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Sample records for current density fluctuations

  1. Measurement of current density fluctuations and ambipolar particle flux due to magnetic fluctuations in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Weimin.

    1992-08-01

    Studies of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport on Reversed Field Pinch plasmas were done on the Madison Symmetric Torus. Plasma current density and current density fluctuations were measured using a multi-coil magnetic probes. The low frequency (f<50 kHz) current density fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 50 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized with a radial correlation length of about 1--2 cm. These modes are locally resonant modes since the measured dominant mode number spectra match the local safety factor q. The net charged particle flux induced by magnetic fluctuations was obtained by measuring the correlation term <{tilde j}{sub {parallel}} {tilde B}{sub r}>. The result of zero net charged particle loss was obtained, meaning the flux is ambipolar. The ambipolarity of low frequency global tearing modes is satisfied through the phase relations determined by tearing instabilities. The ambipolarity of high frequency localized modes could be partially explained by the simple model of Waltz based on the radial average of small scale turbulence.

  2. Density-matrix renormalization-group study of current and activity fluctuations near nonequilibrium phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Gorissen, Mieke; Hooyberghs, Jef; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2009-02-01

    Cumulants of a fluctuating current can be obtained from a free-energy-like generating function, which for Markov processes equals the largest eigenvalue of a generalized generator. We determine this eigenvalue with the density-matrix renormalization group for stochastic systems. We calculate the variance of the current in the different phases, and at the phase transitions, of the totally asymmetric exclusion process. Our results can be described in the terms of a scaling ansatz that involves the dynamical exponent z . We also calculate the generating function of the dynamical activity (total number of configuration changes) near the absorbing-state transition of the contact process. Its scaling properties can be expressed in terms of known critical exponents. PMID:19391693

  3. Alfven resonance mode conversion in the Phaedrus-T current drive experiments: Modelling and density fluctuations measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Vukovic, M.; Harper, M.; Breun, R.; Wukitch, S.

    1995-12-31

    Current drive experiments on the Phaedrus-T tokamak performed with a low field side two-strap fast wave antenna at frequencies below {omega}{sub cH} show loop volt drops of up to 30% with strap phasing (0, {pi}/2). RF induced density fluctuations in the plasma core have also been observed with a microwave reflectometer. It is believed that they are caused by kinetic Alfven waves generated by mode conversion of fast waves at the Alfven resonance. Correlation of the observed density fluctuations with the magnitude of the {Delta}V{sub loop} suggest that the {Delta}V{sub loop} is attributable to current drive/heating due to mode converted kinetic Alfven waves. The toroidal cold plasma wave code LION is used to model the Alfven resonance mode conversion surfaces in the experiments while the cylindrical hot plasma kinetic wave code ISMENE is used to model the behavior of kinetic Alfven waves at the Alfven resonance location. Initial results obtained from limited density, magnetic field, antenna phase, and impurity scans show good agreement between the RF induced density fluctuations and the predicted behavior of the kinetic Alfven waves. Detailed comparisons between the density fluctuations and the code predictions are presented.

  4. Extracting primordial density fluctuations

    PubMed

    Gawiser; Silk

    1998-05-29

    The combination of detections of anisotropy in cosmic microwave background radiation and observations of the large-scale distribution of galaxies probes the primordial density fluctuations of the universe on spatial scales varying by three orders of magnitude. These data are found to be inconsistent with the predictions of several popular cosmological models. Agreement between the data and the cold + hot dark matter model, however, suggests that a significant fraction of the matter in the universe may consist of massive neutrinos.

  5. Current fluctuations in stochastic lattice gases.

    PubMed

    Bertini, L; De Sole, A; Gabrielli, D; Jona-Lasinio, G; Landim, C

    2005-01-28

    We study current fluctuations in lattice gases in the macroscopic limit extending the dynamic approach for density fluctuations developed in previous articles. More precisely, we establish a large deviation theory for the space-time fluctuations of the empirical current which include the previous results. We then estimate the probability of a fluctuation of the average current over a large time interval. It turns out that recent results by Bodineau and Derrida [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 180601 (2004)

  6. Density Fluctuations in Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Niall J.; Tse, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The density distributions and fluctuations in grids of varying size in liquid water at ambient pressure, both above the freezing point and in the supercooled state, are analyzed from the trajectories obtained from large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the occurrence of low- and high-density regions (LDL and HDL) is transient and their respective residence times are dependent on the size of the simulated system. The spatial extent of density-density correlation is found to be within 7 Å or less. The temporal existence of LDL and HDL arises as a result of natural density fluctuations of an equilibrium system. The density of bulk water at ambient conditions is homogenous.

  7. Simulation of nanoscale density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Howard; Bowles, Richard K.

    2000-11-01

    Problems associated with the simulation of density fluctuations of limited breadth in a small cell are exposed and studied. The fluctuations are viewed as "physical clusters" of the type that might appear in nucleation processes and related phenomena. One of the most important features of the study stems from the fact that the simulation of a small heterogeneity in a macroscopic system presents problems that do not occur in the simulation of a bulk homogeneous property of the system. For example, once having simulated the probability of appearance of the fluctuation in a small cell, how is that result to be "mapped" onto the macrosystem in order to specify the equilibrium number of such fluctuations in that system? This problem is closely associated with the proper separation of the translational and internal degrees of freedom of the system, and has arisen in a number of fields, including the theory of nucleation. There are other problems associated with exponential dependence of cluster probability on the work of formation of the cluster, and also with rareness of some important clusters. In the latter case, simulative "umbrella sampling" does not always solve the entire problem. The present study is confined to clusters that appear in rarefied gases. Such systems are important in a number of scenarios, including nucleation processes. Several cluster models are considered including those consisting of molecules confined to a "container" of fixed volume and those constructed on the center of mass of the cluster. Connections between them are derived and rigorous solutions to the mapping problem are derived. Quantitative measures for the accuracy of approximate solutions, applied to cases in which the cluster is compact, are provided and exact solutions are provided even for the noncompact case. Some surprising results emerge from the study, among which is the fact that a cluster whose location is determined by one of its molecules, does not always have a

  8. Fluctuation of heat current in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Virtanen, P.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-02-15

    We discuss the statistics of heat current between two superconductors at different temperatures connected by a generic weak link. As the electronic heat in superconductors is carried by Bogoliubov quasiparticles, the heat transport fluctuations follow the Levitov–Lesovik relation. We identify the energy-dependent quasiparticle transmission probabilities and discuss the resulting probability density and fluctuation relations of the heat current. We consider multichannel junctions, and find that heat transport in diffusive junctions is unique in that its statistics is independent of the phase difference between the superconductors.

  9. Universal bounds on current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-05-01

    For current fluctuations in nonequilibrium steady states of Markovian processes, we derive four different universal bounds valid beyond the Gaussian regime. Different variants of these bounds apply to either the entropy change or any individual current, e.g., the rate of substrate consumption in a chemical reaction or the electron current in an electronic device. The bounds vary with respect to their degree of universality and tightness. A universal parabolic bound on the generating function of an arbitrary current depends solely on the average entropy production. A second, stronger bound requires knowledge both of the thermodynamic forces that drive the system and of the topology of the network of states. These two bounds are conjectures based on extensive numerics. An exponential bound that depends only on the average entropy production and the average number of transitions per time is rigorously proved. This bound has no obvious relation to the parabolic bound but it is typically tighter further away from equilibrium. An asymptotic bound that depends on the specific transition rates and becomes tight for large fluctuations is also derived. This bound allows for the prediction of the asymptotic growth of the generating function. Even though our results are restricted to networks with a finite number of states, we show that the parabolic bound is also valid for three paradigmatic examples of driven diffusive systems for which the generating function can be calculated using the additivity principle. Our bounds provide a general class of constraints for nonequilibrium systems.

  10. Multicellular density fluctuations in epithelial monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehnder, Steven M.; Wiatt, Marina K.; Uruena, Juan M.; Dunn, Alison C.; Sawyer, W. Gregory; Angelini, Thomas E.

    2015-09-01

    Changes in cell size often accompany multicellular motion in tissue, and cell number density is known to strongly influence collective migration in monolayers. Density fluctuations in other forms of active matter have been explored extensively, but not the potential role of density fluctuations in collective cell migration. Here we investigate collective motion in cell monolayers, focusing on the divergent component of the migration velocity field to probe density fluctuations. We find spatial patterns of diverging and converging cell groups throughout the monolayers, which oscillate in time with a period of approximately 3-4 h. Simultaneous fluorescence measurements of a cytosol dye within the cells show that fluid passes between groups of cells, facilitating these oscillations in cell density. Our findings reveal that cell-cell interactions in monolayers may be mediated by intercellular fluid flow.

  11. Vortex Line Density Fluctuations of Quantum Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiyama, Shoji; Tsubota, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    We investigate vortex line density fluctuations of quantum turbulence generated by an oscillating grid in superfluid 3He- B. The scenario of quantum turbulence experimentally suggested by the Lancaster group is confirmed in the numerical simulation. The spectrum of the vortex line density fluctuations with respect to frequency obeyed a -5/3 power law, which is consistent with the experiment of the Lancaster group. Based on the argument of time scales experienced by vortex rings with different sizes and on the power spectrum, the connection between the self-similar structure of the vortex tangle and the power spectrum is discussed.

  12. Origin of density fluctuations in extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Salopek, David S.; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The density fluctuations (both curvature and isocurvature) that arise due to quantum fluctuations in a simple model of extended inflation based upon the Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory are calculated. Curvature fluctuations arise due to quantum fluctuations in the Brans-Dicke field, in general have a nonscale-invariant spectrum, and can have an amplitude that is cosmologically acceptable and interesting without having to tune any coupling constant to a very small value. The density perturbations that arise due to the inflation field are subdominant. If there are other massless fields in the theory, e.g., an axion or an ilion, then isocurvature fluctuations arise in these fields too. Production of gravitational waves and the massless particles associated with excitations of the Brans-Dicke field are also discussed. Several attempts at more realistic models of extended inflation are also analyzed. The importance of the Einstein conformal frame in calculating curvature fluctuations is emphasized. When viewed in this frame, extended inflation closely resembles slow-rollover inflation with an exponential potential and the usual formula for the amplitude of curvature perturbations applies.

  13. Density fluctuations from strings and galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilenkin, A.; Shafi, Q.

    1983-01-01

    The spectra of density fluctuations caused by strings in a universe dominated either by baryons, neutrinos, or axions are presented. Realistic scenarios for galaxy formation seem possible in all three cases. Examples of grand unified theories which lead to strings with the desired mass scales are given.

  14. Spin-current noise from fluctuation relations

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jong Soo; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa

    2013-12-04

    We present fluctuation relations that connect spin-polarized current and noise in mesoscopic conductors. In linear response, these relations are equivalent to the fluctuation-dissipation theorem that relates equilibrium current-current correlations to the linear conductance. More interestingly, in the weakly nonlinear regime of transport, these relations establish a connection between the leading-order rectification spin conductance, the spin noise susceptibility and the third cumulant of spin current fluctuations at equilibrium. Our results are valid even for systems in the presence of magnetic fields and coupled to ferromagnetic electrodes.

  15. Density fluctuation spectra in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Brown, M. R.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that within the framework of nearly incompressible magnetohydrodynamics, but not within that of neutral-fluid hydrodynamics, a k exp -5/3 inertial-range wave number density fluctuation spectrum is to be expected at the same times that k exp -5/3 kinetic energy and magnetic energy cascade spectra are present. A previous discrepancy between theory and observation in the local interstellar medium and solar wind is thereby resolved.

  16. Local density fluctuations and hyperuniformity in quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oğuz, Erdal Celal; Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-03-01

    Local density fluctuations in many-body systems are of fundamental importance throughout various scientific disciplines, including physics, materials science, number theory and biology. In a point pattern, let the variance associated with the number of points contained in a spherical window of radius R be denoted by σ2 (R) . Hyperuniform point patterns in d dimensions do not possess infinite-wavelength fluctuations or, equivalently, possess a number variance that grows more slowly than the window volume, i.e., Rd. Hyperuniform systems include all infinite periodic structures, aperiodic quasicrystals, and some special disordered systems. Previous investigations showed that the number variance for large R in hyperuniform systems serves as a useful metric to rank order systems according to the degree to which large-scale density fluctuations are suppressed. In this work, we investigate the number variance of two-dimensional quasicrystals with a variety of different rotational symmetries. We study how the number variance depends on the rotational symmetry and local isomorphism class of the quasicrystal. We compare these results to a number of different periodic systems as well as disordered hyperuniform systems. ECO acknowledges the support from the German Research Foundation (DFG).

  17. Energy density fluctuations in early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Guardo, G. L.; Ruggieri, M.; Greco, V.

    2014-05-09

    The primordial nucleosinthesys of the element can be influenced by the transitions of phase that take place after the Big Bang, such as the QCD transition. In order to study the effect of this phase transition, in this work we compute the time evolution of thermodynamical quantities of the early universe, focusing on temperature and energy density fluctuations, by solving the relevant equations of motion using as input the lattice QCD equation of state to describe the strongly interacting matter in the early universe plasma. We also study the effect of a primordial strong magnetic field by means of a phenomenological equation of state. Our results show that small inhomogeneities of strongly interacting matter in the early Universe are moderately damped during the crossover.

  18. Density Fluctuations in Uniform Quantum Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.; Singh, G. S.

    2011-12-12

    Analytical expressions are given for the static structure factor S(k) and the pair correlation function g(r) for uniform ideal Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac gases for all temperatures. In the vicinity of Bose Einstein condensation (BEC) temperature, g(r) becomes long ranged and remains so in the condensed phase. In the dilute gas limit, g(r) of bosons and fermions do not coincide with Maxwell-Boltzmann gas but exhibit bunching and anti-bunching effect respectively. The width of these functions depends on the temperature and is scaled as {radical}(inverse atomic mass). Our numerical results provide the precise quantitative values of suppression/increase (antibunching and bunching) of the density fluctuations at small distances in ideal quantum gases in qualitative agreement with the experimental observation for almost non-trapped dilute gases.

  19. Current fluctuations in nonequilibrium diffusive systems: an additivity principle.

    PubMed

    Bodineau, T; Derrida, B

    2004-05-01

    We formulate a simple additivity principle allowing one to calculate the whole distribution of current fluctuations through a large one dimensional system in contact with two reservoirs at unequal densities from the knowledge of its first two cumulants. This distribution (which in general is non-Gaussian) satisfies the Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry and generalizes the one predicted recently for the symmetric simple exclusion process. The additivity principle can be used to study more complex diffusive networks including loops. PMID:15169476

  20. The Transport of Density Fluctuations Throughout the Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zank, G. P.; Jetha, N.; Hu, Q.; Hunana, P.

    2012-01-01

    The solar wind is recognized as a turbulent magnetofluid, for which the properties of the turbulent velocity and magnetic field fluctuations are often described by the equations of incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). However, low-frequency density turbulence is also ubiquitous. On the basis of a nearly incompressible formulation of MHD in the expanding inhomogeneous solar wind, we derive the transport equation for the variance of the density fluctuations (Rho(exp 2)). The transport equation shows that density fluctuations behave as a passive scalar in the supersonic solar wind. In the absence of sources of density turbulence, such as within 1AU, the variance (Rho(exp 2)) approximates r(exp -4). In the outer heliosphere beyond 1 AU, the shear between fast and slow streams, the propagation of shocks, and the creation of interstellar pickup ions all act as sources of density turbulence. The model density fluctuation variance evolves with heliocentric distance within approximately 300 AU as (Rho(exp 2)) approximates r(exp -3.3) after which it flattens and then slowly increases. This is precisely the radial profile for the density fluctuation variance observed by Voyager 2. Using a different analysis technique, we confirm the radial profile for Rho(exp 2) of Bellamy, Cairns, & Smith using Voyager 2 data. We conclude that a passive scalar description for density fluctuations in the supersonic solar wind can explain the density fluctuation variance observed in both the inner and the outer heliosphere.

  1. Sparse Sampling of Water Density Fluctuations in Interfacial Environments.

    PubMed

    Xi, Erte; Remsing, Richard C; Patel, Amish J

    2016-02-01

    The free energetics of water density fluctuations near a surface, and the rare low-density fluctuations in particular, serve as reliable indicators of surface hydrophobicity; the easier it is to displace the interfacial waters, the more hydrophobic the underlying surface is. However, characterizing the free energetics of such rare fluctuations requires computationally expensive, non-Boltzmann sampling methods like umbrella sampling. This inherent computational expense associated with umbrella sampling makes it challenging to investigate the role of polarizability or electronic structure effects in influencing interfacial fluctuations. Importantly, it also limits the size of the volume, which can be used to probe interfacial fluctuations. The latter can be particularly important in characterizing the hydrophobicity of large surfaces with molecular-level heterogeneities, such as those presented by proteins. To overcome these challenges, here we present a method for the sparse sampling of water density fluctuations, which is roughly 2 orders of magnitude more efficient than umbrella sampling. We employ thermodynamic integration to estimate the free energy differences between biased ensembles, thereby circumventing the umbrella sampling requirement of overlap between adjacent biased distributions. Further, a judicious choice of the biasing potential allows such free energy differences to be estimated using short simulations, so that the free energetics of water density fluctuations are obtained using only a few, short simulations. Leveraging the efficiency of the method, we characterize water density fluctuations in the entire hydration shell of the protein, ubiquitin, a large volume containing an average of more than 600 waters.

  2. Density Fluctuations in Crystallizing Polymers: Fact or Fiction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baert, Jimmy; Van Puyvelde, Peter

    2008-07-01

    The fact that, in polymer crystallization, nucleation might be accompanied by large scale density fluctuations has been investigated for the flow-induced crystallization of isotactic poly-1-butene (PB-1). Small Angle Light Scattering (SALS) was applied to measure density and orientation fluctuations, whereas complementary results were obtained from optical microscopy. The observations seem to indicate that the detected density fluctuations result from the presence of weakly anisotropic structures, rather than being an indication of densification before the onset of crystallization. In addition, the present work provides a critical review of polymer crystallization studies using SALS.

  3. Density fluctuations at high density in the ergodic divertor configuration of Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devynck, P.; Gunn, J.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Garbet, X.; Antar, G.; Beyer, P.; Boucher, C.; Honore, C.; Gervais, F.; Hennequin, P.; Quémeneur, A.; Truc, A.

    2001-03-01

    The effect of the ergodic divertor on the plasma edge in Tore Supra is to enhance the perpendicular transport through ergodization of the magnetic field lines [Ph. Ghendrih et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 32 (3&4) (1992) 179]. Nevertheless, the hot spots observed on the divertor plates during ergodic divertor operation indicate that the cross-field transport driven by the fluctuations is still playing an important role, although measurements by CO 2 laser scattering and reflectometry show a decrease of the turbulence level [J. Payan, X. Garbet, J.H. Chatenet et al., Nucl. Fusion 35 (1995) 1357; P. Beyer, X. Garbet, P. Ghendrih, Phys. Plasmas 5 (12) (1998) 4271]. In order to gain more understanding, fluctuation level and poloidal velocity have been measured with a reciprocating Langmuir probe biased to collect the ion saturation current ( jsat) and with a CO 2 laser scattering diagnostic. Though the relative fluctuation level behaves as previously observed at low density, a new interesting result is that this picture is gradually modified when the density is increased. Both diagnostics observe an increase of δn/ n with density in the ergodic region, which is not the usual behavior observed in limiter configuration. This increase is detected on both sides of the Er inversion radius and is therefore also affecting the plasma bulk. Finally, the confinement time is found to follow an L-mode law at all densities indicating that the ergodic divertor does not change the global confinement properties of the plasma.

  4. The Phase Coherence of Interstellar Density Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of MHD turbulence often investigate the Fourier power spectrum to provide information on the nature of the turbulence cascade. However, the Fourier power spectrum only contains the Fourier amplitudes and rejects all information regarding the Fourier phases. Here, we investigate the utility of two statistical diagnostics for recovering information on Fourier phases in ISM column density maps: the averaged amplitudes of the bispectrum and the phase coherence index (PCI), a new phase technique for the ISM. We create three-dimensional density and two-dimensional column density maps using a set of simulations of isothermal ideal MHD turbulence with a wide range of sonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers. We find that the bispectrum averaged along different angles with respect to either the k 1 or k 2 axis is primarily sensitive to the sonic Mach number while averaging the bispectral amplitudes over different annuli is sensitive to both the sonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers. The PCI of density suggests that the most correlated phases occur in supersonic sub-Alfvénic turbulence and near the shock scale. This suggests that nonlinear interactions with correlated phases are strongest in shock-dominated regions, in agreement with findings from the solar wind. Our results suggest that the phase information contained in the bispectrum and PCI can be used to find the turbulence parameters in column density maps.

  5. Density fluctuations in solar wind flow types at 1 AU: Comparison to Doppler scintillation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, D. E.; Woo, R.; Neugebauer, M.

    1995-01-01

    Density fluctuations with periods 10 minutes to 1 hour have been investigated in ISEE 3 plasma measurements of solar wind flows at l AU. Coronal hole, interstream, plasma sheet, coronal mass ejection, and interaction region flow types are considered. The ISEE 3 results support the interpretation of the large-scale variations in density fluctuations observed by Doppler scintillation measurement techniques inside 0.2 AU. The highest absolute and relative density fluctuations occur ahead of and within the plasma from coronal mass ejections, with the maximum values occurring between the associated interplanetary shocks and the driver gas. For the quasi-stationary solar wind, density and relative density fluctuations are highest around the heliospheric current sheet and lowest in the high-speed coronal flow. Superposed epoch analysis shows that the region of enhanced density fluctuations and its abrupt boundaries observed in the vicinity of the heliospheric current sheet near the Sun persists to l AU, providing further support for the filamentary nature of the extensions of coronal streamers. The results of this study confirm the advantages of using density fluctuations rather than density as a tracer of solar wind flows with differing origins at the Sun and as a detector of propagating interplanetary disturbances.

  6. The power associated with density fluctuations and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    Direct observations from Pioneer 6 of solar-wind-proton fluctuations have been used to obtain the power spectra associated with solar-wind-proton number density and velocity fluctuations in the frequency range of 0.001 to 0.01 Hz, extending previous analyses by an order of magnitude at the higher frequencies. The slopes of the power spectra associated with the density fluctuations and the velocity fluctuations are similar and are in agreement with the shape of the power spectra found at the lower frequencies. The power spectra indicate that the power-law density spectrum observed at lower frequencies extends to at least 0.01 Hz. This smooth variation in the spectrum at these frequencies is consistent with previous extrapolations of both spacecraft and interplanetary scintillation observations.

  7. Charge and spin fluctuations in the density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gyoerffy, B.L.; Barbieri, A. . H.H. Wills Physics Lab.); Staunton, J.B. . Dept. of Physics); Shelton, W.A.; Stocks, G.M. )

    1990-01-01

    We introduce a conceptual framework which allow us to treat charge and spin fluctuations about the Local density Approximation (LDA) to the Density Functional Theory (DFT). We illustrate the approach by explicit study of the Disordered Local Moment (DLM) state in Fe above the Curie Temperature {Tc} and the Mott insulating state in MnO. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Density Fluctuations of Hard-Sphere Fluids in Narrow Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygârd, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Hyltegren, Kristin; Chodankar, Shirish; Perret, Edith; Buitenhuis, Johan; van der Veen, J. Friso; Kjellander, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Spatial confinement induces microscopic ordering of fluids, which in turn alters many of their dynamic and thermodynamic properties. However, the isothermal compressibility has hitherto been largely overlooked in the literature, despite its obvious connection to the underlying microscopic structure and density fluctuations in confined geometries. Here, we address this issue by probing density profiles and structure factors of hard-sphere fluids in various narrow slits, using x-ray scattering from colloid-filled nanofluidic containers and integral-equation-based statistical mechanics at the level of pair distributions for inhomogeneous fluids. Most importantly, we demonstrate that density fluctuations and isothermal compressibilities in confined fluids can be obtained experimentally from the long-wavelength limit of the structure factor, providing a formally exact and experimentally accessible connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic, thermodynamic properties. Our approach will thus, for example, allow direct experimental verification of theoretically predicted enhanced density fluctuations in liquids near solvophobic interfaces.

  9. Origin of discrete current fluctuations in a single molecule junction.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dong; Lee, Takhee; Kim, Youngsang; Mei, Tingting; Wang, Qingling

    2014-11-21

    A series of fresh molecular junctions at a single molecule level were created and the current fluctuations were studied as electrons passed through them. Our results indicate that telegraph-like current fluctuations at room temperature neither originate from electron trapping/detrapping processes nor from molecule re-conformation. Our results will be helpful in better understanding the mechanism of current fluctuations. PMID:25271483

  10. MEASUREMENTS OF RAPID DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Malaspina, D. M.; Ergun, R. E.; Kellogg, P. J.; Bale, S. D.

    2010-03-01

    The power spectrum of density fluctuations in the solar wind is inferred by tracking small timescale changes in the electron plasma frequency during periods of strong Langmuir wave activity. STEREO electric field waveform data are used to produce time profiles of plasma density from which the density power spectrum is derived. The power spectra obtained by this method extend the observed frequency range by an order of magnitude while remaining consistent with previous results near a few Hertz. Density power spectral indices are found to be organized by the angle between the local magnetic field and the solar wind direction, indicating significant anisotropy in solar wind high-frequency density turbulence.

  11. Shock-associated plasma density fluctuations in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    Theories of diffuse shock acceleration of the cosmic rays that predict that there should be regions of intense Alfven waves both upstream and downstream of the shock front are considered. Observations of similar waves near solar system shock waves show that they produce substantial density fluctuations. Such density fluctuations might produce observable scattering of radio waves. Observations which searched for angular broadening or blurring of radio sources whose lines of sight pass close to or through supernova remnants are discussed. No definite cases of remnant-associated scattering are detected. However, the source CL 4, which is viewed through the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, may be such an object and merits further observation.

  12. Measurement of density fluctuations in the PDX tokamak using microwave scattering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.

    1984-01-01

    Density fluctuations in the PDX tokamak were analyzed with the scattering of 2 mm microwaves. The primary focus of the study was the low frequency (fluctuations which are ubiquitous in tokamaks and have the characteristics of drift wave turbulence. In PDX, the mean observed frequencies are about 50 to 100 kHz and the mean wavenumbers are k/sub perpendicular/ approx. 3 cm/sup -1/. It is believed that the drift waves are a possible cause of the anomalous heat transport in tokamaks. Density fluctuations with a narrow frequency spectrum were also observed. The latter include the quasi-coherent fluctuation observed in H-mode plasmas. Several scaling studies of the broad-band turbulence have been carried out. The frequency spectra, k/sub perpendicular/ spectra, and magnitude of the fluctuations were measured and their variation with toroidal field, neutral beam heating power, plasma current, position, and confinement regime in PDX was documented.

  13. Collective motion and density fluctuations in swimming bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hepeng

    2011-03-01

    The emergence of collective motion such as in fish schools, mammal herds, and insect swarms is a ubiquitous self-organization phenomenon. Such collective behavior plays an important role in a range of problems, such as spreading of deceases in animal or fish groups. Current models have provided a qualitative understanding of collective motion, but progress in quantitative modeling in hindered by the lack of experimental data. Here we examine a model microscopic system, where we are able to measure simultaneously the positions, velocities, and orientations of up to a thousand bacteria in a colony. The motile bacteria form closely-packed dynamic clusters within which they move cooperatively. The number of bacteria in a cluster exhibits a power-law distribution truncated by an exponential tail, and the probability of finding large clusters grows markedly as bacterial density increases. Mobile clusters cause anomalous fluctuations in bacterial density as found in mathematical theories and numerical models. Our results demonstrate that bacteria are an excellent system to study general phenomena of collective motion.

  14. Suppression of Density Fluctuations in a Quantum Degenerate Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Sanner, Christian; Su, Edward J.; Keshet, Aviv; Gommers, Ralf; Shin, Yong-il; Huang Wujie; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2010-07-23

    We study density profiles of an ideal Fermi gas and observe Pauli suppression of density fluctuations (atom shot noise) for cold clouds deep in the quantum degenerate regime. Strong suppression is observed for probe volumes containing more than 10 000 atoms. Measuring the level of suppression provides sensitive thermometry at low temperatures. After this method of sensitive noise measurements has been validated with an ideal Fermi gas, it can now be applied to characterize phase transitions in strongly correlated many-body systems.

  15. Backscattering cascade of beam modes off ambient density fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. A.; Goldman, M. V.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of a given nonthermal low-frequency density-fluctuation spectrum on the amplification of Langmuir waves by a 'bump-on-tail' beam of electrons are studied. The density-fluctuation spectrum is assumed to contain a uniform distribution of wavelengths ranging from much shorter than the beam mode wavelength to of the same order. This permits multiple large-angle (back) scattering to occur. One-dimensional numerical solutions of the kinetic equations are found which yield criteria for linear saturation of the beam instability of a cascade of backscattering to high wavenumber. The relevant time scales and spectral shapes are also determined in both the stable and unstable regions. Linear damping and Cerenkov emission by a possible nonthermal tail of electrons is taken into account. An application is made to the beam modes observed simultaneously with density fluctuations off the Jovian bow shock. It is shown that the observed level of density fluctuations is sufficient to saturate the unstable Langmuir waves, although nonthermal Landau damping may prevent a cascade to very high wavenumbers.

  16. Density fluctuations in strong Langmuir turbulence - Scalings, spectra, and statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Newman, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    A recently developed two-component model of strong Langmuir turbulence is applied to determine the scalings, spectra, and statistics of the associated density fluctuations. The predictions are found to be in excellent agreement with extensive results from numerical solution of the Zakharov equations in two and three dimensions.

  17. Dynamic density functional theory with hydrodynamic interactions and fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Donev, Aleksandar; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2014-06-21

    We derive a closed equation for the empirical concentration of colloidal particles in the presence of both hydrodynamic and direct interactions. The ensemble average of our functional Langevin equation reproduces known deterministic Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT) [M. Rex and H. Löwen, "Dynamical density functional theory with hydrodynamic interactions and colloids in unstable traps," Phys. Rev. Lett. 101(14), 148302 (2008)], and, at the same time, it also describes the microscopic fluctuations around the mean behavior. We suggest separating the ideal (non-interacting) contribution from additional corrections due to pairwise interactions. We find that, for an incompressible fluid and in the absence of direct interactions, the mean concentration follows Fick's law just as for uncorrelated walkers. At the same time, the nature of the stochastic terms in fluctuating DDFT is shown to be distinctly different for hydrodynamically-correlated and uncorrelated walkers. This leads to striking differences in the behavior of the fluctuations around Fick's law, even in the absence of pairwise interactions. We connect our own prior work [A. Donev, T. G. Fai, and E. Vanden-Eijnden, "A reversible mesoscopic model of diffusion in liquids: from giant fluctuations to Fick's law," J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2014) P04004] on fluctuating hydrodynamics of diffusion in liquids to the DDFT literature, and demonstrate that the fluid cannot easily be eliminated from consideration if one wants to describe the collective diffusion in colloidal suspensions.

  18. Dynamic density functional theory with hydrodynamic interactions and fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, Aleksandar Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2014-06-21

    We derive a closed equation for the empirical concentration of colloidal particles in the presence of both hydrodynamic and direct interactions. The ensemble average of our functional Langevin equation reproduces known deterministic Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT) [M. Rex and H. Löwen, “Dynamical density functional theory with hydrodynamic interactions and colloids in unstable traps,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 101(14), 148302 (2008)], and, at the same time, it also describes the microscopic fluctuations around the mean behavior. We suggest separating the ideal (non-interacting) contribution from additional corrections due to pairwise interactions. We find that, for an incompressible fluid and in the absence of direct interactions, the mean concentration follows Fick's law just as for uncorrelated walkers. At the same time, the nature of the stochastic terms in fluctuating DDFT is shown to be distinctly different for hydrodynamically-correlated and uncorrelated walkers. This leads to striking differences in the behavior of the fluctuations around Fick's law, even in the absence of pairwise interactions. We connect our own prior work [A. Donev, T. G. Fai, and E. Vanden-Eijnden, “A reversible mesoscopic model of diffusion in liquids: from giant fluctuations to Fick's law,” J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2014) P04004] on fluctuating hydrodynamics of diffusion in liquids to the DDFT literature, and demonstrate that the fluid cannot easily be eliminated from consideration if one wants to describe the collective diffusion in colloidal suspensions.

  19. Current density distribution in PEFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhixiang; Mao, Zongqiang; Wu, Bing; Wang, Lisheng; Schmidt, Volkmar M.

    The determination of the current distribution in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is of great practical importance to optimize the process parameter such as the flow field design, the humidification of reaction gases and the utilization of the fuel gas. In this paper, subcells approach is used to measure current density distribution in PEFC with an active electrode area of 30 cm 2. Fuel cell performances determined under different operation conditions clearly indicate that the water balance influences the cell performance most significantly. Furthermore, it is interesting to note that under certain condition both membrane drying and electrode flooding are shown simultaneously inducing performance decaying.

  20. Electronic density fluctuation associated to coherent plasmon excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervasoni, Juana; Segui, Silvina; Arista, Nestor

    2011-10-01

    In this work we analyze, in the frame of the coherent states, the fluctuation of the electronic collective modes associated with the wake potential generated by an external particle of charge Ze. This perturbation is described as coherent states of plasmons spatially localized in an average distance of the order of the velocity of the projectile divided by the plasmon frequency of the material. One of the most important features is that in all the cases, for different trajectories of the external particle, and for different structures of the material, the fluctuations are not negligible. In particular, we observe that due to the importance of the surface in nanostructured materials, the fluctuation of density is very sensitive to their geometry and composition, fact that must have taken into account for the nanodevices designs. In this work we analyze, in the frame of the coherent states, the fluctuation of the electronic collective modes associated with the wake potential generated by an external particle of charge Ze. This perturbation is described as coherent states of plasmons spatially localized in an average distance of the order of the velocity of the projectile divided by the plasmon frequency of the material. One of the most important features is that in all the cases, for different trajectories of the external particle, and for different structures of the material, the fluctuations are not negligible. In particular, we observe that due to the importance of the surface in nanostructured materials, the fluctuation of density is very sensitive to their geometry and composition, fact that must have taken into account for the nanodevices designs. Acknowledgements to CNEA and CONICET, Argentina.

  1. Correlation analysis of magnetic field and density fluctuations in SSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Holden; Rock, Ariel; Schaffner, David; Brown, Michael; SSX Team

    2015-11-01

    The cross correlation and cross spectrum of magnetic field and density fluctuations of plasmas created by the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) MHD wind tunnel are examined. The SSX MHD wind tunnel produces dynamic magnetized plasma plumes with typical values B ~ 0 . 2 T, n >=1021 m-3, and Ti >= 20 eV. Magnetic field fluctuations of these plasmas are measured with a Ḃ probe and local density fluctuations are measured with a double Langmuir probe inserted radially within 1 mm of the Ḃ probe. The axial distance of both probes from the plasma source is varied to examine plasmas of different ``turbulent ages.'' Linearized MHD theory admits three types of waves - slow, fast, and Alfvén - each with different correlation values between magnetic field and density. By taking the Fourier transforms of B (t) and n (t) time series data, the cross spectrum B~* (f) ñ (f) is calculated, and the correlation between magnetic field and density can be determined as a function of frequency. Preliminary results of SSX data analysis indicate a pressure balanced structure present at 100 kHz, likely in the form of a flux tube, as well as predominately positive correlations in the frequency range 100 kHz to 10 MHz. Work supported by DOE OFES and NSF CMSO.

  2. Radial evolution of the energy density of solar wind fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zank, G. P.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Smith, C. W.

    1995-01-01

    On the basis of transport theories appropriate to a radially expanding solar wind, we describe new results for the radial evolution of the energy density in solar wind fluctuations at MHD scales. These models include the effects of 'mixing' and driving as well as the possibility of non-isotropic MHD turbulence. Implications of these results for solar wind heating, cosmic ray diffusion and interstellar pick-up ions will also be addressed.

  3. Suppression of density fluctuations in a quantum degenerate Fermi gas.

    PubMed

    Sanner, Christian; Su, Edward J; Keshet, Aviv; Gommers, Ralf; Shin, Yong-Il; Huang, Wujie; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2010-07-23

    We study density profiles of an ideal Fermi gas and observe Pauli suppression of density fluctuations (atom shot noise) for cold clouds deep in the quantum degenerate regime. Strong suppression is observed for probe volumes containing more than 10 000 atoms. Measuring the level of suppression provides sensitive thermometry at low temperatures. After this method of sensitive noise measurements has been validated with an ideal Fermi gas, it can now be applied to characterize phase transitions in strongly correlated many-body systems.

  4. Spontaneous density fluctuations in granular flow and traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Hans J.

    It is known that spontaneous density waves appear in granular material flowing through pipes or hoppers. A similar phenomenon is known from traffic jams on highways. Using numerical simulations we show that several types of waves exist and find that the density fluctuations follow a power law spectrum. We also investigate one-dimensional traffic models. If positions and velocities are continuous variables the model shows self-organized criticality driven by the slowest car. Lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann models reproduce the experimentally observed effects. Density waves are spontaneously generated when the viscosity has a non-linear dependence on density or shear rate as it is the case in traffic or granular flow.

  5. Cluster evolution as a probe of primordial density fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, J. Richard; Myers, Steven T.

    1993-01-01

    Although COBE's detection of large angle microwave background anisotropies fixes the amplitude of density fluctuations on length scales k exp -1 approximately = (300-6000) h(exp -1)Mpc, what is crucial for the level of large scale clustering is the amplitude of density fluctuations on scales (5-50) h(exp -1)Mpc. The level of dynamical clustering is usually parameterized by the size of the mass fluctuations in 8 h exp -1 Mpc spheres, sigma sub 8. For the cold dark matter model, COBE gives sigma sub 8 approximately = 1, while models with extra large scale power give sigma sub 8 approximately = 1/2. The most massive clusters of galaxies (greater than or approximately = 10 exp 15 solar mass) form from rare 'peak patches' found in the initial mass density distribution. Their abundance as a function of redshift is a sensitive probe of the wave number band k(exp -1) approx. (3-8) h(exp -1)Mpc, hence of sigma sub 8, and so cluster evolution can discriminate among models allowed by the COBE results. We use our Hierarchical Peaks Method, which accurately reproduces the results of P3M N-body simulations, to calculate the evolution of cluster x-ray flux counts, luminosity, and temperature functions as a function of sigma sub 8 for CDM models and those with more large scale power. We find that the EMSS and Edge et al. cluster samples support sigma sub 8 in the range from approx. 0.6-0.9, and that models with more large scale power (and hence flatter fluctuation spectra in the cluster regime) fit the x-ray bright end better.

  6. Fluctuating charge-density waves in a cuprate superconductor.

    PubMed

    Torchinsky, Darius H; Mahmood, Fahad; Bollinger, Anthony T; Božović, Ivan; Gedik, Nuh

    2013-05-01

    Cuprate materials hosting high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) also exhibit various forms of charge and spin ordering whose significance is not fully understood. So far, static charge-density waves (CDWs) have been detected by diffraction probes only at particular doping levels or in an applied external field . However, dynamic CDWs may also be present more broadly and their detection, characterization and relationship with HTS remain open problems. Here we present a method based on ultrafast spectroscopy to detect the presence and measure the lifetimes of CDW fluctuations in cuprates. In an underdoped La(1.9)Sr(0.1)CuO4 film (T(c) = 26 K), we observe collective excitations of CDW that persist up to 100 K. This dynamic CDW fluctuates with a characteristic lifetime of 2 ps at T = 5 K that decreases to 0.5 ps at T = 100 K. In contrast, in an optimally doped La(1.84)Sr(0.16)CuO4 film (T(c) = 38.5 K), we detect no signatures of fluctuating CDWs at any temperature, favouring the competition scenario. This work forges a path for studying fluctuating order parameters in various superconductors and other materials. PMID:23435216

  7. Observations of ULF wave related equatorial electrojet and density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Biouele, C. M.; Moldwin, M. B.; Boudouridis, A.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Anad, F.; Pfaff, R. F.; Hartinger, M.

    2013-10-01

    We report on Pc5 wave related electric field and vertical drift velocity oscillations at the equator as observed by ground magnetometers for an extended period on 9 August 2008. We show that the magnetometer-estimated equatorial E×B drift oscillates with the same frequency as ULF Pc5 waves, creating significant ionospheric density fluctuations. We also show ionospheric density fluctuations during the period when we observed ULF wave activity. At the same time, we detect the ULF activity on the ground using ground-based magnetometer data from the African Meridian B-field Education and Research (AMBER) and the South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA). From space, we use magnetic field observations from the GOES 12 and the Communication/Navigation Outage and Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellites. Upstream solar wind conditions are provided by the ACE spacecraft. We find that the wave power observed on the ground also occurs in the upstream solar wind and in the magnetosphere. All these observations demonstrate that Pc5 waves with a likely driver in the solar wind can penetrate to the equatorial ionosphere and modulate the equatorial electrodynamics. While no direct drift measurements from equatorial radars exist for the 9 August 2008 event, we used JULIA 150 km radar drift velocities observed on 2 May 2010 and found similar fluctuations with the period of 5-8 min, as a means of an independent confirmation of our magnetometer derived drift dynamics.

  8. Affinity- and topology-dependent bound on current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-08-01

    We provide a proof of a recently conjectured universal bound on current fluctuations in Markovian processes. This bound establishes a link between the fluctuations of an individual observable current, the cycle affinities driving the system into a non-equilibrium steady state, and the topology of the network. The proof is based on a decomposition of the network into independent cycles with both positive affinity and positive stationary cycle current. This formalism allows for a refinement of the bound for systems in equilibrium or with locally vanishing affinities.

  9. Extreme current fluctuations in lattice gases: beyond nonequilibrium steady states.

    PubMed

    Meerson, Baruch; Sasorov, Pavel V

    2014-01-01

    We use the macroscopic fluctuation theory (MFT) to study large current fluctuations in nonstationary diffusive lattice gases. We identify two universality classes of these fluctuations, which we call elliptic and hyperbolic. They emerge in the limit when the deterministic mass flux is small compared to the mass flux due to the shot noise. The two classes are determined by the sign of compressibility of effective fluid, obtained by mapping the MFT into an inviscid hydrodynamics. An example of the elliptic class is the symmetric simple exclusion process, where, for some initial conditions, we can solve the effective hydrodynamics exactly. This leads to a super-Gaussian extreme current statistics conjectured by Derrida and Gerschenfeld [J. Stat. Phys. 137, 978 (2009)] and yields the optimal path of the system. For models of the hyperbolic class, the deterministic mass flux cannot be neglected, leading to a different extreme current statistics. PMID:24580151

  10. Measurements of Density Fluctuations in the Pdx Tokamak Using Microwave Scattering Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, Thomas

    Density fluctuations in the PDX tokamak have been analyzed with the scattering of 2 mm microwaves. The primary focus of the study has been the low frequency (< 1MHz), broad band spectrum fluctuations which are ubiquitous in tokamaks and have the characteristics of drift wave turbulence. The fluctuations typically have frequencies and wavelengths characterized by (DELTA)(omega) (TURN) (omega) (TURN) (omega)(,*(,e)) and K(,(PERP))(rho)(,i) of order 1, where (omega)(,*(,e)) is the electron diamagnetic drift frequency and (rho)(,i) is the ion Larmor radius. In PDX, the mean observed frequencies are about 50-100 kHz and the mean wavenumbers are k(,(PERP)) (TURN) 3 cm('-1). It is believed that these waves are a possible cause of the anomalous heat transport in tokamaks. Density fluctuations with a narrow frequency spectrum have also been observed. The latter include the quasi-coherent fluctuation observed in H-mode plasmas. Several scaling studies of the broad band turbulence have been carried out. The frequency spectra, k(,(PERP)) spectra, and magnitude of the fluctuations have been measured and their variation with toroidal field, neutral beam heating power, plasma current, position, and confinement regime in PDX has been documented. Since the turbulence is a possible cause of anomalous heat transport in PDX and other tokamaks, the scaling of the turbulence has been compared with energy confinement scalings. In many cases, increased fluctuation level correlates with decreased energy confinement. In another case, the fluctuation level does not change as the confinement properties of the plasma change. The scaling of the experimental fluctuation levels has also been compared with various drift wave parameters. The fluctuation level scales as the mixing length limit, n/n (TURN) 1/k(,(PERP))L(,n), in some sets of data, but not in other sets. In addition to the broad band frequency spectrum present on all shots, density fluctuations with a narrow frequency spectrum ((DELTA

  11. Current fluctuation of electron and hole carriers in multilayer WSe2 field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seung-Pil; Shin, Jong Mok; Kim, Yong Jin; Jang, Ho-Kyun; Jin, Jun Eon; Shin, Minju; Kim, Young Keun; Kim, Gyu-Tae

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional materials have outstanding scalability due to their structural and electrical properties for the logic devices. Here, we report the current fluctuation in multilayer WSe2 field effect transistors (FETs). In order to demonstrate the impact on carrier types, n-type and p-type WSe2 FETs are fabricated with different work function metals. Each device has similar electrical characteristics except for the threshold voltage. In the low frequency noise analysis, drain current power spectral density (SI) is inversely proportional to frequency, indicating typical 1/f noise behaviors. The curves of the normalized drain current power spectral density (NSI) as a function of drain current at the 10 Hz of frequency indicate that our devices follow the carrier number fluctuation with correlated mobility fluctuation model. This means that current fluctuation depends on the trapping-detrapping motion of the charge carriers near the channel interface. No significant difference is observed in the current fluctuation according to the charge carrier type, electrons and holes that occurred in the junction and channel region.

  12. Current fluctuation of electron and hole carriers in multilayer WSe{sub 2} field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Seung-Pil; Shin, Jong Mok; Jang, Ho-Kyun; Jin, Jun Eon; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Young Keun; Shin, Minju

    2015-12-14

    Two-dimensional materials have outstanding scalability due to their structural and electrical properties for the logic devices. Here, we report the current fluctuation in multilayer WSe{sub 2} field effect transistors (FETs). In order to demonstrate the impact on carrier types, n-type and p-type WSe{sub 2} FETs are fabricated with different work function metals. Each device has similar electrical characteristics except for the threshold voltage. In the low frequency noise analysis, drain current power spectral density (S{sub I}) is inversely proportional to frequency, indicating typical 1/f noise behaviors. The curves of the normalized drain current power spectral density (NS{sub I}) as a function of drain current at the 10 Hz of frequency indicate that our devices follow the carrier number fluctuation with correlated mobility fluctuation model. This means that current fluctuation depends on the trapping-detrapping motion of the charge carriers near the channel interface. No significant difference is observed in the current fluctuation according to the charge carrier type, electrons and holes that occurred in the junction and channel region.

  13. Development of KSTAR ECE imaging system for measurement of temperature fluctuations and edge density fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Choi, M. J.; Kim, J. B.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Tobias, B.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Donne, A. J. H.

    2010-10-15

    The ECE imaging (ECEI) diagnostic tested on the TEXTOR tokamak revealed the sawtooth reconnection physics in unprecedented detail, including the first observation of high-field-side crash and collective heat transport [H. K. Park, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., A. J. H. Donneet al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195003 (2006)]. An improved ECEI system capable of visualizing both high- and low-field sides simultaneously with considerably better spatial coverage has been developed for the KSTAR tokamak in order to capture the full picture of core MHD dynamics. Direct 2D imaging of other MHD phenomena such as tearing modes, edge localized modes, and even Alfven eigenmodes is expected to be feasible. Use of ECE images of the optically thin edge region to recover 2D electron density changes during L/H mode transitions is also envisioned, providing powerful information about the underlying physics. The influence of density fluctuations on optically thin ECE is discussed.

  14. Shocks, Rarefaction Waves, and Current Fluctuations for Anharmonic Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendl, Christian B.; Spohn, Herbert

    2016-10-01

    The nonequilibrium dynamics of anharmonic chains is studied by imposing an initial domain-wall state, in which the two half lattices are prepared in equilibrium with distinct parameters. We analyse the Riemann problem for the corresponding Euler equations and, in specific cases, compare with molecular dynamics. Additionally, the fluctuations of time-integrated currents are investigated. In analogy with the KPZ equation, their typical fluctuations should be of size t^{1/3} and have a Tracy-Widom GUE distributed amplitude. The proper extension to anharmonic chains is explained and tested through molecular dynamics. Our results are calibrated against the stochastic LeRoux lattice gas.

  15. Skewness of steady-state current fluctuations in nonequilibrium systems.

    PubMed

    Belousov, Roman; Cohen, E G D; Wong, Chun-Shang; Goree, John A; Feng, Yan

    2016-04-01

    A skewness of the probability for instantaneous current fluctuations, in a nonequilibrium steady state, is observed experimentally in a dusty plasma. This skewness is attributed to the spatial asymmetry, which is imminent to the nonequilibrium systems due to the external hydrodynamic gradient. Using the modern framework of the large deviation theory, we extend the Onsager-Machlup ansatz for equilibrium fluctuations to systems with a preferred spatial direction, and provide a modulated Gaussian probability distribution, which is tested by simulations. This probability distribution is also of potential interest for other statistical disciplines. Connections with the principles of statistical mechanics, due to Boltzmann and Gibbs, are discussed as well. PMID:27176272

  16. Random paths and current fluctuations in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2014-07-15

    An overview is given of recent advances in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics about the statistics of random paths and current fluctuations. Although statistics is carried out in space for equilibrium statistical mechanics, statistics is considered in time or spacetime for nonequilibrium systems. In this approach, relationships have been established between nonequilibrium properties such as the transport coefficients, the thermodynamic entropy production, or the affinities, and quantities characterizing the microscopic Hamiltonian dynamics and the chaos or fluctuations it may generate. This overview presents results for classical systems in the escape-rate formalism, stochastic processes, and open quantum systems.

  17. Electron-cyclotron wave scattering by edge density fluctuations in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Tsironis, Christos; Peeters, Arthur G.; Isliker, Heinz; Chatziantonaki, Ioanna; Vlahos, Loukas; Strintzi, Dafni

    2009-11-15

    The effect of edge turbulence on the electron-cyclotron wave propagation in ITER is investigated with emphasis on wave scattering, beam broadening, and its influence on localized heating and current drive. A wave used for electron-cyclotron current drive (ECCD) must cross the edge of the plasma, where density fluctuations can be large enough to bring on wave scattering. The scattering angle due to the density fluctuations is small, but the beam propagates over a distance of several meters up to the resonance layer and even small angle scattering leads to a deviation of several centimeters at the deposition location. Since the localization of ECCD is crucial for the control of neoclassical tearing modes, this issue is of great importance to the ITER design. The wave scattering process is described on the basis of a Fokker-Planck equation, where the diffusion coefficient is calculated analytically as well as computed numerically using a ray tracing code.

  18. Model of m-level low-frequency current fluctuations in metal thermionic cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghots, S. S.; Bakhtizin, R. Z.

    2003-06-01

    A new model of low-frequency fluctuations, based on the thermionic current model [Mathematical Handbook for Scientists and Engineers, New York, 1961; Introduction to Statistical Radio-Physic. Part 1: Random Processes, Moscow, 1976 (in Russian)], has been designed. The proposed model provides calculation of realization, auto-correlation function (ACF) and power spectral density (PSD) of an m-level quantum signal. This model has allowed to explain the reason of very small magnitude of low-frequency (LF) boundary (10 -4 to 10 -2 Hz) on experimental spectra of LF current fluctuations in a metal thermionic cathodes.

  19. Plasma density fluctuations observed during Space Shuttle Orbiter water releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, J. S.; D'Angelo, N.; Kurth, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    Observations by the Langmuir probe on the Plasma Diagnostics Package flown as part of the Spacelab 2 mission in the summer of 1985 show a strong increase in the level of turbulence near the Shuttle Orbiter during operations in which liquid water is released. The spectrum of the plasma density fluctuations peaks at the lowest frequencies measured (a few Hz) and extends up to a few kHz, near the lower hybrid frequency. Two potential mechanisms for generating the plasma turbulence are suggested which are both based on the production of water ions as a result of charge exchange with the ambient oxygen ions in the ionosphere. The first mechanism proposed is the ion-plasma instability which arises from the drift of the contaminant with respect to the ambient oxygen ions. The other mechanism proposed is the Ott-Farley instability, which is a result of the ring distribution formed by the 'pick-up' water ions.

  20. Time-resolved measurements of the density fluctuations in ion phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, Ahmed; Skiff, Frederick

    2006-05-15

    A two-point correlation function measurement of the ion density fluctuations is presented. Using two laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection systems, the density fluctuation is resolved in time, ion parallel velocity, and space (along the magnetic field). The measurements reveal two components of the density fluctuations, one of which is explained by fluid theory. The other component is ion-velocity-dependent and is newly identified. In addition to the density fluctuation measurements, a velocity-resolved estimate of the fluctuation-induced transport flux using correlations between a Langmuir probe and LIF is reported.

  1. Stochastic protein production and time-dependent current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorissen, Mieke; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2011-03-01

    Translation is the cellular process in which ribosomes make proteins from information encoded on messenger RNA. We model this process using driven lattice gases and take into account the finite lifetime of mRNA. The stochastic properties of the translation process can then be determined from the time-dependent current fluctuations of the lattice gas model. We illustrate our ideas with a totally asymmetric exclusion process with extended objects.

  2. Climate, fishing, and fluctuations of sardine and anchovy in the California Current.

    PubMed

    Lindegren, Martin; Checkley, David M; Rouyer, Tristan; MacCall, Alec D; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2013-08-13

    Since the days of Elton, population cycles have challenged ecologists and resource managers. Although the underlying mechanisms remain debated, theory holds that both density-dependent and density-independent processes shape the dynamics. One striking example is the large-scale fluctuations of sardine and anchovy observed across the major upwelling areas of the world. Despite a long history of research, the causes of these fluctuations remain unresolved and heavily debated, with significant implications for fisheries management. We here model the underlying causes of these fluctuations, using the California Current Ecosystem as a case study, and show that the dynamics, accurately reproduced since A.D. 1661 onward, are explained by interacting density-dependent processes (i.e., through species-specific life-history traits) and climate forcing. Furthermore, we demonstrate how fishing modifies the dynamics and show that the sardine collapse of the 1950s was largely unavoidable given poor recruitment conditions. Our approach provides unique insight into the origin of sardine-anchovy fluctuations and a knowledge base for sustainable fisheries management in the California Current Ecosystem and beyond.

  3. Enhancing critical current density of cuprate superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhari, Praveen

    2015-06-16

    The present invention concerns the enhancement of critical current densities in cuprate superconductors. Such enhancement of critical current densities include using wave function symmetry and restricting movement of Abrikosov (A) vortices, Josephson (J) vortices, or Abrikosov-Josephson (A-J) vortices by using the half integer vortices associated with d-wave symmetry present in the grain boundary.

  4. Current density and state density in diluted magnetic semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Merchancano, S. T.; Paredes Gutiérrez, H.; Zuñiga, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    We study in this paper the spin-polarized current density components in diluted magnetic semiconductor tunnelling diodes with different sample geometries. We calculate the resonant JxV and the density of states. The differential conductance curves are analyzed as functions of the applied voltage and the magnetic potential strength induced by the magnetic ions.

  5. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Measurement of Temperature, Velocity, and Density Fluctuation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen; Panda, Jayanta

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure dynamic gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 10 kHz. A high power CW laser beam is focused at a point in a heated air jet plume and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and spectrally resolved. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature, velocity, and density of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The circular interference fringe pattern is divided into four concentric regions and sampled at 1 and 10 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows for measurement of gas temperature and velocity. Independently monitoring the total scattered light intensity provides a measure of gas density. Power spectral density calculations of temperature, velocity, and density fluctuations, as well as mean and fluctuating quantities are demonstrated for various radial locations in the jet flow at a fixed axial distance from the jet exit plane. Results are compared with constant current anemometry and pitot probe measurements at the same locations.

  6. Maps of current density using density-functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soncini, A.; Teale, A. M.; Helgaker, T.; de Proft, F.; Tozer, D. J.

    2008-08-01

    The performance of several density-functional theory (DFT) methods for the calculation of current densities induced by a uniform magnetic field is examined. Calculations are performed using the BLYP and KT3 generalized-gradient approximations, together with the B3LYP hybrid functional. For the latter, both conventional and optimized effective potential (OEP) approaches are used. Results are also determined from coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles (CCSD) electron densities by a DFT constrained search procedure using the approach of Wu and Yang (WY). The current densities are calculated within the CTOCD-DZ2 distributed origin approach. Comparisons are made with results from Hartree-Fock (HF) theory. Several small molecules for which correlation is known to be especially important in the calculation of magnetic response properties are considered-namely, O3, CO, PN, and H2CO. As examples of aromatic and antiaromatic systems, benzene and planarized cyclooctatetraene molecules are considered, with specific attention paid to the ring current phenomenon and its Kohn-Sham orbital origin. Finally, the o-benzyne molecule is considered as a computationally challenging case. The HF and DFT induced current maps show qualitative differences, while among the DFT methods the maps show a similar qualitative structure. To assess quantitative differences in the calculated current densities with different methods, the maximal moduli of the induced current densities are compared and integration of the current densities to yield shielding constants is performed. In general, the maximal modulus is reduced in moving from HF to B3LYP and BLYP, and further reduced in moving to KT3, OEP(B3LYP), and WY(CCSD). The latter three methods offer the most accurate shielding constants in comparison with both experimental and ab initio data and hence the more reliable route to DFT calculation of induced current density in molecules.

  7. Spatial density fluctuations and selection effects in galaxy redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Labini, Francesco Sylos; Tekhanovich, Daniil; Baryshev, Yurij V. E-mail: d.tekhanovich@spbu.ru

    2014-07-01

    One of the main problems of observational cosmology is to determine the range in which a reliable measurement of galaxy correlations is possible. This corresponds to determining the shape of the correlation function, its possible evolution with redshift and the size and amplitude of large scale structures. Different selection effects, inevitably entering in any observation, introduce important constraints in the measurement of correlations. In the context of galaxy redshift surveys selection effects can be caused by observational techniques and strategies and by implicit assumptions used in the data analysis. Generally all these effects are taken into account by using pair-counting algorithms to measure two-point correlations. We review these methods stressing that they are based on the a-priori assumption that galaxy distribution is spatially homogeneous inside a given sample. We show that, when this assumption is not satisfied by the data, results of the correlation analysis are affected by finite size effects. In order to quantify these effects, we introduce a new method based on the computation of the gradient of galaxy counts along tiny cylinders. We show, by using artificial homogeneous and inhomogeneous point distributions, that this method identifies redshift dependent selection effects and disentangles them from the presence of large scale density fluctuations. We then apply this new method to several redshift catalogs and we find evidence that galaxy distribution, in those samples where selection effects are small enough, is characterized by power-law correlations with exponent γ=0.9 up to 20 Mpc/h followed by a change of slope that, in the range 20–100 Mpc/h, corresponds to a power-law exponent γ=0.25. Whether a crossover to spatial uniformity occurs at ∼ 100 Mpc/h or larger scales cannot be clarified by the present data.

  8. Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Banakh, V A; Smalikho, I N

    2014-09-22

    Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere have been studied based on numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation for the complex spectral amplitude of the wave field by the split-step method. It has been shown that under conditions of strong optical turbulence, the relative variance of energy density fluctuations of pulsed radiation of femtosecond duration becomes much less than the relative variance of intensity fluctuations of continuous-wave radiation. The spatial structure of fluctuations of the energy density with a decrease of the pulse duration becomes more large-scale and homogeneous. For shorter pulses the maximal value of the probability density distribution of energy density fluctuations tends to the mean value of the energy density.

  9. Parallel-beam correlation technique for measuring density fluctuations in plasmas with strong magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, A.R.

    1981-04-01

    A laser diagnostic scheme is described which facilitates localization of density fluctuations along the line of sight. The method exploits both the generally observed anisotropy of density fluctuations in low-beta plasmas, as well as the twisting of the magnetic field which occurs across the minor diameter of reversed-field pinches, spheromaks, etc. Both interferometric and schlieren variations are discussed.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Short Scalelength Density Fluctuations in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J.D.; MacGowan, B.J.; Glenzer, S.H.; Kirkwood, R.K.; Kruer, W.L.; Williams, E.A.; Stone, G.F.; Montgomery, D.S.; Schmitt, A.J.

    1999-11-01

    The technique of near forward laser. scattering is used to infer characteristics of intrinsic and controlled density fluctuations in laser-produced plasmas. Intrinsic fluctuations are studied in long scalelength plasmas where the fluctuations exhibit scale sizes related to the size of the intensity variations in the plasma forming and interaction beams. Stimulated Brillouin forward scattering and filamentation appear to be the primary mechanism through which these fluctuations originate. The beam spray which results from these fluctuations is important to understand since it can affect symmetry in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiment. Controlled fluctuations are studied in foam and exploding foil targets. Forward scattered light from foam targets shows evidence that the initial target inhomogeneities remain after the target is laser heated. Forward scattered light from an exploding foil plasma shows that a regular intensity pattern can be used to produce a spatially correlated density fluctuation pattern. These results provide data which can be used to benchmark numerical models of beam spray.

  11. Transverse current fluctuations in the Yukawa one-component plasma.

    PubMed

    Mithen, James P

    2014-01-01

    Using numerical simulations, we investigate the wave number and frequency dependent transverse current correlation function CT(k,ω) of a single-component fluid with Yukawa interaction potential, also known as the Yukawa one-component plasma. The transverse current correlation function is an important quantity because it contains the microscopic details of the viscoelastic behavior of the fluid. We show that, in the region of densities and temperatures in which shear waves do not propagate, the dynamics of the system are in striking agreement with a simple model of generalized hydrodynamics. As either the density is increased or the temperature decreased, the transverse current correlation function shows additional structure that the simple models fail to capture.

  12. The origin of density fluctuations in the 'new inflationary universe'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    Cosmological mysteries which are not explained by the Big Bang hypothesis but may be approached by a revamped inflationary universe model are discussed. Attention is focused on the isotropy, the large-scale homogeneity, small-scale inhomogeneity, the oldness/flatness of the universe, and the baryon asymmetry. The universe is assumed to start in the lowest energy state, be initially dominated by false vacuum energy, enter a de Sitter phase, and then cross a barrier which is followed by the formation of fluctuation regions that lead to structure. The scalar fields (perturbation regions) experience quantum fluctuations which produce spontaneous symmetry breaking on a large scale. The scalar field value would need to be much greater than the expansion rate during the de Sitter epoch. A supersymmetric (flat) potential which satisfies the requirement, yields fluctuations of the right magnitude, and allows inflation to occur is described.

  13. Density fluctuations and dielectric constant of water in low and high density liquid states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascaris, Erik; Zhang, Cui; Galli, Giulia A.; Franzese, Giancarlo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2012-02-01

    The hypothesis of a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) in the phase diagram of water, though first published many years ago, still remains the subject of a heated debate. According to this hypothesis there exists a critical point near T 244 K, and P 215 MPa, located at the end of a coexistence line between a high density liquid (HDL) and a low density liquid state (LDL). The LLCP lies below the homogenous nucleation temperature of water and it has so far remained inaccessible to experiments. We study a model of water exhibiting a liquid-liquid phase transition (that is a liquid interacting through the ST2 potential) and investigate the properties of dipolar fluctuations as a function of density, in the HDL and LDL. We find an interesting correlation between the macroscopic dielectric constants and the densities of the two liquids in the vicinity of the critical point, and we discuss possible implications for measurements close to the region where the LLCP may be located.

  14. Additivity, density fluctuations, and nonequilibrium thermodynamics for active Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Subhadip; Mishra, Shradha; Pradhan, Punyabrata

    2016-05-01

    Using an additivity property, we study particle-number fluctuations in a system of interacting self-propelled particles, called active Brownian particles (ABPs), which consists of repulsive disks with random self-propulsion velocities. From a fluctuation-response relation, a direct consequence of additivity, we formulate a thermodynamic theory which captures the previously observed features of nonequilibrium phase transition in the ABPs from a homogeneous fluid phase to an inhomogeneous phase of coexisting gas and liquid. We substantiate the predictions of additivity by analytically calculating the subsystem particle-number distributions in the homogeneous fluid phase away from criticality where analytically obtained distributions are compatible with simulations in the ABPs.

  15. Microwave reflectometry for the study of density fluctuations in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.

    1990-12-01

    The effect of small scale density fluctuations on the propagation of electromagnetic waves in an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma in the presence of a cutoff is investigated. It is shown that, provided the fluctuation scale length is greater than the free space wavelength of an incident plane wave, the scattered field is strongly enhanced from fluctuations near the turning point. Numerical results for wave propagation in a tokamak plasma demonstrate the feasibility of reflectometry for the localized measurement of density fluctuations in the range k {sub {perpendicular}} {rho}{sub i} {much lt} 1. 19 refs., 6 figs,

  16. Burnout current density of bismuth nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, T. W.; Picht, O.; Müller, S.; Neumann, R.; Völklein, F.; Karim, S.; Duan, J. L.

    2008-05-01

    Single bismuth nanowires with diameters ranging from 100nmto1μm were electrochemically deposited in ion track-etched single-pore polycarbonate membranes. The maximum current density the wires are able to carry was investigated by ramping up the current until failure occurred. It increases by three to four orders of magnitude for nanowires embedded in the template compared to bulk bismuth and rises with diminishing diameter. Simulations show that the wires are heated up electrically to the melting temperature. Since the surface-to-volume ratio rises with diminishing diameter, thinner wires dissipate the heat more efficiently to the surrounding polymer matrix and, thus, can tolerate larger current densities.

  17. Electrodialysis simulation to achieve optimum current density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, Cal C.

    1993-01-01

    Electrodialysis is used to remove salts from waste or other water streams, to yield a concentrated brine and a substatially deionized product water. During the electrodialysis process, the boundary layer adjacent to the ion selective membrane can become depleted of ions, resulting in severe pH changes sometimes accompanied by precipitation, and power losses, by a process known as water splitting. In order to optimize the applied electric current density, to achieve maximum deionization without exceeding the limiting current at any point along the path, a simulation program has been created to plot ion concentrations and fluxes, and cell current densities and voltages along the electrodialysis path. A means for tapering the current density along the path is recommended.

  18. Few-layer black phosphorus field-effect transistors with reduced current fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Na, Junhong; Lee, Young Tack; Lim, Jung Ah; Hwang, Do Kyung; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Choi, Won Kook; Song, Yong-Won

    2014-11-25

    We investigated the reduction of current fluctuations in few-layer black phosphorus (BP) field-effect transistors resulting from Al2O3 passivation. In order to verify the effect of Al2O3 passivation on device characteristics, measurements and analyses were conducted on thermally annealed devices before and after the passivation. More specifically, static and low-frequency noise analyses were used in monitoring the charge transport characteristics in the devices. The carrier number fluctuation (CNF) model, which is related to the charge trapping/detrapping process near the interface between the channel and gate dielectric, was employed to describe the current fluctuation phenomena. Noise reduction due to the Al2O3 passivation was expressed in terms of the reduced interface trap density values D(it) and N(it), extracted from the subthreshold slope (SS) and the CNF model, respectively. The deviations between the interface trap density values extracted using the SS value and CNF model are elucidated in terms of the role of the Schottky barrier between the few-layer BP and metal contact. Furthermore, the preservation of the Al2O3-passivated few-layer BP flakes in ambient air for two months was confirmed by identical Raman spectra.

  19. Measurements of ICRF wave-induced density fluctuations in LHD by a microwave reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, A.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tsujii, N.; Saito, K.; Seki, T.; Kasahara, H.; Kamio, S.; Seki, R.; Mutoh, T.; Yamada, I.; Takase, Y.

    2015-12-01

    An O-mode microwave reflectometer has been developed to measure ICRF wave induced electron density fluctuations in LHD plasmas. The system has two probing frequencies (28.8 and 30.1 GHz) to measure two spatial points simultaneously. The rms density fluctuation levels are typically 0.01%. The linearity between the measured density fluctuation amplitude and the square root of the RF power is discussed. The decay length of the RF field was estimated to be 1 to 7 m under the operational condition investigated. A typical spatial distance between the two measurement points corresponding to the two probing frequencies is a few centimeters, and the fluctuation amplitudes at the two points are similar in amplitude. The phase difference between the two fluctuations show in-phase relationship on average. Out-of phase relationships, which implies a standing wave structure, are often observed when the wave absorption is expected to be poor.

  20. An observational study of MHD wave-induced density fluctuations upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, Steven; Fey, Alan; Anderson, Gregory; Fuselier, Stephen

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of plasma density fluctations upstream of the earth's bow shock and their association with MHD waves is reported. The normalized density fluctuation was 14 percent on a day when the plasma beta was less than unity and the waves were circularly polarized and of relatively low amplitude, and 17 percent on a day when the plasma beta was in excess of unity and the waves were elliptically polarized and of large fractional amplitude. On both days there was a feature of the density power spectrum at the MHD carrier wave frequency attributable to oblique propagation of the waves with propagation angles of a few degrees with respect to the mean field. Ponderomotive effects due to spatial gradient in the MHD wave energy density are proposed as responsible for a correlation betweeen density and transverse wave intensity on both days. Generation of density fluctuations by linear polarized MHD waves is not an important contributor to the observed density fluctuations.

  1. Suppression of Interfacial Current Fluctuation in MoTe2 Transistors with Different Dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hyunjin; Joo, Min-Kyu; Yun, Yoojoo; Park, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Gwanmu; Moon, Byoung Hee; Yi, Hojoon; Suh, Dongseok; Lim, Seong Chu

    2016-07-27

    For transition metal dichalcogenides, the fluctuation of the channel current due to charged impurities is attributed to a large surface area and a thickness of a few nanometers. To investigate current variance at the interface of transistors, we obtain the low-frequency (LF) noise features of MoTe2 multilayer field-effect transistors with different dielectric environments. The LF noise properties are analyzed using the combined carrier mobility and carrier number fluctuation model which is additionally parametrized with an interfacial Coulomb-scattering parameter (α) that varies as a function of the accumulated carrier density (Nacc) and the location of the active channel layer of MoTe2. Our model shows good agreement with the current power spectral density (PSD) of MoTe2 devices from a low to high current range and indicates that the parameter α exhibits a stronger dependence on Nacc with an exponent -γ of -1.18 to approximately -1.64 for MoTe2 devices, compared with -0.5 for Si devices. The raised Coulomb scattering of the carriers, particularly for a low-current regime, is considered to be caused by the unique traits of layered semiconductors such as interlayer coupling and the charge distribution strongly affected by the device structure under a gate bias, which completely change the charge screening effect in MoTe2 multilayer. Comprehensive static and LF noise analyses of MoTe2 devices with our combined model reveal that a chemical-vapor deposited h-BN monolayer underneath MoTe2 channel and the Al2O3 passivation layer have a dissimilar contribution to the reduction of current fluctuation. The three-fold enhanced carrier mobility due to the h-BN is from the weakened carrier scattering at the gate dielectric interface and the additional 30% increase in carrier mobility by Al2O3 passivation is due to the reduced interface traps.

  2. Suppression of Interfacial Current Fluctuation in MoTe2 Transistors with Different Dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hyunjin; Joo, Min-Kyu; Yun, Yoojoo; Park, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Gwanmu; Moon, Byoung Hee; Yi, Hojoon; Suh, Dongseok; Lim, Seong Chu

    2016-07-27

    For transition metal dichalcogenides, the fluctuation of the channel current due to charged impurities is attributed to a large surface area and a thickness of a few nanometers. To investigate current variance at the interface of transistors, we obtain the low-frequency (LF) noise features of MoTe2 multilayer field-effect transistors with different dielectric environments. The LF noise properties are analyzed using the combined carrier mobility and carrier number fluctuation model which is additionally parametrized with an interfacial Coulomb-scattering parameter (α) that varies as a function of the accumulated carrier density (Nacc) and the location of the active channel layer of MoTe2. Our model shows good agreement with the current power spectral density (PSD) of MoTe2 devices from a low to high current range and indicates that the parameter α exhibits a stronger dependence on Nacc with an exponent -γ of -1.18 to approximately -1.64 for MoTe2 devices, compared with -0.5 for Si devices. The raised Coulomb scattering of the carriers, particularly for a low-current regime, is considered to be caused by the unique traits of layered semiconductors such as interlayer coupling and the charge distribution strongly affected by the device structure under a gate bias, which completely change the charge screening effect in MoTe2 multilayer. Comprehensive static and LF noise analyses of MoTe2 devices with our combined model reveal that a chemical-vapor deposited h-BN monolayer underneath MoTe2 channel and the Al2O3 passivation layer have a dissimilar contribution to the reduction of current fluctuation. The three-fold enhanced carrier mobility due to the h-BN is from the weakened carrier scattering at the gate dielectric interface and the additional 30% increase in carrier mobility by Al2O3 passivation is due to the reduced interface traps. PMID:27362461

  3. Thermionic current densities from first principles.

    PubMed

    Voss, Johannes; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Chou, Sharon H; Howe, Roger T; Bargatin, Igor; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2013-05-28

    We present a density functional theory-based method for calculating thermionic emission currents from a cathode into vacuum using a non-equilibrium Green's function approach. It does not require semi-classical approximations or crude simplifications of the electronic structure used in previous methods and thus provides quantitative predictions of thermionic emission for adsorbate-coated surfaces. The obtained results match well with experimental measurements of temperature-dependent current densities. Our approach can thus enable computational design of composite electrode materials.

  4. Simple model for an upper bound on density fluctuations in a turbulent pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    A rough scaling relationship for plasma density fluctuations driven by magnetic field disturbances is derived. The result is found to agree with an earlier theory based on acoustic waves inflating magnetic flux surfaces.

  5. Scattering from edge density fluctuations on the lower hybrid waves in FTU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrò, Giuseppe; Ridolfini, V. Pericoli

    2007-09-01

    Careful measurements of density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) plasma have been carried out. The analytical model proposed by Andrews and Perkins for the scattering of lower hybrid (LH) waves by density fluctuations will constitute the basis of our discussion. The envelop of the scattering processes occurring on single points sampled along the poloidal profile of the launching antenna at fixed step Δθ is considered. The trajectories and N∥ (LH parallel refraction index) evolution of the corresponding ray bundles are followed using the fast ray tracing code (FRTC), coupled to the transport code ASTRA to infer the radial absorption profile on a given target plasma. Interpretative ASTRA simulations are presented to support the correctness of the scattering model assumed. The current drive (CD) efficiency calculated is then compared with that measured for the shot assumed as reference and with the scaling valid for FTU. Comparison of measured pump frequency spectral broadening on FTU and theoretical prediction is also presented.

  6. Tangential phase contrast imaging diagnostic for density fluctuation measurement on CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Ernest P.

    Understanding the nature and effects of turbulence is one of the central efforts in fusion science. Spatially resolved measurement of turbulent fluctuations in the core of hot fusion plasmas would permit the detailed investigation of the relationship between turbulence characteristics and variations in global confinement and local gradients. The tangential CO2 laser phase contrast imaging system was developed on the Current Drive Experiment Upgrade (CDX-U), to allow such measurements to be made. Theoretical work demonstrates that the effect of the plasma on the tangential imaging beam is approximately that of a shift-invariant point-spread function. The result indicates that the recovery of core-localized density fluctuation images using a spatial filter is possible in principle. The imaging process is studied through extensive computer simulations. Results show that a simple step-function phase mirror design provides adequate qualitative image recovery, even in the presence of non-ideal effects in the plasma model, such as a finite k∥ variation along the field lines and significant field line pitch. The instrumental components of the system are characterized and calibrated and the absolute system sensitivity is calculated. Sound waves are used as test phase objects to calibrate the diagnostic. The tests locate the image plane, verify the system magnification, and demonstrate spatial filtering capabilities. Plasma measurements show adequate signal to noise and k spectrum measurement capability. Localization of the measurement is suggested by measurements of sawtooth modes. Full experimental demonstration of image recovery, however, will require further work. Preliminary analyses of the MHD activity and turbulence are done. Analysis of the sawtooth mode measurements indicate a long wavelength structure (kr/leq0.78cm-1) localized to the core, and a density fluctuation amplitude of (3.7/pm0.7)cm-1, yielding /Delta n/n≈(17/pm3)/%. A measurement of the fluctuation k

  7. Stable explicit coupling of the Yee scheme with a linear current model in fluctuating magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Filipe da; Pinto, Martin Campos; Després, Bruno; Heuraux, Stéphane

    2015-08-15

    This work analyzes the stability of the Yee scheme for non-stationary Maxwell's equations coupled with a linear current model with density fluctuations. We show that the usual procedure may yield unstable scheme for physical situations that correspond to strongly magnetized plasmas in X-mode (TE) polarization. We propose to use first order clustered discretization of the vectorial product that gives back a stable coupling. We validate the schemes on some test cases representative of direct numerical simulations of X-mode in a magnetic fusion plasma including turbulence.

  8. Recent developments in density, temperature and momentum fluctuation measurement. [in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battle, T. M.; Wang, P. K.; Cheng, D. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Attention is drawn to recent advancements in the fluctuating line-reversal temperature measurement, the development of the two-dimensional drag-sensing probe into a three-dimensional drag-sensing probe, and the fluctuating density gradient cross beam Schlieren technique. An experimental apparatus is explained whereby the temperature fluctuation in a pulsating air-fuel ratio Bunsen burner is measured by means of sodium D-line reversal methods with a new photoelectric circuit to obtain both fluctuating and mean temperature data. The three-D drag probe is made possible by a newly invented differential and total magnetic sensing system that separates signals due to three orthogonal movements so that the vectorial momentum fluctuation can be measured. In the case of the Schlieren technique, the effect of anisotropic density gradients with respect to the angle between the polarization plane and the knife edge of a laser Schlieren system is studied.

  9. Magnetic Fluctuations in Pair-Density-Wave Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Morten H; Jacobsen, Henrik; Maier, Thomas A; Andersen, Brian M

    2016-04-22

    Pair-density-wave superconductivity constitutes a novel electronic condensate proposed to be realized in certain unconventional superconductors. Establishing its potential existence is important for our fundamental understanding of superconductivity in correlated materials. Here we compute the dynamical magnetic susceptibility in the presence of a pair-density-wave ordered state and study its fingerprints on the spin-wave spectrum including the neutron resonance. In contrast to the standard case of d-wave superconductivity, we show that the pair-density-wave phase exhibits neither a spin gap nor a magnetic resonance peak, in agreement with a recent neutron scattering experiment on underdoped La_{1.905}Ba_{0.095}CuO_{4} [Z. Xu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 177002 (2014)]. PMID:27152819

  10. Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.; Kogan, V.G.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the critical current I{sub c}(H) is considered for a short Josephson junction with the critical current density j{sub c} alternating along the tunnel contact. Two model cases, periodic and randomly alternating j{sub c}, are treated in detail. Recent experimental data on I{sub c}(H) for grain-boundary Josephson junctions in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Mobility of electrons in supercritical krypton: Role of density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Masaru; Holroyd, Richard A.; Preses, Jack M.

    2007-07-01

    Excess electrons were generated in supercritical krypton by means of pulsed x-ray irradiation, and the electron transport phenomena were studied. Electron signals immediately after a 30ps pulse showed a distinctive feature characteristic of the presence of the Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in the momentum transfer cross section. The dependence of the drift velocity vD on field strength was found to be concave upward in the low field region and then to go through a maximum with increasing field strength, which is also typical of the presence of a minimum in the scattering cross section at an intermediate field strength. A minimum in the electron mobility was observed at about one-half the critical density. The acoustical phonon scattering model, which successfully explained the mobility change in this density region in supercritical xenon, was again found to account for the mobility in supercritical krypton.

  12. Dynamical Selection of the Primordial Density Fluctuation Amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Lehners, Jean-Luc; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2011-02-25

    In inflationary models, the predicted amplitude of primordial density perturbations Q is much larger than the observed value ({approx}10{sup -5}) for natural choices of parameters. To explain the requisite exponential fine-tuning, anthropic selection is often invoked, especially in cases where microphysics is expected to produce a complex energy landscape. By contrast, we find examples of ekpyrotic models based on heterotic M theory for which dynamical selection naturally favors the observed value of Q.

  13. Dynamical selection of the primordial density fluctuation amplitude.

    PubMed

    Lehners, Jean-Luc; Steinhardt, Paul J

    2011-02-25

    In inflationary models, the predicted amplitude of primordial density perturbations Q is much larger than the observed value (∼10(-5)) for natural choices of parameters. To explain the requisite exponential fine-tuning, anthropic selection is often invoked, especially in cases where microphysics is expected to produce a complex energy landscape. By contrast, we find examples of ekpyrotic models based on heterotic M theory for which dynamical selection naturally favors the observed value of Q. PMID:21405562

  14. Radial evolution of the intermittency of density fluctuations in the fast solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, R.; D'Amicis, R.; Telloni, D.; Primavera, L.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Carbone, V.; Malara, F.; Veltri, P.

    2014-05-01

    We study the radial evolution of the intermittency of density fluctuations in the fast solar wind. The study is performed by analyzing the plasma density measurements provided by Helios 2 in the inner heliosphere between 0.3 and 0.9 AU. The analysis is carried out by means of a complete set of diagnostic tools, including the flatness factor at different timescales to estimate intermittency, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to estimate the degree of intermittency, and the Fourier transform to estimate the power spectral densities of these fluctuations. Density fluctuations within the fast wind are rather intermittent and their level of intermittency, together with the amplitude of intermittent events, decreases with the distance from the Sun, at odds with the intermittency of both magnetic field and all other plasma parameters. Furthermore, the intermittent events are strongly correlated, exhibiting temporal clustering. This indicates that the mechanism underlying their generation departs from a time-varying Poisson process. A remarkable, qualitative similarity with the behavior of plasma density fluctuations obtained from a numerical study of the nonlinear evolution of parametric instability in the solar wind supports the idea that this mechanism has an important role in governing density fluctuations in the inner heliosphere.

  15. Density fluctuations near the liquid-gas critical point of a confined fluid.

    PubMed

    Melnichenko, Y B; Wignall, G D; Cole, D R; Frielinghaus, H

    2004-05-01

    We report the results of an experimental study of the effect of a dilute silica network on liquid-gas critical phenomena in carbon dioxide (CO2). Using small-angle neutron scattering, we measured the correlation length of the density fluctuations in bulk (xi(bulk)) and confined CO2 (xi(conf)) as a function of temperature and average fluid density. We find that quenched disorder induced by an aerogel suppresses density fluctuations: xi(conf) loses the Ising model divergence characteristic of xi(bulk) and does not exceed the size of pores in the homogeneous region.

  16. Thermodynamics versus Local Density Fluctuations in the Metal-Mott-Insulator Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, J. H.; Cocchi, E.; Miller, L. A.; Chan, C. F.; Pertot, D.; Brennecke, F.; Köhl, M.

    2016-09-01

    The crossover between a metal and a Mott insulator leads to a localization of fermions from delocalized Bloch states to localized states. We experimentally study this crossover using fermionic atoms in an optical lattice by measuring thermodynamic and local (on-site) density correlations. In the metallic phase at incommensurable filling we observe the violation of the local fluctuation-dissipation theorem indicating that the thermodynamics of the system cannot be characterized by local observables alone. In contrast, in the Mott insulator we observe the convergence of local and thermodynamic fluctuations indicating the absence of long-range density-density correlations.

  17. Dynamical density fluctuations of superfluids near the critical velocity.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yusuke; Watabe, Shohei

    2010-07-16

    We propose a stability criterion of superfluids in condensed Bose-Einstein systems, which incorporates the spectral function or the autocorrelation function of the local density. Within the Gross-Pitaevskii-Bogoliubov theory, we demonstrate the validity of our criterion for the soliton-emission instability, with use of explicit forms of zero modes of the Bogoliubov equation and a dynamical scaling near the saddle-node bifurcation. We also show that the criterion is applicable to the Landau phonon instability and the Landau roton instability within the single-mode approximation.

  18. Structure, Density and Velocity Fluctuations in Quasi-2D non-Brownian Suspensions of Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouyer, Florence; Lhuillier, Daniel; Martin, Jérôme; Salin, Dominique

    1999-11-01

    Non-brownian sedimenting suspensions exhibit density and velocity fluctuations. We have performed experiments on a quasi-2D counter-flow stabilized suspension of 2000 spherical particles, namely a liquid-solid fluidized bed in a Hele-Shaw cell. This 2D suspension displays a uniform concentration but the particle radial distribution function and the fluctuations of the particle number in a sub-volume of the suspension suggest that the micostructure is homogeneous but not random. We have also measured the velocity fluctuations of a test-particle and the fluctuation of the mean particle velocity in a sub-volume. It happens that the relation between velocity and concentration fluctuation in a sub-volume can be deduced from a balance between buoyancy and parietal friction forces.

  19. Synergistic influences of phase, density, and climatic variation on the dynamics of fluctuating populations.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Varun R; Getz, Lowell L; Hostetler, Jeffrey A; Ozgul, Arpat; Oli, Madan K

    2011-08-01

    Although ecologists have long recognized that certain mammalian species exhibit high-amplitude, often multiannual, fluctuations in abundance, their causes have remained poorly understood and the subject of intense debate. A key contention has been the relative role of density-dependent and density-independent processes in governing population dynamics. We applied capture-mark-recapture analysis to 25 years of monthly trapping data from a fluctuating prairie vole Microtus ochrogaster population in Illinois, USA, to estimate realized population growth rates and associated vital rates (survival and recruitment) and modeled them as a function of vole density and density-independent climatic variation. We also tested for phase dependence and seasonality in the effects of the above processes. Variation in the realized population growth rate was best explained by phase-specific changes in vole density lagged by one month and mean monthly temperatures with no time lags. The underlying vital rates, survival and recruitment, were influenced by the additive and interactive effects of phase, vole density, and mean monthly temperatures. Our results are consistent with the observation that large-scale population fluctuations are characterized by phase-specific changes in demographic and physiological characteristics. Our findings also support the growing realization that the interaction between climatic variables and density-dependent factors may be a widespread phenomenon, and they suggest that the direction and magnitude of such interactive effects may be phase specific. We conclude that density-dependent and density-independent climatic variables work in tandem during each phase of density fluctuations to drive the dynamics of fluctuating populations. PMID:21905434

  20. Steadiness in Dilute Pyroclastic Density Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are often unsteady, as evidenced by direct observations of dilute lobes or jets emerging from the fronts of larger currents and by deposits that indicate transient transport and depositional regimes. We used scaled experiments to investigate unsteadiness in dilute PDCs. The experimental currents were run in an 8.5x6.1x2.6 m tank and comprised heated or ambient temperature 20-μm talc powder turbulently suspended in air. Experiments were scaled such that densimetric and thermal Richardson numbers, Froude number, and particle Stokes and settling numbers were dynamically similar to natural dilute PDCs. Although the experiment Reynolds numbers are substantially lower than those of natural PDCs, the experiments are fully turbulent. Experiments were observed with video and high-speed cameras and high-frequency thermocouples. Currents were generated with total eruption durations of 100 s. Unsteadiness in source conditions was produced by interrupting supply for intervals, t, with durations of 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 s in the experimental runs at 35 and 70 s. When t<2.5 s, the currents are indistinguishable from currents with steady supply. In runs with t=2.5-5 s, the individual pulses comprising each current are readily apparent near the source, but decay with distance downstream until the currents appear as single (e.g. steady) flows. In experiments with t=10 s, the 3 pulses comprising each run never merge and the currents remain unsteady. Comparison with the integral turbulent timescale, τ, and current velocity, U, show that unsteadiness is persistent when t>3<τ but currents are steady when t<τ. In currents with 3τ>t>τ, unsteadiness decays such that at a distance of ~4Ut, the currents are again steady. Applied to natural dilute PDCs, our results suggest that currents and their resulting deposits, will only show evidence of unsteadiness if they are disrupted for many seconds and those breaks may "heal" over distances of 100s of meters.

  1. Current density compression of intense ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefkow, Adam Bennett

    Current density compression of intense ion beams in space and time is required for heavy ion fusion, in order to achieve the necessary intensities to implode an inertial confinement fusion target. Longitudinal compression to high current in a short pulse is achieved by imposing a velocity tilt upon the space-charge-dominated charge bunch, and a variety of means exist for simultaneous transverse focusing to a coincident focal plane. Compression to the desired levels requires sufficient neutralization of the beam by a pre-formed plasma during final transport. The physics of current density compression is studied in scaled experiments relevant for the operating regime of a heavy ion driver, and related theory and advanced particle-in-cell simulations provide valuable insight into the physical and technological limitations involved. A fast Faraday cup measures longitudinal compression ratios greater than 50 with pulse durations less than 5 ns, in excellent agreement with reduced models and sophisticated simulations, which account for many experimental parameters and effects. The detailed physics of achieving current density compression in the laboratory is reviewed. Quantitative examples explore the dependency of longitudinal compression on effects such as the finite-size acceleration gap, voltage waveform accuracy, variation in initial beam temperature, pulse length, intended fractional velocity tilt, and energy uncertainty, as well as aberration within focusing elements and plasma neutralization processes. In addition, plasma evolution in experimental sources responsible for the degree of beam neutralization is studied numerically, since compression stagnation occurs under inadequate neutralization conditions, which may excite nonlinear collective excitations due to beam-plasma interactions. The design of simultaneous focusing experiments using both existing and upgraded hardware is provided, and parametric variations important for compression physics are

  2. Novel Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Thin Films in Supercritical Fluids-Effect of Density Fluctuation

    SciTech Connect

    Koga,T.

    2004-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) is being used increasingly as a green solvent in polymer processing. The major disadvantage thus far is that only a limited class of polymers, such as fluorinated or silicone-based polymers, can be dissolved in CO2. Here I show that large density fluctuations in scCO2 can significantly enhance the solubility of scCO2 in polymer thin films even when the bulk polymers have very poor miscibility with CO2. By using in situ neutron reflectivity, I found that a wide variety of polymer thin films can swell as much as 30-60% when exposed to scCO2 within a narrow temperature and pressure regime, known as the 'density fluctuation ridge', which defines the maximum density fluctuation amplitude in CO2. Furthermore, the swollen structures induced by the density fluctuation could be frozen by a flash evaporation of CO2 via the vitrification process of the polymer without a formation of void structures. X-ray reflectivity clearly showed that the scCO2 process could be used to produce uniform low-density polymer thin films. I also found that other properties of the vitrified films, such as index of refraction, dielectric constant and glass transition, were correlated with the low-density density profile.

  3. Radial electrostatic flux inferred from core measurements of potential and density fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, D. R.; Schoch, P. M.; Crowley, T. P.; Connor, K. A.; Ouroua, A.

    2001-04-01

    Broadband potential fluctuations and electrostatic fluctuation induced particle flux have been measured in the core of a medium size tokamak plasma for the first time. Density fluctuations and wave numbers were simultaneously measured. Measurements indicate that radial electrostatic fluctuation induced particle flux in the core region, at the normalized radii of 0.17<{rho}<0.38, due to modes with wave numbers less than 4 cm{sup -1} is small in magnitude, is likely directed inward, and cannot account for particle flux predicted by the continuity equation and particle source codes. Estimates of electrostatic energy flux are also significantly less than values predicted via power balance analysis. Asymmetries in coherent density and potential fluctuation levels on closed flux surfaces are evident. Relative fluctuation levels {tilde n}/n and {tilde {phi}} tend to increase with radius, and the fluctuations are Boltzmann-like in the region 0.17{<=}{rho}{<=}0.38. The direction of mode propagation is in the electron diamagnetic drift direction. Corresponding phase velocities, v{sub ph}{approx}3.5x10{sup 5} cm/s, are similar to drift wave velocities.

  4. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, S.A.; Fawcett, E.; Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G.

    1992-11-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  5. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, S.A. . Dept. of Physics); Fawcett, E. . Dept. of Physics); Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G. )

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  6. Effect of Heating on Turbulent Density Fluctuations and Noise Generation From High Speed Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Mielke, Amy F.; Eck, Dennis G.

    2004-01-01

    Heated jets in a wide range of temperature ratios (TR), and acoustic Mach numbers (Ma) were investigated experimentally using far field microphones and a molecular Rayleigh scattering technique. The latter provided density fluctuations measurements. Two sets of operating conditions were considered: (1) TR was varied between 0.84 and 2.7 while Ma was fixed at 0.9; (2) Ma was varied between 0.6 and 1.48, while TR was fixed at 2.27. The implementation of the molecular Rayleigh scattering technique required dust removal and usage of a hydrogen combustor to avoid soot particles. Time averaged density measurements in the first set of data showed differences in the peripheral density shear layers between the unheated and heated jets. The nozzle exit shear layer showed increased turbulence level with increased plume temperature. Nevertheless, further downstream the density fluctuations spectra are found to be nearly identical for all Mach number and temperature ratio conditions. To determine noise sources a correlation study between plume density fluctuations and far field sound pressure fluctuations was conducted. For all jets the core region beyond the end of the potential flow was found to be the strongest noise source. Except for an isothermal jet, the correlations did not differ significantly with increasing temperature ratio. The isothermal jet created little density fluctuations. Although the far field noise from this jet did not show any exceptional trend, the flow-sound correlations were very low. This indicated that the density fluctuations only acted as a "tracer parameter" for the noise sources.

  7. Density Fluctuation in Asymmetric Nozzle Plumes and Correlation with Far Field Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2001-01-01

    A comparative experimental study of air density fluctuations in the unheated plumes of a circular, 4-tabbed-circular, chevron-circular and 10-lobed rectangular nozzles was performed at a fixed Mach number of 0.95 using a recently developed Rayleigh scattering based technique. Subsequently, the flow density fluctuations are cross-correlated with the far field sound pressure fluctuations to determine sources for acoustics emission. The nearly identical noise spectra from the baseline circular and the chevron nozzles are found to be in agreement with the similarity in spreading, turbulence fluctuations, and flow-sound correlations measured in the plumes. The lobed nozzle produced the least low frequency noise, in agreement with the weakest overall density fluctuations and flow-sound correlation. The tabbed nozzle took an intermediate position in the hierarchy of noise generation, intensity of turbulent fluctuation and flow-sound correlation. Some of the features in the 4-tabbed nozzle are found to be explainable in terms of splitting of the jet in a central large core and 4 side jetlets.

  8. Poynting vector, energy densities, and pressure of collective transverse electromagnetic fluctuations in unmagnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.

    2012-01-15

    A systematic calculation of the electromagnetic properties (Poynting vector, electromagnetic energy, and pressure) of the collective transverse fluctuations in unmagnetized plasmas with velocity-anisotropic plasma particle distributions functions is presented. Time-averaged electromagnetic properties for monochromatic weakly damped wave-like fluctuations and space-averaged electromagnetic properties for monochromatic weakly propagating and aperiodic fluctuations are calculated. For aperiodic fluctuations, the Poynting vector as well as the sum of the space-averaged electric and magnetic field energy densities vanish. However, aperiodic fluctuations possess a positive pressure given by its magnetic energy density. This finite pressure density p{sub a} of aperiodic fluctuations has important consequences for the dynamics of cosmic unmagnetized plasmas such as the intergalactic medium after reionization. Adopting the standard cosmological evolution model, we show that this additional pressure changes the expansion law of the universe leading to further deceleration. Negative vacuum pressure counterbalances this deceleration to an accelerating universe provided that the negative vacuum pressure is greater than 1.5p{sub a}, which we estimate to be of the order 2.1 {center_dot} 10{sup -16} dyn cm{sup -2}.

  9. Density fluctuations in the interstellar medium: Evidence for anisotropic magnetogasdynamic turbulence. I - Model and astrophysical sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higdon, J. C.

    1984-10-01

    A model of anisotropic magnetogasdynamic turbulence is developed in order to investigate quantitatively a turbulent fluid origin for the small spatial scale density fluctuations observed in 1981 by Armstrong, Cordes, and Rickett in the interstellar medium. The anisotropy at these small spatial scales results from the presence of a large-scale approximately uniform magnetic field that is a sum of the steady-state galactic magnetic field and the large-scale turbulent magnetic field fluctuations. The observed density fluctuations are interpreted to be two-dimensional isobaric entropy variations with oppositely directed gradients in temperature and density projected transverse to the local approximately uniform magnetic field. Three possible sites - cloud shell H II regions, diffuse H II regions produced by O stars, and the tenuous intercloud medium - are investigated as possible locations for turbulent flows.

  10. Investigation of Density Fluctuations in Supersonic Free Jets and Correlation with Generated Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Seasholtz, R. G.

    2000-01-01

    The air density fluctuations in the plumes of fully-expanded, unheated free jets were investigated experimentally using a Rayleigh scattering based technique. The point measuring technique used a continuous wave laser, fiber-optic transmission and photon counting electronics. The radial and centerline profiles of time-averaged density and root-mean-square density fluctuation provided a comparative description of jet growth. To measure density fluctuation spectra a two-Photomultiplier tube technique was used. Crosscorrelation between the two PMT signals significantly reduced electronic shot noise contribution. Turbulent density fluctuations occurring up to a Strouhal number (Sr) of 2.5 were resolved. A remarkable feature of density spectra, obtained from the same locations of jets in 0.5< M<1.5 range, is a constant Strouhal frequency for peak fluctuations. A detailed survey at Mach numbers M = 0.95, 1.4 and 1.8 showed that, in general, distribution of various Strouhal frequency fluctuations remained similar for the three jets. In spite of the similarity in the flow fluctuation the noise characteristics were found to be significantly different. Spark schlieren photographs and near field microphone measurements confirmed that the eddy Mach wave radiation was present in Mach 1.8 jet, and was absent in Mach 0.95 jet. To measure correlation between the flow and the far field sound pressure fluctuations, a microphone was kept at a distance of 50 diameters, 30 deg. to the flow direction, and the laser probe volume was moved from point to point in the flow. The density fluctuations in the peripheral shear layer of Mach 1.8 jet showed significant correlation up to the measurement limit of Sr = 2.5, while for Mach 0.95 jet no correlation was measured. Along the centerline measurable correlation was found from the end of the potential core and at the low frequency range (Sr less than 0.5). Usually the normalized correlation values increased with an increase of the jet Mach

  11. Scattering of diffracting beams of electron cyclotron waves by random density fluctuations in inhomogeneous plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Hannes; Maj, Omar; Poli, Emanuele

    2015-03-01

    The physics and first results of the new WKBeam code for electron cyclotron beams in tokamak plasmas are presented. This code is developed on the basis of a kinetic radiative transfer model which is general enough to account for the effects of diffraction and density fluctuations on the beam. Our preliminary numerical results show a significant broadening of the power deposition profile in ITER due to scattering from random density fluctuations at the plasma edge, while such scattering effects are found to be negligible in medium-size tokamaks like ASDEX upgrade.

  12. Dispersion relations of electron density fluctuations in a Hall thruster plasma, observed by collective light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsikata, S.; Pisarev, V.; Gresillon, D. M.; Lemoine, N.

    2009-03-15

    Kinetic models and numerical simulations of E-vectorxB-vector plasma discharges predict microfluctuations at the scales of the electron cyclotron drift radius and the ion plasma frequency. With the help of a specially designed collective scattering device, the first experimental observations of small-scale electron density fluctuations inside the plasma volume are obtained, and observed in the expected ranges of spatial and time scales. The anisotropy, dispersion relations, form factor, amplitude, and spatial distribution of these electron density fluctuations are described and compared to theoretical expectations.

  13. Comparison of density fluctuation measurements between O-mode and X-mode reflectometry on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbaud, T.; Clairet, F.; Sabot, R.; Sirinelli, A.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.; Vermare, L.

    2006-10-15

    Reflectometry is a versatile diagnostic which allows both electronic density profile and density fluctuation measurements. Fast sweep heterodyne technique is particularly suitable for precise measurement of the phase of the reflected signal, which records the story of the wave propagation through the plasma up to the cutoff layer, including the density fluctuations. The present article exhibits a comparison of the density fluctuation radial profile measurements between fast sweep frequency technique, both using O-mode and X-mode polarizations, and fixed frequency technique. The correct agreement between all measurements of the relative values of the density fluctuation profiles reinforces the validity of the approximations used.

  14. Large fluctuations of the macroscopic current in diffusive systems: a numerical test of the additivity principle.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Pablo I; Garrido, Pedro L

    2010-04-01

    Most systems, when pushed out of equilibrium, respond by building up currents of locally conserved observables. Understanding how microscopic dynamics determines the averages and fluctuations of these currents is one of the main open problems in nonequilibrium statistical physics. The additivity principle is a theoretical proposal that allows to compute the current distribution in many one-dimensional nonequilibrium systems. Using simulations, we validate this conjecture in a simple and general model of energy transport, both in the presence of a temperature gradient and in canonical equilibrium. In particular, we show that the current distribution displays a Gaussian regime for small current fluctuations, as prescribed by the central limit theorem, and non-Gaussian (exponential) tails for large current deviations, obeying in all cases the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem. In order to facilitate a given current fluctuation, the system adopts a well-defined temperature profile different from that of the steady state and in accordance with the additivity hypothesis predictions. System statistics during a large current fluctuation is independent of the sign of the current, which implies that the optimal profile (as well as higher-order profiles and spatial correlations) are invariant upon current inversion. We also demonstrate that finite-time joint fluctuations of the current and the profile are well described by the additivity functional. These results suggest the additivity hypothesis as a general and powerful tool to compute current distributions in many nonequilibrium systems.

  15. Inversion methods for the measurements of MHD-like density fluctuations by Heavy Ion Beam Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaquias, A.; Henriques, R. B.; Nedzelsky, I. S.

    2015-09-01

    We report here on the recent developments in the deconvolution of the path integral effects for the study of MHD pressure-like fluctuations measured by Heavy Ion Beam Diagnostic. In particular, we develop improved methods to account for and remove the path integral effect on the determination of the ionization generation factors, including the double ionization of the primary beam. We test the method using the HIBD simulation code which computes the real beam trajectories and attenuations due to electron impact ionization for any selected synthetic profiles of plasma current, plasma potential, electron temperature and density. Simulations have shown the numerical method to be highly effective in ISTTOK within an overall accuracy of a few percent (< 3%). The method here presented can effectively reduce the path integral effects and may serve as the basis to develop improved retrieving techniques for plasma devices working even in higher density ranges. The method is applied to retrieve the time evolution and spatial structure of m=1 and m=2 modes. The 2D MHD mode-like structure is reconstructed by means of a spatial projection of all 1D measurements obtained during one full rotation of the mode. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  16. Dynamic Harris current sheet thickness from Cluster current density and plasma measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, S. M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; McPherron, R. L.; Weygand, J. M.; Balogh, A.; Reme, H.; Kistler, L. M.

    2005-01-01

    We use the first accurate measurements of current densities in the plasma sheet to calculate the half-thickness and position of the current sheet as a function of time. Our technique assumes a Harris current sheet model, which is parameterized by lobe magnetic field B(o), current sheet half-thickness h, and current sheet position z(sub o). Cluster measurements of magnetic field, current density, and plasma pressure are used to infer the three parameters as a function of time. We find that most long timescale (6-12 hours) current sheet crossings observed by Cluster cannot be described by a static Harris current sheet with a single set of parameters B(sub o), h, and z(sub o). Noting the presence of high-frequency fluctuations that appear to be superimposed on lower frequency variations, we average over running 6-min intervals and use the smoothed data to infer the parameters h(t) and z(sub o)(t), constrained by the pressure balance lobe magnetic field B(sub o)(t). Whereas this approach has been used in previous studies, the spatial gnuhen& now provided by the Cluster magnetometers were unavailable or not well constrained in earlier studies. We place the calculated hdf&cknessa in a magnetospheric context by examining the change in thickness with substorm phase for three case study events and 21 events in a superposed epoch analysis. We find that the inferred half-thickness in many cases reflects the nominal changes experienced by the plasma sheet during substorms (i.e., thinning during growth phase, thickening following substorm onset). We conclude with an analysis of the relative contribution of (Delta)B(sub z)/(Delta)X to the cross-tail current density during substorms. We find that (Delta)B(sub z)/(Delta)X can contribute a significant portion of the cross-tail c m n t around substorm onset.

  17. Current Density Scaling in Electrochemical Flow Capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, NC; Wainright, JS; Savinell, RF

    2015-02-18

    Electrochemical flow capacitors (EFCs) are a recently developed energy storage technology. One of the principal performance metrics of an EFC is the steady-state electrical current density that it can accept or deliver. Numerical models exist to predict this performance for specific cases, but here we present a study of how the current varies with respect to the applied cell voltage, flow rate, cell dimensions, and slurry properties using scaling laws. The scaling relationships are confirmed by numerical simulations and then subsequently by comparison to results from symmetric cell EFC experiments. This modeling approach permits the delimitation of three distinct operational regimes dependent on the values of two nondimensional combinations of the pertinent variables (specifically, a capacitive Graetz number and a conductivity ratio). Lastly, the models and nondimensional numbers are used to provide design guidance in terms of criteria for proper EFC operation. (C) The Author(s) 2015. Published by ECS. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (CC BY, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse of the work in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. All rights reserved.

  18. Critical current density: Measurements vs. reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, A. V.; Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Fedoseev, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Different experimental techniques are employed to evaluate the critical current density (Jc), namely transport current measurements and two different magnetisation measurements forming quasi-equilibrium and dynamic critical states. Our technique-dependent results for superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) film and MgB2 bulk samples show an extremely high sensitivity of Jc and associated interpretations, such as irreversibility fields and Kramer plots, which lose meaning without a universal approach. We propose such approach for YBCO films based on their unique pinning features. This approach allows us to accurately recalculate the magnetic-field-dependent Jc obtained by any technique into the Jc behaviour, which would have been measured by any other method without performing the corresponding experiments. We also discovered low-frequency-dependent phenomena, governing flux dynamics, but contradicting the considered ones in the literature. The understanding of these phenomena, relevant to applications with moving superconductors, can clarify their dramatic impact on the electric-field criterion through flux diffusivity and corresponding measurements.

  19. Potential, Pressure and Density Fluctuation Measurements on the Rentor Tokamak Using AN Ion Beam Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravia, Eduardo

    A Heavy Ion Beam Probe Diagnostic System with dual energy analyzers was used to measure potential, pressure and density fluctuations in RENTOR. The main advantage of the system is the capability to measure directly the correlation length of the fluctuations by varying the primary beam injection conditions. Broadband density and potential spectra obtained in these experiments are characteristics of turbulent plasmas, with most of the power concentrated in the low part of the spectrum, below 100 kHz. The spectra fall off as f^{rm -n}, where the power-index n is approximately 3.5. The density fluctuation levels n/n are about 10% and they are independent of the plasma radius. Pressure and density fluctuations in RENTOR scale approximately like 3rho_ {rm s}/L_{rm p}~ 0.06, except for points near the plasma center. This is in agreement with the scaling observed in other small and medium tokamak experiments. Strong potential fluctuations were measured all across the plasma with levels nearly ten times larger than the corresponding n/n values. These results agree with the prediction that e~{phi }/k_{rm B}T _{rm e} > n/n in the resistive-MHD rippling mode theory developed by Thayer and Diamond. An rms value for the poloidal correlation length l_{rm c} ~sigma_{rm k}^ {-1} of about 5 mm is obtained for sample points in the plasma interior. The total particle flux across the field lines due to electrostatic fluctuations was estimated at 3 times 10 ^{19} particles/sec, which yields an estimate for the particle confinement time of tau_{rm p}~ 2 ms. Similarly, the total heat loss rate due to fluctuations was estimated at 12 times 10 ^{20} eV/sec, which gives an energy confinement time of tau_{rm E}~ 1 ms. The results clearly indicate that the particle and energy losses in RENTOR due to electrostatic fluctuations of the plasma account for a very significant part of the limited plasma confinement. The results of the experiments performed in this thesis have demonstrated the

  20. Short-term variations in gene flow related to cyclic density fluctuations in the common vole.

    PubMed

    Gauffre, Bertrand; Berthier, Karine; Inchausti, Pablo; Chaval, Yannick; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Cosson, Jean-François

    2014-07-01

    In highly fluctuating populations with complex social systems, genetic patterns are likely to vary in space and time due to demographic and behavioural processes. Cyclic rodents are extreme examples of demographically instable populations that often exhibit strong social organization. In such populations, kin structure and spacing behaviour may vary with density fluctuations and impact both the composition and spatial structure of genetic diversity. In this study, we analysed the multiannual genetic structure of a cyclic rodent, Microtus arvalis, using a sample of 875 individuals trapped over three complete cycles (from 1999 to 2007) and genotyped at 10 microsatellite loci. We tested the predictions that genetic diversity and gene flow intensity vary with density fluctuations. We found evidences for both spatial scale-dependant variations in genetic diversity and higher gene flow during high density. Moreover, investigation of sex-specific relatedness patterns revealed that, although dispersal is biased toward males in this species, distances moved by both sexes were lengthened during high density. Altogether, these results suggest that an increase in migration with density allows to restore the local loss of genetic diversity occurring during low density. We then postulate that this change in migration results from local competition, which enhances female colonization of empty spaces and male dispersal among colonies.

  1. Propagation of the lower hybrid wave in a density fluctuating scrape-off layer (SOL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi, M.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Kabalan, K. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The perturbation of the lower hybrid wave (LH) power spectrum by fluctuations of the plasma in the vicinity of the antenna is investigated by solving the full wave equation in a slab geometry using COMSOL Multiphysics®. The numerical model whose generality allows to study the effect of various types of fluctuations, including those with short characteristic wavelengths is validated against a coupling code in quiescent regimes. When electron density fluctuations along the toroidal direction are incorporated in the dielectric tensor over a thin perturbed layer in front of the grill, the power spectrum may be strongly modified from the antenna mouth to the plasma separatrix as the LH wave propagates. The diffraction effect by density fluctuations leads to the appearance of multiple satellite lobes with randomly varying positions and the averaged perturbation is found to be maximum for the Fourier components of the fluctuating spectrum in the vicinity of the launched LH wavelength. This highlights that fast toroidal inhomogeneities with short characteristics length scales in front of the grill may change significantly the initial LH power spectrum used in coupled ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck calculations.

  2. The nucleation process and the roles of structure and density fluctuations in supercooled liquid Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rong; Wu, Yongquan Xiao, Junjiang

    2014-01-21

    We observed homogeneous nucleation process of supercooled liquid Fe by molecular dynamics simulations. Using bond-orientational order parameters together with Voronoi polyhedron method, we characterized local structure, calculated the volume of Voronoi polyhedra of atoms and identified the structure and density fluctuations. We monitored the formation of nucleus and analyzed its inner structure. The birth and growth of the pre-nucleus and nucleus are accompanied with aggregating and disaggregating processes in the time scale of femtosecond. Only the initial solid-like clusters (ISLC), ranging from 1 to 7 atoms, pop up directly from liquid. The relation between the logarithm of number of clusters and the cluster size was found to be linear for ISLCs and was observed to be parabolic for all solid-like clusters (SLC) due to aggregating and disaggregating effects. The nucleus and pre-nuclei mainly consist of body centered cubic (BCC) and hexagonal close packed atoms, while the BCC atoms tend to be located at the surface. Medium-range structure fluctuations induce the birth of ISLCs, benefit the aggregation of embryos and remarkably promote the nucleation. But density fluctuations contribute little to nucleation. The lifetime of most icosahedral-like atoms (ICO) is shorter than 0.7 ps. No obvious relationship was found between structure/density fluctuations and the appearance of ICO atoms.

  3. The nucleation process and the roles of structure and density fluctuations in supercooled liquid Fe.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Wu, Yongquan; Xiao, Junjiang

    2014-01-21

    We observed homogeneous nucleation process of supercooled liquid Fe by molecular dynamics simulations. Using bond-orientational order parameters together with Voronoi polyhedron method, we characterized local structure, calculated the volume of Voronoi polyhedra of atoms and identified the structure and density fluctuations. We monitored the formation of nucleus and analyzed its inner structure. The birth and growth of the pre-nucleus and nucleus are accompanied with aggregating and disaggregating processes in the time scale of femtosecond. Only the initial solid-like clusters (ISLC), ranging from 1 to 7 atoms, pop up directly from liquid. The relation between the logarithm of number of clusters and the cluster size was found to be linear for ISLCs and was observed to be parabolic for all solid-like clusters (SLC) due to aggregating and disaggregating effects. The nucleus and pre-nuclei mainly consist of body centered cubic (BCC) and hexagonal close packed atoms, while the BCC atoms tend to be located at the surface. Medium-range structure fluctuations induce the birth of ISLCs, benefit the aggregation of embryos and remarkably promote the nucleation. But density fluctuations contribute little to nucleation. The lifetime of most icosahedral-like atoms (ICO) is shorter than 0.7 ps. No obvious relationship was found between structure/density fluctuations and the appearance of ICO atoms.

  4. Two Point Space-Time Correlation of Density Fluctuations Measured in High Velocity Free Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta

    2006-01-01

    Two-point space-time correlations of air density fluctuations in unheated, fully-expanded free jets at Mach numbers M(sub j) = 0.95, 1.4, and 1.8 were measured using a Rayleigh scattering based diagnostic technique. The molecular scattered light from two small probe volumes of 1.03 mm length was measured for a completely non-intrusive means of determining the turbulent density fluctuations. The time series of density fluctuations were analyzed to estimate the integral length scale L in a moving frame of reference and the convective Mach number M(sub c) at different narrow Strouhal frequency (St) bands. It was observed that M(sub c) and the normalized moving frame length scale L*St/D, where D is the jet diameter, increased with Strouhal frequency before leveling off at the highest resolved frequency. Significant differences were observed between data obtained from the lip shear layer and the centerline of the jet. The wave number frequency transform of the correlation data demonstrated progressive increase in the radiative part of turbulence fluctuations with increasing jet Mach number.

  5. The nucleation process and the roles of structure and density fluctuations in supercooled liquid Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rong; Wu, Yongquan; Xiao, Junjiang

    2014-01-01

    We observed homogeneous nucleation process of supercooled liquid Fe by molecular dynamics simulations. Using bond-orientational order parameters together with Voronoi polyhedron method, we characterized local structure, calculated the volume of Voronoi polyhedra of atoms and identified the structure and density fluctuations. We monitored the formation of nucleus and analyzed its inner structure. The birth and growth of the pre-nucleus and nucleus are accompanied with aggregating and disaggregating processes in the time scale of femtosecond. Only the initial solid-like clusters (ISLC), ranging from 1 to 7 atoms, pop up directly from liquid. The relation between the logarithm of number of clusters and the cluster size was found to be linear for ISLCs and was observed to be parabolic for all solid-like clusters (SLC) due to aggregating and disaggregating effects. The nucleus and pre-nuclei mainly consist of body centered cubic (BCC) and hexagonal close packed atoms, while the BCC atoms tend to be located at the surface. Medium-range structure fluctuations induce the birth of ISLCs, benefit the aggregation of embryos and remarkably promote the nucleation. But density fluctuations contribute little to nucleation. The lifetime of most icosahedral-like atoms (ICO) is shorter than 0.7 ps. No obvious relationship was found between structure/density fluctuations and the appearance of ICO atoms.

  6. Characterising density fluctuations in liquid yttria aluminates with small angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, G. Neville; Wilding, Martin C.; Vu Van, Quang; Majerus, Odile; Hennet, Louis

    2009-01-29

    Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) has been measured in the wavevector range 0.01density fluctuations deriving from isothermal compressibility. With decreasing Q a minimum is located close to 0.1 A{sup -1} at the foot of the inter-atomic structure factor, below which SAXS rises, suggesting scatter from longer range fluctuating volumes.

  7. Anode current density distribution in a cusped field thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huan Liu, Hui Meng, Yingchao; Zhang, Junyou; Yang, Siyu; Hu, Peng; Chen, Pengbo; Yu, Daren

    2015-12-15

    The cusped field thruster is a new electric propulsion device that is expected to have a non-uniform radial current density at the anode. To further study the anode current density distribution, a multi-annulus anode is designed to directly measure the anode current density for the first time. The anode current density decreases sharply at larger radii; the magnitude of collected current density at the center is far higher compared with the outer annuli. The anode current density non-uniformity does not demonstrate a significant change with varying working conditions.

  8. Anomalous Cross-Field Current and Fluctuating Equilibrium of Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rypdal, K.; Garcia, O.E.; Paulsen, J.

    1997-09-01

    It is shown by simple physical arguments and fluid simulations that electrostatic flute-mode fluctuations can sustain a substantial cross-field current in addition to mass and energy transport. The simulations show that this current determines essential features of the fluctuating plasma equilibrium, and explain qualitatively the experimental equilibria and the coherent flute-mode structures observed in a simple magnetized torus. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. The Effects of the Scattering by Edge Plasma Density Fluctuations on Lower Hyybrid Wave Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N; Bonoli, P T; Harvey, R W; Smirnov, A P; Baek, S G; Parker, R R; Phillips, C K; Valeo, E J; Wilson, J R; Wright, J C

    2012-08-27

    Scattering effects induced by edge density fluctuations on lower hybrid (LH) wave propagation are investigated. The scattering model used here is based on the work of Bonoli and Ott [Phys. Fluids 25 (1982) 361]. It utilizes an electromagnetic wave kinetic equation solved by a Monte Carlo technique. This scattering model has been implemented in GENRAY , a ray tracing code which explicitly simulates wave propagation, as well as collisionless and collisional damping processes, over the entire plasma discharge, including the scrape-off layer (SOL) that extends from the separatrix to the vessel wall. A numerical analysis of the LH wave trajectories and the power deposition profile with and without scattering is presented for Alcator CMod discharges. Comparisons between the measured hard x-ray emission on Alcator C-Mod and simulations of the data obtained from the synthetic diagnostic included in the GENRAY/CQL3D package are shown, with and without the combination of scattering and collisional damping. Implications of these results on LH current drive are discussed.

  10. Simultaneous Microwave Imaging System for Density and Temperature Fluctuation Measurements on TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    H. Park; E. Mazzucato; T. Munsat; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-05-07

    Diagnostic systems for fluctuation measurements in plasmas have, of necessity, evolved from simple 1-D systems to multi-dimensional systems due to the complexity of the MHD and turbulence physics of plasmas illustrated by advanced numerical simulations. Using the recent significant advancements in millimeter wave imaging technology, Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) and Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI), simultaneously measuring density and temperature fluctuations, are developed for TEXTOR. The MIR system was installed on TEXTOR and the first experiment was performed in September, 2003. Subsequent MIR campaigns have yielded poloidally resolved spectra and assessments of poloidal velocity. The new 2-D ECE Imaging system (with a total of 128 channels), installed on TEXTOR in December, 2003, successfully captured a true 2-D images of Te fluctuations of m=1 oscillation (''sawteeth'') near the q {approx} 1 surface for the first time.

  11. Particle Image Velocimetry Study of Density Current Fronts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Juan Ezequiel

    2009-01-01

    Gravity currents are flows that occur when a horizontal density difference causes fluid to move under the action of gravity; density currents are a particular case, for which the scalar causing the density difference is conserved. Flows with a strong effect of the horizontal density difference, even if only partially driven by it--such as the…

  12. Characterization of density fluctuations during the search for an I-mode regime on the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinoni, A.; Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Osborne, T. H.; White, A. E.; Whyte, D. G.; Rhodes, T. L.; Davis, E. M.; Ernst, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.

    2015-09-01

    The I-mode regime, routinely observed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, is characterized by an edge energy transport barrier without an accompanying particle barrier and with broadband instabilities, known as weakly coherent modes (WCM), believed to regulate particle transport at the edge. Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak exhibit I-mode characteristics in various physical quantities. These DIII-D plasmas evolve over long periods, lasting several energy confinement times, during which the edge electron temperature slowly evolves towards an H-mode-like profile, while maintaining a typical L-mode edge density profile. During these periods, referred to as I-mode phases, the radial electric field at the edge also gradually reaches values typically observed in H-mode. Density fluctuations measured with the phase contrast imaging diagnostic during I-mode phases exhibit three features typically observed in H-mode on DIII-D, although they develop progressively with time and without a sharp transition: the intensity of the fluctuations is reduced; the frequency spectrum is broadened and becomes non-monotonic; two dimensional space-time spectra appear to approach those in H-mode, showing phase velocities of density fluctuations at the edge increasing to about 10 km s-1. However, in DIII-D there is no clear evidence of the WCM. Preliminary linear gyro-kinetic simulations are performed in the pedestal region with the GS2 code and its recently upgraded model collision operator that conserves particles, energy and momentum. The increased bootstrap current and flow shear generated by the temperature pedestal are shown to decrease growth rates, thus possibly generating a feedback mechanism that progressively stabilizes fluctuations.

  13. High current density cathode for electrorefining in molten electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Li, Shelly X.

    2010-06-29

    A high current density cathode for electrorefining in a molten electrolyte for the continuous production and collection of loose dendritic or powdery deposits. The high current density cathode eliminates the requirement for mechanical scraping and electrochemical stripping of the deposits from the cathode in an anode/cathode module. The high current density cathode comprises a perforated electrical insulated material coating such that the current density is up to 3 A/cm.sup.2.

  14. Finding evidence for density fluctuation effects on electron cyclotron heating deposition profiles on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Brookman, M. W. Austin, M. E.; Petty, C. C.

    2015-12-10

    Theoretical work, computation, and results from TCV [J. Decker “Effect of density fluctuations on ECCD in ITER and TCV,” EPJ Web of Conf. 32, 01016 (2012)] suggest that density fluctuations in the edge region of a tokamak plasma can cause broadening of the ECH deposition profile. In this paper, a GUI tool is presented which is used for analysis of ECH deposition as a first step towards looking for this broadening, which could explain effects seen in previous DIII-D ECH transport studies [K.W. Gentle “Electron energy transport inferences from modulated electron cyclotron heating in DIII-D,” Phys. Plasmas 13, 012311 (2006)]. By applying an FFT to the T{sub e} measurements from the University of Texas’s 40-channel ECE Radiometer, and using a simplified thermal transport equation, the flux surface extent of ECH deposition is determined. The Fourier method analysis is compared with a Break-In-Slope (BIS) analysis and predictions from the ray-tracing code TORAY. Examination of multiple Fourier harmonics and BIS fitting methods allow an estimation of modulated transport coefficients and thereby the true ECH deposition profile. Correlations between edge fluctuations and ECH deposition in legacy data are also explored as a step towards establishing a link between fluctuations and deposition broadening in DIII-D.

  15. Stirring Coronal Spaghetti: Exploring Multiple Interactions Between MHD Waves and Density Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2016-05-01

    The solar corona has been revealed in the past few decades to be a highly dynamic nonequilibrium plasma environment. Both the loop-filled coronal base and the extended acceleration region of the solar wind appear to be strongly turbulent, and models that invoke the dissipation of incompressible Alfvenic fluctuations have had some success in explaining the heating. However, many of these models neglect the mounting evidence that density and pressure variations may play an important role in the mass and energy balance of this system. In this presentation I will briefly review observations of both compressible and incompressible MHD fluctuations in the corona and solar wind, and discuss future prospects with DKIST. I will also attempt to outline the many ways that these different fluctuation modes have been proposed to interact with one another -- usually with an eye on finding ways to enhance their dissipation and heating. One under-appreciated type of interaction is the fact that Alfven waves will undergo multiple reflections and refractions in a "background plasma" filled with localized density fluctuations. It is becoming increasingly clear that models must not only include the effects of longitudinal variability (e.g., magnetoacoustic waves and pulse-like jets) but also transverse "striations" that appear naturally in a structured magnetic field with small-scale footpoint variability. Future off-limb observations, such as those with DKIST's Cryo-NIRSP instrument, will be crucial for providing us with a detailed census of MHD waves and their mutual interactions in the corona.

  16. Current density partitioning in time-dependent current density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mosquera, Martín A.; Wasserman, Adam

    2014-05-14

    We adapt time-dependent current density functional theory to allow for a fragment-based solution of the many-electron problem of molecules in the presence of time-dependent electric and magnetic fields. Regarding a molecule as a set of non-interacting subsystems that individually evolve under the influence of an auxiliary external electromagnetic vector-scalar potential pair, the partition 4-potential, we show that there are one-to-one mappings between this auxiliary potential, a sharply-defined set of fragment current densities, and the total current density of the system. The partition electromagnetic (EM) 4-potential is expressed in terms of the real EM 4-potential of the system and a gluing EM 4-potential that accounts for exchange-correlation effects and mutual interaction forces between fragments that are required to yield the correct electron dynamics. We prove the zero-force theorem for the fragmented system, establish a variational formulation in terms of action functionals, and provide a simple illustration for a charged particle in a ring.

  17. Relationship between critical charge density, holding current, and maximum current density in optically triggered silicon carbide thyristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuferev, V. S.; Levinshtein, M. E.; Palmour, J. W.

    2013-10-01

    Relationship between critical charge density, holding current, and maximum current density has been studied by using an adequate numerical model for the axisymmetric configuration characteristic of the optical triggering of power silicon carbide thyristors. It is shown that the holding current Ih depends only weakly on the critical charge density of a thyristor, pc. At the same time, the maximum current density in the state corresponding to holding current grows very steeply with increasing pc. It is shown that the maximum current density can substantially increase with decreasing current in the axisymmetric configuration if the switched-on state occupies only a part of the total area of a thyristor.

  18. Wavelike charge density fluctuations and van der Waals interactions at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Ambrosetti, Alberto; Ferri, Nicola; DiStasio, Robert A; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2016-03-11

    Recent experiments on noncovalent interactions at the nanoscale have challenged the basic assumptions of commonly used particle- or fragment-based models for describing van der Waals (vdW) or dispersion forces. We demonstrate that a qualitatively correct description of the vdW interactions between polarizable nanostructures over a wide range of finite distances can only be attained by accounting for the wavelike nature of charge density fluctuations. By considering a diverse set of materials and biological systems with markedly different dimensionalities, topologies, and polarizabilities, we find a visible enhancement in the nonlocality of the charge density response in the range of 10 to 20 nanometers. These collective wavelike fluctuations are responsible for the emergence of nontrivial modifications of the power laws that govern noncovalent interactions at the nanoscale.

  19. Wavelike charge density fluctuations and van der Waals interactions at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Ambrosetti, Alberto; Ferri, Nicola; DiStasio, Robert A; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2016-03-11

    Recent experiments on noncovalent interactions at the nanoscale have challenged the basic assumptions of commonly used particle- or fragment-based models for describing van der Waals (vdW) or dispersion forces. We demonstrate that a qualitatively correct description of the vdW interactions between polarizable nanostructures over a wide range of finite distances can only be attained by accounting for the wavelike nature of charge density fluctuations. By considering a diverse set of materials and biological systems with markedly different dimensionalities, topologies, and polarizabilities, we find a visible enhancement in the nonlocality of the charge density response in the range of 10 to 20 nanometers. These collective wavelike fluctuations are responsible for the emergence of nontrivial modifications of the power laws that govern noncovalent interactions at the nanoscale. PMID:26965622

  20. Experimental evaluation of fluctuating density and radiated noise from a high temperature jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massier, P. F.; Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cuffel, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to characterize the fluctuating density within a high-temperature (1100 K) subsonic jet and to characterize by the noise radiated to the surroundings. Cross correlations obtained by introducing time delay to the signals detected from spatially separated crossed laser beams set up as a Schlieren system were used to determine radial and axial distributions of the convection velocity of the moving noise sources (eddies). In addition, the autocorrelation of the fluctuating density was evaluated in the moving frame of reference of the eddies. Also, the autocorrelation of the radiated noise in the moving reference frame was evaluated from cross correlations by introducing time delay to the signals detected by spatially separated pairs of microphones. Radial distributions of the mean velocity were obtained from measurements of the stagnation temperature, and stagnation and static pressures with the use of probes.

  1. Suppression of polarization fluctuations in chromium alloys with commensurate spin-density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, R. P.; Weissman, M. B.; Ritley, K.; Huang, J. C.; Flynn, C. P.

    1993-02-01

    We compare electrical resistance noise in commensurate and incommensurate phases of the spin-density wave (SDW) in Cr and dilute CrMn alloys. The commensurate phase gives much less polarization fluctuation noise than the incommensurate phase. The incommensurability of the SDW and the lattice in Cr may affect the SDW dynamics through the existence of weak planes in which the induced orbital moment contribution to the SDW is close to zero.

  2. Quasi-Lagrangian measurements of density surface fluctuations and power spectra in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Elizabeth P.; Holzworth, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure and temperature data from eight superpressure balloon flights at 26 km in the southern hemisphere stratosphere are analyzed. The balloons, which float on a constant density surface, travel steadily westward during summer and eastward during winter, as expected from local climatology. Two types of fluctuations are observed: neutral buoyancy oscillations (NBO) of around 4 min, and 0.1- to 1-hour oscillations that are characterized as small-amplitude density surface fluctuations. Lapse rates and densities are calculated and found to agree well with the expected values. Examples of wave damping and simultaneous fluctuation at two nearby balloons are presented. Spectral analysis is performed clearly showing the NBO and that the majority of the power is in the mesoscale range. Spectral slopes of power versus frequency are measured to be on the average -2.18 + or - 0.24 for pressure and -1.72 + or - 0.24 for temperature. These slopes are compared to the predictions of turbulence theories and the theory of a universal gravity wave spectrum.

  3. Interaction between the lower hybrid wave and density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Peysson, Y.; Madi, M.; Kabalan, K.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-10

    In the present paper, the perturbation of the launched power spectrum of the Lower Hybrid wave at the separatrix by electron density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer is investigated. Considering a slab geometry with magnetic field lines parallel to the toroidal direction, the full wave equation is solved using Comsol Multiphysics® for a fully active multi-junction like LH antenna made of two modules. When electron density fluctuations are incorporated in the dielectric tensor over a thin perturbed layer in front of the grill, it is shown that the power spectrum may be strongly modified from the antenna mouth to the plasma separatrix as the wave propagates. The diffraction effect leads to the appearance of multiple satellite lobes with randomly varying positions, a feature consistent with the recently developed model that has been applied successfully to high density discharges on the Tokamak Tore Supra corresponding to the large spectral gap regime [Decker J. et al. Phys. Plasma 21 (2014) 092504]. The perturbation is found to be maximum for the Fourier components of the fluctuating spectrum in the vicinity of the launched LH wavelength.

  4. Interaction between the lower hybrid wave and density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Y.; Madi, M.; Decker, J.; Kabalan, K.

    2015-12-01

    In the present paper, the perturbation of the launched power spectrum of the Lower Hybrid wave at the separatrix by electron density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer is investigated. Considering a slab geometry with magnetic field lines parallel to the toroidal direction, the full wave equation is solved using Comsol Multiphysics® for a fully active multi-junction like LH antenna made of two modules. When electron density fluctuations are incorporated in the dielectric tensor over a thin perturbed layer in front of the grill, it is shown that the power spectrum may be strongly modified from the antenna mouth to the plasma separatrix as the wave propagates. The diffraction effect leads to the appearance of multiple satellite lobes with randomly varying positions, a feature consistent with the recently developed model that has been applied successfully to high density discharges on the Tokamak Tore Supra corresponding to the large spectral gap regime [Decker J. et al. Phys. Plasma 21 (2014) 092504]. The perturbation is found to be maximum for the Fourier components of the fluctuating spectrum in the vicinity of the launched LH wavelength.

  5. Lengthscale-Dependent Solvation and Density Fluctuations in n-Octane.

    PubMed

    Wu, Eugene; Garde, Shekhar

    2015-07-23

    Much attention has been focused on the solvation and density fluctuations in water over the past decade. These studies have brought to light interesting physical features of solvation in condensed media, especially the dependence of solvation on the solute lengthscale, which may be general to many fluids. Here, we focus on the lengthscale-dependent solvation and density fluctuations in n-octane, a simple organic liquid. Using extensive molecular simulations, we show a crossover in the solvation of solvophobic solutes with increasing size in n-octane, with the specifics of the crossover depending on the shape of the solute. Large lengthscale solvation, which is dominated by interface formation, emerges over subnanoscopic lengthscales. The crossover in n-octane occurs at smaller lengthscales than that in water. We connect the lengthscale of crossover to the range of attractive interactions in the fluid. The onset of the crossover is accompanied by the emergence of non-Gaussian tails in density fluctuations in solute shaped observation volumes. Simulations over a range of temperatures highlight a corresponding thermodynamic crossover in solvation. Qualitative similarities between lengthscale-dependent solvation in water, n-octane, and Lennard-Jones fluids highlight the generality of the underlying physics of solvation.

  6. Nonlinear saturation spectra of electric fields and density fluctuations in drift wave turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    The detection of drift waves in the nonlinear evolution of a space plasma process driven at long wavelengths is considered, adducing measurements of the electric field and density fluctuation power spectra as evidence. Since the driving mechanism is clearly at long wavelengths, the detection of drift waves suggests that they may play an important role in the transfer of wave energy from long to short wavelengths in a low beta plasma. The saturated spectral density is compared with theoretical results in order to estimate the anomalous diffusion rate. The observed spectral form and amplitude is in excellent agreement with drift wave predictions.

  7. Feasibility of measuring temperature and density fluctuations in air using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, G. A.; Lemon, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A tunable line-narrowed ArF laser can selectively excite several rotation al lines of the Schumann-Runge band system of O2 in air. The resulting ultraviolet fluorescence can be monitored at 90 deg to the laser beam axis, permitting space and time resolved observation of density and temperature fluctuations in turbulence. Experiments and calculations show that + or - 1 K, + or - 1 percent density, 1 cu mm spatial, and 1 microsecond temporal resolution can be achieved simultaneously under some conditions.

  8. A new interferometry-based electron density fluctuation diagnostic on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, C. P.; Irby, J. H.; Murray, R.; White, A. E.; Pace, D. C.

    2012-10-01

    The two-color interferometry diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak has been upgraded to measure fluctuations in the electron density and density gradient for turbulence and transport studies. Diagnostic features and capabilities are described. In differential mode, fast phase demodulation electronics detect the relative phase change between ten adjacent, radially-separated (ΔR = 1.2 cm, adjustable), vertical-viewing chords, which allows for measurement of the line-integrated electron density gradient. The system can be configured to detect the absolute phase shift of each chord by comparison to a local oscillator, measuring the line-integrated density. Each chord is sensitive to density fluctuations with kR < 20.3 cm-1 and is digitized at up to 10 MS/s, resolving aspects of ion temperature gradient-driven modes and other long-wavelength turbulence. Data from C-Mod discharges is presented, including observations of the quasi-coherent mode in enhanced D-alpha H-mode plasmas and the weakly coherent mode in I-mode.

  9. Volume and surface contributions to the nuclear symmetry energy within the coherent density fluctuation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Sarriguren, P.; Moya de Guerra, E.

    2016-07-01

    The volume and surface components of the nuclear symmetry energy (NSE) and their ratio are calculated within the coherent density fluctuation model (CDFM). The estimations use the results of the model for the NSE in finite nuclei based on the Brueckner energy-density functional for nuclear matter. In addition, we present results for the NSE and its volume and surface contributions obtained by using the Skyrme energy-density functional. The CDFM weight function is obtained using the proton and neutron densities from the self-consistent HF+BCS method with Skyrme interactions. We present and discuss the values of the volume and surface contributions to the NSE and their ratio obtained for the Ni, Sn, and Pb isotopic chains, studying their isotopic sensitivity. The results are compared with estimations of other approaches which have used available experimental data on binding energies, neutron-skin thicknesses, excitation energies to isobaric analog states (IAS), and also with results of other theoretical methods.

  10. Spatial correlations of density and structural fluctuations in liquid water: a comparative simulation study.

    PubMed

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Horinek, Dominik; Netz, Roland R

    2011-02-01

    We use large-scale classical simulations employing different force fields to study spatial correlations between local density and structural order for water in the liquid temperature range. All force fields investigated reproduce the main features of the experimental SAXS structure factor S(q), including the minimum at small q, and the recent TIP4P/2005 parametrization yields almost quantitative agreement. As local structural order parameters we consider the tetrahedrality and the number of hydrogen bonds and calculate all pure and mixed spatial two-point correlation functions. Except for the density-density correlation function, there are only weak features present in all other correlation functions, showing that the tendency to form structural clusters is much weaker than the well-known tendency of water to form density clusters (i.e., spatially correlated regions where the density deviates from the mean). In particular, there are only small spatial correlations between local density and structural fluctuations, suggesting that features in density-density correlations (such as measured by the structure factor) are not straightforwardly related to spatial correlations of structure in liquid water.

  11. Quantifying Density Fluctuations in Volumes of All Shapes and Sizes Using Indirect Umbrella Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Amish J.; Varilly, Patrick; Chandler, David; Garde, Shekhar

    2011-10-01

    Water density fluctuations are an important statistical mechanical observable and are related to many-body correlations, as well as hydrophobic hydration and interactions. Local water density fluctuations at a solid-water surface have also been proposed as a measure of its hydrophobicity. These fluctuations can be quantified by calculating the probability, P v ( N), of observing N waters in a probe volume of interest v. When v is large, calculating P v ( N) using molecular dynamics simulations is challenging, as the probability of observing very few waters is exponentially small, and the standard procedure for overcoming this problem (umbrella sampling in N) leads to undesirable impulsive forces. Patel et al. (J. Phys. Chem. B 114:1632, 2010) have recently developed an indirect umbrella sampling (INDUS) method, that samples a coarse-grained particle number to obtain P v ( N) in cuboidal volumes. Here, we present and demonstrate an extension of that approach to volumes of other basic shapes, like spheres and cylinders, as well as to collections of such volumes. We further describe the implementation of INDUS in the NPT ensemble and calculate P v ( N) distributions over a broad range of pressures. Our method may be of particular interest in characterizing the hydrophobicity of interfaces of proteins, nanotubes and related systems.

  12. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun

    2016-11-01

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R - R0)/a, R0 = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of kθ < 2.4 cm-1. The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  13. Large-scale plasma density fluctuations measured with the HILAT satellite at 830 km altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimer, Daniel R.

    1987-04-01

    Measurements from the plasma monitor on the HILAT satellite have been used to map the distribution of large scale fluctuations in the density of plasma at high latitudes. Digital filtering has been used to separate the original data into three frequency bands. The output from the middle band pass filter has been used to count and map the distribution of large-scale plasma density enhancements. Maps of blob distribution are drawn as a function of magnetic local time and invariant latitude, for both low and high magnetic activity. To serve as a point of reference the same filtering and counting techniques are applied to measurements of the ion drift velocity to show the distribution of electric field fluctuations. Additionally, from the power levels measured at two different frequencies, the average spectral slopes of both the plasma density and electric field have been mapped. The results show that large scale plasma enhancements are created in the auroral zone and are transported away from the production regions by convection. Movement of blobs from the cusp to polar cap is very prominent. The spectral slope of the plasma density is significantly increased in the night side, from 23 to 2 hour magnetic local time. The intermediate scale plasma irregularities appear to be dissipated in this region. Enhanced radio scintillations had been measured with the HILAT radio beacon in the same locations.

  14. Impact of density and environmental factors on population fluctuations in a migratory passerine.

    PubMed

    Pasinelli, Gilberto; Schaub, Michael; Häfliger, Guido; Frey, Monika; Jakober, Hans; Müller, Mathis; Stauber, Wolfgang; Tryjanowski, Piotr; Zollinger, Jean-Luc; Jenni, Lukas

    2011-01-01

    1. Populations of plants and animals typically fluctuate because of the combined effects of density-dependent and density-independent processes. The study of these processes is complicated by the fact that population sizes are typically not known exactly, because population counts are subject to sampling variance. Although the existence of sampling variance is broadly acknowledged, relatively few studies on time-series data have accounted for it, which can result in wrong inferences about population processes. 2. To increase our understanding of population dynamics, we analysed time series from six Central European populations of the migratory red-backed shrike Lanius collurio by simultaneously assessing the strength of density dependence, process and sampling variance. In addition, we evaluated hypotheses predicting effects of factors presumed to operate on the breeding grounds, at stopover sites in eastern Africa during fall and spring migration and in the wintering grounds in southern Africa. We used both simple and state-space formulations of the Gompertz equation to model population size. 3. Across populations and modelling approaches, we found consistent evidence for negative density-dependent population regulation. Further, process variance contributed substantially to variation in population size, while sampling variance did not. Environmental conditions in eastern and southern Africa appear to influence breeding population size, as rainfall in the Sahel during fall migration and in the south African wintering areas were positively related to population size in the following spring in four of six populations. In contrast, environmental conditions in the breeding grounds were not related to population size. 4. Our findings suggest negative density-dependent regulation of red-backed shrike breeding populations and are consistent with the long-standing hypothesis that conditions in the African staging and wintering areas influence population numbers of species

  15. How to resolve microsecond current fluctuations in single ion channels: the power of beta distributions.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Indra

    2015-01-01

    A main ingredient for the understanding of structure/function correlates of ion channels is the quantitative description of single-channel gating and conductance. However, a wealth of information provided from fast current fluctuations beyond the temporal resolution of the recording system is often ignored, even though it is close to the time window accessible to molecular dynamics simulations. This kind of current fluctuations provide a special technical challenge, because individual opening/closing or blocking/unblocking events cannot be resolved, and the resulting averaging over undetected events decreases the single-channel current. Here, I briefly summarize the history of fast-current fluctuation analysis and focus on the so-called "beta distributions." This tool exploits characteristics of current fluctuation-induced excess noise on the current amplitude histograms to reconstruct the true single-channel current and kinetic parameters. A guideline for the analysis and recent applications demonstrate that a construction of theoretical beta distributions by Markov Model simulations offers maximum flexibility as compared to analytical solutions. PMID:26368656

  16. Scaling laws of turbulence and heating of fast solar wind: the role of density fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Carbone, V; Marino, R; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Noullez, A; Bruno, R

    2009-08-01

    Incompressible and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in plasmas can be described by an exact relation for the energy flux through the scales. This Yaglom-like scaling law has been recently observed in the solar wind above the solar poles observed by the Ulysses spacecraft, where the turbulence is in an Alfvénic state. An analogous phenomenological scaling law, suitably modified to take into account compressible fluctuations, is observed more frequently in the same data set. Large-scale density fluctuations, despite their low amplitude, thus play a crucial role in the basic scaling properties of turbulence. The turbulent cascade rate in the compressive case can, moreover, supply the energy dissipation needed to account for the local heating of the nonadiabatic solar wind. PMID:19792547

  17. Density fluctuations in irreversible adsorption processes: Hard ellipses in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Weroński, Paweł

    1997-09-01

    Density fluctuations in 2D systems of irreversibly adsorbed particles were studied. Analytical expressions were derived connecting the magnitude of these fluctuations (characterized by the reduced variance σ¯2) with the available surface function φ and the isotropic pair correlation function g0. Limiting expansions in terms of power series of the dimensionless coverage θ were also derived. The range of validity of these expressions was determined by performing numerical simulations based on the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. Calculations of g0(r), g0(s), φ, and σ¯2 were performed for hard circles and hard ellipses characterized by aspect ratio k=2 and 5. It was deduced that the simulation results can well be accounted for by the theoretical predictions stemming both from the RSA and equilibrium models.

  18. Density fluctuations in saturated phospholipid bilayers increase as the acyl-chain length decreases.

    PubMed Central

    Ipsen, J H; Jørgensen, K; Mouritsen, O G

    1990-01-01

    A systematic computer simulation study is conducted for a model of the main phase transition of fully hydrated saturated diacyl phosphatidylcholine bilayers (DMPC, DPPC, and DSPC). With particular focus on the fluctuation effects on the thermal properties in the transition region, the study yields data for the specific heat, the lateral compressibility, and the lipid-domain size distribution. Via a simple model assumption the transmembrane passive ion permeability is derived from the lipid-domain interfacial measure. A comparative analysis of the various data shows, in agreement with a number of experiments, that the lateral density fluctuations and hence the response functions increase as the acyl-chain length is decreased. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:2291936

  19. Scaling Laws of Turbulence and Heating of Fast Solar Wind: The Role of Density Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, V.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Bruno, R.

    2009-08-07

    Incompressible and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in plasmas can be described by an exact relation for the energy flux through the scales. This Yaglom-like scaling law has been recently observed in the solar wind above the solar poles observed by the Ulysses spacecraft, where the turbulence is in an Alfvenic state. An analogous phenomenological scaling law, suitably modified to take into account compressible fluctuations, is observed more frequently in the same data set. Large-scale density fluctuations, despite their low amplitude, thus play a crucial role in the basic scaling properties of turbulence. The turbulent cascade rate in the compressive case can, moreover, supply the energy dissipation needed to account for the local heating of the nonadiabatic solar wind.

  20. Effect of fluctuations on the onset of density-driven convection in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestehorn, Michael; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2012-11-01

    We study the dissolution of CO2 in saline aquifers. The long diffusion times can be accelerated by orders of magnitude from mass transfer that origins from convection. Convection occurs at a critical time via a phase transition from the horizontally homogeneous diffusion state. To start the instability, perturbations that break the horizontal translation symmetry are necessary. We start with the basic equations and the boundary conditions, examine the linearized equations around the diffusive time and z-dependent base state and compare different definitions of the critical time found in the literature. Taking a simple model we show the role of fluctuations for delayed instabilities if the control parameter is slowly swept through the bifurcation point. Apart from the critical time we use a "visible" time where convection is manifested in the vertical CO2 transport. We specify the perturbations with respect to their strength and length scale, and compute the critical times for various cases by numerical integration of the basic equations in two spatial dimensions. Fluctuating concentration at the upper boundary, fluctuating porosity as well fluctuating permeability are studied in detail. For the permeability fluctuation, the compressibility of the fluid becomes important and the velocity field cannot be derived from a stream function. Our work also includes non-isothermal conditions with a prescribed vertical geothermal gradient and space dependent thermal conductivity. Temperature fields for different standard configurations are computed numerically and serve as starting condition for density-driven convection. Based on our work, we conclude that the visible time is much larger than the critical time. The visible time is a strong function of strength and length scale of the perturbations.

  1. Stochastic thermodynamics of fluctuating density fields: Non-equilibrium free energy differences under coarse-graining

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, T.; Lander, B.; Seifert, U.; Speck, T.

    2013-11-28

    We discuss the stochastic thermodynamics of systems that are described by a time-dependent density field, for example, simple liquids and colloidal suspensions. For a time-dependent change of external parameters, we show that the Jarzynski relation connecting work with the change of free energy holds if the time evolution of the density follows the Kawasaki-Dean equation. Specifically, we study the work distributions for the compression and expansion of a two-dimensional colloidal model suspension implementing a practical coarse-graining scheme of the microscopic particle positions. We demonstrate that even if coarse-grained dynamics and density functional do not match, the fluctuation relations for the work still hold albeit for a different, apparent, change of free energy.

  2. Spacecraft radio scattering observations of the power spectrum of electron density fluctuations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Armstrong, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Solar wind electron density power spectra in the solar equatorial region are inferred from observations of phase scintillations and spectral broadening made with the Viking, Helios, and Pioneer spacecraft. The heliocentric distance range covered is 2-215 solar radii and for some observations close to the sun the spectra extend to fluctuation frequencies as high as 100 Hz. For heliocentric distances of about 20 solar radii the equivalent spacecraft-measured one-dimensional density spectrum is well modeled by a single power law in the frequency range 0.0001-0.05 Hz. The flattening of the density spectrum within 20 solar radii is presumably associated with energy deposition in the near-sun region and acceleration of the solar wind.

  3. Increase in the Random Dopant Induced Threshold Fluctuations and Lowering in Sub 100 nm MOSFETs Due to Quantum Effects: A 3-D Density-Gradient Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen; Slavcheva, G.; Brown, A. R.; Davies, J. H.; Saini, S.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed simulation study of the influence of quantum mechanical effects in the inversion layer on random dopant induced threshold voltage fluctuations and lowering in sub 100 nm MOSFETs. The simulations have been performed using a 3-D implementation of the density gradient (DG) formalism incorporated in our established 3-D atomistic simulation approach. This results in a self-consistent 3-D quantum mechanical picture, which implies not only the vertical inversion layer quantisation but also the lateral confinement effects related to current filamentation in the 'valleys' of the random potential fluctuations. We have shown that the net result of including quantum mechanical effects, while considering statistical dopant fluctuations, is an increase in both threshold voltage fluctuations and lowering. At the same time, the random dopant induced threshold voltage lowering partially compensates for the quantum mechanical threshold voltage shift in aggressively scaled MOSFETs with ultrathin gate oxides.

  4. Theory of small-scale density and electric field fluctuations in the nightside Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huba, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Recently, it has been reported that small-scale (lambda about 0.1-2 km) density irregularities occur during 100-Hz electric field bursts in the nightside ionosphere of Venus. This paper provides a detailed analysis of the lower-hybrid-drift instability as a mechanism to generate the observed irregularities. A fully electromagnetic theory is developed that is relevant to the finite beta plasma in Venus's ionosphere and includes collisional effects (e.g., electron-ion, electron-neutral, and ion-neutral collisions). The key features of the analysis that favor this instability are the following: (1) it is a flute mode and propagates orthogonal to the ambient magnetic field; (2) it is a relatively short wavelength mode and the Doppler-shifted frequency can be greater than about 100 Hz; (3) it can produce both electric field and density fluctuations, as well as magnetic field fluctuations in a finite beta plasma; and (4) it is most unstable in low-beta plasmas so that it is likely to occur in the low-density, high-magnetic-field ionospheric holes. These features are consistent with observational results.

  5. Collective backscattering of gyrotron radiation by small-scale plasma density fluctuations in large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Kharchev, Nikolay; Batanov, German; Petrov, Alexandr; Sarksyan, Karen; Skvortsova, Nina; Tanaka, Kenji; Kubo, Shin; Igami, Hiroe; Azuma, Yoshifumi; Tsuji-Iio, Shunji

    2008-10-15

    A version of the collective backscattering diagnostic using gyrotron radiation for small-scale turbulence is described. The diagnostic is used to measure small-scale (k{sub s}{approx_equal}34 cm{sup -1}) plasma density fluctuations in large helical device experiments on the electron cyclotron heating of plasma with the use of 200 kW 82.7 GHz heating gyrotron. A good signal to noise ratio during plasma production phase was obtained, while contamination of stray light increased during plasma build-up phase. The effect of the stray radiation was investigated. The available quasioptical system of the heating system was utilized for this purpose.

  6. Exact analytic solution for non-linear density fluctuation in a ΛCDM universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jaiyul; Gong, Jinn-Ouk

    2016-07-01

    We derive the exact third-order analytic solution of the matter density fluctuation in the proper-time hypersurface in a ΛCDM universe, accounting for the explicit time-dependence and clarifying the relation to the initial condition. Furthermore, we compare our analytic solution to the previous calculation in the comoving gauge, and to the standard Newtonian perturbation theory by providing Fourier kernels for the relativistic effects. Our results provide an essential ingredient for a complete description of galaxy bias in the relativistic context.

  7. Chaotic density fluctuations in L-mode plasmas of the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, J. E.; Rhodes, T. L.; Morales, G. J.

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of the time series obtained with the Doppler backscattering system (Hillsheim et al 2009 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80 0835070) in the DIII-D tokamak (Luxon 2005 Fusion Sci. Technol. 48 828) shows that intermediate wave number plasma density fluctuations in low confinement (L-mode) tokamak plasmas are chaotic. The supporting evidence is based on the shape of the power spectrum; the location of the signal in the complexity-entropy plane (C-H plane) (Rosso et al 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 154102); and the population of the corresponding Bandt-Pompe (Bandt and Pompe 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 174102) probability distributions.

  8. Connection between ambient density fluctuations and clumpy Langmuir waves in type III radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, I. H.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    A recent stochastic-growth theory of clumpy Langmuir waves in type III sources is shown to imply that the clumps will have the same size distribution as the ambient low-frequency density fluctuations in the solar wind. Spectral analysis of Langmuir-wave time series from the ISEE 3 plasma wave instrument confirms this prediction to within the uncertainties in the spectra. The smallest Langmuir clump size is inferred to be in the range 0.4-30 km in general, and 2-30 km for beam-resonant waves, and it is concluded that the diffusion of waves in the source is anomalous.

  9. Controlling fluctuations and transport in the reversed field pinch with edge current drive and plasma biasing

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, D.J.G.

    1998-09-01

    Two techniques are employed in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to test and control different aspects of fluctuation induced transport in the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). Auxiliary edge currents are driven along the magnetic field to modify magnetic fluctuations, and the particle and energy transport associated with them. In addition, strong edge flows are produced by plasma biasing. Their effect on electrostatic fluctuations and the associated particle losses is studied. Both techniques are accomplished using miniature insertable plasma sources that are biased negatively to inject electrons. This type of emissive electrode is shown to reliably produce intense, directional current without significant contamination by impurities. The two most important conclusions derived from these studies are that the collective modes resonant at the reversal surface play a role in global plasma confinement, and that these modes can be controlled by modifying the parallel current profile outside of the reversal surface. This confirms predictions based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that auxiliary current drive in the sense to flatten the parallel current profile can be successful in controlling magnetic fluctuations in the RFP. However, these studies expand the group of magnetic modes believed to cause transport in MST and suggest that current profile control efforts need to address both the core resonant magnetic modes and those resonant at the reversal surface. The core resonant modes are not significantly altered in these experiments; however, the distribution and/or amplitude of the injected current is probably not optimal for affecting these modes. Plasma biasing generates strong edge flows with shear and particle confinement likely improves in these discharges. These experiments resemble biased H modes in other magnetic configurations in many ways. The similarities are likely due to the common role of electrostatic fluctuations in edge transport.

  10. Density fluctuation measurements by far-forward collective scattering in the MST reversed-field pincha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. X.; Lin, L.; Duff, J. R.; Brower, D. L.; Sarff, J. S.

    2012-10-01

    The multichannel polarimeter-interferometer system on the MST reversed-field pinch can be utilized to measure far-forward collective scattering from electron density fluctuations. The collective scattering system has 11 viewing chords with ˜8 cm spacing. The source is a 432 μm (694 GHz) far infrared laser and the scattered power is measured using a heterodyne detection scheme. Collective scattering provides a line-integrated measurement of fluctuations within the divergence of the probe beam covering wavenumber range: k⊥ < 1.3 cm-1, corresponding k⊥ρs < 1.3 (ρs is the ion-sound Larmor radius), the region of primary interest for turbulent fluctuation-induced transport. The perpendicular wavenumber consists of toroidal, poloidal, and radial contributions, which vary with chord position. Coherent modes associated with tearing instabilities and neutral-beam driven fast particles are observed along with broadband turbulence at frequencies up to 500 kHz. Changes in frequency are consistent with a Doppler shift due to parallel plasma flow.

  11. Optical observation of spin-density-wave fluctuations in Ba122 iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B.; Dai, Y. M.; Xiao, H.; Shen, B.; Ye, Z. R.; Forget, A.; Colson, D.; Feng, D. L.; Wen, H. H.; Qiu, X. G.; Lobo, R. P. S. M.

    2016-08-01

    In iron-based superconductors, a spin-density-wave (SDW) magnetic order is suppressed with doping, and unconventional superconductivity appears in close proximity to the SDW instability. The optical response of the SDW order shows clear gap features: substantial suppression in the low-frequency optical conductivity, alongside a spectral weight transfer from low to high frequencies. Here, we study the detailed temperature dependence of the optical response in three different series of the Ba122 system [Ba1 -xKxFe2As2 , Ba (Fe1-xCox) 2As2 , and BaFe2(As1-xPx) 2 ]. Intriguingly, we find that the suppression of the low-frequency optical conductivity and spectral weight transfer appear at a temperature T* much higher than the SDW transition temperature TSDW. Since this behavior has the same optical feature and energy scale as the SDW order, we attribute it to SDW fluctuations. Furthermore, T* is suppressed with doping, closely following the doping dependence of the nematic fluctuations detected by other techniques. These results suggest that the magnetic and nematic orders have an intimate relationship, in favor of the magnetic-fluctuation-driven nematicity scenario in iron-based superconductors.

  12. Density fluctuation measurements by far-forward collective scattering in the MST reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Duff, J. R.; Sarff, J. S.

    2012-10-15

    The multichannel polarimeter-interferometer system on the MST reversed-field pinch can be utilized to measure far-forward collective scattering from electron density fluctuations. The collective scattering system has 11 viewing chords with {approx}8 cm spacing. The source is a 432 {mu}m (694 GHz) far infrared laser and the scattered power is measured using a heterodyne detection scheme. Collective scattering provides a line-integrated measurement of fluctuations within the divergence of the probe beam covering wavenumber range: k{sub Up-Tack} < 1.3 cm{sup -1}, corresponding k{sub Up-Tack }{rho}{sub s} < 1.3 ({rho}{sub s} is the ion-sound Larmor radius), the region of primary interest for turbulent fluctuation-induced transport. The perpendicular wavenumber consists of toroidal, poloidal, and radial contributions, which vary with chord position. Coherent modes associated with tearing instabilities and neutral-beam driven fast particles are observed along with broadband turbulence at frequencies up to 500 kHz. Changes in frequency are consistent with a Doppler shift due to parallel plasma flow.

  13. Quasi-linear theory of electron density and temperature fluctuations with application to MHD generators and MPD arc thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M.

    1972-01-01

    Fluctuations in electron density and temperature coupled through Ohm's law are studied for an ionizable medium. The nonlinear effects are considered in the limit of a third order quasi-linear treatment. Equations are derived for the amplitude of the fluctuation. Conditions under which a steady state can exist in the presence of the fluctuation are examined and effective transport properties are determined. A comparison is made to previously considered second order theory. The effect of third order terms indicates the possibility of fluctuations existing in regions predicted stable by previous analysis.

  14. Quasi-linear theory of electron density and temperature fluctuations with application to MHD generators and MPD arc thrusters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Fluctuations in electron density and temperature coupled through Ohm's law are studied for an ionizable medium. The nonlinear effects are considered in the limit of a third order quasi-linear treatment. Equations are derived for the amplitude of the fluctuation. Conditions under which a steady state can exist in the presence of the fluctuation are examined and effective transport properties are determined. A comparison is made to previously considered second order theory. The effect of third order terms indicates the possibility of fluctuations existing in regions predicted stable by previous analysis.

  15. A theory for scattering by density fluctuations based on three-wave interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harker, K. J.; Crawford, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of scattering by charged particle fluctuations of a plasma is developed for the case of zero magnetic field. The source current is derived on the basis of: (1) a three wave interaction between the incident and scattered electromagnetic waves and one electrostatic plasma wave (either Langmuir or ion acoustic), and (2) a synchronous interaction between the same two electromagnetic waves and the discrete components of the charged particle fluctuations. Previous work is generalized by no longer making the assumption that the frequency of the electromagnetic waves in large compared to the plasma frequency. The general result is then applied to incoherent scatter, and to scatter by strongly driven plasma waves. An expansion is carried out for each of those cases to determine the lower order corrections to the usual high frequency scattering formulas.

  16. Effect of the electromagnetic environment on current fluctuations in driven tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Moritz; Grabert, Hermann

    2016-07-01

    We examine current fluctuations in tunnel junctions driven by a superposition of a constant and a sinusoidal voltage source. In standard setups, the external voltage is applied to the tunneling element via an impedance providing an electromagnetic environment of the junction. The modes of this environment are excited by the time-dependent voltage and are the source of Johnson-Nyquist noise. We determine the autocorrelation function of the current flowing in the leads of the junction in the weak tunneling limit up to terms of second order in the tunneling Hamiltonian. The driven modes of the electromagnetic environment are treated exactly by means of a unitary transformation introduced recently. Particular emphasis is placed on the spectral function of the current fluctuations. The spectrum is found to comprise three contributions: a term arising from the Johnson-Nyquist noise of the environmental impedance, a part due to the shot noise of the tunneling element, and a third contribution which comes from the cross correlation between fluctuations caused by the electromagnetic environment and fluctuations of the tunneling current. All three parts of the spectral function occur already for devices under dc bias. The spectral function of ac driven tunneling elements can be determined from the result for a dc bias by means of a photoassisted tunneling relation of the Tien-Gordon type. Specific results are given for an Ohmic environment and for a junction driven through a resonator.

  17. Development of KSTAR ECE imaging system for measurement of temperature fluctuations and edge density fluctuationsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Choi, M. J.; Kim, J. B.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Tobias, B.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Donné, A. J. H.

    2010-10-01

    The ECE imaging (ECEI) diagnostic tested on the TEXTOR tokamak revealed the sawtooth reconnection physics in unprecedented detail, including the first observation of high-field-side crash and collective heat transport [H. K. Park, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., A. J. H. Donné et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195003 (2006)]. An improved ECEI system capable of visualizing both high- and low-field sides simultaneously with considerably better spatial coverage has been developed for the KSTAR tokamak in order to capture the full picture of core MHD dynamics. Direct 2D imaging of other MHD phenomena such as tearing modes, edge localized modes, and even Alfvén eigenmodes is expected to be feasible. Use of ECE images of the optically thin edge region to recover 2D electron density changes during L/H mode transitions is also envisioned, providing powerful information about the underlying physics. The influence of density fluctuations on optically thin ECE is discussed.

  18. Measurement of temperature and density fluctuations in turbulence using an ultraviolet laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Noninvasive measurement of density and temperature fluctuations in turbulent air flow was examined. The approach used fluorescence of oxygen molecules which are selectively excited by a tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser beam. The strength of the fluorescence signal and its dependence on laser wavelength vary with the density and temperature of the air in the laser beam. Because fluorescence can be detected at 90 degrees from the beam propagation direction, spatial resolution in three dimensions, rather than path-integrated measurements can be achieved. With spatial resolutions of the order of a millimeter and at supersonic air velocities it is necessary to perform each measurement in a time of the order of a microsecond; this is possible by by using laser pulses of ten nanosecond duration. In this method atmospheric O2 is excited by the emission of a tunable ArF excimer laser, and the fluorescence, which spans the 210 to 420 range, is detected by an ultraviolet phototube.

  19. Characterization of maximally random jammed sphere packings. II. Correlation functions and density fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Michael A; Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    In the first paper of this series, we introduced Voronoi correlation functions to characterize the structure of maximally random jammed (MRJ) sphere packings across length scales. In the present paper, we determine a variety of different correlation functions that arise in rigorous expressions for the effective physical properties of MRJ sphere packings and compare them to the corresponding statistical descriptors for overlapping spheres and equilibrium hard-sphere systems. Such structural descriptors arise in rigorous bounds and formulas for effective transport properties, diffusion and reactions constants, elastic moduli, and electromagnetic characteristics. First, we calculate the two-point, surface-void, and surface-surface correlation functions, for which we derive explicit analytical formulas for finite hard-sphere packings. We show analytically how the contact Dirac delta function contribution to the pair correlation function g_{2}(r) for MRJ packings translates into distinct functional behaviors of these two-point correlation functions that do not arise in the other two models examined here. Then we show how the spectral density distinguishes the MRJ packings from the other disordered systems in that the spectral density vanishes in the limit of infinite wavelengths; i.e., these packings are hyperuniform, which means that density fluctuations on large length scales are anomalously suppressed. Moreover, for all model systems, we study and compute exclusion probabilities and pore size distributions, as well as local density fluctuations. We conjecture that for general disordered hard-sphere packings, a central limit theorem holds for the number of points within an spherical observation window. Our analysis links problems of interest in material science, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. In the third paper of this series, we will evaluate bounds and estimates of a host of different physical properties of the MRJ sphere packings that are based on the

  20. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic Used to Measure Velocity and Density Fluctuation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, Jayanta; Elam, Kristie A.

    2003-01-01

    A new, molecular Rayleigh-scattering-based flow diagnostic developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center has been used for the first time to measure the power spectrum of both gas density and radial velocity components in the plumes of high-speed jets. The objective of the work is to develop an unseeded, nonintrusive dynamic measurement technique for studying turbulent flows in NASA test facilities. This technique provides aerothermodynamic data not previously obtainable. It is particularly important for supersonic flows, where hot wire and pitot probes are difficult to use and disturb the flow under study. The effort is part of the nonintrusive instrumentation development program supporting propulsion research at the NASA Glenn Research Center. In particular, this work is measuring fluctuations in flow velocity, density, and temperature for jet noise studies. These data are valuable to researchers studying the correlation of flow fluctuations with far-field noise. One of the main objectives in jet noise research is to identify noise sources in the jet and to determine their contribution to noise generation. The technique is based on analyzing light scattered from molecules within the jet using a Fabry-Perot interferometer operating in a static imaging mode. The PC-based data acquisition system can simultaneously sample velocity and density data at rates to about 100 kHz and can handle up to 10 million data records. We used this system to interrogate three different jet nozzle designs in a Glenn free-jet facility. Each nozzle had a 25.4-mm exit diameter. One was convergent, used for subsonic flow measurements and to produce a screeching underexpanded jet with a fully expanded Mach number of 1.42. The other nozzles (Mach 1.4 and 1.8) were convergent-divergent types. The radial component of velocity and gas density were simultaneously measured in this work.

  1. Characterization of maximally random jammed sphere packings. II. Correlation functions and density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klatt, Michael A.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    In the first paper of this series, we introduced Voronoi correlation functions to characterize the structure of maximally random jammed (MRJ) sphere packings across length scales. In the present paper, we determine a variety of different correlation functions that arise in rigorous expressions for the effective physical properties of MRJ sphere packings and compare them to the corresponding statistical descriptors for overlapping spheres and equilibrium hard-sphere systems. Such structural descriptors arise in rigorous bounds and formulas for effective transport properties, diffusion and reactions constants, elastic moduli, and electromagnetic characteristics. First, we calculate the two-point, surface-void, and surface-surface correlation functions, for which we derive explicit analytical formulas for finite hard-sphere packings. We show analytically how the contact Dirac delta function contribution to the pair correlation function g2(r ) for MRJ packings translates into distinct functional behaviors of these two-point correlation functions that do not arise in the other two models examined here. Then we show how the spectral density distinguishes the MRJ packings from the other disordered systems in that the spectral density vanishes in the limit of infinite wavelengths; i.e., these packings are hyperuniform, which means that density fluctuations on large length scales are anomalously suppressed. Moreover, for all model systems, we study and compute exclusion probabilities and pore size distributions, as well as local density fluctuations. We conjecture that for general disordered hard-sphere packings, a central limit theorem holds for the number of points within an spherical observation window. Our analysis links problems of interest in material science, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. In the third paper of this series, we will evaluate bounds and estimates of a host of different physical properties of the MRJ sphere packings that are based on the

  2. Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer Observations of Density Fluctuations in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.; Romoli, M.; Poletto, G.; Noci, G.; Kohl, J. L.

    1998-11-01

    In the Letter ``Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer Observations of Density Fluctuations in the Solar Wind'' by L. Ofman, M. Romoli, G. Poletto, G. Noci, and J. L. Kohl (ApJ, 491, L111 [1997]), there was an error in the data reduction of the polarized brightness (pB). It was assumed that the cadence of the data and the exposure time are equal. However, the correct cadence is30 s longer than the exposure time because of the time it takes the polarizer to change orientation between exposures. This error does not affect the main result of the Letter, i.e., the detection of quasi-periodic density fluctuations in the solar wind. However, the correct cadences of the data in Table 1 are 30 s longer. This correction can be taken into account in Figure 1 by multiplying the times by 1.5 and dividing the frequencies by the same factor. Thus, the highest peak in the power spectrum is at 1.8+/-0.07 mHz (the corresponding period is 9.3+/-0.4 minutes). The correction factor is 1.1 in Figure 2 because of the longer exposure time in this observation.

  3. Measurements of core electron temperature and density fluctuations in DIII-D and comparison to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Carter, T. A.; Doyle, E. J.; Rhodes, T. L.; Wang, G.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Holland, C.; Tynan, G. R.; Austin, M. E.; Burrell, K. H.; Candy, J.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.; Staebler, G. M.; Waltz, R. E.; Makowski, M. A.

    2008-05-15

    For the first time, profiles (0.3<{rho}<0.9) of electron temperature and density fluctuations in a tokamak have been measured simultaneously and the results compared to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Electron temperature and density fluctuations measured in neutral beam-heated, sawtooth-free low confinement mode (L-mode) plasmas in DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] are found to be similar in frequency and normalized amplitude, with amplitude increasing with radius. The measured radial profile of two fluctuation fields allows for a new and rigorous comparison with gyrokinetic results. Nonlinear gyrokinetic flux-tube simulations predict that electron temperature and density fluctuations have similar normalized amplitudes in L-mode. At {rho}=0.5, simulation results match experimental heat diffusivities and density fluctuation amplitude, but overestimate electron temperature fluctuation amplitude and particle diffusivity. In contrast, simulations at {rho}=0.75 do not match either the experimentally derived transport properties or the measured fluctuation levels.

  4. Correlation of ion and beam current densities in Kaufman thrusters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    In the absence of direct impingement erosion, electrostatic thruster accelerator grid lifetime is defined by the charge exchange erosion that occurs at peak values of the ion beam current density. In order to maximize the thrust from an engine with a specified grid lifetime, the ion beam current density profile should therefore be as flat as possible. Knauer (1970) has suggested this can be achieved by establishing a radial plasma uniformity within the thruster discharge chamber; his tests with the radial field thruster provide an example of uniform plasma properties within the chamber and a flat ion beam profile occurring together. It is shown that, in particular, the ion density profile within the chamber determines the beam current density profile, and that a uniform ion density profile at the screen grid end of the discharge chamber should lead to a flat beam current density profile.

  5. Fluctuation current in a superconducting ring caused by a thin solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuratsuji, Hiroshi; Tsuchida, Satoshi

    2015-07-01

    The fluctuating current due to the Cooper pair is calculated for a superconducting ring threaded by a thin magnetic solenoid that is arranged by time-varying flux. The formulation is based on the Fokker-Planck equation derived by the Langevin-type Landau-Ginzburg equation. The statistical average of the fluctuation current is calculated. As a special case, for the equilibrium state, the current shows a critical behavior near the transition point. In the presence of the time-varying flux, the current is calculated to be a highly nonlinear function of the electric field induced by the time variation of the flux, which yields a sort of the Ohmic law in the limit of the weak field.

  6. Note: A real-time beam current density meter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Junliang; Yu Deyang; Ruan Fangfang; Xue Yingli; Wang Wei

    2013-03-15

    We have developed a real-time beam current density meter for charged particle beams. It measures the mean current density by collimating a uniform and large diameter primary beam. The suppression of the secondary electrons and the deflection of the beam were simulated, and it was tested with a 105 keV Ar{sup 7+} ion beam.

  7. Preliminary Study of the Magnetic Perturbation Effects on the Edge Density Profiles and Fluctuations Using Reflectometers on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yu; Wang, Yumin; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Shoubiao; Qu, Hao; Han, Xiang; Wen, Fei; Kong, Defeng; Huang, Canbin; Cai, Jianqing; Sun, Youwen; Liang, Yunfeng; Gao, Xiang; East Team

    2016-09-01

    The resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) coils have been successfully designed and installed on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Using the reflectometer systems, the density profile and the density fluctuations during magnetic perturbations (MPs) phase have been investigated. During the experiments, two different cases are studied separately: steady MPs and rotating MPs. In both cases, a strongly density pump-out has been observed. In the steady MPs cases, an enhancement of the low frequency (<60 kHz) density fluctuations in H-mode phase has been observed. The plasma density boundary out-shifts ~ 5% caused by the MPs. The pedestal density gradient is reduced by 50%, while the radial location nearly stays unchanged. In the rotating MPs, the line-averaged density, the Dα emission at the divertor region and the spectrum of the density fluctuations are modulated. The results suggest that the low frequency (<60 kHz) density fluctuations may contribute to the strong density pump-out. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2014GB106000, 2014GB106003 and 2015GB110001), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11275234, 11305215, 11305208, 11405214 and 11505221)

  8. Diameter dependent failure current density of gold nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, S.; Maaz, K.; Ali, G.; Ensinger, W.

    2009-09-01

    Failure current density of single gold nanowires is investigated in this paper. Single wires with diameters ranging from 80 to 720 nm and length 30 µm were electrochemically deposited in ion track-etched single-pore polycarbonate membranes. The maximum current density was investigated while keeping the wires embedded in the polymer matrix and ramping up the current until failure occurred. The current density is found to increase with diminishing diameter and the wires with a diameter of 80 nm withstand 1.2 × 1012 A m-2 before undergoing failure. Possible reasons for these results are discussed in this paper.

  9. Voltage fluctuation to current converter with Coulomb-coupled quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, F; Pfeffer, P; Höfling, S; Kamp, M; Worschech, L

    2015-04-10

    We study the rectification of voltage fluctuations in a system consisting of two Coulomb-coupled quantum dots. The first quantum dot is connected to a reservoir where voltage fluctuations are supplied and the second one is attached to two separate leads via asymmetric and energy-dependent transport barriers. We observe a rectified output current through the second quantum dot depending quadratically on the noise amplitude supplied to the other Coulomb-coupled quantum dot. The current magnitude and direction can be switched by external gates, and maximum output currents are found in the nA region. The rectification delivers output powers in the pW region. Future devices derived from our sample may be applied for energy harvesting on the nanoscale beneficial for autonomous and energy-efficient electronic applications.

  10. Precipitation-Induced Voltage-Dependent Ion Current Fluctuations in Conical Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V

    2010-01-01

    Single conically shaped nanopores produce stable ion current fluctuations when in contact with weakly soluble salts, such as calcium hydrogen phosphate (CaHPO{sub 4}) and cobalt hydrogen phosphate (CoHPO{sub 4}). The pore spontaneously switches between high and low conductance states, called open and closed states, respectively. Pore opening and closing are linked to the dynamic formation of the calcium and cobalt precipitates at the small opening of the pore. The probabilities of pore opening and closing are voltage-dependent, and this characteristic of ion current signal is known for biological voltage-gated channels. We show that new types of ion current fluctuations are obtained in conditions at which precipitates of CaHPO{sub 4} and CoHPO{sub 4} can form in the pore at the same time.

  11. Individual differences in transcranial electrical stimulation current density

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Michael J; Goodman, Theodore; Pierson, Ronald; Shepherd, Shane; Wang, Qiang; Groshong, Bennett; Wiley, David F

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (TCES) is effective in treating many conditions, but it has not been possible to accurately forecast current density within the complex anatomy of a given subject's head. We sought to predict and verify TCES current densities and determine the variability of these current distributions in patient-specific models based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Two experiments were performed. The first experiment estimated conductivity from MRIs and compared the current density results against actual measurements from the scalp surface of 3 subjects. In the second experiment, virtual electrodes were placed on the scalps of 18 subjects to model simulated current densities with 2 mA of virtually applied stimulation. This procedure was repeated for 4 electrode locations. Current densities were then calculated for 75 brain regions. Comparison of modeled and measured external current in experiment 1 yielded a correlation of r = .93. In experiment 2, modeled individual differences were greatest near the electrodes (ten-fold differences were common), but simulated current was found in all regions of the brain. Sites that were distant from the electrodes (e.g. hypothalamus) typically showed two-fold individual differences. MRI-based modeling can effectively predict current densities in individual brains. Significant variation occurs between subjects with the same applied electrode configuration. Individualized MRI-based modeling should be considered in place of the 10-20 system when accurate TCES is needed. PMID:24285948

  12. On bottom density currents on the continental shelves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anuchin, V. N.; Gusev, A. M.; Pyrkin, Y. G.; Khapayev, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    The turbulent characteristics of bottom density currents on the continental shelves and their influence on the vertical profiles of current velocities are studied by considering plane parallel flows of a liquid with one density in a motionless liquid and with lighter density along an inclined plane. The motion of the liquid is a result of gravitational force directed along the parallel plane. Vertical distribution of turbulent stress is determined from a known average velocity profile and is used to obtain the vertical profile of the average current velocity.

  13. Structure and Function of Intra–Annual Density Fluctuations: Mind the Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Battipaglia, Giovanna; Campelo, Filipe; Vieira, Joana; Grabner, Michael; De Micco, Veronica; Nabais, Cristina; Cherubini, Paolo; Carrer, Marco; Bräuning, Achim; Čufar, Katarina; Di Filippo, Alfredo; García-González, Ignacio; Koprowski, Marcin; Klisz, Marcin; Kirdyanov, Alexander V.; Zafirov, Nikolay; de Luis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Tree rings are natural archives of climate and environmental information with a yearly resolution. Indeed, wood anatomical, chemical, and other properties of tree rings are a synthesis of several intrinsic and external factors, and their interaction during tree growth. In particular, Intra-Annual Density Fluctuations (IADFs) can be considered as tree-ring anomalies that can be used to better understand tree growth and to reconstruct past climate conditions with intra-annual resolution. However, the ecophysiological processes behind IADF formation, as well as their functional impact, remain unclear. Are IADFs resulting from a prompt adjustment to fluctuations in environmental conditions to avoid stressful conditions and/or to take advantage from favorable conditions? In this paper we discuss: (1) the influence of climatic factors on the formation of IADFs; (2) the occurrence of IADFs in different species and environments; (3) the potential of new approaches to study IADFs and identify their triggering factors. Our final aim is to underscore the advantages offered by network analyses of data and the importance of high-resolution measurements to gain insight into IADFs formation processes and their relations with climatic conditions, including extreme weather events. PMID:27200063

  14. Structure and Function of Intra-Annual Density Fluctuations: Mind the Gaps.

    PubMed

    Battipaglia, Giovanna; Campelo, Filipe; Vieira, Joana; Grabner, Michael; De Micco, Veronica; Nabais, Cristina; Cherubini, Paolo; Carrer, Marco; Bräuning, Achim; Čufar, Katarina; Di Filippo, Alfredo; García-González, Ignacio; Koprowski, Marcin; Klisz, Marcin; Kirdyanov, Alexander V; Zafirov, Nikolay; de Luis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Tree rings are natural archives of climate and environmental information with a yearly resolution. Indeed, wood anatomical, chemical, and other properties of tree rings are a synthesis of several intrinsic and external factors, and their interaction during tree growth. In particular, Intra-Annual Density Fluctuations (IADFs) can be considered as tree-ring anomalies that can be used to better understand tree growth and to reconstruct past climate conditions with intra-annual resolution. However, the ecophysiological processes behind IADF formation, as well as their functional impact, remain unclear. Are IADFs resulting from a prompt adjustment to fluctuations in environmental conditions to avoid stressful conditions and/or to take advantage from favorable conditions? In this paper we discuss: (1) the influence of climatic factors on the formation of IADFs; (2) the occurrence of IADFs in different species and environments; (3) the potential of new approaches to study IADFs and identify their triggering factors. Our final aim is to underscore the advantages offered by network analyses of data and the importance of high-resolution measurements to gain insight into IADFs formation processes and their relations with climatic conditions, including extreme weather events. PMID:27200063

  15. Lower-hybrid poloidal current drive for fluctuation reduction in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Uchimoto, E.; Cekic, M.; Harvey, R.W.; Litwin, C.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Sovinec, C.R.

    1994-06-01

    Current drive using the lower-hybrid slow wave is shown to be a promising candidate for improving confinement properties of a reversed field pinch (RFP). Ray-tracing calculations indicate that the wave will make a few poloidal turns while spiraling radially into a target zone inside the reversal layer. The poloidal antenna wavelength of the lower hybrid wave can be chosen so that efficient parallel current drive will occur mostly in the poloidal direction in this outer region. Three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) computation demonstrates that an additive poloidal current in this region will reduce the magnetic fluctuations and magnetic stochasticity.

  16. Hyperuniform Density Fluctuations and Diverging Dynamic Correlations in Periodically Driven Colloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjhung, Elsen; Berthier, Ludovic

    2015-04-01

    The emergence of particle irreversibility in periodically driven colloidal suspensions has been interpreted as resulting either from a nonequilibrium phase transition to an absorbing state or from the chaotic nature of particle trajectories. Using a simple model of a driven suspension, we show that a nonequilibrium phase transition is accompanied by hyperuniform static density fluctuations in the vicinity of the transition, where we also observe strong dynamic heterogeneities reminiscent of dynamics in glassy materials. We find that single particle dynamics becomes intermittent and strongly non-Fickian, and that collective dynamics becomes spatially correlated over diverging length scales. Our results suggest that the two theoretical scenarii can be experimentally discriminated using particle-resolved measurements of standard static and dynamic observables.

  17. Vacuum energy density fluctuations in Minkowski and Casimir states via smeared quantum fields and point separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Nicholas G.; Hu, B. L.

    2000-10-01

    We present calculations of the variance of fluctuations and of the mean of the energy momentum tensor of a massless scalar field for the Minkowski and Casimir vacua as a function of an intrinsic scale defined by a smeared field or by point separation. We point out that, contrary to prior claims, the ratio of variance to mean-squared being of the order unity is not necessarily a good criterion for measuring the invalidity of semiclassical gravity. For the Casimir topology we obtain expressions for the variance to mean-squared ratio as a function of the intrinsic scale (defined by a smeared field) compared to the extrinsic scale (defined by the separation of the plates, or the periodicity of space). Our results make it possible to identify the spatial extent where negative energy density prevails which could be useful for studying quantum field effects in worm holes and baby universes, and for examining the design feasibility of real-life ``time machines.'' For the Minkowski vacuum we find that the ratio of the variance to the mean-squared, calculated from the coincidence limit, is identical to the value of the Casimir case at the same limit for spatial point separation while identical to the value of a hot flat space result with a temporal point separation. We analyze the origin of divergences in the fluctuations of the energy density and discuss choices in formulating a procedure for their removal, thus raising new questions about the uniqueness and even the very meaning of regularization of the energy momentum tensor for quantum fields in curved or even flat spacetimes when spacetime is viewed as having an extended structure.

  18. Fluctuating currents in stochastic thermodynamics. II. Energy conversion and nonequilibrium response in kinesin models.

    PubMed

    Altaner, Bernhard; Wachtel, Artur; Vollmer, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Unlike macroscopic engines, the molecular machinery of living cells is strongly affected by fluctuations. Stochastic thermodynamics uses Markovian jump processes to model the random transitions between the chemical and configurational states of these biological macromolecules. A recently developed theoretical framework [A. Wachtel, J. Vollmer, and B. Altaner, Phys. Rev. E 92, 042132 (2015)] provides a simple algorithm for the determination of macroscopic currents and correlation integrals of arbitrary fluctuating currents. Here we use it to discuss energy conversion and nonequilibrium response in different models for the molecular motor kinesin. Methodologically, our results demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm in dealing with parameter-dependent stochastic models. For the concrete biophysical problem our results reveal two interesting features in experimentally accessible parameter regions: the validity of a nonequilibrium Green-Kubo relation at mechanical stalling as well as a negative differential mobility for superstalling forces.

  19. Density-dependent life histories in female bank voles from fluctuating populations.

    PubMed

    Tkadlec, E; Zejda, J

    1998-11-01

    Using long-term data sets from two lowland floodplain forest bank vole populations in central Europe, we tested two predictions that with increasing densities: (i) proportions of nonparous females in winter populations would increase; and (ii) age of both nonparous and parous females would increase. These two predictions follow from the assumption that changes in age structure are driven by density-dependent shifts in age at first reproduction. Both populations were sampled by snap trapping between 1956 and 1976. For each year, we examined samples of animals collected between November and April for proportions of females with and without breeding experience and analysed their variation in age relative to the population density. The presence or absence of placental scars was used to discriminate between the parous and nonparous animals. Age was determined by measuring the length of the first mandibular molar (M1 ) roots. Both populations exhibited multi-annual fluctuations in numbers closely resembling those in northern Fennoscandia. The proportion of nonparous females in our total sample was 0.73, suggesting that it is uncommon for parous female bank voles to breed in two successive years and that their life histories are largely designed for breeding in one season only as a major reproductive strategy. Using a logistic-binomial regression model, we found that the probability of females being nonparous or parous at capture varied significantly with time, space and population density. The final model producing the best fit to data predicted that the proportion of nonparous females would be slightly larger over winter and substantially larger after high-density breeding seasons, which is consistent with the tested prediction. With increasing densities during the breeding seasons, both the nonparous and parous females became older at the onset of winter. Again, the field evidence was consistent with the predicted pattern. The age of parous females in the autumn at

  20. Alternating-Current Equipment for the Measurement of Fluctuations of Air Speed in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, W C , Jr

    1937-01-01

    Recent electrical and mechanical improvements have been made in the equipment developed at the National Bureau of Standards for measurement of fluctuations of air speed in turbulent flow. Data useful in the design of similar equipment are presented. The design of rectified alternating-current power supplies for such apparatus is treated briefly, and the effect of the power supplies on the performance of the equipment is discussed.

  1. Improvement of the noise level of the Split Langmuir Probe - a spatial current density meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marusenkov, Andriy; Dudkin, Fedor; Shuvalov, Valentyn

    2013-04-01

    One of the main tasks at the experimental investigations of the wave processes in space plasma is the determination of the dispersion relations between their wave vector and frequency. The frequency analysis of the magnetic field fluctuations and the electric current density in plasma is very efficient in this case. It had been shown that the simultaneous measurements of the magnetic field orthogonal components and the spatial current density fluctuations can give the wave vector k values for the plane wave spectra, by which a wave field in a plasma reference frame can be represented. The measurements of the magnetic field fluctuations usually are made by a variety of magnetometers using well developed methods. Unfortunately, up to the moment the methods and instruments for the reliable measurements of the space current density are not so good developed as the magnetic ones. There are three independent techniques to study the spatial current density in plasma: the contactless Rogovsky coil, the Faraday cap and the Split Langmuir Probe (SLP). The attempt to compare the different approaches and instruments was carried out during the experiment "Variant" onboard Ukrainian remote sensing satellite SICH-1M launched 2004. The clear advantages of the SLP over other instruments were revealed and proved. Using whistler as a test signal the very good consistency between the magnetic and electric fields and the spatial electric current density was obtained. However, the signal-to-noise ratio of the current density meters has to be further improved. In this report we analyze the sources of the SLP noises and propose the ways to decrease it. The computer simulation of the improved current density meter reveals that the introduced changes have almost no influence on the sensor matching with the space plasma and, as a result, the minor changes of the transformation factor in operation frequency band are expected. The modernized version of the SLP was successfully tested in the

  2. Choice of basic variables in current-density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellgren, Erik I.; Kvaal, Simen; Sagvolden, Espen; Ekström, Ulf; Teale, Andrew M.; Helgaker, Trygve

    2012-12-01

    The selection of basic variables in current-density-functional theory and formal properties of the resulting formulations are critically examined. Focus is placed on the extent to which the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem, constrained-search approach, and Lieb's formulation (in terms of convex and concave conjugation) of standard density-functional theory can be generalized to provide foundations for current-density-functional theory. For the well-known case with the gauge-dependent paramagnetic current density as a basic variable, we find that the resulting total energy functional is not concave. It is shown that a simple redefinition of the scalar potential restores concavity and enables the application of convex analysis and convex (or concave) conjugation. As a result, the solution sets arising in potential-optimization problems can be given a simple characterization. We also review attempts to establish theories with the physical current density as a basic variable. Despite the appealing physical motivation behind this choice of basic variables, we find that the mathematical foundations of the theories proposed to date are unsatisfactory. Moreover, the analogy to standard density-functional theory is substantially weaker as neither the constrained-search approach nor the convex analysis framework carry over to a theory making use of the physical current density.

  3. Correcting magnetic probe perturbations on current density measurements of current carrying plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Knoblauch, P.; Raspa, V.; Di Lorenzo, F.; Lazarte, A.; Moreno, C.; Clausse, A.

    2010-09-15

    A method to infer the current density distribution in the current sheath of a plasma focus discharge from a magnetic probe is formulated and then applied to experimental data obtained in a 1.1 kJ device. Distortions on the magnetic probe signal caused by current redistribution and by a time-dependent total discharge current are considered simultaneously, leading to an integral equation for the current density. Two distinct, easy to implement, numerical procedures are given to solve such equation. Experimental results show the coexistence of at least two maxima in the current density structure of a nitrogen sheath.

  4. Diagnosis of equilibrium magnetic profiles, current transport, and internal structures in a reversed-field pinch using electron temperature fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke, Eli

    Due to long fast ion confinement times, neutral beam injection (NBI) on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) yields large fast ion populations with substantial density gradients. Novel application of the unique high-rep-rate (>10 kHz) Thomson scattering diagnostic on MST has enabled characterization of a newly observed beam-driven instability, and detailed measurement of equilibrium changes caused by the fast ion population. While previous work has focused on high-frequency energetic particle modes (EPMs), recent observations indicate that fast ions drive a bursting instability near the plasma rotation frequency under appropriate conditions. The mode chirps strongly, with a frequency of approximately 7 kHz in the plasma reference frame at peak amplitude. Bursts are correlated with EPM activity and core neutral particle analyzer signals drop by 30% during a burst, suggesting that this mode participates in avalanches of the higher frequency EPMs and drives enhanced fast ion transport. Electron temperature fluctuations correlated with this low-frequency mode exhibit a core-peaked structure with a sensitive dependence on the safety factor q. Although this mode has not yet been positively identified, its characteristics and internal structure are suggestive of an internal kink (fishbone) or beta-induced Alfven eigenmode. In addition to driving EPMs, the large fast ion population also modifies the current profile. An increase in on-axis current density driven by NBI is offset by a reduction in the mid-radius, leading to net-zero current drive. This results in a slight flattening of the safety factor profile, observed by precise measurement of the rational surface locations of the dominant tearing modes; these are identified from the phase flip in correlated electron temperature fluctuations recorded by Thomson scattering. For the core n = 6 rational surface, an inward shift of 1.1 +/- 0.6 cm is observed, with an estimated reduction in q0 of 5%. This technique provides a

  5. A high speed compact microwave interferometer for density fluctuation measurements in Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, H.; Tan, Y.; Liu, Y. Q.; Xie, H. Q.; Gao, Z.

    2016-11-01

    A single-channel 3 mm interferometer has been developed for plasma density diagnostics in the Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak (SUNIST). The extremely compact microwave interferometer utilizes one corrugated feed horn antenna for both emitting and receiving the microwave. The beam path lies on the equatorial plane so the system would not suffer from beam path deflection problems due to the symmetry of the cross section. A focusing lens group and an oblique vacuum window are carefully designed to boost the signal to noise ratio, which allows this system to show good performance even with the small-diameter central column itself as a reflector, without a concave mirror. The whole system discards the reference leg for maximum compactness, which is particularly suitable for the small-sized tokamak. An auto-correcting algorithm is developed to calculate the phase evolution, and the result displays good phase stability of the whole system. The intermediate frequency is adjustable and can reach its full potential of 2 MHz for best temporal resolution. Multiple measurements during ohmic discharges proved the interferometer's capability to track typical density fluctuations in SUNIST, which enables this system to be utilized in the study of MHD activities.

  6. Density nonlinearities in field theories for a toy model of fluctuating nonlinear hydrodynamics of supercooled liquids.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Joonhyun

    2009-11-01

    We study a zero-dimensional version of the fluctuating nonlinear hydrodynamics (FNH) of supercooled liquids originally investigated by Das and Mazenko (DM) [Shankar P. Das and Gene F. Mazenko Phys. Rev. A 34, 2265 (1986)]. The time-dependent density-like and momentum-like variables are introduced with no spatial degrees of freedom in this toy model. The structure of nonlinearities takes the similar form to the original FNH, which allows one to study in a simpler setting the issues raised recently regarding the field theoretical approaches to glass forming liquids. We study the effects of density nonlinearities on the time evolution of correlation and response functions by developing field theoretic formulations in two different ways: first by following the original prescription of DM and then by constructing a dynamical action which possesses a linear time-reversal symmetry as proposed recently. We show explicitly that, at the one-loop order of the perturbation theory, the DM-type field theory does not support a sharp ergodic-nonergodic transition, while the other admits one. The simple nature of the toy model in the DM formulation allows us to develop numerical solutions to a complete set of coupled dynamical equations for the correlation and response functions at the one-loop order. PMID:20364986

  7. A high speed data acquisition and analysis system for transonic velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.

    1988-01-01

    The high speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) is described which provides the capability for the simultaneous measurement of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations. The system of hardware and software is described in context of the wind tunnel environment. The DDAS replaces both a recording mechanism and a separate data processing system. The data acquisition and data reduction process has been combined within DDAS. DDAS receives input from hot wires and anemometers, amplifies and filters the signals with computer controlled modules, and converts the analog signals to digital with real-time simultaneous digitization followed by digital recording on disk or tape. Automatic acquisition (either from a computer link to an existing wind tunnel acquisition system, or from data acquisition facilities within DDAS) collects necessary calibration and environment data. The generation of hot wire sensitivities is done in DDAS, as is the application of sensitivities to the hot wire data to generate turbulence quantities. The presentation of the raw and processed data, in terms of root mean square values of velocity, density and temperature, and the processing of the spectral data is accomplished on demand in near-real-time- with DDAS. A comprehensive description of the interface to the DDAS and of the internal mechanisms will be prosented. A summary of operations relevant to the use of the DDAS will be provided.

  8. Glass transition and density fluctuations in the fragile glass former orthoterphenyl

    SciTech Connect

    Monaco, G.; Fioretto, D.; Comez, L.; Ruocco, G.

    2001-06-01

    High-resolution Brillouin light scattering is used to measure the dynamic structure factor of the fragile glass former orthoterphenyl (OTP) in a wide temperature range around the glass transition region and up to the boiling point. The whole set of spectra is described in terms of a phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic model. In the supercooled phase, we show the contemporary existence of the structural process, whose main features come out to be consistent with the results obtained with other spectroscopies, and of a secondary, activated process, which occurs on the 10{sup {minus}11} s time scale and has a low activation energy (E{sub a}{sup f}=0.28 kcal/mol). This latter process, which is also present in the glassy phase and seems to be insensitive to the glass transition, is attributed to the coupling between the density modes and intramolecular degrees of freedom. In the normal liquid phase, the two processes merge together, and the resulting characteristic time is no longer consistent with those derived with other spectroscopies. The analysis points to the conclusion that, for what concerns the long-wavelength density fluctuations in fragile glass formers such as OTP, the universal dynamical features related to the glass transition come out clearly only in the supercooled phase and at frequencies lower than {approximately}10{sup 6} Hz.

  9. Analysis of sodium current fluctuations in the cut-open squid giant axon

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Patch pipettes were used to record the current arising from small populations of sodium channels in voltage-clamped cut-open squid axons. The current fluctuations associated with the time-variant sodium conductance were analyzed with nonstationary statistical techniques in order to obtain an estimate for the conductance of a single sodium channel. The results presented support the notion that the open sodium channel in the squid axon has only one value of conductance, 3.5 pS. PMID:6325579

  10. Casimir effect for scalar current densities in topologically nontrivial spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, S.; Saharian, A. A.; Saharyan, N. A.

    2015-08-01

    We evaluate the Hadamard function and the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the current density for a charged scalar field, induced by flat boundaries in spacetimes with an arbitrary number of toroidally compactified spatial dimensions. The field operator obeys the Robin conditions on the boundaries and quasiperiodicity conditions with general phases along compact dimensions. In addition, the presence of a constant gauge field is assumed. The latter induces Aharonov-Bohm-type effect on the VEVs. There is a region in the space of the parameters in Robin boundary conditions where the vacuum state becomes unstable. The stability condition depends on the lengths of compact dimensions and is less restrictive than that for background with trivial topology. The vacuum current density is a periodic function of the magnetic flux, enclosed by compact dimensions, with the period equal to the flux quantum. It is explicitly decomposed into the boundary-free and boundary-induced contributions. In sharp contrast to the VEVs of the field squared and the energy-momentum tensor, the current density does not contain surface divergences. Moreover, for Dirichlet condition it vanishes on the boundaries. The normal derivative of the current density on the boundaries vanish for both Dirichlet and Neumann conditions and is nonzero for general Robin conditions. When the separation between the plates is smaller than other length scales, the behavior of the current density is essentially different for non-Neumann and Neumann boundary conditions. In the former case, the total current density in the region between the plates tends to zero. For Neumann boundary condition on both plates, the current density is dominated by the interference part and is inversely proportional to the separation.

  11. Direct Measurements of Upper Limits for Transient Density Fluctuations in the Zodiacal Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, B.

    1997-12-01

    Questions regarding the density of the local zodiacal clouds have recently become important in many areas. Several planned searches for extrasolar system planets require a better knowledge of the behavior of zodiacal clouds, the solar system zodiacal cloud has been suggested as a driving force for glaciations, and it is becoming clear that discussions regarding prebiotic chemistry must include the flux of interplanetary particles onto Earth. No certain upper limits can today be set for transient density variations in the local zodiacal cloud, nor for fluctuations in the particle-flux onto Earth. Some new results have, however, created a possibility to measure this in the geological record. An interdisciplinary project is described. The goal for the project is to set upper limits for the zodiacal dust-flux onto Earth during passages through IRAS dust-bands during the last 2.5 million years, and use these limits to calculate the maximum density of the bands. We estimate the predicted flux of zodiacal particles onto Earth through orbital modeling., where it is assumed that the source for the IRAS dust-bands are a few Hirayama asteroid families. The orbits of the asteroids and the produced dust are integrated to find the times when Earth revolved within a dust-band. This forms the basis for a geochemical analysis of oceanic sediments, lake sediments, ice-cores and loess-deposits, with the goal to find the signal from a passage through a dust-band. Apart from providing an excellent stratigraphic dating tool, the identification and characterization of such a signal would give important information about the behavior of the zodiacal cloud over shorter times (1-2 My). Some astronomical results are presented and compared with sedimentological observations.

  12. Supersonic helium beam diagnostic for fluctuation measurements of electron temperature and density at the Tokamak TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Kruezi, U.; Stoschus, H.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Samm, U.

    2012-06-15

    A supersonic helium beam diagnostic, based on the line-ratio technique for high resolution electron density and temperature measurements in the plasma edge (r/a > 0.9) was designed, built, and optimised at TEXTOR (Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research). The supersonic injection system, based on the Campargue skimmer-nozzle concept, was developed and optimised in order to provide both a high neutral helium beam density of n{sub 0}= 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} m{sup -3} and a low beam divergence of {+-}1 Degree-Sign simultaneously, achieving a poloidal resolution of {Delta}{sub poloidal}= 9 mm. The setup utilises a newly developed dead volume free piezo valve for operation in a high magnetic field environment of up to 2 T with a maximum repetition rate of 80 Hz. Gas injections are realised for a duration of 120 ms at a repetition rate of 2 Hz (duty cycle 1/3). In combination with a high sensitivity detection system, consisting of three 32 multi-channel photomultipliers (PMTs), measurements of edge electron temperature and density with a radial resolution of {Delta}{sub radial}= 2 mm and a maximum temporal resolution of {Delta}t Asymptotically-Equal-To 2 {mu}s (470 kHz) are possible for the first time. The diagnostic setup at TEXTOR is presented. The newly developed injection system and its theoretical bases are discussed. The applicability of the stationary collisional-radiative model as basis of the line-ratio technique is shown. Finally, an example of a fluctuation analysis demonstrating the unique high temporal and spatial resolution capabilities of this new diagnostic is presented.

  13. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-19

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  14. Estimation of nighttime dip-equatorial E-region current density using measurements and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Kuldeep; Sekar, R.; Anandarao, B. G.; Gupta, S. P.; Chakrabarty, D.

    2016-08-01

    The existence of the possible ionospheric current during nighttime over low-equatorial latitudes is one of the unresolved issues in ionospheric physics and geomagnetism. A detailed investigation is carried out to estimate the same over Indian longitudes using in situ measurements from Thumba (8.5 ° N, 76.9 ° E), empirical plasma drift model (Fejer et al., 2008) and equatorial electrojet model developed by Anandarao (1976). This investigation reveals that the nighttime E-region current densities vary from ∼0.3 to ∼0.7 A/km2 during pre-midnight to early morning hours on geomagnetically quiet conditions. The nighttime current densities over the dip equator are estimated using three different methods (discussed in methodology section) and are found to be consistent with one another within the uncertainty limits. Altitude structures in the E-region current densities are also noticed which are shown to be associated with altitudinal structures in the electron densities. The horizontal component of the magnetic field induced by these nighttime ionospheric currents is estimated to vary between ∼2 and ∼6 nT during geomagnetically quiet periods. This investigation confirms the existence of nighttime ionospheric current and opens up a possibility of estimating base line value for geomagnetic field fluctuations as observed by ground-based magnetometer.

  15. Magneto-optical imaging of transport current densities in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G.W.; Welp, U.; Gunter, D.O.; Zhong, W.; Balachandran, U.; Haldar, P.; Sokolowski, R.S.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V.K.; Nikitenko, V.I.

    1995-12-31

    Direct imaging of the paths of transport currents in superconductors creates many new possibilities for exploring the basic features of vortex pinning mechanisms and for improving the performance of superconducting materials. A technique for imaging the path and magnitude of the transport current density flowing in superconductors is described. Results are given for a 37-filament BSCCO 2223 powder-in-tube wire, showing a highly inhomogeneous current path within the filaments.

  16. Characteristics of density currents over regular and irregular rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaganagar, K.

    2013-12-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used as a tool to understand the effect of surface roughness on the propagation of density currents. Simulations have been performed for lock-exchange flow with gate separating the dense and the lighter fluid. As the lock is released the dense fluid collapses with the lighter fluid on the top, resulting in formation of horizontally evolving density current. The talk will focus on the fundamental differences between the propagation of the density current over regular and irregular rough surfaces. The flow statistics and the flow structures are discussed. The results have revealed the spacing between the roughness elements is an important factor in classifying the density currents. The empirical relations of the front velocity and location for the dense and sparse roughness have been evaluated in terms of the roughness height, spacing between the elements and the initial amount of lock fluid. DNS results for a dense current flowing over a (a) smooth and (b) rough bottom with egg-carton roughness elements in a regular configuration. In these simulations the lock-exchange box is located in the middle of the channel and has two gates which allow two dense currents to be generated, one moving to the right and one to the left side of the channel. Note how the dense current interface presents smaller structures when over a rough bottom (right).

  17. TFCX current density and nuclear heating limitations for superconducting tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kalsi, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    A major goal of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) study was to minimize the size of the device and achieve lowest cost. Two key factors influencing the size of the device employing superconducting magnets are toroidal field (TF) winding current density and its nuclear heat load withstand capability. Lower winding current density requires larger radial build of the winding pack. Likewise, lower allowable nuclear heating in the winding requires larger shield thickness between the plasma and coil. To achieve a low-cost device, it is essential to maximize the winding's current density and nuclear heating withstand capability. To meet this objective, the TFCX design specification adopted as goals a nominal winding current density of 3500 A/cm/sup 2/ with 10-T peak field at the winding, peak nuclear heat load limits of 1 mW/cm/sup 3/ for the nominal design and 50 mW/cm/sup 3/ for an advanced design. This study developed justification for these current density and nuclear heat load limits.

  18. Superconducting toroidal field coil current densities for the TFCX

    SciTech Connect

    Kalsi, S.S.; Hooper, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    A major goal of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) study was to minimize the size of the device and achieve lowest cost. Two key factors influencing the size of the device employing superconducting magnets are toroidal field (TF) winding current density and its nuclear heat load withstand capability. Lower winding current density requires larger radial build of the winding pack. Likewise, lower allowable nuclear heating in the winding requires larger shield thickness between the plasma and coil. In order to achieve a low-cost device, it is essential to maximize the winding's current density and nuclear heating withhstand capability. To meet the above objective, the TFCX design specification adopted as goals a nominal winding current density of 3500 A/cm/sup 2/ with 10-T peak field at the winding and peak nuclear heat load limits of 1 MW/cm/sup 3/ for the nominal design and 50 MW/cm/sup 3/ for an advanced design. This study developed justification for these current density and nuclear heat load limits.

  19. Dispersal and air entrainment in unconfined dilute pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Benjamin J.

    2014-09-01

    Unconfined scaled laboratory experiments show that 3D structures control the behavior of dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) during and after liftoff. Experiments comprise heated and ambient temperature 20 μm talc powder turbulently suspended in air to form density currents within an unobstructed 8.5 × 6 × 2.6-m chamber. Comparisons of Richardson, thermal Richardson, Froude, Stokes, and settling numbers and buoyant thermal to kinetic energy densities show good agreement between experimental currents and dilute PDCs. The experimental Reynolds numbers are lower than those of PDCs, but the experiments are fully turbulent; thus, the large-scale dynamics are similar between the two systems. High-frequency, simultaneous observation in three orthogonal planes shows that the currents behave very differently than previous 2D (i.e., confined) currents. Specifically, whereas ambient temperature currents show radial dispersal patterns, buoyancy reversal, and liftoff of heated currents focuses dispersal along narrow axes beneath the rising plumes. The aspect ratios, defined as the current length divided by a characteristic width, are typically 2.5-3.5 in heated currents and 1.5-2.5 in ambient temperature currents, reflecting differences in dispersal between the two types of currents. Mechanisms of air entrainment differ greatly between the two currents: entrainment occurs primarily behind the heads and through the upper margins of ambient temperature currents, but heated currents entrain air through their lateral margins. That lateral entrainment is much more efficient than the vertical entrainment, >0.5 compared to ˜0.1, where entrainment is defined as the ratio of cross-stream to streamwise velocity. These experiments suggest that generation of coignimbrite plumes should focus PDCs along narrow transport axes, resulting in elongate rather than radial deposits.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of core electron temperature and density fluctuations during electron cyclotron heating on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Staebler, G. M.; Burrell, K. H.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.

    2010-02-15

    New measurements show that long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) electron temperature fluctuations can play an important role in determining electron thermal transport in low-confinement mode (L-mode) tokamak plasmas. In neutral beam-heated L-mode tokamak plasmas, electron thermal transport and the amplitude of long-wavelength electron temperature fluctuations both increase in cases where local electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to modify the plasma profiles. In contrast, the amplitude of simultaneously measured long-wavelength density fluctuations does not significantly increase. Linear stability analysis indicates that the ratio of the trapped electron mode (TEM) to ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode growth rates increases in the cases with ECH. The increased importance of the TEM drive relative to the ITG mode drive in the cases with ECH may be associated with the increases in electron thermal transport and electron temperature fluctuations.

  1. Regional absolute conductivity reconstruction using projected current density in MREIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; In Kwon, Oh; Woo, Eung Je

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a non-invasive technique for imaging the internal conductivity distribution in tissue within an MRI scanner, utilizing the magnetic flux density, which is introduced when a current is injected into the tissue from external electrodes. This magnetic flux alters the MRI signal, so that appropriate reconstruction can provide a map of the additional z-component of the magnetic field (Bz) as well as the internal current density distribution that created it. To extract the internal electrical properties of the subject, including the conductivity and/or the current density distribution, MREIT techniques use the relationship between the external injection current and the z-component of the magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz). The tissue studied typically contains defective regions, regions with a low MRI signal and/or low MRI signal-to-noise-ratio, due to the low density of nuclear magnetic resonance spins, short T2 or T*2 relaxation times, as well as regions with very low electrical conductivity, through which very little current traverses. These defective regions provide noisy Bz data, which can severely degrade the overall reconstructed conductivity distribution. Injecting two independent currents through surface electrodes, this paper proposes a new direct method to reconstruct a regional absolute isotropic conductivity distribution in a region of interest (ROI) while avoiding the defective regions. First, the proposed method reconstructs the contrast of conductivity using the transversal J-substitution algorithm, which blocks the propagation of severe accumulated noise from the defective region to the ROI. Second, the proposed method reconstructs the regional projected current density using the relationships between the internal current density, which stems from a current injection on the surface, and the measured Bz data. Combining the contrast conductivity distribution in the entire imaging slice and

  2. Current drive at plasma densities required for thermonuclear reactors.

    PubMed

    Cesario, R; Amicucci, L; Cardinali, A; Castaldo, C; Marinucci, M; Panaccione, L; Santini, F; Tudisco, O; Apicella, M L; Calabrò, G; Cianfarani, C; Frigione, D; Galli, A; Mazzitelli, G; Mazzotta, C; Pericoli, V; Schettini, G; Tuccillo, A A

    2010-08-10

    Progress in thermonuclear fusion energy research based on deuterium plasmas magnetically confined in toroidal tokamak devices requires the development of efficient current drive methods. Previous experiments have shown that plasma current can be driven effectively by externally launched radio frequency power coupled to lower hybrid plasma waves. However, at the high plasma densities required for fusion power plants, the coupled radio frequency power does not penetrate into the plasma core, possibly because of strong wave interactions with the plasma edge. Here we show experiments performed on FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) based on theoretical predictions that nonlinear interactions diminish when the peripheral plasma electron temperature is high, allowing significant wave penetration at high density. The results show that the coupled radio frequency power can penetrate into high-density plasmas due to weaker plasma edge effects, thus extending the effective range of lower hybrid current drive towards the domain relevant for fusion reactors.

  3. Scaling rules for critical current density in anisotropic biaxial superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingxu; Kang, Guozheng; Gao, Yuanwen

    2016-06-01

    Recent researches highlight the additional anisotropic crystallographic axis within the superconducting plane of high temperature superconductors (HTS), demonstrating the superconducting anisotropy of HTS is better understood in the biaxial frame than the previous uniaxial coordinates within the superconducting layer. To quantitatively evaluate the anisotropy of flux pinning and critical current density in HTS, we extend the scaling rule for single-vortex collective pinning in uniaxial superconductors to account for flux-bundle collective pinning in biaxial superconductors. The scaling results show that in a system of random uncorrected point defects, the field dependence of the critical current density is described by a unified function with the scaled magnetic field of the isotropic superconductor. The obtained angular dependence of the critical current density depicts the main features of experimental observations, considering possible corrections due to the strong-pinning interaction.

  4. High-density turbidity currents: Are they sandy debris flows?

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G.

    1996-01-01

    Conventionally, turbidity currents are considered as fluidal flows in which sediment is supported by fluid turbulence, whereas debris flows are plastic flows in which sediment is supported by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The concept of high-density turbidity current refers to high-concentration, commonly non-turbulent, flows of fluids in which sediment is supported mainly by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The conventional wisdom that traction carpets with entrained turbulent clouds on top represent high-density turbidity currents is a misnomer because traction carpets are neither fluidal nor turbulent. Debris flows may also have entrained turbulent clouds on top. The traction carpet/debris flow and the overriding turbulent clouds are two separate entities in terms of flow rheology and sediment-support mechanism. In experimental and theoretical studies, which has linked massive sands and floating clasts to high-density turbidity currents, the term high-density turbidity current has actually been used for laminar flows. In alleviating this conceptual problem, sandy debris flow is suggested as a substitute for high-density turbidity current. Sandy debris flows represent a continuous spectrum of processes between cohesive and cohesionless debris flows. Commonly they are rheologically plastic. They may occur with or without entrained turbulent clouds on top. Their sediment-support mechanisms include matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. They are characterized by laminar flow conditions, a moderate to high grain concentration, and a low to moderate mud content. Although flows evolve and transform during the course of transport in density-stratified flows, the preserved features in a deposit are useful to decipher only the final stages of deposition. At present, there are no established criteria to decipher transport mechanism from the depositional record.

  5. Climatic Signals from Intra-annual Density Fluctuation Frequency in Mediterranean Pines at a Regional Scale

    PubMed Central

    Zalloni, Enrica; de Luis, Martin; Campelo, Filipe; Novak, Klemen; De Micco, Veronica; Di Filippo, Alfredo; Vieira, Joana; Nabais, Cristina; Rozas, Vicente; Battipaglia, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Tree rings provide information about the climatic conditions during the growing season by recording them in different anatomical features, such as intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs). IADFs are intra-annual changes of wood density appearing as latewood-like cells within earlywood, or earlywood-like cells within latewood. The occurrence of IADFs is dependent on the age and size of the tree, and it is triggered by climatic drivers. The variations of IADF frequency of different species and their dependence on climate across a wide geographical range have still to be explored. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of age, tree-ring width and climate on IADF formation and frequency at a regional scale across the Mediterranean Basin in Pinus halepensis Mill., Pinus pinaster Ait., and Pinus pinea L. The analyzed tree-ring network was composed of P. pinea trees growing at 10 sites (2 in Italy, 4 in Spain, and 4 in Portugal), P. pinaster from 19 sites (2 in Italy, 13 in Spain, and 4 in Portugal), and P. halepensis from 38 sites in Spain. The correlations between IADF frequency and monthly minimum, mean and maximum temperatures, as well as between IADF frequency and total precipitation, were analyzed. A significant negative relationship between IADF frequency and tree-ring age was found for the three Mediterranean pines. Moreover, IADFs were more frequent in wider rings than in narrower ones, although the widest rings showed a reduced IADF frequency. Wet conditions during late summer/early autumn triggered the formation of IADFs in the three species. Our results suggest the existence of a common climatic driver for the formation of IADFs in Mediterranean pines, highlighting the potential use of IADF frequency as a proxy for climate reconstructions with geographical resolution. PMID:27200052

  6. Climatic Signals from Intra-annual Density Fluctuation Frequency in Mediterranean Pines at a Regional Scale.

    PubMed

    Zalloni, Enrica; de Luis, Martin; Campelo, Filipe; Novak, Klemen; De Micco, Veronica; Di Filippo, Alfredo; Vieira, Joana; Nabais, Cristina; Rozas, Vicente; Battipaglia, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Tree rings provide information about the climatic conditions during the growing season by recording them in different anatomical features, such as intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs). IADFs are intra-annual changes of wood density appearing as latewood-like cells within earlywood, or earlywood-like cells within latewood. The occurrence of IADFs is dependent on the age and size of the tree, and it is triggered by climatic drivers. The variations of IADF frequency of different species and their dependence on climate across a wide geographical range have still to be explored. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of age, tree-ring width and climate on IADF formation and frequency at a regional scale across the Mediterranean Basin in Pinus halepensis Mill., Pinus pinaster Ait., and Pinus pinea L. The analyzed tree-ring network was composed of P. pinea trees growing at 10 sites (2 in Italy, 4 in Spain, and 4 in Portugal), P. pinaster from 19 sites (2 in Italy, 13 in Spain, and 4 in Portugal), and P. halepensis from 38 sites in Spain. The correlations between IADF frequency and monthly minimum, mean and maximum temperatures, as well as between IADF frequency and total precipitation, were analyzed. A significant negative relationship between IADF frequency and tree-ring age was found for the three Mediterranean pines. Moreover, IADFs were more frequent in wider rings than in narrower ones, although the widest rings showed a reduced IADF frequency. Wet conditions during late summer/early autumn triggered the formation of IADFs in the three species. Our results suggest the existence of a common climatic driver for the formation of IADFs in Mediterranean pines, highlighting the potential use of IADF frequency as a proxy for climate reconstructions with geographical resolution. PMID:27200052

  7. The THz Spectrum of Density Fluctuations of Water: The Viscoelastic Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Cunsolo, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Relevant advances in the knowledge of the water dynamics at mesoscopic scales are reviewed, while mainly focusing on the contribution provided by high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS). In particular it is discussed how the use of IXS has improved our understanding of viscoelastic properties of water at THz frequencies. This specifically involves some solid-like features such as the onset of shear wave propagation, a sound velocity surprisingly similar to the one of ice, and an anomalously low sound absorption coefficient. All these properties can be explained by assuming the coupling of THz density fluctuations with a structural relaxation process connected to the breaking and forming of hydrogen bonds (HBs). This review also includes more recent IXS results demonstrating that, upon approaching supercritical conditions, relaxation phenomena in water gradually lose their structural character becoming essentially collisional in character. Furthermore, GHz spectroscopy results on supercooled water, suggesting the occurrence of a structural arrest, are discussed. An overview of the new opportunities offered by next generation IXS spectrometers finally concludes this review.

  8. Quantification of nanoscale density fluctuations by electron microscopy: probing cellular alterations in early carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Damania, Dhwanil; Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Subramanian, Hariharan; Roy, Hemant K.; Taflove, Allen; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Backman, Vadim

    2011-04-01

    Most cancers are curable if they are diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Recent studies suggest that nanoarchitectural changes occur within cells during early carcinogenesis and that such changes precede microscopically evident tissue alterations. It follows that the ability to comprehensively interrogate cell nanoarchitecture (e.g., macromolecular complexes, DNA, RNA, proteins and lipid membranes) could be critical to the diagnosis of early carcinogenesis. We present a study of the nanoscale mass-density fluctuations of biological tissues by quantifying their degree of disorder at the nanoscale. Transmission electron microscopy images of human tissues are used to construct corresponding effective disordered optical lattices. The properties of nanoscale disorder are then studied by statistical analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the spatially localized eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscale. Our results show an increase in the disorder of human colonic epithelial cells in subjects harboring early stages of colon neoplasia. Furthermore, our findings strongly suggest that increased nanoscale disorder correlates with the degree of tumorigenicity. Therefore, the IPR technique provides a practicable tool for the detection of nanoarchitectural alterations in the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. Potential applications of the technique for early cancer screening and detection are also discussed. Originally submitted for the special focus issue on physical oncology.

  9. Charge density wave fluctuations, heavy electrons, and superconductivity in KNi2S2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, James R.; McQueen, Tyrel M.; Llobet, Anna; Wen, Jiajia; Suchomel, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the complexities of electronic and magnetic ground states in solids is one of the main goals of solid-state physics. Materials with the canonical ThCr2Si2-type structure have proved particularly fruitful in this regard, as they exhibit a wide range of technologically advantageous physical properties described by “many-body physics,” including high-temperature superconductivity and heavy fermion behavior. Here, using high-resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction and time-of-flight neutron scattering, we show that the isostructural mixed valence compound KNi2S2 displays a number of highly unusual structural transitions, most notably the presence of charge density wave fluctuations that disappear on cooling. This behavior occurs without magnetic or charge order, in contrast to expectations based on other known materials exhibiting related phenomena. Furthermore, the low-temperature electronic state of KNi2S2 is found to exhibit many characteristics of heavy-fermion behavior, including a heavy electron state (m*/me˜ 24), with a negative coefficient of thermal expansion, and superconductivity below Tc=0.46(2) K. In the potassium nickel sulfide, these behaviors arise in the absence of localized magnetism, and instead appear to originate in proximity to charge order.

  10. Experimental triplet and quadruplet fluctuation densities and spatial distribution function integrals for liquid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Paul E.

    2015-03-07

    Kirkwood-Buff or Fluctuation Solution Theory can be used to provide experimental pair fluctuations, and/or integrals over the pair distribution functions, from experimental thermodynamic data on liquid mixtures. Here, this type of approach is used to provide triplet and quadruplet fluctuations, and the corresponding integrals over the triplet and quadruplet distribution functions, in a purely thermodynamic manner that avoids the use of structure factors. The approach is then applied to binary mixtures of water + methanol and benzene + methanol over the full composition range under ambient conditions. The observed correlations between the different species vary significantly with composition. The magnitude of the fluctuations and integrals appears to increase as the number of the most polar molecule involved in the fluctuation or integral also increases. A simple physical picture of the fluctuations is provided to help rationalize some of these variations.

  11. Analysis of current fluctuations during after-hyperpolarization current in dentate granule neurones of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Valiante, T A; Abdul-Ghani, M A; Carlen, P L; Pennefather, P

    1997-01-01

    1. We have studied macroscopic current fluctuations associated with the after-hyperpolarization current (IAHP) that follows a 200 ms voltage-clamp step to 0 mV in dentate granule (DG) neurones of the rat hippocampus. This maximally effective stimulus produced a peak IAHP of 205 +/- 20 pA. Background noise was minimized by using the whole-cell single-electrode voltage-clamp configuration. 2. Conventional current-variance analysis was performed on IAHP to obtain estimates of the unitary AHP channel current (i) and the maximal attainable AHP current (Imax). A second approach, utilizing changes in the power spectrum of IAHP 'noise' during the decay of IAHP, was employed to yield an independent estimate of Imax as well as an estimate of the mean open-state duration of AHP channels. 3. Changes in the power spectrum during IAHP decay revealed that the mean channel open time is fixed at 6.9 +/- 0.5 ms and that the decay is due to changes in channel closed-state duration. The same analysis gave a value for Imax of 320 +/- 20 pA (n = 7). 4. Current-variance analysis suggests that channels responsible for generation of IAHP have a unitary current of 0.29 +/- 0.08 pA at -45 mV in 5 mM extracellular potassium and an Imax of 400 +/- 180 (n = 7). Thus, both methods indicate that about 1200 channels are available to generate IAHP in DG neurones and that about 60% are open at the peak of a maximal IAHP. 5. Computer simulations of IAHP currents in a model neurone show that dendritic current sources will result in an underestimation of i while Imax is underestimated to a lesser extent. Estimates of Imax obtained from power-spectrum analysis are more accurate and less affected by neuronal electrotonic structure than estimates of Imax based on current-variance analysis. PMID:9061644

  12. Reprint of : Semiclassical theory of persistent current fluctuations in ballistic chaotic rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, Piet W.; Danon, Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    The persistent current in a mesoscopic ring has a Gaussian distribution with small non-Gaussian corrections. Here we report a semiclassical calculation of the leading non-Gaussian correction, which is described by the three-point correlation function. The semiclassical approach is applicable to systems in which the electron dynamics is ballistic and chaotic, and includes the dependence on the Ehrenfest time. At small but finite Ehrenfest times, the non-Gaussian fluctuations are enhanced with respect to the limit of zero Ehrenfest time.

  13. Single Nanotube Voltammetry: Current Fluctuations Are Due to Physical Motion of the Nanotube

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nanoimpacts of single palladium-coated carbon nanotubes on a gold substrate are studied to elucidate the origins of the fluctuation in the current–time response of the hydrogen oxidation reaction mediated at its surface. The chronoamperometric and cyclic voltammetric responses from a single nanotube immobilized on the gold surface were compared to analogous data on a carbon substrate to determine the possible influence of substrate material on the nanotube–electrode electrical contact. No significant distinction between the gold and carbon was found, indicating in light of the considerable differences in the substrate materials’ intrinsic electronic structures that it is the nanomotion of a nanotube at the electrode surface which is likely responsible for the observed current modulation. This nanomotion creates a varying contact resistance, to which the noise in the current–time signal of the mediated reaction is attributed. In addition, stochastic ex-situ adsorption of single nanotubes onto the gold electrode followed by careful drying of the electrode surface was found to drastically reduce the current fluctuation, again implying that a contact resistance arising from physical motion of the nanotube at the electrode is responsible for the modulation of current. PMID:27066159

  14. Simultaneous excitation of large-scale geomagnetic field fluctuations and plasma density irregularities by powerful radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kuo, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    The physical mechanism of thermal filamentation instability of radio waves whose frequencies can be as low as in the VLF band and as high as in the SHF band are investigated. This instability can excite large-scale magnetic and plasma density fluctuations simultaneously in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Relevant experiments are reviewed in terms of this instability and other mechanisms.

  15. Noise distribution and denoising of current density images

    PubMed Central

    Beheshti, Mohammadali; Foomany, Farbod H.; Magtibay, Karl; Jaffray, David A.; Krishnan, Sridhar; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Umapathy, Karthikeyan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Current density imaging (CDI) is a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique that could be used to study current pathways inside the tissue. The current distribution is measured indirectly as phase changes. The inherent noise in the MR imaging technique degrades the accuracy of phase measurements leading to imprecise current variations. The outcome can be affected significantly, especially at a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We have shown the residual noise distribution of the phase to be Gaussian-like and the noise in CDI images approximated as a Gaussian. This finding matches experimental results. We further investigated this finding by performing comparative analysis with denoising techniques, using two CDI datasets with two different currents (20 and 45 mA). We found that the block-matching and three-dimensional (BM3D) technique outperforms other techniques when applied on current density (J). The minimum gain in noise power by BM3D applied to J compared with the next best technique in the analysis was found to be around 2 dB per pixel. We characterize the noise profile in CDI images and provide insights on the performance of different denoising techniques when applied at two different stages of current density reconstruction. PMID:26158100

  16. Current Density Measurements of an Annular-Geometry Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Patterson, Michael J.; Herman, Daniel A.; Foster, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the annular-geometry ion engine, or AGI-Engine, has been shown to have many potential benefits when scaling electric propulsion technologies to higher power. However, the necessary asymmetric location of the discharge cathode away from thruster centerline could potentially lead to non-uniformities in the discharge not present in conventional geometry ion thrusters. In an effort to characterize the degree of this potential nonuniformity, a number of current density measurements were taken on a breadboard AGI-Engine. Fourteen button probes were used to measure the ion current density of the discharge along a perforated electrode that replaced the ion optics during conditions of simulated beam extraction. Three Faraday probes spaced apart in the vertical direction were also used in a separate test to interrogate the plume of the AGI-Engine during true beam extraction. It was determined that both the discharge and the plume of the AGI-Engine are highly uniform, with variations under most conditions limited to 10% of the average current density in the discharge and 5% of the average current density in the plume. Beam flatness parameter measured 30 mm from the ion optics ranged from 0.85 0.95, and overall uniformity was shown to generally increase with increasing discharge and beam currents. These measurements indicate that the plasma is highly uniform despite the asymmetric location of the discharge cathode.

  17. Current Density Measurements of an Annular-Geometry Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Patterson, Michael J.; Herman, Daniel A.; Foster, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the annular-geometry ion engine, or AGI-Engine, has been shown to have many potential benefits when scaling electric propulsion technologies to higher power. However, the necessary asymmetric location of the discharge cathode away from thruster centerline could potentially lead to non-uniformities in the discharge not present in conventional geometry ion thrusters. In an effort to characterize the degree of this potential non-uniformity, a number of current density measurements were taken on a breadboard AGI-Engine. Fourteen button probes were used to measure the ion current density of the discharge along a perforated electrode that replaced the ion optics during conditions of simulated beam extraction. Three Faraday probes spaced apart in the vertical direction were also used in a separate test to interrogate the plume of the AGI-Engine during true beam extraction. It was determined that both the discharge and the plume of the AGI-Engine are highly uniform, with variations under most conditions limited to +/-10% of the average current density in the discharge and +/-5% of the average current density in the plume. Beam flatness parameter measured 30 mm from the ion optics ranged from 0.85 - 0.95, and overall uniformity was shown to generally increase with increasing discharge and beam currents. These measurements indicate that the plasma is highly uniform despite the asymmetric location of the discharge cathode.

  18. Power density spectra of frog skin potential, current and admittance functions during patch clamp.

    PubMed

    Hoshiko, T

    1978-01-01

    Clamp current fluctuations in frog skin of areas down to 0.07 cm2 are dominated by low frequency components (less than 100 Hz). Patch clamp of 0.001 cm2 under high density fluorosilicone oil exhibits components up to 5000 Hz, often including a peak in the current power density spectrum. The admittance spectrum also exhibits a peak at the same frequency. In some skins no peak was observed, but the break in the curve was too sharp to be Lorentzian. In all instances the final limiting slope approached 1/f2. The resonance peak was observed in either Cl- or SO = 4 Ringer's but disappeared when Na+ was replaced with K+. Resonance frequency varied from 100 to 700 Hz.

  19. Three-dimensional structure of dilute pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Unconfined experimental density currents dynamically similar to pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) suggest that cross-stream motions of the currents and air entrainment through currents' lateral margins strongly affects PDC behavior. Experiments are conducted within an air-filled tank 8.5 m long by 6.1 m wide by 2.6 m tall. Currents are generated by feeding heated powders down a chute into the tank at controlled rates to form dilute, particle-laden, turbulent gravity currents that are fed for 30 to 600 seconds. Powders include 5 μm aluminum oxide, 25 μm talc, 27 μm walnut, 76 μm glass beads and mixtures thereof. Experiments are scaled such that Froude, densimetric and thermal Richardson, particle Stokes and Settling numbers, and thermal to kinetic energy densities are all in agreement with dilute PDCs; experiments have lower Reynolds numbers that natural currents, but the experiments are fully turbulent, thus the large scale structures should be similar. The experiments are illuminated with 3 orthogonal laser sheets (650, 532, and 450 nm wavelengths) and recorded with an array of HD video cameras and a high speed camera (up to 3000 fps); this system provides synchronous observation of a vertical streamwise and cross-stream planes, and a horizontal plane. Ambient temperature currents tend to spread out radially from the source and have long run out distances, whereas warmer currents tend to focus along narrow sectors and have shorter run outs. In addition, when warm currents lift off to form buoyant plumes, lateral spreading ceases. The behavior of short duration currents are dominated by the current head; as eruption duration increases, current transport direction tends to oscillate back and forth (this is particularly true for ambient temperature currents). Turbulent structures in the horizontal plane show air entrainment and advection downstream. Eddies illuminated by the vertical cross-stream laser sheet often show vigorous mixing along the current margins

  20. Electric fields and current densities under small Florida thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaver, Lance E.; Krider, E. P.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of measurements of the electric field E and Maxwell current density that were performed simultaneously under and near small Florida thunderstorms. It is shown that the amplitude of JM is of the order of 1 nA/sq cm or less in the absence of precipitation and that there are regular time variations in JM during the intervals between lightning discharges that tend to have the same shapes after different discharges in different storms. It is argued that the major causes of time variations in JM between lightning discharges are currents that flow in the finitely conducting atmosphere in response to the field changes rather than rapid time variations in the strength of cloud current sources. The displacement current densities that are computed from the E records dominate JM except when there is precipitation, when E is large and steady, or when E is unusually noisy.

  1. Sound Sources Identified in High-Speed Jets by Correlating Flow Density Fluctuations With Far-Field Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; Seasholtz, Richard G.

    2003-01-01

    Noise sources in high-speed jets were identified by directly correlating flow density fluctuation (cause) to far-field sound pressure fluctuation (effect). The experimental study was performed in a nozzle facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in support of NASA s initiative to reduce the noise emitted by commercial airplanes. Previous efforts to use this correlation method have failed because the tools for measuring jet turbulence were intrusive. In the present experiment, a molecular Rayleigh-scattering technique was used that depended on laser light scattering by gas molecules in air. The technique allowed accurate measurement of air density fluctuations from different points in the plume. The study was conducted in shock-free, unheated jets of Mach numbers 0.95, 1.4, and 1.8. The turbulent motion, as evident from density fluctuation spectra was remarkably similar in all three jets, whereas the noise sources were significantly different. The correlation study was conducted by keeping a microphone at a fixed location (at the peak noise emission angle of 30 to the jet axis and 50 nozzle diameters away) while moving the laser probe volume from point to point in the flow. The following figure shows maps of the nondimensional coherence value measured at different Strouhal frequencies ([frequency diameter]/jet speed) in the supersonic Mach 1.8 and subsonic Mach 0.95 jets. The higher the coherence, the stronger the source was.

  2. On the Complex Nature of Magnetic Field Fluctuations During Geomagnetic Tail Current Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolini, G.; De Michelis, P.; Tozzi, R.

    2011-12-01

    One of the phenomena occurring at the onset of magnetospheric substorms is the disruption of the cross-tail current. In the course of the years, this phenomenon has been clearly shown to be characterized by a large spectrum of fluctuations occurring over a large scale interval. Here, the multiscale nature and the complex features of the cross-coupling between the different scales is investigated in the case of an already studied magnetotail current disruption event, observed by a THEMIS satellite on 29 January 2008, by means of the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) and an information theory approach. A particular attention is devoted to the presence of a dual cascading process: an inverse cascading process in the MHD domain (already suggested in several works) and a direct cascading process toward non-MHD scales.

  3. Note: Demonstration of an external-cavity diode laser system immune to current and temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xinyu; Yin, Longfei; Zhuang, Wei; Luo, Bin; Dang, Anhong; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate an external-cavity laser system using an anti-reflection coated laser diode as gain medium with about 60 nm fluorescence spectrum, and a Rb Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) as frequency-selecting element with a transmission bandwidth of 1.3 GHz. With 6.4% optical feedback, a single stable longitudinal mode is obtained with a linewidth of 69 kHz. The wavelength of this laser is operating within the center of the highest transmission peak of FADOF over a diode current range from 55 mA to 142 mA and a diode temperature range from 15 °C to 35 °C, thus it is immune to the fluctuations of current and temperature.

  4. The variance of sodium current fluctuations at the node of Ranvier.

    PubMed

    Sigworth, F J

    1980-10-01

    1. Single myelinated nerve fibres 12-17 mum in diameter from Rana temporaria and Rana pipiens were voltage clamped at 2-5 degrees C. Potassium currents were blocked by internal Cs(+) and external tetraethylammonium ion. Series resistance compensation was employed.2. Sets of 80-512 identical, 20 ms depolarizations were applied, with the pulses repeated at intervals of 300-600 ms. The resulting membrane current records, filtered at 5 kHz, showed record-to-record variations of the current on the order of 1%. From each set of records the time course of the mean current and the time course of the variance were calculated.3. The variance was assumed to arise primarily from two independent sources of current fluctuations: the stochastic gating of sodium channels and the thermal noise background in the voltage clamp. Measurement of the passive properties of the nerve preparation allowed the thermal noise variance to be estimated, and these estimates accounted for the variance observed in the presence of tetrodotoxin and at the reversal potential.4. After the variance sigma(2) was corrected for the contribution from the background, its relationship to the mean current I could be fitted by the function sigma(2) = iI-I(2)/N expected for N independent channels having one non-zero conductance level. The single channel currents i corresponded to a single-channel chord conductance gamma = 6.4 +/- 0.9 pS (S.D.; n = 14). No significant difference in gamma was observed between the two species of frogs. The size of the total population of channels ranged from 20,000 to 46,000.5. The voltage dependence of i corresponded closely to the form of the instantaneous current-voltage relationship of the sodium conductance, except at the smallest depolarizations. The small values of i at small depolarizations may have resulted from the filtering of high-frequency components of the fluctuations.6. It is concluded that sodium channels have only two primary levels of conductance, corresponding to

  5. Magnetically modulated critical current densities of Co/Nb hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhigang; Wang, Weike; Zhang, Li; Yang, Zhaorong; Tian, Mingliang; Zhang, Yuheng

    2015-01-01

    By tuning morphology and size of magnetic subsystem, ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid system provides an effective way to modulate superconductivity due to the interaction between superconducting and magnetic-order parameters at the mesoscopic length scale. In this work, we report on investigations of critical current density in a large-area Co/Nb hybrid via facile colloidal lithography. Here, Co hexagon shell array as a magnetic template build on Nb film to modulate the critical current density. A novel superconducting transition has been observed in I-V curve with two metastable transition states: double-transition and binary-oscillation-transition states. Importantly, such unusual behavior can be adjusted by temperature, magnetic field and contact area of F/S. Such hybrid film has important implications for understanding the role of magnetic subsystem modulating superconductivity, as well as applied to low-energy electronic devices such as superconducting current fault limiters. PMID:26678595

  6. An edge density fluctuation diagnostic for DIII-D using lithium beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. M.

    1991-12-01

    This report covers the research conducted under DOE grant FG03-90ER-081 during the period August 15, 1990 through November 15, 1991. Progress during the period March 15, 1990 through August 15, 1990 was covered in a previous report. Highlights during this period include the development of a compact neutral lithium accelerator capable of producing several mA at up to 30 kV, measurements of intrinsic beam fluctuation levels, and the design and partial completion of the diagnostic installation on the D3-D tokamak. We also had one journal article describing the system published in Reviews of Scientific Instruments, presented a poster on our recent progress at the APS Plasma Physics conference, and submitted an abstract to the 9th Topical Conference on Plasma Diagnostics. The overall objective of this project is to provide detailed information about the behavior of the electron density in the edge region of D3-D, and in particular to examine the local character of the associated degradation in confinement properties. Measurements should provide important data for testing theories of the L-H transition in tokamaks and should help in assessing the role of various instabilities in anomalous transport. The work on this project may be naturally organized according to the following six subareas: Ion source/beam system, neutralizer system, optical system, data acquisition, data analysis, and machine (D3-D) interface. Progress in each of these areas will be discussed briefly. We also briefly discuss our plans for future work on this program.

  7. Planets in other universes: habitability constraints on density fluctuations and galactic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Fred C.; Coppess, Katherine R.; Bloch, Anthony M. E-mail: kcoppess@umich.edu

    2015-09-01

    Motivated by the possibility that different versions of the laws of physics could be realized within other universes, this paper delineates the galactic structure parameters that allow for habitable planets and revisits constraints on the amplitude Q of the primordial density fluctuations. Previous work indicates that large values of Q lead to galaxies so dense that planetary orbits cannot survive long enough for life to develop. Small values of Q lead to delayed star formation, loosely bound galaxies, and compromised heavy element retention. This work generalizes previous treatments in the following directions: [A] We consider models for the internal structure of the galaxies, including a range of stellar densities, and find the fraction of the resulting galactic real estate that allows for stable, long-lived planetary orbits. [B] For high velocity encounters, we perform a large ensemble of numerical simulations to estimate cross sections for the disruption of planetary orbits due to interactions with passing stars. [C] We consider the background radiation fields produced by the galaxies: if a galaxy is too compact, the night sky seen from a potentially habitable planet can provide more power than the host star. [D] One consequence of intense galactic background radiation fields is that some portion of the galaxy, denoted as the Galactic Habitable Zone, will provide the right flux levels to support habitable planets for essentially any planetary orbit including freely floating bodies (but excluding close-in planets). As the value of Q increases, the fraction of stars in a galaxy that allow for (traditional) habitable planets decreases due to both orbital disruption and the intense background radiation. However, the outer parts of the galaxy always allow for habitable planets, so that the value of Q does not have a well-defined upper limit (due to scattering or radiation constraints). Moreover, some Galactic Habitable Zones are large enough to support more

  8. Improved critical current density in DI-BSCCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayai, N.; Kikuchi, M.; Tatamidani, K.; Nakashima, T.; Osabe, G.; Kagiyama, T.; Fujikami, J.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamazaki, K.; Yamade, S.; Shizuya, E.; Hayashi, K.; Sato, K.; Kiss, T.; Higashikawa, K.; Inoue, M.; Kitaguchi, H.; Kumakura, H.; Shimoyama, J.

    2010-06-01

    High Ic in DI-BSCCO has been demonstrated even in high temperature up to 90K and parallel magnetic field up to 200 mT. This performance is advantageous especially to power cables cooled with pressurized liquid nitrogen, where current and temperature fluctuates in real operation. Recent development has updated the highest Jc at 77K, self-field to 630 A/mm2 in a R&D tape. The evaluation by a scanning magnetic microscope has demonstrated the highest Jc of 900 A/mm2 at the midst of a tape which has Ic of 200 A. This property promises innovative Ic more than 300 A in future DI-BSCCO.

  9. Transport and sedimentation in unconfined experimental dilute pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, G.; Andrews, B. J.; Dennen, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from experiments conducted in a new facility that permits the study of large, unconfined particle laden density currents that are dynamically similar to natural dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). Experiments were run in a sealed, air-filled tank measuring 8.5 m long by 6.1 m wide by 2.6 m tall. Currents were generated by feeding mixture of heated particles (5 μm aluminum oxide, 25 μm talc, 27 μm walnut shell, 76 μm glass beads) down a chute at controlled rates to produce dilute, turbulent gravity currents. Comparison of experimental currents with natural PDCs shows good agreement between Froude, densimetric and thermal Richardson, and particle Stokes and settling numbers; experimental currents have lower Reynolds numbers than natural PDCs, but are fully turbulent. Currents were illuminated with 3 orthogonal laser sheets (650, 532, and 450 nm wavelengths) and recorded with an array of HD video cameras and a high speed camera (up to 3000 fps). Deposits were mapped using a grid of sedimentation traps. We observe distinct differences between ambient temperature and warm currents: * warm currents have shorter run out distances, narrow map view distributions of currents and deposits, thicken with distance from the source, and lift off to form coignimbrite plumes; * ambient temperature currents typically travel farther, spread out radially, do not thicken greatly with transport distance, and do not form coignimbrite plumes. Long duration currents (600 s compared to 30-100 s) oscillate laterally with time (e.g. transport to the right, then the left, and back); this oscillation happens prior to any interaction with the tank walls. Isopach maps of the deposits show predictable trends in sedimentation versus distance in response to eruption parameters (eruption rate, duration, temperature, and initial current mass), but all sedimentation curves can be fit with 2nd order polynomials (R2>.9). Proximal sedimentation is similar in comparable warm

  10. Mechanisms of current fluctuation in ambipolar black phosphorus field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuefei; Du, Yuchen; Si, Mengwei; Yang, Lingming; Li, Sichao; Li, Tiaoyang; Xiong, Xiong; Ye, Peide; Wu, Yanqing

    2016-02-14

    Multi-layer black phosphorus has emerged as a strong candidate owing to its high carrier mobility with most of the previous research work focused on its p-type properties. Very few studies have been performed on its n-type electronic characteristics which are important not only for the complementary operation for logic, but also crucial for understanding the carrier transport through the metal-black phosphorus junction. A thorough understanding and proper evaluation of the performance potential of both p- and n-types are highly desirable. In this paper, we investigate the temperature dependent ambipolar operation of both electron and hole transport from 300 K to 20 K. On-currents as high as 85 μA μm(-1) for a 0.2 μm channel length BP nFET at 300 K are observed. Moreover, we provide the first systematic study on the low frequency noise mechanisms for both n-channel and p-channel BP transistors. The dominated noise mechanisms of the multi-layer BP nFET and pFET are mobility fluctuation and carrier number fluctuations with correlated mobility fluctuations, respectively. We have also established a baseline of the low electrical noise of 8.1 × 10(-9)μm(2) Hz(-1) at 10 Hz at room temperature for BP pFETs, which is 3 times improvement over previous reports, and 7.0 × 10(-8)μm(2) Hz(-1) for BP nFETs for the first time. PMID:26806878

  11. Mechanisms of current fluctuation in ambipolar black phosphorus field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuefei; Du, Yuchen; Si, Mengwei; Yang, Lingming; Li, Sichao; Li, Tiaoyang; Xiong, Xiong; Ye, Peide; Wu, Yanqing

    2016-02-01

    Multi-layer black phosphorus has emerged as a strong candidate owing to its high carrier mobility with most of the previous research work focused on its p-type properties. Very few studies have been performed on its n-type electronic characteristics which are important not only for the complementary operation for logic, but also crucial for understanding the carrier transport through the metal-black phosphorus junction. A thorough understanding and proper evaluation of the performance potential of both p- and n-types are highly desirable. In this paper, we investigate the temperature dependent ambipolar operation of both electron and hole transport from 300 K to 20 K. On-currents as high as 85 μA μm-1 for a 0.2 μm channel length BP nFET at 300 K are observed. Moreover, we provide the first systematic study on the low frequency noise mechanisms for both n-channel and p-channel BP transistors. The dominated noise mechanisms of the multi-layer BP nFET and pFET are mobility fluctuation and carrier number fluctuations with correlated mobility fluctuations, respectively. We have also established a baseline of the low electrical noise of 8.1 × 10-9 μm2 Hz-1 at 10 Hz at room temperature for BP pFETs, which is 3 times improvement over previous reports, and 7.0 × 10-8 μm2 Hz-1 for BP nFETs for the first time.

  12. Mechanisms of current fluctuation in ambipolar black phosphorus field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuefei; Du, Yuchen; Si, Mengwei; Yang, Lingming; Li, Sichao; Li, Tiaoyang; Xiong, Xiong; Ye, Peide; Wu, Yanqing

    2016-02-14

    Multi-layer black phosphorus has emerged as a strong candidate owing to its high carrier mobility with most of the previous research work focused on its p-type properties. Very few studies have been performed on its n-type electronic characteristics which are important not only for the complementary operation for logic, but also crucial for understanding the carrier transport through the metal-black phosphorus junction. A thorough understanding and proper evaluation of the performance potential of both p- and n-types are highly desirable. In this paper, we investigate the temperature dependent ambipolar operation of both electron and hole transport from 300 K to 20 K. On-currents as high as 85 μA μm(-1) for a 0.2 μm channel length BP nFET at 300 K are observed. Moreover, we provide the first systematic study on the low frequency noise mechanisms for both n-channel and p-channel BP transistors. The dominated noise mechanisms of the multi-layer BP nFET and pFET are mobility fluctuation and carrier number fluctuations with correlated mobility fluctuations, respectively. We have also established a baseline of the low electrical noise of 8.1 × 10(-9)μm(2) Hz(-1) at 10 Hz at room temperature for BP pFETs, which is 3 times improvement over previous reports, and 7.0 × 10(-8)μm(2) Hz(-1) for BP nFETs for the first time.

  13. High dislocation density of tin induced by electric current

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Yi-Han; Liang, Chien-Lung; Lin, Kwang-Lung; Wu, Albert T.

    2015-12-15

    A dislocation density of as high as 10{sup 17} /m{sup 2} in a tin strip, as revealed by high resolution transmission electron microscope, was induced by current stressing at 6.5 x 10{sup 3} A/ cm{sup 2}. The dislocations exist in terms of dislocation line, dislocation loop, and dislocation aggregates. Electron Backscattered Diffraction images reflect that the high dislocation density induced the formation of low deflection angle subgrains, high deflection angle Widmanstätten grains, and recrystallization. The recrystallization gave rise to grain refining.

  14. Spin-Fluctuation-Driven Nematic Charge-Density Wave in Cuprate Superconductors: Impact of Aslamazov-Larkin Vertex Corrections.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Youichi; Kontani, Hiroshi

    2015-06-26

    We present a microscopic derivation of the nematic charge-density wave (CDW) formation in cuprate superconductors based on the three-orbital d-p Hubbard model by introducing the vertex correction (VC) into the charge susceptibility. The CDW instability at q=(Δ(FS),0), (0,Δ(FS)) appears when the spin fluctuations are strong, due to the strong charge-spin interference represented by the VC. Here, Δ(FS) is the wave number between the neighboring hot spots. The obtained spin-fluctuation-driven CDW is expressed as the "intra-unit-cell orbital order" accompanied by the charge transfer between the neighboring atomic orbitals, which is actually observed by the scanning tunneling microscope measurements. We predict that the cuprate CDW and the nematic orbital order in Fe-based superconductors are closely related spin-fluctuation-driven phenomena. PMID:26197139

  15. Low Mach number two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence - Energy budgets and density fluctuations in a polytropic fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Theory suggests that three distinct types of turbulence can occur in the low Mach number limit of polytropic flow: nearly incompressible flows dominated by vorticity, nearly pure acoustic turbulence dominated by compression, and flows characterized by near statistical equipartition of vorticity and compressions. Distinctions between these kinds of turbulence are investigated here by direct numerical simulation of two-dimensional compressible hydrodynamic turbulence. Dynamical scalings of density fluctuations, examination of the ratio of transverse to longitudinal velocity fluctuations, and spectral decomposition of the fluctuations are employed to distinguish the nature of these low Mach number solutions. A strong dependence on the initial data is observed, as well as a tendency for enhanced effects of compressibility at later times and at higher wave numbers, as suggested by theories of nearly incompressible flows.

  16. Spin-Fluctuation-Driven Nematic Charge-Density Wave in Cuprate Superconductors: Impact of Aslamazov-Larkin Vertex Corrections.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Youichi; Kontani, Hiroshi

    2015-06-26

    We present a microscopic derivation of the nematic charge-density wave (CDW) formation in cuprate superconductors based on the three-orbital d-p Hubbard model by introducing the vertex correction (VC) into the charge susceptibility. The CDW instability at q=(Δ(FS),0), (0,Δ(FS)) appears when the spin fluctuations are strong, due to the strong charge-spin interference represented by the VC. Here, Δ(FS) is the wave number between the neighboring hot spots. The obtained spin-fluctuation-driven CDW is expressed as the "intra-unit-cell orbital order" accompanied by the charge transfer between the neighboring atomic orbitals, which is actually observed by the scanning tunneling microscope measurements. We predict that the cuprate CDW and the nematic orbital order in Fe-based superconductors are closely related spin-fluctuation-driven phenomena.

  17. Role of turbulence fluctuations on uncertainties of acoutic Doppler current profiler discharge measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarrab, Leticia; Garcia, Carlos M.; Cantero, Mariano I.; Oberg, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a systematic analysis quantifying the role of the presence of turbulence fluctuations on uncertainties (random errors) of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) discharge measurements from moving platforms. Data sets of three-dimensional flow velocities with high temporal and spatial resolution were generated from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent open channel flow. Dimensionless functions relating parameters quantifying the uncertainty in discharge measurements due to flow turbulence (relative variance and relative maximum random error) to sampling configuration were developed from the DNS simulations and then validated with field-scale discharge measurements. The validated functions were used to evaluate the role of the presence of flow turbulence fluctuations on uncertainties in ADCP discharge measurements. The results of this work indicate that random errors due to the flow turbulence are significant when: (a) a low number of transects is used for a discharge measurement, and (b) measurements are made in shallow rivers using high boat velocity (short time for the boat to cross a flow turbulence structure).

  18. Voltage clamp analysis of acetylcholine produced end-plate current fluctuations at frog neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C. R.; Stevens, C. F.

    1973-01-01

    1. Acetylcholine produced end-plate current (e.p.c.) noise is shown to be the results of statistical fluctuations in the ionic conductance of voltage clamped end-plates of Rana pipiens. 2. These e.p.c. fluctuations are characterized by their e.p.c. spectra which conform to a relation predicted from a simple model of end-plate channel gating behaviour. 3. The rate constant of channel closing α is determined from e.p.c. spectra and is found to depend on membrane potential V according to the relation α = BeAV (B = 0·17 msec-1±0·04 S.E., A = 0·0058 mV-1±0·0009 S.E. at 8° C) and to vary with temperature T with a Q10 = 2·77, at -70 mV. A and B in this expression both vary with T and therefore produce a membrane potential dependent Q10 for α. 4. Nerve-evoked e.p.c.s and spontaneous miniature e.p.c.s decay exponentially in time with a rate constant which depends exponentially on V. The magnitude and voltage dependence of this decay constant is exactly that found from e.p.c. spectra for the channel closing rate α. 5. The conductance γ of a single open end-plate channel has been estimated from e.p.c. spectra and is found not to be detectibly dependent on membrane potential, temperature and mean end-plate current. γ = 0·32±0·0045 (S.E.) × 10-10 mhos. Some variation in values for γ occurs from muscle to muscle. 6. It is concluded that the relaxation kinetics of open ACh sensitive ionic channels is the rate limiting step in the decay of synaptic current and that this channel closing has a single time constant. The relaxation rate is independent of how it is estimated (ACh produced e.p.c. fluctuations, e.p.c., m.e.p.c.), and is consistent with the hypothesis that individual ionic channels open rapidly to a specific conductance which remains constant for an exponentially distributed duration. 7. The voltage and temperature dependence of the channel closing rate constant agree with the predictions of a simple dipole-conformation change model. PMID:4543940

  19. Experimental triplet and quadruplet fluctuation densities and spatial distribution function integrals for pure liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A.; Karunaweera, Sadish; Smith, Paul E.

    2015-01-28

    Fluctuation solution theory has provided an alternative view of many liquid mixture properties in terms of particle number fluctuations. The particle number fluctuations can also be related to integrals of the corresponding two body distribution functions between molecular pairs in order to provide a more physical picture of solution behavior and molecule affinities. Here, we extend this type of approach to provide expressions for higher order triplet and quadruplet fluctuations, and thereby integrals over the corresponding distribution functions, all of which can be obtained from available experimental thermodynamic data. The fluctuations and integrals are then determined using the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam Formulation 1995 (IAPWS-95) equation of state for the liquid phase of pure water. The results indicate small, but significant, deviations from a Gaussian distribution for the molecules in this system. The pressure and temperature dependence of the fluctuations and integrals, as well as the limiting behavior as one approaches both the triple point and the critical point, are also examined.

  20. Local density of states and its mesoscopic fluctuations near the transition to a superconducting state in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmistrov, I. S.; Gornyi, I. V.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a theory of the local density of states (LDOS) of disordered superconductors, employing the nonlinear sigma-model formalism and the renormalization-group framework. The theory takes into account the interplay of disorder and interaction couplings in all channels, treating the systems with short-range and Coulomb interactions on equal footing. We explore two-dimensional systems that would be Anderson insulators in the absence of interaction and two- or three-dimensional systems that undergo an Anderson transition in the absence of interaction. We evaluate both the average tunneling density of states and its mesoscopic fluctuations which are related to the LDOS multifractality in normal disordered systems. The obtained average LDOS shows a pronounced depletion around the Fermi energy, both in the metallic phase (i.e., above the superconducting critical temperature Tc) and in the insulating phase near the superconductor-insulator transition (SIT). The fluctuations of the LDOS are found to be particularly strong for the case of short-range interactions, especially, in the regime when Tc is enhanced by Anderson localization. On the other hand, the long-range Coulomb repulsion reduces the mesoscopic LDOS fluctuations. However, also in a model with Coulomb interaction, the fluctuations become strong when the systems approach the SIT.

  1. Three-dimensional structure of electron density fluctuations in the Hall thruster plasma: ExB mode

    SciTech Connect

    Tsikata, S.; Honore, C.; Gresillon, D. M.; Lemoine, N.

    2010-11-15

    Collective scattering measurements have been conducted on the plasma of a Hall thruster, in which the electron density fluctuations are fully characterized by the dynamic form factor. The dynamic form factor amplitude distribution has been measured depending on the k-vector spatial and frequency components at different locations. Fluctuations are seen as propagating waves. The largest amplitude mode propagates nearly along the cross-field direction but at a phase velocity that is much smaller than the ExB drift velocity. Refined directional analysis of this largest amplitude mode shows a thin angular emission diagram with a mean direction that is not strictly along the ExB direction but at small angles near it. The deviation is oriented toward the anode in the (E,ExB) plane and toward the exterior of the thruster channel in the (B,ExB) plane. The density fluctuation rate is on the order of 1%. These experimentally determined directional fluctuation characteristics are discussed with regard to the linear kinetic theory model and particle-in-cell simulation results.

  2. Evidence for explosive volcanic density currents on certain Martian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimers, C. E.; Komar, P. D.

    1979-01-01

    The morphologies of certain of the smaller Martian volcanoes are discussed as possible results of explosive volcanic density currents. An examination of newly-photographed flank and caldera features of the Martian volcanoes Ceraunius Tholus, Uranius Tholus, Uranius Patera and Hecates Tholus, including steep slope angles, Krakatoa-type caldera morphologies, erosional features (radial channels and anastamosing gullies) and constructional features (blanketed flanks and possible lava deltas) reveals their similarity to terrestrial cones and composite volcanoes such as Barcena Volcano. Crater age data from the surface of Martian domes and shields indicates that such explosive activity occurred more frequently early in Martian geologic history, consistent with the view that the volcanic density currents were base surges rather than nuees ardentes, with the melting of permafrost supplying the water required in base surge generation.

  3. Enhancement of Current Density by dc Electric Concentrator

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei Xiang; Luo, Chen Yang; Ma, Hui Feng; Mei, Zhong Lei; Cui, Tie Jun

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a dc electric concentrator for steady current fields theoretically and experimentally. Based on the transformation electrostatics, we show that the dc concentrator can focus electric currents into the central concentrated region and enhance the electric field and current density. Outside the concentrator, the current lines are distributed as the same as those in a homogeneous conducting material. Hence, such a dc electric concentrator has no impact on other external devices. Using the analogy between electrically conducting materials and resistor networks, we design, fabricate, and test a dc concentrator using the circuit theory. The measured results agree very well with the theoretical predictions and numerical simulations, demonstrating the perfect concentrating performance. PMID:23233875

  4. Thin-film Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshe, Maayan; Kogan, V. G.; Mints, R. G.

    2009-01-01

    We study the field dependence of the maximum current Im(H) in narrow edge-type thin-film Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density. Im(H) is evaluated within nonlocal Josephson electrodynamics taking into account the stray fields that affect the difference of the order-parameter phases across the junction and therefore the tunneling currents. We find that the phase difference along the junction is proportional to the applied field, depends on the junction geometry, but is independent of the Josephson critical current density gc , i.e., it is universal. An explicit form for this universal function is derived for small currents through junctions of the width W≪Λ , the Pearl length. The result is used to calculate Im(H) . It is shown that the maxima of Im(H)∝1/H and the zeros of Im(H) are equidistant but only in high fields. We find that the spacing between zeros is proportional to 1/W2 . The general approach is applied to calculate Im(H) for a superconducting quantum interference device with two narrow edge-type junctions. If gc changes sign periodically or randomly, as it does in grain boundaries of high- Tc materials and superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor heterostructures, Im(H) not only acquires the major side peaks, but due to nonlocality the following peaks decay much slower than in bulk junctions.

  5. Dynamics of uniform quantum gases, I: Density and current correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.; Singh, G. S.

    2010-02-01

    A unified approach valid for any wavenumber q, frequency ω, and temperature T is presented for uniform ideal quantum gases allowing for a comprehensive study of number density and particle-current density response functions. Exact analytical expressions are obtained for spectral functions in terms of polylogarithms. Also, particle-number and particle-current static susceptibilities are presented which, for fugacity less than unity, additionally involve Kummer functions. The q- and T-dependent transverse-current static susceptibility is used to show explicitly that current correlations are of long range in a Bose-condensed uniform ideal gas but for bosons at T>Tc and for Fermi and Boltzmann gases at all temperatures these correlations are of short range. Contact repulsive interactions for systems of neutral quantum particles are considered within the random phase approximation. The expressions for particle-number and transverse-current susceptibilities are utilized to discuss the existence or nonexistence of superfluidity in the systems under consideration.

  6. Magnetic topology and current channels in plasmas with toroidal current density inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciro, D.; Caldas, I. L.

    2013-10-01

    The equilibrium magnetic field inside axisymmetric plasmas with inversions on the toroidal current density is considered. Previous works have shown that internal regions with negative current density lead to non-nested magnetic surfaces inside the plasma. Following these results, we derive a general expression relating the positive and negative currents inside the non-nested surfaces. This is done in terms of an anisotropy parameter that is model-independent and is based in very general properties of the magnetic field. We demonstrate that the positive currents in axisymmetric islands screen the negative one in the plasma center by reaching about twice its magnitude. Further, we illustrate these results by developing a family of analytical local solutions for the poloidal magnetic field in a region of interest that contains the inverted current. These local solutions exhibit non-nested magnetic surfaces with a combined current of at least twice the magnitude of the negative one, as prescribed from the topological arguments, and allow to study topological transitions driven by geometrical changes in the current profile. To conclude, we discuss the signatures of internal current density inversions in a confinement device and show that magnetic pitch measurements may be inappropriate to differentiate current reversals and small current holes in plasmas.

  7. Morphology and Density Structure of Post-CME Current Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrsnak, B.; Poletto, G.; Vujic, E.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Eruption of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is believed to drag and open the coronal magnetic field, presumably leading to the formation of a large-scale current sheet and field relaxation by magnetic reconnection. This paper analyzes the physical characteristics of ray-like coronal features formed in the aftermath of CMEs, to confirm whether interpreting such phenomena in terms of a reconnecting current sheet is consistent with observations. Methods: The study focuses on UVCS/SOHO and LASCO/SOHO measurements of the ray width, density excess, and coronal velocity field as a function of the radial distance. The morphology of the rays implies that they are produced by Petschek-like reconnection in the large-scale current sheet formed in the wake of CME. The hypothesis is supported by the flow pattern, often showing outflows along the ray, and sometimes also inflows into the ray. The inferred inflow velocities range from 3 to 30 km/s, and are consistent with the narrow opening-angle of rays, which add up to a few degrees. The density of rays is an order of magnitude higher than in the ambient corona. The model results are consistent with the observations, revealing that the main cause of the density excess in rays is a transport of the dense plasma from lower to higher heights by the reconnection outflow.

  8. Lower hybrid current drive in a high density diverted tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, G. M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P. T.; Faust, I. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lau, C.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R. R.; Reinke, M. L.; Schmidt, A. E.; Smirnov, A. P.; Terry, J. L.; Whyte, D. G.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Experimental observations of LHCD at high density (n¯e>1020m˜3) on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak are presented in this paper. Bremsstrahlung emission from relativistic fast electrons in the core plasma drops sharply in single null discharges well below the density limit previously observed on limited tokamaks (ω/ωLH˜2). Modeling and experimental evidence suggest that the absence of LH driven fast electrons at high density may be due to collisional absorption in the scrape off layer. Experiments show that the expected current drive density dependence is recovered for inner wall limited discharges across the range of densities scanned (0.5×1020m-3

  9. A phase contrast imaging-interferometer system for detection of multiscale electron density fluctuations on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. M.; Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Marinoni, A.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    Heterodyne interferometry and phase contrast imaging (PCI) are robust, mature techniques for measuring low-k and high-k electron density fluctuations, respectively. This work describes the first-ever implementation of a combined PCI-interferometer. The combined system uses a single 10.6 μm probe beam, two interference schemes, and two detectors to measure electron density fluctuations at large spatiotemporal bandwidth (10 kHz

  10. Characterizing intra-annual density fluctuations using fine-spatial resolution blue intensity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babst, Flurin; Wright, William; Szejner, Paul; Wells, Leon; Belmecheri, Soumaya; Monson, Russell

    2016-04-01

    Rapidly rising evaporative demand threatens forests in semi-arid areas around the world, but the timing of stem growth response to drought is often coarsely known. This is partly due to a shortage of sub-annual growth records, particularly outside the Mediterranean region where most intra-annual density fluctuation (IADF) chronologies are based. We anticipate that an automated, cost-effective, and easily implementable method to characterize IADFs could foster more widespread development of sub-annual chronologies. Here, we applied a peak detection algorithm to fine-spatial resolution blue intensity (BI) profiles of Ponderosa pine tree rings from two sites located in neighboring mountain ranges in southern Arizona (~300 m elevation difference). This automated procedure proved reliable to isolate and characterize IADFs, thus offering an efficient and objective alternative to visual identification. Out of seven investigated BI parameters, peak height, width, and area showed satisfactory chronology statistics. We assessed the response of these BI and radial growth parameters to six monthly-resolved climate variables and to the onset date of the North American summer monsoon (NAM). The NAM is an atmospheric mode that provides a clear time marker for the termination of a pre-summer drought period (May-June) causing regular IADFs in trees growing near the dry margin of their distribution range. We observed divergent water limitation at the two sites, despite comparable site characteristics. Radial growth at the lower-elevation site depended mainly on winter precipitation, whereas the higher site relied on spring and monsoon precipitation. The pre-summer drought period indeed promoted IADFs in early ring portions at both sites. Yet, IADFs at the higher site were only formed, if spring was sufficiently humid to assume enough radial growth. Late-position IADFs were caused by a weak monsoon and additionally promoted by favorable conditions towards the end of the growing

  11. A high speed data acquisition system for the analysis of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Stainback, P. Calvin

    1988-01-01

    The use of a high-speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) to measure simultaneously velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations is described. The DDAS is used to automate the acquisition of hot-wire calibration data. The data acquisition, data handling, and data reporting techiques used by DDAS are described. Sample data are used to compare results obtained with the DDAS with those obtained from the FM tape and post-test digitization method.

  12. Non-Gaussian density fluctuations from entropically generated curvature perturbations in ekpyrotic models

    SciTech Connect

    Lehners, Jean-Luc; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2008-03-15

    We analyze the non-Gaussian density perturbations generated in ekpyrotic/cyclic models based on heterotic M theory. In this picture, two scalar fields produce nearly scale-invariant entropic perturbations during an ekpyrotic phase that are converted into curvature modes after the ekpyrotic phase is complete and just before the big bang. Both intrinsic nonlinearity in the entropy perturbation and the conversion process contribute to non-Gaussianity. The range of the non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} depends on how gradual the conversion process is and the steepness of the scalar field potential during the ekpyrotic phase. Although a wider range is possible, in principle, natural values of the ekpyrotic parameters combined with a gradual conversion process lead to values of -50 < or approx. f{sub NL} < or approx. +200, typically much greater than slow-roll inflation but within the current observational bounds.

  13. Influence of the fluid density on the statistics of power fluctuations in von Kármán swirling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opazo, A.; Sáez, A.; Bustamante, G.; Labbé, R.

    2016-02-01

    Here, we report experimental results on the fluctuations of injected power in confined turbulence. Specifically, we have studied a von Kármán swirling flow with constant external torque applied to the stirrers. Two experiments were performed at nearly equal Reynolds numbers, in geometrically similar experimental setups. Air was utilized in one of them and water in the other. With air, it was found that the probability density function of power fluctuations is strongly asymmetric, while with water, it is nearly Gaussian. This suggests that the outcome of a big change of the fluid density in the flow-stirrer interaction is not simply a change in the amplitude of stirrers' response. In the case of water, with a density roughly 830 times greater than air density, the coupling between the flow and the stirrers is stronger, so that they follow more closely the fluctuations of the average rotation of the nearby flow. When the fluid is air, the coupling is much weaker. The result is not just a smaller response of the stirrers to the torque exerted by the flow; the PDF of the injected power becomes strongly asymmetric and its spectrum acquires a broad region that scales as f-2. Thus, the asymmetry of the probability density functions of torque or angular speed could be related to the inability of the stirrers to respond to flow stresses. This happens, for instance, when the torque exerted by the flow is weak, due to small fluid density, or when the stirrers' moment of inertia is large. Moreover, a correlation analysis reveals that the features of the energy transfer dynamics with water are qualitatively and quantitatively different to what is observed with air as working fluid.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamically stable plasma with supercritical current density at the axis

    SciTech Connect

    Burdakov, A. V.; Postupaev, V. V. Sudnikov, A. V.

    2014-05-15

    In this work, an analysis of magnetic perturbations in the GOL-3 experiment is given. In GOL-3, plasma is collectively heated in a multiple-mirror trap by a high-power electron beam. During the beam injection, the beam-plasma interaction maintains a high-level microturbulence. This provides an unusual radial profile of the net current (that consists of the beam current, current of the preliminary discharge, and the return current). The plasma core carries supercritical current density with the safety factor well below unity, but as a whole, the plasma is stable with q(a) ≈ 4. The net plasma current is counter-directed to the beam current; helicities of the magnetic field in the core and at the edge are of different signs. This forms a system with a strong magnetic shear that stabilizes the plasma core in good confinement regimes. We have found that the most pronounced magnetic perturbation is the well-known n = 1, m = 1 mode for both stable and disruptive regimes.

  15. Spin-density correlations in the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory: Comparison with polarized neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, N. B.; Reser, B. I.; Paradezhenko, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    To study the spin-density correlations in the ferromagnetic metals above the Curie temperature, we relate the spin correlator and neutron scattering cross-section. In the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory, we obtain explicit expressions for the effective and local magnetic moments and spatial spin-density correlator. Our theoretical results are demonstrated by the example of bcc Fe. The effective and local moments are found in good agreement with results of polarized neutron scattering experiment over a wide temperature range. The calculated short-range order is small (up to 4 Å) and slowly decreases with temperature.

  16. Statistical analysis of polychaete population density: dynamics of dominant species and scaling properties in relative abundance fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroz-Martinez, B.; Schmitt, F. G.; Dauvin, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    We consider here the dynamics of two polychaete populations based on a 20 yr temporal benthic survey of two muddy fine sand communities in the Bay of Morlaix, Western English Channel. These populations display high temporal variability, which is analyzed here using scaling approaches. We find that population densities have heavy tailed probability density functions. We analyze the dynamics of relative species abundance in two different communities of polychaetes by estimating in a novel way a "mean square drift" coefficient which characterizes their fluctuations in relative abundance over time. We show the usefulness of using new tools to approach and model such highly variable population dynamics in marine ecosystems.

  17. High current density, cryogenically cooled sliding electrical joint development

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.

    1986-09-01

    In the past two years, conceptual designs for fusion energy research devices have focussed on compact, high magnetic field configurations. The concept of sliding electrical joints in the large magnets allows a number of technical advantages including enhanced mechanical integrity, remote maintainability, and reduced project cost. The rationale for sliding electrical joints is presented. The conceptual configuration for this generation of experimental devices is highlghted by an approx. 20 T toroidal field magnet with a flat top conductor current of approx. 300 kA and a sliding electrical joint with a gross current density of approx. 0.6 kA/cm/sup 2/. A numerical model was used to map the conductor current distribution as a function of time and position in the conductor. A series of electrical joint arrangements were produced against the system code envelope constraints for a specific version of the Ignition Studies Project (ISP) which is designated as 1025.

  18. Spectral density of fluctuations of a double-well Duffing oscillator driven by white noise

    SciTech Connect

    Dykman, M.I.; Mannella, R.; McClintock, P.V.E.; Moss, F.; Soskin, S.M.

    1988-02-15

    The power spectrum of the archetypal fluctuating bistable system, the underdamped double-well Duffing oscillator, is investigated both experimentally, with use of an electronic circuit, and theoretically. The experiment confirms previous analytic results for the structure of the spectrum, including the existence of three distinct peaks within a certain parameter range. The theory is extended to describe analytically the shape of the peak due to intrawell fluctuations for arbitrary noise intensities as well as certain other features of the spectrum. Good quantitative agreement of theory and experiment is demonstrated.

  19. High-speed low-current-density 850 nm VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Anders; Westbergh, Petter; Gustavsson, Johan; Haglund, Åsa

    2010-02-01

    The design of an oxide confined 850 nm VCSEL has been engineered for high speed operation at low current density. Strained InGaAs/AlGaAs QWs, with a careful choice of In and Al concentrations based on rigorous band structure and gain calculations, were used to increase differential gain and reduce threshold carrier density. Various measures, including multiple oxide layers and a binary compound in the lower distributed Bragg reflector, were implemented for reducing capacitance and thermal impedance. Modulation bandwidths > 20 GHz at 25°C and > 15 GHz at 85°C were obtained. At room temperature, the bandwidth was found to be limited primarily by the still relatively large oxide capacitance, while at 85°C the bandwidth was also limited by the thermal saturation of the resonance frequency. Transmission up to 32 Gb/s (on-off keying) over multimode fiber was successfully demonstrated with the VCSEL biased at a current density of only 11 kA/cm2. In addition, using a more spectrally efficient modulation format (16 QAM subcarrier multiplexing), transmission at 40 Gb/s over 200 m multimode fiber was demonstrated.

  20. Strong magnetic field fluctuations within filamentary auroral density cavities interpreted as VLF saucer sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, D. J.; Kabirzadeh, R.; Burchill, J. K.; Pfaff, R. F.; Wallis, D. D.; Bounds, S. R.; Clemmons, J. H.; Pinçon, J.-L.

    2012-02-01

    The Geoelectrodynamics and Electro-Optical Detection of Electron and Suprathermal Ion Currents (GEODESIC) sounding rocket encountered more than 100 filamentary density cavities associated with enhanced plasma waves at ELF (<3 kHz) and VLF (3-10 kHz) frequencies and at altitudes of 800-990 km during an auroral substorm. These cavities were similar in size (˜20 m diameter in most cases) to so-called lower-hybrid cavities (LHCs) observed by previous sounding rockets and satellites; however, in contrast, many of the GEODESIC cavities exhibited up to tenfold enhancements in magnetic wave power throughout the VLF band. GEODESIC also observed enhancements of ELF and VLF electric fields both parallel and perpendicular to the geomagnetic field B0 within cavities, though the VLF E field increases were often not as large proportionally as seen in the magnetic fields. This behavior is opposite to that predicted by previously published theories of LHCs based on passive scattering of externally incident auroral hiss. We argue that the GEODESIC cavities are active wave generation sites capable of radiating VLF waves into the surrounding plasma and producing VLF saucers, with energy supplied by cold, upward flowing electron beams composing the auroral return current. This interpretation is supported by the observation that the most intense waves, both inside and outside cavities, occurred in regions where energetic electron precipitation was largely inhibited or absent altogether. We suggest that the wave-enhanced cavities encountered by GEODESIC were qualitatively different from those observed by earlier spacecraft because of the fortuitous timing of the GEODESIC launch, which placed the payload at apogee within a substorm-related return current during its most intense phase, lasting only a few minutes.

  1. Incorporation Of Air Into The Campanian Ignimbrite Pyroclastic Density Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ort, M. H.; Giordano, G.; Zanella, E.; Isaia, R.

    2015-12-01

    Knowing the temperature of emplacement of an ignimbrite can tell us how much cooling air it incorporated during eruption and transport. Currents that incorporate cool matter (air, water, cold clasts) cool more than those that do not. Lithic fragments record the maximum temperature they reached, up to their maximum unblocking temperature. Studies of large ignimbrites (e.g. Cerro Galan Ignimbrite) emplaced by dense currents show they do not cool very much, with emplacement temperatures often above 580 oC. Smaller currents, such as those from Vesuvius and Colima, lose significant heat in the eruption column, and then lose some, but less, heat as they travel laterally. The amount of atmosphere incorporated by large dilute currents is not known. The ~40 ka Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) erupted from the Campi Flegrei caldera near Naples, Italy, and extends to ~75 km from the caldera. The CI was emplaced from a density-stratified current with a dilute transport system and a denser depositional system that overtopped 1600-m-high ridges, with the depositional system re-forming on the far side. Modeling of dilute currents shows that they can pass over obstacles ~1.5 times their thickness without losing momentum, which implies the CI current was >1 km thick. Much of that dilute current was gas, but how much was atmospheric? Partial thermal demagnetization of lithic clasts allows the identification of the temperature of emplacement. We sampled lithic fragments from the CI in 13 locations from proximal to distal along several azimuths. The current passed over 30-35 km of sea to get to two sites. Partial thermal demagnetization of 10 specimens from each site show that they were heated and deposited above 580 oC, the unblocking temperature of magnetite, implying the temperature of emplacement was at or above this temperature. The CI is poor in lithic clasts (<1% in most places) and evidence of non-magmatic water in the outflow sheet is absent. We suggest the CI current was a large

  2. Comparing density, electron temperature, and magnetic fluctuations with gyrokinetic simulations using new synthetic diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, D. R.; Bergerson, W.; Ennever, P.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A.; Irby, J.; Phillips, P.; Porkolab, M.; Rowan, W.; Terry, J. L.; Xu, P.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-10-01

    Three new synthetic turbulence diagnostics are implemented in GS2 and compared with measurements: phase contrast imaging, polarimetry, and electron-cyclotron (ECE) emission. Our new synthetic diagnostic framework is based on transforming to a real-space annulus in Cartesian coordinates. This allows straightforward convolution with diagnostic point-spread functions, or integration over viewing chords. Wavenumber spectra and fluctuation amplitudes, as well as transport fluxes, are compared with measurements. Both phase contrast imaging and newly observed ECE electron temperature fluctuations, closely follow the electron temperature in an internal transport barrier during on-axis heating pulses, consistent with the role of TEM turbulence. New C-Mod polarimetry measurements, showing strong broadband core magnetic fluctuations, will also be examined against gyrokinetic simulations. The new framework is readily extended to other fluctuation measurements such as two-color interferometry, beam emission spectroscopy, Doppler back-scattering, ECE imaging, and microwave imaging reflectometry. Supported by U.S. DoE awards DE-FC02-08ER54966, DE-FC02-99ER54512, DE-FG03-96ER54373.

  3. Advances in time-dependent current-density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Arjan

    In this work we solve the problem of the gauge dependence of molecular magnetic properties (magnetizabilities, circular dichroism) using time-dependent current-density functional theory [1]. We also present a new functional that accurately describes the optical absorption spectra of insulators, semiconductors and metals [2] N. Raimbault, P.L. de Boeij, P. Romaniello, and J.A. Berger Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 066404 (2015) J.A. Berger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 137402 (2015) This study has been partially supported through the Grant NEXT No. ANR-10-LABX-0037 in the framework of the Programme des Investissements d'Avenir.

  4. The current density in quantum electrodynamics in external potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlemmer, Jan; Zahn, Jochen

    2015-08-01

    We review different definitions of the current density for quantized fermions in the presence of an external electromagnetic field. Several deficiencies in the popular prescription due to Schwinger and the mode sum formula for static external potentials are pointed out. We argue that Dirac's method, which is the analog of the Hadamard point-splitting employed in quantum field theory in curved space-times, is conceptually the most satisfactory. As a concrete example, we discuss vacuum polarization and the stress-energy tensor for massless fermions in 1+1 dimension. Also a general formula for the vacuum polarization in static external potentials in 3+1 dimensions is derived.

  5. Discretizing Transient Current Densities in the Maxwell Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Stowell, M L

    2008-11-25

    We will briefly discuss a technique for applying transient volumetric current sources in full-wave, time-domain electromagnetic simulations which avoids the need for divergence cleaning. The method involves both 'edge-elements' and 'face-elements' in conjunction with a particle-in-cell scheme to track the charge density. Results from a realistic, 6.7 million element, 3D simulation are shown. While the author may have a finite element bias the technique should be applicable to finite difference methods as well.

  6. The current density in quantum electrodynamics in external potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Schlemmer, Jan; Zahn, Jochen

    2015-08-15

    We review different definitions of the current density for quantized fermions in the presence of an external electromagnetic field. Several deficiencies in the popular prescription due to Schwinger and the mode sum formula for static external potentials are pointed out. We argue that Dirac’s method, which is the analog of the Hadamard point-splitting employed in quantum field theory in curved space–times, is conceptually the most satisfactory. As a concrete example, we discuss vacuum polarization and the stress–energy tensor for massless fermions in 1+1 dimension. Also a general formula for the vacuum polarization in static external potentials in 3+1 dimensions is derived.

  7. Experimental study of bedforms formed by Froude supercritical density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruse, H.; Izumi, N.; Yokokawa, M.; Muto, T.

    2013-12-01

    This study reveals characteristics and formative conditions of plane bed and cyclic steps formed by saline density flows with suspended sediments in supercritical flow condition. Experimental density flows were produced by mixtures of salt water (1.01-1.04 in density) and plastic particles (1.5 in specific density, 140 or 240 mm in diameter). Salt water and plastic particles are analogue materials of muddy water and sand particles in turbidity currents respectively. Acrylic flume (4.0 m long, 2.0 cm wide and 0.5 m deep) was submerged in an experimental tank (6.0 m long, 1.8 m wide and 1.2 m deep) that was filled by clear water. Features of bedforms were observed when the bed state in the flume reached equilibrium condition. The experimental conditions range 1.5-4.2 in densimetric Froude number and 0.2-0.8 in Shields dimensionless stress. We reports two major discoveries as a result of the flume experiments: (1) Plane bed under Froude-supercritical flows and (2) Geometrical characteristics of cyclic steps formed by density flows. (1) Plane bed was formed under the condition of supercritical flow regime. In previous studies, plane bed has been known that plane bed can be formed by subcritical unidirectional flows. However, this study implies that plane bed can also be formed by supercritical conditions with high Shields dimensionless stress (>0.4) and very high Froude number (> 4.0). This discovery may suggest that previous estimations of paleo-hydraulic conditions of parallel lamination in turbidites should be reconsidered. (2) This study also revealed geometrical characteristics of cyclic steps. Cyclic step is a type of bedform that is frequently observed in flanks of submarine levees. This study proved that cyclic steps of density flows show different geometry to those formed by open channel flows. Cyclic steps formed by open channel flows have generally asymmetrical geometry in which lee side is short, whereas cyclic steps formed by density flows are relatively

  8. The dynamics of pyroclastic density currents on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, B. D.; Clarke, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    The products of explosive volcanism have long been observed on the surface of Mars, and their corresponding dynamics, associated with phenomenon such as dike propagation, magma fragmentation, and eruption columns under Martian conditions, have been modeled with significant success (e.g., Wilson, L., J. W. Head (1994), Mars- Review and analysis of volcanic eruption theory and relationships to observed landforms, Rev. Geophy, 32, 221-263). However, the dynamics of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) under Martian conditions is still poorly constrained. Our increasing capability to image the surface at high resolution, both from orbit and from rovers, presents an opportunity for more rigorous deposit observations and descriptions. For example, observations and measurements from Orbiters identify what have been interpreted as extensive aprons of volcanic ash deposits in several volcanic regions, namely those surrounding several southern highland patera, which have been interpreted as the deposits of PDCs. In addition the bedded deposits identified by the Spirit rover at “Home Plate,” an outcrop within the Columbia Hills in Gusev Crater, have been interpreted by many as the deposits of dilute pyroclastic density currents. This demonstrates that the need to understand the role of the Martian atmosphere on flow dynamics and depositional processes is much more important and relevant than it has been in the past. We have developed a quantitative, axi-symmetric model for flow of and sedimentation from a steady-state, vertically uniform dilute density current for application to PDCs on Earth and Mars (following Bursik, M. I., A. W. Woods, 1996, The dynamics and thermodynamics of large ash flows, Bull Volcan, 58, 175-193). The conservation of mass, momentum, and energy are solved simultaneously, and include the effects of atmospheric entrainment, particle sedimentation, basal friction, temperature changes, and variations in current thickness and density. For a given set of

  9. Estimation of the radial size and density fluctuation amplitude of edge localized modes using microwave interferometer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, M. K.; Yun, G. S.; Leem, J.; Kim, M.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.

    2016-03-01

    A novel technique to estimate the range of radial size and density fluctuation amplitude of edge localized modes (ELMs) in the KSTAR tokamak plasma is presented. A microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) system is reconfigured as a multi-channel microwave interferometer array (MIA) to measure the density fluctuations associated with ELMs, while electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system is used as a reference diagnostics to confirm the MIA observation. Two dimensional full-wave (FWR2D) simulations integrated with optics simulation are performed to investigate the Gaussian beam propagation and reflection through the plasma as well as the MIA optical components and obtain the interferometric phase undulations of individual channels at the detector plane due to ELM perturbation. The simulation results show that the amplitude of the phase undulation depends linearly on both radial size and density perturbation amplitude of ELM. For a typical discharge with ELMs, it is estimated that the ELM structure observed by the MIA system has density perturbation amplitude in the range ~ 7 % to 14 % while radial size in the range ~ 1 to 3 cm.

  10. DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS AND THE ACCELERATION OF ELECTRONS BY BEAM-GENERATED LANGMUIR WAVES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, H.; Bian, N. H.; Kontar, E. P.

    2012-12-20

    Non-thermal electron populations are observed throughout the heliosphere. The relaxation of an electron beam is known to produce Langmuir waves which, in turn, may substantially modify the electron distribution function. As the Langmuir waves are refracted by background density gradients and as the solar and heliospheric plasma density is naturally perturbed with various levels of inhomogeneity, the interaction of Langmuir waves with non-thermal electrons in inhomogeneous plasmas is an important topic. We investigate the role played by ambient density fluctuations on the beam-plasma relaxation, focusing on the effect of acceleration of beam electrons. The scattering of Langmuir waves off turbulent density fluctuations is modeled as a wavenumber diffusion process which is implemented in numerical simulations of the one-dimensional quasilinear kinetic equations describing the beam relaxation. The results show that a substantial number of beam electrons are accelerated when the diffusive timescale in wavenumber space {tau}{sub D} is of the order of the quasilinear timescale {tau}{sub ql}, while when {tau}{sub D} << {tau}{sub ql}, the beam relaxation is suppressed. Plasma inhomogeneities are therefore an important means of energy redistribution for waves and hence electrons, and so must be taken into account when interpreting, for example, hard X-ray or Type III emission from flare-accelerated electrons.

  11. Edge electron density profiles and fluctuations measured by two-dimensional beam emission spectroscopy in the KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Y. U. Wi, H. M.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Kovácsik, Ákos

    2014-11-15

    Beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) has recently been upgraded. The background intensity was reduced from 30% to 2% by suppressing the stray lights. This allows acquisition of the relative electron density profiles on the plasma edge without background subtraction from the beam power modulation signals. The KSTAR BES system has its spatial resolution of 1 cm, the temporal resolution of 2 MHz, and a total 32 channel (8 radial × 4 poloidal) avalanche photo diode array. Most measurements were done on the plasma edge, r/a ∼ 0.9, with 8 cm radial measurement width that covers the pedestal range. High speed density profile measurements reveal temporal behaviors of fast transient events, such as the precursors of edge localized modes and the transitions between confinement modes. Low background level also allows analysis of the edge density fluctuation patterns with reduced background fluctuations. Propagation of the density structures can be investigated by comparing the phase delays between the spatially distributed channels.

  12. Local density of states and scanning tunneling currents in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ling; Peres, Nuno; Tsai, Shan-Wen

    2010-03-01

    Graphene consists of an atom-thick layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, and its low-energy electronic excitations are well described as massless Dirac fermions with spin half and an additional pseudospin degree of freedom. We study local properties of graphene with isolated impurities (diagonal and non-diagonal impurity potential) such as the local electronic spectra and real-space and k-space local density of state (LDOS) maps. Using a multimode description for an scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip, we calculate STM currents and find that strong resonances in the LDOS at finite energies lead to the presence of steps in the STM current and suppression of the Fano factor. [Ref: N. M. R. Peres, L. Yang, and S.-W. Tsai, New J. Phys. 11, 095007, (2009)

  13. Experimental Measurement of Asymmetric Fluctuations of Poloidal Magnetic Field in Damavand Tokomak at Different Plasma Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moslehi-Fard, Mahmoud; Alinejad, Naser; Rasouli, Chapar; Sadigzadeh, Asghar

    2012-08-01

    Toroidal and Poloidal magnetic fields have an important effect on the tokomak topology. Damavand Tokomak is a small size tokomak characterized with k = 1.2, B t = 1T, R 0 = 36 cm, maximum plasma current is about 35 KA with a discharge time of 21 ms. In this experimental work, the variation of poloidal magnetic field on the torodial cross section is measured and analyzed. In order to measure the polodial magnetic field, 18 probes were installed on the edge of tokomak plasma with ∆θ = 18°, while a limiter was installed inside the torus. Plasma current, I p, induces a polodial magnetic field, B p, smaller than the torodial magnetic field B t. Magnetic lines B produced as a combination of B t and B p, are localized on the nested toroidal magnetic surfaces. The presence of polodial magnetic field is necessary for particles confinement. Mirnov oscillations are the fluctuations of polodial magnetic field, detected by magnetic probes. Disrupted instability in Tokomak typically starts with mirnov oscillations which appear as fluctuations of polodial magnetic field and is detected by magnetic probes. Minor disruptions inside the plasma can contain principal magnetic islands and their satellites can cause the annihilation of plasma confinement. Production of thin layer of turbulent magnetic field lines cause minor disruption. Magnetic limiter may cause the deformation of symmetric equilibrium configuration and chaotic magnetic islands reveal in plasma occurring in thin region of chaotic field lines close to their separatrix. The width of this chaotic layer in the right side of poloidal profile of Damavand Tokomak is smaller than the width in the left side profile because of Shafranov displacement. Ergodic region in the left side of profile develops a perturbation on the magnetic polodial field lines, B p, that are greater in magnitude than that in the right side, although the values of B p on the left side are smaller than that on the right side of the profile. The Left

  14. A real time dynamic data acquisition and processing system for velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.

    1991-01-01

    The real time Dynamic Data Acquisition and Processing System (DDAPS) is described which provides the capability for the simultaneous measurement of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations. The system of hardware and software is described in context of the wind tunnel environment. The DDAPS replaces both a recording mechanism and a separate data processing system. DDAPS receives input from hot wire anemometers. Amplifiers and filters condition the signals with computer controlled modules. The analog signals are simultaneously digitized and digitally recorded on disk. Automatic acquisition collects necessary calibration and environment data. Hot wire sensitivities are generated and applied to the hot wire data to compute fluctuations. The presentation of the raw and processed data is accomplished on demand. The interface to DDAPS is described along with the internal mechanisms of DDAPS. A summary of operations relevant to the use of the DDAPS is also provided.

  15. Tokamak equilibria with strong toroidal current density reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, G. O.; Rodrigues, Paulo; Bizarro, João P. S.

    2013-05-01

    The equilibrium of large magnetic islands in the core of a tokamak under conditions of strong toroidal current density reversal is investigated by a new method. The method uses distinct spectral representations to describe each simply connected region as well as the containing shell geometry. This ideal conducting shell may substitute for the plasma edge region or take a virtual character representing the external equilibrium field effect. The internal equilibrium of the islands is solved within the framework of the variational moment method. Equivalent surface current densities are defined on the boundaries of the islands and on the thin containing shell, giving a straightforward formulation to the interaction between regions. The equilibrium of the island-shell system is determined by matching moments of the Dirichlet boundary conditions. Finally, the macroscopic stability against a class of tilting displacements is examined by means of an energy principle. It is found out that the up-down symmetric islands are stable to this particular perturbation and geometry but the asymmetric system presents a bifurcation in the equilibrium.

  16. MHD Modeling of Conductors at Ultra-High Current Density

    SciTech Connect

    ROSENTHAL,STEPHEN E.; DESJARLAIS,MICHAEL P.; SPIELMAN,RICK B.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.; ASAY,JAMES R.; DOUGLAS,M.R.; HALL,C.A.; FRESE,M.H.; MORSE,R.L.; REISMAN,D.B.

    2000-08-29

    In conjunction with ongoing high-current experiments on Sandia National Laboratories' Z accelerator, the authors have revisited a problem first described in detail by Heinz Knoepfel. Unlike the 1-Tesla MITLs of pulsed power accelerators used to produce intense particle beams, Z's disc transmission line (downstream of the current addition) is in a 100--1,200 Tesla regime, so its conductors cannot be modeled simply as static infinite conductivity boundaries. Using the MHD code MACH2 they have been investigating the conductor hydrodynamics, characterizing the joule heating, magnetic field diffusion, and material deformation, pressure, and velocity over a range of current densities, current rise-times, and conductor materials. Three purposes of this work are (1) to quantify power flow losses owing to ultra-high magnetic fields, (2) to model the response of VISAR diagnostic samples in various configurations on Z, and (3) to incorporate the most appropriate equation of state and conductivity models into the MHD computations. Certain features are strongly dependent on the details of the conductivity model.

  17. Fluctuating defect density probed with noise spectroscopy in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Verleg, P.A.W.E.; Uca, O.; Dijkhuis, J.I.

    1997-07-01

    Resistance fluctuations have been studied in hydrogenated amorphous silicon in the temperature range between 300 K and 450 K. The primary noise source has a power spectrum of approximately 1/f and is ascribed to hydrogen motion. Hopping of weakly bound hydrogen is thermally activated at such low temperatures with an average activation energy of 0.85 eV. The attempt rate amounts to 7 {center_dot} 10{sup 12} s{sup {minus}1}.

  18. Density fluctuations of the leafminer Phyllonorycter strigulatella (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae) in the impact zone of a power plant.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, M V

    2003-01-01

    Populations of a tiny moth Phyllonorycter strigulatella, whose larvae develop in leaves of Alnus incana, were monitored around a coal fired power plant (annually emitting 11-29 Kt of SO2) near Apatity, northwestern Russia, during 1991-2001. The periodicity in density fluctuation was not affected by pollution; the peak densities of the leafminer in both polluted and clean localities were observed in 1993 and 1999. Densities of P. strigulatella showed no correlation with pollution between the outbreaks but strongly increased near the power plant during the outbreaks. In polluted localities the density increased by a factor of 15-20, whereas in clean localities it increased by a factor of 3-4, relative to the latent density. Mine distribution among individual leaves was more aggregated near the power plant. P. strigulatella demonstrated higher preference of long shoots in the contaminated sites, but mine distributions within a shoot and within a leaf did not change with the distance from the polluter. Thus, moderate contamination by SO2 favoured P. strigulatella, leading to an increase in the intensity of outbreaks (the ratio between outbreak and latent densities) by a factor of five, but did not change either frequency of outbreaks or timing of density increase.

  19. Simultaneous measurement of magnetic and density fluctuations via cross-polarization scattering and Doppler backscattering on the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, T. L.; Barada, K.; Peebles, W. A.; Crocker, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    An upgraded cross-polarization scattering (CPS) system for the simultaneous measurement of internal magnetic fluctuations B ˜ and density fluctuations ñ is presented. The system has eight radial quadrature channels acquired simultaneously with an eight-channel Doppler backscattering system (measures density fluctuations ñ and flows). 3-D ray tracing calculations based on the GENRAY ray tracing code are used to illustrate the scattering and geometric considerations involved in the CPS implementation on DIII-D. A unique quasi-optical design and IF electronics system allow direct comparison of B ˜ and ñ during dynamic or transient plasma events (e.g., Edge Localized Modes or ELMs, L to H-mode transitions, etc.). The system design allows the interesting possibility of both magnetic-density ( B ˜ -ñ) fluctuation and magnetic-temperature ( B ˜ - T ˜ ) fluctuation cross-phase measurements suitable for detailed tests of turbulence simulations.

  20. Thermodynamic Bethe ansatz for non-equilibrium steady states: exact energy current and fluctuations in integrable QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Alvaredo, Olalla; Chen, Yixiong; Doyon, Benjamin; Hoogeveen, Marianne

    2014-03-01

    We evaluate the exact energy current and scaled cumulant generating function (related to the large-deviation function) in non-equilibrium steady states with energy flow, in any integrable model of relativistic quantum field theory (IQFT) with diagonal scattering. Our derivations are based on various recent results of Bernard and Doyon. The steady states are built by connecting homogeneously two infinite halves of the system thermalized at different temperatures Tl, Tr, and waiting for a long time. We evaluate the current J(Tl, Tr) using the exact QFT density matrix describing these non-equilibrium steady states and using Zamolodchikov’s method of the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz (TBA). The scaled cumulant generating function is obtained from the extended fluctuation relations which hold in integrable models. We verify our formula in particular by showing that the conformal field theory (CFT) result is obtained in the high-temperature limit. We analyze numerically our non-equilibrium steady-state TBA equations for three models: the sinh-Gordon model, the roaming trajectories model, and the sine-Gordon model at a particular reflectionless point. Based on the numerics, we conjecture that an infinite family of non-equilibrium c-functions, associated with the scaled cumulants, can be defined, which we interpret physically. We study the full scaled distribution function and find that it can be described by a set of independent Poisson processes. Finally, we show that the ‘additivity’ property of the current, which is known to hold in CFT and was proposed to hold more generally, does not hold in general IQFT—that is, J(Tl, Tr) is not of the form f(Tl) - f(Tr).

  1. Critical current density and current distribution in field cooled superconducting disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Pierre; Noudem, Jacques; Dupont, Louis

    2016-07-01

    Applications of bulk superconductors concern superconducting motors and generators, the levitation of vehicles, the generation of high magnetic fields with small size cryo-magnets, the shielding of magnetic fields and other applications. For all of them, it is essential to determine the critical current density, and to understand the effect of the shape and size of the bulks on the properties of interest. In this contribution, we show how the combination of levitation force and trapped field measurements allow one to determine the characteristics and the potential performances of superconducting disks using analytical modeling. As examples of applications we detail the effects of the magnetizing field and of the bulk sheet critical current density on the levitation force. An important result of the reported measurements is that in field-cooled samples, the shielding currents possibly do not flow along the whole thickness of the disks.

  2. Ionosphere-Earth current density affecting clouds and atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, Brian; Burns, Gary

    Ionosphere-Earth current density affecting clouds and atmospheric dynamics Correlations of atmospheric dynamics, cloud cover, and precipitation with changes in external and internal inputs that affect the downward ionosphere-earth current density, Jz, through the atmosphere have been reported on day-to-day, decadal, century and longer timescales. Such inputs are changes in the cosmic ray flux; in the interplanetary electric field; in solar energetic particles; in relativistic electron precipitation; and in the upward current output of global thunderstorm activity. The interplanetary electric field and relativistic electron and thunderstorm inputs affect Jz while not changing the tropospheric ionization rate, thus ruling out ion-mediated nucleation as the mechanism affecting the cloud processes. Modeling suggests that charge modulation of aerosol scavenging (CMAS) in clouds affects cloud microphysics and can account for the correlations. The CMAS effects are different for cold clouds as compared to warm clouds, and vary with the size of the condensation nuclei and ice-forming nuclei. CMAS effects on cold and warm cloud lifetimes can account for observed changes in cloud cover on day-to-day and decadal time scales. CMAS effects on precipitation from cold clouds can account for increases in winter storm vorticity in cyclogenesis regions. Increases in cyclonic vorticity in these regions generates anticyclonic blocking a half Rossby wavelength downstream. These affect storm tracks and the advection of cold Arctic air in winter onto the continents. Observations, theory and modeling of cloud microphysics supporting these chains of processes will be reviewed, but the needed modeling of resolved clouds and their insertion into GCMs is complex and demanding, and has yet to be undertaken.

  3. Marshall N. Rosenbluth Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Award Talk: Simultaneous Measurement of Electron Temperature and Density Fluctuations in the Core of DIII-D Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. E.

    2009-11-01

    Multi-field fluctuation measurements provide opportunities for rigorous comparison between experiment and nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations. A unique set of diagnostics on DIII-D allows for simultaneous study of local, long-wavelength (0 < kθρs< 0.5) electron temperature and density fluctuations in the core plasma (0.4 < ρ< 0.8). Previous experiments in L-mode indicate that normalized electron temperature fluctuation levels (40 < f < 400,kHz) increase with radius from ˜0.4% at ρ= 0.5 to ˜2% at ρ=0.8, similar to simultaneously measured density fluctuations. Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to increase Te, which increases electron temperature fluctuation levels and electron heat transport in the experiments. In contrast, long wavelength density fluctuation levels change very little. The different responses are consistent with increased TEM drive relative to ITG-mode drive. A new capability at DIII-D is the measurement of phase angle between electron temperature and density fluctuations using coupled correlation electron cyclotron emission radiometer and reflectometer diagnostics. Linear and nonlinear GYRO runs have been used to design validation experiments that focus on measurements of the phase angle. GYRO shows that if Te and ∇Te increase 50% in a beam-heated L-mode plasma (ρ=0.5), then the phase angle between electron temperature and density fluctuations decreases 30%-50% and electron temperature fluctuation levels increase a factor of two more than density fluctuations. Comparisons between these predictions and experimental results will be presented.

  4. Transcranial alternating current stimulation modulates spontaneous low frequency fluctuations as measured with fMRI.

    PubMed

    Cabral-Calderin, Yuranny; Williams, Kathleen A; Opitz, Alexander; Dechent, Peter; Wilke, Melanie

    2016-11-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is a promising tool for modulating brain oscillations. Combining tACS with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we recently showed that tACS applied over the occipital cortex did not exert its strongest effect on regions below the electrodes, but mainly on more distant fronto-parietal regions. Theoretically, this effect could be explained by tACS-induced modulation of functional connectivity between directly stimulated areas and more distant but anatomically and functionally connected regions. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the effect of tACS on low frequency fMRI signal fluctuations. We employed simultaneous fMRI-tACS in 20 subjects during resting state (eyes open with central fixation for ~8min). Subjects received tACS at different frequencies (10, 16, 40Hz) and with different electrode montages (Cz-Oz, P5-P6) previously used in behavioral studies. Electric field simulations showed that tACS over Cz-Oz directly stimulates occipital cortex, while tACS over P5-P6 primarily targets parietal cortices. Group-level simulation-based functional connectivity maps for Cz-Oz and P5-P6 resembled the visual and fronto-parietal control resting-state networks, respectively. The effects of tACS were frequency and partly electrode montage dependent. In regions where frequency-dependent effects of tACS were observed, 10 and 40Hz tACS generally induced opposite effects. Most tACS effects on functional connectivity were observed between, as opposed to within, resting-state networks. The left fronto-parietal control network showed the most extensive frequency-dependent modulation in functional connectivity, mainly with occipito-parietal regions, where 10Hz tACS increased and 40Hz tACS decreased correlation values. Taken together, our results show that tACS modulates local spontaneous low frequency fluctuations and their correlations with more distant regions, which should be taken into account when

  5. Concentration-dependent flow stratification in experimental high-density turbidity currents and their relevance to turbidite facies models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartigny, M. J. B.; Eggenhuisen, J. T.; Hansen, E. W. M.; Postma, G.

    2012-04-01

    High-density turbidity currents exhibit internal density stratifications. In the basal part of these stratified flows, high-sediment concentrations cause rheological deviations from the Newtonian turbulent flow that dominates clear water and low density conditions. Previous studies have distinguished different types of basal layers on the basis of concentration-dependent differences in grain interactions. Field studies have classically linked crude stratification bands, spaced laminations, and/or abundant internal erosion surfaces to high-density turbidity currents. Studies of high-density turbidity current deposits have proposed various mechanisms for this variation in depositional characteristics; however, none of these propositions has been thoroughly tested by experiments or theory. This study presents experiments of high-density turbidity currents (varying in initial sediment concentration between 9-26 vol%) moving quasi steady on an inclined bed surface, being close to their equilibrium slope in a 4 m x 0.5 x 0.07 tank. Three distinct internal flow layers were distinguished on the basis of their observed behavior as captured by a high-speed camera. Ultrasonic velocity profiler (UVP) probes were used to measure the overall velocity and turbulent intensity profiles of the flows, and the change therein as a result of different stacking patterns of internal flow layers. The relation between maximum velocity, shear stress and equilibrium slope for different types of high-density turbidity current was investigated in the experiments. Velocity and camera data were combined to study the interactions between the different flow layers over time. Small-scale fluctuations (0.2-2 seconds) were observed to have a clear control on the depositional behavior of the flow. However, the influence of these fluctuations gradually decreased with increasing sediment concentrations as function of the different types of basal flow layers. By combining these observations with

  6. Density fluctuations in the interstellar medium: Evidence for anisotropic magnetogasdynamic turbulence. II - Stationary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higdon, J. C.

    1986-10-01

    A model of anisotropic plasma fluids is developed to examine the origin of the spectra of random, electron-density variations inferred by Armstrong, Cordes, and Rickett from measurements of pulsar radio signals. These electron variations are interpreted as density components of an anisotropic stationary mode of nonlinear magnetogasdynamics-tangetial pressure balances. It is demonstrated that turbulent flows, generated by the disruption of H I clouds in O star H II regions, reproduce well the mean electron spectrum inferred by Armstrong et al., if the relative rms density variation, >(n-n0)2<1/2/n0 is 0.125, where n0 is the mean density.

  7. Modulation of Core Turbulent Density Fluctuations by Large-Scale Neoclassical Tearing Mode Islands in the DIII-D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardóczi, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; Bañón Navarro, A.; Peebles, W. A.; Jenko, F.; McKee, G.

    2016-05-01

    We report the first observation of localized modulation of turbulent density fluctuations n ˜ (via beam emission spectroscopy) by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in the core of the DIII-D tokamak. NTMs are important as they often lead to severe degradation of plasma confinement and disruptions in high-confinement fusion experiments. Magnetic islands associated with NTMs significantly modify the profiles and turbulence drives. In this experiment n ˜ was found to be modulated by 14% across the island. Gyrokinetic simulations suggest that n ˜ could be dominantly driven by the ion temperature gradient instability.

  8. Modulation of Core Turbulent Density Fluctuations by Large-Scale Neoclassical Tearing Mode Islands in the DIII-D Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Bardóczi, L; Rhodes, T L; Carter, T A; Bañón Navarro, A; Peebles, W A; Jenko, F; McKee, G

    2016-05-27

    We report the first observation of localized modulation of turbulent density fluctuations n[over ˜] (via beam emission spectroscopy) by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in the core of the DIII-D tokamak. NTMs are important as they often lead to severe degradation of plasma confinement and disruptions in high-confinement fusion experiments. Magnetic islands associated with NTMs significantly modify the profiles and turbulence drives. In this experiment n[over ˜] was found to be modulated by 14% across the island. Gyrokinetic simulations suggest that n[over ˜] could be dominantly driven by the ion temperature gradient instability.

  9. Ultra-high current density thin-film Si diode

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi

    2008-04-22

    A combination of a thin-film .mu.c-Si and a-Si:H containing diode structure characterized by an ultra-high current density that exceeds 1000 A/cm.sup.2, comprising: a substrate; a bottom metal layer disposed on the substrate; an n-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited the bottom metal layer; an i-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited on the n-layer; a buffer layer of a-Si:H deposited on the i-layer, a p-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited on the buffer layer; and a top metal layer deposited on the p-layer.

  10. Identifying Distinguishing Characteristics of Secondary Pyroclastic Density Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isom, S. L.; Brand, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are ground-hugging mixtures of volcanic particles and gas that travel down the slopes of erupting volcanoes. The combination of high velocities, high bulk densities (due to particles in the current) and high temperatures make PDCs the most dangerous and deadly hazard associated with explosive volcanism. Secondary explosive phenomenon associated with PDCs, such as inland-directed surges (e.g., Montserrat, 2003) and phreatic explosions (e.g., Mt St Helens 1980) can increase the area affected and duration of the hazard. However, little work has been done on distinguishing the deposits of secondary explosive phenomenon from primary phenomenon. Samples have been acquired from the 1980 Mt St Helens phreatic explosion crater deposits and the 2003 eruptive event at Montserrat where a PDC flowed into the ocean, causing an inland-directed surge (Edmonds and Herd, 2005. Geology 33.4:245-248). The samples will be analyzed via depositional characteristics, granulometry, componentry, microscopic analysis and scanning electron microscope imaging. We hypothesize that thermal cracking or vesicle distortion (e.g., compression or hindered expansion) may occur in hot pyroclasts that enter a body of water, leading to a difference between the ash textures of primary PDCs, phreatic surges and inland-directed surge deposits. Analyzing granulometry and componentry from parent flows and secondary flows may also reveal distinguishing characteristics that will allow us to constrain differences in segregation mechanisms of particles for each phenomenon. Determining distinguishing depositional characteristics of these secondary phenomena is important for assessing their occurrence during past eruptions and identifying conditions conducive to the formation of secondary explosions. This will result in the ability to make more accurate hazard maps for volcanoes prone to explosive activity.

  11. Sparse imaging of cortical electrical current densities via wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ke; Zhu, Min; Ding, Lei; Valette, Sébastien; Zhang, Wenbo; Dickens, Deanna

    2012-11-01

    While the cerebral cortex in the human brain is of functional importance, functions defined on this structure are difficult to analyze spatially due to its highly convoluted irregular geometry. This study developed a novel L1-norm regularization method using a newly proposed multi-resolution face-based wavelet method to estimate cortical electrical activities in electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) inverse problems. The proposed wavelets were developed based on multi-resolution models built from irregular cortical surface meshes, which were realized in this study too. The multi-resolution wavelet analysis was used to seek sparse representation of cortical current densities in transformed domains, which was expected due to the compressibility of wavelets, and evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations. The EEG/MEG inverse problems were solved with the use of the novel L1-norm regularization method exploring the sparseness in the wavelet domain. The inverse solutions obtained from the new method using MEG data were evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations too. The present results indicated that cortical current densities could be efficiently compressed using the proposed face-based wavelet method, which exhibited better performance than the vertex-based wavelet method. In both simulations and auditory experimental data analysis, the proposed L1-norm regularization method showed better source detection accuracy and less estimation errors than other two classic methods, i.e. weighted minimum norm (wMNE) and cortical low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (cLORETA). This study suggests that the L1-norm regularization method with the use of face-based wavelets is a promising tool for studying functional activations of the human brain.

  12. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Measurement of Velocity and Density Fluctuation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, Jayanta; Elam, Kristie A.

    2002-01-01

    A new molecular Rayleigh scattering based flow diagnostic is used for the first time to measure the power spectrum of gas density and radial velocity component in the plumes of high speed jets. The technique is based on analyzing the Rayleigh scattered light with a Fabry-Perot interferometer used in the static, imaging mode. The PC based data acquisition system is capable of simultaneous sampling of velocity and density at rates to 100 kHz and data record lengths to 10 million. Velocity and density power spectra and velocity-density cross spectra are presented for a subsonic jet, an underexpanded screeching jet, and for Mach 1.4 and Mach 1.8 supersonic jets. Software and hardware interfaces were developed to allow computer control of all aspects of the experiment and data acquisition.

  13. IPS activity observed as a precursor of solar induced terrestrial activity. [solar wind density fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronyn, W. M.; Shawhan, S. D.; Rickard, J. J.; Mitchell, D. G.; Roelof, E. C.; Gotwols, B. L.

    1978-01-01

    A radio telescope designed to exploit the interplanetary scintillation (IPS) technique and locate, map, and track solar wind disturbances which result in geomagnetic disturbances, thereby providing a forecast capability, is described. Preliminary results from operation of the telescope include: (1) evidence for a precursor signal in the IPS activity with a 1-2 day lead time with respect to density enhancements which frequently give rise to geomagnetic activity; (2) detection of a spectral broadening signature which also serves as a precursor of geomagnetic activity; (3) out-of-the-ecliptic plasma density enhancements which were not detected by near-Earth, ecliptic plane spacecraft; (4) detection of 12 corotating density enhancements;(5) detection of over 80 sources which give detectable scintillation of which 45 have been used for detailed synoptic analysis and 9 for spectral analysis; and (6) measurement of 0-lag coefficient of 0.56 between density and IPS activity enhancements.

  14. High current density sheet-like electron beam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow-Miller, Cora; Korevaar, Eric; Schuster, John

    Sheet electron beams are very desirable for coupling to the evanescent waves in small millimeter wave slow-wave circuits to achieve higher powers. In particular, they are critical for operation of the free-electron-laser-like Orotron. The program was a systematic effort to establish a solid technology base for such a sheet-like electron emitter system that will facilitate the detailed studies of beam propagation stability. Specifically, the effort involved the design and test of a novel electron gun using Lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) as the thermionic cathode material. Three sets of experiments were performed to measure beam propagation as a function of collector current, beam voltage, and heating power. The design demonstrated its reliability by delivering 386.5 hours of operation throughout the weeks of experimentation. In addition, the cathode survived two venting and pump down cycles without being poisoned or losing its emission characteristics. A current density of 10.7 A/sq cm. was measured while operating at 50 W of ohmic heating power. Preliminary results indicate that the nearby presence of a metal plate can stabilize the beam.

  15. Local Density Fluctuations Predict Photoisomerization Quantum Yield of Azobenzene-Modified DNA.

    PubMed

    Kingsland, Addie; Samai, Soumyadyuti; Yan, Yunqi; Ginger, David S; Maibaum, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Azobenzene incorporated into DNA has a photoisomerization quantum yield that depends on the DNA sequence near the azobenzene attachment site. We use Molecular Dynamics computer simulations to elucidate which physical properties of the modified DNA determine the quantum yield. We show for a wide range of DNA sequences that the photoisomerization quantum yield is strongly correlated with the variance of the number of atoms in close proximity to the outer phenyl ring of the azobenzene group. We infer that quantum yield is controlled by the availability of fluctuations that enable the conformational change. We demonstrate that these simulations can be used as a qualitative predictive tool by calculating the quantum yield for several novel DNA sequences, and confirming these predictions using UV-vis spectroscopy. Our results will be useful for the development of a wide range of applications of photoresponsive DNA nanotechnology. PMID:27428569

  16. Efficient evaluation of neuron populations receiving colored-noise current based on a refractory density method.

    PubMed

    Chizhov, Anton V; Graham, Lyle J

    2008-01-01

    The expected firing probability of a stochastic neuron is approximated by a function of the expected subthreshold membrane potential, for the case of colored noise. We propose this approximation in order to extend the recently proposed white noise model [A. V. Chizhov and L. J. Graham, Phys. Rev. E 75, 011924 (2007)] to the case of colored noise, applying a refractory density approach to conductance-based neurons. The uncoupled neurons of a single population receive a common input and are dispersed by the noise. Within the framework of the model the effect of noise is expressed by the so-called hazard function, which is the probability density for a single neuron to fire given the average membrane potential in the presence of a noise term. To derive the hazard function we solve the Kolmogorov-Fokker-Planck equation for a mean voltage-driven neuron fluctuating due to colored noisy current. We show that a sum of both a self-similar solution for the case of slow changing mean voltage and a frozen stationary solution for fast changing mean voltage gives a satisfactory approximation for the hazard function in the arbitrary case. We demonstrate the quantitative effect of a temporal correlation of noisy input on the neuron dynamics in the case of leaky integrate-and-fire and detailed conductance-based neurons in response to an injected current step.

  17. Fluctuations, Linear Response, and Currents in Out-of-Equilibrium Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciliberto, S.; Gomez-Solano, R.; Petrosyan, A.

    2013-04-01

    In this review we discuss, from an experimental point of view, several concepts of statistical mechanics for systems that are out of equilibrium either because they are driven by external forces or because they are slowly relaxing toward equilibrium. We focus on the case where the mean injected energy is of the order of thermal fluctuations, which therefore cannot be neglected. We first introduce the main concepts of fluctuation theorems (FTs) for work and heat using measurements of (a) a harmonic oscillator driven out of equilibrium by an external force and (b) a colloidal particle trapped in a time-dependent double-well potential. We use the example of the Brownian particle to analyze the problem of the fluctuation-dissipation relation ( FDR ) in out-of-equilibrium systems. We next study the fluctuations of the position of a Brownian particle inside an aging gelatin after a fast quench. Using the experimental data of this experiment, we show that the mean heat flux is quantitatively related to the violation of the equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem or equivalently to the entropy production rate. Finally, we discuss briefly the problems and the new directions for the stochastic thermodynamics.

  18. Control of the current density profile with lower hybrid current drive on PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Chu, T.K.; Gettelfinger, G.; Greenough, N.; Hatcher, R.; Ignat, D.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kozub, T.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.; Sun, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Tighe, W.; Valeo, E.; von Goeler, S.; Blush, L.; Doerner, R.; Schmitz, L.; Tynan, G.; Dunlap, J.; England, A.; Harris, J.; Hirshman, S.; Isler, R.; Lee, D.; Jones, S.; Kesner, J.; Luckhardt, S.; Paoletti, F.; Levinton, F.; Timini, F.

    1993-07-01

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is being explored as a means to control the current density profile on PBX-M with the goal of raising the central safety factor q(O) to values of 1.5-2 to facilitate access to a full-volume second stable regime. Initial experiments have been conducted with up to 400 kW of 4.6 GHz LH power in circular and indented plasmas with modest parameters. A tangential-viewing two-dimensional hard x-ray imaging diagnostic has been used to observe the bremsstrahlung emission from the suprathermal electrons generated during LHCD. Hollow hard x-ray images have indicated off-axis localization of the driven current. A serious obstacle to the control of the current density profile with LHCD is the concomitant generation of MHD activity, which can seriously degrade the confinement of suprathermal electrons. By combining neutral beam injection with LHCD, an MHD-free condition has been obtained where q(O) is raised above 1.

  19. Radial current density effects on rotating magnetic field current drive in field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, R. A.; Gilli, M.; Farengo, R.

    2008-10-15

    Steady state solutions, suitable for field-reversed configurations (FRCs) sustained by rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) are obtained by properly including three-dimensional effects, in the limit of large FRC elongation, and the radial component of Ohm's law. The steady electrostatic potential, necessary to satisfy Ohm's law, is considered to be a surface function. The problem is analyzed at the midplane of the configuration and it is reduced to the solution of two coupled nonlinear differential equations for the real and imaginary parts of the phasor associated to the longitudinal component of the vector potential. Additional constraints are obtained by requesting that the steady radial current density and poloidal magnetic flux vanish at the plasma boundary which is set at the time-averaged separatrix. The results are presented in terms of the degree of synchronism of the electrons with the RMF and compared with those obtained when radial current effects are neglected. Three important differences are observed when compared with the case without radial current density. First, at low penetration of the RMF into the plasma there is a significant increase in the driven azimuthal current. Second, the RMF amplitude necessary to access the high synchronism regime, starting from low synchronism, is larger and the difference appears to increase as the separatrix to classical skin depth ratio increases. Third, the minimum RMF amplitude necessary to sustain almost full synchronism is reduced.

  20. Multichannel Microwave Interferometer for Simultaneous Measurement of Electron Density and its Fluctuation on HL-2A Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Peiwan; Shi, Zhongbing; Chen, Wei; Zhong, Wulyu; Yang, Zengchen; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Boyu; Li, Yonggao; Yu, Liming; Liu, Zetian; Ding, Xuantong

    2016-07-01

    A multichannel microwave interferometer system has been developed on the HL-2A tokomak. Its working frequency is well designed to avoid the fringe jump effect. Taking the structure of HL-2A into account, its antennas are installed in the horizontal direction, i.e. one launcher in high field side (HFS) and four receivers in low field side (LFS). The fan-shaped measurement area covers those regions where the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instabilities are active. The heterodyne technique contributes to its high temporal resolution (1 μs). It is possible for the multichannel system to realize simultaneous measurements of density and its fluctuation. The quadrature phase detection based on the zero-crossing method is introduced to density measurement. With this system, reliable line-averaged densities and density profiles are obtained. The location of the saturated internal kink mode can be figured out from the mode showing different intensities on four channels, and the result agrees well with that measured by electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI). supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB104002, 2013GB107002, 2014GB107001) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475058, 11475057, 11261140326, 11405049)

  1. Vibration effect on magnetization and critical current density of superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovchanskiy, Igor A.; Pan, Alexey V.; George, Jonathan; Wells, Frederick S.; Fedoseev, Sergey A.; Rozenfeld, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    In this work the effect of vibrations on critical current density (J c ) of superconductors has been studied. The vibrations are shown to affect J c of all types of superconductors during their measurements, employing a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Increasing vibration frequency (f) and/or amplitude (A) leads to progressive reduction of J c as a function of magnetic field (B a ). The effect of vibrations is substantially stronger in thin films. It leads to development of unexpected kinks on {J}c({B}a) curves. Analysis of magnetization loops and relaxation of magnetization in YBCO films revealed that the vibration effect can be treated as the effective reduction of pinning potential. The asymmetry of the vibration effect in ascending and descending B a is observed, indicating differences in free energy of the corresponding vortex structures. Thermal effects induced by vibrations with large f and A are shown to have rather insignificant influence, while the vibrational vortex dynamics exhibit a strong impact. The irreversibility field ({B}{{irr}}) is shown to be instrumentally defined, and its value depends on VSM settings. In addition, the practical importance of {B}{{irr}} for J c modeling is demonstrated.

  2. High-density matter: current status and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J. R.

    2015-05-01

    There are many fascinating processes in the Universe which we observe in more and more in detail thanks to increasingly sophisticated technology. One of the most interesting phenomena is the life cycle of stars, their birth, evolution and death. If the stars are massive enough, they end their lives in the core-collapse supernova explosion, the one of the most violent events in the Universe. As the result, the densest objects in the Universe, neutron stars and/or black holes are created. Naturally, the physical basis of these events should be understood in line with observation. The current status of our knowledge of processes in the life of stars is far from adequate for their true understanding. We show that although many models have been constructed their detailed ability to describe observations is limited or non-existent. Furthermore the general failure of all models means that we cannot tell which are heading in the right direction. A possible way forward in modeling of high-density matter is outlined, exemplified by the quark-meson-coupling model (QMC). This model has a natural explanation for the saturation of nuclear forces and depends on very few adjustable parameters, strongly constrained by the underlying physics. Latest QMC results for compact objects and finite nuclei are presented.

  3. Flux pinning in high-current-density superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Freyhardt, H.

    1983-05-01

    A major application of superconducting wire materials is the generation of magnetic fields, often in large volumes, with particular strenth, homogeneity, and field gradients. To fabricate superconductors which can carry high current densities at high temperatures and fields, flux pinning, by crystal inhomogeneities, must be understood. This paper attempts to answer two questions about flux pinning. The first addresses the nature and strenght of the elementary interaction force (f) between one flux line (FL) and one obstacle; the second, the correct summation of these elementary interactions between the obstacles in a unit volume and the FL to the (total) volume pinning force F /SUB v/ = B X J /SUB c/ . The discussion is confined to NbTi and A15 superconductors such as Nb/sub 3/Sn and V/sub 3/Ga. Important pinning sites in these superconductors are dislocation walls, precipitates, small inclusions, voids, grain boundaries, and bubbles. A series of mathematical models which have been used in the past are presented and synthesized into a more sophisticated explanation of pinning.

  4. Modeling Spin Fluctuations and Magnetic Excitations from Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorni, Tommaso; Timrov, Iurii; Dal Corso, Andrea; Baroni, Stefano

    Harnessing spin fluctuations and magnetic excitations in materials is key in many fields of technology, spanning from memory devices to information transfer and processing, to name but a few. A proper understanding of the interplay between collective and single-particle spin excitations is still lacking, and it is expected that first-principle simulations based on TDDFT may shed light on this interplay, as well as on the role of important effects such as relativistic ones and related magnetic anisotropies. All the numerical approaches proposed so far to tackle this problem are based on the computationally demanding solution of the Sternheimer equations for the response orbitals or the even more demanding solution of coupled Dyson equations for the spin and charge susceptibilities. The Liouville-Lanczos approach to TDDFT has already proven to be a valuable alternative, the most striking of its features being the avoidance of sums over unoccupied single-particle states and the frequency-independence of the main numerical bottleneck. In this work we present an extension of this methodology to magnetic systems and its implementation in the Quantum ESPRESSO distribution, together with a few preliminary results on the magnon dispersions in bulk Fe.

  5. Evidence for selection maintaining MHC diversity in a rodent species despite strong density fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Andrea C; Herde, Antje; Mazzoni, Camila J; Eccard, Jana A; Sommer, Simone

    2016-07-01

    Strong spatiotemporal variation in population size often leads to reduced genetic diversity limiting the adaptive potential of individual populations. Key genes of adaptive variation are encoded by the immune genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) playing an essential role in parasite resistance. How MHC variation persists in rodent populations that regularly experience population bottlenecks remains an important topic in evolutionary genetics. We analysed the consequences of strong population fluctuations on MHC class II DRB exon 2 diversity in two distant common vole (Microtus arvalis) populations in three consecutive years using a high-throughput sequencing approach. In 143 individuals, we detected 25 nucleotide alleles translating into 14 unique amino acid MHC alleles belonging to at least three loci. Thus, the overall allelic diversity and amino acid distance among the remaining MHC alleles, used as a surrogate for the range of pathogenic antigens that can be presented to T-cells, are still remarkably high. Both study populations did not show significant population differentiation between years, but significant differences were found between sites. We concluded that selection processes seem to be strong enough to maintain moderate levels of MHC diversity in our study populations outcompeting genetic drift, as the same MHC alleles were conserved between years. Differences in allele frequencies between populations might be the outcome of different local parasite pressures and/or genetic drift. Further understanding of how pathogens vary across space and time will be crucial to further elucidate the mechanisms maintaining MHC diversity in cyclic populations. PMID:27225422

  6. The Critical Current Density in High Critical Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Suvankar

    Critical current density, j_{ rm c}, is an important parameter for determining the usefulness. This work focuses on the understanding of various phenomena related to the j_{ rm c} in type II superconductor. Various methods to enhance j_{rm c} by introducing pinning are also considered. In particular, the effect of secondary phase addition and mechanical treatment on the microstructure and j _{rm c} of various high T _{rm c} superconducting system is investigated. Fine inclusions (<0.1 μm) can be introduced by secondary phase additions. An enhancement in j_{ rm c} is always observed associated with the presence of fine inclusions. These cavities are found to interact strongly with flux lines in a high T _{rm c} superconductor. However, the cavities are found ineffective to pin a large number of flux lines. Dislocations and other structural defects are introduced by consolidating Bi_2Sr _2CaCu_2O _{rm x} by hot isotatically pressing (HIP). Samples HIPed for 15 min. contained a high density of dislocations and showed a substantial higher j_{rm c} than the samples HIPed for 45 min. and 120 min., where most of the dislocations were annihilated during the recovery process. Various methods of determining the irreversibility line are also considered. Using the criterion of a constant j_{rm c}, the irreversibility line obtained from magnetic hysteresis measurements was found to improve with the enhancement of flux pinning and reduction of interlayer spacing. The results can be best explained by the model proposed by Kim et al (1) and Clem (2). Magnetic relaxation of various type II superconductors is also reported. The non-logarithmic of decay of magnetization can be understood by assuming a non-linear U-j relationship. A method to extract U-j relationship from magnetic relaxation experiments is also developed. The effect of flux pinning on the U-j relationship is also investigated. Melt-processed YBa_2Cu _3O_{rm x} samples with strong levitation force are also fabricated

  7. Structure of Dilute Pyroclastic Density Currents During Transport, Buoyancy Reversal and Liftoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Scaled laboratory experiments provide insight into structure, entrainment and liftoff in pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). Experiments are conducted in a 8.5×6.1×2.6 m air-filled tank and comprise turbulently suspended mixtures of heated 20-μm talc particles introduced to the tank at steady and sustained rates; the tank is large enough that the currents are effectively unconfined. Experiments are scaled with bulk (densimetric and thermal Richardson numbers, Froude number) and turbulent (Stokes and settling numbers) parameters dynamically similar to natural currents. The Reynolds numbers of experiments are smaller than those of natural PDCs, but analysis of the experiments demonstrates that they are fully turbulent. Red, green, and blue laser sheets illuminate orthogonal planes within the currents for imaging and recording with HD video cameras; those data are reprojected into cross-sectional and map-view planes for analysis of turbulent velocity fields and fluctuations in particle concentration. A green laser sheet can be swept through the tank at 60 Hz and imaged with a high-speed CCD camera at up to 3000 fps; sequences of 60-300 images are used to make 3D volumetric reconstructions of the currents at up to 10 Hz. Currents typically comprise a lower "bypass" region and an upper entraining region that turbulently mixes with the ambient air. The bypass region is generally about half of the total current thickness and moves faster than the overlying, entraining region. The bypass region controls runout distance and steadiness of currents. If turbulent structures in the entraining region penetrate through the bypass region, the trailing portion of the current can stall before resuming forward progress; thus a single, "steady" current can generate multiple currents. When a current lifts off, it focuses along a narrow axis beneath the rising (coignimbrite) plume. At that time, ambient air entrainment occurs primarily through the lateral margins of the narrow

  8. Small-scale plasma, magnetic, and neutral density fluctuations in the nightside Venus ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Hoegy, W.R.; Brace, L.H.; Kasprazak, W.T. ); Russell, C.T. )

    1990-04-01

    Pioneer Venus orbiter measurements have shown that coherent small-scale waves exist in the electron density, the electron temperature, and the magnetic field in the lower ionosphere of Venus just downstream of the solar terminator (Brace et al., 1983). The waves become less regular and less coherent at larger solar zenith angles, and Brace et al. suggested that these structures may have evolved from the terminator waves as they are convected into the nightside ionosphere, driven by the day-to-night plasma pressure gradient. In this paper the authors describe the changes in wave characteristics with solar zenith angle and show that the neutral gas also has related wave characteristics, probably because of atmospheric gravity waves. The plasma pressure exceeds the magnetic pressure in the nightside ionosphere at these altitudes, and thus the magnetic field is carried along and controlled by the turbulent motion of the plasma, but the wavelike nature of the thermosphere may also be coupled to the plasma and magnetic structure. They show that there is a significant coherence between the ionosphere, thermosphere, and magnetic parameters at altitudes below about 185 km, a coherence which weakens in the antisolar region. The electron temperature and density are approximately 180{degree} out of phase and consistently exhibit the highest correlation of any pair of variables. Waves in the electron and neutral densities are moderately correlated on most orbits, but with a phase difference that varies within each orbit. The average electron temperature is higher when the average magnetic field is more horizontal; however, the correlation between temperature and dip angle does not extend to individual wave structures observed within a satellite pass, particularly in the antisolar region.

  9. Realizing life-scalable experimental pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, S. J.; Lube, G.; Breard, E.; Jones, J.; Valentine, G.; Freundt, A.; Hort, M. K.; Bursik, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Pyroclastic Density Currents (PDCs) - the most deadly threat from volcanoes - are extremely hot, ground-hugging currents of rock fragments and gas that descend slopes at hundreds of kilometers per hour. These hostile flows are impossible to internally measure, thus volcanologists are persistently blocked in efforts to realistically forecast their internal mechanics and hazards. Attempts to fill this gap via laboratory-scale experiments continue to prove difficult, because they usually mismatch the dynamic and kinematic scaling of real-world flows by several orders of magnitude. In a multi-institutional effort, the first large-scale pyroclastic flow generator that can synthesize repeatable hot high-energy gas-particle mixture flows in safety has been commissioned in New Zealand. The final apparatus stands 15 m high, consisting of a tower/elevator system; an instrumented hopper that can hold >6000 kg (or 3.2 m3) of natural volcanic materials, which can be discharged at a range of controlled rates onto an instrumented, variably inclinable (6-25°) glass-sided chute for examining the vertical profiles of PDCs in motion. The use of rhyolitic pyroclastic material from the 1800 AD Taupo Eruption (with its natural grain-size, sorting and shape characteristics) and gas ensures natural coupling between the solids and fluid phases. PDC analogues with runout of >15 meters and flow depths of 1.5-6 meters are created by generating variably heated falling columns of natural volcanic particles (50-1300 kg/s), dispersed and aerated to controlled particle densities between 3 and 60 vol.% at the base of the elevated hopper. The descending columns rapidly generate high-velocity flows (up to 14 m/s) once impacting on the inclined channel, reproducing many features of natural flows, including segregation into dense and dilute regimes, progressive aggradational and en masse deposition of particles and the development of high internal gas-pore-pressures during flow. The PDC starting

  10. On the mode-coupling treatment of collective density fluctuations for quantum liquids: para-hydrogen and normal liquid helium.

    PubMed

    Kletenik-Edelman, Orly; Reichman, David R; Rabani, Eran

    2011-01-28

    A novel quantum mode coupling theory combined with a kinetic approach is developed for the description of collective density fluctuations in quantum liquids characterized by Boltzmann statistics. Three mode-coupling approximations are presented and applied to study the dynamic response of para-hydrogen near the triple point and normal liquid helium above the λ-transition. The theory is compared with experimental results and to the exact imaginary time data generated by path integral Monte Carlo simulations. While for liquid para-hydrogen the combination of kinetic and quantum mode-coupling theory provides semi-quantitative results for both short and long time dynamics, it fails for normal liquid helium. A discussion of this failure based on the ideal gas limit is presented. PMID:21280769

  11. On the mode-coupling treatment of collective density fluctuations for quantum liquids: para-hydrogen and normal liquid helium.

    PubMed

    Kletenik-Edelman, Orly; Reichman, David R; Rabani, Eran

    2011-01-28

    A novel quantum mode coupling theory combined with a kinetic approach is developed for the description of collective density fluctuations in quantum liquids characterized by Boltzmann statistics. Three mode-coupling approximations are presented and applied to study the dynamic response of para-hydrogen near the triple point and normal liquid helium above the λ-transition. The theory is compared with experimental results and to the exact imaginary time data generated by path integral Monte Carlo simulations. While for liquid para-hydrogen the combination of kinetic and quantum mode-coupling theory provides semi-quantitative results for both short and long time dynamics, it fails for normal liquid helium. A discussion of this failure based on the ideal gas limit is presented.

  12. Hazards from pyroclastic density currents at Mt. Etna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behncke, Boris

    2009-03-01

    Despite the recent recognition of Mount Etna as a periodically violently explosive volcano, the hazards from various types of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) have until now received virtually no attention at this volcano. Large-scale pyroclastic flows last occurred during the caldera-forming Ellittico eruptions, 15-16 ka ago, and the risk of them occurring in the near future is negligible. However, minor PDCs can affect much of the summit area and portions of the upper flanks of the volcano. During the past ~ 20 years, small pyroclastic flows or base-surge-like vapor and ash clouds have occurred in at least 8 cases during summit eruptions of Etna. Four different mechanisms of PDC generation have been identified during these events: (1) collapse of pyroclastic fountains (as in 2000 and possibly in 1986); (2) phreatomagmatic explosions resulting from mixing of lava with wet rock (2006); (3) phreatomagmatic explosions resulting from mixing of lava with thick snow (2007); (4) disintegration of the unstable flanks of a lava dome-like structure growing over the rim of one of the summit craters (1999). All of these recent PDCs were of a rather minor extent (maximum runout lengths were about 1.5 km in November 2006 and March 2007) and thus they represented no threat for populated areas and human property around the volcano. Yet, events of this type pose a significant threat to the lives of people visiting the summit area of Etna, and areas in a radius of 2 km from the summit craters should be off-limits anytime an event capable of producing similar PDCs occurs. The most likely source of further PDCs in the near future is the Southeast Crater, the youngest, most active and most unstable of the four summit craters of Etna, where 6 of the 8 documented recent PDCs originated. It is likely that similar hazards exist in a number of volcanic settings elsewhere, especially at snow- or glacier-covered volcanoes and on volcano slopes strongly affected by hydrothermal alteration.

  13. Clast comminution during pyroclastic density current transport: Mt St Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, B.; Brand, B. D.; Dufek, J.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic clasts within pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) tend to be more rounded than those in fall deposits. This rounding reflects degrees of comminution during transport, which produces an increase in fine-grained ash with distance from source (Manga, M., Patel, A., Dufek., J. 2011. Bull Volcanol 73: 321-333). The amount of ash produced due to comminution can potentially affect runout distance, deposit sorting, the volume of ash lofted into the upper atmosphere, and increase internal pore pressure (e.g., Wohletz, K., Sheridan, M. F., Brown, W.K. 1989. J Geophy Res, 94, 15703-15721). For example, increased pore pressure has been shown to produce longer runout distances than non-comminuted PDC flows (e.g., Dufek, J., and M. Manga, 2008. J. Geophy Res, 113). We build on the work of Manga et al., (2011) by completing a pumice abrasion study for two well-exposed flow units from the May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mt St Helens (MSH). To quantify differences in comminution from source, sampling and the image analysis technique developed in Manga et al., 2010 was completed at distances proximal, medial, and distal from source. Within the units observed, data was taken from the base, middle, and pumice lobes within the outcrops. Our study is unique in that in addition to quantifying the degree of pumice rounding with distance from source, we also determine the possible range of ash sizes produced during comminution by analyzing bubble wall thickness of the pumice through petrographic and SEM analysis. The proportion of this ash size is then measured relative to the grain size of larger ash with distance from source. This allows us to correlate ash production with degree of rounding with distance from source, and determine the fraction of the fine ash produced due to comminution versus vent-fragmentation mechanisms. In addition we test the error in 2D analysis by completing a 3D image analysis of selected pumice samples using a Camsizer. We find that the roundness of PDC

  14. Strong Magnetic Field Fluctuations within Filamentary Auroral Density Cavities Interpreted as VLF Saucer Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, D. L.; Kabirzadeh, R.; Burchill, J. K.; Pfaff, Robert F.; Wallis, D. D.; Bounds, S. R.; Clemmons, J. H.; Pincon, J.-L.

    2012-01-01

    The Geoelectrodynamics and Electro-Optical Detection of Electron and SuprathermalIon Currents (GEODESIC) sounding rocket encountered more than 100 filamentary densitycavities associated with enhanced plasma waves at ELF (3 kHz) and VLF (310 kHz)frequencies and at altitudes of 800990 km during an auroral substorm. These cavities weresimilar in size (20 m diameter in most cases) to so-called lower-hybrid cavities (LHCs)observed by previous sounding rockets and satellites; however, in contrast, many of theGEODESIC cavities exhibited up to tenfold enhancements in magnetic wave powerthroughout the VLF band. GEODESIC also observed enhancements of ELF and VLFelectric fields both parallel and perpendicular to the geomagnetic field B0 within cavities,though the VLF E field increases were often not as large proportionally as seen in themagnetic fields. This behavior is opposite to that predicted by previously published theoriesof LHCs based on passive scattering of externally incident auroral hiss. We argue thatthe GEODESIC cavities are active wave generation sites capable of radiating VLF wavesinto the surrounding plasma and producing VLF saucers, with energy supplied by cold,upward flowing electron beams composing the auroral return current. This interpretation issupported by the observation that the most intense waves, both inside and outside cavities,occurred in regions where energetic electron precipitation was largely inhibited orabsent altogether. We suggest that the wave-enhanced cavities encountered by GEODESICwere qualitatively different from those observed by earlier spacecraft because of thefortuitous timing of the GEODESIC launch, which placed the payload at apogee within asubstorm-related return current during its most intense phase, lasting only a few minutes.

  15. X-Ray Fluctuation Power Spectral Densities of Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, A.; Edelson, R.; Vaughan, S.; Uttley, P.; George, I. M.; Griffiths, R. E.; Kaspi, S.; Lawrence, A.; McHandy, I.; Nandra, K.

    2003-01-01

    By combining complementary monitoring observations spanning long, medium and short time scales, we have constructed power spectral densities (PSDs) of six Seyfert 1 galaxies. These PSDs span approx. greater than 4 orders of magnitude in temporal frequency, sampling variations on time scales ranging from tens of minutes to over a year. In at least four cases, the PSD shows a "break," a significant departure from a power law, typically on time scales of order a few days. This is similar to the behavior of Galactic X-ray binaries (XRBs), lower mass compact systems with breaks on time scales of seconds. NGC 3783 shows tentative evidence for a doubly-broken power law, a feature that until now has only been seen in the (much better-defined) PSDs of low-state XRBs. It is also interesting that (when one previously-observed object is added to make a small sample of seven), an apparently significant correlation is seen between the break time scale T and the putative black hole mass M(sub BH), while none is seen between break time scale and luminosity. The data are consistent with the linear relation T = M(sub BH) /10(exp 6.5) solar mass; extrapolation over 6-7 orders of magnitude is in reasonable agreement with XRBs. All of this strengthens the case for a physical similarity between Seyfert 1s and XRBs.

  16. The role of magnetic islands in modifying long range temporal correlations of density fluctuations and local heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Milligen, B. Ph.; Estrada, T.; García, L.; López Bruna, D.; Carreras, B. A.; Xu, Y.; Ochando, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Reynolds-Barredo, J. M.; López Fraguas, A.; the TJ-II Team

    2016-01-01

    This work explores the relation between magnetic islands, long range temporal correlations and heat transport. A low order rational surface ({\\rlap- \\iota}=3/2 ) was purposely scanned outward through an electron cyclotron resonance heated (ECRH) plasma in the TJ-II stellarator. Density turbulence and the poloidal flow velocity were characterized using a two channel Doppler reflectometer. Simultaneously, the ECRH power was modulated to characterize heat transport, using measurements from a 12 channel electron cyclotron emission diagnostic. A systematic variation of the poloidal velocity was found to be associated with the {\\rlap- \\iota}=3/2 rational surface. Near the rational surface, the Hurst exponent, quantifying the nature of long-range correlations, was reduced below 0.5 (indicating subdiffusion), while at radii smaller than that of the rational surface, it was found to be significantly enhanced (superdiffusion). In the latter region, heat transport was enhanced as well, thus establishing a link between density fluctuations and anomalous heat transport. The observed variation of the Hurst exponent was consistent with a magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulation.

  17. Long-term evolution in the global distribution of solar wind speed and density fluctuations during 1997-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Kojima, Masayoshi; Fujiki, Ken'ichi

    2012-06-01

    Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations made with the 327-MHz multistation system of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL) are analyzed to investigate the global distribution of solar wind speed and density fluctuations (ΔNe) and their evolution during 1997-2009. This study aims at elucidating the evolution of ΔNe distribution during the cycle 23 and subsequent extended minimum, which is useful for improving understanding of the heliospheric response to the peculiar solar activity. The computer-assisted tomography (CAT) method is used in the present study to deconvolve the line-of-sight integration of STEL IPS observations. This CAT method enables retrieval of the quasi-stationary large-scale structure of the background solar wind. The results show that the high (low)-latitude region is dominated by reduced (enhanced) ΔNe plasma, being closely associated with the fast (slow) solar wind. The solar wind speed data show a distinct change with solar activity, and an excellent positive (negative) correlation is revealed between the fast (slow) wind area and the polar field strength of the Sun. In contrast, the ΔNe data do not show such a solar cycle variation, but instead reveal a significant increase in the fractional area of low-ΔNe region in 2004 preceded by a constant value with a small amount of fluctuation. This change is observed for all latitudes, distinctly after 2007 for low latitudes. Our finding is consistent with the long-term variation of the solar wind density revealed from in situ measurements at the Earth orbit, if ΔNe ∝ Ne (where Ne is the solar wind electron density), and also consistent with the coronal hole distribution during the last solar cycle. It is found that ΔNe is inversely correlated with the solar wind speed V. We obtain the best fit power law function ΔNe ∝ V-0.36±0.14 for V > 350 km/s, which is basically consistent with our earlier result. This fact suggests that the fractional density fluctuations

  18. Fourier transform magnetic resonance current density imaging (FT-MRCDI) from one component of magnetic flux density.

    PubMed

    Ider, Yusuf Ziya; Birgul, Ozlem; Oran, Omer Faruk; Arikan, Orhan; Hamamura, Mark J; Muftuler, L Tugan

    2010-06-01

    Fourier transform (FT)-based algorithms for magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) from one component of magnetic flux density have been developed for 2D and 3D problems. For 2D problems, where current is confined to the xy-plane and z-component of the magnetic flux density is measured also on the xy-plane inside the object, an iterative FT-MRCDI algorithm is developed by which both the current distribution inside the object and the z-component of the magnetic flux density on the xy-plane outside the object are reconstructed. The method is applied to simulated as well as actual data from phantoms. The effect of measurement error on the spatial resolution of the current density reconstruction is also investigated. For 3D objects an iterative FT-based algorithm is developed whereby the projected current is reconstructed on any slice using as data the Laplacian of the z-component of magnetic flux density measured for that slice. In an injected current MRCDI scenario, the current is not divergence free on the boundary of the object. The method developed in this study also handles this situation.

  19. Laboratory Study Of Magnetic Reconnection With A Density Asymmetry Across The Current Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Joseph; Yamada, Massaaki; Ji, Hantao; Meyers,, Clayton E.; Jara-Almonte,; Chen, Li-Jen

    2014-04-18

    The effects of an upstream density asymmetry on magnetic reconnection are studied systematically in a laboratory plasma. Despite a significant upstream density asymmetry of up to 10, the reconnecting magnetic field pro file is not signifi cantly changed. On the other hand, the out-of-plane magnetic field profile is considerably modified; it is almost bipolar in structure with the density asymmetry, as compared to the quadrupolar structure in the symmetric configuration. The in-plane ion flow pattern and the electrostatic potential pro file are also affected by the density asymmetry. Strong bulk electron heating is observed near the low-density-side separatrix together with electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range. The dependence of the ion outflow and reconnection electric field on the density asymmetry is measured and compared with theoretical expectations.

  20. Downslope Eulerian mean flow associated with high-frequency current fluctuations observed on the outer continental shelf and upper slope along the northeastern United States continental margin: implications for sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, B.

    1988-01-01

    Eulerian current measurements made 5-7 m above bottom at six stations along the United States east coast continental margin show a net downslope flow of 1-5 cm s-1. Although the scalar current speed decreases with water depth and toward the bottom, fluctuations in the cross-isobath flow were stronger and increasingly asymmetric near the bottom. Maximum downslope flow exceeded maximum upslope flow by a factor of two to three. The strength of the low-passed downslope flow was proportional to the upslope Reynolds flux of density as well as to the amplitude of the current fluctuations that have periods shorter than 30 h. These flow characteristics may be caused by differential vertical mixing in the bottom boundary layer where a stratified fluid flows upslope (unstable) and downslope (stable). The asymmetry in current strength clearly favors net downslope transport of sediments that move as bedload. ?? 1988.

  1. CdS-metal contact at higher current densities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.; Boeer, K. W.; Dussel, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the mechanisms by which a steady flow of current proceeds through the contact when an external voltage is applied. The main characteristics of current mechanisms are examined, giving attention to photoemission from the cathode, thermionic emission, minority-carrier extraction, and the tunneling of electrons. A high-field domain analysis is conducted together with experimental studies. Particular attention is given to the range in which tunneling predominates.

  2. Detection of discrete surface charge dynamics in GaAs-based nanowire through metal-tip-induced current fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masaki; Yin, Xiang; Kuroda, Ryota; Kasai, Seiya

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the detection of discrete charge dynamics of an electron trap in a GaAs-based nanowire surface through current fluctuation induced by a metallic scanning probe tip. An equivalent circuit model indicated that the charge state in the surface strongly reflects the channel potential when the local surface potential is fixed by the metal tip, which suggests that random charging and discharging dynamics of the trap appears as random telegraph signal (RTS) noise in the nanowire current. Experimental demonstration of the concept was carried out using a GaAs-based nanowire and an atomic force microscope (AFM) system with a conductive tip. We observed the RTS noise in the drain current and superposition of the Lorentzian component in the noise spectrum when the metal tip was in contact with the nanowire surface at specific positions. The obtained results indicate the possibility of detecting charge dynamics of the individual surface trap in semiconductor devices.

  3. Analysis of recoverable current from one component of magnetic flux density in MREIT and MRCDI.

    PubMed

    Park, Chunjae; Lee, Byung Il; Kwon, Oh In

    2007-06-01

    Magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) provides a current density image by measuring the induced magnetic flux density within the subject with a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) has been focused on extracting some useful information of the current density and conductivity distribution in the subject Omega using measured B(z), one component of the magnetic flux density B. In this paper, we analyze the map Tau from current density vector field J to one component of magnetic flux density B(z) without any assumption on the conductivity. The map Tau provides an orthogonal decomposition J = J(P) + J(N) of the current J where J(N) belongs to the null space of the map Tau. We explicitly describe the projected current density J(P) from measured B(z). Based on the decomposition, we prove that B(z) data due to one injection current guarantee a unique determination of the isotropic conductivity under assumptions that the current is two-dimensional and the conductivity value on the surface is known. For a two-dimensional dominating current case, the projected current density J(P) provides a good approximation of the true current J without accumulating noise effects. Numerical simulations show that J(P) from measured B(z) is quite similar to the target J. Biological tissue phantom experiments compare J(P) with the reconstructed J via the reconstructed isotropic conductivity using the harmonic B(z) algorithm.

  4. Investigations of LHW-plasma coupling and current drive at high density related to H-mode experiments in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, L.; Li, M. H.; Wei, W.; Kong, E. H.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Wang, S. L.; Xu, G. S.; Zhao, L. M.; Hu, H. C.; Jia, H.; Cheng, M.; Yang, Y.; Liu, L.; Zhao, H. L.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Goniche, M.; Amicucci, L.; Cesario, R.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Baek, S. G.; Parker, R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Paoletti, F.; Yang, C.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Zhao, Y. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Gao, X.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; the EAST Team

    2015-09-01

    Two important issues in achieving lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) high confinement plasma in EAST are to improve lower hybrid wave (LHW)-plasma coupling and to drive the plasma current at a high density. Studies in different configurations with different directions of toroidal magnetic field (Bt) show that the density near the antenna is affected by both the radial electric field induced by plasma without a LHW (Er_plasma) in the scrape off layer (SOL), and the radial electric field induced by LHW power (Er_LH) near the grill. Investigations indicate that Er  ×  Bt in the SOL leads to a different effect of configuration on the LHW-plasma coupling and Er_LH  ×  Bt accounts for the asymmetric density behaviour in the SOL observed in the experiments, where Er is the total radial electric field in the SOL. Modelling of parametric instability (PI), collisional absorption (CA) and scattering from density fluctuations (SDF) in the edge region, performed considering the parameters of high density LHCD experiments in EAST, has shown that these mechanisms could be responsible for the low current drive (CD) efficiency at high density. Radiofrequency probe spectra, useful for documenting PI occurrence, show sidebands whose amplitude in the case of the lithiated vacuum chamber is smaller than in the case of poor lithiation, consistently with growth rates from PI modeling of the respective reference discharges. Since strong lithiation is also expected to diminish the parasitic effect on the LHCD of the remaining possible mechanisms, this appears to be a useful method for improving LHCD efficiency at a high density.

  5. Ih Current Is Necessary to Maintain Normal Dopamine Fluctuations and Sleep Consolidation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo-Gomez, Alicia; Turiegano, Enrique; León, Yolanda; Molina, Isabel; Torroja, Laura; Canal, Inmaculada

    2012-01-01

    HCN channels are becoming pharmacological targets mainly in cardiac diseases. But apart from their well-known role in heart pacemaking, these channels are widely expressed in the nervous system where they contribute to the neuron firing pattern. Consequently, abolishing Ih current might have detrimental consequences in a big repertoire of behavioral traits. Several studies in mammals have identified the Ih current as an important determinant of the firing activity of dopaminergic neurons, and recent evidences link alterations in this current to various dopamine-related disorders. We used the model organism Drosophila melanogaster to investigate how lack of Ih current affects dopamine levels and the behavioral consequences in the sleep∶activity pattern. Unlike mammals, in Drosophila there is only one gene encoding HCN channels. We generated a deficiency of the DmIh core gene region and measured, by HPLC, levels of dopamine. Our data demonstrate daily variations of dopamine in wild-type fly heads. Lack of Ih current dramatically alters dopamine pattern, but different mechanisms seem to operate during light and dark conditions. Behaviorally, DmIh mutant flies display alterations in the rest∶activity pattern, and altered circadian rhythms. Our data strongly suggest that Ih current is necessary to prevent dopamine overproduction at dark, while light input allows cycling of dopamine in an Ih current dependent manner. Moreover, lack of Ih current results in behavioral defects that are consistent with altered dopamine levels. PMID:22574167

  6. Drought impact on water use efficiency and intra-annual density fluctuations in Erica arborea on Elba (Italy).

    PubMed

    Battipaglia, Giovanna; DE Micco, Veronica; Brand, Willi A; Saurer, Matthias; Aronne, Giovanna; Linke, Petra; Cherubini, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    Erica arborea (L) is a widespread Mediterranean species, able to cope with water stress and colonize semiarid environments. The eco-physiological plasticity of this species was evaluated by studying plants growing at two sites with different soil moistures on the island of Elba (Italy), through dendrochronological, wood-anatomical analyses and stable isotopes measurements. Intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs) were abundant in tree rings, and were identified as the key parameter to understand site-specific plant responses to water stress. Our findings showed that the formation of IADFs is mainly related to the high temperature, precipitation patterns and probably to soil water availability, which differs at the selected study sites. The recorded increase in the (13) C-derived intrinsic water use efficiency at the IADFs level was linked to reduced water loss rather than to increasing C assimilation. The variation in vessel size and the different absolute values of δ(18) O among trees growing at the two study sites underlined possible differences in stomatal control of water loss and possible differences in sources of water uptake. This approach not only helped monitor seasonal environmental differences through tree-ring width, but also added valuable information on E. arborea responses to drought and their ecological implications for Mediterranean vegetation dynamics.

  7. A Cutoff in the X-Ray Fluctuation Power Density Spectrum of the Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, Rick; Nandra, Kirpal

    1999-01-01

    During 1997 March-July, RXTE observed the bright, strongly variable Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516 once every approx. 12.8 hr for 4.5 months and nearly continuously (with interruptions due to SAA passage but not Earth occultation) for a 4.2 day period in the middle. These were followed by ongoing monitoring once every approx. 4.3 days. These data are used to construct the first well-determined X-ray fluctuation power density spectrum (PDS) of an active galaxy to span more than 4 decades of usable temporal frequency. The PDS shows no signs of any strict or quasi-periodicity, but does show a progressive flattening of the power-low slope from -1.74 at short time scales to -0.73 at longer time scales. This is the clearest observation to date of the long-predicted cutoff in the PDS. The characteristic variability time scale corresponding to this cutoff temporal frequency is approx. 1 month. Although it is unclear how this time scale may be interpreted in terms of a physical size or process, there are several promising candidate models. The PDS appears similar to those seen for Galactic black hole candidates such as Cyg X-1, suggesting that these two classes of objects with very different luminosities and putative black hole masses (differing by more than a factor of 10(exp 5)) may have similar X-ray generation processes and structures.

  8. Drought impact on water use efficiency and intra-annual density fluctuations in Erica arborea on Elba (Italy).

    PubMed

    Battipaglia, Giovanna; DE Micco, Veronica; Brand, Willi A; Saurer, Matthias; Aronne, Giovanna; Linke, Petra; Cherubini, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    Erica arborea (L) is a widespread Mediterranean species, able to cope with water stress and colonize semiarid environments. The eco-physiological plasticity of this species was evaluated by studying plants growing at two sites with different soil moistures on the island of Elba (Italy), through dendrochronological, wood-anatomical analyses and stable isotopes measurements. Intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs) were abundant in tree rings, and were identified as the key parameter to understand site-specific plant responses to water stress. Our findings showed that the formation of IADFs is mainly related to the high temperature, precipitation patterns and probably to soil water availability, which differs at the selected study sites. The recorded increase in the (13) C-derived intrinsic water use efficiency at the IADFs level was linked to reduced water loss rather than to increasing C assimilation. The variation in vessel size and the different absolute values of δ(18) O among trees growing at the two study sites underlined possible differences in stomatal control of water loss and possible differences in sources of water uptake. This approach not only helped monitor seasonal environmental differences through tree-ring width, but also added valuable information on E. arborea responses to drought and their ecological implications for Mediterranean vegetation dynamics. PMID:23848555

  9. Method for determining transport critical current densities and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, Ulf E. (Inventor); Strayer, Donald M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A contact-less method for determining transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductor material. A compressor having a hollow interior and a plunger for selectively reducing the free space area for distribution of the magnetic flux therein are formed of superconductor material. Analytical relationships, based upon the critical state model, Maxwell's equations and geometrical relationships define transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in terms of the initial trapped magnetic flux density and the ratio between initial and final magnetic flux densities whereby data may be reliably determined by means of the simple test apparatus for evaluating the current density and flux penetration depth.

  10. Average OH density in alternating current dielectric barrier discharge by laser-induced fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongliang; Feng, Chunlei; Gao, Liang; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-10-01

    The average OH density in atmospheric He-H2O(0.4%) needle-plate dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was measured by the asynchronous laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and the fluctuation of OH radical density was measured simultaneously to prove that the average OH density can be obtained by the asynchronous LIF technique. The evolution of the average OH density in four different discharge patterns, namely, negative barrier corona discharge, glow discharge, multi glow discharge, and streamer discharge, was studied, and it was found that the average OH density has an observable increase from corona discharge to streamer discharge. The main mechanism of OH production in the four different discharge patterns was analyzed. It was shown that the main mechanism of OH production in negative barrier corona discharge is electron direct collision dissociation, whereas in the other three discharge patterns the He metastable Penning ionization is the main process.

  11. Analysis of Current Fluctuation Due to Trap and Percolation Path in Nano-Scale Bulk FinFET.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyu-Bong; Shin, Jongmin; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2016-05-01

    An electron in the channel can be trapped into the trap inside gate oxide and detrapped into the channel, resulting in the fluctuation in drain current. To investigate the drain current fluctuation (ΔI(D)) caused by trapping/detrapping of an electron in 22 nm bulk FinFET, 3-D device simulation was performed extensively. The ΔI(D) is changed by changing the position of the trap in the gate oxide along the surface of fin body. In the bulk FinFET, the trap located near the center of side surface of the fin body gives the larger ΔI(D) compared to those of the traps located at the top center, top corner, and side bottom. At a fixed trap position, the shallower trap depth (x(T)) from the interface between the gate oxide and the fin body gives the lager ΔI(D). With decreasing fin width (W(fin)) and fin height (H(fin)), the ΔI(D) increases. Especially, decreasing H(fin) increases ΔI(D) significantly. As the trap is close to a percolation path, the ΔI(D) also increases. PMID:27483825

  12. Current Densities in speed analyzer with different symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Valdeblanquez, E.

    2006-12-04

    A comparative analysis of the currents in speed analyzer of speeds is made with different symmetries. Three kinds of symmetries are considered; plane, cylindrical and spherical. The analyzers considered are formed by threes electrodes, the selector grid, the discriminator and the collector. The selector grid has a negative potential and for the coulombian effect the space charge is formed with the ionic thermal bath. Using kinetic theory a strongly non linear differential equation is obtained which is solved by numerical calculation.

  13. Flow Transformation in Pyroclastic Density Currents: Entrainment and Granular Dynamics during the 2006 eruption of Tungurahua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J.; Benage, M. C.; Geist, D.; Harpp, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    Pyroclastic density currents are ground hugging flows composed of hot gases, fragments of juvenile magmatic material, and entrained clasts from the conduit or the edifice over which the flows have traveled. The interior of these flows are opaque to observation due to their large ash content, but recent investigations have highlighted that there are likely strong gradients in particle concentration and segregation of particle sizes in these particle-laden gravity currents. Pyroclastic density currents refer to a broad range of phenomena from dense flows in which the dynamics are dominated by frictional interaction between particles (dense granular flows), to gas fluidized flows, to dilute flows dominated by particle-gas turbulent interaction. However, abrupt flow transformation (e.g. from dense to dilute pyroclastic density currents) can arise due to energy exchange across multiple length scales and phases, and understanding these flow transformations is important in delineating the entrainment and erosion history of these flows, interpretations of their deposits, and in better understanding the hazards they present. During the 2006 eruption of Tungurahua, Ecuador numerous, dense pyroclastic density currents descended the volcano as result of boiling-over or low column collapse eruptions. The deposits of these flows typically have pronounced snouts and levees, and are often dominated by large, clasts (meter scale in some locations). There is an exceptional observational record of these flows and their deposits, permitting detailed field constraints of their dynamics. A particularly interesting set of flows occurred on Aug. 17, 2006 during the paroxysmal phase of the eruption that descended the slope of the volcano, filled in the river channel of the Chambo river, removing much of the larger clasts from the flow, and resulting in a dilute ';surge' that transported finer material across the channel and uphill forming dune features on the opposite bank of the river. We

  14. Topology of magnetic-field induced electron current density in the cubane molecule.

    PubMed

    Pelloni, Stefano; Lazzeretti, Paolo

    2008-05-21

    A spatial model of the electronic current density induced in the cubane molecule by applying an external magnetic-field has been constructed employing quantum mechanical methods at the Hartree-Fock level of accuracy. The topological features of the current density vector field are described via a stagnation graph that shows the isolated points and the lines at which the current vanishes. Shielding density maps based on the differential Biot-Savart law, along with a collection of current density maps, explain magnetic shielding at hydrogen and carbon nuclei, and virtual shielding at ring and cage centers. PMID:18500863

  15. Nonadiabatic analysis of the Josephson critical current influenced by quantum phase fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Geigenmueller, U. ); Ueda, M. Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Basic Research Laboratories, Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 342-01 )

    1994-10-01

    The influence of the electromagnetic environment on the dc Josephson current is studied allowing for nonadiabatic motion of the phase difference across a junction. The critical current is evaluated nonperturbatively within mean-field theory, fully taking into account the nonlocal kernels in the Ambegaokar-Eckern-Schoen effective action. It turns out that the adiabatic approximation, which can be justified when the superconducting energy gap exceeds the charging energy, yields [ital qualitatively] correct results even for the opposite case, although [ital quantitative] deviations from the adiabatic approximation are found to be substantial in some experimentally accessible regions.

  16. In-plane and transverse superconducting fluctuation diamagnetism in the presence of charge-density waves in 2H-NbSe2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, F.; Berger, H.; Cabo, L.; Carballeira, C.; Mosqueira, J.; Pavuna, D.; Vidal, F.

    2007-03-01

    The fluctuation-diamagnetism (FD) above the superconducting transition was measured in 2H-NbSe2 single crystals. The moderate uniaxial anisotropy of this compound, and some experimental improvements, allowed us to measure the superconducting fluctuation effects in the two main crystallographic directions. These results reveal that the nonlocal electrodynamic effects on the FD are highly anisotropic, and they also discard a possible contribution to the FD coming from the charge-density waves (CDWs) appearing below TCDW>TC in 2H-NbSe2 , in agreement with a phenomenological estimate.

  17. Current Fluctuations in a Semiconductor Quantum Dot with Large Energy Spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Heejun

    2014-12-01

    We report on the measurements of the current noise properties of electron tunneling through a split-gate GaAs quantum dot with large energy level spacing and a small number of electrons. Shot noise is full Poissonian or suppressed in the Coulomb-blockaded regime, while it is enhanced to show as super-Poissonian when an excited energy level is involved by finite source-drain bias. The results can be explained by multiple Poissonian processes through multilevel sequential tunneling.

  18. The origin of the long time correlations of the density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer of the Tore Supra Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Devynck, P.; Ghendrih, P.; Sarazin, Y.

    2005-05-15

    It is shown that intermittent density bursts observed in the scrape-off layer of Tore Supra [J. Jacquinot, Nucl. Fusion 43, 1583 (2003)] are detected in packs on the probe. In such a pack, typically two to three bursts are separated by time intervals smaller than the mean separation time. The long tails above 50 {mu}s observed on the autocorrelation function of the density fluctuations are found to be the temporal correlation between the individual bursts within their pack. Packs of density bursts can be detected in two limiting states of the turbulence: when the coupling between density and potential is strong and large density bursts split during their radial propagation or at the opposite when the coupling is weak so that different density bursts can propagate radially along the potential valleys. The lack of spatial resolution of the diagnostic does not allow to discriminate between the two mechanisms.

  19. The origin of the long time correlations of the density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer of the Tore Supra Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devynck, P.; Ghendrih, P.; Sarazin, Y.

    2005-05-01

    It is shown that intermittent density bursts observed in the scrape-off layer of Tore Supra [J. Jacquinot, Nucl. Fusion 43, 1583 (2003)] are detected in packs on the probe. In such a pack, typically two to three bursts are separated by time intervals smaller than the mean separation time. The long tails above 50μs observed on the autocorrelation function of the density fluctuations are found to be the temporal correlation between the individual bursts within their pack. Packs of density bursts can be detected in two limiting states of the turbulence: when the coupling between density and potential is strong and large density bursts split during their radial propagation or at the opposite when the coupling is weak so that different density bursts can propagate radially along the potential valleys. The lack of spatial resolution of the diagnostic does not allow to discriminate between the two mechanisms.

  20. Using intra annual density fluctuations and d13C to assess the impact of summer drought on Mediterranean ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battipaglia, G.; Brand, W. A.; Linke, P.; Schaefer, I.; Noetzli, M.; Cherubini, P.

    2009-04-01

    Tree- ring growth and wood density have been used extensively as indicators of climate change, and tree-ring has been commonly applied as a proxy estimate for seasonal integration of temperatures and precipitation with annual resolution (Hughes 2002). While these relationships have been well established in temperate ecosystems (Fritts, 1976; Schweingruber, 1988, Briffa et al., 1998, 2004), in Mediterranean region dendrochronological studies are still scarce (Cherubini et al, 2003). In Mediterranean environment, trees may form intra-annual density fluctuations, also called "false rings" or "double rings" (Tingley 1937; Schulman 1938). They are usually induced by sudden drought events, occurring during the vegetative period, and, allowing intra-annual resolution, they may provide detailed information at a seasonal level, as well as species-specific sensitivity to drought. We investigated the variability of tree- ring width and carbon stable isotopes of a Mediterranean species, Arbutus unedo L., sampled on Elba island, (Tuscany, Italy). The samples were taken at two different sites, one characterized by wet and one by dry conditions. d13C was measured using Laser- Ablation- Combustion -GC-IRMS. Here, we present first results showing the impact of drought on tree growth and on false ring formation at the different sites and we underline the importance of using Laser Ablation to infer drought impact at the intra -annual level. Briffa KR, Schweingruber FH, Jones PD, Osborn TJ, Harris IC, Shiyatov SG, Vaganov EA, Grudd H (1998) Trees tell of past climates: but are they speaking less clearly today? Phil Transact Royal Soc London 353:65-73 Briffa KR, Osborn TJ, Schweingruber FH (2004) Large-scale temperature inferences from tree rings: a review. Glob Panet Change 40:11-26 Cherubini, P., B.L. Gartner, R. Tognetti, O.U. Bräker, W. Schoch & J.L. Innes. 2003. Identification, measurement and interpretation of tree rings in woody species from Mediterranean climates. Biol. Rev

  1. Near-surface Density Currents Observed in the Southeast Pacific Stratocumulus-topped Marine Boundary Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbanks, Matt C.; Yuter, S. E.; de Szoeke, S.; Brewer, W. A.; Miller, Matthew A.; Hall, Andrew M.; Burleyson, Casey D.

    2015-09-01

    Density currents (i.e. cold pools or outflows) beneath marine stratocumulus clouds are characterized using a 30-d data set of ship-based observations obtained during the 2008 Variability of American Monsoon Systems (VAMOS) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) in the southeast Pacific. An objective method identifies 71 density current fronts using an air density criterion and isolates each density current’s core (peak density) and tail (dissipating) zone. Compared to front and core zones, most density current tails exhibited weaker density gradients and wind anomalies elongated about the axis of the mean wind. The mean cloud-level advection relative to the surface layer wind (1.9 m s-1) nearly matches the mean density current propagation speed (1.8 m s-1). The similarity in speeds allows drizzle cells to deposit tails in their wakes. Based on high-resolution scanning Doppler lidar data, prefrontal updrafts had a mean intensity of 0.91 m s-1, reached an average altitude of 800 m, and were often surmounted by low-lying shelf clouds not connected to the overlying stratocumulus cloud. Nearly 90% of density currents were identified when C-band radar estimated 30-km diameter areal average rain rates exceeded 1 mm d-1. Rather than peaking when rain rates are highest overnight, density current occurrence peaks between 0600 and 0800 local solar time when enhanced local drizzle co-occurs with shallow subcloud dry and stable layers. The dry layers may contribute to density current formation by enhancing subcloud evaporation of drizzle. Density currents preferentially occur in regions of open cells but also occur in regions of closed cells.

  2. Gain and loss as a function of current density and temperature in interband cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Merritt, C D; Bewley, W W; Kim, C S; Canedy, C L; Vurgaftman, I; Meyer, J R; Kim, M

    2015-11-01

    We characterize the internal efficiency, internal loss, and optical gain versus current density in 7-stage interband cascade lasers operating at λ=3.1 and 3.45 μm using a cavity-length study of the external differential quantum efficiency (EDQE) and threshold current density at temperatures between 300 and 345 K. We find that the pronounced efficiency droop of the EDQE at high current densities is primarily due to an increase in the internal loss rather than a reduction in the internal efficiency. On the other hand, if the current density J is fixed, the temperature variation of the EDQE at that J is due primarily to a decrease of the internal efficiency. The gain versus current density is fit well by a logarithmic relationship, although the magnitude of the experimental gain is >20% below the theoretical estimate.

  3. Non-perturbative calculation of molecular magnetic properties within current-density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tellgren, E. I. Lange, K. K.; Ekström, U.; Helgaker, T.; Teale, A. M.; Furness, J. W.

    2014-01-21

    We present a novel implementation of Kohn–Sham density-functional theory utilizing London atomic orbitals as basis functions. External magnetic fields are treated non-perturbatively, which enable the study of both magnetic response properties and the effects of strong fields, using either standard density functionals or current-density functionals—the implementation is the first fully self-consistent implementation of the latter for molecules. Pilot applications are presented for the finite-field calculation of molecular magnetizabilities, hypermagnetizabilities, and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants, focusing on the impact of current-density functionals on the accuracy of the results. Existing current-density functionals based on the gauge-invariant vorticity are tested and found to be sensitive to numerical details of their implementation. Furthermore, when appropriately regularized, the resulting magnetic properties show no improvement over standard density-functional results. An advantage of the present implementation is the ability to apply density-functional theory to molecules in very strong magnetic fields, where the perturbative approach breaks down. Comparison with high accuracy full-configuration-interaction results show that the inadequacies of current-density approximations are exacerbated with increasing magnetic field strength. Standard density-functionals remain well behaved but fail to deliver high accuracy. The need for improved current-dependent density-functionals, and how they may be tested using the presented implementation, is discussed in light of our findings.

  4. Effect of Circular p- n Junction Curvature on the Diode Current Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borblik, Vitalii

    2016-08-01

    The influence of the circular geometry of a p- n junction built into a nanowire or a nanorod, on the radial diode current density is investigated. While the current density from the core to the shell proves to be larger than that in a planar diode at the same values of the parameters, the density of the diode current from the shell to the core, on the contrary, proves to be smaller. A dependence of the effect on the core and the shell radii has been demonstrated. The nature of the effect is explained on the basis of radial distributions of the nonequilibrium current carriers.

  5. 3D Stationary electric current density in a spherical tumor treated with low direct current: an analytical solution.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Rolando Placeres; Pupo, Ana Elisa Bergues; Cabrales, Jesús Manuel Bergues; Joa, Javier Antonio González; Cabrales, Luis Enrique Bergues; Nava, Juan José Godina; Aguilera, Andrés Ramírez; Mateus, Miguel Angel O'Farril; Jarque, Manuel Verdecia; Brooks, Soraida Candida Acosta

    2011-02-01

    Electrotherapy with direct current delivered through implanted electrodes is used for local control of solid tumors in both preclinical and clinical studies. The aim of this research is to develop a solution method for obtaining a three-dimensional analytical expression for potential and electric current density as functions of direct electric current intensity, differences in conductivities between the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue, and length, number and polarity of electrodes. The influence of these parameters on electric current density in both media is analyzed. The results show that the electric current density in the tumor is higher than that in the surrounding healthy tissue for any value of these parameters. The conclusion is that the solution method presented in this study is of practical interest because it provides, in a few minutes, a convenient way to visualize in 3D the electric current densities generated by a radial electrode array by means of the adequate selection of direct current intensity, length, number, and polarity of electrodes, and the difference in conductivity between the solid tumor and its surrounding healthy tissue.

  6. Complexities of determining the Field-Aligned current density from LEO satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerloev, J. W.; Friel, M. M.; Ohtani, S.; Muhleisen, M.; Gjerloev, A. W.; Martin, P.; Barnes, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    We show results from a study of the field-aligned currents (FAC) as derived from SWARM magnetic field perturbations. We calculate the FAC density using four different techniques and explain why they provide different results. Theoretical work, simulations and data are used to show that widely used techniques can provide current density estimates with errors of 1000%. These errors can be explained by spatial gradients in the currents and temporal variability of the currents as well as a breakdown of other fundamental assumptions. We apply the techniques to auroral crossings with THEMIS ASI coverage and use the SWARM magnetic field observations to calculate the current density. Finally, we show how to estimate the errors in the current density calculations.

  7. Dynamic density and spin responses of a superfluid Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover: Path integral formulation and pair fluctuation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lianyi

    2016-10-01

    We present a standard field theoretical derivation of the dynamic density and spin linear response functions of a dilute superfluid Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover in both three and two dimensions. The derivation of the response functions is based on the elegant functional path integral approach which allows us to calculate the density-density and spin-spin correlation functions by introducing the external sources for the density and the spin density. Since the generating functional cannot be evaluated exactly, we consider two gapless approximations which ensure a gapless collective mode (Goldstone mode) in the superfluid state: the BCS-Leggett mean-field theory and the Gaussian-pair-fluctuation (GPF) theory. In the mean-field theory, our results of the response functions agree with the known results from the random phase approximation. We further consider the pair fluctuation effects and establish a theoretical framework for the dynamic responses within the GPF theory. We show that the GPF response theory naturally recovers three kinds of famous diagrammatic contributions: the Self-Energy contribution, the Aslamazov-Lakin contribution, and the Maki-Thompson contribution. We also show that unlike the equilibrium state, in evaluating the response functions, the linear (first-order) terms in the external sources as well as the induced order parameter perturbations should be treated carefully. In the superfluid state, there is an additional order parameter contribution which ensures that in the static and long wavelength limit, the density response function recovers the result of the compressibility (compressibility sum rule). We expect that the f-sum rule is manifested by the full number equation which includes the contribution from the Gaussian pair fluctuations. The dynamic density and spin response functions in the normal phase (above the superfluid critical temperature) are also derived within the Nozières-Schmitt-Rink (NSR) theory.

  8. Seasonal fluctuation of different edaphic microarthropod population densities in relation to soil moisture and temperature in a pine, Pinus kesiya Royle plantation ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. Vikram

    1984-03-01

    Seasonal fluctuations of soil and litter microarthropod populations in a pine, Pinus kesiya Royle plantation of North Eastern India were investigated between November 1976 and November 1977. Three major groups were recognized: (a) Collembola, (b) Acarina and (c) miscellaneous. Collembola was the most abundant group and was dominated by Isotoma trispinata (MacGillivray). The total microarthropod density ranged from 26,800 per m2 to 145,200 per m2. Collembola densities ranged from 10,000 to 121,200 per m2, Acarina densities ranged from 8,800 to 41,600 per m2, and the miscellaneous group ranged from 1,200 to 6,400 per m2. Soil moisture was positively correlated with total arthropod, Collembola and Acarina densities. Soil temperature was positively correlated only with Acarina. Densities of Collembola and Acarina were negatively correlated.

  9. Microstructural factors influencing critical-current densities of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Suenaga, M.

    1992-01-01

    Microstructural defects are the primary determining factors for the values of critical current densities in superconductors. A review is made to assess, (1) what would be the maximum achievable critical-current density in the oxide superconductors if nearly ideal pinning sites were introduced and (2) what types of pinning defects are currently introduced in these superconductors and how effective are these in pinning the vortices Only the case where the applied field is parallel to the c-axis is considered here.

  10. Microstructural factors influencing critical-current densities of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Suenaga, M.

    1992-12-31

    Microstructural defects are the primary determining factors for the values of critical current densities in superconductors. A review is made to assess, (1) what would be the maximum achievable critical-current density in the oxide superconductors if nearly ideal pinning sites were introduced? and (2) what types of pinning defects are currently introduced in these superconductors and how effective are these in pinning the vortices? Only the case where the applied field is parallel to the c-axis is considered here.

  11. Distribution of ion current density on a rotating spherical cap substrate during ion-assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Marushka, Viktor; Zabeida, Oleg Martinu, Ludvik

    2014-11-01

    The uniformity of ion density is critical for applications relying on the ion assisted deposition technique for the fabrication of the high quality thin films. The authors propose and describe here a method allowing one to calculate the ion density distribution on spherical substrate holders under stationary and rotating conditions for different positions of the ion source. The ion beam shape was approximated by a cos{sup n} function, and the ion current density was represented by a function inversely proportional to the distance from the ion source in accordance with our experimental results. As an example, a calculation of the current density distribution on the spherical cap substrate was performed for a broad beam ion source operated with an anode current of 3 A. The authors propose an approach for process optimization with respect to the ion source position and its inclination, in terms of uniformity and absolute value of the ion current density.

  12. Measurements of the cross-phase angle between density and electron temperature fluctuations and comparison with gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Carter, T. A.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L.; Holland, C. H.; Wang, G.; McKee, G. R.; Staebler, G. M.; Waltz, R. E.; DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Burrell, K. H.

    2010-05-15

    This paper presents new measurements of the cross-phase angle, alpha{sub n{sub eT{sub e}}}, between long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) density, n-tilde{sub e}, and electron temperature, T-tilde{sub e}, fluctuations in the core of DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] tokamak plasmas. The coherency and cross-phase angle between n-tilde{sub e} and T-tilde{sub e} are measured using coupled reflectometer and correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostics that view the same plasma volume. In addition to the experimental results, two sets of local, nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations that are performed with the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] are described. One set, called the pre-experiment simulations, was performed prior to the experiment in order to predict a change in alpha{sub n{sub eT{sub e}}} given experimentally realizable increases in the electron temperature, T{sub e}. In the experiment the cross-phase angle was measured at three radial locations (rho=0.55, 0.65, and 0.75) in both a 'Base' case and a 'High T{sub e}' case. The measured cross-phase angle is in good qualitative agreement with the pre-experiment simulations, which predicted that n-tilde{sub e} and T-tilde{sub e} would be out of phase. The pre-experiment simulations also predicted a decrease in cross-phase angle as T{sub e} is increased. Experimentally, this trend is observed at the inner two radial locations only. The second set of simulations, the postexperiment simulations, is carried out using local parameters taken from measured experimental profiles as input to GYRO. These postexperiment simulation results are in good quantitative agreement with the measured cross-phase angle, despite disagreements with transport fluxes. Directions for future modeling and experimental work are discussed.

  13. Spatial and temporal variation in the relative contribution of density dependence, climate variation and migration to fluctuations in the size of great tit populations.

    PubMed

    Grøtan, Vidar; Saether, Bernt-Erik; Engen, Steinar; van Balen, Johan H; Perdeck, Albert C; Visser, Marcel E

    2009-03-01

    1. The aim of the present study is to model the stochastic variation in the size of five populations of great tit Parus major in the Netherlands, using a combination of individual-based demographic data and time series of population fluctuations. We will examine relative contribution of density-dependent effects, and variation in climate and winter food on local dynamics as well as on number of immigrants. 2. Annual changes in population size were strongly affected by temporal variation in number of recruits produced locally as well as by the number of immigrants. The number of individuals recruited from one breeding season to the next was mainly determined by the population size in year t, the beech crop index (BCI) in year t and the temperature during March-April in year t. The number of immigrating females in year t + 1 was also explained by the number of females present in the population in year t, the BCI in autumn year t and the temperature during April-May in year t. 3. By comparing predictions of the population model with the recorded number of females, the simultaneous modelling of local recruitment and immigration explained a large proportion of the annual variation in recorded population growth rates. 4. Environmental stochasticity especially caused by spring temperature and BCI did in general contribute more to annual fluctuations in population size than density-dependent effects. Similar effects of climate on local recruitment and immigration also caused covariation in temporal fluctuations of immigration and local production of recruits. 5. The effects of various variables in explaining fluctuations in population size were not independent, and the combined effect of the variables were generally non-additive. Thus, the effects of variables causing fluctuations in population size should not be considered separately because the total effect will be influenced by covariances among the explanatory variables. 6. Our results show that fluctuations in the

  14. Effect of dust charge fluctuations on current-driven electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability in a collisional magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Sharma, Kavita; Gahlot, Ajay

    2013-05-15

    Current-driven electrostatic ion-cyclotron (EIC) instability is studied in a collisional magnetized dusty plasma. The growth rate and unstable mode frequencies were evaluated based on existing physical parameters relevant to ion cyclotron waves in dusty plasmas. It is found that the unstable mode frequency and growth rate of current-driven EIC instability increase with δ (ion-to-electron density ratio). Moreover, the increase in electron neutral collisional frequency (ν{sub e}) has no effect on the unstable mode frequency while the normalized growth rate has linear dependence on ν{sub e}.

  15. Vortex-lattice pinning and critical current density in anisotropic high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingxu; Li, Xiangyu; Kang, Guozheng; Gao, Yuanwen

    2016-10-01

    The anisotropy of critical current density is an impressive manifestation in the physics of high-temperature superconductors. We develop an analytical characterization of anisotropic flux-lattice pinning and critical current density in a system of random point defects. The effect of superconducting anisotropy on the pinning force and critical current density is formulated. The in-plane/out-of-plane anisotropy and microscopic characteristic lengths are incorporated in the field and angular dependence of the critical current density. This is helpful in understanding the physical essence of the scaling behavior in the experiments for critical current anisotropy. We discuss the role of strong and weak point defects in the anisotropic flux-lattice pinning. Relevance of the theory to the critical-state model is dictated as well.

  16. Method for Determining Local Current Density in 2G HTS Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bludova, A. I.

    Practically important problem is to determine the density and direction of 2G HTS induced currents at each point on the tape in order to examine its local deviations. This problem is resolved indirectly by spatial measurement of generated magnetic field with a scanning Hall sensor at a given height above the tape surface. Current density is subsequently determined by the Biot-Savart law inversion in Fourier domain. Tikhonov regularization is used in order to increase precision. Method is verified with the model current density reconstruction. Optimal calculation parameters and resulting precision are described.

  17. Local current density measurement using a Rogowski probe in Tokyo Spherical Tokamak-2.

    PubMed

    Furui, H; Nagashima, Y; Takase, Y; Ejiri, A; Kakuda, H; Sonehara, M; Oosako, T; Tsujii, N; Hiratsuka, J; Imamura, K; Inada, T; Nakamura, K; Nakanishi, A; Shinya, T; Togashi, H; Tsuda, S; Wakatsuki, T; Yamaguchi, T

    2014-11-01

    A Rogowski probe consisting of a small multi-layer Rogowski coil, five magnetic pick-up coils, and a Langmuir probe was developed to measure the local current density and its direction. It can be moved along the major radius and can be turned around its axis. This probe was used to measure the current density profile near the last closed flux surface of Ohmic plasmas in Tokyo Spherical Tokamak-2. The current density profile was measured successfully with a signal to noise ratio of greater than 20.

  18. Estimation of current density distribution of PAFC by analysis of cell exhaust gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, S.; Seya, A.; Asano, A.

    1996-12-31

    To estimate distributions of Current densities, voltages, gas concentrations, etc., in phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stacks, is very important for getting fuel cells with higher quality. In this work, we leave developed a numerical simulation tool to map out the distribution in a PAFC stack. And especially to Study Current density distribution in the reaction area of the cell, we analyzed gas composition in several positions inside a gas outlet manifold of the PAFC stack. Comparing these measured data with calculated data, the current density distribution in a cell plane calculated by the simulation, was certified.

  19. Studies of velocity fluctuations in the lower atmosphere using the MU radar. I - Azimuthal anisotropy. II - Momentum fluxes and energy densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.; Smith, S. A.; Tsuda, T.; Sato, T.; Fritts, D. C.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from a six-day campaign to observe velocity fluctuations in the lower atmosphere using the MU radar (Fukao et al., 1985) in Shigaraki, Japan in March, 1986. Consideration is given to the azimuthal anisotropy, the frequency spectra, the vertical profiles of energy density, and the momentum flux of the motion field. It is found that all of the observed azimuthal variations are probably caused by a gravity wave field whose parameters vary with time. The results show significant differences between the mean zonal and meridional frequency spectra and different profiles of mean energy density with height for different frequency bands and for zonal and meridional components.

  20. Definition of current density in the presence of a non-local potential.

    PubMed

    Li, Changsheng; Wan, Langhui; Wei, Yadong; Wang, Jian

    2008-04-16

    In the presence of a non-local potential arising from electron-electron interaction, the conventional definition of current density J(c) = (e/2m)([(p-eA)ψ](*)ψ-ψ(*)[(p-eA)ψ]) cannot satisfy the condition of current conservation, i.e., [Formula: see text] in the steady state. In order to solve this problem, we give a new definition of current density including the contribution due to the non-local potential. We show that the current calculated based on the new definition of current density conserves the current and is the same as that obtained from the Landauer-Büttiker formula. Examples are given to demonstrate our results.

  1. The increase of the spin-transfer torque threshold current density in coupled vortex domain walls.

    PubMed

    Lepadatu, S; Mihai, A P; Claydon, J S; Maccherozzi, F; Dhesi, S S; Kinane, C J; Langridge, S; Marrows, C H

    2012-01-18

    We have studied the dependence on the domain wall structure of the spin-transfer torque current density threshold for the onset of wall motion in curved, Gd-doped Ni(80)Fe(20) nanowires with no artificial pinning potentials. For single vortex domain walls, for both 10% and 1% Gd-doping concentrations, the threshold current density is inversely proportional to the wire width and significantly lower compared to the threshold current density measured for transverse domain walls. On the other hand for high Gd concentrations and large wire widths, double vortex domain walls are formed which require an increase in the threshold current density compared to single vortex domain walls at the same wire width. We suggest that this is due to the coupling of the vortex cores, which are of opposite chirality, and hence will be acted on by opposing forces arising through the spin-transfer torque effect.

  2. Characterizing a December 2005 density current event in the Chicago River, Chicago, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C.M.; Jackson, P.R.; Oberg, K.A.; Johnson, K.K.; Garcia, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    During the winter months, the Chicago River in Chicago, Illinois is subject to bi-directional flows, and density currents are thought to be responsible for these flow variations. This paper presents detailed field measurements using three acoustic Doppler current profiler instruments and simultaneous water-quality measurements made during December 2005. Observations indicate that the formation of density currents within the Chicago River and density differences are mostly due to salinity differences between the North Branch and the main stem of the Chicago River, whereas temperature difference does not appreciably affect the creation of density currents. Sources of higher water temperature, conductivity, and salinity values should be addressed in future studies. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  3. Influence of electropolishing current densities on sulfur generation at niobium surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, P. V.; Nishiwaki, M.; Noguchi, T.; Sawabe, M.; Saeki, T.; Hayano, H.; Kato, S.

    2013-11-01

    We report the effect of different current densities on sulfur generation at Nb surface in the electropolishing (EP) with aged electrolyte. In this regard, we conducted a series of electropolishing (EP) experiments in aged EP electrolyte with high (≈50 mA/cm2) and low (≈30 mA/cm2) current densities on Nb surfaces. The experiments were carried out both for laboratory coupons and a real Nb single cell cavity with six witness samples located at three typical positions (equator, iris and beam pipe). Sample's surfaces were investigated by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscope) and EDX (energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). The surface analysis showed that the EP with a high current density produced a huge amount of sulfate/sulfite particles at Nb surface whereas the EP with a low current density was very helpful to mitigate sulfate/sulfite at Nb surface in both the experiments.

  4. Finite temperature bosonic charge and current densities in compactified cosmic string spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, A.; Bezerra de Mello, E. R.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study the expectation values of the induced charge and current densities for a massive bosonic field with nonzero chemical potential in the geometry of a higher-dimensional compactified cosmic string with magnetic fluxes along the string core and also enclosed by the compactified direction in thermal equilibrium at finite temperature T . These densities are calculated by decomposing them into the vacuum expectation values and finite temperature contributions coming from the particles and antiparticles. The only nonzero components correspond to the charge, azimuthal, and axial current densities. By using the Abel-Plana formula, we decompose the components of the densities into the part induced by the cosmic string and the one by the compactification. The charge density is an odd function of the chemical potential and even periodic function of the magnetic flux with a period equal to the quantum flux. Moreover, the azimuthal (axial) current density is an even function of the chemical potential and an odd (even) periodic function of the magnetic flux with the same period. In this paper, our main concern is the thermal effect on the charge and current densities, including some limiting cases, the low- and high-temperature approximations. We show that in all cases, the temperature enhances the induced densities.

  5. The effects of density fluctuations on the partitioning of foreign molecules into lipid bilayers: application to anaesthetics and insecticides.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, K; Ipsen, J H; Mouritsen, O G; Bennett, D; Zuckermann, M J

    1991-08-26

    An extensive computer-simulation study is performed on a simple but general molecular model recently proposed (Jørgensen et al. (1991) Biochem. Biophys. Acta 1062, 277-238) to describe foreign molecules interacting with lipid bilayers. The model is a multi-state lattice model of the main bilayer transition in which the foreign molecules are assumed to intercalate at interstitial lattice positions. Specific as well as non-specific interactions between the foreign molecules and the lipid acyl chains are considered. Particular attention is paid to the fluctuating properties of the membrane and how the presence of the foreign molecules modulates these fluctuations in the transition region. By means of computer-stimulation techniques, a detailed account is given of the macroscopic as well as microscopic consequences of the fluctuations. The macroscopic consequences of the fluctuations are seen in the thermal anomalies of the specific heat and the passive trans-membrane permeability. Microscopically, the fluctuations manifest themselves in lipid-domain formation in the transition region which implies an effective dynamic membrane heterogeneity. Within the model it is found that certain anaesthetics and insecticides which are characterised by specific interactions with the lipids have a strong effect on the heterogeneity of the membrane inducing regions of locally very high concentration of the foreign molecules. This leads to a broadening of the specific heat peak and a maximum in the membrane/water partition coefficient. These results are in accordance with available experimental data for volatile general anaesthetics like halothane, local anaesthetics like cocain derivatives, and insecticides like lindane.

  6. Influence of current density on microstructure of pulse electrodeposited tin coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Sen, Ranjan; Reddy, B.S.B.; Fecht, H.-J.; Das, Karabi; Das, Siddhartha

    2012-06-15

    Pulse electrodeposited tin coatings on copper substrate have been synthesized from an aqueous solution containing sodium stannate (Na{sub 2}SnO{sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH). The effect of current density on surface morphology of the deposits has been investigated. As deposited coatings are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and line profile analysis. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the deposits consist of tetragonal ({beta}-Sn) structure with microcrystalline grains. The deposits plated at lower current density exhibit (110) texture which decreases with increasing current densities. The effects of current density on Cu-Sn diffusion and whisker growth of the electrodeposited tin coatings are also reported here. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pulse electrodeposition of Sn from aqueous alkaline solution without adding any organic additive. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of current density on morphology and whisker growth in tin coatings aged for 1 year. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solution bath is stable and can be operated over a wide range of current density.

  7. Wall current probe: A non-invasive in situ plasma diagnostic for space and time resolved current density distribution measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Baude, R.; Gaboriau, F.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.

    2013-08-15

    In the context of low temperature plasma research, we propose a wall current probe to determine the local charged particle fluxes flowing to the chamber walls. This non-intrusive planar probe consists of an array of electrode elements which can be individually biased and for which the current can be measured separately. We detail the probe properties and present the ability of the diagnostic to be used as a space and time resolved measurement of the ion and electron current density at the chamber walls. This diagnostic will be relevant to study the electron transport in magnetized low-pressure plasmas.

  8. Wall current probe: a non-invasive in situ plasma diagnostic for space and time resolved current density distribution measurement.

    PubMed

    Baude, R; Gaboriau, F; Hagelaar, G J M

    2013-08-01

    In the context of low temperature plasma research, we propose a wall current probe to determine the local charged particle fluxes flowing to the chamber walls. This non-intrusive planar probe consists of an array of electrode elements which can be individually biased and for which the current can be measured separately. We detail the probe properties and present the ability of the diagnostic to be used as a space and time resolved measurement of the ion and electron current density at the chamber walls. This diagnostic will be relevant to study the electron transport in magnetized low-pressure plasmas.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of filamentation instability and current filament merging in a high density current-driven plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M.; Taghadosi, M. R.; Niknam, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The magnetic field generation due to the filamentation instability (FI) of a high density current-driven plasma is studied through a new nonlinear diffusion equation. This equation is obtained on the basis of quantum hydrodynamic model and numerically solved by applying the Crank-Nicolson method. The spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetic field and the electron density distribution exhibits the current filament merging as a nonlinear phase of the FI which is responsible for the strong magnetic fields in the current-driven plasmas. It is found that the general behaviour of the FI is the same as that of the classical case but the instability growth rate, its magnitude, and the saturation time are affected by the quantum effects. It is eventually concluded that the quantum effects can play a stabilizing role in such situation.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and surface wettability study of polypyrrole films: Effect of applied constant current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thombare, J. V.; Lohar, G. M.; Shinde, S. K.; Dhasade, S. S.; Rath, M. C.; Fulari, V. J.

    2015-03-01

    Polypyrrole thin films were prepared by galvanostatic mode of electrodeposition. The applied constant current density changes structural, optical and surface wettability properties of polypyrrole thin films. The prepared films were characterized for structural, optical and surface wettability study. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows the benzoid and qunoid like structures in polypyrrole films. The UV-Visible absorption study shows that the optical density varies with the applied deposition current density. The band gap energy calculated from the Tauc's plot was found to be 2.25 eV and shows the film is in semiconductor nature. The surface wettability study confirms hydrophilic nature of polypyrrole films. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Effect of an axial magnetic field and arc current on the anode current density in diffuse vacuum arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Geng, Yingsan; Liu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Zhenxing; Zhang, Zaiqin

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to measure the effect of an axial magnetic field (AMF) BAMF and arc current on the anode current density in diffuse vacuum arcs. The experimental geometry included a split anode and a butt-type cathode, both with a diameter of 60 mm. The anode surface was divided into a central area and three symmetrically disposed peripheral annular areas. The central area of the split anode had a diameter of 20 mm. The contact material was CuCr25 (25% Cr). The arc current IARC ranged from 4 to 14 kA (rms) at 50 Hz. The opening velocity was 2.4 m/s. The currents of the four areas on the anode contact were measured using four Rogowski coils situated outside the vacuum chamber. An external uniform AMF BAMF ranging from 0 to 110 mT was applied during the experiment. The observed arc modes were recorded by a high-speed charge-coupled device video camera. The experimental results quantitatively reveal that the current density distribution on the anode surface in the diffuse arc mode was not uniform but concentrated in the central area. The current density in the central anode area at the current peak JPeakArea I decreased with increasing BAMF following a power law. For BAMF of 0-110 mT and IARC of 4-14 kA, JPeakArea I = (2.2 IARC + 0.069 IARC2) BAMF-0.22, where JPeakArea I is in A/mm2, BAMF is in mT, and IARC is in kA. Moreover, the current distribution was uneven in the three peripheral areas.

  12. Conduction-electron spin resonance and spin-density fluctuations of CoS2-xSex (x≤0.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivadulla, F.

    2011-10-01

    I report the observation of conduction electron spin resonance (CESR) in the paramagnetic phase of weak itinerant ferromagnet (WIFM) CoS2. The observation of a narrow Lorentzian line above TC is interpreted as a signature of long-wavelength exchange-enhanced spin-density fluctuations, whose amplitude increases up to T* ≈ 2 TC. I propose that this temperature marks a characteristic energy scale below which strong exchange interactions between spin fluctuations determine the spin lifetime. This study shows that the characteristic parameters of CESR are very sensitive to electronic correlations and can be very useful in the study of the spin interactions and relaxation in itinerant electron systems in the intermediate coupling regime.

  13. The evaluation of a density current experiment as a verification tool of a secondary clarifier model.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Kim, S; Yoon, J

    2003-01-01

    The prediction of the spatial and temporal flow regime is important for the efficient design and operation of the settling tank. The impact of the gravity current has been investigated by the temperature difference or artificial glass particles. This experimental study is designed to obtain the steady state of stratified flow with the consideration of the heavy density flow. Two different approaches were performed at lab scale considering the hydraulic similarity. One is the investigation of a heavy density current of saline water intrusion. The characteristics of the internal hydraulics are monitored using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). As a result of the saline intrusion, the internal flow established a continual density stratification of 3-layers in steady state. The other is the movement of activated sludge from a sewage treatment plant. The video image is captured to analyze the behavior of activated sludge in the settling tank. The experiments with various inlet baffle conditions suggest that the hydraulic characteristics of the two experiments are significantly different. As the distance between the baffle and inlet point was decreased, significant strength of saline density currents in the bottom layer was observed. However, the strength of the velocity in the bottom density currents appeared to be the opposite in the case of the activated sludge. The reason for the slower density current in the bottom layer is associated with the compressibility of activated sludge characteristics.

  14. Current Density Imaging Using Directly Measured Harmonic Bz Data in MREIT

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh In

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) measures magnetic flux density signals through the use of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to visualize the internal conductivity and/or current density. Understanding the reconstruction procedure for the internal current density, we directly measure the second derivative of Bz data from the measured k-space data, from which we can avoid a tedious phase unwrapping to obtain the phase signal of Bz. We determine optimal weighting factors to combine the derivatives of magnetic flux density data, ∇2Bz, measured using the multi-echo train. The proposed method reconstructs the internal current density using the relationships between the induced internal current and the measured ∇2Bz data. Results from a phantom experiment demonstrate that the proposed method reduces the scanning time and provides the internal current density, while suppressing the background field inhomogeneity. To implement the real experiment, we use a phantom with a saline solution including a balloon, which excludes other artifacts by any concentration gradient in the phantom. PMID:23573168

  15. Development of an eight-channel NMR system using RF detection coils for measuring spatial distributions of current density and water content in the PEM of a PEFC.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kuniyasu; Yokouchi, Yasuo; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Ito, Kohei

    2013-09-01

    The water generation and water transport occurring in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) can be estimated from the current density generated in the PEFC, and the water content in the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM). In order to measure the spatial distributions and time-dependent changes of current density generated in a PEFC and the water content in a PEM, we have developed an eight-channel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system. To detect a NMR signal from water in a PEM at eight positions, eight small planar RF detection coils of 0.6 mm inside diameter were inserted between the PEM and the gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a PEFC. The local current density generated at the position of the RF detection coil in a PEFC can be calculated from the frequency shift of the obtained NMR signal due to an additional magnetic field induced by the local current density. In addition, the water content in a PEM at the position of the RF detection coil can be calculated by the amplitude of the obtained NMR signal. The time-dependent changes in the spatial distributions were measured at 4 s intervals when the PEFC was operated with supply gas under conditions of fuel gas utilization of 0.67 and relative humidity of the fuel gas of 70%RH. The experimental result showed that the spatial distributions of the local current density and the water content in the PEM within the PEFC both fluctuated with time.

  16. Measurement of induced magnetic flux density using injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) in MREIT.

    PubMed

    Park, Chunjae; Lee, Byung Il; Kwon, Ohin; Woo, Eung Je

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) measures induced magnetic flux densities subject to externally injected currents in order to visualize conductivity distributions inside an electrically conducting object. Injection currents induce magnetic flux densities that appear in phase parts of acquired MR image data. In the conventional current injection method, we inject currents during the time segment between the end of the first RF pulse and the beginning of the reading gradient in order to ensure the gradient linearity. Noting that longer current injections can accumulate more phase changes, we propose a new pulse sequence called injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) where the duration of the injection current pulse is extended until the end of the reading gradient. Since the current injection during the reading gradient disturbs the gradient linearity, we first analyze the MR signal produced by the ICNE pulse sequence and suggest a novel algorithm to extract the induced magnetic flux density from the acquired MR signal. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments show that the new method is clearly advantageous in terms of the reduced noise level in measured magnetic flux density data. The amount of noise reduction depends on the choice of the data acquisition time and it was about 24% when we used a prolonged data acquisition time of 10.8 ms. The ICNE method will enhance the clinical applicability of the MREIT technique when it is combined with an appropriate phase artefact minimization method.

  17. Measurement of Density Correlations in Pseudorapidity via Charged Particle Multiplicity Fluctuations in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, S. S.; Awes, Terry C; Batsouli, Sotiria; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; Zhang, Chun; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2007-09-01

    Longitudinal density correlations of produced matter in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s{sub NN})=200 GeV have been measured from the inclusive charged particle distributions as a function of pseudorapidity window sizes. The extracted {alpha}{xi} parameter, related to the susceptibility of the density fluctuations in the long-wavelength limit, exhibits a nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the number of participant nucleons, N{sub part}. A local maximum is seen at N{sub part}{approx}90, with corresponding energy density based on the Bjorken picture of {epsilon}{sub Bj}{tau}{approx}2.4 GeV/(fm{sup 2}c) with a transverse area size of 60 fm2. This behavior may suggest a critical phase boundary based on the Ginzburg-Landau framework.

  18. Incorporation of Ca and P on anodized titanium surface: Effect of high current density.

    PubMed

    Laurindo, Carlos A H; Torres, Ricardo D; Mali, Sachin A; Gilbert, Jeremy L; Soares, Paulo

    2014-04-01

    This study systematically evaluated the surface and corrosion characteristics of commercially pure titanium (grade 2) modified by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) with high current density. The anodization process was carried out galvanostatically (constant current density) using a solution containing calcium glycerophosphate (0.02mol/L) and calcium acetate (0.15mol/L). The current densities applied were 400, 700, 1000 and 1200mA/cm(2) for a period of 15s. Composition, crystalline structure, morphology, roughness, wettability and "in-vitro" bioactivity test in SBF of the anodized layer were evaluated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, profilometry and contact angle measurements. Corrosion properties were evaluated by open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The results show that the TiO2 oxide layers present an increase of thickness, porosity, roughness, wettability, Ca/P ratio, and bioactivity, with the applied current density up to 1000mA/cm(2). Corrosion resistance also increases with applied current density. It is observed that for 1200mA/cm(2), there is a degradation of the oxide layer. In general, the results suggest that the anodized TiO2 layer with better properties is formed with an applied current of 1000mA/cm(2).

  19. Gauge-Origin Independent Calculations of the Anisotropy of the Magnetically Induced Current Densities.

    PubMed

    Fliegl, Heike; Jusélius, Jonas; Sundholm, Dage

    2016-07-21

    Gauge-origin independent current density susceptibility tensors have been computed using the gauge-including magnetically induced current (GIMIC) method. The anisotropy of the magnetically induced current density (ACID) functions constructed from the current density susceptibility tensors are therefore gauge-origin independent. The ability of the gauge-origin independent ACID function to provide quantitative information about the current flow along chemical bonds has been assessed by integrating the cross-section area of the ACID function in the middle of chemical bonds. Analogously, the current strength susceptibility passing a given plane through the molecule is obtained by numerical integration of the current flow parallel to the normal vector of the integration plane. The cross-section area of the ACID function is found to be strongly dependent on the exact location of the integration plane, which is in sheer contrast to the calculated ring-current strength susceptibilities that are practically independent of the chosen position of the integration plane. The gauge-origin independent ACID functions plotted for different isosurface values show that a visual assessment of the current flow and degree of aromaticity depends on the chosen isosurface. The present study shows that ACID functions are not an unambiguous means to estimate the degree of molecular aromaticity according to the magnetic criterion and to determine the current pathway of complex molecular rings.

  20. Measurement of local current density of all-vanadium redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Wen-Yen; Leu, Chih-Hsing; Wu, Chun-Hsing; Chen, Yong-Song

    2014-12-01

    This article presents a preliminary study of the measurement of local current density in all-vanadium redox flow batteries. Two batteries are designed and manufactured in this study, and the experimental results are compared. In the first cell, the current collector is divided into 25 segments, and the flow field plate is not segmented, whereas in the other cell, the flow field plate is segmented. The effects of the electrolyte flow rate on the battery efficiencies and the local current density variation are investigated. The experimental results show that the current density near the outlet significantly decreases when the discharge capacity approaches zero. In addition, the battery has a larger discharge depth at a higher electrolyte flow rate.

  1. The butterfly - a well-defined constant-current topography pattern on Si(001):H and Ge(001):H resulting from current-induced defect fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Engelund, Mads; Godlewski, Szymon; Kolmer, Marek; Zuzak, Rafał; Such, Bartosz; Frederiksen, Thomas; Szymonski, Marek; Sánchez-Portal, Daniel

    2016-07-28

    Dangling bond (DB) arrays on Si(001):H and Ge(001):H surfaces can be patterned with atomic precision and they exhibit complex and rich physics making them interesting from both technological and fundamental perspectives. But their complex behavior often makes scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images difficult to interpret and simulate. Recently it was shown that low-temperature imaging of unoccupied states of an unpassivated dimer on Ge(001):H results in a symmetric butterfly-like STM pattern, despite the fact that the equilibrium dimer configuration is expected to be a bistable, buckled geometry. Here, based on a thorough characterization of the low-bias switching events on Ge(001):H, we propose a new imaging model featuring a dynamical two-state rate equation. On both Si(001):H and Ge(001):H, this model allows us to reproduce the features of the observed symmetric empty-state images which strongly corroborates the idea that the patterns arise due to fast switching events and provides an insight into the relationship between the tunneling current and switching rates. We envision that our new imaging model can be applied to simulate other bistable systems where fluctuations arise from transiently charged electronic states. PMID:27375264

  2. Finite temperature and density depletion effects on persistent current state transitions and critical velocity of a toroidal Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avinash; Eckel, Stephen; Jendrzejewski, Fred; Campbell, Gretchen

    We study the decay of a persistent, quantized current state in a toroidal geometry. Our experiment involves trapping neutral 23Na atoms in an all optical ``target trap'' shaped potential. This potential consists of a disc surrounded by an annular potential. A current in a superfluid can be sustained only below a critical current. This critical current can be tuned by introducing a density perturbation which depletes the local density. The decay time of a persistent current state can also be controlled by enhancing fluctuations of the system thermally. We study the decay at four different temperatures between 30 nK and 190 nK. For each temperature we record the decay at four different perturbation strengths. We find that increasing the magnitude of the density depletion or the temperature leads to a faster decay, and have seen the decay constant change by over two orders of magnitude. We also studied the size of hysteresis loop between different current states as a function of temperature, allowing us to extract a critical velocity. We find that the discrepancies between the experimentally extracted critical velocity and theoretically calculated critical velocity (using local-density approximation) decreases as the temperature is decreased. Now at University of Heidelberg.

  3. Mechanism of thickness dependence of critical current density in HTS YBCO film and its elimination using nano-engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang

    The most promising characteristic of a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) is its ability to carry larger electrical current at liquid nitrogen boiling temperature and strong applied magnetic field with minimal dissipation. Numerous large scale applications such as HTS transmission cables, HTS magnets and HTS motors have been developed using HTS materials. The major limitation that prevents its wide commercialization is its high cost-to-performance ratio. However, the effort to further improve HTS current carrying capability is jeopardized by a mysterious thickness dependence of the critical current density (Jc) --- Jc monotonically decreases with increasing thickness (t) at 77 K and self-field (SF). This poses a great challenge for both HTS applications and the understanding of vortex dynamics. What further complicates this issue is the complex defect structure in HTS films as well as the creep nature of magnetic vortices at a finite temperature. After a systematic study of the temperature and magnetic field effects on Jc--t, we conclude that Jc--t is most likely the result of a collective pinning effect dictated by a random pinning potential. Besides that, thermal fluctuations also alter Jc--t in a predictable way. Therefore, by either modifying the vortex structure or pinning structure, J c--t can be eliminated. Indeed, a thin film J c has been restored in a HTS/insulator/HTS trilayer while the magnetic coupling is weakened. Moreover, Jc--t has been removed when the random distributed point pins are overpowered by strong linear defects.

  4. Effects of rf power on electron density and temperature, neutral temperature, and T{sub e} fluctuations in an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, James; Fathi, Gilda

    2009-05-15

    Atomic clocks that fly on global-navigation satellites such as global positioning system (GPS) and Galileo employ light from low-temperature, inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) for atomic signal generation and detection (i.e., alkali/noble-gas rf-discharge lamps). In this application, the performance of the atomic clock and the capabilities of the navigation system depend sensitively on the stability of the ICP's optical emission. In order to better understand the mechanisms that might lead to instability in these rf-discharge lamps, and hence the satellite atomic clocks, we studied the optical emission from a Rb/Xe ICP as a function of the rf power driving the plasma. Surprisingly, we found that the electron density in the plasma was essentially independent of increases in rf power above its nominal value (i.e., 'rf-power gain') and that the electron temperature was only a slowly varying function of rf-power gain. The primary effect of rf power was to increase the temperature of the neutrals in the plasma, which was manifested by an increase in Rb vapor density. Interestingly, we also found evidence for electron temperature fluctuations (i.e., fluctuations in the plasma's high-energy electron content). The variance of these fluctuations scaled inversely with the plasma's mean electron temperature and was consistent with a simple model that assumed that the total electron density in the discharge was independent of rf power. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that the electrons in alkali/noble-gas ICPs are little affected by slight changes in rf power and that the primary effect of such changes is to heat the plasma's neutral species.

  5. Does the Genotype Have a Significant Effect on the Formation of Intra-Annual Density Fluctuations? A Case Study Using Larix decidua from Northern Poland

    PubMed Central

    Klisz, Marcin; Koprowski, Marcin; Ukalska, Joanna; Nabais, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs) can imprint environmental conditions within the growing season and most of the research on IADFs has been focused on their climatic signal. However, to our knowledge, the genetic influence on the frequency and type of IADFs has not been evaluated. To understand if the genotype can affect the formation of IADFs we have used a common garden experiment using eight families of Larix decidua established in two neighboring forest stands in northern Poland. Four types of IADFs were identified using X-ray density profiles: latewood-like cells within earlywood (IADF-type E), latewood-like cells in the transition from early- to latewood (IADF type E+), earlywood-like cells within latewood (IADF-type L), and earlywood-like cells in the border zone between the previous and present annual ring (IADF-type L+). The influence of explanatory variables i.e., families, sites, and years on identified density fluctuations was analyzed using generalized estimating equations (GEE). We hypothesized that trees from different families will differ in terms of frequency and type of IADFs because each family will react to precipitation and temperature in a different way, depending on the origin of those trees. The most frequent fluctuation was E+ and L types on both sites. The most important factors in the formation of IADFs were the site and year, the last one reflecting the variable climatic conditions, with no significant effect of the family. However, the relation between the formation of IADFs and selected climate parameters was different between families. Although, our results did not give a significant effect of the genotype on the formation of IADFs, the different sensitivity to climatic parameters among different families indicate that there is a genetic influence. PMID:27242883

  6. Current densities and total contact currents for 110 and 220 kV power line tasks.

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena; Kuisti, Harri; Elovaara, Jarmo

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze all values of electric current from measured periods while performing tasks on 110 and 220 kV power lines. Additionally, the objective was to study the average current densities and average total contact currents caused by electric fields in 110 and 220 kV power line tasks. One worker simulated the following tasks: (A) tested insulation voltage at a 110 kV portal tower, (B) checked the wooden towers for rot at a 110 kV portal tower, (C) tested insulation voltage at a 220 kV portal tower, and (D) checked the wooden towers for rot at a 220 kV portal tower. The highest average current density in the neck was 2.0 mA/m(2) (calculated internal electric field was 19.0-38.0 mV/m), and the highest average contact current was 234 µA. All measured values at 110 and 220 kV towers were lower than the basic restrictions (0.1 and 0.8 V/m) of the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection.

  7. Coupling of turbulent and non-turbulent flow regimes within pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breard, Eric C. P.; Lube, Gert; Jones, Jim R.; Dufek, Josef; Cronin, Shane J.; Valentine, Greg A.; Moebis, Anja

    2016-10-01

    Volcanic eruptions are at their most deadly when pyroclastic density currents sweep across landscapes to devastate everything in their path. The internal dynamics underpinning these hazards cannot be directly observed. Here we present a quantitative view inside pyroclastic density currents by synthesizing their natural flow behaviour in large-scale experiments. The experiments trace flow dynamics from initiation to deposition, and can explain the sequence and evolution of real-world deposits. We show that, inside pyroclastic density currents, the long-hypothesized non-turbulent underflow and fully turbulent ash-cloud regions are linked through a hitherto unrecognized middle zone of intermediate turbulence and concentration. Bounded by abrupt jumps in turbulence, the middle zone couples underflow and ash-cloud regions kinematically. Inside this zone, strong feedback between gas and particle phases leads to the formation of mesoscale turbulence clusters. These extremely fast-settling dendritic structures dictate the internal stratification and evolution of pyroclastic density currents and allow the underflows to grow significantly during runout. Our experiments reveal how the underflow and ash-cloud regions are dynamically related--insights that are relevant to the forecasting of pyroclastic density current behaviour in volcanic hazard models.

  8. Towards the definition of AMS facies in the deposits of pyroclastic density currents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ort, M.H.; Newkirk, T.T.; Vilas, J.F.; Vazquez, J.A.; Ort, M.H.; Porreca, Massimiliano; Geissman, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) provides a statistically robust technique to characterize the fabrics of deposits of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). AMS fabrics in two types of pyroclastic deposits (small-volume phreatomagmatic currents in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Arizona, USA, and large-volume caldera-forming currents, Caviahue Caldera, Neuquén, Argentina) show similar patterns. Near the vent and in areas of high topographical roughness, AMS depositional fabrics are poorly grouped, with weak lineations and foliations. In a densely welded proximal ignimbrite, this fabric is overprinted by a foliation formed as the rock compacted and deformed. Medial deposits have moderate–strong AMS lineations and foliations. The most distal deposits have strong foliations but weak lineations. Based on these facies and existing models for pyroclastic density currents, deposition in the medial areas occurs from the strongly sheared, high-particle-concentration base of a density-stratified current. In proximal areas and where topography mixes this denser base upwards into the current, deposition occurs rapidly from a current with little uniformity to the shear, in which particles fall and collide in a chaotic fashion. Distal deposits are emplaced by a slowing or stalled current so that the dominant particle motion is vertical, leading to weak lineation and strong foliation.

  9. High-Current-Density Vertical-Tunneling Transistors from Graphene/Highly Doped Silicon Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Sheng, Jiming; Wu, Hao; He, Qiyuan; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Shakir, Muhammad Imran; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-06-01

    Scalable fabrication of vertical-tunneling transistors is presented based on heterostructures formed between graphene, highly doped silicon, and its native oxide. Benefiting from the large density of states of highly doped silicon, the tunneling transistors can deliver a current density over 20 A cm(-2) . This study demonstrates that the interfacial native oxide plays a crucial role in governing the carrier transport in graphene-silicon heterostructures.

  10. The current density in quantum electrodynamics in time-dependent external potentials and the Schwinger effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    In the framework of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in external potentials, we introduce a method to compute the time-dependence of the expectation value of the current density for time-dependent homogeneous external electric fields. We apply it to the so-called Sauter pulse. For late times, our results agree with the asymptotic value due to electron-positron pair production. We correct a general expression derived by Serber for the expectation value of the current, linearized in the external field, and compare with our results for the Sauter pulse. Based on the properties of the current density, we argue that the appearance of enhanced quasi-particle densities at intermediate times in slowly varying sub-critical potentials is generic. Also an alternative approach, which circumvents these difficulties, is sketched.

  11. Characterization of thunderstorm induced Maxwell current densities in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baginski, Michael Edward

    1989-01-01

    Middle atmospheric transient Maxwell current densities generated by lightning induced charge perturbations are investigated via a simulation of Maxwell's equations. A time domain finite element analysis is employed for the simulations. The atmosphere is modeled as a region contained within a right circular cylinder with a height of 110 km and radius of 80 km. A composite conductivity profile based on measured data is used when charge perturbations are centered about the vertical axis at altitudes of 6 and 10 km. The simulations indicate that the temporal structure of the Maxwell current density is relatively insensitive to altitude variation within the region considered. It is also shown that the electric field and Maxwell current density are not generally aligned.

  12. Simultaneous Observations of Electric Fields, Current Density, Plasma Density, and Neutral Winds During Two Sounding Rocket Experiments Launched from Wallops Island into Strong Daytime Dynamo Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Rowland, D. E.; Klenzing, J.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Martin, S. C.; Abe, T.; Habu, H.; Yamamoto, M. Y.; Watanabe, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Kakinami, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.; Larsen, M. F.; Hurd, L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Bishop, R. L.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Fish, C. S.; Bullett, T. W.; Mabie, J. J.; Murphy, N.; Angelopoulos, V.; Leinweber, H. K.; Bernal, I.; Chi, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the ion-neutral coupling that creates the global electrical daytime "dynamo" currents in the mid-latitude, lower ionosphere, NASA carried out two multiple sounding rocket experiments from Wallops Island, VA on July 10, 2011 (14:00 UT, 10:00 LT) and July 4, 2013 (14:31 UT, 10:31 LT). The rockets were launched in the presence of well-defined, westward Hall currents observed on the ground with ΔH values of ­-25 nT and -30 nT, respectively, as well as a well-defined, daytime ionospheric density observed by the VIPIR ionosonde at Wallops. During the 2011 experiment, a narrow, intense sporadic-E layer was observed near 102 km. Each experiment consisted of a pair of rockets launched 15 sec apart. The first rocket of each pair carried instruments to measure DC electric and magnetic fields, as well as the ambient plasma and neutral gases and attained apogees of 158 km and 135 km in the 2011 and 2013 experiments, respectively. The second rocket of each pair carried canisters which released a lithium vapor trail along the upleg to illuminate neutral winds in the upper atmosphere. This daytime vapor trail technology was developed jointly by researchers at JAXA and Clemson University. In the second experiment, the lithium release was clearly visible in cameras with infrared filters operated by US and Japanese researchers in a NASA airplane at 9.6 km altitude. The observed wind profiles reached speeds of 100 m/s with strong shears with respect to altitude and were consistent with an independent derivation of the wind from the ionization gauge sensor suite on the instrumented rocket. The "vapor trail" rockets, which also included a falling sphere, attained apogees of 150 km and 143 km in the 2011 and 2013 experiments, respectively. By measuring the current density, conductivity, DC electric fields, and neutral winds, we solve the dynamo equation as a function of altitude, revealing the different contributions to the lower E-region currents. We find that the DC

  13. Fluctuation effects in rotating Bose-Einstein condensates with broken SU(2) and U (1 )×U (1 ) symmetries in the presence of intercomponent density-density interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galteland, Peder Notto; Babaev, Egor; Sudbø, Asle

    2015-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations and melting transitions for rotating single-component superfluids have been intensively studied and are well understood. In contrast, the thermal effects on vortex states for two-component superfluids with density-density interaction, which have a much richer variety of vortex ground states, have been much less studied. Here, we investigate the thermal effects on vortex matter in superfluids with U (1 )×U (1 ) broken symmetries and intercomponent density-density interactions, as well as the case with a larger SU (2 ) broken symmetry obtainable from the [U (1 )×U (1 )] -symmetric case by tuning scattering lengths. In the former case we find that, in addition to first-order melting transitions, the system exhibits thermally driven phase transitions between square and hexagonal lattices. Our main result, however, concerns the case where the condensate exhibits SU (2 ) symmetry, and where vortices are not topological. At finite temperature, the system exhibits effects which do not have a counterpart in single-component systems. Namely, it has a state where thermally averaged quantities show no regular vortex lattice, yet the system retains superfluid coherence along the axis of rotation. In such a state, the thermal fluctuations result in transitions between different (nearly) degenerate vortex states without undergoing a melting transition. Our results apply to multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates, and we suggest how to detect some of these unusual effects experimentally in such systems.

  14. Laser wavefront analyzer for imploding plasma density and current profile measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, N.; Prasad, R.R.; Campbell, K.; Coleman, P.; Krishnan, M.; Weber, B.V.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Mosher, D.

    2004-10-01

    The laser wavefront analyzer (LWA) consists of a polarized laser beam pulse that traverses an imploding z-pinch, and a microlens array that focuses the laser beam into a large number (10{sup 4}) of very tiny spots. LWA image analysis determines the refractive bending angles (due to density gradients) and Faraday rotation angles (due to the magnetic field-density integral) throughout the plasma cross section. Electron density and current distributions are derived from LWA data in an imploding gas-puff z-pinch plasma.

  15. Climatology of convective density currents in the southern foothills of the Atlas Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmel, C.; Knippertz, P.; Schulz, O.

    2010-06-01

    Density currents fed by evaporationally cooled air are an important dust storm-generating feature and can constitute a source of moisture in arid regions. Recently, the existence of such systems has been demonstrated for the area between the High Atlas Mountains and the Sahara desert in southern Morocco on the basis of case studies. Here, a climatological analysis is presented that uses data from the dense climate station network of the IMPETUS project (An Integrated Approach to the Efficient Management of Scarce Water Resources in West Africa) for the 5 year period 2002-2006. Objective criteria mainly based upon abrupt changes in wind and dew point temperature are defined to identify possible density current situations. The preselected events are then subjectively evaluated with the help of satellite imagery and surface observations to exclude causes for air mass changes other than moist convective cold pool formation. On average, 11 ± 4 density currents per year are detected with the main season lasting from April to September. Density currents occur mainly in the afternoon and evening due to the diurnal cycle of moist convection. Mean changes at the leading edge are increases in 2 m dew point temperature and wind speed by 5.4°C and 8.2 m s-1, respectively, and a decrease in 2 m air temperature of 2.3°C. The High Atlas and Jebel Saghro are found to be the most important source regions, while only a few systems originate over the Saharan lowlands. Labilization of the atmosphere due to upper-level troughs over northwest Africa and an enhanced moisture content favor density current formation. In addition, detailed case studies representative of different density current types are presented.

  16. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C. A.

    1987-12-01

    Large (approx. 5 cm) diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes operated at 10 kV have produced 1 to 5 micro electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq cm. Normalized beam brightness, has been consistently measured. To obtain this high current density, the LaB6 cathodes have been heated to temperatures between approximately 1600 to 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure .000001 to .00001 Torr, i.e., under much less demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser type cathodes.

  17. Biexciton state causes photoluminescence fluctuations in CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots at high photoexcitation densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, N.; Hirori, H.; Watanabe, H.; Aoki, T.; Ihara, T.; Kusuda, R.; Wolpert, C.; Fujiwara, T. K.; Kusumi, A.; Kanemitsu, Y.; Tanaka, K.

    2013-10-01

    The excitation density dependence of photoluminescence (PL) blinking of single CdSe/ZnS quantum dots was studied by means of single-dot PL spectroscopy. As the excitation density increases, an intermediate state appears in addition to the highly emissive (ON) and nonemissive (OFF) states. The systematic study of the excitation density dependence of PL blinking behavior (PL intensity, probabilities of finding these states, time probability distributions, and PL spectra and lifetimes) suggests that the intermediate state can be attributed to a charged exciton (trion) state generated through biexciton generation and charging (ionization) of a quantum dot under a high-density excitation regime. Our results indicate that the biexciton generation is a precursor of the trion state and not of the OFF state.

  18. Four-dimensional ultrasound current source density imaging of a dipole field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. H.; Olafsson, R.; Ingram, P.; Li, Q.; Qin, Y.; Witte, R. S.

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI) potentially transforms conventional electrical mapping of excitable organs, such as the brain and heart. For this study, we demonstrate volume imaging of a time-varying current field by scanning a focused ultrasound beam and detecting the acoustoelectric (AE) interaction signal. A pair of electrodes produced an alternating current distribution in a special imaging chamber filled with a 0.9% NaCl solution. A pulsed 1 MHz ultrasound beam was scanned near the source and sink, while the AE signal was detected on remote recording electrodes, resulting in time-lapsed volume movies of the alternating current distribution.

  19. High critical current densities of multifilamentary Nb-46. 5w%Ti superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Somerkoski, J.V.A.; Laasko, L.; Lindroos, V.K.; Toivanen, R.O.; Vanhatalo, V.

    1985-03-01

    Multiple heat treatment, critical current measurements and transmission electron microscopy were employed in improving the critical current carrying capacity of multifilamentary Nb-46.5w%Ti superconductors. The critical current density measurements at 4.2 K exhibited the values of 2860 A/mm/sup 2/ and 580 A/mm/sup 2/ at magnetic fields of 5 T and 9 T, respectively. The high current carrying capacity of the 5 times heat treated superconductor has been attributed to the improved size distribution of the effective pinning sites.

  20. THE ELECTRICAL CURRENT DENSITY VECTOR IN THE INNER PENUMBRA OF A SUNSPOT

    SciTech Connect

    Puschmann, K. G.; Cobo, B. Ruiz; Martinez Pillet, V. E-mail: brc@iac.e

    2010-09-20

    We determine the entire electrical current density vector in a geometrical three-dimensional volume of the inner penumbra of a sunspot from an inversion of spectropolarimetric data obtained with Hinode/SP. Significant currents are seen to wrap around the hotter, more elevated regions with lower and more horizontal magnetic fields that harbor strong upflows and radial outflows (the intraspines). The horizontal component of the current density vector is 3-4 times larger than the vertical; nearly all previous studies only obtain the vertical component J{sub z} , thus strongly underestimating the current density. The current density J-vector and the magnetic field B-vector form an angle of about 20{sup 0}. The plasma {beta} at the 0 km level is larger than 1 in the intraspines and is one order of magnitude lower in the background component of the penumbra (spines). At the 200 km level, the plasma {beta} is below 0.3, nearly everywhere. The plasma {beta} surface as well as the surface optical depth unity is very corrugated. At the borders of intraspines and inside, B-vector is not force-free at deeper layers and nearly force-free at the top layers. The magnetic field of the spines is close to being potential everywhere. The dissipated ohmic energy is five orders of magnitudes smaller than the solar energy flux and thus negligible for the energy balance of the penumbra.

  1. Effect of current density on electrolytic transformation of benzene for groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Sarahney, Hussam; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2007-05-17

    Electrolytic transformation of benzene in water is evaluated as a potential mechanism that can be implemented for in situ remediation of benzene in groundwater. Electrolytic transformation experiments were conducted using inert electrodes that are separated by a membrane. Electrolytes that consist of sodium chloride or sodium nitrate solutions with 40 mg/L benzene concentration were used. Electric currents of 1, 5 and 10 mA (1.8, 9.0 and 18.1 mA/L, respectively) were applied and the transformation of benzene was monitored and compared with a control. The results show that electrolytic transformation of benzene occurred under different rates that depend upon the type of electrolyte and the current density. Transformation results in formation of chlorinated benzene when sodium chloride is the electrolyte. However, processing for long enough time (up to 300 h) resulted in transformation of the chlorinated benzene byproducts. Benzene transformation occurred when the electrolyte was sodium nitrate but the rate was slower than the case with sodium chloride. The results did no show formation of byproducts in this case. The transformation rate was dependent on the current density. The results with sodium chloride showed that the rate increases with increasing the current density, but there is an optimum value, beyond which increasing the current density will not increase the transformation rate.

  2. Lower hybrid current drive at high density in the multi-pass regimea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, G. M.; Faust, I. C.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lau, C.; Ma, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Terry, J. L.; Whyte, D. G.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Harvey, R. W.; Schmidt, A. E.; Smirnov, A. P.; Wilson, J. R.

    2012-06-01

    Assessing the performance of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) at high density is critical for developing non-inductive current drive systems on future steady-state experiments. Excellent LHCD efficiency has been observed during fully non-inductive operation (η =2.0-2.5×1019 AW-1m-2 at n¯e=0.5×1020 m-3) on Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] under conditions (ne, magnetic field and topology, and LHCD frequency) relevant to ITER [S. Shiraiwa et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 103024 (2011)]. To extend these results to advanced tokamak regimes with higher bootstrap current fractions on C-Mod, it is necessary to increase n ¯e to 1.0-1.5×1020 m-3. However, the number of current-carrying, non-thermal electrons generated by LHCD drops sharply in diverted configurations at densities that are well below the density limit previously observed on limited tokamaks. In these cases, changes in scrape off layer (SOL) ionization and density profiles are observed during LHCD, indicating that significant power is transferred from the LH waves to the SOL. Fokker-Planck simulations of these discharges utilizing ray tracing and full wave propagation codes indicate that LH waves in the high density, multi-pass absorption regime linger in the plasma edge, and SOL region, where absorption near or outside the LCFS results in the loss of current drive efficiency. Modeling predicts that non-thermal emission increases with stronger single-pass absorption. Experimental data show that increasing Te in high density LH discharges results in higher non-thermal electron emission, as predicted by the models.

  3. Lower hybrid current drive at high density in the multi-pass regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, G. M.; Faust, I. C.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lau, C.; Ma, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Terry, J. L.; Whyte, D. G.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Schmidt, A. E.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; and others

    2012-06-15

    Assessing the performance of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) at high density is critical for developing non-inductive current drive systems on future steady-state experiments. Excellent LHCD efficiency has been observed during fully non-inductive operation ({eta}=2.0-2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} AW{sup -1}m{sup -2} at n{sub e}=0.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}) on Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] under conditions (n{sub e}, magnetic field and topology, and LHCD frequency) relevant to ITER [S. Shiraiwa et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 103024 (2011)]. To extend these results to advanced tokamak regimes with higher bootstrap current fractions on C-Mod, it is necessary to increase n{sub e} to 1.0-1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}. However, the number of current-carrying, non-thermal electrons generated by LHCD drops sharply in diverted configurations at densities that are well below the density limit previously observed on limited tokamaks. In these cases, changes in scrape off layer (SOL) ionization and density profiles are observed during LHCD, indicating that significant power is transferred from the LH waves to the SOL. Fokker-Planck simulations of these discharges utilizing ray tracing and full wave propagation codes indicate that LH waves in the high density, multi-pass absorption regime linger in the plasma edge, and SOL region, where absorption near or outside the LCFS results in the loss of current drive efficiency. Modeling predicts that non-thermal emission increases with stronger single-pass absorption. Experimental data show that increasing T{sub e} in high density LH discharges results in higher non-thermal electron emission, as predicted by the models.

  4. Electron Charge and Current Densities, the Geometrie Phase and Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukumar, N.; Deb, B. M.; Singh, Harjinder

    1993-02-01

    Some consequences of the quantum fluid dynamics formulation are discussed for excited states of atoms and molecules and for time-dependent processes. It is shown that the conservation of electronic current density j(r) allows us to manufacture a gauge potential for each excited state of an atom, molecule or atom in a molecule. This potential gives rise to a tube of magnetic flux carried around by the many-electron system. In time-dependent situations, the evolution of the electronic density distribution can be followed with simple, site-dependent cellular automaton (CA) rules. The CA consists of a lattice of sites, each with a finite set of possible values, here representing finite localized elements of electronic charge and current density (since the charge density r no longer suffices to fully characterize a time-dependent system, it needs to be supplemented with information about the current density j).Our numerical results are presented elsewhere and further development is in progress.

  5. The role of induced current density in Steroelectronic effects: Perlin effect.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Lima, Joseelyne G; Barquera-Lozada, Jose E; Cuevas, Gabriel; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando

    2015-08-01

    The normal and reverse Perlin effect is usually explained by the redistribution of electron density produced by hyperconjugative mechanisms, which increases the electron population within axial or equatorial proton in normal or reverse effect, respectively. Here an alternative explanation for the Perlin effect is presented on the basis of the topology of the induced current density, which directly determines the nuclear magnetic shielding. Current densities around the C-H bond critical point and intra-atomic and interatomic contributions to the magnetic shielding explain the observed Perlin effect. The balance between intra-atomic and interatomic contributions determines the difference in the total atomic shielding. Normal Perlin effect is dominated by intra-atomic part, whereas reverse effect is dominated by interatomic contribution.

  6. Lower hybrid current drive at ITER-relevant high plasma densities

    SciTech Connect

    Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Marinucci, M.; Panaccione, L.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.

    2009-11-26

    Recent experiments indicated that a further non-inductive current, besides bootstrap, should be necessary for developing advanced scenario for ITER. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) should provide such tool, but its effectiveness was still not proved in operations with ITER-relevant density of the plasma column periphery. Progress of the LH deposition modelling is presented, performed considering the wave physics of the edge, and different ITER-relevant edge parameters. Operations with relatively high edge electron temperatures are expected to reduce the LH{sub ||} spectral broadening and, consequently, enabling the LH power to propagate also in high density plasmas ({sub ||} is the wavenumber component aligned to the confinement magnetic field). New results of FTU experiments are presented, performed by following the aforementioned modeling: they indicate that, for the first time, the LHCD conditions are established by operating at ITER-relevant high edge densities.

  7. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis of porous silicon prepared by photo-electrochemical etching: current density effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husairi, F. S.; Rouhi, J.; Eswar, K. A.; Zainurul, A. Z.; Rusop, M.; Abdullah, S.

    2014-09-01

    Electrical impedance characteristics of porous silicon nanostructures (PSiNs) in frequency function were studied. PSiNs were prepared through photo-electrochemical etching method at various current densities (15-40 mA/cm2) and constant etching time. The atomic force microscope images of PSiNs show that pore diameter and roughness increase when current density increases to 35 mA/cm2. The surface roughness subsequently decreases because of continuous etching of pillars, and a second etching process occurs. Photoluminescence spectra show blue and red shift with increasing applied current density that is attributed to PSiNs size. Variations of electrical resistance and capacitance values of PSiNs were measured using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis. These results indicate that PSiNs prepared at 20 mA/cm2 current density have uniform porous structures with a large number of pillars. Furthermore, this PSiNs structure influences large values of charge transfer resistance and double layer capacitance, indicating potential application in sensors.

  8. Impact of biquadratic coupling on critical current density in Co/Cu/Ni-Fe nanopillar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravinthan, D.; Sabareesan, P.; Daniel, M.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the effect of biquadratic coupling (BQC) on critical current density in the Co/Cu/Ni-Fe nanopillar by solving the magnetization switching dynamics of the free layer which is governed by Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski (LLGS) equation. The LLGS equation is analytically solved for the time independent case and value of the critical current density required to initiate the magnetization switching is calculated. Its value in the absence of BQC is 0.8576×1012 Am-2 and in the presence of BQC its value increases to 1.0914×1012 Am-2. BQC field is acting along the easy axis which opposes the free layer magnetization moving to the out of plane and hence the value of critical current density is high in the presence of BQC. We can reduce the critical current density by reducing the BQC field which can be achieved by making the nanopillar with minimal or no roughness in the pinned and free layer.

  9. Interpretation of very low frequency electromagnetic measurements in terms of normalized current density over variable topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anand; Sharma, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    A 2D inversion approach is developed to interpret VLF electromagnetic measurement recorded over variable topography. To depict the variable topography accurately, an octree mesh discretization is incorporated. Subsurface structure is modeled in terms of apparent current density distribution and compared with the inversion results for actual resistivity distribution obtained using numerical techniques. The study demonstrates that the results obtained using both approaches (current density and resistivity distribution) are comparable, but due to analytical expression, current density imaging is faster. The conjugate gradient method is used to reduce the computation time and storage space when solving the matrix equations, resulting in feasible and practical imaging inversion of VLF data. The preconditioned matrix, which is determined by the distances between the blocks and observation points, has an important function in improving the resolution. In case of flat earth, preconditioned conjugate gradient inversion of data results in images that are comparable to those obtained using resistivity inversion. We also test whether topography variation in the order of skin depth is significant to incorporate topography in the modeling. The example of a topographical field VLF data inversion shows the efficacy of the presented approach to appraise the subsurface structure in terms of current density.

  10. Current densities and total contact currents during forest clearing tasks under 400 kV power lines.

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena; Kuisti, Harri; Elovaara, Jarmo

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze all values of electric currents from measured periods while performing tasks in forest clearing. The objective was also to choose and analyze measurement cases, where current measurements successfully lasted the entire work period (about 30 min). Two forestry workers volunteered to perform four forest clearing tasks under 400 kV power lines. The sampling frequency of the current measurements was 1 sample/s. The maximum values of the current densities were 1.0-1.2 mA/m(2) (calculated internal EFs 5.0-12.0 mV/m), and the average values were 0.2-0.4 mA/m(2) . The highest contact current was 167.4 μA. All measured values during forest clearing tasks were lower than basic restrictions (0.1 V/m and 0.8 V/m) of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:423-428, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Bioelectromagnetics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system for current density measurement on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. Q.; Jie, Y. X. Zou, Z. Y.; Li, W. M.; Wang, Z. X.; Qian, J. P.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Wei, X. C.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Lan, T.; Li, G. S.

    2014-11-15

    A multichannel far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique is under development for current density and electron density profile measurements in the EAST tokamak. Novel molybdenum retro-reflectors are mounted in the inside wall for the double-pass optical arrangement. A Digital Phase Detector with 250 kHz bandwidth, which will provide real-time Faraday rotation angle and density phase shift output, have been developed for use on the POINT system. Initial calibration indicates the electron line-integrated density resolution is less than 5 × 10{sup 16} m{sup −2} (∼2°), and the Faraday rotation angle rms phase noise is <0.1°.

  12. Reduction of TEM/ETG-scale Density Fluctuations in the Core and Edge of H-mode DIII-D Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, L.

    2008-11-01

    Improved confinement during H-mode has been linked to ExB shear suppression of large-scale (kθρs<=0.3) turbulence within an edge transport barrier. While larger scale eddies are preferentially suppressed by increased shear flow in this paradigm, the effects on smaller scale (TEM/ETG-scale) turbulence are less certain. Recent results from DIII-D provide the first experimental evidence that intermediate-scale turbulence (1 < kθρs<=3) together with larger-scale electron temperature fluctuations [1] are also reduced promptly at the L-H transition. These reductions are not confined to the edge region. Intermediate-scale density fluctuations obtained via Doppler backscattering, are significantly reduced (30%-50%) over a range of normalized radii (0.5 <=r/a <=0.85) within a few ms of the L-H transition. A larger reduction (>=75%) is observed at the top of the pedestal (r/a ˜0.9) within 0.2 ms. In addition, low-k electron temperature fluctuations (kθρs<=0.3, from correlation ECE) are strongly reduced (>75%) at the L-H mode transition and during QH-mode (r/a ˜0.7). Gyrokinetic simulation results [2] predict that Te fluctuations contribute significantly to L-mode electron heat transport, hence, the observed reduction is likely an important factor in the observed improved H-mode electron heat confinement (χe^QH/χ3^L < 0.25). Doppler backscattering is also utilized to probe time-dependent shear flows (i.e. zonal flows). The results clearly indicate that zonal flow levels are anti-correlated with the amplitude of intermediate-scale density turbulence in L-mode, suggesting that zonal flows play an important role in turbulence/transport regulation. 3pt [1] L. Schmitz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 035002 (2008).[2] A.E. White et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 056116 (2008).

  13. Switching of YBCO thin films into the dissipative state at high current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villard, Catherine; Devismes, Marie-Françoise; Carbone, Laurent; Bourgault, Daniel

    We report on the switching properties at high current densities of YBCO thin films shunted by an Ag layer. These experiments are performed either in liquid nitrogen or liquid argon (87.3K). Different transition regimes associated to specific electric field thresholds are observed. The nature of the thermal exchange with the bath and the role of the silver shunt and substrate are discussed. While only two regimes in the current-voltage characteristics are observed in liquid nitrogen, successively reversible and hysteretic, an intermediate behaviour appears at 87.3K associated with a total current diversion by the silver layer.

  14. Development of internal magnetic probe for current density profile measurement in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Lee, J. W.; Jung, B. K.; Chung, K. J.; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-11-01

    An internal magnetic probe using Hall sensors to measure a current density profile directly with perturbation of less than 10% to the plasma current is successfully operated for the first time in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST). An appropriate Hall sensor is chosen to produce sufficient signals for VEST magnetic field while maintaining the small size of 10 mm in outer diameter. Temperature around the Hall sensor in a typical VEST plasma is regulated by blown air of 2 bars. First measurement of 60 kA VEST ohmic discharge shows a reasonable agreement with the total plasma current measured by Rogowski coil in VEST.

  15. C-axis critical current density of second-generation YBCO tapes.

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.; Hua, J.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.; Welp, U.; Malozemoff, A. P.; Rupich, M.; Fleshler, S.; Materials Science Division; American Superconductor Corp.

    2010-10-01

    We report on measurements of the temperature and field dependence of the c-axis critical current density (J{sub c}{sup c}) obtained on mesa structures that were patterned into the YBCO layer of second-generation HTS tapes. We find the J{sub c}{sup c}-values of {approx}4 kA cm{sup -2} at 77 K and self-field, corresponding to an unexpectedly high anisotropy in the critical current density J{sub c}{sup ab}/J{sub c}{sup c} of 500-600. C-axis current flow is expected to arise in applications such as the helically wound wires in HTS cables. A simple estimate is given of the fraction of tape width for such a c-axis flow; while in our samples this fraction is approximately 5% for a typical geometry, the fraction will grow linearly with increasing current density anisotropy and could affect the current-carrying ability of the tape.

  16. Density-of-states Fluctuation-induced Negative Out-of-plane Magnetoresistance in Overdoped Bi-2212

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Tomohiro; Adachi, Shintaro; Watanabe, Takao; Nishizaki, Terukazu

    We analyzed the in-plane and out -of-plane m agnetoresistance (MR) f or o verdoped B i1.6Pb0.4Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) s ingle crystals us ing s uperconductive f luctuation t heory, which considers the d ensity-of-states (DOS) contribution i n l ayered superconductors with the conventional s-wave pairing state. The out-of-plane results are well reproduced by the theory, implying that the large, negative out-of-plane MR as well as the sharp increase in the zero-field out-of-plane resistivityρc near the superconducting transition temperature Tc originate from the superconductive DOS fluctuation effect. On the other hand, the in-plane results are better reproduced without the D OS c ontribution (i.e., using only th e Aslamazov-Larkin (AL) contribution), which may be e xplained in terms of the d-wave superconductivity of the layered superconductors.

  17. High temperature and current density induced degradation of multi-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Baoming; Haque, M. A.; Mag-isa, Alexander E.; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo

    2015-10-19

    We present evidence of moderate current density, when accompanied with high temperature, promoting migration of foreign atoms on the surface of multi-layer graphene. Our in situ transmission electron microscope experiments show migration of silicon atoms at temperatures above 800 °C and current density around 4.2 × 10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}. Originating from the micro-machined silicon structures that clamp the freestanding specimen, the atoms are observed to react with the carbon atoms in the multi-layer graphene to produce silicon carbide at temperatures of 900–1000 °C. In the absence of electrical current, there is no migration of silicon and only pyrolysis of polymeric residue is observed.

  18. Threshold current density of electromigration in eutectic SnPb solder

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y.T.; Chou, C.K.; Hsu, Y.C.; Chen Chih; Tu, K.N.

    2005-05-16

    Electromigration has emerged as an important reliability issue in the microelectronics packaging industry since the dimension of solder joints has continued to shrink. In this letter, we report a technique that enables the precise measurement of the important parameters of solder electromigration, such as activation energy, critical length, threshold current density, effective charge numbers, and electromigration rate. Patterned Cu/Ti films in a Si trench were employed for eutectic SnPb solder to be reflowed on, and thus solder Blech specimens were fabricated. Atomic force microscope was used to measure the depletion volume caused by electromigration on the cathode end. The threshold current density is estimated to be 8.5x10{sup 3} A/cm{sup 2} at 100 deg. C, which relates directly to the maximum allowable current that a solder joint can carry without electromigration damage. This technique facilitates the scientifically systematic investigation of electromigration in solders.

  19. Imaging of current density distributions with a Nb weak-link scanning nano-SQUID microscope

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yusuke; Nomura, Shintaro; Kashiwaya, Hiromi; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Ishiguro, Ryosuke; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are accepted as one of the highest magnetic field sensitive probes. There are increasing demands to image local magnetic fields to explore spin properties and current density distributions in a two-dimensional layer of semiconductors or superconductors. Nano-SQUIDs have recently attracting much interest for high spatial resolution measurements in nanometer-scale samples. Whereas weak-link Dayem Josephson junction nano-SQUIDs are suitable to miniaturization, hysteresis in current-voltage (I-V) characteristics that is often observed in Dayem Josephson junction is not desirable for a scanning microscope. Here we report on our development of a weak-link nano-SQUIDs scanning microscope with small hysteresis in I-V curve and on reconstructions of two-dimensional current density vector in two-dimensional electron gas from measured magnetic field. PMID:26459874

  20. Transport, deposition, and liftoff in laboratory density currents composed of hot particles in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.; Manga, M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of transport, deposition, and air entrainment in pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) is required for accurate predictions of future current behaviors and interpretations of ancient deposits, but directly observing the interiors of natural PDCs is effectively impossible. We model PDCs with scaled, hot, particle-laden density currents generated in a 6 m long, 0.6 m wide, 1.8 m tall air-filled tank. Comparison of relevant scaling between our experiments and natural PDCs indicates that we are accurately capturing much of the dynamics of dilute PDCs: * Reynolds numbers of our experiments are lower than natural currents, 10^3 compared to 10^6, but still fully turbulent; * Densimetric and Thermal Richardson numbers are of O(1) in both natural and modeled currents; * Stokes and settling numbers for particles in the experiments fall within the expected range for natural PDCs. Conditions within the tank are monitored with temperature and humidity probes. Experiments are illuminated with sheet lighting, and recorded with high-definition video cameras. In general, currents have average velocities of 10-20 cm/s, initial thicknesses of 10-20 cm (although thickness greatly increases as currents entrain and expand air), and run out or lift off distances of 3-5 m. Large Kelvin-Helmholtz type eddies usually form along the top of the current immediately behind the head; these vortices are similar in size to the total current thickness. In currents that lift off, the distal current end typically retreats with time. Preliminary results suggest that lift off distance decreases with increasing thermal Richardson number. Analysis of turbulent structures indicates that the current heads are dominated by large coherent structures with length scales, L, comparable to the current thickness. Within 5-10 L of the current fronts, sequences of similar large eddies often occur. At greater distances behind the current fronts, turbulent structures become smaller and less

  1. Comparison between the magnetic and transport critical current densities in high critical current density melt-textured yttrium barium copper-oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, L.; Meng, R. L.; Xue, Y. Y.; Hor, P. H.; Chu, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    Using a recently developed pulsed critical current density (Jc) measuring system, the Jc of the high-Jc melt-textured YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) (Y123) bulk samples has been determined. I-V curves with a voltage resolution of 0.5 microV were obtained, and transport Jc's along the a-b plane as high as 7.2 x 10 to the 4th A/sq cm were extracted. These results are comparable to the values obtained magnetically. On the other hand, transport Jc along the c axis were found to be two orders of magnitude smaller, even though the magnetic Jc along the c axis is only about five times smaller than Jc along the a-b plane. It is suggested that for the high-temperature superconducting materials which are highly anisotropic, caution should be taken when using the nontransport magnetic methods to determine Jc.

  2. Application of MODIS GPP to Forecast Risk of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome Based on Fluctuations in Reservoir Population Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loehman, R.; Heinsch, F. A.; Mills, J. N.; Wagoner, K.; Running, S.

    2003-12-01

    Recent predictive models for hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) have used remotely sensed spectral reflectance data to characterize risk areas with limited success. We present an alternative method using gross primary production (GPP) from the MODIS sensor to estimate the effects of biomass accumulation on population density of Peromyscus maniculatus (deer mouse), the principal reservoir species for Sin Nombre virus (SNV). The majority of diagnosed HPS cases in North America are attributed to SNV, which is transmitted to humans through inhalation of excretions and secretions from infected rodents. A logistic model framework is used to evaluate MODIS GPP, temperature, and precipitation as predictors of P. maniculatus density at established trapping sites across the western United States. Rodent populations are estimated using monthly minimum number alive (MNA) data for 2000 through 2002. Both local meteorological data from nearby weather stations and 1.25 degree x 1 degree gridded data from the NASA DAO were used in the regression model to determine the spatial sensitivity of the response. MODIS eight-day GPP data (1-km resolution) were acquired and binned to monthly average and monthly sum GPP for 3km x 3km grids surrounding each rodent trapping site. The use of MODIS GPP to forecast HPS risk may result in a marked improvement over past reflectance-based risk area characterizations. The MODIS GPP product provides a vegetation dynamics estimate that is unique to disease models, and targets the fundamental ecological processes responsible for increased rodent density and amplified disease risk.

  3. THEMIS two‐point measurements of the cross‐tail current density: A thick bifurcated current sheet in the near‐Earth plasma sheet

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The basic properties of the near‐Earth current sheet from 8 RE to 12 RE were determined based on Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations from 2007 to 2013. Ampere's law was used to estimate the current density when the locations of two spacecraft were suitable for the calculation. A total of 3838 current density observations were obtained to study the vertical profile. For typical solar wind conditions, the current density near (off) the central plane of the current sheet ranged from 1 to 2 nA/m2 (1 to 8 nA/m2). All the high current densities appeared off the central plane of the current sheet, indicating the formation of a bifurcated current sheet structure when the current density increased above 2 nA/m2. The median profile also showed a bifurcated structure, in which the half thickness was about 3 RE. The distance between the peak of the current density and the central plane of the current sheet was 0.5 to 1 RE. High current densities above 4 nA/m2 were observed in some cases that occurred preferentially during substorms, but they also occurred in quiet times. In contrast to the commonly accepted picture, these high current densities can form without a high solar wind dynamic pressure. In addition, these high current densities can appear in two magnetic configurations: tail‐like and dipolar structures. At least two mechanisms, magnetic flux depletion and new current system formation during the expansion phase, other than plasma sheet compression are responsible for the formation of the bifurcated current sheets. PMID:27722039

  4. [Correlation of fine structures of distributions of amplitudes of a photomultiplier dark current fluctuations with the Earth rotations about its axis].

    PubMed

    Fedorov, M V; Belousov, L V; Voeĭkov, V L; Zenchenko, K I; Zenchenko, T A; Konradov, A A; Shnol', S E

    2001-01-01

    The fine structures of distributions of photomultiplier dark current fluctuations measured in two laboratories 2000 km distant from other: in the international Institute of Biophysics (Neuss, Germany) and in the Moscow State University (Moscow, Russia) were compared. It is shown that similar forms of appropriate histograms are apparently more often realized at both locations at the same local time. This confirms the previous conclusion that the fine structure of distributions correlates with rotation of the Earth about its axis.

  5. Effects of Neutral Density on Energetic Ions Produced Near High-Current Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kameyama, Ikuya

    1997-01-01

    Energy distributions of ion current from high-current, xenon hollow cathodes, which are essential information to understand erosion phenomena observed in high-power ion thrusters, were obtained using an electrostatic energy analyzer (ESA). The effects of ambient pressure and external flow rate introduced immediately downstream of hollow cathode on ion currents with energies greater than that associated with the cathode-to-anode potential difference were investigated. The results were analyzed to determine the changes in the magnitudes of ion currents to the ESA at various energies. Either increasing the ambient pressure or adding external flow induces an increase in the distribution of ion currents with moderate energies (epsilon less than 25 to 35 eV) and a decrease in the distribution for high energies (epsilon greater than 25 to 35 eV). The magnitude of the current distribution increase in the moderate energy range is greater for a cathode equipped with a toroidal keeper than for one without a keeper, but the distribution in the high energy range does not seem to be affected by a keeper. An MHD model, which has been proposed to describe energetic-ion production mechanism in hollow cathode at high discharge currents, was developed to describe these effects. The results show, however, that this model involves no mechanism by which a significant increase of ion current could occur at any energy. It was found, on the other hand, that the potential-hill model of energetic ion production, which assumes existence of a local maximum of plasma potential, could explain combined increases in the currents of ions with moderate energies and decreases in high energy ions due to increased neutral atom density using a charge-exchange mechanism. The existing, simplified version of the potential-hill model, however, shows poor quantitative agreement with measured ion-current-energy-distribution changes induced by neutral density changes.

  6. Thermal history of pyroclastic density currents and pyroclasts at Tungurahua, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, M. C.; Dufek, J.

    2014-12-01

    The associated hazards and opaqueness of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) make it impossible for in-situ thermal or concentration measurements within the currents that would provide critical information on the dynamics of PDCs. The entrainment of ambient air into these currents significantly impacts their runout distance and thermal history. The most efficient mechanism to cool a PDC is through the entrainment of colder, denser ambient air through Kelvin-Helmholtz and lobe-and-cleft instabilities, which are dependent on density stratification in the current and topographic-current interactions. The combination of high-resolution multiphase numerical models in concert with field measurements of PDC deposits allows us to better understand the evolving concentration gradients, instabilities, entrainment of air, and temperatures of PDCs. We employ a three-dimensional multiphase Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian (EEL) model, high-resolution topography, and field data to understand the PDCs that traveled down the Juive Grande quebrada during the 2006 eruption of Tungurahua volcano. The multiphase model allows us to examine PDC dynamics such as particle concentrations, velocities, thermal heterogeneities, and ambient air entrainment. As the PDC propagates, the entrainment coefficient decreases due to enhanced density stratification. The interaction of the current with rugged topography increases the entrainment coefficient. We also calculate the temperature of deposition and breadcrust bomb rind thickness for individual pyroclasts. The individual pyroclasts are tracked as Lagrangian particles in the multiphase model and we employ the breadcrust bomb model (Benage et al., 2014) to calculate the deposition temperature and the formation of the non-vesicular to low vesicularity rinds. The model results are compared to paleomagnetic data and field measurements of rind thickness, respectively. This allows the deposited pyroclasts to be natural thermometers that help constrain the

  7. Density currents in the Chicago River: Characterization, effects on water quality, and potential sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Garcia, Carlos M.; Oberg, Kevin A.; Johnson, Kevin K.; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2008-01-01

    Bidirectional flows in a river system can occur under stratified flow conditions and in addition to creating significant errors in discharge estimates, the upstream propagating currents are capable of transporting contaminants and affecting water quality. Detailed field observations of bidirectional flows were made in the Chicago River in Chicago, Illinois in the winter of 2005-06. Using multiple acoustic Doppler current profilers simultaneously with a water-quality profiler, the formation of upstream propagating density currents within the Chicago River both as an underflow and an overflow was observed on three occasions. Density differences driving the flow primarily arise from salinity differences between intersecting branches of the Chicago River, whereas water temperature is secondary in the creation of these currents. Deicing salts appear to be the primary source of salinity in the North Branch of the Chicago River, entering the waterway through direct runoff and effluent from a wastewater-treatment plant in a large metropolitan area primarily served by combined sewers. Water-quality assessments of the Chicago River may underestimate (or overestimate) the impairment of the river because standard water-quality monitoring practices do not account for density-driven underflows (or overflows). Chloride concentrations near the riverbed can significantly exceed concentrations at the river surface during underflows indicating that full-depth parameter profiles are necessary for accurate water-quality assessments in urban environments where application of deicing salt is common.

  8. Production of ultrahigh ion current densities at skin-layer subrelativistic laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badziak, J.; Glowacz, S.; Jablonski, S.; Parys, P.; Wolowski, J.; Hora, H.; Krása, J.; Láska, L.; Rohlena, K.

    2004-12-01

    Some applications of fast ions driven by a short (<=1 ps) laser pulse (e.g. fast ignition of ICF targets, x-ray laser pumping, laboratory astrophysics research or some nuclear physics experiments) require ion beams of picosecond (or shorter) time durations and of very high ion current densities (~1010 A cm-2 or higher). A possible way of producing ion beams with such extreme parameters is ballistic focusing of fast ions generated by a target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism at relativistic laser intensities. In this paper we discuss another method, where the production of short-pulse ion beams of ultrahigh current densities is possible in a planar geometry at subrelativistic laser intensities and at a low energy (<=1 J) of the laser pulse. This method—referred to as skin-layer ponderomotive acceleration (S-LPA)—uses strong ponderomotive forces induced at the skin-layer interaction of a short laser pulse with a proper preplasma layer in front of a solid target. The basic features of the high-current ion generation by S-LPA were investigated using a simplified theory, numerical hydrodynamic simulations and measurements. The experiments were performed with subjoule 1 ps laser pulses interacting with massive or thin foil targets at intensities of up to 2 × 1017 W cm-2. It was found that both in the backward and forward directions highly collimated high-density ion beams (plasma blocks) with current densities at the ion source (close to the target) approaching 1010 A cm-2 are produced, in accordance with the theory and numerical calculations. These ion current densities were found to be comparable to (or even higher than) those estimated from recent short-pulse TNSA experiments with relativistic laser intensities. Apart from the simpler physics of the laser plasma interaction, the advantage of the considered method is the low energy of the driving laser pulses allowing the production of ultrahigh-current-density ion beams with a high repetition rate. It

  9. Irreversibility line in superconductor as line of constant shielding current density

    SciTech Connect

    Goemoery, F.; Takacs, S.; Holubar, T.

    1997-06-01

    The irreversibility of magnetic properties of superconductors is due to the existence of macroscopic shielding currents persisting for some period of time. The same currents offer nearly lossless electricity transport. Thus, the extent of magnetic irreversibility is directly proportional to the current-carrying capacity of a superconductor. Because the current-carrying capacity is an intrinsic property of the material, various experimental techniques should give the same irreversibility line corresponding to the same macroscopic shielding current density. Following this approach, the authors compared the irreversibility lines obtained from AC susceptibility measurement with those determined from quasistatic magnetization loops recorded with the help of a SQUID susceptometer. An additional parameter which has to be comparable is the electrical field characterizing the rate of change of the magnetic field. Fulfilling these conditions of equivalency, the authors found that it is possible to explain the irreversibility lines obtained by various techniques and at different conditions by the same physical model. They demonstrate that for the data, taken within two orders of magnitude for the current density and more than seven orders of magnitude for the electrical field, a consistent picture expressing all the observed features by the same model can be found. Measurements are presented from YBCO samples.

  10. Magnetically filtered Faraday probe for measuring the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Rovey, Joshua L.; Walker, Mitchell L.R.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Peterson, Peter Y.

    2006-01-15

    The ability of a magnetically filtered Faraday probe (MFFP) to obtain the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster is investigated. The MFFP is designed to eliminate the collection of low-energy, charge-exchange (CEX) ions by using a variable magnetic field as an ion filter. In this study, a MFFP, Faraday probe with a reduced acceptance angle (BFP), and nude Faraday probe are used to measure the ion current density profile of a 5 kW Hall thruster operating over the range of 300-500 V and 5-10 mg/s. The probes are evaluated on a xenon propellant Hall thruster in the University of Michigan Large Vacuum Test Facility at operating pressures within the range of 4.4x10{sup -4} Pa Xe (3.3x10{sup -6} Torr Xe) to 1.1x10{sup -3} Pa Xe (8.4x10{sup -6} Torr Xe) in order to study the ability of the Faraday probe designs to filter out CEX ions. Detailed examination of the results shows that the nude probe measures a greater ion current density profile than both the MFFP and BFP over the range of angular positions investigated for each operating condition. The differences between the current density profiles obtained by each probe are attributed to the ion filtering systems employed. Analysis of the results shows that the MFFP, operating at a +5 A solenoid current, provides the best agreement with flight-test data and across operating pressures.

  11. Fluctuation theory of critical phenomena in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, G. A.

    2016-07-01

    It is assumed that critical phenomena are generated by density wave fluctuations carrying a certain kinetic energy. It is noted that all coupling equations for critical indices are obtained within the context of this hypothesis. Critical indices are evaluated for 15 liquids more accurately than when using the current theory of critical phenomena.

  12. Quenching of the beam-plasma instability by large-scale density fluctuations in 3 dimensions. [Langmuir waves in type 3 solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muschietti, L.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D.

    1985-01-01

    The highly variable, yet low, level of Langmuir waves measured in situ by spacecraft when electron beams associated with type III solar bursts are passing by are addressed by a model based on the existence of large scale density fluctuations capable of sufficiently diffusing small-k beam-unstable Langmuir waves in phase space. The model is also informed by the presence of a significant isotropic nonthermal tail in the distribution function of the background electron population, which is capable of stabilizing larger k modes. The model is able to predict various levels of Langmuir waves, depending on the parameters; calculations indicate that, for realistic parameters, the most unstable small k modes are fully stabilized, while some oblique mode with higher k and lower growth rate may remain unstable.

  13. Density-fluctuation symbolic computation on the (3+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Kudryashov-Sinelshchikov equation for a bubbly liquid with experimental support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin-Yi

    2016-06-01

    Liquids with gas bubbles are commonly seen in medical science, natural science, daily life and engineering. Nonlinear-wave symbolic computation on the (3+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Kudryashov-Sinelshchikov model for a bubbly liquid is hereby performed. An auto-Bäcklund transformation and with some solitonic solutions are obtained. With respect to the density fluctuation of the bubble-liquid mixture, both the auto-Bäcklund transformation and solitonic solutions depend on the bubble-liquid-viscosity, transverse-perturbation, bubble-liquid-nonlinearity and bubble-liquid-dispersion coefficient functions. We note that some shock waves given by our solutions have been observed by the gas-bubble/liquid-mixture experiments. Effects on a bubbly liquid with respect to the bubble-liquid-viscosity, transverse-perturbation, bubble-liquid-nonlinearity and bubble-liquid-dispersion coefficient functions might be detected by the future gas-bubble/liquid-mixture experiments.

  14. Towards time-dependent current-density-functional theory in the non-linear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Escartín, J. M.; Vincendon, M.; Dinh, P. M.; Suraud, E.; Romaniello, P.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2015-02-28

    Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TDDFT) is a well-established theoretical approach to describe and understand irradiation processes in clusters and molecules. However, within the so-called adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA) to the exchange-correlation (xc) potential, TDDFT can show insufficiencies, particularly in violently dynamical processes. This is because within ALDA the xc potential is instantaneous and is a local functional of the density, which means that this approximation neglects memory effects and long-range effects. A way to go beyond ALDA is to use Time-Dependent Current-Density-Functional Theory (TDCDFT), in which the basic quantity is the current density rather than the density as in TDDFT. This has been shown to offer an adequate account of dissipation in the linear domain when the Vignale-Kohn (VK) functional is used. Here, we go beyond the linear regime and we explore this formulation in the time domain. In this case, the equations become very involved making the computation out of reach; we hence propose an approximation to the VK functional which allows us to calculate the dynamics in real time and at the same time to keep most of the physics described by the VK functional. We apply this formulation to the calculation of the time-dependent dipole moment of Ca, Mg and Na{sub 2}. Our results show trends similar to what was previously observed in model systems or within linear response. In the non-linear domain, our results show that relaxation times do not decrease with increasing deposited excitation energy, which sets some limitations to the practical use of TDCDFT in such a domain of excitations.

  15. Towards time-dependent current-density-functional theory in the non-linear regime.

    PubMed

    Escartín, J M; Vincendon, M; Romaniello, P; Dinh, P M; Reinhard, P-G; Suraud, E

    2015-02-28

    Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TDDFT) is a well-established theoretical approach to describe and understand irradiation processes in clusters and molecules. However, within the so-called adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA) to the exchange-correlation (xc) potential, TDDFT can show insufficiencies, particularly in violently dynamical processes. This is because within ALDA the xc potential is instantaneous and is a local functional of the density, which means that this approximation neglects memory effects and long-range effects. A way to go beyond ALDA is to use Time-Dependent Current-Density-Functional Theory (TDCDFT), in which the basic quantity is the current density rather than the density as in TDDFT. This has been shown to offer an adequate account of dissipation in the linear domain when the Vignale-Kohn (VK) functional is used. Here, we go beyond the linear regime and we explore this formulation in the time domain. In this case, the equations become very involved making the computation out of reach; we hence propose an approximation to the VK functional which allows us to calculate the dynamics in real time and at the same time to keep most of the physics described by the VK functional. We apply this formulation to the calculation of the time-dependent dipole moment of Ca, Mg and Na2. Our results show trends similar to what was previously observed in model systems or within linear response. In the non-linear domain, our results show that relaxation times do not decrease with increasing deposited excitation energy, which sets some limitations to the practical use of TDCDFT in such a domain of excitations.

  16. Cluster electric current density measurements within a magnetic flux rope in the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Lepping, R. P.; Gjerloev, J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Fairfield, D. H.; Acuna, M. H.; Balogh, A.; Dunlop, M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K.

    2003-01-01

    On August 22, 2001 all 4 Cluster spacecraft nearly simultaneously penetrated a magnetic flux rope in the tail. The flux rope encounter took place in the central plasma sheet, Beta(sub i) approx. 1-2, near the leading edge of a bursty bulk flow. The "time-of-flight" of the flux rope across the 4 spacecraft yielded V(sub x) approx. 700 km/s and a diameter of approx.1 R(sub e). The speed at which the flux rope moved over the spacecraft is in close agreement with the Cluster plasma measurements. The magnetic field profiles measured at each spacecraft were first modeled separately using the Lepping-Burlaga force-free flux rope model. The results indicated that the center of the flux rope passed northward (above) s/c 3, but southward (below) of s/c 1, 2 and 4. The peak electric currents along the central axis of the flux rope predicted by these single-s/c models were approx.15-19 nA/sq m. The 4-spacecraft Cluster magnetic field measurements provide a second means to determine the electric current density without any assumption regarding flux rope structure. The current profile determined using the curlometer technique was qualitatively similar to those determined by modeling the individual spacecraft magnetic field observations and yielded a peak current density of 17 nA/m2 near the central axis of the rope. However, the curlometer results also showed that the flux rope was not force-free with the component of the current density perpendicular to the magnetic field exceeding the parallel component over the forward half of the rope, perhaps due to the pressure gradients generated by the collision of the BBF with the inner magnetosphere. Hence, while the single-spacecraft models are very successful in fitting flux rope magnetic field and current variations, they do not provide a stringent test of the force-free condition.

  17. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C. A.

    1988-04-01

    Large diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes operated at 10 kV have produced 1-5-microsec electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq cm. Normalized beam brightness, approximately 300,000 A/sq cm sq rad has been consistently measured. To obtain this high-current density, the LaB6 cathodes have been heated to temperatures between about 1600 and 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure 10 to the -6th to -10 to the -5th Torr, i.e., under much less demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser-type cathodes.

  18. Broadband external cavity tunable quantum dot lasers with low injection current density.

    PubMed

    Lv, X Q; Jin, P; Wang, W Y; Wang, Z G

    2010-04-26

    Broadband grating-coupled external cavity laser, based on InAs/GaAs quantum dots, is achieved. The device has a wavelength tuning range from 1141.6 nm to 1251.7 nm under a low continuous-wave injection current density (458 A/cm(2)). The tunable bandwidth covers consecutively the light emissions from both the ground state and the 1st excited state of quantum dots. The effects of cavity length and antireflection facet coating on device performance are studied. It is shown that antireflection facet coating expands the tuning bandwidth up to ~150 nm, accompanied by an evident increase in threshold current density, which is attributed to the reduced interaction between the light field and the quantum dots in the active region of the device. PMID:20588736

  19. Morphological features of the copper surface layer under sliding with high density electric current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadin, V. V.; Aleutdinova, M. I.; Rubtsov, V. Ye.; Aleutdinova, V. A.

    2015-10-01

    Conductivity and wear intensity of copper under the influence of dry friction and electric current with contact density higher 100 A/cm2 are presented. It is shown that an increase in hardness and heat outflow from a friction zone leads to the reduction of wear intensity and current contact density increase corresponding to the beginning of catastrophic wear. Structural changes, such as the formation of FeO oxide and α-Fe particles in the copper surface layer, have also been found. It is observed that a worn surface is deformed according to a viscous liquid mechanism. Such singularity is explained in terms of appearance of high-excited atomic states in deforming micro-volumes near contact spots that lead to easy stress relaxation by local plastic shears in the vicinity of stress concentrators. In common this effect allows to achieve high wear resistance.

  20. Simulating the frontal instability of lock-exchange density currents with dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanggui; Geng, Xingguo; Wang, Heping; Zhuang, Xin; Ouyang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    The frontal instability of lock-exchange density currents is numerically investigated using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) at the mesoscopic particle level. For modeling two-phase flow, the “color” repulsion model is adopted to describe binary fluids according to Rothman-Keller method. The present DPD simulation can reproduce the flow phenomena of lock-exchange density currents, including the lobe-and-cleft instability that appears at the head, as well as the formation of coherent billow structures at the interface behind the head due to the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Furthermore, through the DPD simulation, some small-scale characteristics can be observed, which are difficult to be captured in macroscopic simulation and experiment.

  1. Morphological features of the copper surface layer under sliding with high density electric current

    SciTech Connect

    Fadin, V. V.; Aleutdinova, M. I.; Rubtsov, V. Ye.; Aleutdinova, V. A.

    2015-10-27

    Conductivity and wear intensity of copper under the influence of dry friction and electric current with contact density higher 100 A/cm{sup 2} are presented. It is shown that an increase in hardness and heat outflow from a friction zone leads to the reduction of wear intensity and current contact density increase corresponding to the beginning of catastrophic wear. Structural changes, such as the formation of FeO oxide and α-Fe particles in the copper surface layer, have also been found. It is observed that a worn surface is deformed according to a viscous liquid mechanism. Such singularity is explained in terms of appearance of high-excited atomic states in deforming micro-volumes near contact spots that lead to easy stress relaxation by local plastic shears in the vicinity of stress concentrators. In common this effect allows to achieve high wear resistance.

  2. PHYSICS OF THE HIGH CURRENT DENSITY ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE (EBIS).

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, M.C.

    1980-02-01

    Interest in upgrading present heavy particle accelerators has led to study of EBIS as a possible source of high Z ions, e.g,, Ar{sup +18}. The present work has been motivated primarily by the results reported by CRYEBIS, which indicate that a space charge neutralized, external electron gun can achieve current densities of 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2}. Scaling relationships are developed as a basis for understanding CRYEBIS operation. The relevance of collective effects to beam equilibrium and stability is pointed out, Single electron impact ionization scaling and beam neutralization scaling indicate that higher beam voltage may be the easiest way of increasing both ionization rate and particle intensity. Consideration of radial ion confinement suggests that beam collapse to high current density may be related to the highest charge state which is energetically accessible.

  3. Strong critical current density enhancement in NiCu/NbN superconducting nanostripes for optical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocco, N.; Pepe, G. P.; Capretti, A.; Parlato, L.; Pagliarulo, V.; Peluso, G.; Barone, A.; Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Casaburi, A.; Kashiwazaki, N.; Taino, T.; Myoren, H.; Sobolewski, Roman

    2010-08-01

    We present measurements of ferromagnet/superconductor (NiCu/NbN) and plain superconducting (NbN) nanostripes with the linewidth ranging from 150 to 300 nm. The NiCu (3 nm)/NbN (8 nm) bilayers, as compared to NbN (8 nm), showed a up to six times increase in their critical current density, reaching at 4.2 K the values of 5.5 MA/cm2 for a 150 nm wide nanostripe meander and 12.1 MA/cm2 for a 300 nm one. We also observed six-time sensitivity enhancement when the 150 nm wide NiCu/NbN nanostripe was used as an optical detector. The strong critical current enhancement is explained by the vortex pinning strength and density increase in NiCu/NbN bilayers and confirmed by approximately tenfold increase in the vortex polarizability factor.

  4. Dependence of various SOL widths on plasma current and density in NSTX H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J; Maingi, R; Boedo, J; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2009-02-12

    The dependence of various SOL widths on the line-averaged density ({ovr n}{sub e}) and plasma current (l{sub p}) for the quiescent H-mode plasmas with Type-V ELMs in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) was investigated. It is found that the heat flux SOL width ({lambda}{sub q}), measured by the IR camera, is virtually insensitive to {ovr n}{sub e} and has a strong negative dependence on l{sub p}. This insensitivity of {lambda}{sub q} to {ovr n}{sub e} is consistent with the scaling law from JET H-mode plasmas that shows a very weak dependence on the upstream density. The electron temperature, ion saturation current density, electron density, and electron pressure decay lengths ({lambda}{sub Te}, {lambda}{sub jsat}, {lambda}{sub ne}, and {lambda}{sub pe}, respectively) measured by the probe showed that {lambda}{sub Te} and {lambda}{sub jsat} have strong negative dependence on l{sub p}, whereas {lambda}{sub ne} and {lambda}{sub pe} revealed only a little or no dependence. The dependence of {lambda}{sub Te} on l{sub p} is consistent with the scaling law in the literature while {lambda}{sub ne} and {lambda}{sub pe} dependence shows a different trend.

  5. Current Density Functional Theory Using Meta-Generalized Gradient Exchange-Correlation Functionals.

    PubMed

    Furness, James W; Verbeke, Joachim; Tellgren, Erik I; Stopkowicz, Stella; Ekström, Ulf; Helgaker, Trygve; Teale, Andrew M

    2015-09-01

    We present the self-consistent implementation of current-dependent (hybrid) meta-generalized gradient approximation (mGGA) density functionals using London atomic orbitals. A previously proposed generalized kinetic energy density is utilized to implement mGGAs in the framework of Kohn-Sham current density functional theory (KS-CDFT). A unique feature of the nonperturbative implementation of these functionals is the ability to seamlessly explore a wide range of magnetic fields up to 1 au (∼235 kT) in strength. CDFT functionals based on the TPSS and B98 forms are investigated, and their performance is assessed by comparison with accurate coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) data. In the weak field regime, magnetic properties such as magnetizabilities and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants show modest but systematic improvements over generalized gradient approximations (GGA). However, in the strong field regime, the mGGA-based forms lead to a significantly improved description of the recently proposed perpendicular paramagnetic bonding mechanism, comparing well with CCSD(T) data. In contrast to functionals based on the vorticity, these forms are found to be numerically stable, and their accuracy at high field suggests that the extension of mGGAs to CDFT via the generalized kinetic energy density should provide a useful starting point for further development of CDFT approximations.

  6. Current Density Functional Theory Using Meta-Generalized Gradient Exchange-Correlation Functionals.

    PubMed

    Furness, James W; Verbeke, Joachim; Tellgren, Erik I; Stopkowicz, Stella; Ekström, Ulf; Helgaker, Trygve; Teale, Andrew M

    2015-09-01

    We present the self-consistent implementation of current-dependent (hybrid) meta-generalized gradient approximation (mGGA) density functionals using London atomic orbitals. A previously proposed generalized kinetic energy density is utilized to implement mGGAs in the framework of Kohn-Sham current density functional theory (KS-CDFT). A unique feature of the nonperturbative implementation of these functionals is the ability to seamlessly explore a wide range of magnetic fields up to 1 au (∼235 kT) in strength. CDFT functionals based on the TPSS and B98 forms are investigated, and their performance is assessed by comparison with accurate coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) data. In the weak field regime, magnetic properties such as magnetizabilities and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants show modest but systematic improvements over generalized gradient approximations (GGA). However, in the strong field regime, the mGGA-based forms lead to a significantly improved description of the recently proposed perpendicular paramagnetic bonding mechanism, comparing well with CCSD(T) data. In contrast to functionals based on the vorticity, these forms are found to be numerically stable, and their accuracy at high field suggests that the extension of mGGAs to CDFT via the generalized kinetic energy density should provide a useful starting point for further development of CDFT approximations. PMID:26575912

  7. Self-consistent density functional calculation of field emission currents from metals

    PubMed

    Gohda; Nakamura; Watanabe; Watanabe

    2000-08-21

    We have developed a fully self-consistent method which is suitable to examine field emission currents, on the basis of the density functional theory. In our method, the nearby counterelectrode is not necessary. By using this method, we have investigated field emission currents from a biased metallic surface represented by the jellium model. We have found that the energy barrier between the jellium and vacuum becomes lower than the Fermi energy under strong electric fields (e.g., 10 V/nm for r(s) = 4 bohr). In this situation, the slope of the Fowler-Nordheim plot becomes flatter than that under a weaker field.

  8. Current density and poloidal magnetic field for toroidal elliptic plasmas with triangularity

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.; Haines, M.G.; Castro, E.

    2005-08-15

    Changes in the poloidal magnetic field around a tokamak magnetic surface due to different values of triangularity and ellipticity are analyzed in this paper. The treatment here presented allows the determination of the poloidal magnetic field from knowledge of the toroidal current density. Different profiles of these currents are studied. Improvements in the analytic forms of the magnetic surfaces have also been found. The treatment has been performed using a recent published system of coordinates. Suitable analytic equations have been used for the elliptic magnetic surfaces with triangularity and Shafranov shift.

  9. Electrical transport properties and current density - voltage characteristic of PVA-Ag nanocomposite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A. K.; Dutta, B.; Sinha, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Basu, S.; Meikap, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    Silver (Ag) nanoparticle and Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) - Silver (Ag) composite have been prepared and its dielectric constant, ac conductivity, and current density-voltage characteristics have been studied, at and above room temperature. Here correlated barrier hopping found to be the dominant charge transport mechanism with maximum barrier height of 0.11 eV. The sample, under ±5 V applied voltage, show back to back Schottky diode behaviour.

  10. Resistance of 4H-SiC Schottky barriers at high forward-current densities

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P. A. Samsonova, T. P.; Il’inskaya, N. D.; Serebrennikova, O. Yu.; Kon’kov, O. I.; Potapov, A. S.

    2015-07-15

    The resistance of Schottky barriers based on 4H-SiC is experimentally determined at high forward-current densities. The measured resistance is found to be significantly higher than the resistance predicted by classical mechanisms of electron transport in Schottky contacts. An assumption concerning the crucial contribution of the tunnel-transparent intermediate oxide layer between the metal and semiconductor to the barrier resistance is proposed and partially justified.

  11. Enhanced current and power density of micro-scale microbial fuel cells with ultramicroelectrode anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hao; Rangaswami, Sriram; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Chae, Junseok

    2016-09-01

    We present a micro-scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an ultramicroelectrode (UME) anode, with the aim of creating a miniaturized high-current/power-density converter using carbon-neutral and renewable energy sources. Micro-scale MFCs have been studied for more than a decade, yet their current and power densities are still an order of magnitude lower than those of their macro-scale counterparts. In order to enhance the current/power densities, we engineer a concentric ring-shaped UME, with a width of 20 μm, to facilitate the diffusion of ions in the vicinity of the micro-organisms that form biofilm on the UME. The biofilm extends approximately 15 μm from the edge of the UME, suggesting the effective biofilm area increases. Measured current/power densities per the effective area and the original anode area are 7.08  ±  0.01 A m‑2 & 3.09  ±  0.04 W m‑2 and 17.7  ±  0.03 A m‑2 & 7.72  ±  0.09 W m‑2, respectively. This is substantially higher than any prior work in micro-scale MFCs, and very close, or even higher, to that of macro-scale MFCs. A Coulombic efficiency, a measure of how efficiently an MFC harvests electrons from donor substrate, of 70%, and an energy conversion efficiency of 17% are marked, highlighting the micro-scale MFC as an attractive alternative within the existing energy conversion portfolio.

  12. Divergence of the axial current and fermion density in Gross-Neveu models

    SciTech Connect

    Karbstein, Felix; Thies, Michael

    2007-10-15

    The divergence of the axial current is used to relate the spatial derivative of the fermion density to the bare fermion mass and scalar/pseudoscalar condensates in 1+1 dimensional Gross-Neveu models. This serves as a useful test of known results, to explain simple features of the continuous chiral model and to resolve a conflict concerning the assignment of baryon number to certain multifermion bound states.

  13. Enhanced current and power density of micro-scale microbial fuel cells with ultramicroelectrode anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hao; Rangaswami, Sriram; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Chae, Junseok

    2016-09-01

    We present a micro-scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an ultramicroelectrode (UME) anode, with the aim of creating a miniaturized high-current/power-density converter using carbon-neutral and renewable energy sources. Micro-scale MFCs have been studied for more than a decade, yet their current and power densities are still an order of magnitude lower than those of their macro-scale counterparts. In order to enhance the current/power densities, we engineer a concentric ring-shaped UME, with a width of 20 μm, to facilitate the diffusion of ions in the vicinity of the micro-organisms that form biofilm on the UME. The biofilm extends approximately 15 μm from the edge of the UME, suggesting the effective biofilm area increases. Measured current/power densities per the effective area and the original anode area are 7.08  ±  0.01 A m-2 & 3.09  ±  0.04 W m-2 and 17.7  ±  0.03 A m-2 & 7.72  ±  0.09 W m-2, respectively. This is substantially higher than any prior work in micro-scale MFCs, and very close, or even higher, to that of macro-scale MFCs. A Coulombic efficiency, a measure of how efficiently an MFC harvests electrons from donor substrate, of 70%, and an energy conversion efficiency of 17% are marked, highlighting the micro-scale MFC as an attractive alternative within the existing energy conversion portfolio.

  14. Fast electron current density profile and diffusion studies during LHCD in PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.E.; Kesner, J.; Luckhardt, S.; Paoletti, F.; von Goeler, S.; Bernabei, S.; Kaita, R.; Rimini, F.

    1993-08-01

    Successful current profile control experiments using lower hybrid current drive (LCHD) clearly require knowledge of (1) the location of the driven fast electrons and (2) the ability to maintain that location from spreading due to radial diffusion. These issues can be addressed by examining the data from the hard x-ray camera on PBX-M, a unique diagnostic producing two-dimensional, time resolved tangential images of fast electron bremsstrahlung. Using modeling, these line-of-sight images are inverted to extract a radial fast electron current density profile. We note that ``hollow`` profiles have been observed, indicative of off-axis current drive. These profiles can then be used to calculate an upper bound for an effective fast electron diffusion constant: assuming an extremely radially narrow lower hybrid absorption profile and a transport model based on Rax and Moreau, a model fast electron current density profile is calculated and compared to the experimentally derived profile. The model diffusion constant is adjusted until a good match is found. Applied to steady-state quiescent modes on PBX-M, we obtain an upper limit for an effective diffusion constant of about D*=1.1 m{sup 2}/sec.

  15. Microwave field frequency and current density modulated skyrmion-chain in nanotrack

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fusheng; Ezawa, Motohiko; Zhou, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates as information carriers for the next-generation spintronic devices because of their small size, facile current-driven motion and topological stability. The controllable nucleation and motion of skyrmions in magnetic nanostructures will be essential in future skyrmionic devices. Here, we present the microwave assisted nucleation and motion of skyrmion-chains in magnetic nanotrack by micromagnetic simulation. A skyrmion-chain is a one-dimensional cluster of equally spaced skyrmions. A skyrmion-chain conveys an integer bit n when it consists of n skyrmions. A series of skyrmion-chains with various lengths is generated and moved in the nanotrack driven by spin-polarized current. The period, length and spacing of the skyrmion-chains can be dynamically manipulated by controlling either the frequency of the microwave field or the time dependent spin-polarized current density. A skyrmion-chain behaves as a massless particle, where it stops without delay when the current is stopped. Their velocity is found to be linearly dependent on the current density and insensitive to the frequency and amplitude of the excitation microwave field. Uniform motion of trains of skyrmion-chains in nanotrack offers a promising approach for spintronic multi-bit memories containing series of skyrmion-chains to represent data stream. PMID:26468929

  16. Iontophoretic Permeation of Lisinopril at Different Current Densities and Drug Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ashish; Nayak, Satish; Soni, Vandana

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present work was to assess iontophoretic permeation of Lisinopril at different current densities and concentrations for development of patient-controlled active transdermal system. Methods: In vitro iontophoretic transdermal delivery of Lisinopril across the pigskin was investigated at three different drug concentrations and three different current densities (0.25- 0.75 mA/cm2) in the donor cell of the diffusion apparatus, using cathodal iontophoresis along with the passive controls. Results: For passive permeation, the steady state flux significantly increased with the increasing of donor drug concentration. At all concentration levels, iontophoresis considerably increased the permeation rate compared to passive controls. Iontophoretic transport of Lisinopril was to be found increase with current densities. Flux enhancement was highest at the lowest drug load and lowest at the highest drug load. Conclusion: The obtained results indicate that permeation rate of Lisinopril across the pigskin can be considerably enhanced, controlled or optimized by the use of Iontophoresis technique. PMID:24312799

  17. The dynamics of short-scale turbulent fluctuations across low-intermediate-high-confinement transition with lower hybrid current drive in the EAST superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, G. M.; Li, Y. D.; Zhang, X. D.; Sun, P. J.; Wu, G. J.; Hu, L. Q.

    2015-02-15

    Two different confinement transition discharges, the low-intermediate-high (L-I-H) and the low-intermediate-low (L-I-L) confinement transitions, respectively, have been obtained by lower hybrid current drive with lithium wall conditioning in the EAST superconducting tokamak. The dynamic features of short-scale turbulent fluctuations in the two discharges are investigated by a tangential CO{sub 2} laser collective scattering system. It is found that the great changes of broadband fluctuations in amplitude and structure characteristics are closely related to the choice of the final transition to H-mode. These results could shed light on the understanding of the L-H transition mechanism.

  18. Persistent current and Drude weight of one-dimensional interacting fermions on imperfect ring from current lattice density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akande, Akinlolu; Sanvito, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    We perform a numerical study of interacting one-dimensional Hubbard rings with a single impurity potential and pierced by a magnetic flux. Our calculations are carried out at the level of current lattice density functional theory (CLDFT) for the Hubbard model and compared to known results obtained in the thermodynamical limit from the Bethe ansatz. In particular, we investigate the effects of disorder and Coulomb interaction on the persistent current (PC) and the Drude weight. It is found that CLDFT is able to accurately describe qualitative and quantitative features of these ground state properties in the presence of disorder and electronic interaction. When the impurity potential is switched off, the CLDFT approach describes well the velocity of the Luttinger liquid excitations as a function of both interaction strength and electron filling. Then, when the impurity scattering potential is finite, we find the PC to vanish as {{L}-{{α\\text{B}}-1}} for large L and independent on the strength of the scattering potential, in good agreement with Luttinger liquid theory.

  19. Persistent current and Drude weight of one-dimensional interacting fermions on imperfect ring from current lattice density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Akande, Akinlolu; Sanvito, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    We perform a numerical study of interacting one-dimensional Hubbard rings with a single impurity potential and pierced by a magnetic flux. Our calculations are carried out at the level of current lattice density functional theory (CLDFT) for the Hubbard model and compared to known results obtained in the thermodynamical limit from the Bethe ansatz. In particular, we investigate the effects of disorder and Coulomb interaction on the persistent current (PC) and the Drude weight. It is found that CLDFT is able to accurately describe qualitative and quantitative features of these ground state properties in the presence of disorder and electronic interaction. When the impurity potential is switched off, the CLDFT approach describes well the velocity of the Luttinger liquid excitations as a function of both interaction strength and electron filling. Then, when the impurity scattering potential is finite, we find the PC to vanish as [Formula: see text] for large L and independent on the strength of the scattering potential, in good agreement with Luttinger liquid theory. PMID:27605413

  20. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Gerald J.; Way, Austin J.; Safron, Nathaniel S.; Evensen, Harold T.; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G0 = 4e2/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm−1, fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm−1, which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm−1 and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies.

  1. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs.

    PubMed

    Brady, Gerald J; Way, Austin J; Safron, Nathaniel S; Evensen, Harold T; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G 0 = 4e (2)/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G 0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm(-1), fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G 0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm(-1), which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm(-1) and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies. PMID:27617293

  2. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs.

    PubMed

    Brady, Gerald J; Way, Austin J; Safron, Nathaniel S; Evensen, Harold T; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G 0 = 4e (2)/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G 0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm(-1), fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G 0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm(-1), which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm(-1) and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies.

  3. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Gerald J.; Way, Austin J.; Safron, Nathaniel S.; Evensen, Harold T.; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G0 = 4e2/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm−1, fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm−1, which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm−1 and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies. PMID:27617293

  4. Amplification of current density modulation in a FEL with an infinite electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Webb, S.D.

    2011-03-28

    We show that the paraxial field equation for a free electron laser (FEL) in an infinitely wide electron beam with {kappa}-2 energy distribution can be reduced to a fourth ordinary differential equation (ODE). Its solution for arbitrary initial phase space density modulation has been derived in the wave-vector domain. For initial current modulation with Gaussian profile, close form solutions are obtained in space-time domain. In developing an analytical model for a FEL-based coherent electron cooling system, an infinite electron beam has been assumed for the modulation and correction processes. While the assumption has its limitation, it allows for an analytical close form solution to be obtained, which is essential for investigating the underlying scaling law, benchmarking the simulation codes and understanding the fundamental physics. 1D theory was previously applied to model a CeC FEL amplifier. However, the theory ignores diffraction effects and does not provide the transverse profile of the amplified electron density modulation. On the other hand, 3D theories developed for a finite electron beam usually have solutions expanded over infinite number of modes determined by the specific transverse boundary conditions. Unless the mode with the largest growth rate substantially dominates other modes, both evaluation and extracting scaling laws can be complicated. Furthermore, it is also preferable to have an analytical FEL model with assumptions consistent with the other two sections of a CeC system. Recently, we developed the FEL theory in an infinitely wide electron beam with {kappa}-1 (Lorentzian) energy distribution. Close form solutions have been obtained for the amplified current modulation initiated by an external electric field with various spatial-profiles. In this work, we extend the theory into {kappa}-2 energy distribution and study the evolution of current density induced by an initial density modulation.

  5. Relation between electric current densities and X-ray emissions from particles accelerated during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musset, Sophie; Vilmer, Nicole; Bommier, Veronique

    The energy released during solar flares is believed to be stored in non-potential magnetic fields associated with electric currents. This energy is partially transferred to particle acceleration. We studied for several X-class flares located near the solar disk center the relation between the location of the X-ray emissions produced by energetic electrons accelerated in the corona and the magnetic field and vertical component of the electric current density in the photosphere. The study is based on X-ray images with data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and magnetic field maps and current density maps calculated with the UNNOFIT inversion and Metcalf disambiguation codes from the spectropolarimetric measurements of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). A comparison between X-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) images from the SDO Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) complete the study. We shall present preliminary conclusions on the link between particle acceleration and the presence of electric currents in the active region.

  6. Ultra-thin YBa2Cu3O7-x films with high critical current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyatti, M.; Savenko, A.; Poppe, U.

    2016-06-01

    Despite impressive progress in the development of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPD), the main obstacle for the widespread use of such detectors is the low operating temperature required for low-temperature superconductors. The very attractive idea of increasing the operating temperature using high-temperature superconductors for SNSPD fabrication is problematic due to the insufficient quality of ultra-thin films from high-temperature superconductors, which is one of the key requirements for the single-photon detection by superconducting nanowires. In this work, we demonstrate the possibility of fabricating ultra-thin YBa2Cu3O7-x films on SrTiO3 substrates with a surface flatness of ±1 unit cell and a high critical current density up to 14 MA cm-2 at T = 78 K. The critical current density of ultra-thin films had very low value in the first three unit cell layers adjacent to the substrate and reached nearly the bulk value at the fifth layer. 97% of the superconducting current is carried by only two upper layers of a 5-unit-cell thick YBa2Cu3O7-x film. Due to such superconducting current distribution over the film thickness and good surface flatness 5-unit-cell thick YBa2Cu3O7-x films could be promising for the fabrication of single-photon detectors.

  7. Analysis of nanosecond breaking of a high-density current in SOS diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grekhov, I. V.; Lyublinskii, A. G.; Smirnova, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    Effect of a sharp (nanosecond) breaking of the reverse current with a density on the order of 103-104 A/cm2 in a silicon diode upon switching from direct to reverse bias voltage (so-called silicon opening switch, or SOS effect) is widely used in nanosecond technologies of gigawatt powers. For detailed analysis of the SOS effect, we constructed a special setup with small stray inductance, which makes it possible to test single SOS diodes with a working area of 1-2 mm2 in a wide range of current densities. Our experiments show, in particular, that the numerical model of the SOS effect developed at the Institute of Electrophysics, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences successfully described the experimental results. It is also shown that the charge extracted from the diode structure by the reverse current exceeds the charge introduced by a direct current pulse by not more than 10%, indicating a relatively small role of ionization processes. The possibility to carry out experiments on single samples with a small surface area allows us to study the SOS effect and considerably facilitates investigations aimed at the perfection of the design of SOS diodes.

  8. Lab Experiments Probe Interactions Between Dilute Pyroclastic Density Currents and 3D Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauria, K.; Andrews, B. J.; Manga, M.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted scaled laboratory experiments of unconfined dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) to examine interactions between three - dimensional obstacles and dilute PDCs. While it is known that PDCs can surmount barriers by converting kinetic energy into potential energy, the signature of topography on PDC dynamics is unclear. To examine the interplay between PDCs and topography, we turbulently suspended heated and ambient-temperature 20 μm talc powder in air within an 8.5 x 6.1 x 2.6 m tank. Experimental parameters (Froude number, densimetric and thermal Richardson number, particle Stokes and Settling numbers) were scaled such that the experimental currents were dynamically similar to natural PCS. The Reynolds number, however, is much smaller than in natural currents, but still large enough for the flows to be turbulent. We placed cylindrical and ridge-like objects in the path of the currents, illuminated the currents with orthogonal laser sheets, and recorded each experiment with high definition cameras. We observed currents surmounting ridge-like barriers (barrier height = current height). Slanted ridges redirected the currents upward and parallel to the upstream face of the ridges (~45° from horizontal). Down stream of the slanted ridges, ambient-temperature currents reattached to the floor. By comparison, hot currents reversed buoyancy and lifted off. These observations suggest that obstacles enhance air entrainment, a process key to affecting runout distance and the depletion of fine particles in ignimbrites. Moreover, we observed vortex shedding in the wake of cylinders. Our experiments demonstrate that barriers of various shapes affect PDC dynamics and can shorten PDC runout distances. Understanding the effects of topography on PDCs is required for interpreting many deposits because processes such as vortex shedding and topographically-induced changes in turbulent length scales and entrainment likely leave depositional signatures.

  9. Pyroclastic density currents and local topography as seen with the conveyer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronzo, Domenico M.; Dellino, Pierfrancesco

    2014-05-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are multiphase flows generated during explosive volcanic eruptions, and they move down the volcano, and over the surrounding topography. The flow-topography interaction can play a fundamental role in the sedimentary processes, and in the resulting deposit facies architecture, as well as can play a dramatic role in the flow behavior, and in the associated volcanic hazard. This paper aims at discussing the PDC-topography interaction theme from the viewpoint of both deposits and flow structure, by accounting for appropriate literature, and revising the concepts in light of the theoretical conveyer model of Doronzo and Dellino (2013) on sedimentation and deposition in particulate density currents. First the effects, then the causes of the flow-topography interaction are discussed, in order to follow the historical development of theme concepts. The discussion is relative in terms of inertial and forced currents, which are defined on the basis of a dimensionless quantity (SD) representing the conservation of mass. Momentum equation relating depositional unit thickness, flow shear velocity, and density contrast shows that the flow is the cause of PDC motion, whereas the density contrast sustains the momentum, and the deposits are the process effect. In particular, the flow structure is described into three parts, flow-substrate boundary zone, boundary layer (lower part), and wake region (upper part) of the current. The facies architecture of PDC deposits, and the volcanic hazard depend on fluid dynamic and hydraulic behavior represented, in light of the conveyer model, by the balance of sedimentation and deposition rates through transport and erosion (“sedimentation-deposition” ratio, SD). This balance acts between flow-substrate boundary zone and boundary layer. The paper discussion mainly applies to small-to-intermediate volume eruptions. Field and modeling examples of Vulcano tuff cone and Colli Albani maar (Italy) constrain the

  10. Micromagnetic model for studies on Magnetic Tunnel Junction switching dynamics, including local current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, Marek; Czapkiewicz, Maciej; Skowroński, Witold; Stobiecki, Tomasz

    2014-02-01

    We present a model introducing the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with a Slonczewski's Spin-Transfer-Torque (STT) component in order to take into account spin polarized current influence on the magnetization dynamics, which was developed as an Object Oriented MicroMagnetic Framework extension. We implement the following computations: magnetoresistance of vertical channels is calculated from the local spin arrangement, local current density is used to calculate the in-plane and perpendicular STT components as well as the Oersted field, which is caused by the vertical current flow. The model allows for an analysis of all listed components separately, therefore, the contribution of each physical phenomenon in dynamic behavior of Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) magnetization is discussed. The simulated switching voltage is compared with the experimental data measured in MTJ nanopillars.

  11. Current initiation in low-density foam z-pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.; Nash, T.; Allshouse, G.

    1996-07-01

    Low density agar and aerogel foams were tested as z-pinch loads on the SATURN accelerator. In these first experiments, we studied the initial plasma conditions by measuring the visible emission at early times with a framing camera and 1-D imaging. At later time, near the stagnation when the plasma is hotter, x-ray imaging and spectral diagnostics were used to characterize the plasma. Filamentation and arcing at the current contacts was observed. None of the implosions were uniform along the z-axis. The prime causes of these problems are believed to be the electrode contacts and the current return configuration and these are solvable. Periodic phenomena consistent with the formation of instabilities were observed on one shot, not on others, implying that there may be a way of controlling instabilities in the pinch. Many of the issues involving current initiation may be solvable. Solutions are discussed.

  12. High voltage and high current density vertical GaN power diodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fischer, A. J.; Dickerson, J. R.; Armstrong, A. M.; Moseley, M. W.; Crawford, M. H.; King, M. P.; Allerman, A. A.; Kaplar, R. J.; van Heukelom, M. S.; Wierer, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the realization of a GaN high voltage vertical p-n diode operating at > 3.9 kV breakdown with a specific on-resistance < 0.9 mΩ.cm2. Diodes achieved a forward current of 1 A for on-wafer, DC measurements, corresponding to a current density > 1.4 kA/cm2. An effective critical electric field of 3.9 MV/cm was estimated for the devices from analysis of the forward and reverse current-voltage characteristics. Furthermore this suggests that the fundamental limit to the GaN critical electric field is significantly greater than previously believed.

  13. High voltage and high current density vertical GaN power diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, A. J.; Dickerson, J. R.; Armstrong, A. M.; Moseley, M. W.; Crawford, M. H.; King, M. P.; Allerman, A. A.; Kaplar, R. J.; van Heukelom, M. S.; Wierer, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the realization of a GaN high voltage vertical p-n diode operating at > 3.9 kV breakdown with a specific on-resistance < 0.9 mΩ.cm2. Diodes achieved a forward current of 1 A for on-wafer, DC measurements, corresponding to a current density > 1.4 kA/cm2. An effective critical electric field of 3.9 MV/cm was estimated for the devices from analysis of the forward and reverse current-voltage characteristics. Furthermore this suggests that the fundamental limit to the GaN critical electric field is significantly greater than previously believed.

  14. Studies in High Current Density Ion Sources for Heavy Ion FusionApplications

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon-Golcher, E.

    2002-06-01

    This dissertation develops diverse research on small (diameter {approx} few mm), high current density (J {approx} several tens of mA/cm{sup 2}) heavy ion sources. The research has been developed in the context of a programmatic interest within the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program to explore alternative architectures in the beam injection systems that use the merging of small, bright beams. An ion gun was designed and built for these experiments. Results of average current density yield () at different operating conditions are presented for K{sup +} and Cs{sup +} contact ionization sources and potassium aluminum silicate sources. Maximum values for a K{sup +} beam of {approx}90 mA/cm{sup 2} were observed in 2.3 {micro}s pulses. Measurements of beam intensity profiles and emittances are included. Measurements of neutral particle desorption are presented at different operating conditions which lead to a better understanding of the underlying atomic diffusion processes that determine the lifetime of the emitter. Estimates of diffusion times consistent with measurements are presented, as well as estimates of maximum repetition rates achievable. Diverse studies performed on the composition and preparation of alkali aluminosilicate ion sources are also presented. In addition, this work includes preliminary work carried out exploring the viability of an argon plasma ion source and a bismuth metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. For the former ion source, fast rise-times ({approx} 1 {micro}s), high current densities ({approx} 100 mA/cm{sup 2}) and low operating pressures (< 2 mtorr) were verified. For the latter, high but acceptable levels of beam emittance were measured ({var_epsilon}{sub n} {le} 0.006 {pi} mm {center_dot} mrad) although measured currents differed from the desired ones (I {approx} 5mA) by about a factor of 10.

  15. Investigation of nonthermal particle effects on ionization dynamics in high current density ion beam transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H. K.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Wang, P.; Moses, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Olson, C. L.; Welch, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    Light ion inertial fusion experiments require the presence of a moderate density background gas in the transport region to provide charge and current neutralization for a high current density ion beam. In this article, we investigate the effects of nonthermal particles such as beam ions or non-Maxwellian electron distributions on the ionization dynamics of the background gas. In particular, we focus on the case of Li beams being transported in an argon gas. Nonthermal particles as well as thermal electrons are included in time-dependent collisional-radiative calculations to determine time-dependent atomic level populations and charge state distributions in a beam-produced plasma. We also briefly discuss the effects of beam ions and energetic electrons on the visible and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral regions. It is found that the mean charge state of the gas, and hence the electron density, is significantly increased by collisions with energetic particles. This higher ionization significantly impacts the VUV spectral region, where numerous resonance lines occur. On the other hand, the visible spectrum tends to be less affected because the closely spaced excited states are populated by lower energy thermal electrons.

  16. Critical Current Density and Bulk Pinning Force in RHQT-Processed Niobium-Aluminum Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buta, F.; Sumption, M. D.; Collings, E. W.

    2004-06-01

    Transformation heat treatments with short excursions (1-10 min) to 1000°C preceding the conventional 800°C/10h were applied to jelly-roll Nb-Al samples that had been rapidly heated and quenched (RHQ) in bcc phase from high temperatures. The critical current density dependence on magnetic field at 4.2K in magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 8.5T was determined from magnetization measurements performed by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry. It was found that in this range of magnetic fields the highest critical current densities are not necessarily obtained for the samples with the highest initial heating rate of the transformation heat treatment as it is the case at magnetic fields in the vicinity of 20T. The highest pinning force density is present in samples that were transformed by rapid insertion in a furnace preheated to 1000°C and not in samples that were ohmically heated to 1000°C (the fastest heating rate employed).

  17. Effects of the current boundary conditions at the plasma-gun gap on density in SSPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Roman; Lodestro, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.

    2012-10-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) was a toroidal magnetic-confinement device without toroidal magnetic-field coils or a central transformer but which generated core-plasma currents by dynamo processes driven by coaxial plasma-gun injection into a flux-conserving vessel. Record electron temperatures in a spheromak (Te˜500eV) were achieved, and final results of the SSPX program were reported in [1]. Plasma density, which depended strongly on wall conditions, was an important parameter in SSPX. It was observed that density rises with Igun and that confinement improved as the density was lowered. Shortly after the last experiments, a new feature was added to the Corsica code's solver used to reconstruct SSPX equilibria. Motivated by n=0 fields observed in NIMROD simulations of SSPX, an insulating boundary condition was implemented at the plasma-gun gap. Using this option we will perform new reconstructions of SSPX equilibria and look for correlations between the location of the separatrix (which moves up the gun wall and onto the insulating gap as Igun increases) and plasma density and magnetic-flux amplification [2].[4pt] [1] H. S. McLean, APS, DPP, Dallas, TX, 2008.[0pt] [2] E. B. Hooper et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 1064 (2007).

  18. Surface Current Density Mapping for Identification of Gastric Slow Wave Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, L. A.; Cheng, L. K.; Richards, W. O.; Pullan, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The magnetogastrogram records clinically relevant parameters of the electrical slow wave of the stomach noninvasively. Besides slow wave frequency, gastric slow wave propagation velocity is a potentially useful clinical indicator of the state of health of gastric tissue, but it is a difficult parameter to determine from noninvasive bioelectric or biomagnetic measurements. We present a method for computing the surface current density (SCD) from multichannel magnetogastrogram recordings that allows computation of the propagation velocity of the gastric slow wave. A moving dipole source model with hypothetical as well as realistic biomagnetometer parameters demonstrates that while a relatively sparse array of magnetometer sensors is sufficient to compute a single average propagation velocity, more detailed information about spatial variations in propagation velocity requires higher density magnetometer arrays. Finally, the method is validated with simultaneous MGG and serosal EMG measurements in a porcine subject. PMID:19403355

  19. High-current-density gun with a LaB6 cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, K.; Hiramatsu, S.

    1996-08-01

    To develop a high-current electron gun for an induction linac, a prototype of a Pierce-type electron gun using planar 12-mm-diam lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) is studied as a thermionic emitter at high current densities. The cathode is heated up to temperatures of 1750 °C by electron bombardment and thermal radiation from a tungsten heater. The heater that has the highest temperature in the gun is thermally isolated from the outer vacuum chamber with heat shields. The bombardment voltage of ˜1 kV is typically applied to a gap between the cathode and the heater. The gun has been operated up to voltages of 55 kV, obtaining a maximum current density of 20 A/cm2 with a pulse width of 250 ns at a cathode temperature of 1600 °C. High-voltage pulsing results show that the gun, with applied voltages of over 40 kV, is operated in space-charge-limited region at temperatures of over 1600 °C; also it is operated in a temperature-limited region at temperatures of less than 1500 °C. An effective work function of 2.68 eV is obtained. The cathode, when heated up to 1600 °C, emits over 7 A of electrons with a ˜20% reduction after 850 h of continuous operation. These measurements were made between vacuum pressures of 10-6 and 10-7 Torr.

  20. Characterisation of high current density resonant tunneling diodes for THz emission using photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Kristof J. P.; Baba, Razvan; Stevens, Benjamin J.; Mukai, Toshikazu; Ohnishi, Dai; Hogg, Richard A.

    2016-03-01

    Resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) provide high speed current oscillation which is applicable to THz generation when coupled to a suitably designed antenna. For this purpose, the InGaAs/AlAs/InP materials have been used, as this system offers high electron mobility, suitable band-offsets, and low resistance contacts. However for high current density operation (~MA/cm2) the epitaxial structure is challenging to characterize using conventional techniques as it consists of a single, very thin AlAs/InGaAs quantum well (QW). Here, we present a detailed low temperature photoluminescence spectroscopic study of high current density RTDs that allow the non-destructive mapping of a range of critical parameters for the device. We show how the doping level of the emitter/collector and contact layers in the RTD structure can be measured using the Moss-Burstein effect. For the full device structure, we show how emission from the QW may be identified, and detail how the emission changes with differing indium composition and well widths. We show that by studying nominally identical, un-doped structures, a type-II QW emission is observed, and explain the origin of the type-I emission in doped devices. This observation opens the way for a new characterization scheme where a "dummy" RTD active element is incorporated below the real RTD structure. This structure allows significantly greater control in the epitaxial process.