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Sample records for current australian guidelines

  1. Are the current Australian sun exposure guidelines effective in maintaining adequate levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D?

    PubMed

    Kimlin, Michael; Sun, Jiandong; Sinclair, Craig; Heward, Sue; Hill, Jane; Dunstone, Kimberley; Brodie, Alison

    2016-01-01

    An adequate vitamin D status, as measured by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration, is important in humans for maintenance of healthy bones and muscle function. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was assessed in participants from Melbourne, Australia (37.81S, 144.96E), who were provided with the current Australian guidelines on sun exposure for 25(OH)D adequacy (25(OH)D ≥50 nmol/L). Participants were interviewed in February (summer, n=104) and August (winter, n=99) of 2013. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was examined as a function of measures of sun exposure and sun protection habits with control of key characteristics such as dietary intake of vitamin D, body mass index (BMI) and skin colour, that may modify this relationship. The mean 25(OH)D concentration in participants who complied with the current sun exposure guidelines was 67.3 nmol/L in summer and 41.9 nmol/L in winter. At the end of the study, 69.3% of participants who complied with the summer sun exposure guidelines were 25(OH)D adequate, while only 27.6% of participants who complied with the winter sun exposure guidelines were 25(OH)D adequate at the end of the study. The results suggest that the current Australian guidelines for sun exposure for 25(OH)D adequacy are effective for most in summer and ineffective for most in winter. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Is implementation of the 2013 Australian treatment guidelines for posttraumatic stress disorder cost-effective compared to current practice? A cost-utility analysis using QALYs and DALYs.

    PubMed

    Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Magnus, Anne; Lal, Anita; Dell, Lisa; Forbes, David; Phelps, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    To assess, from a health sector perspective, the incremental cost-effectiveness of three treatment recommendations in the most recent Australian Clinical Practice Guidelines for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The interventions assessed are trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy (TF-CBT) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for the treatment of PTSD in adults and TF-CBT in children, compared to current practice in Australia. Economic modelling, using existing databases and published information, was used to assess cost-effectiveness. A cost-utility framework using both quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted was used. Costs were tracked for the duration of the respective interventions and applied to the estimated 12 months prevalent cases of PTSD in the Australian population of 2012. Simulation modelling was used to provide 95% uncertainty around the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Consideration was also given to factors not considered in the quantitative analysis but could determine the likely uptake of the proposed intervention guidelines. TF-CBT is highly cost-effective compared to current practice at $19,000/QALY, $16,000/DALY in adults and $8900/QALY, $8000/DALY in children. In adults, 100% of uncertainty iterations fell beneath the $50,000/QALY or DALY value-for-money threshold. Using SSRIs in people already on medications is cost-effective at $200/QALY, but has considerable uncertainty around the costs and benefits. While there is a 13% chance of health loss there is a 27% chance of the intervention dominating current practice by both saving dollars and improving health in adults. The three Guideline recommended interventions evaluated in this study are likely to have a positive impact on the economic efficiency of the treatment of PTSD if adopted in full. While there are gaps in the evidence base, policy-makers can have considerable confidence that the recommendations

  3. A critical analysis of Australian policies and guidelines for water immersion during labour and birth.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Megan; McCutcheon, Helen; Warland, Jane

    2017-10-01

    Accessibility of water immersion for labour and/or birth is often dependent on the care provider and also the policies/guidelines that underpin practice. With little high quality research about the safety and practicality of water immersion, particularly for birth, policies/guidelines informing the practice may lack the evidence necessary to ensure practitioner confidence surrounding the option thereby limiting accessibility and women's autonomy. The aims of the study were to determine how water immersion policies and/or guidelines are informed, who interprets the evidence to inform policies/guidelines and to what extent the policy/guideline facilitates the option for labour and birth. Phase one of a three-phase mixed-methods study critically analysed 25 Australian water immersion policies/guidelines using critical discourse analysis. Policies/guidelines pertaining to the practice of water immersion reflect subjective opinions and views of the current literature base in favour of the risk-focused obstetric and biomedical discursive practices. Written with hegemonic influence, policies and guidelines impact on the autonomy of both women and practitioners. Policies and guidelines pertaining to water immersion, particularly for birth reflect opinion and varied interpretations of the current literature base. A degree of hegemonic influence was noted prompting recommendations for future maternity care policy and guidelines'. The Human Research Ethics Committee of the University of South Australia approved the research. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ethics guidelines, health research and Indigenous Australians.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ian; Griew, Robert; McAullay, Daniel

    2003-02-01

    In this paper we overview the findings of a literature review that was undertaken to guide the revision of the Guidelines on Ethical Matters in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research (NH&MRC, 1991). The literature reviewed, in general, supported the development of specific research guidelines for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander contexts. The findings of this review were analysed thematically, and a number of key issues were identified for consideration in the review process. We present a summary of these key issues. In the final section of the paper we consider in more detail two of the key issues raised in the review process (the assessment of relevance or benefit of proposed research; and the process of consultation and negotiation of collective consent) in order to critically consider how these issue should be engaged in revised guidelines. On the basis of this analysis, it is our contention that specific guidelines on key issues are limited to the extent to which they can anticipate all possible research contexts. In order to address this problem, and guide researchers, guidelines should also explicitly outline the values, from an Aboriginal and Torres Islander perspective that are foundational to an ethical research process.

  5. Awareness of radiographic guidelines for low back pain: a survey of Australian chiropractors.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Hazel J

    2016-01-01

    Chiropractors have been shown to refer for lumbar radiography in clinical scenarios inconsistent with the current clinical guidelines for low back pain. It is unknown whether this is due to lack of adherence with known guidelines or a lack of awareness of relevant guidelines. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine Australian chiropractors' awareness of, and reported adherence to, radiographic guidelines for low back pain. Demographic, chiropractic practice and radiographic usage characteristics will be investigated for association with poor guideline adherence. An online survey was distributed to Australian chiropractors from July to September, 2014. Survey questions assessed demographic, chiropractic practice and radiographic usage characteristics, awareness of radiographic guidelines for low back pain and the level of agreement with current guidelines. Results were analysed with descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis. There were 480 surveys completed online. Only 49.6 % (95 % confidence interval (95 % CI): 44.9, 54.4) reported awareness of radiographic guidelines for low back pain. Chiropractors reported a likelihood of referring for radiographs for low back pain: in new patients (47.6 % (95 % CI: 42.9, 52.3)); to confirm biomechanical pathologies (69.0 % (95 % CI: 64.5, 73.1)); to perform biomechanical analysis (37.5 % (95 % CI: 33.1, 42.0)); or to screen for contraindications (39.4 % (95 % CI: 35.0, 44.0)). Chiropractors agreed that radiographs for low back pain could be useful for: acute low back pain (54.0 % (95 % CI: 49.2, 58.7)); screening for contraindications (55.8 % (95 % CI: 51.0, 60.5)); or to confirm diagnosis and direct treatment (61.3 % (95 % CI: 56.5, 65.9)). Poorer adherence to current guidelines was seen if the chiropractor referred to in-house radiographic facilities, practiced a technique other than diversified technique or was unaware or unsure of current radiographic guidelines for low back pain. Only 50

  6. Australian Football League concussion guidelines: what do community players think?

    PubMed

    White, Peta E; Donaldson, Alex; Sullivan, S John; Newton, Joshua; Finch, Caroline F

    2016-01-01

    Preventing concussion in sport is a global challenge. To assess community-level adult male Australian Football players' views on following the Australian Football League's (AFL) concussion guidelines. 3 focus groups, each comprising 6 players from 1 regional league, were conducted until saturation of issues raised. Discussions followed a semistructured script and were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was conducted by 2 coders independently. Identified advantages of the guidelines included highlighting the seriousness of concussion; changing the culture around playing with concussion and shifting return-to-play decision responsibility from players to others. Disadvantages included players being removed from play unnecessarily; removal of players' rights to decide if they are fit to play and players changing their behaviours to avoid being removed from play. Identified facilitators to guideline use included local league enforcement; broad information dissemination and impartial medically trained staff to assess concussion. Identified barriers to guideline use included players' desire to play at all costs; external pressure that encouraged players to return to play prematurely; and inconvenience and cost. Players generally understand that the AFL concussion guidelines protect their long-term welfare. However, their desire to play at all costs and help their team win is a common barrier to reporting concussion and adhering to guidelines. Leagues should take a lead role by mandating and enforcing the use of the guidelines and educating coaches, game day medical providers and players. The return-to-play component of the guidelines is complex and needs further consideration in the context of community sport.

  7. Australian Football League concussion guidelines: what do community players think?

    PubMed Central

    White, Peta E; Donaldson, Alex; Sullivan, S John; Newton, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Background Preventing concussion in sport is a global challenge. To assess community-level adult male Australian Football players’ views on following the Australian Football League's (AFL) concussion guidelines. Methods 3 focus groups, each comprising 6 players from 1 regional league, were conducted until saturation of issues raised. Discussions followed a semistructured script and were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was conducted by 2 coders independently. Results Identified advantages of the guidelines included highlighting the seriousness of concussion; changing the culture around playing with concussion and shifting return-to-play decision responsibility from players to others. Disadvantages included players being removed from play unnecessarily; removal of players’ rights to decide if they are fit to play and players changing their behaviours to avoid being removed from play. Identified facilitators to guideline use included local league enforcement; broad information dissemination and impartial medically trained staff to assess concussion. Identified barriers to guideline use included players’ desire to play at all costs; external pressure that encouraged players to return to play prematurely; and inconvenience and cost. Conclusions Players generally understand that the AFL concussion guidelines protect their long-term welfare. However, their desire to play at all costs and help their team win is a common barrier to reporting concussion and adhering to guidelines. Leagues should take a lead role by mandating and enforcing the use of the guidelines and educating coaches, game day medical providers and players. The return-to-play component of the guidelines is complex and needs further consideration in the context of community sport. PMID:28890801

  8. Internal Waves in the East Australian Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Matthew H.; Sloyan, Bernadette M.; Simmons, Harper L.

    2017-12-01

    Internal waves, which drive most ocean turbulence and add "noise" to lower-frequency records, interact with low-frequency current systems and topography in yet poorly known ways. Taking advantage of a heavily instrumented, 14 month mooring array, internal waves in the East Australian Current (EAC) are examined for the first time. Internal wave horizontal kinetic energy (HKE) is within a factor of 2 of the Garrett-Munk (1976) spectrum. Continuum internal waves, near-inertial waves, and internal tides together constitute a significant percentage of the total velocity variance. Mode-1 internal tide energy fluxes are southward and much smaller than energy times group velocity, consistent with reflection at the continental slope of incident waves generated from near New Caledonia and the Solomon Islands. Internal tide HKE is highly phase variable, consistent with refraction by the variable EAC. Mode-1 near-inertial wave energy fluxes are of comparable magnitude and are equatorward and episodic, consistent with generation by storms farther poleward. These processes are considered together in the complex environment of the EAC.

  9. Current Australian physiotherapy management of hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Sallie M; Blackburn, Meagan S; McMahon, Kylie; Bennell, Kim L

    2010-12-01

    Symptomatic osteoarthritis can be a painful, costly and debilitating condition. Whilst there is a substantial body of literature surrounding osteoarthritis of the knee, there is less reported research on the hip joint, especially pertaining to physiotherapy intervention. This descriptive study aimed to describe current physiotherapy management of osteoarthritis of the hip by Australian physiotherapists in private practice and acute hospital settings. Cross-sectional survey. A questionnaire was administered to 364 public and private practitioners in the state of Victoria. A response rate of 66% was achieved. Physiotherapists working in the private and public sectors reported frequent use of manual therapy (78% and 87%, respectively), aquatic therapy (82% and 58%, respectively) and home exercise programmes (88% and 80%, respectively). Class-based physiotherapy is employed less frequently (44% and 28%, respectively). Strengthening exercises are the most common treatment technique. The widespread use of exercise and manual therapy in the management of osteoarthritis of the hip is highlighted. There was little difference in overall physiotherapy management between the public and private settings. The results identify interventions commonly used in clinical practice. The need for further research to evaluate the effectiveness of frequently used interventions is also highlighted. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Women and alcohol: current Australian research.

    PubMed

    Hands, M A; Banwell, C L; Hamilton, M A

    1995-01-01

    Over the past decade research on women and alcohol has been gaining momentum with evidence of an accumulating data base and a growing section of the drug and alcohol literature specifically addressing this area of interest. Despite the gains made in gender sensitive research on substance use, a review of the literature reveals that many of the articulated concerns are similar to those identified over the preceding 20 years.This paper reports on the findings of an Australian wide survey investigating the current level of research on women and alcohol. The survey was used in conjunction with a critical analysis of the literature to identify gaps in research activity in the area of women and alcohol. Identified research gaps result, in part, from the disproportionate focus on women with severe alcohol problems within treatment facilities. There is a lack of qualitative and quantitative research on women's drinking, whether it be usual use or problematic use, within the general population as a way of bridging the gap between population surveys and clinical studies. In addition, there is a need for longitudinal research to provide information on the context of women's drinking over a several year period, giving insight into the many factors which could be influencing women's drinking behaviour. Finally, the relative lack of commitment to prevention as a research agenda for women needs to be addressed.

  11. An audit of adherence to heart failure guidelines in an Australian hospital: A pharmacist perspective.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Viviane; Danninger, Melanie; Wang, Wei; Khalil, Hanan

    2017-12-01

    The Australian National Heart Foundation Guidelines have been developed to guide clinicians on how to best manage chronic heart failure (CHF) patients according to the current best available evidence. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the proportion of patients prescribed evidence-based therapy (EBT) for CHF on discharge at this Australian metropolitan hospital and factors affecting its prescribing. The secondary aims are to examine the proportion of patients prescribed EBT on discharge on cardiac wards compared to medical wards and to explore the role of the pharmacist in the management of these patients. A retrospective audit of patients' medical notes who were admitted consecutively for CHF management was conducted over 6 months to examine their management. The results showed at discharge, a total of 52% of patients were discharged on angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, 49% were discharged on β-blockers, 15% were on Aldosterone receptor antagonists, 90% were discharged on diuretics, and 29% were discharged on Digoxin. The main determinants of prescribing EBT on discharge were the presence of prescribing contraindications and patients' comorbidities. Patients discharged from cardiac wards were more likely to be prescribed EBT than if discharged on medical wards. Furthermore, in the subset of the cohort who was reviewed by a pharmacist during admission, a higher percentage of patients were discharged on EBT compared with those who did not have a pharmaceutical input. This study highlighted existing gaps between the National CHF Guidelines and clinical prescribing practice in this hospital. Patients who were discharged from cardiac wards were more likely to be prescribed medications concordant with the guidelines, and there is further opportunity for pharmacists to assist in closing gaps in prescribing practice by the promotion of adherence to these guidelines. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. A Futures Orientation in the Australian Curriculum: Current Levels of Teacher Interest, Activity and Support in Western Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paynter, Mark; Bruce, Neville

    2014-01-01

    The soon to be implemented Australian Curriculum aims to integrate a futures orientation across subject areas. Guidelines and support for this specific initiative are being finalized. Only a little is known about the current teaching of a futures orientation or of secondary teacher interest, understanding and support for this important but…

  13. Predictors of awareness of standard drink labelling and drinking guidelines to reduce negative health effects among Australian drinkers.

    PubMed

    Coomber, Kerri; Jones, Sandra C; Martino, Florentine; Miller, Peter G

    2017-03-01

    This study examined rates of awareness of standard drink labelling and drinking guidelines among Australian adult drinkers. Demographic predictors of these two outcomes were also explored. Online survey panel participants aged 18-45 years(n = 1061; mean age = 33.2 years) completed an online survey assessing demographics, alcohol consumption patterns, awareness of standard drink labels and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) guidelines, and support for more detailed labels. The majority (80%) of participants had seen standard drink labels on alcohol products; with younger drinkers, those from a regional/rural location and high-risk drinkers significantly more likely to have seen such labelling. Most respondents estimated at or below the maximum number of drinks stipulated in the NHMRC guidelines. However, their estimates of the levels for male drinkers were significantly higher than for female drinkers. High-risk drinkers were significantly less likely to provide accurate estimates, while those who had seen the standard drink logo were significantly more likely to provide accurate estimates of drinking levels to reduce the risk of long-term harms only. Just under three-quarters of respondents supported the inclusion of more information on labels regarding guidelines to reduce negative health effects. The current standard drink labelling approach fails to address high-risk drinkers. The inclusion of information about NHMRC guidelines on alcohol labels, and placing standard drink labelling on the front of products could improve awareness of what constitutes a standard drink and safe levels of consumption among Australian drinkers.[Kerri Coomber, Sandra C. Jones, Florentine Martino, Peter G. Miller. Predictors of awareness of standard drink labelling and drinking guidelines to reduce negative health effects among Australian drinkers. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:200-209]. © 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  14. Compliance with the Australian 24-hour movement guidelines for the early years: associations with weight status.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rute; Zhang, Zhiguang; Pereira, João R; Sousa-Sá, Eduarda; Cliff, Dylan P; Okely, Anthony D

    2017-11-20

    For effective public health and surveillance it is important to document the proportion of young children who meet the new Australian Integrated 24 h Movement Guidelines for the Early Years and how these associate with health outcomes. We aimed to (i) assess compliance with the new Integrated 24 h Movement Guidelines for the Early Years in a sample of Australian toddlers; and (ii) ascertain whether compliance with the guidelines associates with weight status. The sample comprised 202 toddlers (104 girls) aged 19.74 ± 4.07 months from the GET UP! Participants wore accelerometers (Actigraph GT3X+) for 24 h over 7 consecutive days to assess physical activity, sedentary time and sleep. Parents reported participants' screen time. Weight and height were measured and body mass index (BMI) z-scores by age and sex were calculated. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) was performed to test differences in BMI z-scores between participants complying with (i) none or any individual guideline, (ii) any combination of meeting two guidelines, and (iii) those who met all three guidelines, adjusting for child age, gender and socioeconomic status. Only 8.9% of the sample met the overall 24 h movement guidelines. Most of the sample met the physical activity (96.5%) and sleep (79.7%) guidelines but only 11.4% met the sedentary behavior guideline. Average BMI Z-scores did not significantly differ between children who complied with none or any individual guideline, any combination of meeting two guidelines, and those who met all three guidelines (p > 0.05). Although the lack of significant differences, participants who accomplished any combination of two guidelines or all three guidelines appear to have had a lower BMI Z-score than those complying with one of the guidelines or none. Just under 9% of our sample met the overall Australian 24 h Movement Guidelines for the Early Years. BMI was not associated with the accomplishment of any of the 24-h Movement Guidelines. Strategies to

  15. The CSIRO Healthy Diet Score: An Online Survey to Estimate Compliance with the Australian Dietary Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hendrie, Gilly A; Baird, Danielle; Golley, Rebecca K; Noakes, Manny

    2017-01-09

    There are few dietary assessment tools that are scientifically developed and freely available online. The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) Healthy Diet Score survey asks questions about the quantity, quality, and variety of foods consumed. On completion, individuals receive a personalised Diet Score-reflecting their overall compliance with the Australian Dietary Guidelines. Over 145,000 Australians have completed the survey since it was launched in May 2015. The average Diet Score was 58.8 out of a possible 100 (SD = 12.9). Women scored higher than men; older adults higher than younger adults; and normal weight adults higher than obese adults. It was most common to receive feedback about discretionary foods (73.8% of the sample), followed by dairy foods (55.5%) and healthy fats (47.0%). Results suggest that Australians' diets are not consistent with the recommendations in the guidelines. The combination of using technology and providing the tool free of charge has attracted a lot of traffic to the website, providing valuable insights into what Australians' report to be eating. The use of technology has also enhanced the user experience, with individuals receiving immediate and personalised feedback. This survey tool will be useful to monitor population diet quality and understand the degree to Australians' diets comply with dietary guidelines.

  16. Therapeutic endorsement enhances compliance with national glaucoma guidelines in Australian and New Zealand optometrists.

    PubMed

    Zangerl, Barbara; Hayen, Andrew; Mitchell, Paul; Jamous, Khalid F; Stapleton, Fiona; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies confirmed that optometrists have access to and confidence in applying clinical tests recommended for glaucoma assessment. Less is known about factors best predicting compliance with national clinical guidelines and thus by inference, the provision of suitable care by primary care ophthalmic practitioners. We utilised the unique two-tiered profession (therapeutic and non-therapeutic scope of practice) in Australia and New Zealand to assess the prospective adherence to glaucoma guidelines dependent on the clinician's background. Australian and New Zealand optometrists were surveyed on ophthalmic techniques for glaucoma assessment, criteria for the evaluation of the optic nerve head, glaucoma risk categories and review times while also recording background, training, and experience. Parameters identifying progression/conversion and patients' risk levels were analysed comparatively to ophthalmologists' opinions. Linear regression analysis identified variables significantly improving the likelihood of concordance with guidelines. Reported application of techniques complied well with glaucoma guidelines although gonioscopy and pachymetry, pupil dilation for optic nerve head examination, and acquisition of permanent records were less frequently employed. The main predictors for entry-level diagnostic standards were therapeutic endorsement together with the associated knowledge of relevant guidance and procedural confidence. Other findings suggested a potential underestimation in the value of optic disc size and intraocular pressure for the prediction of glaucoma risk, while optometrists more frequently relied on the outcomes of non-standardised automated perimetry and auxiliary imaging. Optometrists in Australia and New Zealand may not always exercise optimal clinical acumen regarding techniques/criteria for glaucoma diagnosis. Therapeutic endorsement was gradually adopted in different jurisdictions in various forms since 1999 and is mandatory for

  17. Current situation and future prospects for the Australian beef industry.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Paul Leo; Ferguson, Drewe M

    2018-04-12

    Beef production extends over almost half of Australia, with about 47,000 cattle producers that contribute about 20% ($A12.7 billion GVP) of the total value of farm production in Australia. Australia is one of the world's most efficient producers of cattle and was the world's third largest beef exporter in 2016. The Australian beef industry had 25 million head of cattle in 2016-17, with a national beef breeding herd of 11.5 million head. Australian beef production includes pasture based cow-calf systems, a backgrounding or grow-out period on pasture, and feedlot or pasture finishing. Feedlot finishing has assumed more importance in recent years to assure the eating quality of beef entering the relatively small Australian domestic market, and to enhance the supply of higher value beef for export markets. Maintenance of Australia's preferred status as a quality assured supplier of high value beef produced under environmentally sustainable systems from 'disease-free' cattle is of highest importance. Stringent livestock and meat quality regulations and quality assurance systems, and productivity growth and efficiency across the supply chain to ensure price competiveness, are crucial for continued export market growth in the face of increasing competition. Major industry issues, that also represent research, development and adoption priorities and opportunities for the Australian beef industry have been captured within exhaustive strategic planning processes by the red meat and beef industries. At the broadest level, these issues include consumer and industry support, market growth and diversification, supply chain efficiency, productivity and profitability, environmental sustainability, and animal health and welfare. This review provides an overview of the Australian beef industry including current market trends and future prospects, and major issues and opportunities for the continued growth, development and profitability of the industry.

  18. Concussion guideline implementation perceptions and experiences among parents of community-level Australian Football junior players

    PubMed Central

    White, Peta E; Register-Mihalik, Johna; Donaldson, Alex; Sullivan, S John

    2017-01-01

    Background/aim Concussion guidelines exist for multiple community sports. Parents are key stakeholders in guideline implementation and in appropriate responses following concussive injury. The purpose of this qualitative investigation was to understand how parents of community-level Australian Football (AF) players experience and perceive concussion guidelines in order to inform the design and implementation of concussion guidelines in community sport. Methods A cross-sectional qualitative approach was adopted to allow for an open and detailed exploration of the views of parents of junior community AF players (ie, those aged <16 years) regarding concussion guidelines of the AF League (AFL)—the national governing body for AF. Participants were 15 parents of junior community AF players from two clubs affiliated with a large regional community AF League. Results The key experiences and perceptions of the parents included appreciation that the guidelines outlined the postconcussion process that should be followed, desires for better understanding of the guidelines by general practitioners (ie, medical doctors) who care for children with concussion, having more readily available information for parents and receiving more formal policy guiding timing of return-to-participation following concussion. Difficulties with the guidelines not addressing delayed presentations of concussion were also frequently mentioned. Conclusions Parents are key stakeholders in concussion prevention and care in community sport. As such, their input should be considered when developing guidelines and resources for community sport. Furthermore, concussion information should be made available to parents in an easily accessible and community-friendly form. PMID:28761707

  19. Proportion of infants meeting the Australian 24-hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years: data from the Melbourne InFANT Program.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Kylie D; Downing, Katherine L; Campbell, Karen; Crawford, David; Salmon, Jo; Hnatiuk, Jill A

    2017-11-20

    Little information is available on the movement behaviours of infants, despite evidence that these are important for development. The release of new Australian 24-hour Movement Guidelines provides an opportunity to document the current state of movement behaviours in infants relative to these guidelines. The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of 4 month old Australian infants meeting the 24-hour Movement Guidelines, individually, and in combination, and to describe associations with individual characteristics. Maternal report baseline data from the Melbourne Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial Program were used to determine prevalence of infants meeting physical activity (30 min of tummy time per day), sedentary behaviour (no more than 1 h at a time kept restrained; zero screen time), and sleep guidelines (14-17 h for 0-3 month olds or 12-16 h for 4-11 month olds). Prevalence of infants meeting combined guidelines was also described. The odds of meeting guidelines based on infant and family characteristics was determined. Data are reported for 455 infants with a mean age of 3.6 months (SD = 1.0). The proportion of infants meeting each of the guidelines was 29.7% for tummy time, 56.9% for kept restrained, 27.9% for screen time, 58.7% for sleep and 3.5% for the combined guidelines (i.e. meeting all four guidelines). A significantly higher proportion of girls than boys met the screen time guideline (32.5% versus 24.0%, p = 0.04) and the combined guidelines (5.7% versus 1.6%, p = 0.01). Few associations were observed between infant and family characteristics and proportion of infants meeting individual guidelines. Very few infants met all of the guidelines contained in the new Australian 24-hour Movement Guidelines suggesting there is much room for improvement in movement behaviours from early life. Fewer infants met the tummy time and screen time guidelines hence these appear to be the behaviours requiring most attention. Parents and

  20. Vitamin D: Current Guidelines and Future Outlook.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Stefan; Trummer, Christian; Pandis, Marlene; Schwetz, Verena; Aberer, Felix; Grübler, Martin; Verheyen, Nicolas; Tomaschitz, Andreas; März, Winfried

    2018-02-01

    Vitamin D is of public health interest because its deficiency is common and is associated with musculoskeletal diseases, as well as extraskeletal diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and infections. Several health authorities have reviewed the existing literature and published nutritional vitamin D guidelines for the general population. There was a wide consensus that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration should be used to assess vitamin D status and intake, and that musculoskeletal, and not extraskeletal, effects of vitamin D should be the basis for nutritional vitamin D guidelines. Recommended target levels for 25(OH)D range from 25 to 50 nmol/l (10 to 20 ng/ml), corresponding to a vitamin D intake of 400 to 800 International Units (10 to 20 μg) per day. It is of concern that significant sections of the general population do not meet these recommended vitamin D levels. This definitely requires action from a public health perspective. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  1. Australian and New Zealand Anaesthetic Allergy Group Perioperative Anaphylaxis Investigation Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Scolaro, R J; Crilly, H M; Maycock, E J; McAleer, P T; Nicholls, K A; Rose, M A; The, Rih

    2017-09-01

    These guidelines are a consensus document developed by a working party of the Australian and New Zealand Anaesthetic Allergy Group (ANZAAG) to provide an approach to the investigation of perioperative anaphylaxis. They focus primarily on the use of skin testing as it is the investigation with the greatest clinical utility for the identification of the likely causative agent and potentially safer alternatives. The practicalities and process of skin testing, its limitations, and the place of other tests are discussed. These guidelines also address the roles of graded challenge and in vitro testing. The implications of anaphylaxis associated with neuromuscular blocking agents, beta-lactam antibiotics, local anaesthetic agents and chlorhexidine are discussed. Evidence for the recommendations is derived from literature searches using the words skin test, allergy, anaphylaxis, anaesthesia, and each of the individual agents listed in these guidelines. The individual articles were then reviewed for suitability for inclusion in these guidelines. Where evidence was not strong, as is the situation for many perioperative agents, expert consensus from the ANZAAG working party was used. These guidelines are intended for use by specialists involved in the investigation of perioperative allergy. They have been approved following peer review by members of ANZAAG and are available on the ANZAAG website: http://www.anzaag.com/anaphylaxis-management/testing-guidelines.pdf.

  2. The CSIRO Healthy Diet Score: An Online Survey to Estimate Compliance with the Australian Dietary Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Hendrie, Gilly A.; Baird, Danielle; Golley, Rebecca K.; Noakes, Manny

    2017-01-01

    There are few dietary assessment tools that are scientifically developed and freely available online. The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) Healthy Diet Score survey asks questions about the quantity, quality, and variety of foods consumed. On completion, individuals receive a personalised Diet Score—reflecting their overall compliance with the Australian Dietary Guidelines. Over 145,000 Australians have completed the survey since it was launched in May 2015. The average Diet Score was 58.8 out of a possible 100 (SD = 12.9). Women scored higher than men; older adults higher than younger adults; and normal weight adults higher than obese adults. It was most common to receive feedback about discretionary foods (73.8% of the sample), followed by dairy foods (55.5%) and healthy fats (47.0%). Results suggest that Australians’ diets are not consistent with the recommendations in the guidelines. The combination of using technology and providing the tool free of charge has attracted a lot of traffic to the website, providing valuable insights into what Australians’ report to be eating. The use of technology has also enhanced the user experience, with individuals receiving immediate and personalised feedback. This survey tool will be useful to monitor population diet quality and understand the degree to Australians’ diets comply with dietary guidelines. PMID:28075355

  3. Australian oral health case notes: assessment of forensic relevance and adherence to recording guidelines.

    PubMed

    Stow, L; James, H; Richards, L

    2016-06-01

    Dental case notes record clinical diagnoses and treatments, as well as providing continuity of patient care. They are also used for dento-legal litigation and forensic purposes. Maintaining accurate and comprehensive dental patient records is a dental worker's ethical and legal obligation. Australian registered specialist forensic odontologists were surveyed to determine the relevance of recorded case note items for dental identification. A dental case notes sample was assessed for adherence with odontologist nominated forensic value and compiled professional record keeping guidelines of forensic relevance. Frequency of item recording, confidence interval, examiner agreement and statistical significance were determined. Broad agreement existed between forensic odontologists as to which recorded dental items have most forensic relevance. Inclusion frequency of these items in sampled case notes varied widely (e.g. single area radiographic view present in 75%, CI = 65.65-82.50; completed odontogram in 56%, CI = 46.23-65.33). Recording of information specified by professional record keeping guidelines also varied, although overall inclusion was higher than for forensically desired items (e.g. patient's full name in 99%, CI = 94.01 - >99.99; named treating practitioner in 23%, CI = 15.78-32.31). Many sampled dental case notes lacked details identified as being valuable by forensic specialists and as specified by professional record keeping guidelines. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  4. Basic and advanced paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation - guidelines of the Australian and New Zealand Resuscitation Councils 2010.

    PubMed

    Tibballs, James; Aickin, Richard; Nuthall, Gabrielle

    2012-07-01

    Guidelines for basic and advanced paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have been revised by Australian and New Zealand Resuscitation Councils. Changes encourage CPR out-of-hospital and aim to improve the quality of CPR in-hospital. Features of basic CPR include: omission of abdominal thrusts for foreign body airway obstruction; commencement with chest compression followed by ventilation in a ratio of 30:2 or compression-only CPR if the rescuer is unwilling/unable to give expired-air breathing when the victim is 'unresponsive and not breathing normally'. Use of automated external defibrillators is encouraged. Features of advanced CPR include: prevention of cardiac arrest by rapid response systems; restriction of pulse palpation to 10 s to diagnosis cardiac arrest; affirmation of 15:2 compression-ventilation ratio for children and for infants other than newly born; initial bag-mask ventilation before tracheal intubation; a single direct current shock of 4 J/kg for ventricular fibrillation (VF) and pulseless ventricular tachycardia followed by immediate resumption of CPR for 2 min without analysis of cardiac rhythm and avoidance of unnecessary interruption of continuous external cardiac compressions. Monitoring of exhaled carbon dioxide is recommended to detect non-tracheal intubation, assess quality of CPR, and to help match ventilation to reduced cardiac output. The intraosseous route is recommended if immediate intravenous access is impossible. Amiodarone is strongly favoured over lignocaine for refractory VF and adrenaline over atropine for severe bradycardia, asystole and pulseless electrical activity. Family presence at resuscitation is encouraged. Therapeutic hypothermia is acceptable after resuscitation to improve neurological outcome. Extracorporeal circulatory support for in-hospital cardiac arrest may be used in equipped centres. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal

  5. Australian shellfish ecosystems: Past distribution, current status and future direction.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Chris L; McLeod, Ian M; Alleway, Heidi K; Cook, Peter; Crawford, Christine; Creighton, Colin; Diggles, Ben; Ford, John; Hamer, Paul; Heller-Wagner, Gideon; Lebrault, Emma; Le Port, Agnès; Russell, Kylie; Sheaves, Marcus; Warnock, Bryn

    2018-01-01

    We review the status of marine shellfish ecosystems formed primarily by bivalves in Australia, including: identifying ecosystem-forming species, assessing their historical and current extent, causes for decline and past and present management. Fourteen species of bivalves were identified as developing complex, three-dimensional reef or bed ecosystems in intertidal and subtidal areas across tropical, subtropical and temperate Australia. A dramatic decline in the extent and condition of Australia's two most common shellfish ecosystems, developed by Saccostrea glomerata and Ostrea angasi oysters, occurred during the mid-1800s to early 1900s in concurrence with extensive harvesting for food and lime production, ecosystem modification, disease outbreaks and a decline in water quality. Out of 118 historical locations containing O. angasi-developed ecosystems, only one location still contains the ecosystem whilst only six locations are known to still contain S. glomerata-developed ecosystems out of 60 historical locations. Ecosystems developed by the introduced oyster Crasostrea gigas are likely to be increasing in extent, whilst data on the remaining 11 ecosystem-forming species are limited, preventing a detailed assessment of their current ecosystem-forming status. Our analysis identifies that current knowledge on extent, physical characteristics, biodiversity and ecosystem services of Australian shellfish ecosystems is extremely limited. Despite the limited information on shellfish ecosystems, a number of restoration projects have recently been initiated across Australia and we propose a number of existing government policies and conservation mechanisms, if enacted, would readily serve to support the future conservation and recovery of Australia's shellfish ecosystems.

  6. Interpreting the Australian Dietary Guideline to “Limit” into Practical and Personalised Advice

    PubMed Central

    Fayet-Moore, Flavia; Pearson, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Food-based dietary guidelines shift the focus from single nutrients to whole diet. Guideline 3 of the Australian Dietary Guidelines (ADG) recommends “limiting” discretionary foods and beverages (DF)—Those high in saturated fat, added sugars, salt, and/or alcohol. In Australia, DF contribute 35% of total energy intake. Using the ADG supporting documents, the aim of this study was to develop a food‑based educational toolkit to help translate guideline 3 and interpret portion size. The methodology used to produce the toolkit is presented here. “Additional energy allowance” is specific to gender, age, height and physical activity level, and can be met from core foods, unsaturated fats/oils/spreads and/or DF. To develop the toolkit, additional energy allowance was converted to serves equaling 600 kJ. Common DF were selected and serves were determined based on nutrient profile. Portion sizes were used to calculate number of DF serves. A consumer brochure consisting of DF, portion sizes and equivalent number of DF serves was developed. A healthcare professional guide outlines the methodology used. The toolkit was designed to assist dietitians and consumers to translate guideline 3 of the ADF and develop a personalized approach to include DF as part of the diet. PMID:25803544

  7. Current trends in guideline development: a cause for concern.

    PubMed

    Stephens, R G; Kogon, S L; Bohay, R N

    1996-02-01

    Although the development and use of practice-related guidelines as educational aids has a long history in the health professions, scientific assessment indicates that they have had limited success in changing practice patterns. This is principally due to the exclusion of practitioners from the development process, and the lack of a credible scientific basis for many guidelines. Past failures have led to new methods of guideline development based on a critical analysis of scientific data. These methods, which involve legitimate professional organizations at all stages of the development process, are clearly a step in the right direction. Unfortunately, there are signs that current guideline developers still fail to recognize the critical nature of the new methods or the need for an open and inclusive development process. It is even more disquieting that the objective of some guideline developers, such as licensing bodies, is the formulation of standards or review criteria, particularly when there are very few therapeutic practices with a sufficient scientific basis to justify such a designation. National and provincial societies, as well as dental educators, need to assume a leadership role to ensure that if guidelines are required, they will be developed as credible aids for the improvement of patient care. In this paper, the authors recount why the "traditional process" of guideline development resulted in guidelines that were mistrusted by the profession and, as a result, ineffective. They also outline the widely-documented current methodology, which should be followed if guidelines are to be accepted by the profession. Finally, they discuss the critical issue of who should develop guidelines, and examine their role in dental practice and education.

  8. Australian shellfish ecosystems: Past distribution, current status and future direction

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Chris L.; McLeod, Ian M.; Alleway, Heidi K.; Cook, Peter; Crawford, Christine; Creighton, Colin; Diggles, Ben; Ford, John; Hamer, Paul; Heller-Wagner, Gideon; Lebrault, Emma; Le Port, Agnès; Russell, Kylie; Sheaves, Marcus; Warnock, Bryn

    2018-01-01

    We review the status of marine shellfish ecosystems formed primarily by bivalves in Australia, including: identifying ecosystem-forming species, assessing their historical and current extent, causes for decline and past and present management. Fourteen species of bivalves were identified as developing complex, three-dimensional reef or bed ecosystems in intertidal and subtidal areas across tropical, subtropical and temperate Australia. A dramatic decline in the extent and condition of Australia’s two most common shellfish ecosystems, developed by Saccostrea glomerata and Ostrea angasi oysters, occurred during the mid-1800s to early 1900s in concurrence with extensive harvesting for food and lime production, ecosystem modification, disease outbreaks and a decline in water quality. Out of 118 historical locations containing O. angasi-developed ecosystems, only one location still contains the ecosystem whilst only six locations are known to still contain S. glomerata-developed ecosystems out of 60 historical locations. Ecosystems developed by the introduced oyster Crasostrea gigas are likely to be increasing in extent, whilst data on the remaining 11 ecosystem-forming species are limited, preventing a detailed assessment of their current ecosystem-forming status. Our analysis identifies that current knowledge on extent, physical characteristics, biodiversity and ecosystem services of Australian shellfish ecosystems is extremely limited. Despite the limited information on shellfish ecosystems, a number of restoration projects have recently been initiated across Australia and we propose a number of existing government policies and conservation mechanisms, if enacted, would readily serve to support the future conservation and recovery of Australia’s shellfish ecosystems. PMID:29444143

  9. Defining ‘Unhealthy’: A Systematic Analysis of Alignment between the Australian Dietary Guidelines and the Health Star Rating System

    PubMed Central

    Rådholm, Karin; Neal, Bruce

    2018-01-01

    The Australian Dietary Guidelines (ADGs) and Health Star Rating (HSR) front-of-pack labelling system are two national interventions to promote healthier diets. Our aim was to assess the degree of alignment between the two policies. Methods: Nutrition information was extracted for 65,660 packaged foods available in The George Institute’s Australian FoodSwitch database. Products were classified ‘core’ or ‘discretionary’ based on the ADGs, and a HSR generated irrespective of whether currently displayed on pack. Apparent outliers were identified as those products classified ‘core’ that received HSR ≤ 2.0; and those classified ‘discretionary’ that received HSR ≥ 3.5. Nutrient cut-offs were applied to determine whether apparent outliers were ‘high in’ salt, total sugar or saturated fat, and outlier status thereby attributed to a failure of the ADGs or HSR algorithm. Results: 47,116 products (23,460 core; 23,656 discretionary) were included. Median (Q1, Q3) HSRs were 4.0 (3.0 to 4.5) for core and 2.0 (1.0 to 3.0) for discretionary products. Overall alignment was good: 86.6% of products received a HSR aligned with their ADG classification. Among 6324 products identified as apparent outliers, 5246 (83.0%) were ultimately determined to be ADG failures, largely caused by challenges in defining foods as ‘core’ or ‘discretionary’. In total, 1078 (17.0%) were determined to be true failures of the HSR algorithm. Conclusion: The scope of genuine misalignment between the ADGs and HSR algorithm is very small. We provide evidence-informed recommendations for strengthening both policies to more effectively guide Australians towards healthier choices. PMID:29670024

  10. Toxicity after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy using Australian guidelines.

    PubMed

    Chin, Stephen; Aherne, Noel J; Last, Andrew; Assareh, Hassan; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2017-12-01

    We evaluated single institution toxicity outcomes after post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with implanted fiducial markers following national eviQ guidelines, for which late toxicity outcomes have not been published. Prospectively collected toxicity data were retrospectively reviewed for 293 men who underwent 64-66 Gy IG-IMRT to the prostate bed between 2007 and 2015. Median follow-up after PPRT was 39 months. Baseline grade ≥2 genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI) and sexual toxicities were 20.5%, 2.7% and 43.7%, respectively, reflecting ongoing toxicity after radical prostatectomy. Incidence of new (compared to baseline) acute grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was 5.8% and 10.6%, respectively. New late grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicity occurred in 19.1%, 4.7% and 20.2%, respectively. However, many patients also experienced improvements in toxicities. For this reason, prevalence of grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicities 4 years after PPRT was similar to or lower than baseline (21.7%, 2.6% and 17.4%, respectively). There were no grade ≥4 toxicities. Post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT using Australian contouring guidelines appears to have tolerable acute and late toxicity. The 4-year prevalence of grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was virtually unchanged compared to baseline, and sexual toxicity improved over baseline. This should reassure radiation oncologists following these guidelines. Late toxicity rates of surgery and PPRT are higher than following definitive IG-IMRT, and this should be taken into account if patients are considering surgery and likely to require PPRT. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  11. Challenges of implementing fibromyalgia treatment guidelines in current clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lesley M; Clauw, Daniel J

    2017-09-01

    The current diagnostic and treatment pathway for patients with fibromyalgia (FM) is lengthy, complex, and characterized by multiple physician visits with an average 2-year wait until diagnosis. It is clear that effective identification and appropriate treatment of FM remain a challenge in current clinical practice. Ideally, FM management involves a multidisciplinary approach with the preferable patient pathway originating in primary care but supported by a range of health care providers, including referral to specialist care when necessary. After the publication of individual clinical studies, high-quality reviews, and meta-analyses, recently published FM treatment guidelines have transitioned from an expert consensus to an evidence-based approach. Evidence-based guidelines provide a framework for ensuring early diagnosis and timely adoption of appropriate treatment. However, for successful outcomes, FM treatments must adopt a more holistic approach, which addresses more than just pain. Impact on the associated symptoms of fatigue and cognitive problems, sleep and mood disturbances, and lowered functional status are also important in judging the success of FM therapy. Recently published guidelines recommend the adoption of a symptom-based approach to guide pharmacologic treatment. Emerging treatment options for FM may be best differentiated on the basis of their effect on comorbid symptoms that are often associated with pain (e.g. sleep disturbance, mood, fatigue). The current review discusses the most recently published Canadian guidelines and the implications of the recent European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations, with a focus on the challenges of implementing these guidelines in current clinical practice.

  12. Tobacco interventions for Indigenous Australians: a review of current evidence.

    PubMed

    Power, Jennifer; Grealy, Claire; Rintoul, Duncan

    2009-12-01

    This paper reviewed effective interventions for increasing smoking cessation among Indigenous Australians and identified gaps in evidence regarding smoking cessation interventions for Indigenous Australians. A systematic review of academic literature and reports from government and non-government agencies published between 2001 and 2007 was conducted in early 2008. Initial findings from the review were tested using 16 in-depth interviews and two half-day workshops with practitioners and researchers working in the area of Indigenous health. Seven Australian programs for which there had been well-designed, rigorous evaluations were identified. A further four programs were identified that had limited evaluation information available. These studies provide evidence that face-to-face counselling or quit support used in conjunction with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is likely to increase quit rates among Indigenous people. Training Aboriginal Health Workers to provide brief smoking cessation intervention with patients is also likely to contribute to increased quit rates. Evidence regarding other interventions is more limited. Evidence indicates that smoking cessation strategies targeted at individuals, such as NRT and/ or counselling, may be effective smoking cessation aids for Indigenous Australians. However, there is no evidence regarding interventions likely to be effective in encouraging more Indigenous Australians to access these quit support strategies.

  13. An Exposition of Current Mobile Learning Design Guidelines and Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teall, Ed; Wang, Minjuan; Callaghan, Vic; Ng, Jason W. P.

    2014-01-01

    As mobile devices with wireless access become more readily available, learning delivered via mobile devices of all types must be designed to ensure successful learning. This paper first examines three questions related to the design of mobile learning: 1) what mobile learning (m-learning) guidelines can be identified in the current literature, 2)…

  14. Falling short of dietary guidelines - What do Australian pregnant women really know? A cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bookari, Khlood; Yeatman, Heather; Williamson, Moira

    2017-02-01

    Maternal diets are not consistent with dietary guidance and this may affect the health of mothers and their infants. Nutrition knowledge and motivation may be important factors. To assess pregnant women's diets in relation to consistency with the Australian Guidelines for Healthy Eating (AGHE); factors influencing women's adherence to the recommendations; and women's attitudes towards pregnancy-specific nutrition information. A cross-sectional study using convenience sampling was undertaken at five hospitals in New South Wales (Australia) and through an online link (October 2012 to July 2013). N=388 pregnant women completed the survey. Categorical data were analysed using Chi square and logistic regression with significance set at P<0.05. Most participants were highly motivated to adopt a healthy diet, believed they were trying to do so and that knowing about nutrition in pregnancy was highly important. Reported dietary intakes were poor. No pregnant women met the recommended intakes for all five food groups. Poor knowledge of these recommendations was evident. Knowledge of selected recommendations (for Fruit, Vegetables, and Breads and Cereals) increased the likelihood of those foods' consumption 8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-27.7), 9.1 (95% CI, 2.6-31.3) and 6.8 (95% CI, 3.4-13.7) times respectively. Pregnant women had high levels of motivation and confidence in their ability to achieve a healthy diet and understand dietary recommendations, but actually demonstrated poor knowledge and poor adherence to guidelines. Mistaken or false beliefs may be a barrier to effective nutrition education strategies. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adherence to the Australian dietary guidelines during pregnancy: evidence from a national study.

    PubMed

    Malek, Lenka; Umberger, Wendy; Makrides, Maria; Zhou, Shao J

    2016-05-01

    To assess dietary intake of pregnant women against the Australian Dietary Guidelines with respect to the Five Food Group recommendations and determine predictors of adherence to the recommendations. Cross-sectional web-based survey. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression. Pregnant women living in Australia. A national sample was recruited using an online panel provider and a South Australian sample was recruited through the antenatal clinic of a large public maternity hospital. A total of 857 pregnant women. Fifty-six per cent, 29% and less than 10% of women met the recommendations for the fruit, dairy and other core food groups, respectively. None of the women met the recommendations for all Five Food Groups. Women who were born overseas and who were less physically active pre-pregnancy were less likely to adhere to the fruit and dairy recommendations. Women who smoked during pregnancy, were overweight pre-pregnancy and had lower household incomes were also less likely to meet the fruit recommendations; and women living in metropolitan areas were less likely to meet the vegetable recommendations. Sixty-one per cent believed their diet during this pregnancy was healthy. The majority of pregnant women in Australia perceive their diets to be healthy yet they do not consume the recommended daily servings from the Five Food Groups. Intervention strategies are warranted, particularly those that increase women's ability to evaluate their diet and also encourage positive dietary changes. These strategies may increase adoption of dietary guidelines and optimise pregnancy and other long-term health outcomes.

  16. Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Gin S; Bassett, Darryl; Boyce, Philip; Bryant, Richard; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Fritz, Kristina; Hopwood, Malcolm; Lyndon, Bill; Mulder, Roger; Murray, Greg; Porter, Richard; Singh, Ajeet B

    2015-12-01

    To provide guidance for the management of mood disorders, based on scientific evidence supplemented by expert clinical consensus and formulate recommendations to maximise clinical salience and utility. Articles and information sourced from search engines including PubMed and EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Google Scholar were supplemented by literature known to the mood disorders committee (MDC) (e.g., books, book chapters and government reports) and from published depression and bipolar disorder guidelines. Information was reviewed and discussed by members of the MDC and findings were then formulated into consensus-based recommendations and clinical guidance. The guidelines were subjected to rigorous successive consultation and external review involving: expert and clinical advisors, the public, key stakeholders, professional bodies and specialist groups with interest in mood disorders. The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disorders (Mood Disorders CPG) provide up-to-date guidance and advice regarding the management of mood disorders that is informed by evidence and clinical experience. The Mood Disorders CPG is intended for clinical use by psychiatrists, psychologists, physicians and others with an interest in mental health care. The Mood Disorder CPG is the first Clinical Practice Guideline to address both depressive and bipolar disorders. It provides up-to-date recommendations and guidance within an evidence-based framework, supplemented by expert clinical consensus. Professor Gin Malhi (Chair), Professor Darryl Bassett, Professor Philip Boyce, Professor Richard Bryant, Professor Paul Fitzgerald, Dr Kristina Fritz, Professor Malcolm Hopwood, Dr Bill Lyndon, Professor Roger Mulder, Professor Greg Murray, Professor Richard Porter and Associate Professor Ajeet Singh. Professor Carlo Altamura, Dr Francesco Colom, Professor Mark George, Professor Guy Goodwin, Professor Roger McIntyre, Dr Roger Ng

  17. The Australian Geodetic Observing Program. Current Status and Future Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, G.; Dawson, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade, the Australian government has through programs like AuScope, the Asia Pacific Reference Frame (APREF), and the Pacific Sea Level Monitoring (PSLM) Project made a significant contribution to the Global Geodetic Observing Program. In addition to supporting the national research priorities, this contribution is justified by Australia's growing economic dependence on precise positioning to underpin efficient transportation, geospatial data management, and industrial automation (e.g., robotic mining and precision agriculture) and the consequent need for the government to guarantee provision of precise positioning products to the Australian community. It is also well recognised within Australia that there is an opportunity to exploit our near unique position as being one of the few regions in the world to see all new and emerging satellite navigation systems including Galileo (Europe), GPS III (USA), GLONASS (Russia), Beidou (China), QZSS (Japan) and IRNSS (India). It is in this context that the Australian geodetic program will build on earlier efforts and further develop its key geodetic capabilities. This will include the creation of an independent GNSS analysis capability that will enable Australia to contribute to the International GNSS Service (IGS) and an upgrade of key geodetic infrastructure including the national VLBI and GNSS arrays. This presentation will overview the significant geodetic activities undertaken by the Australian government and highlight its future plans.

  18. Higher Adherence to the Australian Dietary Guidelines Is Associated with Better Mental Health Status among Australian Adult First-Time Mothers.

    PubMed

    Huddy, Rebecca Lee; Torres, Susan Jane; Milte, Catherine Margaret; McNaughton, Sarah A; Teychenne, Megan; Campbell, Karen Jane

    2016-09-01

    Mental health disorders are a leading cause of disability worldwide, including in first-time mothers. Understanding the associations between diet and depressive symptoms could assist in improving mental health status in this group. Our aim was to determine the association between diet quality, fruit, vegetable, and fish consumption and depressive symptoms in first-time mothers aged 19 to 45 years. We analyzed cross-sectional, baseline data (3 months postpartum) from the Melbourne InFANT (Infant Feeding, Activity, and Nutrition Trial) Extend Program. Participants were first-time Australian mothers aged 19 to 45 years from the Geelong and Melbourne regions of Victoria, Australia (n=457). A self-administered, 137-item food frequency questionnaire assessed dietary intake over the past year. Adherence to the 2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines was assessed using the Dietary Guideline Index as a measure of diet quality. Depressive symptoms were determined using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Relationships between diet quality, fruit, vegetable, and fish intake and depressive symptoms were investigated using linear regression adjusted for relevant covariates (age, smoking status, sleep quality, education, physical activity status, and body mass index). Better diet quality, as indicated by a higher score on the Dietary Guideline Index, was associated with lower depressive symptoms after adjusting for relevant covariates (β=-.034; 95% CI -.056 to -0.012). There were no other associations between dietary intake and depressive symptoms. Adherence to the Australian Dietary Guidelines was associated with better mental health status among first-time mothers. Further research, including longitudinal and intervention studies, are required to determine causality between dietary intake and depressive symptoms, which might help inform future public health nutrition programs for this target group. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published

  19. Use of risk stratification to guide ambulatory management of neutropenic fever. Australian Consensus Guidelines 2011 Steering Committee.

    PubMed

    Worth, L J; Lingaratnam, S; Taylor, A; Hayward, A M; Morrissey, S; Cooney, J; Bastick, P A; Eek, R W; Wei, A; Thursky, K A

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of risk-stratification tools in the setting of neutropenic fever is currently limited by inadequate knowledge and lack of awareness. Within this context, the approach to management of low-risk patients with neutropenic fever is inconsistent with the available evidence across many Australian treating centres. These clinical guidelines define and clarify an accepted standard of care for this patient group given the current evidence base. The Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer risk index is presented as the preferred risk assessment tool for determining patient risk. Suitability of ambulatory care within specific patient populations is discussed, with defined eligibility criteria provided to guide clinical decision-making. Detailed recommendations for implementing appropriate ambulatory strategies, such as early discharge and outpatient antibiotic therapy, are also provided. Due consideration is given to infrastructural requirements and other supportive measures at a resourcing and operational level. An analysis of the relevant health economics is also presented. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  20. Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for the management of schizophrenia and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Galletly, Cherrie; Castle, David; Dark, Frances; Humberstone, Verity; Jablensky, Assen; Killackey, Eóin; Kulkarni, Jayashri; McGorry, Patrick; Nielssen, Olav; Tran, Nga

    2016-05-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the clinical management of schizophrenia and related disorders for health professionals working in Australia and New Zealand. It aims to encourage all clinicians to adopt best practice principles. The recommendations represent the consensus of a group of Australian and New Zealand experts in the management of schizophrenia and related disorders. This guideline includes the management of ultra-high risk syndromes, first-episode psychoses and prolonged psychoses, including psychoses associated with substance use. It takes a holistic approach, addressing all aspects of the care of people with schizophrenia and related disorders, not only correct diagnosis and symptom relief but also optimal recovery of social function. The writing group planned the scope and individual members drafted sections according to their area of interest and expertise, with reference to existing systematic reviews and informal literature reviews undertaken for this guideline. In addition, experts in specific areas contributed to the relevant sections. All members of the writing group reviewed the entire document. The writing group also considered relevant international clinical practice guidelines. Evidence-based recommendations were formulated when the writing group judged that there was sufficient evidence on a topic. Where evidence was weak or lacking, consensus-based recommendations were formulated. Consensus-based recommendations are based on the consensus of a group of experts in the field and are informed by their agreement as a group, according to their collective clinical and research knowledge and experience. Key considerations were selected and reviewed by the writing group. To encourage wide community participation, the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists invited review by its committees and members, an expert advisory committee and key stakeholders including professional bodies and special interest groups. The

  1. Australian Diabetes Foot Network: practical guideline on the provision of footwear for people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Shan M; Nube, Vanessa L; Alford, Jan B; Allard, Bernard P; Gurr, Joel M; Holland, Emma L; Horsley, Mark W; Kamp, Maarten C; Lazzarini, Peter A; Sinha, Ashim K; Warnock, Jason T; Wraight, Paul R

    2013-02-26

    Trauma, in the form of pressure and/or friction from footwear, is a common cause of foot ulceration in people with diabetes. These practical recommendations regarding the provision of footwear for people with diabetes were agreed upon following review of existing position statements and clinical guidelines. The aim of this process was not to re-invent existing guidelines but to provide practical guidance for health professionals on how they can best deliver these recommendations within the Australian health system. Where information was lacking or inconsistent, a consensus was reached following discussion by all authors. Appropriately prescribed footwear, used alone or in conjunction with custom-made foot orthoses, can reduce pedal pressures and reduce the risk of foot ulceration. It is important for all health professionals involved in the care of people with diabetes to both assess and make recommendations on the footwear needs of their clients or to refer to health professionals with such skills and knowledge. Individuals with more complex footwear needs (for example those who require custom-made medical grade footwear and orthoses) should be referred to health professionals with experience in the prescription of these modalities and who are able to provide appropriate and timely follow-up. Where financial disadvantage is a barrier to individuals acquiring appropriate footwear, health care professionals should be aware of state and territory based equipment funding schemes that can provide financial assistance. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and people living in rural and remote areas are likely to have limited access to a broad range of footwear. Provision of appropriate footwear to people with diabetes in these communities needs be addressed as part of a comprehensive national strategy to reduce the burden of diabetes and its complications on the health system.

  2. Australian Diabetes Foot Network: practical guideline on the provision of footwear for people with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Trauma, in the form of pressure and/or friction from footwear, is a common cause of foot ulceration in people with diabetes. These practical recommendations regarding the provision of footwear for people with diabetes were agreed upon following review of existing position statements and clinical guidelines. The aim of this process was not to re-invent existing guidelines but to provide practical guidance for health professionals on how they can best deliver these recommendations within the Australian health system. Where information was lacking or inconsistent, a consensus was reached following discussion by all authors. Appropriately prescribed footwear, used alone or in conjunction with custom-made foot orthoses, can reduce pedal pressures and reduce the risk of foot ulceration. It is important for all health professionals involved in the care of people with diabetes to both assess and make recommendations on the footwear needs of their clients or to refer to health professionals with such skills and knowledge. Individuals with more complex footwear needs (for example those who require custom-made medical grade footwear and orthoses) should be referred to health professionals with experience in the prescription of these modalities and who are able to provide appropriate and timely follow-up. Where financial disadvantage is a barrier to individuals acquiring appropriate footwear, health care professionals should be aware of state and territory based equipment funding schemes that can provide financial assistance. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and people living in rural and remote areas are likely to have limited access to a broad range of footwear. Provision of appropriate footwear to people with diabetes in these communities needs be addressed as part of a comprehensive national strategy to reduce the burden of diabetes and its complications on the health system. PMID:23442978

  3. Just add a pinch of salt!--current directions for the use of salt in recipes in Australian magazines.

    PubMed

    Webster, Jacqui; Dunford, Elizabeth; Barzi, Federica; Neal, Bruce

    2010-02-01

    Australians currently consume too much salt causing adverse consequences for health. The media play an important role in the provision of nutrition advice to consumers. Previous research shows that many foods advertized in consumer magazines are high in salt, but little research has examined magazine recipes in this context. The aim of this project was to summarize directions for salt use in recipes in leading Australian magazines. In August 2007 and 2008, the top 10 magazines by circulation that included at least five recipes, were examined. Standardized information was collected about directions for salt use in recipes. Three hundred and thirty recipes were identified in 2007 and 417 in 2008. About 68% of recipes included high-salt ingredients, 37% instructed to season with salt, 10% instructed to add a specific quantity of salt and 15% recommended selection of low-salt ingredients. There was substantial variability in directions for salt use in recipes between magazines, but no clear differences between 2007 and 2008. Many recipes advised to add salt in direct contradiction to national dietary guidelines. There is clear potential for editorial guidelines on salt use in recipes to play a role in advancing public health efforts in Australia and other such nations.

  4. Trainers' Attitudes towards Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, Current Care Guidelines, and Training

    PubMed Central

    Mäkinen, M.; Castrén, M.; Nurmi, J.; Niemi-Murola, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have shown that healthcare personnel hesitate to perform defibrillation due to individual or organisational attitudes. We aimed to assess trainers' attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation (CPR-D), Current Care Guidelines, and associated training. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to CPR trainers attending seminars in Finland (N = 185) focusing on the updated national Current Care Guidelines 2011. The questions were answered using Likert scale (1 = totally disagree, 7 = totally agree). Factor loading of the questionnaire was made using maximum likelihood analysis and varimax rotation. Seven scales were constructed (Hesitation, Nurse's Role, Nontechnical Skill, Usefulness, Restrictions, Personal, and Organisation). Cronbach's alphas were 0.92–0.51. Statistics were Student's t-test, ANOVA, stepwise regression analysis, and Pearson Correlation. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 124/185, 67% CPR trainers, of whom two-thirds felt that their undergraduate training in CPR-D had not been adequate. Satisfaction with undergraduate defibrillation training correlated with the Nontechnical Skills scale (p < 0.01). Participants scoring high on Hesitation scale (p < 0.01) were less confident about their Nurse's Role (p < 0.01) and Nontechnical Skills (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Quality of undergraduate education affects the work of CPR trainers and some feel uncertain of defibrillation. The train-the-trainers courses and undergraduate medical education should focus more on practical scenarios with defibrillators and nontechnical skills. PMID:27144027

  5. Compliance with Dietary Guidelines Varies by Weight Status: A Cross-Sectional Study of Australian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hendrie, Gilly A.; Golley, Rebecca K.; Noakes, Manny

    2018-01-01

    Population surveys have rarely identified dietary patterns associated with excess energy intake in relation to risk of obesity. This study uses self-reported food intake data from the validated Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) Healthy Diet Score survey to examine whether apparent compliance with dietary guidelines varies by weight status. The sample of 185,951 Australian adults were majority female (71.8%), with 30.2%, 35.3% and 31.0% aged between 18–30, 31–50 and 51–70 years respectively. Using multinomial regression, in the adjusted model controlling for gender and age, individuals in the lowest quintile of diet quality were almost three times more likely to be obese than those in the highest quintile (OR 2.99, CI: 2.88:3.11; p < 0.001). The differential components of diet quality between normal and obese adults were fruit (difference in compliance score 12.9 points out of a possible 100, CI: 12.3:13.5; p < 0.001), discretionary foods (8.7 points, CI: 8.1:9.2; p < 0.001), and healthy fats (7.7 points, CI: 7.2:8.1; p < 0.001). Discretionary foods was the lowest scoring component across all gender and weight status groups, and are an important intervention target to improve diet quality. This study contributes to the evidence that diet quality is associated with health outcomes, including weight status, and will be useful in framing recommendations for obesity prevention and management. PMID:29439463

  6. [Current international recommendations for pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation: the European guidelines].

    PubMed

    López-Herce, Jesús; Rodríguez Núñez, Antonio; Maconochie, Ian; Van de Voorde, Patric; Biarent, Dominique; Eich, Christof; Bingham, Robert; Rajka, Thomas; Zideman, David; Carrillo, Ángel; de Lucas, Nieves; Calvo, Custodio; Manrique, Ignacio

    2017-07-01

    This summary of the European guidelines for pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasizes the main changes and encourages health care professionals to keep their pediatric CPR knowledge and skills up to date. Basic and advanced pediatric CPR follow the same algorithm in the 2015 guidelines. The main changes affect the prevention of cardiac arrest and the use of fluids. Fluid expansion should not be used routinely in children with fever in the abuse of signs of shock because too high a volume can worsen prognosis. Rescue breaths should last around 1 second in basic CPR, making pediatric recommendations consistent with those for adults. Chest compressions should be at least as deep as one-third the anteroposterior diameter of the thorax. Most children in cardiac arrest lack a shockable rhythm, and in such cases a coordinated sequence of breaths, chest compressions, and administration of adrenalin is essential. An intraosseous canula may be the first choice for introducing fluids and medications, especially in young infants. In treating supraventricular tachycardia with cardioversion, an initial dose of 1 J/kg is currently recommended (vs the dose of 0.5 J/kg previously recommended). After spontaneous circulation is recovered, measures to control fever should be taken. The goal is to reach a normal temperature even before arrival to the hospital.

  7. Implementation of asthma guidelines to West Australian community pharmacies: an exploratory, quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Trevenen, Michelle; Murray, Kevin; Kendall, Peter A; Schneider, Carl R; Clifford, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pharmacy assistants are often the first point of contact for patients presenting in community pharmacies. The current role of pharmacy assistants in the supply of asthma-reliever medications (short-acting β-agonists) was identified as a barrier to appropriate guideline-based care. The aim of this research was to devise and evaluate a team-based intervention to formalise the role of pharmacy assistants and to improve asthma guideline-based care in community pharmacy. Design A controlled pre-post intervention study was conducted in 336 metropolitan pharmacies located in Perth, Western Australia. Pharmacies were stratified into 2 groups (187 intervention and 149 control) based on known confounders for asthma control. The intervention was designed using a common-sense approach and resources developed included a checklist, videos and web page. Delivery was via workshops (25 pharmacies) or academic detailing (162 pharmacies). Pharmacy practice was assessed preintervention and postintervention via covert simulated patient methodology. Primary outcome measures included patient medical referral, device use demonstration and counselling, internal referral and/or direct involvement of a pharmacist in consultations. Results There was a significant increase in patient medical referral in intervention pharmacies from 32% to 47% (p=0.0007) from preintervention to postintervention, while control pharmacies showed a non-significant decrease from 50% to 44% (p=0.22). Device counselling was not routinely carried out at any stage or in any cohort of this research and no significant changes in internal referral were observed. Conclusions Increases in medical referral indicate that asthma guideline compliance can be improved in community pharmacy if implementation employs a team-based approach and involves pharmacy assistants. However, results were variable and the intervention did not improve practice related to device counselling or internal referral/pharmacist involvement

  8. Current Practices in the Education of Gifted and Advanced Learners in South Australian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Jane M.; Henderson, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Despite calls over the past several decades for increased attention to the needs of gifted and advanced learners, little is known about how South Australian schools currently identify and provide for these students. An online questionnaire was sent to all schools in the state and was completed by participants from 71 schools. Findings suggested…

  9. Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guideline for the management of deliberate self-harm.

    PubMed

    Carter, Gregory; Page, Andrew; Large, Matthew; Hetrick, Sarah; Milner, Allison Joy; Bendit, Nick; Walton, Carla; Draper, Brian; Hazell, Philip; Fortune, Sarah; Burns, Jane; Patton, George; Lawrence, Mark; Dadd, Lawrence; Robinson, Jo; Christensen, Helen

    2016-10-01

    To provide guidance for the organisation and delivery of clinical services and the clinical management of patients who deliberately self-harm, based on scientific evidence supplemented by expert clinical consensus and expressed as recommendations. Articles and information were sourced from search engines including PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO for several systematic reviews, which were supplemented by literature known to the deliberate self-harm working group, and from published systematic reviews and guidelines for deliberate self-harm. Information was reviewed by members of the deliberate self-harm working group, and findings were then formulated into consensus-based recommendations and clinical guidance. The guidelines were subjected to successive consultation and external review involving expert and clinical advisors, the public, key stakeholders, professional bodies and specialist groups with interest and expertise in deliberate self-harm. The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for deliberate self-harm provide up-to-date guidance and advice regarding the management of deliberate self-harm patients, which is informed by evidence and clinical experience. The clinical practice guidelines for deliberate self-harm is intended for clinical use and service development by psychiatrists, psychologists, physicians and others with an interest in mental health care. The clinical practice guidelines for deliberate self-harm address self-harm within specific population sub-groups and provide up-to-date recommendations and guidance within an evidence-based framework, supplemented by expert clinical consensus. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  10. Limitations of Current AHA Guidelines and Proposal of New Guidelines for the Preparticipation Examination of Athletes.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Tim P; Pickham, David; Aggarwal, Sonya; Saini, Divya; Kumar, Nikhil; Wheeler, Matthew T; Perez, Marco; Ashley, Euan; Froelicher, Victor F

    2015-11-01

    To examine the prevalence of athletes who screen positive with the preparticipation examination guidelines from the American Heart Association, the AHA 12-elements, in combination with 3 screening electrocardiogram (ECG) criteria. Observational cross-sectional study. Stanford University Sports Medicine Clinic. Total of 1596 participants, including 297 (167 male; mean age, 16.2 years) high school athletes, 1016 (541 male; mean age, 18.8 years) collegiate athletes, and 283 (mean age, 26.3 years) male professional athletes. Athletes were screened using the 8 personal and family history questions from the AHA 12-elements. Electrocardiograms were obtained for all participants and interpreted using Seattle criteria, Stanford criteria, and European Society of Cardiology (ESC) recommendations. Approximately one-quarter of all athletes (23.8%) had at least 1 positive response to the AHA personal and family history elements. High school and college athletes had similar rates of having at least 1 positive response (25.9% vs 27.4%), whereas professional athletes had a significantly lower rate of having at least 1 positive response (8.8%, P < 0.05). Females reported more episodes of unexplained syncope (11.4% vs 7.5%, P = 0.017) and excessive exertional dyspnea with exercise (11.1% vs 6.1%, P = 0.001) than males. High school athletes had more positive responses to the family history elements when compared with college athletes (P < 0.05). The percentage of athletes who had an abnormal ECG varied between Seattle criteria (6.0%), Stanford criteria (8.8%), and ESC recommendations (26.8%). Many athletes screen positive under current screening recommendations, and ECG results vary widely by interpretation criteria. In a patient population without any adverse cardiovascular events, the currently recommended AHA 12-elements have an unacceptably high rate of false positives. Newer screening guidelines are needed, with fewer false positives and evidence-based updates.

  11. Neonatal Cranial Ultrasound: Are Current Safety Guidelines Appropriate?

    PubMed

    Lalzad, Assema; Wong, Flora; Schneider, Michal

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound can lead to thermal and mechanical effects in interrogated tissues. We reviewed the literature to explore the evidence on ultrasound heating on fetal and neonatal neural tissue. The results of animal studies have suggested that ultrasound exposure of the fetal or neonatal brain may lead to a significant temperature elevation at the bone-brain interface above current recommended safety thresholds. Temperature increases between 4.3 and 5.6°C have been recorded. Such temperature elevations can potentially affect neuronal structure and function and may also affect behavioral and cognitive function, such as memory and learning. However, the majority of these studies were carried out more than 25 y ago using non-diagnostic equipment with power outputs much lower than those of modern machines. New studies to address the safety issues of cranial ultrasound are imperative to provide current clinical guidelines and safety recommendations. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Exploring current and potential roles of Australian community pharmacists in gout management: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Counsell, Allyce B; Nguyen, Amy D; Baysari, Melissa T; Kannangara, Diluk R W; McLachlan, Andrew J; Day, Richard O

    2018-05-09

    Gout is an increasingly prevalent form of inflammatory arthritis. Although effective treatments for gout exist, current management is suboptimal due to low medication adherence rates and treatments that are non-concordant with guidelines. Medications are the mainstay and most effective form of gout management. Thus, there is potential for community pharmacists to play an important primary health care role in gout management, however their current role and their potential to improve management of gout treatment is currently unclear. The purpose of the study is to explore the views of Australian pharmacists on their roles in gout management and to identify factors influencing their involvement in gout management. A convenience sample of community pharmacists were invited to participate using a snowballing recruitment strategy. Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 15 pharmacists of varying age, gender and pharmacy experience. Interviews focused on pharmacists' experiences of managing gout, interactions with people living with gout and their perceived roles and responsibilities in gout management. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and independently analysed by two reviewers to identify themes. The main role of pharmacists reported in gout management was providing patient education. The greatest facilitator to pharmacists involvement in gout management was identified to be pharmacists' good understanding of gout and its management. Barriers to pharmacists involvement were identified to be difficulties in monitoring adherence to gout medications, low priority given to gout in the pharmacy compared to other chronic health conditions, and lack of specific training and/or continuing education in gout prevention and management. Pharmacists can expand their primary health care role in gout management, particularly in the area of ongoing provision of education to people living with gout and in monitoring medication adherence in patients. However, a

  13. Implementation of asthma guidelines to West Australian community pharmacies: an exploratory, quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Kim; Trevenen, Michelle; Murray, Kevin; Kendall, Peter A; Schneider, Carl R; Clifford, Rhonda

    2016-08-31

    Pharmacy assistants are often the first point of contact for patients presenting in community pharmacies. The current role of pharmacy assistants in the supply of asthma-reliever medications (short-acting β-agonists) was identified as a barrier to appropriate guideline-based care. The aim of this research was to devise and evaluate a team-based intervention to formalise the role of pharmacy assistants and to improve asthma guideline-based care in community pharmacy. A controlled pre-post intervention study was conducted in 336 metropolitan pharmacies located in Perth, Western Australia. Pharmacies were stratified into 2 groups (187 intervention and 149 control) based on known confounders for asthma control. The intervention was designed using a common-sense approach and resources developed included a checklist, videos and web page. Delivery was via workshops (25 pharmacies) or academic detailing (162 pharmacies). Pharmacy practice was assessed preintervention and postintervention via covert simulated patient methodology. Primary outcome measures included patient medical referral, device use demonstration and counselling, internal referral and/or direct involvement of a pharmacist in consultations. There was a significant increase in patient medical referral in intervention pharmacies from 32% to 47% (p=0.0007) from preintervention to postintervention, while control pharmacies showed a non-significant decrease from 50% to 44% (p=0.22). Device counselling was not routinely carried out at any stage or in any cohort of this research and no significant changes in internal referral were observed. Increases in medical referral indicate that asthma guideline compliance can be improved in community pharmacy if implementation employs a team-based approach and involves pharmacy assistants. However, results were variable and the intervention did not improve practice related to device counselling or internal referral/pharmacist involvement. Undertaking more workshops may have

  14. Recurrent glioblastoma: Current patterns of care in an Australian population.

    PubMed

    Parakh, Sagun; Thursfield, Vicky; Cher, Lawrence; Dally, Michael; Drummond, Katharine; Murphy, Michael; Rosenthal, Mark A; Gan, Hui K

    2016-02-01

    This retrospective population-based survey examined current patterns of care for patients with recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM) who had previously undergone surgery and post-operative therapy at original diagnosis. The patients were identified from the Victorian Cancer Registry (VCR) from 2006 to 2008. Patient demographics, tumour characteristics and oncological management were extracted using a standardised survey by the treating clinicians/VCR staff and results analysed by the VCR. Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival (OS) at diagnosis and progression were calculated. A total of 95 patients (48%) received treatment for first recurrence; craniotomy and post-operative treatment (38), craniotomy only (34) and non-surgical treatment (23). Patients receiving treatment at first progression had a higher median OS than those who did not (7 versus 3 months, p<0.0001). All patients progressed after treatment for first progression with 43 patients (45%) receiving treatment at second progression. To our knowledge this is the first population-based pattern of care survey of treatment for rGBM in an era where post-operative "Stupp" chemo-radiation is standard. First and second line therapy for rGBM is common and associated with significant benefit. Treatment generally includes re-resection and/or systemic therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modeling geomagnetic induced currents in Australian power networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, R. A.; Kelly, A.; Van Der Walt, T.; Honecker, A.; Ong, C.; Mikkelsen, D.; Spierings, A.; Ivanovich, G.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2017-07-01

    Geomagnetic induced currents (GICs) have been considered an issue for high-latitude power networks for some decades. More recently, GICs have been observed and studied in power networks located in lower latitude regions. This paper presents the results of a model aimed at predicting and understanding the impact of geomagnetic storms on power networks in Australia, with particular focus on the Queensland and Tasmanian networks. The model incorporates a "geoelectric field" determined using a plane wave magnetic field incident on a uniform conducting Earth, and the network model developed by Lehtinen and Pirjola (1985). Model results for two intense geomagnetic storms of solar cycle 24 are compared with transformer neutral monitors at three locations within the Queensland network and one location within the Tasmanian network. The model is then used to assess the impacts of the superintense geomagnetic storm of 29-31 October 2003 on the flow of GICs within these networks. The model results show good correlation with the observations with coefficients ranging from 0.73 to 0.96 across the observing sites. For Queensland, modeled GIC magnitudes during the superstorm of 29-31 October 2003 exceed 40 A with the larger GICs occurring in the south-east section of the network. Modeled GICs in Tasmania for the same storm do not exceed 30 A. The larger distance spans and general east-west alignment of the southern section of the Queensland network, in conjunction with some relatively low branch resistance values, result in larger modeled GICs despite Queensland being a lower latitude network than Tasmania.

  16. A Revised Australian Dietary Guideline Index and Its Association with Key Sociodemographic Factors, Health Behaviors and Body Mass Index in Peri-Retirement Aged Adults

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Maree G.; Milte, Catherine M.; Crawford, David; McNaughton, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    The Dietary Guideline Index, a measure of diet quality, was updated to reflect the 2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines. This paper describes the revision of the index (DGI-2013) and examines its use in older adults. The DGI-2013 consists of 13 components reflecting food-based daily intake recommendations of the Australian Dietary Guidelines. In this cross-sectional study, the DGI-2013 score was calculated using dietary data collected via an 111-item food frequency questionnaire and additional food-related behaviour questions. The DGI-2013 score was examined in Australian adults (aged 55–65 years; n = 1667 men; 1801 women) according to sociodemographics, health-related behaviours and BMI. Women scored higher than men on the total DGI-2013 and all components except for dairy. Those who were from a rural area (men only), working full-time (men only), with lower education, smoked, did not meet physical activity guidelines, and who had a higher BMI, scored lower on the DGI-2013, highlighting a group of older adults at risk of poor health. The DGI-2013 is a tool for assessing compliance with the Australian Dietary Guidelines. We demonstrated associations between diet quality and a range of participant characteristics, consistent with previous literature. This suggests that the DGI-2013 continues to demonstrate convergent validity, consistent with the original Dietary Guideline Index. PMID:26978399

  17. Equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction: current understanding and recommendations from the Australian and New Zealand Equine Endocrine Group.

    PubMed

    Secombe, C J; Bailey, S R; de Laat, M A; Hughes, K J; Stewart, A S; Sonis, J M; Tan, Rhh

    2018-06-03

    The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current knowledge and opinions about the epidemiology, clinical findings (including sequelae), diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction, particularly in the Australian context. This information and the recommendations provided will assist practitioners in making informed decisions regarding the diagnosis and management of this disorder. © 2018 Australian Veterinary Association.

  18. Current Guidelines Have Limited Applicability to Patients with Comorbid Conditions: A Systematic Analysis of Evidence-Based Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Lugtenberg, Marjolein; Burgers, Jako S.; Clancy, Carolyn; Westert, Gert P.; Schneider, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Guidelines traditionally focus on the diagnosis and treatment of single diseases. As almost half of the patients with a chronic disease have more than one disease, the applicability of guidelines may be limited. The aim of this study was to assess the extent that guidelines address comorbidity and to assess the supporting evidence of recommendations related to comorbidity. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a systematic analysis of evidence-based guidelines focusing on four highly prevalent chronic conditions with a high impact on quality of life: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depressive disorder, diabetes mellitus type 2, and osteoarthritis. Data were abstracted from each guideline on the extent that comorbidity was addressed (general comments, specific recommendations), the type of comorbidity discussed (concordant, discordant), and the supporting evidence of the comorbidity-related recommendations (level of evidence, translation of evidence). Of the 20 guidelines, 17 (85%) addressed the issue of comorbidity and 14 (70%) provided specific recommendations on comorbidity. In general, the guidelines included few recommendations on patients with comorbidity (mean 3 recommendations per guideline, range 0 to 26). Of the 59 comorbidity-related recommendations provided, 46 (78%) addressed concordant comorbidities, 8 (14%) discordant comorbidities, and for 5 (8%) the type of comorbidity was not specified. The strength of the supporting evidence was moderate for 25% (15/59) and low for 37% (22/59) of the recommendations. In addition, for 73% (43/59) of the recommendations the evidence was not adequately translated into the guidelines. Conclusions/Significance Our study showed that the applicability of current evidence-based guidelines to patients with comorbid conditions is limited. Most guidelines do not provide explicit guidance on treatment of patients with comorbidity, particularly for discordant combinations. Guidelines should be more

  19. The current state of epilepsy guidelines: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sauro, Khara M; Wiebe, Samuel; Dunkley, Colin; Janszky, Jozsef; Kumlien, Eva; Moshé, Solomon; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Pedley, Timothy A; Perucca, Emilio; Senties, Horacio; Thomas, Sanjeev V; Wang, Yuping; Wilmshurst, Jo; Jetté, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Epilepsy Guidelines Task Force, composed of 14 international members, was established in 2011 to identify, using systematic review methodology, international epilepsy clinical care guidelines, assess their quality, and determine gaps in areas of need of development. A systematic review of the literature (1985-2014) was performed in six electronic databases (e.g. Medline, Embase) using a broad search strategy without initial limits to language or study design. Six gray literature databases (e.g., American Academy of Neurology [AAN], ILAE) were also searched to minimize publication bias. Two independent reviewers screened abstracts, reviewed full text articles, and performed data abstraction. Descriptive statistics and a meta-analysis were generated. The search identified 10,926 abstracts. Of the 410 articles selected for full text review, 63 met our eligibility criteria for a guideline. Of those included, 54 were in English and 9 were in other languages (French, Spanish, and Italian). Of all guidelines, 29% did not specify the target age groups, 27% were focused on adults, 22% included only children, and 6% specifically addressed issues related to women with epilepsy. Guidelines included in the review were most often aimed at guiding clinical practice for status epilepticus (n = 7), first seizure (n = 6), drug-resistant epilepsy (n = 5), and febrile seizures (n = 4), among others. Most of the guidelines were therapeutic (n = 35) or diagnostic (n = 16) in nature. The quality of the guidelines using a 1-7 point scale (7 = highest) varied and was moderate overall (mean = 4.99 ± 1.05 [SD]). We identified substantial gaps in topics (e.g., epilepsy in the elderly) and there was considerable heterogeneity in methodologic quality. The findings should offer a valuable resource for health professionals caring for people with epilepsy, since they will help guide the prioritization, development, and dissemination of future

  20. Current codex guidelines for assessment of potential protein allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Ladics, G S

    2008-10-01

    A rigorous safety assessment process exists for GM crops. It includes evaluation of the introduced protein as well as the crop containing such protein with the goal of demonstrating the GM crop is "as-safe-as" non-transgenic crops in the food supply. One of the major issues for GM crops is the assessment of the expressed protein for allergenic potential. Currently, no single factor is recognized as an identifier for protein allergenicity. Therefore, a weight-of-evidence approach, which takes into account a variety of factors and approaches for an overall assessment of allergenic potential, is conducted [Codex Alimentarious Commission, 2003. Alinorm 03/34: Joint FAO/WHO Food Standard Programme, Codex Alimentarious Commission, Twenty-Fifth Session, Rome, Italy, 30 June-5 July, 2003. Appendix III, Guideline for the conduct of food safety assessment of foods derived from recombinant-DNA plants, and Appendix IV, Annex on the assessment of possible allergenicity, pp. 47-60]. This assessment is based on what is known about allergens, including the history of exposure and safety of the gene(s) source; protein structure (e.g., amino acid sequence identity to human allergens); stability to pepsin digestion in vitro [Thomas, K. et al., 2004. A multi-laboratory evaluation of a common in vitro pepsin digestion assay protocol used in assessing the safety of novel proteins. Regul. Toxicol. Pharmacol. 39, 87-98]; an estimate of exposure of the novel protein(s) to the gastrointestinal tract where absorption occurs (e.g., protein abundance in the crop, processing effects); and when appropriate, specific IgE binding studies or skin prick testing. Additional approaches may be considered (e.g., animal models; targeted sera screening) as the science evolves; however, such approaches have not been thoroughly evaluated or validated for predicting protein allergenicity.

  1. Current dietary supplement use of Australian military veterans of Middle East operations.

    PubMed

    van der Pols, Jolieke C; Kanesarajah, Jeeva; Bell, Alison; Lui, Chi-Wai

    2017-12-01

    To assess patterns and levels of dietary supplement use among Australian Defence Forces, previously deployed to the Middle East Area of Operations. A cross-sectional study. Participants of a large survey self-completed questions about dietary supplement use, health status, personal and job-related characteristics, and lifestyle factors. Frequency of current use of supplements was assessed in three categories (bodybuilding, energy and weight loss). Middle East Area of Operations post-deployment health survey. Current and ex-serving Australian Defence Force personnel (n 14 032) who deployed to the Middle East between 2001 and 2009. Bodybuilding supplements were used by 17·5 % of participants, energy supplements by 24·5 % and weight-loss supplements by 7·6 %. Overall, 32·3 % of participants used any of these supplements. Bodybuilding and energy supplements were more often used by men, younger persons and those in the Army, while weight-loss supplements were more commonly used by women and Navy personnel. Supplements in all three categories were more commonly used by persons in lower ranks, active service and combat roles. Users of bodybuilding supplements had healthier lifestyles and better health status, while users of energy and weight-loss supplements had less healthy lifestyles and poorer mental and physical health status. Overall, 11·7 % of participants used supplements containing caffeine and 3·6 % used a creatine-containing product. Use of dietary supplements among Australian Defence Force personnel is common, and patterned by lifestyle factors and health status.

  2. Current challenges in adherence to clinical guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sohail Ahmad; Rodrigues, Gabrial; Kumar, Pramod; Rao, Padma G M

    2006-06-01

    To study the impact of guidelines on surgical antibiotic prophylaxis in clinical practice, barriers involved in adherence to guidelines and how to overcome the same. Literature pertaining to prophylactic antibiotic usage was searched. Medscape, Medline, Cochrane, Surgical Infection Prevention (SIP) project databases were reviewed. Recent articles from relevant journals, texts, and standard guidelines were also studied. Local guidelines seem more likely to be accepted and followed than those developed nationally. Major barriers involved in adherence to guidelines include lack of awareness about the guidelines, general perception of guideline as a bureaucratic rather than educational tool. Some practitioners perceive guidelines as "cookbook medicine" that does not permit them to make their own medical decisions. Other barriers are complex, multi-step systems that create confusion, decrease accountability. Methods for guideline adherence include surveillance and data analysis, new systems to facilitate documentation and improving workflow, education regarding current evidence-based guidelines and promoting the development of local guidelines or protocol, development and implementation of reminders to facilitate adherence to the local guidelines. A multidisciplinary steering team of surgeons, infectious disease specialists, pharmacists, anesthesiologists, microbiologists and nurses should develop local guidelines suitable to their institution and methods for adherence to prevent the surgical site infections. The gap between evidence-based guidelines and practice must be addressed in order to achieve optimal practice in this domain.

  3. Strength Training. Rationale for Current Guidelines for Adult Fitness Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feigenbaum, Matthew S.; Pollock, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    Strength training is an effective method of developing musculoskeletal strength and is often prescribed for fitness, health, and for prevention and rehabilitation of orthopedic injuries. This paper describes and presents a rationale for the population-specific strength training guidelines established by major health organizations. (SM)

  4. Clinical decision guidelines for NHS cosmetic surgery: analysis of current limitations and recommendations for future development.

    PubMed

    Cook, S A; Rosser, R; Meah, S; James, M I; Salmon, P

    2003-07-01

    Because of increasing demand for publicly funded elective cosmetic surgery, clinical decision guidelines have been developed to select those patients who should receive it. The aims of this study were to identify: the main characteristics of such guidelines; whether and how they influence clinical decision making; and ways in which they should be improved. UK health authorities were asked for their current guidelines for elective cosmetic surgery and, in a single plastic surgery unit, we examined the impact of its guidelines by observing consultations and interviewing surgeons and managers. Of 115 authorities approached, 32 reported using guidelines and provided sufficient information for analysis. Guidelines mostly concerned arbitrary sets of cosmetic procedures and lacked reference to an evidence base. They allowed surgery for specified anatomical, functional or symptomatic reasons, but these indications varied between guidelines. Most guidelines also permitted surgery 'exceptionally' for psychological reasons. The guidelines that were studied in detail did not appreciably influence surgeons' decisions, which reflected criteria that were not cited in the guidelines, including cost of the procedure and whether patients sought restoration or improvement of their appearance. Decision guidelines in this area have several limitations. Future guidelines should: include all cosmetic procedures; be informed by a broad range of evidence; and, arguably, include several nonclinical criteria that currently inform surgeons' decision-making.

  5. Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia and related disorders.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists is co-ordinating the development of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in psychiatry, funded under the National Mental Health Strategy (Australia) and the New Zealand Health Funding Authority. This paper presents CPGs for schizophrenia and related disorders. Over the past decade schizophrenia has become more treatable than ever before. A new generation of drug therapies, a renaissance of psychological and psychosocial interventions and a first generation of reform within the specialist mental health system have combined to create an evidence-based climate of realistic optimism. Progressive neuroscientific advances hold out the strong possibility of more definitive biological treatments in the near future. However, this improved potential for better outcomes and quality of life for people with schizophrenia has not been translated into reality in Australia. The efficacy-effectiveness gap is wider for schizophrenia than any other serious medical disorder. Therapeutic nihilism, under-resourcing of services and a stalling of the service reform process, poor morale within specialist mental health services, a lack of broad-based recovery and life support programs, and a climate of tenacious stigma and consequent lack of concern for people with schizophrenia are the contributory causes for this failure to effectively treat. These guidelines therefore tackle only one element in the endeavour to reduce the impact of schizophrenia. They distil the current evidence-base and make recommendations based on the best available knowledge. A comprehensive literature review (1990-2003) was conducted, including all Cochrane schizophrenia reviews and all relevant meta-analyses, and a number of recent international clinical practice guidelines were consulted. A series of drafts were refined by the expert committee and enhanced through a bi-national consultation process. This guideline provides evidence-based recommendations

  6. Parent attitudes, family dynamics and adolescent drinking: qualitative study of the Australian parenting guidelines for adolescent alcohol use

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Parents play a critical role in their children’s introduction to alcohol. A range of parenting factors have been associated with the progression to risky drinking among adolescents, and have recently formed the basis of the Australian ‘Parenting Guidelines for Adolescent Alcohol Use’ designed to help parents delay or reduce their adolescents’ alcohol use. Methods This study aimed to explore the experiences and attitudes of parents of adolescents to gain insight into: (1) the extent to which the behaviours of parents follow the recommendations made in the guidelines; and (2) approaches to reduce hazardous drinking among adolescents. Thirty-two telephone and face-to-face interviews were conducted with parents, and the content of discussions was examined using thematic analysis. Results Parents used approaches they thought would minimise harm and promote healthy development in their children. The guidelines address key areas of concern for parents but their adherence to these approaches is low in certain areas. Many parents provided some alcohol to their adolescents and often cited the social norm of drinking among their adolescents’ peers as a source of pressure to supply. Conclusions Further dissemination of the guidelines may be the first step in a public health strategy, but it is likely that parents will require support to effectively adopt the recommendations. Understanding the influences on parents’ beliefs about their children’s drinking and the functions of social networks in the creation of behavioural norms relating to alcohol consumption and supply may be necessary to address adolescent risky drinking. PMID:22747699

  7. Australian general practitioner attitudes to clinical practice guidelines and some implications for translating osteoarthritis care into practice.

    PubMed

    Basedow, Martin; Runciman, William B; Lipworth, Wendy; Esterman, Adrian

    2016-11-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been shown to improve processes of care and health outcomes, but there is often a discrepancy between recommendations for care and clinical practice. This study sought to explore general practitioner (GP) attitudes towards CPGs, in general and specifically for osteoarthritis (OA), with the implications for translating OA care into practice. A self-administered questionnaire was conducted in January 2013 with a sample of 228 GPs in New South Wales and South Australia. Seventy-nine GPs returned questionnaires (response rate 35%). Nearly all GPs considered that CPGs support decision-making in practice (94%) and medical education (92%). Very few respondents regarded CPGs as a threat to clinical autonomy, and most recognised that individual patient circumstances must be taken into account. Shorter CPG formats were preferred over longer and more comprehensive formats, with preferences being evenly divided among respondents for short, 2-3-page summaries, flowcharts or algorithms and single page checklists. GPs considered accessibility to CPGs to be important, and electronic formats were popular. Familiarity and use of The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners OA Guideline was poor, with most respondents either not aware of it (30%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 27 - 41%), had never used it (19%; 95% CI 12 - 29%) or rarely used it (34%; 95% CI 25-45%). If CPGs are to assist with the translation of evidence into practice, they must be easily accessible and in a format that encourages use.

  8. Osteoporosis medication dispensing for older Australian women from 2002 to 2010: influences of publications, guidelines, marketing activities and policy.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Geeske; Tett, Susan E; Duncan, Emma L; Mishra, Gita D; Dobson, Annette J

    2014-12-01

    Developments in anti-osteoporosis medications (AOMs) have led to changes in guidelines and policy, which, along with media and marketing strategies, have had an impact upon the prescribing of AOM. The aim was to examine patterns of AOM dispensing in older women (aged 76-81 years at baseline) from 2002 to 2010. Administrative claims data were used to describe AOM dispensing in 4649 participants (born in 1921-1926 and still alive in 2011) in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. The patterns were interpreted in the context of changes in guidelines, indications for subsidy, publications (scholarly and general media), and marketing activities. Total use of AOM increased from 134 DDD/1000/day in 2002 to 216 DDD/1000/day in 2007 but then decreased to 184 DDD/1000/day in 2010. Alendronate was the most commonly dispensed AOM but decreased from 2007, while use of risedronate (2002 onward), strontium ranelate (2007 onward) and zoledronic acid (2008 onward) increased. Etidronate and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) prescriptions gradually decreased over time. The decline in alendronate dispensing coincided with increases of other bisphosphonates and publicity about potential adverse effects of bisphosphonates, despite relaxing indications for bone density testing and subsidy for AOM. Overall dispense of AOM from 2002 reached a peak in 2007 and thereafter declined despite increases in therapeutic options and improved subsidised access. The recent decline in overall AOM dispensing seems to be explained largely by negative publicity rather than specific changes in guidelines and policy. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Non-surgical treatment of hallux valgus: a current practice survey of Australian podiatrists.

    PubMed

    Hurn, Sheree E; Vicenzino, Bill T; Smith, Michelle D

    2016-01-01

    , there appears to be a consensus among Australian podiatrists regarding non-surgical management of HV, and these recommendations are largely aligned with available clinical consensus documents. Presenting concerns and physical examination findings associated with HV are diverse and have implications for treatment decisions. Management strategies differ across patient age groups, thus any updated clinical guidelines should differentiate between adult and juvenile HV. This study provides useful data to inform clinical practice, education, policy and future research.

  10. Perspectives on Current Training Guidelines for Cardiac Imaging and Recommendations for the Future.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, James A; Kilic, Sena; Haines, Philip G

    2018-04-23

    To summarize current training guidelines for cardiac imaging and provide recommendations for future guidelines. The current structure of training in cardiac imaging is largely dictated by modality-specific guidelines. While there has been debate on how to define the advanced cardiac imager for over a decade, a uniform consensus has not emerged. We report the perspectives of three key stakeholders in this debate: a senior faculty member-former fellowship program director, a cardiology fellow, and an academic junior faculty imaging expert. The observations of these stakeholders suggest that there is no consensus on the definition of advanced cardiac imaging, leading to ambiguity in training guidelines. This may have negative impact on recruitment of fellows into cardiac imaging careers. Based on the current status of training in cardiac imaging, the authors suggest that the relevant professional groups reconvene to form a consensus in defining advanced cardiac imaging, in order to guide future revisions of training guidelines.

  11. Current use of Australian snake antivenoms and frequency of immediate-type hypersensitivity reactions and anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Isbister, Geoffrey K; Brown, Simon G; MacDonald, Ellen; White, Julian; Currie, Bart J

    2008-04-21

    To investigate current use of Australian snake antivenoms and the frequency and severity of immediate-type hypersensitivity reactions. Nested prospective cohort study as part of the Australian Snakebite Project. Patients receiving snake antivenom in Australian hospitals between 1 January 2002 and 30 November 2007. The use of CSL Limited antivenom; frequency and severity of hypersensitivity reactions to antivenom; premedication and treatment of these reactions. Snake antivenom was administered to 195 patients, mostly for venom-induced consumption coagulopathy (145 patients, 74%), followed by non-specific systemic effects (12%), neurotoxicity (5%) and myotoxicity (4%). Antivenom was given to nine patients (5%) without evidence of envenoming or who were bitten by a species of snake for which antivenom is not required. The commonest antivenoms used were brown snake (46%), tiger snake (30%) and polyvalent (11%). The median dose was four vials (interquartile range, 2-5 vials), and 24 patients received two different types of antivenom. Immediate-type hypersensitivity reactions occurred in 48 patients (25%); 21 satisfied our definition of anaphylaxis, with 11 moderate and 10 severe cases, including nine in which patients were hypotensive. The remaining 27 reactions were mild (skin only). Adrenaline was used in 26 cases with good effect. The frequency of reactions to tiger snake (41%) and polyvalent (41%) antivenoms was higher than that to brown snake antivenom (10%). Hypersensitivity reactions occurred in 11 of 40 patients receiving any form of premedication (28%) and in 2 of 11 given adrenaline for premedication (18%) versus 20 of 86 not receiving premedication (23%). Antivenom was used appropriately, and most commonly for coagulopathy. Hypersensitivity reactions were common, but most were not severe. The discretionary use of premedication was not associated with any reduction in reactions.

  12. Current and future risks of asbestos exposure in the Australian community

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Australia mined asbestos for more than 100 years and manufactured and imported asbestos products. There is a legacy of in situ asbestos throughout the built environment. Methods The aim of this study was to identify the possible sources of current and future asbestos exposure from the built environment. Telephone interviews with environmental health officers, asbestos removalists, and asbestos assessors in Australia sought information about common asbestos scenarios encountered. Results There is a considerable amount of asbestos remaining in situ in the Australian built environment. Potential current and future sources of asbestos exposure to the public are from asbestos-containing roofs and fences, unsafe asbestos removal practices, do-it-yourself home renovations and illegal dumping. Conclusion This research has highlighted a need for consistent approaches in the regulation and enforcement of safe practices for the management and removal of asbestos to ensure that in situ asbestos in the built environment is managed appropriately. PMID:27611196

  13. Current and future risks of asbestos exposure in the Australian community.

    PubMed

    Gray, Corie; Carey, Renee N; Reid, Alison

    2016-10-01

    Australia mined asbestos for more than 100 years and manufactured and imported asbestos products. There is a legacy of in situ asbestos throughout the built environment. The aim of this study was to identify the possible sources of current and future asbestos exposure from the built environment. Telephone interviews with environmental health officers, asbestos removalists, and asbestos assessors in Australia sought information about common asbestos scenarios encountered. There is a considerable amount of asbestos remaining in situ in the Australian built environment. Potential current and future sources of asbestos exposure to the public are from asbestos-containing roofs and fences, unsafe asbestos removal practices, do-it-yourself home renovations and illegal dumping. This research has highlighted a need for consistent approaches in the regulation and enforcement of safe practices for the management and removal of asbestos to ensure that in situ asbestos in the built environment is managed appropriately.

  14. Adherence to 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years and associations with social-cognitive development among Australian preschool children.

    PubMed

    Cliff, Dylan P; McNeill, Jade; Vella, Stewart A; Howard, Steven J; Santos, Rute; Batterham, Marijka; Melhuish, Edward; Okely, Anthony D; de Rosnay, Marc

    2017-11-20

    The new Australian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years recommend that, for preschoolers, a healthy 24-h includes: i) ≥180 min of physical activity, including ≥60 min of energetic play, ii) ≤1 h of sedentary screen time, and iii) 10-13 h of good quality sleep. Using an Australian sample, this study reports the proportion of preschool children meeting these guidelines and investigates associations with social-cognitive development. Data from 248 preschool children (mean age = 4.2 ± 0.6 years, 57% boys) participating in the PATH-ABC study were analyzed. Children completed direct assessments of physical activity (accelerometry) and social cognition (the Test of Emotional Comprehension (TEC) and Theory of Mind (ToM)). Parents reported on children's screen time and sleep. Children were categorised as meeting/not meeting: i) individual guidelines, ii) combinations of two guidelines, or iii) all three guidelines. Associations were examined using linear regression adjusting for child age, sex, vocabulary, area level socio-economic status and childcare level clustering. High proportions of children met the physical activity (93.1%) and sleep (88.7%) guidelines, whereas fewer met the screen time guideline (17.3%). Overall, 14.9% of children met all three guidelines. Children meeting the sleep guideline performed better on TEC than those who did not (mean difference [MD] = 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.36, 2.47). Children meeting the sleep and physical activity or sleep and screen time guidelines also performed better on TEC (MD = 1.36; 95% CI = 0.31, 2.41) and ToM (MD = 0.25; 95% CI = -0.002, 0.50; p = 0.05), respectively, than those who did not. Meeting all three guidelines was associated with better ToM performance (MD = 0.28; 95% CI = -0.002, 0.48, p = 0.05), while meeting a larger number of guidelines was associated with better TEC (3 or 2 vs. 1/none, p < 0.02) and ToM performance (3 vs. 2, p = 0.03). Strategies

  15. Deployment guidelines for diplomats: current policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Dunn, R; Kemp, V; Patel, D; Williams, R; Greenberg, N

    2015-10-01

    Diplomatic organizations routinely send staff to high-threat postings (HTPs) and consequentially have moral and legal obligations to protect their health as far as is reasonably practicable. To carry out an international survey of diplomatic organizations that send personnel to HTPs to establish how they deal practically with their obligations to protect the mental health of their staff. An online anonymous survey about their organizations' policies relating to HTPs completed by international diplomatic organizations. Fourteen of 30 organizations approached completed the questionnaire, with a response rate of 47%. Deployment length varied: no minimum (15%), a minimum of 2 years (39%) and a maximum of 2 (31%), 3 (15%) or 4 years (31%); one organization did not state any maximum. HTP and low-threat postings had the same policies in 46% of organizations. Additional care and support (66%), additional preparation (50%), enhanced leave (33%) and additional physical and mental health assessments were informally adopted to address psychosocial risks of deployment to HTPs. There was little consensus on policies and practice for HTP deployment. We suggest that formal, consistently written guidelines, based on available quality evidence, and associated training and quality assurance should be formulated to make international practice more consistent and equitable. © Crown copyright 2015.

  16. Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Hay, Phillipa; Chinn, David; Forbes, David; Madden, Sloane; Newton, Richard; Sugenor, Lois; Touyz, Stephen; Ward, Warren

    2014-11-01

    This clinical practice guideline for treatment of DSM-5 feeding and eating disorders was conducted as part of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) Project 2013-2014. The CPG was developed in accordance with best practice according to the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia. Literature of evidence for treatments of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), other specified and unspecified eating disorders and avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) was sourced from the previous RANZCP CPG reviews (dated to 2009) and updated with a systematic review (dated 2008-2013). A multidisciplinary working group wrote the draft CPG, which then underwent expert, community and stakeholder consultation, during which process additional evidence was identified. In AN the CPG recommends treatment as an outpatient or day patient in most instances (i.e. in the least restrictive environment), with hospital admission for those at risk of medical and/or psychological compromise. A multi-axial and collaborative approach is recommended, including consideration of nutritional, medical and psychological aspects, the use of family based therapies in younger people and specialist therapist-led manualised based psychological therapies in all age groups and that include longer-term follow-up. A harm minimisation approach is recommended in chronic AN. In BN and BED the CPG recommends an individual psychological therapy for which the best evidence is for therapist-led cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). There is also a role for CBT adapted for internet delivery, or CBT in a non-specialist guided self-help form. Medications that may be helpful either as an adjunctive or alternative treatment option include an antidepressant, topiramate, or orlistat (the last for people with comorbid obesity). No specific treatment is recommended for ARFID as there are no trials to

  17. Antidepressants during pregnancy: Guideline adherence and current practice amongst Dutch gynaecologists and midwives.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Nina M; Brouwer, Marlies E; Duvekot, Johannes J; Burger, Huibert; Knijff, Esther M; Hoogendijk, Witte J; Bockting, Claudi L H; de Wolf, G S; Lambregtse-van den Berg, Mijke P

    2018-06-01

    prescription rates of antidepressants during pregnancy range from 2-3% in The Netherlands to 6.2% in the USA. Inconclusive evidence about harms and benefits of antidepressants during pregnancy leads to variation in advice given by gynaecologists and midwives. The objective was to investigate familiarity with, and adherence to the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline on Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) use during pregnancy by gynaecologists and midwives in the Netherlands. an online survey was developed and send to Dutch gynaecologists and midwives. The survey consisted mainly of multiple-choice questions addressing guideline familiarity and current practice of the respondent. Also, caregiver characteristics associated with guideline adherence were investigated. a total of 178 gynaecologists and 139 midwives responded. Overall familiarity with the Dutch guideline was 92.7%. However, current practice and advice given to patients by caregivers differed substantially, both between gynaecologists and midwives as well as within both professions. Overall guideline adherence was 13.9%. Multivariable logistic regression showed that solely caregiver profession was associated with guideline adherence, with gynaecologists having a higher adherence rate (OR 2.10, 95%CI 1.02-4.33) than midwives. although reported familiarity with the guideline is high, adherence to the guideline is low, possibly resulting in advice to patients that is inconsistent with guidelines and unwanted variation in current practice. further implementation of the recommendations as given in the guideline should be stimulated. Additional research is needed to examine how gynaecologists and midwives can be facilitated to follow the recommendations of the clinical guideline on SSRI use during pregnancy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Current guidelines for management of severe hand injuries.

    PubMed

    Stępień, Robert; Szczęsny, Grzegorz

    2014-06-18

    Severe, multitissue hand injuries constitute a serious problem of the modern world. Despite investing significant funds in their management these injuries often exclude young people from professional life. It is often due to improper management conducted by untrained personnel lacking appropriate instruments. The goal of this work is to review the literature on the problem and attempt to organize this information. A review of available literature on mutilating hand trauma, amputations in the hand region, replantation and scales used for assessment of the severity of injury and hand function, both in Poland and internationally. Hand injuries may be managed through three approaches: concomitant definitive, delayed and secondary. The best results are achieved through the first approach. However sometimes, due to the character of injury or lack of trained personnel, the team is forced to apply temporary dressing and, subsequently, initiate complex further management. HISS scale is a useful tool allowing for precise determination of the severity of injury and, used together with DASH questionnaire, prediction of long-term treatment outcome. Necessary changes need to be implemented in the healthcare system in order to achieve better results of treatment of severe hand injuries. Proper guidelines for everyday practice should be also introduced. Changes should encompass precise determination of competences of individual centers as well as the mode and indications for patient transport between them. Training of doctors should be modified in such way to ensure that at least one person in each center would be capable of performing proper immediate management of such injuries, making further treatment possible. At the same time, financing, as a strong motivator, should promote appropriate management.

  19. A Comparison of Current Guidelines of Five International Societies on Clostridium difficile Infection Management.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Csaba; Mensa, Josep

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is increasingly recognized as an emerging healthcare problem of elevated importance. Prevention and treatment strategies are constantly evolving along with the apperance of new scientific evidence and novel treatment methods, which is well-reflected in the differences among consecutive international guidelines. In this article, we summarize and compare current guidelines of five international medical societies on CDI management, and discuss some of the controversial and currently unresolved aspects which should be addressed by future research.

  20. Management of asthma in Australian general practice: care is still not in line with clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Barton, Christopher; Proudfoot, Judith; Amoroso, Cheryl; Ramsay, Emmae; Holton, Christine; Bubner, Tanya; Harris, Mark; Beilby, Justin

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the quality of primary care asthma management in a sample of Australian general practices. 247 general practitioners (GPs) from 97 practices completed a structured interview about management of asthma, diabetes and hypertension/heart disease. A further structured interview with the senior practice principal and practice manager was used to collect information about practice capacity for chronic disease management. Just under half of GPs (47%) had access to an asthma register and the majority (76%) had access to spirometry in their practice. In terms of routine management of asthma, 12% of GPs reported using spirometry routinely, 13% routinely reviewed written asthma action plans, 27% routinely provided education about trigger factors, 30% routinely reviewed inhaler technique, 24% routinely assessed asthma severity, and 29% routinely assessed physical activity. Practice characteristics such as practice size (p=1.0) and locality (rural/metropolitan) (p=0.7) did not predict quality of asthma management nor did indicators of practice capacity including Business maturity, IT/IM maturity, Multidisciplinary teamwork, and Clinical linkages. Gaps remain in the provision of evidence-based care for patients with asthma in general practice. Markers of practice capacity measured here were not associated with guideline-based respiratory care within practices.

  1. Implementation of concussion guidelines in community Australian Football and Rugby League-The experiences and challenges faced by coaches and sports trainers.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Joanne L; Newton, Joshua D; White, Peta E; Finch, Caroline F

    2016-04-01

    While guidelines outlining the appropriate management of sport-related concussion have been developed and adapted for use within community sport, it remains unknown how they are experienced by those responsible for implementing them. Longitudinal study. 111 coaches and sports trainers from community-level Australian Football and Rugby League teams completed pre- and post-season surveys assessing their attitudes towards using concussion guidelines. Participants also provided post-season feedback regarding their experiences in using the guidelines. 71% of participants reported using the guidelines in the preceding season. Post-season attitude was related to pre-season attitude (p=0.002), football code (p=0.015), and team role (p=0.045). An interaction between team role and guideline use (p=0.012) was also found, with coaches who had used the guidelines, and sports trainers who had not, reporting more positive post-season attitudes towards using the concussion guidelines. Implementation challenges included disputing of decisions about return-to-play by players, parents, and coaches, and a perceived lack of time. Recommendations for improved guideline materials included using larger fonts and providing for witnessing of advice given to players. This is the first study to examine the implementation of concussion guidelines in community sport. Training of coaches/sports trainers needs enhancement. In addition, new education should be developed for parents/players about the importance of the return-to-play advice given to them by those who follow these guidelines. Information provided by those who attempted to use the guidelines will assist the refinement of implementation and dissemination processes around concussion guidelines across sports. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Identifying the barriers and enablers in the implementation of the New Zealand and Australian Antenatal Corticosteroid Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mc Goldrick, E L; Crawford, T; Brown, J A; Groom, K M; Crowther, C A

    2016-10-28

    Australian Antenatal Corticosteroid Clinical Practice Guidelines using the validated Theoretical Domains Framework, as perceived by health professionals. We have identified differences between individual health professional groups and organisations. The identification of these behavioural determinants can be used to enhance an implementation strategy, assist in the design of interventions to achieve improved implementation and facilitate process evaluations to understand why or how change interventions are effective.

  3. Adherence to guidelines for cardiovascular screening in current high school preparticipation evaluation forms.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Christopher M; Phillips, George C

    2009-10-01

    We compared the content of the cardiac screening questions on US state high school athletic association preparticipation evaluation forms with current consensus recommendations. We reviewed the high school athletic association's approved, recommended, or required sports preparticipation form from each of the 50 US states and the District of Columbia, and compared the content of the personal and family history components with current recommendations for cardiac screening questions. We found that 85% of the preparticipation forms in current use contain all elements of the formerly recommended guidelines, but only 17% contain all elements of the new consensus guidelines. We conclude that although there appears to be some improvement in the content of the preparticipation forms in current use compared with previous studies, the vast majority of these forms are incomplete compared with current consensus guidelines.

  4. [Comments on current guidelines of type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment].

    PubMed

    Martinka, Emil

    In an effort to facilitate the widest possible application of recent findings in diabetology and the related medical fields, with regard to characteristics of medicines and current possibilities of using modern procedures, but also to their limitations due to the financial capacities of health insurance companies, SDS innovates its therapeutic recommendations for the treatment of diabetes mellitus on a regular basis. The most recent recommendations were issued by SDS in August 2016. The review discusses and describes several factors which the authors considered during their preparation: (1) Compliance with the findings of evidence-based medicine, compliance with reference recommendations (therapeutic recommendations ADA/EASD), compliance with summary characteristics of active substances in the treatment of diabetes mellitus and approved possibilities of their use, and compliance with indica-tive restrictions (IO) which define medical and economic conditions for health insurance covered treatment. (2) Certain departure from the "glucocentric" approach to therapy, in favour of the approach preferring the selection of drugs based on clinical characteristics of the patient and proven benefits/risks of individual drugs (3) Preference of groups as well as individual active substances within groups based on evidence medicine regarding the individual active substances for specific patient groups. (4) Emphasis on individualization of goals for glycemic control (5) Emphasis on the right classification of diabetes mellitus as the basic condition for the selection of an optimum thera-peutic procedure, and (6) Emphasis on education and overcoming of clinical inertia, and patient medication adherence and medication "literacy" as the basic condition for successful therapy. The discussion also considers the outcomes of the most recent studies including of the studies focusing on empagliflozin and liraglutide, as well as recent modifications of the therapeutic recommendations of

  5. Current funding and financing issues in the Australian hospice and palliative care sector.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Robert; Eagar, Kathy; Currow, David; Green, Janette

    2009-07-01

    This article overviews current funding and financing issues in the Australian hospice and palliative care sector. Within Australia, the major responsibilities for managing the health care system are shared between two levels of government. Funding arrangements vary according to the type of care. The delivery of palliative care services is a State/Territory responsibility. Recently, almost all States/Territories have developed overarching frameworks to guide the development of palliative care policies, including funding and service delivery structures. Palliative care services in Australia comprise a mix of specialist providers, generalist providers, and support services in the public, nongovernment, and private sectors. The National Palliative Care Strategy is a joint strategy of the Commonwealth and States that commenced in 2002 and includes a number of major issues. Following a national study in 1996, the Australian National Subacute and Nonacute Patient (AN-SNAP) system was endorsed as the national casemix classification for subacute and nonacute care. Funding for palliative care services varies depending on the type of service and the setting in which it is provided. There is no national model for funding inpatient or community services, which is a State/Territory responsibility. A summary of funding arrangements is provided in this article. Palliative care continues to evolve at a rapid rate in Australia. Increasingly flexible evidence-based models of care delivery are emerging. This article argues that it will be critical for equally flexible funding and financing models to be developed. Furthermore, it is critical that palliative care patients can be identified, classified, and costed. Casemix classifications such as AN-SNAP represent an important starting point but further work is required.

  6. A collaborative approach to adopting/adapting guidelines - The Australian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the early years (Birth to 5 years): an integration of physical activity, sedentary behavior, and sleep.

    PubMed

    Okely, Anthony D; Ghersi, Davina; Hesketh, Kylie D; Santos, Rute; Loughran, Sarah P; Cliff, Dylan P; Shilton, Trevor; Grant, David; Jones, Rachel A; Stanley, Rebecca M; Sherring, Julie; Hinkley, Trina; Trost, Stewart G; McHugh, Clare; Eckermann, Simon; Thorpe, Karen; Waters, Karen; Olds, Timothy S; Mackey, Tracy; Livingstone, Rhonda; Christian, Hayley; Carr, Harriette; Verrender, Adam; Pereira, João R; Zhang, Zhiguang; Downing, Katherine L; Tremblay, Mark S

    2017-11-20

    In 2017, the Australian Government funded the update of the National Physical Activity Recommendations for Children 0-5 years, with the intention that they be an integration of movement behaviours across the 24-h period. The benefit for Australia was that it could leverage research in Canada in the development of their 24-h guidelines for the early years. Concurrently, the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) working group published a model to produce guidelines based on adoption, adaption and/or de novo development using the GRADE evidence-to-decision framework. Referred to as the GRADE-ADOLOPMENT approach, it allows guideline developers to follow a structured and transparent process in a more efficient manner, potentially avoiding the need to unnecessarily repeat costly tasks such as conducting systematic reviews. The purpose of this paper is to outline the process and outcomes for adapting the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years to develop the Australian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years guided by the GRADE-ADOLOPMENT framework. The development process was guided by the GRADE-ADOLOPMENT approach. A Leadership Group and Consensus Panel were formed and existing credible guidelines identified. The draft Canadian 24-h integrated movement guidelines for the early years best met the criteria established by the Panel. These were evaluated based on the evidence in the GRADE tables, summaries of findings tables and draft recommendations from the Canadian Draft Guidelines. Updates to each of the Canadian systematic reviews were conducted and the Consensus Panel reviewed the evidence for each behaviour separately and made a decision to adopt or adapt the Canadian recommendations for each behaviour or create de novo recommendations. An online survey was then conducted (n = 302) along with five focus groups (n = 30) and five key informant interviews (n = 5) to obtain feedback from stakeholders on

  7. Informed consent in human subject research: a comparison of current international and Nigerian guidelines.

    PubMed

    Fadare, Joseph O; Porteri, Corinna

    2010-03-01

    Informed consent is a basic requirement for the conduct of ethical research involving human subjects. Currently, the Helsinki Declaration of the World Medical Association and the International Ethical Guidelines for Biomedical Research of the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) are widely accepted as international codes regulating human subject research and the informed consent sections of these documents are quite important. Debates on the applicability of these guidelines in different socio-cultural settings are ongoing and many workers have advocated the need for national or regional guidelines. Nigeria, a developing country, has recently adopted its national guideline regulating human subject research: the National Health Research Ethics Committee (NHREC) code. A content analysis of the three guidelines was done to see if the Nigerian guidelines confer any additional protection for research subjects. The concept of a Community Advisory Committee in the Nigerian guideline is a novel one that emphasizes research as a community burden and should promote a form of "research friendship" to foster the welfare of research participants. There is also the need for a regular update of the NHREC code so as to address some issues that were not considered in its current version.

  8. Application of best practice guidelines for OSCEs-An Australian evaluation of their feasibility and value.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Marion L; Henderson, Amanda; Jeffrey, Carol; Nulty, Duncan; Groves, Michele; Kelly, Michelle; Knight, Sabina; Glover, Pauline

    2015-05-01

    Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) are widely used in health professional education and should be based on sound pedagogical foundations. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and utility of using Best Practice Guidelines (BPGs) within an OSCE format in a broad range of tertiary education settings with under-graduate and post-graduate nursing and midwifery students. We evaluated how feasible it was to apply the BPGs to modify OSCEs in a course; students' perspective of the OSCE; and finally, if the BPG-revised OSCEs better prepared students for clinical practice when compared with the original OSCEs. A mixed method with surveys, focus groups and semi-structured interviews evaluated the BPGs within an OSCE. Four maximally different contexts across four sites in Australia were used. Participants included lecturers and undergraduate nursing students in high and low fidelity simulation settings; under-graduate midwifery students; and post-graduate rural and remote area nursing students. 691 students participated in revised OSCEs. Surveys were completed by 557 students; 91 students gave further feedback through focus groups and 14 lecturers participated in interviews. At all sites the BPGs were successfully used to modify and implement OSCEs. Students valued the realistic nature of the modified OSCEs which contributed to students' confidence and preparation for clinical practice. The lecturers considered the revised OSCEs enhanced student preparedness for their clinical placements. The BPGs have a broad applicability to OSCEs in a wide range of educational contexts with improved student outcomes. Students and lecturers identified the revised OSCEs enhanced student preparation for clinical practice. Subsequent examination of the BPGs saw further refinement to a set of eight BPGs that provide a sequential guide to their application in a way that is consistent with best practice curriculum design principles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd

  9. A survey of Australian chiropractors' attitudes and beliefs about evidence-based practice and their use of research literature and clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Walker, Bruce F; Stomski, Norman J; Hebert, Jeff J; French, Simon D

    2013-12-17

    Research into chiropractors' use of evidence in clinical practice appears limited to a single small qualitative study. The paucity of research in this area suggests that it is timely to undertake a more extensive study to build a more detailed understanding of the factors that influence chiropractors' adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) principles. This study aimed to identify Australian chiropractors' attitudes and beliefs towards EBP in clinical practice, and also examine their use of research literature and clinical practice guidelines. We used an online questionnaire about attitudes, beliefs and behaviours towards the use of EBP in clinical practice that had been developed to survey physiotherapists and modified it to ensure that it was relevant to chiropractic practice. We endeavoured to survey all registered Australian chiropractors (n = 4378) via email invitation distributed by Australian chiropractic professional organisations and the Chiropractic Board of Australia. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine univariate associations between responses to items measuring attitudes and beliefs with items measuring: age; years since registration; attention to literature; and use of clinical practice guidelines. Questionnaires were returned by 584 respondents (response rate approximately 13%). The respondents' perceptions of EBP were generally positive: most agreed that the application of EBP is necessary (77.9%), literature and research findings are useful (80.2%), EBP helps them make decisions about patient care (66.5%), and expressed an interest in learning or improving EBP skills (74.9%). Almost half of the respondents (45.1%) read between two to five articles a month. Close to half of the respondents (44.7%) used literature in the process of clinical decision making two to five times each month. About half of the respondents (52.4%) agreed that they used clinical practice guidelines, and around half (54.4%) agreed that they were able

  10. The strengthening East Australian Current, its eddies and biological effects — an introduction and overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthers, Iain M.; Young, Jock W.; Baird, Mark E.; Roughan, Moninya; Everett, Jason D.; Brassington, Gary B.; Byrne, Maria; Condie, Scott A.; Hartog, Jason R.; Hassler, Christel S.; Hobday, Alistair J.; Holbrook, Neil J.; Malcolm, Hamish A.; Oke, Peter R.; Thompson, Peter A.; Ridgway, Ken

    2011-03-01

    The poleward flowing East Australian Current (EAC) is characterised by its separation from the coast, 100-200 nautical miles north of Sydney, to form the eastward flowing Tasman Front and a southward flowing eddy field. The separation zone greatly influences coastal ecosystems for the relatively narrow continental shelf (only 15-50 km wide), particularly between 32-34°S. In this region the continental shelf has a marked shift in the seasonal temperature-salinity relationship and elevated surface nitrate concentrations. This current parallels the portion of the coast where Australia's population is concentrated and has a long history of scientific research. However, understanding of physical and biological processes driven by the EAC, particularly in linking circulation to ecosystems, is limited. In this special issue of 16 papers on the EAC, we examine the effects of climatic wind-stress forced ocean dynamics on EAC transport variability and coastal sea level, from ENSO to multi-decadal time scales; eddy formation and structure; fine scale connectivity and larval retention. Comparisons with the poleward-flowing Leeuwin Current on Australia's west coast show differences in ecosystem productivity that can be attributed to the underlying physics in each region. On average there is double the chlorophyll a concentration on the east coast than the west. In comparison to the Leeuwin, the EAC may have less local retention of larvae and act as a partial barrier to onshore transport, which may also be related to the local spawning and early life history of small pelagic fish on each coast. Inter-annual variations in the EAC transport produce a detectable sea-level signal in Sydney Harbour, which could provide a useful fisheries index as does the Fremantle sea level and Leeuwin Current relationship. The EAC's eddy structure and formation by the EAC are examined. A particular cold-core eddy is shown to have a "tilt" towards the coast, and that during a rotation the flow of

  11. The formation of a cold-core eddy in the East Australian Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, H. S.; Roughan, M.; Baird, M. E.; Wilkin, J.

    2016-02-01

    Cold-core eddies (CCEs) frequently form in western boundary currents and can affect continental shelf processes. It is not always clear, however, if baroclinic or barotropic instabilities contribute more to their formation. The Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS) is used to investigate the ocean state during the formation of a CCE in the East Australian Current (EAC) during October 2009. The observed eddy initially appeared as a small billow (approx. 50 km in length) that perturbed the landward edge of the EAC. The billow grew into a mesoscale CCE (approx. 100 km in diameter), diverting the EAC around it. A ROMS simulation with a realistic wind field reproduced a similar eddy. This eddy formed from negative vorticity waters found on the continental shelf south of the EAC separation point. A sensitivity analysis is performed whereby the impact of 3 different wind forcing scenarios, upwelling, downwelling, and no winds, are investigated. A CCE formed in all wind scenarios despite the wind induced changes in hydrographic conditions in the continental shelf and slope waters. As such, the source of energy for eddy formation did not come from the interactions of wind with the continental shelf waters. Analysis of strain and energy transformation confirms this by showing that the prevailing source of CCE energy was kinetic energy of the offshore EAC. These results clearly link the formation of the CCE to the swift flowing EAC and barotropic instabilities.

  12. Wind Forced Variability in Eddy Formation, Eddy Shedding, and the Separation of the East Australian Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Christopher Y. S.; Kiss, Andrew E.; Jourdain, Nicolas C.; England, Matthew H.; van Sebille, Erik

    2017-12-01

    The East Australian Current (EAC), like many other subtropical western boundary currents, is believed to be penetrating further poleward in recent decades. Previous observational and model studies have used steady state dynamics to relate changes in the westerly winds to changes in the separation behavior of the EAC. As yet, little work has been undertaken on the impact of forcing variability on the EAC and Tasman Sea circulation. Here using an eddy-permitting regional ocean model, we present a suite of simulations forced by the same time-mean fields, but with different atmospheric and remote ocean variability. These eddy-permitting results demonstrate the nonlinear response of the EAC to variable, nonstationary inhomogeneous forcing. These simulations show an EAC with high intrinsic variability and stochastic eddy shedding. We show that wind stress variability on time scales shorter than 56 days leads to increases in eddy shedding rates and southward eddy propagation, producing an increased transport and southward reach of the mean EAC extension. We adopt an energetics framework that shows the EAC extension changes to be coincident with an increase in offshore, upstream eddy variance (via increased barotropic instability) and increase in subsurface mean kinetic energy along the length of the EAC. The response of EAC separation to regional variable wind stress has important implications for both past and future climate change studies.

  13. Characterizing frontal eddies along the East Australian Current from HF radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Amandine; Gramoulle, A.; Roughan, M.; Mantovanelli, A.

    2017-05-01

    The East Australian Current (EAC) dominates the ocean circulation along south-eastern Australia, however, little is known about the submesoscale frontal instabilities associated with this western boundary current. One year of surface current measurements from HF radars, in conjunction with mooring and satellite observations, highlight the occurrence and propagation of meanders and frontal eddies along the inshore edge of the EAC. Eddies were systematically identified using the geometry of the high spatial resolution (˜1.5 km) surface currents, and tracked every hour. Cyclonic eddies were observed irregularly, on average every 7 days, with inshore radius ˜10 km. Among various forms of structures, frontal eddies associated with EAC meanders were characterized by poleward advection speeds of ˜0.3-0.4 m/s, migrating as far as 500 km south, based on satellite imagery. Flow field kinematics show that cyclonic eddies have high Rossby numbers (0.6-1.9) and enhance particle dispersion. Patches of intensified surface divergence at the leading edge of the structures are expected to generate vertical uplift. This is confirmed by subsurface measurements showing temperature uplift of up to 55 m over 24 h and rough estimates of vertical velocities of 10s of meters per day. While frontal eddies propagate through the radar domain independently of local wind stress, upfront wind can influence their stalling and growth, and can also generate large cold core eddies through intense shear. Such coherent structures are a major mechanism for the transport and entrainment of nutrient rich coastal or deep waters, influencing physical and biological dynamics, and connectivity over large distances.

  14. Do Nutrient-Based Front-of-Pack Labelling Schemes Support or Undermine Food-Based Dietary Guideline Recommendations? Lessons from the Australian Health Star Rating System.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Mark A; Dickie, Sarah; Woods, Julie L

    2018-01-05

    Food-based Dietary Guidelines (FBDGs) promote healthy dietary patterns. Nutrient-based Front-of-Pack Labelling (NBFOPL) schemes rate the 'healthiness' of individual foods. This study aimed to investigate whether the Australian Health Star Rating (HSR) system aligns with the Australian Dietary Guidelines (ADGs). The Mintel Global New Products Database was searched for every new food product displaying a HSR entering the Australian marketplace from 27 June 2014 (HSR system endorsement) until 30 June 2017. Foods were categorised as either a five food group (FFG) food or 'discretionary' food in accordance with ADG recommendations. Ten percent (1269/12,108) of new food products displayed a HSR, of which 57% were FFG foods. The median number of 'health' stars displayed on discretionary foods (2.5; range: 0.5-5) was significantly lower ( p < 0.05) than FFG foods (4.0; range: 0.5-5), although a high frequency of anomalies and overlap in the number of stars across the two food categories was observed, with 56.7% of discretionary foods displaying ≥2.5 stars. The HSR system is undermining the ADG recommendations through facilitating the marketing of discretionary foods. Adjusting the HSR's algorithm might correct certain technical flaws. However, supporting the ADGs requires reform of the HSR's design to demarcate the food source (FFG versus discretionary food) of a nutrient.

  15. Infective endocarditis prophylaxis: current practice trend among paediatric cardiologists: are we following the 2007 guidelines?

    PubMed

    Naik, Ronak J; Patel, Neil R; Wang, Ming; Shah, Nishant C

    2016-08-01

    In 2007, the American Heart Association modified the infective endocarditis prophylaxis guidelines by limiting the use of antibiotics in patients with cardiac conditions associated with the highest risk of adverse outcomes after infective endocarditis. Our objective was to evaluate current practice for infective endocarditis prophylaxis among paediatric cardiologists. A web-based survey focussing on current practice, describing the use of antibiotics for infective endocarditis prophylaxis in various congenital and acquired heart diseases, was distributed via e-mail to paediatric cardiologists. The survey was kept anonymous and was distributed twice. Data from 253 participants were analysed. Most paediatric cardiologists discontinued infective endocarditis prophylaxis in patients with simple lesions such as small ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, and bicuspid aortic valve without stenosis or regurgitation; however, significant disagreement persists in prescribing infective endocarditis prophylaxis in certain conditions such as rheumatic heart disease, Fontan palliation without fenestration, and the Ross procedure. Use of antibiotic prophylaxis in certain selected conditions for which infective endocarditis prophylaxis has been indicated as per the current guidelines varies from 44 to 83%. Only 44% follow the current guidelines exclusively, and 34% regularly discuss the importance of oral hygiene with their patients at risk for infective endocarditis. Significant heterogeneity still persists in recommending infective endocarditis prophylaxis for several cardiac lesions among paediatric cardiologists. More than half of the participants (56%) do not follow the current guidelines exclusively in their practice. Counselling for optimal oral health in patients at risk for infective endocarditis needs to be optimised in the current practice.

  16. Best practice guidelines for the operation of a donor human milk bank in an Australian NICU.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, B T; Pang, W W; Keil, A D; Hartmann, P E; Simmer, K

    2007-10-01

    Until the establishment of the PREM Bank (Perron Rotary Express Milk Bank) donor human milk banking had not occurred in Australia for the past 20 years. In re-establishing donor human milk banking in Australia, the focus of the PREM Bank has been to develop a formal and consistent approach to safety and quality in processing during the operation of the human milk bank. There is currently no existing legislation in Australia that specifically regulates the operation of donor human milk banks. For this reason the PREM Bank has utilised existing and internationally recognised management practices for managing hazards during food production. These tools (specifically HACCP) have been used to guide the development of Standard Operating Procedures and Good Manufacturing Practice for the screening of donors and processing of donor human milk. Donor screening procedures are consistent with those recommended by other human milk banks operating internationally, and also consistent with the requirements for blood and tissue donation in Australia. Controlled documentation and record keep requirements have also been developed that allow complete traceability from individual donation to individual feed dispensed to recipient and maintain a record of all processing and storage conditions. These operational requirements have been developed to reduce any risk associated with feeding pasteurised donor human milk to hospitalised preterm or ill infants to acceptable levels.

  17. Use of antibacterial prophylaxis for patients with neutropenia. Australian Consensus Guidelines 2011 Steering Committee.

    PubMed

    Slavin, M A; Lingaratnam, S; Mileshkin, L; Booth, D L; Cain, M J; Ritchie, D S; Wei, A; Thursky, K A

    2011-01-01

    The use of oral prophylactic antibiotics in patients with neutropenia is controversial and not recommended by this group because of a lack of evidence showing a reduction in mortality and concerns that such practice promotes antimicrobial resistance. Recent evidence has demonstrated non-significant but consistent, improvement in all-cause mortality when fluoroquinolones (FQs) are used as primary prophylaxis. However, the consensus was that this evidence was not strong enough to recommend prophylaxis. The evidence base for FQ prophylaxis is presented alongside current consensus opinion to guide the appropriate and judicious use of these agents. Due consideration is given to patient risk, as it pertains to specific patient populations, as well as the net effect on selective pressure from antibiotics if FQ prophylaxis is routinely used in a target population. The potential costs and consequences of emerging FQ resistance, particularly among Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile and Gram-positive organisms, are considered. As FQ prophylaxis has been advocated in some chemotherapy protocols, specific regard is given to whether FQ prophylaxis should be used to support these regimens. The group also provides recommendations for monitoring and surveillance of emerging resistance in those centres that have adopted FQ prophylaxis. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  18. On the Variability of the East Australian Current: Jet Structure, Meandering, and Influence on Shelf Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Matthew R.; Roughan, Moninya; Keating, Shane R.; Schaeffer, Amandine

    2017-11-01

    Given the importance of western boundary currents over a wide range of scales in the ocean, it is crucial that we understand their dynamics to accurately predict future changes. For this, we need detailed knowledge of their structure and variability. Here we investigate the jet structure of the East Australian Current (EAC), using observations from HF radars and moorings deployed at 30°S-31°S. Meandering, core velocity, width, and eddy kinetic energy (EKE) are quantified from 4 years of hourly 1.5 km resolution surface current maps (2012-2016), to obtain the most detailed representation of the surface EAC jet to date. The EAC flows predominantly over the ˜1,500 m isobath 50 km offshore but makes large amplitude displacements eastward every 65-100 days—the time scale associated with mesoscale eddy shedding at the EAC separation. Smaller-amplitude, higher-frequency meanders occur every 20-45 days. Using a coordinate frame that follows the jet, we show core velocity and EKE exhibit seasonality in both magnitude and variance, being maximum in summer (1.55 m s-1 mean core velocity), minimum in winter (0.8 m s-1). However, it is the eddy-shedding time scale that dominates jet variability. As the EAC moves shoreward, shelf temperature and along-stream velocity vary linearly with jet movement, within ˜35 km of the core. The EAC is within this range 75% of the time, demonstrating its importance to the shelf circulation. Temperature and velocity fluctuations at the 70 m (100 m) isobath are more influenced by wind (EAC encroachment), with the strongest response occurring when wind and EAC act constructively.

  19. The value of best-practice guidelines for OSCEs in a postgraduate program in an Australian remote area setting.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, Carol A; Mitchell, Marion L; Henderson, Amanda; Lenthall, Sue; Knight, Sabina; Glover, Pauline; Kelly, Michelle; Nulty, Duncan; Groves, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Nurses in remote areas of Australia are the primary healthcare professionals, who need to be able to deliver comprehensive and culturally sensitive care to clients, many of whom are Indigenous Australians. Adequate and specific preparation for practice is crucial to the quality of care delivered by remote area nurses (RANs). Objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE) provide an excellent opportunity for student practice in a simulated environment that is safe, authentic, fair and valid when well constructed. Seven integrated best practice guidelines (BPGs), previously developed by project team members to inform OSCEs within educational programs, provided guidance in restructuring the OSCE. This paper provides a detailed analysis of the value of BPGs used in the development, teaching and learning, and evaluation of OSCEs in a rural and remote postgraduate course for RANs. A pre-site visit to the Centre for Remote Health, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, was conducted with modification of the course and previous OSCE according to BPGs. Following delivery of the course and OSCE, evaluations occurred via a mixed method approach. Student surveys (n=15) and focus groups (n=13) and staff interviews (n=5) provided an in-depth analysis of their perceptions of the revised OSCE. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the student sample. The narrative data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. Triangulation was achieved with the convergence of the separate data sources focusing on themes and patterns within and between students and tutors. All 15 students and five tutors provided feedback. The majority of student participants had limited experience in working in remote area nursing prior to participation and therefore the opportunities that availed themselves were critical in adequately equipping them with the requisite knowledge, skills and abilities. Three themes emerged from the data: (1) value of common and significant events in OSCE

  20. Estimating the Velocity and Transport of the East Australian Current using Argo, XBT, and Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilberman, N. V.; Roemmich, D. H.; Gille, S. T.

    2016-02-01

    Western Boundary Currents (WBCs) are the strongest ocean currents in the subtropics, and constitute the main pathway through which warm water-masses transit from low to mid-latitudes in the subtropical gyres of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. Heat advection by WBCs has a significant impact on heat storage in subtropical mode waters formation regions and at high latitudes. The possibility that the magnitude of WBCs might change under greenhouse gas forcing has raised significant concerns. Improving our knowledge of WBC circulation is essential to accurately monitor the oceanic heat budget. Because of the narrowness and strong mesoscale variability of WBCs, estimation of WBC velocity and transport places heavy demands on any potential sampling scheme. One strategy for studying WBCs is to combine complementary data sources. High-resolution bathythermograph (HRX) profiles to 800-m have been collected along transects crossing the East Australian Current (EAC) system at 3-month nominal sampling intervals since 1991. EAC transects, with spatial sampling as fine as 10-15 km, are obtained off Brisbane (27°S) and Sydney (34°S), and crossing the related East Auckland Current north of Auckland. Here, HRX profiles collected since 2004 off Brisbane are merged with Argo float profiles and 1000 m trajectory-based velocities to expand HRX shear estimates to 2000-m and to estimate absolute geostrophic velocity and transport. A method for combining altimetric data with HRX and Argo profiles to mitigate temporal aliasing by the HRX transects and to reduce sampling errors in the HRX/Argo datasets is described. The HRX/Argo/altimetry-based estimate of the time-mean poleward alongshore transport of the EAC off Brisbane is 18.3 Sv, with a width of about 180 km, and of which 3.7 Sv recirculates equatorward on a similar spatial scale farther offshore. Geostrophic transport anomalies in the EAC at 27°S show variability of ± 1.3 Sv at interannual time scale related to ENSO. The

  1. Promoting oral health during pregnancy: current evidence and implications for Australian midwives.

    PubMed

    George, Ajesh; Johnson, Maree; Blinkhorn, Anthony; Ellis, Sharon; Bhole, Sameer; Ajwani, Shilpi

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine current evidence supporting the promotion of oral health during pregnancy and proffer aspects of a potential role for Australian midwives. Research continues to show that poor oral health during pregnancy can have an impact on the health outcomes of the mother and baby. Poor maternal oral health increases the chances of infants developing early caries and is strongly associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm and low birth-weight babies. Unfortunately in Australia, no preventive strategies exist to maintain the oral health of pregnant women. Systematic review. This review examines all literature on oral health during pregnancy published to date in the English language and focuses on whether preventive oral health strategies during the prenatal period are warranted in Australia and if so, how they could be provided. Maintaining oral health is important during pregnancy and many developed countries have implemented preventive strategies to address this issue using non-dental professionals such as prenatal care providers. However, despite the positive international evidence, limited importance is being given to the oral health of pregnant women in Australia. It is also evident that the unique potential of prenatal care providers such as midwives to assess and improve maternal oral heath is not being thoroughly utilised. Compounding the issue in Australia, especially for pregnant women from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds, is the limited access to public dental services and the high cost of private dental treatment. Promoting and maintaining oral health during pregnancy is crucial, and preventive prenatal oral health services are needed in Australia to achieve this. Midwives have an excellent opportunity to offer preventive oral health services by providing oral health assessments, education and referrals for pregnant women attending antenatal clinics. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. The Canadian critical care nutrition guidelines in 2013: an update on current recommendations and implementation strategies.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Rupinder; Cahill, Naomi; Lemieux, Margot; Heyland, Daren K

    2014-02-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are systematically developed statements to assist practitioners and patient decisions about appropriate healthcare for specific clinical circumstances, and are designed to minimize practice variation, improve costs, and improve clinical outcomes. The Canadian Critical Care Practice Guidelines (CCPGs) were first published in 2003 and most recently updated in 2013. A total of 68 new randomized controlled trials were identified since the last version in 2009, 50 of them published between 2009 and 2013. The remaining articles were trials published before 2009 but were not identified in previous iterations of the CCPGs. For clinical practice guidelines to be useful to practitioners, they need to be up-to-date and be reflective of the current body of evidence. Herein we describe the process by which the CCPGs were updated. This process resulted in 10 new sections or clinical topics. Of the old clinical topics, 3 recommendations were upgraded, 4 were downgraded, and 27 remained the same. To influence decision making at the bedside, these updated guidelines need to be accompanied by active guideline implementation strategies. Optimal implementation strategies should be guided by local contextual factors including barriers and facilitators to best practice recommendations. Moreover, evaluating and monitoring performance, such as participating in the International Nutrition Survey of practice, should be part of any intensive care unit's performance improvement strategy. The active implementation of the updated CCPGs may lead to better nutrition care and improved patient outcomes in the critical care setting.

  3. Medication management policy, practice and research in Australian residential aged care: Current and future directions.

    PubMed

    Sluggett, Janet K; Ilomäki, Jenni; Seaman, Karla L; Corlis, Megan; Bell, J Simon

    2017-02-01

    Eight percent of Australians aged 65 years and over receive residential aged care each year. Residents are increasingly older, frailer and have complex care needs on entry to residential aged care. Up to 63% of Australian residents of aged care facilities take nine or more medications regularly. Together, these factors place residents at high risk of adverse drug events. This paper reviews medication-related policies, practices and research in Australian residential aged care. Complex processes underpin prescribing, supply and administration of medications in aged care facilities. A broad range of policies and resources are available to assist health professionals, aged care facilities and residents to optimise medication management. These include national guiding principles, a standardised national medication chart, clinical medication reviews and facility accreditation standards. Recent Australian interventions have improved medication use in residential aged care facilities. Generating evidence for prescribing and deprescribing that is specific to residential aged care, health workforce reform, medication-related quality indicators and inter-professional education in aged care are important steps toward optimising medication use in this setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Decreased suicide rate after induced abortion, after the Current Care Guidelines in Finland 1987-2012.

    PubMed

    Gissler, Mika; Karalis, Elina; Ulander, Veli-Matti

    2015-02-01

    Women with a recent induced abortion have a 3-fold risk for suicide, compared to non-pregnant women. The increased risk was recognised in unofficial guidelines (1996) and Current Care Guidelines (2001) on abortion treatment, highlighting the importance of a check-up 2 - 3 weeks after the termination, to monitor for mental health disorders. We studied the suicide trends after induced abortion in 1987 - 2012 in Finland. We linked the Register on Induced Abortions (N = 284,751) and Cause-of-Death Register (N = 3798 suicides) to identify women who had committed suicide within 1 year after an induced abortion (N = 79). The abortion rates per 100,000 person-years were calculated for 1987 - 1996 (period with no guidelines), 1997 - 2001 (with unofficial guidelines) and 2002 - 2012 (with Current Care Guidelines). The suicide rate after induced abortion declined by 24%, from 32.4/100,000 in 1987 - 1996 to 24.3/100,000 in 1997 - 2001 and then 24.8/100,000 in 2002 - 2012. The age-adjusted suicide rate among women aged 15 - 49 decreased by 13%; from 11.4/100,000 to 10.4/100,000 and 9.9/100,000, respectively. After induced abortions, the suicide rate increased by 30% among teenagers (to 25/100,000), stagnated for women aged 20 - 24 (at 32/100,000), but decreased by 43% (to 21/100,000) for women aged 25 - 49. The excess risk for suicide after induced abortion decreased, but the change was not statistically significant. Women with a recent induced abortion still have a 2-fold suicide risk. A mandatory check-up may decrease this risk. The causes for the increased suicide risk, including mental health prior to pregnancy and the social circumstances, should be investigated further. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  5. Refractory Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Cytomegalovirus Infection: A Call for a Change in the Current Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shimanovsky, Alexei; Patel, Devbala; Wasser, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by a decreased platelet count caused by excess destruction of platelets and inadequate platelet production. In many cases, the etiology is not known, but the viral illness is thought to play a role in the development of some cases of ITP. The current (2011) American Society of Hematology ITP guidelines recommend initial diagnostic studies to include testing for HIV and Hepatitis C. The guidelines suggest that initial treatment consist of observation, therapy with corticosteroids, IVIG or anti D. Most cases respond to the standard therapy such that the steroids may be tapered and the platelet counts remain at a hemostatically safe level. Some patients with ITP are dependent on long-term steroid maintenance, and the thrombocytopenia persists with the tapering of the steroids. Recent case reports demonstrate that ITP related to cytomegalovirus (CMV) can persist in spite of standard therapy and that antiviral therapy may be indicated. Herein we report a case of a 26-year-old female with persistent ITP that resolved after the delivery of a CMV-infected infant and placenta. Furthermore, we review the current literature on CMV-associated ITP and propose that the current ITP guidelines be amended to include assessment for CMV, even in the absence of signs and symptoms, as part of the work-up for severe and refractory ITP, especially prior to undergoing an invasive procedure such as splenectomy.

  6. Refractory Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Cytomegalovirus Infection: A Call for a Change in the Current Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Shimanovsky, Alexei; Patel, Devbala; Wasser, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by a decreased platelet count caused by excess destruction of platelets and inadequate platelet production. In many cases, the etiology is not known, but the viral illness is thought to play a role in the development of some cases of ITP. The current (2011) American Society of Hematology ITP guidelines recommend initial diagnostic studies to include testing for HIV and Hepatitis C. The guidelines suggest that initial treatment consist of observation, therapy with corticosteroids, IVIG or anti D. Most cases respond to the standard therapy such that the steroids may be tapered and the platelet counts remain at a hemostatically safe level. Some patients with ITP are dependent on long-term steroid maintenance, and the thrombocytopenia persists with the tapering of the steroids. Recent case reports demonstrate that ITP related to cytomegalovirus (CMV) can persist in spite of standard therapy and that antiviral therapy may be indicated. Herein we report a case of a 26-year-old female with persistent ITP that resolved after the delivery of a CMV-infected infant and placenta. Furthermore, we review the current literature on CMV-associated ITP and propose that the current ITP guidelines be amended to include assessment for CMV, even in the absence of signs and symptoms, as part of the work-up for severe and refractory ITP, especially prior to undergoing an invasive procedure such as splenectomy. PMID:26740871

  7. Urinary tract infection in children: Diagnosis, treatment, imaging - Comparison of current guidelines.

    PubMed

    Okarska-Napierała, M; Wasilewska, A; Kuchar, E

    2017-12-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a frequent disorder of childhood, yet the proper approach for a child with UTI is still a matter of controversy. The objective of this study was to critically compare current guidelines for the diagnosis and management of UTI in children, in light of new scientific data. An analysis was performed of the guidelines from: American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), Italian Society of Pediatric Nephrology, Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS), Polish Society of Pediatric Nephrology, and European Association of Urology (EAU)/European Society for Pediatric Urology (ESPU). Separate aspects of the approach for a child with UTI, including diagnosis, treatment and further imaging studies, were compared, with allowance for recent research in each field. The analyzed guidelines tried to reconcile recent reports about diagnosis, treatment, and further diagnostics in pediatric UTI with prior practices and opinions, and economic capabilities. There was still a lack of sufficient data to formulate coherent, unequivocal guidelines on UTI management in children, with imaging tests remaining the main area of controversy. As a result, the authors formulated their own proposal for UTI management in children. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. CT-Pathologic Correlation of Major Types of Pulmonary Fibrosis: Insights for Revisions to Current Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jonathan H; Oldham, Justin M; Montner, Steven M; Vij, Rekha; Adegunsoye, Ayodeji; Husain, Aliya N; Noth, Imre; Lynch, David A; Strek, Mary E

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic significance of CT patterns that cannot be classified according to current idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) guidelines and of specific findings of the inconsistent with usual interstitial pneumonitis (UIP) pattern. Subjects with a multidisciplinary diagnosis of interstitial lung disease who had undergone surgical lung biopsy and chest CT within 1 year of each other were included in the study. The predominant distribution and pattern of disease were scored. Cases were classified as UIP, possible UIP, or inconsistent with UIP at chest CT according to 2011 IPF guidelines. Cases that could not be confidently categorized with current guidelines were annotated as indeterminate. UIP, possible UIP, and inconsistent with UIP CT patterns were associated with pathologic UIP in 89.6%, 81.6%, and 60.0% of subjects. An indeterminate CT pattern (7.7% [20/259]) was associated with a UIP pathologic diagnosis in 55.0% of cases. This finding was not statistically different from the findings in the group with the inconsistent with UIP CT pattern (p = 0.677) but was different from the findings in the UIP (p < 0.001) and possible UIP (p = 0.031) groups. In regard to specific findings of the inconsistent with UIP CT category, ground-glass opacity, air-trapping, consolidation, and axial distribution were associated with a non-UIP pathologic diagnosis; however, there was no significant association with zonal distribution. A substantial minority of cases cannot be confidently categorized according to current guidelines for IPF and differ diagnostically from the possible UIP and UIP CT categories. The term "inconsistent with UIP" is misleading and should be renamed.

  9. Screening mammography among nursing home residents in the United States: Current guidelines and practice.

    PubMed

    Mack, Deborah S; Epstein, Mara M; Dubé, Catherine; Clark, Robin E; Lapane, Kate L

    2018-06-04

    United States (US) guidelines regarding when to stop routine breast cancer screening remain unclear. No national studies to-date have evaluated the use of screening mammography among US long-stay nursing home residents. This cross-sectional study was designed to identify prevalence, predictors, and geographic variation of screening mammography among that population in the context of current US guidelines. Screening mammography prevalence, identified with Physician/Supplier Part B claims and stratified by guideline age classification (65-74, ≥75 years), was estimated for all women aged ≥65 years residing in US Medicare- and Medicaid- certified nursing homes (≥1 year) with an annual Minimum Data Set (MDS) 3.0 assessment, continuous Medicare Part B enrollment, and no clinical indication for screening mammography as of 2011 (n = 389,821). The associations between resident- and regional- level factors, and screening mammography, were estimated by crude and adjusted prevalence ratios from robust Poisson regressions clustered by facility. Women on average were 85.4 (standard deviation ±8.1) years old, 77.9% were disabled, and 76.3% cognitively impaired. Screening mammography prevalence was 7.1% among those aged 65-74 years (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 6.8%-7.3%) and 1.7% among those ≥75 years (95% CI, 1.7%-1.8%), with geographic variation observed. Predictors of screening in both age groups included race, cognitive impairment, frailty, hospice, and some comorbidities. These results shed light on the current screening mammography practices in US nursing homes. Thoughtful consideration about individual screening recommendations and the implementation of more clear guidelines for this special population are warranted to prevent overscreening. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Do Australian Football players have sensitive groins? Players with current groin pain exhibit mechanical hyperalgesia of the adductor tendon.

    PubMed

    Drew, Michael K; Lovell, Gregory; Palsson, Thorvaldur S; Chiarelli, Pauline E; Osmotherly, Peter G

    2016-10-01

    This is the first study to evaluate the mechanical sensitivity, clinical classifications and prevalence of groin pain in Australian football players. Case-control. Professional (n=66) and semi-professional (n=9) Australian football players with and without current or previous groin injuries were recruited. Diagnoses were mapped to the Doha Agreement taxonomy. Point and career prevalence of groin pain was calculated. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed at regional and distant sites using handheld pressure algometry across four sites bilaterally (adductor longus tendon, pubic bone, rectus femoris, tibialis anterior muscle). To assess the relationship between current groin pain and fixed effects of hyperalgesia of each site and a history of groin pain, a mixed-effect logistic regression model was utilised. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curve were determined for the model. Point prevalence of groin pain in the preseason was 21.9% with a career prevalence of 44.8%. Adductor-related groin pain was the most prevalent classification in the pre-season period. Hyperalgesia was observed in the adductor longus tendon site in athletes with current groin pain (OR=16.27, 95% CI 1.86 to 142.02). The ROC area under the curve of the regression model was fair (AUC=0.76, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.83). Prevalence data indicates that groin pain is a larger issue than published incidence rates imply. Adductor-related groin pain is the most common diagnosis in pre-season in this population. This study has shown that hyperalgesia exists in Australian football players experiencing groin pain indicating the value of assessing mechanical pain sensitivity as a component of the clinical assessment. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Extended Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis after Radical Cystectomy: A Call for Adherence to Current Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Zachary; Arora, Karan; Goldberg, Hanan; Chandrasekar, Thenappan; Wallis, Christopher J D; Sayyid, Rashid K; Fleshner, Neil E; Finelli, Antonio; Kutikov, Alexander; Violette, Philippe D; Kulkarni, Girish S

    2018-04-01

    Radical cystectomy is inherently associated with morbidity. We assess the timing and incidence of venous thromboembolism, review current guideline recommendations and provide evidence for considering extended venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in all patients undergoing radical cystectomy. We searched PubMed® for available literature on radical cystectomy and venous thromboembolism, focusing on incidence and timing, evidence supporting extended venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients undergoing radical cystectomy or abdominal oncologic surgery, current guideline recommendations, safety considerations and direct oral anticoagulants. Search terms included "radical cystectomy," "venous thromboembolism," "prophylaxis," and "extended oral anticoagulants" and "direct oral anticoagulants" alone and in combination. Relevant articles were reviewed, including original research, reviews and clinical guidelines. References from review articles and guidelines were also assessed to develop a narrative review. The incidence of symptomatic venous thromboembolism in short-term followup after radical cystectomy is 3% to 11.6%, of which more than 50% of cases will occur after hospital discharge. Meta-analyses of clinical trials in patients undergoing major abdominal oncologic operations suggest a decreased risk of venous thromboembolisms for patients receiving extended (4 weeks) venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. Extended prophylaxis should be considered in all radical cystectomy cases. Although the relative risk of bleeding also increases, the overall net benefit of extended prophylaxis clearly favors use for at least 28 days postoperatively. Extrarenal eliminated prophylaxis agents are preferred given the risk of renal insufficiency in radical cystectomy cases, with newer oral anticoagulants providing an alternative route of administration. Patients undergoing radical cystectomy are at high risk for venous thromboembolism after hospital discharge. There is strong evidence

  12. Clinical compliance of viewing conditions in radiology reporting environments against current guidelines and standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, S.; Rainford, L.; Butler, M. L.

    2014-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the importance of environmental conditions in the radiology reporting environment, with many indicating that incorrect parameters could lead to error and misinterpretation. Literature is available with recommendations as to the levels that should be achieved in clinical practice, but evidence of adherence to these guidelines in radiology reporting environments is absent. This study audited the reporting environments of four teleradiologist and eight hospital based radiology reporting areas. This audit aimed to quantify adherence to guidelines and identify differences in the locations with respect to layout and design, monitor distance and angle as well as the ambient factors of the reporting environments. In line with international recommendations, an audit tool was designed to enquire in relation to the layout and design of reporting environments, monitor angle and distances used by radiologists when reporting, as well as the ambient factors such as noise, light and temperature. The review of conditions were carried out by the same independent auditor for consistency. The results obtained were compared against international standards and current research. Each radiology environment was given an overall compliance score to establish whether or not their environments were in line with recommended guidelines. Poor compliance to international recommendations and standards among radiology reporting environments was identified. Teleradiology reporting environments demonstrated greater compliance than hospital environments. The findings of this study identified a need for greater awareness of environmental and perceptual issues in the clinical setting. Further work involving a larger number of clinical centres is recommended.

  13. Health Risk Assessment of Dietary Cadmium Intake: Do Current Guidelines Indicate How Much is Safe?

    PubMed

    Satarug, Soisungwan; Vesey, David A; Gobe, Glenda C

    2017-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a food-chain contaminant, is a significant health hazard. The kidney is one of the primary sites of injury after chronic Cd exposure. Kidney-based risk assessment establishes the urinary Cd threshold at 5.24 μg/g creatinine, and tolerable dietary intake of Cd at 62 μg/day per 70-kg person. However, cohort studies show that dietary Cd intake below a threshold limit and that tolerable levels may increase the risk of death from cancer, cardiovascular disease, and Alzheimer's disease. We evaluated if the current tolerable dietary Cd intake guideline and urinary Cd threshold limit provide sufficient health protection. Staple foods constitute 40-60% of total dietary Cd intake by average consumers. Diets high in shellfish, crustaceans, mollusks, spinach, and offal add to dietary Cd sources. Modeling studies predict the current tolerable dietary intake corresponding to urinary Cd of 0.70-1.85 μg/g creatinine in men and 0.95-3.07 μg/g creatinine in women. Urinary Cd levels of < 1 μg/g creatinine were associated with progressive kidney dysfunction and peripheral vascular disease. A urinary Cd of 0.37 μg/g creatinine was associated with breast cancer, whereas dietary Cd of 16-31.5 μg/day was associated with 25-94% increase in risk of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Modeling shows that dietary intake levels for Cd exceed the levels associated with kidney damage and many other adverse outcomes. Thus, the threshold level of urinary Cd should be re-evaluated. A more restrictive dietary intake guideline would afford enhanced health protection from this pervasive toxic metal. Citation: Satarug S, Vesey DA, Gobe GC. 2017. Health risk assessment of dietary cadmium intake: do current guidelines indicate how much is safe? Environ Health Perspect 125:284-288; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP108.

  14. Design Guidelines for Shielding Effectiveness, Current Carrying Capability, and the Enhancement of Conductivity of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    These guidelines address the electrical properties of composite materials which may have an effect on electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). The main topics of the guidelines include the electrical shielding, fault current return, and lightning protection capabilities of graphite reinforced polymers, since they are somewhat conductive but may require enhancement to be adequate for EMC purposes. Shielding effectiveness depends heavily upon the conductivity of the material. Graphite epoxy can provide useful shielding against RF signals, but it is approximately 1,000 times more resistive than good conductive metals. The reduced shielding effectiveness is significant but is still useful in many cases. The primary concern is with gaps and seams in the material just as it is with metal. Current carrying capability of graphite epoxy is adequate for dissipation static charges, but fault currents through graphite epoxy may cause fire at the shorting contact and at joints. The effect of lightning on selected graphite epoxy material and mating surfaces is described, and protection methods are reviewed.

  15. Reporting unit size and measurement uncertainty: current Australian practice in clinical chemistry and haematology.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Robert C; Badrick, Tony

    2015-08-01

    In this study we aimed to compare the reporting unit size used by Australian laboratories for routine chemistry and haematology tests to the unit size used by learned authorities and in standard laboratory textbooks and to the justified unit size based on measurement uncertainty (MU) estimates from quality assurance program data. MU was determined from Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA) - Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB) and RCPA Haematology Quality Assurance Program survey reports. The reporting unit size implicitly suggested in authoritative textbooks, the RCPA Manual, and the General Serum Chemistry program itself was noted. We also used published data on Australian laboratory practices.The best performing laboratories could justify their chemistry unit size for 55% of analytes while comparable figures for the 50% and 90% laboratories were 14% and 8%, respectively. Reporting unit size was justifiable for all laboratories for red cell count, >50% for haemoglobin but only the top 10% for haematocrit. Few, if any, could justify their mean cell volume (MCV) and mean cell haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) reporting unit sizes.The reporting unit size used by many laboratories is not justified by present analytical performance. Using MU estimates to determine the reporting interval for quantitative laboratory results ensures reporting practices match local analytical performance and recognises the inherent error of the measurement process.

  16. Evaluation of current Australian health service accreditation processes (ACCREDIT-CAP): protocol for a mixed-method research project.

    PubMed

    Hinchcliff, Reece; Greenfield, David; Moldovan, Max; Pawsey, Marjorie; Mumford, Virginia; Westbrook, Johanna Irene; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Accreditation programmes aim to improve the quality and safety of health services, and have been widely implemented. However, there is conflicting evidence regarding the outcomes of existing programmes. The Accreditation Collaborative for the Conduct of Research, Evaluation and Designated Investigations through Teamwork-Current Accreditation Processes (ACCREDIT-CAP) project is designed to address key gaps in the literature by evaluating the current processes of three accreditation programmes used across Australian acute, primary and aged care services. The project comprises three mixed-method studies involving documentary analyses, surveys, focus groups and individual interviews. Study samples will comprise stakeholders from across the Australian healthcare system: accreditation agencies; federal and state government departments; consumer advocates; professional colleges and associations; and staff of acute, primary and aged care services. Sample sizes have been determined to ensure results allow robust conclusions. Qualitative information will be thematically analysed, supported by the use of textual grouping software. Quantitative data will be subjected to a variety of analytical procedures, including descriptive and comparative statistics. The results are designed to inform health system policy and planning decisions in Australia and internationally. The project has been approved by the University of New South Wales Human Research Ethics Committee (approval number HREC 10274). Results will be reported to partner organisations, healthcare consumers and other stakeholders via peer-reviewed publications, conference and seminar presentations, and a publicly accessible website.

  17. Management of chronic hepatitis B infection: Current treatment guidelines, challenges, and new developments

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ceen-Ming; Yau, Tung On; Yu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) virus infection is a global public health problem, affecting more than 400 million people worldwide. The clinical spectrum is wide, ranging from a subclinical inactive carrier state, to progressive chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, decompensation, and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, complications of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related chronic liver disease may be reduced by viral suppression. Current international guidelines recommend first-line treatment of CHB infection with pegylated interferon, entecavir, or tenofovir, but the optimal treatment for an individual patient is controversial. The indications for treatment are contentious, and increasing evidence suggests that HBV genotyping, as well as serial on-treatment measurements of hepatitis B surface antigen and HBV DNA kinetics should be used to predict antiviral treatment response. The likelihood of achieving a sustained virological response is also increased by extending treatment duration, and using combination therapy. Hence the paradigm for treatment of CHB is constantly evolving. This article summarizes the different indications for treatment, and systematically reviews the evidence for the efficacy of various antiviral agents. It further discusses the shortcomings of current guidelines, use of rescue therapy in drug-resistant strains of HBV, and highlights the promising clinical trials for emerging therapies in the pipeline. This concise overview presents an updated practical approach to guide the clinical management of CHB. PMID:24876747

  18. Late Pleistocene Leeuwin Current Variability: Multi-Species Foraminiferal Isotope Records from IODP Site U1460, SW Australian Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolfi, C.; Christensen, B. A.; Groeneveld, J.; Pacelli, L.; Thapa, D.; Henderiks, J.; De Vleeschouwer, D.; Petrick, B.; Bogus, K.; Fulthorpe, C.; Gallagher, S. J.; Expedition 356 Scientists, I.

    2016-12-01

    Australian climate, drought and precipitation, is tightly linked to the position of the Leeuwin Current (LC) and larger scale weather phenomena such as ENSO and the Indian Ocean Dipole, both of which are characterized by sea surface temperature (SST) variations. If the LC is weak, then cooler SST are present along the western shelf and a negative-like phase of IOD on Australia results in drought (Saji et al. 2009). Previous studies of the last 0.5 Myr indicate the LC was present north of the Western Cape, in both glacial and interglacial periods. This study presents a record from south of the Western Cape at IODP Expedition 356 Site U1460 in the northern Perth Basin. Hemipelagic Site U1460 (27.4°S; 112.9°E; 214 m. w.d.) is under the influence of both the LC and the Western Australian Current (WAC) and impacted by strong Westerly winds and associated winter rains. Samples were taken at 1.5 m intervals from cores 1F-57F (0-267m), washed (63 µm) and picked for planktonic (G. sacculifer, G. ruber, G. inflata, N. dutertrei) and benthic (Cibicides spp. and U. peregrina) foraminiferal species. Stable isotopes were measured at MARUM, Bremen University using a Finnigan MAT 251 mass spectrometer with a Kiel device, and corrected for species-specific disequilibrium effects. The δ18O values are interpreted as temperature (Spooner et al., 2011); ages are constrained by shipboard biostratigraphy. The surface waters cooled during glacial periods suggesting the Leeuwin Current did not reach south of the Western Cape, or was significantly cooler. The δ18O signals for N. dutertrei and G. inflata, deeper-dwelling species, converge with surface water values during glacial periods, suggesting a deeper thermocline. This may point to a strengthened WAC during glacial periods, although lower sea level may also have influenced thermocline development. The impact of the LC on modern Australian climate provides an opportunity to evaluate climate in SW Australia in the Late Pleistocene

  19. A critical appraisal of guidelines for electronic communication between patients and clinicians: the need to modernize current recommendations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joy L; Matthias, Marianne S; Menachemi, Nir; Frankel, Richard M; Weiner, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Patient-provider electronic communication has proliferated in recent years, yet there is a dearth of published research either leading to, or including, recommendations that improve clinical care and prevent unintended negative consequences. We critically appraise published guidelines and suggest an agenda for future work in this area. To understand how existing guidelines align with current practice, evidence, and technology. We performed a narrative review of provider-targeted guidelines for electronic communication between patients and providers, searching Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and PubMed databases using relevant terms. We limited the search to articles published in English, and manually searched the citations of relevant articles. For each article, we identified and evaluated the suggested practices. Across 11 identified guidelines, the primary focus was on technical and administrative concerns, rather than on relational communication. Some of the security practices recommended by the guidelines are no longer needed because of shifts in technology. It is unclear the extent to which the recommendations that are still relevant are being followed. Moreover, there is no guideline-cited evidence of the effectiveness of the practices that have been proposed. Our analysis revealed major weaknesses in current guidelines for electronic communication between patients and providers: the guidelines appear to be based on minimal evidence and offer little guidance on how best to use electronic tools to communicate effectively. Further work is needed to systematically evaluate and identify effective practices, create a framework to evaluate quality of communication, and assess the relationship between electronic communication and quality of care.

  20. Assisting Australians with mental health problems and financial difficulties: a Delphi study to develop guidelines for financial counsellors, financial institution staff, mental health professionals and carers.

    PubMed

    Bond, Kathy S; Chalmers, Kathryn J; Jorm, Anthony F; Kitchener, Betty A; Reavley, Nicola J

    2015-06-03

    There is a strong association between mental health problems and financial difficulties. Therefore, people who work with those who have financial difficulties (financial counsellors and financial institution staff) need to have knowledge and helping skills relevant to mental health problems. Conversely, people who support those with mental health problems (mental health professionals and carers) may need to have knowledge and helping skills relevant to financial difficulties. The Delphi expert consensus method was used to develop guidelines for people who work with or support those with mental health problems and financial difficulties. A systematic review of websites, books and journal articles was conducted to develop a questionnaire containing items about the knowledge, skills and actions relevant to working with or supporting someone with mental health problems and financial difficulties. These items were rated over three rounds by five Australian expert panels comprising of financial counsellors (n = 33), financial institution staff (n = 54), mental health professionals (n = 31), consumers (n = 20) and carers (n = 24). A total of 897 items were rated, with 462 items endorsed by at least 80 % of members of each of the expert panels. These endorsed statements were used to develop a set of guidelines for financial counsellors, financial institution staff, mental health professionals and carers about how to assist someone with mental health problems and financial difficulties. A diverse group of expert panel members were able to reach substantial consensus on the knowledge, skills and actions needed to work with and support people with mental health problems and financial difficulties. These guidelines can be used to inform policy and practice in the financial and mental health sectors.

  1. Are current guidelines for sun protection optimal for health? Exploring the evidence.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Robyn M; Neale, Rachel E; Madronich, Sasha; McKenzie, Richard L

    2018-06-15

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the main risk factor for skin cancer, and a major source of vitamin D, in many regions of the world. Sun protection messages to minimize skin cancer risks but avoid vitamin D deficiency are challenging, partly because levels of UV radiation vary by location, season, time of day, and atmospheric conditions. The UV Index provides information on levels of UV radiation and is a cornerstone of sun protection guidelines. Current guidelines from the World Health Organization are that sun protection is required only when the UV Index is 3 or greater. This advice is pragmatic rather than evidence based. The UV Index is a continuous scale; more comprehensive sun protection is required as the UV Index increases. In addition, a wide range of UVA doses is possible with a UVI of 3, from which there may be health consequences, while full sun protection when the UVI is "moderate" (between 3 and 5) may limit vitamin D production. Finally, the duration of time spent in the sun is an essential component of a public health message, in addition to the intensity of ambient UV radiation as measured by the UV Index. Together these provide the dose of UV radiation that is relevant to both skin cancer genesis and vitamin D production. Further education is required to increase the understanding of the UV Index; messages framed using the UV Index need to incorporate the importance of duration of exposure and increasing sun protection with increasing dose of UV radiation.

  2. The current status of pesticide resistance in Australian populations of the redlegged earth mite (Halotydeus destructor).

    PubMed

    Umina, Paul A; Weeks, Andrew R; Roberts, John; Jenkins, Sommer; Mangano, G Peter; Lord, Alan; Micic, Svetlana

    2012-06-01

    The redlegged earth mite, Halotydeus destructor Tucker, is an important pest of broad-acre farming systems in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. In 2006, high levels of resistance to synthetic pyrethroids were discovered in this species in Western Australia. Between 2007 and 2010, the authors monitored resistance in field populations and found it had spread considerably within the state of Western Australia. Twenty-six paddocks from 15 individual properties were identified with resistance, and these paddocks ranged over 480 km. To date, resistance has not been detected in any other Australian state. Resistance in H. destructor appears to be found across the entire pyrethroid group, but not to other chemical classes such as organophosphates and carbamates, or other chemistries with novel modes of action. The high levels of resistance occurring in Western Australia have caused considerable economic losses due to ineffective chemical applications and mortality of crop plants at seedling establishment. These findings highlight the need for a comprehensive resistance surveillance programme to be developed for H. destructor within Australia. Growers need to consider non-chemical approaches for pest control and should be encouraged to implement pesticide resistance management programmes for H. destructor. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Current consensus and guidelines of contrast enhanced ultrasound for the characterization of focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae Young; Kim, Moon Young; Jeong, Soung Won; Kim, Tae Yeob; Kim, Seung Up; Lee, Sae Hwan; Suk, Ki Tae; Park, Soo Young; Woo, Hyun Young; Kim, Sang Gyune; Heo, Jeong; Baik, Soon Koo; Kim, Hong Soo

    2013-01-01

    The application of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) is considered essential when evaluating focal liver lesions (FLLs) using ultrasonography (US). Microbubble UCAs are easy to use and robust; their use poses no risk of nephrotoxicity and requires no ionizing radiation. The unique features of contrast enhanced US (CEUS) are not only noninvasiveness but also real-time assessing of liver perfusion throughout the vascular phases. The later feature has led to dramatic improvement in the diagnostic accuracy of US for detection and characterization of FLLs as well as the guidance to therapeutic procedures and evaluation of response to treatment. This article describes the current consensus and guidelines for the use of UCAs for the FLLs that are commonly encountered in US. After a brief description of the bases of different CEUS techniques, contrast-enhancement patterns of different types of benign and malignant FLLs and other clinical applications are described and discussed on the basis of our experience and the literature data. PMID:23593604

  4. Vitamin K deficiency: a case report and review of current guidelines.

    PubMed

    Marchili, Maria Rosaria; Santoro, Elisa; Marchesi, Alessandra; Bianchi, Simona; Rotondi Aufiero, Lelia; Villani, Alberto

    2018-03-14

    Vitamin K, a fat soluble vitamin, is a necessary cofactor for the activation of coagulation factors II, VII, IX, X, and protein C and S. In neonatal period, vitamin K deficiency may lead to Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding (VKDB). We present the case of a 2 months and 20 days Caucasian male, presented for bleeding from the injections sites of vaccines. At birth oral vitamin K prophylaxis was administered. Neonatal period was normal. He was exclusively breastfed and received a daily oral supplementation with 25 μg of vitamin K. A late onset vitamin K deficiency bleeding was suspected. Intravenous Vitamin K was administered with complete recovery. Nevertheless the oral prophylaxis, our case developed a VKDB: it is necessary to revise the current guidelines in order to standardize timing and dosage in different clinical conditions.

  5. Current Guidelines, Common Clinical Pitfalls, and Future Directions for Laboratory Diagnosis of Lyme Disease, United States.

    PubMed

    Moore, Andrew; Nelson, Christina; Molins, Claudia; Mead, Paul; Schriefer, Martin

    2016-07-01

    In the United States, Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted to humans by blacklegged ticks. Patients with an erythema migrans lesion and epidemiologic risk can receive a diagnosis without laboratory testing. For all other patients, laboratory testing is necessary to confirm the diagnosis, but proper interpretation depends on symptoms and timing of illness. The recommended laboratory test in the United States is 2-tiered serologic analysis consisting of an enzyme-linked immunoassay or immunofluorescence assay, followed by reflexive immunoblotting. Sensitivity of 2-tiered testing is low (30%-40%) during early infection while the antibody response is developing (window period). For disseminated Lyme disease, sensitivity is 70%-100%. Specificity is high (>95%) during all stages of disease. Use of other diagnostic tests for Lyme disease is limited. We review the rationale behind current US testing guidelines, appropriate use and interpretation of tests, and recent developments in Lyme disease diagnostics.

  6. Current Guidelines, Common Clinical Pitfalls, and Future Directions for Laboratory Diagnosis of Lyme Disease, United States

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Andrew; Nelson, Christina; Molins, Claudia; Mead, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted to humans by blacklegged ticks. Patients with an erythema migrans lesion and epidemiologic risk can receive a diagnosis without laboratory testing. For all other patients, laboratory testing is necessary to confirm the diagnosis, but proper interpretation depends on symptoms and timing of illness. The recommended laboratory test in the United States is 2-tiered serologic analysis consisting of an enzyme-linked immunoassay or immunofluorescence assay, followed by reflexive immunoblotting. Sensitivity of 2-tiered testing is low (30%–40%) during early infection while the antibody response is developing (window period). For disseminated Lyme disease, sensitivity is 70%–100%. Specificity is high (>95%) during all stages of disease. Use of other diagnostic tests for Lyme disease is limited. We review the rationale behind current US testing guidelines, appropriate use and interpretation of tests, and recent developments in Lyme disease diagnostics. PMID:27314832

  7. Determining the anaerobic threshold in postpolio syndrome: comparison with current guidelines for training intensity prescription.

    PubMed

    Voorn, Eric L; Gerrits, Karin H; Koopman, Fieke S; Nollet, Frans; Beelen, Anita

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether the anaerobic threshold (AT) can be identified in individuals with postpolio syndrome (PPS) using submaximal incremental exercise testing, and to compare current guidelines for intensity prescription in PPS with the AT. Cohort study. Research laboratory. Individuals with PPS (N=82). Not applicable. Power output, gas exchange variables, heart rate, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured in an incremental submaximal cycle ergometry test. Two independent observers identified the AT. Comparison of current guidelines for training intensity prescription in PPS (40%-60% heart rate reserve [HRR] or RPE of 12) with the AT was based on correlations between recommended heart rate and the heart rate at the AT. In addition, we determined the proportion of individuals that would have been recommended to train at an intensity corresponding to their AT. The AT was identified in 63 (77%) of the participants. Pearson correlation coefficients between the recommended heart rate and the heart rate at the AT were lower in cases of 40% HRR (r=.56) and 60% HRR (r=.50) than in cases of prescription based on the RPE (r=.86). Based on the RPE, 55% of the individuals would have been recommended to train at an intensity corresponding to their AT. This proportion was higher compared with 40% HRR (41%) or 60% HRR (18%) as criterion. The AT can be identified in most individuals with PPS offering an individualized target for aerobic training. If the AT cannot be identified (eg, because gas analysis equipment is not available), intensity prescription can best be based on the RPE. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Breast milk banking: current opinion and practice in Australian neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Lam, Eva Y; Kecskés, Zsuzsoka; Abdel-Latif, Mohamed E

    2012-09-01

    To find out the knowledge and attitudes of health-care professionals (HCPs) in Australian neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) towards breast milk banking (BMBg) and pasteurised donated breast milk (PDBM). Cross-sectional structured survey of HCPs in all 25 NICUs in Australia. Response rate was 43.4% (n= 358 of 825). Participants included nurses and midwives (291, 81.3%) and the remainder were neonatologists and neonatal trainees (67, 18.7%). A variable number of HCPs agreed that PDBM would decrease the risk of necrotising enterocolitis (81%) and allergies (48.9%), 8.4% thought PDBM will carry risk of infections and 78.8% agreed that PDBM is preferable over formula, but only 67.5% thought that establishing breast milk banks (BMBs) are justifiable. Significant differences were found between doctors and nurses/midwives, with 19.4% of doctors compared with 5.8% of nurses/midwives agreed that PDBM carried an increased risk of infection. Although, over 90% of nurses/midwives and 70% of doctors agreed that the donation of breast milk is important, only 71% of nurses/midwives and 52.2% of doctors thought that setting up a BMB was justifiable. The opinions about BMBg differ widely between HCPs; however, the majority support the practice. HCPs had different knowledge gaps in regard to BMBg. Nurses/midwives positively view the practice of BMBg more strongly compared with neonatologists. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2012 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  9. Last Glacial Maximum to Holocene climate evolution controlled by sea-level change, Leeuwin Current, and Australian Monsoon in the Northwestern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwa, T.; Yokoyama, Y.; McHugh, C.; Reuning, L.; Gallagher, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    The transition from cold to warm conditions during the last deglaciation influenced climate variability in the Indian Ocean and Pacific as a result of submerge of continental shelf and variations in the Indonesian Throughflow and Australian Monsoon. The shallow continental shelf (< 200 m water depth) developed along the northwestern Australian margin is influenced by the Australian Monsoon and Leeuwin Current (one of branch of the Indonesian Throughflow). The International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 356 Indonesian Throughflow drilled in the northwestern Australian shallow continental shelf and recovered an interval from the Last Glacial Maximum to Holocene in Site U1461. Radiocarbon dating on macrofossils, foraminifera, and bulk organic matter provided a precise age-depth model, leading to high-resolved paleoclimate reconstruction. X-ray elemental analysis results are interpreted as an indicator of sedimentary environmental changes. The upper 20-m part of Site U1461 apparently records the climate transition from the LGM to Holocene in the northwestern Australia, which could be associated with sea-level change, Leeuwin Current activity, and the Australian Monsoon.

  10. Current hydration guidelines are erroneous: dehydration does not impair exercise performance in the heat.

    PubMed

    Wall, Bradley A; Watson, Greig; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Abbiss, Chris R; Siegel, Rodney; Laursen, Paul B

    2015-08-01

    Laboratory studies that support the hydration guidelines of leading governing bodies have shown that dehydration to only -2% of body mass can lead to increase in body temperature and heart rate during exercise, and decrease in performance. These studies, however, have been conducted in relatively windless environments (ie, wind speed <12.9 km/h), without participants being blinded to their hydration status. To investigate the effect of blinded hydration status on cycling time-trial performance in the heat with ecologically valid facing wind speed conditions. During three experimental trials, 10 cyclists were dehydrated to -3% body mass by performing 2 h of submaximal exercise (walking and cycling) in the heat, before being reinfused with saline to replace 100%, 33% or 0% of fluid losses, leaving them 0%, -2% or -3% hypohydrated, respectively. Participants then completed a 25 km time trial in the heat (33°C, 40% relative humidity; wind speed 32 km/h) during which their starting hydration status was maintained by infusing saline at a rate equal to their sweat rate. The treatment was participant-blinded and the order was randomised. Completion time, power output, heart rate, rectal temperature and perceptual variables were measured. While rectal temperature was higher beyond 17 km of the time trial in the -3% vs 0% conditions (38.9±0.3°C vs 38.6±0.3°C; p<0.05), no other differences between trials were shown. When well-trained cyclists performed a 25 km cycling time trial under ecologically valid conditions and were blinded to their hydration status, performance, physiological and perceptual variables were not different between trials. These data do not support the residing basis behind many of the current hydration guidelines. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Historical processes and contemporary ocean currents drive genetic structure in the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in the Indo-Australian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Hernawan, Udhi E; van Dijk, Kor-Jent; Kendrick, Gary A; Feng, Ming; Biffin, Edward; Lavery, Paul S; McMahon, Kathryn

    2017-02-01

    Understanding spatial patterns of gene flow and genetic structure is essential for the conservation of marine ecosystems. Contemporary ocean currents and historical isolation due to Pleistocene sea level fluctuations have been predicted to influence the genetic structure in marine populations. In the Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA), the world's hotspot of marine biodiversity, seagrasses are a vital component but population genetic information is very limited. Here, we reconstructed the phylogeography of the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in the IAA based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and then characterized the genetic structure based on a panel of 16 microsatellite markers. We further examined the relative importance of historical isolation and contemporary ocean currents in driving the patterns of genetic structure. Results from SNPs revealed three population groups: eastern Indonesia, western Indonesia (Sunda Shelf) and Indian Ocean; while the microsatellites supported five population groups (eastern Indonesia, Sunda Shelf, Lesser Sunda, Western Australia and Indian Ocean). Both SNPs and microsatellites showed asymmetrical gene flow among population groups with a trend of southwestward migration from eastern Indonesia. Genetic diversity was generally higher in eastern Indonesia and decreased southwestward. The pattern of genetic structure and connectivity is attributed partly to the Pleistocene sea level fluctuations modified to a smaller level by contemporary ocean currents. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Development of guidelines for tertiary education institutions to assist them in supporting students with a mental illness: a Delphi consensus study with Australian professionals and consumers

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Anna M.; Killackey, Eoin; Jorm, Anthony F.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The age at which most young people are in tertiary education is also the age of peak onset for mental illness. Because mental health problems can have adverse effects on students’ academic performance and welfare, institutions require guidance how they can best provide support. However, the scientific evidence for how best to do this is relatively limited. Therefore a Delphi expert consensus study was carried out with professional and consumer experts. Methods. A systematic review of websites, books and journal articles was conducted to develop a 172 item survey containing strategies that institutions might use to support students with a mental illness. Two panels of Australian experts (74 professionals and 35 consumers) were recruited and independently rated the items over three rounds, with strategies reaching consensus on importance written into the guidelines. Results. The overall response rate across three rounds was 83% (80% consumers, 85% professionals). 155 strategies were endorsed as essential or important by at least 80% of panel members. The endorsed strategies provided information on policy, measures to promote support services, service provision, accessibility of support services, relationships between services, other types of support and issues associated with reasonable adjustments. They also provided guidance on the procedures the institutions should have for making staff aware of issues associated with mental illness, mental illness training, support for staff and communicating with a student with a mental illness. They also covered student rights and responsibilities, the procedures the institutions should have for making students aware of issues associated with mental illness, dealing with mental health crises, funding and research and evaluation. Conclusions. The guidelines provide guidance for tertiary institutions to assist them in supporting students with a mental illness. It is hoped that they may be used to inform policy and

  13. Development of guidelines for tertiary education institutions to assist them in supporting students with a mental illness: a Delphi consensus study with Australian professionals and consumers.

    PubMed

    Reavley, Nicola J; Ross, Anna M; Killackey, Eoin; Jorm, Anthony F

    2013-01-01

    Background. The age at which most young people are in tertiary education is also the age of peak onset for mental illness. Because mental health problems can have adverse effects on students' academic performance and welfare, institutions require guidance how they can best provide support. However, the scientific evidence for how best to do this is relatively limited. Therefore a Delphi expert consensus study was carried out with professional and consumer experts. Methods. A systematic review of websites, books and journal articles was conducted to develop a 172 item survey containing strategies that institutions might use to support students with a mental illness. Two panels of Australian experts (74 professionals and 35 consumers) were recruited and independently rated the items over three rounds, with strategies reaching consensus on importance written into the guidelines. Results. The overall response rate across three rounds was 83% (80% consumers, 85% professionals). 155 strategies were endorsed as essential or important by at least 80% of panel members. The endorsed strategies provided information on policy, measures to promote support services, service provision, accessibility of support services, relationships between services, other types of support and issues associated with reasonable adjustments. They also provided guidance on the procedures the institutions should have for making staff aware of issues associated with mental illness, mental illness training, support for staff and communicating with a student with a mental illness. They also covered student rights and responsibilities, the procedures the institutions should have for making students aware of issues associated with mental illness, dealing with mental health crises, funding and research and evaluation. Conclusions. The guidelines provide guidance for tertiary institutions to assist them in supporting students with a mental illness. It is hoped that they may be used to inform policy and

  14. Curriculum Style and English Language: An Investigation into Current Practices in the Teaching of English Language in Australian Schools. ACER Research Monograph No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Kevin

    Intended for English teachers and administrators involved in curriculum design, this monograph describes the Language Learning Project, an investigation into current school practices in the teaching of English language in the Australian junior secondary school, with particular reference to teaching directed toward the attainment of language…

  15. COPD-X Australian and New Zealand guidelines for the diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: 2017 update.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ian A; Brown, Juliet L; George, Johnson; Jenkins, Sue; McDonald, Christine F; McDonald, Vanessa M; Phillips, Kirsten; Smith, Brian J; Zwar, Nicholas A; Dabscheck, Eli

    2017-11-20

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by persistent respiratory symptoms and chronic airflow limitation, and is associated with exacerbations and comorbidities. Advances in the management of COPD are updated quarterly in the national COPD guidelines, the COPD-X plan, published by Lung Foundation Australia in conjunction with the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand and available at http://copdx.org.au. Main recommendations: Spirometry detects persistent airflow limitation (post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC < 0.7) and must be used to confirm the diagnosis.Non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies should be considered as they optimise function (ie, improve symptoms and quality of life) and prevent deterioration (ie, prevent exacerbations and reduce decline).Pulmonary rehabilitation and regular exercise are highly beneficial and should be provided to all symptomatic COPD patients.Short- and long-acting inhaled bronchodilators and, in more severe disease, anti-inflammatory agents (inhaled corticosteroids) should be considered in a stepwise approach.Given the wide range of inhaler devices available, inhaler technique and adherence should be checked regularly.Smoking cessation is essential, and influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations reduce the risk of exacerbations.A plan of care should be developed with the multidisciplinary team. COPD action plans reduce hospitalisations and are recommended as part of COPD self-management.Exacerbations should be managed promptly with bronchodilators, corticosteroids and antibiotics as appropriate to prevent hospital admission and delay COPD progression.Comorbidities of COPD require identification and appropriate management.Supportive, palliative and end-of-life care are beneficial for patients with advanced disease.Education of patients, carers and clinicians, and a strong partnership between primary and tertiary care, facilitate evidence-based management of COPD. Changes in management as result of

  16. Diabetes in Cystic Fibrosis: Multicenter Screening Results Based on Current Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Scheuing, Nicole; Holl, Reinhard W.; Dockter, Gerd; Fink, Katharina; Junge, Sibylle; Naehrlich, Lutz; Smaczny, Christina; Staab, Doris; Thalhammer, Gabriela; van Koningsbruggen-Rietschel, Silke; Ballmann, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Background Published estimates on age-dependent frequency of diabetes in cystic fibrosis (CF) vary widely, and are based mostly on older data. However, CF treatment and prevention of comorbidities changed over recent years. In many studies, definition of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is not in line with current guideline recommendations. Therefore, we evaluated age-dependent occurrence of glucose abnormalities and associated risk factors in CF patients who participated in a multicenter screening program using oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT). Methods Between 2001 and 2010, 43 specialized CF centers from Germany and Austria serially performed 5,179 standardized OGTTs in 1,658 clinically stable, non-pregnant CF patients with no prior steroid medication or lung transplantation. Age-dependent occurrence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), IFG+IGT, one (DGT) or two consecutive (CFRD) diabetic OGTTs was analyzed, using Kaplan Meier curves. Cox proportional-hazards models were created to elucidate the influence of sex or underweight. Results At baseline/last OGTT, median age was 15.9 years/18.2 years and 30.6%/31.8% of patients were underweight. 25% of patients showed IFG at age 14.3 years; IGT at age 16.3 years; IFG+IGT combined at age 17.7 years. DGT was observed in 25% of patients at age 22.6 years; CFRD at age 34.5 years. Females had a 3.54 [95% CI 1.23–10.18] times higher risk for CFRD; risk for DGT was 2.21 [1.22–3.98] times higher. Underweight was a risk factor for IGT (HR [95% CI]: 1.38 [1.11–1.71]) and IFG+IGT (1.43 [1.11–1.83]), and in males also for DGT (1.49 [1.09–2.04]). Conclusions/Significance If confirmation of diabetes by a second test is required, as recommended in current guidelines, age at CFRD diagnosis was higher compared to most previous studies. However, known risk factors for glucose abnormalities in CF were confirmed. Confirmation of diabetic OGT by a repeat test is important for a

  17. Late Pleistocene Age Model for Site U1460, Perth Basin, SW Australian Shelf: Implications for Leeuwin Current History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, B. A.; Takayanagi, H.; Petrick, B.; Ishiwa, T.; Henderiks, J.; Groeneveld, J.; Mamo, B. L.; De Vleeschouwer, D.; Auer, G.; Deik, H.; Fulthorpe, C.; Gallagher, S. J.; McHugh, C.; Reuning, L.; Yokoyama, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The Leeuwin Current (LC) exerts an important control on modern Australian climate, but its onset is not well defined. The LC is the only southward flowing eastern boundary current. Driven by a pressure gradient set up in the Indonesian Throughflow, its warm waters support reefs to 29°S. It is seasonally controlled south of the Western Cape. Determination of the onset of the LC was a major objective of IODP Expedition 356. Expedition 356 drilling on the western Australian margin provides an opportunity to explore depositional patterns and timing in the region influenced by the current. Site U1460 was drilled in 214.5 m w.d. (Gallagher et al., 2017). Integrated calcareous nannofossil and planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy places the upper 86.5 m firmly within the late Pleistocene. However, the glacial- interglacial stratigraphy is uncertain because of the complexity of this shelfal depositional environment. Here we present a likely late Pleistocene stratigraphy based on integrated geochemical and paleontological datasets. A benthic foraminifer (Uvigerina peregrina) stable isotope record provides the foundation for the age model and the data are supported by SST estimates based on Tex86 and alkenones. Our age model places MIS 16 between 104 and 99 m-CSF-A, followed by an expanded MIS 15 section (99 - 50 m-CSF-A). We correlate the interval from 50 - 5 m-CSF-A with MIS 14 to MIS 8, with the largest magnitude glacial events (MIS 12, MIS 6) either condensed or represented as depositional hiatuses. A Recent 14C date at 0.34 mbsf constrains the interval from 2 - 0.5 m-CSF-A to MIS 4-3, which is in good agreement with the base of common Emiliania huxleyi (0.09 Ma) at 2.13 m-CSF-A. Thus MIS 5 is equivalent to the interval from 5 to 2 m-CSF-A. The expanded MIS 15 section follows a geometric change from slope to prograding shelf. It is associated with a shift to infaunal benthic foraminiferal assemblages, abundant sponge spicules, and a reduction in CaCO3%, suggesting

  18. Added sugar intake that exceeds current recommendations is associated with nutrient dilution in older Australians.

    PubMed

    Moshtaghian, Hanieh; Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu; Charlton, Karen E; Probst, Yasmine C; Gopinath, Bamini; Mitchell, Paul; Flood, Victoria M

    2016-09-01

    A nutrient dilution effect of diets high in added sugar has been reported in some older populations, but the evidence is inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between added sugar intakes (according to recommended guidelines) and nutrient intake, food consumption, and body mass index (BMI). A cross-sectional analysis of data collected between 2007 and 2009 from participants of the Blue Mountains Eye study 4 was performed (n = 879). Dietary intake was assessed using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Added sugar content of foods was determined by applying a systematic step-wise method. BMI was calculated from measured weight and height. Food and nutrient intakes and BMI were assessed according to categories of percentage energy from added sugar (EAS% < 5%, EAS% = 5%-10%, and EAS% >10%) using analysis of covariance for multivariate analysis. Micronutrient intake including retinol equivalents, vitamins B6, B12, C, E, and D, and minerals including calcium, iron, and magnesium showed a significant inverse association with EAS% intakes (Ptrend < 0.05). In people with the lowest intake of added sugars (<5% energy) intake of alcohol, fruits, and vegetables were higher and intake of sugar sweetened beverages was lower compared to other participants (all Ptrend < 0.001). BMI was similar between the three EAS% categories. Energy intake from added sugar greater than the recommended level of 10% is associated with lower micronutrient intakes, indicating micronutrient dilution. Conversely, added sugar intakes <5% of energy intake are associated with higher micronutrient intakes. This information may inform dietary messages targeted at optimizing diet quality in older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A numerical modeling study of the East Australian Current encircling and overwashing a warm-core eddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, H. S.; Roughan, M.; Baird, M. E.; Wilkin, J.

    2013-01-01

    AbstractWarm-core eddies (WCEs) often form in the meanders of Western Boundary <span class="hlt">Currents</span> (WBCs). WCEs are frequently overwashed with less dense waters sourced from the WBC. We use the Regional Ocean Modelling System to investigate the ocean state during the overwashing of one such WCE in October 2008 in the East <span class="hlt">Australian</span> <span class="hlt">Current</span> (EAC). Comparisons of model outputs with satellite sea surface temperature and vertical profiles show that the model provides a realistic simulation of the eddy during the period when the EAC encircled and then overwashed the eddy. During the encircling stage, an eddy with closed circulation persisted at depth. In the surface EAC water entered from the north, encircled the eddy and exited to the east. The overwashing stage was initiated by the expulsion of cyclonic vorticity. For the following 8 days after the expulsion, waters from the EAC washed over the top of the eddy, transferring heat and anticyclonic vorticity radially-inward. After approximately one rotation period of overwashing, the eddy separated. The overwashing creates a two-layer system that forms a subsurface maximum velocity at the interface of the two layers. Analysis of water mass properties, Eulerian tracer dynamics, and Lagrangian particle tracks show that the original eddy sinks 10-50 m during the overwashing period. Overwashing has been observed in many WBCs and occurs in most WCEs in the western Tasman Sea.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22677587','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22677587"><span>Implications of <span class="hlt">current</span> resident work-hour <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on the future practice of surgery in Canada.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maruscak, Adam A; VanderBeek, Laura; Ott, Michael C; Kelly, Stephen; Forbes, Thomas L</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Work-hour restrictions have had a profound impact on surgical training. However, little is known of how work-hour restrictions may affect the future practice patterns of <span class="hlt">current</span> surgical residents. The purpose of this study is to compare the anticipated career practice patterns of surgical residents who are training within an environment of work-hour restrictions with the <span class="hlt">current</span> practice of faculty surgeons. An electronic survey was sent to all surgery residents and faculty at 2 Canadian university-affiliated medical centers. The survey consisted of questions regarding expected (residents) or <span class="hlt">current</span> (faculty) practice patterns. A total of 149 residents and 125 faculty members completed the survey (50.3% and 52.3% response rates, respectively). A greater proportion of males were in the faculty cohort than in the resident group (77.6% vs 62.4%, p = 0.0003). More faculty than residents believed that work-hour restrictions have a negative impact on both residency education (40.8% vs 20.8%, p = 0.008) and preparation for a surgical career (56.8% vs 19.5%, p < 0.0001). Compared with <span class="hlt">current</span> faculty, residents plan to take less call (p < 0.0003), work fewer days of the week (p < 0.0001), are more likely to limit their duty hours on postcall days (p = 0.009), and take parental leave (p = 0.02) once in practice. Male and female residents differed somewhat in their responses in that more female residents plan to limit their postcall duty hours (55.4% vs 36.5%, p = 0.009) and to take a parental leave (51.8% vs 16.1%, p < 0.0001) compared with their male resident colleagues. <span class="hlt">Current</span> surgical residents expect to adopt components of resident work-hour <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> into their surgical practices after completing their residency. These practice patterns will have surgical workforce implications and might require larger surgical groups and reconsideration of resource allocation. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3620758','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3620758"><span>Gestational Diabetes and Preeclampsia in Association with Air Pollution at Levels below <span class="hlt">Current</span> Air Quality <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jakobsson, Kristina; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna; Rylander, Lars</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background: Several studies have estimated associations between air pollution and birth outcomes, but few have evaluated potential effects on pregnancy complications. Objective: We investigated whether low-level exposure to air pollution is associated with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. Methods: High-quality registry information on 81,110 singleton pregnancy outcomes in southern Sweden during 1999–2005 was linked to individual-level exposure estimates with high spatial resolution. Modeled exposure to nitrogen oxides (NOx), expressed as mean concentrations per trimester, and proximity to roads of different traffic densities were used as proxy indicators of exposure to combustion-related air pollution. The data were analyzed by logistic regression, with and without adjusting for potential confounders. Results: The prevalence of gestational diabetes increased with each NOx quartile, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.69 (95% CI: 1.41, 2.03) for the highest (> 22.7 µg/m3) compared with the lowest quartile (2.5–8.9 µg/m3) of exposure during the second trimester. The adjusted OR for acquiring preeclampsia after exposure during the third trimester was 1.51 (1.32, 1.73) in the highest quartile of NOx compared with the lowest. Both outcomes were associated with high traffic density, but ORs were significant for gestational diabetes only. Conclusion: NOx exposure during pregnancy was associated with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia in an area with air pollution levels below <span class="hlt">current</span> air quality <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. PMID:23563048</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22645457','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22645457"><span>Low body mass index can identify majority of osteoporotic inflammatory bowel disease patients missed by <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Atreja, Ashish; Aggarwal, Ashish; Licata, Angelo A; Lashner, Bret A</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at high risk of developing osteoporosis. Our objective was to determine the usefulness of IBD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in identifying patients at risk for developing osteoporosis. We utilized institutional repository to identify patients seen in IBD center and extracted data on demographics, disease history, conventional, and nonconventional risk factors for osteoporosis and Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) findings. 59% of patients (1004/1703) in our IBD cohort had at least one risk factor for osteoporosis screening. DXA was documented in 263 patients with indication of screening (provider adherence, 26.2%), and of these, 196 patients had DXA completed ("at-risk" group). Ninety-five patients not meeting <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>-based risk factors also had DXA completed ("not at-risk" group). 139 (70.9%) patients in "at-risk" group had low BMD, while 51 (53.7%) of "not-at-risk" patients had low BMD. Majority of the patients with osteoporosis (83.3%) missed by the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> had low BMI. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that low BMI was the strongest risk factor for osteoporosis (OR 3.07; 95% CI, 1.47-6.42; P = 0.003). Provider adherence to <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> is suboptimal. Low BMI can identify majority of the patients with osteoporosis that are missed by <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3258816','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3258816"><span>Congruence of the <span class="hlt">current</span> practices in Hymenoptera venom allergic patients in Poland with EAACI <span class="hlt">guidelines</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Diwakar, Lavanya; Brzyski, Piotr; Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Beata; Lis, Grzegorz; Pietrzyk, Jacek J.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Venom immunotherapy (VIT) practice is the definitive treatment for patients with potentially fatal allergic reactions to Hymenoptera stings. The aim is assesing compliance of VIT practice in Poland with the <span class="hlt">current</span> European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) guidance. Material and methods A multicentre study was carried out using a structured questionnaire which was sent by post to all VIT practitioners in Poland. Some questionnaire items were altered, in comparison to original version by adding additional answer options or alowing multiple answer option. The response rate was 100%. The obtained results were compared with the published EAACI <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Results Twenty-six Polish centres took part in the survey. SSIgE and skin prick tests (SPT) are together used as the first line of investigation, whereas confirmatory intradermal tests (IDT) are applied in half of centres. Only a few centres measure baseline serum tryptase levels. The ultra-rush protocol is preferred. Antihistamine pre-medication is routinely practiced. A target dose equal to 100 µg is used in most centres. A 6-week interval between booster doses is the most frequent. Five years is considered as an optimal VIT duration. Before the VIT completion, SSIgE is evaluated in fifty percent of centres, whereas sting challenge is considered by half of responders. Conclusions There are some differences between <span class="hlt">current</span> practice in Poland and the EAACI recommendations, indicating areas requiring better compliance. Comparision between Poland and the United Kingdom revealed that health service organization and health care funding may play a major role in the provision of allergy services. This may affect the extent to which international guidance may be applied in individual countries. It is worth considering conducting the same survey in other European countries. PMID:22291828</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24946156','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24946156"><span>Evidence synthesis and <span class="hlt">guideline</span> development in genomic medicine: <span class="hlt">current</span> status and future prospects.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schully, Sheri D; Lam, Tram Kim; Dotson, W David; Chang, Christine Q; Aronson, Naomi; Birkeland, Marian L; Brewster, Stephanie Jo; Boccia, Stefania; Buchanan, Adam H; Calonge, Ned; Calzone, Kathleen; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Goddard, Katrina A B; Klein, Roger D; Klein, Teri E; Lau, Joseph; Long, Rochelle; Lyman, Gary H; Morgan, Rebecca L; Palmer, Christina G S; Relling, Mary V; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Swen, Jesse J; Terry, Sharon F; Williams, Marc S; Khoury, Muin J</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>With the accelerated implementation of genomic medicine, health-care providers will depend heavily on professional <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and recommendations. Because genomics affects many diseases across the life span, no single professional group covers the entirety of this rapidly developing field. To pursue a discussion of the minimal elements needed to develop evidence-based <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in genomics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute jointly held a workshop to engage representatives from 35 organizations with interest in genomics (13 of which make recommendations). The workshop explored methods used in evidence synthesis and <span class="hlt">guideline</span> development and initiated a dialogue to compare these methods and to assess whether they are consistent with the Institute of Medicine report "Clinical Practice <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> We Can Trust." The participating organizations that develop <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> or recommendations all had policies to manage <span class="hlt">guideline</span> development and group membership, and processes to address conflicts of interests. However, there was wide variation in the reliance on external reviews, regular updating of recommendations, and use of systematic reviews to assess the strength of scientific evidence. Ongoing efforts are required to establish criteria for <span class="hlt">guideline</span> development in genomic medicine as proposed by the Institute of Medicine.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29325218','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29325218"><span>EQUAL Candida Score: An ECMM score derived from <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> to measure QUAlity of Clinical Candidaemia Management.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mellinghoff, Sibylle C; Hoenigl, Martin; Koehler, Philipp; Kumar, Anil; Lagrou, Katrien; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Meis, Jacques F; Menon, Vidya; Rautemaa-Richardson, Riina; Cornely, Oliver A</p> <p>2018-05-01</p> <p>Candida species frequently cause blood stream infections and are reported to be the third to tenth most commonly isolated pathogens. <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> and standardised treatment algorithms provided by professional organisations aim to facilitate decision-making regarding diagnosis, management and treatment of candidaemia. In routine clinical practise, however, it may be challenging to comply with these <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. The reasons include lack of familiarity or feasibility to adherence, but also their length and complexity. There is no tool to measure <span class="hlt">guideline</span> adherence <span class="hlt">currently</span>. To provide such a tool, we reviewed the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> provided by the European Society for Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) and by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), and selected the strongest recommendations for management quality as the bases for our scoring tool. Factors incorporated were diagnostic (blood cultures, echocardiography, ophthalmoscopy, species identification) and follow-up procedures (repeat blood cultures until negative result) as well as key treatment parameters (echinocandin treatment, step down to fluconazole depending on susceptibility result, CVC removal). The EQUAL Candida Score weighs and aggregates factors recommended for the ideal management of candidaemia and provides a tool for antifungal stewardship as well as for measuring <span class="hlt">guideline</span> adherence. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JGRC..123.1457B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JGRC..123.1457B"><span>The Role of the New Zealand Plateau in the Tasman Sea Circulation and Separation of the East <span class="hlt">Australian</span> <span class="hlt">Current</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bull, Christopher Y. S.; Kiss, Andrew E.; van Sebille, Erik; Jourdain, Nicolas C.; England, Matthew H.</p> <p>2018-02-01</p> <p>The East <span class="hlt">Australian</span> <span class="hlt">Current</span> (EAC) plays a major role in regional climate, circulation, and ecosystems, but predicting future changes is hampered by limited understanding of the factors controlling EAC separation. While there has been speculation that the presence of New Zealand may be important for the EAC separation, the prevailing view is that the time-mean partial separation is set by the ocean's response to gradients in the wind stress curl. This study focuses on the role of New Zealand, and the associated adjacent bathymetry, in the partial separation of the EAC and ocean circulation in the Tasman Sea. Here utilizing an eddy-permitting ocean model (NEMO), we find that the complete removal of the New Zealand plateau leads to a smaller fraction of EAC transport heading east and more heading south, with the mean separation latitude shifting >100 km southward. To examine the underlying dynamics, we remove New Zealand with two linear models: the Sverdrup/Godfrey Island Rule and NEMO in linear mode. We find that linear processes and deep bathymetry play a major role in the mean Tasman Front position, whereas nonlinear processes are crucial for the extent of the EAC retroflection. Contrary to past work, we find that meridional gradients in the basin-wide wind stress curl are not the sole factor determining the latitude of EAC separation. We suggest that the Tasman Front location is set by either the maximum meridional gradient in the wind stress curl or the northern tip of New Zealand, whichever is furthest north.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=ethics+AND+medical+AND+profession&pg=6&id=EJ460721','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=ethics+AND+medical+AND+profession&pg=6&id=EJ460721"><span>An Overview of <span class="hlt">Current</span> <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Commercial Support of Continuing Medical Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Harrison, R. Van</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>A number of bodies have produced <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> concerning financial support from commercial companies for continuing medical education. Basic principles include independence of the continuing education provider, balanced content, no unusual benefits, and disclosure of potential for bias. (SK)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=313490&keyword=working+AND+performance&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="https://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=313490&keyword=working+AND+performance&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50"><span>Revision of OECD <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Genotoxicity Testing: <span class="hlt">Current</span> Status and Next Steps</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Over the past 30 years, assays have been developed to evaluate chemical genotoxicity. OECD Genotoxicity Test <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> (TG) describe assay procedures for regulatory safety testing. Since the last OECD TG revision (1997), there has been tremendous scientific and technological pro...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28170086','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28170086"><span>Cancer screening in the United States, 2017: A review of <span class="hlt">current</span> American Cancer Society <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and <span class="hlt">current</span> issues in cancer screening.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Smith, Robert A; Andrews, Kimberly S; Brooks, Durado; Fedewa, Stacey A; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Saslow, Debbie; Brawley, Otis W; Wender, Richard C</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Each year, the American Cancer Society publishes a summary of its <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for early cancer detection, data and trends in cancer screening rates, and select issues related to cancer screening. In this issue of the journal, the authors summarize <span class="hlt">current</span> American Cancer Society cancer screening <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, describe an update of their <span class="hlt">guideline</span> for using human papillomavirus vaccination for cancer prevention, describe updates in US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations for breast and colorectal cancer screening, discuss interim findings from the UK Collaborative Trial on Ovarian Cancer Screening, and provide the latest data on utilization of cancer screening from the National Health Interview Survey. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:100-121. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28710141','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28710141"><span>Perspective: Improving Nutritional <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Sustainable Health Policies: <span class="hlt">Current</span> Status and Perspectives.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Magni, Paolo; Bier, Dennis M; Pecorelli, Sergio; Agostoni, Carlo; Astrup, Arne; Brighenti, Furio; Cook, Robert; Folco, Emanuela; Fontana, Luigi; Gibson, Robert A; Guerra, Ranieri; Guyatt, Gordon H; Ioannidis, John Pa; Jackson, Ann S; Klurfeld, David M; Makrides, Maria; Mathioudakis, Basil; Monaco, Alessandro; Patel, Chirag J; Racagni, Giorgio; Schünemann, Holger J; Shamir, Raanan; Zmora, Niv; Peracino, Andrea</p> <p>2017-07-01</p> <p>A large body of evidence supports the notion that incorrect or insufficient nutrition contributes to disease development. A pivotal goal is thus to understand what exactly is appropriate and what is inappropriate in food ingestion and the consequent nutritional status and health. The effective application of these concepts requires the translation of scientific information into practical approaches that have a tangible and measurable impact at both individual and population levels. The agenda for the future is expected to support available methodology in nutrition research to personalize <span class="hlt">guideline</span> recommendations, properly grading the quality of the available evidence, promoting adherence to the well-established evidence hierarchy in nutrition, and enhancing strategies for appropriate vetting and transparent reporting that will solidify the recommendations for health promotion. The final goal is to build a constructive coalition among scientists, policy makers, and communication professionals for sustainable health and nutritional policies. <span class="hlt">Currently</span>, a strong rationale and available data support a personalized dietary approach according to personal variables, including sex and age, circulating metabolic biomarkers, food quality and intake frequency, lifestyle variables such as physical activity, and environmental variables including one's microbiome profile. There is a strong and urgent need to develop a successful commitment among all the stakeholders to define novel and sustainable approaches toward the management of the health value of nutrition at individual and population levels. Moving forward requires adherence to well-established principles of evidence evaluation as well as identification of effective tools to obtain better quality evidence. Much remains to be done in the near future. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29860285','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29860285"><span>Investigating the Effectiveness of <span class="hlt">Current</span> and Modified World Health Organization <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for the Control of Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Farrell, Sam H; Coffeng, Luc E; Truscott, James E; Werkman, Marleen; Toor, Jaspreet; de Vlas, Sake J; Anderson, Roy M</p> <p>2018-06-01</p> <p>Considerable efforts have been made to better understand the effectiveness of large-scale preventive chemotherapy therapy for the control of morbidity caused by infection with soil-transmitted helminths (STHs): Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and the 2 hookworm species, Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale. <span class="hlt">Current</span> World Health Organization (WHO) <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for STH control include mass drug administration (MDA) programs based on prevalence measurements, aiming at reducing morbidity in pre-school-aged children (pre-SAC) and school-aged children (SAC) by lowering the prevalence of moderate- to heavy-intensity infections to <1%. We project the likely impact of following the <span class="hlt">current</span> WHO <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and assess whether the WHO morbidity goals will be achieved across a range of transmission settings. We also investigate modifications that could be made to the <span class="hlt">current</span> WHO treatment <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, and project their potential impacts in achieving morbidity and transmission control. While the standard <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are sufficient at low transmission levels, community-wide treatment (ie, involving pre-SAC, SAC, and adults) is essential if WHO morbidity goals are to be met in moderate- to high-transmission settings. Moreover, removing the recommendation of decreasing the treatment frequency at midline (5-6 years after the start of MDA) further improves the likelihood of achieving morbidity control in SAC. We meld analyses based on 2 mathematical models of parasite transmission and control by MDA for the dominant STH species, to generate a unified treatment approach applicable across all settings, regardless of which STH infection is most common. We recommend clearly defined changes to the <span class="hlt">current</span> WHO <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28464833','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28464833"><span>Light and sporadic physical activity overlooked by <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> makes older women more active than older men.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Amagasa, Shiho; Fukushima, Noritoshi; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Takamiya, Tomoko; Oka, Koichiro; Inoue, Shigeru</p> <p>2017-05-02</p> <p>Men are generally believed to be more physically active than women when evaluated using <span class="hlt">current</span> physical activity (PA) <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, which count only moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in bouts lasting at least 10 min. However, it remains unclear men are truly more physically active provided that all-intensity PA are evaluated. This population based cross-sectional study aimed to examine gender differences in patterns of objectively-assessed PA in older adults. One thousand two hundred ten community-dwelling Japanese older adults who were originally randomly selected from residential registry of three municipalities were asked to respond a questionnaire and wear an accelerometer (HJA-350IT, Omron Healthcare). The prevalence of achieving <span class="hlt">current</span> PA <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, ≥150 min/week MVPA in bouts lasting at least 10 min, was calculated. Gender differences in volume of each-intensity activity (METs-hour) were assessed by analysis of covariance after adjustment for age and wear time. Data from 450 (255 men, mean 74 years) participants who had valid accelerometer data were analyzed. Women were less likely to meet the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> (men: 31.0, women: 21.5%; p < 0.05). However, women accumulated more light-intensity PA (LPA) and short-bout (1-9 min) MVPA, and thus established higher total volume of PA (men: 22.0 METs-hour/day, women: 23.9 METs-hour/day) (p < 0.05). Older women were less active when evaluated against <span class="hlt">current</span> PA <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, but more active by total PA. Considering accumulated evidence on health benefits of LPA and short-bout MVPA, our findings highlight the potential for the limitation of assessing PA using <span class="hlt">current</span> PA <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5982801','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5982801"><span>Investigating the Effectiveness of <span class="hlt">Current</span> and Modified World Health Organization <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for the Control of Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Farrell, Sam H; Coffeng, Luc E; Truscott, James E; Werkman, Marleen; Toor, Jaspreet; de Vlas, Sake J; Anderson, Roy M</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>Abstract Background Considerable efforts have been made to better understand the effectiveness of large-scale preventive chemotherapy therapy for the control of morbidity caused by infection with soil-transmitted helminths (STHs): Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and the 2 hookworm species, Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale. <span class="hlt">Current</span> World Health Organization (WHO) <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for STH control include mass drug administration (MDA) programs based on prevalence measurements, aiming at reducing morbidity in pre–school-aged children (pre-SAC) and school-aged children (SAC) by lowering the prevalence of moderate- to heavy-intensity infections to <1%. Methods We project the likely impact of following the <span class="hlt">current</span> WHO <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and assess whether the WHO morbidity goals will be achieved across a range of transmission settings. We also investigate modifications that could be made to the <span class="hlt">current</span> WHO treatment <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, and project their potential impacts in achieving morbidity and transmission control. Results While the standard <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are sufficient at low transmission levels, community-wide treatment (ie, involving pre-SAC, SAC, and adults) is essential if WHO morbidity goals are to be met in moderate- to high-transmission settings. Moreover, removing the recommendation of decreasing the treatment frequency at midline (5–6 years after the start of MDA) further improves the likelihood of achieving morbidity control in SAC. Conclusions We meld analyses based on 2 mathematical models of parasite transmission and control by MDA for the dominant STH species, to generate a unified treatment approach applicable across all settings, regardless of which STH infection is most common. We recommend clearly defined changes to the <span class="hlt">current</span> WHO <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. PMID:29860285</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27442023','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27442023"><span>Do <span class="hlt">current</span> national and international <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> have specific recommendations for older adults with bipolar disorder? A brief report.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dols, Annemiek; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Rej, Soham; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Gildengers, Ariel G; Almeida, Osvaldo P; Shulman, Kenneth I; Sajatovic, Martha</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Older adults with bipolar disorder (OABD) are a growing segment of patients with bipolar disorder (BD) for which specific <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are warranted. Although, OABD are frequently excluded from randomized controlled trials due to their age or somatic comorbidity, more treatment data from a variety of sources have become available in recent years. It is expected that at least some of this emerging information on OABD would be incorporated into treatment <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> available to clinicians around the world. The International Society of Bipolar Disorders OABD task force compiled and compared recommendations from <span class="hlt">current</span> national and international <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> that specifically address geriatric or older individuals with BD (from year 2005 onwards). There were 34 <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, representing six continents and 19 countries. The majority of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> had no separate section on OABD. General principles for treating OABD with medication are recommended to be similar to those for younger adults, with special caution for side effects due to somatic comorbidity and concomitant medications. Therapeutic lithium serum levels are suggested to be lower but recommendations are very general and mostly not informed by specific research evidence. There is a lack of emphasis of OABD-specific issues in existing <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Given the substantial clinical heterogeneity in BD across the life span, along with the rapidly expanding population of older individuals worldwide, and limited mental health workforce with geriatric expertise, it is critical that additional effort and resources be devoted to studying treatment interventions specific to OABD and that treatment <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> reflect research findings. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27374247','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27374247"><span>Toward best practice in Human Machine Interface design for older drivers: A review of <span class="hlt">current</span> design <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Young, K L; Koppel, S; Charlton, J L</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>Older adults are the fastest growing segment of the driving population. While there is a strong emphasis for older people to maintain their mobility, the safety of older drivers is a serious community concern. Frailty and declines in a range of age-related sensory, cognitive, and physical impairments can place older drivers at an increased risk of crash-related injuries and death. A number of studies have indicated that in-vehicle technologies such as Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) and In-Vehicle Information Systems (IVIS) may provide assistance to older drivers. However, these technologies will only benefit older drivers if their design is congruent with the complex needs and diverse abilities of this driving cohort. The design of ADAS and IVIS is largely informed by automotive Human Machine Interface (HMI) <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. However, it is unclear to what extent the declining sensory, cognitive and physical capabilities of older drivers are addressed in the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. This paper provides a review of key <span class="hlt">current</span> design <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for IVIS and ADAS with respect to the extent they address age-related changes in functional capacities. The review revealed that most of the HMI <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> do not address design issues related to older driver impairments. In fact, in many <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> driver age and sensory cognitive and physical impairments are not mentioned at all and where reference is made, it is typically very broad. Prescriptive advice on how to actually design a system so that it addresses the needs and limitations of older drivers is not provided. In order for older drivers to reap the full benefits that in-vehicle technology can afford, it is critical that further work establish how older driver limitations and capabilities can be supported by the system design process, including their inclusion into HMI design <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24511236','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24511236"><span>Could a revision of the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for cancer drug use improve the quality of cancer treatment?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lippert, Theodor H; Ruoff, Hans-Jörg; Volm, Manfred</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are indispensable for such a variable disease as malignant solid tumors, with the complex possibilities of drug treatment. The <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> may be criticized on several points, however. First, there is a lack of information on the outcome of treatment, such as the expected success and failure rates. Treating not only drug responders but also nonresponders, that is, patients with drug resistance, must result in failures. There is no mention of the possibility of excluding the drug nonresponders, identifiable by special laboratory tests and no consideration is given to the different side effects of the recommended drug regimens. Nor are there any instructions concerning tumor cases for which anticancer drug treatment is futile. In such cases, early palliative care may lead to significant improvements in both life quality and life expectancy. Not least, there is no transparency concerning the preparation of the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>: persons cannot be identified who could give a statement of conflicts of interest, and responsibility is assumed only by anonymous medical associations. A revision of the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> could considerably improve cancer treatment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16395493','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16395493"><span>[Confronting the practice of surgery on differentiated thyroid cancer with <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in Germany. A multicenter trial].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schwab, R; Wieler, H; Birtel, S; Ostwald-Lenz, E; Kaiser, K P; Becker, H P</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>For the surgical therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer precise <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are applied by the German medical societies. In a retrospective multicenter study, we investigated the following issues: Are the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> respected? Is there a difference concerning the surgical radicalism and the outcome? Does the perioperative morbidity increase with the higher radicalism of the procedure? Data gained from 102 patients from 17 regional referral hospitals who underwent surgery for thyroid cancer and a following rodioiodine treatment (mean follow up: 42.7 [24-79] months) were analyzed. At least 71 criterias were analyzed in a SPSS file. 46.1% of carcinomas were incidentally detected during goiter surgery. The thyroid cancer (papillary n = 78; follicular n = 24) occurred in 87% unilateral and in 13% bilateral. Papillary carcinomas < 1 cm were detected in 25 cases; in five of these cases (20%) contralateral carcinomas < 1 cm were found. There were significant differences concerning the surgical radicalism: a range from hemithyroidectomy to radical thyroidectomy with lateral neck dissection. Analysis of the histopathologic reports revealed that lymph node dissection was not performed according to <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in 55% of all patients. The perioperative morbidity was lower in departments with a high case load. The postoperative dysfunction of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (mean: 7.9% total / 4.9% nerves at risk) variated highly, depending on differences in radicalism and hospitals. Up to now these variations in surgical treatment have shown no differences in their outcome and survival rates, when followed by radioiodine therapy. <span class="hlt">Current</span> surgical regimes did not follow the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in more than 50% of all cases. This low acceptance has to be discussed. The actual discussion about principles of treatment regarding, the so-called papillary microcarcinomas (old term) has to be respected within the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5060548','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5060548"><span>Exploring the impact of training on the experience of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> support group leaders: <span class="hlt">current</span> practices and implications for research</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zordan, Rachel D.; Juraskova, Ilona; Butow, Phyllis N; Jolan, Afsaneh; Kirsten, Laura; Chapman, Julie; Sedgwick, Christine; Charles, Margaret; Sundquist, Kendra</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Abstract Background  Existing literature suggests that the effectiveness of a support group is linked to the qualifications, skills and experience of the group leader. Yet, little research has been conducted into the experiences of trained vs. untrained support group leaders of chronic‐illness support groups. The <span class="hlt">current</span> study aimed to compare the experience of leaders, trained vs. untrained in group facilitation, in terms of challenges, rewards and psychological wellbeing. Methods  A total of 358 <span class="hlt">Australian</span> leaders of cancer and multiple sclerosis (MS) support groups, recruited through State Cancer Councils and the MS society (response rate of 66%), completed a mailed survey. Results  Compared with untrained leaders, those with training were significantly younger, leading smaller groups and facilitating more groups, more frequently (all P < 0.05). Trained leaders were more likely to be female, educated beyond high school, paid to facilitate, a recipient of formal supervision and more experienced (in years) (all P < 0.01). Untrained leaders reported more challenges than trained leaders (P < 0.03), particularly struggling with being contacted outside of group meetings (52%) and a lack of leadership training (47%). Regardless of level of training, leaders identified a number of unmet support and training needs. Overwhelmingly, leaders found their facilitation role rewarding and the majority reported a high level of psychological wellbeing. Conclusions  Group facilitator training has the potential to reduce the burden of support group leadership. Developing interventions to assist support group leaders will be particularly beneficial for leaders with minimal or no training group facilitation training. PMID:20550596</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=work+AND+hours&pg=3&id=EJ808530','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=work+AND+hours&pg=3&id=EJ808530"><span>New ACGME Work-Hour <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> and Their Impact on <span class="hlt">Current</span> Residency Training Practices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sattar, S. Pirzada; Basith, Fatima; Madison, James; Bhatia, Subhash C.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Objective: Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has introduced new work-hour <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for residents in ACGME accredited programs that were implemented in July 2003. The new ACGME policies impact several practices in various psychiatry residency programs across the U.S., even though psychiatry has not been at the forefront…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27079341','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27079341"><span>Diabetic Dyslipidemia Review: An Update on <span class="hlt">Current</span> Concepts and Management <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> of Diabetic Dyslipidemia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dake, Andrew W; Sora, Nicoleta D</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes and the major source of cost in the care of diabetes. Treatment of dyslipidemia with cholesterol-lowering medications has been shown to decrease cardiovascular events. However, available <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the treatment of dyslipidemia often contain significant differences in their recommendations. Lipid <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> from National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, American Diabetes Association and American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology were reviewed. In addition a literature review was performed using PubMed to research diabetic peculiarities to the topic of lipids. Summarized within this article are the aforementioned, commonly-used <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> as they relate to diabetes, as well as information regarding the diabetic phenotype of dislipidemia and the association between statins and new-onset diabetes. While the multitude of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and the differences between them may contribute to confusion for practitioners, they are best viewed as tools to help tailor appropriate treatment plans for individual patients. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18617380','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18617380"><span>Using laboratory measurements to predict in-flight desaturation in respiratory patients: are <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> appropriate?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Robson, A G; Lenney, J; Innes, J A</p> <p>2008-11-01</p> <p>In an attempt to guide physicians asked by respiratory patients for advice on flight fitness, the British Thoracic Society (BTS) have published <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on fitness to fly. The main potential hazard is hypobaric hypoxia, and efforts have focused on the prediction of hypoxia in individuals. The present study examines 10 years' experience of hypoxic challenge (HC) of respiratory patients to evaluate if the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> recommended by the BTS are appropriate. One hundred and eighteen patients (67 female, mean age 65.6+/-11.4 (SD) years) were referred for assessment. Patients underwent HC using a 40% Venturi mask supplied with 100% N(2) which lowered the F(i)O(2) to 15.1%. A further 13 patients on long-term oxygen therapy also underwent HC whilst receiving supplemental oxygen. In agreement with the BTS <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, all patients with a sea level SpO(2) of over 95% maintained their SpO(2) > or = 90% during HC. One third of patients with sea level SpO(2) of 92-95%, but no other risk factor (as defined by the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>) also desaturated below 90% during HC. Thirty-two patients were assessed as fit to fly with supplemental oxygen. Our results support the BTS <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for patients with a sea level SpO(2) > 95% but suggest that some revision is required for patients with a sea level SpO(2) of 92-95%. It was not possible to predict from either initial SpO(2) or spirometry which individuals were at risk of desaturation below 90% during hypoxic challenge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3939793','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3939793"><span>Pharmacogenomic Testing for Neuropsychiatric Drugs: <span class="hlt">Current</span> Status of Drug Labeling, <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Using Genetic Information, and Test Options</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Drozda, Katarzyna; Müller, Daniel J.; Bishop, Jeffrey R.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Advancements in pharmacogenomics have introduced an increasing number of opportunities to bring personalized medicine into clinical practice. Understanding how and when to use this technology to help guide pharmacotherapy used to treat neuropsychiatric conditions remains a challenge for many clinicians. <span class="hlt">Currently</span>, <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> exist to assist clinicians in the use of genetic information for drug selection and/or dosing for the tricyclic antidepressants, carbamazepine, and phenytoin. Additional language in the product labeling suggests that genetic information may also be useful for assessing the starting and target doses, as well as drug interaction potential, for a number of other medications used to treat psychiatric and neurological conditions. In this review, we outline the <span class="hlt">current</span> status of pharmacogenomic testing for neuropsychiatric drugs as it pertains to information contained in drug labeling, consensus <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, and test panels, as well as considerations related to obtaining tests for patients. PMID:24523097</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24505363','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24505363"><span>How <span class="hlt">current</span> Clinical Practice <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for low back pain reflect Traditional Medicine in East Asian Countries: a systematic review of Clinical Practice <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> and systematic reviews.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cho, Hyun-Woo; Hwang, Eui-Hyoung; Lim, Byungmook; Heo, Kwang-Ho; Liu, Jian-Ping; Tsutani, Kiichiro; Lee, Myeong Soo; Shin, Byung-Cheul</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The aims of this study were to investigate whether there is a gap between evidence of traditional medicine (TM) interventions in East-Asian countries from the <span class="hlt">current</span> Clinical Practice <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> (CPGs) and evidence from <span class="hlt">current</span> systematic reviews and meta-analyses (SR-MAs) and to analyze the impact of this gap on present CPGs. We examined 5 representative TM interventions in the health care systems of East-Asian countries. We searched seven relevant databases for CPGs to identify whether core CPGs included evidence of TM interventions, and we searched 11 databases for SR-MAs to re-evaluate <span class="hlt">current</span> evidence on TM interventions. We then compared the gap between the evidence from CPGs and SR-MAs. Thirteen CPGs and 22 SR-MAs met our inclusion criteria. Of the 13 CPGs, 7 CPGs (54%) mentioned TM interventions, and all were for acupuncture (only one was for both acupuncture and acupressure). However, the CPGs did not recommend acupuncture (or acupressure). Of 22 SR-MAs, 16 were for acupuncture, 5 for manual therapy, 1 for cupping, and none for moxibustion and herbal medicine. Comparing the evidence from CPGs and SR-MAs, an underestimation or omission of evidence for acupuncture, cupping, and manual therapy in <span class="hlt">current</span> CPGs was detected. Thus, applying the results from the SR-MAs, we moderately recommend acupuncture for chronic LBP, but we inconclusively recommend acupuncture for (sub)acute LBP due to the limited <span class="hlt">current</span> evidence. Furthermore, we weakly recommend cupping and manual therapy for both (sub)acute and chronic LBP. We cannot provide recommendations for moxibustion and herbal medicine due to a lack of evidence. The <span class="hlt">current</span> CPGs did not fully reflect the evidence for TM interventions. As relevant studies such as SR-MAs are conducted and evidence increases, the <span class="hlt">current</span> evidence on acupuncture, cupping, and manual therapy should be rigorously considered in the process of developing or updating the CPG system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29620410','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29620410"><span>Sedation assisted by an endoscopist (SAE) for complex endoscopic procedures. Is it time to change the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hernán Ocaña, Pablo</p> <p>2018-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Currently</span>, sedation in endoscopic procedures is considered a necessary condition and a criterion of quality in digestive endoscopy. The role of SAE in conventional endoscopic procedures is clearly established in clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, but this is not so clear in complex endoscopic procedures, such as ERCP. In recent years, numerous studies have been published, with results similar to those noticed in this article, endorsing the safety, efficacy and efficiency of SAE, when performed by properly trained staff.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27919525','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27919525"><span><span class="hlt">Current</span> and potential cyber attacks on medical journals; <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for improving security.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dadkhah, Mehdi; Seno, Seyed Amin Hosseini; Borchardt, Glenn</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>At the moment, scholarly publishing is faced with much academic misconduct and threats such as predatory journals, hijacked journals, phishing, and other scams. In response, we have been discussing this misconduct and trying to increase the awareness of researchers, but it seems that there is a lack of research that presents <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for editors to help them protect themselves against these threats. It seems that information security is missing in some parts of scholarly publishing that particularly involves medical journals. In this paper, we explain different types of cyber-attacks that especially threaten editors and academic journals. We then explain the details involved in each type of attack. Finally, we present general <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for detection and prevention of the attacks. In some cases, we use small experiments to show that our claim is true. Finally, we conclude the paper with a prioritization of these attacks. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23221495','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23221495"><span><span class="hlt">Current</span> management of gender identity disorder in childhood and adolescence: <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, barriers and areas of controversy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shumer, Daniel E; Spack, Norman P</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>The approach to gender identity disorder (GID) in childhood and adolescence has been rapidly evolving and is in a state of flux. In an effort to form management recommendations on the basis of the available literature, The Endocrine Society published clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in 2009. The <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> recommend against sex role change in prepubertal children, but they recommend the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists to suppress puberty in adolescence, and the use of cross-sex hormones starting around age 16 for eligible patients. In actual practice, the approach to GID is quite variable due to continued lack of consensus and specific barriers to treatment that are unique to GID. Recent literature has focused on the mental health approach to prepubertal children with GID and short-term outcomes using pubertal suppression and cross-sex steroids in adolescents with GID. This review will describe the literature published since the release of The Endocrine Society <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> regarding the management of GID in both children and adolescents.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18972322','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18972322"><span>Evidence based <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and <span class="hlt">current</span> practice for physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Walsh, Nicola E; Hurley, Michael V</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>To document physiotherapy provision for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in relation to the United Kingdom (UK) recently published National Institute of health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for osteoarthritis. Questionnaire survey of chartered physiotherapists. 300 postal questionnaires were distributed to Physiotherapy Departments requesting information regarding source of referrals, treatment aims, preferred methods of treatment and service delivery. Responses were received from 83 physiotherapists (28 %), predominantly working in the UK National Health Service. Approximately equal numbers of referrals came from primary and secondary care. Aims of physiotherapy management were to; encourage self-management; increase strength and range of movement; reduce pain; and improve function. To achieve these, exercise was utilised by 100% of practitioners, often supplemented with electrotherapeutic modalities (66%), manual therapy (64%) and acupuncture (60%). The majority of patients received individual treatment for a total contact time of 1-2 hours, whilst most group interventions lasted 5-6 hours. Approximately half (54%) of respondents reported using outcome measures to determine treatment efficacy. Although knee OA is usually managed in primary care, the similar number of referrals from primary and secondary care may suggest a deviation from evidence-based management <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. The <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>' recommendations of exercise, patient education and self-management are observed by physiotherapists, but other modalities are often used despite poor or no research evidence supporting their efficacy. Whether any of these interventions are clinically beneficial is speculative as treatment outcomes were frequently under-evaluated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18076980','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18076980"><span>Retrospective report of social withdrawal during adolescence and <span class="hlt">current</span> maladjustment in young adulthood: cross-cultural comparisons between <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and South Korean students.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kim, Jinkwan; Rapee, Ronald M; Ja Oh, Kyung; Moon, Hye-Shin</p> <p>2008-10-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">current</span> study investigated associations between the frequency of and motivations for social withdrawal during adolescence and emotional distress in young adulthood. Perceived motivations for social withdrawal included unsociability, isolation, shyness, and low mood. Social withdrawal during adolescence was assessed using a retrospective questionnaire completed by <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and Korean university students. They also completed measures of general self-worth, social relationships, loneliness, social anxiety, and depression at university. Partial correlations and path analyses revealed that different motivations for social withdrawal had different risk status for later adjustment across the two samples. In particular, it appeared that shy and unsociable individuals in Korea showed better social and emotional adjustment than their counterparts in Australia. In contrast, social relationships of sad/depressed and isolated respondents in Korea appeared to be more seriously impaired than their <span class="hlt">Australian</span> counterparts. These cross-cultural differences are discussed in terms of socio-cultural values and environments unique to the two countries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011DSRII..58..678S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011DSRII..58..678S"><span>Characteristic ichthyoplankton taxa in the separation zone of the East <span class="hlt">Australian</span> <span class="hlt">Current</span>: Larval assemblages as tracers of coastal mixing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Syahailatua, Augy; Roughan, Moninya; Suthers, Iain M.</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>Ichthyoplankton assemblages were compared between regions dominated by the oligotrophic East <span class="hlt">Australian</span> <span class="hlt">Current</span> (EAC) and the inner-shelf waters off southeastern Australia, to determine if the early life history of fish was related to the separation of the EAC from the coast, producing different water masses as well as characteristic taxa. Samples were collected at the surface and in sub-surface waters, at 50 and 100 m isobath stations, during two summer research voyages in November 1998 and January 1999. On both voyages the study region was characterized by coastal and EAC waters in the north (˜31°S), and in the south by topographically induced upwelling (˜31°S), associated with narrowing of the continental shelf and separation of the EAC from the coast. Among the 111 families of larval fish, we observed distinctive assemblages of ichthyoplankton associated with the two different water masses. A greater abundance of the Carangidae, Labridae, Lutjanidae, Microcanthidae, Myctophidae and Scombridae was associated with the nutrient poor EAC water mass, while the Callionymidae, Clupeidae, Platycephalidae and Sillaginidae were mostly found in the cooler and/or fresher inner-shelf water mass. We assessed these patterns with opportunistic samples from an unusual, wind-driven upwelling event in the north (˜31°S) earlier in the November voyage. The relative abundance of these 10 characteristic families distinguished this wind-driven upwelling event from the subsequent relaxation and predominance of the EAC assemblage at this location just 6 d later. Distinctive and abundant families such as larval clupeids, relative to larval carangids, could be a useful marker of inner-shelf, EAC and mixed water masses in the absence of robust hydrographic data. This and related studies indicate contrast in early life histories of Sardinops sagax and Trachurus spp., which appear to spawn respectively in the inner-shelf and outer-shelf waters. The post-flexion stages of S. sagax</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24796897','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24796897"><span>Carotid and coronary disease management prior to open and endovascular aortic surgery. What are the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thompson, J P</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>Several bodies produce broadly concurring and updated <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the evaluation and treatment of cardiovascular disease in both surgical and non-surgical patients. Recent developments include revised recommendations on preoperative stress testing, referral for possible coronary revascularization and medical management. It is recognized that non-invasive cardiac tests are relatively poor at predicting perioperative risk, and "prophylactic" coronary revascularization has a limited role. The planned aortic intervention (open or endovascular repair) also influences preoperative management. Patients presenting for elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair should only be referred for cardiological testing if they have active symptoms of coronary artery disease (CAD), known CAD and poor functional exercise capacity, or multiple risk factors for CAD. Coronary revascularization before AAA surgery should be limited to patients with established indications, so cardiac stress testing should only be performed if it would change management i.e. the patient is a candidate for and would benefit from coronary revascularization. When endovascular aortic repair is planned, it is reasonable to proceed to surgery without further cardiac stress testing or evaluation unless otherwise indicated. All non-emergency patients require medical optimization, but perioperative beta blockade benefits only certain patients. Some of the data informing recent <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> have been questioned and some <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are being revised. <span class="hlt">Current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> do not specifically address the management of patients with known or suspected carotid artery disease who may require aortic surgery. For these patients, an individualized approach is required. This review considers recent <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Algorithms for investigation and management based on their recommendations are included.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27697938','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27697938"><span>Evidence from prospective cohort studies does not support <span class="hlt">current</span> dietary fat <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>: a systematic review and meta-analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Harcombe, Zoë; Baker, Julien S; Davies, Bruce</p> <p>2017-12-01</p> <p>National dietary <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were introduced in 1977 and 1983, by the US and UK governments to reduce coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality by reducing dietary fat intake. Our 2016 systematic review examined the epidemiological evidence available to the dietary committees at the time; we found no support for the recommendations to restrict dietary fat. The present investigation extends our work by re-examining the totality of epidemiological evidence <span class="hlt">currently</span> available relating to dietary fat <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. A systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies <span class="hlt">currently</span> available, which examined the relationship between dietary fat, serum cholesterol and the development of CHD, were undertaken. Across 7 studies, involving 89 801 participants (94% male), there were 2024 deaths from CHD during the mean follow-up of 11.9±5.6 years. The death rate from CHD was 2.25%. Eight data sets were suitable for inclusion in meta-analysis; all excluded participants with previous heart disease. Risk ratios (RRs) from meta-analysis were not statistically significant for CHD deaths and total or saturated fat consumption. The RR from meta-analysis for total fat intake and CHD deaths was 1.04 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.10). The RR from meta-analysis for saturated fat intake and CHD deaths was 1.08 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.25). Epidemiological evidence to date found no significant difference in CHD mortality and total fat or saturated fat intake and thus does not support the present dietary fat <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. The evidence per se lacks generalisability for population-wide <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22012113','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22012113"><span>Usual sodium intakes compared with <span class="hlt">current</span> dietary <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> --- United States, 2005-2008.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-21</p> <p>High sodium intake can increase blood pressure and the risk for heart disease and stroke. According to the Dietary <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Americans, 2010, persons in the United States aged ≥2 years should limit daily sodium intake to <2,300 mg. Subpopulations that would benefit from further reducing sodium intake to 1,500 mg daily include 1) persons aged ≥51 years, 2) blacks, and 3) persons with hypertension, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease. To estimate the proportion of the U.S. population for whom the 1,500 mg recommendation applies and to assess the usual sodium intake for those persons, CDC and the National Institutes of Health used data for 2005-2008 from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). This report summarizes the results of that assessment, which determined that, although 47.6% of persons aged ≥2 years meet the criteria to limit their daily sodium intake to 1,500 mg, the usual daily sodium intake for 98.6% of those persons was >1,500 mg. Moreover, for 88.2% of the remaining U.S. population, daily sodium intake was greater than the recommended <2,300 mg. New population-based strategies and increased public health and private efforts will be needed to meet the Dietary <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> recommendations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27832668','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27832668"><span>[<span class="hlt">Current</span> Perceptions of Lipofilling on the Basis of the New <span class="hlt">Guideline</span> on "Autologous Fat Grafting"].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Prantl, L; Rennekampff, H O; Giunta, R E; Harder, Y; von Heimburg, D; Heine, N; Herold, C; Kneser, U; Lampert, F; Machens, H G; Mirastschijski, U; Müller, D; Pallua, N; Schantz, T; Schönborn, A; Ueberreiter, K; Witzel, C H; Bull, G; Rezek, D; Sattler, G; Vogt, P M; Horch, R E</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Introduction: Autologous fat transfer has recently become an increasingly popular surgical procedure and comprises harvesting, processing and transplantation of adipose tissue, as well as professional follow-up care. This method, as a surgical procedure, can be utilised for trauma-, disease- or age-related soft tissue volume deficits and soft tissue augmentation. As usage is increasing, but the variables of fat harvest, specific indications and fashion of fat transfer are poorly defined, there is a great demand for development of a <span class="hlt">guideline</span> in the field of reconstructive and aesthetic surgery. Methods: All relevant points were discussed within the scope of a consensus conference including a nominal group process of all societies involved in the procedure and ratified with a strong consensus (>95%). Literature from the standard medical databases over the last 10 years was retrieved, studied and specific <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were concluded. Results: Consensus was achieved among all professionals involved on the following points: 1. definition 2. indication/contraindication, 3. preoperative measures 4. donor sites 5. techniques of processing 6. transplantation 7. follow-up care 8. storage 9. efficacy 10. documentation 11. evaluation of patient safety. Conclusion: Definite indications and professional expertise are paramount for autologous fat tissue transfer. Successful transfers are based on the use of correct methods as well as specific instruments and materials. Autologous adipose tissue transplantation is considered to be a safe procedure in reconstructive and aesthetic surgery, due to the low rate of postoperative complications and sequelae. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28530474','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28530474"><span>Optimizing Preseason Training Loads in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Football.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Carey, David L; Crow, Justin; Ong, Kok-Leong; Blanch, Peter; Morris, Meg E; Dascombe, Ben J; Crossley, Kay M</p> <p>2018-02-01</p> <p>To investigate whether preseason training plans for <span class="hlt">Australian</span> football can be computer generated using <span class="hlt">current</span> training-load <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> to optimize injury-risk reduction and performance improvement. A constrained optimization problem was defined for daily total and sprint distance, using the preseason schedule of an elite <span class="hlt">Australian</span> football team as a template. Maximizing total training volume and maximizing Banister-model-projected performance were both considered optimization objectives. Cumulative workload and acute:chronic workload-ratio constraints were placed on training programs to reflect <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on relative and absolute training loads for injury-risk reduction. Optimization software was then used to generate preseason training plans. The optimization framework was able to generate training plans that satisfied relative and absolute workload constraints. Increasing the off-season chronic training loads enabled the optimization algorithm to prescribe higher amounts of "safe" training and attain higher projected performance levels. Simulations showed that using a Banister-model objective led to plans that included a taper in training load prior to competition to minimize fatigue and maximize projected performance. In contrast, when the objective was to maximize total training volume, more frequent training was prescribed to accumulate as much load as possible. Feasible training plans that maximize projected performance and satisfy injury-risk constraints can be automatically generated by an optimization problem for <span class="hlt">Australian</span> football. The optimization methods allow for individualized training-plan design and the ability to adapt to changing training objectives and different training-load metrics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5319376','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5319376"><span>Upper extremity sarcoma: impact of <span class="hlt">current</span> practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and controversies on reconstructive approaches</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dobke, Marek; Mackert, Gina A.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The goals of sarcoma management include both a cure and the functional preservation of involved tissues and adjacent critical structures with common opinions favoring immediate reconstruction. The question arises whether these goals are contradictory. This paper discusses the question based on the experience of 28 patients with different types of extremity sarcoma, with 24 surgically treated by the University of California San Diego (UCSD) orthopedic and plastic surgery team (2011–2016) and the collection of evidence from published practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, reviews, case studies, and clinical trials. Included are the impact of limb-sparing and functional reconstructive concepts, efforts regarding the adequacy of surgical margins, and the rationale of immediate versus delayed reconstructive approaches, and the disease-free status of sarcoma management. PMID:28220751</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9307551','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9307551"><span><span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for the use of carotid endarterectomy: <span class="hlt">current</span> recommendations from the Canadian Neurosurgical Society.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Findlay, J M; Tucker, W S; Ferguson, G G; Holness, R O; Wallace, M C; Wong, J H</p> <p>1997-09-15</p> <p>To develop <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on the suitability of patients for carotid endarterectomy (CEA). For atherosclerotic carotid stenosis that has resulted in retinal or cerebral ischemia: antiplatelet drugs or CEA. For asymptomatic carotid stenosis: CEA or no surgery. Risk of stroke and death. Trials comparing CEA with nonsurgical management of carotid stenosis. Greatest weight was given to findings that were highly significant both statistically and clinically. Benefit: reduction in the risk of stroke. Major harms: iatrogenic stroke, cardiac complications and death secondary to surgical manipulations of the artery or the systemic stress of surgery. Costs were not considered. CEA is clearly recommended for patients with surgically accessible internal carotid artery (ICA) stenoses equal to or greater than 70% of the more distal, normal ICA lumen diameter, providing: (1) the stenosis is symptomatic, causing transient ischemic attacks or nondisabling stroke (including retinal infarction); (2) there is no worse distal, ipsilateral, carotid distribution arterial disease; (3) the patient is in stable medical condition; and (4) the rates of major surgical complications (stroke and death) among patients of the treating surgeon are less than 6%. Surgery is not recommended for asymptomatic stenoses of less than 60%. Symptomatic stenoses of less than 70% and asymptomatic stenoses of greater than 60% are uncertain indications. For these indications, consideration should be given to (1) patient presentation, age and medical condition; (2) plaque characteristics such as degree of narrowing, the presence of ulceration and any documented worsening of the plaque over time; (3) other cerebral arterial stenoses or occlusions, or cerebral infarcts identified through neuroimaging; and (4) surgical complication rates at the institution. CEA should not be considered for asymptomatic stenoses unless the combined stroke and death rate among patients of the surgeon is less than 3%. These <span class="hlt">guidelines</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25046709','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25046709"><span>APA <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>: their importance and a plan to keep them <span class="hlt">current</span>: 2013 annual report of the Policy and Planning Board.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>When <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are approved by APA, they become association policy, and it is imperative that they remain <span class="hlt">current</span>. The revision of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> poses several challenges to the association. These challenges range from the availability and allocation of resources to support the complicated processes involved in developing and updating these policies to the lack of a clearly defined process that includes identification of tasks, assignments of responsibilities, and so forth. For this reason, the APA Board of Directors asked the Policy and Planning Board (P&P) to work with the boards of the four directorates (i.e., the Education Directorate, the Practice Directorate, the Public Interest Directorate, and the Science Directorate) to create a proposal that would (a) make recommendations with regard to how the review and revision of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> documents might best be accomplished in accordance with the APA Strategic Plan and existing policies and procedures and (b) make suggestions regarding the association resources that might be required. The Board of Directors approved the proposed review process in December 2013. 2014 APA, all rights reserved</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://dceg.cancer.gov/news-events/research-news-highlights/2018/lung-cancer-deaths-screening','NCI'); return false;" href="https://dceg.cancer.gov/news-events/research-news-highlights/2018/lung-cancer-deaths-screening"><span>Risk-based lung cancer screening may prevent more deaths than <span class="hlt">current</span> U.S. <span class="hlt">guidelines</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A study from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) offers new evidence that individualized lung cancer risk-based screening may be more effective at preventing lung cancer deaths than <span class="hlt">current</span> U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) screening criteria.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23769961','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23769961"><span>[Therapeutic strategies. Evolution and <span class="hlt">current</span> status of the European <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> on Cardiovascular disease prevention].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Guijarro, Carlos; García-Díaz, Juan de Dios</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The European <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> on Dyslipidaemias (2011) and Cardiovascular Prevention (2012) have incorporated important changes. Firstly, it highlights the identification of a group of "very high risk" patients: patients with atherosclerotic disease in any vascular area, diabetes with associated risk factors, advanced chronic renal failure, or a SCORE estimate >10%. Patients with diabetes and no other risk factors, moderate renal failure, severe hypertension, genetic dyslipidaemias, or a SCORE estimate 5-10%, are considered as "high risk". The HDL cholesterol and triglycerides levels are considered as modulators of risks, but not therapeutic objectives per se. The therapeutic objectives are set at LDL cholesterol levels < 70 mg/dl (or at least a reduction of at least 50%) for patients at very high risk, and an LDL < 100 mg/dl for high risk patients. As well as the changes in lifestyle, pharmacological treatment with statins is the focal point of lipid lowering treatments. Other pharmacological options may be considered if the treatment with the maximum tolerable doses of statins do not achieve the therapeutic objectives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEA. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3346661','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3346661"><span>Microbiological Aetiology, Epidemiology, and Clinical Profile of Prosthetic Joint Infections: Are <span class="hlt">Current</span> Antibiotic Prophylaxis <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> Effective?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cheng, Allen C.; Buising, Kirsty L.; Choong, Peter F. M.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Prosthetic joint infections remain a major complication of arthroplasty. At present, local and international <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> recommend cefazolin as a surgical antibiotic prophylaxis at the time of arthroplasty. This retrospective cohort study conducted across 10 hospitals over a 3-year period (January 2006 to December 2008) investigated the epidemiology and microbiological etiology of prosthetic joint infections. There were 163 cases of prosthetic joint infection identified. From a review of the microbiological culture results, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated in 45% of infections. In addition, polymicrobial infections, particularly those involving Gram-negative bacilli and enterococcal species, were common (36%). The majority (88%) of patients received cefazolin as an antibiotic prophylaxis at the time of arthroplasty. In 63% of patients in this cohort, the microorganisms subsequently obtained were not susceptible to the antibiotic prophylaxis administered. The results of this study highlight the importance of ongoing reviews of the local ecology of prosthetic joint infection, demonstrating that the spectrum of pathogens involved is broad. The results should inform empirical antibiotic therapy. This report also provokes discussion about infection control strategies, including changing surgical antibiotic prophylaxis to a combination of glycopeptide and cefazolin, to reduce the incidence of infections due to methicillin-resistant staphylococci. PMID:22314530</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27734781','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27734781"><span>The management of scabies outbreaks in residential care facilities for the elderly in England: a review of <span class="hlt">current</span> health protection <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>White, L C J; Lanza, S; Middleton, J; Hewitt, K; Freire-Moran, L; Edge, C; Nicholls, M; Rajan-Iyer, J; Cassell, J A</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Commonly thought of as a disease of poverty and overcrowding in resource-poor settings globally, scabies is also an important public health issue in residential care facilities for the elderly (RCFE) in high-income countries such as the UK. We compared and contrasted <span class="hlt">current</span> local Health Protection Team (HPT) <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the management of scabies outbreaks in RCFE throughout England. We performed content analysis on 20 <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, and used this to create a quantitative report of their variation in key dimensions. Although the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were generally consistent on issues such as the treatment protocols for individual patients, there was substantial variation in their recommendations regarding the prophylactic treatment of contacts, infection control measures and the roles and responsibilities of individual stakeholders. Most <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> did not adequately address the logistical challenges associated with mass treatment in this setting. We conclude that the heterogeneous nature of the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> reviewed is an argument in favour of national <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> being produced.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26750748','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26750748"><span>Peroxisome biogenesis disorders in the Zellweger spectrum: An overview of <span class="hlt">current</span> diagnosis, clinical manifestations, and treatment <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Braverman, Nancy E; Raymond, Gerald V; Rizzo, William B; Moser, Ann B; Wilkinson, Mark E; Stone, Edwin M; Steinberg, Steven J; Wangler, Michael F; Rush, Eric T; Hacia, Joseph G; Bose, Mousumi</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Peroxisome biogenesis disorders in the Zellweger spectrum (PBD-ZSD) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders caused by mutations in PEX genes responsible for normal peroxisome assembly and functions. As a result of impaired peroxisomal activities, individuals with PBD-ZSD can manifest a complex spectrum of clinical phenotypes that typically result in shortened life spans. The extreme variability in disease manifestation ranging from onset of profound neurologic symptoms in newborns to progressive degenerative disease in adults presents practical challenges in disease diagnosis and medical management. Recent advances in biochemical methods for newborn screening and genetic testing have provided unprecedented opportunities for identifying patients at the earliest possible time and defining the molecular bases for their diseases. Here, we provide an overview of <span class="hlt">current</span> clinical approaches for the diagnosis of PBD-ZSD and provide broad <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the treatment of disease in its wide variety of forms. Although we anticipate future progress in the development of more effective targeted interventions, the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are meant to provide a starting point for the management of these complex conditions in the context of personalized health care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=connection+AND+current&pg=4&id=EJ1155059','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=connection+AND+current&pg=4&id=EJ1155059"><span>Assessment Processes in Science across the Primary-Secondary Interface: An <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Skamp, Keith</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Assessment <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in the "<span class="hlt">Australian</span> Curriculum: Science" are outlined after the status and practice of science is overviewed. Available, but dated, empirical reports of teachers' assessment processes and procedures across the interface are compared. <span class="hlt">Current</span> assessment practices are inferred from indirect research data. Two…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/27267','DOTNTL'); return false;" href="https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/27267"><span>Refinement of <span class="hlt">current</span> WisDOT HMA mixture application <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> related to NMAS and aggregate characteristics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntlsearch.bts.gov/tris/index.do">DOT National Transportation Integrated Search</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Current</span> Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) Specifications limit nominal maximum aggregate : size (NMAS) of hot-mix asphalt (HMA) to 12.5 mm in the surface layer and 19.0 mm in lower layers. This : potentially places unnecessary limits on...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28449799','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28449799"><span>Impact of <span class="hlt">Current</span> Versus Previous Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> on the Proportion of Patients With Heart Failure Eligible for Therapy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lyons, Kristin J; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Liang, Li; Heidenreich, Paul A; Yancy, Clyde W; DeVore, Adam D; Hernandez, Adrian F; Fonarow, Gregg C</p> <p>2017-05-01</p> <p>This study sought to ascertain the impact of heart failure (HF) <span class="hlt">guideline</span> change on the number of patients eligible to undergo cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The 2013 HF <span class="hlt">guideline</span> of the American College of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association (ACCF/AHA) narrowed the recommendations for CRT. The impact of this <span class="hlt">guideline</span> change on the number of eligible patients for CRT has not been described. Using data from Get With The <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>-Heart Failure between 2012 and 2015, this study evaluated the proportion of hospitalized patients with HF who were eligible for CRT on the basis of historical and <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guideline</span> recommendations. The authors identified 25,102 hospitalizations for HF that included patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤35% from 283 hospitals. Patients with a medical, system-related, or patient-related reason for not undergoing CRT were excluded. Overall, 49.1% (n = 12,336) of patients with HF, an LVEF ≤35%, and no documented contraindication were eligible for CRT on the basis of historical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, and 33.1% (n = 8,299) of patients were eligible for CRT on the basis of <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, a 16.1% absolute reduction in eligibility (p < 0.0001). Patients eligible for CRT on the basis of <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were more likely to have CRT with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator or CRT with pacing only placed or prescribed at discharge (57.8% vs. 54.9%; p < 0.0001) compared with patients eligible for CRT on the basis of historical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. In this population of patients with HF, an LVEF ≤35%, and no documented contraindication for CRT, the <span class="hlt">current</span> ACCF/AHA HF <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> reduce the proportion of patients eligible for CRT by approximately 15%. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4028084','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4028084"><span>In vitro genotoxicity testing strategy for nanomaterials and the adaptation of <span class="hlt">current</span> OECD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Doak, S.H.; Manshian, B.; Jenkins, G.J.S.; Singh, N.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>There is a pressing requirement to define a hazard identification and risk management strategy for nanomaterials due to the rapid growth in the nanotechnology industry and their promise of life-style revolutions through the development of wide-ranging nano-containing consumer products. Consequently, a battery of well defined and appropriate in vitro assays to assess a number of genotoxicity endpoints is required to minimise extensive and costly in vivo testing. However, the validity of the established protocols in <span class="hlt">current</span> OECD recognised genotoxicity assays for nanomaterials is <span class="hlt">currently</span> being questioned. In this report, we therefore consider the in vitro OECD genotoxicity test battery including the Ames, micronucleus and HPRT forward mutation assays, and their potential role in the safety assessment of nanomaterial induced DNA damage in vitro. PMID:21971291</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27975344','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27975344"><span>[<span class="hlt">Current</span> Practice of Pre- and Postnatal Screening and Future Developments for Evidence Based <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hebebrand, J; Hamelmann, E; Hartmann, A; Holtmann, M; Jöckel, K-H; Kremer, U; Legenbauer, T; Lücke, T; Radkowski, K; Reinehr, T; Wand, K; Mühlig, Y; Föcker, M</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Objectives: In this selective review we provide an overview of the <span class="hlt">current</span> pre- and postnatal screenings up to 18 years established in Germany to inform physicians of different medical fields (gynecologists, pediatricians, general practitioners, other medical specialists who treat children, adolescents or pregnant females). <span class="hlt">Current</span> State: Research on screening for different types of cancer has frequently failed to show any benefit. Thus, there is a need to broaden the evidence basis related to medical screenings especially for children and adolescents. Outlook: Potential future developments of pre- and postnatal screenings are illustrated including their social impact. The lack of an early detection of mental health problems is pointed out. An interdisciplinary collaboration and research is required to accumulate evidence with regard to medical screenings and to consider health economic and ethical aspects. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23106226','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23106226"><span>Implementation of a clinical practice <span class="hlt">guideline</span> for antenatal magnesium sulphate for neuroprotection in Australia and New Zealand.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bain, Emily; Bubner, Tanya; Ashwood, Pat; Crowther, Caroline A; Middleton, Philippa</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>Health professionals at 25 <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and New Zealand tertiary maternity hospitals were surveyed about local implementation of a clinical practice <span class="hlt">guideline</span> for antenatal magnesium sulphate for fetal neuroprotection. Seventy-six percent of respondents reported that their hospital is <span class="hlt">currently</span> following a <span class="hlt">guideline</span>; 36% confirmed that their hospital is auditing uptake. Estimates of uptake ranged from 53 to 90%. Ongoing education and support are needed to ensure that the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are optimally implemented, and uptake and important health outcomes are monitored. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28856924','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28856924"><span>Review of <span class="hlt">current</span> typhoid fever vaccines, cross-protection against paratyphoid fever, and the European <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zuckerman, Jane N; Hatz, Christoph; Kantele, Anu</p> <p>2017-10-01</p> <p>Typhoid and paratyphoid fever remain a global health problem, which - in non-endemic countries - are mainly seen in travelers, particularly in VFRs (visiting friends and relatives), with occasional local outbreaks occurring. A rise in anti-microbial resistance emphasizes the role of preventive measures, especially vaccinations against typhoid and paratyphoid fever for travelers visiting endemic countries. Areas covered: This state-of-the-art review recapitulates the epidemiology and mechanisms of disease of typhoid and paratyphoid fever, depicts the perspective of non-endemic countries and travelers (VFRs), and collectively presents <span class="hlt">current</span> European recommendations for typhoid fever vaccination. We provide a brief overview of available (and developmental) vaccines in Europe, present <span class="hlt">current</span> data on cross-protection to S. Paratyphi, and aim to provide a background for typhoid vaccine decision-making in travelers. Expert commentary: European recommendations are not harmonized. Experts must assess vaccination of travelers based on <span class="hlt">current</span> country-specific recommendations. Travel health practitioners should be aware of the issues surrounding vaccination of travelers and be motivated to increase awareness of typhoid and paratyphoid fever risks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26686317','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26686317"><span>Evaluation of physiological stress in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> wildlife: Embracing pioneering and <span class="hlt">current</span> knowledge as a guide to future research directions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Narayan, Edward J</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Australia has a rich terrestrial and marine biodiversity and high species endemism. However, the oceanic continent is facing the biodiversity extinction crisis. The primary factors are anthropogenic induced environmental changes, including wildlife habitat destruction through urbanisation and predation by feral animals (e.g. red foxes and feral cats), increased severity of diseases (e.g. chytridiomycosis and chlamydia), and increased occurrence of summer heat waves and bush fires. Stress physiology is a dynamic field of science based on the studies of endocrine system functioning in animals. The primary stress regulator is the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal (interrenal) axis and glucocorticoids (corticosterone and/or cortisol) provide stress index across vertebrate groups. This review paper focuses on physiological stress assessments in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> wildlife using examples of amphibians, reptiles, birds and marsupials. I provide a thorough discussion of pioneering studies that have shaped the field of stress physiology in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> wildlife species. The main findings point towards key aspects of stress endocrinology research, such as quantification of biologically active levels of glucocorticoids, development of species-specific GC assays and applications of stress physiology approaches in field ecology and wildlife conservation programs. Furthermore, I also discuss the importance of chronic stress assessment in wildlife populations. Finally, I provide a conceptual framework presenting key research questions in areas of wildlife stress physiology research. In conclusion, wildlife management programs can immensely benefit from stress physiology assessments to gauge the impact of human interventions on wildlife such as species translocation and feral species eradication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29860290','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29860290"><span>Are We on Our Way to Achieving the 2020 Goals for Schistosomiasis Morbidity Control Using <span class="hlt">Current</span> World Health Organization <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Toor, Jaspreet; Alsallaq, Ramzi; Truscott, James E; Turner, Hugo C; Werkman, Marleen; Gurarie, David; King, Charles H; Anderson, Roy M</p> <p>2018-06-01</p> <p>Schistosomiasis remains an endemic parasitic disease affecting millions of people around the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) has set goals of controlling morbidity to be reached by 2020, along with elimination as a public health problem in certain regions by 2025. Mathematical models of parasite transmission and treatment impact have been developed to assist in controlling the morbidity caused by schistosomiasis. These models can inform and guide implementation policy for mass drug administration programs, and help design monitoring and evaluation activities. We use these models to predict whether the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> set by the WHO are on track for achieving their 2020 goal for the control of morbidity, specifically for Schistosoma mansoni. We examine whether programmatic adaptations; namely increases in treatment coverage and/or expansion to adult inclusion in treatment, will improve the likelihood of reaching the WHO goals. We find that in low-prevalence settings, the goals are likely to be attainable under <span class="hlt">current</span> WHO <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, but in moderate to high-prevalence settings, the goals are less likely to be achieved unless treatment coverage is increased and expanded to at least 85% for school-aged children and 40% for adults. To improve the likelihood of reaching the WHO goals, programmatic adaptations are required, particularly for moderate- to high-prevalence settings. Furthermore, improvements in adherence to treatment, potential development of candidate vaccines, and enhanced snail control and WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) measures will all assist in achieving the goals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23101552','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23101552"><span>From distress <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> to developing models of psychosocial care: <span class="hlt">current</span> best practices.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Clark, Paul G; Bolte, Sage; Buzaglo, Joanne; Golant, Mitch; Daratsos, Louisa; Loscalzo, Matthew</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Psychological distress has been recognized as having a significant effect upon cognitive and emotional functioning, quality of life, and in some populations increased costs of care. Screening for distress and provision of psychosocial care in oncology treatment settings has been identified as a future accreditation standard by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer (CoC). Because there are few available models of programs of distress screening and referral to inform oncology social workers and other members of the psychosocial support team with planning their own programs, this article seeks to provide exemplars of best practices that are <span class="hlt">currently</span> in place in four different settings where psychosocial support is provided to people living with cancer and their families. Each program will provide an overview of how it was successfully established and its contribution toward evolving evidence-informed best practices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27866120','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27866120"><span>Evidence-based <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on the therapeutic use of transcranial direct <span class="hlt">current</span> stimulation (tDCS).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Antal, Andrea; Ayache, Samar S; Benninger, David H; Brunelin, Jérôme; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Cotelli, Maria; De Ridder, Dirk; Ferrucci, Roberta; Langguth, Berthold; Marangolo, Paola; Mylius, Veit; Nitsche, Michael A; Padberg, Frank; Palm, Ulrich; Poulet, Emmanuel; Priori, Alberto; Rossi, Simone; Schecklmann, Martin; Vanneste, Sven; Ziemann, Ulf; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Paulus, Walter</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>A group of European experts was commissioned by the European Chapter of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology to gather knowledge about the state of the art of the therapeutic use of transcranial direct <span class="hlt">current</span> stimulation (tDCS) from studies published up until September 2016, regarding pain, Parkinson's disease, other movement disorders, motor stroke, poststroke aphasia, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, consciousness disorders, Alzheimer's disease, tinnitus, depression, schizophrenia, and craving/addiction. The evidence-based analysis included only studies based on repeated tDCS sessions with sham tDCS control procedure; 25 patients or more having received active treatment was required for Class I, while a lower number of 10-24 patients was accepted for Class II studies. <span class="hlt">Current</span> evidence does not allow making any recommendation of Level A (definite efficacy) for any indication. Level B recommendation (probable efficacy) is proposed for: (i) anodal tDCS of the left primary motor cortex (M1) (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in fibromyalgia; (ii) anodal tDCS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in major depressive episode without drug resistance; (iii) anodal tDCS of the right DLPFC (with left DLPFC cathode) in addiction/craving. Level C recommendation (possible efficacy) is proposed for anodal tDCS of the left M1 (or contralateral to pain side, with right orbitofrontal cathode) in chronic lower limb neuropathic pain secondary to spinal cord lesion. Conversely, Level B recommendation (probable inefficacy) is conferred on the absence of clinical effects of: (i) anodal tDCS of the left temporal cortex (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in tinnitus; (ii) anodal tDCS of the left DLPFC (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in drug-resistant major depressive episode. It remains to be clarified whether the probable or possible therapeutic effects of tDCS are clinically meaningful and how to optimally perform t</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20441835','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20441835"><span>Pediatric anthropometrics are inconsistent with <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for assessing rider fit on all-terrain vehicles.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bernard, Andrew C; Mullineaux, David R; Auxier, James T; Forman, Jennifer L; Shapiro, Robert; Pienkowski, David</p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>This study sought to establish objective anthropometric measures of fit or misfit for young riders on adult and youth-sized all-terrain vehicles and use these metrics to test the unproved historical reasoning that age alone is a sufficient measure of rider-ATV fit. Male children (6-11 years, n=8; and 12-15 years, n=11) were selected by convenience sampling. Rider-ATV fit was quantified by five measures adapted from published recommendations: (1) standing-seat clearance, (2) hand size, (3) foot vs. foot-brake position, (4) elbow angle, and (5) handlebar-to-knee distance. Youths aged 12-15 years fit the adult-sized ATV better than the ATV Safety Institute recommended age-appropriate youth model (63% of subjects fit all 5 measures on adult-sized ATV vs. 20% on youth-sized ATV). Youths aged 6-11 years fit poorly on ATVs of both sizes (0% fit all 5 parameters on the adult-sized ATV vs 12% on the youth-sized ATV). The ATV Safety Institute recommends rider-ATV fit according to age and engine displacement, but no objective data linking age or anthropometrics with ATV engine or frame size has been previously published. Age alone is a poor predictor of rider-ATV fit; the five metrics used offer an improvement compared to <span class="hlt">current</span> recommendations. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29609969','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29609969"><span>Are the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for surgical delay in hip fractures too rigid? A single center assessment of mortality and economics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kempenaers, Kristof; Van Calster, Ben; Vandoren, Cindy; Sermon, An; Metsemakers, Willem-Jan; Vanderschot, Paul; Misselyn, Dominique; Nijs, Stefaan; Hoekstra, Harm</p> <p>2018-06-01</p> <p>Controversy remains around acceptable surgical delay of acute hip fractures with <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> ranging from 24 to 48 h. Increasing healthcare costs force us to consider the economic burden as well. We aimed to evaluate the adjusted effect of surgical delay for hip fracture surgery on early mortality, healthcare costs and readmission rate. We hypothesized that shorter delays resulted in lower early mortality and costs. In this retrospective cohort study 2573 consecutive patients aged ≥50 years were included, who underwent surgery for acute hip fractures between 2009 and 2017. Main endpoints were thirty- and ninety-day mortality, total cost, and readmission rate. Multivariable regression included sex, age and ASA score as covariates. Thirty-day mortality was 5% (n = 133), ninety-day mortality 12% (n = 304). Average total cost was €11960, dominated by hospitalization (59%) and honoraria (23%). Per 24 h delay, the adjusted odds ratio was 1.07 (95% CI 0.98-1.18) for thirty-day mortality, 1.12 (95% CI 1.04-1.19) for ninety-day mortality, and 0.99 (95% CI = 0.88-1.12) for readmission. Per 24 h delay, costs increased with 7% (95% CI 6-8%). For mortality, delay was a weaker predictor than sex, age, and ASA score. For costs, delay was the strongest predictor. We did not find clear cut-points for surgical delay after which mortality or costs increased abruptly. Despite only modest associations with mortality, we observed a steady increase in healthcare costs when delaying surgery. Hence, a more pragmatic approach with surgery as soon as medically and organizationally possible seems justifiable over rigorous implementation of the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25695630','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25695630"><span>When should acute exacerbations of COPD be treated with systemic corticosteroids and antibiotics in primary care: a systematic review of <span class="hlt">current</span> COPD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Laue, Johanna; Reierth, Eirik; Melbye, Hasse</p> <p>2015-02-19</p> <p>Not all patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) benefit from treatment with systemic corticosteroids and antibiotics. The aim of the study was to identify criteria recommended in <span class="hlt">current</span> COPD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for treating acute exacerbations with systemic corticosteroids and antibiotics and to assess the underlying evidence. <span class="hlt">Current</span> COPD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were identified by a systematic literature search. The most recent <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> as per country/organisation containing recommendations about treating acute exacerbations of COPD were included. <span class="hlt">Guideline</span> development and criteria for treating acute exacerbations with systemic corticosteroids and antibiotics were appraised. Randomised controlled trials directly referred to in context with the recommendations were evaluated in terms of study design, setting, and study population. A total of 19 COPD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were included. Systemic corticosteroids were often universally recommended to all patients with acute exacerbations. Criteria for treatment with antibiotics were mainly an increase in respiratory symptoms. Objective diagnostic tests or clinical examination were only rarely recommended. Only few criteria were directly linked to underlying evidence, and the trial patients represented a highly specific group of COPD patients. <span class="hlt">Current</span> COPD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are of little help in primary care to identify patients with acute exacerbations probably benefitting from treatment with systemic corticosteroids and antibiotics in primary care, and might contribute to overuse or inappropriate use of either treatment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29846940','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29846940"><span>Cancer screening in the United States, 2018: A review of <span class="hlt">current</span> American Cancer Society <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and <span class="hlt">current</span> issues in cancer screening.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Smith, Robert A; Andrews, Kimberly S; Brooks, Durado; Fedewa, Stacey A; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Saslow, Debbie; Brawley, Otis W; Wender, Richard C</p> <p>2018-05-30</p> <p>Each year, the American Cancer Society publishes a summary of its <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for early cancer detection, data and trends in cancer screening rates from the National Health Interview Survey, and select issues related to cancer screening. In this 2018 update, we also summarize the new American Cancer Society colorectal cancer screening <span class="hlt">guideline</span> and include a clarification in the language of the 2013 lung cancer screening <span class="hlt">guideline</span>. CA Cancer J Clin 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20196708','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20196708"><span>Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in the critically ill: a point prevalence survey of <span class="hlt">current</span> practice in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and New Zealand intensive care units.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Robertson, Megan S; Nichol, Alistair D; Higgins, Alisa M; Bailey, Michael J; Presneill, Jeffrey J; Cooper, D James; Webb, Steven A; McArthur, Colin; MacIsaac, Christopher M</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>Critically ill patients are at high risk of morbidity and mortality caused by venous thromboembolism (VTE). In addition to premorbid predisposing conditions, critically ill patients may be exposed to prolonged immobility, invasive intravascular catheters and frequent operative procedures, and further may have contraindications to pharmaceutical prophylactic measures designed to attenuate VTE risk. There are limited data describing <span class="hlt">current</span> VTE prophylaxis regimens in Australia and New Zealand. To document <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and New Zealand management of VTE prophylaxis in a large mixed cohort of critically ill patients. Prospective, multicentre point prevalence survey endorsed by the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Clinical Trials Group (ANZICS CTG). 30 public hospital ICUs in Australia and New Zealand surveyed on Wednesday 9 May 2007. For all patients in each ICU on the study day, demographic data, admission diagnosis and information on VTE prophylaxis were prospectively collected. 502 patients were included in the survey, and 431 of these (86%) received VTE prophylaxis. Of these, 64% (276/431) received pharmacological prophylaxis and 80% (345/431) received mechanical prophylaxis, with 44% (190/431) receiving both. Of those receiving pharmacological prophylaxis, unfractionated heparin was used in 74%, and enoxaparin (low molecular weight heparin) in 23%. Contraindications to pharmacological prophylaxis were reported in 122 patients. Overall, pharmacological prophylaxis was administered to 87% of potentially suitable patients. We observed a high prevalence of VTE prophylaxis, with many critically ill patients receiving two or more modalities of prophylaxis. These results show that the potential risk of VTE in critically ill patients is recognised in Australia and New Zealand, and strategies to mitigate this serious complication are widely implemented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25852494','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25852494"><span>Remotely-supervised transcranial direct <span class="hlt">current</span> stimulation (tDCS) for clinical trials: <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for technology and protocols.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Charvet, Leigh E; Kasschau, Margaret; Datta, Abhishek; Knotkova, Helena; Stevens, Michael C; Alonzo, Angelo; Loo, Colleen; Krull, Kevin R; Bikson, Marom</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The effect of transcranial direct <span class="hlt">current</span> stimulation (tDCS) is cumulative. Treatment protocols typically require multiple consecutive sessions spanning weeks or months. However, traveling to clinic for a tDCS session can present an obstacle to subjects and their caregivers. With modified devices and headgear, tDCS treatment can be administered remotely under clinical supervision, potentially enhancing recruitment, throughput, and convenience. Here we propose standards and protocols for clinical trials utilizing remotely-supervised tDCS with the goal of providing safe, reproducible and well-tolerated stimulation therapy outside of the clinic. The recommendations include: (1) training of staff in tDCS treatment and supervision; (2) assessment of the user's capability to participate in tDCS remotely; (3) ongoing training procedures and materials including assessments of the user and/or caregiver; (4) simple and fail-safe electrode preparation techniques and tDCS headgear; (5) strict dose control for each session; (6) ongoing monitoring to quantify compliance (device preparation, electrode saturation/placement, stimulation protocol), with corresponding corrective steps as required; (7) monitoring for treatment-emergent adverse effects; (8) <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for discontinuation of a session and/or study participation including emergency failsafe procedures tailored to the treatment population's level of need. These <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are intended to provide a minimal level of methodological rigor for clinical trials seeking to apply tDCS outside a specialized treatment center. We outline indication-specific applications (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Depression, Multiple Sclerosis, Palliative Care) following these recommendations that support a standardized framework for evaluating the tolerability and reproducibility of remote-supervised tDCS that, once established, will allow for translation of tDCS clinical trials to a greater size and range of patient populations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3551742','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3551742"><span>Development of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> to assist organisations to support employees returning to work after an episode of anxiety, depression or a related disorder: a Delphi consensus study with <span class="hlt">Australian</span> professionals and consumers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background Mental disorders are a significant cause of disability and loss of workplace productivity. The scientific evidence for how organisations should best support those returning to work after common mental disorders is relatively limited. Therefore a Delphi expert consensus study was carried out with professional and consumer experts. Methods A systematic review of websites, books and journal articles was conducted to develop a 387 item survey containing strategies that organisations might use to support those returning to work after common mental disorders. Three panels of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> experts (66 health professionals, 30 employers and 80 consumers) were recruited and independently rated the items over three rounds, with strategies reaching consensus on importance written into the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Results The participation rate across all three rounds was 60.2% (57.6% health professionals, 76.7% employers, 56.3% consumers). 308 strategies were endorsed as essential or important by at least 80% of all three panels. The endorsed strategies provided information on policy and procedures, the roles of supervisors, employees and colleagues in managing absence and return to work, and provision of mental health information and training. Conclusions The <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> outline strategies for organisations supporting those returning to work after common mental disorders. It is hoped that they may be used to inform policy and practice in a variety of workplaces. PMID:22943604</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27465769','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27465769"><span>National Heart Foundation of Australia and Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand: <span class="hlt">Australian</span> clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the management of acute coronary syndromes 2016.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chew, Derek P; Scott, Ian A; Cullen, Louise; French, John K; Briffa, Tom G; Tideman, Philip A; Woodruffe, Stephen; Kerr, Alistair; Branagan, Maree; Aylward, Philip Eg</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>The modern care of suspected and confirmed acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is informed by an extensive and evolving evidence base. This clinical practice <span class="hlt">guideline</span> focuses on key components of management associated with improved clinical outcomes for patients with chest pain or ACS. These are presented as recommendations that have been graded on both the strength of evidence and the likely absolute benefit versus harm. Additional considerations influencing the delivery of specific therapies and management strategies are presented as practice points. This <span class="hlt">guideline</span> provides advice on the standardised assessment and management of patients with suspected ACS, including the implementation of clinical assessment pathways and subsequent functional and anatomical testing. It provides guidance on the: diagnosis and risk stratification of ACS; provision of acute reperfusion therapy and immediate post-fibrinolysis care for patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction; risk stratification informing the use of routine versus selective invasive management for patients with non-ST segment elevation ACS; administration of antithrombotic therapies in the acute setting and considerations affecting their long term use; and implementation of an individualised secondary prevention plan that includes both pharmacotherapies and cardiac rehabilitation. Changes in management as a result of the <span class="hlt">guideline</span>: This <span class="hlt">guideline</span> has been designed to facilitate the systematic integration of the recommendations into a standardised approach to ACS care, while also allowing for contextual adaptation of the recommendations in response to the individual's needs and preferences. The provision of ACS care should be subject to continuous monitoring, feedback and improvement of quality and patient outcomes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20701496','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20701496"><span>Intermittent auscultation of fetal heart rate during labour - a widely accepted technique for low risk pregnancies: but are the <span class="hlt">current</span> national <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> robust and practical?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sholapurkar, S L</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Intermittent auscultation of fetal heart rate is an accepted practice in low risk labours in many countries. National <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on intrapartum fetal monitoring were critically reviewed regarding timing and frequency of intermittent auscultation. Hypothetical but plausible examples are presented to illustrate that it may be possible to miss significant fetal distress with strict adherence to <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Opinion is forwarded that intermittent auscultation should be performed for 60 seconds before and after three contractions over about 10 min every half an hour in the first stage of labour. Reasons are put forward to show how this could be more practical and patient friendly and at the same time could improve detection of fetal distress. The <span class="hlt">current</span> recommendation of intermittent auscultation every 15 min in the first stage is associated with poor compliance and leads to unnecessary burden, stress and medicolegal liability for birth attendants. Modification of <span class="hlt">current</span> national <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> would be desirable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3222161','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3222161"><span>Features of Mobile Diabetes Applications: Review of the Literature and Analysis of <span class="hlt">Current</span> Applications Compared Against Evidence-Based <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fernandez-Luque, Luis; Årsand, Eirik; Hartvigsen, Gunnar</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p> = 101) were (1) insulin and medication recording, 63 (62%), (2) data export and communication, 61 (60%), (3) diet recording, 47 (47%), and (4) weight management, 43 (43%). From the literature search (n = 26), the most prevalent features were (1) PHR or Web server synchronization, 18 (69%), (2) insulin and medication recording, 17 (65%), (3) diet recording, 17 (65%), and (4) data export and communication, 16 (62%). Interestingly, although clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> widely refer to the importance of education, this is missing from the top functionalities in both cases. Conclusions While a wide selection of mobile applications seems to be available for people with diabetes, this study shows there are obvious gaps between the evidence-based recommendations and the functionality used in study interventions or found in online markets. <span class="hlt">Current</span> results confirm personalized education as an underrepresented feature in diabetes mobile applications. We found no studies evaluating social media concepts in diabetes self-management on mobile devices, and its potential remains largely unexplored. PMID:21979293</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16124447','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16124447"><span>The <span class="hlt">current</span> situation regarding the establishment of national ethical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for biomedical research in Thailand and its neighboring countries.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kojima, Somei; Waikagul, Jitra; Rojekittikhun, Wichit; Keicho, Naoto</p> <p>2005-05-01</p> <p>This study discusses the establishment of ethical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for ethical review for biomedical research performed in Thailand, and to some extent, in neighboring countries. There are differences, from country to country, at national and institutional levels regarding <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for ethical review committees. Only a handbook issued by Mahidol University describes <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for human genetic research and on research dealing with reproductive technology. Both these areas require special consideration to avoid violating human dignity, rights, and confidentiality. This indicates that further efforts should be made to establish research <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and/or principles dealing with the human genome.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27742167','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27742167"><span>A comparison of <span class="hlt">current</span> practice patterns of US dermatologists versus published <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the biopsy, initial management, and follow up of patients with primary cutaneous melanoma.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Farberg, Aaron S; Rigel, Darrell S</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> exist for the management of cutaneous malignant melanoma, but their adoption, prevalence, and impact have not yet been determined. To determine <span class="hlt">current</span> melanoma clinical management practices of US dermatologists and the variance from <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> that might exist. A cross-sectional e-mail survey study assessing preferred biopsy methods for lesions suspicious for melanoma, margins used for excision, and recommended follow-up intervals were sent to 6177 US dermatologists (540 responding). The representative nature of the responding subset was verified by comparing their demographics to that from the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) membership. Management varied from published <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Shave biopsy (35%) was the most commonly used method followed by narrow excisional biopsy (31%), saucerization/scoop shave (12%), punch (11%), and wide excision (3%). Excisional margins narrower than recommended were noted and follow-up intervals varied. There were significant management differences noted for dermatologists by practice setting and by years in practice. The impact of patient history, lesion anatomic site, and size of lesion were not assessed. Recall and nonresponder sampling bias may exist. Variations in dermatologists' approaches to melanoma management and variance from <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> suggest that a knowledge gap may exist representing an educational opportunity. However, emerging data may also justify deviations from existing <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, suggesting a reassessment of the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> may be indicated. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16818399','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16818399"><span>The development of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for drug and alcohol dependence treatment: affecting policy and practice.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Heather, N; Mattick, R P</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>The rationale and methodology behind the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Quality Assurance Project is described. The Project aimed to develop <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for treatment content based on three sources of information: research findings, <span class="hlt">current</span> practice and expert opinion. The issue of the gap between research and practice is discussed, as well as the role of dissemination in altering clinician behaviour.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28754397','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28754397"><span>Contemporary Atrial Fibrillation Management: A Comparison of the <span class="hlt">Current</span> AHA/ACC/HRS, CCS, and ESC <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Andrade, Jason G; Macle, Laurent; Nattel, Stanley; Verma, Atul; Cairns, John</p> <p>2017-08-01</p> <p>In this article we compare and contrast the <span class="hlt">current</span> recommendations, and highlight the important differences, in the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Rhythm Society, European Society of Cardiology, and Canadian Cardiovascular Society atrial fibrillation (AF) <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Although many of the recommendations of the various societies are similar, there are important differences in the methodologies underlying their development and the specific content. Specifically, key differences can be observed in: (1) the definition of nonvalvular AF, which subsequently affects anticoagulation choices and candidacy for non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (2) the symptom score used to guide management decisions and longitudinal patient profiling; (3) the stroke risk stratification algorithm used to determine indications for oral anticoagulant therapy; (4) the role of acetylsalicylic acid in stroke prevention in AF; (5) the antithrombotic regimens used in the context of coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, and percutaneous coronary intervention; (6) the rate control target and medications recommended to achieve the target; and (7) the role of "first-line" catheter ablation, open surgical ablation, and left atrial appendage exclusion. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3324995','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3324995"><span>Adherence to <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among patients treated with combination of long-acting bronchodilators or inhaled corticosteroids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Asche, Carl Victor; Leader, Shelah; Plauschinat, Craig; Raparla, Swetha; Yan, Ming; Ye, Xiangyang; Young, Dave</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background To estimate the potential cost savings by following the <span class="hlt">current</span> Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) <span class="hlt">guideline</span> recommendations in patients being treated for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with the combination of long-acting β2-agonist (LABA), long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) or inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). Methods The Geisinger Health System (GHS) database was utilized to identify subjects between January 1, 2004 to March 12, 2007. The index date was based on the first prescription of a LAMA plus LABA, LAMA plus LABA/ICS, or LABA plus ICS. Patients were included in the study if they: had a COPD diagnosis; had data representative of treatment 12 months prior to and 12 months post index date; were 40 years of age or over; had no prior diagnosis for asthma; and had pulmonary function test (PFT) data. We examined the baseline characteristics of these patients along with their healthcare resource utilization. Based on PFT data within 30 days of the index date, a subgroup was classified as adhering or non-adhering to GOLD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Results A total of 364 subjects could be classified as adhering or non-adherent to <span class="hlt">current</span> GOLD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> based on their PFT results. The adherent subgroup received COPD medications consistent with <span class="hlt">current</span> GOLD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Of the LAMA plus LABA cohort, 25 patients adhered and 39 patients were non-adherent to <span class="hlt">current</span> GOLD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. In the cohort of LABA plus ICS, 74 patients were adherent and 180 patients non-adherent to <span class="hlt">current</span> GOLD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. In the cohort of LAMA plus LABA/ICS, 21 patients were adherent and 25 patients non-adherent to <span class="hlt">current</span> GOLD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. GOLD adherence was associated with mean total cost of all services savings of $5,889 for LAMA plus LABA, $3,330 for LABA + ICS, and $10,217 for LAMA plus LABA/ICS cohorts. Conclusion Staging of COPD with a PFT and adherence to <span class="hlt">current</span> GOLD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> was associated with lower costs in subjects with moderate to severe</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22500120','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22500120"><span>Adherence to <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among patients treated with combination of long-acting bronchodilators or inhaled corticosteroids.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Asche, Carl Victor; Leader, Shelah; Plauschinat, Craig; Raparla, Swetha; Yan, Ming; Ye, Xiangyang; Young, Dave</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>To estimate the potential cost savings by following the <span class="hlt">current</span> Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) <span class="hlt">guideline</span> recommendations in patients being treated for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with the combination of long-acting β(2)-agonist (LABA), long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) or inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). The Geisinger Health System (GHS) database was utilized to identify subjects between January 1, 2004 to March 12, 2007. The index date was based on the first prescription of a LAMA plus LABA, LAMA plus LABA/ICS, or LABA plus ICS. Patients were included in the study if they: had a COPD diagnosis; had data representative of treatment 12 months prior to and 12 months post index date; were 40 years of age or over; had no prior diagnosis for asthma; and had pulmonary function test (PFT) data. We examined the baseline characteristics of these patients along with their healthcare resource utilization. Based on PFT data within 30 days of the index date, a subgroup was classified as adhering or non-adhering to GOLD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. A total of 364 subjects could be classified as adhering or non-adherent to <span class="hlt">current</span> GOLD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> based on their PFT results. The adherent subgroup received COPD medications consistent with <span class="hlt">current</span> GOLD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Of the LAMA plus LABA cohort, 25 patients adhered and 39 patients were non-adherent to <span class="hlt">current</span> GOLD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. In the cohort of LABA plus ICS, 74 patients were adherent and 180 patients non-adherent to <span class="hlt">current</span> GOLD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. In the cohort of LAMA plus LABA/ICS, 21 patients were adherent and 25 patients non-adherent to <span class="hlt">current</span> GOLD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. GOLD adherence was associated with mean total cost of all services savings of $5,889 for LAMA plus LABA, $3,330 for LABA + ICS, and $10,217 for LAMA plus LABA/ICS cohorts. Staging of COPD with a PFT and adherence to <span class="hlt">current</span> GOLD <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> was associated with lower costs in subjects with moderate to severe COPD. Appropriate use of LAMA plus LABA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25976269','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25976269"><span>The uniform chest compression depth of 50 mm or greater recommended by <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> is not appropriate for all adults.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, Soo Hoon; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kang, Tae-Sin; Kang, Changwoo; Jeong, Jin Hee; Kim, Seong Chun; Kim, Dong Seob</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>This study was conducted to evaluate the appropriateness of the chest compression (CC) depth recommended in the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and simulated external CCs, and to characterize the optimal CC depth for an adult by body mass index (BMI). Adult patients who underwent chest computed tomography as a screening test for latent pulmonary diseases in the health care center were enrolled in this study. We calculated the internal anteroposterior (AP) diameter (IAPD) and external AP diameter (EAPD) of the chest across BMIs (<18.50, 18.50-24.99, 25.00-29.99, and ≥30.00 kg/m(2)) for simulated CC depth. We also calculated the residual chest depths less than 20 mm for simulated CC depth. There was a statistically significant difference in the chest EAPD and IAPD measured at the lower half of the sternum for each BMI groups (EAPD: R(2) = 0.638, P < .001; IAPD: R(2) = 0.297, P < .001). For one-half external AP CC, 100% of the patients, regardless of BMI, had a calculated residual internal chest depth less than 20 mm. For one-fourth external AP CC, no patients had a calculated residual internal chest depth less than 20 mm. For one-third external AP CC, only 6.48% of the patients had a calculated residual internal chest depth less than 20 mm. It is not appropriate that the <span class="hlt">current</span> CC depth (≥50 mm), expressed only as absolute measurement without a fraction of the depth of the chest, is applied uniformly in all adults. In addition, in terms of safety and efficacy, simulated CC targeting approximately between one-third and one-fourth EAPD CC depth might be appropriate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28358870','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28358870"><span><span class="hlt">Guideline</span> appraisal with AGREE II: Systematic review of the <span class="hlt">current</span> evidence on how users handle the 2 overall assessments.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hoffmann-Eßer, Wiebke; Siering, Ulrich; Neugebauer, Edmund A M; Brockhaus, Anne Catharina; Lampert, Ulrike; Eikermann, Michaela</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The Appraisal of <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Research & Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument is the most commonly used <span class="hlt">guideline</span> appraisal tool. It includes 23 appraisal criteria (items) organized within 6 domains and 2 overall assessments (1. overall <span class="hlt">guideline</span> quality; 2. recommendation for use). The aim of this systematic review was twofold. Firstly, to investigate how often AGREE II users conduct the 2 overall assessments. Secondly, to investigate the influence of the 6 domain scores on each of the 2 overall assessments. A systematic bibliographic search was conducted for publications reporting <span class="hlt">guideline</span> appraisals with AGREE II. The impact of the 6 domain scores on the overall assessment of <span class="hlt">guideline</span> quality was examined using a multiple linear regression model. Their impact on the recommendation for use (possible answers: "yes", "yes, with modifications", "no") was examined using a multinomial regression model. 118 relevant publications including 1453 <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were identified. 77.1% of the publications reported results for at least one overall assessment, but only 32.2% reported results for both overall assessments. The results of the regression analyses showed a statistically significant influence of all domains on overall <span class="hlt">guideline</span> quality, with Domain 3 (rigour of development) having the strongest influence. For the recommendation for use, the results showed a significant influence of Domains 3 to 5 ("yes" vs. "no") and Domains 3 and 5 ("yes, with modifications" vs. "no"). The 2 overall assessments of AGREE II are underreported by <span class="hlt">guideline</span> assessors. Domains 3 and 5 have the strongest influence on the results of the 2 overall assessments, while the other domains have a varying influence. Within a normative approach, our findings could be used as guidance for weighting individual domains in AGREE II to make the overall assessments more objective. Alternatively, a stronger content analysis of the individual domains could clarify their importance in terms of <span class="hlt">guideline</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28390477','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28390477"><span><span class="hlt">Current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the evaluation and management of atopic dermatitis: A comparison of the Joint Task Force Practice Parameter and American Academy of Dermatology <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Ahluwalia, Jusleen; Waldman, Andrea; Borok, Jenna; Udkoff, Jeremy; Boguniewicz, Mark</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic pruritic inflammatory disease that commonly presents in the pediatric population. Although definitions and diagnosis of AD have largely been agreed upon, allergists and dermatologists have similar and divergent approaches to the management of AD. This review facilitated integration of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology/American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Joint Task Force 2012 AD Practice Parameter and the 2014 American Academy of Dermatology <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> to highlight the basic principles of AD management and discuss therapies and management of AD from the distinct perspectives of the allergist and dermatologist. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21712281','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21712281"><span>Management of atrial fibrillation around the world: a comparison of <span class="hlt">current</span> ACCF/AHA/HRS, CCS, and ESC <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wasmer, Kristina; Eckardt, Lars</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>New <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the management of atrial fibrillation (AF) have recently been published by the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association, and Heart Rhythm Society (ACCF/AHA/HRS) task force on practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS), and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Although they all refer to the same scientific data and agree in the majority of AF management, interpretation, and weighing of study results are quite different in some aspects. While recommendations for stroke risk assessment and prophylaxis are rather conservative in the ESC <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, the CCS <span class="hlt">guideline</span> recommendations are more conservative with regard to lenient rate control and the ACCF/AHA/HRS recommendations are rather strict with regard to rhythm management.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29358889','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29358889"><span>Systematic review of colorectal cancer screening <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for average-risk adults: Summarizing the <span class="hlt">current</span> global recommendations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bénard, Florence; Barkun, Alan N; Martel, Myriam; von Renteln, Daniel</p> <p>2018-01-07</p> <p>To summarize and compare worldwide colorectal cancer (CRC) screening recommendations in order to identify similarities and disparities. A systematic literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, CENTRAL and ISI Web of knowledge identifying all average-risk CRC screening <span class="hlt">guideline</span> publications within the last ten years and/or position statements published in the last 2 years. In addition, a hand-search of the webpages of National Gastroenterology Society websites, the National <span class="hlt">Guideline</span> Clearinghouse, the BMJ Clinical Evidence website, Google and Google Scholar was performed. Fifteen <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were identified. Six <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were published in North America, four in Europe, four in Asia and one from the World Gastroenterology Organization. The majority of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> recommend screening average-risk individuals between ages 50 and 75 using colonoscopy (every 10 years), or flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS, every 5 years) or fecal occult blood test (FOBT, mainly the Fecal Immunochemical Test, annually or biennially). Disparities throughout the different <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are found relating to the use of colonoscopy, rank order between test, screening intervals and optimal age ranges for screening. Average risk individuals between 50 and 75 years should undergo CRC screening. Recommendations for optimal surveillance intervals, preferred tests/test cascade as well as the optimal timing when to start and stop screening differ regionally and should be considered for clinical decision making. Furthermore, local resource availability and patient preferences are important to increase CRC screening uptake, as any screening is better than none.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007DSRII..54.1129G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007DSRII..54.1129G"><span>Potential mechanisms of influence of the Leeuwin <span class="hlt">Current</span> eddy system on teleost recruitment to the Western <span class="hlt">Australian</span> continental shelf</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gaughan, Daniel J.</p> <p>2007-04-01</p> <p>The Leeuwin <span class="hlt">Current</span> (LC), an oligotrophic, warm <span class="hlt">current</span> that flows south (poleward) along the shelf-break off the west coast of Australia and then east along the south coast, is recognized as a key factor affecting fisheries production in the region, but the mechanisms for this influence have not been determined. Recruitment strength of the globally significant western rock lobster ( Panulirus cygnus) stock is correlated to interannual variations in the strength of the LC. While this relationship has been based on a 2-decade time-series of P. cygnus recruitment data, the important teleost species of the region rarely have recruitment data for more than a few years; yet this group is nonetheless economically, socially and politically important. Furthermore, there is little knowledge of the egg- and larval-stage dynamics for the majority of these teleosts. Previous and new information on those aspects of the LC system that could theoretically impact on recruitment of shelf teleosts were identified to provide a basis for developing a conceptual model of how the LC could affect recruitment. The potential impacts of the LC system, which entrains shelf water, were examined with reference to retention/loss of teleost eggs and larvae and positive/negative influences on feeding conditions for larvae. Owing to the lack of early-life-history information for many teleosts in Western Australia, this was undertaken for generalized shelf species whose eggs are spawned on the shelf and whose larvae must settle on the shelf to access favourable nursery habitat. The results indicate that the LC system most likely contributes a net negative impact on success of teleost eggs and larvae. Larvae of shelf teleosts entrained and trapped in the warm-core (WC) eddies that form from the LC and then propagate offshore would contribute little to recruitment. Given that larval teleosts predominantly feed on copepods and that these were much less abundant in the WC eddy than is typical of shelf</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22268503','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22268503"><span>Ethical issues in the translation of social neuroscience: a policy analysis of <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for public dialogue in human research.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zimmerman, Emma; Racine, Eric</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Social neuroscience and its potential implications create an interesting case study for examining human research ethics policies on the topic of public communication of research. We reviewed mainstream national and international human research ethics <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and policies on issues of public communication of research. Our analysis relied on five thematic nets to capture the interactions between research and the public: public understanding, knowledge translation, public participation, social outcomes, and dual use. Coverage of these topics is sparse and inconsistent in mainstream policies and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. We identify three options to address these gaps and analyze their strengths and weaknesses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7630308','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7630308"><span>Harris P. Mosher Award thesis. Peritonsillar abscess: incidence, <span class="hlt">current</span> management practices, and a proposal for treatment <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Herzon, F S</p> <p>1995-08-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Currently</span> there is no agreement on the treatment of patients who develop a peritonsillar abscess (PTA). This lack of consensus results in highly variable and possibly expensive therapeutic regimens that may not provide optimum quality patient care at reasonable cost. The present study evaluates surgical, medical, diagnostic, and cost factors that affect the management of PTA based on the following: 1. a cohort study of 123 patients with PTA treated using needle aspiration as the initial surgical drainage; 2. a national survey of the PTA management practices of otolaryngologists; and 3. meta-analyses of various components of the treatment regimen for PTA. In the cohort study, patients diagnosed with PTA were treated by both otolaryngologists and emergency medicine specialists with needle aspiration as the primary surgical modality resulting in a 96% acute resolution rate for PTA. In the national survey, questionnaires were sent to 2000 randomly selected members of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery regarding their management of PTA. The return rate was 73%. Ninety-six percent of the physicians who returned survey forms treated an average of seven PTAs per year using either needle aspiration, incision and drainage, or abscess tonsillectomy to drain the abscess initially. The incidence of PTA in the United States and Puerto Rico among patients 5 to 59 years of age treated by survey practitioners is 30.1 per 100,000 person years, accounting for approximately 45,000 cases per year. Four meta-analyses were completed to quantify the success rate of needle aspiration in the treatment of PTA (94%), the recurrence rate of PTA (10% to 15%), the rate at which penicillin-resistant microorganisms are found in patients with PTA (0% to 56%), and the rate of prior oropharyngeal infections associated with PTA (11% to 56%). The recurrence rate for PTA in the United States is 10%, which is significantly different from the recurrence rate of 15% reported from</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17877869','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17877869"><span><span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for computer security in general practice.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schattner, Peter; Pleteshner, Catherine; Bhend, Heinz; Brouns, Johan</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>As general practice becomes increasingly computerised, data security becomes increasingly important for both patient health and the efficient operation of the practice. To develop <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for computer security in general practice based on a literature review, an analysis of available information on <span class="hlt">current</span> practice and a series of key stakeholder interviews. While the <span class="hlt">guideline</span> was produced in the context of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> general practice, we have developed a template that is also relevant for other countries. <span class="hlt">Current</span> data on computer security measures was sought from <span class="hlt">Australian</span> divisions of general practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with general practitioners (GPs), the medical software industry, senior managers within government responsible for health IT (information technology) initiatives, technical IT experts, divisions of general practice and a member of a health information consumer group. The respondents were asked to assess both the likelihood and the consequences of potential risks in computer security being breached. The study suggested that the most important computer security issues in general practice were: the need for a nominated IT security coordinator; having written IT policies, including a practice disaster recovery plan; controlling access to different levels of electronic data; doing and testing backups; protecting against viruses and other malicious codes; installing firewalls; undertaking routine maintenance of hardware and software; and securing electronic communication, for example via encryption. This information led to the production of computer security <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, including a one-page summary checklist, which were subsequently distributed to all GPs in Australia. This paper maps out a process for developing computer security <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for general practice. The specific content will vary in different countries according to their levels of adoption of IT, and cultural, technical and other health service factors. Making</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25903912','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25903912"><span><span class="hlt">Current</span> advance care planning practice in the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> community: an online survey of home care package case managers and service managers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sellars, Marcus; Detering, Karen M; Silvester, William</p> <p>2015-04-23</p> <p>Advance care planning (ACP) is the process of planning for future healthcare that is facilitated by a trained healthcare professional, whereby a person's values, beliefs and treatment preferences are made known to guide clinical decision-making at a future time when they cannot communicate their decisions. Despite the potential benefits of ACP for community aged care clients the availability of ACP is unknown, but likely to be low. In Australia many of these clients receive services through Home Care Package (HCP) programs. This study aimed to explore <span class="hlt">current</span> attitudes, knowledge and practice of advance care planning among HCP service managers and case managers. An invitation to take part in a cross-sectional online survey was distributed by email to all HCP services across Australia in November 2012. Descriptive analyses were used to examine overall patterns of responses to each survey item in the full sample. 120 (response rate 25%) service managers and 178 (response rate 18%) case managers completed the survey. Only 34% of services had written ACP policies and procedures in place and 48% of case managers had previously completed any ACP training. In addition, although most case managers (70%) had initiated an ACP discussion in the past 12 months and viewed ACP as part of their role, the majority of the conversations (80%) did not result in documentation of the client's wishes and most (85%) of the case managers who responded did not believe ACP was done well within their service. This survey shows low organisational ACP systems and support for case managers and a lack of a normative approach to ACP across <span class="hlt">Australian</span> HCP services. As HCPs become more prevalent it is essential that a model of ACP is developed and evaluated in this setting, so that clients have the opportunity to discuss and document their future healthcare wishes if they choose to.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20683393','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20683393"><span><span class="hlt">Current</span> status of therapeutic drug monitoring in Australia and New Zealand: a need for improved assay evaluation, best practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, and professional development.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Norris, Ross L; Martin, Jennifer H; Thompson, Erin; Ray, John E; Fullinfaw, Robert O; Joyce, David; Barras, Michael; Jones, Graham R; Morris, Raymond G</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>The measurement of drug concentrations, for clinical purposes, occurs in many diagnostic laboratories throughout Australia and New Zealand. However, the provision of a comprehensive therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) service requires the additional elements of pre- and postanalytical advice to ensure that concentrations reported are meaningful, interpretable, and clinically applicable to the individual patient. The aim of this project was to assess the status of TDM services in Australia and New Zealand. A range of professions involved in key aspects of TDM was surveyed by questionnaire in late 2007. Information gathered included: the list of drugs assayed; analytical methods used; interpretation services offered; interpretative methods used; and further monitoring advice provided. Fifty-seven responses were received, of which 42% were from hospitals (public and/or private); 11% a hospital (public and/or private) and pathology provider; and 47% a pathology provider only (public and/or private). Results showed that TDM is applied to a large number of different drugs. Poorly performing assay methods were used in some cases, even when published <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> recommended alternative practices. Although there was a wide array of assays available, the evidence suggested a need for better selection of assay methods. In addition, only limited advice and/or interpretation of results was offered. Of concern, less than 50% of those providing advice on aminoglycoside dosing in adults used pharmacokinetic tools with six of 37 (16.2%) respondents using Bayesian pharmacokinetic tools, the method recommended in the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Therapeutic <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>: Antibiotic. In conclusion, the survey highlighted deficiencies in the provision of TDM services, in particular assay method selection and both quality and quantity of postanalytical advice. A range of recommendations, some of which may have international implications, are discussed. There is a need to include measures of impact on clinical</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24634428','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24634428"><span>Pediatricians' knowledge of <span class="hlt">current</span> sports concussion legislation and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and comfort with sports concussion management: a cross-sectional study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Carl, Rebecca L; Kinsella, Sarah B</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Sports-related concussions disproportionately affect young athletes. The primary objective of our study was to determine Illinois pediatricians' level of familiarity with state concussion legislation and with published consensus <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for sports concussion diagnosis and treatment. We also sought to determine pediatricians' knowledge regarding concussion management and comfort treating sports concussion patients. This was a cross-sectional survey of pediatrician members of the Illinois Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Few general pediatricians (26.6%, n = 42) were "very familiar" or "somewhat familiar" with the recently passed Illinois state concussion legislation. Only 14.6% (n = 23) of general pediatrician respondents use concussion consensus <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in their practice. Pediatricians were generally very knowledgeable about concussions; only 5 out of 19 knowledge-based items were answered incorrectly by more than 25% of the study participants. General pediatricians are knowledgeable about concussions but most are not well aware of state concussion legislation and concussion consensus <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. © The Author(s) 2014.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28299777','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28299777"><span>Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis: A review of <span class="hlt">guideline</span> recommendations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Matheson, Alexia; Mazza, Danielle</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a difficult-to-manage condition that affects 5-8% of women of reproductive age. <span class="hlt">Current</span> treatment regimes have high relapse rates, resulting in poor quality of life for the women affected. To compare the quality and content of <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> concerned with recurrent VVC and to develop a summary of recommendations to assist in the management of women with this condition. Relevant clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were identified through a search of several databases (MEDLINE, SCOPUS and The Cochrane Library) and relevant websites. Five <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were identified. Each <span class="hlt">guideline</span> was assessed for quality using the AGREE II instrument. <span class="hlt">Guideline</span> recommendations were extracted, compared and contrasted. The identified <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were of mixed quality. This is not related to the level of evidence supporting them but is because of poor stakeholder involvement, applicability and lack of clarity concerning editorial independence. <span class="hlt">Current</span> international <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for recurrent VVC are consistent in terms of their definition of the condition, diagnostic techniques and utilising induction and maintenance therapy as the treatment of choice. However, the regimen suggested by most <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> (fluconazole weekly for six months) is not particularly effective; only 42.9% of patients are disease free after 12 months. An alternative regimen put forward by one of the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> cites a 77% cure rate after 12 months. Most <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> lacked specific recommendations for the induction part of induction and maintenance treatment. The <span class="hlt">current</span> most recommended treatment of recurrent VVC is sub-optimal. Studies performed on a larger scale are required to identify more effective treatments. © 2017 The Royal <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=shrubs&id=EJ727867','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=shrubs&id=EJ727867"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> Extinctions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Science Teacher, 2005</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Massive extinctions of animals and the arrival of the first humans in ancient Australia--which occurred 45,000 to 55,000 years ago--may be linked. Researchers at the Carnegie Institution, University of Colorado, <span class="hlt">Australian</span> National University, and Bates College believe that massive fires set by the first humans may have altered the ecosystem of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28592344','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28592344"><span>Whole grain intake of <span class="hlt">Australians</span> estimated from a cross-sectional analysis of dietary intake data from the 2011-13 <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Health Survey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Galea, Leanne M; Beck, Eleanor J; Probst, Yasmine C; Cashman, Chris J</p> <p>2017-08-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Dietary <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> recommend <span class="hlt">Australians</span> choose mostly whole-grain and/or high-fibre varieties within the grains (cereal) foods category, with other groups specifying a whole grain Daily Target Intake of 48 g for <span class="hlt">Australians</span> aged 9 years or above. The USA and UK report estimates of whole grain intake that are low and declining, and no comprehensive studies on whole grain intake in the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> population are available. The present study aimed to determine national estimates of whole grain intake, compared with <span class="hlt">current</span> recommendations. A recently updated whole grain database was applied to the most <span class="hlt">current</span> population dietary intake data. Single 24 h dietary recall intake data were reviewed against age group, sex, relative to energy intake and whole grain recommendations. Australia. <span class="hlt">Australians</span> (2-85 years) participating in the 2011-13 <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Health Survey (n 12 153). The median daily whole grain intake was 21 g for adults (19-85 years) and 17 g for children/adolescents (2-18 years), or 28 and 23 g/10 MJ per d, respectively. Approximately 30 % of children/adolescents consumed no whole grains on the day of the survey. Whole grain intake was lowest for the age group 14-18 years (8·7 g/d). Of all participants aged ≥9 years, 73 % did not reach the recommended Daily Target Intake of 48 g. Whole grain intake in Australia is below recommendations in all age groups. Adolescents may be a key target for campaigns to increase whole grain consumption. This study provides the first quantification of absolute whole grain intake from all food sources in a national sample of <span class="hlt">Australians</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27757962','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27757962"><span>For love or money? <span class="hlt">Australian</span> attitudes to financially compensated (commercial) surrogacy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tremellen, Kelton; Everingham, Sam</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Australian</span> law allows for altruistic surrogacy but prohibits compensation of surrogates beyond their expenses, or the use of professional surrogacy agencies. These restrictions limit local access to surrogacy, driving <span class="hlt">Australians</span> overseas where they can access commercial surrogacy. To assess the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> public's views regarding the use of gestational surrogacy under various social and medical scenarios, together with their level of support for financial compensation of surrogates and the use of professional surrogacy agencies. Online survey of 500 <span class="hlt">Australians</span> of reproductive age (18-49 years) regarding views on surrogacy and acceptable levels of compensation, conducted during January 2016. The majority of respondents supported access to surrogacy for couples, irrespective of a couple's marital status or sexuality, with only 9% believing that surrogacy was unjustified under any circumstances. Of those who held a view on compensated surrogacy, over half (58%) believed the <span class="hlt">current</span> ban was unjustified, with close to two-thirds (62%) also believing that <span class="hlt">Australians</span> should be allowed to access commercial surrogacy overseas. In relation to compensation, most believed that payment should be determined by negotiation between the surrogate and commissioning parents, while also supporting additional payments for 'hardship' pregnancies. Half of the surveyed cohort supported the legalisation of professional surrogacy agencies, with only 17% being totally opposed. The majority of <span class="hlt">Australians</span> support surrogacy, compensation for surrogates and professional surrogacy agencies. Therefore, the existing legal restrictions should be replaced with professional <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> that protect the surrogate and commissioning parents, while also improving <span class="hlt">Australians</span>' access to surrogacy. © 2016 The Royal <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17170535','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17170535"><span><span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Amerling, Richard; Winchester, James F; Ronco, Claudio</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are proliferating in medicine. In addition to methodological problems that cause <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> to be outdated rapidly, they are plagued by conflicts of interest. They are largely consensus opinions of panels of experts, most of whom are supported by industry. Professional societies, health insurers, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, and dialysis providers also benefit from <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Little attention is paid to the potential for harm to patients, and to the profession of medicine, from the widespread use of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23641612','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23641612"><span>[<span class="hlt">Current</span> status of practice of providing dietary advice to pregnant women by members of the Japanese Midwives' Association. Knowledge and utilization of the "Dietary <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Pregnant and Lactating Women"].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Takimoto, Hidemi; Yonezawa, Junko; Shimada, Marie; Kato, Noriko; Yokoyama, Tetsuji</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Midwives are actively involved in providing dietary advice to pregnant women. In order to describe the <span class="hlt">current</span> status of prenatal dietary advice provided by midwives, we conducted a questionnaire survey inquiring about their knowledge and usage of the "Dietary <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Pregnant and Lactating Women" (<span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>) issued by the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare in 2006. In total, 2000 members of the Japanese Midwives' Association were randomly selected for administration of the questionnaire. The recovery rate was 42.1%, and 785 responses were eligible for analyses. The questionnaire collected information on the respondent's age, years of work experience, <span class="hlt">current</span> involvement in delivery practice, number of deliveries per year in the <span class="hlt">current</span> affiliation, provision of dietary advice to pregnant women, and knowledge and usage of the <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>. The proportion of respondents in their 20 s was low (1.8%). About half of the respondents were practicing delivery. Further, 66.1% (519 midwives) reported they had knowledge of the <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>. Among those who had knowledge of the <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> and were <span class="hlt">currently</span> providing dietary advice (426 midwives), 88.0% were using the <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>. The most frequently used item in the <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> was "Diet for preventing anemia" (75.8%). The least used item was "Shoku-iku (diet and nutrition education) for pregnant and lactating women" (58.5%). Midwives who were practicing delivery showed a significantly lower usage of the <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> than those who were not (84.9% vs. 92.6%, P = 0.02). Among midwives practicing delivery, the most common reason for not using the <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> was "using original educational material produced by oneself or the facility." Providing dietary advice to pregnant women constituted a large fraction of midwives' duties as well as delivery practice. About 90% of the midwives, who had knowledge of the <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> and provided dietary advice, were using the <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>. In order to increase the usage of individual items</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25644211','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25644211"><span>Reference levels for corticosterone and immune function in farmed saltwater crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) hatchlings using <span class="hlt">current</span> Code of Practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Finger, John W; Thomson, Peter C; Adams, Amanda L; Benedict, Suresh; Moran, Christopher; Isberg, Sally R</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>To determine reference levels for on-farm stressors on immune responsiveness and growth rate, 253 hatchling crocodiles from 11 known breeding pairs were repeatedly measured and blood sampled during their first year. Plasma corticosterone (CORT) was used to quantify baseline stress levels in captive animals and were found to be lower (mean 1.83±SE 0.16 ng/mL) than previously reported in saltwater crocodile hatchlings. Two tests of immune function were also conducted. Innate constitutive immunity was assessed using bacterial killing assays (BKA) against two bacterial species: Escherichia coli and Providencia rettgeri, whereby the latter causes considerable economic loss to industry from septicaemic mortalities. Although the bactericidal capabilities were different at approximately 4 months old (32±3% for E. coli and 16±4% for P. rettgeri), the differences had disappeared by approximately 9 months old (58±2% and 68±6%, respectively). To assess immune responsiveness to a novel antigen, the inflammatory swelling response caused by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) injection was assessed but was only significantly different between Samplings 1 and 3 (5% LSD). There were no significant clutch effects for CORT or PHA but there were for both BKA traits. CORT was not significantly associated with growth (head length) or the immune parameters except for P. rettgeri BKA where higher CORT levels were associated with better bactericidal capability. As such, these results suggest that the crocodiles in this study are not stressed, therefore endorsing the management strategies adopted within the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> industry Code of Practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28203110','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28203110"><span>Variability in delivered dose and respirable delivered dose from nebulizers: are <span class="hlt">current</span> regulatory testing <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> sufficient to produce meaningful information?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hatley, Ross Hm; Byrne, Sarah M</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>To improve convenience to patients, there have been advances in the operation of nebulizers, resulting in fast treatment times and less drug lost to the environment. However, limited attention has been paid to the effects of these developments on the delivered dose (DD) and respirable delivered dose (RDD). Published pharmacopoeia and ISO testing <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for adult-use testing utilize a single breathing pattern, which may not be sufficient to enable effective comparisons between the devices. The DD of 5 mg of salbutamol sulfate into adult breathing patterns with inhalation:exhalation (I:E) ratios between 1:1 and 1:4 was determined. Droplet size was determined by laser diffraction and RDD calculated. Nine different nebulizer brands with different modes of operation (conventional, venturi, breath-enhanced, mesh, and breath-activated) were tested. Between the non-breath-activated nebulizers, a 2.5-fold difference in DD (~750-1,900 µg salbutamol) was found; with RDD, there was a more than fourfold difference (~210-980 µg). With increasing time spent on exhalation, there were progressive reductions in DD and RDD, with the RDD at an I:E ratio of 1:4 being as little as 40% of the dose with the 1:1 I:E ratio. The DD and RDD from the breath-activated mesh nebulizer were independent of the I:E ratio, and for the breath-activated jet nebulizer, there was less than 20% change in RDD between the I:E ratios of 1:1 and 1:4. Comparing nebulizers using the I:E ratio recommended in the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> does not predict relative performance between the devices at other ratios. There was significant variance in DD or RDD between different brands of non-breath-activated nebulizer. In future, consideration should be given to revision of the test protocols included in the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, to reflect more accurately the potential therapeutic dose that is delivered to a realistic spectrum of breathing patterns.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29111008','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29111008"><span>Management of blood pressure in acute stroke: Comparison of <span class="hlt">current</span> prescribing patterns with AHA/ASA <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in a Sub-Saharan African referral hospital.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kuate-Tegueu, C; Dongmo-Tajeuna, J J; Doumbe, J; Mapoure-Njankouo, Y; Noubissi, G; Djientcheu, V D P</p> <p>2017-11-15</p> <p>High blood pressure (HBP) is common at acute phase of stroke. It may reflect untreated or uncontrolled hypertension before stroke, or it may relate to stress response. The present study was designed to compare <span class="hlt">current</span> American Stroke Association (ASA) <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> with actual prescribing patterns for management of HBP at the acute phase of stroke, in a tertiary care Hospital in Douala, Cameroon. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Cardiology and Neurology department of the Douala Laquintinie Hospital. Consenting patients with sign of stroke, confirmed by a brain CT-scan, who consented to participate in the study were recruited from March to July 2012. The use of antihypertensive medications (type, dose, routes of administration, BP recordings) in the first three days after admission was noted. One hundred and eleven patients were recruited including 59 men (53.1%). The mean age of patients was 60.9±12.3years, 70 patients (63%) had ischemic stroke and 41 (37%) hemorrhagic. Sixty two (55.8%) patients had hypertension severe enough to warrant treatment upon arrival. There was an overtreatment rate of 46.9% and undertreatment rate of 9.7%. The ASA <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were broadly respected by practitioners for patients who required treatment, but those who do not need treatment were overtreated. These findings support the need for more research to improve treatment <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> as well as patient management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24983995','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24983995"><span>Optimal screening of children with acute malnutrition requires a change in <span class="hlt">current</span> WHO <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> as MUAC and WHZ identify different patient groups.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Laillou, Arnaud; Prak, Sophonneary; de Groot, Richard; Whitney, Sophie; Conkle, Joel; Horton, Lindsey; Un, Sam Oeurn; Dijkhuizen, Marjoleine A; Wieringa, Frank T</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Timely treatment of acute malnutrition in children <5 years of age could prevent >500,000 deaths annually. Screening at community level is essential to identify children with malnutrition. <span class="hlt">Current</span> WHO <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for community screening for malnutrition recommend a Mid Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) of <115 mm to identify severe acute malnutrition (SAM). However, it is <span class="hlt">currently</span> unclear how MUAC relates to the other indicator used to define acute malnutrition: weight-for-height Z-score (WHZ). Secondary data from >11,000 Cambodian children, obtained by different surveys between 2010 and 2012, was used to calculate sensitivity and ROC curves for MUAC and WHZ. The secondary analysis showed that using the <span class="hlt">current</span> WHO cut-off of 115 mm for screening for severe acute malnutrition over 90% of children with a weight-for-height z-score (WHZ) <-3 would have been missed. Reversely, WHZ<-3 missed 80% of the children with a MUAC<115 mm. The <span class="hlt">current</span> WHO cut-off for screening for SAM should be changed upwards from the <span class="hlt">current</span> 115 mm. In the Cambodian data-set, a cut-off of 133 mm would allow inclusion of >65% of children with a WHZ<-3. Importantly, MUAC and WHZ identified different sub-groups of children with acute malnutrition, therefore these 2 indicators should be regarded as independent from each other. We suggest a 2-step model with MUAC used a screening at community level, followed by MUAC and WHZ measured at a primary health care unit, with both indicators used independently to diagnose severe acute malnutrition. <span class="hlt">Current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> should be changed to reflect this, with treatment initiated when either MUAC <115 mm or WHZ<-3.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4077752','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4077752"><span>Optimal Screening of Children with Acute Malnutrition Requires a Change in <span class="hlt">Current</span> WHO <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> as MUAC and WHZ Identify Different Patient Groups</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Laillou, Arnaud; Prak, Sophonneary; de Groot, Richard; Whitney, Sophie; Conkle, Joel; Horton, Lindsey; Un, Sam Oeurn; Dijkhuizen, Marjoleine A.; Wieringa, Frank T.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background Timely treatment of acute malnutrition in children <5 years of age could prevent >500,000 deaths annually. Screening at community level is essential to identify children with malnutrition. <span class="hlt">Current</span> WHO <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for community screening for malnutrition recommend a Mid Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) of <115 mm to identify severe acute malnutrition (SAM). However, it is <span class="hlt">currently</span> unclear how MUAC relates to the other indicator used to define acute malnutrition: weight-for-height Z-score (WHZ). Methods Secondary data from >11,000 Cambodian children, obtained by different surveys between 2010 and 2012, was used to calculate sensitivity and ROC curves for MUAC and WHZ. Findings The secondary analysis showed that using the <span class="hlt">current</span> WHO cut-off of 115 mm for screening for severe acute malnutrition over 90% of children with a weight-for-height z-score (WHZ) <−3 would have been missed. Reversely, WHZ<−3 missed 80% of the children with a MUAC<115 mm. Conclusions The <span class="hlt">current</span> WHO cut-off for screening for SAM should be changed upwards from the <span class="hlt">current</span> 115 mm. In the Cambodian data-set, a cut-off of 133 mm would allow inclusion of >65% of children with a WHZ<−3. Importantly, MUAC and WHZ identified different sub-groups of children with acute malnutrition, therefore these 2 indicators should be regarded as independent from each other. We suggest a 2-step model with MUAC used a screening at community level, followed by MUAC and WHZ measured at a primary health care unit, with both indicators used independently to diagnose severe acute malnutrition. <span class="hlt">Current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> should be changed to reflect this, with treatment initiated when either MUAC <115 mm or WHZ<−3. PMID:24983995</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA537081','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA537081"><span>Will the <span class="hlt">Current</span> Solution Survive the Future Battlespace? An examination of the Combatant Role of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Army’s Protected mobility capability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-12-10</p> <p>requirements exist which the Army may need to address as it develops towards ‘Force 2030’? Critically, this paper aims to analyze the future...Defence White Paper , Defending Australia 1994, represented a fundamental shift in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> strategic defense policy. Historical Background 1 Self...Keating Labour Government in 1993, it was determined that a revision of the previous White Paper (Defending Australia 1987) was to be undertaken. The</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/6059','DOTNTL'); return false;" href="https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/6059"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> transport index thesaurus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntlsearch.bts.gov/tris/index.do">DOT National Transportation Integrated Search</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>This Thesaurus is designed to assist <span class="hlt">Australian</span> librarians and researchers to access <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and overseas : literature on transport and roads. Preferred terms have largely been chosen to reflect <span class="hlt">Australian</span> usage. Terms : from the thesaurus are use...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28750773','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28750773"><span>A study on <span class="hlt">current</span> risk assessments and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on the use of food animal products derived from cloned animals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hur, Sun Jin</p> <p>2017-10-01</p> <p>The author widely surveyed and analyzed the food safety issues, ethical issues, permits, and approval of animal products from animals cloned by somatic cell nuclear transfer worldwide. As a result of a 2-year survey, the author found that there is no evidence that meat and milk derived from cloned animals or their progeny pose a risk to food safety in terms of genotoxicity, adverse reproductive effects, or allergic reactions. Most countries have not approved meat and milk derived from cloned animals, and their progeny are entering the food supply. To establish the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, the author suggests four principles of safety assessment for meat and milk derived from cloned animals. The four main principles for safety assessment are similarities of chemical composition, adverse reproductive effects, genotoxicity, and allergic reactions under the influence of meat and milk from cloned animals and noncloned counterparts. This principle means that meat and milk derived from a cloned animal are safe if there are no differences in the four safety assessments of meat and milk between cloned animal's progeny and noncloned counterparts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19788428','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19788428"><span>Knowledge of general dentists in the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for emergency treatment of avulsed teeth and dental trauma prevention.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>de Vasconcellos, Luis Gustavo Oliveira; Brentel, Aline Scalone; Vanderlei, Aleska Dias; de Vasconcellos, Luana Marotta Reis; Valera, Márcia Carneiro; de Araújo, Maria Amélia Máximo</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>A high prevalence of dental trauma exists and its effects on function and esthetics deserve the attention of general dentists. The aim of this study was to assess the level of general dental practitioners' (GDPs) knowledge about <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for dental avulsion and its prevention using a questionnaire. The 21-item questionnaire was distributed among 264 GDPs and the survey was realized between August-November 2006. The data obtained were statistically analyzed using descriptive analysis and Pearson's Chi-square test to determine associations between knowledge regarding emergency treatment and dentists from public or private dental schools and years of experience. The results showed that the participants exhibited appropriate knowledge concerning procedures in cases of tooth avulsion and its prevention. The number of correct answers was low in relation to recommended treatment at the site of injury. Storage medium, preparation of the alveolus and splint time for receiving the avulsed tooth received a high number of correct answers. One statistically significant association between years of experience and recommended treatment at the site of the injury in the case an avulsed tooth (chi(2) = 9.384, P = 0.009). In conclusion, this survey showed appropriate knowledge of dental avulsion management and its prevention among the surveyed dentists. The findings also showed that communication between dentists and the population is deficient, especially concerning practitioners of high risk and contact sports.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28566113','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28566113"><span>Group-based education for patients with type 2 diabetes: a survey of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> dietitians.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Odgers-Jewell, Kate; Isenring, Elisabeth A; Thomas, Rae; Reidlinger, Dianne P</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>Group-based education has the potential to substantially improve the outcomes of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and reduce the enormous burden that chronic diseases place on healthcare systems worldwide. Despite this proven effectiveness, the utilisation of group services for the management of T2DM by <span class="hlt">Australian</span> dietitians is surprisingly low. This study surveyed a sample of 263 <span class="hlt">Australian</span> dietitians to explore the utilisation of group-based education for T2DM, as well as dietitians' preferences for practice and training. The results of this study indicate that <span class="hlt">Australian</span> dietitians are <span class="hlt">currently</span> under-utilising group-based education programs for the management of T2DM, with the primary reasons identified as a lack of training provided to dietitians in the area, limited access to facilities suitable for conducting group education, the perceived poor cost-effectiveness of these programs, and the lack of evidence-based practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the group-based management of persons with T2DM. Additionally, the majority of preferences for further training were for either face-to-face or web-based formal training conducted over 3-6h. Clear, evidence-based practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and training resources for group education for the management of T2DM are needed in order to encourage better utilisation of group-based education by <span class="hlt">Australian</span> dietitians.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24193232','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24193232"><span>Application of <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for chest compression depth on different surfaces and using feedback devices: a randomized cross-over study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schober, P; Krage, R; Lagerburg, V; Van Groeningen, D; Loer, S A; Schwarte, L A</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Current</span> cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)-<span class="hlt">guidelines</span> recommend an increased chest compression depth and rate compared to previous <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, and the use of automatic feedback devices is encouraged. However, it is unclear whether this compression depth can be maintained at an increased frequency. Moreover, the underlying surface may influence accuracy of feedback devices. We investigated compression depths over time and evaluated the accuracy of a feedback device on different surfaces. Twenty-four volunteers performed four two-minute blocks of CPR targeting at <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guideline</span> recommendations on different surfaces (floor, mattress, 2 backboards) on a patient simulator. Participants rested for 2 minutes between blocks. Influences of time and different surfaces on chest compression depth (ANOVA, mean [95% CI]) and accuracy of a feedback device to determine compression depth (Bland-Altman) were assessed. Mean compression depth did not reach recommended depth and decreased over time during all blocks (first block: from 42 mm [39-46 mm] to 39 mm [37-42 mm]). A two-minute resting period was insufficient to restore compression depth to baseline. No differences in compression depth were observed on different surfaces. The feedback device slightly underestimated compression depth on the floor (bias -3.9 mm), but markedly overestimated on the mattress (bias +12.6 mm). This overestimation was eliminated after correcting compression depth by a second sensor between manikin and mattress. Strategies are needed to improve chest compression depth, and more than two providers should alternate with chest compressions. The underlying surface does not necessarily adversely affect CPR performance but influences accuracy of feedback devices. Accuracy is improved by a second, posterior, sensor.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29899249','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29899249"><span>Cost and Affordability of Diets Modelled on <span class="hlt">Current</span> Eating Patterns and on Dietary <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>, for New Zealand Total Population, Māori and Pacific Households.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mackay, Sally; Buch, Tina; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Goodwin, Rawinia; Korohina, Erina; Funaki-Tahifote, Mafi; Lee, Amanda; Swinburn, Boyd</p> <p>2018-06-13</p> <p>The affordability of diets modelled on the <span class="hlt">current</span> (less healthy) diet compared to a healthy diet based on Dietary <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> was calculated for population groups in New Zealand. Diets using common foods were developed for a household of four for the total population, Māori and Pacific groups. Māori and Pacific nutrition expert panels ensured the diets were appropriate. Each <span class="hlt">current</span> (less healthy) diet was based on eating patterns identified from national nutrition surveys. Food prices were collected from retail outlets. Only the <span class="hlt">current</span> diets contained alcohol, takeaways and discretionary foods. The modelled healthy diet was cheaper than the <span class="hlt">current</span> diet for the total population (3.5% difference) and Pacific households (4.5% difference) and similar in cost for Māori households (0.57% difference). When the diets were equivalent in energy, the healthy diet was more expensive than the <span class="hlt">current</span> diet for all population groups (by 8.5% to 15.6%). For households on the minimum wage, the diets required 27% to 34% of household income, and if receiving income support, required 41⁻52% of household income. Expert panels were invaluable in guiding the process for specific populations. Both the modelled healthy and <span class="hlt">current</span> diets are unaffordable for some households as a considerable portion of income was required to purchase either diet. Policies are required to improve food security by lowering the cost of healthy food or improving household income.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22452292','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22452292"><span>The extent and nature of alcohol advertising on <span class="hlt">Australian</span> television.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pettigrew, Simone; Roberts, Michele; Pescud, Melanie; Chapman, Kathy; Quester, Pascale; Miller, Caroline</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Current</span> alcohol <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in Australia recommend minimising alcohol consumption, especially among minors. This study investigated (i) the extent to which children and the general population are exposed to television advertisements that endorse alcohol consumption and (ii) the themes used in these advertisements. A content analysis was conducted on alcohol advertisements aired over two months in major <span class="hlt">Australian</span> cities. The advertisements were coded according to the products that were promoted, the themes that were employed, and the time of exposure. Advertising placement expenditure was also captured. In total, 2810 alcohol advertisements were aired, representing one in 10 beverage advertisements. Advertisement placement expenditure for alcohol products in the five cities over the two months was $15.8 million. Around half of all alcohol advertisements appeared during children's popular viewing times. The most common themes used were humour, friendship/mateship and value for money. Children and adults are regularly exposed to advertisements that depict alcohol consumption as fun, social and inexpensive. Such messages may reinforce existing alcohol-related cultural norms that prevent many <span class="hlt">Australians</span> from meeting <span class="hlt">current</span> intake <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. © 2012 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22171863','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22171863"><span>Animal bites and rabies exposure in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> travellers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mills, Deborah J; Lau, Colleen L; Weinstein, Philip</p> <p>2011-12-19</p> <p>To examine the circumstances of animal exposure in a case series of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> travellers who required rabies postexposure prophylaxis, and to assess the appropriateness of <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for rabies pre-exposure vaccination. Prospective case series of 65 returned travellers who presented to four <span class="hlt">Australian</span> travel medicine clinics between 1 April 2009 and 31 July 2010 for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis. Demographic characteristics associated with risk of injury; countries where injuries occurred; circumstances of the injuries; and travellers' experiences of obtaining postexposure prophylaxis overseas. Animal bites and scratches occurred most commonly among travellers aged 20-29 years. Most injuries occurred in Bali, Indonesia (30 [46%]) and Thailand (21 [32%]), and the most common animals responsible for the injuries to the 65 travellers were monkeys (29 travellers [45%]) and dogs (27 [42%]). Thirty-nine of the travellers (60%) initiated contact with the animal. Forty travellers (62%) were able to commence rabies vaccination overseas, but only nine (14%) were able to obtain rabies immunoglobulin overseas. Most travellers had difficulty obtaining rabies postexposure prophylaxis overseas, resulting in significant delays in appropriate treatment. We recommend that <span class="hlt">current</span> National Health and Medical Research Council <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for at-risk persons be broadened, and that the risk of rabies and the option of pre-exposure vaccination be discussed with all travellers to rabies-endemic areas.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25173553','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25173553"><span><span class="hlt">Current</span> quality of cardiovascular prevention for Million Hearts: an analysis of 147,038 outpatients from The <span class="hlt">Guideline</span> Advantage.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Eapen, Zubin J; Liang, Li; Shubrook, Jay H; Bauman, Mary A; Bufalino, Vincent J; Bhatt, Deepak L; Peterson, Eric D; Hernandez, Adrian F</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Million Hearts is a national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes over 5 years. The degree to which outpatient providers are controlling risk factors has not been fully described. We examined adherence to the Million Hearts clinical quality measures using The <span class="hlt">Guideline</span> Advantage, a nationwide quality improvement program for outpatient care. Specifically, we determined the proportion of patients with (1) ischemic vascular disease who were prescribed an antiplatelet drug; (2) hypertension whose blood pressure was controlled; (3) diabetes mellitus whose most recent low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was <100 mg/dL; and 4) a tobacco use screening and who received a smoking cessation intervention as needed. From January 1, 2010, to March 31, 2012, there were 147,038 patients enrolled from 25 US practices. At the practice level, antiplatelet prescription ranged from 50.0% to 82.3% (median 71.9%, interquartile range [IQR] 66.7-82.1), hypertension control ranged from 48.6% to 75.3% (median 66.6%, IQR 60.1-70.9), hyperlipidemia control among patients with diabetes mellitus ranged from 53.3% to 100.0% (median 75.8%, IQR 65.8-83.0), and tobacco use screening and intervention ranged from 31.0% to 98.8% (median 79.8%, IQR 72.0-83.2). Black and people of color races were associated with a lower likelihood of blood pressure control and cholesterol control. Female gender was associated with a lower likelihood of antiplatelet prescription and cholesterol control. Compliance with quality measures for the Million Hearts initiative varies widely and is notable for racial and gender disparities. Our findings identify multiple opportunities to improve the quality of cardiovascular prevention. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15505756','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15505756"><span>Global risk management in type 2 diabetes: blood glucose, blood pressure, and lipids--update on the background of the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Clemens, A; Siegel, E; Gallwitz, B</p> <p>2004-10-01</p> <p>Diabetes mellitus presents a significant public health burden based on its increased morbidity, mortality, and economic cost. The high comorbidity and prevalence of concomitant diseases like hypertension and dyslipidemia in diabetic patients cause the high risk in developing secondary, cost intensive, and for the patient often disastrous late complications (nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy, and cardiovascular disease). Therefore, patients with diabetes mellitus need a global risk management that takes the various individual clinical problems into account. The <span class="hlt">current</span> global standards of therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus are focused on the control of glycemia, blood pressure, and lipid levels, as well as aspirin therapy and avoiding of smoking. There are a number of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and recommendations to manage these global issues. Our review will summarize <span class="hlt">current</span> recommendations and consolidate therapeutic goals and treatments that are of vital importance in the global risk management in diabetic patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29699493','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29699493"><span>Effects of age, comorbidity and adherence to <span class="hlt">current</span> antimicrobial <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on mortality in hospitalized elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Han, Xiudi; Zhou, Fei; Li, Hui; Xing, Xiqian; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yimin; Zhang, Chunxiao; Liu, Xuedong; Suo, Lijun; Wang, Jinxiang; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Guangqiang; Yao, Xuexin; Yu, Hongxia; Wang, Lei; Liu, Meng; Xue, Chunxue; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Yanli; Xiao, Ying; Cui, Xiaojing; Li, Lijuan; Purdy, Jay E; Cao, Bin</p> <p>2018-04-24</p> <p>Limited information exists on the clinical characteristics predictive of mortality in patients aged ≥65 years in many countries. The impact of adherence to <span class="hlt">current</span> antimicrobial <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on the mortality of hospitalized elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has never been assessed. A total of 3131 patients aged ≥65 years were enrolled from a multi-center, retrospective, observational study initiated by the CAP-China network. Risk factors for death were screened with multivariable logistic regression analysis, with emphasis on the evaluation of age, comorbidities and antimicrobial treatment regimen with regard to the <span class="hlt">current</span> Chinese CAP <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. The mean age of the study population was 77.4 ± 7.4 years. Overall in-hospital and 60-day mortality were 5.7% and 7.6%, respectively; these rates were three-fold higher in those aged ≥85 years than in the 65-74 group (11.9% versus 3.2% for in-hospital mortality and 14.1% versus 4.7% for 60-day mortality, respectively). The mortality was significantly higher among patients with comorbidities compared with those who were otherwise healthy. According to the 2016 Chinese CAP <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, 62.1% of patients (1907/3073) received non-adherent treatment. For general-ward patients without risk factors for Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infection (n = 2258), 52.3% (1094/2090) were over-treated, characterized by monotherapy with an anti-pseudomonal β-lactam or combination with fluoroquinolone + β-lactam; while 71.4% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients (120/168) were undertreated, without coverage of atypical bacteria. Among patients with risk factors for PA infection (n = 815), 22.9% (165/722) of those in the general ward and 74.2% of those in the ICU (69/93) were undertreated, using regimens without anti-pseudomonal activity. The independent predictors of 60-day mortality were age, long-term bedridden status, congestive heart failure, CURB-65, glucose, heart rate, arterial oxygen</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/21410239-current-performance-wide-range-ev-soft-ray-beamline-australian-synchrotron','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/21410239-current-performance-wide-range-ev-soft-ray-beamline-australian-synchrotron"><span>The <span class="hlt">Current</span> Performance of the Wide Range (90-2500 eV) Soft X-ray Beamline at the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Synchrotron</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cowie, B. C. C.; Tadich, A.; Thomsen, L.</p> <p>2010-06-23</p> <p>The Soft X-ray beamline at the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> synchrotron has been constructed around a collimated light Plane Grating Monochromator taking light from an Elliptically Polarized Undulator (EPU). The beamline covers a wide photon energy range between 90 to 2500 eV, using two gratings of 250 l/mm and 1200 l/mm. At present the output from the monochromator is directed into one branchline with a dedicated UHV endstation. The measured performance of the beamline in flux and resolution is shown to be very close to that of theoretical calculations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26481765','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26481765"><span>Do patients discussed at a lung cancer multidisciplinary team meeting receive <span class="hlt">guideline</span>-recommended treatment?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Boxer, Miriam M; Duggan, Kirsten J; Descallar, Joseph; Vinod, Shalini K</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> provide evidence-based management recommendations to guide practice. This study aimed to evaluate whether patients discussed at a lung cancer multidisciplinary team meeting received <span class="hlt">guideline</span>-recommended treatment and determine reasons for not receiving <span class="hlt">guideline</span>-recommended treatment. All new lung cancer patients discussed at the Liverpool/Macarthur lung cancer multidisciplinary team meeting between 1 December 2005 and 31 December 2010 were included. <span class="hlt">Guideline</span>-recommended treatment was assigned according to pathology, stage and ECOG (Eastern Co-operative Oncology Group) performance status as per the 2004 <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Lung Cancer <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>. This was compared with actual treatment received to determine adherence to <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. For those patients who did not receive <span class="hlt">guideline</span>-recommended treatment, the medical record was reviewed to determine the reason(s) for this. Survival was compared between those who did and did not receive <span class="hlt">guideline</span>-recommended treatment. 808 new patients were discussed at the multidisciplinary team meeting. <span class="hlt">Guideline</span>-recommended treatment could not be assigned in 2% of patients due to missing data. 435 patients (54%) received <span class="hlt">guideline</span>-recommended treatment, and 356 (44%) did not. The most common reasons for not receiving <span class="hlt">guideline</span>-recommended treatment were a decline in ECOG performance status (24%), large tumor volume precluding radical radiotherapy (17%), comorbidities (15%) and patient preference (13%). Patients less than 70 years who received <span class="hlt">guideline</span>-recommended treatment had improved survival compared with those who did not. A significant proportion of lung cancer patients did not receive <span class="hlt">guideline</span>-recommended treatment due to legitimate reasons. Alternative <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are needed for patients not suitable for <span class="hlt">current</span> best practice. Treatment according to <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> was a predictor for survival. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10999353','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10999353"><span>Retrospective study of urinalysis for dl-amphetamine and dl-methamphetamine analysis under <span class="hlt">current</span> Department of Defense <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shippee, R L; Kippenberger, D J</p> <p>2000-09-01</p> <p>Under <span class="hlt">current</span> Department of Defense (DOD) directive, the laboratories certified to conduct urinalyis testing in support of the DOD Drug Deterrence Program are required to conduct dl-isomer analysis on all specimens that confirm at a concentration greater than 500 ng/mL methamphetamine (METH). Although the same cutoff concentration is required for amphetamine (AMP) reporting, there is no requirement for dl-isomer analysis of AMP-positive specimens. Of the 894,823 specimens screened by the Army Drug Testing Laboratory at Ft. Meade, MD during a 19-month period, 339 confirmed positive for METH. From this positive population, seven specimens failed to confirm at or above the DOD cutoff of > 20% d-isomer. One of the seven specimens contained 534 ng/mL l-AMP and was reported positive for AMP. Although 100% of the AMP was the l-isomer, under <span class="hlt">current</span> DOD directive, this information was not passed along to the Medical Review Officers (MRO) to assist them during the interview process. Although this situation appears to be a rare event, consideration should be given to requiring dl-isomer analysis of AMP-positive specimens and forwarding this information to the MRO.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27810000','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27810000"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> Brain Alliance.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p></p> <p>2016-11-02</p> <p>A proposal for an <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Brain Initiative (ABI) is under development by members of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Brain Alliance. Here we discuss the goals of the ABI, its areas of research focus, its context in the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> research setting, and its necessity for ensuring continued success for <span class="hlt">Australian</span> brain research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26165916','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26165916"><span>Implementation workshop of WHO <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on evaluation of malaria vaccines: <span class="hlt">Current</span> regulatory concepts and issues related to vaccine quality, Pretoria, South Africa 07 Nov 2014.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ho, Mei Mei; Baca-Estrada, Maria; Conrad, Christoph; Karikari-Boateng, Eric; Kang, Hye-Na</p> <p>2015-08-26</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">current</span> World Health Organization (WHO) <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on the quality, safety and efficacy of recombinant malaria vaccines targeting the pre-erythrocytic and blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum were adopted by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization in 2012 to provide guidance on the quality, nonclinical and clinical aspects of recombinant malaria vaccines. A WHO workshop was organised to facilitate implementation into African (national/regional) regulatory practices, of the regulatory evaluation principles outlined in the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> regarding quality aspects. The workshop was used also to share knowledge and experience on regulatory topics of chemistry, manufacturing and control with a focus on vaccines through presentations and an interactive discussion using a case study approach. The basic principles and concepts of vaccine quality including consistency of production, quality control and manufacturing process were presented and discussed in the meeting. By reviewing and practicing a case study, better understanding on the relationship between consistency of production and batch release tests of an adjuvanted pre-erythrocytic recombinant malaria vaccine was reached. The case study exercise was considered very useful to understand regulatory evaluation principles of vaccines and a suggestion was made to WHO to provide such practices also through its Global Learning Opportunities for Vaccine Quality programme. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26967360','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26967360"><span>Pediatric Audiology in North America: <span class="hlt">Current</span> Clinical Practice and How It Relates to the American Academy of Audiology Pediatric Amplification <span class="hlt">Guideline</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moodie, Sheila; Rall, Eileen; Eiten, Leisha; Lindley, George; Gordey, Dave; Davidson, Lisa; Bagatto, Marlene; Scollie, Susan</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>There is broad consensus that screening and diagnosis of permanent hearing loss in children must be embedded within a comprehensive, evidence-based, family-centered intervention program. Clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> (CPGs) for pediatric hearing assessment and hearing aid verification aim to reduce variability in practice and increase the use of effective evidence-based diagnostic and treatment options so that optimal outcomes may be achieved. To be of value, <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> must be translated and implemented into practice and ongoing monitoring of their use in practice should occur. This paper provides the results of two studies that aim to examine <span class="hlt">current</span> pediatric audiology and amplification practice in North America. A concurrent embedded mixed methods design was used. An electronic survey was distributed to North American audiologists who delivered pediatric audiology services with 350 audiologists participating in study 1 and 63 audiologists participating in study 2. A quantitative approach was the predominant method of data collection. Respondents were prompted to provide additional qualitative text and detail regarding their quantitative response choice. This qualitative text was used during the analysis phase and combined with quantitative results to assist understanding of respondents' knowledge, skills, and barriers/facilitators to implement best practice in pediatric amplification. Approximately 70% of audiologists reported using best-practice protocols for pediatric hearing aid fitting. Despite widespread knowledge and increased use of CPGs over the last 18 yrs, results of these studies show that variation in practice patterns continue to exist. Several examples of implementation challenges are discussed with recommendations provided. In order for audiologists working with children who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families to achieve the principles of family-centered early intervention, practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> must continue to be developed, disseminated</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25787998','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25787998"><span>How effective are <span class="hlt">current</span> dietary <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for cardiovascular disease prevention in healthy middle-aged and older men and women? A randomized controlled trial.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Reidlinger, Dianne P; Darzi, Julia; Hall, Wendy L; Seed, Paul T; Chowienczyk, Philip J; Sanders, Thomas A B</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>. Selecting a diet consistent with <span class="hlt">current</span> dietary <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> lowers BP and lipids, which would be expected to reduce the risk of CVD by one-third in healthy middle-aged and older men and women. This study is registered at www.isrctn.com as 92382106. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5946214','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5946214"><span>Both Mother and Infant Require a Vitamin D Supplement to Ensure That Infants’ Vitamin D Status Meets <span class="hlt">Current</span> <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Weinberg, Amy R.; Letourneau, Nicole</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>We examined the association between maternal vitamin D intake during breastfeeding with their infants’ vitamin D status in infants who did or did not receive vitamin D supplements to determine whether infant supplementation was sufficient. Using plasma from a subset of breastfed infants in the APrON (Alberta Pregnant Outcomes and Nutrition) cohort, vitamin D status was measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Maternal and infants’ dietary data were obtained from APrON’s dietary questionnaires. The median maternal vitamin D intake was 665 International Units (IU)/day, while 25% reported intakes below the recommended 400 IU/day. Of the 224 infants in the cohort, 72% were exclusively breastfed, and 90% were receiving vitamin D supplements. Infants’ median 25(OH)D was 96.0 nmol/L (interquartile ranges (IQR) 77.6–116.2), and 25% had 25(OH)D < 75 nmol/L. An adjusted linear regression model showed that, with a 100 IU increase in maternal vitamin D intake, infants’ 25(OH)D increased by 0.9 nmol/L controlling for race, season, mid-pregnancy maternal 25(OH)D, birthweight, and whether the infant received daily vitamin D supplement (β = 0.008, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.002, 0.13). These results suggest that, to ensure infant optimal vitamin D status, not only do infants require a supplement, but women also need to meet <span class="hlt">current</span> recommended vitamin D intake during breastfeeding. PMID:29596362</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29596362','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29596362"><span>Both Mother and Infant Require a Vitamin D Supplement to Ensure That Infants' Vitamin D Status Meets <span class="hlt">Current</span> <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aghajafari, Fariba; Field, Catherine J; Weinberg, Amy R; Letourneau, Nicole</p> <p>2018-03-29</p> <p>We examined the association between maternal vitamin D intake during breastfeeding with their infants' vitamin D status in infants who did or did not receive vitamin D supplements to determine whether infant supplementation was sufficient. Using plasma from a subset of breastfed infants in the APrON (Alberta Pregnant Outcomes and Nutrition) cohort, vitamin D status was measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Maternal and infants' dietary data were obtained from APrON's dietary questionnaires. The median maternal vitamin D intake was 665 International Units (IU)/day, while 25% reported intakes below the recommended 400 IU/day. Of the 224 infants in the cohort, 72% were exclusively breastfed, and 90% were receiving vitamin D supplements. Infants' median 25(OH)D was 96.0 nmol/L (interquartile ranges (IQR) 77.6-116.2), and 25% had 25(OH)D < 75 nmol/L. An adjusted linear regression model showed that, with a 100 IU increase in maternal vitamin D intake, infants' 25(OH)D increased by 0.9 nmol/L controlling for race, season, mid-pregnancy maternal 25(OH)D, birthweight, and whether the infant received daily vitamin D supplement (β = 0.008, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.002, 0.13). These results suggest that, to ensure infant optimal vitamin D status, not only do infants require a supplement, but women also need to meet <span class="hlt">current</span> recommended vitamin D intake during breastfeeding.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24990138','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24990138"><span>The emergence of international food safety standards and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>: understanding the <span class="hlt">current</span> landscape through a historical approach.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ramsingh, Brigit</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Following the Second World War, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) teamed up to construct an International Codex Alimentarius (or 'food code') which emerged in 1963. The Codex Committee on Food Hygiene (CCFH) was charged with the task of developing microbial hygiene standards, although it found itself embroiled in debate with the WHO over the nature these standards should take. The WHO was increasingly relying upon the input of biometricians and especially the International Commission on Microbial Specifications for Foods (ICMSF) which had developed statistical sampling plans for determining the microbial counts in the final end products. The CCFH, however, was initially more focused on a qualitative approach which looked at the entire food production system and developed codes of practice as well as more descriptive end-product specifications which the WHO argued were 'not scientifically correct'. Drawing upon historical archival material (correspondence and reports) from the WHO and FAO, this article examines this debate over microbial hygiene standards and suggests that there are many lessons from history which could shed light upon <span class="hlt">current</span> debates and efforts in international food safety management systems and approaches.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28338358','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28338358"><span>A Mismatch Between Athlete Practice and <span class="hlt">Current</span> Sports Nutrition <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> Among Elite Female and Male Middle- and Long-Distance Athletes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Heikura, Ida A; Stellingwerff, Trent; Mero, Antti A; Uusitalo, Arja Leena Tuulia; Burke, Louise M</p> <p>2017-08-01</p> <p>Contemporary nutrition <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> promote a variety of periodized and time-sensitive recommendations, but <span class="hlt">current</span> information regarding the knowledge and practice of these strategies among world-class athletes is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate this theme by implementing a questionnaire on dietary periodization practices in national/international level female (n = 27) and male (n = 21) middle- and long-distance runners/race-walkers. The questionnaire aimed to gain information on between and within-day dietary choices, as well as timing of pre- and posttraining meals and practices of training with low or high carbohydrate (CHO) availability. Data are shown as percentage (%) of all athletes, with differences in responses between subgroups (sex or event) shown as Chi-square x 2 when p < .05. Nearly two-thirds of all athletes reported that they aim to eat more food on, or after, hard training days. Most athletes said they focus on adequate fueling (96%) and adequate CHO and protein (PRO) recovery (87%) around key sessions. Twenty-six percent of athletes (11% of middle vs 42% of long-distance athletes [x 2 (1, n = 46) = 4.308, p = .038, phi = 0.3])) reported to undertake training in the fasted state, while 11% said they periodically restrict CHO intake, with 30% ingesting CHO during training sessions. Our findings show that elite endurance athletes appear to execute pre- and post-key session nutrition recovery recommendations. However, very few athletes deliberately undertake some contemporary dietary periodization approaches, such as training in the fasted state or periodically restricting CHO intake. This study suggests mismatches between athlete practice and <span class="hlt">current</span> and developing sports nutrition <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24570450','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24570450"><span>A survey of <span class="hlt">current</span> ostrich handling and transport practices in North America with reference to ostrich welfare and transportation <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> set up in other countries.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bejaei, M; Cheng, K M</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>Appropriate management of an ostrich's exposure to stressors during preslaughter handling and transport practices can improve its well-being and product quality. Because of the lack of information about ostrich farming and transportation in North America and lack of developed Codes of Practice for ratite transport in Canada and the United States, the first objective of our research was to identify <span class="hlt">current</span> preslaughter handling and transport practices of the ostrich industry in Canada and the United States, and to identify potential welfare issues based on the <span class="hlt">current</span> practices. The second objective of this research was to review ostrich transport welfare standards and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> from Australia, European Union, New Zealand, and South Africa to investigate if those <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are applicable to Canadian and American ostrich production systems. Preliminary producer interviews, on-farm visits, and literature review information sources were used to design a producer questionnaire that was used to survey producers by Internet and mail surveying methods to identify existing ostrich transport norms in Canada and the United States. Based on the results of our producer survey and review of the transport standards and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, we conclude that following factors are potential ostrich handling and transport welfare issues in Canada and the United States: lack of scientific information about welfare of ostriches during handling and transport; unfamiliarity of handlers and birds with handling and transport practices; not considering birds' social bounds, sex, behavior, and physical state in mixing them during handling and transport process; lack of an established specific maximum water and feed withdrawal duration for ostrich transport in Canada and the United States; lack of a specific vehicle designed for ratite transportation in Canada and the United States considering different physical body characteristics of ostriches compared with other species; exposure of birds to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26689428','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26689428"><span>Management of community-acquired pneumonia in an <span class="hlt">Australian</span> regional hospital.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Trad, Mohamad-Ali; Baisch, Andreas</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Current</span> management of hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in an <span class="hlt">Australian</span> regional hospital in accordance with the recommended <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> is unknown. The prescription rate of inappropriate antibiotic therapy was measured and analysed. A retrospective audit, December 2012 to November 2013. Regional <span class="hlt">Australian</span> hospital in North East Victoria. Interventions were the average of inpatient and intensive care unit length of stay, time to first antibiotic and to first chest X-ray, days of intravenous antibiotics, and extra intravenous therapy; proportion of intensive care unit admissions, average time to first antibiotic administration, patients with failed outpatient management of CAP, initial microbiological investigations, positive investigations, predominant microbiology, antibiotic choice, and concordance with <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>; proportion of justifiable deviation from <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, ratio of patients switched to oral therapy appropriately, complications during therapy, clinical failure, inpatient mortality, mortality at 30 days, mortality at 6 months, and readmission with CAP in 30 days and in 3 months. To improve the rates of concordance with <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> by following a specified method to rate severity of CAP, to clearly document reasons for non-concordance with <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, and to rationalise investigations. To improve antibiotic stewardship in the management of CAP. In an <span class="hlt">Australian</span> regional hospital, ceftriaxone and azithromycin were the predominant combination used at 56%, demonstrating that mild CAP was frequently overtreated. Mild CAP was eight times more likely to be treated as severe CAP (odds ratio = 8.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.7-40.3) P < 0.009). There is a need for a simple yet effective strategy to be introduced to rationalise treatment and investigation of CAP in this setting. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1130346.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1130346.pdf"><span>Promoting Leadership in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Universities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bradley, Andrew P.; Grice, Tim; Paulsen, Neil</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>In this paper we review <span class="hlt">current</span> practices for developing and promoting academic leadership in universities. We consider the forms of leadership that are appropriate for academic organisations, while exploring the types of leadership favoured by recruitment and promotion committees. Using the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> higher education context as a case study, we…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27389033','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27389033"><span>Adolescent energy drink consumption: An <span class="hlt">Australian</span> perspective.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Costa, Beth M; Hayley, Alexa; Miller, Peter</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Caffeinated Energy Drinks (EDs) are not recommended for consumption by children, yet there is a lack of age-specific recommendations and restrictions on the marketing and sale of EDs. EDs are increasingly popular among adolescents despite growing evidence of their negative health effects. In the <span class="hlt">current</span> study we examined ED consumption patterns among 399 <span class="hlt">Australian</span> adolescents aged 12-18 years. Participants completed a self-report survey of consumption patterns, physiological symptoms, and awareness of <span class="hlt">current</span> ED consumption <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Results indicated that ED consumption was common among the sample; 56% reported lifetime ED consumption, with initial consumption at mean age 10 (SD = 2.97). Twenty-eight percent of the sample consumed EDs at least monthly, 36% had exceeded the recommended two standard EDs/day, and 56% of consumers had experienced negative physiological health effects following ED consumption. The maximum number of EDs/day considered appropriate for children, adolescents, and adults varied, indicating a lack of awareness of <span class="hlt">current</span> consumption recommendations. These findings add to the growing body of international evidence of adolescent ED consumption, and the detrimental impact of EDs to adolescent health. Enforced regulation and restriction of EDs for children's and adolescents' consumption is urgently needed in addition to greater visibility of ED consumption recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28320633','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28320633"><span>Nutritional status, nutrient intake and use of enzyme supplements in paediatric patients with Cystic Fibrosis; a European multicentre study with reference to <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Calvo-Lerma, Joaquim; Hulst, Jessie M; Asseiceira, Inês; Claes, Ine; Garriga, Maria; Colombo, Carla; Fornés, Victoria; Woodcock, Sandra; Martins, Tiago; Boon, Mieke; Ruperto, Mar; Walet, Sylvia; Speziali, Chiara; Witters, Peter; Masip, Etna; Barreto, Celeste; de Boeck, Kris; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen</p> <p>2017-07-01</p> <p>The New European <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> have established the most updated recommendations on nutrition and pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) in CF. In the context of MyCyFAPP project - a European study in children with CF aimed at developing specific tools for improvement of self-management - the objective of the <span class="hlt">current</span> study was to assess nutritional status, daily energy and macronutrient intake, and PERT dosing with reference to these new <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Cross sectional study in paediatric patients with CF from 6 European centres. SD-scores for weight-for-age (WFA), height-for-age (HFA) and body mass index-for-age (BMI) were obtained. Through a specific 4-day food and enzyme-dose record, energy and macronutrients intake and PERT-use (LU/g lipids) were automatically calculated by the MyCyFAPP system. Comparisons were made using linear regression models. The lowest quartiles for BMI and HFA were between 0 and -1SD in all the centres with no significant differences, and 33.5% of the patients had a SD-score <0 for all three parameters. The minimum energy intake recommendation was not reached by 40% of the children and mean nutrients intake values were 14%, 51% and 34% of the total energy for protein, carbohydrates and lipids respectively. When assessed per centre, reported PERT doses were in the recommended range in only 13.8% to 46.6% of the patients; from 5.6% up to 82.7% of children were above the recommended doses and 3.3% to 75% were below. Among the 6 centres, a large variability and inconsistency with new <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on nutrition and PERT-use was found. Our findings document the lack of a general criterion to adjust PERT and suggest the potential benefit of educational and self-managerial tools to ensure adherence to therapies, both for clinical staff and families. They will be taken into account when developing these new tools during the next stages of MyCyFAPP Project. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20509562','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20509562"><span>[Diagnosis and venom specific immunotherapy (VIT) in allergic children in Poland--how much the <span class="hlt">current</span> practice follows the international <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>?].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Brzyski, Piotr; Lis, Grzegorz; Jedynak-Wasowicz, Urszula; Pietrzyk, Jacek Józef; Lange, Joanna; Małaczyńska, Teresa; Kraluk, Barbara; Swiebocka, Ewa; Breborowicz, Anna; Kycler, Zdzisława; Pietraszek-Mamcarz, Jolanta; Poszwiński, Adam; Gaszczyk, Grzegorz</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Insect venom allergy requires a high level approach adequate to allergy intensity. In case of severe IgE-mediated sting reactions, in children older than five years, venom immunotherapy is a treatment of choice. Identification of <span class="hlt">current</span> practices applied to venom allergic children in Poland and their adherence to the international <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Questionnaire survey concerning diagnostic and treatment rules was carried out in 8 centres of pediatric allergology, based on a similar audit conducted in the United Kingdom [Diwakar L. et al. Clin Exp Allergy 2008, 38: 1651]. In 5 centres both RAST and SPT tests were used as the first line of investigation. Subsequently 6 centres performed IDT. In three centres baseline serum tryptase levels were estimated. In case of sensitization to both bee and wasp venom in a child with the history of severe systemic reaction, but uncertain culprit insect, specific venom immunotherapy with both venoms was practised by 2 centres. In systemic reaction and not-detectable IgE in 6 centres child was followed-up in 6-12 months. Antihistamine premedication concerned all children in 7 centres. Six-week interval between booster doses was applied in half of centres. A target dose equal 100 mcg was used in 7 centres. Similarly all centres practiced 3-5 five year period of VIT. In Poland <span class="hlt">current</span> practice with venom allergic children was conducted in congruence with most of the recommendations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JKPS...67...17L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JKPS...67...17L"><span>Study of quality assurance regulations for linear accelerators in Korea: A comparison study between the <span class="hlt">current</span> status in Korea and the international <span class="hlt">guidelines</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, Hyunho; Jeong, Seonghoon; Jo, Yunhui; Yoon, Myonggeun</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Quality assurance (QA) for medical linear accelerators is indispensable for appropriate cancer treatment. Some international organizations and advanced Western countries have provided QA <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for linear accelerators. <span class="hlt">Currently</span>, QA regulations for linear accelerators in Korean hospitals specify a system in which each hospital stipulates its independent hospital-based protocols for QA procedures (HP_QAPs) and conducts QA based on those HP_QAPs while regulatory authorities verify whether items under those HP_QAPs have been performed. However, because this regulatory method cannot guarantee the quality of universal treatment and QA items with tolerance criteria are different in many hospitals, the presentation of standardized QA items and tolerance criteria is essential. In this study, QA items in HP_QAPs from various hospitals and those presented by international organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency, the European Union, and the American Association of Physicist in Medicine, and by advanced Western countries, such as the USA, the UK, and Canada, were compared. Concordance rates between QA items for linear accelerators that were presented by the aforementioned organizations and those <span class="hlt">currently</span> being implemented in Korean hospitals were shown to exhibit a daily QA of 50%, a weekly QA of 22%, a monthly QA of 43%, and an annual QA of 65%, and the overall concordance rates of all QA items were approximately 48%. In the comparison between QA items being implemented in Korean hospitals and those being implemented in advanced Western countries, concordance rates were shown to exhibit a daily QA of 50%, a weekly QA of 33%, a monthly QA of 60%, and an annual QA of 67%, and the overall concordance rates of all QA items were approximately 57%. The results of this study indicate that the HP_QAPs <span class="hlt">currently</span> implemented by Korean hospitals as QA standards for linear accelerators used in radiation therapy do not meet international standards. If this</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/magazine/issues/winter07/articles/winter07pg5.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/magazine/issues/winter07/articles/winter07pg5.html"><span><span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Better Heart Health</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Skip Navigation Bar Home <span class="hlt">Current</span> Issue Past Issues <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Better Heart Health Past Issues / Winter 2007 ... women either had or did not have CVD. <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> at a Glance: Prevention should be tailored to ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132396&Lab=OEI&keyword=internet+AND+access&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="https://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132396&Lab=OEI&keyword=internet+AND+access&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50"><span>PREVENTION <span class="hlt">GUIDELINES</span> SYSTEM/DATABASE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Prevention <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> System gives public health practitioners quick access to the most <span class="hlt">current</span> CDC recommendations and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the prevention, control, treatment and detection of infectious and chronic diseases, environmental hazards, natural or human-generated disast...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27220966','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27220966"><span>A Community Standard: Equivalency of Healthcare in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Immigration Detention.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Essex, Ryan</p> <p>2017-08-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Australian</span> government has long maintained that the standard of healthcare provided in its immigration detention centres is broadly comparable with health services available within the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> community. Drawing on the literature from prison healthcare, this article examines (1) whether the principle of equivalency is being applied in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> immigration detention and (2) whether this standard of care is achievable given Australia's <span class="hlt">current</span> policies. This article argues that the principle of equivalency is not being applied and that this standard of health and healthcare will remain unachievable in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> immigration detention without significant reform. Alternate approaches to addressing the well documented issues related to health and healthcare in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> immigration detention are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26257315','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26257315"><span>Infant gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD): <span class="hlt">Australian</span> GP attitudes and practices.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kirby, Catherine N; Segal, Ahuva Y; Hinds, Rupert; Jones, Kay M; Piterman, Leon</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to evaluate the attitudes and practices of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> general practitioners (GPs) regarding infant gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) diagnosis and management. A national cross-sectional survey, involving a random sample of <span class="hlt">currently</span> practising <span class="hlt">Australian</span> GPs (n = 2319) was undertaken between July and September 2011. GPs attitudes and management of infant GORD were surveyed via an online and paper-based 41-item questionnaire. In total, 400 responses were analysed (17.24% response rate). The majority of GPs employed empirical trials of acid-suppression medication and/or lifestyle modifications to diagnose infant GORD. GPs frequently recommended dietary modification despite the belief that they were only moderately effective at best. In addition, GPs frequently prescribed acid-suppression medication, despite concerns regarding their safety in the infant population. Other GP concerns included the lack of clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and education for GPs about infant GORD, as well as the level of evidence available for the safety and efficacy of diagnostic tests and treatments. Despite the important role <span class="hlt">Australian</span> GPs play in the diagnosis and management of infant GORD, high-level evidence-based <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for GPs are lacking. Consequently, GPs engage in diagnostic and management practices despite their concerns regarding the safety and effectiveness. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24703797','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24703797"><span>Alarm setting for the critically ill patient: a descriptive pilot survey of nurses' perceptions of <span class="hlt">current</span> practice in an <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Regional Critical Care Unit.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Christensen, Martin; Dodds, Andrew; Sauer, Josh; Watts, Nigel</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>The aim of this survey was to assess registered nurse's perceptions of alarm setting and management in an <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Regional Critical Care Unit. The setting and management of alarms within the critical care environment is one of the key responsibilities of the nurse in this area. However, with up to 99% of alarms potentially being false-positives it is easy for the nurse to become desensitised or fatigued by incessant alarms; in some cases up to 400 per patient per day. Inadvertently ignoring, silencing or disabling alarms can have deleterious implications for the patient and nurse. A total population sample of 48 nursing staff from a 13 bedded ICU/HDU/CCU within regional Australia were asked to participate. A 10 item open-ended and multiple choice questionnaire was distributed to determine their perceptions and attitudes of alarm setting and management within this clinical area. Two key themes were identified from the open-ended questions: attitudes towards inappropriate alarm settings and annoyance at delayed responses to alarms. A significant number of respondents (93%) agreed that alarm fatigue can result in alarm desensitisation and the disabling of alarms, whilst 81% suggested the key factors are those associated with false-positive alarms and inappropriately set alarms. This study contributes to what is known about alarm fatigue, setting and management within a critical care environment. In addition it gives an insight as to what nurses' within a regional context consider the key factors which contribute to alarm fatigue. Clearly nursing burnout and potential patient harm are important considerations for practice especially when confronted with alarm fatigue and desensitisation. Therefore, promoting and maintaining an environment of ongoing intra-professional communication and alarm surveillance are crucial in alleviating these potential problems. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5201328','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5201328"><span>Development and Preliminary Validation of a Comprehensive Questionnaire to Assess Women’s Knowledge and Perception of the <span class="hlt">Current</span> Weight Gain <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> during Pregnancy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ockenden, Holly; Gunnell, Katie; Giles, Audrey; Nerenberg, Kara; Goldfield, Gary; Manyanga, Taru; Adamo, Kristi</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to develop and validate an electronic questionnaire, the Electronic Maternal Health Survey (EMat Health Survey), related to women’s knowledge and perceptions of the <span class="hlt">current</span> gestational weight gain <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> (GWG), as well as pregnancy-related health behaviours. Constructs addressed within the questionnaire include self-efficacy, locus of control, perceived barriers, and facilitators of physical activity and diet, outcome expectations, social environment and health practices. Content validity was examined using an expert panel (n = 7) and pilot testing items in a small sample (n = 5) of pregnant women and recent mothers (target population). Test re-test reliability was assessed among a sample (n = 71) of the target population. Reliability scores were calculated for all constructs (r and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC)), those with a score of >0.5 were considered acceptable. The content validity of the questionnaire reflects the degree to which all relevant components of excessive GWG risk in women are included. Strong test-retest reliability was found in the <span class="hlt">current</span> study, indicating that responses to the questionnaire were reliable in this population. The EMat Health Survey adds to the growing body of literature on maternal health and gestational weight gain by providing the first comprehensive questionnaire that can be self-administered and remotely accessed. The questionnaire can be completed in 15–25 min and collects useful data on various social determinants of health and GWG as well as associated health behaviours. This online tool may assist researchers by providing them with a platform to collect useful information in developing and tailoring interventions to better support women in achieving recommended weight gain targets in pregnancy. PMID:27916921</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26967362','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26967362"><span>Children with Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder Fitted with Hearing Aids Applying the American Academy of Audiology Pediatric Amplification <span class="hlt">Guideline</span>: <span class="hlt">Current</span> Practice and Outcomes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Walker, Elizabeth; McCreery, Ryan; Spratford, Meredith; Roush, Patricia</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p> performed more poorly in background noise with HAs, compared to the SNHL group. The American Academy of Audiology Pediatric Amplification <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> recommend that children with ANSD receive an HA trial if their behavioral thresholds are sufficiently high enough to impede speech perception at conversational levels. For children with ANSD in the mild-to-severe HL range, the <span class="hlt">current</span> results support this recommendation, as children with ANSD can achieve functional outcomes similar to peers with SNHL. American Academy of Audiology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26481261','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26481261"><span>An investigation into the exercise behaviours of regionally based <span class="hlt">Australian</span> pregnant women.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hayman, Melanie; Short, Camille; Reaburn, Peter</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Regular exercise during pregnancy is a recommended prenatal care strategy with short and long-term health benefits to mother and child. Unfortunately, most pregnant women are insufficiently active to obtain health benefits and there is evidence that activity levels decrease overall during pregnancy. Physical activity among regionally based women is lower than that of urban-based women within Australia. However, little is <span class="hlt">currently</span> known about exercise behaviours of regionally based <span class="hlt">Australian</span> pregnant women. To successfully promote exercise among regionally based pregnant women, a greater understanding of exercise behaviours must first be explored. This study investigated exercise behaviours in a sample of regionally based <span class="hlt">Australian</span> pregnant women. Regionally based <span class="hlt">Australian</span> pregnant women (n=142) completed a modified version of the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire examining exercise behaviours before and during pregnancy. Women self-reported their exercise behaviours, including exercise frequency, intensity, time and type, before and during pregnancy. Chi-square analysis revealed significantly less (χ(2)=31.66, p<0.05) women participated in exercise during pregnancy (61%) compared to before pregnancy (87%). During pregnancy, respondents exercised at a significantly lower frequency (χ(2)=111.63, p<0.05), intensity (χ(2)=67.41, p<0.05), shorter time/duration (χ(2)=114.33, p<0.05), and significantly less (χ(2)=8.55, p<0.05) women (8%) are meeting 'exercise during pregnancy' <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> compared to women before pregnancy (49%) meeting physical activity <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Exercise during pregnancy decreases to levels significantly lower than what is <span class="hlt">currently</span> recommended. Public health initiatives that promote exercise among <span class="hlt">Australian</span> pregnant women should aim to increase frequency, intensity, time and type of exercise to be undertaken during pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28689881','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28689881"><span>Comparison of radium-228 determination in water among <span class="hlt">Australian</span> laboratories.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zawadzki, Atun; Cook, Megan; Cutmore, Brodie; Evans, Fiona; Fierro, Daniela; Gedz, Alicea; Harrison, Jennifer J; Loosz, Tom; Medley, Peter; Mokhber-Shahin, Lida; Mullins, Sarah; Sdraulig, Sandra</p> <p>2017-11-01</p> <p>The National Health and Medical Research Council and Natural Resource Management Ministerial Council of Australia developed the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Drinking Water <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> which recommend an annual radiation dose value of 1 mSv year -1 . One of the potential major contributors to the radiation dose from drinking water is radium-228, a naturally occurring radionuclide arising from the thorium decay series. Various methods of analysing for radium-228 in water have been established and adapted by analytical radiochemistry laboratories. Seven laboratories in Australia participated in analysing radium-228 spiked water samples with activity concentrations ranging from 6 mBq L -1 to 20 Bq L -1 . The aim of the exercise was to compare and evaluate radium-228 results reported by the participating laboratories, the methods used and the detection limits. This paper presents the outcome of the exercise. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28112634','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28112634"><span><span class="hlt">Guideline</span>.gov: A Database of Clinical Specialty <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>El-Khayat, Yamila M; Forbes, Carrie S; Coghill, Jeffrey G</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The National <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> Clearinghouse (NGC), also known as <span class="hlt">Guideline</span>.gov, is a database of resources to assist health care providers with a central depository of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for clinical specialty areas in medicine. The database is provided free of charge and is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for treatment are updated regularly, with new <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> replacing older <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> every five years. There are hundreds of <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> with more added each week. The purpose and goal of NGC is to provide physicians, nurses, and other health care providers, insurance companies, and others in the field of health care with a unified database of the most <span class="hlt">current</span>, detailed, relevant, and objective clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28259550','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28259550"><span><span class="hlt">Current</span> use of <span class="hlt">guideline</span>-based medical therapy in elderly patients admitted with acute heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and its impact on event-free survival.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Akita, Keitaro; Kohno, Takashi; Kohsaka, Shun; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Nagatomo, Yuji; Izumi, Yuki; Goda, Ayumi; Mizuno, Atsushi; Sawano, Mitsuaki; Inohara, Taku; Fukuda, Keiichi; Yoshikawa, Tsutomu</p> <p>2017-05-15</p> <p>Acute heart failure (HF) is a frequently encountered cardiac condition. Its prevalence increases exponentially with age. In spite of this, elderly patients are underrepresented in clinical trials and the implementation of <span class="hlt">guideline</span>-based medical therapy (GBMT) in them is not well established. We investigated the <span class="hlt">current</span> use of GBMT and its effects on mortality and HF rehospitalization among elderly patients with acute HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) using data obtained from a contemporary multi-center registry. We analyzed data from 1,441 consecutive acute HF patients registered in the West Tokyo Heart Failure (WET-HF) registry (mean age 73.2 ± 13.6 years). Reduced ejection fraction (<45%) was noted in 803 patients (55.7%), of which 237 were aged ≥80 years (elderly group). The prescription rate of GBMT (use of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors and β-blockers at discharge) was significantly lower in the elderly than in the younger (aged < 80 years) group (46.8% vs. 66.9%, p<0.001). Although GBMT at discharge was associated with reductions in HF readmission or the composite endpoint of cardiac death and HF readmission (HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.30-0.80; and HR 0.53, 95% CI 0.32-0.89, respectively) in the younger group, this association was not observed in the elderly group (HR 1.41, 95% CI 0.68-2.92; and HR 1.54, 95% CI 0.76-3.13, respectively) CONCLUSIONS: GBMT implementation in elderly patients with HFrEF was found to be suboptimal. However, the underuse of GBMT did not appear to be responsible for poorer outcomes in elderly HFrEF patients. Further research is required to establish an ideal therapeutic approach for this population. URL: http://www.umin.ac.jp/icdr/index-j.html. Unique identifier: UMIN000001171. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25163378','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25163378"><span><span class="hlt">Australians</span>' use of surrogacy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Everingham, Sam G; Stafford-Bell, Martyn A; Hammarberg, Karin</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>To investigate the characteristics of parents and intended parents and their <span class="hlt">current</span> and planned behaviour in relation to surrogacy arrangements. Members of two <span class="hlt">Australian</span> parenting support forums who were considering surrogacy or were <span class="hlt">currently</span> or previously in a surrogacy arrangement were invited to complete an online survey during July 2013. Sociodemographic characteristics; proportions engaging in domestic uncompensated and overseas compensated arrangements; countries used; costs incurred; and impact on behaviour of state laws criminalising compensated surrogacy. Of 1135 potential participants, 312 (27%) commenced the survey. Of these, 24 did not fulfil inclusion criteria and 29 did not complete the survey. Eighty-nine respondents were considering surrogacy and 170 had commenced or completed surrogacy. Many respondents (53%) considered both overseas and domestic surrogacy. Among those who only considered one option, overseas surrogacy was considered significantly more often than domestic surrogacy (92% v 8%; P < 0.05). Only 22 respondents (8%) commenced with a surrogate in Australia. The most common countries used for compensated surrogacy were India and the United States, and average total estimated costs were $69 212 for India and $172 347 for the US. Barriers discouraging domestic surrogacy included concern that the surrogate might keep the child (75%), belief that it was too long and complicated a process (68%) and having no one of the right age or life stage to ask (61%). Few intended parents (9%) were deterred by state laws criminalising compensated surrogacy. Most <span class="hlt">Australian</span> intended parents via surrogacy consider or use overseas compensated arrangements. Laws banning compensated surrogacy do not appear to deter those seeking surrogacy arrangements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=social+AND+withdrawal&pg=3&id=EJ808581','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=social+AND+withdrawal&pg=3&id=EJ808581"><span>Retrospective Report of Social Withdrawal during Adolescence and <span class="hlt">Current</span> Maladjustment in Young Adulthood: Cross-Cultural Comparisons between <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and South Korean Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kim, Jinkwan; Rapee, Ronald M.; Ja Oh, Kyung; Moon, Hye-Shin</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">current</span> study investigated associations between the frequency of and motivations for social withdrawal during adolescence and emotional distresses in young adulthood. Perceived motivations for social withdrawal included unsociability, isolation, shyness, and low mood. Social withdrawal during adolescence was assessed using a retrospective…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28604142','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28604142"><span>Rubella antibodies in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> immunoglobulin products.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Young, Megan K; Bertolini, Joseph; Kotharu, Pushpa; Maher, Darryl; Cripps, Allan W</p> <p>2017-08-03</p> <p>Rubella antibodies are not routinely measured in immunoglobulin products and there is a lack of information on the titer in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> products. To facilitate future studies of the effectiveness of passive immunisation for preventing rubella and congenital rubella syndrome, this study measured the concentration of rubella-specific antibodies in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV) human immunoglobulin products suitable for post-exposure prophylaxis using a chemiluminescent immunoassay. The GMT ± GSD for the IM product was 19 ± 1.2 IU/mg (2980 ± 1.2 IU/mL). The GMT ± GSD for the IV product was 12 ± 1.5 IU/mg (729 ± 1.5 IU/mL). At present, <span class="hlt">Australian</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> recommend offering non-immune pregnant women exposed to rubella 20 mL of intramuscular immunoglobulin within 72 hours of exposure. This equates to 42,160 IU of rubella antibodies if the lowest titer obtained for the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> IM product is considered. The same dose would be delivered by 176 mL of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> IV product at the lowest measured rubella-specific antibody titer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4529492','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4529492"><span>Low Quality of Free Coaching Apps With Respect to the American College of Sports Medicine <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>: A Review of <span class="hlt">Current</span> Mobile Apps</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bian, Jiang; Leavitt, Trevor; Bromwell, Jennifer; Harris III, Charles; Vincent, Heather</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background Low physical activity level is a significant contributor to chronic disease, weight dysregulation, and mortality. Nearly 70% of the American population is overweight, and 35% is obese. Obesity costs an estimated US$ 147 billion annually in health care, and as many as 95 million years of life. Although poor nutritional habits remain the major culprit, lack of physical activity significantly contributes to the obesity epidemic and related lifestyle diseases. Objective Over the past 10 years, mobile devices have become ubiquitous, and there is an ever-increasing number of mobile apps that are being developed to facilitate physical activity, particularly for active people. However, no systematic assessment has been performed about their quality with respect to following the parameters of sound fitness principles and scientific evidence, or suitability for a variety of fitness levels. The aim of this paper is to fill this gap and assess the quality of mobile coaching apps on iOS mobile devices. Methods A set of 30 popular mobile apps pertaining to physical activity programming was identified and reviewed on an iPhone device. These apps met the inclusion criteria and provided specific prescriptive fitness and exercise programming content. The content of these apps was compared against the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and fitness principles established by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). A weighted scoring method based on the recommendations of the ACSM was developed to generate subscores for quality of programming content for aerobic (0-6 scale), resistance (0-6 scale), and flexibility (0-2 scale) components using the frequency, intensity, time, and type (FITT) principle. An overall score (0-14 scale) was generated from the subscores to represent the overall quality of a fitness coaching app. Results Only 3 apps scored above 50% on the aerobic component (mean 0.7514, SD 1.2150, maximum 4.1636), 4 scored above 50% on the resistance/strength component (mean</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26209109','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26209109"><span>Low Quality of Free Coaching Apps With Respect to the American College of Sports Medicine <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>: A Review of <span class="hlt">Current</span> Mobile Apps.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Modave, François; Bian, Jiang; Leavitt, Trevor; Bromwell, Jennifer; Harris Iii, Charles; Vincent, Heather</p> <p>2015-07-24</p> <p>Low physical activity level is a significant contributor to chronic disease, weight dysregulation, and mortality. Nearly 70% of the American population is overweight, and 35% is obese. Obesity costs an estimated US$ 147 billion annually in health care, and as many as 95 million years of life. Although poor nutritional habits remain the major culprit, lack of physical activity significantly contributes to the obesity epidemic and related lifestyle diseases. Over the past 10 years, mobile devices have become ubiquitous, and there is an ever-increasing number of mobile apps that are being developed to facilitate physical activity, particularly for active people. However, no systematic assessment has been performed about their quality with respect to following the parameters of sound fitness principles and scientific evidence, or suitability for a variety of fitness levels. The aim of this paper is to fill this gap and assess the quality of mobile coaching apps on iOS mobile devices. A set of 30 popular mobile apps pertaining to physical activity programming was identified and reviewed on an iPhone device. These apps met the inclusion criteria and provided specific prescriptive fitness and exercise programming content. The content of these apps was compared against the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and fitness principles established by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). A weighted scoring method based on the recommendations of the ACSM was developed to generate subscores for quality of programming content for aerobic (0-6 scale), resistance (0-6 scale), and flexibility (0-2 scale) components using the frequency, intensity, time, and type (FITT) principle. An overall score (0-14 scale) was generated from the subscores to represent the overall quality of a fitness coaching app. Only 3 apps scored above 50% on the aerobic component (mean 0.7514, SD 1.2150, maximum 4.1636), 4 scored above 50% on the resistance/strength component (mean 1.4525, SD 1.2101, maximum 4</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28921833','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28921833"><span><span class="hlt">Guideline</span> of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>: asymptomatic microscopic haematuria.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Linder, Brian J; Bass, Edward J; Mostafid, Hugh; Boorjian, Stephen A</p> <p>2018-02-01</p> <p>The aim of the present study was to review major organizational <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on the evaluation and management of asymptomatic microscopic haematuria (AMH). We reviewed the haematuria <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> from: the American Urological Association; the consensus statement by the Canadian Urological Association, Canadian Urologic Oncology Group and Bladder Cancer Canada; the American College of Physicians; the Joint Consensus Statement of the Renal Association and British Association of Urological Surgeons; and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> reviewed recommend evaluation for AMH in the absence of potential benign aetiologies, with the evaluation including cystoscopy and upper urinary tract imaging. Existing <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> vary in their definition of AMH (role of urine dipstick vs urine microscopy), the age threshold for recommending evaluation, and the optimal imaging method (computed tomography vs ultrasonography). Of the reviewed <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, none recommended the use of urine cytology or urine markers during the initial AMH evaluation. Patients should have ongoing follow-up after a negative initial AMH evaluation. Significant variation exists among <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for AMH with respect to who should be evaluated and in what manner. Given the patient and health system implications of balancing appropriately focused and effective diagnostic evaluation, AMH represents a valuable future research opportunity. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21645469','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21645469"><span>Integration of complementary and alternative medicine information and advice in chronic disease management <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Team, Victoria; Canaway, Rachel; Manderson, Lenore</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The growing evidence on the benefits and risks of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its high rate of use (69% of <span class="hlt">Australians</span>) - particularly for chronic or recurrent conditions - means increasing attention on CAM. However, few people disclose CAM use to their GP, and health professionals tend to inadequately discuss CAM-related issues with their patients, partly due to insufficient knowledge. As clinical and non-clinical chronic condition management <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are a means to educate primary health care practitioners, we undertook a content analysis of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> relevant to two common chronic conditions - cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) - to assess their provision of CAM-related information. Ten <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">Australian</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were reviewed, revealing scant CAM content. When available, the CAM-relevant information was brief, in some cases unclear, inconclusive and lacking in direction to the GP or health care provider. Although we focus on CVD and T2DM, we argue the value of all chronic condition management <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> integrating relevant evidence-informed information and advice on CAM risks, benefits and referrals, to increase GP awareness and knowledge of appropriate CAM therapies, and potentially to facilitate doctor-client discussion about CAM.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24612031','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24612031"><span>Management of food allergy: a survey of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> paediatricians.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Morawetz, Deborah Y; Hiscock, Harriet; Allen, Katrina J; Davies, Sarah; Danchin, Margie H</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>The prevalence of Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated food allergy in the developed world is increasing, overwhelming tertiary allergy services. Alternative models of care are required. General paediatricians could provide this care but may require further training to do so. We aimed to determine <span class="hlt">Australian</span> general paediatricians': (i) knowledge and management of IgE-mediated food allergy; (ii) access to and use of diagnostic services; and (iii) interest in further training. Members of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Paediatric Research Network completed an online survey in 2011/12. A case study elicited paediatrician's knowledge of diagnostic history taking, testing and key management principles. Study-designed questions assessed paediatricians' <span class="hlt">current</span> practice, access to allergy services and interest in further training. One hundred sixty-eight (43%) of 390 paediatricians responded; 93 paediatricians reported managing food allergy. Diagnostic and management practices varied widely. Paediatricians had high levels of agreement (>90%) for only three of 13 questions pertaining to diagnosis and management. Only 56 (61%) correctly identified that a diagnosis of IgE-mediated food allergy requires a history consistent with a clinical reaction and a positive specific serum IgE antibody or skin prick test result. Reported waiting times for tertiary allergy services ranged from 5.4 (private) to 10.6 months (public). Most (91%) paediatricians expressed interest in further training. General paediatricians would benefit from further training if they are to practice allergy care as their diagnosis and management is often inconsistent with international <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Training could be delivered online to maximise reach and uptake. If effective, such a model could relieve some of the burden experienced by <span class="hlt">Australian</span> tertiary allergy services. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21859669','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21859669"><span>Dietary <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in singapore.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, Benjamin Lc</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The 2011 Dietary <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> were developed with the aim of providing guidance on what dietary strategies can best address increasing rates of obesity and non-communicable chronic disease in Singapore. This set of dietary <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> was developed with a local expert committee based on a review of scientific literature and data on <span class="hlt">current</span> dietary patterns from the 2010 National Nutrition Survey. Projected nutrient intakes from a diet adhering to the 2011 Dietary <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> were calculated using a local food composition database (FOCOS) and validated against nutrient recommendations. Acknowledging that dietary requirements differ between age groups, different sets of dietary <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> have been developed and customised for different segments of the population. To date, Singapore has produced dietary <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for children and adolescents (focusing on establishing healthy lifelong eating patterns), adults (focusing on preventing obesity and reinforcing healthy eating patterns), and most recently, <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for older adults (>50 years of age) that address the issue of potential dietary insufficiency caused by age-related increases in nutrient requirements combined with a reduction in energy requirements. In Singapore, dietary <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> have been used to inform and direct public policy and promote dietary patterns that meet nutrient requirements while reducing the risk of non-communicable chronic diseases. Examples of public policy include: national <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on food advertising and standards for food served in nursing homes; examples of public health promotion programmes include: the Healthier Choice Symbol Programme for packaged food products and programmes encouraging provision of healthier meals in hawker centres, restaurants, and school or workplace canteens.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED511040.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED511040.pdf"><span>School Business Community Partnership Brokers. Program <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>, 2010-2013</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, 2009</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>These <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for 2010-2013 relate specifically to the Partnership Brokers program. This program is part of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Government's contribution to the Youth Attainment and Transitions National Partnership and will commence on 1 January 2010. These <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> set out the requirements for the provision of services by organisations contracted…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25041318','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25041318"><span>Funding emergency care: <span class="hlt">Australian</span> style.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bell, Anthony; Crilly, Julia; Williams, Ged; Wylie, Kate; Toloo, Ghasem Sam; Burke, John; FitzGerald, Gerry</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>The ongoing challenge for ED leaders is to remain abreast of system-wide changes that impact on the day-to-day management of their departments. Changes to the funding model creates another layer of complexity and this introductory paper serves as the beginning of a discussion about the way in which EDs are funded and how this can and will impact on business decisions, models of care and resource allocation within <span class="hlt">Australian</span> EDs. Furthermore it is evident that any funding model today will mature and change with time, and moves are afoot to refine and contextualise ED funding over the medium term. This perspective seeks to provide a basis of understanding for our <span class="hlt">current</span> and future funding arrangements in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> EDs. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25516311','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25516311"><span>Australasian Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for supplementation of trace elements during parenteral nutrition.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Osland, Emma J; Ali, Azmat; Isenring, Elizabeth; Ball, Patrick; Davis, Melvyn; Gillanders, Lyn</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This work represents the first part of a progressive review of AuSPEN's 1999 <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Provision of Micronutrient Supplementation in Adult Patients receiving Parenteral Nutrition, in recognition of the developments in the literature on this topic since that time. A systematic literature review was undertaken and recommendations were made based on the available evidence and with consideration to specific elements of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and New Zealand practice environment. The strength of evidence underpinning each recommendation was assessed. External reviewers provided feedback on the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> using the AGREE II tool. Reduced doses of manganese, copper, chromium and molybdenum, and an increased dose of selenium are recommended when compared with the 1999 <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. <span class="hlt">Currently</span> the composition of available multi-trace element formulations is recognised as an obstacle to aligning these <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> with practice. A paucity of available literature and limitations with <span class="hlt">currently</span> available methods of monitoring trace element status are acknowledged. The <span class="hlt">currently</span> unknown clinical impact of changes to trace element contamination of parenteral solutions with contemporary practices highlights need for research and clinical vigilance in this area of nutrition support practice. Trace elements are essential and should be provided daily to patients receiving parenteral nutrition. Monitoring is generally only required in longer term parenteral nutrition, however should be determined on an individual basis. Industry is encouraged to modify existing multi-trace element solutions available in Australia and New Zealand to reflect changes in the literature outlined in these <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Areas requiring research are highlighted.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/20861665-terrestrial-vertebrate-fauna-surveys-preparation-environmental-impact-assessments-how-can-we-do-better-western-australian-example','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/20861665-terrestrial-vertebrate-fauna-surveys-preparation-environmental-impact-assessments-how-can-we-do-better-western-australian-example"><span>Terrestrial vertebrate fauna surveys for the preparation of environmental impact assessments; how can we do it better? A Western <span class="hlt">Australian</span> example</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Thompson, Graham G.</p> <p>2007-01-15</p> <p>The Western <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) in 2002 released Position Statement, No. 3, Terrestrial Biological Surveys as an Element of Biodiversity Protection outlining how terrestrial fauna survey data are to be used and interpreted in the preparation of environmental impact assessments (EIA). In 2004, the EPA released its Guidance for the Assessment of Environmental Factors, Terrestrial Fauna Surveys for Environmental Impact Assessment in Western Australia, No. 56. This paper briefly assesses the adequacy of recent terrestrial fauna surveys undertaken to support publicly released EIAs and indicates that the EPA is not always adhering to its own position and guidancemore » statements. This paper argues that the <span class="hlt">current</span> fauna survey <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are in need of improvement. The approach and requirements of some other <span class="hlt">Australian</span> states are briefly assessed to identify similarities and where improvements can be made to the Western <span class="hlt">Australian</span> (WA) <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. This paper concludes with suggestions on how the process and the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in WA can be revised to more adequately assess the impact of developments on terrestrial vertebrate biodiversity and ecosystem function. These suggestions may have relevance for other areas where fauna surveys are undertaken to support EIAs.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25601201','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25601201"><span>The <span class="hlt">current</span> use of active surveillance in an <span class="hlt">Australian</span> cohort of men: a pattern of care analysis from the Victorian Prostate Cancer Registry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Weerakoon, Mahesha; Papa, Nathan; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Evans, Sue; Millar, Jeremy; Frydenberg, Mark; Bolton, Damien; Murphy, Declan G</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p> the private sector were also a median of 2.8 years younger (median 65.6 vs 68.4 years, P < 0.001); had a lower median PSA level (5.3 vs 6.7 ng/mL, P < 0.001); and had lower biopsy Gleason score and clinical staging. There was no significant difference in the uptake of AS demographically, in our cohort of men between metropolitan and regional areas. In this contemporary registry-based population, AS is being used in a significant proportion of patients. The proportion of men progressing to intervention is lower than that reported in the <span class="hlt">current</span> literature. Patients are more likely to be on AS if they are managed in a private hospital, with no differences in the uptake of AS, from metropolitan to regional areas. © 2015 The Authors. BJU International © 2015 BJU International.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10155616','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10155616"><span>A comparative review of pharmacoeconomic <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jacobs, P; Bachynsky, J; Baladi, J F</p> <p>1995-09-01</p> <p>We have reviewed 4 international sets of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the economic evaluation of pharmaceutical products-those of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee, the Canadian Coordinating Office for Health Technology Assessment, the Ontario Ministry of Health, and the England and Wales Department of Health. Comparison of these <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> reveals that there are a number of differences between them, including disparities in outcome selection, costs and perspectives. These observations were attributed to differences in study purpose, conceptual approach, measurement techniques and value judgements. Uniformity can be achieved only in conceptual approach and measurement technique. <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> should be flexible to accommodate differences in the study purposes and value judgements of the analysts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1488025','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1488025"><span>Evaluation of clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Basinski, A S</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Compared with the <span class="hlt">current</span> focus on the development of clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> the effort devoted to their evaluation is meagre. Yet the ultimate success of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> depends on routine evaluation. Three types of evaluation are identified: evaluation of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> under development and before dissemination and implementation, evaluation of health care programs in which <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> play a central role, and scientific evaluation, through studies that provide the scientific knowledge base for further evolution of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Identification of evaluation and program goals, evaluation design and a framework for evaluation planning are discussed. PMID:7489550</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ854340.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ854340.pdf"><span>The Case for an <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Certificate of Education</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Masters, Geoff</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The Commonwealth Department of Education, Science and Training on May 2005 commissioned the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Council for Educational Research to investigate and report on models and implementation arrangements for an <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Certificate of Education. There are ten different certificates <span class="hlt">currently</span> available across the six states and two territories of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1102018.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1102018.pdf"><span>Ethics Education in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Preservice Teacher Programs: A Hidden Imperative?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Boon, Helen J.; Maxwell, Bruce</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This paper provides a snapshot of the <span class="hlt">current</span> approach to ethics education in accredited <span class="hlt">Australian</span> pre-service teacher programs. Methods included a manual calendar search of ethics related subjects required in teacher programs using a sample of 24 <span class="hlt">Australian</span> universities and a survey of 26 university representatives. Findings show a paucity of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1016862.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1016862.pdf"><span>Redefining & Leading the Academic Discipline in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Universities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Harkin, Damien G.; Healy, Annah H.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Disciplines have emerged as an alternative administrative structure to departments or schools in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> universities. We presently investigate the pattern of discipline use and by way of case study examine a role for distributed leadership in discipline management. Over forty per cent of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> universities <span class="hlt">currently</span> employ disciplines,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20815990','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20815990"><span>Climate change and the possible health effects on older <span class="hlt">Australians</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Saniotis, Arthur; Irvine, Rod</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Climate change is an important issue for Australia. Climate change research forecasts that Australia will experience accelerated warming due to anthrogenic activities. Australia's aging society will face special challenges that demand <span class="hlt">current</span> attention. This paper discusses two issues in relation to climate change and older <span class="hlt">Australians</span>: first, pharmacology and autoregulation; and second, mental health among older <span class="hlt">Australians</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008wafr.book...61H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008wafr.book...61H"><span>Web Accessibility and <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Harper, Simon; Yesilada, Yeliz</p> <p></p> <p>Access to, and movement around, complex online environments, of which the World Wide Web (Web) is the most popular example, has long been considered an important and major issue in the Web design and usability field. The commonly used slang phrase ‘surfing the Web’ implies rapid and free access, pointing to its importance among designers and users alike. It has also been long established that this potentially complex and difficult access is further complicated, and becomes neither rapid nor free, if the user is disabled. There are millions of people who have disabilities that affect their use of the Web. Web accessibility aims to help these people to perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with, as well as contribute to, the Web, and thereby the society in general. This accessibility is, in part, facilitated by the Web Content Accessibility <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> (WCAG) <span class="hlt">currently</span> moving from version one to two. These <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are intended to encourage designers to make sure their sites conform to specifications, and in that conformance enable the assistive technologies of disabled users to better interact with the page content. In this way, it was hoped that accessibility could be supported. While this is in part true, <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> do not solve all problems and the new WCAG version two <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are surrounded by controversy and intrigue. This chapter aims to establish the published literature related to Web accessibility and Web accessibility <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, and discuss limitations of the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and future directions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=institutional+AND+theory+AND+vocational+AND+theory&pg=5&id=EJ938153','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=institutional+AND+theory+AND+vocational+AND+theory&pg=5&id=EJ938153"><span>The Missing Link in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Tertiary Education: Short-Cycle Higher Education</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Moodie, Gavin</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>The blurring of the boundary between <span class="hlt">Australian</span> vocational education and training and higher education is leading to a reconsideration of the <span class="hlt">current</span> structure of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> tertiary education. This paper starts with the main overlap of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> tertiary education sectors, diplomas and advanced diplomas. The ambiguous treatment of these…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28209318','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28209318"><span>An evaluation of physical activity training in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> medical school curricula.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Strong, Abigail; Stoutenberg, Mark; Hobson-Powell, Anita; Hargreaves, Mark; Beeler, Halle; Stamatakis, Emmanuel</p> <p>2017-06-01</p> <p>To evaluate the <span class="hlt">current</span> level of physical activity (PA) training provided to <span class="hlt">Australian</span> medical students. Individual interviews were completed via phone interview or online survey from June-October 2015. Program leaders from <span class="hlt">Australian</span> medical schools, who were knowledgeable about their curriculum content, were invited to participate in the study. The number of programs, hours of PA training instruction, institutional attitude towards offering PA, barriers experienced, and content areas in which PA training was offered, were explored. Seventeen of the 19 (89%) <span class="hlt">Australian</span> medical schools participated in the study. Among the responding schools, 15 (88.2%) reported providing specific PA training to medical students. Thirteen of these 15 schools (86.7%) taught the national aerobic <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> while only seven (46.7%) taught the national strength training recommendations. Four, five, and six year programs reported providing an average of 6.6, 5.0, and 12.3h of PA training, respectively, across their entire curriculum. Only 42.9% of the schools that had PA training reported that it was sufficient for their medical students. Nearly half (41.2%) of the respondents reported no barriers to implementing PA training into their medical curricula. Most <span class="hlt">Australian</span> medical schools reported including some PA training in their medical curriculum. Key topics, such as the national strength recommendations, however, were not taught by most schools. Given the importance of PA for the prevention and treatment of numerous mental and physical health outcomes, it is unlikely that the attention it <span class="hlt">currently</span> receives adequately prepares medical students to treat patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.epa.gov/agstar/interconnection-guidelines','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://www.epa.gov/agstar/interconnection-guidelines"><span>Interconnection <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Interconnection <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> provide general guidance on the steps involved with connecting biogas recovery systems to the utility electrical power grid. Interconnection best practices including time and cost estimates are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.epa.gov/eg','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://www.epa.gov/eg"><span>Effluent <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Effluent <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are national standards for wastewater discharges to surface waters and municipal sewage treatment plants. We issue the regulations for industrial categories based on the performance of treatment and control technologies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23525878','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23525878"><span>Can <span class="hlt">current</span> analytical quality performance of UK clinical laboratories support evidence-based <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for diabetes and ischaemic heart disease?--A pilot study and a proposal.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jassam, Nuthar; Yundt-Pacheco, John; Jansen, Rob; Thomas, Annette; Barth, Julian H</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>The implementation of national and international <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> is beginning to standardise clinical practice. However, since many <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> have decision limits based on laboratory tests, there is an urgent need to ensure that different laboratories obtain the same analytical result on any sample. A scientifically-based quality control process will be a pre-requisite to provide this level of analytical performance which will support evidence-based <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and movement of patients across boundaries while maintaining standardised outcomes. We discuss the finding of a pilot study performed to assess UK clinical laboratories readiness to work to a higher grade quality specifications such as biological variation-based quality specifications. Internal quality control (IQC) data for HbA1c, glucose, creatinine, cholesterol and high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol were collected from UK laboratories participating in the Bio-Rad Unity QC programme. The median of the coefficient of variation (CV%) of the participating laboratories was evaluated against the CV% based on biological variation. Except creatinine, the other four analytes had a variable degree of compliance with the biological variation-based quality specifications. More than 75% of the laboratories met the biological variation-based quality specifications for glucose, cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol. Slightly over 50% of the laboratories met the analytical goal for HBA1c. Only one analyte (cholesterol) had a performance achieving the higher quality specifications consistent with 5σ. Our data from IQC do not consistently demonstrate that the results from clinical laboratories meet evidence-based quality specifications. Therefore, we propose that a graded scale of quality specifications may be needed at this stage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26792282','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26792282"><span>Tuberculosis screening in patients with HIV: An audit against UK national <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> to assess <span class="hlt">current</span> practice and the effectiveness of an electronic tuberculosis-screening prompt.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fox-Lewis, A; Brima, N; Muniina, P; Grant, A D; Edwards, S G; Miller, R F; Pett, S L</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>A retrospective clinical audit was performed to assess if the British HIV Association 2011 <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on routine screening for tuberculosis in HIV are being implemented in a large UK urban clinic, and if a tuberculosis-screening prompt on the electronic patient record for new attendees was effective. Of 4658 patients attending during the inclusion period, 385 were newly diagnosed first-time attendees and routine tuberculosis screening was recommended in 165. Of these, only 6.1% of patients had a completed tuberculosis screening prompt, and 12.1% underwent routine tuberculosis screening. This audit represents the first published UK data on routine screening rates for tuberculosis in HIV and demonstrates low rates of tuberculosis screening despite an electronic screening prompt designed to simplify adherence to the national <span class="hlt">guideline</span>. Reasons why tuberculosis screening rates were low, and the prompt ineffective, are unclear. A national audit is ongoing, and we await the results to see if our data reflect a lack of routine tuberculosis screening in HIV-infected patients at a national level. © The Author(s) 2016.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/18610','DOTNTL'); return false;" href="https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/18610"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> road rules</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntlsearch.bts.gov/tris/index.do">DOT National Transportation Integrated Search</a></p> <p></p> <p>2009-02-01</p> <p>*These are national-level rules. <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Road Rules - 2009 Version, Part 18, Division 1, Rule 300 "Use of Mobile Phones" describes restrictions of mobile phone use while driving. The rule basically states that drivers cannot make or receive calls ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24805160','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24805160"><span>[Personnel requirements of medical radiation physics in radiotherapy in comparison to the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> "radiation protection in medicine" : Special consideration of intensity-modulated radiation therapy].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Leetz, H-K; Eipper, H H; Gfirtner, H; Schneider, P; Welker, K</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>In 1994 and 1998 reports on staffing levels in medical radiation physics for radiation therapy were published by the "Deutsche Gesellschaft für Medizinische Physik" (DGMP, German Society for Medical Physics). Because of the technical and methodological progress, changes in recommended qualifications of staff and new governmental regulations, it was necessary to establish new staffing levels. The data were derived from a new survey in clinics. Some of the previously established results from the old reports were adapted to the new conditions by conversion.The staffing requirements were normalized to main components as in the earlier reports resulting in a simple method for calculation of staffing levels. The results were compared with the requirements in the "Richtlinie Strahlenschutz in der Medizin" (<span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on radiation protection in medicine) and showed satisfactory agreement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24920154','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24920154"><span>Are we (mis)guided by <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on intrapartum fetal heart rate monitoring? Case for a more physiological approach to interpretation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ugwumadu, A</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>Original interpretations of fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns equated FHR decelerations with 'fetal distress', requiring expeditious delivery. This simplistic interpretation is still implied in our clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> despite 40 years of increasing understanding of the behaviour and regulation of the fetal cardiovascular system during labour. The physiological basis of FHR responses and adaptations to oxygen deprivation is de-emphasised, whilst generations of obstetricians and midwives are trained to focus on, and classify, the morphological appearances of decelerations into descriptive categories, with no attempt to understand how the fetus defends itself and compensates for intrapartum hypoxic ischaemic insults, or the patterns that suggest progressive loss of compensation. Consequently, there is a lack of confidence, marked variation in FHR interpretation, defensive practices, unnecessary operative interventions, and a failure to recognise abnormal FHR patterns, resulting in adverse outcomes and expensive litigation. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED078216.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED078216.pdf"><span>Instructional <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>. Welding.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale</p> <p></p> <p>Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> manual presents a course of study in accordance with the <span class="hlt">current</span> practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/16764','DOTNTL'); return false;" href="https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/16764"><span><span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for routine maintenance of concrete pavements.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntlsearch.bts.gov/tris/index.do">DOT National Transportation Integrated Search</a></p> <p></p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p>These <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were prepared from research conducted for the Texas Department of Transportation : (TxDOT) on two projects. The <span class="hlt">current</span> project, which determined the distresses and categories, was project 0- : 5821 Develop <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Routine ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/magazine/issues/fall07/articles/fall07pg15.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/magazine/issues/fall07/articles/fall07pg15.html"><span>New Asthma <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> What You Should Know</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Bar Home <span class="hlt">Current</span> Issue Past Issues Special Section New Asthma <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>: What You Should Know Past Issues / ... and chairs the Expert Panel that established the new <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. The report gives health care professionals new ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27539252','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27539252"><span>Knowledge, experience and perceptions regarding Molar-Incisor Hypomineralisation (MIH) amongst <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and Chilean public oral health care practitioners.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gambetta-Tessini, K; Mariño, R; Ghanim, A; Calache, H; Manton, D J</p> <p>2016-08-18</p> <p>Molar-Incisor Hypomineralisation (MIH) is a prevalent developmental defect of tooth enamel associated with a high burden of disease. The present study aimed to survey <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and Chilean oral health care practitioners (OHCPs) working in public dental facilities and to compare their knowledge, clinical experience and perceptions about MIH. Findings would give insights about how <span class="hlt">current</span> knowledge has penetrated into OHCPs working into the public systems. A mixed-mode survey regarding MIH was carried out amongst <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and Chilean OHCPs from the public sector. The survey required responses to questions regarding sociodemographics, clinical experience, perceptions, clinical management and preferences for further training. The level of knowledge regarding MIH was determined by Delphi methods for consensus. Data analysis utilised Chi-square, linear and logistic regression models using SPSS Ver. 22.0. The majority of respondents had observed MIH in their patients (88.6 %) and the level of knowledge regarding MIH was high in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> participants (p = 0.03). <span class="hlt">Australian</span> respondents felt more confident when diagnosing (OR 8.80, 95 % CI 2.49-31.16) and treating MIH-affected children (OR 4.56, 95 % CI 2.16-9.76) compared to Chilean respondents. Oral health therapists reported higher levels of confidence than <span class="hlt">Australian</span> general dental practitioners when providing treatment to children with MIH (OR 7.53; 95 % CI 1.95-29.07). Continuing to update clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> may help practitioners increase their understanding when diagnosing and treating MIH-affected children. Dissemination of information and awareness regarding MIH is necessary in public clinics, and in particular Chilean general dental practitioners should be alerted to these factors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24942100','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24942100"><span>Diagnosing attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children involved with child protection services: are <span class="hlt">current</span> diagnostic <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> acceptable for vulnerable populations?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Klein, B; Damiani-Taraba, G; Koster, A; Campbell, J; Scholz, C</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Children involved with child protection services (CPS) are diagnosed and treated for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at higher rates than the general population. Children with maltreatment histories are much more likely to have other factors contributing to behavioural and attentional regulation difficulties that may overlap with or mimic ADHD-like symptoms, including language and learning problems, post-traumatic stress disorder, attachment difficulties, mood disorders and anxiety disorders. A higher number of children in the child welfare system are diagnosed with ADHD and provided with psychotropic medications under a group care setting compared with family-based, foster care and kinship care settings. However, children's behavioural trajectories change over time while in care. A reassessment in the approach to ADHD-like symptoms in children exposed to confirmed (or suspected) maltreatment (e.g. neglect, abuse) is required. Diagnosis should be conducted within a multidisciplinary team and practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> regarding ADHD diagnostic and management practices for children in CPS care are warranted both in the USA and in Canada. Increased education for caregivers, teachers and child welfare staff on the effects of maltreatment and often perplexing relationship with ADHD-like symptoms and co-morbid disorders is also necessary. Increased partnerships are needed to ensure the mental well-being of children with child protection involvement. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22867756','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22867756"><span>Assessment of possible allergenicity of hypothetical ORFs in common food crops using <span class="hlt">current</span> bioinformatic <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and its implications for the safety assessment of GM crops.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Young, Gregory J; Zhang, Shiping; Mirsky, Henry P; Cressman, Robert F; Cong, Bin; Ladics, Gregory S; Zhong, Cathy X</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>Before a genetically modified (GM) crop can be commercialized it must pass through a rigorous regulatory process to verify that it is safe for human and animal consumption, and to the environment. One particular area of focus is the potential introduction of a known or cross-reactive allergen not previously present within the crop. The assessment of possible allergenicity uses the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> outlined by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and World Health Organization's (WHO) Codex Alimentarius Commission (Codex) to evaluate all newly expressed proteins. Some regulatory authorities have broadened the scope of the assessment to include all DNA reading frames between stop codons across the insert and spanning the insert/genomic DNA junctions. To investigate the utility of this bioinformatic assessment, all naturally occurring stop-to-stop frames in the non-transgenic genomes of maize, rice, and soybean, as well as the human genome, were compared against the AllergenOnline (www.allergenonline.org) database using the Codex criteria. We discovered thousands of frames that exceeded the Codex defined threshold for potential cross-reactivity suggesting that evaluating hypothetical ORFs (stop-to-stop frames) has questionable value for making decisions on the safety of GM crops. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020050549','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020050549"><span><span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Project Management</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ben-Arieh, David</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Project management is an important part of the professional activities at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Project management is the means by which many of the operations at KSC take shape. Moreover, projects at KSC are implemented in a variety of ways in different organizations. The official <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for project management are provided by NASA headquarters and are quite general. The project reported herein deals with developing practical and detailed project management <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in support of the project managers. This report summarizes the <span class="hlt">current</span> project management effort in the Process Management Division and presents a new modeling approach of project management developed by the author. The report also presents the Project Management <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> developed during the summer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=relationship+AND+return+AND+investment&pg=3&id=EJ1021568','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=relationship+AND+return+AND+investment&pg=3&id=EJ1021568"><span><span class="hlt">Australians</span> as International Students--Where They Go, What They Do and Why They Do It</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Nerlich, Steve</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Current</span> published information on the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> student mobility offshore is reviewed as part of a long-term project aiming to determine the <span class="hlt">current</span> propensity of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> higher education students to study overseas and the return on investment that they can expect to achieve. It was found that limited data are available on the <span class="hlt">current</span> extent of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=professional+AND+gaming&pg=6&id=EJ209907','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=professional+AND+gaming&pg=6&id=EJ209907"><span><span class="hlt">Current</span> Simulation Gaming in Australia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Diehl, B. J.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">current</span> level of simulation and game (SG) research and development activity in Australia is limited compared with levels in America and England; but <span class="hlt">Australian</span> interest in SG is rapidly increasing, especially due to the recent formation of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Decision-Simulation and Educational Gaming Association. (CMV)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20400768','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20400768"><span>Proportion of patients needing an implantable cardioverter defibrillator on the basis of <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>: impact on healthcare resources in Italy and the USA. Data from the ALPHA study registry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pedretti, Roberto F E; Curnis, Antonio; Massa, Riccardo; Morandi, Fabrizio; Tritto, Massimo; Manca, Lorenzo; Occhetta, Eraldo; Molon, Giulio; De Ferrari, Gaetano M; Sarzi Braga, Simona; Raciti, Giovanni; Klersy, Catherine; Salerno-Uriarte, Jorge A</p> <p>2010-08-01</p> <p>Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) improve survival in selected patients with left ventricular dysfunction or heart failure (HF). The objective is to estimate the number of ICD candidates and to assess the potential impact on public health expenditure in Italy and the USA. Data from 3513 consecutive patients (ALPHA study registry) were screened. A model based on international <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> inclusion criteria and epidemiological data was used to estimate the number of eligible patients. A comparison with <span class="hlt">current</span> ICD implant rate was done to estimate the necessary incremental rate to treat eligible patients within 5 years. Up to 54% of HF patients are estimated to be eligible for ICD implantation. An implantation policy based on <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> would significantly increase the ICD number to 2671 implants per million inhabitants in Italy and to 4261 in the USA. An annual increment of prophylactic ICD implants of 20% in the USA and 68% in Italy would be necessary to treat all indicated patients in a 5-year timeframe. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation policy based on <span class="hlt">current</span> evidence may have significant impact on public health expenditure. Effective risk stratification may be useful in order to maximize benefit of ICD therapy and its cost-effectiveness in primary prevention.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27710111','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27710111"><span>Are BTS <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> followed?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-03-01</p> <p>In 1993, the British Thoracic Society (BTS) issued <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the management of spontaneous pneumothorax. The study's aim was to determine the level of adherence to these <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> at a London teaching hospital. A retrospective case note audit of 59 episodes was performed. In patients undergoing intervention, the initial procedure was simple aspiration in 32 (73 per cent) and chest tube insertion in 12 (27 per cent) cases, contrasting with the BTS recommendation that aspiration should be attempted first in all such patients. Simple aspiration was successful on 34 per cent of occasions. Successful aspiration was associated with a significantly shorter hospital stay (median 3, range 1-11 days) than either failed aspiration (7, 3-66 days) or chest tube insertion without aspiration (9, 3-16 days). Other areas where practice differed from the BTS <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were clamping of chest tubes and use of a pursestring suture for wound closure. A follow up questionnaire suggested a lack of familiarity with the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. These findings indicate that <span class="hlt">current</span> management of spontaneous pneumothorax deviates from the BTS <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in potentially important respects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4614280','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4614280"><span>ADHD Rehabilitation through Video Gaming: A Systematic Review Using PRISMA <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> of the <span class="hlt">Current</span> Findings and the Associated Risk of Bias</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Strahler Rivero, Thiago; Herrera Nuñez, Lina Maria; Uehara Pires, Emmy; Amodeo Bueno, Orlando Francisco</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Empirical research studies have highlighted the need to investigate whether video game can be useful as a tool within a neuropsychological rehabilitation program for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients. However, little is known about the possible gains that this kind of video game-based interventions can produce and even if these gains can be transferred to real life abilities. The present paper aims to uncover key information related to the use of video game in ADHD neuropsychological rehabilitation/intervention by focusing on its gains and its capability to transfer/generalize these gains to real life situation via a systematic review of the empirical literature. The PRISMA <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were adopted. Internet-based bibliographic searches were conducted via seven major electronic databases (i.e., PsycARTICLES, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Core Collection BIOSIS Citation Index, MEDLINE, SciELO Citation Index, and PubMed) to access studies examining the association between video game interventions in ADHD patients and behavioral and cognitive outcomes. A total of 14 empirical studies meeting the inclusion criteria were identified. The studies reported the attention, working memory, and the behavioral aspects as the main target of the intervention. Cognitive and behavioral gains were reported after the video game training (VGT). However, many bias related to the choice of outcome instruments, sampling and blindness of assessors, weaken the results power. Additional researches are important to clarify the effects and stability of the VGT programs, and an important effort should be made to construct better methods to assess improvements on everyday cognitive abilities and real world functioning. PMID:26557098</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12314207','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12314207"><span>AIDS <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Berger, R</p> <p>1986-04-30</p> <p>The Sun article, "Employers finding that AIDS in the workplace is a managerial nightmare" (April 3), did not accurately portray the status of AIDS in the workplace. The AIDS virus, HTLV III, is transmitted by body fluids, primarily semen and blood, and there is no known risk of transmitting the virus by casual contact in the workplace. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) released <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for child care workers last August. <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> on preventing transmission of AIDS in the workplace were issued by CDC in November 1985. These <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> specifically discussed health care, personal service, and food service workers. The recommendations were against routine screening. Furthermore, employment should not be restricted on the basis of a positive HTLV III antibody test. A person with HTLV III infection should be exempt from the workplace only if there are circumstances interfering with job performance. In Maryland, the Governor's Task Force on AIDS has gone on record as endorsing CDC <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> related to employment. Furthermore, the task force condemns discrimination based on the disease AIDS, AIDS Related Complex (ARC), or HTLV III infection. Increasingly AIDS patients are being considered legally disabled and therefore are protected by federal and state laws prohibiting discrimination on the basis of a handicap. Marylanders who are subjected to mandatory HTLV III screening in the workplace, or if discriminated against on the basis of HTLV III inefction, should contact the Maryland Commission on Human Relations, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, or the Health Education Resource Organization (HERO). All 3 of these resources guarantee confidentiality. It is only by employees reporting incidents that a nightmare in the workplace can be avoided in Maryland. full text</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GMD.....9.3779K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GMD.....9.3779K"><span>Development and evaluation of a high-resolution reanalysis of the East <span class="hlt">Australian</span> <span class="hlt">Current</span> region using the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS 3.4) and Incremental Strong-Constraint 4-Dimensional Variational (IS4D-Var) data assimilation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kerry, Colette; Powell, Brian; Roughan, Moninya; Oke, Peter</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>As with other Western Boundary <span class="hlt">Currents</span> globally, the East <span class="hlt">Australian</span> <span class="hlt">Current</span> (EAC) is highly variable making it a challenge to model and predict. For the EAC region, we combine a high-resolution state-of-the-art numerical ocean model with a variety of traditional and newly available observations using an advanced variational data assimilation scheme. The numerical model is configured using the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS 3.4) and takes boundary forcing from the BlueLink ReANalysis (BRAN3). For the data assimilation, we use an Incremental Strong-Constraint 4-Dimensional Variational (IS4D-Var) scheme, which uses the model dynamics to perturb the initial conditions, atmospheric forcing, and boundary conditions, such that the modelled ocean state better fits and is in balance with the observations. This paper describes the data assimilative model configuration that achieves a significant reduction of the difference between the modelled solution and the observations to give a dynamically consistent "best estimate" of the ocean state over a 2-year period. The reanalysis is shown to represent both assimilated and non-assimilated observations well. It achieves mean spatially averaged root mean squared (rms) residuals with the observations of 7.6 cm for sea surface height (SSH) and 0.4 °C for sea surface temperature (SST) over the assimilation period. The time-mean rms residual for subsurface temperature measured by Argo floats is a maximum of 0.9 °C between water depths of 100 and 300 m and smaller throughout the rest of the water column. Velocities at several offshore and continental shelf moorings are well represented in the reanalysis with complex correlations between 0.8 and 1 for all observations in the upper 500 m. Surface radial velocities from a high-frequency radar array are assimilated and the reanalysis provides surface velocity estimates with complex correlations with observed velocities of 0.8-1 across the radar footprint. A comparison with</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22877693','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22877693"><span>Disaster preparedness in an <span class="hlt">Australian</span> urban trauma center: staff knowledge and perceptions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Corrigan, Ellen; Samrasinghe, Iromi</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>A substantial barrier to improving disaster preparedness in Australia is a lack of prescriptive national <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> based on individual hospital capabilities. A recent literature review revealed that only one <span class="hlt">Australian</span> hospital has published data regarding its <span class="hlt">current</span> preparedness level. To establish baseline levels of disaster knowledge, preparedness, and willingness to respond to a disaster among one hospital's staff, and thus enable the implementation of national disaster preparedness <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> based on realistic capabilities of individual hospitals. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to individuals and departments that play key roles in the hospital's external disaster response. Questions concerned prior education and experience specific to disasters, general preparedness knowledge, perceived preparedness of themselves and their department, and willingness to respond to a disaster from a conventional and/or chemical, biological, or radiological incident. Responses were received from 140 individuals representing nine hospital departments. Eighty-three participants (59.3%) had previously received disaster education; 53 (37.9%) had attended a disaster simulation drill, and 18 (12.9%) had responded to an actual disaster. The average disaster preparedness knowledge score was 3.57 out of 10. The majority of respondents rated themselves as "not really" prepared and were "unsure" of their respective departments' level of preparedness. Most respondents indicated a willingness to participate in both a conventional incident involving burns and/or physical trauma, and an incident involving chemical, biological or radiological (CBR) weapons. <span class="hlt">Australian</span> hospital staff are under-prepared to respond to a disaster because of a lack of education, insufficient simulation exercises, and limited disaster experience. The absence of specific national standards and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> through which individual hospitals can develop their capabilities further compounds the poverty in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26777255','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26777255"><span>Bite wounds and antibiotic prescription among patients presenting to an <span class="hlt">Australian</span> emergency department.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Birdsey, Matthew; Edwards, Gail; Abetz, Jeremy; Jennings, Natasha; Mitra, Biswadev</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Emergency department presentations after mammalian bites may be associated with injection of bacteria into broken skin and may require prophylactic antibiotics to prevent subsequent infection. We aim to describe the epidemiology of patients presenting with a mammalian bite injury and antibiotic choice to an <span class="hlt">Australian</span> adult tertiary centre. A retrospective cohort study was performed capturing all presentations after mammalian bite wounds between 01 Jan 2014 and 31 Dec 2014. An explicit chart review was conducted to determine management of each case. Cases were subgrouped into high- and low-risk groups as defined by the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Therapeutic <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for animal bites. There were 160 cases of mammalian bite wounds included, with 143 (89.4%) patients grouped as high-risk and 17 (10.6%) patients identified as low-risk. High-risk features were delayed presentation > 8 hours (57 patients, 35.6%), bites to the head, hand or face (113 patients, 70.6%), and puncture wounds unable to be adequately debrided (74 patients, 46.3%). There was a significant association with delayed presentation of more than eight hours and clinically established infection [OR 36.2; 95% CI: 12.6-103.6; P < 0.001]. Prescriptions for antibiotics that adhered to <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> occurred in 99 (61.9%) cases. This study highlights variability in antibiotic prescription practice among clinicians and the need for ongoing education on antibiotic stewardship. Intervention strategies, including ongoing education, are indicated to improve adherence to antibiotic <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24195919','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24195919"><span>Corticosteroid and platelet-rich plasma injection therapy in tennis elbow (lateral epicondylalgia): a survey of <span class="hlt">current</span> U.K. specialist practice and a call for clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Titchener, Andrew G; Booker, Simon J; Bhamber, Nivraj S; Tambe, Amol A; Clark, David I</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Tennis elbow is a common condition with a variety of treatment options, but little is known about which of these options specialists choose most commonly. Corticosteroid injections in tennis elbow may reduce pain in the short-term but delay long-term recovery. We have undertaken a UK-wide survey of upper limb specialists to assess <span class="hlt">current</span> practice. Cross-sectional electronic survey of <span class="hlt">current</span> members of the British Elbow and Shoulder Society (BESS) and the British Society for Surgery of the Hand (BSSH). 271 of 1047 eligible members responded (25.9%); consultant surgeons constituted the largest group (232/271, 85%). 131 respondents (48%) use corticosteroid injections as their first-line treatment for tennis elbow. 206 respondents (77%) believed that corticosteroid injections are not potentially harmful in the treatment of tennis elbow, while 31 (11%) did not use them in their <span class="hlt">current</span> practice. In light of recent evidence of the potential harmful effects of corticosteroid therapy, 136 (50%) had not changed their practice while 108 (40.1%) had reduced or discontinued their use. 43 respondents (16%) reported having used platelet-rich plasma injections. Recent high-quality evidence that corticosteroids may delay recovery in tennis elbow appears to have had a limited effect on <span class="hlt">current</span> practice. Treatment is not uniform among specialists and a proportion of them use platelet-rich plasma injections. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6679049','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6679049"><span>Can <span class="hlt">Australians</span> identify snakes?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Morrison, J J; Pearn, J H; Covacevich, J; Nixon, J</p> <p>1983-07-23</p> <p>A study of the ability of <span class="hlt">Australians</span> to identify snakes was undertaken, in which 558 volunteers (primary and secondary schoolchildren, doctors and university science and medical students) took part. Over all, subjects correctly identified an average of 19% of snakes; 28% of subjects could identify a taipan, 59% could identify a death adder, 18% a tiger snake, 23% an eastern (or common) brown snake, and 0.5% a rough-scaled snake. Eighty-six per cent of subjects who grew up in rural areas could identify a death adder; only 4% of those who grew up in an <span class="hlt">Australian</span> capital city could identify a nonvenomous python. Male subjects identified snakes more accurately than did female subjects. Doctors and medical students correctly identified an average of 25% of snakes. The ability to identify medically significant <span class="hlt">Australian</span> snakes was classified according to the observer's background, education, sex, and according to the individual snake species. <span class="hlt">Australians</span> need to be better educated about snakes indigenous to this country.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22Film+industry%22&pg=6&id=ED193727','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22Film+industry%22&pg=6&id=ED193727"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> Film Studies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Breen, Myles P.</p> <p></p> <p>Although Australia had a vigorous film industry in the silent film era, it was stifled in the 1930s when United States and British interests bought up the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> distribution channels and closed down the indigenous industry. However, the industry and film study have undergone a renaissance since the advent of the Labor government in 1972,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ946078.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ946078.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> Curriculum Linked Lessons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hurrell, Derek; O'Neil, Jennifer</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Curriculum, this issue the authors focus, on Geometry in the Measurement and Geometry strand with strong links for an integrated focus on the Statistics and Probability strand. The small unit of work on the sorting and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED572377.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED572377.pdf"><span>Numeracy and <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Forgasz, Helen; Leder, Gilah</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Australian</span> teachers, recruited via Facebook, completed an online survey about aspects of numeracy. The survey was designed to explore views on numeracy and capacity to respond to numeracy tasks. In this paper, we focus primarily on responses to two numeracy tasks--one numerical, the other requiring critical evaluation. On the first item, 40%…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Economic+AND+reference+AND+book&pg=6&id=EJ997495','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Economic+AND+reference+AND+book&pg=6&id=EJ997495"><span>Researching <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Children's Literature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Saxby, Maurice</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>When in 1962 the author began to research the history of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> children's literature, access to the primary sources was limited and difficult. From a catalogue drawer in the Mitchell Library of hand-written cards marked "Children's books" he could call up from the stacks, in alphabetical order, piles of early publications. His notes…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Media+AND+Ethics%3a+AND+Issues+AND+Cases&pg=5&id=EJ397940','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Media+AND+Ethics%3a+AND+Issues+AND+Cases&pg=5&id=EJ397940"><span>Fraud and <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Academics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Martin, Brian</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>A series of highly publicized cases of alleged fraud in the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> academic community are described. Each case reveals an apparent failure of peer review. The right to pursue investigations and make comments that may offend powerful figures within the scholarly community is precarious. (MLW)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=festival+AND+musical&pg=4&id=ED060331','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=festival+AND+musical&pg=4&id=ED060331"><span>Music in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Schools.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bartle, Graham</p> <p></p> <p>This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of a survey of music in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> schools. The survey included all types of schools, and includes facilities and equipment for musical education, and the use made of them. The courses of study, organization of musical activities, finance, supervision, teacher training, and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1093320.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1093320.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> Curriculum Linked Lessons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hurrell, Derek</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Curriculum, this issue will focus on Number in the Number and Algebra strand. In this article Derek Hurrell provides a few tried and proven activities to develop place value understanding. These activities are provided for…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29769031','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29769031"><span>Presentation and outcomes of indigenous <span class="hlt">Australians</span> with peripheral artery disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Singh, Tejas P; Moxon, Joseph V; Healy, Genevieve N; Cadet-James, Yvonne; Golledge, Jonathan</p> <p>2018-05-16</p> <p>The risk factors for peripheral artery disease (PAD) are more common in Indigenous than non-Indigenous <span class="hlt">Australians</span>, however the presentation and outcome of PAD in Indigenous <span class="hlt">Australians</span> has not been previously investigated. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to compare the presenting characteristics and clinical outcome of Indigenous and non-Indigenous <span class="hlt">Australians</span> with PAD. PAD patients were prospectively recruited and followed-up since 2003 from an outpatient vascular clinic in Townsville, Australia. Presenting symptoms and risk factors in Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients were compared using Pearson's χ2 test and Mann Whitney U test. Kaplan Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard analysis were used to compare the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke or death (major cardiovascular events) among Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients. Four hundred and one PAD patients were recruited, of which 16 were Indigenous and 385 were non-Indigenous <span class="hlt">Australians</span>. Indigenous <span class="hlt">Australians</span> were younger at entry (median age 63.3 [54.7-67.8] vs 69.6 [63.3-75.4]), more commonly <span class="hlt">current</span> smokers (56.3% vs 31.4%), and more frequently had insulin-treated diabetes (18.8% vs 5.2%). During a median follow-up of 2.5 years, five and 45 major cardiovascular events were recorded amongst Indigenous and non-Indigenous <span class="hlt">Australians</span>, respectively. Indigenous <span class="hlt">Australians</span> were at ~ 5-fold greater risk of major cardiovascular events (adjusted hazard ratio 4.72 [95% confidence intervals 1.41-15.78], p = 0.012) compared to non-Indigenous <span class="hlt">Australians</span>. These findings suggest that Indigenous <span class="hlt">Australians</span> with PAD present at a younger age, have higher rates of smoking and insulin-treated diabetes, and poorer clinical outcomes compared to non-Indigenous <span class="hlt">Australians</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25908383','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25908383"><span><span class="hlt">Current</span> UK dental sedation practice and the 'National Institute for Health and Care Excellence' (NICE) <span class="hlt">guideline</span> 112: sedation in children and young people.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Coulthard, P; Craig, D; Holden, C; Robb, N D; Sury, M; Chopra, S; Holroyd, I</p> <p>2015-04-24</p> <p>Describe <span class="hlt">current</span> dental sedation practice for under 19-year-olds in the UK and compare it with the recommendations of NICE guidance 112. Members of the Society for the Advancement of Anaesthesia in Dentistry and members of the Dental Sedation Teachers Group were invited to participate in an online survey. Two hundred and sixty-six dentists and doctors completed the survey. Eighty-two percent were operator and sedationist (operator-sedationist). Ninety-five percent provided written information and 94% obtained written consent. Eighty-four percent kept a written or electronic sedation record. Eighty-six percent complied with life support training expectations. Eighty-six percent had immediate access to resuscitation equipment. Sixty-seven percent of sedationists reported that treatment could not be completed under sedation for <10% of cases during the previous year. When sedation was unsuccessful, 61% said they would schedule general anaesthesia and 54.5% would schedule advanced sedation care. Forty-nine percent believed that a dentist was an appropriate person to provide advanced sedation for 12-18 years. Only 24% thought a dentist should provide advanced sedation for children<12 years, with 75% preferring an anaesthetist. The appropriate setting for advanced sedation was thought to be primary care by 33% and secondary care by 68%. We found good agreement between the <span class="hlt">current</span> practice of sedation and the recommendations of the NICE guidance 112.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27572068','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27572068"><span><span class="hlt">Current</span> status of laparoscopy for acute abdomen in Italy: a critical appraisal of 2012 clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> from two consecutive nationwide surveys with analysis of 271,323 cases over 5 years.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Agresta, Ferdinando; Campanile, Fabio Cesare; Podda, Mauro; Cillara, Nicola; Pernazza, Graziano; Giaccaglia, Valentina; Ciccoritti, Luigi; Ioia, Giovanna; Mandalà, Stefano; La Barbera, Camillo; Birindelli, Arianna; Sartelli, Massimo; Di Saverio, Salomone</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Several authors have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of laparoscopy in selected cases of abdominal emergencies. The aim of the study was to analyse the <span class="hlt">current</span> Italian practice on the use of laparoscopy in abdominal emergencies and to evaluate the impact of the 2012 national <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on the daily surgical activity. Two surveys (42 closed-ended questions) on the use of laparoscopy in acute abdomen were conducted nationwide with an online questionnaire, respectively, before (2010) and after (2014) the national <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> publication. Data from two surveys were compared using Chi-square or Fisher's exact test, and data were considered significant when p < 0.05. Two-hundred and one and 234 surgical units answered to the surveys in 2010 and 2014, respectively. Out of 144,310 and 127,013 overall surgical procedures, 23,407 and 20,102, respectively, were abdominal emergency operations. Respectively 24.74 % (in 2010) versus 30.27 % (in 2014) of these emergency procedures were approached laparoscopically, p = 0.42. The adoption of laparoscopy increased in all the considered clinical scenarios, with statistical significance in acute appendicitis (44 vs. 64.7 %; p = 0.004). The percentage of units approaching Hinchey III acute diverticulitis with laparoscopy in 26-75 % of cases (14.0 vs. 29.7 %; p = 0.009), those with >25 % of surgeons confident with laparoscopic approach to acute diverticulitis (29.9 vs. 54 %; p = 0.0009), the units with >50 % of surgeons confident with laparoscopic approach to acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and perforated duodenal ulcer, all significantly increased in the time frame. The majority of respondents declared that the 2012 national <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> influenced their clinical practice. The surveys showed an increasing use of laparoscopy for patients with abdominal emergencies. The 2012 national <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> profoundly influenced the Italian surgical practice in the laparoscopic approach to the acute abdomen.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29707882','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29707882"><span>Dietitians' opinions regarding refeeding syndrome, clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and extended scope of practice.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Matthews, Kylie L; Palmer, Michelle A; Capra, Sandra M</p> <p>2018-04-30</p> <p>Refeeding syndrome (RFS) prevalence rates vary across studies depending on the criteria used for assessment and identification. For registered dietitians, the assessment and management of RFS is highly reliant on daily serum electrolyte values; however, registered dietitians working within Australia do not <span class="hlt">currently</span> possess laboratory test ordering privileges. We aimed to examine the opinions of registered dietitians regarding RFS identification, management and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and the option of using extended scope of practice to order electrolyte monitoring autonomously. A multi-method action research approach was used, incorporating two projects. The first was a survey examining <span class="hlt">Australian</span> registered dietitians' (n = 187) opinions regarding RFS identification, management and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, and autonomous electrolyte monitoring. To establish if results were similar internationally, an interview was conducted with 22 registered dietitians working within 10 different countries. Data were analysed using chi-square tests and thematic analysis. <span class="hlt">Australian</span> registered dietitians (75%) identify patients at risk of RFS at a high rate of more than once per fortnight, with 74% reporting that they have previously worked with a patient diagnosed with RFS. Results varied internationally, with respondents from eight countries reporting that RFS is a problem within acute care versus respondents from five countries having never treated a patient with RFS. The majority (≥89%) of registered dietitians desire new <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and the option to order patient electrolyte monitoring autonomously. Our findings suggest that more stringent tools for the identification of RFS are necessary. There was limited uniformity across countries, and updated practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are needed. © 2018 Dietitians Association of Australia.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11090233','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11090233"><span>Prevalence of osteoporosis in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> women: Geelong Osteoporosis Study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Henry, M J; Pasco, J A; Nicholson, G C; Seeman, E; Kotowicz, M A</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>To evaluate the prevalence of osteoporosis at various sites among <span class="hlt">Australian</span> women, cross-sectional bone mineral density (BMD) data for adult females was obtained from an age-stratified population-based sample (n = 1494; 20-94 yr) drawn at random from the Barwon Statistical Division, a population characteristic of Australia. Age- and weight- (and for three sites, height) matched reference ranges for BMD at the lumbar spine, proximal femur, forearm, and total body were developed using regression techniques. The cutoff BMD level for osteoporosis at the PA spine was 0. 917g/cm(2) and 0.713 g/cm(2) at the femoral neck according to the World Health Organization (WHO) <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. The upper cutoff level for osteopenia was 1.128 g/cm(2) at the PA spine and 0.913g/cm(2) for the femoral neck. The proportion of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> women categorized as having osteoporosis at the PA spine, femoral neck, or midforearm ranged from 0.9% among those aged 40-44 yr to 87.0% for those older than 79 yr. This study provides reference data representative of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> female population. A large proportion of elderly <span class="hlt">Australian</span> women has osteoporosis according to the WHO <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26914014','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26914014"><span>Sonographic screening for developmental dysplasia of the hip in preterm breech infants: do <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> address the specific needs of premature infants?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, J; Spinazzola, R M; Kohn, N; Perrin, M; Milanaik, R L</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>To assess the association between gestational age versus corrected age at the time of hip ultrasound with findings for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in preterm breech infants. A retrospective medical chart review was conducted to examine hip ultrasounds of 318 premature breech infants for findings associated with DDH. Positive findings for DDH occurred in 3/135 (2%) of infants <32 weeks gestational age and 17/183 (9%) of infants 32 to <37 weeks gestational age (odds ratio: 0.22, 95% CI: 0.04 to 0.79, P<0.015). No infants born <32 weeks gestational age had abnormal findings for DDH upon follow-up ultrasound. Infants <40 weeks corrected age at the time of hip ultrasound were more likely to have DDH findings compared with infants ⩾44 weeks corrected age (odds ratio: 7.83, 95% CI: 2.20 to 29.65, P<0.001). <span class="hlt">Current</span> hip ultrasonography policies that include screening of premature breech infants may need to be revised.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28087179','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28087179"><span>Value of serum N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide in asymptomatic structural heart disease in Taiwanese population: Comparisons with <span class="hlt">current</span> ESC <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hung, Ta-Chuan; Wang, Kuang-Te; Yun, Chun-Ho; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Bezerra, Hiram G; Cheng, Hsiao-Yang; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Yeh, Hung-I</p> <p>2017-03-15</p> <p>The relationship between N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and cardiac structural or functional anomalies in pre-clinical, asymptomatic Asian populations has not been well identified. From October 2005 to March 2008, we enrolled consecutive asymptomatic adults with preserved global left ventricular (LV) function (ejection fraction>50%) who underwent annual cardiovascular health survey. Circulating NT-proBNP was used to identify echo-defined cardiac structural/functional anomalies and compared to <span class="hlt">current</span> recommended cut-off from the European Society of Heart Failure. Among 976 eligible subjects, 371 (38%) had structural heart diseases. Echocardiography-based left atrial diameter (Coef: 71.2), diastolic dysfunction (Coef: 35.4), and presence of pulmonary hypertension (Coef: 83.1) or valvular heart disease (Coef: 56.1, all p<0.05) of any form independently predicted circulating NT-ProBNP. NT-ProBNP cut-off values of 32.8 and 115.4pg/ml for subjects aged ≤ and >75years, respectively, demonstrated areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.76 (95% CI: 0.73-0.80) and 0.70 (95% CI: 0.52-0.88) for predicting structural or functional anomaly. We examined the feasibility of NT-ProBNP for identifying cardiac structural and functional anomaly in an asymptomatic ethnic Taiwanese population with a relatively lower cut-off value, indicating its potential role for pre-clinical screening of Asian patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27624518','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27624518"><span>Diet during pregnancy: Women's knowledge of and adherence to food safety <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bryant, Jamie; Waller, Amy; Cameron, Emilie; Hure, Alexis; Sanson-Fisher, Rob</p> <p>2017-06-01</p> <p>As a precaution against acquiring food-borne illnesses, <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> recommend women avoid some foods during pregnancy. To examine among women receiving antenatal care: (i) level of knowledge and self-reported adherence to <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> about foods that should be avoided during pregnancy; and (ii) associated socio-demographic characteristics. Women attending a public outpatient clinic who were: pregnant or had recently given birth; 18 years or older; able to complete an English language survey with minimal assistance; and had at least one prior antenatal appointment for their <span class="hlt">current</span> pregnancy, were asked to complete a cross-sectional survey. In total 223 women (64% consent rate) participated. Knowledge of foods to avoid during pregnancy was poor, with 83% of women incorrectly identifying at least one unsafe food as safe to consume. The average knowledge score for foods to avoid during pregnancy was 7.9 (standard deviation = 3.4; median = 9; interquartile range: 6-11; n = 218) out of a possible score of 12. Having more general practice (GP) visits for antenatal care and fewer tertiary antenatal visits were significantly associated with higher knowledge. Women with a higher number of GP visits and those receiving care in a high-risk clinic were more likely to be adherent to <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. The majority of pregnant women have poor knowledge of food avoidance <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and continue to consume foods that put them at risk. © 2016 The Royal <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20378873','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20378873"><span>An <span class="hlt">Australian</span> perspective on developing standards and ensuring compliance.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thornber, Peter M</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Australia is a federation of states and territories, each with their own parliament and animal-welfare laws. <span class="hlt">Australian</span> animal-welfare legislation imposes a "duty of care" on people responsible for the care and well-being of animals under their management. In the livestock sector, this responsibility is mirrored by the ongoing development of standards, <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, and codes of practice to assist people to understand their responsibilities and to meet expectations concerning animal welfare. The <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Animal Welfare Strategy (AAWS) is the national animal-welfare policy blueprint for sustainable improvements in animal welfare, and one of its key goals is to achieve greater consistency in the development, implementation, and enforcement of animal-welfare standards. Standards, <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, and model codes also inform the development of contemporary, evidence-based quality assurance programs for individual livestock industries and provide the basis for competency-based training programs for animal handlers. <span class="hlt">Australian</span> standards have been developed for pigs and land transport of livestock, and work is progressing on national standards for cattle, sheep, horses, zoo animals, dogs, and cats. Other achievements include the development of requirements for the care and use of animals in research and teaching, <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the welfare of aquatic animals, and codes of practice for the humane killing of pest animals. State and territory governments are developing a framework for consistent regulation and compliance in consultation with industries and welfare organizations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3330425','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3330425"><span>Developing Practice <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Psychoanalysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>GRAY, SHEILA HAFTER</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Consensus-based practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> codify clinical intelligence and the rich oral tradition in medicine. Because they reflect actual practice, they are readily accepted by clinicians as a basis for external review. This article illustrates the development of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for a psychoanalytic approach to the large pool of patients who present with a depression. It suggests an integrated biopsychosocial approach to these individuals that is useful in <span class="hlt">current</span> practice, and it offers propositions that may be tested in future research undertakings. Eventually, practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> such as these may form the basis of economical systems of health care that avoid arbitrary, clinically untenable limitations on services. PMID:22700290</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28741003','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28741003"><span>Singapore Paediatric Resuscitation <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> 2016.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ong, Gene Yong Kwang; Chan, Irene Lai Yeen; Ng, Agnes Suah Bwee; Chew, Su Yah; Mok, Yee Hui; Chan, Yoke Hwee; Ong, Jacqueline Soo May; Ganapathy, Sashikumar; Ng, Kee Chong</p> <p>2017-07-01</p> <p>We present the revised 2016 Singapore paediatric resuscitation <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation's Pediatric Taskforce Consensus Statements on Science and Treatment Recommendations, as well as the updated resuscitation <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> from the American Heart Association and European Resuscitation Council released in October 2015, were debated and discussed by the workgroup. The final recommendations for the Singapore Paediatric Resuscitation <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> 2016 were derived after carefully reviewing the <span class="hlt">current</span> available evidence in the literature and balancing it with local clinical practice. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5523090','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5523090"><span>Singapore Neonatal Resuscitation <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> 2016</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yeo, Cheo Lian; Biswas, Agnihotri; Ee, Teong Tai Kenny; Chinnadurai, Amutha; Baral, Vijayendra Ranjan; Chang, Alvin Shang Ming; Ereno, Imelda Lustestica; Ho, Kah Ying Selina; Poon, Woei Bing; Shah, Varsha Atul; Quek, Bin Huey</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>We present the revised Neonatal Resuscitation <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Singapore. The 2015 International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation Neonatal Task Force’s consensus on science and treatment recommendations (2015), and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> from the American Heart Association and European Resuscitation Council were debated and discussed. The final recommendations of the National Resuscitation Council, Singapore, were derived after the task force had carefully reviewed the <span class="hlt">current</span> available evidence in the literature and addressed their relevance to local clinical practice. PMID:28741001</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18647425','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18647425"><span>Diet and pregnancy status in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> women.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hure, Alexis; Young, Anne; Smith, Roger; Collins, Clare</p> <p>2009-06-01</p> <p>To investigate and report the diet quality of young <span class="hlt">Australian</span> women by pregnancy status. Pregnancy status was defined as pregnant (n 606), trying to conceive (n 454), had a baby in the last 12 months (n 829) and other (n 5597). The Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies was used to calculate diet quality using the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Recommended Food Score (ARFS) methodology. Nutrient intakes were compared with the Nutrient Reference Values for Australia and New Zealand. A population-based cohort participating in the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). A nationally representative sample of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> women, aged 25 to 30 years, who completed Survey 3 of the ALSWH. The 7486 women with biologically plausible energy intake estimates, defined as >4.5 but <20.0 MJ/d, were included in the analyses. Pregnancy status was not significantly predictive of diet quality, before or after adjusting for area of residence and socio-economic status. Pregnant women and those who had given birth in the previous 12 months had marginally higher ARFS (mean (se): 30.2 (0.4) and 30.2 (0.3), respectively) than 'other' women (29.1 (0.1)). No single food group accounted for this small difference. Across all pregnancy categories there were important nutrients that did not meet the <span class="hlt">current</span> nationally recommended levels of intake, including dietary folate and fibre. Women do not appear to consume a wider variety of nutritious foods when planning to become pregnant or during pregnancy. Many young <span class="hlt">Australian</span> women are failing to meet key nutrient targets as nationally recommended.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29488890','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29488890"><span>[Clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the management of schizophrenia:Aims and limitations (Ι)].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Margariti, M; Hadjulis, M; Lazaridou, M; Angelidis, G F; Fotopoulos, V; Markaki, L; Koulouri, F</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The initiative for the development of national treatment <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, dates back to the '90s. In Greece, however, National Clinical <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for the management of schizophrenia were first formulated in 2014 when a Working Group was set up for this purpose by the Greek Ministry of Health. The objective of this Working Group was to provide evidence-based recommendations covering the pharmacological and psychosocial treatment of schizophrenia as well as the development of appropriate treatment services. The Working Group utilized the NICE <span class="hlt">Guideline</span> (National Institute of Clinical Excellence, 2010, 2014) for the management of Psychosis & Schizophrenia as the main guide to develop the Greek National <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> , and in addition the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Practice <span class="hlt">Guideline</span> for the Treatment of Patients with Schizophrenia (APA 2004), the Royal <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the treatment of schizophrenia and related disorders (Royal <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2005) , as well as other relevant sources. The Working Group also took into consideration the available Greek bibliography as well as the external evaluations of the Greek psychiatric reform programs. A special effort was made to adapt the international experience to the <span class="hlt">current</span> Greek landscape with the constraints resulting from the uneven dispersion of mental health services, the lack of coordination between services, the incomplete sectorization of mental health services provided as part of the National Health System, the still underdeveloped Primary Care Health Service, and last but not least the difficult economic situation in Greece. After the preparation of the draft <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, a thorough consultation followed with the relevant stakeholders, including mental health professionals, user associations and representatives of the Greek Ombudsman. Additionally, the Hellenic Psychiatric Association established an Expert</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24176286','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24176286"><span>Preventing maternal and early childhood obesity: the fetal flaw in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> perinatal care.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Miller, Margaret; Hearn, Lydia; van der Pligt, Paige; Wilcox, Jane; Campbell, Karen J</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Almost half of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> women of child-bearing age are overweight or obese, with a rate of 30-50% reported in early pregnancy. Maternal adiposity is a costly challenge for <span class="hlt">Australian</span> obstetric care, with associated serious maternal and neonatal complications. Excess gestational weight gain is an important predictor of offspring adiposity into adulthood and higher maternal weight later in life. <span class="hlt">Current</span> public health and perinatal care approaches in Australia do not adequately address excess perinatal maternal weight or gestational weight gain. This paper argues that the failure of primary health-care providers to offer systematic advice and support regarding women's weight and related lifestyle behaviours in child-bearing years is an outstanding 'missed opportunity' for prevention of inter-generational overweight and obesity. Barriers to action could be addressed through greater attention to: clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for maternal weight management for the perinatal period, training and support of maternal health-care providers to develop skills and confidence in raising weight issues with women, a variety of weight management programs provided by state maternal health services, and clear referral pathways to them. Attention is also required to service systems that clearly define roles in maternal weight management and ensure consistency and continuity of support across the perinatal period.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5933362','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5933362"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> cardiac rehabilitation exercise parameter characteristics and perceptions of high-intensity interval training: a cross-sectional survey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hannan, Amanda L; Hing, Wayne; Climstein, Mike; Coombes, Jeff S; Furness, James; Jayasinghe, Rohan; Byrnes, Joshua</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>Purpose This study explored <span class="hlt">current</span> demographics, characteristics, costs, evaluation methods, and outcome measures used in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs. It also determined the actual usage and perceptions of high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Methods A cross-sectional observational web-based survey was distributed to 328 <span class="hlt">Australian</span> CR programs nationally. Results A total of 261 programs completed the survey (79.6% response rate). Most <span class="hlt">Australian</span> CR programs were located in a hospital setting (76%), offered exercise sessions once a week (52%) for 6–8 weeks (49%) at moderate intensity (54%) for 46–60 min (62%), and serviced 101–500 clients per annum (38%). HIIT was reported in only 1% of programs, and 27% of respondents believed that it was safe while 42% of respondents were unsure. Lack of staff (25%), monitoring resources (20%), and staff knowledge (18%) were the most commonly reported barriers to the implementation of HIIT. Overall, <span class="hlt">Australian</span> CR coordinators are unsure of the cost of exercise sessions. Conclusion There is variability in CR delivery across Australia. Only half of programs reassess outcome measures postintervention, and cost of exercise sessions is unknown. Although HIIT is recommended in international CR <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, it is essentially not being used in Australia and clinicians are unsure as to the safety of HIIT. Lack of resources and staff knowledge were perceived as the biggest barriers to HIIT implementation, and there are inconsistent perceptions of prescreening and monitoring requirements. This study highlights the need to educate health professionals about the benefits and safety of HIIT to improve its usage and patient outcomes. PMID:29750058</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29750058','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29750058"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> cardiac rehabilitation exercise parameter characteristics and perceptions of high-intensity interval training: a cross-sectional survey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hannan, Amanda L; Hing, Wayne; Climstein, Mike; Coombes, Jeff S; Furness, James; Jayasinghe, Rohan; Byrnes, Joshua</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>This study explored <span class="hlt">current</span> demographics, characteristics, costs, evaluation methods, and outcome measures used in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs. It also determined the actual usage and perceptions of high-intensity interval training (HIIT). A cross-sectional observational web-based survey was distributed to 328 <span class="hlt">Australian</span> CR programs nationally. A total of 261 programs completed the survey (79.6% response rate). Most <span class="hlt">Australian</span> CR programs were located in a hospital setting (76%), offered exercise sessions once a week (52%) for 6-8 weeks (49%) at moderate intensity (54%) for 46-60 min (62%), and serviced 101-500 clients per annum (38%). HIIT was reported in only 1% of programs, and 27% of respondents believed that it was safe while 42% of respondents were unsure. Lack of staff (25%), monitoring resources (20%), and staff knowledge (18%) were the most commonly reported barriers to the implementation of HIIT. Overall, <span class="hlt">Australian</span> CR coordinators are unsure of the cost of exercise sessions. There is variability in CR delivery across Australia. Only half of programs reassess outcome measures postintervention, and cost of exercise sessions is unknown. Although HIIT is recommended in international CR <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, it is essentially not being used in Australia and clinicians are unsure as to the safety of HIIT. Lack of resources and staff knowledge were perceived as the biggest barriers to HIIT implementation, and there are inconsistent perceptions of prescreening and monitoring requirements. This study highlights the need to educate health professionals about the benefits and safety of HIIT to improve its usage and patient outcomes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29240386','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29240386"><span>EVALUATION OF A NURSE-LED HYPERTENSION MANAGEMENT INTERVENTION IN <span class="hlt">AUSTRALIAN</span> GENERAL PRACTICE: THE IMPRESS INTERVENTION.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stephen, Catherine</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Hypertension is <span class="hlt">currently</span> the most frequently seen condition in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> general practice (Britt et al. 2015). Of the 4.6 million <span class="hlt">Australians</span> living with hypertension, many struggle to keep their blood pressure under control and are at increased risk of renal failure, cardiovascular disease and premature death (<span class="hlt">Australian</span> Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015; Cadilhac et al. 2012). The General Practice Nurse (GPN) has a significant role to play in supporting self-management and lifestyle risk factor reduction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23879440','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23879440"><span>An overview of service quality of continuous positive airway pressure services in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> pharmacies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hanes, Carissa A; Wong, Keith K H; Saini, Bandana</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Little is known about CPAP services offered in the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> primary care pharmacy setting, despite the potential influence of service quality on patient adherence. The objective of this study was to provide an overview on a nationwide scale of the range and quality of CPAP and sleep apnoea-related services in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> pharmacies. A paper-based questionnaire was developed and mailed to all pharmacies in Australia that <span class="hlt">currently</span> provide CPAP services (as identified by manufacturer's distributor lists or Internet search). A point system was devised to score participants on the quality of their CPAP service. Pharmacies were rated against a list of 23 criteria that were determined by consensus, with one point allocated for each criterion met, allowing for a maximum score of 23. The study response rate was 55% (110/199), and representation was obtained from all eight <span class="hlt">Australian</span> states and territories. The mean number of criteria met (total score) for pharmacies was 15.7 ± 3.4 (15.7/23 = 68.3%; score range 2-22). Variability was evident in the range of services offered. Eighty-seven per cent of respondents believed that pharmacies supplying CPAP should adhere to a formalized set of professional <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. The accessibility of pharmacies may make them a valuable venue for CPAP service provision. However, models of care to guide practice and standardize the variability in services are required. Implementation of such models could improve patient access to quality treatment in the primary care setting. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29153827','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29153827"><span>Compassion satisfaction and fatigue: A cross-sectional survey of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> intensive care nurses.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jakimowicz, Samantha; Perry, Lin; Lewis, Joanne</p> <p>2017-11-16</p> <p>Compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue influence nurses' intention to stay or leave nursing. Identification of compassion satisfaction or fatigue in critical care nurses is important in this high turnover workforce. The aim of this study was to examine factors predicting and contributing to compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue experienced by critical care nurses in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> intensive care units. A self-reported cross-sectional survey using an established tool collected data from critical care nurses of two adult <span class="hlt">Australian</span> intensive care units. Overall, these critical care nurses reported what Professional Quality of Life Scale <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> designated as 'average' levels of compassion satisfaction and burnout, and 'low' levels of Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS). Compared to Site B, nurses at Site A had significantly higher compassion satisfaction (p=0.008) and lower STS scores (p=0.025), with site significantly predictive for compassion satisfaction (p<0.024) and STS (p<0.002). Nurses with postgraduate qualifications had significantly higher compassion satisfaction scores (p=0.027), and compassion satisfaction significantly increased with increasing duration of practice (p=0.042) as a nurse and in their <span class="hlt">current</span> ICU (p=0.038). Burnout scores significantly reduced with increasing age, years of tenure and practice; burnout was predicted by lower years of tenure (p<0.016). These critical care nurses revealed profiles that, whilst not in crisis, fell short of the ideal high compassion satisfaction and moderate/low fatigue. More recent tenure flags those potentially at higher risk of compassion fatigue, whilst the better scores associated with postgraduate education and from one site need further exploration. Further research should develop understanding and interventions to enhance compassion satisfaction and support retention of this crucial nursing workforce. Copyright © 2017 <span class="hlt">Australian</span> College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29241885','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29241885"><span>Cost Effectiveness of the Angiotensin Receptor Neprilysin Inhibitor Sacubitril/Valsartan for Patients with Chronic Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction in the Netherlands: A Country Adaptation Analysis Under the Former and <span class="hlt">Current</span> Dutch Pharmacoeconomic <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ramos, Isaac Corro; Versteegh, Matthijs M; de Boer, Rudolf A; Koenders, Jolanda M A; Linssen, Gerard C M; Meeder, Joan G; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H</p> <p>2017-12-01</p> <p>To describe the adaptation of a global health economic model to determine whether treatment with the angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor LCZ696 is cost effective compared with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril in adult patients with chronic heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction in the Netherlands; and to explore the effect of performing the cost-effectiveness analyses according to the new pharmacoeconomic Dutch <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> (updated during the submission process of LCZ696), which require a value-of-information analysis and the inclusion of indirect medical costs of life-years gained. We adapted a UK model to reflect the societal perspective in the Netherlands by including travel expenses, productivity loss, informal care costs, and indirect medical costs during the life-years gained and performed a preliminary value-of-information analysis. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio obtained was €17,600 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. This was robust to changes in most structural assumptions and across different subgroups of patients. Probability sensitivity analysis results showed that the probability that LCZ696 is cost-effective at a €50,000 per QALY threshold is 99.8%, with a population expected value of perfect information of €297,128. On including indirect medical costs of life-years gained, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was €26,491 per QALY gained, and LCZ696 was 99.46% cost effective at €50,000 per QALY, with a population expected value of perfect information of €2,849,647. LCZ696 is cost effective compared with enalapril under the former and <span class="hlt">current</span> Dutch <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. However, the (monetary) consequences of making a wrong decision were considerably different in both scenarios. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23844088','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23844088"><span>Are <span class="hlt">current</span> UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) obesity risk <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> useful? Cross-sectional associations with cardiovascular disease risk factors in a large, representative English population.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tabassum, Faiza; Batty, G David</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has recently released obesity <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for health risk. For the first time in the UK, we estimate the utility of these <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> by relating them to the established cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Health Survey for England (HSE) 2006, a population-based cross-sectional study in England was used with a sample size of 7225 men and women aged ≥35 years (age range: 35-97 years). The following CVD risk factor outcomes were used: hypertension, diabetes, total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, glycated haemoglobin, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein and Framingham risk score. Four NICE categories of obesity were created based on body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC): no risk (up to normal BMI and low/high WC); increased risk (normal BMI & very high WC, or obese & low WC); high risk (overweight & very high WC, or obese & high WC); and very high risk (obese I & very high WC or obese II/III with any levels of WC. Men and women in the very high risk category had the highest odds ratios (OR) of having unfavourable CVD risk factors compared to those in the no risk category. For example, the OR of having hypertension for those in the very high risk category of the NICE obesity groupings was 2.57 (95% confidence interval 2.06 to 3.21) in men, and 2.15 (1.75 to 2.64) in women. Moreover, a dose-response association between the adiposity groups and most of the CVD risk factors was observed except total cholesterol in men and low HDL in women. Similar results were apparent when the Framingham risk score was the outcome of interest. In conclusion, the <span class="hlt">current</span> NICE definitions of obesity show utility for a range of CVD risk factors and CVD risk in both men and women.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3699476','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3699476"><span>Are <span class="hlt">Current</span> UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) Obesity Risk <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> Useful? Cross-Sectional Associations with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in a Large, Representative English Population</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tabassum, Faiza; Batty, G. David</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has recently released obesity <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for health risk. For the first time in the UK, we estimate the utility of these <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> by relating them to the established cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Health Survey for England (HSE) 2006, a population-based cross-sectional study in England was used with a sample size of 7225 men and women aged ≥35 years (age range: 35–97 years). The following CVD risk factor outcomes were used: hypertension, diabetes, total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, glycated haemoglobin, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein and Framingham risk score. Four NICE categories of obesity were created based on body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC): no risk (up to normal BMI and low/high WC); increased risk (normal BMI & very high WC, or obese & low WC); high risk (overweight & very high WC, or obese & high WC); and very high risk (obese I & very high WC or obese II/III with any levels of WC. Men and women in the very high risk category had the highest odds ratios (OR) of having unfavourable CVD risk factors compared to those in the no risk category. For example, the OR of having hypertension for those in the very high risk category of the NICE obesity groupings was 2.57 (95% confidence interval 2.06 to 3.21) in men, and 2.15 (1.75 to 2.64) in women. Moreover, a dose-response association between the adiposity groups and most of the CVD risk factors was observed except total cholesterol in men and low HDL in women. Similar results were apparent when the Framingham risk score was the outcome of interest. In conclusion, the <span class="hlt">current</span> NICE definitions of obesity show utility for a range of CVD risk factors and CVD risk in both men and women. PMID:23844088</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12179436','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12179436"><span>Population and <span class="hlt">Australian</span> development assistance.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jones, R</p> <p>1992-07-01</p> <p>Australia's position on international population issues is consistent with the major international statements on population: the World Population Plan of Action (1974), the Mexico City Declaration (1984), and the Amsterdam Declaration (1989). Australia's policy emphasizes the importance of population policies as an integral part of social, economic, and cultural development aimed at improving the quality of life of the people. Factors that would promote smaller families include improving economic opportunities, old-age security, education and health (particularly for women), as well as improving the accessibility and quality of family planning services. The quality of care approach is directly complementary to the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> International Development Assistance Bureau (AIDAB)'s Women-In-Development Policy and its Health Policy, which stresses the theme of Women And Their Children's Health (WATCH). Australia's support for population programs and activities has increased considerably over the last few years. Total assistance for the year 1990/91 was around $7 million out of a total aid program of $1216 million. In recent years AIDAB has funded family planning activities or health projects with family planning components in a number of countries in the Asia-Pacific region. In the South Pacific region AIDAB has funded a reproductive health video project taking into consideration the cultural sensitivities and customs of the peoples of the region. AIDAB has supported a UN Population Fund project in Thailand that aims to strengthen the capacity of the National Statistical Office to collect population data. The US <span class="hlt">currently</span> accounts for around 40% of all population-related development assistance to improve the health of women and children through family planning. The other major donors are Japan, the Scandinavian countries, and the Netherlands. Funding for population has been a relatively low percentage of overall development assistance budgets in OECD countries. In the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26220028','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26220028"><span>What is the evidence status of Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC)? Insight from a matching exercise with the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for echocardiography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fonseca, R; Negishi, K; Marwick, T H</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>There is interest in adapting the American Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for transthoracic echocardiography to <span class="hlt">Australian</span> practice. We matched 90 of 98 AUC with the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> (53 appropriate, 12 sometimes appropriate, 25 rarely appropriate), but eight lacked any match. Among the matched criteria, 76 (82%) indications were concordant with the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. A stronger evidence base would be desirable to settle these discrepancies before <span class="hlt">Australian</span> adoption of AUC. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=funding+AND+model&pg=7&id=EJ1031348','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=funding+AND+model&pg=7&id=EJ1031348"><span>Review of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Higher Education: An <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Policy Perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Montague, Alan</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Higher education is one of the key foundations that economic prosperity is founded upon. Government policies, funding and strategic planning require a fine balance to stimulate growth, prosperity health and well-being. The key <span class="hlt">Australian</span> government policies influenced by a Review of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Higher Education report include attracting many more…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18942236','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18942236"><span>Understanding <span class="hlt">current</span> steam sterilization recommendations and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Spry, Cynthia</p> <p>2008-10-01</p> <p>Processing surgical instruments in preparation for surgery is a complex multistep practice. It is impractical to culture each and every item to determine sterility; therefore, the best assurance of a sterile product is careful execution of every step in the process coupled with an ongoing quality control program. Perioperative staff nurses and managers responsible for instrument processing, whether for a single instrument or multiple sets, must be knowledgeable with regard to cleaning; packaging; cycle selection; and the use of physical, chemical, and biological monitors. Nurses also should be able to resolve issues related to loaner sets, flash sterilization, and extended cycles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27242065','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27242065"><span>Intravenous immunoglobulin in paediatric neurology: safety, adherence to <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, and long-term outcome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nosadini, Margherita; Mohammad, Shekeeb S; Suppiej, Agnese; Sartori, Stefano; Dale, Russell C</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an expensive therapy used in immunodeficiency and autoimmune disorders. Increasing demands and consequent shortages result in a need for usage to conform to <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. We retrospectively evaluated IVIG use for neuroimmunological indications and adherence to existing <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in a major <span class="hlt">Australian</span> paediatric hospital between 2000 and 2014. One-hundred and ninety-six children (96 male, 100 female; mean age at disease onset 6y 5mo [range 3mo-15y 10mo], mean age at first IVIG dose 7y 2mo [range 3mo-16y 5mo]) received IVIG for neuroimmunological indications during the study period (28.1% had Guillain-Barré syndrome), representing 15.5% of all hospital indications. In total, 1669 IVIG courses were administered (total 57 221g, median 78g/patient, range 12-5748g). The highest median numbers of courses were in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies, opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia syndrome, suspected immune-mediated epilepsies, and Rasmussen's encephalitis. Adverse reactions occurred in 25.5% of patients, but these were mostly minor. Outcome at follow-up was best in anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and myasthenia gravis, and worst in Rasmussen's encephalitis and epilepsies. The total cost of IVIG was US$2 595 907 (median $3538/patient, range $544-260 766). Of patients receiving IVIG, 45.4% to 57.1% were given the therapy for 'weak' indications or indications 'not listed' in international <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Some entities commonly treated with IVIG in <span class="hlt">current</span> practice, such as anti-NMDAR encephalitis and transverse myelitis, are not listed in most <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Our study demonstrates that IVIG is generally well tolerated but expensive, and discloses discrepancies between <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and clinical practice in paediatric neurology, suggesting both the need for greater adherence to <span class="hlt">current</span> recommendations, and for recommendations to be updated to accommodate emerging indications. </p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26344813','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26344813"><span>Variations in serving sizes of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> snack foods and confectionery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Watson, Wendy L; Kury, Alexandra; Wellard, Lyndal; Hughes, Clare; Dunford, Elizabeth; Chapman, Kathy</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This study examined the serving size and energy content per serving of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> packaged snack foods and confectionery products. Nutrition Information Panel data for 23 sub-categories of packaged snack foods (n = 3481) were extracted from The George Institute for Global Health's 2013 branded food composition database. Variations in serving size and energy content per serving were examined. Energy contents per serving were compared to recommendations in the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Dietary <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>. Serving sizes varied within and between snack food categories. Mean energy content per serving varied from 320 kJ to 899 kJ. More energy per serving than the recommended 600 kJ was displayed by 22% (n = 539) of snack foods classified in the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Dietary <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> as discretionary foods. The recommendation for energy content per serving was exceeded in 60% (n = 635) of snack foods from the Five Food Groups. Only 37% (n = 377) of confectionery products displayed the industry-agreed serving size of 25 g. Energy content per serving of many packaged snack foods do not align with the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Dietary <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> and the industry agreed serving size has not been taken up widely within the confectionery category. Given the inconsistencies in serving sizes, featuring serving size in front-of-pack information may hinder the objective of a clear and simple nutrition message. Messaging to help consumers make healthier choices should consider the variation in serving sizes on packaged snack foods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29598832','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29598832"><span><span class="hlt">Guideline</span> on cochlear implants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Manrique, Manuel; Ramos, Ángel; de Paula Vernetta, Carlos; Gil-Carcedo, Elisa; Lassaleta, Luis; Sanchez-Cuadrado, Isabel; Espinosa, Juan Manuel; Batuecas, Ángel; Cenjor, Carlos; Lavilla, María José; Núñez, Faustino; Cavalle, Laura; Huarte, Alicia</p> <p>2018-03-26</p> <p>In the last decade numerous hospitals have started to work with patients who are candidates for a cochlear implant (CI) and there have been numerous and relevant advances in the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss that extended the indications for cochlear implants. To provide a <span class="hlt">guideline</span> on cochlear implants to specialists in otorhinolaryngology, other medical specialities, health authorities and society in general. The Scientific Committees of Otology, Otoneurology and Audiology from the Spanish Society of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery (SEORL-CCC), in a coordinated and agreed way, performed a review of the <span class="hlt">current</span> state of CI based on the existing regulations and in the scientific publications referenced in the bibliography of the document drafted. The clinical <span class="hlt">guideline</span> on cochlear implants provides information on: a) Definition and description of Cochlear Implant; b) Indications for cochlear implants; c) Organizational requirements for a cochlear implant programme. A clinical <span class="hlt">guideline</span> on cochlear implants has been developed by a Committee of Experts of the SEORL-CCC, to help and guide all the health professionals involved in this field of CI in decision-making to treathearing impairment. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11898959','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11898959"><span>Cholesterol treatment <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> update.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Safeer, Richard S; Ugalat, Prabha S</p> <p>2002-03-01</p> <p>Hypercholesterolemia is one of the major contributors to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease in our society. The National Cholesterol Education Program of the National Institutes of Health has created a set of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> that standardize the clinical assessment and management of hypercholesterolemia for practicing physicians and other professionals in the medical community. In May 2001, the National Cholesterol Education Program released its third set of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, reflecting changes in cholesterol management since their previous report in 1993. In addition to modifying <span class="hlt">current</span> strategies of risk assessment, the new <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> stress the importance of an aggressive therapeutic approach in the management of hypercholesterolemia. The major risk factors that modify low-density lipoprotein goals include age, smoking status, hypertension, high-density lipoprotein levels, and family history. The concept of "CHD equivalent" is introduced-conditions requiring the same vigilance used in patients with coronary heart disease. Patients with diabetes and those with a 10-year cardiac event risk of 20 percent or greater are considered CHD equivalents. Once low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is at an accepted level, physicians are advised to address the metabolic syndrome and hypertriglyceridemia.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cow&pg=4&id=EJ842102','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cow&pg=4&id=EJ842102"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> University International Student Finances</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Marginson, Simon; Nyland, Chris; Ramia, Gaby; Sawir, Erlenawati</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The omission of international students from the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Vice-Chancellor's Committee (AVCC) 2007 national study on student finances is indicative of a pattern of exclusion. The exclusion is unacceptable from a humane perspective and feeds the belief that <span class="hlt">Australians</span> perceive international students primarily as "cash cows". This study…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25443866','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25443866"><span>[Preoperative fasting <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>: an update].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>López Muñoz, A C; Busto Aguirreurreta, N; Tomás Braulio, J</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Anesthesiology societies have issued various <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on preoperative fasting since 1990, not only to decrease the incidence of lung aspiration and anesthetic morbidity, but also to increase patient comfort prior to anesthesia. Some of these societies have been updating their <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, as such that, since 2010, we now have 2 evidence-based preoperative fasting <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> available. In this article, an attempt is made to review these updated <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, as well as the <span class="hlt">current</span> instructions for more controversial patients such as infants, the obese, and a particular type of ophthalmic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25103462','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25103462"><span>Application of clinical techniques relevant for glaucoma assessment by optometrists: concordance with <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jamous, Khalid F; Kalloniatis, Michael; Hayen, Andrew; Mitchell, Paul; Stapleton, Fiona J; Zangerl, Barbara</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for the screening, prognosis, diagnosis, management and prevention of glaucoma were released by the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> National Health and Medical Research Council in 2010. Comparable guidance has been made available by respective bodies in the USA and UK at a similar time. Key to successful translation of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> into clinical practice includes clinicians having the necessary skills to perform required tests. Optometrists in Australia and New Zealand were invited to participate in an online survey exploring these aspects. The results provide insights for improving glaucoma diagnosis and management by optometric primary eye care practitioners. An online questionnaire was developed to investigate glaucoma assessment of optometrists as a function of demographic details, educational background and experience. Key points to ascertain compliance with <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were the availability of equipment, procedural confidence in techniques, and preferences in visual field tests. Chi square statistics was employed to support similarity to national averages and highlight differences between the two countries. Multivariate linear regression analysis identified variables significantly associated with individual tests being available to optometrists and their confidence in applying them. Thirteen per cent of all <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and 36% of the New Zealand optometrists responded to the survey in 2013, which reflected the demographics/geography of the practising populations. Techniques considered essential or preferred for glaucoma assessment were widely available in both countries with the exception of gonioscopy and pachymetry. After correcting for availability, regression models highlighted therapeutic endorsement and knowledge of glaucoma <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> as the main variables to maintain high diagnostic confidence. Correlations to number of years in optometric practice mirrored a changed emphasis in teaching and technology over the past 10-15 years. <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and New Zealand</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10139372','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10139372"><span>Practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Cookbook medicine.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Harding, J</p> <p>1994-08-01</p> <p>A large measure of the confusion and doubt <span class="hlt">currently</span> being sowed in the ongoing debate over the advisability and effectiveness of practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> is a matter of terminology. In deference to the wishes and fears of physicians, the term "requirements" is not used. But requirements they are. Their quality and the degree to which they are useful will depend on their level of detail and the degree to which they are based on positive outcomes. Regardless, attorneys and others will always view and use them as requirements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19283249','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19283249"><span>Post-traumatic stress disorder--best practice GP <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Forbes, David; Wolfgang, Bronwyn; Cooper, John; Creamer, Mark; Barton, David</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>Approximately 50-65% of <span class="hlt">Australians</span> are exposed to a traumatic event during their lifetime. Approximately 250 000 <span class="hlt">Australians</span> suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at any given time, making it one of the most common anxiety disorders. In May 2007, the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the treatment of adults with acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder was published. In order to facilitate translation of evidence regarding PTSD into busy clinical practice, and particularly for general practitioners, a more succinct version of the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> has been developed. This article describes a brief algorithm based on the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and outlines key recommendations. General practitioners are often the first point of contact with the health care system for someone who has experienced a traumatic event. Patients experiencing trauma within the past 2 weeks require psychological first aid, and monitoring and assessment for the development of acute stress disorder and symptoms of PTSD. If the patient wishes to talk about the event with you, support them in doing so. However, it is important not to push those who prefer not to talk about the event. Trauma focused psychological treatment is the first line of treatment for PTSD, although antidepressant medication may have an adjuvant role in some patients or in those with comorbidities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Peacock&pg=2&id=ED499154','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Peacock&pg=2&id=ED499154"><span>Re-Imagining Science Education: Engaging Students in Science for Australia's Future. <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Education Review 51</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tytler, Russell</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Australian</span> Education Review (AER) 51 elaborates on issues raised by the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Council for Educational Research (ACER) Research Conference 2006: "Boosting Science Learning--What Will It Take?" It challenges <span class="hlt">current</span> orthodoxies in science education and proposes a re-imagining that charts new directions for science teaching and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED579365.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED579365.pdf"><span>E-Learning Instructional Design Practice in American and <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Institutions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sadeghi, Sayed Hadi</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>This research study provides a comparative understanding of instructional design e-practice in an <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and an American university. This comparative study identifies information relating to the <span class="hlt">current</span> status of instructional design e-practice that will be of assistance to <span class="hlt">Australian</span> universities to improve their existing online programs. The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=accounting+AND+professional&pg=3&id=EJ1108136','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=accounting+AND+professional&pg=3&id=EJ1108136"><span>Accounting Students' Feedback on Feedback in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Universities: They're Less than Impressed</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Watty, Kim; de Lange, Paul; Carr, Rodney; O'Connell, Brendan; Howieson, Bryan; Jacobsen, Ben</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Undergraduate accounting students in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> universities are dissatisfied with the feedback that they <span class="hlt">currently</span> receive. Recent evidence from the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ, a national survey of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> university graduates) suggests that the accounting discipline ranks poorly on assessment feedback when compared to other…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=aboriginal+AND+australians&pg=3&id=EJ808883','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=aboriginal+AND+australians&pg=3&id=EJ808883"><span>Non-Standard Assessment Practices in the Evaluation of Communication in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Aboriginal Children</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gould, Judith</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Australian</span> Aboriginal children typically receive communication assessment services from Standard <span class="hlt">Australian</span> English (SAE) speaking non-Aboriginal speech-language pathologists (SLPs). Educational assessments, including intelligence testing, are also primarily conducted by non-Aboriginal educational professionals. While the <span class="hlt">current</span> paper will show…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=mass+AND+media+AND+effects+AND+teenagers&pg=3&id=EJ642887','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=mass+AND+media+AND+effects+AND+teenagers&pg=3&id=EJ642887"><span>Teenagers and the Fragmenting Media Environment in Asia: An <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Pilot Study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sternberg, Jason; George, Christina; Green, Joshua</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Presents preliminary results from a survey of 15- to 17-year-old <span class="hlt">Australians</span>, exploring television's place within a rapidly expanding multimedia environment. Finds strong evidence for arguing that <span class="hlt">Australian</span> youth's media use is <span class="hlt">currently</span> in a state of flux. Lays foundations for more comprehensive studies of youth media use in Australia that might…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24372749','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24372749"><span>National survey of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> paediatricians' approach to infant crying.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rimer, Romi; Hiscock, Harriet</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Persistent crying in infancy (i.e. crying that lasts for more than 3 h a day for more than 3 days per week for at least 3 weeks) is widespread. Although there is no gold standard approach to its management, <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> exist with common management principles. This study aims to document how <span class="hlt">Australian</span> general paediatricians (i) assess and manage persistent crying compared with published <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>; (ii) screen for and manage associated post-natal depression; and (iii) rate their training in this area. Online survey were administered to all 394 members of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Paediatric Research Network in November 2011 to February 2012. Members are predominantly general paediatricians. A total of 168 paediatricians (45%) responded. The majority (n = 96 (69%)) take one session to assess infant crying and at least two sessions to manage it (n = 106 (79%)). Specific approaches are not always evidence based (e.g. use of antacids/simethicone by 8%) and do not follow available <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Most paediatricians routinely asked about maternal (n = 120 (88%)) but not paternal (n = 51 (33%)) mental health. Paediatricians typically received training around this issue before rather than after gaining formal paediatric qualifications (61% vs. 37%, respectively) and rate their training as satisfactory (67%). Despite this, only 39% feel very confident in managing infant crying. The lack of a gold standard approach to managing persistent infant crying has likely contributed to a lack of uniform care among <span class="hlt">Australian</span> general paediatricians. Given that most paediatricians do not feel very confident in dealing with this problem, there is a scope for further training supported by evidence-based <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28403751','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28403751"><span>Management of dengue in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> travellers: a retrospective multicentre analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tai, Alex Yc; McGuinness, Sarah L; Robosa, Roselle; Turner, David; Huang, G Khai Lin; Leder, Karin; Korman, Tony M; Thevarajan, Irani; Stewardson, Andrew J; Padiglione, Alexander A; Johnson, Douglas F</p> <p>2017-04-17</p> <p>To describe the epidemiology, clinical and laboratory features and outcomes of dengue in returned <span class="hlt">Australian</span> travellers, applying the revised WHO dengue classification (2009) to this population. Retrospective case series analysis of confirmed dengue cases hospitalised at one of four <span class="hlt">Australian</span> tertiary hospitals, January 2012 - May 2015. Clinical features, laboratory findings and outcomes of patients with dengue; dengue classification according to 2009 WHO <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. 208 hospitalised patients (median age, 32 years; range, 4-76 years) were included in the study. Dengue was most frequently acquired in Indonesia (94 patients, 45%) and Thailand (40, 19%). The most common clinical features were fever (98% of patients) and headache (76%). 84 patients (40%) met the WHO criteria for dengue with warning signs, and one the criteria for severe dengue; the most common warning signs were mucosal bleeding (44 patients, 21%) and abdominal pain (43, 21%). Leukopenia (176 patients, 85%), thrombocytopenia (133, 64%), and elevated liver enzyme levels (154, 76%) were the most common laboratory findings. 46 patients (22%) had serological evidence of previous exposure to dengue virus. WHO <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were documented as a management benchmark in ten cases (5%); 46 patients (22%) received non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). A significant proportion of returning <span class="hlt">Australian</span> travellers hospitalised for dengue have unrecognised warning signs of severe disease. Many received NSAIDs, which can increase the risk of haemorrhage in dengue. As travel to Asia from Australia continues to increase, it is vital for averting serious outcomes that clinicians can recognise and manage dengue.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24252427','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24252427"><span>Intention to use sport concussion <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> among community-level coaches and sports trainers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Newton, Joshua D; White, Peta E; Ewing, Michael T; Makdissi, Michael; Davis, Gavin A; Donaldson, Alex; Sullivan, S John; Seward, Hugh; Finch, Caroline F</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Sporting bodies have developed <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for managing community-level players with suspected concussion in response to international consensus statements on concussion in sport. The purpose of this study was to examine the factors that influence the intended use of concussion <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> among community-level coaches and sports trainers from two popular football codes in Australia: <span class="hlt">Australian</span> football and rugby league. Cross-sectional survey. The survey, based on an extended theory of planned behaviour model, was completed by 183 <span class="hlt">Australian</span> football coaches, 121 <span class="hlt">Australian</span> football sports trainers, 171 rugby league coaches, and 142 rugby league sports trainers. Personal norms and self-efficacy were significant predictors of intention to use concussion <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, although the relationship between self-efficacy and intention was stronger among <span class="hlt">Australian</span> football coaches than rugby league coaches. Analysis of the salient beliefs that underpin self-efficacy found that coaches, irrespective of football code, felt less familiar (χ(2)=25.70, p<0.001) and less experienced (χ(2)=31.56, p<0.001) than sports trainers in using the concussion <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. At the same time, <span class="hlt">Australian</span> football personnel, irrespective of their team role, felt that they had insufficient time (χ(2)=8.04, p<0.01) and resources (χ(2)=12.31, p<0.001) to implement the concussion <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> relative to rugby league personnel. Programmes aimed at increasing the intended use of sport concussion <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> should focus on enhancing self-efficacy and leveraging personal norms. Increasing coaches' familiarity and experience in using the concussion <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> would also be warranted, as would finding ways to overcome the perceived time and resource constraints identified among <span class="hlt">Australian</span> football personnel. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5010117','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5010117"><span>Pregnancy and lactation advice: How does <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Product Information compare with established information resources?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hotham, Elizabeth; Hotham, Neil</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background Product information is a popular medicines information resource; however, there is some evidence that its pregnancy and lactation information is overconservative, which can lead to inadequate treatment of pregnant and lactating women. Methods A thorough analysis of pregnancy and lactation information within <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Product Information and Consumer Medicines Information was performed. The statements within these resources were compared with established clinical resources: <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Medicines Handbook, Therapeutic <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>, South <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Perinatal Practice <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>, Organization of Teratology Information Specialists, LactMed, Motherisk and the Pregnancy and Breastfeeding Medicines Guide published by the Royal Women’s Hospital Melbourne. Results Product Information was found to be the most cautious resource, with 44.5% of pregnancy recommendations and 69% of lactation recommendations reviewed being more conservative than other resources. Conclusion Product Information is an imperfect and often overconservative reference for pregnant and lactating women. Health professionals are urged to review established clinical resources to inform decision making. PMID:27630750</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19062768','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19062768"><span>An evaluation of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Rotavirus Surveillance Program.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Roberts-Witteveen, April R; Patel, Mahomed S; Roche, Paul W</p> <p>2008-09-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Rotavirus Serotyping Program (ARSP) serotypes rotavirus isolates obtained from stool samples sent from <span class="hlt">Australian</span> laboratories. In collaboration with ARSP the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Government Department of Health and Ageing evaluated the program for its utility and capacity to monitor effectiveness of the rotavirus vaccines recently introduced into the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> National Immunisation Program. The system was described using ARSP annual reports and staff interviews. The attributes of the system were assessed by adapting standard <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for evaluating a surveillance system. Email surveys or face to face interviews were conducted with staff of ARSP, participating laboratories, rotavirus vaccine manufacturing companies and representatives of the Communicable Diseases Network Australia. The ability of the ARSP to monitor changes in rotavirus serotype epidemiology was assessed. ARSP serotypes rotavirus isolates received from participating laboratories at least bi-annually, with results being reported at least as often. Serotype analyses have informed formulation of rotavirus vaccines and contributed to forecasting the extent of outbreaks caused by novel serotypes. The ARSP will be able to monitor changes in rotavirus serotype epidemiology and identify probable vaccination failures. Enhancement of the representativeness and sensitivity of the system are needed for the data to remain useful in the public health context. Methods for transferring data between the program and state and territory health departments need to be developed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3078090','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3078090"><span>Farming fit? Dispelling the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> agrarian myth</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Background Rural <span class="hlt">Australians</span> face a higher mental health and lifestyle disease burden (obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease) than their urban counterparts. Our ongoing research reveals that the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> farming community has even poorer physical and mental health outcomes than rural averages. In particular, farm men and women have high rates of overweightness, obesity, abdominal adiposity, high blood pressure and psychological distress when compared against <span class="hlt">Australian</span> averages. Within our farming cohort we observed a significant association between psychological distress and obesity, abdominal adiposity and body fat percentage in the farming population. Presentation of hypothesis This paper presents a hypothesis based on preliminary data obtained from an ongoing study that could potentially explain the complex correlation between obesity, psychological distress and physical activity among a farming population. We posit that spasmodic physical activity, changing farm practices and climate variability induce prolonged stress in farmers. This increases systemic cortisol that, in turn, promotes abdominal adiposity and weight gain. Testing the hypothesis The hypothesis will be tested by anthropometric, biochemical and psychological analysis matched against systemic cortisol levels and the physical activity of the subjects. Implications of the hypothesis tested Previous studies indicate that farming populations have elevated rates of psychological distress and high rates of suicide. <span class="hlt">Australian</span> farmers have recently experienced challenging climatic conditions including prolonged drought, floods and cyclones. Through our interactions and through the media it is not uncommon for farmers to describe the effect of this long-term stress with feelings of 'defeat'. By gaining a greater understanding of the role cortisol and physical activity have on mental and physical health we may positively impact the <span class="hlt">current</span> rates of psychological distress in farmers. Trial</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=IT+AND+governance+AND+frameworks&pg=3&id=EJ1080155','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=IT+AND+governance+AND+frameworks&pg=3&id=EJ1080155"><span>Internal Audit: Does it Enhance Governance in the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Public University Sector?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Christopher, Joe</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This study seeks to confirm if internal audit, a corporate control process, is functioning effectively in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> public universities. The study draws on agency theory, published literature and best-practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> to develop an internal audit evaluation framework. A survey instrument is thereafter developed from the framework and used as a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=ia&pg=6&id=EJ836575','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=ia&pg=6&id=EJ836575"><span>The Use of Supporting Documentation for Information Architecture by <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Libraries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hider, Philip; Burford, Sally; Ferguson, Stuart</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This article reports the results of an online survey that examined the development of information architecture of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> library Web sites with reference to documented methods and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. A broad sample of library Web managers responded from across the academic, public, and special sectors. A majority of libraries used either in-house or…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=sustainability+AND+policy&pg=6&id=EJ1088669','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=sustainability+AND+policy&pg=6&id=EJ1088669"><span>School Policies on Bullying and Cyberbullying: Perspectives across Three <span class="hlt">Australian</span> States</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chalmers, Caitlin; Campbell, Marilyn Anne; Spears, Barbara A; Butler, Des; Cross, Donna; Slee, Phillip; Kift, Sally</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background: Despite decades of research, bullying in all its forms is still a significant problem within schools in Australia, as it is internationally. Anti-bullying policies and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are thought to be one strategy as part of a whole school approach to reduce bullying. However, although <span class="hlt">Australian</span> schools are required to have these…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=importance+AND+use+AND+ICT+AND+education&pg=5&id=EJ919515','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=importance+AND+use+AND+ICT+AND+education&pg=5&id=EJ919515"><span>The Intersections of Curriculum Development: Music, ICT and <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Music Education</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Southcott, Jane; Crawford, Renee</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Recently, in Australia both the "National Review of School Music Education" and "The <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Curriculum" identify the importance of technology in school music education. However, the understanding of music technology, as demonstrated by state and territory curricular <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, is limited with technology mostly recognised…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25891996','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25891996"><span>Misguided <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for managing labor.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cohen, Wayne R; Friedman, Emanuel A</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>In a recent review we expressed concerns about new <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the assessment and management of labor recommended jointly by the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM). These <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are based heavily on a new concept of how cervical dilatation and fetal descent progress, derived from the work of Zhang et al. In their Viewpoint article they have addressed, but not allayed, the concerns we described in our review. We assert that the dilatation curve promulgated by Zhang et al cannot be reconciled with direct clinical observation. Even if they were correct, however, it still does not follow that the ACOG/SMFM <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> should recommend replacing the coherent system of identifying and managing labor aberrations described by Friedman. That system is grounded in well-established clinical principles based on decades of use and the objectively documented association of some labor abnormalities with poor fetal and maternal outcomes. Recommendations for new clinical management protocols should require the demonstration of superior outcomes through extensive, preferably prospective, assessment. Using untested <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the management of labor may adversely affect women and children. Even if those <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were to reduce the <span class="hlt">currently</span> excessive cesarean delivery rate, the price of that benefit is likely to be a trade-off in harm to parturients and their offspring. The nature and degree of that harm needs to be documented before considering adoption of the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15467270','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15467270"><span>Impact of globalization under the ICH <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on the conduct of reproductive toxicity studies--report on <span class="hlt">current</span> status in Japan, Europe and the U.S. by questionnaire survey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mineshima, Hiroshi; Endo, Yoshihiko; Ogasawara, Hiroyuki; Nishigaki, Keiji; Numa, Toshiaki; Hirano, Fumiya; Matsuzawa, Toshiaki</p> <p>2004-08-01</p> <p>We surveyed interpretation of the ICH <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> concerning reproductive toxicology. Valid responses were obtained from Japan (JPN), Europe (EUR) and the U.S. The results obtained were compared to those at the time of a previous survey targeted at JPN facilities in 1995-1996 as well as compared among all three regions. Compared to the previous survey in Japan, the number of facilities performing toxicokinetics (TK) in rats has slightly increased. This result was considered to represent changes of attitude toward TK in reproductive toxicity studies. Differences in interpretation of the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> between JPN, EUR and the US were widely seen. Clear differences were noted in sperm examinations, postnatal tests, fetal examinations, some examinations for F1 animals after culling and TK. Researchers in the West seemed to be interpreting the ICH <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> more flexibly from the scientific point of view. JPN researchers appeared to interpret the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, including notes, as rigid requirements. Most of the parts which produced different interpretations were the notes in the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. The force of mention in the notes should be defined in the future. In addition, there were doubts about some parts, including notes, which had been found to have become unsuitable for the implementation of studies because of scientific progress or from long experience in using the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Therefore, updates of the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> may be needed in the future as well as the remedy of interpretation by JPN researchers. In JPN, the number of reproductive toxicity studies has decreased. The scanty experience in JPN therefore raises apprehension of appropriate selection and stagnating development of methodology, and might hinder the maintenance of the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. In the future, the cooperation of CROs as well as global collaboration will be essential not only to scientific developments of reproductive toxicology but also updates of the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24760732','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24760732"><span>Methodological quality of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in gastroenterology.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Malheiro, Rui; de Monteiro-Soares, Matilde; Hassan, Cesare; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are a common feature in modern endoscopy practice and they are being produced faster than ever. However, their methodological quality is rarely assessed. This study evaluated the methodological quality of <span class="hlt">current</span> clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in the field of gastroenterology, with an emphasis on endoscopy. Practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> published by the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG), American Gastroenterological Association (AGA), American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE), European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG), National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), and the Scottish Intercollegiate <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> Network (SIGN) were searched between September and October 2012 and evaluated using the AGREE II (Appraisal of <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Research and Evaluation) instrument (23 items, scores 1 - 7 for each item; higher scores mean better quality). A total of 100 <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were assessed. The mean number of items scoring 6 or 7 per <span class="hlt">guideline</span> was 9.2 (out of 23 items). Overall, 99 % of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> failed to include the target population in the development process, and 96 % did not report facilitators and barriers to <span class="hlt">guideline</span> application. In addition, 86 % did not include advice or tools, and 94 % did not present monitoring or auditing criteria. The global methodological quality of clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in the field of gastroenterology is poor, particularly regarding involvement of the target population in the development of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and in the provision of clear suggestions to practitioners. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3804874','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3804874"><span>A review of clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for lung cancer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ball, David; Silvestri, Gerard A.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are important evidence-based resources to guide complex clinical decision making. However, it is challenging for health professionals to keep abreast available <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and to know how and where to access relevant <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. This review examines <span class="hlt">currently</span> available <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for lung cancer published in the English language. Important key features are listed for each identified <span class="hlt">guideline</span>. The methodology, approaches to dissemination and implementation, and associated resources are summarised. General challenges in the area of <span class="hlt">guideline</span> development are highlighted. The potential to collaborate more widely across lung cancer <span class="hlt">guideline</span> developers by sharing literature searches and assessments is discussed. PMID:24163752</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26736078','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26736078"><span>Substance misuse in Aboriginal <span class="hlt">Australians</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gracey, M</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Australia's Aborigines lived in isolation from the rest of humanity as successful hunter-gatherers for tens of thousands of years. That isolation ended abruptly with British colonization in the late 18th century and was followed by a traumatic 200 years for Aborigines who are now seriously disadvantaged, socio-economically and in terms of their health standards. It has often been assumed that the Aborigines had no access to psychotropic substances before permanent European contact but several pieces of evidence dispute this view. The history of Aboriginal contact with and usage of intoxicating substances, including alcohol, is extremely complex and affected by a maze of restrictive government policies. These interact with a wide range of other Federal and State policies which have changed rapidly since the late 1960s when Aborigines were first granted the franchise; access to unrestricted drinking followed soon afterwards. Today Aborigines suffer disproportionately to other <span class="hlt">Australians</span> from the physical and social consequences of excess alcohol consumption, tobacco usage, petrol and other solvent sniffing, usage of marijuana, amphetamines, cocaine and heroin, as well as other drugs. The Aboriginal population is dispersed in cities, towns, fringe settlements, rural and remote areas over this vast continent and there are different patterns of drug usage from place to place. This review attempts to synthesize some of this information in order to give an overview to the history, background, <span class="hlt">current</span> status of substance misuse by Aborigines as well as some strategies being used to try to overcome this serious problem.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=architectural+AND+thesis&id=EJ1170027','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=architectural+AND+thesis&id=EJ1170027"><span>"Re-Casting Terra Nullius Design-Blindness": Better Teaching of Indigenous Knowledge and Protocols in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Architecture Education</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tucker, Richard; Choy, Darryl Low; Heyes, Scott; Revell, Grant; Jones, David</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>This paper reviews the <span class="hlt">current</span> status and focus of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Architecture programs with respect to Indigenous Knowledge and the extent to which these tertiary programs <span class="hlt">currently</span> address reconciliation and respect to Indigenous <span class="hlt">Australians</span> in relation to their professional institutions and accreditation policies. The paper draws upon the findings…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=unicorn&pg=5&id=EJ355432','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=unicorn&pg=5&id=EJ355432"><span>Evaluating the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Traineeship System.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ryan, R. J.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Describes the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Traineeship System (ATS), a program integrating formal education and employment designed to increase options for dropouts. Discusses problems involving the centrality of ATS's educational component and implementation of a program evaluation strategy. Includes two references. (MLH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29704027','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29704027"><span>Implementation of the Western <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Osteoporosis Model of Care: a fracture liaison service utilising emergency department information systems to identify patients with fragility fracture to improve <span class="hlt">current</span> practice and reduce re-fracture rates: a 12-month analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Inderjeeth, C A; Raymond, W D; Briggs, A M; Geelhoed, E; Oldham, D; Mountain, D</p> <p>2018-04-27</p> <p>Fracture liaison service linked to an emergency department database effectively identifies patients with OP, improves best practice care, reduces recurrent fractures, and improves quality of life (QoL). The next step is to establish cost-effectiveness. This should be seen as the standard model of care. The Western <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Osteoporosis Model of Care recommends implementation of a fracture liaison service (FLS) to manage patients with minimal trauma fractures (MTFs). This study evaluates the efficacy of a FLS linked to a tertiary hospital emergency department information system (EDIS) in reducing recurrent fractures. Patients aged ≥ 50 years with MTF identified from EDIS were invited to the FLS. Patient outcomes were compared to routine care (retrospective group-same hospital, and prospective group-other hospital) at 3- and 12-month follow-up. Two hundred forty-one of 376 (64.1%) eligible patients participated in the FLS with 12 months of follow-up. Absolute risk of recurrent MTF at 12 months was reduced by 9.2 and 10.2% compared with the prospective and retrospective controls, respectively. After age/sex adjustment, FLS participants had less MTF at 12 months vs. the retrospective controls, OR 0.38 (95%CI 0.18-0.79), but not the prospective controls, OR 0.40 (95%CI 0.16-1.01). FLS patients were more likely to receive the 'best practice' care, i.e. awareness of osteoporosis, investigations, and treatment (all p < 0.05). 'Fallers' (OR 0.48 (95%CI 0.24, 0.96)) and fall rates were lower in the FLS (p = 0.001) compared to the prospective control. FLS experienced the largest improvement in QoL from 3 to 12 months as measured by the EuroQoL 5-domain (EQ-5D) UK weighted score (+ 15 vs. - 11 vs. - 16%, p < 0.001) and EQ-5D Health State visual analogue scale (+ 29 vs. - 2 vs. + 1%, p < 0.001). Patients managed in a linked EDIS-FLS were more likely to receive the 'best practice' care and had lower recurrent MTF and improved QoL.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29768495','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29768495"><span>Pollen analysis of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> honey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sniderman, J M Kale; Matley, Kia A; Haberle, Simon G; Cantrill, David J</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>Pollen analysis is widely used to verify the geographic origin of honeys, but has never been employed in Australia. In this study, we analysed the pollen content of 173 unblended honey samples sourced from most of the commercial honey producing regions in southern Australia. Southern <span class="hlt">Australian</span> vegetation is dominated by Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) forests and, as expected, most <span class="hlt">Australian</span> honeys are palynologically dominated by Eucalyptus, while other important components include Myrtaceae taxa such as Corymbia/Angophora and the tribe Leptospermeae; plus Brassicaceae, Echium, Macadamia, and Acacia. An important feature of the honeys is the number of Myrtaceae pollen morphotypes per sample, which is generally high (mean = 4.6) compared to honeys produced outside of Australia, including Eucalyptus honeys produced in the Mediterranean region, and honeys produced in South America, which has its own rich indigenous Myrtaceae flora. In the latter regions, the number of Myrtaceae morphotypes is apparently generally ≤2. A high number of Myrtaceae morphotypes may be a feasible criterion for authenticating the origin of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> honeys, since most <span class="hlt">Australian</span> honey is produced by honey bees mainly working indigenous floral resources. Myrtaceae morphotype diversity is a convenient melissopalynological measure that could be applied even where detailed knowledge of the pollen morphology of the many component genera and species is absent. Palynological criteria developed in Europe for authenticating Eucalyptus honeys should not be relied upon for <span class="hlt">Australian</span> honeys, since those criteria are not based on samples of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> honey.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24054510','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24054510"><span>International CPR <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> - perspectives in CPR.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nolan, Jerry P</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) co-ordinates regular reviews of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) science and publishes consensus on science statements and treatment recommendations. These outputs are used by international resuscitation organisations to generate clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. This review will outline the history behind the development of international CPR <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and will provide a detailed description of the <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">guideline</span> generating process. A perspective is provided on the future of this process and the prospects for completely unified international CPR <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23489957','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23489957"><span>Enhancing the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> healthcare sector's responsiveness to environmental sustainability issues: suggestions from <span class="hlt">Australian</span> healthcare professionals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dunphy, Jillian L</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>Identify strategies to implement change across the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> healthcare sector to better support social and natural environments. Methods. Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews with <span class="hlt">Australian</span> healthcare professionals. Interviewees described multiple barriers to implementing change and numerous strategies to overcome these barriers. They argued that action must be taken at the individual and systemic levels to produce substantial and effective change. The strategies recommended fall into four main categories: altering workplace cultures and professional identities, community engagement, political activity, and change from within. The overarching goals of these strategies are to reduce negative impacts on the natural environment, and increase social equity within and across generations. By implementing the strategies described, a more cohesive effort to address sustainability issues across the sector can be made. This may improve local and global health, within <span class="hlt">current</span> and future generations. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC? Healthcare has a significant impact on the natural and social environments, which in turn have a significant impact upon health and healthcare. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD? This paper describes strategies to alter healthcare to better support environmental sustainability. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTITIONERS? Collective implementation of the described strategies may allow a more cohesive and effective response across the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> healthcare sector, to enhance local and global health for <span class="hlt">current</span> and future generations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Service+AND+reference&pg=2&id=EJ845180','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Service+AND+reference&pg=2&id=EJ845180"><span>Models of Reference Services in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Academic Libraries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Burke, Liz</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>This article reports on a project which was undertaken in 2006 to investigate the <span class="hlt">current</span> modes and methods for delivering reference services in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> academic libraries. The project included a literature review to assist in providing a definition of reference services as well as a snapshot of statistics showing staff and patron numbers from…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=transparency&pg=2&id=EJ1048495','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=transparency&pg=2&id=EJ1048495"><span>Transparency and Opacity: Levinasian Reflections on Accountability in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Schooling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sellar, Sam</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This article draws on the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas to consider, from an ethical perspective, the <span class="hlt">current</span> transparency and accountability agenda in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> schooling. It focuses on the case of the "My School" website and the argument that transparent publication of comparative performance data via the website provides a basis for…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=history+AND+quality&pg=2&id=EJ935160','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=history+AND+quality&pg=2&id=EJ935160"><span>Quality Assurance in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Higher Education: Historical and Future Development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shah, Mahsood; Nair, Sid; Wilson, Mark</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Higher education policies related to quality assurance are implemented in many countries. The purposes of such policies are to ensure the provision for high-quality education, university accountability and transparency in the use of public funding and meeting the needs of the diverse stakeholders. The <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Higher Education Quality…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Growing+AND+Asian+AND+Australia&id=EJ436370','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Growing+AND+Asian+AND+Australia&id=EJ436370"><span>Language Core Values in a Multicultural Setting: An <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Experience.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Smolicz, Jerzy J.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Reviews European Community and <span class="hlt">Australian</span> language policies. Considers cultural-economic interface in Australia with respect to <span class="hlt">current</span> interest in teaching Asian languages for trade purposes. Discusses Australia's growing acceptance of languages other than English and its affect on Aboriginal people. Urges the better utilization of the country's…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=strategic+AND+planning+AND+university+AND+university&pg=5&id=EJ1077595','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=strategic+AND+planning+AND+university+AND+university&pg=5&id=EJ1077595"><span>The Challenging <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Policy Context for University Engagement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Barker, Karen</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Despite the <span class="hlt">current</span> broad agreement amongst <span class="hlt">Australian</span> universities that engagement is now a core activity, the implications of that commitment are yet to be fully realised. The difficulties many universities face in articulating engagement as a strategic priority begin with the conceptual and definitional issues around the third mission and its…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22509879','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22509879"><span>Incidence of vitamin D deficiency rickets among <span class="hlt">Australian</span> children: an <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Paediatric Surveillance Unit study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Munns, Craig F; Simm, Peter J; Rodda, Christine P; Garnett, Sarah P; Zacharin, Margaret R; Ward, Leanne M; Geddes, Janet; Cherian, Sarah; Zurynski, Yvonne; Cowell, Christopher T</p> <p>2012-04-16</p> <p>To determine the incidence of and factors associated with vitamin D deficiency rickets in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> children. 18-month questionnaire-based prospective observational study, using <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Paediatric Surveillance Unit (APSU) data. <span class="hlt">Australian</span> paediatricians and child health workers, January 2006 - July 2007. Children aged ≤ 15 years with vitamin D deficiency rickets (25-hydroxyvitamin D [25OHD] ≤ 50 nmol/L, and elevated alkaline phosphatase levels [> 229 IU/L] and/or radiological rickets). Incidence of vitamin D deficiency rickets. Description of demographics, clinical presentation, identification and further analysis of overrepresented groups, and treatment regimens compared with best-practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. We identified 398 children with vitamin D deficiency (55% male; median age, 6.3 years [range, 0.2-15 years]). The overall incidence in children ≤ 15 years of age in Australia was 4.9/100 000/year. All had a low 25OHD level (median, 28 nmol/L [range, 5-50 nmol]) and an elevated alkaline phosphatase level (median, 407 IU/L [range, 229-5443 IU/L]), and 48 (12%) were hypocalcaemic. Ninety-five children had wrist x-rays, of whom 67 (71%) had rachitic changes. Most (98%) had dark or intermediate skin colour and 18% of girls were partially or completely veiled. Most children were born in Africa (252; 63%) and 75% of children were refugees. Duration of exclusive breastfeeding was inversely related to serum vitamin D levels in children < 3 years of age. Empirical vitamin D treatment was given to 4% of children before diagnosis. Vitamin D deficiency rickets is a significant problem in Australia among known high-risk groups. Public health campaigns to prevent, identify and tre@vitamin D deficiency, especially in high-risk groups, are essential.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26545328','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26545328"><span>[Elaboration and critical evaluation of clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>García Villar, C</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are documents to help professionals and patients select the best diagnostic or therapeutic option. Elaborating <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> requires an efficient literature search and a critical evaluation of the articles found to select the most appropriate ones. After that, the recommendations are formulated and then must be externally evaluated before they can be disseminated. Even when the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are very thorough and rigorous, it is important to know whether they fulfill all the methodological requisites before applying them. With this aim, various scales have been developed to critically appraise <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Of these, the AGREE II instrument is <span class="hlt">currently</span> the most widely used. This article explains the main steps in elaborating clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and the main aspects that should be analyzed to know whether the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are well written. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27844136','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27844136"><span>[ECS <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> 2016 - dyslipidaemias].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sinning, D; Landmesser, U</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Dyslipidaemia is a major cause of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and its progression towards clinical complications, such as acute coronary syndromes and stroke. In August 2016 the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) issued new joint <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the management of dyslipidaemias. In these new <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, the concept of treating patients to a risk-based low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol target is reinforced. The task force considers LDL cholesterol as the primary target for dyslipidaemia treatment, whereas high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is not recommended as a treatment target (based on the failure of HDL cholesterol elevation treatment strategies to reduce cardiovascular risk in recent studies). In patients with a very high risk for cardiovascular events it is recommended to treat to an LDL cholesterol target of less than 70 mg/dl. Moreover, the new <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> now additionally recommend a > 50% reduction of LDL cholesterol in patients with very high cardiovascular risk patients and baseline levels between 70 and 135 mg/dl as well as in patients with high cardiovascular risk and baseline LDL cholesterol levels between 100 and 200 mg/dl. Statins are recommended as first-line medicinal treatment and the LDL cholesterol goals given imply the more frequent use of maximum tolerated statin therapy, in particular for patients with very high cardiovascular risk. Treatment with ezetimibe in patients with substantially elevated LDL cholesterol levels despite maximum tolerated statin therapy has now received a stronger recommendation (<span class="hlt">currently</span> IIa recommendation). The <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> also now include the potential use of the novel proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors and a recent ESC/EAS consensus document provides more detailed information on which patients can be considered for treatment with PCSK9 inhibitors, i. e. in particular patients with familial</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24679179','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24679179"><span>Development of clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hollon, Steven D; Areán, Patricia A; Craske, Michelle G; Crawford, Kermit A; Kivlahan, Daniel R; Magnavita, Jeffrey J; Ollendick, Thomas H; Sexton, Thomas L; Spring, Bonnie; Bufka, Lynn F; Galper, Daniel I; Kurtzman, Howard</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> (CPGs) are intended to improve mental, behavioral, and physical health by promoting clinical practices that are based on the best available evidence. The American Psychological Association (APA) is committed to generating patient-focused CPGs that are scientifically sound, clinically useful, and informative for psychologists, other health professionals, training programs, policy makers, and the public. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2011 standards for generating CPGs represent <span class="hlt">current</span> best practices in the field. These standards involve multidisciplinary <span class="hlt">guideline</span> development panels charged with generating recommendations based on comprehensive systematic reviews of the evidence. The IOM standards will guide the APA as it generates CPGs that can be used to inform the general public and the practice community regarding the benefits and harms of various treatment options. CPG recommendations are advisory rather than compulsory. When used appropriately, high-quality <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> can facilitate shared decision making and identify gaps in knowledge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27523783','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27523783"><span>Prevalence and socio-economic distribution of eating, physical activity and sedentary behaviour among South <span class="hlt">Australian</span> children in urban and rural communities: baseline findings from the OPAL evaluation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bell, L; Ullah, S; Olds, T; Magarey, A; Leslie, E; Jones, M; Miller, M; Cobiac, L</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>To identify <span class="hlt">current</span> prevalence and sociodemographic distribution of adherence to national diet and physical activity and sedentary behaviour <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> among <span class="hlt">Australian</span> primary school children. Cross-sectional survey of children (n = 4637, 9-11 years) participating at baseline in the South <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle (OPAL) programme evaluation. Self-reported diet, physical activity (PA) and screen time (ST) behaviours were assessed via questionnaire. Children were classified as meeting or not meeting each <span class="hlt">guideline</span> (two or more serves of fruit, five or more serves of vegetables, two or less serves of discretionary food, ≥60 min of PA, and ≤2 h of ST per day). Although 65% of children met fruit recommendations, only 22% met vegetable recommendations (17% consumed no vegetables). Approximately one-quarter (28%) of children met discretionary food recommendations. Only 17% of children met the ST recommendations and 33% met PA recommendations. Less than 1% of children met all five recommendations. Rural children were more likely to meet both PA (OR = 1.45, 95% CI: 1.21-1.74, P < 0.001) and ST (OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.14-1.66, P < 0.01) recommendations than urban counterparts. Children at least socio-economic disadvantage performed better than those at greatest disadvantage for most behaviours. Improvement in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> children's diet and physical activity and sedentary behaviours, particularly urban children and those at greatest socio-economic disadvantage, is urgently warranted. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. All rights reserved.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21118785','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21118785"><span><span class="hlt">Current</span> assessment of the effects of environmental chemicals on the mammary gland in <span class="hlt">guideline</span> rodent studies by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and National Toxicology Program (NTP).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Makris, Susan L</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>Evaluation of the structural and/or functional integrity of the mammary gland (MG) across life stages is integral to the assessment of developmental, reproductive, and carcinogenic risk for environmental chemicals. In this commentary I characterize MG assessment recommended in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, and National Toxicology Program <span class="hlt">guideline</span> toxicology study protocols and identify any information gaps for the evaluation of MG development, structure, and function. Several data gaps, issues, and challenges were identified. <span class="hlt">Current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> that include a lactation phase do not provide specific recommendations to record observations on maternal or offspring lactation or nursing behavior. In <span class="hlt">guideline</span> studies, the assessment of MG toxicity often relies upon indirect, nonspecific, or surrogate end points, and information that could be useful in the interpretation of these data (e.g., mode of action or toxicokinetics) is often unavailable. Most <span class="hlt">guideline</span> studies designed to assess general organ toxicity do not expose test animals during sensitive stages of MG development; histopathological evaluation of the developing MG is not routinely conducted; and evaluation of MG tissue for both sexes is inconsistently recommended. I propose the following general recommendations to enhance MG assessment in <span class="hlt">guideline</span> toxicology studies: a) inclusion of more specific criteria for the evaluation of MG end points in <span class="hlt">guideline</span> language, b) inclusion of histopathological evaluation of MG development (using whole-mount techniques) in existing or new <span class="hlt">guideline</span> protocols that include offspring with perinatal and/or pubertal treatment, c) incorporation of perinatal exposures into rodent subchronic and carcinogenicity assays, and d) expansion of the histopathological evaluation of male MG tissue.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3237339','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3237339"><span><span class="hlt">Current</span> Assessment of the Effects of Environmental Chemicals on the Mammary Gland in <span class="hlt">Guideline</span> Rodent Studies by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and National Toxicology Program (NTP)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background: Evaluation of the structural and/or functional integrity of the mammary gland (MG) across life stages is integral to the assessment of developmental, reproductive, and carcinogenic risk for environmental chemicals. Objectives: In this commentary I characterize MG assessment recommended in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, and National Toxicology Program <span class="hlt">guideline</span> toxicology study protocols and identify any information gaps for the evaluation of MG development, structure, and function. Discussion: Several data gaps, issues, and challenges were identified. <span class="hlt">Current</span> <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> that include a lactation phase do not provide specific recommendations to record observations on maternal or offspring lactation or nursing behavior. In <span class="hlt">guideline</span> studies, the assessment of MG toxicity often relies upon indirect, nonspecific, or surrogate end points, and information that could be useful in the interpretation of these data (e.g., mode of action or toxicokinetics) is often unavailable. Most <span class="hlt">guideline</span> studies designed to assess general organ toxicity do not expose test animals during sensitive stages of MG development; histopathological evaluation of the developing MG is not routinely conducted; and evaluation of MG tissue for both sexes is inconsistently recommended. Conclusions: I propose the following general recommendations to enhance MG assessment in <span class="hlt">guideline</span> toxicology studies: a) inclusion of more specific criteria for the evaluation of MG end points in <span class="hlt">guideline</span> language, b) inclusion of histopathological evaluation of MG development (using whole-mount techniques) in existing or new <span class="hlt">guideline</span> protocols that include offspring with perinatal and/or pubertal treatment, c) incorporation of perinatal exposures into rodent subchronic and carcinogenicity assays, and d) expansion of the histopathological evaluation of male MG tissue. PMID:21118785</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14645952','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14645952"><span>The <span class="hlt">Australian</span> cigarette brand as product, person, and symbol.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Carter, S M</p> <p>2003-12-01</p> <p>To examine, for dominant <span class="hlt">Australian</span> cigarette brands, brand identity (overriding brand vision), brand positioning (brand identity elements communicated to the consumer), brand image (consumers' brand perceptions) and brand equity (financial value). Tobacco industry documents, articles from retail trade publications since 1990, and <span class="hlt">current</span> brand advertising from retail trade publications were searched for information about <span class="hlt">Australian</span> brands. Cigarette manufacturers benefit from their competitors' brand equity as well as their own. The industry sees <span class="hlt">Australian</span> smokers as far less brand loyal and strongly oriented to "low tar". A few predominantly local brands dominate the market, with variation by state. Successful <span class="hlt">Australian</span> brands exist in one of three categories: premium, mainstream, and supervalue. Their brand identity essence is as follows. Premium: quality. Mainstream: a good humoured "fair go" for ordinary <span class="hlt">Australians</span>. Supervalue: value for money. All supervalue brand identities also include freedom, escape, mildness, an aspirational attitude, blue tones, and waterside scenes. Brand image and brand identity is frequently congruent, even when marketing is restricted, and brand image is generally more positive for a smoker's own brand. Tobacco control activities have undermined cigarette brand equity. Further research is needed regarding brand loyalty, low tar, and brand categories. Smokers may respond more positively to tobacco control messages consistent with the identities of their chosen brand, and brand-as-organisation elements may assist. Further marketing restrictions should consider all elements of brand identity, and aim to undermine brand categories.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1766115','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1766115"><span>The <span class="hlt">Australian</span> cigarette brand as product, person, and symbol</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Carter, S</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Objective: To examine, for dominant <span class="hlt">Australian</span> cigarette brands, brand identity (overriding brand vision), brand positioning (brand identity elements communicated to the consumer), brand image (consumers' brand perceptions) and brand equity (financial value). Design: Tobacco industry documents, articles from retail trade publications since 1990, and <span class="hlt">current</span> brand advertising from retail trade publications were searched for information about <span class="hlt">Australian</span> brands. Results: Cigarette manufacturers benefit from their competitors' brand equity as well as their own. The industry sees <span class="hlt">Australian</span> smokers as far less brand loyal and strongly oriented to "low tar". A few predominantly local brands dominate the market, with variation by state. Successful <span class="hlt">Australian</span> brands exist in one of three categories: premium, mainstream, and supervalue. Their brand identity essence is as follows. Premium: quality. Mainstream: a good humoured "fair go" for ordinary <span class="hlt">Australians</span>. Supervalue: value for money. All supervalue brand identities also include freedom, escape, mildness, an aspirational attitude, blue tones, and waterside scenes. Brand image and brand identity is frequently congruent, even when marketing is restricted, and brand image is generally more positive for a smoker's own brand. Conclusions: Tobacco control activities have undermined cigarette brand equity. Further research is needed regarding brand loyalty, low tar, and brand categories. Smokers may respond more positively to tobacco control messages consistent with the identities of their chosen brand, and brand-as-organisation elements may assist. Further marketing restrictions should consider all elements of brand identity, and aim to undermine brand categories. PMID:14645952</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1560832','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1560832"><span>Semantic Clinical <span class="hlt">Guideline</span> Documents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Eriksson, Henrik; Tu, Samson W.; Musen, Mark</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Decision-support systems based on clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> can support physicians and other health-care personnel in the process of following best practice consistently. A knowledge-based approach to represent <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> makes it possible to encode computer-interpretable <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in a formal manner, perform consistency checks, and use the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> directly in decision-support systems. Decision-support authors and <span class="hlt">guideline</span> users require <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in human-readable formats in addition to computer-interpretable ones (e.g., for <span class="hlt">guideline</span> review and quality assurance). We propose a new document-oriented information architecture that combines knowledge-representation models with electronic and paper documents. The approach integrates decision-support modes with standard document formats to create a combined clinical-<span class="hlt">guideline</span> model that supports on-line viewing, printing, and decision support. PMID:16779037</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://health.gov/paguidelines/','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://health.gov/paguidelines/"><span>Physical Activity <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... use this site. health.gov Physical Activity <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> Physical Activity Physical activity is key to improving the health of the Nation. Based on the latest science, the Physical Activity <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Americans is an essential resource for ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Panic+AND+Disorder&pg=5&id=EJ650186','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Panic+AND+Disorder&pg=5&id=EJ650186"><span>Treatment for Panic Disorder: Practical <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Beamish, Patricia M.; Granello, Darcy Haag; Belcastro, Amy L.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>This article presents <span class="hlt">current</span> research information on the treatment of panic disorder. Specific <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are presented to guide the mental health counselor in the delivery of effective psychopharmacological and cognitive-behavioral treatment. (Contains 81 references.) (Author)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29902396','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29902396"><span>A nurse-led model at public academic hospitals maintains high adherence to colorectal cancer surveillance <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Symonds, Erin L; Simpson, Kalindra; Coats, Michelle; Chaplin, Angela; Saxty, Karen; Sandford, Jayne; Young Am, Graeme P; Cock, Charles; Fraser, Robert; Bampton, Peter A</p> <p>2018-06-18</p> <p>To examine the compliance of colorectal cancer surveillance decisions for individuals at greater risk with <span class="hlt">current</span> evidence-based <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and to determine whether compliance differs between surveillance models. Prospective auditing of compliance of surveillance decisions with evidence-based <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> (NHMRC) in two decision-making models: nurse coordinator-led decision making in public academic hospitals and physician-led decision making in private non-academic hospitals. Selected South <span class="hlt">Australian</span> hospitals participating in the Southern Co-operative Program for the Prevention of Colorectal Cancer (SCOOP). Proportions of recall recommendations that matched NHMRC <span class="hlt">guideline</span> recommendations (March-May 2015); numbers of surveillance colonoscopies undertaken more than 6 months ahead of schedule (January-December 2015); proportions of significant neoplasia findings during the 15 years of SCOOP operation (2000-2015). For the nurse-led/public academic hospital model, the recall interval recommendation following 398 of 410 colonoscopies (97%) with findings covered by NHMRC <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> corresponded to the <span class="hlt">guideline</span> recommendations; for the physician-led/private non-academic hospital model, this applied to 257 of 310 colonoscopies (83%) (P < 0.001). During 2015, 27% of colonoscopies in public academic hospitals (mean, 27 months; SD, 13 months) and 20% of those in private non-academic hospitals (mean, 23 months; SD, 12 months) were performed more than 6 months earlier than scheduled, in most cases because of patient-related factors (symptoms, faecal occult blood test results). The ratio of the numbers of high risk adenomas to cancers increased from 6.6:1 during 2001-2005 to 16:1 during 2011-2015. The nurse-led/public academic hospital model for decisions about colorectal cancer surveillance intervals achieves a high degree of compliance with <span class="hlt">guideline</span> recommendations, which should relieve burdening of colonoscopy resources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030020924','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030020924"><span>LEO Spacecraft Charging <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hillard, G. B.; Ferguson, D. C.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Over the past decade, Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) spacecraft have gradually required ever-increasing power levels. As a rule, this has been accomplished through the use of high voltage systems. Recent failures and anomalies on such spacecraft have been traced to various design practices and materials choices related to the high voltage solar arrays. NASA Glenn has studied these anomalies including plasma chamber testing on arrays similar to those that experienced difficulties on orbit. Many others in the community have been involved in a comprehensive effort to understand the problems and to develop practices to avoid them. The NASA Space Environments and Effects program, recognizing the timeliness of this effort, has commissioned and funded a design <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> document intended to capture the <span class="hlt">current</span> state of understanding. We present here an overview of this document, which is now nearing completion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20959345','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20959345"><span>Perceived barriers to <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in peritoneal dialysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Allen, Nathan; Schwartz, Daniel; Sood, Amy R; Mendelssohn, David; Verrelli, Mauro; Tanna, Gemini; Schiff, Jeff; Komenda, Paul; Rigatto, Claudio; Sood, Manish M</p> <p>2011-05-01</p> <p>Little is known regarding barriers to <span class="hlt">guideline</span> adherence in the nephrology community. We set out to identify perceived barriers to evidence-based medicine (EBM) and measurement of continuous quality indicators (CQI) in an international cohort of peritoneal dialysis (PD) practitioners. Subscribers to an online nephrology education site (Nephrology Now) were invited to participate in an online survey. Nephrology Now is a non-profit, monthly mailing list that highlights clinically relevant articles in nephrology. Four hundred and seventy-five physicians supplying PD care participated in an online survey assessing their use of EBM and CQI in their PD practice. Ordinal logistic regression was utilized to determine relationships between baseline characteristics and EBM and CQI practices. The majority of physicians were nephrologists (89.7%), and 50.4% worked in an academic centre. Respondents were from the following geographic regions: 13.5% Canadian, 24% American, 23.8% European, 4.4% <span class="hlt">Australian</span>, 5.3% South American, 10.7% African and 12.2% Asian. Adherence to PD clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were generally strong; however, lower adherence was associated with countries with lower healthcare expenditure, not using personal digital assistant (PDA), the longer the physician had been practising and smaller (< 20 patients per centre) PD practice. International variation in <span class="hlt">guideline</span> adherence may be influenced by a country's healthcare expenditure, physician's PDA use and experience, and size of PD practice which may impact future <span class="hlt">guideline</span> development and implementation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28670748','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28670748"><span>SOMANZ <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the investigation and management sepsis in pregnancy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bowyer, Lucy; Robinson, Helen L; Barrett, Helen; Crozier, Timothy M; Giles, Michelle; Idel, Irena; Lowe, Sandra; Lust, Karin; Marnoch, Catherine A; Morton, Mark R; Said, Joanne; Wong, Maggie; Makris, Angela</p> <p>2017-10-01</p> <p>SOMANZ (Society of Obstetric Medicine Australia and New Zealand) has written a <span class="hlt">guideline</span> to provide evidence-based guidance for the investigation and care of women with sepsis in pregnancy or the postpartum period. The <span class="hlt">guideline</span> is evidence-based and incorporates recent changes in the definition of sepsis. The etiology, investigation and treatment of bacterial, viral and non-infective causes of sepsis are discussed. Obstetric considerations relevant to anaesthetic and intensive care treatment in sepsis are also addressed. A multi-disciplinary group of clinicians with experience in all aspects of the care of pregnant women have contributed to the development of the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. This is an executive summary of the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. © 2017 The Royal <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5900819','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5900819"><span>A review of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> healthcare system: A policy perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sambasivan, Murali</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>This article seeks to review the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> healthcare system and compare it to similar systems in other countries to highlight the main issues and problems. A literature search for articles relating to the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and other developed countries’ healthcare systems was conducted by using Google and the library of Victoria University, Melbourne. Data from the websites of the Commonwealth of Australia, the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Institute of Health and Welfare, the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Productivity Commission, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and the World Bank have also been used. Although care within the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> healthcare system is among the best in the world, there is a need to change the paradigm <span class="hlt">currently</span> being used to measure the outcomes and allocate resources. The <span class="hlt">Australian</span> healthcare system is potentially dealing with two main problems: (a) resource allocation, and (b) performance and patient outcomes improvements. An interdisciplinary research approach in the areas of performance measurement, quality and patient outcomes improvement could be adopted to discover new insights, by using the policy implementation error/efficiency and bureaucratic capacity. Hospital managers, executives and healthcare management practitioners could use an interdisciplinary approach to design new performance measurement models, in which financial performance, quality, healthcare and patient outcomes are blended in, for resource allocation and performance improvement. This article recommends that public policy implementation error and the bureaucratic capacity models be applied to healthcare to optimise the outcomes for the healthcare system in Australia. In addition, it highlights the need for evaluation of the <span class="hlt">current</span> reimbursement method, freedom of choice to patients and a regular scrutiny of the appropriateness of care. PMID:29686869</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29686869','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29686869"><span>A review of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> healthcare system: A policy perspective.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dixit, Sunil K; Sambasivan, Murali</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>This article seeks to review the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> healthcare system and compare it to similar systems in other countries to highlight the main issues and problems. A literature search for articles relating to the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> and other developed countries' healthcare systems was conducted by using Google and the library of Victoria University, Melbourne. Data from the websites of the Commonwealth of Australia, the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Institute of Health and Welfare, the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Productivity Commission, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and the World Bank have also been used. Although care within the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> healthcare system is among the best in the world, there is a need to change the paradigm <span class="hlt">currently</span> being used to measure the outcomes and allocate resources. The <span class="hlt">Australian</span> healthcare system is potentially dealing with two main problems: (a) resource allocation, and (b) performance and patient outcomes improvements. An interdisciplinary research approach in the areas of performance measurement, quality and patient outcomes improvement could be adopted to discover new insights, by using the policy implementation error/efficiency and bureaucratic capacity. Hospital managers, executives and healthcare management practitioners could use an interdisciplinary approach to design new performance measurement models, in which financial performance, quality, healthcare and patient outcomes are blended in, for resource allocation and performance improvement. This article recommends that public policy implementation error and the bureaucratic capacity models be applied to healthcare to optimise the outcomes for the healthcare system in Australia. In addition, it highlights the need for evaluation of the <span class="hlt">current</span> reimbursement method, freedom of choice to patients and a regular scrutiny of the appropriateness of care.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED314047.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED314047.pdf"><span>National Bookmobile <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>, 1988.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ohio State Library, Columbus.</p> <p></p> <p>These <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were developed by the bookmobile community that has met in Columbus, Ohio, since 1985 for their annual conference. The <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> comprise the collaborative effort of hundreds of conference participants and representatives from 79 libraries throughout the United States and Canada, who discussed the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in regional and state…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22891001','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22891001"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> barnacles (Cirripedia: Thoracica), distributions and biogeographical affinities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jones, Diana S</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Currently</span>, 279 barnacle species are recognized in Australia waters. The barnacle fauna of tropical Australia exhibits high species diversity (221), with a high incidence of tropical species (87 Indo-west Pacific [IWP], 16 West Pacific and 65 Indo-Malayan), a low species endemicity (8), and 44 cosmopolitan and 1 Australasian species. Conversely, that of temperate Australia shows lower species diversity (129), with a lower incidence of tropical species (26 IWP, 10 West Pacific and 25 Indo-Malayan), higher species endemicity (23), 37 cosmopolitan, 6 Australasian species, and 3 Australasian/Antarctic species. Distributions corroborate the general patterns demonstrated by the shallow-water biota of northern tropical and southern temperate <span class="hlt">Australian</span> biogeographic provinces. Tropical and temperate provinces grade into each other in a broad overlap zone along both the western and eastern <span class="hlt">Australian</span> coasts. This overlap zone is essentially a transitional region, with the gradual replacement of a tropical barnacle fauna in the north by a predominantly temperate barnacle fauna in the south. Both western and eastern <span class="hlt">Australian</span> coasts are bounded by major poleward-flowing warm <span class="hlt">currents</span> that have considerable influence on the marine flora and fauna, distributing tropical species of many taxa much farther south than could be predicted by latitude. <span class="hlt">Currently</span>, 16 barnacle species introduced into <span class="hlt">Australian</span> waters are identified, although this number may increase in the future due to new port developments and increased shipping arrivals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29735356','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29735356"><span>Guaranteeing the quality and integrity of pork - An <span class="hlt">Australian</span> case study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Channon, H A; D'Souza, D N; Jarrett, R G; Lee, G S H; Watling, R J; Jolley, J Y C; Dunshea, F R</p> <p>2018-04-27</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Australian</span> pork industry is strongly committed to assuring the integrity of its product, with substantial research investment made over the past ten years to develop and implement systems to assure the consistency and quality of fresh pork and to enable accurate tracing of unpackaged fresh pork back to property of origin using trace elemental profiling. These initiatives are pivotal to allow <span class="hlt">Australian</span> pork of guaranteed eating quality to be successfully positioned as higher value products, across a range of international and domestic markets, whilst managing any threats of product substitution. This paper describes the <span class="hlt">current</span> status of the development of a predictive eating quality model for <span class="hlt">Australian</span> pork, utilizing eating quality datasets generated from recent <span class="hlt">Australian</span> studies. The implementation of trace elemental profiling, by Physi-Trace™, to verify and defend provenance claims and support the supply of consistently high eating quality <span class="hlt">Australian</span> pork to its customers, is also discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20170004633','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20170004633"><span><span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> and Suggestions for Balloon Gondola Design</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Franco, Hugo</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>This paper discusses the <span class="hlt">current</span> gondola design requirements for the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF). The CSBF is responsible for launching and supporting balloon borne scientific instruments and has some <span class="hlt">current</span> updated <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> that will be discussed in this presentation. As the sophistication of Payload systems have increased in size and complexity new <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> have been implemented in order to make these instruments stay within the acceptable launch risks. Additionally, there is a requirement to submit a proper stress analysis report that states the flight design requirements have been met. Suggestions are discussed in this presentation that establish the proper <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> to submit these.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26809451','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26809451"><span>The descriptive epidemiology of total physical activity, muscle-strengthening exercises and sedentary behaviour among <span class="hlt">Australian</span> adults--results from the National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bennie, Jason A; Pedisic, Zeljko; van Uffelen, Jannique G Z; Gale, Joanne; Banting, Lauren K; Vergeer, Ineke; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Bauman, Adrian E; Biddle, Stuart J H</p> <p>2016-01-25</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">current</span> Australia's Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> recommend that adults engage in regular moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) and strength training (ST), and minimise time spent in sedentary behaviours (SB). However, evidence about the specific individual and concurrent distribution of these behaviours in Australia is scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of MVPA, ST and SB in a national-representative sample of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> adults. Data were collected using face-to-face interviews, as part of the National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey 2011-12. The population-weighted proportions meeting the MVPA (≥ 150 min/week), ST (≥ 2 sessions/week) and combined MVPA-ST <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, and proportions classified as having 'low levels of SB' (< 480 min/day) were calculated, and their associations with selected sociodemographic and health-related variables were assessed using multiple logistic regression analyses. This was also done for those at potentially 'high-risk', defined as insufficient MVPA-ST and 'high-sedentary' behaviour. Out of 9345 participants (response rate = 77.0 %), aged 18-85 years, 52.6 % (95 % CI: 51.2 %-54.0 %), 18.6 % (95 % CI: 17.5 %-19.7 %) and 15.0 % (95 % CI: 13.9 %-16.1 %) met the MVPA, ST and combined MVPA-ST <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, respectively. Female gender, older age, low/medium education, poorer self-rated health, being classified as underweight or obese, and being a <span class="hlt">current</span> smoker were independently associated with lower odds of meeting the MVPA, ST and combined MVPA-ST <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. A total of 78.9 % (95 % CI: 77.9 %-80.0 %) were classified as having low levels of SB. Females, older adults and those with lower education were more likely to report lower levels of SB, whilst those with poor self-rated health and obese individuals were less likely to report lower levels of SB (i.e. SB = ≥ 480 min/day). A total of 8.9 % (95 % CI: 8.1 %-9</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25716142','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25716142"><span>Health literacy and the Internet: a study on the readability of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> online health information.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cheng, Christina; Dunn, Matthew</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>Almost 80% of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Internet users seek out health information online so the readability of this information is important. This study aimed to evaluate the readability of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> online health information and determine if it matches the average reading level of <span class="hlt">Australians</span>. Two hundred and fifty-one web pages with information on 12 common health conditions were identified across sectors. Readability was assessed by the Flesch-Kincaid (F-K), Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) and Flesch Reading Ease (FRE) formulas, with grade 8 adopted as the average <span class="hlt">Australian</span> reading level. The average reading grade measured by F-K and SMOG was 10.54 and 12.12 respectively. The mean FRE was 47.54, a 'difficult-to-read' score. Only 0.4% of web pages were written at or below grade 8 according to SMOG. Information on dementia was the most difficult to read overall, while obesity was the most difficult among government websites. The findings suggest that the readability of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> health websites is above the average <span class="hlt">Australian</span> levels of reading. A quantifiable <span class="hlt">guideline</span> is needed to ensure online health information accommodates the reading needs of the general public to effectively use the Internet as an enabler of health literacy. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Water+AND+turbine&pg=2&id=ED324446','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Water+AND+turbine&pg=2&id=ED324446"><span>Training for the Future. How Can Trainees Meet <span class="hlt">Current</span> and Future Needs of Industry? <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> and Models for the Development of Interdisciplinary Assignments Based on the Concept of Key Technologies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bolton, William; Clyde, Albert</p> <p></p> <p>This document provides <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the development of interdisciplinary assignments to help prepare learners for the developing needs of industry; it also contains a collection of model assignments produced by 12 British colleges. An introduction explains how to use the document and offers a checklist for the development of interdisciplinary…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3799569','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3799569"><span>An Evaluation of Web-Based Clinical Practice <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Managing Problems Associated with Cannabis Use</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Turner, Michael W; Rooke, Sally E; Langton, Julia M; Gates, Peter J</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background Cannabis is the most widely used illicit substance, and multiple treatment options and avenues exist for managing its use. There has been an increase in the development of clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> (CPGs) to improve standards of care in this area, many of which are disseminated online. However, little is known about the quality and accessibility of these online CPGs. Objective The purpose of study 1 was to determine the extent to which cannabis-related CPGs disseminated online adhere to established methodological standards. The purpose of study 2 was to determine if treatment providers are familiar with these <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and to assess their perceived quality of these <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Methods Study 1 involved a systematic search using the Google Scholar search engine and the National Drugs Sector Information Service (NDSIS) website of the Alcohol and Other Drugs Council of Australia (ADCA) to identify CPGs disseminated online. To be included in the <span class="hlt">current</span> study, CPGs needed to be free of charge and provide guidance on psychological interventions for reducing cannabis use. Four trained reviewers independently assessed the quality of the 7 identified <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> using the Appraisal of <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) tool. Study 2 assessed 166 <span class="hlt">Australian</span> cannabis-use treatment providers’ (mean age = 45.47 years, SD 12.14) familiarity with and opinions of these 7 <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> using an online survey. Treatment providers were recruited using online advertisements that directed volunteers to a link to complete the survey, which was posted online for 6 months (January to June 2012). Primary study outcomes included quality scores and rates of <span class="hlt">guideline</span> familiarity, <span class="hlt">guideline</span> use, and discovery methods. Results Based on the AGREE II, the quality of CPGs varied considerably. Across different reporting domains, adherence to methodological standards ranged from 0% to 92%. Quality was lowest in the domains of rigor of development (50%), applicability (46</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28592071','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28592071"><span>[Progress in methodological characteristics of clinical practice <span class="hlt">guideline</span> for osteoarthritis].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xing, D; Wang, B; Lin, J H</p> <p>2017-06-01</p> <p>At present, several clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the treatment of osteoarthritis have been developed by institutes or societies. The ultimate purpose of developing clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> is to formulate the process in the treatment of osteoarthritis effectively. However, the methodologies used in developing clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> may place an influence on the transformation and application of that in treating osteoarthritis. The present study summarized the methodological features of individual clinical practice <span class="hlt">guideline</span> and presented the tools for quality evaluation of clinical practice <span class="hlt">guideline</span>. The limitations of <span class="hlt">current</span> osteoarthritis <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> of China are also indicated. The review article might help relevant institutions improve the quality in developing guide and clinical transformation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28704139','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28704139"><span>Influencing Safety in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Agriculture and Fisheries.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McBain-Rigg, Kristin E; Franklin, Richard C; King, Jemma C; Lower, Tony</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Improving the health and safety of those working in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> agriculture and fishery industries is a recognized priority area for preventative activities. With <span class="hlt">Australian</span> agricultural industries being among the nation's most dangerous workplaces, there is a need for action. While there are <span class="hlt">currently</span> known solutions, their implementation is limited. Influential agents, i.e., people who can influence others, are important for helping engender action to enact solutions into practice. This study examines agents that influence safety behavior either negatively (barriers) or positively (facilitators), in the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> agriculture and fishery industries. Focus groups were conducted with producers and industry representatives. Thematic analysis identified barriers and facilitators to improve health and safety. These were assessed against the Socioecological Model, which considers the various, and often intersecting, human (intrapersonal, i.e. values and attitudes, peers, familial, and cultural) factors influencing safety behavior. Seven categories of human influences were identified: self, peers, family, intergenerational change, industry agents, government agents, and other. Peers (including direct managers) and family were seen to be direct influencers. Individuals signal to others that safety is valued and important. This is reinforced by experience, skill, attitudes, and behavior. Safety practice knowledge acquisition occurred via the family unit, specific training, industry, or knowledge transfer between industries. Government influence predominately focused on legislation and while the source of this influence is distant, it does influence behavior. There is a need to support comprehensive programs. These should include strengthening relationships via peer-to-peer networking, sharing information about safety initiatives, appropriate legislation, and enhancing leadership of all influencers with regard to safety.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20932202','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20932202"><span>Factors associated with dementia in Aboriginal <span class="hlt">Australians</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Smith, Kate; Flicker, Leon; Dwyer, Anna; Atkinson, David; Almeida, Osvaldo P; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; LoGiudice, Dina</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>Although the prevalence of dementia in remote living Aboriginal <span class="hlt">Australians</span> is one of the highest in the world, the factors associated with dementia in this population are yet to be examined. This study was designed to determine the demographic, lifestyle and clinical factors associated with dementia in Aboriginal <span class="hlt">Australians</span> living in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. A total of 363 Aboriginal <span class="hlt">Australians</span> aged over 45 years from the Kimberley region were selected by semi-purposeful sampling. The factors analysed for association with dementia were age, sex, education, smoking, chewing tobacco, alcohol, head injury, heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, previous stroke, epilepsy, falls, mobility, incontinence, urinary problems, vision and hearing. This exposure data was collected from participants' and informants' reports using the Kimberley Indigenous Cognitive Assessment and specialist review, and medical records. Factors associated with dementia included older age, male gender (OR 3.1, 95%CI 1.4, 6.8) and no formal education (OR 2.7, 95%CI 1.1, 6.7) and after adjusting for age, sex and education, dementia was associated with <span class="hlt">current</span> smoking (OR 4.5, 95%CI 1.1, 18.6), previous stroke (OR 17.9, 95%CI 5.9, 49.7), epilepsy (OR 33.5, 95%CI 4.8, 232.3), head injury (OR 4.0, 95%CI 1.7, 9.4), and poor mobility, incontinence and falls. Interventions aimed at better management or prevention of the modifiable factors identified could reduce dementia risk in Aboriginal populations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=bipolar+AND+disorder&pg=5&id=EJ696944','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=bipolar+AND+disorder&pg=5&id=EJ696944"><span>Treatment <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kowatch, Robert A.; Fristad, Mary; Birmaher, Boris; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Findling, Robert L.; Hellander, Martha</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Clinicians who treat children and adolescents with bipolar disorder desperately need <span class="hlt">current</span> treatment <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. These <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were developed by expert consensus and a review of the extant literature about the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric bipolar disorders. The four sections of these <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> include diagnosis, comorbidity, acute…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title5-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title5-vol3-sec1312-10.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title5-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title5-vol3-sec1312-10.pdf"><span>5 CFR 1312.10 - Systematic review <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Systematic review <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. 1312.10... Declassification of National Security Information § 1312.10 Systematic review <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. The EOP Security Officer will prepare and keep <span class="hlt">current</span> such <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> as are required by Executive Order 12958 for the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27515491','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27515491"><span>What are the similarities and differences in antimicrobial prescribing between <span class="hlt">Australian</span> public and private hospitals?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cotta, M O; Chen, C; Tacey, M; James, R S; Buising, K L; Marshall, C; Thursky, K A</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Identifying themes associated with inappropriate prescribing in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> public and private hospitals will help target future antimicrobial stewardship initiatives. To describe <span class="hlt">current</span> antimicrobial prescribing practices, identify similarities and differences between hospital sectors and provide target areas for improvement specific to each hospital sector. All hospitals included in the study were part of the 2014 national antimicrobial prescribing survey and conducted one of the following: a whole hospital point prevalence survey, serial point prevalence surveys or a sample of randomly selected patients. Data on the types of antibiotics used, their indications for use and the quality of prescription based on compliance with national and local prescribing <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were collected. Two hundred and two hospitals (166 public and 36 private) comprising 10 882 patients and 15 967 antimicrobial prescriptions were included. Public hospitals had higher proportions of prescriptions for treatment (81.5% vs 48.4%) and medical prophylaxis (8.8% and 4.6%), whilst private hospitals had significantly higher surgical prophylaxis use (9.6% vs 46.9%) (P < 0.001). In public hospitals, the main reasons for non-compliance of treatment prescriptions were spectrum being too broad (30.5%) while in private it was incorrect dosing. Prolonged duration was the main reason for non-compliance among surgical prophylaxis prescriptions in both types of hospitals. <span class="hlt">Australian</span> hospitals need to target specific areas to improve antimicrobial use. Specifically, unnecessary broad-spectrum therapy should be a priority area in public hospitals, whilst emphasis on curtailing antimicrobial overuse in surgical prophylaxis needs to be urgently addressed across in the private hospital sector. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28645230','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28645230"><span>Implementation in action: how <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Exercise Physiologists approach exercise prescription for people with mental illness.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stanton, Robert; Rosenbaum, Simon; Lederman, Oscar; Happell, Brenda</p> <p>2018-04-01</p> <p>Accredited Exercise Physiologists (AEPs) are trained to deliver exercise and physical activity interventions for people with chronic and complex health conditions including those with mental illness. However, their views on exercise for mental illness, their exercise prescription practices, and need for further training are unknown. To examine the way in which <span class="hlt">Australian</span> AEPs prescribe exercise for people with mental illness. Eighty-one AEPs (33.3 ± 10.4 years) completed an online version of the Exercise in Mental Illness Questionnaire. Findings are reported using descriptive statistics. AEPs report a high level of knowledge and confidence in prescribing exercise for people with mental illness. AEPs rate exercise to be at least of equal value to many established treatments for mental illness, and frequently prescribe exercise based on <span class="hlt">current</span> best-practice principles. A need for additional training was identified. The response rate was low (2.4%) making generalisations from the findings difficult. Exercise prescription practices utilised by AEPs are consistent with <span class="hlt">current</span> best-practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and there is frequent consultation with consumers to individualise exercise based on their preferences and available resources. Further training is deemed important.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Corporate+AND+governance&pg=4&id=EJ764289','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Corporate+AND+governance&pg=4&id=EJ764289"><span>Changing Patterns of Governance for <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Universities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Harman, Kay; Treadgold, Elaine</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Dissatisfaction with the "corporate" model for university governance, a model advocated by both sides of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> parliament and adopted by <span class="hlt">Australian</span> universities over the past two decades, prompted the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Vice-Chancellors' Committee (AVCC) in 2003 to suggest an alternative "trusteeship" model. The paper…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=aboriginal+AND+australians&pg=7&id=EJ1129100','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=aboriginal+AND+australians&pg=7&id=EJ1129100"><span>Embracing Babel: The "Framework for <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Languages"</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Troy, Jaky; Walsh, Michael</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) has been developing language-specific curricula for a range of languages in the "<span class="hlt">Australian</span> Curriculum: Language"s and has also undertaken development of a "Framework for <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Languages", to provide guidance for the development of curricula for specific…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015hae..book.2215N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015hae..book.2215N"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> Aboriginal Astronomy - An Overview</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Norris, Ray P.; Hamacher, Duane W.</p> <p></p> <p>The traditional cultures of Aboriginal <span class="hlt">Australians</span> include a significant astronomical component, perpetuated through oral tradition, ceremony, and art. This astronomical component includes a deep understanding of the motion of objects in the sky, and this knowledge was used for practical purposes such as constructing calendars. There is also evidence that traditional Aboriginal <span class="hlt">Australians</span> made careful records and measurements of cyclical phenomena, paid careful attention to unexpected phenomena such as eclipses and meteorite impacts, and could determine the cardinal points to an accuracy of a few degrees.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26149255','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26149255"><span>Unhealthy product sponsorship of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> national and state sports organisations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Macniven, Rona; Kelly, Bridget; King, Lesley</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Marketing of products harmful to the health of children has been found to be prolific, and occurs across multiple media platforms and in several settings, including organised sport, thus potentially undermining the health benefits inherent in sports participation. Through website audits, this study investigated the nature and extent of unhealthy food, beverage, alcohol and gambling sponsorship across peak <span class="hlt">Australian</span> sporting organisations. A structured survey tool identified and assessed sponsoring companies and products displayed on the websites of the 53 national and state/territory sport governing bodies in Australia receiving government funding. Identified products were categorised as healthy or unhealthy, based on criteria developed by health experts. There was a total of 413 websites operated by the 53 sports, with 1975 company or product sponsors identified. Overall, 39 sports had at least one unhealthy sponsor, and 10% of all sponsors were rated as unhealthy. Cricket had the highest percent of unhealthy sponsors (27%) and the highest number of unhealthy food and beverage sponsors (n=19). Rugby Union (n=16) and <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Football (n=4) had the highest numbers of alcohol and gambling sponsors respectively. Sponsorship of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> sport governing bodies by companies promoting unhealthy food and beverage, alcohol and gambling products is prevalent at the state/territory and national level. SO WHAT?: Regulatory <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> should be established to limit such sponsorship and ensure that it is not translated into promotions that may reach and influence children.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21144181','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21144181"><span>Emerging tropical diseases in Australia. Part 3. <span class="hlt">Australian</span> bat lyssavirus.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moore, P R; Jansen, C C; Graham, G C; Smith, I L; Craig, S B</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Since its discovery in a juvenile black flying fox (Pteropus alecto) in 1996, <span class="hlt">Australian</span> bat lyssavirus (ABLV) has become the cause of a potentially important emerging disease for health authorities in Australia, with two human deaths (one in 1996 and one in 1998) attributed to the virus in the north-eastern state of Queensland. In Australia, the virus has been isolated from all four species of flying fox found on the mainland (i.e. P. alecto, P. scapulatus, P. poliocephalus and P. conspicillatus) as well as a single species of insectivorous bat (Saccolaimus flaviventris). <span class="hlt">Australian</span> bat lyssavirus belongs to the Lyssavirus genus and is closely related, genetically, to the type strain of Rabies virus (RABV). Clinically, patients infected with ABLV have displayed the 'classical' symptoms of rabies and a similar disease course. This similarity has led to the belief that the infection and dissemination of ABLV in the body follows the same pathways as those followed by RABV. Following the two ABLV-related deaths in Queensland, protocols based on the World Health Organization's <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for RABV prophylaxis were implemented and, presumably in consequence, no human infection with ABLV has been recorded since 1998. ABLV will, however, probably always have an important part to play in the health of <span class="hlt">Australians</span> as the density of the human population in Australia and, consequently, the level of interaction between humans and flying foxes increase.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=national+AND+competitive&pg=2&id=EJ857920','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=national+AND+competitive&pg=2&id=EJ857920"><span>Are <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Universities Promoting Learning and Teaching Activity Effectively? An Assessment of the Effects on Science and Engineering Academics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cretchley, Patricia</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Federal Government and <span class="hlt">Australian</span> universities have embarked on a bid to raise the profile of learning and teaching (L&T) in universities. <span class="hlt">Current</span> strategies include increased funding of competitive grants for L&T projects, a wider range of teaching awards and fellowships and a controversial new national competitive Learning…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ689632.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ689632.pdf"><span>'Wishing for Dragon Children': Ironies and Contradictions in China's Education Reform and the Chinese Diaspora's Disappointments with <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Education</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wu, Jianguo; Singh, Michael</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>This paper argues that the re-traditionalisation of 'wishing for dragon children' creates difficulties for China's <span class="hlt">current</span> education reforms and informs the disquiet expressed by Chinese-<span class="hlt">Australians</span> about <span class="hlt">Australian</span> education. We develop this argument around three key propositions. First, we explore Confucianism and the civil service examination…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5763964-wind-tornado-guidelines-study','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5763964-wind-tornado-guidelines-study"><span>Wind/Tornado <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ng, D.S.; Holman, G.S.</p> <p>1991-10-01</p> <p>This report documents the strategy employed to develop recommended wind/tornado hazard design <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for a New Production Reactor (NRP) <span class="hlt">currently</span> planned for either the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) or the Savannah River (SR) site. The Wind/Tornado Working Group (WTWG), comprising six nationally recognized experts in structural engineering, wind engineering, and meteorology, formulated an independent set of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> based on site-specific wind/tornado hazard curves and state-of-the-art tornado missile technology. The basic philosophy was to select realistic wind and missile load specifications, and to meet performance goals by applying conservative structural response evaluation and acceptance criteria. Simplified probabilistic risk analyses (PRAs)more » for wind speeds and missile impact were performed to estimate annual damage risk frequencies for both the INEL and SR sites. These PRAs indicate that the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> will lead to facilities that meet the US Department of Energy (DOE) design requirements and that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> adopted by the DOE for design are adequate to meet the NPR safety goals.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29058530','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29058530"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> Queer Science Fiction Fans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kerry, Stephen Craig</p> <p>2017-10-23</p> <p>Science fiction (sf) does more than provide a fleeting moment of entertainment; it has many personal and social functions. In addition to offering audiences "romantic escapism" (Gerrold, 1996, pp. 5-6), sf also enables the "postulation of an alternative reality from which to contemplate this one" (Gerrold, 1996, pp. 5-6); as such, it is especially important "for groups which have had limited stakes in the status quo" (Jenkins, 1995, p. 242). To date, no research has been undertaken on the relationship between <span class="hlt">Australian</span> queers and sf fandom. This article reports the findings of an online survey and explores the psycho-social features of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> queer sf fans and why they like the genre. While the characteristics of this sample mirror those of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> queers generally, they also have slightly higher rates of mental illness and are far more likely to state they have "no religion." Furthermore, while enjoying the "sciency" (P10, bisexual woman) aspects of sf, <span class="hlt">Australian</span> queers also like the "poignant metaphors for our own civilization" (P45, asexual man).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Circus&pg=3&id=EJ630362','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Circus&pg=3&id=EJ630362"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> Circuses as Cooperative Communities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Moriarty, Beverley J.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Studied how circus personnel of all ages interact in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> circuses to preserve traditional circus lifestyles and entertainment. Interviews with 30 personnel from 4 circuses show the importance of learning to be a member of a cooperative society through immersion. Results provide information about the education of a community of occupational…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=stress+AND+management&id=EJ867265','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=stress+AND+management&id=EJ867265"><span>Stress Literacy in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Adolescents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Varlow, Megan; Wuthrich, Viviana; Murrihy, Rachael; Remond, Louise; Tuqiri, Rebekka; van Kessel, Jacobine; Wheatley, Anna; Dedousis-Wallace, Anna; Kidman, Antony</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Stress literacy is a term that refers to knowledge about stress and stress management techniques. Levels of stress literacy were examined in more than nine hundred <span class="hlt">Australian</span> adolescents by providing a short stress-management education session and assessing stress literacy using a pre-post survey design. It was found that while adolescents had a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=business+AND+research+AND+gap&pg=2&id=EJ925694','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=business+AND+research+AND+gap&pg=2&id=EJ925694"><span>Skills Gaps in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Firms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lindorff, Margaret</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This paper reports the results of a survey of more than 2000 managers examining perceptions of skills gaps in a range of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> firms. It finds that three quarters report a skills gap, and almost one third report skills gaps across the whole organisation. Firm size and industry differences exist in perceptions of the effect of the skills gap…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=ocean+AND+literacy&pg=4&id=EJ555679','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=ocean+AND+literacy&pg=4&id=EJ555679"><span>Arabic in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Islamic Schools.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hall, Michael</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Presents census data on the Muslim population in Australia and overviews full-time independent Islamic schools offering a comprehensive education across the curriculum. Argues that these schools offer great potential for the successful development of Arabic language and cultural literacy skills required by <span class="hlt">Australian</span> exporters and diplomats in the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=generation+AND+y&pg=7&id=EJ816147','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=generation+AND+y&pg=7&id=EJ816147"><span>The Spirituality of Young <span class="hlt">Australians</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mason, Michael; Singleton, Andrew; Webber, Ruth</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>A research project conducted in 2003-2006, the Spirit of Generation Y, using both extended interviews and a nationwide survey, revealed three main strands in the spirituality of young <span class="hlt">Australians</span>: traditional, alternative and humanist. Their involvement in traditional religions was declining, like that of their parents, and although some adopted…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/27519','TREESEARCH'); return false;" href="https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/27519"><span>Techniques of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> forest planning</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/">Treesearch</a></p> <p>Australian Forestry Council</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Computer modeling has been extensively adopted for <span class="hlt">Australian</span> forest planning over the last ten years. It has been confined almost entirely to the plantations of fast-growing species for which adequate inventory, growth, and experimental data are available. Stand simulation models have replaced conventional yield tables and enabled a wide range of alternative...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=quantitative+AND+survey+AND+research&pg=7&id=EJ922478','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=quantitative+AND+survey+AND+research&pg=7&id=EJ922478"><span>Staff Bullying in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Schools</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Riley, Dan; Duncan, Deirdre J.; Edwards, John</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of staff bullying in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> schools, to identify bullies and targets and to examine some implications for school leaders in dealing with staff bullying. Design/methodology/approach: The quantitative research design survey instrument contained 11 demographic items, 44 questions of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Telecom&pg=3&id=EJ452448','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Telecom&pg=3&id=EJ452448"><span>Employee Participation: Some <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Cases.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lansbury, Russell D.; Davis, Edward M.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Workplace Industrial Relations Survey of 2,353 companies showed sporadic employee participation in decision making. Although case studies of Ford Motor, Australia Post, Lend Lease, Telecom Australia, and Woodlawn Mining illustrate successful programs, most managers appear cautious about industrial democracy. (SK)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4822076','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4822076"><span>Larval food plants of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Larentiinae (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) - a review of available data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Abstract Background In Australia, the subfamily Larentiinae (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) comprises over 45 genera with about 270 species described so far. However, life histories of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> larentiine moths have barely been studied. New information The <span class="hlt">current</span> paper presents a list of larval food plants of 51 <span class="hlt">Australian</span> larentiine species based on literature references, data from specimen labels and own observations. Some <span class="hlt">Australian</span> habitats are shown. Possible relationships among the taxa based on food preference of the larvae are discussed. Additionally, a list of Australasian larentiine species from the genera occurring in Australia and their food plants is presented. PMID:27099558</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17115949','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17115949"><span>The <span class="hlt">Australian</span> response: pandemic influenza preparedness.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Horvath, John S; McKinnon, Moira; Roberts, Leslee</p> <p>2006-11-20</p> <p>Australia's preparedness for a potential influenza pandemic involves many players, from individual health carers to interdepartmental government committees. It embraces a wide number of strategies from the management of the disease to facilitating business continuity. The key strategy underlying Australia's planned response is an intensive effort to reduce transmission of the virus. This includes actions to reduce the likelihood of entry of the virus into the country and to contain outbreaks when they occur. Containment will provide time to allow production of a matched vaccine. The health strategies are outlined in the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> health management plan for pandemic influenza. The plan is accompanied by technical annexes setting out key considerations and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in the areas of clinical management and infection control. National plans present overall strategies and guidance, but the operational details can only be determined by individual states and territories, regions, and the services themselves. Primary health care practices will be on the frontline of an influenza pandemic. Every practice needs a plan that defines the roles of staff, incorporates infection control and staff protection measures, and considers business continuity. Most importantly, a practice needs to know how to implement that plan.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5969104','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5969104"><span>Quality of Author <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> in Nursing Journals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nicoll, Leslie H.; Chinn, Peggy L.; Conklin, Jamie L.; McCarty, Midori; Amarasekara, Sathya</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p> based on evidence. <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for publishing in the scholarly literature assist clinicians and scholars to ensure that published articles are complete, <span class="hlt">current</span>, concise, and accurate. PMID:29645403</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1055181','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1055181"><span>Clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>: proliferation and medicolegal significance.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hurwitz, B</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> seeking to influence and regulate clinical activity are <span class="hlt">currently</span> gaining a new cultural ascendancy on both sides of the Atlantic. Statutory agencies may be charged with developing clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, and civil courts, in deciding actions in negligence, could be influenced by standards of care expressed in <span class="hlt">guideline</span> statements. Clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are not accorded unchallengeable status: they have been subject to careful scrutiny by British and American courts to establish their authenticity and relevance. In the United States, compliance with clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> cannot be used as a defence against liability if a physician's conduct is held to have been negligent, and third party organisations can be held liable if their clinical <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are found to be a contributory cause of patient harm. <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> have not usurped the role of the expert witness in court. The importance the law attaches to customary practice means that atypical or bizarre <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are unlikely to be accepted as embodying a legally required standard of clinical care. PMID:10136259</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28279405','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28279405"><span>Vascular Access <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>: Summary, Rationale, and Controversies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sequeira, Adrian; Naljayan, Mihran; Vachharajani, Tushar J</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Dialysis vascular access management in the United States changed significantly after National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) clinical practice <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were first published in 1997. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service adopted these <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and in collaboration with the End-Stage Renal Disease Networks established the Fistula First Breakthrough Initiative (FFBI) in 2003 to improve the rate of arteriovenous fistula use over arteriovenous graft and central venous catheter in the dialysis population. The implementation of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> and FFBI has led to a significant increase in the arteriovenous fistula use in the prevalent dialysis population. The <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> are criticized for being opinion based and often impractical. Over the past 2 decades, the patient population undergoing dialysis has become older with complex comorbidities and challenges for creating an ideal vascular access. Advancing knowledge about access pathophysiology, improved treatment options, and improved process of care with team approach model point toward diminishing relevance of few of the existing <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. Moreover, several <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> remain controversial and may be leading to clinical decisions that may be unfavorable to the patients. The review discusses the historical aspect of vascular access care in the United States and evolution of <span class="hlt">current</span> practice standards and controversies surrounding few of these <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in the <span class="hlt">current</span> time. Published by Elsevier Inc.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27720978','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27720978"><span>Successful use of heat as first aid for tropical <span class="hlt">Australian</span> jellyfish stings.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Little, Mark; Fitzpatrick, Richard; Seymour, Jamie</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Currently</span> the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Resuscitation Council (ARC) recommends dousing with vinegar followed by ice as first aid for jellyfish stings in tropical Australia, with limited evidence to support this recommendation (Li et al., 2013). We report our successful experience in using hot water immersion as first aid in treating two people stung by venomous tropical <span class="hlt">Australian</span> jellyfish, one by Chironex fleckeri and one by Carukia barnesi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28830485','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28830485"><span>Re-development of mental health first aid <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders who are engaging in non-suicidal self-injury.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Armstrong, Gregory; Ironfield, Natalie; Kelly, Claire M; Dart, Katrina; Arabena, Kerry; Bond, Kathy; Jorm, Anthony F</p> <p>2017-08-22</p> <p>Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) disproportionally affects Indigenous <span class="hlt">Australians</span>. Friends, family and frontline workers (for example, teachers, youth workers) are often best positioned to provide initial assistance if someone is engaging in NSSI. Culturally appropriate expert consensus <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> on how to provide mental health first aid to <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders who are engaging in NSSI were developed in 2009. This study describes the re-development of these <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> to ensure they contain the most <span class="hlt">current</span> recommended helping actions. The Delphi consensus method was used to elicit consensus on potential helping statements to be included in the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. These statements describe helping actions that Indigenous community members and non-Indigenous frontline workers can take, and information they should have, to help someone who is engaging in NSSI. The statements were sourced from systematic searches of peer-reviewed literature, grey literature, books, websites and online materials, and existing NSSI courses. A panel was formed, comprising 26 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders with expertise in NSSI. The panellists were presented with the helping statements via online questionnaires and were encouraged to suggest re-wording of statements and any additional helping statements that were not included in the original questionnaire. Statements were only accepted for inclusion in the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> if they were endorsed by ≥90% of panellists as essential or important. From a total of 185 statements shown to the expert panel, 115 were endorsed as helping statements to be included in the re-developed <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. A panel of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with expertise in NSSI were able to reach consensus on appropriate strategies for providing mental health first aid to an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander engaging in NSSI. The re-development of the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> has resulted in more comprehensive guidance than the earlier</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27609324','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27609324"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> work exposures studies: occupational exposure to pesticides.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jomichen, Jasmine; El-Zaemey, Sonia; Heyworth, Jane S; Carey, Renee N; Darcey, Ellie; Reid, Alison; Glass, Deborah C; Driscoll, Tim; Peters, Susan; Abramson, Michael; Fritschi, Lin</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Pesticides are widely used in some occupational settings. Some pesticides have been classified as carcinogens; however, data on the number of workers exposed to pesticides are not available in Australia. The main aim of this study was to estimate the <span class="hlt">current</span> prevalence of pesticide exposure in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> workplaces. The analysis used data from the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Work Exposures Study, a series of nationwide telephone surveys which investigated work-related prevalence and exposure to carcinogens and asthmagens, including pesticides, among <span class="hlt">current</span> <span class="hlt">Australian</span> workers. Information about the respondents' <span class="hlt">current</span> job and various demographic factors was collected in a telephone interview using the web-based tool OccIDEAS. Workers were considered exposed to pesticides if they reported applying or mixing pesticides in their <span class="hlt">current</span> job. Of the 10 371 respondents, 410 (4%) respondents were assessed as being exposed to pesticides in the workplace, with exposure being more likely among males, individuals born in Australia, individuals with lower education level and those residing in regional or remote areas. Glyphosate was the most common active ingredient used by workers. This is the first study to describe the prevalence of occupational pesticide exposure in Australia and one of the few recent studies internationally. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28941902','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28941902"><span>National survey of foodborne viruses in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> oysters at production.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Torok, Valeria; Hodgson, Kate; McLeod, Catherine; Tan, Jessica; Malhi, Navreet; Turnbull, Alison</p> <p>2018-02-01</p> <p>Internationally human enteric viruses, such as norovirus (NoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV), are frequently associated with shellfish related foodborne disease outbreaks, and it has been suggested that acceptable NoV limits based on end-point testing be established for this high risk food group. <span class="hlt">Currently</span>, shellfish safety is generally managed through the use of indicators of faecal contamination. Between July 2014 and August 2015, a national prevalence survey for NoV and HAV was done in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> oysters suitable for harvest. Two sampling rounds were undertaken to determine baseline levels of these viruses. Commercial <span class="hlt">Australian</span> growing areas, represented by 33 oyster production regions in New South Wales, South Australia, Tasmania and Queensland, were included in the survey. A total of 149 and 148 samples were collected during round one and two of sampling, respectively, and tested for NoV and HAV by quantitative RT-PCR. NoV and HAV were not detected in oysters collected in either sampling round, indicating an estimated prevalence for these viruses in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> oysters of <2% with a 95% confidence interval based on the survey design. The low estimated prevalence of foodborne viruses in <span class="hlt">Australian</span> oysters was consistent with epidemiological evidence, with no oyster-related foodborne viral illness reported during the survey period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=insomnia+AND+stress&pg=2&id=EJ617923','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=insomnia+AND+stress&pg=2&id=EJ617923"><span><span class="hlt">Guideline</span> 3: Psychosocial Treatment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>American Journal on Mental Retardation, 2000</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The third in seven sets of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> based on the consensus of experts in the treatment of psychiatric and behavioral problems in mental retardation (MR) focuses on psychosocial treatment. <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> cover general principles, choosing among psychosocial treatments, severity of MR and psychiatric/behavior symptoms, diagnosable disorders, target…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1219649','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1219649"><span>Measure <span class="hlt">Guideline</span>: Ventilation Cooling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>The purpose of this measure <span class="hlt">guideline</span> is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This <span class="hlt">guideline</span> provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1039798','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1039798"><span>Measure <span class="hlt">Guideline</span>: Ventilation Cooling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>The purpose of this measure <span class="hlt">guideline</span> on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This <span class="hlt">guideline</span> provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Homan&pg=5&id=EJ588688','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Homan&pg=5&id=EJ588688"><span>How Principled Are <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Homan, Roger</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Explores and interprets factors related to the burgeoning of codes, criteria, and <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> in recent years within three kinds of context: (1) higher degree and dissertation-award processes; (2) <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for teachers and university lecturers; and (3) codes for researchers in the social sciences. Discusses the intentions and unforeseen…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/34076','TREESEARCH'); return false;" href="https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/34076"><span>Whitebark pine planting <span class="hlt">guidelines</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/">Treesearch</a></p> <p>Ward McCaughey; Glenda L. Scott; Kay L. Izlar</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This article incorporates new information into previous whitebark pine <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for planting prescriptions. Earlier 2006 <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> were developed based on review of general literature, research studies, field observations, and standard US Forest Service survival surveys of high-elevation whitebark pine plantations. A recent study of biotic and abiotic factors...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ctio.noao.edu/noao/content/Visitors-Computer-Guidelines','SCIGOVWS'); return false;" href="http://www.ctio.noao.edu/noao/content/Visitors-Computer-Guidelines"><span>Visitor's Computer <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> | CTIO</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.science.gov/aboutsearch.html">Science.gov Websites</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Visitor's <em>Computer</em> <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> Network Connection Request Instruments Instruments by Telescope IR Instruments Logs Tololo Kaxis Webcam NOAO Newsletters NOAO Data Archive Astronomical Links Visitor's <em>Computer</em> ‹› You are here CTIO Home » Astronomers » Visitor's <em>Computer</em> <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> Visitor's <em>Computer</em></p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ938798.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ938798.pdf"><span>Maintenance Trades <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Weidner, Theodore J.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>In 2002, APPA published "Maintenance Staffing <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> for Educational Facilities," the first building maintenance trades staffing <span class="hlt">guideline</span> designed to assist educational facilities professionals with their staffing needs. addresses how facilities professionals can determine the appropriate size and mix of their organization. Contents…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED055066.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED055066.pdf"><span>Social Studies Curriculum <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Manson, Gary; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>These <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, which set standards for social studies programs K-12, can be used to update existing programs or may serve as a baseline for further innovation. The first section, "A Basic Rationale for Social Studies Education," identifies the theoretical assumptions basic to the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> as knowledge, thinking, valuing, social participation,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10317512','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10317512"><span>Introducing <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> into clinical practice.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fowkes, F G; Roberts, C J</p> <p>1984-04-01</p> <p>The impetus for <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> of practice has been accelerated by a worldwide trend towards insurance based systems of health care. In the past it has been the tradition for the clinician to order all the diagnostic procedures that conceivably might help to clarify what is wrong with a patient, or what course of treatment should be followed. This traditional view ignores the stubborn economic reality that resources are finite and that it is no longer possible to be both endlessly generous and continually fair. Making judgements about the need for, and value of, services now forms an important part of coping with this problem. Clinical practice has to strive to be as safe as possible and to produce a given benefit at a socially acceptable cost. <span class="hlt">Guidelines</span> are recommendations, preferably developed by clinicians themselves, which describe how and when individual clinical activities should be offered in order to achieve these objectives. Utilisation review of <span class="hlt">current</span> practice is a valuable source of information for the development of <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>. In the United Kingdom the Royal College of Radiologists attempted to do this in connection with the use of pre-operative chest X-rays. In 1979 they published the findings of a multicentre review of 10,619 consecutive cases of elective non-cardiopulmonary surgery undertaken in 8 centres throughout the United Kingdom. Substantial variations were found in national practice. Use of pre-operative chest X-rays varied from 11.5% of patients in one centre to 54.2% of patients in another centre. The study also found that the chest X-ray report did not seem to have much influence on the decision to operate nor on the decision to use inhalation anaesthesia. The College study failed to find "any evidence at all for the effectiveness of pre-operative chest X-ray when used routinely" and it was estimated that even if the procedure was 10% effective the costs of avoiding one death would be approximately 1 million pounds. These findings provided</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26562982','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26562982"><span>A pilot study on the application of the <span class="hlt">current</span> European <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the management of acute coronary syndrome without elevation of ST segment (NSTEMI) in the Emergency Department setting in the Italian region Lazio.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Valli, Gabriele; De Marco, Francesca; Spina, Maria Teresa; Valeriano, Valentina; Rosa, Antonello; Minerva, Valentina; Mirante, Enrico; Ruggieri, Maria Pia; Pugliese, Francesco Rocco</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>In 2011 the European Society of Cardiology published the new <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> for the treatment and management of acute coronary syndrome without elevation of the ST segment (NSTEMI). For the treatment of the syndrome, the use of P2Y12 inhibitors in addition to aspirin was strongly recommended (evidence IA). We studied the application of this recommendation in the setting of the emergency department in the vast and uneven area of the Italian region Lazio, three years after the release of these drugs in Italy. 121 consecutive patients (65% older than 65 years) affected by NSTEMI were recruited between May and July 2013. During the transition in the emergency department data was collected on patient's symptoms, syndrome severity and type & timing of treatments chosen. Adherence to the <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> was evaluated considering the number of "good treated" patients: these being the patients that received at least 80% of the main five recommendations on percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) timing, antiplatelet and anti-coagulant therapy suggested by the European Cardiology Task Force (ESC <span class="hlt">guidelines</span>, 2011) for the very acute phase of NSTEMI. Patients were treated with: 1) 35% of cases with double antiplatelet therapy and anticoagulation (DAPT+AC), 2) 22% of cases with single antiplatelet and anticoagulation (SAPT+AC), 3) 6% of cases with a single antiplatelet therapy (SAPT), 4) 6% of cases with a double antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) and 5) 24% of cases did not receive any therapy. Data on PCI was available for 95 patients and, of these, only 82% of the patients underwent the procedure. The percentage of "good treated" patients were among of 20-40%, depending on PCI timing--as <span class="hlt">guidelines</span> suggested--was considered as mandatory (20,5%) or as the extreme time limit (40%). Significant differences were found between patients treated in a central hospital with a hemodynamic laboratory active 24/24hr (HUB) and patients treated in the other hospital (SPOKE). HUBs showed a higher percent</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003IJSEd..25...57D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003IJSEd..25...57D"><span>Western <span class="hlt">Australian</span> school students' understanding of biotechnology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dawson, Vaille; Schibeci, Renato</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Are science educators providing secondary school students with the background to understand the science behind recent controversies such as the recently introduced compulsory labelling of genetically modified foods? Research from the UK suggests that many secondary school students do not understand the processes or implications of modern biotechnology. The situation in Australia is unclear. In this study, 1116 15-year-old students from eleven Western <span class="hlt">Australian</span> schools were surveyed to determine their understanding of, and attitude towards, recent advances in modern biotechnology. The results indicate that approximately one third of students have little or no understanding of biotechnology. Many students over-estimate the use of biotechnology in our society by confusing <span class="hlt">current</span> uses with possible future applications. The results provide a rationale for the inclusion of biotechnology, a cutting edge science, in the school science curriculum</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25870041','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25870041"><span>Forensic archaeology and anthropology : An <span class="hlt">Australian</span> perspective.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Oakley, Kate</p> <p>2005-09-01</p> <p>Forensic archaeology is an extremely powerful investigative discipline and, in combination with forensic anthropology, can provide a wealth of evidentiary information to police investigators and the forensic community. The re-emergence of forensic archaeology and anthropology within Australia relies on its diversification and cooperation with established forensic medical organizations, law enforcement forensic service divisions, and national forensic boards. This presents a unique opportunity to develop a new multidisciplinary approach to forensic archaeology/anthropology within Australia as we hold a unique set of environmental, social, and cultural conditions that diverge from overseas models and require different methodological approaches. In the <span class="hlt">current</span> world political climate, more forensic techniques are being applied at scenes of mass disasters, genocide, and terrorism. This provides <span class="hlt">Australian</span> forensic archaeology/anthropology with a unique opportunity to develop multidisciplinary models with contributions from psychological profiling, ballistics, sociopolitics, cultural anthropology, mortuary technicians, post-blast analysis, fire analysis, and other disciplines from the world of forensic science.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED526849.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED526849.pdf"><span>"I Love to Teach but No Thank You!" Factors Responsible for the Demise of Teaching as a Profession: An <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Naidu, Sham</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Currently</span>, the decline in teacher numbers has become an important topic for discussion in the field of teachers' work in Australia. The purpose of this article is to discuss <span class="hlt">current</span> initiatives being implemented by both the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> federal government and the South <span class="hlt">Australian</span> state government to retain and attract prospective teachers and some…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27635339','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27635339"><span>Depression, anxiety, and stress in partners of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> combat veterans and military personnel: a comparison with <span class="hlt">Australian</span> population norms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>MacDonell, Gail V; Bhullar, Navjot; Thorsteinsson, Einar B</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Partners of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> combat veterans are at an increased risk of experiencing mental health problems. The present study provides a comparative analysis of the mental health of partners of veterans with that of the <span class="hlt">Australian</span> normative data. To compare different types of groups of partners, the study samples comprised: (a) partners of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> combat veterans (Sample 1: n = 282, age M = 60.79, SD = 5.05), (b) a sub-sample of partners of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> combat veterans from the previous sample (Sample 2: n = 50; M = 60.06, SD = 4.80), (c) partners of Special Air Services Regiment (SASR) personnel (Sample 3: n = 40, age M = 34.39SD = 7.01), and (d) partners of <span class="hlt">current</span> serving military (non-SASR) personnel (Sample 4: n = 38, age M = 32.37, SD = 6.20). Respondents completed measures assessing their reported levels of depression, anxiety, and stress. Samples 1 and 2 comprised partners of <span class="hlt">Australian</span> military veterans who reported significantly greater symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress than the comparative population norms. The sample of SASR personnel partners (Sample 3) reported significantly lower levels of depression and anxiety, whereas the sample with non-SASR personnel partners (Sample 4) reported a significantly greater stress symptomatology than the comparative norms. Number of deployments was found to be associated with depression, anxiety, and stress in partners of non-SASR veterans (Sample 4). Lessons and protective factors can be learnt from groups within the <span class="hlt">current</span> military as to what may assist partners and families to maintain a better level of psychosocial health.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002SPIE.4934..110W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002SPIE.4934..110W"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> defence requirements and initiatives in smart materials and structures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wilson, Alan R.; Galea, Stephen C.; Scala, Christine; Wong, Albert</p> <p>2002-11-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Defence Force is increasingly facing escalating costs on through-life support for major platforms (ships, aircraft and land vehicles). The application of smart materials and structures technologies in platform management systems is seen as a very promising approach to reduce these costs and to potentially achieve significant enhancement of platform capability. A new DSTO Key Initiative, 'Smart Materials and Structures', has been recently developed and funded to address these technologies. The Initiative will build on and grow the <span class="hlt">current</span> activities within DSTO and promote collaboration with external <span class="hlt">Australian</span> institutes and industry. This paper will present an overview of the Initiative and the generic sensor and system issues inherent in the 'whole-of-platform' and 'whole-of-life' monitoring and management of major defence platforms. Examples for some particular elements of this will be drawn from <span class="hlt">current</span> work in DSTO. Other presentations in the conference will cover the technical and scientific aspects of these in more detail.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009Arch...22...62H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009Arch...22...62H"><span><span class="hlt">Australian</span> Aboriginal Geomythology: Eyewitness Accounts of Cosmic Impacts?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>Descriptions of cosmic impacts and meteorite falls are found throughout <span class="hlt">Australian</span> Aboriginal oral traditions. In some cases, these texts describe the impact event in detail, sometimes citing the location, suggesting that the events were witnessed. We explore whether cosmic impacts and meteorite falls may have been witnessed by Aboriginal <span class="hlt">Australians</span> and incorporated into their oral traditions. We discuss the complications and bias in recording and analysing oral texts but suggest that these texts may be used both to locate new impact structures or meteorites and model observed impact events. We find that, while detailed Aboriginal descriptions of cosmic impacts are abundant in the literature, there is <span class="hlt">currently</span> no physical evidence connecting these accounts to impact events <span class="hlt">currently</span> known to Western science.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20579194','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20579194"><span>Pressure ulcer <span class="hlt">guideline</span> development and dissemination in Europe.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Meesterberends, Esther; Halfens, Ruud; Lohrmann, C