the taxonomic validity of Muricoidea, whereas the monophyly of Conoidea was supported by most phylogenetic analyses, albeit weakly. All analyzed families were recovered as monophyletic except Turridae due to the inclusion of Terebridae

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of the bag-shelter moth Ochrogaster lunifer (Lepidoptera, Notodontidae)

    PubMed Central

    Salvato, Paola; Simonato, Mauro; Battisti, Andrea; Negrisolo, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Background Knowledge of animal mitochondrial genomes is very important to understand their molecular evolution as well as for phylogenetic and population genetic studies. The Lepidoptera encompasses more than 160,000 described species and is one of the largest insect orders. To date only nine lepidopteran mitochondrial DNAs have been fully and two others partly sequenced. Furthermore the taxon sampling is very scant. Thus advance of lepidopteran mitogenomics deeply requires new genomes derived from a broad taxon sampling. In present work we describe the mitochondrial genome of the moth Ochrogaster lunifer. Results The mitochondrial genome of O. lunifer is a circular molecule 15593 bp long. It includes the entire set of 37 genes usually present in animal mitochondrial genomes. It contains also 7 intergenic spacers. The gene order of the newly sequenced genome is that typical for Lepidoptera and differs from the insect ancestral type for the placement of trnM. The 77.84% A+T content of its α strand is the lowest among known lepidopteran genomes. The mitochondrial genome of O. lunifer exhibits one of the most marked C-skew among available insect Pterygota genomes. The protein-coding genes have typical mitochondrial start codons except for cox1 that present an unusual CGA. The O. lunifer genome exhibits the less biased synonymous codon usage among lepidopterans. Comparative genomics analysis study identified atp6, cox1, cox2 as cox3, cob, nad1, nad2, nad4, and nad5 as potential markers for population genetics/phylogenetics studies. A peculiar feature of O. lunifer mitochondrial genome it that the intergenic spacers are mostly made by repetitive sequences. Conclusion The mitochondrial genome of O. lunifer is the first representative of superfamily Noctuoidea that account for about 40% of all described Lepidoptera. New genome shares many features with other known lepidopteran genomes. It differs however for its low A+T content and marked C-skew. Compared to other

  11. Complete mitochondrial genome of Blue-winged Macaw (Primolius maracana).

    PubMed

    Urantowka, Adam Dawid; Mackiewicz, Paweł

    2017-03-01

    abtract The presence of bare facial area distinguishes Macaws from other members of the Arini tribe. Genera and species of the Macaw group differ in pattern of this bare skin as well as in body size. Individuals of the genera: Diopsittaca, Orthopsittaca, and Primolius are significantly smaller than the members of the genera: Anodorhynchus, Cyanopsitta, and the most species of the genus Ara. The genus Primolius contains three species: P. auricollis, P. couloni, and P. maracana, which are classified as medium-sized Macaws. So far, mitochondrial genome representative for the genus was sequenced only for Primolius couloni species. Primolius maracana mitogenome, which was sequenced in this study, will be indispensable to refine the phylogenetic relationships between Primolius species, as results of molecular researches seems to be inconsistent with Primolius species morphology.

  12. Complete mitochondrial genome of Swan goose Anser cygnoides (Anseriformes: Anatidae).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongyu; Li, Bo; Li, Lunyue; Zhou, Lizhi

    2016-09-01

    The Swan goose Anser cygnoides is a large threatened goose species in the IUCN Red List, with a natural breeding range in East Asia, migratory and wintering mainly in central and eastern China. In this study, we used PCR-based method to determine the complete mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) of this Anatidae species. The complete mtDNA is a 16,740 bp circular molecule containing 37 typical genes. The gene order is identical with that of the standard avian gene order. All protein-coding genes start with a typical ATG codon except ND5, COI and COII. The termination codon is usually the standard TAA. The non-coding region contains some inter-genic spacers and a control region.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Coreoperca whiteheadi (Perciformes: Serranidae).

    PubMed

    Lv, Liyuan; Tian, Changxu; Liang, Xufang; Yuan, Yongchao; Zhao, Cheng; Song, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Coreoperca whiteheadi was determined. The complete mtDNA genome sequence of C. whiteheadi is 16,483 bp in length. It consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and 2 non-coding regions. Overall base composition of mitogenome is estimated to be 28.30% for A, 29.33% for C, 16.06% for G and 26.32% for T, respectively, with a high A + T content (54.62%). The complete mitogenome of the C. whiteheadi could contribute to basic researches on population history, molecular systematics and phylogeography. It is also helpful to the reasonable utilization and development of rational management strategies for C. whiteheadi resource.

  14. Complete mitochondrial genome of Cygnus olor (Aves, Anseriformes, Anatidae).

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Eon; Park, Gun-Seok; Kwak, Yunyoung; Hong, Sung-Jun; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Jung, Byung Kwon; Park, Yeong-Jun; Kim, Jong-Guk; Park, Hee Cheon; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Cygnus olor (Aves, Anseriformes, Anatidae) was revealed in this study. Total 16 739 base pairs (bp) of this mitogenome encoded genes for 13 protein coding genes (PCGs), two ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and a D-loop (control region). The 12S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes are located between tRNA-Phe and tRNA-Leu (UUR) and segmentalized by the tRNA-Val. D-loop is located between tRNA-Glu and tRNA-Phe. The overall base composition of C. olor is G + C: 47.8%, A + T: 52.2%, apparently with a slight AT bias. Following the phylogenetic analysis, the C. olor was closed to Anser cygnoides.

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of Gonepteryx mahaguru (Lepidoptera: Pieridae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianing; Xu, Chang; Li, Jialian; Lei, Ying; Fan, Cheng; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Chongren; Wang, Rongjiang

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Gonepteryx mahaguru (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) is 15,221 bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA genes (tRNAs), 2 ribosomal RNA genes (LrRNA and SrRNA) and 1 non-coding A + T-rich region. The nucleotide composition is significantly biased toward A + T (80.9%). All PCGs are initiated by classical ATN codon, with the exception of COI, which begins with TTA codon. Nine PCGs harbor the complete stop codon TAA, whereas COI, COII, ND4 and ND5 stop with incomplete codons, single T or TA. All tRNAs can be folded into the typical cloverleaf secondary structure, except for tRNA(Ser)(AGN). The A + T content of AT-rich region is 95.2%, same to the highest one in the known species in Pieridae.

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome of Babina adenopleura (Anura: Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Yu, Danna; Zhang, Jiayong; Zheng, Rongquan

    2012-12-01

    The mitochondrial (mt) genome of Babina adenopleura (Anura: Ranidae) is a circular molecule of 18,982 bp in length, containing 38 genes as well as other anurans. The complete mtDNA of B. adenopleura is 18,982 bp in length, and the A+T content of the overall base composition of H-strand is 58.9% (T, 29.8%; C, 26.6%; A, 29.1%; G, 14.4%). The control regions are 3159 bp in length, and the A+T content of this region is 70.2% (A, 36.6%; C, 16.8%; G, 12.9%; T, 33.6%). The control region possesses distinct repeat regions at both 5' and 3' sides. A long space region between ND5 and ND6 genes is 461 bp.

  17. The complete mitochondrial genome of Lithobates catesbeianus (Anura: Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Lin, Yubo; Tao, Bofang; Fang, Xindong; Wang, Tingting; Zhang, Jiayong

    2014-12-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Lithobates catesbeianus (Anura: Ranidae) is sequenced to analyze the gene arrangement. It is a circular molecule of 18,241 bp in length including 37 genes typically found in other frogs. The AT content of the overall base composition of L. catesbeianus is 59.9%. The length of control region is 2783 bp with 66.0% AT content. Protein-coding genes begin with ATG as start codon except except ND1 and ATP6 began with ATA, COI and ND4L with GTG, and ND2 with ATT. COI end with AGG as stop codon, COII and ND6 end with AGA, ND2 end with TAG, ATP8. ND4L. ND5 and Cytb end with TAA, and the other five PCGs end with a incomplete stop codon (a single stop nucleotide T).

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Rana huanrensis (Anura: Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Dong, Bingjun; Zhou, Yu; Yang, Baotian

    2016-11-01

    We first determined complete mitochondrial genomes of R. huanrensis (Anura: Ranidae). The complete mtDNA sequence is 19 253 bp in length, including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and one displacement loop. The start/stop codons of protein-coding genes are similar to which of R. chensinensis. D-loop region of R. huanrensis is 3448 bp in size, contains many tandem repeat units. The phylogenetic trees of 18 species from Ranidae were reconstructed by BI and ML analyses. The result indicated that R. huanrensis is the most closely related species with other Rana species. The molecular data are expected to provide a useful tool for population genetics studies of this species and further phylogenetic analyses of Ranidae.

  19. Characterization of the mitochondrial genome of Amolops tuberodepressus (Anura: Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaohua; Xia, Yun; Zeng, Xiaomao

    2016-07-01

    Amolops tuberodepressus is a vulnerable torrent frog, and only know distributed in the Wuliang Mountain in southwestern China. In the present study, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of A. tuberodepressus was determined. The genome was 18 348 bp in length, and it contained 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNAs, and 22 transfer RNAs), one partial control region and one light strand replication origin. The gene rearrangement was observed within the WANCY tRNA gene cluster region, which similar to other Amolops species. In this paper, we utilized 13 protein-coding genes of A. tuberodepressus and other 10 closely ranid species to construct the species phylogenetic tree to verify the A. tuberodepressus was accuracy.

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of Leiolepis reevesii (Sauria, Agamidae).

    PubMed

    Tong, Qing-Lin; Du, Yu; Lin, Long-Hui; Ji, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report the complete mitochondrial genome of Leiolepis reevesii (Sauria, Agamidae), which is a circular molecule of 16,908 bp in size and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs and a control region. The A+T content of overall base composition of H-strand is 59.8% (T: 25.1%, C: 27.5%, A: 34.7%, G: 12.7%). Some short microsatellite-like repeat regions (polyA and polyT) are scattered in the control region. All the results provide powerful data to further study of the molecular systematics, species identification and conservation genetics.

  1. The complete mitochondrial genome of Bemisia afer (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Ling; Xiao, Na; Yang, Jiao; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Colvin, John; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The length of the Bemisia afer (Priesner & Hosny) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) is 14,968 bp and consists of 13 protein coding genes (PCGs), 21 transfer RNAs (tRNA), 2 ribosomal RNAs and 1 control region. Apart from one serine transfer RNA gene (tRNA-Ser) which is absent, the synteny is consistent with the mitogenomes of other whitefly species. The overall base composition of the heavy strand for A, G, T and C is 28.96, 18.97, 36.7 and 15.37%, respectively, with a slight AT bias. Two rare codons (GTG and TTG) are employed as start codons by some PCGs. B. afer is a group of cryptic species. This first mitogenome cloned from African cassava B. afer, therefore, both enrich the whitefly molecular resource and will aid the sequencing of the other species' mitogenomes. It will contribute significantly to resolving the systematics of the B. afer complex.

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of natural Cobitis elongatoides (Cypriniformes: Cobitidae).

    PubMed

    Huang, Songqian; Tomljanovic, Tea; Tian, Xianchang; Wang, Yizhou; Cao, Xiaojuan

    2016-01-01

    Cobitis elongatoides is a small sized freshwater fish species that is widely distributed in Europe, especially in Croatia. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of C. elongatoides is sequenced to be 16,540 bp in length, including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs, a control region and the origin of the light strand replication. The overall base composition of C. elongatoides in descending order is A 29.37%, T 28.53%, C 25.34%, and G 16.76%, with a slight A + T bias. The mitogenome sequence data may provide useful information to the population genetics analysis of C. elongatoides and the elucidation of evolutionary mechanisms in Cobitidae.

  3. Improved Calibration of the Human Mitochondrial Clock Using Ancient Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Rieux, Adrien; Eriksson, Anders; Li, Mingkun; Sobkowiak, Benjamin; Weinert, Lucy A.; Warmuth, Vera; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Manica, Andrea; Balloux, François

    2014-01-01

    Reliable estimates of the rate at which DNA accumulates mutations (the substitution rate) are crucial for our understanding of the evolution and past demography of virtually any species. In humans, there are considerable uncertainties around these rates, with substantial variation among recent published estimates. Substitution rates have traditionally been estimated by associating dated events to the root (e.g., the divergence between humans and chimpanzees) or to internal nodes in a phylogenetic tree (e.g., first entry into the Americas). The recent availability of ancient mitochondrial DNA sequences allows for a more direct calibration by assigning the age of the sequenced samples to the tips within the human phylogenetic tree. But studies also vary greatly in the methodology employed and in the sequence panels analyzed, making it difficult to tease apart the causes for the differences between previous estimates. To clarify this issue, we compiled a comprehensive data set of 350 ancient and modern human complete mitochondrial DNA genomes, among which 146 were generated for the purpose of this study and estimated substitution rates using calibrations based both on dated nodes and tips. Our results demonstrate that, for the same data set, estimates based on individual dated tips are far more consistent with each other than those based on nodes and should thus be considered as more reliable. PMID:25100861

  4. Complete mitochondrial genome of the sandfish Holothuria scabra (Holothuroidea, Holothuriidae).

    PubMed

    Xia, Jianjun; Ren, Chunhua; Yu, Zonghe; Wu, Xiangyun; Qian, Jing; Hu, Chaoqun

    2016-11-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of Holothuria scabra, an economically and ecologically important tropical sea cucumber, was first sequenced and annotated. The mitochondrial DNA is 15,779 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and a 456 bp putative control region, of which gene order is identical to the echinoderm ground pattern. Comparative analyses between H. scabra and other holothurians revealed three new findings: (1) the mitogenome of H. scabra is highly compact having five regions with overlapping genes and least intergenic nucleotides among the sequenced holothurians, only accounting for 3.58% of its mitogenome; (2) the genus Holothuria mitogenomes show a pattern of high interspecies divergence at the 13 PCGs, and the genetic p-distance reaches 25.68% between H. scabra and H. forskali; (3) the incomplete stop codon T of cox2 shared with H. forskali may be a common feature in the genus Holothuria.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of Triphysa phryne (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Gan, Shanshan; Zuo, Ni; Chen, Chunhui; Wang, Ying; Hao, Jiasheng

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of Triphysa phryne (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae) was determined in this study. The mitogenome is 15,143 bp in length, containing 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes: 13 putative protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs and a non-coding AT-rich region. Its gene content and order are identical to those of other lepidopteran mitogenomes. All protein-coding genes (PCGs) are initiated by ATN codons, except for COI gene which uses CGA as its start codon. Nine PCGs terminate in the common stop TAA, whereas the COI, COII, ND5 and ND4 genes end with single T. All tRNA genes showed typical secondary cloverleaf structures except for the tRNA(Ser)(AGN), which has a simple loop with the absence of its DHU stem. The 316 bp AT-rich region contains several features common to the other lepidopterans, such as the motif ATAGA followed by an 19-bp poly-T stretch and two microsatellite-like (TA)8(AT) and (TA)4 elements preceded by the ATTTA motif.

  6. Population genetics inside a cell: Mutations and mitochondrial genome maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sidhartha; Shraiman, Boris; Gottschling, Dan

    2012-02-01

    In realistic ecological and evolutionary systems natural selection acts on multiple levels, i.e. it acts on individuals as well as on collection of individuals. An understanding of evolutionary dynamics of such systems is limited in large part due to the lack of experimental systems that can challenge theoretical models. Mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA) are subjected to selection acting on cellular as well as organelle levels. It is well accepted that mtDNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unstable and can degrade over time scales comparable to yeast cell division time. We utilize a recent technology designed in Gottschling lab to extract DNA from populations of aged yeast cells and deep sequencing to characterize mtDNA variation in a population of young and old cells. In tandem, we developed a stochastic model that includes the essential features of mitochondrial biology that provides a null model for expected mtDNA variation. Overall, we find approximately 2% of the polymorphic loci that show significant increase in frequency as cells age providing direct evidence for organelle level selection. Such quantitative study of mtDNA dynamics is absolutely essential to understand the propagation of mtDNA mutations linked to a spectrum of age-related diseases in humans.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of Rondotia menciana (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Weiqing; Yang, Jinhong

    2015-01-01

    The mulberry white caterpillar, Rondotia menciana Moore (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae) is a species with closest relationship with Bombyx mori and Bombyx mandarina, and the genetic information of R. menciana is important for understanding the diversity of the Bombycidae. In this study, the mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of R. menciana was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The mitogenome of R. menciana was determined to be 15,301 bp, including 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and an AT-rich region. The A+T content (78.87%) was lower than that observed for other Bombycidae insects. All PCGs were initiated by ATN codons and terminated with the canonical stop codons, except for coxII, which was terminated by a single T. All the tRNA genes displayed a typical clover-leaf structure of mitochondrial tRNA. The length of AT-rich region (360 bp) of R. menciana mitogenome is shorter than that of other Bombycidae species. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the R. menciana was clustered on one branch with B. mori and B. mandarina from Bombycidae. PMID:25888706

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome sequences of three Crocodylus species and their comparison within the Order Crocodylia.

    PubMed

    Meganathan, P R; Dubey, Bhawna; Batzer, Mark A; Ray, David A; Haque, Ikramul

    2011-06-01

    Crocodylus is the largest genus within the Order Crocodylia consisting of eleven species. This paper reports the complete mitochondrial genome sequences of three Crocodylus species, Crocodylus moreletii, Crocodylus johnstoni and Crocodylus palustris, and compares the newly obtained mitochondrial DNA sequences with other crocodilians, available in the public databases. The mitochondrial genomes of C. moreletii, C. johnstoni and C. palustris are 16,827 bp, 16,851 bp and 16,852 bp in length, respectively. These mitochondrial genomes consist of 13 protein coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a non-coding region. The mitochondrial genomes of all the Crocodylus species, studied herein show identical characteristics in terms of nucleotide composition and codon usage, suggestive of the existence of analogous evolutionary patterns within the genus, Crocodylus. The synonymous and non-synonymous substitution rates for all the protein coding genes of Crocodylus were observed in between 0.001 and 0.275 which reveal the prevalence of purifying selection in these genes. The phylogenetic analyses based on complete mitochondrial DNA data substantiate the previously established crocodilian phylogeny. This study provides a better understanding of the crocodilian mitochondrial genome and the data described herein will prove useful for future studies concerning crocodilian mitochondrial genome evolution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A genome-wide map of mitochondrial DNA recombination in yeast.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Emilie S; Chabbert, Christophe D; Klaus, Bernd; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the production of cellular energy requires close interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The mitochondrial genome is essential in that it encodes several genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Each cell contains several mitochondrial genome copies and mitochondrial DNA recombination is a widespread process occurring in plants, fungi, protists, and invertebrates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be an excellent model to dissect mitochondrial biology. Several studies have focused on DNA recombination in this organelle, yet mostly relied on reporter genes or artificial systems. However, no complete mitochondrial recombination map has been released for any eukaryote so far. In the present work, we sequenced pools of diploids originating from a cross between two different S. cerevisiae strains to detect recombination events. This strategy allowed us to generate the first genome-wide map of recombination for yeast mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that recombination events are enriched in specific hotspots preferentially localized in non-protein-coding regions. Additionally, comparison of the recombination profiles of two different crosses showed that the genetic background affects hotspot localization and recombination rates. Finally, to gain insights into the mechanisms involved in mitochondrial recombination, we assessed the impact of individual depletion of four genes previously associated with this process. Deletion of NTG1 and MGT1 did not substantially influence the recombination landscape, alluding to the potential presence of additional regulatory factors. Our findings also revealed the loss of large mitochondrial DNA regions in the absence of MHR1, suggesting a pivotal role for Mhr1 in mitochondrial genome maintenance during mating. This study provides a comprehensive overview of mitochondrial DNA recombination in yeast and thus paves the way for future mechanistic studies of mitochondrial recombination and genome

  10. A Genome-Wide Map of Mitochondrial DNA Recombination in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Emilie S.; Chabbert, Christophe D.; Klaus, Bernd; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the production of cellular energy requires close interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The mitochondrial genome is essential in that it encodes several genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Each cell contains several mitochondrial genome copies and mitochondrial DNA recombination is a widespread process occurring in plants, fungi, protists, and invertebrates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be an excellent model to dissect mitochondrial biology. Several studies have focused on DNA recombination in this organelle, yet mostly relied on reporter genes or artificial systems. However, no complete mitochondrial recombination map has been released for any eukaryote so far. In the present work, we sequenced pools of diploids originating from a cross between two different S. cerevisiae strains to detect recombination events. This strategy allowed us to generate the first genome-wide map of recombination for yeast mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that recombination events are enriched in specific hotspots preferentially localized in non-protein-coding regions. Additionally, comparison of the recombination profiles of two different crosses showed that the genetic background affects hotspot localization and recombination rates. Finally, to gain insights into the mechanisms involved in mitochondrial recombination, we assessed the impact of individual depletion of four genes previously associated with this process. Deletion of NTG1 and MGT1 did not substantially influence the recombination landscape, alluding to the potential presence of additional regulatory factors. Our findings also revealed the loss of large mitochondrial DNA regions in the absence of MHR1, suggesting a pivotal role for Mhr1 in mitochondrial genome maintenance during mating. This study provides a comprehensive overview of mitochondrial DNA recombination in yeast and thus paves the way for future mechanistic studies of mitochondrial recombination and genome

  11. Evolutionary History of Chimpanzees Inferred from Complete Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Bjork, Adam; Liu, Weimin; Wertheim, Joel O.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Worobey, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Investigations into the evolutionary history of the common chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes, have produced inconsistent results due to differences in the types of molecular data considered, the model assumptions employed, and the quantity and geographical range of samples used. We amplified and sequenced 24 complete P. troglodytes mitochondrial genomes from fecal samples collected at multiple study sites throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Using a “relaxed molecular clock,” fossil calibrations, and 12 additional complete primate mitochondrial genomes, we analyzed the pattern and timing of primate diversification in a Bayesian framework. Our results support the recognition of four chimpanzee subspecies. Within P. troglodytes, we report a mean (95% highest posterior density [HPD]) time since most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) of 1.026 (0.811–1.263) Ma for the four proposed subspecies, with two major lineages. One of these lineages (tMRCA = 0.510 [0.387–0.650] Ma) contains P. t. verus (tMRCA = 0.155 [0.101–0.213] Ma) and P. t. ellioti (formerly P. t. vellerosus; tMRCA = 0.157 [0.102–0.215] Ma), both of which are monophyletic. The other major lineage contains P. t. schweinfurthii (tMRCA = 0.111 [0.077–0.146] Ma), a monophyletic clade nested within the P. t. troglodytes lineage (tMRCA = 0.380 [0.296–0.476] Ma). We utilized two analysis techniques that may be of widespread interest. First, we implemented a Yule speciation prior across the entire primate tree with separate coalescent priors on each of the chimpanzee subspecies. The validity of this approach was confirmed by estimates based on more traditional techniques. We also suggest that accurate tMRCA estimates from large computationally difficult sequence alignments may be obtained by implementing our novel method of bootstrapping smaller randomly subsampled alignments. PMID:20802239

  12. Complete mitochondrial genomes of two flat-backed millipedes by next-generation sequencing (Diplopoda, Polydesmida)

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yan; Zhu, Lixin; Bai, Yu; Ou, Yongyue; Wang, Changbao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A lack of mitochondrial genome data from myriapods is hampering progress across genetic, systematic, phylogenetic and evolutionary studies. Here, the complete mitochondrial genomes of two millipedes, Asiomorpha coarctata Saussure, 1860 (Diplopoda: Polydesmida: Paradoxosomatidae) and Xystodesmus sp. (Diplopoda: Polydesmida: Xystodesmidae) were assembled with high coverage using Illumina sequencing data. The mitochondrial genomes of the two newly sequenced species are circular molecules of 15,644 bp and 15,791 bp, within which the typical mitochondrial genome complement of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs and two ribosomal RNA genes could be identified. The mitochondrial genome of Asiomorpha coarctata is the first complete sequence in the family Paradoxosomatidae (Diplopoda: Polydesmida) and the gene order of the two flat-backed millipedes is novel among known myriapod mitochondrial genomes. Unique translocations have occurred, including inversion of one half of the two genomes with respect to other millipede genomes. Inversion of the entire side of a genome (trnF-nad5-trnH-nad4-nad4L, trnP, nad1-trnL2-trnL1-rrnL-trnV-rrnS, trnQ, trnC and trnY) could constitute a common event in the order Polydesmida. Last, our phylogenetic analyses recovered the monophyletic Progoneata, subphylum Myriapoda and four internal classes. PMID:28138271

  13. Complete mitochondrial genomes of two flat-backed millipedes by next-generation sequencing (Diplopoda, Polydesmida).

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan; Zhu, Lixin; Bai, Yu; Ou, Yongyue; Wang, Changbao

    2016-01-01

    A lack of mitochondrial genome data from myriapods is hampering progress across genetic, systematic, phylogenetic and evolutionary studies. Here, the complete mitochondrial genomes of two millipedes, Asiomorpha coarctata Saussure, 1860 (Diplopoda: Polydesmida: Paradoxosomatidae) and Xystodesmus sp. (Diplopoda: Polydesmida: Xystodesmidae) were assembled with high coverage using Illumina sequencing data. The mitochondrial genomes of the two newly sequenced species are circular molecules of 15,644 bp and 15,791 bp, within which the typical mitochondrial genome complement of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs and two ribosomal RNA genes could be identified. The mitochondrial genome of Asiomorpha coarctata is the first complete sequence in the family Paradoxosomatidae (Diplopoda: Polydesmida) and the gene order of the two flat-backed millipedes is novel among known myriapod mitochondrial genomes. Unique translocations have occurred, including inversion of one half of the two genomes with respect to other millipede genomes. Inversion of the entire side of a genome (trnF-nad5-trnH-nad4-nad4L, trnP, nad1-trnL2-trnL1-rrnL-trnV-rrnS, trnQ, trnC and trnY) could constitute a common event in the order Polydesmida. Last, our phylogenetic analyses recovered the monophyletic Progoneata, subphylum Myriapoda and four internal classes.

  14. A mitochondrial genome phylogeny of owlet moths (Lepidoptera: Noctuoidea), and examination of the utility of mitochondrial genomes for lepidopteran phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiushuai; Cameron, Stephen L; Lees, David C; Xue, Dayong; Han, Hongxiang

    2015-04-01

    A phylogenetic hypothesis for the lepidopteran superfamily Noctuoidea was inferred based on the complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes of 12 species (six newly sequenced). The monophyly of each noctuoid family in the latest classification was well supported. Novel and robust relationships were recovered at the family level, in contrast to previous analyses using nuclear genes. Erebidae was recovered as sister to (Nolidae+(Euteliidae+Noctuidae)), while Notodontidae was sister to all these taxa (the putatively basalmost lineage Oenosandridae was not included). In order to improve phylogenetic resolution using mt genomes, various analytical approaches were tested: Bayesian inference (BI) vs. maximum likelihood (ML), excluding vs. including RNA genes (rRNA or tRNA), and Gblocks treatment. The evolutionary signal within mt genomes had low sensitivity to analytical changes. Inference methods had the most significant influence. Inclusion of tRNAs positively increased the congruence of topologies, while inclusion of rRNAs resulted in a range of phylogenetic relationships varying depending on other analytical factors. The two Gblocks parameter settings had opposite effects on nodal support between the two inference methods. The relaxed parameter (GBRA) resulted in higher support values in BI analyses, while the strict parameter (GBDH) resulted in higher support values in ML analyses.

  15. The Multipartite Mitochondrial Genome of Liposcelis bostrychophila: Insights into the Evolution of Mitochondrial Genomes in Bilateral Animals

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ming-Long; Dou, Wei; Barker, Stephen C.; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Booklice (order Psocoptera) in the genus Liposcelis are major pests to stored grains worldwide and are closely related to parasitic lice (order Phthiraptera). We sequenced the mitochondrial (mt) genome of Liposcelis bostrychophila and found that the typical single mt chromosome of bilateral animals has fragmented into and been replaced by two medium-sized chromosomes in this booklouse; each of these chromosomes has about half of the genes of the typical mt chromosome of bilateral animals. These mt chromosomes are 8,530 bp (mt chromosome I) and 7,933 bp (mt chromosome II) in size. Intriguingly, mt chromosome I is twice as abundant as chromosome II. It appears that the selection pressure for compact mt genomes in bilateral animals favors small mt chromosomes when small mt chromosomes co-exist with the typical large mt chromosomes. Thus, small mt chromosomes may have selective advantages over large mt chromosomes in bilateral animals. Phylogenetic analyses of mt genome sequences of Psocodea (i.e. Psocoptera plus Phthiraptera) indicate that: 1) the order Psocoptera (booklice and barklice) is paraphyletic; and 2) the order Phthiraptera (the parasitic lice) is monophyletic. Within parasitic lice, however, the suborder Ischnocera is paraphyletic; this differs from the traditional view that each suborder of parasitic lice is monophyletic. PMID:22479490

  16. Reconstructing mitochondrial genomes directly from genomic next-generation sequencing reads—a baiting and iterative mapping approach

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Christoph; Bachmann, Lutz; Chevreux, Bastien

    2013-01-01

    We present an in silico approach for the reconstruction of complete mitochondrial genomes of non-model organisms directly from next-generation sequencing (NGS) data—mitochondrial baiting and iterative mapping (MITObim). The method is straightforward even if only (i) distantly related mitochondrial genomes or (ii) mitochondrial barcode sequences are available as starting-reference sequences or seeds, respectively. We demonstrate the efficiency of the approach in case studies using real NGS data sets of the two monogenean ectoparasites species Gyrodactylus thymalli and Gyrodactylus derjavinoides including their respective teleost hosts European grayling (Thymallus thymallus) and Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). MITObim appeared superior to existing tools in terms of accuracy, runtime and memory requirements and fully automatically recovered mitochondrial genomes exceeding 99.5% accuracy from total genomic DNA derived NGS data sets in <24 h using a standard desktop computer. The approach overcomes the limitations of traditional strategies for obtaining mitochondrial genomes for species with little or no mitochondrial sequence information at hand and represents a fast and highly efficient in silico alternative to laborious conventional strategies relying on initial long-range PCR. We furthermore demonstrate the applicability of MITObim for metagenomic/pooled data sets using simulated data. MITObim is an easy to use tool even for biologists with modest bioinformatics experience. The software is made available as open source pipeline under the MIT license at https://github.com/chrishah/MITObim. PMID:23661685

  17. Reconstructing mitochondrial genomes directly from genomic next-generation sequencing reads--a baiting and iterative mapping approach.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Christoph; Bachmann, Lutz; Chevreux, Bastien

    2013-07-01

    We present an in silico approach for the reconstruction of complete mitochondrial genomes of non-model organisms directly from next-generation sequencing (NGS) data-mitochondrial baiting and iterative mapping (MITObim). The method is straightforward even if only (i) distantly related mitochondrial genomes or (ii) mitochondrial barcode sequences are available as starting-reference sequences or seeds, respectively. We demonstrate the efficiency of the approach in case studies using real NGS data sets of the two monogenean ectoparasites species Gyrodactylus thymalli and Gyrodactylus derjavinoides including their respective teleost hosts European grayling (Thymallus thymallus) and Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). MITObim appeared superior to existing tools in terms of accuracy, runtime and memory requirements and fully automatically recovered mitochondrial genomes exceeding 99.5% accuracy from total genomic DNA derived NGS data sets in <24 h using a standard desktop computer. The approach overcomes the limitations of traditional strategies for obtaining mitochondrial genomes for species with little or no mitochondrial sequence information at hand and represents a fast and highly efficient in silico alternative to laborious conventional strategies relying on initial long-range PCR. We furthermore demonstrate the applicability of MITObim for metagenomic/pooled data sets using simulated data. MITObim is an easy to use tool even for biologists with modest bioinformatics experience. The software is made available as open source pipeline under the MIT license at https://github.com/chrishah/MITObim.

  18. The mitochondrial genome map of Nelumbo nucifera reveals ancient evolutionary features

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Songtao; Wu, Zhihua; Zhang, Hongyuan; Zheng, Yinzhen; Zhu, Zhixuan; Liang, Dequan; Ding, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Nelumbo nucifera is an evolutionary relic from the Late Cretaceous period. Sequencing the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome is important for elucidating the evolutionary characteristics of basal eudicots. Here, the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome was sequenced using single molecule real-time sequencing technology (SMRT), and the mitochondrial genome map was constructed after de novo assembly and annotation. The results showed that the 524,797-bp N. nucifera mitochondrial genome has a total of 63 genes, including 40 protein-coding genes, three rRNA genes and 20 tRNA genes. Fifteen collinear gene clusters were conserved across different plant species. Approximately 700 RNA editing sites in the protein-coding genes were identified. Positively selected genes were identified with selection pressure analysis. Nineteen chloroplast-derived fragments were identified, and seven tRNAs were derived from the chloroplast. These results suggest that the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome retains evolutionarily conserved characteristics, including ancient gene content and gene clusters, high levels of RNA editing, and low levels of chloroplast-derived fragment insertions. As the first publicly available basal eudicot mitochondrial genome, the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome facilitates further analysis of the characteristics of basal eudicots and provides clues of the evolutionary trajectory from basal angiosperms to advanced eudicots. PMID:27444405

  19. Mitochondrial disease genetic diagnostics: optimized whole-exome analysis for all MitoCarta nuclear genes and the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Falk, Marni J; Pierce, Eric A; Consugar, Mark; Xie, Michael H; Guadalupe, Moraima; Hardy, Owen; Rappaport, Eric F; Wallace, Douglas C; LeProust, Emily; Gai, Xiaowu

    2012-12-01

    Discovering causative genetic variants in individual cases of suspected mitochondrial disease requires interrogation of both the mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nuclear genomes. Whole-exome sequencing can support simultaneous dual-genome analysis, although currently available capture kits do not target the mtDNA genome and provide insufficient capture for some nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. To optimize interrogation of nuclear and mtDNA genes relevant to mitochondrial biology and disease, a custom SureSelect "Mito-Plus" whole-exome library was formulated by blending RNA "baits" from three separate designs: (A) Agilent Technologies SureSelectXT 50 Mb All Exon PLUS Targeted Enrichment Kit, (B) 16-gene nuclear panel targeting sequences for known MitoCarta proteins not included in the 50 Mb All Exon design, and (C) sequences targeting the entire mtDNA genome. The final custom formulations consisted of a 1:1 ratio of nuclear baits to which a 1 to 1,000-fold diluted ratio of mtDNA genome baits were blended. Patient sample capture libraries were paired-end sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 system using v3.0 SBS chemistry. mtDNA genome coverage varied depending on the mtDNA:nuclear blend ratio, where a 1:100 ratio provided optimal dual-genome coverage with 10X coverage for over 97.5% of all targeted nuclear regions and 1,000X coverage for 99.8% of the mtDNA genome. mtDNA mutations were reliably detected to at least an 8% heteroplasmy level, as discriminated both from sequencing errors and potential contamination from nuclear mtDNA transcripts (Numts). The "1:100 Mito-Plus Whole-Exome" Agilent capture kit offers an optimized tool for whole-exome analysis of nuclear and mtDNA genes relevant to the diagnostic evaluation of mitochondrial disease.

  20. Complete mitochondrial genome of the San Lucan gecko, Phyllodactylus unctus (Sauria, Gekkota, Phyllodactylidae), in comparison with Tarentola mauritanica.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jie; Tian, Chao; Lv, Linna; Bauer, Aaron M; Zhou, Kaiya

    2014-06-01

    We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of the San Lucan gecko, Phyllodactylus unctus, which is endemic to Mexico. The complete mitochondrial genome was 16,881 bp in size, consisting of 37 genes coding for 13 proteins, 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs and 1 control region. Its gene arrangement pattern was identical with most vertebrates. We compared the mitochondrial genome of P. unctus with that of the Moorish gecko, Tarentola mauritanica, which is the only other sequenced species from Phyllodactylidae. Nucleotide sequence divergence (p distance) between two mitochondrial genomes was 31.32%. The detailed comparison between the mitochondrial genomes of two species was done.

  1. Structure, transcription, and variability of metazoan mitochondrial genome: perspectives from an unusual mitochondrial inheritance system.

    PubMed

    Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Milani, Liliana; Guerra, Davide; Chang, Peter L; Breton, Sophie; Nuzhdin, Sergey V; Passamonti, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Despite its functional conservation, the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) presents strikingly different features among eukaryotes, such as size, rearrangements, and amount of intergenic regions. Nonadaptive processes such as random genetic drift and mutation rate play a fundamental role in shaping mtDNA: the mitochondrial bottleneck and the number of germ line replications are critical factors, and different patterns of germ line differentiation could be responsible for the mtDNA diversity observed in eukaryotes. Among metazoan, bivalve mollusc mtDNAs show unusual features, like hypervariable gene arrangements, high mutation rates, large amount of intergenic regions, and, in some species, an unique inheritance system, the doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI). The DUI system offers the possibility to study the evolutionary dynamics of mtDNAs that, despite being in the same organism, experience different genetic drift and selective pressures. We used the DUI species Ruditapes philippinarum to study intergenic mtDNA functions, mitochondrial transcription, and polymorphism in gonads. We observed: 1) the presence of conserved functional elements and novel open reading frames (ORFs) that could explain the evolutionary persistence of intergenic regions and may be involved in DUI-specific features; 2) that mtDNA transcription is lineage-specific and independent from the nuclear background; and 3) that male-transmitted and female-transmitted mtDNAs have a similar amount of polymorphism but of different kinds, due to different population size and selection efficiency. Our results are consistent with the hypotheses that mtDNA evolution is strongly dependent on the dynamics of germ line formation, and that the establishment of a male-transmitted mtDNA lineage can increase male fitness through selection on sperm function.

  2. Structure, Transcription, and Variability of Metazoan Mitochondrial Genome: Perspectives from an Unusual Mitochondrial Inheritance System

    PubMed Central

    Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Milani, Liliana; Guerra, Davide; Chang, Peter L.; Breton, Sophie; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.; Passamonti, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Despite its functional conservation, the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) presents strikingly different features among eukaryotes, such as size, rearrangements, and amount of intergenic regions. Nonadaptive processes such as random genetic drift and mutation rate play a fundamental role in shaping mtDNA: the mitochondrial bottleneck and the number of germ line replications are critical factors, and different patterns of germ line differentiation could be responsible for the mtDNA diversity observed in eukaryotes. Among metazoan, bivalve mollusc mtDNAs show unusual features, like hypervariable gene arrangements, high mutation rates, large amount of intergenic regions, and, in some species, an unique inheritance system, the doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI). The DUI system offers the possibility to study the evolutionary dynamics of mtDNAs that, despite being in the same organism, experience different genetic drift and selective pressures. We used the DUI species Ruditapes philippinarum to study intergenic mtDNA functions, mitochondrial transcription, and polymorphism in gonads. We observed: 1) the presence of conserved functional elements and novel open reading frames (ORFs) that could explain the evolutionary persistence of intergenic regions and may be involved in DUI-specific features; 2) that mtDNA transcription is lineage-specific and independent from the nuclear background; and 3) that male-transmitted and female-transmitted mtDNAs have a similar amount of polymorphism but of different kinds, due to different population size and selection efficiency. Our results are consistent with the hypotheses that mtDNA evolution is strongly dependent on the dynamics of germ line formation, and that the establishment of a male-transmitted mtDNA lineage can increase male fitness through selection on sperm function. PMID:23882128

  3. A novel component of the mitochondrial genome segregation machinery in trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Anneliese; Jakob, Martin; Ochsenreiter, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    We recently described a new component (TAC102) of the mitochondrial genome segregation machinery (mtGSM) in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. T. brucei belongs to a group of organisms that contain a single mitochondrial organelle with a single mitochondrial genome (mt-genome) per cell. The mt-genome consists of 5000 minicircles (1 kb) and 25 maxicircles (23 kb) that are catenated into a large network. After replication of the network its segregation is driven by the separating basal bodies, which are homologous structures to the centrioles organizing the spindle apparatus in many eukaryotes. The structure connecting the basal body to the mt-genome was named the Tripartite Attachment Complex (TAC) owing its name to the distribution across three areas in the cell including the two mitochondrial membranes. PMID:28357371

  4. The complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of Rongchang pig (Sus Scrofa).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Yu; Xu, Dong; Ma, Hai-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Rongchang pig is one of the native breeds in Sichuan province in China. The total length of mitochondrial genome of Rongchang pig is 16,710 bp, including 34.67% A, 26.18% C, 25.82% T and 13.33% G, and in the order A > C > T > G. Mitochondrial genome contains a major non-coding control region (D-Loop region), 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs) and 22 transfer RNA genes. This is the first report of the complete mitochondrial genome sequence about Rongchang pig. The mitochondrial genome of Rongchang pig subsequently provides an important information in genetic mechanism and the evolution genomes.

  5. The mitochondrial genome of the ascalaphid owlfly Libelloides macaronius and comparative evolutionary mitochondriomics of neuropterid insects.

    PubMed

    Negrisolo, Enrico; Babbucci, Massimiliano; Patarnello, Tomaso

    2011-05-10

    The insect order Neuroptera encompasses more than 5,700 described species. To date, only three neuropteran mitochondrial genomes have been fully and one partly sequenced. Current knowledge on neuropteran mitochondrial genomes is limited, and new data are strongly required. In the present work, the mitochondrial genome of the ascalaphid owlfly Libelloides macaronius is described and compared with the known neuropterid mitochondrial genomes: Megaloptera, Neuroptera and Raphidioptera. These analyses are further extended to other endopterygotan orders. The mitochondrial genome of L. macaronius is a circular molecule 15,890 bp long. It includes the entire set of 37 genes usually present in animal mitochondrial genomes. The gene order of this newly sequenced genome is unique among Neuroptera and differs from the ancestral type of insects in the translocation of trnC. The L. macaronius genome shows the lowest A+T content (74.50%) among known neuropterid genomes. Protein-coding genes possess the typical mitochondrial start codons, except for cox1, which has an unusual ACG. Comparisons among endopterygotan mitochondrial genomes showed that A+T content and AT/GC-skews exhibit a broad range of variation among 84 analyzed taxa. Comparative analyses showed that neuropterid mitochondrial protein-coding genes experienced complex evolutionary histories, involving features ranging from codon usage to rate of substitution, that make them potential markers for population genetics/phylogenetics studies at different taxonomic ranks. The 22 tRNAs show variable substitution patterns in Neuropterida, with higher sequence conservation in genes located on the α strand. Inferred secondary structures for neuropterid rrnS and rrnL genes largely agree with those known for other insects. For the first time, a model is provided for domain I of an insect rrnL. The control region in Neuropterida, as in other insects, is fast-evolving genomic region, characterized by AT-rich motifs. The new genome

  6. NCBI reference sequences (RefSeq): a curated non-redundant sequence database of genomes, transcripts and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Kim D.; Tatusova, Tatiana; Maglott, Donna R.

    2007-01-01

    NCBI's reference sequence (RefSeq) database () is a curated non-redundant collection of sequences representing genomes, transcripts and proteins. The database includes 3774 organisms spanning prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses, and has records for 2 879 860 proteins (RefSeq release 19). RefSeq records integrate information from multiple sources, when additional data are available from those sources and therefore represent a current description of the sequence and its features. Annotations include coding regions, conserved domains, tRNAs, sequence tagged sites (STS), variation, references, gene and protein product names, and database cross-references. Sequence is reviewed and features are added using a combined approach of collaboration and other input from the scientific community, prediction, propagation from GenBank and curation by NCBI staff. The format of all RefSeq records is validated, and an increasing number of tests are being applied to evaluate the quality of sequence and annotation, especially in the context of complete genomic sequence. PMID:17130148

  7. NCBI reference sequences (RefSeq): a curated non-redundant sequence database of genomes, transcripts and proteins.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana; Maglott, Donna R

    2007-01-01

    NCBI's reference sequence (RefSeq) database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/) is a curated non-redundant collection of sequences representing genomes, transcripts and proteins. The database includes 3774 organisms spanning prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses, and has records for 2,879,860 proteins (RefSeq release 19). RefSeq records integrate information from multiple sources, when additional data are available from those sources and therefore represent a current description of the sequence and its features. Annotations include coding regions, conserved domains, tRNAs, sequence tagged sites (STS), variation, references, gene and protein product names, and database cross-references. Sequence is reviewed and features are added using a combined approach of collaboration and other input from the scientific community, prediction, propagation from GenBank and curation by NCBI staff. The format of all RefSeq records is validated, and an increasing number of tests are being applied to evaluate the quality of sequence and annotation, especially in the context of complete genomic sequence.

  8. Complete sequence and characterization of mitochondrial DNA genome of Channa asiatica (Perciformes: Channidae).

    PubMed

    Meng, Yan; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Channa asiatica mitochondrial (mtDNA) genome was determined in this study. The genome sequence (GenBank accession number KJ930190) was 16,550 base pairs in length, and the gene content and organization on the mitochondrial genome were similar to the other Channa fishes. The overall base composition of C. asiatica mitogenome is 29.4% A, 26.3% T, 15.3% G, 29.0% C, with a high A + T content of 55.7%. The mitochondrial sequence could provide useful genetic information for studying the molecular identification, population genetics, phylogenetic analysis and conservation genetics.

  9. Mitochondrial genome sequences and comparative genomics ofPhytophthora ramorum and P. sojae

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Frank N.; Douda, Bensasson; Tyler, Brett M.; Boore,Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    The complete sequences of the mitochondrial genomes of theoomycetes of Phytophthora ramorum and P. sojae were determined during thecourse of their complete nuclear genome sequencing (Tyler, et al. 2006).Both are circular, with sizes of 39,314 bp for P. ramorum and 42,975 bpfor P. sojae. Each contains a total of 37 identifiable protein-encodinggenes, 25 or 26 tRNAs (P. sojae and P. ramorum, respectively)specifying19 amino acids, and a variable number of ORFs (7 for P. ramorum and 12for P. sojae) which are potentially additional functional genes.Non-coding regions comprise approximately 11.5 percent and 18.4 percentof the genomes of P. ramorum and P. sojae, respectively. Relative to P.sojae, there is an inverted repeat of 1,150 bp in P. ramorum thatincludes an unassigned unique ORF, a tRNA gene, and adjacent non-codingsequences, but otherwise the gene order in both species is identical.Comparisons of these genomes with published sequences of the P. infestansmitochondrial genome reveals a number of similarities, but the gene orderin P. infestans differs in two adjacent locations due to inversions.Sequence alignments of the three genomes indicated sequence conservationranging from 75 to 85 percent and that specific regions were morevariable than others.

  10. Mitochondrial Genome of Palpitomonas bilix: Derived Genome Structure and Ancestral System for Cytochrome c Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yuki; Tanifuji, Goro; Kamikawa, Ryoma; Yabuki, Akinori; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Inagaki, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    We here reported the mitochondrial (mt) genome of one of the heterotrophic microeukaryotes related to cryptophytes, Palpitomonas bilix. The P. bilix mt genome was found to be a linear molecule composed of “single copy region” (∼16 kb) and repeat regions (∼30 kb) arranged in an inverse manner at both ends of the genome. Linear mt genomes with large inverted repeats are known for three distantly related eukaryotes (including P. bilix), suggesting that this particular mt genome structure has emerged at least three times in the eukaryotic tree of life. The P. bilix mt genome contains 47 protein-coding genes including ccmA, ccmB, ccmC, and ccmF, which encode protein subunits involved in the system for cytochrome c maturation inherited from a bacterium (System I). We present data indicating that the phylogenetic relatives of P. bilix, namely, cryptophytes, goniomonads, and kathablepharids, utilize an alternative system for cytochrome c maturation, which has most likely emerged during the evolution of eukaryotes (System III). To explain the distribution of Systems I and III in P. bilix and its phylogenetic relatives, two scenarios are possible: (i) System I was replaced by System III on the branch leading to the common ancestor of cryptophytes, goniomonads, and kathablepharids, and (ii) the two systems co-existed in their common ancestor, and lost differentially among the four descendants. PMID:27604877

  11. The History of Slavs Inferred from Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mielnik-Sikorska, Marta; Daca, Patrycja; Malyarchuk, Boris; Derenko, Miroslava; Skonieczna, Katarzyna; Perkova, Maria; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Grzybowski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    To shed more light on the processes leading to crystallization of a Slavic identity, we investigated variability of complete mitochondrial genomes belonging to haplogroups H5 and H6 (63 mtDNA genomes) from the populations of Eastern and Western Slavs, including new samples of Poles, Ukrainians and Czechs presented here. Molecular dating implies formation of H5 approximately 11.5–16 thousand years ago (kya) in the areas of southern Europe. Within ancient haplogroup H6, dated at around 15–28 kya, there is a subhaplogroup H6c, which probably survived the last glaciation in Europe and has undergone expansion only 3–4 kya, together with the ancestors of some European groups, including the Slavs, because H6c has been detected in Czechs, Poles and Slovaks. Detailed analysis of complete mtDNAs allowed us to identify a number of lineages that seem specific for Central and Eastern Europe (H5a1f, H5a2, H5a1r, H5a1s, H5b4, H5e1a, H5u1, some subbranches of H5a1a and H6a1a9). Some of them could possibly be traced back to at least ∼4 kya, which indicates that some of the ancestors of today's Slavs (Poles, Czechs, Slovaks, Ukrainians and Russians) inhabited areas of Central and Eastern Europe much earlier than it was estimated on the basis of archaeological and historical data. We also sequenced entire mitochondrial genomes of several non-European lineages (A, C, D, G, L) found in contemporary populations of Poland and Ukraine. The analysis of these haplogroups confirms the presence of Siberian (C5c1, A8a1) and Ashkenazi-specific (L2a1l2a) mtDNA lineages in Slavic populations. Moreover, we were able to pinpoint some lineages which could possibly reflect the relatively recent contacts of Slavs with nomadic Altaic peoples (C4a1a, G2a, D5a2a1a1). PMID:23342138

  12. The history of Slavs inferred from complete mitochondrial genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Mielnik-Sikorska, Marta; Daca, Patrycja; Malyarchuk, Boris; Derenko, Miroslava; Skonieczna, Katarzyna; Perkova, Maria; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Grzybowski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    To shed more light on the processes leading to crystallization of a Slavic identity, we investigated variability of complete mitochondrial genomes belonging to haplogroups H5 and H6 (63 mtDNA genomes) from the populations of Eastern and Western Slavs, including new samples of Poles, Ukrainians and Czechs presented here. Molecular dating implies formation of H5 approximately 11.5-16 thousand years ago (kya) in the areas of southern Europe. Within ancient haplogroup H6, dated at around 15-28 kya, there is a subhaplogroup H6c, which probably survived the last glaciation in Europe and has undergone expansion only 3-4 kya, together with the ancestors of some European groups, including the Slavs, because H6c has been detected in Czechs, Poles and Slovaks. Detailed analysis of complete mtDNAs allowed us to identify a number of lineages that seem specific for Central and Eastern Europe (H5a1f, H5a2, H5a1r, H5a1s, H5b4, H5e1a, H5u1, some subbranches of H5a1a and H6a1a9). Some of them could possibly be traced back to at least ∼4 kya, which indicates that some of the ancestors of today's Slavs (Poles, Czechs, Slovaks, Ukrainians and Russians) inhabited areas of Central and Eastern Europe much earlier than it was estimated on the basis of archaeological and historical data. We also sequenced entire mitochondrial genomes of several non-European lineages (A, C, D, G, L) found in contemporary populations of Poland and Ukraine. The analysis of these haplogroups confirms the presence of Siberian (C5c1, A8a1) and Ashkenazi-specific (L2a1l2a) mtDNA lineages in Slavic populations. Moreover, we were able to pinpoint some lineages which could possibly reflect the relatively recent contacts of Slavs with nomadic Altaic peoples (C4a1a, G2a, D5a2a1a1).

  13. Mitochondrial genomics in the Genus Phytophthora with a focus on Phytophthora ramorum

    Treesearch

    Frank N. Martin; Paul Richardson

    2008-01-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of Phytophthora infestans, P. ramorum and P. sojae have been sequenced and comparative genomics has provided an opportunity to examine the processes involved with genome evolution in the genus Phytophthora. This approach can also be useful in assessing intraspecific...

  14. Mitochondrial Genomics in the Peronosporales; Implications for Phylogenetics and Development of Molecular Markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mitochondrial genomes of the genera Pythium and Phytophthora encode a similar suite of genes but differ from each other by an inverted repeat (IR) in Pythium that can represent approximately 75% of the genome size. While an IR is not usually found in Phytophthora genomes, a small IR was observe...

  15. Draft Plastid and Mitochondrial Genome Sequences from Antarctic Alga Prasiola crispa

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Evelise Leis; Wallau, Gabriel da Luz; Rangel, Darlene Lopes; Machado, Laís Ceschini; da Silva, Alexandre Freitas; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Duarte; Macedo, Pablo Echeverria; Pereira, Antonio Batista; Victoria, Filipe de Carvalho; Boldo, Juliano Tomazzoni; Dal Belo, Cháriston André

    2015-01-01

    The organelle genomes of the Antarctic alga Prasiola crispa (Lightfoot) Kützing have been sequenced. The plastid and mitochondrial genomes have a total length of 196,502 bp and 89,819 bp, respectively. These genomes have 19 putative photosynthesis-related genes and 17 oxidative metabolism-related genes, respectively. PMID:26450727

  16. The Complete Moss Mitochondrial Genome in the Angiosperm Amborella Is a Chimera Derived from Two Moss Whole-Genome Transfers

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Z. Nathan; Rice, Danny W.; Palmer, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing of the 4-Mb mitochondrial genome of the angiosperm Amborella trichopoda has shown that it contains unprecedented amounts of foreign mitochondrial DNA, including four blocks of sequences that together correspond almost perfectly to one entire moss mitochondrial genome. This implies whole-genome transfer from a single moss donor but conflicts with phylogenetic results from an earlier, PCR-based study that suggested three different moss donors to Amborella. To resolve this conflict, we conducted an expanded set of phylogenetic analyses with respect to both moss lineages and mitochondrial loci. The moss DNA in Amborella was consistently placed in either of two positions, depending on the locus analyzed, as sister to the Ptychomniales or within the Hookeriales. This agrees with two of the three previously suggested donors, whereas the third is no longer supported. These results, combined with synteny analyses and other considerations, lead us to favor a model involving two successive moss-to-Amborella whole-genome transfers, followed by recombination that produced a single intact and chimeric moss mitochondrial genome integrated in the Amborella mitochondrial genome. Eight subsequent recombination events account for the state of fragmentation, rearrangement, duplication, and deletion of this chimeric moss mitochondrial genome as it currently exists in Amborella. Five of these events are associated with short-to-intermediate sized repeats. Two of the five probably occurred by reciprocal homologous recombination, whereas the other three probably occurred in a non-reciprocal manner via microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR). These findings reinforce and extend recent evidence for an important role of MMBIR in plant mitochondrial DNA evolution. PMID:26618775

  17. The Complete Moss Mitochondrial Genome in the Angiosperm Amborella Is a Chimera Derived from Two Moss Whole-Genome Transfers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Z Nathan; Rice, Danny W; Palmer, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing of the 4-Mb mitochondrial genome of the angiosperm Amborella trichopoda has shown that it contains unprecedented amounts of foreign mitochondrial DNA, including four blocks of sequences that together correspond almost perfectly to one entire moss mitochondrial genome. This implies whole-genome transfer from a single moss donor but conflicts with phylogenetic results from an earlier, PCR-based study that suggested three different moss donors to Amborella. To resolve this conflict, we conducted an expanded set of phylogenetic analyses with respect to both moss lineages and mitochondrial loci. The moss DNA in Amborella was consistently placed in either of two positions, depending on the locus analyzed, as sister to the Ptychomniales or within the Hookeriales. This agrees with two of the three previously suggested donors, whereas the third is no longer supported. These results, combined with synteny analyses and other considerations, lead us to favor a model involving two successive moss-to-Amborella whole-genome transfers, followed by recombination that produced a single intact and chimeric moss mitochondrial genome integrated in the Amborella mitochondrial genome. Eight subsequent recombination events account for the state of fragmentation, rearrangement, duplication, and deletion of this chimeric moss mitochondrial genome as it currently exists in Amborella. Five of these events are associated with short-to-intermediate sized repeats. Two of the five probably occurred by reciprocal homologous recombination, whereas the other three probably occurred in a non-reciprocal manner via microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR). These findings reinforce and extend recent evidence for an important role of MMBIR in plant mitochondrial DNA evolution.

  18. Comparative mitochondrial genome analysis reveals the evolutionary rearrangement mechanism in Brassica.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Liu, G; Zhao, N; Chen, S; Liu, D; Ma, W; Hu, Z; Zhang, M

    2016-05-01

    The genus Brassica has many species that are important for oil, vegetable and other food products. Three mitochondrial genome types (mitotype) originated from its common ancestor. In this paper, a B. nigra mitochondrial main circle genome with 232,407 bp was generated through de novo assembly. Synteny analysis showed that the mitochondrial genomes of B. rapa and B. oleracea had a better syntenic relationship than B. nigra. Principal components analysis and development of a phylogenetic tree indicated maternal ancestors of three allotetraploid species in Us triangle of Brassica. Diversified mitotypes were found in allotetraploid B. napus, in which napus-type B. napus was derived from B. oleracea, while polima-type B. napus was inherited from B. rapa. In addition, the mitochondrial genome of napus-type B. napus was closer to botrytis-type than capitata-type B. oleracea. The sub-stoichiometric shifting of several mitochondrial genes suggested that mitochondrial genome rearrangement underwent evolutionary selection during domestication and/or plant breeding. Our findings clarify the role of diploid species in the maternal origin of allotetraploid species in Brassica and suggest the possibility of breeding selection of the mitochondrial genome. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  19. Localization of transcription initiation sites on the mouse mitochondrial genome

    SciTech Connect

    Fluellen, C.F.; Bhat, K.S.; Avdalovic, N.; Avadhani, M.G.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have identified the primary transcription initiation sites on the H and L strands of mouse mitochondrial (mt) genome by mapping the 5' ends of in vitro capped mt RNA, and 5' end labelling of the nascent RNA synthesized in an in vitro mt system. RNA capped with TSP GTP resolve into 4 major (25 to 150 nucleotides) and one minor (0.75 kb) bands on denaturing gels. Only the 25 nucleotide long capped RNA hybridizes to the H strand of D-loop DNA and the rest hybridize to the L-strand DNA probes. S1 protection of capped RNA and DNA hybrids, and primer extention analysis using defined DNA primers show that all of the L-strand specific primary transcripts have a common 5' end mapping at about nucleotide 16,180 +/- 5 of the genome. The 3' ends of the small RNA species map near the start of conserved sequence boxes. The 3' end of the 0.75 Kb RNA maps to the start of gene coding for tRNA/sup Phe/. The 5' end of the capped RNA hybridizing to the H strand maps at about nucleotide 16,275 to 16,280 of the genome indicating a major H strand transcription initiation at this region. The authors have also used an in vitro transcription system which involves the use of mt extract from Ehrlich ascites cells to study transcription initiation. Nascent RNA 5' end labeled with elTSP ATP and GTP closely resemble the electrophoretic pattern and S1 protection pattern obtained with the capped RNA.

  20. Sequencing and analysis of the complete mitochondrial genome in Anopheles sinensis (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Wang, Yan; Li, Xiang-Yu; Peng, Heng; Ma, Ya-Jun

    2017-10-02

    Anopheles sinensis (Diptera: Culicidae) is a primary vector of Plasmodium vivax and Brugia malayi in most regions of China. In addition, its phylogenetic relationship with the cryptic species of the Hyrcanus Group is complex and remains unresolved. Mitochondrial genome sequences are widely used as molecular markers for phylogenetic studies of mosquito species complexes, of which mitochondrial genome data of An. sinensis is not available. An. sinensis samples was collected from Shandong, China, and identified by molecular marker. Genomic DNA was extracted, followed by the Illumina sequencing. Two complete mitochondrial genomes were assembled and annotated using the mitochondrial genome of An. gambiae as reference. The mitochondrial genomes sequences of the 28 known Anopheles species were aligned and reconstructed phylogenetic tree by Maximum Likelihood (ML) method. The length of complete mitochondrial genomes of An. sinensis was 15,076 bp and 15,138 bp, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, and an AT-rich control region. As in other insects, most mitochondrial genes are encoded on the J strand, except for ND5, ND4, ND4L, ND1, two rRNA and eight tRNA genes, which are encoded on the N strand. The bootstrap value was set as 1000 in ML analyses. The topologies restored phylogenetic affinity within subfamily Anophelinae. The ML tree showed four major clades, corresponding to the subgenera Cellia, Anopheles, Nyssorhynchus and Kerteszia of the genus Anopheles. The complete mitochondrial genomes of An. sinensis were obtained. The number, order and transcription direction of An. sinensis mitochondrial genes were the same as in other species of family Culicidae.

  1. Mining clinical attributes of genomic variants through assisted literature curation in Egas

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Sérgio; Campos, David; Pinho, Renato; Silva, Raquel M.; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N.; Oliveira, José Luís

    2016-01-01

    The veritable deluge of biological data over recent years has led to the establishment of a considerable number of knowledge resources that compile curated information extracted from the literature and store it in structured form, facilitating its use and exploitation. In this article, we focus on the curation of inherited genetic variants and associated clinical attributes, such as zygosity, penetrance or inheritance mode, and describe the use of Egas for this task. Egas is a web-based platform for text-mining assisted literature curation that focuses on usability through modern design solutions and simple user interactions. Egas offers a flexible and customizable tool that allows defining the concept types and relations of interest for a given annotation task, as well as the ontologies used for normalizing each concept type. Further, annotations may be performed on raw documents or on the results of automated concept identification and relation extraction tools. Users can inspect, correct or remove automatic text-mining results, manually add new annotations, and export the results to standard formats. Egas is compatible with the most recent versions of Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Internet Explorer and Safari and is available for use at https://demo.bmd-software.com/egas/. Database URL: https://demo.bmd-software.com/egas/ PMID:27278817

  2. Mining clinical attributes of genomic variants through assisted literature curation in Egas.

    PubMed

    Matos, Sérgio; Campos, David; Pinho, Renato; Silva, Raquel M; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N; Oliveira, José Luís

    2016-01-01

    The veritable deluge of biological data over recent years has led to the establishment of a considerable number of knowledge resources that compile curated information extracted from the literature and store it in structured form, facilitating its use and exploitation. In this article, we focus on the curation of inherited genetic variants and associated clinical attributes, such as zygosity, penetrance or inheritance mode, and describe the use of Egas for this task. Egas is a web-based platform for text-mining assisted literature curation that focuses on usability through modern design solutions and simple user interactions. Egas offers a flexible and customizable tool that allows defining the concept types and relations of interest for a given annotation task, as well as the ontologies used for normalizing each concept type. Further, annotations may be performed on raw documents or on the results of automated concept identification and relation extraction tools. Users can inspect, correct or remove automatic text-mining results, manually add new annotations, and export the results to standard formats. Egas is compatible with the most recent versions of Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Internet Explorer and Safari and is available for use at https://demo.bmd-software.com/egas/Database URL: https://demo.bmd-software.com/egas/.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of the true water bugs (Insecta: Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Nepomorpha): evidence from mitochondrial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jimeng; Li, Ming; Dong, Pengzhi; Cui, Ying; Xie, Qiang; Bu, Wenjun

    2009-01-01

    Background The true water bugs are grouped in infraorder Nepomorpha (Insecta: Hemiptera: Heteroptera) and are of great economic importance. The phylogenetic relationships within Nepomorpha and the taxonomic hierarchies of Pleoidea and Aphelocheiroidea are uncertain. Most of the previous studies were based on morphological characters without algorithmic assessment. In the latest study, the molecular markers employed in phylogenetic analyses were partial sequences of 16S rDNA and 18S rDNA with a total length about 1 kb. Up to now, no mitochondrial genome of the true water bugs has been sequenced, which is one of the largest data sets that could be compared across animal taxa. In this study we analyzed the unresolved problems in Nepomorpha using evidence from mitochondrial genomes. Results Nine mitochondrial genomes of Nepomorpha and five of other hemipterans were sequenced. These mitochondrial genomes contain the commonly found 37 genes without gene rearrangements. Based on the nucleotide sequences of mt-genomes, Pleoidea is not a member of the Nepomorpha and Aphelocheiroidea should be grouped back into Naucoroidea. Phylogenetic relationships among the superfamilies of Nepomorpha were resolved robustly. Conclusion The mt-genome is an effective data source for resolving intraordinal phylogenetic problems at the superfamily level within Heteroptera. The mitochondrial genomes of the true water bugs are typical insect mt-genomes. Based on the nucleotide sequences of the mt-genomes, we propose the Pleoidea to be a separate heteropteran infraorder. The infraorder Nepomorpha consists of five superfamilies with the relationships (Corixoidea + ((Naucoroidea + Notonectoidea) + (Ochteroidea + Nepoidea))). PMID:19523246

  4. Whole Genome Mapping and Re-Organization of the Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genomes of Babesia microti Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Cornillot, Emmanuel; Dassouli, Amina; Garg, Aprajita; Pachikara, Niseema; Randazzo, Sylvie; Depoix, Delphine; Carcy, Bernard; Delbecq, Stéphane; Frutos, Roger; Silva, Joana C.; Sutton, Richard; Krause, Peter J.; Mamoun, Choukri Ben

    2013-01-01

    Babesia microti is the primary causative agent of human babesiosis, an emerging pathogen that causes a malaria-like illness with possible fatal outcome in immunocompromised patients. The genome sequence of the B. microti R1 strain was reported in 2012 and revealed a distinct evolutionary path for this pathogen relative to that of other apicomplexa. Lacking from the first genome assembly and initial molecular analyses was information about the terminal ends of each chromosome, and both the exact number of chromosomes in the nuclear genome and the organization of the mitochondrial genome remained ambiguous. We have now performed various molecular analyses to characterize the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of the B. microti R1 and Gray strains and generated high-resolution Whole Genome maps. These analyses show that the genome of B. microti consists of four nuclear chromosomes and a linear mitochondrial genome present in four different structural types. Furthermore, Whole Genome mapping allowed resolution of the chromosomal ends, identification of areas of misassembly in the R1 genome, and genomic differences between the R1 and Gray strains, which occur primarily in the telomeric regions. These studies set the stage for a better understanding of the evolution and diversity of this important human pathogen. PMID:24023759

  5. Mitochondrial genomes suggest that hexapods and crustaceans are mutually paraphyletic

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Charles E; Yue, Qiaoyun; Akam, Michael

    2005-01-01

    For over a century the relationships between the four major groups of the phylum Arthropoda (Chelicerata, Crustacea, Hexapoda and Myriapoda) have been debated. Recent molecular evidence has confirmed a close relationship between the Crustacea and the Hexapoda, and has included the suggestion of a paraphyletic Hexapoda. To test this hypothesis we have sequenced the complete or near-complete mitochondrial genomes of three crustaceans (Parhyale hawaiensis, Squilla mantis and Triops longicaudatus), two collembolans (Onychiurus orientalis and Podura aquatica) and the insect Thermobia domestica. We observed rearrangement of transfer RNA genes only in O. orientalis, P. aquatica and P. hawaiensis. Of these, only the rearrangement in O. orientalis, an apparent autapomorphy for the collembolan family Onychiuridae, was phylogenetically informative. We aligned the nuclear and amino acid sequences from the mitochondrial protein-encoding genes of these taxa with their homologues from other arthropod taxa for phylogenetic analysis. Our dataset contains many more Crustacea than previous molecular phylogenetic analyses of the arthropods. Neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and Bayesian posterior probabilities all suggest that crustaceans and hexapods are mutually paraphyletic. A crustacean clade of Malacostraca and Branchiopoda emerges as sister to the Insecta sensu stricto and the Collembola group with the maxillopod crustaceans. Some, but not all, analyses strongly support this mutual paraphyly but statistical tests do not reject the null hypotheses of a monophyletic Hexapoda or a monophyletic Crustacea. The dual monophyly of the Hexapoda and Crustacea has rarely been questioned in recent years but the idea of both groups' paraphyly dates back to the nineteenth century. We suggest that the mutual paraphyly of both groups should seriously be considered. PMID:16024395

  6. Mitochondrial genomes suggest that hexapods and crustaceans are mutually paraphyletic.

    PubMed

    Cook, Charles E; Yue, Qiaoyun; Akam, Michael

    2005-06-22

    For over a century the relationships between the four major groups of the phylum Arthropoda (Chelicerata, Crustacea, Hexapoda and Myriapoda) have been debated. Recent molecular evidence has confirmed a close relationship between the Crustacea and the Hexapoda, and has included the suggestion of a paraphyletic Hexapoda. To test this hypothesis we have sequenced the complete or near-complete mitochondrial genomes of three crustaceans (Parhyale hawaiensis, Squilla mantis and Triops longicaudatus), two collembolans (Onychiurus orientalis and Podura aquatica) and the insect Thermobia domestica. We observed rearrangement of transfer RNA genes only in O. orientalis, P. aquatica and P. hawaiensis. Of these, only the rearrangement in O. orientalis, an apparent autapomorphy for the collembolan family Onychiuridae, was phylogenetically informative.We aligned the nuclear and amino acid sequences from the mitochondrial protein-encoding genes of these taxa with their homologues from other arthropod taxa for phylogenetic analysis. Our dataset contains many more Crustacea than previous molecular phylogenetic analyses of the arthropods. Neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and Bayesian posterior probabilities all suggest that crustaceans and hexapods are mutually paraphyletic. A crustacean clade of Malacostraca and Branchiopoda emerges as sister to the Insecta sensu stricto and the Collembola group with the maxillopod crustaceans. Some, but not all, analyses strongly support this mutual paraphyly but statistical tests do not reject the null hypotheses of a monophyletic Hexapoda or a monophyletic Crustacea. The dual monophyly of the Hexapoda and Crustacea has rarely been questioned in recent years but the idea of both groups' paraphyly dates back to the nineteenth century. We suggest that the mutual paraphyly of both groups should seriously be considered.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of the articulate brachiopod Terebratalia transversa.

    PubMed

    Helfenbein, K G; Brown, W M; Boore, J L

    2001-09-01

    We sequenced the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the articulate brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. The circular genome is 14,291 bp in size, relatively small compared with other published metazoan mtDNAs. The 37 genes commonly found in animal mtDNA are present; the size decrease is due to the truncation of several tRNA, rRNA, and protein genes, to some nucleotide overlaps, and to a paucity of noncoding nucleotides. Although the gene arrangement differs radically from those reported for other metazoans, some gene junctions are shared with two other articulate brachiopods, Laqueus rubellus and Terebratulina retusa. All genes in the T. transversa mtDNA, unlike those in most metazoan mtDNAs reported, are encoded by the same strand. The A+T content (59.1%) is low for a metazoan mtDNA, and there is a high propensity for homopolymer runs and a strong base-compositional strand bias. The coding strand is quite G+T-rich, a skew that is shared by the confamilial (laqueid) species L. rubellus but is the opposite of that found in T. retusa, a cancellothyridid. These compositional skews are strongly reflected in the codon usage patterns and the amino acid compositions of the mitochondrial proteins, with markedly different usages being observed between T. retusa and the two laqueids. This observation, plus the similarity of the laqueid noncoding regions to the reverse complement of the noncoding region of the cancellothyridid, suggests that an inversion that resulted in a reversal in the direction of first-strand replication has occurred in one of the two lineages. In addition to the presence of one noncoding region in T. transversa that is comparable with those in the other brachiopod mtDNAs, there are two others with the potential to form secondary structures; one or both of these may be involved in the process of transcript cleavage.

  8. The adaptive evolution of the mammalian mitochondrial genome

    PubMed Central

    da Fonseca, Rute R; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Ramos, Maria João; Antunes, Agostinho

    2008-01-01

    Background The mitochondria produce up to 95% of a eukaryotic cell's energy through oxidative phosphorylation. The proteins involved in this vital process are under high functional constraints. However, metabolic requirements vary across species, potentially modifying selective pressures. We evaluate the adaptive evolution of 12 protein-coding mitochondrial genes in 41 placental mammalian species by assessing amino acid sequence variation and exploring the functional implications of observed variation in secondary and tertiary protein structures. Results Wide variation in the properties of amino acids were observed at functionally important regions of cytochrome b in species with more-specialized metabolic requirements (such as adaptation to low energy diet or large body size, such as in elephant, dugong, sloth, and pangolin, and adaptation to unusual oxygen requirements, for example diving in cetaceans, flying in bats, and living at high altitudes in alpacas). Signatures of adaptive variation in the NADH dehydrogenase complex were restricted to the loop regions of the transmembrane units which likely function as protons pumps. Evidence of adaptive variation in the cytochrome c oxidase complex was observed mostly at the interface between the mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits, perhaps evidence of co-evolution. The ATP8 subunit, which has an important role in the assembly of F0, exhibited the highest signal of adaptive variation. ATP6, which has an essential role in rotor performance, showed a high adaptive variation in predicted loop areas. Conclusion Our study provides insight into the adaptive evolution of the mtDNA genome in mammals and its implications for the molecular mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation. We present a framework for future experimental characterization of the impact of specific mutations in the function, physiology, and interactions of the mtDNA encoded proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:18318906

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome of Articulate Brachiopod Terebratal ia transversa

    SciTech Connect

    Helfenbein, Kevin G.; Brown, Wesley M.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2001-07-01

    We have sequenced the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the articulate brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. The circular genome is 14,291 bp in size, relatively small compared to other published metazoan mtDNAs. The 37 genes commonly found in animal mtDNA are present; the size decrease is due to the truncation of several tRNA, rRNA, and protein genes, to some nucleotide overlaps, and to a paucity of non-coding nucleotides. Although the gene arrangement differs radically from those reported for other metazoans, some gene junctions are shared with two other articulate brachiopods, Laqueus rubellus and Terebratulina retusa. All genes in the T. transversa mtDNA, unlike those in most metazoan mtDNAs reported, are encoded by the same strand. The A+T content (59.1 percent) is low for a metazoan mtDNA, and there is a high propensity for homopolymer runs and a strong base-compositional strand bias. The coding strand is quite G+T-rich, a skew that is shared by the confamilial (laqueid) specie s L. rubellus, but opposite to that found in T. retusa, a cancellothyridid. These compositional skews are strongly reflected in the codon usage patterns and the amino acid compositions of the mitochondrial proteins, with markedly different usage observed between T. retusa and the two laqueids. This observation, plus the similarity of the laqueid non-coding regions to the reverse complement of the non-coding region of the cancellothyridid, suggest that an inversion that resulted in a reversal in the direction of first-strand replication has occurred in one of the two lineages. In addition to the presence of one non-coding region in T. transversa that is comparable to those in the other brachiopod mtDNAs, there are two others with the potential to form secondary structures; one or both of these may be involved in the process of transcript cleavage.

  10. The past, present and future of mitochondrial genomics: have we sequenced enough mtDNAs?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The year 2014 saw more than a thousand new mitochondrial genome sequences deposited in GenBank—an almost 15% increase from the previous year. Hundreds of peer-reviewed articles accompanied these genomes, making mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) the most sequenced and reported type of eukaryotic chromosome. These mtDNA data have advanced a wide range of scientific fields, from forensics to anthropology to medicine to molecular evolution. But for many biological lineages, mtDNAs are so well sampled that newly published genomes are arguably no longer contributing significantly to the progression of science, and in some cases they are tying up valuable resources, particularly journal editors and referees. Is it time to acknowledge that as a research community we have published enough mitochondrial genome papers? Here, I address this question, exploring the history, milestones and impacts of mitochondrial genomics, the benefits and drawbacks of continuing to publish mtDNAs at a high rate and what the future may hold for such an important and popular genetic marker. I highlight groups for which mtDNAs are still poorly sampled, thus meriting further investigation, and recommend that more energy be spent characterizing aspects of mitochondrial genomes apart from the DNA sequence, such as their chromosomal and transcriptional architectures. Ultimately, one should be mindful before writing a mitochondrial genome paper. Consider perhaps sending the sequence directly to GenBank instead, and be sure to annotate it correctly before submission. PMID:26117139

  11. Complete mitochondrial genome of the endangered roughskin sculpin Trachidermus fasciatus (Scorpaeniformes, Cottidae).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhen; Liu, Zhi Zhi; Pan, Lian De; Tang, Shou Jie; Wang, Cong Tao; Tang, Wen Qiao; Yang, Jin Quan

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of the endangered roughskin sculpin, Trachidermus fasciatus, was first determined. The mitogenome (16,536 bp) consisted of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 1 control region. Except for the eight tRNA and ND6 genes, all other mitochondrial genes were encoded on the heavy strand. Mitochondrial DNA information can assist in species identification and conservation of the species' natural resources.

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome of the silvertip tetra, Hasemania nana (Characiformes: Characidae).

    PubMed

    Xu, Ru; Zhao, Zi-Xia; Xu, Peng; Sun, Xiao-Wen

    2015-01-01

    We first sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of silvertip tetra (Hasemania nana). The mitogenome was determined to be 16,581 bp long circular molecule with a typical gene arrangement of vertebrate mitochondrial DNA. All genes were encoded on the heavy strand with the exception of ND6 and eight tRNA genes. Mitochondrial DNA information provided the basis for the studies in species identification and conservation of the species' natural resources.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome of Hyriopsis cumingii (Unionoida: Unionidae): genome description and related phylogenetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Yang, Shoubao; Yu, Peng; Wan, Quan

    2016-05-01

    Hyriopsis cumingii is a freshwater pearl mussel in china, easily identified by a big sail-like bulging at back edge of the mussel. In the present study, we reported the complete mitochondrial genome of H. cumingii. It was 16,958 bp in length, and it contained 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes. Besides, we conducted alignment with other two different individuals of H. cumingii and phylogenetic analysis with closely related species.

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Diannan small-ear pig (Sus Scrofa).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Yu; Xu, Dong; Xiao, Ding-Fu; Ma, Hai-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Diannan small-ear pig in Yunnan Province was firstly reported, which was determined through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The total length of mitochondrial genome of Diannan small-ear pig was 16720 bp, including 34.77% A, 26.18% C, 25.81% T and 13.24% G, and in the order A > C > T > G. Mitochondrial genome contained a major non-coding control region (D-Loop region), 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs) and 22 transfer RNA genes. The mitochondrial genome of Diannan small-ear pig provides an important data set for the study on genetic mechanism.

  15. Experimental evidence supports a sex-specific selective sieve in mitochondrial genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Paolo; Morrow, Edward H; Dowling, Damian K

    2011-05-13

    Mitochondria are maternally transmitted; hence, their genome can only make a direct and adaptive response to selection through females, whereas males represent an evolutionary dead end. In theory, this creates a sex-specific selective sieve, enabling deleterious mutations to accumulate in mitochondrial genomes if they exert male-specific effects. We tested this hypothesis, expressing five mitochondrial variants alongside a standard nuclear genome in Drosophila melanogaster, and found striking sexual asymmetry in patterns of nuclear gene expression. Mitochondrial polymorphism had few effects on nuclear gene expression in females but major effects in males, modifying nearly 10% of transcripts. These were mostly male-biased in expression, with enrichment hotspots in the testes and accessory glands. Our results suggest an evolutionary mechanism that results in mitochondrial genomes harboring male-specific mutation loads.

  16. The mitochondrial genome of the wood-degrading basidiomycete Trametes cingulata.

    PubMed

    Haridas, Sajeet; Gantt, J Stephen

    2010-07-01

    We present the 91,500 bp mitochondrial genome of the wood-degrading basidiomycete Trametes cingulata and compare it with the mitochondrial genomes of five additional Basidiomycota species. The Trametes mitochondrial genome encodes 15 proteins, 25 tRNAs and the small and large rRNAs. All of the genes, except one tRNA, are found on the same DNA strand. Several additional ORFs have also been identified; however, their sequences have not been conserved across the species we compared and they show no similarity to any known gene, suggesting that they may not correspond to authentic genes. The presence of endonuclease-like sequences in introns suggests a mechanism that explains the diversity of mitochondrial genome sizes that are unrelated to the gene content.

  17. Mitochondrial genome sequences illuminate maternal lineages of conservation concern in a rare carnivore

    Treesearch

    Brian J. Knaus; Richard Cronn; Aaron Liston; Kristine Pilgrim; Michael K. Schwartz

    2011-01-01

    Science-based wildlife management relies on genetic information to infer population connectivity and identify conservation units. The most commonly used genetic marker for characterizing animal biodiversity and identifying maternal lineages is the mitochondrial genome. Mitochondrial genotyping figures prominently in conservation and management plans, with much of the...

  18. Evolution along the mutation gradient in the dynamic mitochondrial genome of salamanders.

    PubMed

    Chong, Rebecca A; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are intracellular organelles where oxidative phosphorylation is carried out to complete ATP synthesis. Mitochondria have their own genome; in metazoans, this is a small, circular molecule encoding 13 electron transport proteins, 22 tRNAs, and 2 rRNAs. In invertebrates, mitochondrial gene rearrangement is common, and it is correlated with increased substitution rates. In vertebrates, mitochondrial gene rearrangement is rare, and its relationship to substitution rate remains unexplored. Mitochondrial genes can also show spatial variation in substitution rates around the genome due to the mechanism of mtDNA replication, which produces a mutation gradient. To date, however, the strength of the mutation gradient and whether movement along the gradient in rearranged (or otherwise modified) genomes impacts genic substitution rates remain unexplored in the majority of vertebrates. Salamanders include both normal mitochondrial genomes and independently derived rearrangements and expansions, providing a rare opportunity to test the effects of large-scale changes to genome architecture on vertebrate mitochondrial gene sequence evolution. We show that: 1) rearranged/expanded genomes have higher substitution rates; 2) most genes in rearranged/expanded genomes maintain their position along the mutation gradient, substitution rates of the genes that do move are unaffected by their new position, and the gradient in salamanders is weak; and 3) genomic rearrangements/expansions occur independent of levels of selective constraint on genes. Together, our results demonstrate that large-scale changes to genome architecture impact mitochondrial gene evolution in predictable ways; however, despite these impacts, the same functional constraints act on mitochondrial protein-coding genes in both modified and normal genomes.

  19. Evolution Along the Mutation Gradient in the Dynamic Mitochondrial Genome of Salamanders

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Rebecca A.; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are intracellular organelles where oxidative phosphorylation is carried out to complete ATP synthesis. Mitochondria have their own genome; in metazoans, this is a small, circular molecule encoding 13 electron transport proteins, 22 tRNAs, and 2 rRNAs. In invertebrates, mitochondrial gene rearrangement is common, and it is correlated with increased substitution rates. In vertebrates, mitochondrial gene rearrangement is rare, and its relationship to substitution rate remains unexplored. Mitochondrial genes can also show spatial variation in substitution rates around the genome due to the mechanism of mtDNA replication, which produces a mutation gradient. To date, however, the strength of the mutation gradient and whether movement along the gradient in rearranged (or otherwise modified) genomes impacts genic substitution rates remain unexplored in the majority of vertebrates. Salamanders include both normal mitochondrial genomes and independently derived rearrangements and expansions, providing a rare opportunity to test the effects of large-scale changes to genome architecture on vertebrate mitochondrial gene sequence evolution. We show that: 1) rearranged/expanded genomes have higher substitution rates; 2) most genes in rearranged/expanded genomes maintain their position along the mutation gradient, substitution rates of the genes that do move are unaffected by their new position, and the gradient in salamanders is weak; and 3) genomic rearrangements/expansions occur independent of levels of selective constraint on genes. Together, our results demonstrate that large-scale changes to genome architecture impact mitochondrial gene evolution in predictable ways; however, despite these impacts, the same functional constraints act on mitochondrial protein-coding genes in both modified and normal genomes. PMID:23918809

  20. Wide Distribution of Mitochondrial Genome Rearrangements in Wild Strains of the Cultivated Basidiomycete Agrocybe aegerita

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, G.; Blesa, S.; Labarere, J.

    1995-01-01

    We used restriction fragment length polymorphisms to examine mitochondrial genome rearrangements in 36 wild strains of the cultivated basidiomycete Agrocybe aegerita, collected from widely distributed locations in Europe. We identified two polymorphic regions within the mitochondrial DNA which varied independently: one carrying the Cox II coding sequence and the other carrying the Cox I, ATP6, and ATP8 coding sequences. Two types of mutations were responsible for the restriction fragment length polymorphisms that we observed and, accordingly, were involved in the A. aegerita mitochondrial genome evolution: (i) point mutations, which resulted in strain-specific mitochondrial markers, and (ii) length mutations due to genome rearrangements, such as deletions, insertions, or duplications. Within each polymorphic region, the length differences defined only two mitochondrial types, suggesting that these length mutations were not randomly generated but resulted from a precise rearrangement mechanism. For each of the two polymorphic regions, the two molecular types were distributed among the 36 strains without obvious correlation with their geographic origin. On the basis of these two polymorphisms, it is possible to define four mitochondrial haplotypes. The four mitochondrial haplotypes could be the result of intermolecular recombination between allelic forms present in the population long enough to reach linkage equilibrium. All of the 36 dikaryotic strains contained only a single mitochondrial type, confirming the previously described mitochondrial sorting out after cytoplasmic mixing in basidiomycetes. PMID:16534984

  1. CHCHD10 mutations promote loss of mitochondrial cristae junctions with impaired mitochondrial genome maintenance and inhibition of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Genin, Emmanuelle C; Plutino, Morgane; Bannwarth, Sylvie; Villa, Elodie; Cisneros-Barroso, Eugenia; Roy, Madhuparna; Ortega-Vila, Bernardo; Fragaki, Konstantina; Lespinasse, Françoise; Pinero-Martos, Estefania; Augé, Gaëlle; Moore, David; Burté, Florence; Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Kageyama, Yusuke; Itoh, Kie; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Sesaki, Hiromi; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Vives-Bauza, Cristofol; Paquis-Flucklinger, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    CHCHD10-related diseases include mitochondrial DNA instability disorder, frontotemporal dementia-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FTD-ALS) clinical spectrum, late-onset spinal motor neuropathy (SMAJ), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). Here, we show that CHCHD10 resides with mitofilin, CHCHD3 and CHCHD6 within the "mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system" (MICOS) complex. CHCHD10 mutations lead to MICOS complex disassembly and loss of mitochondrial cristae with a decrease in nucleoid number and nucleoid disorganization. Repair of the mitochondrial genome after oxidative stress is impaired in CHCHD10 mutant fibroblasts and this likely explains the accumulation of deleted mtDNA molecules in patient muscle. CHCHD10 mutant fibroblasts are not defective in the delivery of mitochondria to lysosomes suggesting that impaired mitophagy does not contribute to mtDNA instability. Interestingly, the expression of CHCHD10 mutant alleles inhibits apoptosis by preventing cytochrome c release.

  2. Complete mitochondrial genome of Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) and expression profiles of mitochondrial-encoded genes in early and late embryos

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mitochondrial genome of the bollworm, Helicoverpa zea, was assembled using paired-end nucleotide sequence reads generated with a next-generation sequencing platform. Assembly resulted in a mitogenome of 15,348 bp with greater than 17,000-fold average coverage. Organization of the H. zea mitogen...

  3. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Pallas's squirrel Callosciurus erythraeus (Rodentia: Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Hu, Lanlin; Peng, Rui; Zou, Fangdong

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Pallas's squirrel (Callosciurus erythraeus) from Sichuan Province was sequenced and characterized in detail. It was 16,550 bp in length and composed of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and 1 control region. The mitochondrial genome of C. erythraeus presented in this report will be useful for species identification, genetic variability and clarifying the controversial taxonomic status of genus Callosciurus.

  4. Mitochondrial genome of the Neotropical catfish Ageneiosus pardalis, Lütken 1874 (Siluriformes, Auchenipteridae).

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Escobar, Natalia; Alzate, Juan F; Márquez, Edna J

    2016-05-01

    Ageneiosus pardalis is a trans-Andean member of the Neotropical freshwater fish family Auchenipteridae (Siluriformes). In this work, the complete mitochondrial genome of A. pardalis was pyrosequenced by FLX 454 technology. The mitochondrial genome is 16,484 bp in length and encodes 13 proteins, 22 tRNAs and 2 ribosomal RNAs. Additionally, the synteny is conserved with others species of the Auchenipteridae family as well as other Siluriformes.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genomes of two band-winged grasshoppers, Gastrimargus marmoratus and Oedaleus asiaticus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chuan; Liu, Chunxiang; Yang, Pengcheng; Kang, Le

    2009-01-01

    Background The two closely related species of band-winged grasshoppers, Gastrimargus marmoratus and Oedaleus asiaticus, display significant differences in distribution, biological characteristics and habitat preferences. They are so similar to their respective congeneric species that it is difficult to differentiate them from other species within each genus. Hoppers of the two species have quite similar morphologies to that of Locusta migratoria, hence causing confusion in species identification. Thus we determined and compared the mitochondrial genomes of G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus to address these questions. Results The complete mitochondrial genomes of G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus are 15,924 bp and 16,259 bp in size, respectively, with O. asiaticus being the largest among all known mitochondrial genomes in Orthoptera. Both mitochondrial genomes contain a standard set of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and an A+T-rich region in the same order as those of the other analysed caeliferan species, but different from those of the ensiferan species by the rearrangement of trnD and trnK. The putative initiation codon for the cox1 gene in the two species is ATC. The presence of different sized tandem repeats in the A+T-rich region leads to size variation between their mitochondrial genomes. Except for nad2, nad4L, and nad6, most of the caeliferan mtDNA genes exhibit low levels of divergence. In phylogenetic analyses, the species from the suborder Caelifera form a monophyletic group, as is the case for the Ensifera. Furthermore, the two suborders cluster as sister groups, supporting the monophyly of Orthoptera. Conclusion The mitochondrial genomes of both G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus harbor the typical 37 genes and an A+T-rich region, exhibiting similar characters to those of other grasshopper species. Characterization of the two mitochondrial genomes has enriched our knowledge on mitochondrial genomes of Orthoptera. PMID

  6. The complete mitochondrial genomes of two band-winged grasshoppers, Gastrimargus marmoratus and Oedaleus asiaticus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuan; Liu, Chunxiang; Yang, Pengcheng; Kang, Le

    2009-04-10

    The two closely related species of band-winged grasshoppers, Gastrimargus marmoratus and Oedaleus asiaticus, display significant differences in distribution, biological characteristics and habitat preferences. They are so similar to their respective congeneric species that it is difficult to differentiate them from other species within each genus. Hoppers of the two species have quite similar morphologies to that of Locusta migratoria, hence causing confusion in species identification. Thus we determined and compared the mitochondrial genomes of G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus to address these questions. The complete mitochondrial genomes of G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus are 15,924 bp and 16,259 bp in size, respectively, with O. asiaticus being the largest among all known mitochondrial genomes in Orthoptera. Both mitochondrial genomes contain a standard set of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and an A+T-rich region in the same order as those of the other analysed caeliferan species, but different from those of the ensiferan species by the rearrangement of trnD and trnK. The putative initiation codon for the cox1 gene in the two species is ATC. The presence of different sized tandem repeats in the A+T-rich region leads to size variation between their mitochondrial genomes. Except for nad2, nad4L, and nad6, most of the caeliferan mtDNA genes exhibit low levels of divergence. In phylogenetic analyses, the species from the suborder Caelifera form a monophyletic group, as is the case for the Ensifera. Furthermore, the two suborders cluster as sister groups, supporting the monophyly of Orthoptera. The mitochondrial genomes of both G. marmoratus and O. asiaticus harbor the typical 37 genes and an A+T-rich region, exhibiting similar characters to those of other grasshopper species. Characterization of the two mitochondrial genomes has enriched our knowledge on mitochondrial genomes of Orthoptera.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of the sand tiger shark, Carcharias taurus (Chondrichthyes, Odontaspididae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Jabado, Rima W; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Shao, Kwang-Tsao

    2015-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the sand tiger shark consists of 16,773 bp and including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA, 22 transfer RNA genes, 1 replication origin region and 1 control region. The mitochondrial gene arrangement of the sand tiger shark is the same as the one observed in most vertebrates. Base composition of the genome is A (31.8%), T (28.7%), C (26.3%) and G (13.2%).

  8. The complete mitochondrial genome of the great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias (Chondrichthyes, Lamnidae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Fang, Yi-Chiao; Ho, Hsuan-Ching

    2014-10-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the great white shark having 16,744 bp and including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA, 22 transfer RNA genes, 1 replication origin region and 1 control region. The mitochondrial gene arrangement of the great white shark is the same as the one observed in the most vertebrates. Base composition of the genome is A (30.6%), T (28.7%), C (26.9%) and G (13.9%).

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome of the salmon shark, Lamna ditropis (Chondrichthyes, Lamnidae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Jang-Liaw, Nian-Hong; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Carlisle, Aaron; Hsu, Hua Hsun; Liao, Yun-Chih; Shao, Kwang-Tsao

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the salmon shark consists of 16,699 bp and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 1 replication origin region and 1 control region. The mitochondrial gene arrangement of the salmon shark is the same as that of most vertebrates. Base composition of the genome is A (29.6%), T (28.6%), C (27.1%), and G (14.8%).

  10. The complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus).

    PubMed

    Labuschagne, Christiaan; Kotzé, Antoinette; Grobler, J Paul; Dalton, Desiré L

    2014-01-15

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus) was sequenced. The molecule was sequenced via next generation sequencing and primer walking. The size of the genome is 17,346 bp in length. Comparison with the mitochondrial DNA of two other penguin genomes that have so far been reported was conducted namely; Little blue penguin (Eudyptula minor) and the Rockhopper penguin (Eudyptes chrysocome). This analysis made it possible to identify common penguin mitochondrial DNA characteristics. The S. demersus mtDNA genome is very similar, both in composition and length to both the E. chrysocome and E. minor genomes. The gene content of the African penguin mitochondrial genome is typical of vertebrates and all three penguin species have the standard gene order originally identified in the chicken. The control region for S. demersus is located between tRNA-Glu and tRNA-Phe and all three species of penguins contain two sets of similar repeats with varying copy numbers towards the 3' end of the control region, accounting for the size variance. This is the first report of the complete nucleotide sequence for the mitochondrial genome of the African penguin, S. demersus. These results can be subsequently used to provide information for penguin phylogenetic studies and insights into the evolution of genomes. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The complete nucleotide sequence of white Amur bream (Parabramis pekinensis) mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujie; Song, Wen; Wang, Yizhou; Du, Rui; Wang, Weimin

    2014-10-01

    White Amur bream, Parabramis pekinensis (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae), a freshwater cyprinid fish, is an important economic fish in several countries, especially in China. The complete sequence of P. pekinensis mitochondrial genome has been determined. The genome is 16,622 bp in length, and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and the noncoding control region, with the genomic organization being identical to that of typical vertebrates. Three conserved sequence blocks (CSB1 to CSB3) were identified in the control region. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence is useful for phylogenetic analysis and studies of population genetics of P. pekinensis.

  12. Extraordinary number of gene rearrangements in the mitochondrial genomes of lice (Phthiraptera: Insecta).

    PubMed

    Covacin, C; Shao, R; Cameron, S; Barker, S C

    2006-02-01

    The arrangement of genes in the mitochondrial (mt) genomes of most insects is the same, or near-identical, to that inferred to be ancestral for insects. We sequenced the entire mt genome of the small pigeon louse, Campanulotes bidentatus compar, and part of the mt genomes of nine other species of lice. These species were from six families and the three main suborders of the order Phthiraptera. There was no variation in gene arrangement among species within a family but there was much variation in gene arrangement among the three suborders of lice. There has been an extraordinary number of gene rearrangements in the mitochondrial genomes of lice!

  13. The Armc10/SVH gene: genome context, regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and protection against Aβ-induced mitochondrial fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Serrat, R; Mirra, S; Figueiro-Silva, J; Navas-Pérez, E; Quevedo, M; López-Doménech, G; Podlesniy, P; Ulloa, F; Garcia-Fernàndez, J; Trullas, R; Soriano, E

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial function and dynamics are essential for neurotransmission, neural function and neuronal viability. Recently, we showed that the eutherian-specific Armcx gene cluster (Armcx1–6 genes), located in the X chromosome, encodes for a new family of proteins that localise to mitochondria, regulating mitochondrial trafficking. The Armcx gene cluster evolved by retrotransposition of the Armc10 gene mRNA, which is present in all vertebrates and is considered to be the ancestor gene. Here we investigate the genomic organisation, mitochondrial functions and putative neuroprotective role of the Armc10 ancestor gene. The genomic context of the Armc10 locus shows considerable syntenic conservation among vertebrates, and sequence comparisons and CHIP-data suggest the presence of at least three conserved enhancers. We also show that the Armc10 protein localises to mitochondria and that it is highly expressed in the brain. Furthermore, we show that Armc10 levels regulate mitochondrial trafficking in neurons, but not mitochondrial aggregation, by controlling the number of moving mitochondria. We further demonstrate that the Armc10 protein interacts with the KIF5/Miro1-2/Trak2 trafficking complex. Finally, we show that overexpression of Armc10 in neurons prevents Aβ-induced mitochondrial fission and neuronal death. Our data suggest both conserved and differential roles of the Armc10/Armcx gene family in regulating mitochondrial dynamics in neurons, and underscore a protective effect of the Armc10 gene against Aβ-induced toxicity. Overall, our findings support a further degree of regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in the brain of more evolved mammals. PMID:24722288

  14. Translational Regulation of the Mitochondrial Genome Following Redistribution of Mitochondrial MicroRNA (MitomiR) in the Diabetic Heart

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Rajaganapathi; Thapa, Dharendra; Nichols, Cody E.; Shepherd, Danielle L.; Stricker, Janelle C.; Croston, Tara L.; Baseler, Walter A.; Lewis, Sara E.; Martinez, Ivan; Hollander, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiomyocytes are rich in mitochondria which are situated in spatially-distinct subcellular regions including those under the plasma membrane, subsarcolemmal mitochondria; and those between the myofibrils, interfibrillar mitochondria. We previously observed subpopulation-specific differences in mitochondrial proteomes following diabetic insult. The objective of this study was to determine whether mitochondrial genome-encoded proteins are regulated by microRNAs inside the mitochondrion and whether subcellular spatial location or diabetes mellitus influences the dynamics. Methods and Results Using microarray technology coupled with cross-linking immunoprecipitation and next generation sequencing, we identified a pool of mitochondrial microRNAs, termed mitomiRs that are redistributed in spatially-distinct mitochondrial subpopulations in an inverse manner following diabetic insult. Redistributed mitomiRs displayed distinct interactions with the mitochondrial genome requiring specific stoichiometric associations with RISC constituents argonaute-2 (Ago2) and fragile X mental retardation–related protein 1 (FXR1) for translational regulation. In the presence of Ago2 and FXR1, redistribution of mitomiR-378 to the IFM following diabetic insult led to down regulation of mitochondrially-encoded F0 component ATP6. Next generation sequencing analyses identified specific transcriptome and mitomiR sequences associated with ATP6 regulation. Overexpression of mitomiR-378 in HL-1 cells resulted in its accumulation in the mitochondrion and down-regulation of functional ATP6 protein, while antagomir blockade restored functional ATP6 protein and cardiac pump function. Conclusions We propose mitomiRs can translationally regulate mitochondrially-encoded proteins in spatially-distinct mitochondrial subpopulations during diabetes mellitus. The results reveal the requirement of RISC constituents in the mitochondrion for functional mitomiR translational regulation and provide a

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of Biston panterinaria (Lepidoptera: Geometridae), with phylogenetic utility of mitochondrial genome in the Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiushuai; Xue, Dayong; Han, Hongxiang

    2013-02-25

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the Chinese pistacia looper Biston panterinaria was sequenced and annotated (15,517bp). It contains the typical 37 genes of animal mitogenomes and a high A+T content (79.5%). All protein coding genes (PCGs) use standard ATN initiation codons except for cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COX1) with CGA. Eleven PCGs use a common stop codon of TAA or TAG, whereas COX2 and NADH dehydrogenase 4 (ND4) use a single T. All transfer RNA (tRNA) genes have the typical clover-leaf structure with the exception of tRNA(Ser(AGN)). We reconstructed a preliminary mitochondrial phylogeny of six ditrysian superfamilies and performed comparative analyses of inference methods (Bayesian Inference (BI), Maximum Likelihood (ML), and Maximum Parsimony (MP)), dataset compositions (including and excluding 3rd codon positions), and alignment methods (Muscle, Clustal W, and MAFFT). Our analyses indicated that inference methods and dataset compositions more significantly affected the phylogenetic results than alignment methods. BI analysis consistently revealed uncontroversial relationships with all dataset compositions. By contrast, ML analysis failed to reconstruct stable phylogeny at two nodes, whereas MP analysis had more difficulties in the tree resolution and nodal support. Distinct from most previous studies, our analyses revealed that Geometroidea had a closer lineage relationship with Bombycoidea than Noctuoidea. Similar to previous molecular studies, our analyses revealed that Hesperiidae were nested in the Papilionoidea clade, providing further evidence to the previous concept that Papilionoidea was paraphyletic, and none of the butterflies were associated with the Macroheterocera.

  16. Afrobatrachian mitochondrial genomes: genome reorganization, gene rearrangement mechanisms, and evolutionary trends of duplicated and rearranged genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial genomic (mitogenomic) reorganizations are rarely found in closely-related animals, yet drastic reorganizations have been found in the Ranoides frogs. The phylogenetic relationships of the three major ranoid taxa (Natatanura, Microhylidae, and Afrobatrachia) have been problematic, and mitogenomic information for afrobatrachians has not been available. Several molecular models for mitochondrial (mt) gene rearrangements have been proposed, but observational evidence has been insufficient to evaluate them. Furthermore, evolutionary trends in rearranged mt genes have not been well understood. To gain molecular and phylogenetic insights into these issues, we analyzed the mt genomes of four afrobatrachian species (Breviceps adspersus, Hemisus marmoratus, Hyperolius marmoratus, and Trichobatrachus robustus) and performed molecular phylogenetic analyses. Furthermore we searched for two evolutionary patterns expected in the rearranged mt genes of ranoids. Results Extensively reorganized mt genomes having many duplicated and rearranged genes were found in three of the four afrobatrachians analyzed. In fact, Breviceps has the largest known mt genome among vertebrates. Although the kinds of duplicated and rearranged genes differed among these species, a remarkable gene rearrangement pattern of non-tandemly copied genes situated within tandemly-copied regions was commonly found. Furthermore, the existence of concerted evolution was observed between non-neighboring copies of triplicated 12S and 16S ribosomal RNA regions. Conclusions Phylogenetic analyses based on mitogenomic data support a close relationship between Afrobatrachia and Microhylidae, with their estimated divergence 100 million years ago consistent with present-day endemism of afrobatrachians on the African continent. The afrobatrachian mt data supported the first tandem and second non-tandem duplication model for mt gene rearrangements and the recombination-based model for concerted

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the polychaete annelidPlatynereis dumerilii

    SciTech Connect

    Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-08-15

    Complete mitochondrial genome sequences are now available for 126 metazoans (see Boore 1999; Mitochondrial Genomics link at http://www.jgi.doe.gov), but the taxonomic representation is highly biased. For example, 80 are from a single phylum, Chordata, and show little variation for many molecular features. Arthropoda is represented by 16 taxa, Mollusca by eight, and Echinodermata by five, with only 17 others from the remaining {approx}30 metazoan phyla. With few exceptions (see Wolstenholme 1992 and Boore 1999) these are circular DNA molecules, about 16 kb in size, and encode the same set of 37 genes. A variety of non-standard names are sometimes used for animal mitochondrial genes; see Boore (1999) for gene nomenclature and a table of synonyms. Mitochondrial genome comparisons serve as a model of genome evolution. In this system, much smaller and simpler than that of the nucleus, are all of the same factors of genome evolution, where one may find tractable the changes in tRNA structure, base composition, genetic code, gene arrangement, etc. Further, patterns of mitochondrial gene rearrangements are an exceptionally reliable indicator of phylogenetic relationships (Smith et al.1993; Boore et al. 1995; Boore, Lavrov, and Brown 1998; Boore and Brown 1998, 2000; Dowton 1999; Stechmann and Schlegel 1999; Kurabayashi and Ueshima 2000). To these ends, we are sampling further the variation among major animal groups in features of their mitochondrial genomes.

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the tubeworm Lamellibrachia satsuma and structural conservation in the mitochondrial genome control regions of Order Sabellida.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ajit Kumar; Kwon, Yong Min; Kang, Sung Gyun; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The control region of the mitochondrial genomes shows high variation in conserved sequence organizations, which follow distinct evolutionary patterns in different species or taxa. In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Lamellibrachia satsuma from the cold-seep region of Kagoshima Bay, as a part of whole genome study and extensively studied the structural features and patterns of the control region sequences. We obtained 15,037 bp of mitochondrial genome using Illumina sequencing and identified the non-coding AT-rich region or control region (354 bp, AT=83.9%) located between trnH and trnR. We found 7 conserved sequence blocks (CSB), scattered throughout the control region of L. satsuma and other taxa of Annelida. The poly-TA stretches, which commonly form the stem of multiple stem-loop structures, are most conserved in the CSB-I and CSB-II regions. The mitochondrial genome of L. satsuma encodes a unique repetitive sequence in the control region, which forms a unique secondary structure in comparison to Lamellibrachia luymesi. Phylogenetic analyses of all protein-coding genes indicate that L. satsuma forms a monophyletic clade with L. luymesi along with other tubeworms found in cold-seep regions (genera: Lamellibrachia, Escarpia, and Seepiophila). In general, the control region sequences of Annelida could be aligned with certainty within each genus, and to some extent within the family, but with a higher rate of variation in conserved regions.

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome of Tambocerus sp. (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    PubMed

    Yu, Pengfei; Wang, Mengxin; Cui, Lin; Chen, Xuexin; Han, Baoyu

    2017-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Tambocerus sp. (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) from Zhejiang and Anhui provinces of China was sequenced. The total length of the mitogenome is 15 955 bp (GenBank accession no. KT827824) and consists of 22 transfer RNAs, 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs and 1 control region. The base composition of the heavy strand for A, T, C, and G is 41.39, 35.02, 14.00, and 9.59%, respectively. All of the protein-coding genes (PCGs) start with ATN. Five protein-coding genes use TAA as stop codons, four use TAG as stop codons, and others use incomplete stop codons ''T--'' or ''TA-''. The control region has a length of 1581 bp which is between rrnS and trnI genes with the AT content high to 85.96%. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Tambocerus sp. was clustered in a closely related subgroup with Homalodisca vitripennis and Empoasca vitis. This is consistent with the result of the traditional taxonomy.

  20. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of the Rice Moth, Corcyra cephalonica

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Peng; Li, Jie; Zhao, Jin-Liang; Su, Tian-Juan; Luo, A-Rong; Fan, Ren-Jun; Chen, Ming-Chang; Wu, Chun-Sheng; Zhu, Chao-Dong

    2012-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the rice moth, Corcyra cephalonica Stainton (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) was determined as a circular molecular of 15,273 bp in size. The mitogenome composition (37 genes) and gene order are the same as the other lepidopterans. Nucleotide composition of the C. cephalonica mitogenome is highly A+T biased (80.43%) like other insects. Twelve protein-coding genes start with a typical ATN codon, with the exception of coxl gene, which uses CGA as the initial codon. Nine protein-coding genes have the common stop codon TAA, and the nad2, cox1, cox2, and nad4 have single T as the incomplete stop codon. 22 tRNA genes demonstrated cloverleaf secondary structure. The mitogenome has several large intergenic spacer regions, the spacer1 between trnQ gene and nad2 gene, which is common in Lepidoptera. The spacer 3 between trnE and trnF includes microsatellite-like repeat regions (AT)18 and (TTAT)3. The spacer 4 (16 bp) between trnS2 gene and nad1 gene has a motif ATACTAT; another species, Sesamia inferens encodes ATCATAT at the same position, while other lepidopteran insects encode a similar ATACTAA motif. The spacer 6 is A+T rich region, include motif ATAGA and a 20-bp poly(T) stretch and two microsatellite (AT)9, (AT)8 elements. PMID:23413968

  1. Complete mitochondrial genome of yellow meal worm (Tenebrio molitor).

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Na; Wang, Cheng-Ye

    2014-11-18

    The yellow meal worm (Tenebrio molitor L.) is an important resource insect typically used as animal feed additive. It is also widely used for biological research. The first complete mitochondrial genome of T. molitor was determined for the first time by long PCR and conserved primer walking approaches. The results showed that the entire mitogenome of T. molitor was 15 785 bp long, with 72.35% A+T content [deposited in GenBank with accession number KF418153]. The gene order and orientation were the same as the most common type suggested as ancestral for insects. Two protein-coding genes used atypical start codons (CTA in ND2 and AAT in COX1), and the remaining 11 protein-coding genes started with a typical insect initiation codon ATN. All tRNAs showed standard clover-leaf structure, except for tRNA(Ser) (AGN), which lacked a dihydrouridine (DHU) arm. The newly added T. molitor mitogenome could provide information for future studies on yellow meal worm.

  2. Complete mitochondrial genome of yellow meal worm(Tenebrio molitor)

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Li-Na; WANG, Cheng-Ye

    2014-01-01

    The yellow meal worm(Tenebrio molitor L.) is an important resource insect typically used as animal feed additive. It is also widely used for biological research. The first complete mitochondrial genome of T. molitor was determined for the first time by long PCR and conserved primer walking approaches. The results showed that the entire mitogenome of T. molitor was 15 785 bp long, with 72.35% A+T content [deposited in GenBank with accession number KF418153]. The gene order and orientation were the same as the most common type suggested as ancestral for insects. Two protein-coding genes used atypical start codons(CTA in ND2 and AAT in COX1), and the remaining 11 protein-coding genes started with a typical insect initiation codon ATN. All tRNAs showed standard clover-leaf structure, except for tRNASer(AGN), which lacked a dihydrouridine(DHU) arm. The newly added T. molitor mitogenome could provide information for future studies on yellow meal worm. PMID:25465087

  3. Chicken domestication: an updated perspective based on mitochondrial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Y-W; Peng, M-S; Wu, G-S; Ouyang, Y-N; Yang, Z-Y; Yu, N; Liang, J-P; Pianchou, G; Beja-Pereira, A; Mitra, B; Palanichamy, M G; Baig, M; Chaudhuri, T K; Shen, Y-Y; Kong, Q-P; Murphy, R W; Yao, Y-G; Zhang, Y-P

    2013-01-01

    Domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) fulfill various roles ranging from food and entertainment to religion and ornamentation. To survey its genetic diversity and trace the history of domestication, we investigated a total of 4938 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragments including 2843 previously published and 2095 de novo units from 2044 domestic chickens and 51 red junglefowl (Gallus gallus). To obtain the highest possible level of molecular resolution, 50 representative samples were further selected for total mtDNA genome sequencing. A fine-gained mtDNA phylogeny was investigated by defining haplogroups A–I and W–Z. Common haplogroups A–G were shared by domestic chickens and red junglefowl. Rare haplogroups H–I and W–Z were specific to domestic chickens and red junglefowl, respectively. We re-evaluated the global mtDNA profiles of chickens. The geographic distribution for each of major haplogroups was examined. Our results revealed new complexities of history in chicken domestication because in the phylogeny lineages from the red junglefowl were mingled with those of the domestic chickens. Several local domestication events in South Asia, Southwest China and Southeast Asia were identified. The assessment of chicken mtDNA data also facilitated our understanding about the Austronesian settlement in the Pacific. PMID:23211792

  4. The earliest angiosperms: evidence from mitochondrial, plastid and nuclear genomes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y L; Lee, J; Bernasconi-Quadroni, F; Soltis, D E; Soltis, P S; Zanis, M; Zimmer, E A; Chen, Z; Savolainen, V; Chase, M W

    1999-11-25

    Angiosperms have dominated the Earth's vegetation since the mid-Cretaceous (90 million years ago), providing much of our food, fibre, medicine and timber, yet their origin and early evolution have remained enigmatic for over a century. One part of the enigma lies in the difficulty of identifying the earliest angiosperms; the other involves the uncertainty regarding the sister group of angiosperms among extant and fossil gymnosperms. Here we report a phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences of five mitochondrial, plastid and nuclear genes (total aligned length 8,733 base pairs), from all basal angiosperm and gymnosperm lineages (105 species, 103 genera and 63 families). Our study demonstrates that Amborella, Nymphaeales and Illiciales-Trimeniaceae-Austrobaileya represent the first stage of angiosperm evolution, with Amborella being sister to all other angiosperms. We also show that Gnetales are related to the conifers and are not sister to the angiosperms, thus refuting the Anthophyte Hypothesis. These results have far-reaching implications for our understanding of diversification, adaptation, genome evolution and development of the angiosperms.

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome of Zebra tilapia, Tilapia buttikoferi.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xi-Dong; Liu, Chao; Wang, Xue-Jie; Liu, Yi; Hu, Yin-Chang; Luo, Jian-Ren

    2016-01-01

    We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of Tilapia buttikoferi, which was 16,577 bp in length with an A + T content of 53.0%, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs and a complete control region. The gene arrangement was similar to that of typical fishes. The total base composition of the mitogenome was 25.6% T, 30.8% C, 27.4% A and 16.2% G. Of the 13 protein-coding genes, 12 genes start with an ATG codon, except for COX1 with GTG. Seven (ND1, ND2, COX1, ATPase8, ATPase6, ND4L and ND6) used TAA or AGA as the termination codon, whereas six (COX2, COX3, ND3, ND4, ND5 and cyt b) had incomplete stop codon T. Its control region was atypical in being short at 861 bp, and contained TACAT motif and one microsatellite-like region (TA)7. This mitogenome sequence data may be useful for phylogenetic and systematic analyses within the family Cichlaidae.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of Setaria digitata (Nematoda: Filarioidea): Mitochondrial gene content, arrangement and composition compared with other nematodes.

    PubMed

    Yatawara, Lalani; Wickramasinghe, Susiji; Rajapakse, R P V J; Agatsuma, Takeshi

    2010-09-01

    In the present study, we determined the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence (13,839bp) of parasitic nematode Setaria digitata and its structure and organization compared with Onchocerca volvulus, Dirofilaria immitis and Brugia malayi. The mt genome of S. digitata is slightly larger than the mt genomes of other filarial nematodes. S. digitata mt genome contains 36 genes (12 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs and 2 ribosomal RNAs) that are typically found in metazoans. This genome contains a high A+T (75.1%) content and low G+C content (24.9%). The mt gene order for S. digitata is the same as those for O. volvulus, D. immitis and B. malayi but it is distinctly different from other nematodes compared. The start codons inferred in the mt genome of S. digitata are TTT, ATT, TTG, ATG, GTT and ATA. Interestingly, the initiation codon TTT is unique to S. digitata mt genome and four protein-coding genes use this codon as a translation initiation codon. Five protein-coding genes use TAG as a stop codon whereas three genes use TAA and four genes use T as a termination codon. Out of 64 possible codons, only 57 are used for mitochondrial protein-coding genes of S. digitata. T-rich codons such as TTT (18.9%), GTT (7.9%), TTG (7.8%), TAT (7%), ATT (5.7%), TCT (4.8%) and TTA (4.1%) are used more frequently. This pattern of codon usage reflects the strong bias for T in the mt genome of S. digitata. In conclusion, the present investigation provides new molecular data for future studies of the comparative mitochondrial genomics and systematic of parasitic nematodes of socio-economic importance. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evolution of the mitochondrial genome in snakes: Gene rearrangements and phylogenetic relationships

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jie; Li, Hongdan; Zhou, Kaiya

    2008-01-01

    Background Snakes as a major reptile group display a variety of morphological characteristics pertaining to their diverse behaviours. Despite abundant analyses of morphological characters, molecular studies using mitochondrial and nuclear genes are limited. As a result, the phylogeny of snakes remains controversial. Previous studies on mitochondrial genomes of snakes have demonstrated duplication of the control region and translocation of trnL to be two notable features of the alethinophidian (all serpents except blindsnakes and threadsnakes) mtDNAs. Our purpose is to further investigate the gene organizations, evolution of the snake mitochondrial genome, and phylogenetic relationships among several major snake families. Results The mitochondrial genomes were sequenced for four taxa representing four different families, and each had a different gene arrangement. Comparative analyses with other snake mitochondrial genomes allowed us to summarize six types of mitochondrial gene arrangement in snakes. Phylogenetic reconstruction with commonly used methods of phylogenetic inference (BI, ML, MP, NJ) arrived at a similar topology, which was used to reconstruct the evolution of mitochondrial gene arrangements in snakes. Conclusion The phylogenetic relationships among the major families of snakes are in accordance with the mitochondrial genomes in terms of gene arrangements. The gene arrangement in Ramphotyphlops braminus mtDNA is inferred to be ancestral for snakes. After the divergence of the early Ramphotyphlops lineage, three types of rearrangements occurred. These changes involve translocations within the IQM tRNA gene cluster and the duplication of the CR. All phylogenetic methods support the placement of Enhydris plumbea outside of the (Colubridae + Elapidae) cluster, providing mitochondrial genomic evidence for the familial rank of Homalopsidae. PMID:19038056

  8. RECG Maintains Plastid and Mitochondrial Genome Stability by Suppressing Extensive Recombination between Short Dispersed Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Odahara, Masaki; Masuda, Yuichi; Sato, Mayuko; Wakazaki, Mayumi; Harada, Chizuru; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sekine, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of plastid and mitochondrial genome stability is crucial for photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. Recently, we have reported that RECA1 maintains mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing gross rearrangements induced by aberrant recombination between short dispersed repeats in the moss Physcomitrella patens. In this study, we studied a newly identified P. patens homolog of bacterial RecG helicase, RECG, some of which is localized in both plastid and mitochondrial nucleoids. RECG partially complements recG deficiency in Escherichia coli cells. A knockout (KO) mutation of RECG caused characteristic phenotypes including growth delay and developmental and mitochondrial defects, which are similar to those of the RECA1 KO mutant. The RECG KO cells showed heterogeneity in these phenotypes. Analyses of RECG KO plants showed that mitochondrial genome was destabilized due to a recombination between 8–79 bp repeats and the pattern of the recombination partly differed from that observed in the RECA1 KO mutants. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) instability was greater in severe phenotypic RECG KO cells than that in mild phenotypic ones. This result suggests that mitochondrial genomic instability is responsible for the defective phenotypes of RECG KO plants. Some of the induced recombination caused efficient genomic rearrangements in RECG KO mitochondria. Such loci were sometimes associated with a decrease in the levels of normal mtDNA and significant decrease in the number of transcripts derived from the loci. In addition, the RECG KO mutation caused remarkable plastid abnormalities and induced recombination between short repeats (12–63 bp) in the plastid DNA. These results suggest that RECG plays a role in the maintenance of both plastid and mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing aberrant recombination between dispersed short repeats; this role is crucial for plastid and mitochondrial functions. PMID:25769081

  9. NCBI Reference Sequence (RefSeq): a curated non-redundant sequence database of genomes, transcripts and proteins.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana; Maglott, Donna R

    2005-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Reference Sequence (RefSeq) database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/) provides a non-redundant collection of sequences representing genomic data, transcripts and proteins. Although the goal is to provide a comprehensive dataset representing the complete sequence information for any given species, the database pragmatically includes sequence data that are currently publicly available in the archival databases. The database incorporates data from over 2400 organisms and includes over one million proteins representing significant taxonomic diversity spanning prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses. Nucleotide and protein sequences are explicitly linked, and the sequences are linked to other resources including the NCBI Map Viewer and Gene. Sequences are annotated to include coding regions, conserved domains, variation, references, names, database cross-references, and other features using a combined approach of collaboration and other input from the scientific community, automated annotation, propagation from GenBank and curation by NCBI staff.

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of the big-eye thresher shark, Alopias superciliosus (Chondrichthyes, Alopiidae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Ho, Hsuan-Ching; Liao, Yun-Chih

    2014-08-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the big-eye thresher shark was sequenced using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method. The total length of mitochondrial DNA is 16,719 bp and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA, 22 transfer RNA genes, 1 replication origin region and 1 control region. The mitochondrial gene arrangement of the big-eye thresher shark is the same as the one observed in the most vertebrates. Base composition of the genome is A (31.8%), T (28.9%), C (25.8%) and G (13.5%).

  11. The Complete Chloroplast and Mitochondrial Genome Sequences of Boea hygrometrica: Insights into the Evolution of Plant Organellar Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xumin; Deng, Xin; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of the chloroplast (cp) and mitochondrial (mt) genomes of resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica (Bh, Gesneriaceae) have been determined with the lengths of 153,493 bp and 510,519 bp, respectively. The smaller chloroplast genome contains more genes (147) with a 72% coding sequence, and the larger mitochondrial genome have less genes (65) with a coding faction of 12%. Similar to other seed plants, the Bh cp genome has a typical quadripartite organization with a conserved gene in each region. The Bh mt genome has three recombinant sequence repeats of 222 bp, 843 bp, and 1474 bp in length, which divide the genome into a single master circle (MC) and four isomeric molecules. Compared to other angiosperms, one remarkable feature of the Bh mt genome is the frequent transfer of genetic material from the cp genome during recent Bh evolution. We also analyzed organellar genome evolution in general regarding genome features as well as compositional dynamics of sequence and gene structure/organization, providing clues for the understanding of the evolution of organellar genomes in plants. The cp-derived sequences including tRNAs found in angiosperm mt genomes support the conclusion that frequent gene transfer events may have begun early in the land plant lineage. PMID:22291979

  12. The complete chloroplast and mitochondrial genome sequences of Boea hygrometrica: insights into the evolution of plant organellar genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tongwu; Fang, Yongjun; Wang, Xumin; Deng, Xin; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of the chloroplast (cp) and mitochondrial (mt) genomes of resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica (Bh, Gesneriaceae) have been determined with the lengths of 153,493 bp and 510,519 bp, respectively. The smaller chloroplast genome contains more genes (147) with a 72% coding sequence, and the larger mitochondrial genome have less genes (65) with a coding faction of 12%. Similar to other seed plants, the Bh cp genome has a typical quadripartite organization with a conserved gene in each region. The Bh mt genome has three recombinant sequence repeats of 222 bp, 843 bp, and 1474 bp in length, which divide the genome into a single master circle (MC) and four isomeric molecules. Compared to other angiosperms, one remarkable feature of the Bh mt genome is the frequent transfer of genetic material from the cp genome during recent Bh evolution. We also analyzed organellar genome evolution in general regarding genome features as well as compositional dynamics of sequence and gene structure/organization, providing clues for the understanding of the evolution of organellar genomes in plants. The cp-derived sequences including tRNAs found in angiosperm mt genomes support the conclusion that frequent gene transfer events may have begun early in the land plant lineage.

  13. Rapid evolution of the compact and unusual mitochondrial genome in the ctenophore, Pleurobrachia bachei.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Andrea B; Citarella, Mathew R; Kocot, Kevin M; Bobkova, Yelena V; Halanych, Kenneth M; Moroz, Leonid L

    2012-04-01

    Ctenophores are one of the most basally branching lineages of metazoans with the largest mitochondrial organelles in the animal kingdom. We sequenced the mitochondrial (mtDNA) genome from the Pacific cidipid ctenophore, Pleurobrachia bachei. The circular mitochondrial genome is 11,016 nts, with only 12 genes, and one of the smallest metazoan mtDNA genomes recorded. The protein coding genes are intronless cox1-3, cob, nad1, 3, 4, 4L and 5. The nad2 and 6 genes are represented as short fragments whereas the atp6 gene was found in the nuclear genome. Only the large ribosomal RNA subunit and two tRNAs were present with possibly the small subunit unidentifiable due to extensive fragmentation. The observed unique features of this mitochondrial genome suggest that nuclear and mitochondrial genomes have evolved at very different rates. This reduced mtDNA genome sharply contrasts with the very large sizes of mtDNA found in other basal metazoans including Porifera (sponges), and Placozoa (Trichoplax). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. History of plastid DNA insertions reveals weak deletion and at mutation biases in angiosperm mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Daniel B; Wu, Zhiqiang

    2014-11-21

    Angiosperm mitochondrial genomes exhibit many unusual properties, including heterogeneous nucleotide composition and exceptionally large and variable genome sizes. Determining the role of nonadaptive mechanisms such as mutation bias in shaping the molecular evolution of these unique genomes has proven challenging because their dynamic structures generally prevent identification of homologous intergenic sequences for comparative analyses. Here, we report an analysis of angiosperm mitochondrial DNA sequences that are derived from inserted plastid DNA (mtpts). The availability of numerous completely sequenced plastid genomes allows us to infer the evolutionary history of these insertions, including the specific nucleotide substitutions and indels that have occurred because their incorporation into the mitochondrial genome. Our analysis confirmed that many mtpts have a complex history, including frequent gene conversion and multiple examples of horizontal transfer between divergent angiosperm lineages. Nevertheless, it is clear that the majority of extant mtpt sequence in angiosperms is the product of recent transfer (or gene conversion) and is subject to rapid loss/deterioration, suggesting that most mtpts are evolving relatively free from functional constraint. The evolution of mtpt sequences reveals a pattern of biased mutational input in angiosperm mitochondrial genomes, including an excess of small deletions over insertions and a skew toward nucleotide substitutions that increase AT content. However, these mutation biases are far weaker than have been observed in many other cellular genomes, providing insight into some of the notable features of angiosperm mitochondrial architecture, including the retention of large intergenic regions and the relatively neutral GC content found in these regions.

  15. Presence of two mitochondrial genomes in the mytilid Perumytilus purpuratus: Phylogenetic evidence for doubly uniparental inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Jaime; Pérez, Montse; Toro, Jorge; Astorga, Marcela P.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents evidence, using sequences of ribosomal 16S and COI mtDNA, for the presence of two mitochondrial genomes in Perumytilus purpuratus. This may be considered evidence of doubly uniparental mtDNA inheritance. The presence of the two types of mitochondrial genomes differentiates females from males. The F genome was found in the somatic and gonadal tissues of females and in the somatic tissues of males; the M genome was found in the gonads and mantle of males only. For the mitochondrial 16S region, ten haplotypes were found for the F genome (nucleotide diversity 0.004), and 7 haplotypes for the M genome (nucleotide diversity 0.001), with a distance Dxy of 0.125 and divergence Kxy of 60.33%. For the COI gene 17 haplotypes were found for the F genome (nucleotide diversity 0.009), and 10 haplotypes for the M genome (nucleotide diversity 0.010), with a genetic distance Dxy of 0.184 and divergence Kxy of 99.97%. Our results report the presence of two well-differentiated, sex-specific types of mitochondrial genome (one present in the male gonad, the other in the female gonad), implying the presence of DUI in P. purpuratus. These results indicate that care must be taken in phylogenetic comparisons using mtDNA sequences of P. purpuratus without considering the sex of the individuals. PMID:26273220

  16. Comparative mitochondrial genomics of snakes: extraordinary substitution rate dynamics and functionality of the duplicate control region

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi J; Castoe, Todd A; Austin, Christopher C; Burbrink, Frank T; Herron, Matthew D; McGuire, Jimmy A; Parkinson, Christopher L; Pollock, David D

    2007-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial genomes of snakes are characterized by an overall evolutionary rate that appears to be one of the most accelerated among vertebrates. They also possess other unusual features, including short tRNAs and other genes, and a duplicated control region that has been stably maintained since it originated more than 70 million years ago. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of evolutionary dynamics in snake mitochondrial genomes to better understand the basis of these extreme characteristics, and to explore the relationship between mitochondrial genome molecular evolution, genome architecture, and molecular function. We sequenced complete mitochondrial genomes from Slowinski's corn snake (Pantherophis slowinskii) and two cottonmouths (Agkistrodon piscivorus) to complement previously existing mitochondrial genomes, and to provide an improved comparative view of how genome architecture affects molecular evolution at contrasting levels of divergence. Results We present a Bayesian genetic approach that suggests that the duplicated control region can function as an additional origin of heavy strand replication. The two control regions also appear to have different intra-specific versus inter-specific evolutionary dynamics that may be associated with complex modes of concerted evolution. We find that different genomic regions have experienced substantial accelerated evolution along early branches in snakes, with different genes having experienced dramatic accelerations along specific branches. Some of these accelerations appear to coincide with, or subsequent to, the shortening of various mitochondrial genes and the duplication of the control region and flanking tRNAs. Conclusion Fluctuations in the strength and pattern of selection during snake evolution have had widely varying gene-specific effects on substitution rates, and these rate accelerations may have been functionally related to unusual changes in genomic architecture. The among-lineage and

  17. No association between the mitochondrial genome and prostate cancer risk: The Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi, Elena E.; Li, Yuqing; Caberto, Christian P.; Beckman, Kenneth B.; Lum-Jones, Annette; Haiman, Christopher A.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Stram, Daniel O.; Saxena, Richa; Cheng, Iona

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondria are involved in many processes that are central to the life and death of a cell. Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), in particular, is known to be altered in carcinogenesis, leading to an increase in the production of reactive oxidative species and glycolysis, one of the hallmarks of cancer cells. Because of this, genetic variation in the mitochondrial genome, which encodes for part of the OXPHOS pathway, has been suggested to play a role in many cancers, including prostate cancer. Methods We comprehensively examined the role of the mitochondrial genome and prostate cancer risk in 4,086 prostate cancer cases and 3,698 controls from the Multiethnic Cohort, testing 350 mitochondrial SNPs (mtSNPs) in five racial/ethnic populations—Africans, Asian Americans, Europeans, Latinos, and Native Hawaiians. Logistic regression was conducted to examine single mitochondrial SNP and haplogroup associations. The sequence kernel association test was conducted for gene and pathway analysis. Results Eleven mtSNPs and haplogroup N were nominally associated with overall prostate cancer risk at P<0.05. The mitochondrial DNA encoded OXPHOS pathway, complexes, and genes were not associated with prostate cancer risk. No significant associations were identified after multiple testing correction (all FDR q>0.20). Conclusions The mitochondrial genome was not associated with prostate cancer risk in our study of 7,784 subjects from the Multiethnic Cohort. Impact Our comprehensive study does not support the role of the mitochondrial genome in the risk of prostate cancer. PMID:27021046

  18. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Verticillium-wilt causing plant pathogen Verticillium nonalfalfae.

    PubMed

    Jelen, Vid; de Jonge, Ronnie; Van de Peer, Yves; Javornik, Branka; Jakše, Jernej

    2016-01-01

    Verticillium nonalfalfae is a fungal plant pathogen that causes wilt disease by colonizing the vascular tissues of host plants. The disease induced by hop isolates of V. nonalfalfae manifests in two different forms, ranging from mild symptoms to complete plant dieback, caused by mild and lethal pathotypes, respectively. Pathogenicity variations between the causal strains have been attributed to differences in genomic sequences and perhaps also to differences in their mitochondrial genomes. We used data from our recent Illumina NGS-based project of genome sequencing V. nonalfalfae to study the mitochondrial genomes of its different strains. The aim of the research was to prepare a V. nonalfalfae reference mitochondrial genome and to determine its phylogenetic placement in the fungal kingdom. The resulting 26,139 bp circular DNA molecule contains a full complement of the 14 "standard" fungal mitochondrial protein-coding genes of the electron transport chain and ATP synthase subunits, together with a small rRNA subunit, a large rRNA subunit, which contains ribosomal protein S3 encoded within a type IA-intron and 26 tRNAs. Phylogenetic analysis of this mitochondrial genome placed it in the Verticillium spp. lineage in the Glomerellales group, which is also supported by previous phylogenetic studies based on nuclear markers. The clustering with the closely related Verticillium dahliae mitochondrial genome showed a very conserved synteny and a high sequence similarity. Two distinguishing mitochondrial genome features were also found-a potential long non-coding RNA (orf414) contained only in the Verticillium spp. of the fungal kingdom, and a specific fragment length polymorphism observed only in V. dahliae and V. nubilum of all the Verticillium spp., thus showing potential as a species specific biomarker.

  19. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Verticillium-wilt causing plant pathogen Verticillium nonalfalfae

    PubMed Central

    Jelen, Vid; de Jonge, Ronnie; Van de Peer, Yves; Javornik, Branka; Jakše, Jernej

    2016-01-01

    Verticillium nonalfalfae is a fungal plant pathogen that causes wilt disease by colonizing the vascular tissues of host plants. The disease induced by hop isolates of V. nonalfalfae manifests in two different forms, ranging from mild symptoms to complete plant dieback, caused by mild and lethal pathotypes, respectively. Pathogenicity variations between the causal strains have been attributed to differences in genomic sequences and perhaps also to differences in their mitochondrial genomes. We used data from our recent Illumina NGS-based project of genome sequencing V. nonalfalfae to study the mitochondrial genomes of its different strains. The aim of the research was to prepare a V. nonalfalfae reference mitochondrial genome and to determine its phylogenetic placement in the fungal kingdom. The resulting 26,139 bp circular DNA molecule contains a full complement of the 14 "standard" fungal mitochondrial protein-coding genes of the electron transport chain and ATP synthase subunits, together with a small rRNA subunit, a large rRNA subunit, which contains ribosomal protein S3 encoded within a type IA-intron and 26 tRNAs. Phylogenetic analysis of this mitochondrial genome placed it in the Verticillium spp. lineage in the Glomerellales group, which is also supported by previous phylogenetic studies based on nuclear markers. The clustering with the closely related Verticillium dahliae mitochondrial genome showed a very conserved synteny and a high sequence similarity. Two distinguishing mitochondrial genome features were also found—a potential long non-coding RNA (orf414) contained only in the Verticillium spp. of the fungal kingdom, and a specific fragment length polymorphism observed only in V. dahliae and V. nubilum of all the Verticillium spp., thus showing potential as a species specific biomarker. PMID:26839950

  20. A complete mitochondrial genome of wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Yumai), and fast evolving mitochondrial genes in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peng; Liu, Huitao; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Zhuo, Guoyin; Hu, Songnian; Liu, Dongcheng; Yang, Wenlong; Zhan, Kehui; Zhang, Aimin; Yu, Jun

    2009-12-01

    Plant mitochondrial genomes, encoding necessary proteins involved in the system of energy production, play an important role in the development and reproduction of the plant. They occupy a specific evolutionary pattern relative to their nuclear counterparts. Here, we determined the winter wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Yumai) mitochondrial genome in a length of 452 and 526 bp by shotgun sequencing its BAC library. It contains 202 genes, including 35 known protein-coding genes, three rRNA and 17 tRNA genes, as well as 149 open reading frames (ORFs; greater than 300 bp in length). The sequence is almost identical to the previously reported sequence of the spring wheat (T. aestivum cv. Chinese Spring); we only identified seven SNPs (three transitions and four transversions) and 10 indels (insertions and deletions) between the two independently acquired sequences, and all variations were found in non-coding regions. This result confirmed the accuracy of the previously reported mitochondrial sequence of the Chinese Spring wheat. The nucleotide frequency and codon usage of wheat are common among the lineage of higher plant with a high AT-content of 58%. Molecular evolutionary analysis demonstrated that plant mitochondrial genomes evolved at different rates, which may correlate with substantial variations in metabolic rate and generation time among plant lineages. In addition, through the estimation of the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates between orthologous mitochondrion-encoded genes of higher plants, we found an accelerated evolutionary rate that seems to be the result of relaxed selection.

  1. The complete mitochondrial genome of snubnose pompano Trachinotus blochii (Teleostei, Carangidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dianchang; Wang, Long; Guo, Huayang; Ma, Zhenhua; Jiang, Shigui

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Trachinotus blochii was determined using the polymerase chain reaction. The complete mitochondrial DNA sequence is 16,558 bp in length. It consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two rRNA genes and two non-coding regions. Overall base composition of its mitochondrial genome is estimated to be 29.21% for A, 15.74% for G, 26.49% for T, 28.56% for C, respectively, with a high A + T content (55.70%). The control region contains three conserved sequence blocks, a termination-associated sequence and a TATA box. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of T. blochii can provide a basic data for the studies on population structure, molecular systematic, stock evaluation and conservation genetics. It is also helpful to develop the rational management strategies for T. blochii resource.

  2. Distribution of mitochondrial DNA fragments in the nuclear genome of the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Du, W X; Qin, Y C

    2015-10-27

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts), which originated from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) insertions in the nuclear genome, have been detected in many species. The distribution of numts in the honeybee nuclear genome has not yet been fully reported. By referring to the whole honeybee mtDNA sequence and to the recent version of the honeybee nuclear genome, 236 reference sequences were identified by BLAST, with 90 unmapped. The size of the numts ranged from 219 to 3788 bp, and the homologous identity between numts and their corresponding mtDNA fragments varied from 71 to 93%. Furthermore, identified honeybee numts covered nearly all mitochondrial genes and were distributed over all chromosomes. This study provides useful information for further research related to mitochondrial genes and the evolution of the honeybee.

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of the hybrid grouper Epinephelus coioides♀ × Epinephelus lanceolatus♂.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Chen, Huimin; Xu, Wen; He, Jianan; Xie, Zhenzhen; Tang, Lin; Tang, Zhujing; Li, Yu; Li, Shuisheng; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Haoran

    2016-11-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the hybrid grouper (Epinephelus coioides♀ × Epinephelus lanceolatus♂) was presented in this study. The mitochondrial genome is 16,743 bp long and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and a control region. The gene order and the composition of the hybrid grouper mitochondrial genome were similar to that of most other vertebrates. The nucleotide compositions of the light strand are 26.56% of A, 15.79% of C, 28.74% of T, and 28.91% of G. With the exception of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) and eight tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand.

  4. Horizontal transfer of DNA from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome and its subsequent evolution in milkweeds (Apocynaceae)

    Treesearch

    Shannon C.K. Straub; Richard C. Cronn; Christopher Edwards; Mark Fishbein; Aaron. Liston

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of DNA from the plastid to the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of higher plants is a common phenomenon; however, plastid genomes (plastomes) are highly conserved and have generally been regarded as impervious to HGT. We sequenced the 158 kb plastome and the 690 kb mitochondrial genome of common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca [Apocynaceae...

  5. Exceptionally high cumulative percentage of NUMTs originating from linear mitochondrial DNA molecules in the Hydra magnipapillata genome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In contrast to most animal genomes, mitochondrial genomes in species belonging to the phylum Cnidaria show distinct variations in genome structure, including the mtDNA structure (linear or circular) and the presence or absence of introns in protein-coding genes. Therefore, the analysis of nuclear insertions of mitochondrial sequences (NUMTs) in cnidarians allows us to compare the NUMT content in animals with different mitochondrial genome structures. Results NUMT identification in the Hydra magnipapillata, Nematostella vectensis and Acropora digitifera genomes showed that the NUMT density in the H. magnipapillata genome clearly exceeds that in other two cnidarians with circular mitochondrial genomes. We found that H. magnipapillata is an exceptional ancestral metazoan with a high NUMT cumulative percentage but a large genome, and its mitochondrial genome linearisation might be responsible for the NUMT enrichment. We also detected the co-transposition of exonic and intronic fragments within NUMTs in N. vectensis and provided direct evidence that mitochondrial sequences can be transposed into the nuclear genome through DNA-mediated fragment transfer. In addition, NUMT expression analyses showed that NUMTs are co-expressed with adjacent protein-coding genes, suggesting the relevance of their biological function. Conclusions Taken together, our results provide valuable information for understanding the impact of mitochondrial genome structure on the interaction of mitochondrial molecules and nuclear genomes. PMID:23826818

  6. A novel mitochondrial genome architecture in thrips (Insecta: Thysanoptera): extreme size asymmetry among chromosomes and possible recent control region duplication

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multi-partite mitochondrial genomes are very rare in animals but have been found previously in two insect orders with highly rearranged genomes, the Phthiraptera (parasitic lice), and the Psocoptera (booklice/barklice). We provide the first report of a multi-partite mitochondrial genome architecture...

  7. Recent dermatophyte divergence revealed by comparative and phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuan; Yang, Jian; Yang, Fan; Liu, Tao; Leng, Wenchuan; Chu, Yonglie; Jin, Qi

    2009-01-01

    Background Dermatophytes are fungi that cause superficial infections of the skin, hair, and nails. They are the most common agents of fungal infections worldwide. Dermatophytic fungi constitute three genera, Trichophyton, Epidermophyton, and Microsporum, and the evolutionary relationships between these genera are epidemiologically important. Mitochondria are considered to be of monophyletic origin and mitochondrial sequences offer many advantages for phylogenetic studies. However, only one complete dermatophyte mitochondrial genome (E. floccosum) has previously been determined. Results The complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of five dermatophyte species, T. rubrum (26,985 bp), T. mentagrophytes (24,297 bp), T. ajelloi (28,530 bp), M. canis (23,943 bp) and M. nanum (24,105 bp) were determined. These were compared to the E. floccosum sequence. Mitochondrial genomes of all 6 species were found to harbor the same set of genes arranged identical order indicating that these dermatophytes are closely related. Genome size differences were largely due to variable lengths of non-coding intergenic regions and the presence/absence of introns. Phylogenetic analyses based on complete mitochondrial genomes reveals that the divergence of the dermatophyte clade was later than of other groups of pathogenic fungi. Conclusion This is the first systematic comparative genomic study on dermatophytes, a highly conserved and recently-diverged lineage of ascomycota fungi. The data reported here provide a basis for further exploration of interrelationships between dermatophytes and will contribute to the study of mitochondrial evolution in higher fungi. PMID:19457268

  8. Small inverted repeats drive mitochondrial genome evolution in Lake Baikal sponges.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, Dennis V; Maikova, Olga O; Pett, Walker; Belikov, Sergey I

    2012-08-15

    Demosponges, the largest and most diverse class in the phylum Porifera, possess mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markedly different from that in other animals. Although several studies investigated evolution of demosponge mtDNA among major lineages of the group, the changes within these groups remain largely unexplored. Recently we determined mitochondrial genomic sequence of the Lake Baikal sponge Lubomirskia baicalensis and described proliferation of small inverted repeats (hairpins) that occurred in it since the divergence between L. baicalensis and the most closely related cosmopolitan freshwater sponge Ephydatia muelleri. Here we report mitochondrial genomes of three additional species of Lake Baikal sponges: Swartschewskia papyracea, Rezinkovia echinata and Baikalospongia intermedia morpha profundalis (Demospongiae, Haplosclerida, Lubomirskiidae) and from a more distantly related freshwater sponge Corvomeyenia sp. (Demospongiae, Haplosclerida, Metaniidae). We use these additional sequences to explore mtDNA evolution in Baikalian sponges, paying particular attention to the variation in the rates of nucleotide substitutions and the distribution of hairpins, abundant in these genomes. We show that most of the changes in Lubomirskiidae mitochondrial genomes are due to insertion/deletion/duplication of these elements rather than single nucleotide substitutions. Thus inverted repeats can act as an important force in evolution of mitochondrial genome architecture and be a valuable marker for population- and species-level studies in this group. In addition, we infer (((Rezinkovia+Lubomirskia)+Swartschewskia)+Baikalospongia) phylogeny for the family Lubomirskiidae based on the analysis of mitochondrial coding sequences from freshwater sponges.

  9. Comparative mitochondrial genome analysis of Daphnis nerii and other lepidopteran insects reveals conserved mitochondrial genome organization and phylogenetic relationships

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Chen, Chen; Gao, Jin; Abbas, Muhammad Nadeem; Kausar, Saima; Qian, Cen; Wang, Lei; Wei, Guoqing; Zhu, Bao-Jian

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Daphnis nerii (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) is described. The mitogenome (15,247 bp) of D.nerii encodes13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA genes (tRNAs), two ribosomal RNA genes (rRNAs) and an adenine (A) + thymine (T)-rich region. Its gene complement and order is similar to that of other sequenced lepidopterans. The 12 PCGs initiated by ATN codons except for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene that is seemingly initiated by the CGA codon as documented in other insect mitogenomes. Four of the 13 PCGs have the incomplete termination codon T, while the remainder terminated with the canonical stop codon. This mitogenome has six major intergenic spacers, with the exception of A+T-rich region, spanning at least 10 bp. The A+T-rich region is 351 bp long, and contains some conserved regions, including ‘ATAGA’ motif followed by a 17 bp poly-T stretch, a microsatellite-like element (AT)9 and also a poly-A element. Phylogenetic analyses based on 13 PCGs using maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) revealed that D. nerii resides in the Sphingidae family. PMID:28598968

  10. The mitochondrial genome structure of Xenoturbella bocki (phylum Xenoturbellida) is ancestral within the deuterostomes

    PubMed Central

    Bourlat, Sarah J; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Lanfear, Robert; Telford, Maximilian J

    2009-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial genome comparisons contribute in multiple ways when inferring animal relationships. As well as primary sequence data, rare genomic changes such as gene order, shared gene boundaries and genetic code changes, which are unlikely to have arisen through convergent evolution, are useful tools in resolving deep phylogenies. Xenoturbella bocki is a morphologically simple benthic marine worm recently found to belong among the deuterostomes. Here we present analyses comparing the Xenoturbella bocki mitochondrial gene order, genetic code and control region to those of other metazoan groups. Results The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Xenoturbella bocki was determined. The gene order is most similar to that of the chordates and the hemichordates, indicating that this conserved mitochondrial gene order might be ancestral to the deuterostome clade. Using data from all phyla of deuterostomes, we infer the ancestral mitochondrial gene order for this clade. Using inversion and breakpoint analyses of metazoan mitochondrial genomes, we test conflicting hypotheses for the phylogenetic placement of Xenoturbella and find a closer affinity to the hemichordates than to other metazoan groups. Comparative analyses of the control region reveal similarities in the transcription initiation and termination sites and origin of replication of Xenoturbella with those of the vertebrates. Phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial sequence indicate a weakly supported placement as a basal deuterostome, a result that may be the effect of compositional bias. Conclusion The mitochondrial genome of Xenoturbella bocki has a very conserved gene arrangement in the deuterostome group, strikingly similar to that of the hemichordates and the chordates, and thus to the ancestral deuterostome gene order. Similarity to the hemichordates in particular is suggested by inversion and breakpoint analysis. Finally, while phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial sequences support a

  11. Linear Plasmids and the Rate of Sequence Evolution in Plant Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jessica M.; Simmons, Mark P.; Wu, Zhiqiang; Sloan, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants experience frequent insertions of foreign sequences, including linear plasmids that also exist in standalone forms within mitochondria, but the history and phylogenetic distribution of plasmid insertions is not well known. Taking advantage of the increased availability of plant mitochondrial genome sequences, we performed phylogenetic analyses to reconstruct the evolutionary history of these plasmids and plasmid-derived insertions. Mitochondrial genomes from multiple land plant lineages (including liverworts, lycophytes, ferns, and gymnosperms) include fragmented remnants from ancient plasmid insertions. Such insertions are much more recent and widespread in angiosperms, in which approximately 75% of sequenced mitochondrial genomes contain identifiable plasmid insertions. Although conflicts between plasmid and angiosperm phylogenies provide clear evidence of repeated horizontal transfers, we were still able to detect significant phylogenetic concordance, indicating that mitochondrial plasmids have also experienced sustained periods of (effectively) vertical transmission in angiosperms. The observed levels of sequence divergence in plasmid-derived genes suggest that nucleotide substitution rates in these plasmids, which often encode their own viral-like DNA polymerases, are orders of magnitude higher than in mitochondrial chromosomes. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the periodic incorporation of mitochondrial genes into plasmids contributes to the remarkable heterogeneity in substitution rates among genes that has recently been discovered in some angiosperm mitochondrial genomes. In support of this hypothesis, we show that the recently acquired ψtrnP-trnW gene region in a maize linear plasmid is evolving significantly faster than homologous sequences that have been retained in the mitochondrial chromosome in closely related grasses. PMID:26759362

  12. A whole mitochondrial genome screening in a MELAS patient: A novel mitochondrial tRNA{sup Val} mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Mezghani, Najla; Mnif, Mouna; Kacem, Maha; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Hadj Salem, Ikhlass; Kallel, Nozha; Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} We report a young Tunisian patient with clinical features of MELAS syndrome. {yields} Reported mitochondrial mutations were absent after a mutational screening of the whole mtDNA. {yields} We described a novel m.1640A>G mutation in the tRNA{sup Val} gene which was absent in 150 controls. {yields} Mitochondrial deletions and POLG1 gene mutations were absent. {yields} The m.1640A>G mutation could be associated to MELAS syndrome. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by a wide variety of clinical presentations and a multisystemic organ involvement. In this study, we report a Tunisian girl with clinical features of MELAS syndrome who was negative for the common m.3243A>G mutation, but also for the reported mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and deletions. Screening of the entire mtDNA genome showed several known mitochondrial variants besides to a novel transition m.1640A>G affecting a wobble adenine in the anticodon stem region of the tRNA{sup Val}. This nucleotide was conserved and it was absent in 150 controls suggesting its pathogenicity. In addition, no mutations were found in the nuclear polymerase gamma-1 gene (POLG1). These results suggest further investigation nuclear genes encoding proteins responsible for stability and structural components of the mtDNA or to the oxidative phosphorylation machinery to explain the phenotypic variability in the studied family.

  13. Complete sequence of heterogenous-composition mitochondrial genome (Brassica napus) and its exogenous source

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Unlike maternal inheritance of mitochondria in sexual reproduction, somatic hybrids follow no obvious pattern. The introgressed segment orf138 from the mitochondrial genome of radish (Raphanus sativus) to its counterpart in rapeseed (Brassica napus) demonstrates that this inheritance mode derives from the cytoplasm of both parents. Sequencing of the complete mitochondrial genome of five species from Brassica family allowed the prediction of other extraneous sources of the cybrids from the radish parent, and the determination of their mitochondrial rearrangement. Results We obtained the complete mitochondrial genome of Ogura-cms-cybrid (oguC) rapeseed. To date, this is the first time that a heterogeneously composed mitochondrial genome was sequenced. The 258,473 bp master circle constituted of 33 protein-coding genes, 3 rRNA sequences, and 23 tRNA sequences. This mitotype noticeably holds two copies of atp9 and is devoid of cox2-2. Relative to nap mitochondrial genome, 40 point mutations were scattered in the 23 protein-coding genes. atp6 even has an abnormal start locus whereas tatC has an abnormal end locus. The rearrangement of the 22 syntenic regions that comprised 80.11% of the genome was influenced by short repeats. A pair of large repeats (9731 bp) was responsible for the multipartite structure. Nine unique regions were detected when compared with other published Brassica mitochondrial genome sequences. We also found six homologous chloroplast segments (Brassica napus). Conclusions The mitochondrial genome of oguC is quite divergent from nap and pol, which are more similar with each other. We analyzed the unique regions of every genome of the Brassica family, and found that very few segments were specific for these six mitotypes, especially cam, jun, and ole, which have no specific segments at all. Therefore, we conclude that the most specific regions of oguC possibly came from radish. Compared with the chloroplast genome, six identical regions

  14. Complete mitochondrial genome sequencing reveals novel haplotypes in a Polynesian population.

    PubMed

    Benton, Miles; Macartney-Coxson, Donia; Eccles, David; Griffiths, Lyn; Chambers, Geoff; Lea, Rod

    2012-01-01

    The high risk of metabolic disease traits in Polynesians may be partly explained by elevated prevalence of genetic variants involved in energy metabolism. The genetics of Polynesian populations has been shaped by island hoping migration events which have possibly favoured thrifty genes. The aim of this study was to sequence the mitochondrial genome in a group of Maoris in an effort to characterise genome variation in this Polynesian population for use in future disease association studies. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of 20 non-admixed Maori subjects using Affymetrix technology. DNA diversity analyses showed the Maori group exhibited reduced mitochondrial genome diversity compared to other worldwide populations, which is consistent with historical bottleneck and founder effects. Global phylogenetic analysis positioned these Maori subjects specifically within mitochondrial haplogroup--B4a1a1. Interestingly, we identified several novel variants that collectively form new and unique Maori motifs--B4a1a1c, B4a1a1a3 and B4a1a1a5. Compared to ancestral populations we observed an increased frequency of non-synonymous coding variants of several mitochondrial genes in the Maori group, which may be a result of positive selection and/or genetic drift effects. In conclusion, this study reports the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence data for a Maori population. Overall, these new data reveal novel mitochondrial genome signatures in this Polynesian population and enhance the phylogenetic picture of maternal ancestry in Oceania. The increased frequency of several mitochondrial coding variants makes them good candidates for future studies aimed at assessment of metabolic disease risk in Polynesian populations.

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of the sea spider Nymphon gracile (Arthropoda: Pycnogonida).

    PubMed

    Podsiadlowski, Lars; Braband, Anke

    2006-11-06

    Mitochondrial genomes form units of genetic information replicating indepentently from nuclear genomes. Sequence data (most often from protein-coding genes) and other features (gene order, RNA secondary structure) of mitochondrial genomes are often used in phylogenetic studies of metazoan animals from population to phylum level. Pycnogonids are primarily marine arthropods, often considered closely related to chelicerates (spiders, scorpions and allies). However, due to their aberrant morphology and to controversial results from molecular studies, their phylogenetic position is still under debate. This is the first report of a complete mitochondrial genome sequence from a sea spider (Nymphon gracile, class Pycnogonida). Gene order derives from that of other arthropods so that presumably 10 single tRNA gene translocations, a translocation of the mitochondrial control region, and one large inversion affecting protein-coding genes must have happened in the lineage leading to Nymphon gracile. Some of the changes in gene order seem not to be common to all pycnogonids, as those were not found in a partial mitochondrial genome of another species, Endeis spinosa. Four transfer RNAs of Nymphon gracile show derivations from the usual cloverleaf secondary structure (truncation or loss of an arm). Initial phylogenetic analyses using mitochondrial protein-coding gene sequences placed Pycnogonida as sister group to Acari. However, this is in contrast to the majority of all other studies using nuclear genes and/or morphology and was not recovered in a second analysis where two long-branching acarid species were omitted. Extensive gene rearrangement characterizes the mitochondrial genome of Nymphon gracile. At least some of the events leading to this derived gene order happened after the split of pycnogonid subtaxa. Nucleotide and amino acid frequencies show strong differences between chelicerate taxa, presumably biasing phylogenetic analyses. Thus the affinities between

  16. Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of the Galápagos Endemic Land Snail Naesiotus nux.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Samuel S; Settles, Matthew L; New, Daniel D; Parent, Christine E; Gerritsen, Alida T

    2016-01-21

    We report herein the draft mitochondrial genome sequence of Naesiotus nux, a Galápagos endemic land snail species of the genus Naesiotus. The circular genome is 15 kb and encodes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 21 tRNA genes.

  17. A Cost-Effective Approach to Sequence Hundreds of Complete Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Oleksiak, Marjorie F.

    2016-01-01

    We present a cost-effective approach to sequence whole mitochondrial genomes for hundreds of individuals. Our approach uses small reaction volumes and unmodified (non-phosphorylated) barcoded adaptors to minimize reagent costs. We demonstrate our approach by sequencing 383 Fundulus sp. mitochondrial genomes (192 F. heteroclitus and 191 F. majalis). Prior to sequencing, we amplified the mitochondrial genomes using 4–5 custom-made, overlapping primer pairs, and sequencing was performed on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. After removing low quality and short sequences, 2.9 million and 2.8 million reads were generated for F. heteroclitus and F. majalis respectively. Individual genomes were assembled for each species by mapping barcoded reads to a reference genome. For F. majalis, the reference genome was built de novo. On average, individual consensus sequences had high coverage: 61-fold for F. heteroclitus and 57-fold for F. majalis. The approach discussed in this paper is optimized for sequencing mitochondrial genomes on an Illumina platform. However, with the proper modifications, this approach could be easily applied to other small genomes and sequencing platforms. PMID:27505419

  18. Hydroxymethyl cytosine marks in the human mitochondrial genome are dynamic in nature.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sourav; Sengupta, Shantanu; Scaria, Vinod

    2016-03-01

    Apart from DNA methylation, hydroxymethylation has increasingly been studied as an important epigenetic mark. 5- hydroxymethylcytosines, though initially were thought to be an intermediary product of demethylation, recent studies suggest this to be a highly regulated process and modulated by the TET family of enzymes. Recent genome wide studies have shown that hydroxymethylcytosine marks are closely associated with the regulation of important biological processes like transcription and embryonic development. It is also known that aberrant hydroxymethylation marks have been associated with diseases like cancer. The presence of hydroxymethylcytosines in the mitochondrial genome has been earlier suggested, though the genome-scale map has not been laid out. In this present study, we have mapped and analyzed the hydroxymethylcytosine marks in the mitochondrial genome using 23 different publicly available datasets. We cross validated our data by checking for consistency across a subset of genomic regions previously annotated to hydroxymethylcytosines and show good consistency. We observe a dynamic distribution of hydroxymethylation marks in the mitochondrial genome. Unlike the methylcytosine marks, hydroxymethylcytosine marks are characterized by the lack of conservation across the samples considered, though similar cell types shared the pattern. We additionally observed that the hydroxymethylation marks are enriched in the upstream of GSS (gene start site) regions and in gene body as similar as nuclear genes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genome-scale map of hydroxymethyl cytosines in the human mitochondrial genome.

  19. The complete Mitochondrial genome of the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Heteroptera: Miridae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris, comprises 17027 bp. The genome contains 13 protein coding regions, 22 tRNA genes, and two ribosomal RNA genes. The gene arrangement corresponds to the common order found among insect mtDNAs which is considered to be the ...

  20. Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of the Galápagos Endemic Land Snail Naesiotus nux

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Samuel S.; Settles, Matthew L.; New, Daniel D.; Parent, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    We report herein the draft mitochondrial genome sequence of Naesiotus nux, a Galápagos endemic land snail species of the genus Naesiotus. The circular genome is 15 kb and encodes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 21 tRNA genes. PMID:26798085

  1. Mitochondrial Genomes of Kinorhyncha: trnM Duplication and New Gene Orders within Animals

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Olga V.; Mikhailov, Kirill V.; Nikitin, Mikhail A.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Penin, Aleksey A.; Muntyan, Maria S.; Kedrova, Olga S.; Petrov, Nikolai B.; Panchin, Yuri V.

    2016-01-01

    Many features of mitochondrial genomes of animals, such as patterns of gene arrangement, nucleotide content and substitution rate variation are extensively used in evolutionary and phylogenetic studies. Nearly 6,000 mitochondrial genomes of animals have already been sequenced, covering the majority of animal phyla. One of the groups that escaped mitogenome sequencing is phylum Kinorhyncha—an isolated taxon of microscopic worm-like ecdysozoans. The kinorhynchs are thought to be one of the early-branching lineages of Ecdysozoa, and their mitochondrial genomes may be important for resolving evolutionary relations between major animal taxa. Here we present the results of sequencing and analysis of mitochondrial genomes from two members of Kinorhyncha, Echinoderes svetlanae (Cyclorhagida) and Pycnophyes kielensis (Allomalorhagida). Their mitochondrial genomes are circular molecules approximately 15 Kbp in size. The kinorhynch mitochondrial gene sequences are highly divergent, which precludes accurate phylogenetic inference. The mitogenomes of both species encode a typical metazoan complement of 37 genes, which are all positioned on the major strand, but the gene order is distinct and unique among Ecdysozoa or animals as a whole. We predict four types of start codons for protein-coding genes in E. svetlanae and five in P. kielensis with a consensus DTD in single letter code. The mitochondrial genomes of E. svetlanae and P. kielensis encode duplicated methionine tRNA genes that display compensatory nucleotide substitutions. Two distant species of Kinorhyncha demonstrate similar patterns of gene arrangements in their mitogenomes. Both genomes have duplicated methionine tRNA genes; the duplication predates the divergence of two species. The kinorhynchs share a few features pertaining to gene order that align them with Priapulida. Gene order analysis reveals that gene arrangement specific of Priapulida may be ancestral for Scalidophora, Ecdysozoa, and even Protostomia

  2. Mitochondrial Genomes of Kinorhyncha: trnM Duplication and New Gene Orders within Animals.

    PubMed

    Popova, Olga V; Mikhailov, Kirill V; Nikitin, Mikhail A; Logacheva, Maria D; Penin, Aleksey A; Muntyan, Maria S; Kedrova, Olga S; Petrov, Nikolai B; Panchin, Yuri V; Aleoshin, Vladimir V

    2016-01-01

    Many features of mitochondrial genomes of animals, such as patterns of gene arrangement, nucleotide content and substitution rate variation are extensively used in evolutionary and phylogenetic studies. Nearly 6,000 mitochondrial genomes of animals have already been sequenced, covering the majority of animal phyla. One of the groups that escaped mitogenome sequencing is phylum Kinorhyncha-an isolated taxon of microscopic worm-like ecdysozoans. The kinorhynchs are thought to be one of the early-branching lineages of Ecdysozoa, and their mitochondrial genomes may be important for resolving evolutionary relations between major animal taxa. Here we present the results of sequencing and analysis of mitochondrial genomes from two members of Kinorhyncha, Echinoderes svetlanae (Cyclorhagida) and Pycnophyes kielensis (Allomalorhagida). Their mitochondrial genomes are circular molecules approximately 15 Kbp in size. The kinorhynch mitochondrial gene sequences are highly divergent, which precludes accurate phylogenetic inference. The mitogenomes of both species encode a typical metazoan complement of 37 genes, which are all positioned on the major strand, but the gene order is distinct and unique among Ecdysozoa or animals as a whole. We predict four types of start codons for protein-coding genes in E. svetlanae and five in P. kielensis with a consensus DTD in single letter code. The mitochondrial genomes of E. svetlanae and P. kielensis encode duplicated methionine tRNA genes that display compensatory nucleotide substitutions. Two distant species of Kinorhyncha demonstrate similar patterns of gene arrangements in their mitogenomes. Both genomes have duplicated methionine tRNA genes; the duplication predates the divergence of two species. The kinorhynchs share a few features pertaining to gene order that align them with Priapulida. Gene order analysis reveals that gene arrangement specific of Priapulida may be ancestral for Scalidophora, Ecdysozoa, and even Protostomia.

  3. Maintenance of mitochondrial morphology is linked to maintenance of the mitochondrial genome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Hanekamp, Theodor; Thorsness, Mary K; Rebbapragada, Indrani; Fisher, Elizabeth M; Seebart, Corrine; Darland, Monica R; Coxbill, Jennifer A; Updike, Dustin L; Thorsness, Peter E

    2002-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, certain mutant alleles of YME4, YME6, and MDM10 cause an increased rate of mitochondrial DNA migration to the nucleus, carbon-source-dependent alterations in mitochondrial morphology, and increased rates of mitochondrial DNA loss. While single mutants grow on media requiring mitochondrial respiration, any pairwise combination of these mutations causes a respiratory-deficient phenotype. This double-mutant phenotype allowed cloning of YME6, which is identical to MMM1 and encodes an outer mitochondrial membrane protein essential for maintaining normal mitochondrial morphology. Yeast strains bearing null mutations of MMM1 have altered mitochondrial morphology and a slow growth rate on all carbon sources and quantitatively lack mitochondrial DNA. Extragenic suppressors of MMM1 deletion mutants partially restore mitochondrial morphology to the wild-type state and have a corresponding increase in growth rate and mitochondrial DNA stability. A dominant suppressor also suppresses the phenotypes caused by a point mutation in MMM1, as well as by specific mutations in YME4 and MDM10. PMID:12454062

  4. Complete mitochondrial genome of the freshwater sculpin Cottus koreanus (Scorpaeniformes, Cottidae).

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dae-Sik; Byeon, Hwa-Kun; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2013-10-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced from the freshwater sculpin Cottus koreanus. The genome sequence was 16,560 bp in size, and the gene order and contents were identical with those of previously reported fish mitochondrial genomes. Of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 3 genes (CO2, ND4, Cytb) had incomplete stop codons. The base composition of C. koreanus mitogenome showed anti-G bias (13.94% and 12.73%) on the second and third positions of PCGs, respectively.

  5. Complete genome sequence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Massimiliano; Costelli, Cristina; Malavasi, Veronica; Cusano, Roberto; Concas, Alessandro; Angius, Andrea; Cao, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    The complete sequence of mitochondrial genome of the Chlorella sorokiniana strain (SAG 111-8 k) is presented in this work. Within the Chlorella genus, it represents the second species with a complete sequenced and annotated mitochondrial genome (GenBank accession no. KM241869). The genome consists of circular chromosomes of 52,528 bp and encodes a total of 31 protein coding genes, 3 rRNAs and 26 tRNAs. The overall AT contents of the C. sorokiniana mtDNA is 70.89%, while the coding sequence is of 97.4%.

  6. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of northeastern sika deer (Cervus nippon hortulorum).

    PubMed

    Shao, Yuanchen; Zha, Daiming; Xing, Xiumei; Su, Weilin; Liu, Huamiao; Zhang, Ranran

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the northeastern sika deer, Cervus nippon hortulorum, was determined by accurate polymerase chain reaction. The entire genome is 16,434 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and 1 control region, all of which are arranged in a typical vertebrate manner. The overall base composition of the northeastern sika deer's mitochondrial genome is 33.3% of A, 24.5% of C, 28.7% of T and 13.5% of G. A termination associated sequence and several conserved central sequence block domains were discovered within the control region.

  7. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of tarim red deer (Cervus elaphus yarkandensis).

    PubMed

    Shao, Yuanchen; Xing, Xiumei; Zha, Daiming; Yang, Fuhe

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the tarim red deer, Cervus elaphus yarkandensis, was determined by accurate polymerase chain reaction. The entire genome was 16,351 bp in length and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and 1 control region, all of which were arranged in a typical vertebrate manner. The overall base composition of the northeast sika deer's mitochondrial genome was 33.3% of A, 24.4% of C, 28.9% of T and 13.4% of G. A termination-associated sequence and several conserved central sequence block domains were discovered within the control region.

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of northeastern red deer (Cervus elaphus xanthopygus).

    PubMed

    Shao, Yuanchen; Su, Weilin; Liu, Huamiao; Zha, Daiming; Zhang, Ranran; Xing, Xiumei

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the northeastern red deer, Cervus elaphus xanthopygus, was determined by accurate polymerase chain reaction. The entire genome is 16,416 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and 1 control region, all of which are arranged in a typical vertebrate manner. The overall base composition of the northeastern red deer's mitochondrial genome is 33.3% of A, 24.3% of C, 28.9% of T and 13.5% of G. A termination-associated sequence and several conserved central sequence block domains were discovered within the control region.

  9. The first mitochondrial genome for caddisfly (insecta: Trichoptera) with phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuyu; Liu, Xingyue; Yang, Ding

    2013-01-01

    The Trichoptera (caddisflies) is a holometabolous insect order with 14,300 described species forming the second most species-rich monophyletic group of animals in freshwater. Hitherto, there is no mitochondrial genome reported of this order. Herein, we describe the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of a caddisfly species, Eubasilissa regina (McLachlan, 1871). A phylogenomic analysis was carried out based on the mt genomic sequences of 13 mt protein coding genes (PCGs) and two rRNA genes of 24 species belonging to eight holometabolous orders. Both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses highly support the sister relationship between Trichoptera and Lepidoptera.

  10. The First Mitochondrial Genome for Caddisfly (Insecta: Trichoptera) with Phylogenetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuyu; Liu, Xingyue; Yang, Ding

    2014-01-01

    The Trichoptera (caddisflies) is a holometabolous insect order with 14,300 described species forming the second most species-rich monophyletic group of animals in freshwater. Hitherto, there is no mitochondrial genome reported of this order. Herein, we describe the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of a caddisfly species, Eubasilissa regina (McLachlan, 1871). A phylogenomic analysis was carried out based on the mt genomic sequences of 13 mt protein coding genes (PCGs) and two rRNA genes of 24 species belonging to eight holometabolous orders. Both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses highly support the sister relationship between Trichoptera and Lepidoptera. PMID:24391451

  11. The complete sequence of mitochondrial genome of Laiwu Black pig (Sus Scrofa).

    PubMed

    Yang, Hu; Xu, Xing-Li; Ma, Hai-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the ear tissue of an adult Laiwu Black pig is from the Shandong province of China. The complete mitochondrial genome of Laiwu Black pig was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The complete mitochondrial genome is 16,710 bp, and it contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, a control region (D-loop), with the genome organization and gene order being identical to that of the typical vertebrates.

  12. Complete mitochondrial genome of the argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ezi; Bi, Guiqi; Yang, Junqing; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Guoqiang; Du, Qingwei; Shang, Erlei

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of the widespread invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) was first determined. The mitochondrial genome is 16 098 bp in length, and encodes one D-loop region, two ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, and 18 transfer RNA genes. Average GC content of this genome is 19.68%. nad6 and cob genes were overlapped by 4 bp. The phylogenetic tree involving 13 available closely related species further validated the new determined sequences and phylogeny of L. humile.

  13. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Leucoptera malifoliella Costa (Lepidoptera: Lyonetiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Peng; Zhao, Jin-Liang; Su, Tian-Juan; Li, Jie; Yu, Fang; Chesters, Douglas; Fan, Ren-Jun; Chen, Ming-Chang; Wu, Chun-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Leucoptera malifoliella (=L. scitella) (Lepidoptera: Lyonetiidae) was sequenced. The size was 15,646 bp with gene content and order the same as those of other lepidopterans. The nucleotide composition of L. malifoliella mitogenome is highly A+T biased (82.57%), ranked just below Coreana raphaelis (82.66%) (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae). All protein-coding genes (PCGs) start with the typical ATN codon except for the cox1 gene, which uses CGA as the initiation codon. Nine PCGs have the common stop codon TAA, four PCGs have the common stop codon T as incomplete stop codons, and nad4l and nad6 have TAG as the stop codon. Cloverleaf secondary structures were inferred for 22 tRNA genes, but trnS1(AGN) was found to lack the DHU stem. The secondary structure of rrnL and rrnS is generally similar to other lepidopterans but with some minor differences. The A+T-rich region includes the motif ATAGA, but the poly (T) stretch is replaced by a stem-loop structure, which may have a similar function to the poly (T) stretch. Finally, there are three long repeat (154 bp) sequences followed by one short repeat (56 bp) with four (TA)n intervals, and a 10-bp poly-A is present upstream of trnM. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the position of Yponomeutoidea, as represented by L. malifoliella, is the same as traditional classifications. Yponomeutoidea is the sister to the other lepidopteran superfamilies covered in the present study. PMID:22856872

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome of Leucoptera malifoliella Costa (Lepidoptera: Lyonetiidae).

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Peng; Zhao, Jin-Liang; Su, Tian-Juan; Li, Jie; Yu, Fang; Chesters, Douglas; Fan, Ren-Jun; Chen, Ming-Chang; Wu, Chun-Sheng; Zhu, Chao-Dong

    2012-10-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Leucoptera malifoliella (=L. scitella) (Lepidoptera: Lyonetiidae) was sequenced. The size was 15,646 bp with gene content and order the same as those of other lepidopterans. The nucleotide composition of L. malifoliella mitogenome is highly A+T biased (82.57%), ranked just below Coreana raphaelis (82.66%) (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae). All protein-coding genes (PCGs) start with the typical ATN codon except for the cox1 gene, which uses CGA as the initiation codon. Nine PCGs have the common stop codon TAA, four PCGs have the common stop codon T as incomplete stop codons, and nad4l and nad6 have TAG as the stop codon. Cloverleaf secondary structures were inferred for 22 tRNA genes, but trnS1(AGN) was found to lack the DHU stem. The secondary structure of rrnL and rrnS is generally similar to other lepidopterans but with some minor differences. The A+T-rich region includes the motif ATAGA, but the poly (T) stretch is replaced by a stem-loop structure, which may have a similar function to the poly (T) stretch. Finally, there are three long repeat (154 bp) sequences followed by one short repeat (56 bp) with four (TA)(n) intervals, and a 10-bp poly-A is present upstream of trnM. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the position of Yponomeutoidea, as represented by L. malifoliella, is the same as traditional classifications. Yponomeutoidea is the sister to the other lepidopteran superfamilies covered in the present study.

  15. Early penguin fossils, plus mitochondrial genomes, calibrate avian evolution.

    PubMed

    Slack, Kerryn E; Jones, Craig M; Ando, Tatsuro; Harrison, G L Abby; Fordyce, R Ewan; Arnason, Ulfur; Penny, David

    2006-06-01

    Testing models of macroevolution, and especially the sufficiency of microevolutionary processes, requires good collaboration between molecular biologists and paleontologists. We report such a test for events around the Late Cretaceous by describing the earliest penguin fossils, analyzing complete mitochondrial genomes from an albatross, a petrel, and a loon, and describe the gradual decline of pterosaurs at the same time modern birds radiate. The penguin fossils comprise four naturally associated skeletons from the New Zealand Waipara Greensand, a Paleocene (early Tertiary) formation just above a well-known Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary site. The fossils, in a new genus (Waimanu), provide a lower estimate of 61-62 Ma for the divergence between penguins and other birds and thus establish a reliable calibration point for avian evolution. Combining fossil calibration points, DNA sequences, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian analysis, the penguin calibrations imply a radiation of modern (crown group) birds in the Late Cretaceous. This includes a conservative estimate that modern sea and shorebird lineages diverged at least by the Late Cretaceous about 74 +/- 3 Ma (Campanian). It is clear that modern birds from at least the latest Cretaceous lived at the same time as archaic birds including Hesperornis, Ichthyornis, and the diverse Enantiornithiformes. Pterosaurs, which also coexisted with early crown birds, show notable changes through the Late Cretaceous. There was a decrease in taxonomic diversity, and small- to medium-sized species disappeared well before the end of the Cretaceous. A simple reading of the fossil record might suggest competitive interactions with birds, but much more needs to be understood about pterosaur life histories. Additional fossils and molecular data are still required to help understand the role of biotic interactions in the evolution of Late Cretaceous birds and thus to test that the mechanisms of microevolution are sufficient to explain

  16. Arthropod Phylogenetics in Light of Three Novel Millipede (Myriapoda: Diplopoda) Mitochondrial Genomes with Comments on the Appropriateness of Mitochondrial Genome Sequence Data for Inferring Deep Level Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Michael S.; Swafford, Lynn; Spruill, Chad L.; Bond, Jason E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Arthropods are the most diverse group of eukaryotic organisms, but their phylogenetic relationships are poorly understood. Herein, we describe three mitochondrial genomes representing orders of millipedes for which complete genomes had not been characterized. Newly sequenced genomes are combined with existing data to characterize the protein coding regions of myriapods and to attempt to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships within the Myriapoda and Arthropoda. Results The newly sequenced genomes are similar to previously characterized millipede sequences in terms of synteny and length. Unique translocations occurred within the newly sequenced taxa, including one half of the Appalachioria falcifera genome, which is inverted with respect to other millipede genomes. Across myriapods, amino acid conservation levels are highly dependent on the gene region. Additionally, individual loci varied in the level of amino acid conservation. Overall, most gene regions showed low levels of conservation at many sites. Attempts to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships suffered from questionable relationships and low support values. Analyses of phylogenetic informativeness show the lack of signal deep in the trees (i.e., genes evolve too quickly). As a result, the myriapod tree resembles previously published results but lacks convincing support, and, within the arthropod tree, well established groups were recovered as polyphyletic. Conclusions The novel genome sequences described herein provide useful genomic information concerning millipede groups that had not been investigated. Taken together with existing sequences, the variety of compositions and evolution of myriapod mitochondrial genomes are shown to be more complex than previously thought. Unfortunately, the use of mitochondrial protein-coding regions in deep arthropod phylogenetics appears problematic, a result consistent with previously published studies. Lack of phylogenetic signal renders the

  17. Mitochondrial genomes and comparative genomics of Aphanomyces astaci and Aphanomyces invadans

    PubMed Central

    Makkonen, Jenny; Vesterbacka, Arto; Martin, Frank; Jussila, Japo; Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier; Kortet, Raine; Kokko, Harri

    2016-01-01

    The genus Aphanomyces (Saprolegniales, Oomycetes) includes species with a variety of ecologies from saprotrophs to plant and animal parasites. Two important species in this genus are A. astaci, the cause of crayfish plague and its close relative, A. invadans, which causes the epizootic ulcerative syndrome on fish. In this study, we have assembled and annotated the mitochondrial (mt) genomes of A. astaci and A. invadans from the whole genome shotgun sequence reads (PRJNA187372; PRJNA258292, respectively). The assembly was generated from A. astaci Pc-genotype strain APO3 and A. invadans strain NJM9701. The sizes of the mtDNAs were 49,489 bp and 49,061 bp for A. astaci and A. invadans, respectively. The species shared similar genetic content and organization encoding 35 proteins, two ribosomal RNAs, three putative open reading frames and 33 transfer RNAs of 19 amino acids for peptide synthesis. Both species also had a large inverted repeat region (LIR) of approximately 12 kb, the LIR contained large and small ribosomal RNAs and eight protein coding genes. These annotated mt genomes serve as a valuable genetic backbone for further development of diagnostic methods and phylogenetic and migration studies of the animal parasitic species of Aphanomyces. PMID:27808238

  18. Reconstructing the plant mitochondrial genome for marker discovery: a case study using Pinus.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Kevin; Cottrell, Joan; Ennos, Richard A; Vendramin, Giovanni Guiseppe; A'Hara, Stuart; King, Sarah; Perry, Annika; Wachowiak, Witold; Cavers, Stephen

    2016-12-20

    Whole-genome-shotgun (WGS) sequencing of total genomic DNA was used to recover ~1 Mbp of novel mitochondrial (mtDNA) sequence from Pinus sylvestris (L.) and three members of the closely-related Pinus mugo species complex. DNA was extracted from megagametophyte tissue from six mother trees from locations across Europe and 100 bp paired-end sequencing was performed on the Illumina HiSeq platform. Candidate mtDNA sequences were identified by their size and coverage characteristics, and by comparison with published plant mitochondrial genomes. Novel variants were identified, and primers targeting these loci were trialled on a set of 28 individuals from across Europe. In total, 31 SNP loci were successfully resequenced, characterising 15 unique haplotypes. This approach offers a cost effective means of developing marker resources for mitochondrial genomes in other plant species where reference sequences are unavailable. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome of the codling moth Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    PubMed

    Shi, Bao-Cai; Liu, Wei; Wei, Shu-Jun

    2013-02-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the codling moth Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) was determined. The genome is 15,253 bp long with 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes and an A+T-rich region. All genes are arranged in their conserved positions compared with the pupative ancestral arrangement of insects except for trnM, which was translocated to the upstream of the transfer RNA cluster trnI-trnQ as in all previously reported lepidopteran mitochondiral genomes. Seven portein-coding genes use ATG start codon and five use ATT. However, the cox1 gene uses the CGA start codon as it is found in all previous reported mitochondrial genomes of Lepidoptera. Nine protein-coding genes stop with termination codon TAA. Four protein-coding genes use incomplete stop codons TA or T. The A+T region is located between rrnS and trnM with a length of 331 bp.

  20. Complete mitochondrial genomes of the New World jacanas: Jacana spinosa and Jacana jacana.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew J; Aguilar, Celestino; De León, Luis Fernando; Loaiza, José R; McMillan, W Owen

    2016-01-01

    The New World jacanas, Jacana spinosa (Mexico to Panama and also the West Indies) and Jacana jacana (Panama and South America), are polyandrous freshwater waders that are common throughout the Neotropics. These two species hybridize narrowly at their contact zone in Panama, and as part of a study of the hybrid zone dynamics, we present complete, annotated mitochondrial genomes for both species. The two species have very similar mitochondrial genomes, showing identical gene orders, and differing in size in only two RNA features and the control region, and among protein-coding genes, the two genomes had average uncorrected pairwise divergence of 1.8%, ranging from 0.7% for ND4L and 3.6% for ATP8. However, control region divergence is high (∼ 16%). These mitochondrial genome sequences may be useful tools for understanding jacana hybridization dynamics, especially regarding potential mitonuclear incompatibilities.

  1. The complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of Lantang pig (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Ran, Mao-Liang; Liu, Zhen; Yang, An-Qi; Li, Zhi; Chen, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Lantang pig is a native breed of Guangzhou Province in China. It is the first time that the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Lantang pig is reported in this work, which is determined through the PCR-based method. The total length of the mitognome is 16,709 bp, which contains 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, 13 PCGs and 1 conntrol region (D-loop region, Table 1). The total base composition of Lantang pig mitochondrial genome is 34.69% for A, 26.18% for C, 25.82% for T and 13.31% for G, in the order A>C>T>G. The complete mitochondrial genome of Lantang pig provides an important data in genetic mechanism and the evolution genomes.

  2. The complete sequence of mitochondrial genome of Wuzhishan pig (Sus Scrofa).

    PubMed

    Chai, Yu-Lan; Xu, Dong; Ma, Hai-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Wuzhishan pig, which was 16,741 bp in size and had a nucleotide composition in A and T (60.46%). The genome consisted of a major non-coding control region (D-loop region) and 37 genes, including 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), and 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes. The genes in the mitochondrial genomes of Wuzhishan pig used three kinds of initiation codons (ATA, ATG, and GTG) and four kinds of termination codons (TAA, AGA, TAG, and an incomplete termination codons T-). The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Wuzhishan pig provides an important data set for further study on genetic mechanism.

  3. Demographic History of the Genus Pan Inferred from Whole Mitochondrial Genome Reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Lobon, Irene; Tucci, Serena; de Manuel, Marc; Ghirotto, Silvia; Benazzo, Andrea; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Nam, Kiwoong; Dabad, Marc; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Comas, David; Navarro, Arcadi; Schierup, Mikkel H; Andres, Aida M; Barbujani, Guido; Hvilsom, Christina; Marques-Bonet, Tomas

    2016-07-03

    The genus Pan is the closest genus to our own and it includes two species, Pan paniscus (bonobos) and Pan troglodytes (chimpanzees). The later is constituted by four subspecies, all highly endangered. The study of the Pan genera has been incessantly complicated by the intricate relationship among subspecies and the statistical limitations imposed by the reduced number of samples or genomic markers analyzed. Here, we present a new method to reconstruct complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) from whole genome shotgun (WGS) datasets, mtArchitect, showing that its reconstructions are highly accurate and consistent with long-range PCR mitogenomes. We used this approach to build the mitochondrial genomes of 20 newly sequenced samples which, together with available genomes, allowed us to analyze the hitherto most complete Pan mitochondrial genome dataset including 156 chimpanzee and 44 bonobo individuals, with a proportional contribution from all chimpanzee subspecies. We estimated the separation time between chimpanzees and bonobos around 1.15 million years ago (Mya) [0.81-1.49]. Further, we found that under the most probable genealogical model the two clades of chimpanzees, Western + Nigeria-Cameroon and Central + Eastern, separated at 0.59 Mya [0.41-0.78] with further internal separations at 0.32 Mya [0.22-0.43] and 0.16 Mya [0.17-0.34], respectively. Finally, for a subset of our samples, we compared nuclear versus mitochondrial genomes and we found that chimpanzee subspecies have different patterns of nuclear and mitochondrial diversity, which could be a result of either processes affecting the mitochondrial genome, such as hitchhiking or background selection, or a result of population dynamics. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  4. Demographic History of the Genus Pan Inferred from Whole Mitochondrial Genome Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Serena; de Manuel, Marc; Ghirotto, Silvia; Benazzo, Andrea; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Nam, Kiwoong; Dabad, Marc; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Comas, David; Navarro, Arcadi; Schierup, Mikkel H.; Andres, Aida M.; Barbujani, Guido; Hvilsom, Christina; Marques-Bonet, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    The genus Pan is the closest genus to our own and it includes two species, Pan paniscus (bonobos) and Pan troglodytes (chimpanzees). The later is constituted by four subspecies, all highly endangered. The study of the Pan genera has been incessantly complicated by the intricate relationship among subspecies and the statistical limitations imposed by the reduced number of samples or genomic markers analyzed. Here, we present a new method to reconstruct complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) from whole genome shotgun (WGS) datasets, mtArchitect, showing that its reconstructions are highly accurate and consistent with long-range PCR mitogenomes. We used this approach to build the mitochondrial genomes of 20 newly sequenced samples which, together with available genomes, allowed us to analyze the hitherto most complete Pan mitochondrial genome dataset including 156 chimpanzee and 44 bonobo individuals, with a proportional contribution from all chimpanzee subspecies. We estimated the separation time between chimpanzees and bonobos around 1.15 million years ago (Mya) [0.81–1.49]. Further, we found that under the most probable genealogical model the two clades of chimpanzees, Western + Nigeria-Cameroon and Central + Eastern, separated at 0.59 Mya [0.41–0.78] with further internal separations at 0.32 Mya [0.22–0.43] and 0.16 Mya [0.17–0.34], respectively. Finally, for a subset of our samples, we compared nuclear versus mitochondrial genomes and we found that chimpanzee subspecies have different patterns of nuclear and mitochondrial diversity, which could be a result of either processes affecting the mitochondrial genome, such as hitchhiking or background selection, or a result of population dynamics. PMID:27345955

  5. Inheritance and recombination of mitochondrial genomes in plants, fungi and animals.

    PubMed

    Barr, Camille M; Neiman, Maurine; Taylor, Douglas R

    2005-10-01

    It is generally assumed that mitochondrial genomes are uniparentally transmitted, homoplasmic and nonrecombining. However, these assumptions draw largely from early studies on animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In this review, we show that plants, animals and fungi are all characterized by episodes of biparental inheritance, recombination among genetically distinct partners, and selfish elements within the mitochondrial genome, but that the extent of these phenomena may vary substantially across taxa. We argue that occasional biparental mitochondrial transmission may allow organisms to achieve the best of both worlds by facilitating mutational clearance but continuing to restrict the spread of selfish genetic elements. We also show that methodological biases and disproportionately allocated study effort are likely to have influenced current estimates of the extent of biparental inheritance, heteroplasmy and recombinatio