Science.gov

Sample records for current durability model

  1. "Low-Li2O" Frits: Selecting Glasses that Support the Melt Rate Studies and Challenge the Current Durability Model

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.

    2005-07-30

    During the progressive development of the cold cap model (as it applies to a potential melt rate predictive tool), the formation of an Al-Li-silicate phase was identified as an intermediate reaction phase that could possibly hinder melt rate for SB4. To test this theory, six glasses were designed (using Frit 320's composition as the baseline) to maintain a constant 20 wt% sum of alkali content (in frit) by varying Na{sub 2}O to Li{sub 2}O ratios. The Li{sub 2}O concentration ranged from 8 wt% down to 0% in either 2% or 1% increments with the differences being accounted for by an increase in Na{sub 2}O concentration. Although the primary objective of the ''lower Li{sub 2}O'' frits was to evaluate the potential for melt rate improvements, assessments of durability (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) were also performed. The results suggest that durable glasses can be produced with these ''lower Li{sub 2}O'' frits should it be necessary to pursue this option for improving melt rate. In addition to the series of glasses to support melt rate assessments, a series of frits were also developed to challenge the current durability model based on the limits proposed by Edwards et al. (2004). Although the ''new'' limits allow access into compositional regions of interest (i.e., higher alkali systems) which can improve melt rate and/or waste loading, there may still be ''additional'' conservatism. In this report, two series of glasses were developed to challenge the ''new'' durability limits for the SB4 system. In the first series, the total alkali of the Frit 320-based glasses (designed to support the melt rate program) was increased from 20 wt% to 21 wt% (in the frit), but the series also evaluated the possible impact of various Na{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}O mass ratio differences. The second series pushed the alkali limit in the frit even further with frits containing either 22 or 24 wt% total alkali as well as various Na{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}O mass ratios. The

  2. Evaluation of models of waste glass durability

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, A.

    1995-08-01

    The main variable under the control of the waste glass producer is the composition of the glass; thus a need exists to establish functional relationships between the composition of a waste glass and measures of processability, product consistency, and durability. Many years of research show that the structure and properties of a glass depend on its composition, so it seems reasonable to assume that there also is relationship between the composition of a waste glass and its resistance to attack by an aqueous solution. Several models have been developed to describe this dependence, and an evaluation their predictive capabilities is the subject of this paper. The objective is to determine whether any of these models describe the ``correct`` functional relationship between composition and corrosion rate. A more thorough treatment of the relationships between glass composition and durability has been presented elsewhere, and the reader is encouraged to consult it for a more detailed discussion. The models examined in this study are the free energy of hydration model, developed at the Savannah River Laboratory, the structural bond strength model, developed at the Vitreous State Laboratory at the Catholic University of America, and the Composition Variation Study, developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

  3. On the problems of stability and durability of field-emission current sources for electrovacuum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, Alexander N.; Aban'shin, Nikolay P.; Akchurin, Garif G.; Akchurin, Georgy G.; Avetisyan, Yuri A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of the practical implementation of the concept of field-emission current source with high average current density of 0.1-0.3 A-cm-2 are shown. The durability of cathode samples at a level of 6000 hours is achieved under conditions of technical vacuum. A phenomenological model is suggested that describes the tunneling of both equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrons in a vacuum from the zone of concentration of electrostatic field. Conditions are discussed as the resulting increase in the emission current due to the connection mechanism of the photoelectric effect is thermodynamically favorable, that is not accompanied by an undesirable increase in the temperature of the local emission zone. It is shown that to ensure stability and durability of the cathode is also important to limit the concentration of equilibrium carriers using composite structures «DLC film on Mo substrate." This helps to reduce the criticality of the CVC. A possible alternative is to use a restrictive resistance in the cathode. However, this increases the heat losses and thus decreases assembly efficiency. The results of experimental studies of the structure showing the saturation of photoemission current component with an increase in operating voltage. This fact suggests the existence of an effective mechanism for control of emission at constant operating voltage. This is fundamentally important for the stabilization of field emission cathode, providing a reliability and durability. The single-photon processes and the small thickness DLC films (15-20 nm) provide high-speed process of control.

  4. Evolutionary model of an anonymous consumer durable market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaldasch, Joachim

    2011-07-01

    An analytic model is presented that considers the evolution of a market of durable goods. The model suggests that after introduction goods spread always according to a Bass diffusion. However, this phase will be followed by a diffusion process for durable consumer goods governed by a variation-selection-reproduction mechanism and the growth dynamics can be described by a replicator equation. The theory suggests that products play the role of species in biological evolutionary models. It implies that the evolution of man-made products can be arranged into an evolutionary tree. The model suggests that each product can be characterized by its product fitness. The fitness space contains elements of both sites of the market, supply and demand. The unit sales of products with a higher product fitness compared to the mean fitness increase. Durables with a constant fitness advantage replace other goods according to a logistic law. The model predicts in particular that the mean price exhibits an exponential decrease over a long time period for durable goods. The evolutionary diffusion process is directly related to this price decline and is governed by Gompertz equation. Therefore it is denoted as Gompertz diffusion. Describing the aggregate sales as the sum of first, multiple and replacement purchase the product life cycle can be derived. Replacement purchase causes periodic variations of the sales determined by the finite lifetime of the good (Juglar cycles). The model suggests that both, Bass- and Gompertz diffusion may contribute to the product life cycle of a consumer durable. The theory contains the standard equilibrium view of a market as a special case. It depends on the time scale, whether an equilibrium or evolutionary description is more appropriate. The evolutionary framework is used to derive also the size, growth rate and price distribution of manufacturing business units. It predicts that the size distribution of the business units (products) is lognormal

  5. Progressive Damage Modeling of Durable Bonded Joint Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Lin, Shih-Yung; Smeltzer, Stan; Girolamo, Donato; Ghose, Sayata; Guzman, Juan C.; McCarville, Duglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of durable bonded joint technology for assembling composite structures for launch vehicles is being pursued for the U.S. Space Launch System. The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology applicable to a wide range of sandwich structures for a Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented Durable Redundant Joint. Both designs involve a honeycomb sandwich with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined with adhesively bonded doublers. Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage. For structures that include multiple materials, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be considered increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The joints were modeled using Abaqus parametric finite element models, in which damage was modeled with user-written subroutines. Each ply was meshed discretely, and layers of cohesive elements were used to account for delaminations and to model the adhesive layers. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and predicted failure mechanisms.

  6. Durability to Electromigration of an Annealing-Twinned Ag-4Pd Alloy Wire Under Current Stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Tung-Han; Lin, Hsin-Jung; Chuang, Chien-Hsun; Tsai, Chih-Hsin; Lee, Jun-Der; Tsai, Hsing-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Ag-4Pd binary alloy wire has been produced as an alternative to a previously developed Ag-8Au-3Pd ternary alloy wire to meet requirements for high electrical conductivity and low cost. The electrical resistivity of this Ag-4Pd bonding wire, manufactured with a conventional method, is 3.7 μΩ cm, close to the values of traditional 3N Au wire (3.5 μΩ cm) and Pd-coated Cu wire (1.8 μΩ cm). To further improve the performance of this bonding wire, a large amount of annealing twins were introduced in this Ag-4Pd alloy wire through an innovative concept of sequential drawing and multiple annealing processes. The resulting electrical resistivity of this annealing-twinned Ag-4Pd wire is 3.5 μΩ cm. In contrast to the apparent increase in grain size in the conventional Ag-4Pd wire under electrical stressing with a current density of 1.23 × 105 A/cm2 for various times, the grains in this annealing-twinned wire grow much more slowly. The breaking load and elongation of this annealing-twinned Ag-4Pd wire are also higher than those of conventional wire. Furthermore, annealing twins increase the durability to electromigration of this Ag-4Pd wire under electrical stressing with various current densities.

  7. Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Durability Modeling; An Overview and Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, A.; Bhatt, R. T.; Grady, J. E.; Zhu, D.

    2012-01-01

    A study outlining a fracture mechanics based model that is being developed to investigate crack growth and spallation of environmental barrier coating (EBC) under thermal cycling conditions is presented. A description of the current plan and a model to estimate thermal residual stresses in the coating and preliminary fracture mechanics concepts for studying crack growth in the coating are also discussed. A road map for modeling life and durability of the EBC and the results of FEA model(s) developed for predicting thermal residual stresses and the cracking behavior of the coating are generated and described. Further initial assessment and preliminary results showed that developing a comprehensive EBC life prediction model incorporating EBC cracking, degradation and spalling mechanism under stress and temperature gradients typically seen in turbine components is difficult. This is basically due to mismatch in thermal expansion difference between sub-layers of EBC as well as between EBC and substrate, diffusion of moisture and oxygen though the coating, and densification of the coating during operating conditions as well as due to foreign object damage, the EBC can also crack and spall from the substrate causing oxidation and recession and reducing the design life of the EBC coated substrate.

  8. Transparent superwetting nanofilms with enhanced durability at model physiological condition

    PubMed Central

    Hwangbo, Sunghee; Heo, Jiwoong; Lin, Xiangde; Choi, Moonhyun; Hong, Jinkee

    2016-01-01

    There have been many studies on superwetting surfaces owing to the variety of their potential applications. There are some drawbacks to developing these films for biomedical applications, such as the fragility of the microscopic roughness feature that is vital to ensure superwettability. But, there are still only a few studies that have shown an enhanced durability of nanoscale superwetting films at certain extreme environment. In this study, we fabricated intrinsically stable superwetting films using the organosilicate based layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method in order to control nano-sized roughness of the multilayer structures. In order to develop mechanically and chemically robust surfaces, we successfully introduced polymeric silsesquioxane as a building block for LbL assembly with desired fashion. Even in the case that the superhydrophobic outer layers were damaged, the films maintained their superhydrophobicity because of the hydrophobic nature of their inner layers. As a result, we successfully fabricated superwetting nano-films and evaluated their robustness and stability. PMID:26764164

  9. Transparent superwetting nanofilms with enhanced durability at model physiological condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwangbo, Sunghee; Heo, Jiwoong; Lin, Xiangde; Choi, Moonhyun; Hong, Jinkee

    2016-01-01

    There have been many studies on superwetting surfaces owing to the variety of their potential applications. There are some drawbacks to developing these films for biomedical applications, such as the fragility of the microscopic roughness feature that is vital to ensure superwettability. But, there are still only a few studies that have shown an enhanced durability of nanoscale superwetting films at certain extreme environment. In this study, we fabricated intrinsically stable superwetting films using the organosilicate based layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method in order to control nano-sized roughness of the multilayer structures. In order to develop mechanically and chemically robust surfaces, we successfully introduced polymeric silsesquioxane as a building block for LbL assembly with desired fashion. Even in the case that the superhydrophobic outer layers were damaged, the films maintained their superhydrophobicity because of the hydrophobic nature of their inner layers. As a result, we successfully fabricated superwetting nano-films and evaluated their robustness and stability.

  10. New Accelerated Testing and Lifetime Modeling Methods Promise Faster Development of More Durable MEAs

    SciTech Connect

    Pierpont, D. M.; Hicks, M. T.; Turner, P. L.; Watschke, T. M.

    2005-11-01

    For the successful commercialization of fuel cell technology, it is imperative that membrane electrode assembly (MEA) durability is understood and quantified. MEA lifetimes of 40,000 hours remain a key target for stationary power applications. Since it is impractical to wait 40,000 hours for durability results, it is critical to learn as much information as possible in as short a time period as possible to determine if an MEA sample will survive past its lifetime target. Consequently, 3M has utilized accelerated testing and statistical lifetime modeling tools to develop a methodology for evaluating MEA lifetime. Construction and implementation of a multi-cell test stand have allowed for multiple accelerated tests and stronger statistical data for learning about durability.

  11. Durability-Based Design Guide for an Automotive Structural Composite: Part 2. Background Data and Models

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; Brinkman, C.R.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.; Weitsman, Y.J.; Yahr, G.T.

    1998-02-01

    This background report is a companion to the document entitled ''Durability-Based Design Criteria for an Automotive Structural Composite: Part 1. Design Rules'' (ORNL-6930). The rules and the supporting material characterization and modeling efforts described here are the result of a U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Automotive Materials project entitled ''Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures.'' The overall goal of the project is to develop experimentally based, durability-driven design guidelines for automotive structural composites. The project is closely coordinated with the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC). The initial reference material addressed by the rules and this background report was chosen and supplied by ACC. The material is a structural reaction injection-molded isocyanurate (urethane), reinforced with continuous-strand, swirl-mat, E-glass fibers. This report consists of 16 position papers, each summarizing the observations and results of a key area of investigation carried out to provide the basis for the durability-based design guide. The durability issues addressed include the effects of cyclic and sustained loadings, temperature, automotive fluids, vibrations, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. The position papers cover these durability issues. Topics include (1) tensile, compressive, shear, and flexural properties; (2) creep and creep rupture; (3) cyclic fatigue; (4) the effects of temperature, environment, and prior loadings; (5) a multiaxial strength criterion; (6) impact damage and damage tolerance design; (7) stress concentrations; (8) a damage-based predictive model for time-dependent deformations; (9) confirmatory subscale component tests; and (10) damage development and growth observations.

  12. Modeling the Rate-Dependent Durability of Reduced-Ag SAC Interconnects for Area Array Packages Under Torsion Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Vikram; Menon, Sandeep; Osterman, Michael; Pecht, Michael G.

    2013-08-01

    Solder durability models frequently focus on the applied strain range; however, the rate of applied loading, or strain rate, is also important. In this study, an approach to incorporate strain rate dependency into durability estimation for solder interconnects is examined. Failure data were collected for SAC105 solder ball grid arrays assembled with SAC305 solder that were subjected to displacement-controlled torsion loads. Strain-rate-dependent (Johnson-Cook model) and strain-rate-independent elastic-plastic properties were used to model the solders in finite-element simulation. Test data were then used to extract damage model constants for the reduced-Ag SAC solder. A generalized Coffin-Manson damage model was used to estimate the durability. The mechanical fatigue durability curve for reduced-silver SAC solder was generated and compared with durability curves for SAC305 and Sn-Pb from the literature.

  13. Durability and life prediction modeling in polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    1995-01-01

    Sudden appearance of cracks on a macroscopically smooth surface of brittle materials due to cooling or drying shrinkage is a phenomenon related to many engineering problems. Although conventional strength theories can be used to predict the necessary condition for crack appearance, they are unable to predict crack spacing and depth. On the other hand, fracture mechanics theory can only study the behavior of existing cracks. The theory of crack initiation can be summarized into three conditions, which is a combination of a strength criterion and laws of energy conservation, the average crack spacing and depth can thus be determined. The problem of crack initiation from the surface of an elastic half plane is solved and compares quite well with available experimental evidence. The theory of crack initiation is also applied to concrete pavements. The influence of cracking is modeled by the additional compliance according to Okamura's method. The theoretical prediction by this structural mechanics type of model correlates very well with the field observation. The model may serve as a theoretical foundation for future pavement joint design. The initiation of interactive cracks of quasi-brittle material is studied based on a theory of cohesive crack model. These cracks may grow simultaneously, or some of them may close during certain stages. The concept of crack unloading of cohesive crack model is proposed. The critical behavior (crack bifurcation, maximum loads) of the cohesive crack model are characterized by rate equations. The post-critical behavior of crack initiation is also studied.

  14. Legal and regulatory challenges currently facing diabetes treatment providers and related durable medical equipment suppliers.

    PubMed

    Liles, Robert

    2013-03-01

    It has been estimated that 24 million Americans have diabetes, many of whom are Medicare beneficiaries. These individuals carefully monitor their blood glucose levels primarily through the use of in-home blood glucose testing kits. Although the test is relatively simple, the cumulative expense of providing glucose test strips and lancets to patients is ever increasing, both to the Medicare program and to uninsured individuals who must pay out-of-pocket for these testing supplies. This article discusses the diabetes durable medical equipment (DME) coverage under Part B Medicare, the establishment and role of DME Medicare administrative contractors, and national and local coverage requirements for diabetes DME suppliers. This article also discusses the federal government's ongoing concerns regarding the improper billing of diabetes testing supplies. To protect the Medicare Trust Fund, the federal government has contracted with multiple private entities to conduct reviews and audits of questionable Medicare claims. These private sector contractors have conducted unannounced site visits of DME supplier offices, interviewed patients and their families, placed suppliers on prepayment review, and conducted extensive postpayment audits of prior paid Medicare claims. In more egregious administrative cases, Medicare contractors have recommended that problematic providers and/or DME suppliers have their Medicare numbers suspended or, in some instances, revoked. More serious infractions can lead to civil or criminal liability. In the final part of this article, we will examine the future of enforcement efforts by law enforcement and Medicare contractors and the importance of understanding and complying with federal laws when ordering and supplying diabetes testing strips and lancets.

  15. Application of the hydration thermodynamic model for glass durability under saturated tuff repository conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, W.G.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1990-12-31

    The effects of tuff repository groundwater on glass dissolution and surface layer formation was examined utilizing the hydration thermodynamic model. A 28 day MCC-1 monolithic durability test was performed on the following glasses: SiO{sub 2}, obsidian, basalt, medieval window glasses, frit glass, and simulated nuclear waste glass. Silica dissolution was compared with the pH corrected free energy of hydration and shown to have the theoretical slope, ln(1/2.303RT), in agreement with MCC-1 tests using deionized water. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy identified clays of the saponite family and carbonates, on the glass surfaces leached in tuff groundwater. 31 refs.

  16. Test validation of environmental barrier coating (EBC) durability and damage tolerance modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Najafi, Ali; Abdi, Frank; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Grady, Joseph E.

    2014-03-01

    Protection of Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) is rather an important element for the engine manufacturers and aerospace companies to help improve the durability of their hot engine components. The CMC's are typically porous materials which permits some desirable infiltration that lead to strength enhancements. However, they experience various durability issues such as degradation due to coating oxidation. These concerns are being addressed by introducing a high temperature protective system, Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) that can operate at temperature applications1, 3 In this paper, linear elastic progressive failure analyses are performed to evaluate conditions that would cause crack initiation in the EBC. The analysis is to determine the overall failure sequence under tensile loading conditions on different layers of material including the EBC and CMC in an attempt to develop a life/failure model. A 3D finite element model of a dogbone specimen is constructed for the analyses. Damage initiation, propagation and final failure is captured using a progressive failure model considering tensile loading conditions at room temperature. It is expected that this study will establish a process for using a computational approach, validated at a specimen level, to predict reliably in the future component level performance without resorting to extensive testing.

  17. Urban Decline and Durable Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaeser, Edward L.; Gyourko, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Urban decline is not the mirror image of growth, and durable housing is the primary reason the nature of decline is so different. This paper presents a model of urban decline with durable housing and verifies these implications of the model: (1) city growth rates are skewed so that cities grow more quickly than they decline; (2) urban decline is…

  18. Time-Dependent Deformation Modelling for a Chopped-Glass Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, W

    2001-08-24

    Time-dependent deformation behavior of a polymeric composite with chopped-glass-fiber reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications, The material under stress was exposed to representative automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on time-dependent deformation behavior of the material. The data were analyzed and experimentally-based models developed for the time-dependent deformation behavior as a basis for automotive structural durability design criteria.

  19. Mathematical Modelling of Turbidity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, G. L.; Fowler, A.; Howell, P.

    2011-12-01

    A turbidity current is a submarine sediment flow which propagates downslope through the ocean into the deep sea. Turbidity currents can occur randomly and without much warning and consequently are hard to observe and measure. The driving force in a turbidity current is the presence of sediment in the current - gravity acts on the sediment in suspension, causing it to move downstream through the ocean water. A phenomenon known as ignition or autosuspension has been observed in turbidity currents in submarine canyons, and it occurs when a current travelling downslope gathers speed as it erodes sediment from the sea floor in a self-reinforcing cycle. Using the turbidity current model of Parker et al. (Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 1986) we investigate the evolution of a 1-D turbidity current as it moves downstream. To seek a better understanding of the dynamics of flow as the current evolves in space and time, we present analytical results alongside computed numerical solutions, incorporating entrainment of water and erosion and deposition of sediment. We consider varying slope functions and inlet conditions and attempt to predict when the current will become extinct. We examine currents which are in both supercritical and subcritical flow regimes and consider the dynamics of the flow as the current switches regime.

  20. WOODSTOVE DURABILITY TESTING PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development of an accelerated laboratory test to simulate in-home woodstove aging and degradation. nown as a stress test, the protocol determines the long-term durability of woodstove models in a 1- to 2-week time frame. wo avenues of research have been t...

  1. Limitations of bootstrap current models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.; Meneghini, O.; Osborne, T. H.

    2014-04-01

    We assess the accuracy and limitations of two analytic models of the tokamak bootstrap current: (1) the well-known Sauter model (1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834, 2002 Phys. Plasmas 9 5140) and (2) a recent modification of the Sauter model by Koh et al (2012 Phys. Plasmas 19 072505). For this study, we use simulations from the first-principles kinetic code NEO as the baseline to which the models are compared. Tests are performed using both theoretical parameter scans as well as core-to-edge scans of real DIII-D and NSTX plasma profiles. The effects of extreme aspect ratio, large impurity fraction, energetic particles, and high collisionality are studied. In particular, the error in neglecting cross-species collisional coupling—an approximation inherent to both analytic models—is quantified. Furthermore, the implications of the corrections from kinetic NEO simulations on MHD equilibrium reconstructions is studied via integrated modeling with kinetic EFIT.

  2. Combustor liner durability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, V.

    1981-01-01

    An 18 month combustor liner durability analysis program was conducted to evaluate the use of advanced three dimensional transient heat transfer and nonlinear stress-strain analyses for modeling the cyclic thermomechanical response of a simulated combustor liner specimen. Cyclic life prediction technology for creep/fatigue interaction is evaluated for a variety of state-of-the-art tools for crack initiation and propagation. The sensitivity of the initiation models to a change in the operating conditions is also assessed.

  3. In vivo tissue response and durability of five novel synthetic polymers in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Sahin, E; Cingi, C; Eskiizmir, G; Altintoprak, N; Calli, A; Calli, C; Yilgör, I; Yilgör, E

    2016-04-01

    Alloplastic materials are frequently used in facial plastic surgeries such as rhinoplasty and nasal reconstruction. Unfortunately, the ideal alloplastic material has not been found. This experimental study evaluates the tissue response and durability of five novel polymers developed as an alloplastic material. In this experimental study involving a tertiary university hospital, six subcuticular pockets were formed at the back of 10 rabbits for the implantation of each polymer and sham group. Each pocket was excised with its adjacent tissue after three months, and collected for histopathological examination. Semi-quantitative examination including neovascularisation, inflammation, fibrosis, abscess formation, multinucleated foreign body giant cells was performed, and integrity of polymer was evaluated. A statistical comparison was performed. No statically significant difference was detected in neovascularisation, inflammation, fibrosis, abscess formation and multinucleated foreign body giant cells when a paired comparison between sham and polymer II, III and IV groups was performed individually. Nevertheless, the degree of fibrosis was less than sham group in polymer I (p = .027) and V (p = .018), although the other variables were almost similar. The integrity of polymers III (9 intact, 1 fragmented) and IV (8 intact, 2 absent) was better than the other polymers. These novel synthetic polymers could be considered as good candidates for clinical applicability. All polymers provided satisfactory results in terms of tissue response; however, fibrovascular integration was higher in polymers II, III and IV. In addition, the durability of polymer III and IV was better than the others.

  4. Wave/current interaction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, A. K.

    1988-01-01

    The wave-current interaction for the application to remote sensing data via numerical simulations and data comparison is modelled. Using the field data of surface current shear, wind condition and ambient wave spectrum, the numerical simulations of directional wave spectrum evolution were used to interpret and to compare with the aircraft data from Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) and Surface Contour Radar (SCR) across the front during Frontal Air Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX). The wave-ice interaction was inspired by the observation of large amplitude waves hundreds of kms inside the ice pack in the Weddell Sea, resulting in breakup of the ice pack. The developed analysis of processes includes the refraction of waves at the pack edge, the effects of pack compression on wave propagation, wave train stability and buckling stability in the ice pack. Sources of pack compression and interaction between wave momentum and pack compression are investigated. Viscous camping of propagating waves in the marginal ice zone are also studied. The analysis suggests an explanation for the change in wave dispersion observed from the ship and the sequence of processes that cause ice pack breakup, pressure ridge formation and the formation of open bands of water.

  5. Generator Set Durability Testing Using 25% ATJ Fuel Blend

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    FMTV – Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles GEP – General Engine Products HC – hydrocarbon HEUI – hydraulically actuated, electronically controlled...loggers: Campbell Scientific model CR3000. Thirty thermocouples were used on each generator , along with five pressure transducers. Voltage, current...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED GENERATOR SET DURABILITY TESTING USING 25% ATJ FUEL BLEND INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 476 by Gregory A. T

  6. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell model for aging predictions: Simulated equivalent active surface area loss and comparisons with durability tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, C.; Gérard, M.; Quinaud, M.; d'Arbigny, J.; Bultel, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The prediction of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) lifetime is one of the major challenges to optimize both material properties and dynamic control of the fuel cell system. In this study, by a multiscale modeling approach, a mechanistic catalyst dissolution model is coupled to a dynamic PEMFC cell model to predict the performance loss of the PEMFC. Results are compared to two 2000-h experimental aging tests. More precisely, an original approach is introduced to estimate the loss of an equivalent active surface area during an aging test. Indeed, when the computed Electrochemical Catalyst Surface Area profile is fitted on the experimental measures from Cyclic Voltammetry, the computed performance loss of the PEMFC is underestimated. To be able to predict the performance loss measured by polarization curves during the aging test, an equivalent active surface area is obtained by a model inversion. This methodology enables to successfully find back the experimental cell voltage decay during time. The model parameters are fitted from the polarization curves so that they include the global degradation. Moreover, the model captures the aging heterogeneities along the surface of the cell observed experimentally. Finally, a second 2000-h durability test in dynamic operating conditions validates the approach.

  7. Current Status in Cavitation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Ashok K.; Avva, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation is a common problem for many engineering devices in which the main working fluid is in liquid state. In turbomachinery applications, cavitation generally occurs on the inlet side of pumps. The deleterious effects of cavitation include: lowered performance, load asymmetry, erosion and pitting of blade surfaces, vibration and noise, and reduction of the overall machine life. Cavitation models in use today range from rather crude approximations to sophisticated bubble dynamics models. Details about bubble inception, growth and collapse are relevant to the prediction of blade erosion, but are not necessary to predict the performance of pumps. An engineering model of cavitation is proposed to predict the extent of cavitation and performance. The vapor volume fraction is used as an indicator variable to quantify cavitation. A two-phase flow approach is employed with the assumption of the thermal equilibrium between liquid and vapor. At present velocity slip between the two phases is selected. Preliminary analyses of 2D flows shows qualitatively correct results.

  8. Modeling the durability of ZOSTAVAX® vaccine efficacy in people ≥60 years of age.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Jane H; Betts, Robert F; Morrison, Vicki A; Xu, Ruifeng; Itzler, Robbin F; Acosta, Camilo J; Dasbach, Erik J; Pellissier, James M; Johnson, Gary R; Chan, Ivan S F

    2015-03-17

    Since 2006, the vaccine, ZOSTAVAX(®), has been licensed to prevent herpes zoster. Only limited clinical follow-up data are available to evaluate duration of protection, an important consideration when developing HZ vaccination policy recommendations. Four Poisson regression models were developed based on an integrated analysis of data from the Shingles Prevention Study and its Short Term Persistence extension to estimate the effects of years-since-vaccination and chronological-age on vaccine efficacy among people ≥60 years old. The models included number of HZ cases parsed into categories by chronological-age and time-since-vaccination as the dependent variable with different explanatory variables in each model. In all models, the interaction between vaccine-group and chronological-age was statistically significant indicating that vaccine efficacy decreases with the expected effects of advancing age but the interaction between vaccine-group and time-since-vaccination was not statistically significant indicating that much of the reduction in vaccine efficacy over time-since-vaccination can be explained by increasing age.

  9. Durable sequence stability and bone marrow tropism in a macaque model of human pegivirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Adam L.; Lauck, Michael; Mohns, Mariel; Peterson, Eric J.; Beheler, Kerry; Brunner, Kevin G.; Crosno, Kristin; Mejia, Andres; Mutschler, James; Gehrke, Matthew; Greene, Justin; Ericsen, Adam J.; Weiler, Andrea; Lehrer-Brey, Gabrielle; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Sibley, Samuel D.; Kallas, Esper G.; Capuano, Saverio; Rogers, Jeffrey; Goldberg, Tony L.; Simmons, Heather A.; O’Connor, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Human Pegivirus (HPgV) – formerly known as GB virus C and hepatitis G virus – is a poorly characterized RNA virus that infects approximately one-sixth of the global human population and is transmitted frequently in the blood supply. Here, we create an animal model of HPgV infection by infecting macaque monkeys with a new simian pegivirus (SPgV) discovered in wild baboons. Using this model, we provide a high-resolution, longitudinal picture of SPgV viremia where the dose, route, and timing of infection are known. We detail the highly-variable acute-phase of SPgV infection, showing that the viral load trajectory early in infection is dependent upon the infecting dose, whereas the chronic-phase viremic set-point is not. We also show that SPgV has an extremely low propensity for accumulating sequence variation, with no consensus-level variants detected during the acute phase of infection and an average of only 1.5 variants generated per 100 infection days. Finally, we show that SPgV RNA is highly concentrated in only two tissues: spleen and bone marrow, with bone marrow likely producing the majority of virus detected in plasma. Together, these results reconcile several paradoxical observations from cross-sectional analyses of HPgV in humans and provide an animal model for studying pegivirus biology. PMID:26378244

  10. Thermal fatigue durability for advanced propulsion materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    1989-01-01

    A review is presented of thermal and thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) crack initiation life prediction and cyclic constitutive modeling efforts sponsored recently by the NASA Lewis Research Center in support of advanced aeronautical propulsion research. A brief description is provided of the more significant material durability models that were created to describe TMF fatigue resistance of both isotropic and anisotropic superalloys, with and without oxidation resistant coatings. The two most significant crack initiation models are the cyclic damage accumulation model and the total strain version of strainrange partitioning. Unified viscoplastic cyclic constitutive models are also described. A troika of industry, university, and government research organizations contributed to the generation of these analytic models. Based upon current capabilities and established requirements, an attempt is made to project which TMF research activities most likely will impact future generation propulsion systems.

  11. Modeling Harris Current Sheets with Themis Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepko, L.; Angelopoulos, V.; McPherron, R. L.; Apatenkov, S.; Glassmeier, K.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Current sheets are ubiquitous in nature. occurring in such varied locations as the solar atmosphere. the heliosphere, and the Earth's magnetosphere. The simplest current sheet is the one-dimensional Harris neutral sheet, with the lobe field strength and scale-height the only free parameters. Despite its simplicity, confirmation of the Harris sheet as a reasonable description of the Earth's current sheet has remained elusive. In early 2009 the orbits of the 5 THEMIS probes fortuitously aligned such that profiles of the Earth's current sheet could be modeled in a time dependent manner. For the few hours of alignment we have calculated the time history of the current sheet parameters (scale height and current) in the near-Earth region. during both quiet and active times. For one particular substorm. we further demonstrate good quantitative agreement with the diversion of cross tail current inferred from the Harris modeling with the ionospheric current inferred from ground magnetometer data.

  12. Durable solar mirror films

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Mark B.; Henderson, Andrew J.; Hebrink, Timothy J.; Katare, Rajesh K.; Jing, Naiyong; North, Diane; Peterson, Eric M.

    2017-02-14

    The present disclosure generally relates to durable solar mirror films, methods of making durable solar mirror films, and constructions including durable solar mirror films. In one embodiment, the present disclosure relates to a solar mirror film comprising: a multilayer optical film layer including having a coefficient of hygroscopic expansion of less than about 30 ppm per percent relative humidity; and a reflective layer having a coefficient of hygroscopic expansion.

  13. Achieving Durable Resistance Against Plant Diseases: Scenario Analyses with a National-Scale Spatially Explicit Model for a Wind-Dispersed Plant Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Elisabeth Lof, Marjolein; de Vallavieille-Pope, Claude; van der Werf, Wopke

    2017-03-13

    Genetic resistance in crops is a cornerstone of disease management in agriculture. Such genetic resistance is often rapidly broken due to selection for virulence in the pathogen population. Here, we ask whether there are strategies that can prolong the useful life of plant resistance genes. In a modeling study, we compared four deployment strategies: gene pyramiding, sequential use, simultaneous use, and a mixed strategy. We developed a spatially explicit model for France and parameterized it for the fungal pathogen Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (causing wheat yellow rust) to test management strategies in a realistic spatial setting. We found that pyramiding two new resistance genes in one variety was the most durable solution only when the virulent genotype had to emerge by mutation. Deploying single-gene-resistant varieties concurrently with the pyramided variety eroded the durability of the gene pyramid. We found that continuation of deployment of varieties with broken-down resistance prolonged the useful life of simultaneous deployment of four single-gene-resistant varieties versus sequential use. However, when virulence was already present in the pathogen population, durability was low and none of the deployment strategies had effect. These results provide guidance on effective strategies for using resistance genes in crop protection practice.

  14. Environmental barrier coating (EBC) durability modeling using a progressive failure analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Abumeri, Galib; Troha, William; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Grady, Joseph E.; Zhu, D.

    2012-04-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are getting the attention of most engine manufacturers and aerospace firms for turbine engine and other related applications. This is because of their potential weight advantage and performance benefits. As a protecting guard for these materials, a highly specialized form of environmental barrier coating (EBC) is being developed and explored for high temperature applications that are greater than 1100 °C1,2. The EBCs are typically a multilayer of coatings and are on the order of hundreds of microns thick. CMCs are generally porous materials and this feature is somewhat beneficial since it allows some desirable infiltration of the EBC. Their degradation usually includes coating interface oxidation as opposed to moisture induced matrix degradation which is generally seen at a higher temperature. A variety of factors such as residual stresses, coating process related flaws, and casting conditions may influence the strength of degradation. The cause of such defects which cause cracking and other damage is that not much energy is absorbed during fracture of these materials. Therefore, an understanding of the issues that control crack deflection and propagation along interfaces is needed to maximize the energy dissipation capabilities of layered ceramics. Thus, evaluating components and subcomponents made out of CMCs under gas turbine engine conditions is suggested to demonstrate that these material will perform as expected and required under these aggressive environmental circumstances. Progressive failure analysis (PFA) is applied to assess the damage growth of the coating under combined thermal and mechanical loading conditions. The PFA evaluation is carried out using a full-scale finite element model to account for the average material failure at the microscopic or macroscopic levels. The PFA life prediction evaluation identified the root cause for damage initiation and propagation. It indicated that delamination type damage

  15. Phase VI Glove Durability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 - 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a clean, controlled ISS environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 - 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 - 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of ISS-based tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected at periodic intervals throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the development of improved cycle model tables. This paper provides a

  16. Phase VI Glove Durability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 -- 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a dust free, manufactured microgravity EVA environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 -- 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 -- 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of International Space Station (ISS)-based EVA tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected periodically throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the

  17. Highly Dispersed Alloy Catalyst for Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek S. Murthi; Izzo, Elise; Bi, Wu; Guerrero, Sandra; Protsailo, Lesia

    2013-01-08

    Achieving DOE's stated 5000-hr durability goal for light-duty vehicles by 2015 will require MEAs with characteristics that are beyond the current state of the art. Significant effort was placed on developing advanced durable cathode catalysts to arrive at the best possible electrode for high performance and durability, as well as developing manufacturing processes that yield significant cost benefit. Accordingly, the overall goal of this project was to develop and construct advanced MEAs that will improve performance and durability while reducing the cost of PEMFC stacks. The project, led by UTC Power, focused on developing new catalysts/supports and integrating them with existing materials (membranes and gas diffusion layers (GDLs)) using state-of-the-art fabrication methods capable of meeting the durability requirements essential for automotive applications. Specifically, the project work aimed to lower platinum group metals (PGM) loading while increasing performance and durability. Appropriate catalysts and MEA configuration were down-selected that protects the membrane, and the layers were tailored to optimize the movements of reactants and product water through the cell to maximize performance while maintaining durability.

  18. Circulation-based Modeling of Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiburg, E. H.; Borden, Z.

    2013-05-01

    Atmospheric and oceanic flows driven by predominantly horizontal density differences, such as sea breezes, thunderstorm outflows, powder snow avalanches, and turbidity currents, are frequently modeled as gravity currents. Efforts to develop simplified models of such currents date back to von Karman (1940), who considered a two-dimensional gravity current in an inviscid, irrotational and infinitely deep ambient. Benjamin (1968) presented an alternative model, focusing on the inviscid, irrotational flow past a gravity current in a finite-depth channel. More recently, Shin et al. (2004) proposed a model for gravity currents generated by partial-depth lock releases, considering a control volume that encompasses both fronts. All of the above models, in addition to the conservation of mass and horizontal momentum, invoke Bernoulli's law along some specific streamline in the flow field, in order to obtain a closed system of equations that can be solved for the front velocity as function of the current height. More recent computational investigations based on the Navier-Stokes equations, on the other hand, reproduce the dynamics of gravity currents based on the conservation of mass and momentum alone. We propose that it should therefore be possible to formulate a fundamental gravity current model without invoking Bernoulli's law. The talk will show that the front velocity of gravity currents can indeed be predicted as a function of their height from mass and momentum considerations alone, by considering the evolution of interfacial vorticity. This approach does not require information on the pressure field and therefore avoids the need for an energy closure argument such as those invoked by the earlier models. Predictions by the new theory are shown to be in close agreement with direct numerical simulation results. References Von Karman, T. 1940 The engineer grapples with nonlinear problems, Bull. Am. Math Soc. 46, 615-683. Benjamin, T.B. 1968 Gravity currents and related

  19. Estimates of current debris from flux models

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Flux models that balance accuracy and simplicity are used to predict the growth of space debris to the present. Known and projected launch rates, decay models, and numerical integrations are used to predict distributions that closely resemble the current catalog-particularly in the regions containing most of the debris.

  20. Integrated water resources management of the Ichkeul basin taking into account the durability of its wetland ecosystem using WEAP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabou, M.; Lili-Chabaane, Z.; Gastli, W.; Chakroun, H.; Ben Abdallah, S.; Oueslati, I.; Lasram, F.; Laajimi, R.; Shaiek, M.; Romdhane, M. S.; Mnajja, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Conservation of coastal wetlands in the Mediterranean area is generally faced with development issues. It is the case of Tunisia where the precipitation is irregular in time and space. For the equity of water use (drinking, irrigation), there is a planning at the national level allowing the possibility of water transfer from regions rich in water resources to poor ones. This plan was initially done in Tunisia without taking into account the wetlands ecosystems and their specificities. The main purpose of this study is to find a model able to integrate simultaneously available resources and various water demands within a watershed by taking into account the durability of related wetland ecosystems. It is the case of the Ichkeul basin. This later is situated in northern of Tunisia, having an area of 2080 km2 and rainfall of about 600 mm/year. Downstream this basin, the Ichkeul Lake is characterized by a double alternation of seasonal high water and low salinity in winter and spring and low water levels and high salinity in summer and autumn that makes the Ichkeul an exceptional ecosystem. The originality of this hydrological system of Lake-marsh conditions is related to the presence of aquatic vegetation in the lake and special rich and varied hygrophilic in the marshes that constitutes the main source of food for large migrating water birds. After the construction of three dams on the principle rivers that are feeding the Ichkeul Lake, aiming particularly to supply the local irrigation and the drinking water demand of cities in the north and the east of Tunisia, freshwater inflow to the lake is greatly reduced causing a hydrological disequilibrium that influences the ecological conditions of the different species. Therefore, to ensure the sustainability of the water resources management, it's important to find a trade off between the existing hydrological and ecological systems taking into account water demands of various users (drinking, irrigation fishing, and

  1. Flare models. [solar physics current status review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of solar flare modeling is reviewed. Primary and secondary observational features that a proposed flare model should be capable of explaining are discussed, including energy storage and release, particle acceleration, mass ejection, heating of the temperature minimum region, X-ray, EUV, UV, visible and radio emission and mass flow. Consideration is then given to the twisted flux tube paramagnetic recombination model of Gold and Hoyle (1960), the current model of Alfven and Carlqvist (1967), closed current-sheet models such as those of Syrovatskii (1966, 1969, 1977) and Uchida and Sakurai (1977), open-field models such as those of Carmichael (1964) and Barnes and Sturrock (1972), the emerging flux model of Heyvaerts and Priest (1974, 1977, 1978) and the loop-flare models of Spicer (1977) and Colgate (1978). It is noted that no one model can yet account for all the observational features, and that there may turn out to be several types of flare, each requiring its own explanation.

  2. A simple model of Birkeland currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, David P.

    1993-01-01

    The paper develops a simple representation of the global circuit of Birkeland currents on the basis of a representation of the current density (j) in terms of Euler potentials (alpha, chi). The underlying magnetic field, which shares the potential alpha with j, is assumed to be dipolar, making the model applicable chiefly to region 2 Birkeland currents. A form of j is chosen that gives a current sheet with peak outflow at dawn and peak inflow at dusk (or vice versa), connected across a flat polar cap sheet. The superposition of harmonics of the same type, centered at different 'foci', are found to provide a flexible and powerful representation of harmonic functions, accurate within less than 1 percent. An interpolation formula by which current sheets of finite width could be consistently represented is developed.

  3. Model of current enhancement at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.S.; Melendez, R.E.

    1983-04-05

    A model is proposed to account for the phenomenon of net current enhancement at high pressures recently observed on the Experimental Test Accelerator. The proposed mechanism involves energetic secondary electrons (delta rays) which are pushed forward by the self-magnetic field of the electron beam. For high current beams, the forward delta ray current can build up to a significant fraction of the beam current. Analytic calculations of the steady-state solution as well as the rate of buildup of the delta ray current are presented in this paper. In addition, numerical results from a nonlocal Boltzmann code, NUTS, are presented. The analytic and numerical results have many features which are in qualitative agreement with the experiments, but quantitative discrepancies still exist.

  4. Current Challenges in Bayesian Model Choice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clyde, M. A.; Berger, J. O.; Bullard, F.; Ford, E. B.; Jefferys, W. H.; Luo, R.; Paulo, R.; Loredo, T.

    2007-11-01

    Model selection (and the related issue of model uncertainty) arises in many astronomical problems, and, in particular, has been one of the focal areas of the Exoplanet working group under the SAMSI (Statistics and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute) Astrostatistcs Exoplanet program. We provide an overview of the Bayesian approach to model selection and highlight the challenges involved in implementing Bayesian model choice in four stylized problems. We review some of the current methods used by statisticians and astronomers and present recent developments in the area. We discuss the applicability, computational challenges, and performance of suggested methods and conclude with recommendations and open questions.

  5. Three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1995-01-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawnside and duskside of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L = 2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H(+) fluxes at tens of keV, which are always overestimated. A newly invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion differential flux. Important features of storm time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (less than 10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, J(sub o)(1 + Ay(sup n)), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (less than 30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n.

  6. The use of plasma ashers and Monte Carlo modeling for the projection of atomic oxygen durability of protected polymers in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Auer, Bruce M.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Degroh, Kim K.; Gebauer, Linda

    1992-01-01

    The results of ground laboratory and in-space exposure of polymeric materials to atomic oxygen has enabled the development of a Monte Carlo computational model which simulates the oxidation processes of both environments. The cost effective projection of long-term low-Earth-orbital durability of protected polymeric materials such as SiO(x)-coated polyimide Kapton photovoltaic array blankets will require ground-based testing to assure power system reliability. Although silicon dioxide thin film protective coatings can greatly extend the useful life of polymeric materials in ground-based testing, the projection of in-space durability based on these results can be made more reliable through the use of modeling which simulates the mechanistic properties of atomic oxygen interaction, and replicates test results in both environments. Techniques to project long-term performance of protected materials, such as the Space Station Freedom solar array blankets, are developed based on ground laboratory experiments, in-space experiments, and computational modeling.

  7. Microscopic models for bridging electrostatics and currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, L.; DeAmbrosis, A.; Mascheretti, P.

    2007-03-01

    A teaching sequence based on the use of microscopic models to link electrostatic phenomena with direct currents is presented. The sequence, devised for high school students, was designed after initial work carried out with student teachers attending a school of specialization for teaching physics at high school, at the University of Pavia. The results obtained with them are briefly presented, because they directed our steps for the development of the teaching sequence. For both the design of the experiments and their interpretation, we drew inspiration from the original works of Alessandro Volta; in addition, a structural model based on the particular role of electrons as elementary charges both in electrostatic phenomena and in currents was proposed. The teaching sequence starts from experiments on charging objects by rubbing and by induction, and engages students in constructing microscopic models to interpret their observations. By using these models and by closely examining the ideas of tension and capacitance, the students acknowledge that a charging (or discharging) process is due to the motion of electrons that, albeit for short time intervals, represent a current. Finally, they are made to see that the same happens in transients of direct current circuits.

  8. Dynamic modeling of lower hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ignat, D.W.; Valeo, E.J.; Jardin, S.C.

    1993-10-01

    A computational model of lower hybrid current drive in the presence of an electric field is described and some results are given. Details of geometry, plasma profiles and circuit equations are treated carefully. Two-dimensional velocity space effects are approximated in a one-dimensional Fokker-Planck treatment.

  9. Nearshore Operational Model for Rip Current Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembiring, L. E.; Van Dongeren, A. R.; Van Ormondt, M.; Winter, G.; Roelvink, J.

    2012-12-01

    waves with peak period greater than 7 seconds and propagate relatively from the North. Further investigations will focus on these findings in order to improve model skill during swimming season. The flow model results are analyzed for the dominant tidal constituents. The results show that for tidal amplitude, differences between observation and modeled are in range of 2 cm to maximum 14 cm. For the tidal phase, all stations considered along the Dutch coastline give differences less than 10 degrees between observations and predictions. A local XBeach model for the Egmond aan Zee resort is constructed in order to predict rip currents events. This model is applied during the August 2011 period, where the bathymetry produced by model-data assimilation is compared against surveyed bathymetry. In general, this method is able to produce bathymetry converging towards the observations. An offshore bar exists in the field data can be reproduced by this method. Moreover, it shows a potential ability of depicting rip channels features near the shoreline. Rip currents flow fields simulated over measured and modeled bathymetries are compared in order to assess the performance of the proposed forecast system in terms of offshore rip current strength, location and duration, which are all important information for local life guards. Keywords: operational model, SWAN, Delft3D, bathymetry, Argus, rip currents, XBeach

  10. Interdisciplinary modeling of the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C. A.; Veneziani, M.; Broquet, G.; Goebel, N.; Moore, A. M.; Zehr, J. P.; Follows, M.

    2008-12-01

    The California Current System (CCS) refers to the collection of poleward and equatorward surface and subsurface currents that extends along the west coast of North America and a thousand kilometers offshore where it merges with the larger Pacific circulation. It exhibits strong seasonal fluctuations and rich mesoscale variability and supports a productive and diverse ecosystem with geographically varying communities. We report on the development and evaluation of an interdisciplinary modeling effort for this region. For the physical model, we use the Regional Ocean Modeling System, driven at the surface by output from the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System and coupled at the lateral boundaries to GODAE- derived fields from the project, Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean. The forward physical model is evaluated using in situ hydrographic measurements and satellite-derived data. An incremental, strong-constraint, 4-dimensional variational approach assimilates this data, with evaluations based on model- data error statistics of both analysis and forecast fields. The ecosystem model, run in the forward model, supports 78 phytoplankton species and demonstrates self-organizing behavior. We focus this talk on the challenges associated with complex model evaluation in the coastal ocean. ~

  11. Current progress in patient-specific modeling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We present a survey of recent advancements in the emerging field of patient-specific modeling (PSM). Researchers in this field are currently simulating a wide variety of tissue and organ dynamics to address challenges in various clinical domains. The majority of this research employs three-dimensional, image-based modeling techniques. Recent PSM publications mostly represent feasibility or preliminary validation studies on modeling technologies, and these systems will require further clinical validation and usability testing before they can become a standard of care. We anticipate that with further testing and research, PSM-derived technologies will eventually become valuable, versatile clinical tools. PMID:19955236

  12. Model Performance of Water-Current Meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of discharge in natural streams requires hydrographers to use accurate water-current meters that have consistent performance among meters of the same model. This paper presents the results of an investigation into the performance of four models of current meters - Price type-AA, Price pygmy, Marsh McBirney 2000 and Swoffer 2100. Tests for consistency and accuracy for six meters of each model are summarized. Variation of meter performance within a model is used as an indicator of consistency, and percent velocity error that is computed from a measured reference velocity is used as an indicator of meter accuracy. Velocities measured by each meter are also compared to the manufacturer's published or advertised accuracy limits. For the meters tested, the Price models werer found to be more accurate and consistent over the range of test velocities compared to the other models. The Marsh McBirney model usually measured within its accuracy specification. The Swoffer meters did not meet the stringent Swoffer accuracy limits for all the velocities tested.

  13. Conserved Current for General Teleparallel Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itin, Y.

    The obstruction for the existence of an energy-momentum tensor for the gravitational field in GR is connected with vanishing of first order invariants in (pseudo) Riemannian geometry. This specific geometric property is not valid in alternative geometrical structures1,2. A parallelizable differentiable 4D-manifold endowed with a class of smooth coframe fields ϑa is considered. A general 3-parameter class of global Lorentz invariant teleparallel models is considered. It includes a 1-parameter subclass of models with the Schwarzschild coframe solution (generalized teleparallel equivalent of gravity) 3. By introducing the notion of a 3-parameter conjugate field strength F linear in the strength Ca = dϑa the coframe Lagrangian is rewritten in the Maxwell-Yang-Mills form L = 1/2Fa ∧ Ca. The field equation turns out to have a form d * Fa = Ta completely similar to the Maxwell field equation. By applying the Noether procedure, the source 3-form Ta is shown to be connected with the diffeomorphism invariance of the Lagrangian. Thus the source Ta of the coframe field is interpreted as the total conserved energy-momentum current of the coframe field and matter4. The energy-momentum tensor is defined as a map of the module of current 3-forms into the module of vector fields 5. Thus an energy-momentum tensor for the coframe is defined in a diffeomorphism invariant and a translational covariant way. The total energy-momentum current of a system is conserved. Thus a redistribution of the energy-momentum current between material and coframe (gravity) field is possible in principle, unlike as in the standard GR. The result is: The standard GR has a neighborhood of viable models with the same Schwarzschild solutions. These models however have a better Lagrangian behavior and produce an invariant energy-momentum tensor.

  14. Benchmarking an Unstructured-Grid Model for Tsunami Current Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinglong J.; Priest, George; Allan, Jonathan; Stimely, Laura

    2016-12-01

    We present model results derived from a tsunami current benchmarking workshop held by the NTHMP (National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program) in February 2015. Modeling was undertaken using our own 3D unstructured-grid model that has been previously certified by the NTHMP for tsunami inundation. Results for two benchmark tests are described here, including: (1) vortex structure in the wake of a submerged shoal and (2) impact of tsunami waves on Hilo Harbor in the 2011 Tohoku event. The modeled current velocities are compared with available lab and field data. We demonstrate that the model is able to accurately capture the velocity field in the two benchmark tests; in particular, the 3D model gives a much more accurate wake structure than the 2D model for the first test, with the root-mean-square error and mean bias no more than 2 cm s-1 and 8 mm s-1, respectively, for the modeled velocity.

  15. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOEpatents

    Schissel, Paul O.; Kennedy, Cheryl E.; Jorgensen, Gary J.; Shinton, Yvonne D.; Goggin, Rita M.

    1994-01-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

  16. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOEpatents

    Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

    1994-11-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

  17. Durability of oxygen sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snapp, L.

    1985-03-01

    This report describes the results of dynamometer and vehicle durability testing from a variety of sources, as well as common causes of failure for oxygen sensors. The data indicates that oxygen sensors show low failure rates, even at mileages of 80,000 miles and beyond.

  18. Nonlinear energy principle for model current sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.; Lui, Anthony T.Y.

    2006-01-15

    It is demonstrated on the basis of exact invariants of nonlinear Vlasov equation and model current sheets that the change in magnetic topology (i.e., reconnection) in a finite closed system leads to the conversion of magnetic-field energy to particle energy. It is also shown that the volume-averaged conversion efficiency diminishes as the spatial average is taken over larger and larger system size, while it increases when the system size becomes smaller. This finding may have an important implication for numerical simulation of reconnection processes under finite geometry.

  19. A generalized definition for waste form durability.

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, T. H.; Bauer, T. H.; Morris, E. E.; Wigeland, R. A.

    2002-06-26

    When evaluating waste form performance, the term ''durability'' often appears in casual discourse, but in the technical literature, the focus is often on waste form ''degradation'' in terms of mass lost per unit area per unit time. Waste form degradation plays a key role in developing models of the long-term performance in a repository environment, but other factors also influence waste form performance. These include waste form geometry; density, porosity, and cracking; the presence of cladding; in-package chemistry feedback; etc. The paper proposes a formal definition of waste form ''durability'' which accounts for these effects. Examples from simple systems as well as from complex models used in the Total System Performance Assessment of Yucca Mountain are provided. The application of ''durability'' in the selection of bounding models is also discussed.

  20. Quantile Regression Models for Current Status Data.

    PubMed

    Ou, Fang-Shu; Zeng, Donglin; Cai, Jianwen

    2016-11-01

    Current status data arise frequently in demography, epidemiology, and econometrics where the exact failure time cannot be determined but is only known to have occurred before or after a known observation time. We propose a quantile regression model to analyze current status data, because it does not require distributional assumptions and the coefficients can be interpreted as direct regression effects on the distribution of failure time in the original time scale. Our model assumes that the conditional quantile of failure time is a linear function of covariates. We assume conditional independence between the failure time and observation time. An M-estimator is developed for parameter estimation which is computed using the concave-convex procedure and its confidence intervals are constructed using a subsampling method. Asymptotic properties for the estimator are derived and proven using modern empirical process theory. The small sample performance of the proposed method is demonstrated via simulation studies. Finally, we apply the proposed method to analyze data from the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging.

  1. A study of model bivalve siphonal currents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monismith, Stephen G.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Thompson, Janet K.; O'Riordan, Catherine A.; Nepf, Heidi M.

    1990-01-01

    We carried out experiments studying the hydrodynamics of bivalve siphonal currents in a laboratory flume. Rather than use living animals, we devised a simple, model siphon pair connected to a pump. Fluorescence-based flow visualization was used to characterize siphon-jet flows for several geometric configurations and flow speeds. These measurements show that the boundary-layer velocity profile, siphon height, siphon pair orientation, and size of siphon structure all affect the vertical distribution of the excurrent flow downstream of the siphon pair and the fraction of excurrent that is refiltered. The observed flows may effect both the clearance rate of an entire population of siphonate bivalves as well as the efficiency of feeding of any individual. Our results imply that field conditions are properly represented in laboratory flume studies of phytoplankton biomass losses to benthic bivalves when the shear velocity and bottom roughness are matched to values found in the field. Numerical models of feeding by a bivalve population should include an effective sink distribution which is created by the combined incurrent-excurrent flow field. Near-bed flows need to be accounted for to properly represent these benthic-pelagic exchanges. We also present velocity measurements made with a laser-Doppler anemometer (LDA) for a single configuration (siphons flush with bed, inlet downstream) that show that the siphonal currents have a significant local effect on the properties of a turbulent boundary layer.

  2. Dental adhesion: mechanism, techniques and durability.

    PubMed

    Manuja, N; Nagpal, R; Pandit, I K

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary dental adhesives show favorable immediate results in terms of bonding effectiveness. However, the durability of resin-dentin bonds is their major problem. It appears that simplification of adhesive techniques is rather detrimental to the long-term stability of resin-tooth interface. The hydrostatic pulpal pressure, the dentinal fluid flow and the increased dentinal wetness in vital dentin can affect the intimate interaction of certain dentin adhesives with dentinal tissue. Bond degradation occurs via water sorption, hydrolysis of ester linkages of methacrylate resins, and activation of endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases. The three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives still remain the gold standard in terms of durability. This review discusses the fundamental process of adhesion to enamel and dentin with different adhesive techniques, factors affecting the long-term bonding performance of modern adhesives and addresses the current perspectives for improving bond durability.

  3. The Durability of Public Goods Changes the Dynamics and Nature of Social Dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sam P.; Taddei, François

    2007-01-01

    An implicit assumption underpins basic models of the evolution of cooperation, mutualism and altruism: The benefits (or pay-offs) of cooperation and defection are defined by the current frequency or distribution of cooperators. In social dilemmas involving durable public goods (group resources that can persist in the environment–ubiquitous from microbes to humans) this assumption is violated. Here, we examine the consequences of relaxing this assumption, allowing pay-offs to depend on both current and past numbers of cooperators. We explicitly trace the dynamic of a public good created by cooperators, and define pay-offs in terms of the current public good. By raising the importance of cooperative history in determining the current fate of cooperators, durable public goods cause novel dynamics (e.g., transient increases in cooperation in Prisoner's Dilemmas, oscillations in Snowdrift Games, or shifts in invasion thresholds in Stag-hunt Games), while changes in durability can transform one game into another, by moving invasion thresholds for cooperation or conditions for coexistence with defectors. This enlarged view challenges our understanding of social cheats. For instance, groups of cooperators can do worse than groups of defectors, if they inherit fewer public goods, while a rise in defectors no longer entails a loss of social benefits, at least not in the present moment (as highlighted by concerns over environmental lags). Wherever durable public goods have yet to reach a steady state (for instance due to external perturbations), the history of cooperation will define the ongoing dynamics of cooperators. PMID:17611625

  4. Environmental durability of polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Palmese, G.R.; Chawalwala, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past two decades, polymer concrete has increasingly been used for a number of applications including piping, machine bases, chemically resistant flooring, and bridge overlays. Currently, the use of polymer concrete as a wear surface for polymeric composite bridge decks is being investigated. Polymer concrete is a particulate composite comprised of mineral aggregate bound by a polymeric matrix. Such materials possess significantly higher mechanical properties than Portland cement concrete. However, the mechanical characteristics and environmental durability of polymer concrete are influenced by a number of factors. Among these are the selection of aggregate and resin, surface treatment, and cure conditions. In this work the influence of matrix selection and cure history on the environmental durability of polymer concrete was investigated. Particular attention was given to the effects of water on composite properties and to the mechanisms by which degradation occurs. The basalt-based polymer concrete systems investigated were susceptible to attack by water. Furthermore, results suggest that property loss associated with water exposure was primarily a result of interfacial weakening.

  5. Duct Tape Durability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2004-04-01

    Duct leakage is a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums, or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections, a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have shown that taped seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been testing sealant durability for several years using accelerated test methods and found that typical duct tape (i.e., cloth-backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) fails more rapidly than other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing over two years for four UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (two cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The tests involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars. Periodic air leakage tests and visual inspection were used to document changes in sealant performance. After two years of testing, the flex-to-collar connections showed little change in air leakage, but substantial visual degradation from some products. A surprising experimental result was failure of most of the clamps used to mechanically fasten the connections. This indicates that the durability of clamps also need to be addressed ensure longevity of the duct connection. An accelerated test method developed during this study has been used as the basis for an ASTM standard (E2342-03).

  6. Cross-Resistance between Cry1 Proteins in Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) May Affect the Durability of Current Pyramided Bt Maize Hybrids in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Daniel; Salmeron, Eloisa; Horikoshi, Renato Jun; Bernardi, Oderlei; Dourado, Patrick Marques; Carvalho, Renato Assis; Martinelli, Samuel; Head, Graham P.; Omoto, Celso

    2015-01-01

    , indicates that current Cry1-based maize hybrids face a challenge in managing S. frugiperda in Brazil and highlights the importance of effective insect resistance management for these technologies. PMID:26473961

  7. Low Cost, Durable Seal

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

    2010-12-17

    Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

  8. Modeling Earth's Ring Current Using The CIMI Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, J. D., II; Perez, J. D.; Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M. C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's ring current is a result of the injection of charged particles trapped in the magnetosphere from solar storms. The enhancement of the ring current particles produces magnetic depressions and disturbances to the Earth's magnetic field known as geomagnetic storms, which have been modeled using the comprehensive inner magnetosphere-ionosphere (CIMI) model. The purpose of this model is to identify and understand the physical processes that control the dynamics of the geomagnetic storms. The basic procedure was to use the CIMI model for the simulation of 15 storms since 2009. Some of the storms were run multiple times, but with varying parameters relating to the dynamics of the Earth's magnetic field, particle fluxes, and boundary conditions of the inner-magnetosphere. Results and images were placed in the TWINS online catalog page for further analysis and discussion. Particular areas of interest were extreme storm events. A majority of storms simulated had average DST values of -100 nT; these extreme storms exceeded DST values of -200 nT. The continued use of the CIMI model will increase knowledge of the interactions and processes of the inner-magnetosphere as well as lead to a better understanding of extreme solar storm events for the future advancement of space weather physics.

  9. Dark current model for ILC main linac

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Romanov, G.; Mokhov, N.V.; Eidelman, Y.; Tam, Wai-Ming; /Indiana U.

    2008-06-01

    In the ILC Main Linac, the dark current electrons, generated in SRF cavity can be accelerated to hundreds of MeV before being kicked out by quadrupoles and thus will originate electromagnetic cascade showers in the surrounding materials. Some of the shower secondaries can return back into vacuum and be re-accelerated again. The preliminary results of simulation of the dark current generation in ILC cavity, its dynamics in linac are discussing in this paper.

  10. Prediction of glass durability as a function of environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C M

    1988-01-01

    A thermodynamic model of glass durability is applied to natural, ancient, and nuclear waste glasses. The durabilities of over 150 different natural and man-made glasses, including actual ancient Roman and Islamic glasses (Jalame ca. 350 AD, Nishapur 10-11th century AD and Gorgon 9-11th century AD), are compared. Glass durability is a function of the thermodynamic hydration free energy, ..delta..G/sub hyd/, which can be calculated from glass composition and solution pH. The durability of the most durable nuclear waste glasses examined was /approximately/10/sup 6/ years. The least durable waste glass formulations were comparable in durability to the most durable simulated medieval window glasses of /approximately/10/sup 3/ years. In this manner, the durability of nuclear waste glasses has been interpolated to be /approximately/10/sup 6/ years and no less than 10/sup 3/ years. Hydration thermodynamics have been shown to be applicable to the dissolution of glass in various natural environments. Groundwater-glass interactions relative to geologic disposal of nuclear waste, hydration rind dating of obsidians, andor other archeological studies can be modeled, e.g., the relative durabilities of six simulated medieval window glasses have been correctly predicted for both laboratory (one month) and burial (5 years) experiments. Effects of solution pH on glass dissolution has been determined experimentally for the 150 different glasses and can be predicted theoretically by hydration thermodynamics. The effects of solution redox on dissolution of glass matrix elements such as SI and B have shown to be minimal. The combined effects of solution pH and Eh have been described and unified by construction of thermodynamically calculated Pourbaix (pH-Eh) diagrams for glass dissolution. The Pourbaix diagrams have been quantified to describe glass dissolution as a function of environmental conditions by use of the data derived from hydration thermodynamics. 56 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Nanocomposites for Improved Physical Durability of Porous PVDF Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chi Yan; Groth, Andrew; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    Current commercial polymer membranes have shown high performance and durability in water treatment, converting poor quality waters to higher quality suitable for drinking, agriculture and recycling. However, to extend the treatment into more challenging water sources containing abrasive particles, micro and ultrafiltration membranes with enhanced physical durability are highly desirable. This review summarises the current limits of the existing polymeric membranes to treat harsh water sources, followed by the development of nanocomposite poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes for improved physical durability. Various types of nanofillers including nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nanoclays were evaluated for their effect on flux, fouling resistance, mechanical strength and abrasion resistance on PVDF membranes. The mechanisms of abrasive wear and how the more durable materials provide resistance was also explored. PMID:24957121

  12. Nanocomposites for Improved Physical Durability of Porous PVDF Membranes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chi Yan; Groth, Andrew; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel

    2014-02-24

    Current commercial polymer membranes have shown high performance and durability in water treatment, converting poor quality waters to higher quality suitable for drinking, agriculture and recycling. However, to extend the treatment into more challenging water sources containing abrasive particles, micro and ultrafiltration membranes with enhanced physical durability are highly desirable. This review summarises the current limits of the existing polymeric membranes to treat harsh water sources, followed by the development of nanocomposite poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes for improved physical durability. Various types of nanofillers including nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nanoclays were evaluated for their effect on flux, fouling resistance, mechanical strength and abrasion resistance on PVDF membranes. The mechanisms of abrasive wear and how the more durable materials provide resistance was also explored.

  13. 25. CURRENT METERS: GURLEY MODEL NO. 665 AT CENTER, GURLEY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. CURRENT METERS: GURLEY MODEL NO. 665 AT CENTER, GURLEY MODEL NO. 625 'PYGMY' CURRENT METER AT LEFT, AND WES MINIATURE PRICE-TYPE CURRENT METER AT RIGHT. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  14. Current status: Animal models of nausea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    The advantages, and possible benefits of a valid, reliable animal model for nausea are discussed, and difficulties inherent to the development of a model are considered. A principle problem for developing models arises because nausea is a subjective sensation that can be identified only in humans. Several putative measures of nausea in animals are considered, with more detailed consideration directed to variation in cardiac rate, levels of vasopressin, and conditioned taste aversion. Demonstration that putative measures are associated with reported nausea in humans is proposed as a requirement for validating measures to be used in animal models. The necessity for a 'real-time' measure of nausea is proposed as an important factor for future research; and the need for improved understanding of the neuroanatomy underlying the emetic syndrome is discussed.

  15. Energy modelling: Clean grids with current technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2016-05-01

    The need for new energy storage is often seen as an obstacle to integrating renewable electricity into national power systems. Modelling shows that existing technologies could provide significant emissions reductions in the US without the need for storage, however.

  16. [Stretching--do current explanatory models suffice?].

    PubMed

    Freiwald, J; Engelhardt, M; Jäger, M; Gnewuch, A; Reuter, I; Wiemann, K; Starischka, S

    1998-06-01

    The opinion that mobility in the usual performance if the "straight leg raise" test for the evaluation of stretching techniques is subject to solety muscular limitations is critically appraised. With integration of recent results from molecular biological research and our own measurements, we can show that not only mechanical but also neurophysiological factors must be considered in the limitation of mobility. In the majority of the examined patients stretching of the ischiadic nerve seems to be responsible for restrictions in movement. The presented results cast doubt on the currently held assumptions and basic principles of stretching in therapy and sport.

  17. Observational support for the current sheet catastrophe model of substorm current disruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Lopez, R. E.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Speiser, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    The principles of the current sheet catastrophe models are briefly reviewed, and observations of some of the signatures predicted by the theory are presented. The data considered here include AMPTE/CCE observations of fifteen current sheet disruption events. According to the model proposed here, the root cause of the current disruption is some process, as yet unknown, that leads to an increase in the k sub A parameter. Possible causes for the increase in k sub A are discussed.

  18. Analysis of a PEMFC durability test under low humidity conditions and stack behaviour modelling using experimental design techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahdame, Bouchra; Candusso, Denis; Harel, Fabien; François, Xavier; Péra, Marie-Cécile; Hissel, Daniel; Kauffmann, Jean-Marie

    A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack has been operated under low humidity conditions during 1000 h. The fuel cell characterisation is based both on polarisation curves and electrochemical impedance spectra recorded for various stoichiometry rates, performed regularly throughout the ageing process. Some design of experiment (DoE) techniques, and in particular the response surface methodology (RSM), are employed to analyse the results of the ageing test and to propose some numerical/statistical laws for the modelling of the stack performance degradation. These mathematical relations are used to optimise the fuel cell operating conditions versus ageing time and to get a deeper understanding of the ageing mechanisms. The test results are compared with those obtained from another stack operated in stationary regime at roughly nominal conditions during 1000 h (reference test). The final objective is to ensure for the next fuel cell systems proper operating conditions leading to extended lifetimes.

  19. Modeling of fracture and durability of paste-bonded composite joints subjected to hygro-thermal-mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David Lee

    The objective of the research is to characterize the behavior of composite/composite joints with paste adhesive using both experimental testing and analytical modeling. In comparison with the conventional tape adhesive, joining composites using paste adhesive provides several advantages. The carbon fiber laminate material systems employed in this study included IM7 carbon fibers and 977-3 epoxy matrix assembled in prepreg tape, and AS4 carbon fibers and 977-3 epoxy matrix as a five-harness satin weave. The adhesive employed was EA 9394 epoxy. All laminates and test specimens were fabricated and inspected by Boeing using their standard propriety procedures. Three types of test specimens were used in the program. They were bonded double-lap shear (DLS), bonded double cantilever beam (DCB) and bonded interlaminar tension (ILT) specimens. A group of specimens were conditioned at elevated temperature and humidity in an environmental chamber at Boeing's facility and their moisture absorption recorded with time. Specimens were tested at room temperature dry and elevated temperatures. DCB and DLS specimens were tested in fatigue as well as static conditions. Two-dimensional finite element models of the three configurations were developed for determining stresses and strains using the ABAQUS finite element package code. Due to symmetry, only the one-half of the specimen needed to be considered thus reducing computational time. The effect of the test fixture is not taken into account instead equivalent distributed stresses are applied directly on the composite laminates. For each of the specimen, the distribution of Mises stress and the first strain invariant J1 are obtained to identify potential failure locations within a specimen.

  20. 24. CURRENT VELOCITYDIRECTION INDICATOR, AND GURLEY MODEL NO. 665 PRICETYPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. CURRENT VELOCITY-DIRECTION INDICATOR, AND GURLEY MODEL NO. 665 PRICE-TYPE CURRENT METER. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  1. Current SPE Hydrodynamic Modeling and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban

    2012-08-14

    Extensive work has been conducted on SPE analysis efforts: Fault effects Non-uniform weathered layer analysis MUNROU: material library incorporation, parallelization, and development of non-locking tets Development of a unique continuum-based-visco-plastic strain-rate-dependent material model With corrected SPE data path is now set for a multipronged approach to fully understand experimental series shot effects.

  2. Current Density and Continuity in Discretized Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boykin, Timothy B.; Luisier, Mathieu; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Discrete approaches have long been used in numerical modelling of physical systems in both research and teaching. Discrete versions of the Schrodinger equation employing either one or several basis functions per mesh point are often used by senior undergraduates and beginning graduate students in computational physics projects. In studying…

  3. TMG-123, a novel glucokinase activator, exerts durable effects on hyperglycemia without increasing triglyceride in diabetic animal models

    PubMed Central

    Tsushima, Yu; Tamura, Azusa; Hasebe, Makiko; Kanou, Masanobu; Kato, Hirotsugu; Kobayashi, Tsunefumi

    2017-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) plays a critical role for maintaining glucose homeostasis with regulating glucose uptake in liver and insulin secretion in pancreas. GK activators have been reported to decrease blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, clinical development of GK activators has failed due to the loss of glucose-lowering effects and increased plasma triglyceride levels after chronic treatment. Here, we generated a novel GK activator, TMG-123, examined its in vitro and in vivo pharmacological characteristics, and evaluated its risks of aforementioned clinical issues. TMG-123 selectively activated GK enzyme activity without increasing Vmax. TMG-123 improved glucose tolerance without increasing plasma insulin levels in both insulin-deficient (Goto-Kakizaki rats) and insulin-resistant (db/db mice) models. The beneficial effect on glucose tolerance was greater than results observed with clinically available antidiabetic drugs such as metformin and glibenclamide in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats. TMG-123 also improved glucose tolerance in combination with metformin. After 4 weeks of administration, TMG-123 reduced the Hemoglobin A1c levels without affecting liver and plasma triglyceride levels in Goto-Kakizaki rats and Diet-Induced Obesity mice. Moreover, TMG-123 sustained its effect on Hemoglobin A1c levels even after 24 weeks of administration without affecting triglycerides. Taken together, these data indicate that TMG-123 exerts glucose-lowering effects in both insulin-deficient and -resistant diabetes, and sustains reduced Hemoglobin A1c levels without affecting hepatic and plasma triglycerides even after chronic treatment. Therefore, TMG-123 is expected to be an antidiabetic drug that overcomes the concerns previously reported with other GK activators. PMID:28207836

  4. TMG-123, a novel glucokinase activator, exerts durable effects on hyperglycemia without increasing triglyceride in diabetic animal models.

    PubMed

    Tsumura, Yoshinori; Tsushima, Yu; Tamura, Azusa; Hasebe, Makiko; Kanou, Masanobu; Kato, Hirotsugu; Kobayashi, Tsunefumi

    2017-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) plays a critical role for maintaining glucose homeostasis with regulating glucose uptake in liver and insulin secretion in pancreas. GK activators have been reported to decrease blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, clinical development of GK activators has failed due to the loss of glucose-lowering effects and increased plasma triglyceride levels after chronic treatment. Here, we generated a novel GK activator, TMG-123, examined its in vitro and in vivo pharmacological characteristics, and evaluated its risks of aforementioned clinical issues. TMG-123 selectively activated GK enzyme activity without increasing Vmax. TMG-123 improved glucose tolerance without increasing plasma insulin levels in both insulin-deficient (Goto-Kakizaki rats) and insulin-resistant (db/db mice) models. The beneficial effect on glucose tolerance was greater than results observed with clinically available antidiabetic drugs such as metformin and glibenclamide in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats. TMG-123 also improved glucose tolerance in combination with metformin. After 4 weeks of administration, TMG-123 reduced the Hemoglobin A1c levels without affecting liver and plasma triglyceride levels in Goto-Kakizaki rats and Diet-Induced Obesity mice. Moreover, TMG-123 sustained its effect on Hemoglobin A1c levels even after 24 weeks of administration without affecting triglycerides. Taken together, these data indicate that TMG-123 exerts glucose-lowering effects in both insulin-deficient and -resistant diabetes, and sustains reduced Hemoglobin A1c levels without affecting hepatic and plasma triglycerides even after chronic treatment. Therefore, TMG-123 is expected to be an antidiabetic drug that overcomes the concerns previously reported with other GK activators.

  5. Multinucleon Ejection Model for Two Body Current Neutrino Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczyk, Jan T.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    A model is proposed to describe nucleons ejected from a nucleus as a result of two-body-current neutrino interactions. The model can be easily implemented in Monte Carlo neutrino event generators. Various possibilities to measure the two-body-current contribution are discussed. The model can help identify genuine charge current quasielastic events and allow for a better determination of the systematic error on neutrino energy reconstruction in neutrino oscillation experiments.

  6. Vacuum vessel eddy current modeling for TFTR adiabatic compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    DeLucia, J.; Bell, M.; Wong, K.L.

    1985-07-01

    A relatively simple current filament model of the TFTR vacuum vessel is described. It is used to estimate the three-dimensional structure of magnetic field perturbations in the vicinity of the plasma that arise from vacuum vessel eddy currents induced during adiabatic compression. Eddy currents are calculated self-consistently with the plasma motion. The Shafranov formula and adiabatic scaling laws are used to model the plasma. Although the specific application is to TFTR, the present model is of generation applicability.

  7. Inter-Hemispherical Currents for Realistic Model of Ionospheric Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyatsky, S.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2013-12-01

    We present results of modeling of the global 3-D ionosphere-magnetosphere current system including in addition to the R1 and R2 field-aligned currents also inter-hemispherical currents. The inter-hemispherical currents flow between Northern and Southern conjugate ionospheres in case of a North-South asymmetry in ionospheric conductivity in two hemispheres. These currents link together the ionospheric currents in two hemispheres, so the currents observed in one hemisphere can provide us with information about currents in the opposite hemisphere, which is especially important when their magnitude can not be obtained from direct observation (e.g., in Antarctica). In this study, we investigate the generation of the inter-hemispherical currents for several distributions of ionospheric conductivity in two hemispheres including a simplified model of ionospheric conductivity, which is important for better understanding of the expected distribution and magnitude of these currents, and a more realistic model of ionospheric conductivity, which is observed during magnetospheric substorms, when the geometry of the inter-hemispherical currents is more complicated. Simulation results show that the inter-hemispherical currents during substorms could play a very significant role, and neglecting these currents does not allow obtaining the correct picture of 3-D magnetosphere-ionosphere current system. These currents are an important part of 3-D field-aligned current system, and they are especially strong during summer-winter months, when they are comparable in magnitude with the R2 currents (about ~0.5 MA). Inter-hemispherical currents map. Left panel is related to Northern hemisphere, right panel to Southern. R1 and R2 currents are not shown; their locations are indicated by the red and blue dashed circles, respectively. The inter-hemispherical currents appear inside the auroral zone in the region of conductivity gradient. The currents in both hemispheres are equal in magnitude and

  8. Designing durable icephobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, Kevin; Kobaku, Sai P. R.; Lee, Duck Hyun; DiLoreto, Edward T.; Mabry, Joseph M.; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-01-01

    Ice accretion has a negative impact on critical infrastructure, as well as a range of commercial and residential activities. Icephobic surfaces are defined by an ice adhesion strength τice < 100 kPa. However, the passive removal of ice requires much lower values of τice, such as on airplane wings or power lines (τice < 20 kPa). Such low τice values are scarcely reported, and robust coatings that maintain these low values have not been reported previously. We show that, irrespective of material chemistry, by tailoring the cross-link density of different elastomeric coatings and by enabling interfacial slippage, it is possible to systematically design coatings with extremely low ice adhesion (τice < 0.2 kPa). These newfound mechanisms allow for the rational design of icephobic coatings with virtually any desired ice adhesion strength. By using these mechanisms, we fabricate extremely durable coatings that maintain τice < 10 kPa after severe mechanical abrasion, acid/base exposure, 100 icing/deicing cycles, thermal cycling, accelerated corrosion, and exposure to Michigan wintery conditions over several months. PMID:26998520

  9. Designing durable icephobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Kevin; Kobaku, Sai P R; Lee, Duck Hyun; DiLoreto, Edward T; Mabry, Joseph M; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-03-01

    Ice accretion has a negative impact on critical infrastructure, as well as a range of commercial and residential activities. Icephobic surfaces are defined by an ice adhesion strength τice < 100 kPa. However, the passive removal of ice requires much lower values of τice, such as on airplane wings or power lines (τice < 20 kPa). Such low τice values are scarcely reported, and robust coatings that maintain these low values have not been reported previously. We show that, irrespective of material chemistry, by tailoring the cross-link density of different elastomeric coatings and by enabling interfacial slippage, it is possible to systematically design coatings with extremely low ice adhesion (τice < 0.2 kPa). These newfound mechanisms allow for the rational design of icephobic coatings with virtually any desired ice adhesion strength. By using these mechanisms, we fabricate extremely durable coatings that maintain τice < 10 kPa after severe mechanical abrasion, acid/base exposure, 100 icing/deicing cycles, thermal cycling, accelerated corrosion, and exposure to Michigan wintery conditions over several months.

  10. Durability Evaluation of Superconducting Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Akihiko; Ogata, Masafumi; Nakauchi, Masahiko; Asahara, Tetsuo; Herai, Toshiki; Nishikawa, Yoichi

    2006-06-01

    It is one of the most essential things to verify the durability of devices and components of JR-Maglev system to realize the system into the future inauguration. Since the load requirements were insufficient in terms of the durability under vibrations under mere running tests carried out on Yamanashi Maglev Test Line hereinafter referred to YMTL, we have developed supplemental method with bench tests. Superconducting magnets hereinafter referred to SCM as used in the experimental running for the last seven years on the YMTL were brought to Kunitachi Technical Research Institute; we conducted tests to evaluate the durability of SCM up to a period of the service life in commercial use. The test results have indicated that no irregularity in each part of SCM proving that SCM are sufficiently durable for the practical application.

  11. Durability of Expedient Repair Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    by the Flofida Department of Transportation. I&. SUWIUET" TERMS 󈧓. NUMBER OF 1A1ES Expedient Repair Materials 21PAGE Shotcrete Air Force Base...produced by CTS Cemem Company. A dry process shotcrete standard, MicrosilR, and a State of Florida corrosion - resistant concrete system, referred to as...34 durability of the rapid repair materials tested by conventional methods for determining durability. E. CONCLUSIONS The blended Rapid-SetR shotcrete system

  12. Current algebra and the nonlinear σ-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.

    2007-06-01

    We present the current algebra of a particular form in the nonlinear σ-model. The algebra has a non-Abelian form with field-dependent structure functions. We comment on the connection of the model with noncommutative space.

  13. Durability Evaluation of Reversible Solid Oxide Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaoyu Zhang; James E. O'Brien; Robert C. O'Brien; Gregory K. Housley

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide cells (SOCs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. Reversible operation of SOCs includes electricity generation in the fuel cell mode and hydrogen generation in the electrolysis mode. Degradation is a more significant issue when operating SOCs in the electrolysis mode. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOCs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. A new test apparatus for single cell and small stack tests has been developed for this purpose. Cells were obtained from four industrial partners. Cells from Ceramatec Inc. and Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) showed improved durability in electrolysis mode compared to previous stack tests. Cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials Inc. (St. Gobain) and SOFCPower Inc. demonstrated stable performance in the fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode, especially at high current density. Electrolyte-electrode delamination was found to have a significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the electrode microstructure helped to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements were performed during the tests to characterize cell performance and degradation.

  14. Development of an efficient and durable photocatalytic system for hydride reduction of an NAD(P)+ model compound using a ruthenium(II) complex based on mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Yasuo; Koga, Kichitaro; Kobayashi, Atsuo; Konno, Hideo; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Morimoto, Tatsuki; Ishitani, Osamu

    2010-08-04

    The mechanism of photocatalytic reduction of 1-benzylnicotinamidium cation (BNA(+)) to the 1,4-dihydro form (1,4-BNAH) using [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(L)](2+) (Ru-L(2+), where tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, and L = pyridine and MeCN) as a photocatalyst and NEt(3) as a reductant has been clarified. On the basis of this mechanistic study, an efficient and durable photocatalytic system for selective hydride reduction of an NAD(P)(+) model compound has been developed. The photocatalytic reaction is initiated by the formation of [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(NEt(3))](2+) (Ru-NEt(3)(2+)) via the photochemical ligand substitution of Ru-L(2+). For this reason, the production rate of 1,4-BNAH using [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(MeCN)](2+) (Ru-MeCN(2+)) as a photocatalyst, from which the quantum yield of photoelimination of the MeCN ligand is greater than that of the pyridine ligand from [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(pyridine)](2+) (Ru-py(2+)), was faster than that using Ru-py(2+), especially in the first stage of the photocatalytic reduction. The photoexcitation of Ru-NEt(3)(2+) yields [Ru(tpy)(bpy)H](+) (Ru-H(+)), which reacts with BNA(+) to give 1:1 adduct [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(1,4-BNAH)](2+) (Ru-BNAH(2+)). In the presence of excess NEt(3) in the reaction solution, a deprotonation of the carbamoyl group in Ru-BNAH(2+) proceeds rapidly, mainly forming [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(1,4-BNAH-H(+))](+) (Ru-(BNAH-H(+))(+)). Although photocleavage of the adduct yields 1,4-BNAH and the cycle is completed by the re-coordination of a NEt(3) molecule to the Ru(II) center, this process competes with hydride abstraction from Ru-(BNAH-H(+))(+) by BNA(+) giving 1,4-BNAH and [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(BNA(+)-H(+))](2+). This adduct was observed as the major complex in the reaction solution after the photocatalysis was depressed and is a dead-end product because of its stability. Based on the information about the reaction mechanism and the deactivation process, we have successfully developed a new photocatalytic system using Ru-MeCN(2+) with 2 M of NEt(3) as

  15. A nonlinear viscoelastic approach to durability predictions for polymer based composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, Hal F.

    1991-01-01

    Current industry approaches for the durability assessment of metallic structures are briefly reviewed. For polymer based composite structures, it is suggested that new approaches must be adopted to include memory or viscoelastic effects which could lead to delayed failures that might not be predicted using current techniques. A durability or accelerated life assessment plan for fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) developed and documented over the last decade or so is reviewed and discussed. Limitations to the plan are outlined and suggestions to remove the limitations are given. These include the development of a finite element code to replace the previously used lamination theory code and the development of new specimen geometries to evaluate delamination failures. The new DCB model is reviewed and results are presented. Finally, it is pointed out that new procedures are needed to determine interfacial properties and current efforts underway to determine such properties are reviewed. Suggestions for additional efforts to develop a consistent and accurate durability predictive approach for FRP structures are outlined.

  16. A nonlinear viscoelastic approach to durability predictions for polymer based composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, Hal F.; Hiel, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Current industry approaches for the durability assessment of metallic structures are briefly reviewed. For polymer based composite structures, it is suggested that new approaches must be adopted to include memory or viscoelastic effects which could lead to delayed failures that might not be predicted using current techniques. A durability or accelerated life assessment plan for fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) developed and documented over the last decade or so is reviewed and discussed. Limitations to the plan are outlined and suggestions to remove the limitations are given. These include the development of a finite element code to replace the previously used lamination theory code and the development of new specimen geometries to evaluate delamination failures. The new DCB model is reviewed and results are presented. Finally, it is pointed out that new procedures are needed to determine interfacial properties and current efforts underway to determine such properties are reviewed. Suggestions for additional efforts to develop a consistent and accurate durability predictive approach for FRP structures is outlined.

  17. Transcranial current brain stimulation (tCS): models and technologies.

    PubMed

    Ruffini, Giulio; Wendling, Fabrice; Merlet, Isabelle; Molaee-Ardekani, Behnam; Mekonnen, Abeye; Salvador, Ricardo; Soria-Frisch, Aureli; Grau, Carles; Dunne, Stephen; Miranda, Pedro C

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we provide a broad overview of models and technologies pertaining to transcranial current brain stimulation (tCS), a family of related noninvasive techniques including direct current (tDCS), alternating current (tACS), and random noise current stimulation (tRNS). These techniques are based on the delivery of weak currents through the scalp (with electrode current intensity to area ratios of about 0.3-5 A/m2) at low frequencies (typically < 1 kHz) resulting in weak electric fields in the brain (with amplitudes of about 0.2-2 V/m). Here we review the biophysics and simulation of noninvasive, current-controlled generation of electric fields in the human brain and the models for the interaction of these electric fields with neurons, including a survey of in vitro and in vivo related studies. Finally, we outline directions for future fundamental and technological research.

  18. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Durability-Composition Models and the Applicability of the Associated Reduction of Constraints (ROC) Criteria for High TiO2 Containing Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C. M.; Edwards, T. B.; Trivelpiece, C. L.

    2016-08-30

    Radioactive high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the DWPF since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it has been poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than relying on statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to determine, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository. The DWPF SPC system is known as the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). One of the process models within PCCS is known as the Thermodynamic Hydration Energy Reaction MOdel (THERMO™). The DWPF will soon be receiving increased concentrations of TiO2-, Na2O-, and Cs2O-enriched wastes from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The SWPF has been built to pretreat the high-curie fraction of the salt waste to be removed from the HLW tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms at the SRS. In order to validate the existing TiO2 term in THERMO™ beyond 2.0 wt% in the DWPF, new durability data were developed over the target range of 2.00 to 6.00 wt% TiO2 and evaluated against the 1995 durability model. The durability was measured by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. This study documents the adequacy of the existing THERMO™ terms. It is recommended that the modified THERMO™ durability models and

  19. (Durability of building materials and components)

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.

    1990-11-27

    The traveler participated in the fourth meeting of RILEM 100-TSL, Techniques for Service Life Prediction,'' and The Fifth International Conference on Durability of Building Materials and Components.'' In addition, the traveler met with staff members at Taywood Engineering Ltd., Electricite de France, and AEA Technology. The meeting pertained to performance of concrete materials in nuclear power plant structures, time variation of concrete material properties, methods for evaluating concrete structures, and modeling to predict the effects of degradation factors on concrete materials. As many of the concrete structures in general civil engineering applications as well as nuclear power plant applications in Europe are aging, there is increasing emphasis on assessing the durability of these structures. Information was provided of direct application to the Structural Aging Program which would not have been available without these visits. Of equal, or possibly more importance, was the individual contacts established at the organizations visited. Each organization was extremely interested in both the approach and scope of the Structural Aging Program and requested that they be informed of progress. The initial steps were taken to cooperate with several of these researchers and this should help the Structural Aging Program keep abreast of related European activities. In summary, information obtained during this trip will benefit the ongoing Structural Aging Program by informing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) of the extensive European research programs addressing the durability of concrete structures, and also by forming and strengthening acquaintances with counterparts in other countries, thus enhancing the basis for possible international cooperation.

  20. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    SciTech Connect

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  1. Durability of polymer composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liu

    The purpose of this research is to examine structural durability of advanced composite materials under critical loading conditions, e.g., combined thermal and mechanical loading and shear fatigue loading. A thermal buckling model of a burnt column, either axially restrained or under an axial applied force was developed. It was predicted that for a column exposed to the high heat flux under simultaneous constant compressive load, the response of the column is the same as that of an imperfection column; the instability of the burnt column happens. Based on the simplified theoretical prediction, the post-fire compressive behavior of fiberglass reinforced vinyl-ester composite columns, which have been exposed to high heat flux for a certain time was investigated experimentally, the post-fire compressive strength, modulus and failure mode were determined. The integrity of the same column under constant compressive mechanical loading combined with heat flux exposure was examined using a specially designed mechanical loading fixture that mounted directly below a cone calorimeter. All specimens in the experiments exhibited compressive instability. The experimental results show a thermal bending moment exists and has a significant influence on the structural behavior, which verified the thermal buckling model. The trend of response between the deflection of the column and exposure time is similar to that predicted by the model. A new apparatus was developed to study the monotonic shear and cyclic-shear behavior of sandwich structures. Proof-of-concept experiments were performed using PVC foam core polymeric sandwich materials. Shear failure occurred by the extension of cracks parallel to the face-sheet/core interface, the shear modulus degraded with the growth of fatigue damage. Finite element analysis was conducted to determine stress distribution in the proposed specimen geometry used in the new technique. Details for a novel apparatus used for the fatigue testing of thin

  2. Current filamentation model for the Weibel/Filamentation instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Chang-Mo; Huynh, Cong Tuan; Kim, Chul Min

    2016-10-01

    A current filamentaion model for a nonrelativistic plasma with e +/e- beam has been presented together with PIC simulations, which can explain the mangetic field enhancement during the Weibel/ Filamentation instabilities. This filament model assumes the Hammer-Rostoker equilibrium. In addition, this model predicts preferential acceleration/deceleration for electron-ion plasmas depending on the injected beam to be e +/e-.

  3. On the current sheet model with {kappa} distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.; Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Sheldon, Robert B.

    2006-10-15

    The present paper (re)derives current sheet equilibrium solutions on the basis of the so-called {kappa} distribution functions for the particles. The present work builds upon a recent paper [W.-Z. Fu and L.-N. Hau, Phys. Plasmas 12, 070701 (2005)], where the authors formulated the equilibrium current sheet model with the {kappa} distribution. According to their work, however, the global temperature profile monotonically increases in the asymptotic regime. In the present paper it is shown that the presence of a finite stationary background population of the particles arrests the unlimited increase of the global temperature profile in the asymptotic limit. The present paper further extends the analysis by considering a current sheet model where the electron current is embedded within a thicker ion current layer, and where there exists a weak electrostatic potential drop across the current sheet.

  4. Eddy current modeling of silicon steel for use on SPICE

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Toru; Tahara, Ryoichi

    1995-11-01

    The relation between the equivalent eddy current field He and the instantaneous flux density rate dB/dt is experimentally obtained for current transformers made of silicon steel. The results show that He is proportional to (dB/dt){sup 0.6-0.7} in the operating frequency range ({approximately}100 Hz) of the current transformers. The ac B-H loop calculated by combining the proposed eddy current model with the Jiles-Atherton model agrees well with the measured data. In addition, this combined model allows magnetic component characteristics using SPICE to be simulated. The simulated secondary voltage waveforms of current transformers are in satisfactory agreement with the measured values.

  5. Durable silver coating for mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Jesse D.; Thomas, Norman L.

    2000-01-01

    A durable multilayer mirror includes reflective layers of aluminum and silver and has high reflectance over a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to visible to infrared. An adhesion layer of a nickel and/or chromium alloy or nitride is deposited on an aluminum surface, and a thin layer of silver is then deposited on the adhesion layer. The silver layer is protected by a passivation layer of a nickel and/or chromium alloy or nitride and by one or more durability layers made of metal oxides and typically a first layer of metal nitride. The durability layers may include a composite silicon aluminum nitride and an oxinitride transition layer to improve bonding between nitride and oxide layers.

  6. CURRENT METHODS AND RESEARCH STRATEGIES FOR MODELING ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The atmospheric pathway of the global mercury cycle is known to be the primary source of mercury contamination to most threatened aquatic ecosystems. Current efforts toward numerical modeling of atmospheric mercury are hindered by an incomplete understanding of emissions, atmosp...

  7. Modelling of the ring current in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampieri, G.; Dougherty, M.

    2004-02-01

    . The existence of a ring current inside Saturn's magnetosphere was first suggested by smith80 and ness81,ness82, in order to explain various features in the magnetic field observations from the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. connerney83 formalized the equatorial current model, based on previous modelling work of Jupiter's current sheet and estimated its parameters from the two Voyager data sets. Here, we investigate the model further, by reconsidering the data from the two Voyager spacecraft, as well as including the Pioneer 11 flyby data set. First, we obtain, in closed form, an analytic expression for the magnetic field produced by the ring current. We then fit the model to the external field, that is the difference between the observed field and the internal magnetic field, considering all the available data. In general, through our global fit we obtain more accurate parameters, compared to previous models. We point out differences between the model's parameters for the three flybys, and also investigate possible deviations from the axial and planar symmetries assumed in the model. We conclude that an accurate modelling of the Saturnian disk current will require taking into account both of the temporal variations related to the condition of the magnetosphere, as well as non-axisymmetric contributions due to local time effects.

  8. Modeled and Observed Transitions Between Rip Currents and Alongshore Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, M.; Elgar, S.; Warner, J. C.; Raubenheimer, B.

    2014-12-01

    Predictions of rip currents, alongshore currents, and the temporal transitions between these circulation patterns are important for swimmer safety and for estimating the transport of sediments, biota, and pollutants in the nearshore. Here, field observations are combined with hydrodynamic modeling to determine the dominant processes that lead rip currents to turn on and off with changing waves, bathymetry, and tidal elevation. Waves, currents, mean sea levels, and bathymetry were measured near and within five shore-perpendicular channels (on average 2-m deep, 30-m wide) that were dredged with the propellers of a landing craft at different times on a long straight Atlantic Ocean beach near Duck, NC in summer 2012. The circulation was measured for a range of incident wave conditions and channel sizes, and included rapid transitions between strong (0.5 to 1 m/s) rip current jets flowing offshore through the channels and alongshore currents flowing across the channels with no rip currents. Meandering alongshore currents (alongshore currents combined with an offshore jet at the downstream edge of the channel) also were observed. Circulation patterns near and within idealized rip channels simulated with COAWST (a three-dimensional phase-averaged model that couples ROMS and SWAN) are compared with the observations. In addition, the model is used to investigate the hydrodynamic response to a range of wave conditions (angle, height, period) and bathymetries (channel width, depth, and length; tidal elevations; shape of sandbar or terrace). Rip current speeds are largest for the deepest perturbations, and decrease as incident wave angles become more oblique. For obliquely incident waves, the rip currents are shifted in the direction of the alongshore flow, with an increasing shift for increasing alongshore current speed or increasing bathymetric perturbation depth.

  9. Modeling dilute pyroclastic density currents on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, A. B.; Brand, B. D.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.

    2013-12-01

    The surface of Mars has been shaped extensively by volcanic activity, including explosive eruptions that may have been heavily influenced by water- or ice-magma interaction. However, the dynamics of associated pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) under Martian atmospheric conditions and controls on deposition and runout from such currents are poorly understood. This work combines numerical modeling with terrestrial field measurements to explore the dynamics of dilute PDC dynamics on Earth and Mars, especially as they relate to deposit characteristics. We employ two numerical approaches. Model (1) consists of simulation of axi-symmetric flow and sedimentation from a steady-state, depth-averaged density current. Equations for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy are solved simultaneously, and the effects of atmospheric entrainment, particle sedimentation, basal friction, temperature changes, and variations in current thickness and density are explored. The Rouse number and Brunt-Väisälä frequency are used to estimate the wavelength of internal gravity waves in a density-stratified current, which allows us to predict deposit dune wavelengths. The model predicts realistic runout distances and bedform wavelengths for several well-documented field cases on Earth. The model results also suggest that dilute PDCs on Mars would have runout distances up to three times that of equivalent currents on Earth and would produce longer-wavelength bedforms. In both cases results are heavily dependent on source conditions, grain-size characteristics, and entrainment and friction parameters. Model (2) relaxes several key simplifications, resulting in a fully 3D, multiphase, unsteady model that captures more details of propagation, including density stratification, and depositional processes. Using this more complex approach, we focus on the role of unsteady or pulsatory vent conditions typically associated with phreatomagmatic eruptions. Runout distances from Model (2) agree

  10. Stirling engine - Approach for long-term durability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Michael T.; Bartolotta, Paul A.; Halford, Gary R.; Freed, Alan D.

    The approach employed by NASA Lewis for the long-term durability assessment of the Stirling engine hot-section components is summarized. The approach consists of: preliminary structural assessment; development of a viscoplastic constitutive model to accurately determine material behavior under high-temperature thermomechanical loads; an experimental program to characterize material constants for the viscoplastic constitutive model; finite-element thermal analysis and structural analysis using a viscoplastic constitutive model to obtain stress/strain/temperature at the critical location of the hot-section components for life assessment; and development of a life prediction model applicable for long-term durability assessment at high temperatures. The approach should aid in the provision of long-term structural durability and reliability of Stirling engines.

  11. Electric currents above Saint-Santin. II - Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaudier, C.; Blanc, M.

    1982-04-01

    An empirical model of local horizontal electric current flow seasonal variations above Saint-Santin, France, is generated by means of Ohm's law and a combination of ionosphere electrodynamic parameter local models derived from previous incoherent scatter studies. The Hall and Pedersen, neutral wind-driven and electric field-driven contributions to the total current are explicitly obtained, and the local time variations of the two components of the total, height-integrated horizontal current are compared with the magnetic variation at another location. The zonal component is found to be weak in all seasons, due to the equal and opposite contributions of the electric field and neutral winds. Both the net northward flow of charges revealed by the ionospheric data, and the observed discrepancy between calculated ionospheric currents and magnetic data, suggest that field-aligned currents are flowing from the northern to the southern hemisphere in the authors' longitude sector during at least part of the day.

  12. Durability Assessment of Gamma Tial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, Susan L.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Pereira, J. Michael; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Arya, Vinod K.; Zhuang, Wyman

    2004-01-01

    Gamma TiAl was evaluated as a candidate alloy for low-pressure turbine blades in aeroengines. The durability of g-TiAl was studied by examining the effects of impact or fretting on its fatigue strength. Cast-to-size Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb was studied in impact testing with different size projectiles at various impact energies as the reference alloy and subsequently fatigue tested. Impacting degraded the residual fatigue life. However, under the ballistic impact conditions studied, it was concluded that the impacts expected in an aeroengine would not result in catastrophic damage, nor would the damage be severe enough to result in a fatigue failure under the anticipated design loads. In addition, other gamma alloys were investigated including another cast-to-size alloy, several cast and machined specimens, and a forged alloy. Within this Ti-48-2-2 family of alloys aluminum content was also varied. The cracking patterns as a result of impacting were documented and correlated with impact variables. The cracking type and severity was reasonably predicted using finite element models. Mean stress affects were also studied on impact-damaged fatigue samples. The fatigue strength was accurately predicted based on the flaw size using a threshold-based, fracture mechanics approach. To study the effects of wear due to potential applications in a blade-disk dovetail arrangement, the machined Ti-47-2-2 alloy was fretted against In-718 using pin-on-disk experiments. Wear mechanisms were documented and compared to those of Ti-6Al-4V. A few fatigue samples were also fretted and subsequently fatigue tested. It was found that under the conditions studied, the fretting was not severe enough to affect the fatigue strength of g-TiAl.

  13. Residential energy demand models: Current status and future improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peabody, G.

    1980-12-01

    Two models currently used to analyze energy use by the residential sector are described. The ORNL model is used to forecast energy use by fuel type for various end uses on a yearly basis. The MATH/CHRDS model analyzes variations in energy expenditures by households of various socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. The essential features of the ORNL and MATH/CHRDS models are retained in a proposed model and integrated into a framework that is more flexible than either model. The important determinants of energy use by households are reviewed.

  14. Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries

    DOEpatents

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O; Dudney, Nancy J; Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Armstrong, Beth L

    2013-05-21

    A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

  15. Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries

    DOEpatents

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Baker, Frederick S.; Armstrong, Beth L.

    2011-09-13

    A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

  16. Experimental modelling of eddy currents and deflection for tokamak limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, T.Q.; Knott, M.J.; Turner, L.R.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1986-11-01

    During plasma disruptions in a tokamak fusion reactor, eddy currents are induced in the limiters and other conducting structures surrounding the plasma. Interactions between these currents with the toroidal field causes deflection and stress in the structural components. The structural motion in the strong magnetic field induces additional eddy current opposing the initial eddy current and modifying subsequent structural dynamics. Therefore, the motion and current are coupled and must be solved simultaneously. The coupling between current and deflection in cantilevered beams was investigated experimentally. The beams provide a simple model for the limiter blade of a tokamak fusion reactor. Several test pieces and various magnetic field conditions were employed to study the extend of the coupling effect from weak to strong coupling. Experimental results are compared with analytical predictions.

  17. Teaching Direct Current Theory Using a Field Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocklmayer, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Principles of direct current have long been recognised in the literature as presenting difficulties for learners. Most of these difficulties have been reported in the context of the traditional electron flow model. In this paper, an alternative approach for high school students using a field model is explored. Findings from a range of short pilot…

  18. Merging imagery and models for river current prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Cheryl Ann; Linzell, Robert S.; McKay, Paul

    2011-06-01

    To meet the challenge of operating in river environments with denied access and to improve the riverine intelligence available to the warfighter, advanced high resolution river circulation models are combined with remote sensing feature extraction algorithms to produce a predictive capability for currents and water levels in rivers where a priori knowledge of the river environment is limited. A River Simulation Tool (RST) is developed to facilitate the rapid configuration of a river model. River geometry is extracted from the automated processing of available imagery while minimal user input is collected to complete the parameter and forcing specifications necessary to configure a river model. Contingencies within the RST accommodate missing data such as a lack of water depth information and allow for ensemble computations. Successful application of the RST to river environments is demonstrated for the Snohomish River, WA. Modeled currents compare favorably to in-situ currents reinforcing the value of the developed approach.

  19. Phenomenological Model of Current Sheet Canting in Pulsed Electromagnetic Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, Thomas; Choueiri, E. Y.

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of current sheet canting in pulsed electromagnetic accelerators is the departure of the plasma sheet (that carries the current) from a plane that is perpendicular to the electrodes to one that is skewed, or tipped. Review of pulsed electromagnetic accelerator literature reveals that current sheet canting is a ubiquitous phenomenon - occurring in all of the standard accelerator geometries. Developing an understanding of current sheet canting is important because it can detract from the propellant sweeping capabilities of current sheets and, hence, negatively impact the overall efficiency of pulsed electromagnetic accelerators. In the present study, it is postulated that depletion of plasma near the anode, which results from axial density gradient induced diamagnetic drift, occurs during the early stages of the discharge, creating a density gradient normal to the anode, with a characteristic length on the order of the ion skin depth. Rapid penetration of the magnetic field through this region ensues, due to the Hall effect, leading to a canted current front ahead of the initial current conduction channel. In this model, once the current sheet reaches appreciable speeds, entrainment of stationary propellant replenishes plasma in the anode region, inhibiting further Hall-convective transport of the magnetic field; however, the previously established tilted current sheet remains at a fairly constant canting angle for the remainder of the discharge cycle, exerting a transverse J x B force which drives plasma toward the cathode and accumulates it there. This proposed sequence of events has been incorporated into a phenomenological model. The model predicts that canting can be reduced by using low atomic mass propellants with high propellant loading number density; the model results are shown to give qualitative agreement with experimentally measured canting angle mass dependence trends.

  20. Durability/life of fiber composites in hygrothermomechanical environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Statistical analysis and multiple regression were used to determine and quantify the significant hygrothermomechanical variables which infuence the tensile durability/life (cycle loading, fatigue) of boron-fiber/epoxy-matrix (B/E) and high-modulus-fiber/epoxy-matrix (HMS/E) composites. The use of the multiple regression analysis reduced the variables from fifteen, assumed initially, to six or less with a probability of greater than 0.999. The reduced variables were used to derive predictive models for compression an intralaminar shear durability/life of B/E and HMS/E composites assuming isoparametric fatigue behavior. The predictive models were subsequently generalized to predict the durability/life of graphite-fiber-r generalized model is of simple form, predicts conservative values compared with measured data and should be adequate for use in preliminary designs.

  1. Modeling the Inner Magnetosphere: Radiation Belts, Ring Current, and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The space environment is a complex system defined by regions of differing length scales, characteristic energies, and physical processes. It is often difficult, or impossible, to treat all aspects of the space environment relative to a particular problem with a single model. In our studies, we utilize several models working in tandem to examine this highly interconnected system. The methodology and results will be presented for three focused topics: 1) Rapid radiation belt electron enhancements, 2) Ring current study of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs), Dst, and plasma composition, and 3) Examination of the outflow of ionospheric ions. In the first study, we use a coupled MHD magnetosphere - kinetic radiation belt model to explain recent Akebono/RDM observations of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. In the second study, we present initial results of a ring current study using a newly coupled kinetic ring current model with an MHD magnetosphere model. Results of a dst study for four geomagnetic events are shown. Moreover, direct comparison with TWINS ENA images are used to infer the role that composition plays in the ring current. In the final study, we directly model the transport of plasma from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. We especially focus on the role of photoelectrons and and wave-particle interactions. The modeling methodology for each of these studies will be detailed along with the results.

  2. Application of heat flow models to SOI current mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Feixia; Cheng, Ming-C.

    2004-11-01

    An analytical heat flow model for SOI circuits is presented. The model is able to account for heat exchanges among devices and heat loss from the silicon film and interconnects to the substrate through the buried oxide. The developed model can accurately and efficiently predict the temperature distribution in the interconnect/poly-lines and SOI devices. The model is applied to SOI current mirrors to study heat flow in different layout designs. The results from the developed model are verified with those from Raphael, a 3D numerical simulator that can provide the detailed 3D temperature distribution in interconnect/poly-lines.

  3. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-04-24

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

  4. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing...

  5. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing...

  6. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing...

  7. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing...

  8. Meson exchange current (MEC) models in neutrino interaction generators

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei

    2015-05-15

    Understanding of the so-called 2 particle-2 hole (2p-2h) effect is an urgent program in neutrino interaction physics for current and future oscillation experiments. Such processes are believed to be responsible for the event excesses observed by recent neutrino experiments. The 2p-2h effect is dominated by the meson exchange current (MEC), and is accompanied by a 2-nucleon emission from the primary vertex, instead of a single nucleon emission from the charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) interaction. Current and future high resolution experiments can potentially nail down this effect. For this reason, there are world wide efforts to model and implement this process in neutrino interaction simulations. In these proceedings, I would like to describe how this channel is modeled in neutrino interaction generators.

  9. Community Benchmarking of Tsunami-Induced Nearshore Current Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynett, P. J.; Wilson, R. I.; Gately, K.

    2015-12-01

    To help produce accurate and consistent maritime hazard products, the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) Strategic Plan includes a requirement to develop and run a benchmarking workshop to evaluate the numerical tsunami modeling of currents. For this workshop, five different benchmarking datasets were organized. These datasets were selected based on characteristics such as geometric complexity, currents that are shear/separation driven (and thus are de-coupled from the incident wave forcing), tidal coupling, and interaction with the built environment. While tsunami simulation models have generally been well validated against wave height and runup, comparisons with speed data are much less common. As model results are increasingly being used to estimate or indicate damage to coastal infrastructure, understanding the accuracy and precision of speed predictions becomes of important. As a result of this 2-day workshop held in early 2015, modelers now have a better awareness of their ability to accurately capture the physics of tsunami currents, and therefore a better understanding of how to use these simulation tools for hazard assessment and mitigation efforts. In this presentation, the model results - from 14 different modelers - will be presented and summarized, with a focus on statistical and ensemble properties of the current predictions.

  10. Probability of detection models for eddy current NDE methods

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, S.N.

    1993-04-30

    The development of probability of detection (POD) models for a variety of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods is motivated by a desire to quantify the variability introduced during the process of testing. Sources of variability involved in eddy current methods of NDE include those caused by variations in liftoff, material properties, probe canting angle, scan format, surface roughness and measurement noise. This thesis presents a comprehensive POD model for eddy current NDE. Eddy current methods of nondestructive testing are used widely in industry to inspect a variety of nonferromagnetic and ferromagnetic materials. The development of a comprehensive POD model is therefore of significant importance. The model incorporates several sources of variability characterized by a multivariate Gaussian distribution and employs finite element analysis to predict the signal distribution. The method of mixtures is then used for estimating optimal threshold values. The research demonstrates the use of a finite element model within a probabilistic framework to the spread in the measured signal for eddy current nondestructive methods. Using the signal distributions for various flaw sizes the POD curves for varying defect parameters have been computed. In contrast to experimental POD models, the cost of generating such curves is very low and complex defect shapes can be handled very easily. The results are also operator independent.

  11. Structure of High Latitude Currents in Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltberger, M.; Rigler, E. J.; Merkin, V.; Lyon, J. G.

    2017-03-01

    Using three resolutions of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global magnetosphere-ionosphere model (LFM) and the Weimer 2005 empirical model we examine the structure of the high latitude field-aligned current patterns. Each resolution was run for the entire Whole Heliosphere Interval which contained two high speed solar wind streams and modest interplanetary magnetic field strengths. Average states of the field-aligned current (FAC) patterns for 8 interplanetary magnetic field clock angle directions are computed using data from these runs. Generally speaking the patterns obtained agree well with results obtained from the Weimer 2005 computing using the solar wind and IMF conditions that correspond to each bin. As the simulation resolution increases the currents become more intense and narrow. A machine learning analysis of the FAC patterns shows that the ratio of Region 1 (R1) to Region 2 (R2) currents decreases as the simulation resolution increases. This brings the simulation results into better agreement with observational predictions and the Weimer 2005 model results. The increase in R2 current strengths also results in the cross polar cap potential (CPCP) pattern being concentrated in higher latitudes. Current-voltage relationships between the R1 and CPCP are quite similar at the higher resolution indicating the simulation is converging on a common solution. We conclude that LFM simulations are capable of reproducing the statistical features of FAC patterns.

  12. Current animal models of obsessive compulsive disorder: an update.

    PubMed

    Albelda, N; Joel, D

    2012-06-01

    During the last 30 years there have been many attempts to develop animal models of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), in the hope that they may provide a route for furthering our understanding and treatment of this disorder. The present review provides the reader with an overview of the currently active animal models of OCD, their strengths and limitations, so that the reader can use the review as a guide for establishing new animal models of OCD, evaluating existing animal models and choosing among them according to one's needs. We review current genetic, pharmacological, neurodevelopmental and behavioral animal models of OCD, and evaluate their face validity (derived from phenomenological similarity between the behavior in the animal model and the specific symptoms of the human condition), predictive validity (derived from similarity in response to treatment) and construct validity (derived from similarity in the underlying mechanisms [physiological or psychological]). On the basis of this evaluation we discuss the usefulness of the different models for screening drugs for anti-compulsive activity, detecting new targets for high frequency stimulation, studying the neural mechanisms of OCD and unraveling the role of gonadal hormones. We then describe potential new treatment strategies that emerge from the convergence of data obtained in different models on the one hand, and how different models can be used to model different subtypes or dimensions of OCD, on the other hand.

  13. Comparison of analytical eddy current models using principal components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contant, S.; Luloff, M.; Morelli, J.; Krause, T. W.

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring the gap between the pressure tube (PT) and the calandria tube (CT) in CANDU® fuel channels is essential, as contact between the two tubes can lead to delayed hydride cracking of the pressure tube. Multifrequency transmit-receive eddy current non-destructive evaluation is used to determine this gap, as this method has different depths of penetration and variable sensitivity to noise, unlike single frequency eddy current non-destructive evaluation. An Analytical model based on the Dodd and Deeds solutions, and a second model that accounts for normal and lossy self-inductances, and a non-coaxial pickup coil, are examined for representing the response of an eddy current transmit-receive probe when considering factors that affect the gap response, such as pressure tube wall thickness and pressure tube resistivity. The multifrequency model data was analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA), a statistical method used to reduce the data set into a data set of fewer variables. The results of the PCA of the analytical models were then compared to PCA performed on a previously obtained experimental data set. The models gave similar results under variable PT wall thickness conditions, but the non-coaxial coil model, which accounts for self-inductive losses, performed significantly better than the Dodd and Deeds model under variable resistivity conditions.

  14. A three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1994-01-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawn and dusk sides of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L = 2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H+ fluxes at tens of keV, which are always over-estimated. A newly-invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion differential flux. Important features of storm-time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (less than 10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, j(sub o)(1+Ay(exp n)), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (less than 30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n.

  15. Application of HF radar currents to oil spill modelling.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Ana J; Castanedo, Sonia; Medina, Raul; Losada, Inigo J; Alvarez-Fanjul, Enrique

    2009-02-01

    In this work, the benefits of high-frequency (HF) radar currents for oil spill modeling and trajectory analysis of floating objects are analyzed. The HF radar performance is evaluated by means of comparison between a drifter buoy trajectory and the one simulated using a Lagrangian trajectory model. A methodology to optimize the transport model performance and to calculate the search area of the predicted positions is proposed. This method is applied to data collected during the Galicia HF Radar Experience. This experiment was carried out to explore the capabilities of this technology for operational monitoring along the Spanish coast. Two long-range HF radar stations were installed and operated between November 2005 and February 2006 on the Galician coast. In addition, a drifter buoy was released inside the coverage area of the radar. The HF radar currents, as well as numerical wind data were used to simulate the buoy trajectory using the TESEO oil spill transport model. In order to evaluate the contribution of HF radar currents to trajectory analysis, two simulation alternatives were carried out. In the first one, wind data were used to simulate the motion of the buoy. In the second alternative, surface currents from the HF radar were also taken into account. For each alternative, the model was calibrated by means of the global optimization algorithm SCEM-UA (Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis) in order to obtain the probability density function of the model parameters. The buoy trajectory was computed for 24h intervals using a Monte Carlo approach based on the results provided in the calibration process. A bivariate kernel estimator was applied to determine the 95% confidence areas. The analysis performed showed that simulated trajectories integrating HF radar currents are more accurate than those obtained considering only wind numerical data. After a 24h period, the error in the final simulated position improves using HF radar currents. Averaging the

  16. Encapsulation of TRISO particle fuel in durable soda-lime-silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Paul G.; Corkhill, Claire L.; Stennett, Martin C.; Hand, Russell J.; Meyer, Willem C. H. M.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2013-05-01

    Tri-Structural Isotropic (TRISO) coated particle-fuel is a key component in designs for future high temperature nuclear reactors. This study investigated the suitability of three soda lime silicate glass compositions, for the encapsulation of simulant TRISO particle fuel. A cold press and sinter (CPS) methodology was employed to produce TRISO particle-glass composites. Composites produced were determined to have an aqueous durability, fracture toughness and Vickers' hardness comparable to glasses currently employed for the disposal of high level nuclear wastes. Sintering at 700 °C for 30 min was found to remove all interconnected porosity from the composite bodies and oxidation of the outer pyrolytic carbon layer during sintering was prevented by processing under a 5% H2/N2 atmosphere. However, the outer pyrolytic carbon layer was not effectively wetted by the encapsulating glass matrix. The aqueous durability of the TRISO particle-glass composites was investigated using PCT and MCC-1 tests combined with geochemical modelling. It was found that durability was dependent on silicate and calcium solution saturation. This study provides significant advancements in the preparation of TRISO particle encapsulant waste forms. The potential for the use of non-borosilicate sintered glass composites for TRISO particle encapsulation has been confirmed, although further refinements are required.

  17. Animal models of frailty: current applications in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Kane, Alice E; Hilmer, Sarah N; Mach, John; Mitchell, Sarah J; de Cabo, Rafael; Howlett, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    The ethical, logistical, and biological complications of working with an older population of people inherently limits clinical studies of frailty. The recent development of animal models of frailty, and tools for assessing frailty in animal models provides an invaluable opportunity for frailty research. This review summarizes currently published animal models of frailty including the interleukin-10 knock-out mouse, the mouse frailty phenotype assessment tool, and the mouse clinical frailty index. It discusses both current and potential roles of these models in research into mechanisms of frailty, interventions to prevent/delay frailty, and the effect of frailty on outcomes. Finally, this review discusses some of the challenges and opportunities of translating research findings from animals to humans.

  18. Animal models of frailty: current applications in clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Alice E; Hilmer, Sarah N; Mach, John; Mitchell, Sarah J; de Cabo, Rafael; Howlett, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    The ethical, logistical, and biological complications of working with an older population of people inherently limits clinical studies of frailty. The recent development of animal models of frailty, and tools for assessing frailty in animal models provides an invaluable opportunity for frailty research. This review summarizes currently published animal models of frailty including the interleukin-10 knock-out mouse, the mouse frailty phenotype assessment tool, and the mouse clinical frailty index. It discusses both current and potential roles of these models in research into mechanisms of frailty, interventions to prevent/delay frailty, and the effect of frailty on outcomes. Finally, this review discusses some of the challenges and opportunities of translating research findings from animals to humans. PMID:27822024

  19. Modelling of current loads on aquaculture net cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, Trygve; Faltinsen, Odd M.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we propose and discuss a screen type of force model for the viscous hydrodynamic load on nets. The screen model assumes that the net is divided into a number of flat net panels, or screens. It may thus be applied to any kind of net geometry. In this paper we focus on circular net cages for fish farms. The net structure itself is modelled by an existing truss model. The net shape is solved for in a time-stepping procedure that involves solving a linear system of equations for the unknown tensions at each time step. We present comparisons to experiments with circular net cages in steady current, and discuss the sensitivity of the numerical results to a set of chosen parameters. Satisfactory agreement between experimental and numerical prediction of drag and lift as function of the solidity ratio of the net and the current velocity is documented.

  20. Finite element modeling of pulsed eddy current NDT phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.; Ida, N.; Lord, W.

    1985-05-15

    Transient fields for nondestructive testing (pulsed eddy current methods) have been used experimentally for such applications as coating thickness measurements and the inspection of reactor fuel tubing. The lack of suitable models to facilitate understanding of the interaction of the pulsed field with the test specimen has hindered a wider acceptance of the method as a tool in NDT. Two models, based on the finite element technique are described. The first model, used for repetitive pulse train sources makes use of the Fourier series of the source current to solve a steady state problem for each significant harmonic. The harmonic solutions are then summed to produce the total EMF in the pickup coil. The second model is used for single pulse application. The response is calculated using an iterative time stepping solution. In both cases axisymmetric geometries are studied using a magnetic vector potential formulation. Solutions are compared with experimental results. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  1. A turbidity current model for real world applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, Jorge; Castro, Manuel J.; Morales, Tomás

    2016-04-01

    Traditional turbidity current models suffer from several drawbacks. Among them not preserving freshwater mass, a missing pressure term, or not including terms related to deposition, erosion and entrainment in the momentum equation. In Morales et al.(2009) a new turbidity current model was proposed trying to overcome all these drawbacks. This model takes into account the interaction between the turbidity current and the bottom, considering deposition and erosion effects as well as solid bedload transport of particles at the bed due to the current. Moreover, this model includes the effects of the deposition, erosion and water entrainment into the momentum equation,commonly neglected in this type of models and, finally, in the absence of water entrainment, freshwater mass in the turbidity current is preserved. Despite these improvements, the numerical results obtained by this model when applied to real river systems were not satisfactory due to the simple form of the friction term that was considered. In the present work we propose a different parameterization of this term, where bottom and interface fluid frictions are separately parameterized with more complex expressions. Moreover, the discretization of the deposition/erosion terms is now performed semi-implicitly which guarantees the positivity of the volumetric concentration of sediments in suspension and in the erodible sediment layer at the bed. The numerical simulations obtained with this new turbidity current model (component of HySEA numerical computing platform) greatly improve previous numerical results for simplified geometries as well as for real river systems. Acknowledgements: This research has been partially supported by the Junta de Andalucía research project TESELA (P11-RNM7069) and the Spanish Government Research project DAIFLUID (MTM2012-38383-C02-01) and Universidad de Málaga, Campus de Excelencia Andalucía TECH. References: T. Morales, M. Castro, C. Parés, and E. Fernández-Nieto (2009). On

  2. Durable antistatic coating for polymethylmethacrylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadek, V.; Somoano, R. B.; Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A durable antistatic coating is achieved on polymethylmethacrylate plastic without affecting its optical clarity by applying to the surface of the plastic a low molecular weight solvent having a high electron affinity and a high dipole moment, such as acentonitrile or nitromethane alone or in the presence of photopolymerizable monomer. The treated polymethylmethacrylate plastic dissipates most of the induced electrostatic charge and retains its optical clarity. The antistatic behavior persists after washing, rubbing and vacuum treatment.

  3. Medicare and durable medical equipment.

    PubMed

    Coviello, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Medicare coverage of wheelchairs, hospital beds and other durable medical equipment (DME) is a major source of confusion for people with Medicare, their families and the professionals who work with them. Yet, consumer publications rarely touch on it. In this brief we offer an overview of DME coverage issues and payment policies, including potential costs for consumers and their rights to appeal denials of payment.

  4. On current sheet approximations in models of eruptive flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bungey, T. N.; Forbes, T. G.

    1994-01-01

    We consider an approximation sometimes used for current sheets in flux-rope models of eruptive flares. This approximation is based on a linear expansion of the background field in the vicinity of the current sheet, and it is valid when the length of the current sheet is small compared to the scale length of the coronal magnetic field. However, we find that flux-rope models which use this approximation predict the occurrence of an eruption due to a loss of ideal-MHD equilibrium even when the corresponding exact solution shows that no such eruption occurs. Determination of whether a loss of equilibrium exists can only be obtained by including higher order terms in the expansion of the field or by using the exact solution.

  5. Current fluctuations in a two dimensional model of heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; Garrido, Pedro L.; Hurtado, Pablo I.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we study numerically and analytically current fluctuations in the two-dimensional Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti (KMP) model of heat conduction. For that purpose, we use a recently introduced algorithm which allows the direct evaluation of large deviations functions. We compare our results with predictions based on the Hydrodynamic Fluctuation Theory (HFT) of Bertini and coworkers, finding very good agreement in a wide interval of current fluctuations. We also verify the existence of a well-defined temperature profile associated to a given current fluctuation which depends exclusively on the magnitude of the current vector, not on its orientation. This confirms the recently introduced Isometric Fluctuation Relation (IFR), which results from the time-reversibility of the dynamics, and includes as a particular instance the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem in this context but adds a completely new perspective on the high level of symmetry imposed by timereversibility on the statistics of nonequilibrium fluctuations.

  6. A current sheet model for the Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, Daniel R.; Pollack, Gerald L.

    1998-09-01

    As an example in magnetostatics we consider the main magnetic field of the Earth and its current sources. The measured field on the surface is accurately given, in tables of the International Geological Reference Field, in terms of Gaussian coefficients. By applying Maxwell's equations to these data we calculate the extended field, inside the Earth, and give graphical representations of it. We also construct a simple theoretical model of the source of the field, in which the field is the result of currents flowing on the surface of a sphere inside the Earth. The current sources which give the observed field are calculated in terms of vector spherical harmonics. The stream function and currents are displayed on a Mercator projection for a sphere whose radius is half the Earth's radius. Interesting properties of vector operations on the Mercator plane are analytically and graphically described.

  7. [Neither Descartes nor Freud? current pain models in psychosomatic medicine].

    PubMed

    Egloff, N; Egle, U T; von Känel, R

    2008-05-14

    Models explaining chronic pain based on the mere presence or absence of peripheral somatic findings or which view pain of psychological origin when there is no somatic explanation, have their shortcomings. Current scientific knowledge calls for distinct pain concepts, which integrate neurobiological and neuropsychological aspects of pain processing.

  8. Gompertz kinetics model of fast chemical neurotransmission currents.

    PubMed

    Easton, Dexter M

    2005-10-01

    At a chemical synapse, transmitter molecules ejected from presynaptic terminal(s) bind reversibly with postsynaptic receptors and trigger an increase in channel conductance to specific ions. This paper describes a simple but accurate predictive model for the time course of the synaptic conductance transient, based on Gompertz kinetics. In the model, two simple exponential decay terms set the rates of development and decline of transmitter action. The first, r, triggering conductance activation, is surrogate for the decelerated rate of growth of conductance, G. The second, r', responsible for Y, deactivation of the conductance, is surrogate for the decelerated rate of decline of transmitter action. Therefore, the differential equation for the net conductance change, g, triggered by the transmitter is dg/dt=g(r-r'). The solution of that equation yields the product of G(t), representing activation, and Y(t), which defines the proportional decline (deactivation) of the current. The model fits, over their full-time course, published records of macroscopic ionic current associated with fast chemical transmission. The Gompertz model is a convenient and accurate method for routine analysis and comparison of records of synaptic current and putative transmitter time course. A Gompertz fit requiring only three independent rate constants plus initial current appears indistinguishable from a Markov fit using seven rate constants.

  9. Current Models and Innovative Strategies in Management Education in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zhong-Ming

    1999-01-01

    Current models of management education in China include national training, on-the-job technical training, and the national master's of business administration supervisory committee. Effective strategies being used include teamwork, process skills, action learning, cross-cultural management learning, and competency-based management development. (SK)

  10. Experimental modeling of eddy currents and defections for tokamak limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, T.Q.; Knott, M.J.; Turner, L.R.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    In a tokamak fusion reactor or other magnetically confined fusion device, a rapid decay of the magnetic field due to a disrupting plasma current induces eddy currents in the surrounding structures. These include the limiters, blanket, first wall, and vacuum vessel. The eddy currents, through interaction with the applied toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, produce large mechanical torques and forces that deflect the structural components. An important coupling effect exists between the dynamic behavior of the structure and the transient eddy current. This coupling occurs when, as it deflects, the component intercepts additional magnetic flux. The coupling between deflection and eddy current could reduce the peak current, deflection, and other electromagnetic effects to a level far less severe than would be predicted if coupling is disregarded. In this study, experiments were performed to investigate deflection, current, and material stress in cantilever beams with the Fusion ELectromagnetic Induction eXperiment (FELIX) at the Argonne National Laboratory. Since structures near the plasma are typically cantilevered, the beams provide a good model for the limiter blades of a tokamak fusion reactor. 2 figs.

  11. International Low-Earth-Orbit Spacecraft Materials Test Program Initiated for Better Prediction of Durability and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1999-01-01

    Spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) are subjected to many components of the environment, which can cause them to degrade much more rapidly than intended and greatly shorten their functional life. The atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, and cross contamination present in LEO can affect sensitive surfaces such as thermal control paints, multilayer insulation, solar array surfaces, and optical surfaces. The LEO Spacecraft Materials Test (LEO-SMT) program is being conducted to assess the effects of simulated LEO exposure on current spacecraft materials to increase understanding of LEO degradation processes as well as to enable the prediction of in-space performance and durability. Using ground-based simulation facilities to test the durability of materials currently flying in LEO will allow researchers to compare the degradation evidenced in the ground-based facilities with that evidenced on orbit. This will allow refinement of ground laboratory test systems and the development of algorithms to predict the durability and performance of new materials in LEO from ground test results. Accurate predictions based on ground tests could reduce development costs and increase reliability. The wide variety of national and international materials being tested represent materials being functionally used on spacecraft in LEO. The more varied the types of materials tested, the greater the probability that researchers will develop and validate predictive models for spacecraft long-term performance and durability. Organizations that are currently participating in the program are ITT Research Institute (USA), Lockheed Martin (USA), MAP (France), SOREQ Nuclear Research Center (Israel), TNO Institute of Applied Physics (The Netherlands), and UBE Industries, Ltd. (Japan). These represent some of the major suppliers of thermal control and sensor materials currently flying in LEO. The participants provide materials that are exposed to selected levels of atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet

  12. Parametric overdispersed frailty models for current status data.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Steven; Aerts, Marc; Molenberghs, Geert; Hens, Niel

    2017-03-27

    Frailty models have a prominent place in survival analysis to model univariate and multivariate time-to-event data, often complicated by the presence of different types of censoring. In recent years, frailty modeling gained popularity in infectious disease epidemiology to quantify unobserved heterogeneity using Type I interval-censored serological data or current status data. In a multivariate setting, frailty models prove useful to assess the association between infection times related to multiple distinct infections acquired by the same individual. In addition to dependence among individual infection times, overdispersion can arise when the observed variability in the data exceeds the one implied by the model. In this article, we discuss parametric overdispersed frailty models for time-to-event data under Type I interval-censoring, building upon the work by Molenberghs et al. () and Hens et al. (). The proposed methodology is illustrated using bivariate serological data on hepatitis A and B from Flanders, Belgium anno 1993-1994. Furthermore, the relationship between individual heterogeneity and overdispersion at a stratum-specific level is studied through simulations. Although it is important to account for overdispersion, one should be cautious when modeling both individual heterogeneity and overdispersion based on current status data as model selection is hampered by the loss of information due to censoring.

  13. Current results on the asymptotics of dynamo models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, H. P.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic field generation and evolution models that are capable of describing a large body of observational material are currently available for different celestial bodies. Despite recent decades of great success in numerical magnetic hydrodynamics and in detailed research into some specific problems, asymptotic methods still have to be used to clarify the magnetic field generation mechanism in dynamo theory. In this review, current asymptotic methods are presented together with the results of their application to the simulation of solar, stellar, and galactic magnetic activities.

  14. Empirical Model of the Pressure in the Earth's Ring Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotirelis, T.; Gkioulidou, M.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; MacDonald, E.

    2014-12-01

    Plasma in the inner magnetosphere produces the Earth's ring current through its pressure. Changes in the plasma pressure dramatically effects the ring current, and the magnetic field which guides particle motion. Here, the pressure in the inner magnetosphere is empirically modeled using Van Allen Probes observations by the RBSPICE and ECT-HOPE instruments. The radial and local-time dependence of both the parallel and perpendicular components of plasma pressure are assessed and the contributions of Helium and Oxygen are measured. Correlation studies are used to further understand the causal roles played by various drivers. Simultaneous observations from the two Van Allen Probes permit an understanding of global versus local variations.

  15. Modeling of current characteristics of segmented Langmuir probe on DEMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Imtiaz, Nadia; Marchand, Richard; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre

    2013-05-15

    We model the current characteristics of the DEMETER Segmented Langmuir probe (SLP). The probe is used to measure electron density and temperature in the ionosphere at an altitude of approximately 700 km. It is also used to measure the plasma flow velocity in the satellite frame of reference. The probe is partitioned into seven collectors: six electrically insulated spherical segments and a guard electrode (the rest of the sphere and the small post). Comparisons are made between the predictions of the model and DEMETER measurements for actual ionospheric plasma conditions encountered along the satellite orbit. Segment characteristics are computed numerically with PTetra, a three-dimensional particle in cell simulation code. In PTetra, space is discretized with an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, thus, enabling a good representation of the probe geometry. The model also accounts for several physical effects of importance in the interaction of spacecraft with the space environment. These include satellite charging, photoelectron, and secondary electron emissions. The model is electrostatic, but it accounts for the presence of a uniform background magnetic field. PTetra simulation results show different characteristics for the different probe segments. The current collected by each segment depends on its orientation with respect to the ram direction, the plasma composition, the magnitude, and the orientation of the magnetic field. It is observed that the presence of light H{sup +} ions leads to a significant increase in the ion current branch of the I-V curves of the negatively polarized SLP. The effect of the magnetic field is demonstrated by varying its magnitude and direction with respect to the reference magnetic field. It is found that the magnetic field appreciably affects the electron current branch of the I-V curves of certain segments on the SLP, whereas the ion current branch remains almost unaffected. PTetra simulations are validated by comparing the computed

  16. Animal Models of Psychosis: Current State and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Alexandra D.; Coto, Carlos A.; Siegel, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Psychosis is an abnormal mental state characterized by disorganization, delusions and hallucinations. Animal models have become an increasingly important research tool in the effort to understand both the underlying pathophysiology and treatment of psychosis. There are multiple animal models for psychosis, with each formed by the coupling of a manipulation and a measurement. In this manuscript we do not address the diseases of which psychosis is a prominent comorbidity. Instead, we summarize the current state of affairs and future directions for animal models of psychosis. To accomplish this, our manuscript will first discuss relevant behavioral and electrophysiological measurements. We then provide an overview of the different manipulations that are combined with these measurements to produce animal models. The strengths and limitations of each model will be addressed in order to evaluate its cross-species comparability. PMID:25215267

  17. Physical model of bathymetric effects on the Antarctic circumpolar current

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, D.L.; Ruirong Chen; Lijun Tao ); Davies, P.A. )

    1993-02-15

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to simulate some of the effects of the bathymetry of the southern ocean on the physical characteristics of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). An idealized zonal wind stress, which varied inversely with the distance from the model Antarctic continent, was simulated in the laboratory model by a radially inward sink-source flow in a thin layer along the surface of the circular test cell. The present model, however, has the limitation of not accounting for such factors as the longitudinal variations in the wind shear and the decrease in wind stress on approaching the Antarctic continent from the north. Planetary beta effects were neglected because the topographic beta term can be shown to dominate over large portions of the model area. The neglect of beta effects is also a limitation of the model. In spite of these limitations, however, the simulations of the physical model for both the homogeneous and linearly stratified cases were shown to be in good agreement with observations of the ACC. These include well-defined strong currents along the mid-ocean ridge; strong perturbations in the vicinity of the Macquarie Ridge, Campbell Plateau, and Kerguelen Gaussberg Plateau; strong meridional transport to the east of the Drake Passage; and anomalies to the south (wave troughs) and to the north (wave ridges) of the main circumpolar current over ocean basins and mountain ridges, respectively. It was shown that the Eltanin and Udintsev fracture zones in the vicinity of 135[degrees]W are important factors in directing the ACC eastward across the Southeast Pacific Basin to the Drake Passage. The estimated volume transports through the Drake Passage based on the model results are in fair agreement with oceanic observations. Estimates of the spin-up time of the system for homogeneous and stratified cases have been provided. 28 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Modeling ion-induced electrons in the High Current Experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltz, P. H.; Verboncoeur, J. P.; Cohen, R. H.; Molvik, A. W.; Vay, J.-L.; Veitzer, S. A.

    2006-05-01

    A primary concern for high current ion accelerators is contaminant electrons. These electrons can interfere with the beam ions, causing emittance growth and beam loss. Numerical simulation is a main tool for understanding the interaction of the ion beam with the contaminant electrons, but these simulations then require accurate models of electron generation. These models include ion-induced electron emission from ions hitting the beam pipe walls or diagnostics. However, major codes for modeling ion beam transport are written in different programming languages and used on different computing platforms. For electron generation models to be maximally useful, researchers should be able to use them easily from many languages and platforms. A model of ion-induced electrons including the electron energy distribution is presented here, including a discussion of how to use the Babel software tool to make these models available in multiple languages and how to use the GNU Autotools to make them available on multiple platforms. An application to simulation of the end region of the High Current Experiment is shown. These simulations show formation of a virtual cathode with a potential energy well of amplitude 12.0eV, approximately six times the most probable energy of the ion-induced electrons. Oscillations of the virtual cathode could lead to possible longitudinal and transverse modulation of the density of the electrons moving out of the virtual cathode.

  19. Modeling ion-induced electrons in the High Current Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltz, P.H.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Cohen, R.H.; Molvik, A.W.; Vay, J.-L.; Veitzer, S.A.

    2006-05-15

    A primary concern for high current ion accelerators is contaminant electrons. These electrons can interfere with the beam ions, causing emittance growth and beam loss. Numerical simulation is a main tool for understanding the interaction of the ion beam with the contaminant electrons, but these simulations then require accurate models of electron generation. These models include ion-induced electron emission from ions hitting the beam pipe walls or diagnostics. However, major codes for modeling ion beam transport are written in different programming languages and used on different computing platforms. For electron generation models to be maximally useful, researchers should be able to use them easily from many languages and platforms. A model of ion-induced electrons including the electron energy distribution is presented here, including a discussion of how to use the Babel software tool to make these models available in multiple languages and how to use the GNU Autotools to make them available on multiple platforms. An application to simulation of the end region of the High Current Experiment is shown. These simulations show formation of a virtual cathode with a potential energy well of amplitude 12.0 eV, approximately six times the most probable energy of the ion-induced electrons. Oscillations of the virtual cathode could lead to possible longitudinal and transverse modulation of the density of the electrons moving out of the virtual cathode.

  20. A fluid mechanical model for current-generating-feeding jellyfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John

    2008-11-01

    Many jellyfish species, e.g. moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita, use body motion to generate fluid currents which carry their prey to the vicinity of their capture appendages. In this study, a model was developed to understand the fluid mechanics for this current-generating-feeding mode of jellyfish. The flow generated by free-swimming Aurelia aurita was measured using digital particle image velocimetry. The dynamics of prey (e.g., brine shrimp Artemia) in the flow field were described by a modified Maxey-Riley equation which takes into consideration the inertia of prey and the escape forces, which prey exert in the presence of predator. A Lagrangian analysis was used to identify the region of the flow in which prey can be captured by the jellyfish and the clearance rate was quantified. The study provides a new methodology to study biological current-generating-feeding and the transport and mixing of particles in fluid flow in general.

  1. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Farges, Francois; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; Haddi, Amine; Trocellier, Patrick; Curti, Enzo; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-02

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

  2. Durable Tactile Glove for Human or Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butzer, Melissa; Diftler, Myron A.; Huber, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A glove containing force sensors has been built as a prototype of tactile sensor arrays to be worn on human hands and anthropomorphic robot hands. The force sensors of this glove are mounted inside, in protective pockets; as a result of this and other design features, the present glove is more durable than earlier models.

  3. Structural Integrity and Durability of Reusable Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A two-day conference on the structural integrity and durability of reusable space propulsion systems was held on May 12 and 13, 1987, at the NASA Lewis research Center. Aerothermodynamic loads; instrumentation; fatigue, fracture, and constitutive modeling; and structural dynamics were discussed.

  4. Energy current loss instability model on a computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edighoffer, John A.

    1995-04-01

    The computer program called Energy Stability in a Recirculating Accelerator (ESRA) Free Electron Laser (FEL) has been written to model bunches of particles in longitudinal phase space transversing a recirculating accelerator and the associated rf changes and aperture current losses. This energy-current loss instability was first seen by Los Alamos's FEL group in their energy recovery experiments. This code addresses these stability issues and determines the transport, noise, feedback and other parameters for which these FEL systems are stable or unstable. Two representative systems are modeled, one for the Novosibirisk high power FEL racetrack microtron for photochemical research, the other is the CEBAF proposed UV FEL system. Both of these systems are stable with prudent choices of parameters.

  5. Idealized model of polar cap currents, fields, and auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwall, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    During periods of northward Bz, the electric field applied to the magnetosphere is generally opposite to that occurring during southward Bz and complicated patterns of convection result, showing some features reversed in comparison with the southward Bz case. A study is conducted of a simple generalization of early work on idealized convection models, which allows for coexistence of sunward convection over the central polar cap and antisunward convection elsewhere in the cap. The present model, valid for By approximately 0, has a four-cell convection pattern and is based on the combination of ionospheric current conservation with a relation between parallel auroral currents and parallel potential drops. Global magnetospheric issues involving, e.g., reconnection are not considered. The central result of this paper is an expression giving the parallel potential drop for polar cap auroras (with By approximately 0) in terms of the polar cap convection field profile.

  6. Effect of glass composition on waste form durability: A critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, A.J.G.; Mazer, J.J.; Ebert, W.L.

    1994-11-01

    This report reviews literature concerning the relationship between the composition and durability of silicate glasses, particularly glasses proposed for immobilization of radioactive waste. Standard procedures used to perform durability tests are reviewed. It is shown that tests in which a low-surface area sample is brought into contact with a very large volume of solution provide the most accurate measure of the intrinsic durability of a glass composition, whereas high-surface area/low-solution volume tests are a better measure of the response of a glass to changes in solution chemistry induced by a buildup of glass corrosion products. The structural chemistry of silicate and borosilicate glasses is reviewed to identify those components with the strongest cation-anion bonds. A number of examples are discussed in which two or more cations engage in mutual bonding interactions that result in minima or maxima in the rheologic and thermodynamic properties of the glasses at or near particular optimal compositions. It is shown that in simple glass-forming systems such interactions generally enhance the durability of glasses. Moreover, it is shown that experimental results obtained for simple systems can be used to account for durability rankings of much more complex waste glass compositions. Models that purport to predict the rate of corrosion of glasses in short-term durability tests are evaluated using a database of short-term durability test results for a large set of glass compositions. The predictions of these models correlate with the measured durabilities of the glasses when considered in large groupings, but no model evaluated in this review provides accurate estimates of durability for individual glass compositions. Use of these models in long-term durability models is discussed. 230 refs.

  7. Current plate motions. [continental groupings and global modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Argus, D. F.; Stein, S.

    1990-01-01

    A global plate motion model, named NUVEL-1, which describes current plate motions between 12 rigid plates is described, with special attention given to the method, data, and assumptions used. Tectonic implications of the patterns that emerged from the results are discussed. It is shown that wide plate boundary zones can form not only within the continental lithosphere but also within the oceanic lithosphere; e.g., between the Indian and Australian plates and between the North American and South American plates. Results of the model also suggest small but significant diffuse deformation of the oceanic lithosphere, which may be confined to small awkwardly shaped salients of major plates.

  8. Persistent current in an almost staggered Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasserman, A.; Berkovits, R.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we study the persistent current (PC) of a staggered Harper model, close to the half-filling. The Harper model is different than other one dimensional disordered systems which are always localized, since it is a quasi-periodic system with correlated disorder resulting in the fact that it can be in the metallic regime. Nevertheless, the PC for a wide range of parameters of the Harper model does not show typical metallic behavior, although the system is in the metallic regime. This is a result of the nature of the central band states, which are a hybridization of Gaussian states localized in superlattice points. When the superlattice is not commensurate with the system length, the PC behaves as an insulator. Thus even in the metallic regime a typical finite Harper model may exhibit a PC expected from an insulator.

  9. MNESIS: towards the integration of current multisystem models of memory

    PubMed Central

    Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice

    2008-01-01

    After a brief description of the “diseases of memory” which have made the greatest contribution to theoretical developments in the past years, we turn our attention to the most important concepts to have arisen from the dissociations brought to light in different neuropsychological syndromes. This is followed by a critical review of the tasks currently used to assess each memory system. We then describe the monohierarchical model proposed by E. Tulving (1995), together with other recent concepts, notably Baddeley’s model of working memory with its latest component, the episodic buffer. Lastly, we attempt to reconcile these models with several other theoretical propositions, which we have linked together in a macromodel - the Memory NEo-Structural Inter-Systemic model (MNESIS). PMID:18311523

  10. The Role of Wakes in Modelling Tidal Current Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Daniel; Roc, Thomas; Greaves, Deborah

    2010-05-01

    The eventual proper development of arrays of Tidal Current Turbines (TCT) will require a balance which maximizes power extraction while minimizing environmental impacts. Idealized analytical analogues and simple 2-D models are useful tools for investigating questions of a general nature but do not represent a practical tool for application to realistic cases. Some form of 3-D numerical simulations will be required for such applications and the current project is designed to develop a numerical decision-making tool for use in planning large scale TCT projects. The project is predicated on the use of an existing regional ocean modelling framework (the Regional Ocean Modelling System - ROMS) which is modified to enable the user to account for the effects of TCTs. In such a framework where mixing processes are highly parametrized, the fidelity of the quantitative results is critically dependent on the parameter values utilized. In light of the early stage of TCT development and the lack of field scale measurements, the calibration of such a model is problematic. In the absence of explicit calibration data sets, the device wake structure has been identified as an efficient feature for model calibration. This presentation will discuss efforts to design an appropriate calibration scheme which focuses on wake decay and the motivation for this approach, techniques applied, validation results from simple test cases and limitations shall be presented.

  11. Operational advances in ring current modeling using RAM-SCB

    SciTech Connect

    Welling, Daniel T; Jordanova, Vania K; Zaharia, Sorin G; Morley, Steven K

    2010-12-03

    The Ring current Atmosphere interaction Model with Self-Consistently calculated 3D Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) combines a kinetic model of the ring current with a force-balanced model of the magnetospheric magnetic field to create an inner magnetospheric model that is magnetically self consistent. RAM-SCB produces a wealth of outputs that are valuable to space weather applications. For example, the anisotropic particle distribution of the KeV-energy population calculated by the code is key for predicting surface charging on spacecraft. Furthermore, radiation belt codes stand to benefit substantially from RAM-SCB calculated magnetic field values and plasma wave growth rates - both important for determining the evolution of relativistic electron populations. RAM-SCB is undergoing development to bring these benefits to the space weather community. Data-model validation efforts are underway to assess the performance of the system. 'Virtual Satellite' capability has been added to yield satellite-specific particle distribution and magnetic field output. The code's outer boundary is being expanded to 10 Earth Radii to encompass previously neglected geosynchronous orbits and allow the code to be driven completely by either empirical or first-principles based inputs. These advances are culminating towards a new, real-time version of the code, rtRAM-SCB, that can monitor the inner magnetosphere conditions on both a global and spacecraft-specific level. This paper summarizes these new features as well as the benefits they provide the space weather community.

  12. Fokker-Planck modeling of current penetration during electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Merkulov, A.; Westerhof, E.; Schueller, F. C.

    2007-05-15

    The current penetration during electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the resistive time scale is studied with a Fokker-Planck simulation, which includes a model for the magnetic diffusion that determines the parallel electric field evolution. The existence of the synergy between the inductive electric field and EC driven current complicates the process of the current penetration and invalidates the standard method of calculation in which Ohm's law is simply approximated by j-j{sub cd}={sigma}E. Here it is proposed to obtain at every time step a self-consistent approximation to the plasma resistivity from the Fokker-Planck code, which is then used in a concurrent calculation of the magnetic diffusion equation in order to obtain the inductive electric field at the next time step. A series of Fokker-Planck calculations including a self-consistent evolution of the inductive electric field has been performed. Both the ECCD power and the electron density have been varied, thus varying the well known nonlinearity parameter for ECCD P{sub rf}[MW/m{sup -3}]/n{sub e}{sup 2}[10{sup 19} m{sup -3}] [R. W. Harvey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 62, 426 (1989)]. This parameter turns out also to be a good predictor of the synergetic effects. The results are then compared with the standard method of calculations of the current penetration using a transport code. At low values of the Harvey parameter, the standard method is in quantitative agreement with Fokker-Planck calculations. However, at high values of the Harvey parameter, synergy between ECCD and E{sub parallel} is found. In the case of cocurrent drive, this synergy leads to the generation of large amounts of nonthermal electrons and a concomitant increase of the electrical conductivity and current penetration time. In the case of countercurrent drive, the ECCD efficiency is suppressed by the synergy with E{sub parallel} while only a small amount of nonthermal electrons is produced.

  13. Homology Modeling a Fast Tool for Drug Discovery: Current Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, V. K.; Ukawala, R. D.; Ghate, M.; Chintha, C.

    2012-01-01

    Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery. PMID:23204616

  14. Homology modeling a fast tool for drug discovery: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vyas, V K; Ukawala, R D; Ghate, M; Chintha, C

    2012-01-01

    Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery.

  15. Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Spernjak, Dusan; Baker, Andrew M.; Lujan, Roger W.; Langlois, David Alan; Ahluwalia, Rajesh; Papadia, D. D.; Weber, Adam Z.; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Shi, Shouwnen; More, K. L.; Grot, Steve

    2015-08-03

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. By investigating cell component degradation modes and defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions, new materials can be designed to improve durability. To achieve a deeper understanding of PEM fuel cell durability and component degradation mechanisms, we utilize a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary team with significant experience investigating these phenomena.

  16. Concrete Durability: A Multibillion-Dollar Opportunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    1985. Durability of building materials: Durability research in the United States and the influence of RILEM on durability research. Materiaux et...the porosity, microstructure. and permeability of the final concrete and, to a large * extent, its resistance to environmental attack. This is well...to resist dilation induced by freezing. Large-sized aggregate pieces are far more susceptible than small-sized pieces of aggregate of the same type and

  17. Interpreting snowpack radiometry using currently existing microwave radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Do-Hyuk; Tang, Shurun; Kim, Edward J.

    2015-10-01

    A radiative transfer model (RTM) to calculate the snow brightness temperatures (Tb) is a critical element in terrestrial snow parameter retrieval from microwave remote sensing observations. The RTM simulates the Tb based on a layered snow by solving a set of microwave radiative transfer equations. Even with the same snow physical inputs to drive the RTM, currently existing models such as Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS), Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT-QMS), and Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) models produce different Tb responses. To backwardly invert snow physical properties from the Tb, differences from RTMs are first to be quantitatively explained. To this end, this initial investigation evaluates the sources of perturbations in these RTMs, and reveals the equations where the variations are made among the three models. Modelling experiments are conducted by providing the same but gradual changes in snow physical inputs such as snow grain size, and snow density to the 3 RTMs. Simulations are conducted with the frequencies consistent with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer- E (AMSR-E) at 6.9, 10.7, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0 GHz. For realistic simulations, the 3 RTMs are simultaneously driven by the same snow physics model with the meteorological forcing datasets and are validated against the snow insitu samplings from the CLPX (Cold Land Processes Field Experiment) 2002-2003, and NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment) 2009-2010.

  18. Thermoregulatory models. Recent research, current applications and future development.

    PubMed

    Werner, J

    1989-01-01

    This review traces the efforts of different fields of thermoregulatory modeling. The aims of the three diverging branches can be characterized by (i) insight into functional physiological mechanisms and prediction of physiological phenomena, (ii) prediction of human performance for the protection of industrial workers or military personnel, and (iii) prediction of the impact of accidents, diseases, and clinical treatments. Common current and future efforts may be recognized which improve the physiological quality of the models for purposes either of physiological research itself or of promotion of the field of application, namely, (i) to approach the models to real geometry and anatomy of the human body, (ii) to simulate more adequately heat transport processes induced by the circulating blood, (iii) to implement more sophisticated regulatory concepts, (iv) to take into account interaction with other regulatory systems. "Environmental Ergonomics" should be an adequate forum for linking these diversified fields together.

  19. A 3D Current Loop Model of Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, James

    1992-05-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model is developed to study magnetic clouds (Burlaga et al. 1981). In this model, magnetic clouds observed near 1 AU are treated as a consequence of eruptive solar current loops. It is shown that current loops intially in MHD equilibrium can be triggered to rise rapidly, propelling material of up to 10(16) g at up to ~ 1000 km s(-1) and dissipating ~ 10(32) erg of magnetic energy in tens of minutes. The initial rise profile is consistent with observed height-time profiles of erupting filaments (Kahler et al. 1988). Two triggering mechanisms for eruption are suggested: (1)subphotospheric energy storage and trigger and (2) in situ (coronal) energy storage and trigger. In the former, eruption occurs as a result of changes in the subphotospheric magnetic topology and subsequent relaxation to a new equilibrium. In the latter, the current loop can evolve to exceed a local maximum in the magnetic potential associated with the ambient magnetic fields. The former scenario leads to more energetic and longer-lasting eruption than the latter. Burlaga, L. F., Sittler, E., Mariani, F., and Schwenn, R. 1981, J. Geophys. Res., 86, 6673. Kahler, S. W., Moore, R. L., Kane, S. R., and Zirin, H. 1988, Ap. J., 328, 824.

  20. Durability-based design criteria for an automotive structural composite

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; Brinkman, C.R.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.; Yahr, G.T.

    1998-11-01

    Before composite structures can be widely used in automotive applications, their long-term durability must be assured. The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was established by the US Department of Energy to help provide that assurance. The project is closely coordinated with the Automotive Composites Consortium. The experimentally-based, durability-driven design criteria described in this paper are the result of the initial project thrust. The criteria address a single reference composite, which is an SRIM (Structural Reaction Injection Molded) polyurethane, reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass fibers. The durability issues addressed include the effects of cyclic and sustained loadings, temperature, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) on strength, stiffness, and deformation. The criteria provide design analysis guidance, a multiaxial strength criterion, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loading, and damage tolerance design guidance. Environmental degradation factors and the degrading effects of prior loadings are included. Efforts are currently underway to validate the criteria by application to a second random-glass-fiber composite. Carbon-fiber composites are also being addressed.

  1. Interpreting snowpack radiometry using currently existing microwave radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D. H.; Tan, S.; Kim, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    A radiative transfer model (RTM) to calculate a snow brightness temperature (Tb) is a critical element to retrieve terrestrial snow from microwave remote sensing observations. The RTM simulates the Tb based on a layered snow by solving a set of microwave radiative transfer formulas. Even with the same snow physical inputs used for the RTM, currently existing models such as Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS), Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT-Tsang), and Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) models produce different Tb responses. To backwardly invert snow physical properties from the Tb, the differences from the RTMs are to be quantitatively explained. To this end, the paper evaluates the sources of perturbations in the RTMs, and reveals the equations where the variations are made among three models. Investigations are conducted by providing the same but gradual changes in snow physical inputs such as snow grain size, and snow density to the 3 RTMs. Simulations are done with the frequencies consistent with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-E (AMSR-E) at 6.9, 10.7, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0 GHz. For realistic simulations, the 3 RTMs are simultaneously driven by the same snow physics model with the meteorological forcing datasets and are validated from the snow core samplings from the CLPX (Cold Land Processes Field Experiment) 2002-2003, and NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment) 2009-2010.

  2. Current models of the intensely ionizing particle environment in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Effects on MicroElectronics (CREME) model that is currently in use to estimate single event effect rates in spacecraft is described. The CREME model provides a description of the radiation environment in interplanetary space near the orbit of the earth that contains no major deficiencies. The accuracy of the galactic cosmic ray model is limited by the uncertainties in solar modulation. The model for solar energetic particles could be improved by making use of all the data that has been collected on solar energetic particle events. There remain major uncertainties about the environment within the earth's magnetosphere, because of the uncertainties over the charge states of the heavy ions in the anomalous component and solar flares, and because of trapped heavy ions. The present CREME model is valid only at 1 AU, but it could be extended to other parts of the heliosphere. There is considerable data on the radiation environment from 0.2 to 35 AU in the ecliptic plane. This data could be used to extend the CREME model.

  3. Advances in modeling of lower hybrid current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Nilsson, E.; Artaud, J.-F.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Ding, B.; Li, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Shiraiwa, S.; Madi, M.

    2016-04-01

    First principle modeling of the lower hybrid (LH) current drive in tokamak plasmas is a longstanding activity, which is gradually gaining in accuracy thanks to quantitative comparisons with experimental observations. The ability to reproduce simulatenously the plasma current and the non-thermal bremsstrahlung radial profiles in the hard x-ray (HXR) photon energy range represents in this context a significant achievement. Though subject to limitations, ray tracing calculations are commonly used for describing wave propagation in conjunction with Fokker-Planck codes, as it can capture prominent features of the LH wave dynamics in a tokamak plasma-like toroidal refraction. This tool has been validated on several machines when the full absorption of the LH wave requires the transfer of a small fraction of power from the main lobes of the launched power spectrum to a tail at a higher parallel refractive index. Conversely, standard modeling based on toroidal refraction only becomes more challenging when the spectral gap is large, except if other physical mechanisms may dominate to bridge it, like parametric instabilities, as suggested for JET LH discharges (Cesario et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 175002), or fast fluctuations of the launched power spectrum or ‘tail’ LH model, as shown for Tore Supra (Decker et al 2014 Phys. Plasma 21 092504). The applicability of the heuristic ‘tail’ LH model is investigated for a broader range of plasma parameters as compared to the Tore Supra study and with different LH wave characteristics. Discrepancies and agreements between simulations and experiments depending upon the different models used are discussed. The existence of a ‘tail’ in the launched power spectrum significantly improves the agreement between modeling and experiments in plasma conditions for which the spectral gap is large in EAST and Alcator C-Mod tokamaks. For the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, the experimental evolution of the HXR profiles with density suggests

  4. Animal models of transcranial direct current stimulation: Methods and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Mark P; Rahman, Asif; Lafon, Belen; Kronberg, Gregory; Ling, Doris; Parra, Lucas C; Bikson, Marom

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this review is to summarize the contribution of animal research using direct current stimulation (DCS) to our understanding of the physiological effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). We comprehensively address experimental methodology in animal studies, broadly classified as: (1) transcranial stimulation; (2) direct cortical stimulation in vivo and (3) in vitro models. In each case advantages and disadvantages for translational research are discussed including dose translation and the overarching "quasi-uniform" assumption, which underpins translational relevance in all animal models of tDCS. Terminology such as anode, cathode, inward current, outward current, current density, electric field, and uniform are defined. Though we put key animal experiments spanning decades in perspective, our goal is not simply an exhaustive cataloging of relevant animal studies, but rather to put them in context of ongoing efforts to improve tDCS. Cellular targets, including excitatory neuronal somas, dendrites, axons, interneurons, glial cells, and endothelial cells are considered. We emphasize neurons are always depolarized and hyperpolarized such that effects of DCS on neuronal excitability can only be evaluated within subcellular regions of the neuron. Findings from animal studies on the effects of DCS on plasticity (LTP/LTD) and network oscillations are reviewed extensively. Any endogenous phenomena dependent on membrane potential changes are, in theory, susceptible to modulation by DCS. The relevance of morphological changes (galvanotropy) to tDCS is also considered, as we suggest microscopic migration of axon terminals or dendritic spines may be relevant during tDCS. A majority of clinical studies using tDCS employ a simplistic dose strategy where excitability is singularly increased or decreased under the anode and cathode, respectively. We discuss how this strategy, itself based on classic animal studies, cannot account for the

  5. A statistical model of magnetic islands in a current layer

    SciTech Connect

    Fermo, R. L.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2010-01-15

    This letter describes a statistical model of the dynamics of magnetic islands in very large current layers that develop in space plasma. Two parameters characterize the island distribution: the flux psi contained in the island and the area A it encloses. The integrodifferential evolution equation for this distribution function is based on rules that govern the small-scale generation of secondary islands, the rates of island growth, and island merging. The numerical solutions of this equation produce island distributions relevant to the magnetosphere and solar corona. The solution of a differential equation for large islands explicitly shows the role merging plays in island growth.

  6. A Model for Axial Magnetic Bearings Including Eddy Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Ladislav; Ahrens, Markus

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical method of modelling eddy currents inside axial bearings. The problem is solved by dividing an axial bearing into elementary geometric forms, solving the Maxwell equations for these simplified geometries, defining boundary conditions and combining the geometries. The final result is an analytical solution for the flux, from which the impedance and the force of an axial bearing can be derived. Several impedance measurements have shown that the analytical solution can fit the measured data with a precision of approximately 5%.

  7. Cloud fractional coverage: A key uncertainty in current climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Walcek, C.J.

    1996-12-31

    Climate models being used to study global warming use highly uncertain and widely divergent methods for calculating fractional cloudiness, which plays a significant role in regulating global albedo and climate. In this study the author compares cloud cover formulations used by various climate models with observations of fractional cloudiness and related meteorology derived from surface reports, upper atmospheric soundings, and satellites. He found that relative humidity is the best single predictor of cloud coverage, in agreement with most climate model formulations. However, the precise functional relationships used by climate models to estimate cloud coverage disagree significantly with observed cloud relationships. In the middle troposphere, most climate models probably underestimate cloud coverage since they specify zero cloud amounts when relative humidities are below 60--80%, while observed cloud amounts range from 20--60% at these height and humidity ranges. At humidities close to saturation, current algorithms probably overestimate cloud coverage. Cloud fractional cover observations compiled in this study suggest that at any level in the atmosphere, cloud amount decreases exponentially as humidity falls below 100%, and there is no evidence for critical humidities below which no clouds exist.

  8. Structural Analyses of Stirling Power Convertor Heater Head for Long-Term Reliability, Durability, and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Shah, Ashwin; Arya, Vinod K.; Krause, David L.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    2002-01-01

    Deep-space missions require onboard electric power systems with reliable design lifetimes of up to 10 yr and beyond. A high-efficiency Stirling radioisotope power system is a likely candidate for future deep-space missions and Mars rover applications. To ensure ample durability, the structurally critical heater head of the Stirling power convertor has undergone extensive computational analyses of operating temperatures (up to 650 C), stresses, and creep resistance of the thin-walled Inconel 718 bill of material. Durability predictions are presented in terms of the probability of survival. A benchmark structural testing program has commenced to support the analyses. This report presents the current status of durability assessments.

  9. LORENTZ SELF-FORCE OF AN ELLIPSE CURRENT LOOP MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang Jie; Kunkel, Valbona

    2013-07-10

    In this work, the Lorentz self-force of an ellipse current loop model is derived. We are motivated by the fact that it has been reported in the literature that coronal mass ejection morphology can resemble an ellipse in the field of view of coronagraph images. Deriving the Lorentz self-force using an ellipse geometry has the advantage of being able to be solved analytically, as opposed to other more complex geometries. The derived ellipse model is compared with the local curvature approximation, where the Lorentz self-force at the ellipse major/minor axis is compared with the Lorentz self-force of a torus with curvature equal to the local curvature at the ellipses major/minor axis. It is found that the local curvature approximation is valid for moderate values of eccentricity.

  10. Considering digits in a current model of numerical development

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Stephanie; Moeller, Korbinian

    2015-01-01

    Numerical cognition has long been considered the perfect example of abstract information processing. Nevertheless, there is accumulating evidence in recent years suggesting that the representation of number magnitude may not be entirely abstract but may present a specific case of embodied cognition rooted in the sensory and bodily experiences of early finger counting and calculating. However, so far none of the existing models of numerical development considers the influence of finger-based representations. Therefore, we make first suggestions on (i) how finger-based representations may be integrated into a current model of numerical development; and (ii) how they might corroborate the acquisition of basic numerical competencies at different development levels. PMID:25628559

  11. Durable Solutions for Developing Country Refugees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Barry N.

    1986-01-01

    There are only three durable solutions to the refugee problem--voluntary repatriation, local settlement, and third-country resettlement--and all depend on political will, diplomacy, and statesmanship. It is important to remember, however, that humanitarian concerns must outweigh costs consciousness when durable solutions are sought. (Author/GC)

  12. Environmental Durability of Electroplated Black Chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Report describes tests of durability of electroplated black chromium coatings on solar-collector panels in rural, industrial, and seacoast environments for 60, 36, and 13 months, respectively. Black-chromium coating showed exceptionally-good optical durability in all three environments.

  13. Modeling Surface Currents in the Eastern Levantine Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Leila; Brajard, Julien; Fakhri, Milad; Mortier, Laurent; Poulain, Pierre-Marie

    2015-04-01

    We consider the problem of reconstructing the meso-scale features of the currents in the Eastern Levantine Mediterranean from combining in-situ and satellite altimetry data. Mathematically, this is an inverse problem where the objective is to invert Lagrangian trajectories, which are positions of drifters launched at sea, in order to improve the coarse Eulerian velocity, provided by the altimetric satellite measurements. We shall use a variational assimilation approach, whereby the eulerian velocity correction is obtained by minimizing the distance between the simulated position from a velocity background and actual observations. One important property of our approach is that it is model free, so that it is inexpensive and can be easily cast into real-time oceanic operational products. Our method is first validated with twin experiments, where we conduct sensitivity analysis to parameters such as number of drifters, assimilation time window and spatial filter length. The approach is next validated with past and present data from the Levantine Mediterranean by correcting velocity fields derived from altimetry by assimilating drifters' data. The drifters' data used here were collected in the context of the MedSVP program and more recently by the National Lebanese Marine Center (CNSM) in September 2013. The CNSM with its boat CANA has developed an important activity of data collection along the Lebanese coast so far and this activity will permit it to extend its collaborations further by integrating the modeling and data assimilation methods for reconstructing the surface currents.

  14. A Catapult (Slingshot) Current Sheet Relaxation Model for Substorm Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.

    2010-12-01

    Based on the results of our superposed epoch analysis of Geotail data, we have proposed a catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation model in which earthward flows are produced in the central plasma sheet (CPS) due to the catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation, together with the rapid enhancement of Poynting flux toward the CPS in the lobe around X ~ -15 Re about 4 min before the substrom onset. These earthward flows are characterized by plasma pressure decrease and large amplitude magnetic field fluctuations. When these flows reach X ~ 12Re in the magnetotail, they give significant disturbances to the inner magnetosphere to initiate some instability such as a ballooning instability or other instabilities, and the substorm starts in the inner magnetosphere. The occurrence of the magnetic reconnection is a natural consequence of the initial convective earthward flows, because the relaxation of a highly stretched catapult current sheet produces a very thin current at its tailward edge being surrounded by intense magnetic fields which were formerly the off-equatorial lobe magnetic fields. Recently, Nishimura et al. [2010] reported that the substorm onset begins when faint poleward discrete arcs collide with equatorward quiet arcs. The region of earthward convective flows correlatively moves earthward prior to the onset. Thus, this region of the earthward convective flows seems to correspond to the faint poleward discrete arcs. Interestingly, our statistical analysis shows that the earthward convective flows are not produced by the magnetic reconnection, but they are attributed to the dominance of the earthward JxB force over the tailward pressure associated with the progress of the plasma sheet thinning.

  15. Ceramics: Durability and radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W.; Weber, W.J.

    1996-05-01

    At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (1) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (2) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass {open_quotes}logs{close_quotes}; (3) deep borehole disposal. The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  16. Tsunami-HySEA model validation for tsunami current predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, Jorge; Castro, Manuel J.; González-Vida, José Manuel; Ortega, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Model ability to compute and predict tsunami flow velocities is of importance in risk assessment and hazard mitigation. Substantial damage can be produced by high velocity flows, particularly in harbors and bays, even when the wave height is small. Besides, an accurate simulation of tsunami flow velocities and accelerations is fundamental for advancing in the study of tsunami sediment transport. These considerations made the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) proposing a benchmark exercise focussed on modeling and simulating tsunami currents. Until recently, few direct measurements of tsunami velocities were available to compare and to validate model results. After Tohoku 2011 many current meters measurement were made, mainly in harbors and channels. In this work we present a part of the contribution made by the EDANYA group from the University of Malaga to the NTHMP workshop organized at Portland (USA), 9-10 of February 2015. We have selected three out of the five proposed benchmark problems. Two of them consist in real observed data from the Tohoku 2011 event, one at Hilo Habour (Hawaii) and the other at Tauranga Bay (New Zealand). The third one consists in laboratory experimental data for the inundation of Seaside City in Oregon. Acknowledgements: This research has been partially supported by the Junta de Andalucía research project TESELA (P11-RNM7069) and the Spanish Government Research project DAIFLUID (MTM2012-38383-C02-01) and Universidad de Málaga, Campus de Excelencia Andalucía TECH. The GPU and multi-GPU computations were performed at the Unit of Numerical Methods (UNM) of the Research Support Central Services (SCAI) of the University of Malaga.

  17. Modelling ac ripple currents in HTS coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhihan; Grilli, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Dc transmission using high temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors (CCs) offers a promising solution to the globally growing demand for effective, reliable and economic transmission of green energy up to the gigawatt level over very long distances. The credible estimation of the losses and thereby the heat dissipation involved, where ac ripples (introduced in rectification/ac-dc conversion) are viewed as a potential source of notable contribution, is highly essential for the rational design of practical HTS dc transmission cables and corresponding cryogenic systems to fulfil this demand. Here we report a targeted modelling study into the ac losses in a HTS CC subject to dc and ac ripple currents simultaneously, by solving Maxwell’s equations using the finite element method (FEM) in the commercial software package COMSOL. It is observed that the instantaneous loss exhibits only one peak per cycle in the HTS CC subject to sinusoidal ripples, given that the amplitude of the ac ripples is smaller than approximately 20% of that of the dc current. This is a distinct contrast to the usual observation of two peaks per cycle in a HTS CC subject to ac currents only. The unique mechanism is also revealed, which is directly associated with the finding that, around any local minima of the applied ac ripples, the critical state of -J c is never reached at the edges of the HTS CC, as it should be according to the Bean model. When running further into the longer term, it is discovered that the ac ripple loss of the HTS CC in full-wave rectification decays monotonically, at a speed which is found to be insensitive to the frequency of the applied ripples within our targeted situations, to a relatively low level of approximately 1.38 × 10-4 W m-1 in around 1.7 s. Comparison between this level and other typical loss contributions in a HTS dc cable implies that ac ripple currents in HTS CCs should only be considered as a minor source of dissipation in superconducting dc

  18. Shigella vaccine development: prospective animal models and current status.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Jeong; Yeo, Sang-Gu; Park, Jae-Hak; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Shigella was first discovered in 1897 and is a major causative agent of dysenteric diarrhea. The number of affected patients has decreased globally because of improved sanitary conditions; however, Shigella still causes serious problems in many subjects, including young children and the elderly, especially in developing countries. Although antibiotics may be effective, a vaccine would be the most powerful solution to combat shigellosis because of the emergence of drug-resistant strains. However, the development of a vaccine is hampered by several problems. First, there is no suitable animal model that can replace human-based studies for the investigation of the in vivo mechanisms of Shigella vaccines. Mouse, guinea pig, rat, rabbit, and nonhuman primates could be used as models for shigellosis, but they do not represent human shigellosis and each has its own weaknesses. However, a recent murine model based on peritoneal infection with virulent S. flexneri 2a is promising. Moreover, although the inflammatory responses and mechanisms such as pathogenassociated molecular patterns and danger-associated molecular patterns have been studied, the pathology and immunology of Shigella are still not clearly defined. Despite these obstacles, many vaccine candidates have been developed, including live attenuated, killed whole cells, conjugated, and subunit vaccines. The development of Shigella vaccines also demands considerations of the cost, routes of administration, ease of storage (stability), cross-reactivity, safety, and immunogenicity. The main aim of this review is to provide a detailed introduction to the many promising vaccine candidates and animal models currently available, including the newly developed mouse model.

  19. Current Translational Research and Murine Models For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Merryl; Echigoya, Yusuke; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. Mutations in the DMD gene result in the absence of dystrophin, a protein required for muscle strength and stability. Currently, there is no cure for DMD. Since murine models are relatively easy to genetically manipulate, cost effective, and easily reproducible due to their short generation time, they have helped to elucidate the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency and to assess therapies for treating DMD. Recently, several murine models have been developed by our group and others to be more representative of the human DMD mutation types and phenotypes. For instance, mdx mice on a DBA/2 genetic background, developed by Fukada et al., have lower regenerative capacity and exhibit very severe phenotype. Cmah-deficient mdx mice display an accelerated disease onset and severe cardiac phenotype due to differences in glycosylation between humans and mice. Other novel murine models include mdx52, which harbors a deletion mutation in exon 52, a hot spot region in humans, and dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), which displays a severe dystrophic phenotype due the absence of utrophin, a dystrophin homolog. This paper reviews the pathological manifestations and recent therapeutic developments in murine models of DMD such as standard mdx (C57BL/10), mdx on C57BL/6 background (C57BL/6-mdx), mdx52, dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), mdxβgeo, Dmd-null, humanized DMD (hDMD), mdx on DBA/2 background (DBA/2-mdx), Cmah-mdx, and mdx/mTRKO murine models. PMID:27854202

  20. Current Capabilities of the Fuel Performance Modeling Code PARFUME

    SciTech Connect

    G. K. Miller; D. A. Petti; J. T. Maki; D. L. Knudson

    2004-09-01

    The success of gas reactors depends upon the safety and quality of the coated particle fuel. A fuel performance modeling code (called PARFUME), which simulates the mechanical and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation, is under development at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Among current capabilities in the code are: 1) various options for calculating CO production and fission product gas release, 2) a thermal model that calculates a time-dependent temperature profile through a pebble bed sphere or a prismatic block core, as well as through the layers of each analyzed particle, 3) simulation of multi-dimensional particle behavior associated with cracking in the IPyC layer, partial debonding of the IPyC from the SiC, particle asphericity, kernel migration, and thinning of the SiC caused by interaction of fission products with the SiC, 4) two independent methods for determining particle failure probabilities, 5) a model for calculating release-to-birth (R/B) ratios of gaseous fission products, that accounts for particle failures and uranium contamination in the fuel matrix, and 6) the evaluation of an accident condition, where a particle experiences a sudden change in temperature following a period of normal irradiation. This paper presents an overview of the code.

  1. Computational modeling of cardiac hemodynamics: Current status and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat; Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; Choi, Young J.; Liu, Hang; Huang, H. Howie; Jain, Saurabh; Younes, Laurent; Abraham, Theodore; George, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of four-dimensional imaging technologies, increasing computational speeds, improved simulation algorithms, and the widespread availability of powerful computing platforms is enabling simulations of cardiac hemodynamics with unprecedented speed and fidelity. Since cardiovascular disease is intimately linked to cardiovascular hemodynamics, accurate assessment of the patient's hemodynamic state is critical for the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease. Unfortunately, while a variety of invasive and non-invasive approaches for measuring cardiac hemodynamics are in widespread use, they still only provide an incomplete picture of the hemodynamic state of a patient. In this context, computational modeling of cardiac hemodynamics presents as a powerful non-invasive modality that can fill this information gap, and significantly impact the diagnosis as well as the treatment of cardiac disease. This article reviews the current status of this field as well as the emerging trends and challenges in cardiovascular health, computing, modeling and simulation and that are expected to play a key role in its future development. Some recent advances in modeling and simulations of cardiac flow are described by using examples from our own work as well as the research of other groups.

  2. Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System, Coverage and Payment for Renal Dialysis Services Furnished to Individuals With Acute Kidney Injury, End-Stage Renal Disease Quality Incentive Program, Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics and Supplies Competitive Bidding Program Bid Surety Bonds, State Licensure and Appeals Process for Breach of Contract Actions, Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics and Supplies Competitive Bidding Program and Fee Schedule Adjustments, Access to Care Issues for Durable Medical Equipment; and the Comprehensive End-Stage Renal Disease Care Model. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-11-04

    This rule updates and makes revisions to the End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Prospective Payment System (PPS) for calendar year 2017. It also finalizes policies for coverage and payment for renal dialysis services furnished by an ESRD facility to individuals with acute kidney injury. This rule also sets forth requirements for the ESRD Quality Incentive Program, including the inclusion of new quality measures beginning with payment year (PY) 2020 and provides updates to programmatic policies for the PY 2018 and PY 2019 ESRD QIP. This rule also implements statutory requirements for bid surety bonds and state licensure for the Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics, and Supplies (DMEPOS) Competitive Bidding Program (CBP). This rule also expands suppliers' appeal rights in the event of a breach of contract action taken by CMS, by revising the appeals regulation to extend the appeals process to all types of actions taken by CMS for a supplier's breach of contract, rather than limit an appeal for the termination of a competitive bidding contract. The rule also finalizes changes to the methodologies for adjusting fee schedule amounts for DMEPOS using information from CBPs and for submitting bids and establishing single payment amounts under the CBPs for certain groupings of similar items with different features to address price inversions. Final changes also are made to the method for establishing bid limits for items under the DMEPOS CBPs. In addition, this rule summarizes comments on the impacts of coordinating Medicare and Medicaid Durable Medical Equipment for dually eligible beneficiaries. Finally, this rule also summarizes comments received in response to a request for information related to the Comprehensive ESRD Care Model and future payment models affecting renal care.

  3. Proton Therapy Expansion Under Current United States Reimbursement Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstiens, John; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether all the existing and planned proton beam therapy (PBT) centers in the United States can survive on a local patient mix that is dictated by insurers, not by number of patients. Methods and Materials: We determined current and projected cancer rates for 10 major US metropolitan areas. Using published utilization rates, we calculated patient percentages who are candidates for PBT. Then, on the basis of current published insurer coverage policies, we applied our experience of what would be covered to determine the net number of patients for whom reimbursement is expected. Having determined the net number of covered patients, we applied our average beam delivery times to determine the total number of minutes needed to treat that patient over the course of their treatment. We then calculated our expected annual patient capacity per treatment room to determine the appropriate number of treatment rooms for the area. Results: The population of patients who will be both PBT candidates and will have treatments reimbursed by insurance is significantly smaller than the population who should receive PBT. Coverage decisions made by insurers reduce the number of PBT rooms that are economically viable. Conclusions: The expansion of PBT centers in the US is not sustainable under the current reimbursement model. Viability of new centers will be limited to those operating in larger regional metropolitan areas, and few metropolitan areas in the US can support multiple centers. In general, 1-room centers require captive (non–PBT-served) populations of approximately 1,000,000 lives to be economically viable, and a large center will require a population of >4,000,000 lives. In areas with smaller populations or where or a PBT center already exists, new centers require subsidy.

  4. Durable Airtightness in Single-Family Dwellings - Field Measurementsand Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2015-06-01

    Here, durability of the building envelope is important to new homes that are increasingly built with improved levels of airtightness. It is also important to weatherized homes such that energy savings from retrofit measures, such as air sealing, are persistent. This paper presents a comparison of air leakage measurements collected in November 2013 through March 2014, with two sets of prior data collected between 2001-2003 from 17 new homes located near Atlanta, GA, and 17 homes near Boise, ID that were weatherized in 2007- 2008. The purpose of the comparison is to determine if there are changes to the airtightnessmore » of building envelopes over time. The air leakage increased in all but one of the new homes, with a mean increase of about 25%. The weatherized homes also showed an increase in the mean air leakage (12%). A regression analysis was performed to describe the relationship between prior and current measurements in terms of normalized leakage (NL). The best estimate of the ageing factor predicts a 15% increase in NL over ten years. Further analysis using ResDB data (LBNL’s Residential Diagnostic Database) showed the expected changes in air leakage if ageing were modelled. These results imply the need to examine the causes of increased leakage and methods to avoid them. This increase in leakage with time should be accounted for in long-term population-wide energy savings estimates, such as those used in ratings or energy savings programs.« less

  5. Durable Airtightness in Single-Family Dwellings - Field Measurementsand Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2015-06-01

    Here, durability of the building envelope is important to new homes that are increasingly built with improved levels of airtightness. It is also important to weatherized homes such that energy savings from retrofit measures, such as air sealing, are persistent. This paper presents a comparison of air leakage measurements collected in November 2013 through March 2014, with two sets of prior data collected between 2001-2003 from 17 new homes located near Atlanta, GA, and 17 homes near Boise, ID that were weatherized in 2007- 2008. The purpose of the comparison is to determine if there are changes to the airtightness of building envelopes over time. The air leakage increased in all but one of the new homes, with a mean increase of about 25%. The weatherized homes also showed an increase in the mean air leakage (12%). A regression analysis was performed to describe the relationship between prior and current measurements in terms of normalized leakage (NL). The best estimate of the ageing factor predicts a 15% increase in NL over ten years. Further analysis using ResDB data (LBNL’s Residential Diagnostic Database) showed the expected changes in air leakage if ageing were modelled. These results imply the need to examine the causes of increased leakage and methods to avoid them. This increase in leakage with time should be accounted for in long-term population-wide energy savings estimates, such as those used in ratings or energy savings programs.

  6. Durable Airtightness in Single-Family Dwellings: Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2015-06-01

    Durability of building envelope is important to new homes that are increasingly built with improved levels of airtightness. It is also important to weatherized homes such that energy savings from retrofit measures, such as air sealing, are persistent. We presented a comparison of air leakage measurements collected in November 2013 through March 2014, with two sets of prior data collected between 2001-2003 from 17 new homes located near Atlanta, GA, and 17 homes near Boise, ID that were weatherized in 2007-2008. The purpose of the comparison is to determine if there are changes to the airtightness of building envelopes over time. The air leakage increased in all but one of the new homes, with a mean increase of about 25%. The weatherized homes also showed an increase in the mean air leakage (12%). We performed a regression analysis to describe the relationship between prior and current measurements in terms of normalized leakage (NL). The best estimate of the aging factor predicts a 15% increase in NL over ten years. Further analysis using ResDB data (LBNL’s Residential Diagnostic Database) showed the expected changes in air leakage if aging were modeled. These results imply that we should examine the causes of increased leakage and methods to avoid them. This increase in leakage with time should be accounted for in long-term population-wide energy savings estimates, such as those used in ratings or energy savings programs.

  7. Numerically Modeling Pulsed-Current, Kinked Wire Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filbey, Gordon; Kingman, Pat

    1999-06-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has embarked on a program to provide far-term land fighting vehicles with electromagnetic armor protection. Part of this work seeks to establish robust simulations of magneto-solid-mechanics phenomena. Whether describing violent rupture of a fuse link resulting from a large current pulse or the complete disruption of a copper shaped-charge jet subjected to high current densities, the simulations must include effects of intense Lorentz body forces and rapid Ohmic heating. Material models are required that describe plasticity, flow and fracture, conductivity, and equation of state (EOS) parameters for media in solid, liquid, and vapor phases. An extended version of the Eulerian wave code CTH has been used to predict the apex motion of a V-shaped (``kinked'') copper wire 3mm in diameter during a 400 kilo-amp pulse. These predictions, utilizing available material, EOS, and conductivity data for copper and the known characteristics of an existing capacitor-bank pulsed power supply, were then used to configure an experiment. The experiments were in excellent agreement with the prior simulations. Both computational and experimental results (including electrical data and flash X-rays) will be presented.

  8. Experimental modeling of eddy currents and deflections for tokamak limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, T.Q.; Knott, M.J.; Turner, L.R.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, experiments were performed to investigate deflection, current, and material stress in cantilever beams with the Fusion ELectromagnetic Induction eXperiment (FELIX) at the Argonne National Laboratory. Since structures near the plasma are typically cantilevered, the beams provide a good model for the limiter blades of a tokamak fusion reactor. The test pieces were copper, aluminum, phosphor bronze, and brass cantilever beams, clamped rigidly at one end with a nonconducting support frame inside the FELIX test volume. The primary data recorded as functions of time were the beam deflection measured with a noncontact electro-optical device, the total eddy current measured with a Rogowski coil and linking through a central hole in the beam, and the material stress extracted from strain gauges. Measurements of stress and deflection were taken at selected positions along the beam. The extent of the coupling effect depends on several factors. These include the size, the electrical and mechanical properties of the beam, segmenting of the beam, the decay rate of the dipole field, and the strength of the solenoid field.

  9. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR TIDES AND CURRENTS WITH FIELD APPLICATIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    A finite element model, based upon the shallow water equations, is used to calculate tidal amplitudes and currents for two field-scale test problems. Because tides are characterized by line spectra, the governing equations are subjected to harmonic decomposition. Thus the solution variables are the real and imaginary parts of the amplitude of sea level and velocity rather than a time series of these variables. The time series is recovered through synthesis. This scheme, coupled with a modified form of the governing equations, leads to high computational efficiency and freedom from excessive numerical noise. Two test-cases are presented. The first is a solution for eleven tidal constituents in the English Channel and southern North Sea, and three constituents are discussed. The second is an analysis of the frequency response and tidal harmonics for south San Francisco Bay.

  10. Current Trends in Modeling Research for Turbulent Aerodynamic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, Thomas B.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Manceau, Remi

    2007-01-01

    The engineering tools of choice for the computation of practical engineering flows have begun to migrate from those based on the traditional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach to methodologies capable, in theory if not in practice, of accurately predicting some instantaneous scales of motion in the flow. The migration has largely been driven by both the success of Reynolds-averaged methods over a wide variety of flows as well as the inherent limitations of the method itself. Practitioners, emboldened by their ability to predict a wide-variety of statistically steady, equilibrium turbulent flows, have now turned their attention to flow control and non-equilibrium flows, that is, separation control. This review gives some current priorities in traditional Reynolds-averaged modeling research as well as some methodologies being applied to a new class of turbulent flow control problems.

  11. Space charge templates for high-current beam modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, Leonid G.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    A computational method to evaluate space charge potential and gradients of charged particle beam in the presence of conducting boundaries, has been introduced. The three-dimensional (3D) field of the beam can be derived as a convolution of macro Green's functions (template fields), satisfying the same boundary conditions, as the original beam. Numerical experiments gave a confidence that space charge effects can be modeled by templates with enough accuracy and generality within dramatically faster computational times than standard combination: a grid density + Poisson solvers, realized in the most of Particle in Cell codes. The achieved rapidity may significantly broaden the high-current beam design space, making the optimization in automatic mode possible, which so far was only feasible for simplest self-field formulations such as rms envelope equations. The template technique may be used as a standalone program, or as an optional field solver in existing beam dynamics codes both in one-passage structures and in rings.

  12. The effect of compositional parameters on the TCLP and PCT durability of environmental glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Resce, J.L.; Overcamp, T.J.; Cicero, C.A.; Bickford, D.F.

    1995-12-01

    The relationship between glass composition and the chemical durability of environmental waste glass is very important for both the development of glass formulations and the prediction of glass durability for process control. The development of such a model is extremely difficult for several reasons. Firstly, chemical durability is dependent upon the type of leach test employed; the leach tests themselves being only crude approximations of actual environmental conditions or long term behavior. Secondly, devitrification or crystallinity can also play a major role in durability, but is much more difficult to quantify. Lastly, the development of any one model for all glass types is impractical because of the wide variety of wastestreams, the heterogeneity of the wastestreams, and the large variety of components within each wastestream. Several ongoing efforts have been directed toward this goal, but as yet, no model has been proven acceptable.

  13. Durability Challenges for Next Generation of Gas Turbine Engine Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive fuel burn and carbon dioxide emission reduction goals for future gas turbine engines will require higher overall pressure ratio, and a significant increase in turbine inlet temperature. These goals can be achieved by increasing temperature capability of turbine engine hot section materials and decreasing weight of fan section of the engine. NASA is currently developing several advanced hot section materials for increasing temperature capability of future gas turbine engines. The materials of interest include ceramic matrix composites with 1482 - 1648 C temperature capability, advanced disk alloys with 815 C capability, and low conductivity thermal barrier coatings with erosion resistance. The presentation will provide an overview of durability challenges with emphasis on the environmental factors affecting durability for the next generation of gas turbine engine materials. The environmental factors include gaseous atmosphere in gas turbine engines, molten salt and glass deposits from airborne contaminants, impact from foreign object damage, and erosion from ingestion of small particles.

  14. Analytical modeling for transient probe response in eddy current testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel

    Analytical models that describe the electromagnetic field interactions arising between field generating and sensing coils in close proximity to conducting structures can be used to enhance analysis and information extracted from signals obtained using electromagnetic non-destructive evaluation technologies. A novel strategy, which enables the derivation of exact solutions describing all electromagnetic interactions arising in inductively coupled circuits due to a voltage excitation, is developed in this work. Differential circuit equations are formulated in terms of an arbitrary voltage excitation and of the magnetic fields arising in inductive systems, using Faraday's law and convolution, and solved using the Fourier transform. The approach is valid for systems containing any number of driving and receiving coils, and include nearby conducting and ferromagnetic structures. In particular, the solutions account for feedback between a ferromagnetic conducting test piece and the driving and sensing coils, providing correct voltage response of the coils. Also arising from the theory are analytical expressions for complex inductances in a circuit, which account for real (inductive) and imaginary (loss) elements associated with conducting and ferromagnetic structures. A novel model-based method for simultaneous characterization of material parameters, which includes magnetic permeability, electrical conductivity, wall thickness and liftoff, is subsequently developed from the forward solutions. Furthermore, arbitrary excitation waveforms, such as a sinusoid or a square wave, for applications in conventional and transient eddy current, respectively, may be considered. Experimental results, obtained for a square wave excitation, are found to be in excellent agreement with the analytical predictions.

  15. Modeling the heliospheric current sheet: Solar cycle variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Pete; Linker, J. A.; Mikić, Z.

    2002-07-01

    In this report we employ an empirically driven, three-dimensional MHD model to explore the evolution of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) during the course of the solar cycle. We compare our results with a simpler ``constant-speed'' approach for mapping the HCS outward into the solar wind to demonstrate that dynamic effects can substantially deform the HCS in the inner heliosphere (<~5 AU). We find that these deformations are most pronounced at solar minimum and become less significant at solar maximum, when interaction regions are less effective. Although solar maximum is typically associated with transient, rather than corotating, processes, we show that even under such conditions, the HCS can maintain its structure over the course of several solar rotations. While the HCS may almost always be topologically equivalent to a ``ballerina skirt,'' we discuss an interval approaching the maximum of solar cycle 23 (Carrington rotations 1960 and 1961) when the shape would be better described as ``conch shell''-like. We use Ulysses magnetic field measurements to support the model results.

  16. A geomagnetically induced current warning system: model development and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, A.; Clarke, E.; Reay, S.; Thomson, A.

    Geomagnetically Induced Currents (GIC), which can flow in technological systems at the Earth's surface, are a consequence of magnetic storms and Space Weather. A well-documented practical problem for the power transmission industry is that GIC can affect the lifetime and performance of transformers within the power grid. Operational mitigation is widely considered to be one of the best strategies to manage the Space Weather and GIC risk. Therefore in the UK a magnetic storm warning and GIC monitoring and analysis programme has been under development by the British Geological Survey and Scottish Power plc (the power grid operator for Central Scotland) since 1999. Under the auspices of the European Space Agency's service development activities BGS is developing the capability to meet two key user needs that have been identified. These needs are, firstly, the development of a near real-time solar wind shock/ geomagnetic storm warning, based on L1 solar wind data and, secondly, the development of an integrated surface geo-electric field and power grid network model that should allow prediction of GIC throughout the power grid in near real time. While the final goal is a `seamless package', the components of the package utilise diverse scientific techniques. We review progress to date with particular regard to the validation of the individual components of the package. The Scottish power grid response to the October 2003 magnetic storms is also discussed and model and validation data are presented.

  17. Recent Simulation Results on Ring Current Dynamics Using the Comprehensive Ring Current Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Zaharia, Sorin G.; Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Fok, Mei-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Plasma sheet conditions and electromagnetic field configurations are both crucial in determining ring current evolution and connection to the ionosphere. In this presentation, we investigate how different conditions of plasma sheet distribution affect ring current properties. Results include comparative studies in 1) varying the radial distance of the plasma sheet boundary; 2) varying local time distribution of the source population; 3) varying the source spectra. Our results show that a source located farther away leads to a stronger ring current than a source that is closer to the Earth. Local time distribution of the source plays an important role in determining both the radial and azimuthal (local time) location of the ring current peak pressure. We found that post-midnight source locations generally lead to a stronger ring current. This finding is in agreement with Lavraud et al.. However, our results do not exhibit any simple dependence of the local time distribution of the peak ring current (within the lower energy range) on the local time distribution of the source, as suggested by Lavraud et al. [2008]. In addition, we will show how different specifications of the magnetic field in the simulation domain affect ring current dynamics in reference to the 20 November 2007 storm, which include initial results on coupling the CRCM with a three-dimensional (3-D) plasma force balance code to achieve self-consistency in the magnetic field.

  18. Predicting the Impact of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Cement Hydration Products and Durability of Cementitious Matrix Using Artificial Neural Network Modeling Technique

    PubMed Central

    Fakhim, Babak; Hassani, Abolfazl; Rashidi, Alimorad; Ghodousi, Parviz

    2013-01-01

    In this study the feasibility of using the artificial neural networks modeling in predicting the effect of MWCNT on amount of cement hydration products and improving the quality of cement hydration products microstructures of cement paste was investigated. To determine the amount of cement hydration products thermogravimetric analysis was used. Two critical parameters of TGA test are PHPloss and CHloss. In order to model the TGA test results, the ANN modeling was performed on these parameters separately. In this study, 60% of data are used for model calibration and the remaining 40% are used for model verification. Based on the highest efficiency coefficient and the lowest root mean square error, the best ANN model was chosen. The results of TGA test implied that the cement hydration is enhanced in the presence of the optimum percentage (0.3 wt%) of MWCNT. Moreover, since the efficiency coefficient of the modeling results of CH and PHP loss in both the calibration and verification stages was more than 0.96, it was concluded that the ANN could be used as an accurate tool for modeling the TGA results. Another finding of this study was that the ANN prediction in higher ages was more precise. PMID:24489487

  19. Method of determining glass durability

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-12-08

    A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

  20. Method of determining glass durability

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol Maryanne; Pickett, John Butler; Brown, Kevin George; Edwards, Thomas Barry

    1998-01-01

    A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

  1. Durable coatings for IR windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Jha, Santosh K.; Gunda, Nilesh; Cooke, Rick; Agarwal, Neeta; Sastri, Suri A.; Harker, Alan; Kirsch, Jim

    2005-05-01

    Durable coatings of silicon-carbon-oxy-nitride (a.k.a. SiCON) are being developed to protect high-speed missile windows from the environmental loads during flight. Originally developed at Rockwell Scientific Corporation (RSC) these coatings exhibited substantial promise, but were difficult to deposit. Under a DoD DARPA SBIR Phase I program, Surmet Corporation, working closely with RSC, is depositing these coatings using an innovative vacuum vapor deposition process. High rate of coating deposition and the ease of manipulating the process variables, make Surmet"s process suitable for the deposition of substantially thick films (up to 30 μm) with precisely controlled chemistry. Initial work has shown encouraging results, and the refinement of the coating and coating process is still underway. Coupons of SiN and SiCON coatings with varying thickness on a variety of substrates such as Si-wafer, ZnS and ALON were fabricated and used for the study. This paper will present and discuss the results of SiN and SiCON coatings deposition and characterization (physical, mechanical and optical properties) as a basis for evaluating their suitability for high speed missile windows application.

  2. Comparison of Hemostatic Durability between N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Gelatin Sponge Particles in Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in a Coagulopathic Condition in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yonemitsu, Takafumi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Takasaka, Isao; Nakai, Motoki; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Sahara, Shinya; Iwasaki, Yasuhiro; Naka, Toshio; Shinozaki, Masahiro

    2010-12-15

    This study was designed to compare the efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) or gelatin sponge particles (GSP) for acute arterial bleeding in a coagulopathic condition using a swine model. Four healthy swine were divided into two coagulopathic conditions: mild and severe. Five hemorrhages were created in each swine (10 hemorrhages per coagulopathy). Mild coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 10% of the total circulatory whole blood and preserving activated clotting time (ACT) less than 200 s (ACT < 200 s state); severe coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 30% and preserving ACT > 400 s (ACT > 400-second state). For each state, of ACT < 200 s or ACT > 400 s, TAE was conducted with GSP or NBCA to control five hemorrhages arising from artificially created renal and splenic injuries. Angiography immediately after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed complete occlusion in both coagulopathic conditions. In the ACT < 200-second state, follow-up angiography at 5-30 min after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed no evidence of recurrent hemorrhage. In the ACT > 400-second state, follow-up angiography showed recurrent hemorrhage in four (80%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with GSP and in one (20%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with NBCA. Microscopically, red thrombi were observed densely surrounding GSP in mild coagulopathy but were scarce in severe coagulopathy. In a condition with severe coagulopathy, TAE with NBCA was more effective in durability to cease active arterial bleeding than with GSP.

  3. 40 CFR 1065.415 - Durability demonstration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 1065.415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Selection, Preparation, and Maintenance § 1065.415 Durability.... Perform emission tests to determine deterioration factors consistent with good engineering...

  4. Delamination durability of composite materials for rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin

    1988-01-01

    Delamination is the most commonly observed failure mode in composite rotorcraft dynamic components. Although delamination may not cause immediate failure of the composite part, it often precipitates component repair or replacement, which inhibits fleet readiness, and results in increased life cycle costs. A fracture mechanics approach for analyzing, characterizing, and designing against delamination will be outlined. Examples of delamination problems will be illustrated where the strain energy release rate associated with delamination growth was found to be a useful generic parameter, independent of thickness, layup, and delamination source, for characterizing delamination failure. Several analysis techniques for calculating strain energy release rates for delamination from a variety of sources will be outlined. Current efforts to develop ASTM standard test methods for measuring interlaminar fracture toughness and developing delamination failure criteria will be reviewed. A technique for quantifying delamination durability due to cyclic loading will be presented. The use of this technique for predicting fatigue life of composite laminates and developing a fatigue design philosophy for composite structural components will be reviewed.

  5. Drought Duration Biases in Current Global Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Heewon; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Several droughts in the recent past are characterized by their increased duration and intensity. In particular, substantially prolonged droughts have brought major societal and economic losses in certain regions, yet climate change projections of such droughts in terms of duration is subject to large uncertainties. This study analyzes the biases of drought duration in state-of-the-art global climate model (GCM) simulations from the 5th phase of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Drought durations are defined as negative precipitation anomalies and evaluated with three observation-based datasets in the period of 1901-2010. Large spread in biases of GCMs is commonly found in all regions, with particular strong biases in North East Brazil, Africa, Northern Australia, Central America, Central and Northern Europe, Sahel and Asia. Also in most regions, the interquartile range of bias lies below 0, meaning that the GCMs tend to underestimate drought durations. Meanwhile in some regions such as Western South America, the Amazon, Sahel, West and South Africa, and Asia, considerable inconsistency among the three observation-based datasets were found. These results indicate substantial uncertainties and errors in current GCMs for simulating drought durations as well as a large spread in observation-based datasets, both of which are found to be particularly strong in those regions that are often considered to be hot spots of projected future drying. The underlying sources of these uncertainties need to be identified in further study and will be applied to constrain GCM-based drought projections under climate change.

  6. Durability of Composite Materials and Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-02

    Michigan State University Composite Materials and Structures Center 2100 Engineering Building , East Lansing, MI 48824-1226 6.1 Objectives The...DATES COVERED (From - To) February 7, 2005 - January 31. 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DURABILITY OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES 5a...Manager: Dr. Yapa D.S. Rajapakse Office of Naval Research 875 N. Randolph Street Arlington, VA 22203-1995 DURABILITY OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND

  7. Mechanistic Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsman, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under “real world” conditions is an issue for commercial deployment. In particular cathode exposure to moisture, CO2, Cr vapor (from interconnects and BOP), and particulates results in long-term performance degradation issues. Here, we have conducted a multi-faceted fundamental investigation of the effect of these contaminants on cathode performance degradation mechanisms in order to establish cathode composition/structures and operational conditions to enhance cathode durability.

  8. Geomagnetically induced currents in Uruguay: Sensitivity to modelling parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraballo, R.

    2016-11-01

    According to the traditional wisdom, geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) should occur rarely at mid-to-low latitudes, but in the last decades a growing number of reports have addressed their effects on high-voltage (HV) power grids at mid-to-low latitudes. The growing trend to interconnect national power grids to meet regional integration objectives, may lead to an increase in the size of the present energy transmission networks to form a sort of super-grid at continental scale. Such a broad and heterogeneous super-grid can be exposed to the effects of large GIC if appropriate mitigation actions are not taken into consideration. In the present study, we present GIC estimates for the Uruguayan HV power grid during severe magnetic storm conditions. The GIC intensities are strongly dependent on the rate of variation of the geomagnetic field, conductivity of the ground, power grid resistances and configuration. Calculated GIC are analysed as functions of these parameters. The results show a reasonable agreement with measured data in Brazil and Argentina, thus confirming the reliability of the model. The expansion of the grid leads to a strong increase in GIC intensities in almost all substations. The power grid response to changes in ground conductivity and resistances shows similar results in a minor extent. This leads us to consider GIC as a non-negligible phenomenon in South America. Consequently, GIC must be taken into account in mid-to-low latitude power grids as well.

  9. Catapult current sheet relaxation model confirmed by THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Nose, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we show the result of superposed epoch analysis on the THEMIS probe data during the period from November, 2007 to April, 2009 by setting the origin of time axis to the substorm onset determined by Nishimura with THEMIS all sky imager (THEMS/ASI) data (http://www.atmos.ucla.edu/~toshi/files/paper/Toshi_THEMIS_GBO_list_distribution.xls). We confirmed the presence of earthward flows which can be associated with north-south auroral streamers during the substorm growth phase. At around X = -12 Earth radii (Re), the northward magnetic field and its elevation angle decreased markedly approximately 4 min before substorm onset. A northward magnetic-field increase associated with pre-onset earthward flows was found at around X = -17Re. This variation indicates the occurrence of the local depolarization. Interestingly, in the region earthwards of X = -18Re, earthward flows in the central plasma sheet (CPS) reduced significantly about 3min before substorm onset. However, the earthward flows enhanced again at t = -60 sec in the region around X = -14 Re, and they moved toward the Earth. At t = 0, the dipolarization of the magnetic field started at X ~ -10 Re, and simultaneously the magnetic reconnection started at X ~ -20 Re. Synthesizing these results, we can confirm the validity of our catapult current sheet relaxation model.

  10. A Review of Current Models of Cometary Tail Disconnection Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, Daniel

    The plasma tail of a comet is susceptible to influences from the solar wind and its embedded magnetic field. The ion tail can show fluctuations, kinks , and moving structures. In addition, it is possible that a disconnection event (DE) might occur, when the ion tail separates from the comet and reforms a few hours later as recently observed in the tail of comet Encke by A. Vourlidas et al. [Ap.J.Lett. 668, L79-82 (2007)] using the Heliospheric Imager onboard NASA's STEREO Mission. The solar wind has a permanent abrupt, and well-known change in magnetic field direction located close to the solar equator, which the comet will intersect. The Sun also releases a large amount of ionized gases from fast-moving disturbances, such as Coronal Mass Ejections as observed by the LASCO instrument onboard ESA's SOHO Mission. In addition, highspeed streams and interplanetary shocks in the solar wind are plausible mechanisms for causing cometary tail disturbances. These types of solar phenomenon can dramatically alter the comet's tail and, on rare occasions, cause a disconnection event. In this paper, we will review the relevant observations and models of disconnection events and summarize our current state of knowledge, highlighting outstanding problems for future research. Acknowledgements. We acknowledge funding and support from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program and the NASA Discovery Data Analysis Program.

  11. Organotypic liver culture models: Meeting current challenges in toxicity testing

    PubMed Central

    LeCluyse, Edward L.; Witek, Rafal P.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Powers, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of chemical-induced hepatotoxicity in humans from in vitro data continues to be a significant challenge for the pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Generally, conventional in vitro hepatic model systems (i.e. 2-D static monocultures of primary or immortalized hepatocytes) are limited by their inability to maintain histotypic and phenotypic characteristics over time in culture, including stable expression of clearance and bioactivation pathways, as well as complex adaptive responses to chemical exposure. These systems are less than ideal for longer-term toxicity evaluations and elucidation of key cellular and molecular events involved in primary and secondary adaptation to chemical exposure, or for identification of important mediators of inflammation, proliferation and apoptosis. Progress in implementing a more effective strategy for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation and human risk assessment depends on significant advances in tissue culture technology and increasing their level of biological complexity. This article describes the current and ongoing need for more relevant, organotypic in vitro surrogate systems of human liver and recent efforts to recreate the multicellular architecture and hemodynamic properties of the liver using novel culture platforms. As these systems become more widely used for chemical and drug toxicity testing, there will be a corresponding need to establish standardized testing conditions, endpoint analyses and acceptance criteria. In the future, a balanced approach between sample throughput and biological relevance should provide better in vitro tools that are complementary with animal testing and assist in conducting more predictive human risk assessment. PMID:22582993

  12. Teeth: Among Nature's Most Durable Biocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawn, Brian R.; Lee, James J.-W.; Chai, Herzl

    2010-08-01

    This paper addresses the durability of natural teeth from a materials perspective. Teeth are depicted as smart biocomposites, highly resistant to cumulative deformation and fracture. Favorable morphological features of teeth at both macroscopic and microscopic levels contribute to an innate damage tolerance. Damage modes are activated readily within the brittle enamel coat but are contained from spreading catastrophically into the vulnerable tooth interior in sustained occlusal loading. Although tooth enamel contains a multitude of microstructural defects that can act as sources of fracture, substantial overloads are required to drive any developing cracks to ultimate failure—nature's strategy is to contain damage rather than avoid it. Tests on model glass-shell systems simulating the basic elements of the tooth enamel/dentin layer structure help to identify important damage modes. Fracture and deformation mechanics provide a basis for analyzing critical conditions for each mode, in terms of characteristic tooth dimensions and materials properties. Comparative tests on extracted human and animal teeth confirm the validity of the model test approach and point to new research directions. Implications in biomechanics, especially as they relate to dentistry and anthropology, are outlined.

  13. Durability of Low Platinum Fuel Cells Operating at High Power Density

    SciTech Connect

    Polevaya, Olga; Blanchet, Scott; Ahluwalia, Rajesh; Borup, Rod; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2014-03-19

    was correlated with the upper potential limit in the cycle tests, although the performance degradation was found to be a strong function of initial Pt loading. A large fraction of the voltage degradation was found due to increased mass transfer overpotentials, especially in the lower Pt loading cells. Increased mass transfer overpotentials were responsible for a large fraction of the voltage degradation at high current densities. Analysis of the impedance and polarization data indicated O2 diffusion in the aged electrode ionomer to be the main source of the increased mass transfer overpotentials. Results from the experimental parametric studies were used to inform and calibrate newly developed durability model, simulating lifetime performance of the fuel cell under variety of load-cycle protocols, electrode loadings and throughout wide range of operating conditions, including elevated-to-3.0A/cm2 current densities. Complete durability model included several sub-models: platinum dissolution-and-growth as well as reaction-diffusion model of cathode electrode, applied sequentially to study the lifetime predictions of ECSA and polarization performance in the ASTs and NSTs. These models establish relations between changes in overpotentials, ECSA and oxygen mass transport in fuel cell cathodes. The model was calibrated using single cells with land-channel and open flowfield architectures. The model was validated against Nuvera Orion® (open flowfield) short stack data in the load cycle durability tests. The reaction-diffusion model was used to correlate the effective mass transfer coefficients for O2 diffusion in cathode ionomer and separately in gas pores with the operating conditions (pressure, temperature, gas velocity in flow field and current density), Pt loading, and ageing related growth in Pt particles and thinning of the electrode. Achievements of both modeling and experimental objectives were demonstrated in a full format, subscale stacks operating in a simulated

  14. Toward improved durability in advanced aircraft engine hot sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Daniel E. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The conference on durability improvement methods for advanced aircraft gas turbine hot-section components discussed NASA's Hot Section Technology (HOST) project, advanced high-temperature instrumentation for hot-section research, the development and application of combustor aerothermal models, and the evaluation of a data base and numerical model for turbine heat transfer. Also discussed are structural analysis methods for gas turbine hot section components, fatigue life-prediction modeling for turbine hot section materials, and the service life modeling of thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines.

  15. Modelling Monsoons: Understanding and Predicting Current and Future Behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, A; Sperber, K R; Slingo, J M; Meehl, G A; Mechoso, C R; Kimoto, M; Giannini, A

    2008-09-16

    including, but not limited to, the Mei-Yu/Baiu sudden onset and withdrawal, low-level jet orientation and variability, and orographic forced rainfall. Under anthropogenic climate change many competing factors complicate making robust projections of monsoon changes. Without aerosol effects, increased land-sea temperature contrast suggests strengthened monsoon circulation due to climate change. However, increased aerosol emissions will reflect more solar radiation back to space, which may temper or even reduce the strength of monsoon circulations compared to the present day. A more comprehensive assessment is needed of the impact of black carbon aerosols, which may modulate that of other anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Precipitation may behave independently from the circulation under warming conditions in which an increased atmospheric moisture loading, based purely on thermodynamic considerations, could result in increased monsoon rainfall under climate change. The challenge to improve model parameterizations and include more complex processes and feedbacks pushes computing resources to their limit, thus requiring continuous upgrades of computational infrastructure to ensure progress in understanding and predicting the current and future behavior of monsoons.

  16. Moisture Durability with Vapor-Permeable Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect

    Lepage, R.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-09-01

    Exterior sheathing insulation is an effective strategy in increasing the overall R-value of wall assemblies; other benefits include decreasing the effects of thermal bridging and increasing the moisture durability of the built assembly. Vapor-permeable exterior insulation, such as mineral board or expanded polystyrene foam, are one such product that may be used to achieve these benefits. However,uncertainty exists on the effects of inward driven moisture and the interaction of increased sheathing temperatures on the moisture durability of the edifice. To address these concerns, Building Science Corporation (BSC) conducted a series of hygrothermal models for cities representing a range of different climate zones. This report describes the research project, key research questions, and theprocedures utilized to analyse the problems.

  17. Engine cyclic durability by analysis and material testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Halford, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of calculating turbine engine component durability is addressed. Nonlinear, finite-element structural analyses, cyclic constitutive behavior models, and an advanced creep-fatigue life prediction method called strainrange partitioning were assessed for their applicability to the solution of durability problems in hot-section components of gas turbine engines. Three different component or subcomponent geometries are examined: a stress concentration in a turbine disk; a louver lip of a half-scale combustor liner; and a squealer tip of a first-stage high-pressure turbine blade. Cyclic structural analyses were performed for all three problems. The computed strain-temperature histories at the critical locations of the combustor linear and turbine blade components were imposed on smooth specimens in uniaxial, strain-controlled, thermomechanical fatigue tests of evaluate the structural and life analysis methods.

  18. Moisture Durability with Vapor-Permeable Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect

    Lepage, R.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-09-01

    Exterior sheathing insulation is an effective strategy in increasing the overall R-value of wall assemblies; other benefits include decreasing the effects of thermal bridging and increasing the moisture durability of the built assembly. Vapor-permeable exterior insulation, such as mineral board or expanded polystyrene foam, are one such product that may be used to achieve these benefits. However, uncertainty exists on the effects of inward driven moisture and the interaction of increased sheathing temperatures on the moisture durability of the edifice. To address these concerns, Building Science Corporation (BSC) conducted a series of hygrothermal models for cities representing a range of different climate zones. This report describes the research project, key research questions, and the procedures utilized to analyse the problems.

  19. Durability of organobentonite-amended liner for decelerating chloroform transport.

    PubMed

    He, Shichong; Zhu, Lizhong

    2016-04-01

    Chloroform is added to landfill for suppressing methane generation, which however may transport through landfill liners and lead to contamination of groundwater. To decelerate chloroform transport, the enhanced sorption ability of clay liners following organobentonite addition was tested. In this study, we used batch sorption to evaluate sorption capacity of chloroform to organobentonite, followed by column tests and model simulations for assessing durability of different liners. Results show that adding 10% CTMAB-bentonite (organobentonite synthesized using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) increased the duration of a bentonite liner by 88.5%. CTMAB-bentonite consistently showed the highest sorption capacity (Qm) among six typical organobentonites under various environmental conditions. The removal rate of chloroform by CTMAB-bentonite was 3.6-23 times higher than that by natural soils. According to the results derived by model simulation, a 70-cm 10% CTMAB-bentonite liner exhibited much better durability than a 100-cm compact clay liner (CCL) and natural bentonite liner evidenced by the delayed and lower peak of eluent concentration. A minimum thickness of 65.8 cm of the 10% CTMAB-bentonite liner could completely sorb the chloroform in a 100-m-high landfill. The 10% CTMAB-bentonite liner exhibiting much better durability has the promise for reducing environmental risk of chloroform in landfill.

  20. Individualized model predicts brain current flow during transcranial direct-current stimulation treatment in responsive stroke patient.

    PubMed

    Datta, Abhishek; Baker, Julie M; Bikson, Marom; Fridriksson, Julius

    2011-07-01

    Although numerous published reports have demonstrated the beneficial effects of transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) on task performance, fundamental questions remain regarding the optimal electrode configuration on the scalp. Moreover, it is expected that lesioned brain tissue will influence current flow and should therefore be considered (and perhaps leveraged) in the design of individualized tDCS therapies for stroke. The current report demonstrates how different electrode configurations influence the flow of electrical current through brain tissue in a patient who responded positively to a tDCS treatment targeting aphasia. The patient, a 60-year-old man, sustained a left hemisphere ischemic stroke (lesion size = 87.42 mL) 64 months before his participation. In this study, we present results from the first high-resolution (1 mm(3)) model of tDCS in a brain with considerable stroke-related damage; the model was individualized for the patient who received anodal tDCS to his left frontal cortex with the reference cathode electrode placed on his right shoulder. We modeled the resulting brain current flow and also considered three additional reference electrode positions: right mastoid, right orbitofrontal cortex, and a "mirror" configuration with the anode over the undamaged right cortex. Our results demonstrate the profound effect of lesioned tissue on resulting current flow and the ability to modulate current pattern through the brain, including perilesional regions, through electrode montage design. The complexity of brain current flow modulation by detailed normal and pathologic anatomy suggest: (1) That computational models are critical for the rational interpretation and design of individualized tDCS stroke-therapy; and (2) These models must accurately reproduce head anatomy as shown here.

  1. Numerical modeling of lower hybrid heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Valeo, E.J.; Eder, D.C.

    1986-03-01

    The generation of currents in toroidal plasma by application of waves in the lower hybrid frequency range involves the interplay of several physical phenomena which include: wave propagation in toroidal geometry, absorption via wave-particle resonances, the quasilinear generation of strongly nonequilibrium electron and ion distribution functions, and the self-consistent evolution of the current density in such a nonequilibrium plasma. We describe a code, LHMOD, which we have developed to treat these aspects of current drive and heating in tokamaks. We present results obtained by applying the code to a computation of current ramp-up and to an investigation of the possible importance of minority hydrogen absorption in a deuterium plasma as the ''density limit'' to current drive is approached.

  2. Integrated approach for investigating the durability of self-consolidating concrete to sulfate attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassuoni, Mohamed Tamer F.

    The growing use of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) in various infrastructure applications exposed to sulfate-rich environments necessitates conducting comprehensive research to evaluate its durability to external sulfate attack. Since the reliability and adequacy of standard sulfate immersion tests have been questioned, the current thesis introduced an integrated testing approach for assessing the durability of a wide scope of SCC mixtures to external sulfate attack. This testing approach involved progressive levels of complexity from single to multiple damage processes. A new series of sulfate attack tests involving multiple field-like parameters and combined damage mechanisms (various cations, controlled pH, wetting-drying, partial immersion, freezing-thawing, and cyclic cold-hot conditions with or without sustained flexural loading) were designed to evaluate the performance (suitability) of the SCC mixtures under various sulfate attack exposure scenarios. The main mixture design variables of SCC included the type of binder (single, binary, ternary and quaternary), air-entrainment, sand-to-aggregate mass ratio and hybrid fibre reinforcement. The comprehensive database and knowledge obtained from this research were used to develop smart models (fuzzy and neuro-fuzzy inference systems) based on artificial-intelligence to evaluate and predict the performance of the SCC mixtures under various sulfate attack exposure regimes implemented in this study. In full immersion tests involving high concentration sodium and magnesium sulfate solutions with controlled pH, the low penetrability of SCC was responsible for the high durability of specimens. Ternary and quaternary cementitious systems with or without limestone materials provided a passivating layer, with or without acid neutralization capacity, which protected SCC from severe damage in the aggressive sulfuric acid and ammonium sulfate solutions. In contrast to conclusions drawn from the sodium sulfate immersion

  3. Revised model of thermally stimulated current in MOS capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.

    1997-06-01

    It is shown analytically and experimentally that thermally stimulated current (TSC) measurements at negative bias incompletely describe oxide-trap charge in SIMOX and bipolar base oxides irradiated at 0 V. Positive-bias TSC is also required.

  4. Modelling tidal current energy extraction in large area using a three-dimensional estuary model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yaling; Lin, Binliang; Lin, Jie

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional modelling study for simulating tidal current energy extraction in large areas, with a momentum sink term being added into the momentum equations. Due to the limits of computational capacity, the grid size of the numerical model is generally much larger than the turbine rotor diameter. Two models, i.e. a local grid refinement model and a coarse grid model, are employed and an idealized estuary is set up. The local grid refinement model is constructed to simulate the power generation of an isolated turbine and its impacts on hydrodynamics. The model is then used to determine the deployment of turbine farm and quantify a combined thrust coefficient for multiple turbines located in a grid element of coarse grid model. The model results indicate that the performance of power extraction is affected by array deployment, with more power generation from outer rows than inner rows due to velocity deficit influence of upstream turbines. Model results also demonstrate that the large-scale turbine farm has significant effects on the hydrodynamics. The tidal currents are attenuated within the turbine swept area, and both upstream and downstream of the array. While the currents are accelerated above and below turbines, which is contributed to speeding up the wake mixing process behind the arrays. The water levels are heightened in both low and high water levels as the turbine array spanning the full width of estuary. The magnitude of water level change is found to increase with the array expansion, especially at the low water level.

  5. The PRISM data/model co-operative: current modelling activities, future plans and data requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Alan

    2010-05-01

    Here we review current activities and future model and data requirements associated with the palaeoclimate modelling arm of the PRISM data/model co-operative. The talk will begin with a description of modelling focussed on understanding the behaviour of climate phenomena that are responsible for generating significant regional decadal and sub-decadal climate variability (ENSO and NAO), and the challenges associated with linking such predictions to mid-Piacenzian palaeoenvironmental data. Secondly, we will examine current efforts to understand the role of changing sea-surface temperatures, in relation to other important boundary conditions, in driving global and regional climate/environmental shifts recognised in the proxy data. Thirdly, we will examine initial results from coupled climate and ice sheet modelling examining the response of the Greenland and East Antarctic Ice Sheets to orbital variations and how these predicted changes relate to current estimates of mid-Piacenzian mean sea level and sea level variability. Our future plans centre on (a) the development of the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project, (b) understanding uncertainty in climate model predictions of mid-Piacenzian climates and (c) moving towards an Earth System Modelling framework for the PRISM interval. With the 4th iteration of the PRISM palaeoenvironmental data set under construction we briefly outline how the demands of modern climate and earth system models will partly shape PRISM4, as well as the new scientific opportunities that will stem from it (e.g. the advent of isotope enabled models, higher resolution boundary conditions, river routing schemes and palaeobathymetry).

  6. Micromagnetic modeling of critical current oscillations in magnetic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Bol'ginov, V. V.; Stolyarov, V. S.; Abramov, N. N.; Ben Hamida, A.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Stolyarov, B. S.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Golubov, A. A.; Ryazanov, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we propose and explore an effective numerical approach for investigation of critical current dependence on applied magnetic field for magnetic Josephson junctions with in-plane magnetization orientation. This approach is based on micromagnetic simulation of the magnetization reversal process in the ferromagnetic layer with introduced internal magnetic stiffness and subsequent reconstruction of the critical current value using total flux or reconstructed actual phase difference distribution. The approach is flexible and shows good agreement with experimental data obtained on Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic barriers. Based on this approach we have obtained a critical current dependence on applied magnetic field for rectangular magnetic Josephson junctions with high size aspect ratio. We have shown that the rectangular magnetic Josephson junctions can be considered for application as an effective Josephson magnetic memory element with the value of critical current defined by the orientation of magnetic moment at zero magnetic field. An impact of shape magnetic anisotropy on critical current is revealed and discussed. Finally, we have considered a curling magnetic state in the ferromagnetic layer and demonstrated its impact on critical current.

  7. Therapeutic administration of IL-15 superagonist complex ALT-803 leads to long-term survival and durable antitumor immune response in a murine glioblastoma model.

    PubMed

    Mathios, Dimitrios; Park, Chul-Kee; Marcus, Warren D; Alter, Sarah; Rhode, Peter R; Jeng, Emily K; Wong, Hing C; Pardoll, Drew M; Lim, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary central nervous system malignancy with a poor prognosis in patients. Despite the need for better treatments against glioblastoma, very little progress has been made in discovering new therapies that exhibit superior survival benefit than the standard of care. Immunotherapy has been shown to be a promising treatment modality that could help improve clinical outcomes of glioblastoma patients by assisting the immune system to overcome the immunosuppressive tumor environment. Interleukin-15 (IL-15), a cytokine shown to activate several effector components of the immune system, may serve as an excellent immunotherapeutic candidate for the treatment of glioblastoma. Thus, we evaluated the efficacy of an IL-15 superagonist complex (IL-15N72D:IL-15RαSu-Fc; also known as ALT-803) in a murine GL261-luc glioblastoma model. We show that ALT-803, as a single treatment as well as in combination with anti-PD-1 antibody or stereotactic radiosurgery, exhibits a robust antitumor immune response resulting in a prolonged survival including complete remission in tumor bearing mice. In addition, ALT-803 treatment results in long-term immune memory against glioblastoma tumor rechallenge. Flow cytometric analysis of tumor infiltrating immune cells shows that ALT-803 leads to increased percentage of CD8+-cell infiltration, but not the NK cells, and IFN-γ production into the tumor microenvironment. Cell depletion studies, in accordance with the flow cytometric results, show that the ALT-803 therapeutic effect is dependent on CD4+ and CD8+ cells. These results provide a rationale for evaluating the therapeutic activity of ALT-803 against glioblastoma in the clinical setting.

  8. Thermal cyclic durability testing of ceramic materials for turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal cyclic durability of commercial ceramic materials for turbine engines was under evaluation since 1978. Ceramic materials are exposed to cyclic diesel-fired burner exhaust at either 1204 or 1371 C (2200 or 2500 F) for up to 3500 hours. The test conditions are selected to simulate the environment experienced by the hot flow path components in an automotive gas turbine engine. The silicon nitride and silicon carbide materials tested are the same ceramic materials currently used on the AGT100 and AGT101 ceramic turbine engine program.

  9. Survey of current situation in radiation belt modeling.

    PubMed

    Fung, Shing F

    2004-01-01

    The study of Earth's radiation belts is one of the oldest subjects in space physics. Despite the tremendous progress made in the last four decades, we still lack a complete understanding of the radiation belts in terms of their configurations, dynamics, and detailed physical accounts of their sources and sinks. The static nature of early empirical trapped radiation models, for examples, the NASA AP-8 and AE-8 models, renders those models inappropriate for predicting short-term radiation belt behaviors associated with geomagnetic storms and substorms. Due to incomplete data coverage, these models are also inaccurate at low altitudes (e.g., <1000 km) where many robotic and human space flights occur. The availability of radiation data from modern space missions and advancement in physical modeling and data management techniques have now allowed the development of new empirical and physical radiation belt models. In this paper, we will review the status of modern radiation belt modeling.

  10. Modeling Current Transfer from PV Modules Based on Meteorological Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hacke, Peter; Smith, Ryan; Kurtz, Sarah; Jordan, Dirk; Wohlgemuth, John

    2016-11-21

    Current transferred from the active cell circuit to ground in modules undergoing potential-induced degradation (PID) stress is analyzed with respect to meteorological data. Duration and coulombs transferred as a function of whether the module is wet (from dew or rain) or the extent of uncondensed surface humidity are quantified based on meteorological indicators. With this, functions predicting the mode and rate of coulomb transfer are developed for use in estimating the relative PID stress associated with temperature, moisture, and system voltage in any climate. Current transfer in a framed crystalline silicon module is relatively high when there is no condensed water on the module, whereas current transfer in a thin-film module held by edge clips is not, and displays a greater fraction of coulombs transferred when wet compared to the framed module in the natural environment.

  11. Subsurface Counter Current beneath the Tsushima Warm Current Reproduced by a Data Assimilative Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, A.; Watanabe, T.; Takayama, K.

    2012-12-01

    In the Japan Sea, the Tsushima Warm Current (TWC) dominates the surface layer, and the TWC water flows roughly northeastward along the coast of Japan. From early summer to autumn, a seasonal circulation often forms beneath the TWC. This seasonal circulation is referred to as the subsurface counter current (SSCC) because it flows over the Japanese continental slope in the opposite direction to the surface TWC. The SSCC has been investigated in both observational and numerical studies, and some numerical studies have proposed that subsurface clockwise gyres that form off the Japanese coast induce the SSCC. However, the preceding numerical studies have focused on the climatological representation of the SSCC, and so more realistic year-to-year examination of the SSCC has been needed. Hence we analyzed 13-year data-assimilative products of JADE (JApan sea Data assimilation Experiment), an ocean forecast system operated at Japan Sea National Fisheries Research Institute, Fisheries Research Agency. The JADE products from 1999 to 2011 reproduced the climatological view of the SSCC reported by the preceding numerical studies: Subsurface clockwise gyres appeared off the Japanese coast from May to October, inducing the SSCC over the continental slope; Core of the SSCC (or the gyre) was found around 140-200 m depth. The subsurface gyres showed year-to-year variation in its position, magnitude and duration, thus magnitude and duration of the SSCC at a fixed location notably varied year-to-year. The reproduced SSCC showed 10-20 cm/s velocity that well corresponded to the observed values. Formation of the subsurface gyres was characterized by seasonal enhancement of clockwise vortices that were trapped in embayments of the bottom relief. The vortices were surface-intensified and showed vertically-coherent negative vorticity from the surface to about 300 m depth. Because the vortices were embedded into the more surface-intensified TWC, the clockwise gyre flow (or the SSCC) was

  12. Analysis of equilibrium and kinetic models of internal reforming on solid oxide fuel cell anodes: Effect on voltage, current and temperature distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Khaliq; Fӧger, Karl

    2017-03-01

    The SOFC is well-established as a high-efficiency energy conversion technology with demonstrations of micro-CHP systems delivering 60% net electrical efficiency [1]. However, there are key challenges in the path to commercialization. Foremost among them is stack durability. Operating at high temperatures, the SOFC invariably suffers from thermally induced material degradation. This is compounded by thermal stresses within the SOFC stack which are generated from a number of interacting factors. Modelling is used as a tool for predicting undesirable temperature and current density gradients. For an internal reforming SOFC, fidelity of the model is strongly linked to the representation of the fuel reforming reactions, which dictate species concentrations and net heat release. It is critical for simulation of these profiles that the set of reaction rate expressions applicable for the particular anode catalyst are chosen in the model. A relatively wide spectrum of kinetic correlations has been reported in the literature. This work presents a comparative analysis of the internal distribution of temperature, current, voltage and compositions on a SOFC anode, using various combinations of reaction kinetics and equilibrium expressions for the reactions. The results highlight the significance of the fuel reforming chemistry and kinetics in the prediction of cell performance.

  13. Mathematical model for prediction of currents, magnetic fields, melt velocities, melt topography and current efficiency in Hall-Heroult cells

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.W.; Zundelevich, Y.; Sharma, D.

    1981-06-01

    The magnetic fields, current densities, metal and electrolyte velocities, current efficiencies and topography of the electrolyte-metal interface within the Hall-Heroult cell used to produce aluminum have been predicted from first principles. The computation of current densities was carried out by solving Ohms law enabling the calculation of magnetic field vectors from the Biot-Savart law. The cross product of the current densities and magnetic fields then yielded the electromagnetic stirring forces acting on the molten metal and electrolyte. By employing a turbulence model and the time averaged Navier-Stokes equations, velocities within these two liquids could be calculated. The solution of the fluid flow equations yielded the pressure distribution within both electrolyte and metal, permitting the calculation of the shape of the interface betweeen these two liquids.

  14. The NRC's SPAR Models: Current Status, Future Development, and Modeling Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Buell

    2008-09-01

    Probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) play an increasingly important role in the regulatory framework of the U.S. nuclear power industry. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) relies on a set of plant-specific Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models to provide critical risk-based input to the regulatory process. The Significance Determination Process (SDP), Management Directive 8.3 - NRC Incident Investigation Program, Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) and Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) programs are among the regulatory initiatives that receive significant input from the SPAR models. Other uses of the SPAR models include: Screening & Resolution of Generic Safety Issues, License Amendment reviews and Notice of Enforcement Discretion (NOEDs). This paper presents the current status of SPAR model development activities, future development objectives, and issues related to the development, verification and maintenance of the SPAR models.

  15. Current Trends in Distance Education: An Administrative Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compora, Daniel P.

    2003-01-01

    Current practices and procedures of distance education programs at selected institutions in higher education in Ohio were studied. Relevant data was found in the areas of: (1) content of the distance education program's mission statement; (2) needs assessment procedures; (3) student demographics; (4) course acquisition, development, and evaluation…

  16. Current Experimental Basis for Modeling Ice Accretions on Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a review of the experimental basis for modeling ice accretions on swept wings. Experimental work related to ice accretion physics on swept wings conducted between 1954 and 2004 is reviewed. Proposed models or explanations of scallop formations are singled out and discussed. Special emphasis is placed on reviewing the work done to determine the basic macroscopic mechanisms of scallop formation. The role of feather growth and its connection to scallop growth is discussed. Conceptual steps in modeling scallop formations are presented. Research elements needed for modeling are discussed.

  17. Dynamic finite-element model for efficient modelling of electric currents in electroporated tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langus, J.; Kranjc, M.; Kos, B.; Šuštar, T.; Miklavčič, D.

    2016-05-01

    In silico experiments (numerical simulations) are a valuable tool for non-invasive research of the influences of tissue properties, electrode placement and electric pulse delivery scenarios in the process of electroporation. The work described in this article was aimed at introducing time dependent effects into a finite element model developed specifically for electroporation. Reference measurements were made ex vivo on beef liver samples and experimental data were used both as an initial condition for simulation (applied pulse voltage) and as a reference value for numerical model calibration (measured pulse current). The developed numerical model is able to predict the time evolution of an electric pulse current within a 5% error over a broad range of applied pulse voltages, pulse durations and pulse repetition frequencies. Given the good agreement of the current flowing between the electrodes, we are confident that the results of our numerical model can be used both for detailed in silico research of electroporation mechanisms (giving researchers insight into time domain effects) and better treatment planning algorithms, which predict the outcome of treatment based on both spatial and temporal distributions of applied electric pulses.

  18. Carbon nanocages: a new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-03-24

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for "real world" application.

  19. Carbon nanocages: A new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-01-01

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for “real world” application. PMID:24658614

  20. Carbon nanocages: A new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-03-01

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for ``real world'' application.

  1. Modeling of the influences of multiple modulated electron cyclotron current drive on NTMs in rotating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chen; Jinyuan, Liu; Ping, Duan; Guangrui, Liu; Xingyu, Bian

    2017-02-01

    In this work, physical models of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) including bootstrap current and multiple modulated electron cyclotron current drive model are applied. Based on the specific physical problems during the suppression of NTMs by driven current, this work compares the efficiency of continuous and modulated driven currents, and simulates the physical processes of multiple modulated driven currents on suppressing rotating magnetic island. It is found that when island rotates along the poloidal direction, the suppression ability of continuous driven current can be massively reduced due to current deposition outside the island separatrix and reverse deposition direction at the X point, which can be avoided by current drive modulation. Multiple current drive has a better suppressing effect than single current drive. This work gives realistic numerical simulations by optimizing the model and parameters based on the experiments, which could provide references for successful suppression of NTMs in future advanced tokamak such as international thermonuclear experimental reactor.

  2. Data Assimilation and Model Simulations in the California Current

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    regions in order to improve our scientific understanding of the structure and dynamics of such regions. OBJECTIVES The broad objective of this research...analysis, and to apply the method to several quasi-synoptic hydrographic data sets from the California Current and the Alboran Sea. WORK COMPLETED During...5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School,Department of Meteorology (MR/Hy),589 Dyer Rd

  3. Wave-current interactions: model development and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayet, Clement; Lyard, Florent; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    The coastal area concentrates many uses that require integrated management based on diagnostic and predictive tools to understand and anticipate the future of pollution from land or sea, and learn more about natural hazards at sea or activity on the coast. The realistic modelling of coastal hydrodynamics needs to take into account various processes which interact, including tides, surges, and sea state (Wolf [2008]). These processes act at different spatial scales. Unstructured-grid models have shown the ability to satisfy these needs, given that a good mesh resolution criterion is used. We worked on adding a sea state forcing in a hydrodynamic circulation model. The sea state model is the unstructured version of WAVEWATCH III c (Tolman [2008]) (which version is developed at IFREMER, Brest (Ardhuin et al. [2010]) ), and the hydrodynamic model is the 2D barotropic module of the unstructured-grid finite element model T-UGOm (Le Bars et al. [2010]). We chose to use the radiation stress approach (Longuet-Higgins and Stewart [1964]) to represent the effect of surface waves (wind waves and swell) in the barotropic model, as previously done by Mastenbroek et al. [1993]and others. We present here some validation of the model against academic cases : a 2D plane beach (Haas and Warner [2009]) and a simple bathymetric step with analytic solution for waves (Ardhuin et al. [2008]). In a second part we present realistic application in the Ushant Sea during extreme event. References Ardhuin, F., N. Rascle, and K. Belibassakis, Explicit wave-averaged primitive equations using a generalized Lagrangian mean, Ocean Modelling, 20 (1), 35-60, doi:10.1016/j.ocemod.2007.07.001, 2008. Ardhuin, F., et al., Semiempirical Dissipation Source Functions for Ocean Waves. Part I: Definition, Calibration, and Validation, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 40 (9), 1917-1941, doi:10.1175/2010JPO4324.1, 2010. Haas, K. A., and J. C. Warner, Comparing a quasi-3D to a full 3D nearshore circulation model: SHORECIRC and

  4. Survey of current situation in radiation belt modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.

    2004-01-01

    The study of Earth's radiation belts is one of the oldest subjects in space physics. Despite the tremendous progress made in the last four decades, we still lack a complete understanding of the radiation belts in terms of their configurations, dynamics, and detailed physical accounts of their sources and sinks. The static nature of early empirical trapped radiation models, for examples, the NASA AP-8 and AE-8 models, renders those models inappropriate for predicting short-term radiation belt behaviors associated with geomagnetic storms and substorms. Due to incomplete data coverage, these models are also inaccurate at low altitudes (e.g., <1000 km) where many robotic and human space flights occur. The availability of radiation data from modern space missions and advancement in physical modeling and data management techniques have now allowed the development of new empirical and physical radiation belt models. In this paper, we will review the status of modern radiation belt modeling. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  5. Current State of Animal (Mouse) Modeling in Melanoma Research

    PubMed Central

    Kuzu, Omer F.; Nguyen, Felix D.; Noory, Mohammad A.; Sharma, Arati

    2015-01-01

    Despite the considerable progress in understanding the biology of human cancer and technological advancement in drug discovery, treatment failure remains an inevitable outcome for most cancer patients with advanced diseases, including melanoma. Despite FDA-approved BRAF-targeted therapies for advanced stage melanoma showed a great deal of promise, development of rapid resistance limits the success. Hence, the overall success rate of melanoma therapy still remains to be one of the worst compared to other malignancies. Advancement of next-generation sequencing technology allowed better identification of alterations that trigger melanoma development. As development of successful therapies strongly depends on clinically relevant preclinical models, together with the new findings, more advanced melanoma models have been generated. In this article, besides traditional mouse models of melanoma, we will discuss recent ones, such as patient-derived tumor xenografts, topically inducible BRAF mouse model and RCAS/TVA-based model, and their advantages as well as limitations. Although mouse models of melanoma are often criticized as poor predictors of whether an experimental drug would be an effective treatment, development of new and more relevant models could circumvent this problem in the near future. PMID:26483610

  6. The equatorial electrojet current modelling from SWARM satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaissa, Mahfoud

    2016-07-01

    Equatorial ElectroJet (EEJ) is an intense eastward electric current circulating in the ionospheric magnetic equator band between 100 and 130 km of altitude in E region. These currents vary by day, by season, by solar activity, and also with the main magnetic field of internal origin. The irregularity of the ionosphere has a major impact on the performance of communication systems and navigation (GPS), industry.... Then it becomes necessary study the characteristics of EEJ. In this paper, we present a study of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) phenomenon along one year (2014) period. In addition, the satellite data used in this study are obtained with SWARM satellite scalar magnetometer data respecting magnetically quiet days with KP < 2. In this paper, we process to separate and extract the electrojet intensity signal from other recorded signal-sources interfering with the main signal and reduce considerably the signal to noise ratio during the SWARM measurements. This pre-processing step allows removing all external contributions in regard to EEJ intensity value. Key words: Ionosphere (Equatorial ionosphere; Electric fields and currents; Equatorial electrojet (EEJ)); SWARM.

  7. Current advancements and challenges in soil-root interactions modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Huber, Katrin; Abesha, Betiglu; Meunier, Felicien; Leitner, Daniel; Roose, Tiina; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Roots change their surrounding soil chemically, physically and biologically. This includes changes in soil moisture and solute concentration, the exudation of organic substances into the rhizosphere, increased growth of soil microorganisms, or changes in soil structure. The fate of water and solutes in the root zone is highly determined by these root-soil interactions. Mathematical models of soil-root systems in combination with non-invasive techniques able to characterize root systems are a promising tool to understand and predict the behaviour of water and solutes in the root zone. With respect to different fields of applications, predictive mathematical models can contribute to the solution of optimal control problems in plant recourse efficiency. This may result in significant gains in productivity, efficiency and environmental sustainability in various land use activities. Major challenges include the coupling of model parameters of the relevant processes with the surrounding environment such as temperature, nutrient concentration or soil water content. A further challenge is the mathematical description of the different spatial and temporal scales involved. This includes in particular the branched structures formed by root systems or the external mycelium of mycorrhizal fungi. Here, reducing complexity as well as bridging between spatial scales is required. Furthermore, the combination of experimental and mathematical techniques may advance the field enormously. Here, the use of root system, soil and rhizosphere models is presented through a number of modelling case studies, including image based modelling of phosphate uptake by a root with hairs, model-based optimization of root architecture for phosphate uptake from soil, upscaling of rhizosphere models, modelling root growth in structured soil, and the effect of root hydraulic architecture on plant water uptake efficiency and drought resistance.

  8. Current Advancements and Challenges in Soil-Root Interactions Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, A.; Huber, K.; Abesha, B.; Meunier, F.; Leitner, D.; Roose, T.; Javaux, M.; Vanderborght, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Roots change their surrounding soil chemically, physically and biologically. This includes changes in soil moisture and solute concentration, the exudation of organic substances into the rhizosphere, increased growth of soil microorganisms, or changes in soil structure. The fate of water and solutes in the root zone is highly determined by these root-soil interactions. Mathematical models of soil-root systems in combination with non-invasive techniques able to characterize root systems are a promising tool to understand and predict the behaviour of water and solutes in the root zone. With respect to different fields of applications, predictive mathematical models can contribute to the solution of optimal control problems in plant recourse efficiency. This may result in significant gains in productivity, efficiency and environmental sustainability in various land use activities. Major challenges include the coupling of model parameters of the relevant processes with the surrounding environment such as temperature, nutrient concentration or soil water content. A further challenge is the mathematical description of the different spatial and temporal scales involved. This includes in particular the branched structures formed by root systems or the external mycelium of mycorrhizal fungi. Here, reducing complexity as well as bridging between spatial scales is required. Furthermore, the combination of experimental and mathematical techniques may advance the field enormously. Here, the use of root system, soil and rhizosphere models is presented through a number of modelling case studies, including image based modelling of phosphate uptake by a root with hairs, model-based optimization of root architecture for phosphate uptake from soil, upscaling of rhizosphere models, modelling root growth in structured soil, and the effect of root hydraulic architecture on plant water uptake efficiency and drought resistance.

  9. Current themes and recent advances in modelling species occurrences

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have seen a huge expansion in the range of methods and approaches that are being used to predict species occurrences. This expansion has been accompanied by many improvements in statistical methods, including more accurate ways of comparing models, better null models, methods to cope with autocorrelation, and greater awareness of the importance of scale and prevalence. However, the field still suffers from problems with incorporating temporal variation, overfitted models and poor out-of-sample prediction, confusion between explanation and prediction, simplistic assumptions, and a focus on pattern over process. The greatest advances in recent years have come from integrative studies that have linked species occurrence models with other themes and topics in ecology, such as island biogeography, climate change, disease geography, and invasive species. PMID:20948597

  10. The Integrated Landscape Modeling partnership - Current status and future directions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mushet, David M.; Scherff, Eric J.

    2016-01-28

    The Integrated Landscape Modeling (ILM) partnership is an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to identify, evaluate, and develop models to quantify services derived from ecosystems, with a focus on wetland ecosystems and conservation effects. The ILM partnership uses the Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST) modeling platform to facilitate regional quantifications of ecosystem services under various scenarios of land-cover change that are representative of differing conservation program and practice implementation scenarios. To date, the ILM InVEST partnership has resulted in capabilities to quantify carbon stores, amphibian habitat, plant-community diversity, and pollination services. Work to include waterfowl and grassland bird habitat quality is in progress. Initial InVEST modeling has been focused on the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of the United States; future efforts might encompass other regions as data availability and knowledge increase as to how functions affecting ecosystem services differ among regions.The ILM partnership is also developing the capability for field-scale process-based modeling of depressional wetland ecosystems using the Agricultural Policy/Environmental Extender (APEX) model. Progress was made towards the development of techniques to use the APEX model for closed-basin depressional wetlands of the PPR, in addition to the open systems that the model was originally designed to simulate. The ILM partnership has matured to the stage where effects of conservation programs and practices on multiple ecosystem services can now be simulated in selected areas. Future work might include the continued development of modeling capabilities, as well as development and evaluation of differing conservation program and practice scenarios of interest to partner agencies including the USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) and Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). When

  11. Phenomenological models of holographic superconductors and hall currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, Francesco; Franco, Sebastián; Rodríguez-Gómez, Diego; Russo, Jorge G.

    2010-05-01

    We study general models of holographic superconductivity parametrized by four arbitrary functions of a neutral scalar field of the bulk theory. The models can accommodate several features of real superconductors, like arbitrary critical temperatures and critical exponents in a certain range, and perhaps impurities or boundary or thickness effects. We find analytical expressions for the critical exponents of the general model and show that they satisfy the Rushbrooke identity. An important subclass of models exhibit second order phase transitions. A study of the specific heat shows that general models can also describe holographic superconductors undergoing first, second and third (or higher) order phase transitions. We discuss how small deformations of the HHH model can lead to the appearance of resonance peaks in the conductivity, which increase in number and become narrower as the temperature is gradually decreased, without the need for tuning mass of the scalar to be close to the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. Finally, we investigate the inclusion of a generalized “theta term” producing Hall effect without magnetic field.

  12. A Final Approach Trajectory Model for Current Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Chester; Sadovsky, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Predicting accurate trajectories with limited intent information is a challenge faced by air traffic management decision support tools in operation today. One such tool is the FAA's Terminal Proximity Alert system which is intended to assist controllers in maintaining safe separation of arrival aircraft during final approach. In an effort to improve the performance of such tools, two final approach trajectory models are proposed; one based on polynomial interpolation, the other on the Fourier transform. These models were tested against actual traffic data and used to study effects of the key final approach trajectory modeling parameters of wind, aircraft type, and weight class, on trajectory prediction accuracy. Using only the limited intent data available to today's ATM system, both the polynomial interpolation and Fourier transform models showed improved trajectory prediction accuracy over a baseline dead reckoning model. Analysis of actual arrival traffic showed that this improved trajectory prediction accuracy leads to improved inter-arrival separation prediction accuracy for longer look ahead times. The difference in mean inter-arrival separation prediction error between the Fourier transform and dead reckoning models was 0.2 nmi for a look ahead time of 120 sec, a 33 percent improvement, with a corresponding 32 percent improvement in standard deviation.

  13. Boussinesq modeling of HB06 tracer releases Part 1: Wave and current model-data comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feddersen, F.; Clark, D. B.; Guza, R. T.

    2010-12-01

    During the HB06 experiment (Fall 2006 at Huntington Beach), a cross-shore array of current meters and pressure sensors were deployed from the shoreline to 4-m depth to make Eulerian wave and current measurements. Five dye tracer releases were performed. In each, the mean tracer plume was advected alongshore and dispersed in the cross-shore in a manner consistent with a wall bounded plume [Clark et al. JGR, in press 2010]. The mechanisms of horizontal tracer dispersion are complex and include mixing by breaking waves and stirring by the horizontal eddy field that is driven by both shear-waves and finite-crest-length breaking due to directionally-spread waves. Thus acurate simulation of surfzone tracer evolution requires a model that resolves that resolves individual waves such as the time-dependent Boussinesq model funwaveC. Such models have not been extensively validated with field observations. Prior to simulating the time- and spatial-dependent evolution of a surfzone tracer field (Part 2), the model is first used to simulate the wave and current conditions during the 5 dye releases (Part 1). The observed bathymetery is used with a shoreline sponge layer (at typically 0.25 m depth) to absorb excess wave anergy. The modeled random and directionally spread wave field is forced approximately 350 m offshore in 7 m depth with O(1000) discrete frequencies. Standard values of the model coefficients for wave breaking and bottom friction are chosen. For the 5 tracer releases, the model is run for roughly 3 hours. With the inputs of the observed bathymetry and the offshore wave spectra, the Boussinesq model funwaveC reproduces well the 1. cross-shore structure of signficant wave height, wave angle, and directional spread and 2. the cross-shore evolution of the wave spectra in the sea-swell band from outside the surfzone through the surfzone The good Eulerian model-data agreement demonstrates that the funwaveC model may be useful in understanding and characterizing surfzone

  14. Chemical vapor deposition modeling: An assessment of current status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1991-01-01

    The shortcomings of earlier approaches that assumed thermochemical equilibrium and used chemical vapor deposition (CVD) phase diagrams are pointed out. Significant advancements in predictive capabilities due to recent computational developments, especially those for deposition rates controlled by gas phase mass transport, are demonstrated. The importance of using the proper boundary conditions is stressed, and the availability and reliability of gas phase and surface chemical kinetic information are emphasized as the most limiting factors. Future directions for CVD are proposed on the basis of current needs for efficient and effective progress in CVD process design and optimization.

  15. Manufacturing metrology for c-Si photovoltaic module reliability and durability, Part I: Feedstock, crystallization and wafering

    SciTech Connect

    Seigneur, Hubert; Mohajeri, Nahid; Brooker, R. Paul; Davis, Kristopher O.; Schneller, Eric J.; Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Rodgers, Marianne P.; Wohlgemuth, John; Shiradkar, Narendra S.; Scardera, Giuseppe; Rudack, Andrew C.; Schoenfeld, Winston V.

    2016-06-01

    This article is the first in a three-part series of manufacturing metrology for c-Si photovoltaic (PV) module reliability and durability. Here in Part 1 we focus on the three primary process steps for making silicon substrates for PV cells: (1) feedstock production; (2) ingot and brick production; and (3) wafer production. Each of these steps can affect the final reliability/durability of PV modules in the field with manufacturing metrology potentially playing a significant role. This article provides a comprehensive overview of historical and current processes in each of these three steps, followed by a discussion of associated reliability challenges and metrology strategies that can be employed for increased reliability and durability in resultant modules. Gaps in the current state of understanding in connective metrology data during processing to reliability/durability in the field are then identified along with suggested improvements that should be considered by the PV community.

  16. Modeling Ballistic Current Flow in Carbon Nanotube Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Experiments have shown carbon nanotubes (CNT) to be almost perfect conductors at small applied biases. The features of the CNT band structure, large velocity of the crossing subbands and the small number of modes that an electron close to the band center / Fermi energy can scatter into, are the reasons for the near perfect small bias conductance. We show that the CNT band structure does not help at large applied biases - electrons injected into the non crossing subbands can either be Bragg reflected or undergo Zener-type tunneling. This limits the current carrying capacity of CNT. We point out that the current carrying capacity of semiconductor quantum wires in the ballistic limit is different, owing to its band structure. The second aspect addressed is the relationship of nanotube chirality in determining the physics of metal-nanotube coupling. We show that a metallic-zigzag nanotube couples better than an armchair nanotube to a metal contact. This arises because in the case of armchair nanotubes, while the pi band couples well, the pi* band does not couple well to the metal. In the case of zigzag nanotube both crossing modes couple reasonably well to the metal. Many factors such as the role of curvature, strain and defects will play a role in determining the suitability of nanotubes as nanowires. From the limited view point of metal-nanotube coupling, we feel that metallic-zigzag nanotubes are preferable to armchair nanotubes.

  17. Durability assessments of concrete using electrical properties and acoustic emission testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todak, Heather N.

    Premature damage deterioration has been observed in pavement joints throughout the Midwestern region of the United States. Over time, severe joint damage creates a transportation safety concern and the necessary repairs can be an extreme economic burden. The deterioration is due in part to freeze-thaw damage associated with fluid accumulation at the pavement joints. This very preventable problem is an indication that current specifications and construction practices for freeze-thaw durability of concrete are inadequate. This thesis serves to create a better understanding of moisture ingress, freeze-thaw damage mechanisms, and the effect of variations in mixture properties on freeze-thaw behavior of concrete. The concepts of the nick point degree of saturation, sorptivity rates, and critical degree of saturation are discussed. These factors contribute to service life, defined in this study as the duration of time a concrete element remains below levels of critical saturation which are required for damage development to initiate. A theoretical model and a simple experimental procedure are introduced which help determine the nick point for a series of 32 concrete mixtures with unique mixture proportions and air entrainment properties. This simple experimental procedure is also presented as a method to measure important electrical properties in order to establish the formation factor, a valuable measure of concrete transport properties. The results of freeze-thaw testing with acoustic emission monitoring are presented to help understand and quantify damage development in concrete specimens when conditioned to various degrees of saturation. This procedure was used to study the relationship between air entrainment properties and the critical degree of saturation. Applying the concepts of degree of saturation and sorptivity, a performance-based model is proposed as a new approach to specifications for freeze-thaw durability. Finally, a conceptual model is presented to

  18. DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-12-04

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  19. Advanced Durability Analysis. Volume 1. Analytical Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-31

    for microstruc .- tural behavior . This approach for representing the IFQ, when properly used, can provide reasonable durability analysis rt,- sults for...equivalent initial flaw size distribution (EIFSD) function. Engineering principles rather than mechanistic-based theories for microstructural behavior are...accurate EIFS distribution and a service crack growth behavior . The determinations of EIFS distribution have been described in detail previously. In this

  20. 14 CFR 33.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.19 Durability. (a) Engine design and... design of the compressor and turbine rotor cases must provide for the containment of damage from rotor blade failure. Energy levels and trajectories of fragments resulting from rotor blade failure that...

  1. 14 CFR 33.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.19 Durability. (a) Engine design and... design of the compressor and turbine rotor cases must provide for the containment of damage from rotor blade failure. Energy levels and trajectories of fragments resulting from rotor blade failure that...

  2. 14 CFR 33.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.19 Durability. (a) Engine design and... design of the compressor and turbine rotor cases must provide for the containment of damage from rotor blade failure. Energy levels and trajectories of fragments resulting from rotor blade failure that...

  3. 14 CFR 33.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.19 Durability. (a) Engine design and... design of the compressor and turbine rotor cases must provide for the containment of damage from rotor blade failure. Energy levels and trajectories of fragments resulting from rotor blade failure that...

  4. 14 CFR 33.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.19 Durability. (a) Engine design and... design of the compressor and turbine rotor cases must provide for the containment of damage from rotor blade failure. Energy levels and trajectories of fragments resulting from rotor blade failure that...

  5. Machine tests crease durability of sheet materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. K.; Stanford, H. B.

    1964-01-01

    To test the crease resistance of sheet materials, the mid-section is folded over crease-control blades. One end is clamped to a motor-driven eccentric, the other to a spring, and durability is measured by the cycles required to produce failure.

  6. 14 CFR 35.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Design and Construction § 35.19 Durability. Each part of the propeller must be designed and constructed to minimize the development of any unsafe condition of the propeller...

  7. Facile preparation of super durable superhydrophobic materials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Zhang, Junping; Li, Bucheng; Fan, Ling; Li, Lingxiao; Wang, Aiqin

    2014-10-15

    The low stability, complicated and expensive fabrication procedures seriously hinder practical applications of superhydrophobic materials. Here we report an extremely simple method for preparing super durable superhydrophobic materials, e.g., textiles and sponges, by dip coating in fluoropolymers (FPs). The morphology, surface chemical composition, mechanical, chemical and environmental stabilities of the superhydrophobic textiles were investigated. The results show how simple the preparation of super durable superhydrophobic textiles can be! The superhydrophobic textiles outperform their natural counterparts and most of the state-of-the-art synthetic superhydrophobic materials in stability. The intensive mechanical abrasion, long time immersion in various liquids and repeated washing have no obvious influence on the superhydrophobicity. Water drops are spherical in shape on the samples and could easily roll off after these harsh stability tests. In addition, this simple dip coating approach is applicable to various synthetic and natural textiles and can be easily scaled up. Furthermore, the results prove that a two-tier roughness is helpful but not essential with regard to the creation of super durable superhydrophobic textiles. The combination of microscale roughness of textiles and materials with very low surface tension is enough to form super durable superhydrophobic textiles. According to the same procedure, superhydrophobic polyurethane sponges can be prepared, which show high oil absorbency, oil/water separation efficiency and stability.

  8. Process modeling - It's history, current status, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duttweiler, Russell E.; Griffith, Walter M.; Jain, Sulekh C.

    1991-04-01

    The development of process modeling is reviewed to examine the potential of process applications to prevent and solve problems associated with the aerospace industry. The business and global environments is assessed, and the traditional approach to product/process design is argued to be obsolete. A revised engineering process is described which involves planning and prediction before production by means of process simulation. Process simulation can permit simultaneous engineering of unit processes and complex processes, and examples are given in the cross-coupling of forging-process variance. The implementation of process modeling, CAE, and computer simulations are found to reduce costs and time associated with technological development when incorporated judiciously.

  9. Your Medicare Coverage: Durable Medical Equipment (DME) Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Medicare.gov for covered items Durable medical equipment (DME) coverage How often is it covered? Medicare ... B (Medical Insurance) covers medically necessary durable medical equipment (DME) that your doctor prescribes for use in ...

  10. A coronal magnetic field model with horizontal volume and sheet currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Xuepu; Hoeksema, J. Todd

    1994-01-01

    When globally mapping the observed photospheric magnetic field into the corona, the interaction of the solar wind and magnetic field has been treated either by imposing source surface boundary conditions that tacitly require volume currents outside the source surface or by limiting the interaction to thin current sheets between oppositely directed field regions. Yet observations and numerical Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) calculations suggest the presence of non-force-free volume currents throughout the corona as well as thin current sheets in the neighborhoods of the interfaces between closed and open field lines or between oppositely directed open field lines surrounding coronal helmet-streamer structures. This work presents a model including both horizontal volume currents and streamer sheet currents. The present model builds on the magnetostatic equilibria developed by Bogdan and Low and the current-sheet modeling technique developed by Schatten. The calculation uses synoptic charts of the line-of-sight component of the photospheric magnetic field measured at the Wilcox Solar Observatory. Comparison of an MHD model with the calculated model results for the case of a dipole field and comparison of eclipse observations with calculations for CR 1647 (near solar minimum) show that this horizontal current-current-sheet model reproduces polar plumes and axes of corona streamers better than the source-surface model and reproduces polar plumes and axes of corona streamers better than the source-surface model and reproduces coro nal helmet structures better than the current-sheet model.

  11. Toxicity of Nanoparticles and an Overview of Current Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing field having potential applications in many areas. Nanoparticles (NPs) have been studied for cell toxicity, immunotoxicity, and genotoxicity. Tetrazolium-based assays such as MTT, MTS, and WST-1 are used to determine cell viability. Cell inflammatory response induced by NPs is checked by measuring inflammatory biomarkers, such as IL-8, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor, using ELISA. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay is used for cell membrane integrity. Different types of cell cultures, including cancer cell lines have been employed as in vitro toxicity models. It has been generally agreed that NPs interfere with either assay materials or with detection systems. So far, toxicity data generated by employing such models are conflicting and inconsistent. Therefore, on the basis of available experimental models, it may be difficult to judge and list some of the more valuable NPs as more toxic to biological systems and vice versa. Considering the potential applications of NPs in many fields and the growing apprehensions of FDA about the toxic potential of nanoproducts, it is the need of the hour to look for new internationally agreed free of bias toxicological models by focusing more on in vivo studies. PMID:26286636

  12. Current Status of Superheat Spray Modeling With NCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.; Bulzan, Dan L.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of liquid fuel behavior at superheat conditions is identified to be a topic of importance in the design of modern supersonic engines. As a part of the NASA's supersonics project office initiative on high altitude emissions, we have undertaken an effort to assess the accuracy of various existing CFD models used in the modeling of superheated sprays. As a part of this investigation, we have completed the implementation of a modeling approach into the national combustion code (NCC), and then applied it to investigate the following three cases: (1) the validation of a flashing jet generated by the sudden release of pressurized R134A from a cylindrical nozzle, (2) the differences between two superheat vaporization models were studied based on both hot and cold flow calculations of a Parker-Hannifin pressure swirl atomizer, (3) the spray characteristics generated by a single-element LDI (Lean Direct Injector) experiment were studied to investigate the differences between superheat and non-superheat conditions. Further details can be found in the paper.

  13. Taenia solium: current understanding of laboratory animal models of taeniosis.

    PubMed

    Flisser, A; Avila, G; Maravilla, P; Mendlovic, F; León-Cabrera, S; Cruz-Rivera, M; Garza, A; Gómez, B; Aguilar, L; Terán, N; Velasco, S; Benítez, M; Jimenez-Gonzalez, D E

    2010-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a public health problem in many developing countries and is the most frequent parasitic disease of the brain. The human tapeworm carrier is the main risk factor for acquiring neurocysticercosis. Since the parasite lodges only in the human intestine, experimental models of Taenia solium taeniosis have been explored. Macaques, pigs, dogs, cats and rabbits are unsuccessful hosts even in immunodepressed status. By contrast, rodents are adequate hosts since tapeworms with mature, pregravid and, in some cases, gravid proglottids develop after infection. In this review, information that has been generated with experimental models of taeniosis due to T. solium is discussed. Initially, the use of the model for immunodiagnosis of human taeniosis and evaluation of intervention measures is summarized. Next, descriptions of tapeworms and comparison of hamsters, gerbils and other mammals as experimental models are discussed, as well as data on the humoral immune response, the inflammatory reaction and the production of cytokines associated to Th1 and Th2 responses in the intestinal mucosa. Finally, evaluation of protection induced against the development of tapeworms by recombinant T. solium calreticulin in hamsters is summarized and compared to other studies.

  14. Oxide film microstructure: the link between surface preparation processes and strength/durability of adhesively bonded aluminum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, K. Jimmy; Pearlstein, Arne J.; Scheeline, Alexander; Shang, Jian Ku

    2000-11-30

    Strength and durability of adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys structures are intrinsically determined by the surface microstructures and interfacial failure micromechanisms. The current project presents a multidisciplinary approach to addressing critical issues controlling the strength and durability of adhesive bonds of aluminum alloys. Three main thrust areas have been pursued: surface treatment technology development to achieve desirable surface microstructures; relationship between surface structure and properties of adhesive bonds; and failure mechanisms of adhesively bonded components.

  15. Endpoints for Mouse Abdominal Tumor Models: Refinement of Current Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Paster, Eden V; Villines, Kimberly A; Hickman, Debra L

    2009-01-01

    Accurate, rapid, and noninvasive health assessments are required to establish more appropriate endpoints in mouse cancer models where tumor size is not easily measured. We evaluated potential endpoints in mice with experimentally induced peritoneal lymphoma, an abdominal tumor model, by comparing body weight, body condition, and behavior with those of a control group of mice not developing lymphoma. Our hypothesis was that body weight would increase or plateau, whereas body condition and behavioral scores would decrease, as disease progressed. Results indicated that body weight did not differ significantly between the control and experimental groups, but the experimental group experienced significant decreases in both body condition and behavioral scores. Our results support the use of body condition and behavioral scoring as adjunctive assessment methods for mice involved in abdominal lymphoma tumor studies in which health may decline despite an increase or plateau in body weight. PMID:19619413

  16. Cognitive mechanisms of mindfulness: A test of current models.

    PubMed

    Isbel, Ben; Mahar, Doug

    2015-12-15

    Existing models of mindfulness describe the self-regulation of attention as primary, leading to enhanced decentering and ability to access and override automatic cognitive processes. This study compared 23 experienced and 21 non-meditators on tests of mindfulness, attention, decentering, and ability to override automatic cognitive processes to test the cognitive mechanisms proposed to underlie mindfulness practice. Experienced meditators had significantly higher mindfulness and decentering than non-meditators. No significant difference between groups was found on measures of attention or ability to override automatic processes. These findings support the prediction that mindfulness leads to enhanced decentering, but do not support the cognitive mechanisms proposed to underlie such enhancement. Since mindfulness practice primarily involves internally directed attention, it may be the case that cognitive tests requiring externally directed attention and timed responses do not accurately assess mindfulness-induced cognitive changes. Implications for the models of mindfulness and future research are discussed.

  17. Structural Integrity and Durability of Reusable Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A two-day conference on the structural integrity and durability of reusable space propulsion systems was held on 14 to 15 May 1991 at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Presentations were made by industry, university, and government researchers organized into four sessions: (1) aerothermodynamic loads; (2) instrumentation; (3) fatigue, fracture, and constitutive modeling; and (4) structural dynamics. The principle objectives were to disseminate research results and future plans in each of four areas. This publication contains extended abstracts and the visual material presented during the conference. Particular emphasis is placed on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and the SSME turbopump.

  18. Investigation of titanium nitride as catalyst support material and development of durable electrocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avasarala, Bharat K.

    The impending energy and climatic crisis makes it imperative for human society to seek non-fossil based alternative sources for our energy needs. Although many alternative energy technologies are currently being developed, fuel cell technology provides energy solutions, which satisfy a wide range of applications. But the current fuel cell technology is far from its target of large scale commercialization mainly because of its high cost and poor durability. Considerable work has been done in reducing the cost but its durability still needs significant improvement. Of the various materials in a PEM fuel cell, the degradation of electrocatalyst affects its durability the most, leading to performance loss. Carbon black (C) support corrosion plays a significant role in the electrocatalyst degradation and its severe affects due to potential cycling has been identified through my research. Through my resaerch, I introduce titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiN NP) as alternative catalyst supports replacing carbon black. TiN NP has higher electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance compared to that of C. The physical and electrochemical properties of TiN NP were studied and the Pt/TiN electrocatalyst was synthesized using polyol process. Upon optimizing using DOE, for desired catalyst particle size and activity, Pt/TiN is shown to have higher catalytic performance than conventional Pt/C. TiN NP are significantly influenced by the electrochemical conditions and show 'active' or 'passive' nature depending on the temperature and acidic concentration; and a temperature dependence model is proposed to understand the active/passive nature of TiN NP. A one-to-one comparison between TiN NP and C electrodes under similar electrochemical conditions show a superior performance of TiN NP as a catalyst support. The durability of the Pt/TiN electrocatalyst is also tested and it agrees well with the proposed model of active/passive nature of the TiN NP. Through theoretical calculation

  19. An Analytical Model of Wave-Induced Longshore Current Based on Power Law Wave Height Decay.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    34I ANALYtTICAL MODEL OF NAVE-INDUCED LON6SHORE CURRENT BASED ON PONE* LAW.. (U) COASTAL ENG INEERING RESEAKNH CENTER VICKSBURG NS J N SMITH ET AL...j . - .L .V . : ; * AN ANALYTICAL MODEL OF WAVE-INDUCED ~ z * LONGSHORE CURRENT BASED ON POWER LAW * - WAVE HEIGHT DECAY by Jane McKee...I_ I IF 31592 11. TITLE (Include Security Classfication) • An Analytical Model of Wave-Induced Longshore Current Based on Power Law . Wave

  20. A generalized hinged-magnetodisc model of Jupiter's nightside current sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, Krishan K.

    1992-01-01

    A nonaxial hinged magnetodisk model of Jupiter's nightside current sheet is presented. The model organizes the current sheet crossings equally successfully for all three of the spacecraft that have visited the nightside of Jupiter. The model assumes that the hinging is caused by the action of the solar wind forcing on the magnetotail of Jupiter. It is found necessary to include both the hinging of the current sheet and the propagation delay to obtain good fits to the observations.

  1. Projected current density comparison in tDCS block and smooth FE modeling.

    PubMed

    Indahlastari, Aprinda; Chauhan, Munish; Sadleir, Rosalind J

    2016-08-01

    Current density distribution and projected current density calculation following transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) forward model in a human head were compared between two modeling pipelines: block and smooth. Block model was directly constructed from MRI voxel resolution and simulated in C. Smooth models underwent a boundary smoothing process by applying recursive Gaussian filters and simulated in COMSOL. Three smoothing levels were added to determine their effects on current density distribution compared to block models. Median current density percentage differences were calculated in anterior superior temporal gyrus (ASTG), hippocampus (HIP), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), occipital lobes (OCC) and precentral gyrus (PRC) and normalized against a baseline value. A maximum of + 20% difference in median current density was found for three standard electrode montages: F3-RS, T7-T8 and Cz-Oz. Furthermore, median current density percentage differences in each montage target brain structures were found to be within + 7%. Higher levels of smoothing increased median current density percentage differences in T7-T8 and Cz-Oz target structures. However, while demonstrating similar trends in each montage, additional smoothing levels showed no clear relationship between their smoothing effects and calculated median current density in the five cortical structures. Finally, relative L2 error in reconstructed projected current density was found to be 17% and 21% for block and smooth pipelines, respectively. Overall, a block model workflow may be a more attractive alternative for simulating tDCS stimulation because involves a shorter modeling time and independence from commercial modeling platforms.

  2. Coating-Substrate Systems for Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-30

    Technical Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Coating - Substrate Systems for Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Tresa Pollock 3...Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils Final Report ONRGrant#N00014-l 1-1-0616 Technical Contact (Principal Investigator) Tresa M. Pollock Materials...Substrate Systems for Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils 1. Summary In the severe operating environments encountered in Naval ship

  3. Therma1 Conductivity and Durability of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperature and reduce cooling, thus helping to achieve engine emission and efficiency goals. Future TBCs must be designed with increased phase stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved sintering and thermal stress resistance in order to effectively protect engine hot-section components. Advanced low conductivity TBCs are being developed at NASA by incorporating multi-component oxide dopants into zirconia-yttria or hafnia-yttria to promote the formation of thermodynamically stable defect clusters within the coating structures. This presentation will primarily focus on thermal conductivity and durability of the novel defect cluster thermal barrier coatings for turbine airfoil and combustor applications, determined by a unique CO2 laser heat-flux approach. The laser heat-flux testing approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity under simulated engine temperature and thermal gradient conditions. The conductivity increase due to coating sintering (and/or phase change) and the conductivity decrease due to coating delamination have been determined under steady-state, cyclic, uniform or non-uniform heat-flux conditions. The coating radiation flux resistance has been evaluated by varying coating thermal gradients, and also by using a laser-heated radiative-flux source. Advanced multi-component TBC systems have been shown to have significantly reduced thermal conductivity and improved high temperature stability due to the nano-sized, low mobility defect clusters associated with the paired rare earth dopant additions. The effect of oxide defect cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, thermal stability and furnace cyclic durability will also be discussed. The current low conductivity TBC systems have demonstrated long-term cyclic durability at very high

  4. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-03-03

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  5. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-02-20

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  6. Current Methods of Natural Hazards Communication used within Catastrophe Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawber, C.; Latchman, S.

    2012-04-01

    In the field of catastrophe modelling, natural hazards need to be explained every day to (re)insurance professionals so that they may understand estimates of the loss potential of their portfolio. The effective communication of natural hazards to city professionals requires different strategies to be taken depending on the audience, their prior knowledge and respective backgrounds. It is best to have at least three sets of tools in your arsenal for a specific topic, 1) an illustration/animation, 2) a mathematical formula and 3) a real world case study example. This multi-faceted approach will be effective for those that learn best by pictorial means, mathematical means or anecdotal means. To show this we will use a set of real examples employed in the insurance industry of how different aspects of natural hazards and the uncertainty around them are explained to city professionals. For example, explaining the different modules within a catastrophe model such as the hazard, vulnerability and loss modules. We highlight how recent technology such as 3d plots, video recording and Google Earth maps, when used properly can help explain concepts quickly and easily. Finally we also examine the pitfalls of using overly-complicated visualisations and in general how counter-intuitive deductions may be made.

  7. Parameterizing total storm conduction currents in the Community Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalb, Christina; Deierling, Wiebke; Baumgaertner, Andreas; Peterson, Michael; Liu, Chuntao; Mach, Douglas

    2016-11-01

    Electrified clouds are known to play a major role in the Global Electric Circuit. These clouds produce upward currents which maintain the potential difference between Earth's surface and the upper atmosphere. In this study, model output from two simulations of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) are compared with conduction currents and other data derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, including both the Lightning Imaging Sensor and Precipitation Radar. The intention is to determine CESM's skill at representing these microphysical and dynamical properties of clouds. Then, these cloud properties are used to develop a model parameterization to compute conduction currents from electrified clouds. Specifically, we evaluate the ability of global mean convective mass flux, ice water path, and convective precipitation to represent conduction current sources. Parameterizations using these variables yield derived global mean currents that agree well with the geographical patterns of TRMM currents. In addition, comparing the diurnal variations of modeled global mean current to the observed diurnal variations of electric potential gradient, root-mean-square (RMS) errors range between 6.5% and 8.1%, but the maximum occurs 4 to 6 h early in all three variables. Output currents derived from the model variables generally match well to the currents derived from TRMM, and the total global current estimates agree well with past studies. This suggests that cloud parameters are well suited for representing the global distribution and strength of currents in a global model framework.

  8. Durability aspects of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethuraman, Vijay Anand

    activity. The H2O 2 selectivity in ORR was independent of oxygen concentration but increased with decrease in water activity (i.e., decreased humidity). Presences of trace impurities (such as CO, H2S, NH3, etc.) in the fuel also affect PEMFC durability. Among these impurities, H 2S causes significantly higher performance loss and irreversible catalytic poisoning. A concise mechanism for the poisoning kinetics of H2S on composite solid polymer electrolyte Pt (SPE-Pt) electrode was validated experimentally by charge balances and theoretically by a model, which predicted the oxidation current as a function of the applied potential. H2S dissociatively adsorbed onto SPE-Pt electrode as linear and bridge bonded sulfur (S) species and, under favorable potentials, underwent electro-oxidation to sulfur and then to sulfur dioxide (SO2). Fraction of the adsorbed S species remained as 'hard-to-oxidize' adsorbents and caused irreversible loss of catalytic activity. Deactivation of bridge sites occurred first followed by the loss of linear sites. A method to estimate the catalytic sites irreversibly lost due to sulfur poisoning was developed.

  9. Dual dimensional nanostructures with highly durable non-wetting properties under dynamic and underwater conditions.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seunghyeon; Kim, Wuseok; Jeon, Sangmin; Yong, Kijung

    2017-03-23

    Non-wetting states with high durability under both dynamic and underwater conditions are very desirable for practical applications of superhydrophobic surfaces in various fields. Despite increasing demands for this dual stability of non-wetting surfaces, studies investigating both the impact dynamics and underwater stability are very rare. In the current study, we performed water droplet impact dynamics and underwater stability studies using ZnO/Si hierarchical nanostructures (HNs) as a model system. The effects of the surface structure on the non-wetting states under dynamic conditions were first studied by comparing various surface structures, such as ZnO nanowires (NWs), Si microposts (MPs), ZnO/Si HNs with controlled MP interspacings, and lotus leaf (LL). The growth of ZnO NWs on Si MPs drastically improves the non-wetting properties of Si MPs under dynamic conditions. The transition of wetting states from the Cassie-Baxter state to the Wenzel state occurs on ZnO/Si HNs as the impact velocity increases. Measurement of the critical We number during transition enables us to determine the important parameters of wetting pressure using a simple model. Moreover, compared to Si MPs, ZnO NWs, and LL, our ZnO/Si HNs exhibit dramatically increased air pocket lifetimes under underwater conditions, which is due to the enhanced capillary pressure originating from the dual dimensional hierarchical structure. Our study indicates that optimally designed hierarchical surfaces have remarkably high durability non-wetting states under both dynamic and underwater conditions, expanding the potential application of non-wetting surfaces.

  10. Durability of glasses from the Hg-doped Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1992-08-30

    The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) for the vitrification of high-level radioactive wastes is designed and constructed to be a 1/9th scale prototype of the full scale Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. The IDMS facility is the first engineering scale melter system capable of processing mercury, and flowsheet levels of halides and noble metals. In order to determine the effects of mercury on the feed preparation process, the off-gas chemistry, glass melting behavior, and glass durability, a three-run mercury (Hg) campaign was conducted. The glasses produced during the Hg campaign were composed of Batch 1 sludge, simulated precipitate hydrolysis aqueous product (PHA) from the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF), and Frit 202. The glasses were produced using the DWPF process/product models for glass durability, viscosity, and liquidus. The durability model indicated that the glasses would all be more durable than the glass qualified in the DWPF Environmental Assessment (EA). The glass quality was verified by performing the Product Consistency Test (PCT) which was designed for glass durability testing in the DWPF.

  11. Development of film- and- fabric composite materials durability assessing methodology under time-dependent influences of temperature and solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayumov, R. A.; Muhamedova, I. Z.; Suleymanov, A. M.; Tazyukov, B. F.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present the design of stress-strain state calculation and film-and- fabric composite materials durability under stresses and solar radiation. We have constructed a two-dimensional finite-state-element computer model of the deforming process of the low- level cell of film-and-fabric-based composite material for the evaluation of its durability which takes into account non-linear viscoelasticity, temperature variations, ageing of the material, the process of upbuilding of microdamage and photodegradation. Qualitative research of operational factors influence (UV, temperature) on film-and-fabric composite materials durability was conducted.

  12. World agriculture and climate change: Current modeling issues

    SciTech Connect

    Darwin, R.

    1996-12-31

    Recent studies suggest that although global increases in temperature and changes in precipitation patterns during the next century will affect world agriculture, farmer adaptations are likely to prevent climate change from jeopardizing world food production. The costs and benefits of global climate change, however, are not equally distributed around the world. Agricultural production may increase in high latitude and alpine areas, but decrease in tropical and some other areas. Also, land use changes that accompany climate-induced shifts in cropland and permanent pasture are likely to raise additional social and environmental issues. Despite these advances, some important aspects of climate change have not been adequately simulated in global models. These include the effects that climate-induced changes in water resources are likely to have on agricultural production, the well-documented beneficial effects of higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide on plant growth and water use, and the cooling effects of tropospheric emissions of sulfur dioxide. In addition, past research generally relied on equilibrium climates based on a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Now, however, results from transient climate change experiments are available.

  13. Proton currents constrain structural models of voltage sensor activation

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Aaron L; Mokrab, Younes; Bennett, Ashley L; Sansom, Mark SP; Ramsey, Ian Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Hv1 proton channel is evidently unique among voltage sensor domain proteins in mediating an intrinsic ‘aqueous’ H+ conductance (GAQ). Mutation of a highly conserved ‘gating charge’ residue in the S4 helix (R1H) confers a resting-state H+ ‘shuttle’ conductance (GSH) in VGCs and Ci VSP, and we now report that R1H is sufficient to reconstitute GSH in Hv1 without abrogating GAQ. Second-site mutations in S3 (D185A/H) and S4 (N4R) experimentally separate GSH and GAQ gating, which report thermodynamically distinct initial and final steps, respectively, in the Hv1 activation pathway. The effects of Hv1 mutations on GSH and GAQ are used to constrain the positions of key side chains in resting- and activated-state VS model structures, providing new insights into the structural basis of VS activation and H+ transfer mechanisms in Hv1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18017.001 PMID:27572256

  14. Current understanding of divertor detachment: experiments and modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Wischmeier, W; Groth, M; Kallenbach, A; Chankin, A; Coster, D; Dux, R; Herrmann, A; Muller, H; Pugno, R; Reiter, D; Scarabosio, A; Watkins, J; Team, T D; Team, A U

    2008-05-23

    A qualitative as well as quantitative evaluation of experimentally observed plasma parameters in the detached regime proves to be difficult for several tokamaks. A series of ohmic discharges have been performed in ASDEX Upgrade and DIII-D at similar as possible plasma parameters and at different line averaged densities, {bar n}{sub e}. The experimental data represent a set of well diagnosed discharges against which numerical simulations are compared. For the numerical modeling the fluid-code B2.5 coupled to the Monte Carlo neutrals transport code EIRENE is used. Only the combined enhancement of effects, such as geometry, drift terms, neutral conductance, increased radial transport and divertor target composition, explains a significant fraction of the experimentally observed asymmetries of the ion fluxes as a function of {bar n}{sub e} to the inner and outer target plates in ASDEX Upgrade. The relative importance of the mechanisms leading to detachment are different in DIII-D and ASDEX Upgrade.

  15. The Predictability of Near-Coastal Currents Using a Baroclinic Unstructured Grid Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-28

    Near-coastal Currents Using a Baroclinic Unstructured Grid Model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 0602435N 6...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT A coastal forecast system consisting of a baroclinic unstructured grid model one-way coupled to meteorological...SUBJECT TERMS coastal currents, predictability, operational forecast system, wind resolution, coupled models, unstructured grid models 16. SECURITY

  16. Gate-to-body tunneling current model for silicon-on-insulator MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing-Qing; Chen, Jing; Luo, Jie-Xin; Lü, Kai; Yu, Tao; Chai, Zhan; Wang, Xi

    2013-10-01

    A gate-to-body tunneling current model for silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices is simulated. As verified by the measured data, the model, considering both gate voltage and drain voltage dependence as well as image force-induced barrier low effect, provides a better prediction of the tunneling current and gate-induced floating body effect than the BSIMSOI4 model. A delayed gate-induced floating body effect is also predicted by the model.

  17. A model for the shell current in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, P.A. . Dept. of Physics); Robertson, S.H. )

    1990-04-01

    A model is presented for the current in a resistive shell in a reversed field pinch (RFP). The model is compared to experimental measurements. The model is applied to experiments performed on the Reversatron II RFP and is shown to provide an approximate description of the shell current. This model provides a means for including the effect of the shell in the design of feedback control systems that may be used on existing or future RFP's having resistive shells.

  18. Durability and Design Issues of Thermal/environmental Barrier Coatings on Sic/sic Ceramic Matrix Composites Under 1650 C Test Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal/environmental barrier coatings for SiC-based ceramics will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating durability remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. Currently, advanced T/EBC systems, which typically include a high temperature capable zirconia- (or hahia-) based oxide top coat (thermal barrier) on a less temperature capable mullite/barium-strontium-aluminosilicate (BSAS)/Si inner coat (environmental barrier), are being developed and tested for higher temperature capability Sic combustor applications. In this paper, durability of several thermal/environmental barrier coating systems on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites was investigated under laser simulated engine thermal gradient cyclic, and 1650 C (3000 F) test conditions. The coating cracking and delamination processes were monitored and evaluated. The effects of temperature gradients and coating configurations on the ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation were analyzed using finite element analysis (FEA) models based on the observed failure mechanisms, in conjunction with mechanical testing results. The environmental effects on the coating durability will be discussed. The coating design approach will also be presented.

  19. Durability Testing of Commercial Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schienle, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    Technical efforts by AlliedSignal Engines in DOE/NASA-funded project from February, 1978 through December, 1995 are reported in the fields ceramic materials for gas turbine engines and cyclic thermal durability testing. A total of 29 materials were evaluated in 40 cyclic oxidation exposure durability tests. Ceramic test bars were cyclically thermally exposed to a hot combustion environment at temperatures up to 1371 C (2500 F) for periods of up to 3500 hours, simulating conditions typically encountered by hot flowpath components in an automotive gas turbine engine. Before and after exposure, quarter-point flexure strength tests were performed on the specimens, and fractography examinations including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed to determine failure origins.

  20. Creep Behavior and Durability of Cracked CMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Fox, Dennis; Smith, Craig

    2015-01-01

    To understand failure mechanisms and durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), Melt Infiltration (MI) SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-iBN fibers and full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-ion bombarded BN (iBN) and Hi-Nicalon -S fibers were pre-cracked between 150 to 200 megapascal and then creep and Sustained Peak Low Cycle Fatigue (SPLCF) tested at 13150 C at stress levels from 35 to 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace and burner rig conditions. In addition creep testing was also conducted on pre-cracked full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites at 14500 C between 35 and 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace conditions. If the specimens survived the 200 hour durability tests, then they were tensile tested at room temperature to determine their residual tensile properties. The failed specimens were examined by Scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine the failure modes and mechanisms. The influence of crack healing matrix, fiber types, crack density, testing modes and interface oxidation on durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be discussed.

  1. Experimental study on durability improvement of fly ash concrete with durability improving admixture.

    PubMed

    Quan, Hong-zhu; Kasami, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the durability of fly ash concrete, a series of experimental studies are carried out, where durability improving admixture is used to reduce drying shrinkage and improve freezing-thawing resistance. The effects of durability improving admixture, air content, water-binder ratio, and fly ash replacement ratio on the performance of fly ash concrete are discussed in this paper. The results show that by using durability improving admixture in nonair-entraining fly ash concrete, the compressive strength of fly ash concrete can be improved by 10%-20%, and the drying shrinkage is reduced by 60%. Carbonation resistance of concrete is roughly proportional to water-cement ratio regardless of water-binder ratio and fly ash replacement ratio. For the specimens cured in air for 2 weeks, the freezing-thawing resistance is improved. In addition, by making use of durability improving admixture, it is easier to control the air content and make fly ash concrete into nonair-entraining one. The quality of fly ash concrete is thereby optimized.

  2. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Inverse computation for cardiac sources using single current dipole and current multipole models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Ma, Ping; Lu, Hong; Tang, Xue-Zheng; Hua, Ning; Tang, Fa-Kuan

    2009-12-01

    Two cardiac functional models are constructed in this paper. One is a single current model and the other is a current multipole model. Parameters denoting the properties of these two models are calculated by a least-square fit to the measurements using a simulated annealing algorithm. The measured signals are detected at 36 observation nodes by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). By studying the trends of position, orientation and magnitude of the single current dipole model and the current multipole model in the QRS complex during one time span and comparing the reconstructed magnetocardiography (MCG) of these two cardiac models, we find that the current multipole model is a more appropriate model to represent cardiac electrophysiological activity.

  3. Wetland methane modelling over the Scandinavian Arctic: Performance of current land-surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, Garry; Quiquet, Aurélien; Gedney, Nicola; Clark, Douglas; Friend, Andrew; George, Charles; Prigent, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Wetlands are generally accepted as being the largest, but least well quantified, single natural source of CH4, with global emission estimates ranging from 100-231 Tg yr-1 [1] and for which the Boreal and Arctic regions make a significant contribution [2, 3]. The recent review by Melton et al. [4] has provided a summary of the current state of knowledge on the modelling of wetlands and the outcome of the WETCHIMP model intercomparison exercise. Melton et al. found a large variation in the wetland areas and associated methane emissions from the participating models and varying responses to climate change. In this paper, we report results from offline runs of two land surface models over Scandinavia (JULES, the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator [5, 6] and HYBRID8 [7]), using the same driving meteorological dataset (CRU-NCEP) for the period from January 1980 to December 2010. Although the two land surface models are very different, both models have used a TOPMODEL approach to derive the wetland area and have similar parameterisations of the methane wetland emissions. We find that both models give broadly similar results. They underestimate the wetland areas over Northern Scandinavia, compared to remote sensing and map-based datasets of wetlands [8]. This leads to lower predicted methane emissions compared to those observed on the ground and from aircraft [9]. We will present these findings and identify possible reasons for the underprediction. We will show the sensitivity to using the observed wetland areas to improve the methane emission estimates. References [1] Denman, K., et al.,: Couplings Between Changes in the Climate System and Biogeochemistry, In Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis, Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Cambridge University Press, United Kingdom, 2007; [2] Smith, L. C., et al.: Siberian peatlands a net carbon sink and global methane source since the early

  4. Engine rotor health monitoring: an experimental approach to fault detection and durability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Woike, Mark R.; Clem, Michelle; Baaklini, George

    2015-03-01

    Efforts to update and improve turbine engine components in meeting flights safety and durability requirements are commitments that engine manufacturers try to continuously fulfill. Most of their concerns and developments energies focus on the rotating components as rotor disks. These components typically undergo rigorous operating conditions and are subject to high centrifugal loadings which subject them to various failure mechanisms. Thus, developing highly advanced health monitoring technology to screen their efficacy and performance is very essential to their prolonged service life and operational success. Nondestructive evaluation techniques are among the many screening methods that presently are being used to pre-detect hidden flaws and mini cracks prior to any appalling events occurrence. Most of these methods or procedures are confined to evaluating material's discontinuities and other defects that have mature to a point where failure is eminent. Hence, development of more robust techniques to pre-predict faults prior to any catastrophic events in these components is highly vital. This paper is focused on presenting research activities covering the ongoing research efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) rotor dynamics laboratory in support of developing a fault detection system for key critical turbine engine components. Data obtained from spin test experiments of a rotor disk that relates to investigating behavior of blade tip clearance, tip timing and shaft displacement based on measured data acquired from sensor devices such as eddy current, capacitive and microwave are presented. Additional results linking test data with finite element modeling to characterize the structural durability of a cracked rotor as it relays to the experimental tests and findings is also presented. An obvious difference in the vibration response is shown between the notched and the baseline no notch rotor disk indicating the presence of some type of irregularity.

  5. A numerical model of ionospheric convection derived from field-alignment currents and the corresponding conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, L. G.; Marklund, G. T.

    1991-08-01

    A numerical model for the calculation of ionospheric convection patterns from given distributions of field aligned current and ionospheric conductivity is described. The model includes a coupling between the conductivity and the field aligned current. The input contributions, the field aligned current and the conductivity, are parametrized. From the primary model output a number of other quantities can be computed: the potential in the inertial frame, the potential in the magnetospheric equatorial plane, the distribution of ionosheric current, and the Joule heating in the ionosphere. This model was used together with a technique to caculate the high latitude potential distribution prevailing during a particular event by combining information from global auroral images and local measurements of fields and particles. The model potential variation along the satellite orbit was found to be in agreement with that calculated from the measured electric field. The model was also used to study some fundamental properties of the electrodynamics of the high latitude ionosphere.

  6. Spacecraft Charging Current Balance Model Applied to High Voltage Solar Array Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Emily M.; Pour, Maria Z. A.

    2016-01-01

    Spacecraft charging induced by high voltage solar arrays can result in power losses and degradation of spacecraft surfaces. In some cases, it can even present safety issues for astronauts performing extravehicular activities. An understanding of the dominant processes contributing to spacecraft charging induced by solar arrays is important to current space missions, such as the International Space Station, and to any future space missions that may employ high voltage solar arrays. A common method of analyzing the factors contributing to spacecraft charging is the current balance model. Current balance models are based on the simple idea that the spacecraft will float to a potential such that the current collecting to the surfaces equals the current lost from the surfaces. However, when solar arrays are involved, these currents are dependent on so many factors that the equation becomes quite complicated. In order for a current balance model to be applied to solar array operations, it must incorporate the time dependent nature of the charging of dielectric surfaces in the vicinity of conductors1-3. This poster will present the factors which must be considered when developing a current balance model for high voltage solar array operations and will compare results of a current balance model with data from the Floating Potential Measurement Unit4 on board the International Space Station.

  7. Modified model of gate leakage currents in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan-Gang; Feng, Zhi-Hong; Lv, Yuan-Jie; Tan, Xin; Dun, Shao-Bo; Fang, Yu-Long; Cai, Shu-Jun

    2016-10-01

    It has been reported that the gate leakage currents are described by the Frenkel-Poole emission (FPE) model, at temperatures higher than 250 K. However, the gate leakage currents of our passivated devices do not accord with the FPE model. Therefore, a modified FPE model is developed in which an additional leakage current, besides the gate (I II), is added. Based on the samples with different passivations, the I II caused by a large number of surface traps is separated from total gate currents, and is found to be linear with respect to (φ B-V g)0.5. Compared with these from the FPE model, the calculated results from the modified model agree well with the I g-V g measurements at temperatures ranging from 295 K to 475 K. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61306113).

  8. Model development and validation of geometrically complex eddy current coils using finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alexander; Eviston, Connor

    2017-02-01

    Multiple FEM models of complex eddy current coil geometries were created and validated to calculate the change of impedance due to the presence of a notch. Capable realistic simulations of eddy current inspections are required for model assisted probability of detection (MAPOD) studies, inversion algorithms, experimental verification, and tailored probe design for NDE applications. An FEM solver was chosen to model complex real world situations including varying probe dimensions and orientations along with complex probe geometries. This will also enable creation of a probe model library database with variable parameters. Verification and validation was performed using other commercially available eddy current modeling software as well as experimentally collected benchmark data. Data analysis and comparison showed that the created models were able to correctly model the probe and conductor interactions and accurately calculate the change in impedance of several experimental scenarios with acceptable error. The promising results of the models enabled the start of an eddy current probe model library to give experimenters easy access to powerful parameter based eddy current models for alternate project applications.

  9. A model of a rapidly-adapting mechanosensitive current generated by a dorsal root ganglion neuron.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kazuhisa

    2014-06-01

    I propose a model that replicates the kinetics of a rapidly-adapting mechanosensitive current generated by a dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron. When the DRG neuron is mechanically stimulated, an ionic current called a mechanosensitive current flows across its membrane. The kinetics of mechanosensitive currents are broadly classified into three types; rapidly adapting (RA), intermediately adapting, and slowly adapting. The kinetics of RA mechanosensitive currents are particularly intriguing. An RA mechanosensitive current is initially evoked by and rapidly adapts to a mechanical stimulus, but can also respond to an additional stimulus. Furthermore, an antecedent stimulus immediately followed by an additional stimulus suppresses reactivation of the current. The features of the kinetics depend on the characteristics of the mechanotransducer channels. Physiologists have proposed three factors associated with mechanotransducer channels, invoking activation, adaptation, and inactivation. In the present study, these factors are incorporated into an RA mechanosensitive current model. Computer simulations verified that the proposed model replicates the kinetics of real RA DRG mechanosensitive currents. The mechanosensitive current elicited by successive pulse-form stimuli was predominantly desensitized by the inactivating factor. Both the inactivating and adapting factors were involved in desensitization of a double-decker stimulus. The reduction of the sensitivity with decreasing velocity of the stimulus was mainly controlled by the adapting factor.

  10. Durability tests of a five centimeter diameter ion thruster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakanishi, S.

    1972-01-01

    A modified Hughes SIT-5 system is being tested for durability at the Lewis Research Center. As of October 1, 1972, the thruster subsystem has logged over 8000 hours of operation. The initial 2023 hours were run with a translating screen thrust vector grid. The thruster is currently operating with an electrostatic type vector grid. Profiles and maps taken at widely separated intervals show that performance and operating characteristics have remained essentially constant. Overall efficiency is about 32 percent and power to thrust ratio is 170 watts per millipound at a specific impulse of 2500 seconds. Telescopic examination of the vector grid shows some sputtering erosion due to charge exchange and direct impingement ions.

  11. Environmental Durability and Stress Rupture of EBC/CMCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on the strength and creep performance of SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems under complex simulated engine environments. Tensile-strength and stress-rupture testing was conducted to illustrate the material properties under isothermal and thermal gradient conditions. To determine material durability, further testing was conducted under exposure to thermal cycling, thermal gradients and simulated combustion environments. Emphasis is placed on experimental techniques as well as implementation of non-destructive evaluation, including modal acoustic emission and electrical resistivity monitoring, to characterize strength degradation and damage mechanisms. Currently, little is known about the behavior of EBC-CMCs under these conditions; consequently, this work will prove invaluable in the development of structural components for use in high temperature applications.

  12. Revisiting single photon avalanche diode current-voltage modeling and transient characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Javitt, M.; Savuskan, V. Merhav, T.; Nemirovsky, Y.

    2014-05-28

    A model for the current-voltage and transient behavior of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) based on device physics is presented. The results of the model are compared to actual measurements and a reasonable fit is seen. Additionally, the model provides a useful tool for designing quenching circuitry and determining optimal operation conditions of the SPAD.

  13. Comparison of model-simulated and observed currents in the central Adriatic during DART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. J.; Book, J. W.; Burrage, D. M.; Rowley, C. D.; Tudor, M.

    2009-02-01

    Numerical simulations of the Adriatic Sea were performed with the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) during the Dynamics of the Adriatic in Real Time (DART) Experiments conducted between October 2005 and September 2006. Grid resolution was 1 km. Model forcing included tides, surface fluxes from the Aire Limitée Adaptation Dynamique Développement International (ALADIN) atmospheric model, relaxation to a daily satellite sea surface temperature analysis, extensive river and runoff discharges, and open boundary conditions south of Otranto specified from a global model. Currents predicted by the model were compared with currents from 12 Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) moorings located along a line between the Gargano Peninsula, Italy, and Split, Croatia. The nontidal comparisons were performed with detided currents. Correlations between the model and ADCP currents were highest in the Western Adriatic Current (WAC), which flows southeastward along the Italian coast. Lowest correlations were in the interior of the Adriatic, likely because of instability processes. Correlations between the ALADIN winds and the model and ADCP currents at the mooring locations were also highest in the WAC. For November 2005 through August 2006, the model and ADCP mean WAC transports were 0.321 and 0.304 Sv, respectively, with a temporal correlation of 0.79. Comparison of current variance showed best agreement near the Italian and Croatian coasts. In the interior, the NCOM current variance compared fairly well with that of the ADCPs for November-January but decreased significantly relative to the ADCPs for February-August. Spectral analyses indicate most of the difference in variance to be at periods exceeding 2 days.

  14. Modeling of Ring Current Energy Content and Magnetic Field During Storms: How Much Do the Results Depend on Model Choice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganushkina, N. Y.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2009-12-01

    We use the Inner Magnetosphere Particle Transport and Acceleration model (IMPTAM) to trace particles from the plasma sheet to the inner magnetosphere regions and to study the ring current formation during storm times. The IMPTAM model follows drift of ions and electrons with arbitrary pitch angles in time-dependent magnetic and electric fields, assuming that 1st and 2nd adiabatic invariants are conserved. For two storms, one moderate on November 6-7, 1997 and one intense on October 21-23, 1999, we analyze the evolution of model ring current energy content and magnetic field depression produced by the modeled ring current at the Earth. We trace particles in several combinations of electric and magnetic field models such as dipole, Tsyganenko T89, Tsyganenko T96, Tsyganenko and Sitnov TS04 models for magnetic field and Volland-Stern, Boyle et al., and Weimer models for electric field. We also apply 4 different types of boundary distribution in the plasma sheet at different locations. We make model-to-model and model-to-Dst-observed comparisons. The questions to be answered are How much do the results of the storm-time ring current modeling depend on the choice of models and How accurate are the conclusions made from the modeling output?

  15. The "anthracene problem": closed-form conjugated-circuit models of ring currents in linear polyacenes.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Patrick W; Myrvold, Wendy

    2011-11-17

    Conjugated-circuit models for induced π ring currents differ in the types of circuit that they include and the weights attached to them. Choice of circuits for general π systems can be expressed compactly in terms of matchings of the circuit-deleted molecular graph. Variants of the conjugated-circuit model for induced π currents are shown to have simple closed-form solutions for linear polyacenes. Despite differing assumptions about the effect of cycle area, all the models predict the most intense perimeter current in the central rings, in general agreement with ab initio current-density maps. All tend to overestimate the rate of increase with N of the central ring current for the [N]polyacene, in comparison with molecular-orbital treatments using ipsocentric ab initio, pseudo-π, and Hückel-London approaches.

  16. Evaluation of the durability of composite tidal turbine blades.

    PubMed

    Davies, Peter; Germain, Grégory; Gaurier, Benoît; Boisseau, Amélie; Perreux, Dominique

    2013-02-28

    The long-term reliability of tidal turbines is critical if these structures are to be cost effective. Optimized design requires a combination of material durability models and structural analyses. Composites are a natural choice for turbine blades, but there are few data available to predict material behaviour under coupled environmental and cycling loading. The present study addresses this problem, by introducing a multi-level framework for turbine blade qualification. At the material scale, static and cyclic tests have been performed, both in air and in sea water. The influence of ageing in sea water on fatigue performance is then quantified, and much lower fatigue lives are measured after ageing. At a higher level, flume tank tests have been performed on three-blade tidal turbines. Strain gauging of blades has provided data to compare with numerical models.

  17. Salt transport in the Irminger Current: a regional and a global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, A.; Stocker, T. F.; Sandø, A. B.

    2012-04-01

    Salt transport in the Irminger Current and thus the coupling between eastern and western subpolar North Atlantic play an important role for climate variability across a wide range of time scales. High resolution ocean modeling and observations indicate that salinities in the eastern subpolar North Atlantic correlate negatively with the circulation of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre (SPG). This has led to the perception that a weaker SPG also transports less salt. In contrast, global climate models simulate enhanced salt transport with a stronger gyre that acts as an important positive feedback mechanism for climate variability. Is this an artifact of insufficient model resolution or sub-grid parametrizations? We find that one of the current generation of global climate models shows good agreement with a regional ocean model in the simulated dynamics of the SPG. Enhanced salt transport in the Irminger Current is a robust feature of both models, because the increase in volume transport overcompensates the decrease in salinity.

  18. Analytical model for thin-film SOI PIN-diode leakage current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Andrei; Dreiner, Stefan; Vogt, Holger; Goehlich, Andreas; Paschen, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    An analytical model for the thin-film silicon-on-insulator pin-diode leakage current is presented. Particularly the back-gate potential influence on the leakage current is addressed. The two-dimensional Poisson equation is simplified and then solved including the influence of the back-gate potential. Subsequently the analytical model is verified by comparison with numerical simulation and measurements. For the verification of the model the dependence on the back-gate potential, reverse voltage, device geometry, doping concentration and -polarity is considered. In this procedure the interface recombination velocity is used as fitting parameter. The model verification shows an accurate modeling of the leakage current at full depletion in combination with a back-gate potential dependence. The usage of the model is limited to back-gate and reverse potentials close to full depletion state of the pin-diode.

  19. Durable fear memories require PSD-95

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Paul J.; Pinard, Courtney R.; Camp, Marguerite C.; Feyder, Michael; Sah, Anupam; Bergstrom, Hadley; Graybeal, Carolyn; Liu, Yan; Schlüter, Oliver; Grant, Seth G.N.; Singewald, Nicolas; Xu, Weifeng; Holmes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic fear memories are highly durable but also dynamic, undergoing repeated reactivation and rehearsal over time. While overly persistent fear memories underlie anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder, the key neural and molecular mechanisms underlying fear memory durability remain unclear. Post-synaptic density 95 (PSD-95) is a synaptic protein regulating glutamate receptor anchoring, synaptic stability and certain types of memory. Employing a loss-of-function mutant mouse lacking the guanylate kinase domain of PSD-95 (PSD-95GK), we analyzed the contribution of PSD-95 to fear memory formation and retrieval, and sought to identify the neural basis of PSD-95-mediated memory maintenance using ex vivo immediate-early gene mapping, in vivo neuronal recordings and viral-mediated knockdown approaches. We show that PSD-95 is dispensable for the formation and expression of recent fear memories, but essential for the formation of precise and flexible fear memories and for the maintenance of memories at remote time points. The failure of PSD-95GK mice to retrieve remote cued fear memories was associated with hypoactivation of the infralimbic cortex (IL) (not anterior cingulate (ACC) or prelimbic cortex), reduced IL single-unit firing and bursting, and attenuated IL gamma and theta oscillations. Adeno-associated PSD-95 virus-mediated knockdown in the IL, not ACC, was sufficient to impair recent fear extinction and remote fear memory, and remodel IL dendritic spines. Collectively, these data identify PSD-95 in the IL as a critical mechanism supporting the durability of fear memories over time. These preclinical findings have implications for developing novel approaches to treating trauma-based anxiety disorders that target the weakening of overly persistent fear memories. PMID:25510511

  20. Durable fear memories require PSD-95.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, P J; Pinard, C R; Camp, M C; Feyder, M; Sah, A; Bergstrom, H C; Graybeal, C; Liu, Y; Schlüter, O M; Grant, S G; Singewald, N; Xu, W; Holmes, A

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic fear memories are highly durable but also dynamic, undergoing repeated reactivation and rehearsal over time. Although overly persistent fear memories underlie anxiety disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder, the key neural and molecular mechanisms underlying fear memory durability remain unclear. Postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95) is a synaptic protein regulating glutamate receptor anchoring, synaptic stability and certain types of memory. Using a loss-of-function mutant mouse lacking the guanylate kinase domain of PSD-95 (PSD-95(GK)), we analyzed the contribution of PSD-95 to fear memory formation and retrieval, and sought to identify the neural basis of PSD-95-mediated memory maintenance using ex vivo immediate-early gene mapping, in vivo neuronal recordings and viral-mediated knockdown (KD) approaches. We show that PSD-95 is dispensable for the formation and expression of recent fear memories, but essential for the formation of precise and flexible fear memories and for the maintenance of memories at remote time points. The failure of PSD-95(GK) mice to retrieve remote cued fear memory was associated with hypoactivation of the infralimbic (IL) cortex (but not the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) or prelimbic cortex), reduced IL single-unit firing and bursting, and attenuated IL gamma and theta oscillations. Adeno-associated virus-mediated PSD-95 KD in the IL, but not the ACC, was sufficient to impair recent fear extinction and remote fear memory, and remodel IL dendritic spines. Collectively, these data identify PSD-95 in the IL as a critical mechanism supporting the durability of fear memories over time. These preclinical findings have implications for developing novel approaches to treating trauma-based anxiety disorders that target the weakening of overly persistent fear memories.

  1. Durability of polymers for containment barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Heiser, J.; Milian, L.; Clinton, J.; Colombo, P.

    1994-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has been involved in several tasks to develop, demonstrate, and implement advanced polymer materials for use in subsurface barriers throughout the US Department of Energy complex. Binders investigated as barrier composites include polyester styrenes, vinylester styrenes, high-molecular-weight acrylics, sulfur polymer cement, bitumen, and a furfuryl-alcohol-based furan polymer. These materials have been extensively used in many commercial applications, e.g., in sewage and brine handling systems and electrolytic baths. They have also been used by the US Army Corps of Engineers to repair dams and canal locks, and by the Federal highway Administration for bridge deck and highway repairs. Their impermeability to gases and liquids, combined with resistance to radiation and to acidic and alkaline environments, make polymer grouts candidates for high-quality, durable barriers. Laboratory testing and evaluation of polymer composites has been ongoing since early 1992. A series of resistance tests were used to determine the performance and durability characteristics of a variety of polymer composites. This paper details the results of this characterization that pertain to the Hanford Site underground storage tanks. Testing includes wet-dry cycling, chemical resistivity to ground water, base, solvent and a surrogate nitrate tank brine, resistance to irradiation, and hydraulic conductivity. Performance values indicate that polymers can meet the requirements for containment barriers for underground storage tanks at the Hanford tank farm, including the high-heat tanks. Appropriate choices of binder and aggregate, followed by appropriate, site-specific compatibility testing will result in a durable, high-strength, low-permeability barrier.

  2. A Sustainable Model for Integrating Current Topics in Machine Learning Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiopoulos, M.; DeMara, R. F.; Gonzalez, A. J.; Wu, A. S.; Mollaghasemi, M.; Gelenbe, E.; Kysilka, M.; Secretan, J.; Sharma, C. A.; Alnsour, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated research and teaching model that has resulted from an NSF-funded effort to introduce results of current Machine Learning research into the engineering and computer science curriculum at the University of Central Florida (UCF). While in-depth exposure to current topics in Machine Learning has traditionally occurred…

  3. Surface-Charge-Based Micro-Models--A Solid Foundation for Learning about Direct Current Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirvonen, P. E.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores how the use of a surface-charge-based instructional approach affects introductory university level students' understanding of direct current (dc) circuits. The introduced teaching intervention includes electrostatics, surface-charge-based micro-models that explain the existence of an electric field inside the current-carrying…

  4. Advanced Face Gear Surface Durability Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Heath, Gregory F.

    2016-01-01

    The surface durability life of helical face gears and isotropic super-finished (ISF) face gears was investigated. Experimental fatigue tests were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Endurance tests were performed on 10 sets of helical face gears in mesh with tapered involute helical pinions, and 10 sets of ISF-enhanced straight face gears in mesh with tapered involute spur pinions. The results were compared to previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly less than that of previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly greater than that of the helical configuration.

  5. Durable, Low-Surface-Energy Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.; Mcelroy, Paul M.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical treatment for creation of durable, low-surface-energy coatings for glass, ceramics and other protonated surfaces easily applied, and creates very thin semipermanent film with extremely low surface tension. Exhibits excellent stability; surfaces retreated if coating becomes damaged or eroded. Uses include water-repellent surfaces, oil-repellent surfaces, antimigration barriers, corrosion barriers, mold-release agents, and self-cleaning surfaces. Film resists wetting by water, alcohols, hydrocarbon solvents, and silicone oil. Has moderate resistance to abrasion, such as rubbing with cloths, and compression molding to polymers and composite materials.

  6. Chemistry of Durable and Regenerable Biocidal Textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gang; Worley, S. Dave

    2005-01-01

    Unlike the widely used slow-releasing biocidal mechanism now employed in biocidal textiles, a novel regenerable process, based on a regeneration principle and halamine chemistry, has been developed in antimicrobial finishing of textiles. Halamine-modified textile materials demonstrate durable and regenerable antimicrobial functions and execute rapid inactivation of a broad spectrum of microorganisms by contact without yielding drug resistance. The unique properties of the products render them useful materials for medical-use and hygienic textiles. The chemistry of the biocidal materials is be discussed. See Featured Molecules .

  7. Environmental durability of electroplated black chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the durability of nickel-black chromium plated aluminum in an outdoor rural industrial, and seacoast environment. Test panels were exposed to these environments for 60, 36, and 13 months, respectively. The results of this study showed that no significant optical degradation occurred from exposure to either of these environments, although a considerable amount of corrosion occurred on the panels exposed to the seacoast environment. The rural and industrial atmosphere produced only a slight amount of corrosion on test panels.

  8. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Lindquist, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-11-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. We have begun evaluation of several new UV-screened polycarbonate sheet glazing constructions. This has involved interactions with several major polymer industry companies to obtain improved candidate samples. Proposed absorber materials were tested for UV resistance, and appear adequate for unglazed ICS absorbers.

  9. Comparison of empirical magnetic field models and global MHD simulations: The near-tail currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Baker, D. N.; Walker, R. J.; Raeder, J.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1995-01-01

    The tail currents predicted by empirical magnetic field models and global MHD simulations are compared. It is shown that the near-Earth currents obtained from the MHD simulations are much weaker than the currents predicted by the Tsyganenko models, primarily because the ring current is not properly represented in the simulations. On the other hand, in the mid-tail and distant tail the lobe field strength predicted by the simulations is comparable to what is observed at about 50 R(sub E) distance, significantly larger than the very low lobe field values predicted by the Tsyganenko models at that distance. Ways to improve these complementary approaches to model the actual magnetospheric configuration are discussed.

  10. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  11. AIR QUALITY MODELING OF HAZARDOUS POLLUTANTS: CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a review of current air toxics modeling applications and discusses possible advanced approaches. Many applications require the ability to predict hot spots from industrial sources or large roadways that are needed for community health and Environmental Justice...

  12. A Test of Source-Surfae Model Predictions of Heliospheric Current Sheet Inclination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, M. E.; Smith, E. J.; Crooker, N. U.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    The orientation of the heliospheric current sheet predicted from a source surfae model is compared with the orientation determined from minimum variance analysis of ISEE-3 magnetic field data at 1 AU near solar maximum.

  13. Test of the Additivity Principle for Current Fluctuations in a Model of Heat Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtado, Pablo I.; Garrido, Pedro L.

    2009-06-01

    The additivity principle allows to compute the current distribution in many one-dimensional (1D) nonequilibrium systems. Using simulations, we confirm this conjecture in the 1D Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti model of heat conduction for a wide current interval. The current distribution shows both Gaussian and non-Gaussian regimes, and obeys the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem. We verify the existence of a well-defined temperature profile associated to a given current fluctuation. This profile is independent of the sign of the current, and this symmetry extends to higher-order profiles and spatial correlations. We also show that finite-time joint fluctuations of the current and the profile are described by the additivity functional. These results suggest the additivity hypothesis as a general and powerful tool to compute current distributions in many nonequilibrium systems.

  14. Test of the additivity principle for current fluctuations in a model of heat conduction.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Pablo I; Garrido, Pedro L

    2009-06-26

    The additivity principle allows to compute the current distribution in many one-dimensional (1D) nonequilibrium systems. Using simulations, we confirm this conjecture in the 1D Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti model of heat conduction for a wide current interval. The current distribution shows both Gaussian and non-Gaussian regimes, and obeys the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem. We verify the existence of a well-defined temperature profile associated to a given current fluctuation. This profile is independent of the sign of the current, and this symmetry extends to higher-order profiles and spatial correlations. We also show that finite-time joint fluctuations of the current and the profile are described by the additivity functional. These results suggest the additivity hypothesis as a general and powerful tool to compute current distributions in many nonequilibrium systems.

  15. A Fully Automated and Robust Method to Incorporate Stamping Data in Crash, NVH and Durability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniswamy, Hariharasudhan; Kanthadai, Narayan; Roy, Subir; Beauchesne, Erwan

    2011-08-01

    Crash, NVH (Noise, Vibration, Harshness), and durability analysis are commonly deployed in structural CAE analysis for mechanical design of components especially in the automotive industry. Components manufactured by stamping constitute a major portion of the automotive structure. In CAE analysis they are modeled at a nominal state with uniform thickness and no residual stresses and strains. However, in reality the stamped components have non-uniformly distributed thickness and residual stresses and strains resulting from stamping. It is essential to consider the stamping information in CAE analysis to accurately model the behavior of the sheet metal structures under different loading conditions. Especially with the current emphasis on weight reduction by replacing conventional steels with aluminum and advanced high strength steels it is imperative to avoid over design. Considering this growing need in industry, a highly automated and robust method has been integrated within Altair Hyperworks® to initialize sheet metal components in CAE models with stamping data. This paper demonstrates this new feature and the influence of stamping data for a full car frontal crash analysis.

  16. Cohomology, cocyles and the current algebra for the nonlinear σ-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Takanori; Kitakado, Shinsaku; Nonoyama, Tatsuhiko

    1985-05-01

    Using the idea of cohomology defined for the Lie algebra of gauge transformations, we examine the extension of the current algebra for the system of the gauged nonlinear σ-model. An anomalous term in the current commutation relation is constructed and shown to be equivalent to that arising in the gauged nonlinear σ-model with the Wess-Zumino term. The relation with the anomalous Schwinger term given by Faddeev is also discussed.

  17. Dynamo currents representing geomagnetic L variation demonstrated by a multi-layer ionospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.-Y.; Tschu, K.-K.; Matsushita, S.

    1984-05-01

    A multi-layer ionospheric model and lunar (2,2) tidal mode have been used to calculate dynamo current systems representing lunar geomagnetic semidiurnal variations. Since both the height variation of the ionospheric conductivities and latitudinal dependence of the height of the conductivity peaks have been taken into account, the dynamo current systems agree with equivalent ones (estimated from geomagnetic data) better than those for a thin shell model of the ionospheric conductivity, especially in the polar region.

  18. A numerical model of ionospheric convection derived from field-aligned currents and the corresponding conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, L. G.; Marklund, G. T.

    1988-03-01

    A numerical model for the calculation of ionospheric convection patterns from given distributions of field-aligned current and ionospheric conductivity is described. The model includes a coupling between the conductivity and the field-aligned current, so that the conductivity peaks in regions of upward current, as usually observed by measurements. The model is very flexible in that the input distributions, the field-aligned current, and the conductivity are parameterized in a convenient way. From the primary model output, namely the ionospheric electrostatic potential (or convection) in the corotating frame, a number of other quantities can be computed. These include: the potential in a Sun-fixed frame (the transformation takes into account the nonalignment of the Earth's magnetic and geographic axes); the potential in the magnetospheric equatorial plane (projected using either a dipole magnetic field model or the Tsyganenko-Usmanov model, and the assumption of vanishing parallel electric field); the distribution of ionospheric (horizontal) current; and Joule heating in the ionosphere. The model was used with input data inferred from satellite measurements to calculate the high-latitude potential distribution prevailing during a particular event. The model potential variation along the satellite orbit is found to be in excellent agreement with the measured electric field.

  19. The Thirring interaction in the two-dimensional axial-current-pseudoscalar derivative coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Belvedere, L.V. . E-mail: armflavio@if.uff.br

    2006-12-15

    We reexamine the two-dimensional model of massive fermions interacting with a massless pseudoscalar field via axial-current derivative coupling. The hidden Thirring interaction in the axial-derivative coupling model is exhibited compactly by performing a canonical field transformation on the Bose field algebra and the model is mapped into the Thirring model with an additional vector-current-scalar derivative interaction (Schroer-Thirring model). The Fermi field operator is rewritten in terms of the Mandelstam soliton operator coupled to a free massless scalar field. The charge sectors of the axial-derivative model are mapped into the charge sectors of the massive Thirring model. The complete bosonized version of the model is presented. The bosonized composite operators of the quantum Hamiltonian are obtained as the leading operators in the Wilson short distance expansions.

  20. Combined Hydrophobicity and Mechanical Durability through Surface Nanoengineering

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Paul R.; Stagon, Stephen P.; Huang, Hanchen; Furrer, David U.; Burlatsky, Sergei F.; Filburn, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through the nanoscale engineering of surfaces in the form of nanorod-polymer composites. Specifically, the hydrophobicity derives from nanoscale features of mechanically hard ZnO nanorods and the mechanical durability derives from the composite structure of a hard ZnO nanorod core and soft polymer shell. Experimental characterization correlates the morphology of the nanoengineered surfaces with the combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability, and reveals the responsible mechanisms. Such surfaces may find use in applications, such as boat hulls, that benefit from hydrophobicity and require mechanical durability. PMID:25851026

  1. Combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through surface nanoengineering

    DOE PAGES

    Elliott, Paul R.; Stagon, Stephen P.; Huang, Hanchen; ...

    2015-04-08

    This paper reports combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through the nanoscale engineering of surfaces in the form of nanorod-polymer composites. Specifically, the hydrophobicity derives from nanoscale features of mechanically hard ZnO nanorods and the mechanical durability derives from the composite structure of a hard ZnO nanorod core and soft polymer shell. Experimental characterization correlates the morphology of the nanoengineered surfaces with the combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability, and reveals the responsible mechanisms. Such surfaces may find use in applications, such as boat hulls, that benefit from hydrophobicity and require mechanical durability.

  2. Effect of Human Model Height and Sex on Induced Current Dosimetry in Household Induction Heater Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarao, Hiroo; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Isaka, Katsuo

    Induced currents in the high-resolution, anatomical human models are numerically calculated by the impedance method. The human models are supposed to be exposed to highly inhomogeneous 20.9 kHz magnetic fields from a household induction heater (IH). In the case of the adult models, the currents ranging from 5 to 19 mA/m2 are induced for between the shoulder and lower abdomen. Meanwhile, in the case of the child models, the currents ranging from 5 to 21 mA/m2 are induced for between the head and abdomen. In particular, the induced currents near the brain tissue are almost the same as those near the abdomen. When the induced currents in the central nervous system tissues are considered, the induced currents in the child model are 2.1 to 6.9 times as large as those in the adult model under the same B-field exposure environment. These results suggest the importance of further investigation intended for a pregnant female who uses the IH as well as for a child (or the IH users of small standing height).

  3. CURRENT - A Computer Code for Modeling Two-Dimensional, Chemically Reaccting, Low Mach Number Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.S.; Evans, G.H.; Moen, C.D.

    1996-10-01

    This report documents CURRENT, a computer code for modeling two- dimensional, chemically reacting, low Mach number flows including the effects of surface chemistry. CURRENT is a finite volume code based on the SIMPLER algorithm. Additional convergence acceleration for low Peclet number flows is provided using improved boundary condition coupling and preconditioned gradient methods. Gas-phase and surface chemistry is modeled using the CHEMKIN software libraries. The CURRENT user-interface has been designed to be compatible with the Sandia-developed mesh generator and post processor ANTIPASTO and the post processor TECPLOT. This report describes the theory behind the code and also serves as a user`s manual.

  4. A nowcast model for tides and tidal currents in San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Smith, Richard E.

    1998-01-01

    National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) installed Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System (PORTS) in San Francisco Bay, California to provide observations of tides, tidal currents, and meteorological conditions. PORTS data are used for optimizing vessel operations, increasing margin of safety for navigation, and guiding hazardous material spill prevention and response. Because tides and tidal currents in San Francisco Bay are extremely complex, limited real-time observations are insufficient to provide spatial resolution for variations of tides and tidal currents. To fill the information gaps, a highresolution, robust, semi-implicit, finite-difference nowcast numerical model has been implemented for San Francisco Bay. The model grid and water depths are defined on coordinates based on Mercator projection so the model outputs can be directly superimposed on navigation charts. A data assimilation algorithm has been established to derive the boundary conditions for model simulations. The nowcast model is executed every hour continuously for tides and tidal currents starting from 24 hours before the present time (now) covering a total of 48 hours simulation. Forty-eight hours of nowcast model results are available to the public at all times through the World Wide Web (WWW). Users can view and download the nowcast model results for tides and tidal current distributions in San Francisco Bay for their specific applications and for further analysis.

  5. Mechanically durable superhydrophobic surfaces prepared by abrading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fajun; Yu, Shan; Ou, Junfei; Xue, Mingshan; Li, Wen

    2013-09-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with both excellent mechanical durability and easy reparability based on polytetrafluoroethylene/room temperature vulcanized silicone rubber (PTFE/RTVSR) composites were prepared by a simple abrading method. The surface energy of RTVSR matrix decreased with the increasing volume fraction of PTFE particles, and the surface rough microstructures of the composites were created by abrading. A water droplet on the surface exhibited a contact angle of about 165° ± 3.4° and a sliding angle of about 7.3° ± 1.9°. Such superhydrophobic surfaces showed strong mechanical durability against sandpaper because the surfaces were prepared in the way of mechanical abrasion, and the fresh exposed surfaces were still superhydrophobic. In addition, the micro-structures on the elastic surface of the composite will be compressed by elastic deformation to avoid being broken during the friction cycles when cotton fabric was used as an abrasion surface. The deformation will rebound to renew the original surface structures when the load is withdrawn. Therefore, the elastic PTFE/RTVSR composites are of advantage to construct superhydrophobic surfaces with better abrasion resistance. More importantly, such superhydrophobicity can be repaired by a simple abrading regeneration process within a few minutes when the surface is damaged or polluted by organic contaminant.

  6. Converting mixed waste into durable glass

    SciTech Connect

    Ruller, J.A.; Greenman, W.G.

    1994-12-31

    Radioactive, hazardous and mixed contamination of soils and sediments within the Weapons Complex is widespread and estimated to total billions of cubic meters. The cost to remediate this contamination, as well as the contaminated surface and groundwaters, buildings and facilities has been estimated to be up to $300 billion over the next 30 years and up to $30 billion over the next five years. Progress towards cleaning the Weapons Complex depends upon the development of new remediation technologies. The remediation of contaminated soils and sludges ultimately rests on the immobilization of radioactive and hazardous contaminants into a solid wasteform that is leach resistant to aqueous corrosion and other forms of degradation (such as thermal cycling and biological attack) and is highly durable. In addition, the process to immobilize the contaminants should concentrate the contaminants into the smallest volume to reduce disposal/storage and transportation costs. GTS Duratek and the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America have successfully demonstrated that several different waste streams can be converted into a durable, leach-resistant glass that will also lower waste volumes. In this paper, the authors discuss these successes for soils and sludges from three separate US Department of Energy sites. The sites are: the K-25 facility; the Weldon Spring site; and Fernald, Ohio.

  7. CHP Fuel Cell Durability Demonstration - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Petrecky, James; Ashley, Christopher J

    2014-07-21

    Plug Power has managed a demonstration project that has tested multiple units of its high-temperature, PEM fuel cell system in micro-combined heat and power (μ-CHP) applications in California. The specific objective of the demonstration project was to substantiate the durability of GenSys Blue, and, thereby, verify its technology and commercial readiness for the marketplace. In the demonstration project, Plug Power, in partnership with the National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and Sempra, will execute two major tasks: • Task 1: Internal durability/reliability fleet testing. Six GenSys Blue units will be built and will undergo an internal test regimen to estimate failure rates. This task was modified to include 3 GenSys Blue units installed in a lab at UCI. • Task 2: External customer testing. Combined heat and power units will be installed and tested in real-world residential and/or light commercial end user locations in California.

  8. Durability Assessment of TiAl Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, Susan L.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2008-01-01

    The durability of TiAl is a prime concern for the implementation of TiAl into aerospace engines. Two durability issues, the effect of high temperature exposure on mechanical properties and impact resistance, have been investigated and the results are summarized in this paper. Exposure to elevated temperatures has been shown to be detrimental to the room temperature ductility of gamma alloys with the most likely mechanisms being the ingress of interstitials from the surface. Fluorine ion implantation has been shown to improve the oxidation resistance of gamma alloys, and ideally it could also improve the environmental embrittlement of high Nb content TiAl alloys. The effect of F ion implantation on the surface oxidation and embrittlement of a third generation, high Nb content TiAl alloy (Ti-45Al-5Nb-B-C) were investigated. Additionally, the ballistic impact resistance of a variety of gamma alloys, including Ti-48Al-2Cr- 2Nb, Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb, ABB-2, ABB-23, NCG359E, 95A and Ti-45Al-5Nb-B-C was accessed. Differences in the ballistic impact properties of the various alloys will be discussed, particularly with respect to their manufacturing process, microstructure, and tensile properties.

  9. Durable Nanocomposites for Superhydrophobicity and Superoleophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Adam

    Anti-wetting surfaces and materials have the potential for dramatic performance improvements such as drag reduction on marine vehicles and fluid power systems as well as anti-fouling on aircraft and wind turbines. Although a wide variety of synthetic superhydrophobic surfaces have been developed and investigated, several critical obstacles remain before industrial application can be realized, including: (1) large surface area application, (2) multi-liquid anti-wetting, (3) environmentally friendly compositions, (4) mechanical durability and adhesion, and (5) long-term performance. In this dissertation, nanocomposite coatings have been investigated to generate high performance anti-wetting surfaces that address these obstacles which may enable application on wind turbine blades. Solution processable materials were used which self-assemble to create anti-wetting nanocomposite surfaces upon spray coating and curing. As a result, the first superoleophobic nanocomposite, the first environmentally friendly superhydrophobic compositions, and the first highly durable superhydrophobic nanocomposite coatings were created. Furthermore, the mechanisms leading to this improved performance were studied.

  10. Modeling magnetic perturbation fields associated with ionospheric and geomagnetic-field-aligned currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, A. D.; Maute, A.

    2003-04-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General-Circulation Model calculates ionospheric and geomagnetic-field-aligned electric currents produced by ionospheric wind dynamo action, taking into account magnetospheric sources at high latitudes. The associated magnetic perturbations at the ground and at low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellite altitudes are calculated by representing the height-integrated horizontal ionospheric current as a current sheet at 110 km, connected to geomagnetic-field-aligned currents flowing into and out of the top. The horizontal sheet current can be divided into two components: a divergence-free equivalent current which, together with the associated induced Earth currents, is responsible for all of the magnetic perturbations below the current sheet, and a divergent (but not irrotational) current that closes the field-aligned currents above. We call the combination of the field-aligned currents and their closing ionospheric currents the ``nonequivalent'' currents. By definition, these produce no magnetic effect at the ground, but they do produce important magnetic effects at LEO altitudes, generally dominating the component of LEO magnetic perturbations perpendicular to the main geomagnetic field. At high magnetic latitudes the nonequivalent LEO magnetic perturbations are largely toroidal, and are associated with the strong field-aligned currents that couple the ionosphere with the outer magnetosphere. At middle and low magnetic latitudes the nonequivalent LEO magnetic perturbations are largely associated with field-aligned currents that flow between the northern and southern hemispheres, and that can produce east-west perturbations of tens of nanoteslas.

  11. Global modelling of non-axisymmetric disruptions and halo currents in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarrick, James F.

    1997-12-01

    As tokamak plasmas become more robust with the development of increasingly advanced operating regimes, the occurrence of plasma disruptions places a greater demand on the tokamak structure. In particular, the flow of halo currents, large currents which appear in tokamak vacuum vessels as a result of direct contact with bulk plasma, has become a matter of increasing concern. Experimental measurements have confirmed the existence of large, toroidally asymmetric currents which flow poloidally in the wall, exerting strong localized forces on the wall as they interact with the toroidal magnetic field. A new model has been developed to study this phenomenon, based on the use of nested sheet currents to represent a disrupting plasma. This model contains the minimum number of degrees of freedom which permit the flow of continuous, non-axisymmetric poloidal and toroidal currents; furthermore, the model can be put into a compact integral formulation which allows rapid numerical solution even in the presence of complicated tokamak geometries. A fast code called TSPS-3D has been written to solve the sheet current model; the code has been matched against experimental data and used to examine basic scaling relationships of halo currents and the resulting J x B loads with plasma parameters. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253- 1690.)

  12. A self-consistent model for estimating the critical current of superconducting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zermeño, V.; Sirois, F.; Takayasu, M.; Vojenciak, M.; Kario, A.; Grilli, F.

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, there is growing interest in using superconducting wires or tapes for the design and manufacture of devices such as cables, coils, rotating machinery, transformers, and fault current limiters, among others. Their high current capacity has made them the candidates of choice for manufacturing compact and light cables and coils that can be used in the large-scale power applications described above. However, the performance of these cables and coils is limited by their critical current, which is determined by several factors, including the conductor’s material properties and the geometric layout of the device itself. In this work we present a self-consistent model for estimating the critical current of superconducting devices. This is of large importance when the operating conditions are such that the self-field produced by the current is a significant fraction of the total field. The model is based on the asymptotic limit when time approaches infinity of Faraday’s equation written in terms of the magnetic vector potential. It uses a continuous E-J relationship and takes the angular dependence of the critical current density on the magnetic flux density into account. The proposed model is used to estimate the critical current of superconducting devices such as cables, coils, and coils made of transposed cables with very high accuracy. The high computing speed of this model makes it an ideal candidate for design optimization.

  13. The model of a collisionless current sheet in a homogeneous gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovsky, Igor S.; Kislov, Roman A.; Malova, Helmi V.; Khabarova, Olga V.

    2016-10-01

    The self-consistent 1D kinetic Harris-like model of a collisionless current sheet is developed for the case of the current sheet experiencing the impact of an external uniform gravity field. The ambipolar Pannekoek-Rosseland electric field appears in the system as a result of the additional drift motion of ions and electrons. This produces separation of charges, which is responsible for corresponding changes of the current sheet form. The presence of gravitation leads to formation of asymmetric distributions of the magnetic field as well as the plasma and the current density changes. Our estimations show that gravity-forced disruptions of the current sheet profile may occur in the Mercurial magnetosphere and, most probable, in the Io plasma torus near the Jupiter. Also, the model can be applied to magnetospheres of exoplanets.

  14. Observations and model simulations of wave-current interaction on the inner shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Julia; Elgar, Steve; Raubenheimer, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Wave directions and mean currents observed for two 1 month long periods in 7 and 2 m water depths along 11 km of the southern shoreline of Martha's Vineyard, MA, have strong tidal modulations. Wave directions are modulated by as much as 70° over a tidal cycle. The magnitude of the tidal modulations in the wavefield decreases alongshore to the west, consistent with the observed decrease in tidal currents from 2.1 to 0.2 m/s along the shoreline. A numerical model (SWAN and Deflt3D-FLOW) simulating waves and currents reproduces the observations accurately. Model simulations with and without wave-current interaction and tidal depth changes demonstrate that the observed tidal modulations of the wavefield primarily are caused by wave-current interaction and not by tidal changes to water depths over the nearby complex shoals.

  15. Computational modeling of the effect of external electron injection into a direct-current microdischarge

    SciTech Connect

    Panneer Chelvam, Prem Kumar; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-12-28

    Electron emission from the electrode surface plays an important role in determining the structure of a direct-current microdischarge. Here we have developed a computational model of a direct-current microdischarge to study the effect of external electron injection from the cathode surface into the discharge to manipulate its properties. The model provides a self-consistent, multi-species, multi-temperature fluid representation of the plasma. A microdischarge with a metal-insulator-metal configuration is chosen for this study. The effect of external electron injection on the structure and properties of the microdischarge is described. The transient behavior of the microdischarge during the electron injection is examined. The nonlinearities in the dynamics of the plasma result in a large increase of conduction current after active electron injection. For the conditions simulated a switching time of ∼100 ns from a low-current to high-current discharge state is realized.

  16. Durability of polymer matrix composites for automotive structural applications: A state-of-the-art review

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.; Simpson, W.A. Jr.; Sun, C.T.; Talreja, R.; Weitsman, Y.J.

    1995-07-01

    A key unanswered question that must be addressed before polymeric composites will be widely used in automotive structural components is their known durability. Major durability issues are the effects that cyclic loadings, creep, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts have on dimensional stability, strength, and stiffness throughout the required life of a composite component. This report reviews the current state of understanding in each of these areas. It also discusses the limited information that exists on one of the prime candidate materials for automotive structural applications--an isocyanurate reinforced with a continuous strand, swirl mat. Because of the key role that nondestructive evaluations must play in understanding damage development and progression, a chapter is included on ultrasonic techniques. A final chapter then gives conclusions and recommendations for research needed to resolve the various durability issues. These recommendations will help provide a sound basis for program planning for the Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the Automotive Composites Consortium of Chrysler, Ford, and General Motors.

  17. Comparisons of purely topological model, betweenness based model and direct current power flow model to analyze power grid vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Min

    2013-06-01

    This paper selects three frequently used power grid models, including a purely topological model (PTM), a betweennness based model (BBM), and a direct current power flow model (DCPFM), to describe three different dynamical processes on a power grid under both single and multiple component failures. Each of the dynamical processes is then characterized by both a topology-based and a flow-based vulnerability metrics to compare the three models with each other from the vulnerability perspective. Taking as an example, the IEEE 300 power grid with line capacity set proportional to a tolerance parameter tp, the results show non-linear phenomenon: under single node failures, there exists a critical value of tp = 1.36, above which the three models all produce identical topology-based vulnerability results and more than 85% nodes have identical flow-based vulnerability from any two models; under multiple node failures that each node fails with an identical failure probability fp, there exists a critical fp = 0.56, above which the three models produce almost identical topology-based vulnerability results at any tp ≥ 1, but producing identical flow-based vulnerability results only occurs at fp = . In addition, the topology-based vulnerability results can provide a good approximation for the flow-based vulnerability under large fp, and the priority of PTM and BBM to better approach the DCPFM for vulnerability analysis mainly depends on the value of fp. Similar results are also found for other failure types, other system operation parameters, and other power grids.

  18. Equilibrium Reconstructions with V3FIT and Current Evolution Modeling for 3-D Stellarator Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J. C.; Cianciosa, M.; Geiger, J.; Lazerson, S.

    2016-10-01

    V3FIT is a powerful equilibrium reconstruction tool for magnetic confinement fusion experiments which are inherently 3-D in nature (i.e. stellarators) or have 3-D components (tokamaks with 3-D shaping, reversed field pinches with helical states, etc). Here, we present details of the diagnostic modeling, constraints and the user interface for reconstructions of W7-X plasmas. For typical discharges during the OP1.1 run campaign of W7-X, the net toroidal current and current density profile do not reach steady-state. When modeling the current evolution in 3-D plasmas, both poloidal and toroidal currents are linked with both poloidal and toroidal fluxes. In contrast, in toroidally axisymmetric plasmas, the poloidal flux is linked only with the toroidal current and the toroidal current is linked only with the poloidal flux. Compared to an equivalently-sized axisymmetric configuration, the current diffusion in 3-D plasmas is enhanced, leading to a faster relaxation of the current profile to its steady-state. Implications for the time-evolution of the current and rotational transform profiles in stellarator plasmas are discussed. This work is supported by DoE Grant DE-SC00014529.

  19. Shunt currents in vanadium flow batteries: Measurement, modelling and implications for efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, H.; Remy, M.

    2015-06-01

    Shunt currents are an important factor which must be considered when designing a stack for flow batteries. They lead to a reduction of the coulombic efficiency and can cause furthermore a critical warming of the electrolyte. Shunt currents inevitably appear at bypass connections of the hydraulic system between the single cells of a stack. In this work the shunt currents of a five-celled mini stack of a vanadium flow battery with external hydraulic system and their effects are investigated directly. The external hydraulic system allows the implementation of current sensors for direct measurement of the shunt currents; moreover, the single bypass channels can be interrupted by clamping the tube couplings and with it the shunt currents between the cells when the pumps are off. Thus the shares of losses by cross contamination and by shunt currents are quantified separately by charge conservation measurements. The experimentally gained data are compared to a shunt current model based on a equivalent circuit diagram and the linear equation system derived from it. Experiments and model data are in good agreement. The effects of shunt currents for different flow frame geometries and number of cells in a stack are simulated and presented in this work.

  20. Statistics of large currents in the Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti model in a ring geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarfaty, Lior; Meerson, Baruch

    2016-03-01

    We use the macroscopic fluctuation theory to determine the statistics of large currents in the Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti (KMP) model in a ring geometry. About 10 years ago this simple setting was instrumental in identifying a breakdown of the additivity principle in a class of lattice gases at currents exceeding a critical value. Building on earlier work, we assume that, for supercritical currents, the optimal density profile, conditioned on the given current, has the form of a traveling wave (TW). For the KMP model we find this TW analytically, in terms of elliptic functions, for any supercritical current I. Using this TW solution, we evaluate, up to a pre-exponential factor, the probability distribution P(I). We obtain simple asymptotics of the TW and of P(I) for currents close to the critical current, and for currents much larger than the critical current. In the latter case we show that -\\ln P(I)˜ I\\ln I , whereas the optimal density profile acquires a soliton-like shape. Our analytic results are in a very good agreement with Monte-Carlo simulations and numerical solutions of Hurtado and Garrido (2011).

  1. Modeling of current gain compression in common emitter mode of a transistor laser above threshold base current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Rikmantra; Mukhopadhyay, Bratati; Basu, P. K.

    2012-04-01

    We have obtained the expressions for the terminal currents in a heterojunction bipolar transistor laser the base of which contains a quantum well (QW). The emitter-base junction is assumed to be abrupt, leading to abrupt discontinuity in quasi-Fermi level at the interface. The expressions for the terminal currents as a function of collector-emitter and base-emitter voltages are obtained from the solution of the continuity equation. The current density in the QW located at an arbitrary position in the base is related to the virtual state current density. The threshold current density in the QW is calculated by using the expression for gain obtained from Fermi golden rule. The plot of collector current (IC) versus collector-emitter voltage (VCE) for different values of base current shows the usual transistor characteristics, i.e., a rising portion after a cut-in VCE, and then a saturation behavior. The dc current gain remains constant. However, as the base current exceeds the threshold, a stimulated recombination rate is added to the spontaneous recombination rate and the plots of collector currents become closer for the same increase in base current. This current gain compression is in agreement with the experimental observation. Our calculated values qualitatively agree with other experimental findings; however some features like Early effect do not show up in the calculation.

  2. Durability of bonds and clinical success of adhesive restorations

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Manso, Adriana P.; Geraldeli, Saulo; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Resin-dentin bond strength durability testing has been extensively used to evaluate the effectiveness of adhesive systems and the applicability of new strategies to improve that property. Clinical effectiveness is determined by the survival rates of restorations placed in non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). While there is evidence that the bond strength data generated in laboratory studies somehow correlates with the clinical outcome of NCCL restorations, it is questionable whether the knowledge of bonding mechanisms obtained from laboratory testing can be used to justify clinical performance of resin-dentin bonds. There are significant morphological and structural differences between the bonding substrate used in in vitro testing versus the substrate encountered in NCCL. These differences qualify NCCL as a hostile substrate for bonding, yielding bond strengths that are usually lower than those obtained in normal dentin. However, clinical survival time of NCCL restorations often surpass the durability of normal dentin tested in the laboratory. Likewise, clinical reports on the long-term survival rates of posterior composite restorations defy the relatively rapid rate of degradation of adhesive interfaces reported in laboratory studies. This article critically analyzes how the effectiveness of adhesive systems is currently measured, to identify gaps in knowledge where new research could be encouraged. The morphological and chemical analysis of bonded interfaces of resin composite restorations in teeth that had been in clinical service for many years, but were extracted for periodontal reasons, could be a useful tool to observe the ultrastructural characteristics of restorations that are regarded as clinically acceptable. This could help determine how much degradation is acceptable for clinical success. PMID:22192252

  3. Automated MRI Segmentation for Individualized Modeling of Current Flow in the Human Head

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Dmochowski, Jacek P.; Su, Yuzhuo; Datta, Abhishek; Rorden, Christopher; Parra, Lucas C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective High-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) and high-density electroencephalography (HD-EEG) require accurate models of current flow for precise targeting and current source reconstruction. At a minimum, such modeling must capture the idiosyncratic anatomy of brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and skull for each individual subject. Currently, the process to build such high-resolution individualized models from structural magnetic resonance images (MRI) requires labor-intensive manual segmentation, even when leveraging available automated segmentation tools. Also, accurate placement of many high-density electrodes on individual scalp is a tedious procedure. The goal was to develop fully automated techniques to reduce the manual effort in such a modeling process. Approach A fully automated segmentation technique based on Statical Parametric Mapping 8 (SPM8), including an improved tissue probability map (TPM) and an automated correction routine for segmentation errors, was developed, along with an automated electrode placement tool for high-density arrays. The performance of these automated routines was evaluated against results from manual segmentation on 4 healthy subjects and 7 stroke patients. The criteria include segmentation accuracy, the difference of current flow distributions in resulting HD-tDCS models and the optimized current flow intensities on cortical targets. Main results The segmentation tool can segment out not just the brain but also provide accurate results for CSF, skull and other soft tissues with a field of view (FOV) extending to the neck. Compared to manual results, automated segmentation deviates by only 7% and 18% for normal and stroke subjects, respectively. The predicted electric fields in the brain deviate by 12% and 29% respectively, which is well within the variability observed for various modeling choices. Finally, optimized current flow intensities on cortical targets do not differ significantly

  4. Automated MRI segmentation for individualized modeling of current flow in the human head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Dmochowski, Jacek P.; Su, Yuzhuo; Datta, Abhishek; Rorden, Christopher; Parra, Lucas C.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. High-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) and high-density electroencephalography require accurate models of current flow for precise targeting and current source reconstruction. At a minimum, such modeling must capture the idiosyncratic anatomy of the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and skull for each individual subject. Currently, the process to build such high-resolution individualized models from structural magnetic resonance images requires labor-intensive manual segmentation, even when utilizing available automated segmentation tools. Also, accurate placement of many high-density electrodes on an individual scalp is a tedious procedure. The goal was to develop fully automated techniques to reduce the manual effort in such a modeling process. Approach. A fully automated segmentation technique based on Statical Parametric Mapping 8, including an improved tissue probability map and an automated correction routine for segmentation errors, was developed, along with an automated electrode placement tool for high-density arrays. The performance of these automated routines was evaluated against results from manual segmentation on four healthy subjects and seven stroke patients. The criteria include segmentation accuracy, the difference of current flow distributions in resulting HD-tDCS models and the optimized current flow intensities on cortical targets.Main results. The segmentation tool can segment out not just the brain but also provide accurate results for CSF, skull and other soft tissues with a field of view extending to the neck. Compared to manual results, automated segmentation deviates by only 7% and 18% for normal and stroke subjects, respectively. The predicted electric fields in the brain deviate by 12% and 29% respectively, which is well within the variability observed for various modeling choices. Finally, optimized current flow intensities on cortical targets do not differ significantly.Significance. Fully

  5. Current transformer model with hysteresis for improving the protection response in electrical transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matussek, Robert; Dzienis, Cezary; Blumschein, Jörg; Schulte, Horst

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a generic enhanced protection current transformer (CT) model with saturation effects and transient behavior is presented. The model is used for the purpose of analysis and design of power system protection algorithms. Three major classes of protection CT have been modeled which all take into account the nonlinear inductance with remanence effects. The transient short-circuit currents in power systems are simulated under CT saturation condition. The response of a common power system protection algorithm with respect to robustness to nominal parameter variations and sensitivity against maloperation is demonstrated by simulation studies.

  6. A constitutive model for the forces of a magnetic bearing including eddy currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, D. L.; Hebbale, K. V.

    1993-01-01

    A multiple magnet bearing can be developed from N individual electromagnets. The constitutive relationships for a single magnet in such a bearing is presented. Analytical expressions are developed for a magnet with poles arranged circumferencially. Maxwell's field equations are used so the model easily includes the effects of induced eddy currents due to the rotation of the journal. Eddy currents must be included in any dynamic model because they are the only speed dependent parameter and may lead to a critical speed for the bearing. The model is applicable to bearings using attraction or repulsion.

  7. Voltage-Gated ion currents of schwann cells in cell culture models of human neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Fieber, Lynne A

    2003-11-01

    K(+) (K) channels play a role in the proliferation of many cell types in normal cells and certain disease states. Several laboratories have studied K currents in cultured Schwann cells from models of the human diseases, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). These diseases are characterized by the growth of Schwann cell tumors. In all cell culture NF models the K current properties differ in tumor-derived and normal Schwann cells. Depending on the model however, the type of K channel abnormality differs. K channels appear to play a role in the proliferation of Schwann cell cultures of these disease models, because a link has been established between K current blockade and the inhibition of Schwann cell proliferation in NF1 and NF2. Differences in the proliferation response of normal Schwann cells to K channel blockers suggest that in vitro regulation of proliferation in neoplastic and normal Schwann cells is complex.

  8. Modelling of Current Density Redistribution in Hollow Needle to Plate Electrical Discharge Designed for Ozone Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriha, Vitezslav

    2003-10-01

    Non-thermal plasma of atmospheric pressure electrical discharges in flowing air can be used to generation of ozone. We have been observed two modes of discharge burning in a hollow needle to plane electrodes configuration studied in the ozone generation experiments: A low current diffuse mode is characterized by increasing of the ozone production with the discharge current; a high current filamentary mode is disadvantageous for the ozone generation(the ozone production decreases when the discharge current increases). A possible interpretation of this effect is following: The filamentary mode discharge current density is redistributed and high current densities in filaments cores lead to degradation of the ozone generation. Local fields in the discharge can be modified by charged metallic and/or dielectric components (passive modulators) in the discharge space. An interactive numerical model has been developed for this purpose. This model is based on Ferguson's polynomial objects for both the discharge chamber scene modelling and the discharge fields analyzing. This approach allows intuitive modifications of modulators shapes and positions in 3D scene followed by quantitative comparison of the current density distribution with previous configurations.

  9. The boundary currents east and north of Madagascar: 2. Direct measurements and model comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, Friedrich; Fieux, MichèLe; Kindle, John; Swallow, John; Zantopp, Rainer

    1988-05-01

    Moored current measurements of 11-month duration were carried out in the boundary currents east of Madagascar, near 12°S at Cape Amber where the mean current flows northwestward and near 23°S where the mean current flows approximately southward. Transports derived from the moored current measurements in the depth range 150-1100 m compare reasonably well with those derived from ship sections by Swallow et al. (this issue). At 12°S, very energetic boundary current transport variations occur in the 40- to 55-day-period band, contributing about 40% to the total transport variance, while at 23°S the 40- to 55-day-period band fluctuations contribute only 15% to the total transport variance. The fluctuations near 12°S do not seem to be caused by local wind forcing, which does not show an energy peak in this period band. A significant annual cycle cannot be detected in the moored current and transport time series despite significant variation of wind forcing over the subtropical Indian Ocean. A comparison of the observations is carried out with two different numerical Indian Ocean models, both forced by the seasonally varying winds of Hellerman and Rosenstein (1983). A reduced-gravity model gives mean boundary current transports which compare well with the observations and also shows a negligible seasonal cycle. The multilayer Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory model also shows a small seasonal cycle. The observational evidence from the western subtropical Indian Ocean appears to be similar to that from the subtropical North Atlantic east of the Bahamas-Antilles arc where also no significant seasonal boundary current response was detected, despite large annual variation of wind forcing over the ocean. The two observational situations and numerical model results for both oceans are compared.

  10. An adaptive finite element approach to modelling sediment laden density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, S.; Hill, J.; Allison, P. A.; Piggott, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    Modelling sediment-laden density currents at real-world scales is a challenging task. Here we present Fluidity, which uses dynamic adaptive re-meshing to reduce computational costs whilst maintaining sufficient resolution where and when it is required. This allows small-scale processes to be captured in large scale simulations. Density currents, also known as gravity or buoyancy currents, occur wherever two fluids with different densities meet. They can occur at scales of up to hundred kilometres in the ocean when continental shelves collapse. This process releases large quantities of sediment into the ocean which increase the bulk density of the fluid to form a density current. These currents can carry sediment hundreds of kilometres, at speeds of up to a hundred kilometres per hour, over the sea bed. They can be tsunamigenic and they have the potential to cause significant damage to submarine infrastructure, such as submarine telecommunications cables or oil and gas infrastructure. They are also a key process for movement of organic material into the depths of the ocean. Due to this, they play an important role in the global carbon cycle on the Earth, forming a significant component of the stratigraphic record, and their deposits can form useful sources of important hydrocarbons. Modelling large scale sediment laden density currents is a very challenging problem. Particles within the current are suspended by turbulence that occurs at length scales that are several orders of magnitude smaller than the size of the current. Models that resolve the vertical structure of the flow require a very large, highly resolved mesh, and substantial computing power to solve. Here, we verify our adaptive model by comparison with a set of laboratory experiments by Gladstone et al. [1998] on the propagation and sediment deposition of bidisperse gravity currents. Comparisons are also made with fixed mesh solutions, and it is shown that accuracy can be maintained with fewer elements

  11. Application of microorganisms in concrete: a promising sustainable strategy to improve concrete durability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianyun; Ersan, Yusuf Cagatay; Boon, Nico; De Belie, Nele

    2016-04-01

    The beneficial effect of microbially induced carbonate precipitation on building materials has been gradually disclosed in the last decade. After the first applications of on historical stones, promising results were obtained with the respect of improved durability. An extensive study then followed on the application of this environmentally friendly and compatible material on a currently widely used construction material, concrete. This review is focused on the discussion of the impact of the two main applications, bacterial surface treatment and bacteria based crack repair, on concrete durability. Special attention was paid to the choice of suitable bacteria and the metabolic pathway aiming at their functionality in concrete environment. Interactions between bacterial cells and cementitious matrix were also elaborated. Furthermore, recommendations to improve the effectiveness of bacterial treatment are provided. Limitations of current studies, updated applications and future application perspectives are shortly outlined.

  12. Ecosystem Modeling in the South Central US: A Synthesis of Current Models toward the Development of Coupled Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kc, M.

    2015-12-01

    Ecosystem services and products are the foundation of sustainability for regional and global economy since we are directly or indirectly dependent on the ecosystem services like food, livestock, water, air, wildlife etc. It has been increasingly recognized that for sustainability concerns, the conservation problems need to be addressed in the context of entire ecosystems. This approach known as the ecosystem approach is fundamental to managing earth's finite resources since it addresses the interactions that link biotic systems, of which human, flora and fauna are integral parts, with the physical systems on which they depend. This approach is even more vital in the 21st century with formidable increasing human population and rapid changes in global environment. This study is being conducted to find the state of the science of ecosystem models in the South-Central region of US. The propose of the project is to conduct a systematic review and synthesize relevant information on the current state of the science of ecosystem modeling in the South-Central region of US toward coupling these models with climate, agronomic, hydrologic, economic or management models to better represent ecosystem dynamics as affected by climate change and human activities; and hence gain more reliable predictions of future ecosystem functions and service in the region. Better understandings of such processes will increase our ability to predict the ecosystem responses and feedbacks to environmental and human induced change in the region so that decision makers can make an informed management decisions of the ecosystem.

  13. Simulations of the Arctic Boundary Current in an eddy-resolving global ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, Y.; Nurser, A. J. G.; Bacon, S.; Coward, A. C.

    2012-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is shielded from winds by sea ice and is strongly stratified, resulting in extremely low mixing rates. In this quiescent ocean, currents along the continental shelves become the principal dynamical features of the circulation. Observations and model results suggest the existence of a fast oceanic current in the Arctic Ocean, the Arctic Circumpolar Boundary Current (ACBC). The current flows counterclockwise (cyclonically) along the shelf break of the Siberian, Alaskan and Canadian Arctic shelves all way around the Arctic Ocean margins, leaving through western Fram Strait, and taking about two decades to complete the circuit (Aksenov et al., 2011). Simulations with an eddy-resolving global 1/12 degree NEMO model show that the ACBC consists of several jets with the fastest flow occurring at the shelf break. We compare the models results with observations and examine mechanisms driving the ACBC. Through the analysis of the NEMO simulations performed with eddy-resolving, eddy-permitting and non-eddying model configurations we investigate the effect of resolution on the current. Reference Aksenov, Y., V. V. Ivanov, A. J. G. Nurser, S. Bacon, I. V. Polyakov, A. C. Coward, A. C. Naveira-Garabato, and A. Beszczynska-Moeller (2011), The Arctic Circumpolar Boundary Current, J. Geophys. Res., 116, C09017, doi:10.1029/2010JC006637.

  14. Simulation Study of Disruption and Halo Currents in the KSTAR Model Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. Y.

    1999-11-01

    A detailed simulation study has been performed for the disruption load analysis in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device using the Tokamak Simulation Code. Two different types of disruptions (radial and vertical) are simulated for various initial equilibria and halo region models. Special emphasis is put on the behavior of halo currents in the KSTAR model structure, in which a highly conductive passive plate is located near the plasma. It is found that the path and magnitude of the poloidal halo current depend quite sensitively on the detailed structure model of the KSTAR plasma facing component (PFC). In particular, a local circulation of a very large poloidal halo current is observed to occur near the connector of the up-down passive plates when it is not electrically insulated. An explanation is presented for the physical origin of this rather unusual feature of the halo current in the KSTAR PFC environment. The large poloidal halo current can give a severe electromagnetic load to the KSTAR PFC structure, and an optimized PFC model structure is proposed which can substantially reduce the undesirable halo current.

  15. Mechanically durable, superoleophobic coatings prepared by layer-by-layer technique for anti-smudge and oil-water separation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Philip S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Superoleophobic surfaces are of interest for anti-fouling, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, low-drag, anti-fog, and oil-water separation applications. Current bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. A so-called layer-by-layer approach, involving charged species with electrostatic interactions between layers, can provide the flexibility needed to improve adhesion to the substrate while providing a low surface tension coating at the air interface. In this work, a polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and a fluorosurfactant are spray deposited separately to create a durable, superoleophobic coating. Polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) polyelectrolyte was complexed with a fluorosurfactant layer (FL), which provides oil repellency while being hydrophilic. This oleophobic/superhydrophilic behavior was enhanced through the use of roughening with SiO2 particles resulting in a superoleophobic coating with hexadecane contact angles exceeding 155° and tilt angles of less than 4°. The coating is also superhydrophilic, which is desirable for oil-water separation applications. The durability of these coatings was examined through the use of micro- and macrowear experiments. These coatings currently display characteristics of transparency. Fabrication of these coatings via the layer-by-layer technique results in superoleophobic surfaces displaying improved durability compared to existing work where either the durability or the oil-repellency is compromised. PMID:25731716

  16. Mechanically durable, superoleophobic coatings prepared by layer-by-layer technique for anti-smudge and oil-water separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Philip S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-03-01

    Superoleophobic surfaces are of interest for anti-fouling, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, low-drag, anti-fog, and oil-water separation applications. Current bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. A so-called layer-by-layer approach, involving charged species with electrostatic interactions between layers, can provide the flexibility needed to improve adhesion to the substrate while providing a low surface tension coating at the air interface. In this work, a polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and a fluorosurfactant are spray deposited separately to create a durable, superoleophobic coating. Polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) polyelectrolyte was complexed with a fluorosurfactant layer (FL), which provides oil repellency while being hydrophilic. This oleophobic/superhydrophilic behavior was enhanced through the use of roughening with SiO2 particles resulting in a superoleophobic coating with hexadecane contact angles exceeding 155° and tilt angles of less than 4°. The coating is also superhydrophilic, which is desirable for oil-water separation applications. The durability of these coatings was examined through the use of micro- and macrowear experiments. These coatings currently display characteristics of transparency. Fabrication of these coatings via the layer-by-layer technique results in superoleophobic surfaces displaying improved durability compared to existing work where either the durability or the oil-repellency is compromised.

  17. Mechanically durable, superoleophobic coatings prepared by layer-by-layer technique for anti-smudge and oil-water separation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Philip S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-03-03

    Superoleophobic surfaces are of interest for anti-fouling, self-cleaning, anti-smudge, low-drag, anti-fog, and oil-water separation applications. Current bioinspired surfaces are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. A so-called layer-by-layer approach, involving charged species with electrostatic interactions between layers, can provide the flexibility needed to improve adhesion to the substrate while providing a low surface tension coating at the air interface. In this work, a polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and a fluorosurfactant are spray deposited separately to create a durable, superoleophobic coating. Polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) polyelectrolyte was complexed with a fluorosurfactant layer (FL), which provides oil repellency while being hydrophilic. This oleophobic/superhydrophilic behavior was enhanced through the use of roughening with SiO2 particles resulting in a superoleophobic coating with hexadecane contact angles exceeding 155° and tilt angles of less than 4°. The coating is also superhydrophilic, which is desirable for oil-water separation applications. The durability of these coatings was examined through the use of micro- and macrowear experiments. These coatings currently display characteristics of transparency. Fabrication of these coatings via the layer-by-layer technique results in superoleophobic surfaces displaying improved durability compared to existing work where either the durability or the oil-repellency is compromised.

  18. Changing head model extent affects finite element predictions of transcranial direct current stimulation distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indahlastari, Aprinda; Chauhan, Munish; Schwartz, Benjamin; Sadleir, Rosalind J.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. In this study, we determined efficient head model sizes relative to predicted current densities in transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Approach. Efficiency measures were defined based on a finite element (FE) simulations performed using nine human head models derived from a single MRI data set, having extents varying from 60%-100% of the original axial range. Eleven tissue types, including anisotropic white matter, and three electrode montages (T7-T8, F3-right supraorbital, Cz-Oz) were used in the models. Main results. Reducing head volume extent from 100% to 60%, that is, varying the model’s axial range from between the apex and C3 vertebra to one encompassing only apex to the superior cerebellum, was found to decrease the total modeling time by up to half. Differences between current density predictions in each model were quantified by using a relative difference measure (RDM). Our simulation results showed that {RDM} was the least affected (a maximum of 10% error) for head volumes modeled from the apex to the base of the skull (60%-75% volume). Significance. This finding suggested that the bone could act as a bioelectricity boundary and thus performing FE simulations of tDCS on the human head with models extending beyond the inferior skull may not be necessary in most cases to obtain reasonable precision in current density results.

  19. Modeling surf zone-inner shelf exchange: Interaction of rip currents and stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N.; Feddersen, F.

    2014-12-01

    Transient rip currents on alongshore uniform beaches develop from the coalescence of surf zone eddies, exchanging tracers between the surf zone and the potentially stratified inner shelf. The interaction of stratification and transient rip currents has not yet been investigated. Surf zone eddies responsible for transient rip currents are generated by short-crested wave breaking, a process included in wave-resolving (WR) Boussinesq models. However, WR models are depth-integrated and cannot account for stratification and vertically sheared flows. Wave-averaged (WA) models can simulate these processes, but cannot create surf zone eddies. A combination of WR and WA models is required to accurately simulate surf zone-inner shelf exchange. Here, WR depth-integrated Boussinessq model funwaveC is coupled to the stratification and depth-resolving WA Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system. The surf zone eddy generation forcing is extracted from a funwaveC simulation of normally incident waves on a planar beach, and provided to COAWST as a depth-uniform surf zone force. COAWST model simulations resolving the surf zone to mid-shelf are conducted with surf zone eddy forcing, idealistic surface heating/cooling, stratification, and Coriolis effects. These simulations provide three-dimensional evolution of velocity and temperature, diagnosed to quantify the role of surf zone eddy forcing in surf zone-inner shelf exchange. The impact of stratification on rip currents and exchange is studied by varying the stratification. Funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  20. Higher spin currents in the N =2 stringy coset minimal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Changhyun

    2016-12-01

    In the coset model based on (AN-1 (1 )⊕AN-1 (1 ),AN-1 (1 )) at level (N ,N ;2 N ), it is known that the N =2 superconformal algebra can be realized by the two kinds of adjoint fermions. Each Kac-Moody current of spin 1 is given by the product of fermions with structure constant (f symbols) as usual. One can construct the spin-1 current by combining the above two fermions with the structure constant and the spin-1 current by multiplying these two fermions with a completely symmetric S U (N ) invariant tensor of rank 3 (d symbols). The lowest higher spin-2 current with nonzero U (1 ) charge (corresponding to the zero mode eigenvalue of the spin-1 current of N =2 superconformal algebra) can be obtained from these four spin-1 currents in quadratic form. Similarly, the other type of lowest higher spin-2 current, whose U (1 ) charge is opposite to the above one, can be obtained also. Four higher spin-5/2 currents can be constructed from the operator product expansions (OPEs) between the spin-3/2 currents of N =2 superconformal algebra and the above two higher spin-2 currents. The two higher spin-3 currents can be determined by the OPEs between the above spin-3/2 currents and the higher spin-5/2 currents. Finally, the ten N =2 OPEs between the four N =2 higher spin multiplets (2 ,5/2 ,5/2 ,3 ) , (2 ,5/2 ,5/2 ,3 ) , (7/2 ,4 ,4 ,9/2 ) , and (7/2 ,4 ,4 ,9/2 ) are obtained explicitly for generic N .

  1. Weak constraint four-dimensional variational data assimilation in a model of the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, William J.; Smith, Polly J.; Milliff, Ralph F.; Fiechter, Jerome; Wikle, Christopher K.; Edwards, Christopher A.; Moore, Andrew M.

    2016-12-01

    A new approach is explored for computing estimates of the error covariance associated with the intrinsic errors of a numerical forecast model in regions characterized by upwelling and downwelling. The approach used is based on a combination of strong constraint data assimilation, twin model experiments, linear inverse modeling, and Bayesian hierarchical modeling. The resulting model error covariance estimates Q are applied to a model of the California Current System using weak constraint four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation to compute estimates of the ocean circulation. The results of this study show that the estimates of Q derived following our approach lead to demonstrable improvements in the model circulation estimates and isolate regions where model errors are likely to be important and that have been independently identified in the same model in previously published work.

  2. 40 CFR 94.219 - Durability data engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Durability data engine selection. 94... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certification Provisions § 94.219 Durability data engine selection. (a) For Category 1 and Category 2 engines, the manufacturer shall...

  3. 40 CFR 94.219 - Durability data engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Durability data engine selection. 94... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certification Provisions § 94.219 Durability data engine selection. (a) For Category 1 and Category 2 engines, the manufacturer shall...

  4. 40 CFR 94.219 - Durability data engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Durability data engine selection. 94... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certification Provisions § 94.219 Durability data engine selection. (a) For Category 1 and Category 2 engines, the manufacturer shall...

  5. 40 CFR 94.219 - Durability data engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Durability data engine selection. 94... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certification Provisions § 94.219 Durability data engine selection. (a) For Category 1 and Category 2 engines, the manufacturer shall...

  6. Effect of Unprofessional Supervision on Durability of Buildings.

    PubMed

    Yahaghi, Javad

    2017-02-02

    The durability of buildings which depends on the nature of the supervisory system used in their construction is an important feature of the construction industry. This article tries to draw the readers' attention to the effect of untrained and unprofessional building supervisors and their unethical performance on the durability of buildings.

  7. Synergy of AMPA and NMDA Receptor Currents in Dopaminergic Neurons: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Zakharov, Denis; Lapish, Christopher; Gutkin, Boris; Kuznetsov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons display two modes of firing: low-frequency tonic and high-frequency bursts. The high frequency firing within the bursts is attributed to NMDA, but not AMPA receptor activation. In our models of the DA neuron, both biophysical and abstract, the NMDA receptor current can significantly increase their firing frequency, whereas the AMPA receptor current is not able to evoke high-frequency activity and usually suppresses firing. However, both currents are produced by glutamate receptors and, consequently, are often co-activated. Here we consider combined influence of AMPA and NMDA synaptic input in the models of the DA neuron. Different types of neuronal activity (resting state, low frequency, or high frequency firing) are observed depending on the conductance of the AMPAR and NMDAR currents. In two models, biophysical and reduced, we show that the firing frequency increases more effectively if both receptors are co-activated for certain parameter values. In particular, in the more quantitative biophysical model, the maximal frequency is 40% greater than that with NMDAR alone. The dynamical mechanism of such frequency growth is explained in the framework of phase space evolution using the reduced model. In short, both the AMPAR and NMDAR currents flatten the voltage nullcline, providing the frequency increase, whereas only NMDA prevents complete unfolding of the nullcline, providing robust firing. Thus, we confirm a major role of the NMDAR in generating high-frequency firing and conclude that AMPAR activation further significantly increases the frequency. PMID:27252643

  8. Study of the effects of fuel vortex film cooling on high temperature coating durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A report on the effects of fuel vortex film cooling on high temperature coating durability is presented. The program evaluated candidate high temperature oxidation resistant reaction control system engine thrust chamber material. As a result of the evaluation, the current and future programs may be optimized from the materials standpoint. Engine firing data for the evaluation of one material system is generated. The subjects considered are: (1) screening of materials, (2) thrust chamber fabrication, (3) engine testing, and (4) analysis of the data.

  9. A finite element model to identify electrode influence on current distribution in the skin.

    PubMed

    Sha, Ning; Kenney, Laurence P J; Heller, Ben W; Barker, Anthony T; Howard, David; Moatamedi, Moji

    2008-08-01

    Discomfort experienced during surface functional electrical stimulation (FES) is thought to be partly a result of localized high current density in the skin underneath the stimulating electrode. This article describes a finite element (FE) model to predict skin current density distribution in the region of the electrode during stimulation and its application to the identification of electrode properties that may act to reduce sensation. The FE model results show that the peak current density was located in an area immediately under the stratum corneum, adjacent to a sweat duct. A simulation of surface FES via a high-resistivity electrode showed a reduction in this peak current density, when compared to that with a low-resistivity electrode.

  10. A High-resolution Model of Field-aligned Currents Through Empirical Orthogonal Functions Analysis (MFACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Maosheng; Vogt, Joachim; Luehr, Hermann; Sorbalo, Eugen; Blagau, Adrian; Le, Guan; Lu, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Ten years of CHAMP magnetic field measurements are integrated into MFACE, a model of field-aligned currents (FACs) using empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). EOF1 gives the basic Region-1/Region-2 pattern varying mainly with the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component. EOF2 captures separately the cusp current signature and By-related variability. Compared to existing models, MFACE yields significantly better spatial resolution, reproduces typically observed FAC thickness and intensity, improves on the magnetic local time (MLT) distribution, and gives the seasonal dependence of FAC latitudes and the NBZ current signature. MFACE further reveals systematic dependences on By, including 1) Region-1/Region-2 topology modifications around noon; 2) imbalance between upward and downward maximum current density; 3) MLT location of the Harang discontinuity. Furthermore, our procedure allows quantifying response times of FACs to solar wind driving at the bow shock nose: we obtain 20 minutes and 35-40 minutes lags for the FAC density and latitude, respectively.

  11. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface I: Wave-current coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; William, Perrie; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-06-01

    To study the electromagnetic backscattering from a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface, a fractal sea surface wave-current model is derived, based on the mechanism of wave-current interactions. The numerical results show the effect of the ocean current on the wave. Wave amplitude decreases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height increase, spectrum intensity decreases and shifts towards lower frequencies when the current occurs parallel to the direction of the ocean wave. By comparison, wave amplitude increases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height decrease, spectrum intensity increases and shifts towards higher frequencies if the current is in the opposite direction to the direction of ocean wave. The wave-current interaction effect of the ocean current is much stronger than that of the nonlinear wave-wave interaction. The kurtosis of the nonlinear fractal ocean surface is larger than that of linear fractal ocean surface. The effect of the current on skewness of the probability distribution function is negligible. Therefore, the ocean wave spectrum is notably changed by the surface current and the change should be detectable in the electromagnetic backscattering signal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Development Program of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service.

  12. Durability of Waste Glass Flax Fiber Reinforced Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, M.; Hashmi, M. S. J.; Olabi, A. G.; Messeiry, M.

    2011-01-01

    The main concern for natural fibre reinforced mortar composites is the durability of the fibres in the alkaline environment of cement. The composites may undergo a reduction in strength as a result of weakening of the fibres by a combination of alkali attack and fibre mineralisation. In order to enhance the durability of natural fiber reinforced cement composites several approaches have been studied including fiber impregnation, sealing of the matrix pore system and reduction of matrix alkalinity through the use of pozzolanic materials. In this study waste glass powder was used as a pozzolanic additive to improve the durability performance of flax fiber reinforced mortar (FFRM). The durability of the FFRM was studied by determining the effects of ageing in water and exposure to wetting and drying cycles; on the microstructures and flexural behaviour of the composites. The mortar tests demonstrated that the waste glass powder has significant effect on improving the durability of FFRM.

  13. Durability of waste glass flax fiber reinforced mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Aly, M.; Hashmi, M. S. J.; Olabi, A. G.; Messeiry, M.

    2011-01-17

    The main concern for natural fibre reinforced mortar composites is the durability of the fibres in the alkaline environment of cement. The composites may undergo a reduction in strength as a result of weakening of the fibres by a combination of alkali attack and fibre mineralisation. In order to enhance the durability of natural fiber reinforced cement composites several approaches have been studied including fiber impregnation, sealing of the matrix pore system and reduction of matrix alkalinity through the use of pozzolanic materials. In this study waste glass powder was used as a pozzolanic additive to improve the durability performance of flax fiber reinforced mortar (FFRM). The durability of the FFRM was studied by determining the effects of ageing in water and exposure to wetting and drying cycles; on the microstructures and flexural behaviour of the composites. The mortar tests demonstrated that the waste glass powder has significant effect on improving the durability of FFRM.

  14. DROP: Durable Reconnaissance and Observation Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; McKenzie, Clifford F.

    2012-01-01

    Robots have been a valuable tool for providing a remote presence in areas that are either inaccessible or too dangerous for humans. Having a robot with a high degree of adaptability becomes crucial during such events. The adaptability that comes from high mobility and high durability greatly increases the potential uses of a robot in these situations, and therefore greatly increases its usefulness to humans. DROP is a lightweight robot that addresses these challenges with the capability to survive large impacts, carry a usable payload, and traverse a variety of surfaces, including climbing vertical surfaces like wood, stone, and concrete. The platform is crash-proof, allowing it to be deployed in ways including being dropped from an unmanned aerial vehicle or thrown from a large MSL-class (Mars Science Laboratory) rover.

  15. Durable fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Corinaldesi, V.; Moriconi, G

    2004-02-01

    In order to produce thin precast elements, a self-compacting concrete was prepared. When manufacturing these elements, homogenously dispersed steel fibers instead of ordinary steel-reinforcing mesh were added to the concrete mixture at a dosage of 10% by mass of cement. An adequate concrete strength class was achieved with a water to cement ratio of 0.40. Compression and flexure tests were carried out to assess the safety of these thin concrete elements. Moreover, serviceability aspects were taken into consideration. Firstly, drying shrinkage tests were carried out in order to evaluate the contribution of steel fibers in counteracting the high concrete strains due to a low aggregate-cement ratio. Secondly, the resistance to freezing and thawing cycles was investigated on concrete specimens in some cases superficially treated with a hydrophobic agent. Lastly, both carbonation and chloride penetration tests were carried out to assess durability behavior of this concrete mixture.

  16. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

  17. A Hybrid Kinetic Model of Asymmetric Thin Current Sheets with Sheared Flows in a Collisionless Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-27

    control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDREss. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYVY) 12. REPORT TYPE 3 . DATES COVERED (From - To) 27-12...Current Sheets ........................................ 5 3 . Asymmetric Current Sheet Model ............................................. 6 3.1...Chen,l Robert A. Santoro, 2, t, Adam Szabo, 3 , and Davin E. Larson4 1 Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 2 NRC

  18. Event study combining magnetospheric and ionospheric perspectives of the substorm current wedge modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, V. A.; Nikolaev, A. V.; Kubyshkina, M. V.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Singer, H. J.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Nakamura, R.; Milan, S. E.; Coxon, J. C.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2014-12-01

    Unprecedented spacecraft and instrumental coverage and the isolated nature and distinct step-like development of a substorm on 17 March 2010 has allowed validation of the two-loop substorm current wedge model (SCW2L). We find a close spatiotemporal relationship of the SCW with many other essential signatures of substorm activity in the magnetotail and demonstrate its azimuthally localized structure and stepwise expansion in the magnetotail. We confirm that ground SCW diagnostics makes it possible to reconstruct and organize the azimuthal spatiotemporal substorm development pattern with accuracy better than 1 h magnetic local time (MLT) in the case of medium-scale substorm. The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE)-based study of global field-aligned current distribution indicates that (a) the SCW-related field-aligned current system consists of simultaneously activated R1- and R2-type currents, (b) their net currents have a R1-sense, and (c) locations of net current peaks are consistent with the SCW edge locations inferred from midlatitude variations. Thanks to good azimuthal coverage of four GOES and three Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms spacecraft, we evaluated the intensities of the SCW R1- and R2-like current loops (using the SCW2L model) obtained from combined magnetospheric and ground midlatitude magnetic observations and found the net currents consistent (within a factor of 2) with the AMPERE-based estimate. We also ran an adaptive magnetospheric model and show that SCW2L model outperforms it in predicting the magnetic configuration changes during substorm dipolarizations.

  19. Polydispersed Gravity Currents Along a V-Shaped Valley: Experiments and Box Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriaux, C. A. M. D.; Besson, C. K.

    2014-12-01

    Turbidity currents, which occur at the continental margins and transport sediments along submarines canyons are particulate gravity currents made of poorly sorted particles. In such currents, the flow is to a large extent controlled by the grain size distribution of the particles at the source. Here we present the combined results of a box model and lock-exchange experiments of particulate gravity currents at small volumetric concentrations of particles (< 4%) flowing along a V-shaped valley, for which we looked at the grain size distributions along the deposit. The currents were made of 1) Silicon Carbide (SiC), 2) Glass Beads (GBs), 3) combined poorly sorted SiC/GBs, and 4) moderately sorted combined SiC/GBs. Experimental particles sizes were in the range 3-100 microns. We used 20 particle size classes to characterize the distributions. First we show that a box model that solves for the deposition of all the particle size classes, remarkably describes the speed of the currents, the mass deposited by the currents, and the material density of the deposit for those currents initially made of SiC and GBs. Last but not least, the box model also reconstructs the mass based size distributions along the deposits characterized by various fining. Yet, the reconstructed distributions differ with the shape of the particles. In the presence of only round GBs particles, the mass based size distributions given by the box compare extremely well with the experimental counterparts. In the presence of SiC, there is a systematic shift towards the smaller grain sizes of the mass based size distributions given by the box compared to the experimental ones. Several hypotheses to explain this shift are currently being investigated. The present work was supported by the Fundaçao para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT, Portugal) under Project Pest-OE/CTE /LA0019/2013-2014.

  20. NON-EQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION MODELING OF THE CURRENT SHEET IN A SIMULATED SOLAR ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Chengcai; Reeves, Katharine K.; Raymond, John C.; Murphy, Nicholas A.; Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Lin Jun; Mikic, Zoran; Linker, Jon A.

    2013-08-20

    The current sheet that extends from the top of flare loops and connects to an associated flux rope is a common structure in models of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). To understand the observational properties of CME current sheets, we generated predictions from a flare/CME model to be compared with observations. We use a simulation of a large-scale CME current sheet previously reported by Reeves et al. This simulation includes ohmic and coronal heating, thermal conduction, and radiative cooling in the energy equation. Using the results of this simulation, we perform time-dependent ionization calculations of the flow in a CME current sheet and construct two-dimensional spatial distributions of ionic charge states for multiple chemical elements. We use the filter responses from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the predicted intensities of emission lines to compute the count rates for each of the AIA bands. The results show differences in the emission line intensities between equilibrium and non-equilibrium ionization. The current sheet plasma is underionized at low heights and overionized at large heights. At low heights in the current sheet, the intensities of the AIA 94 A and 131 A channels are lower for non-equilibrium ionization than for equilibrium ionization. At large heights, these intensities are higher for non-equilibrium ionization than for equilibrium ionization inside the current sheet. The assumption of ionization equilibrium would lead to a significant underestimate of the temperature low in the current sheet and overestimate at larger heights. We also calculate the intensities of ultraviolet lines and predict emission features to be compared with events from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, including a low-intensity region around the current sheet corresponding to this model.

  1. MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING OF EDDY CURRENT EFFECTS IN BNL'S AGS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN, K.A.; AHRENS, L.; GARDNER, C.; GLENN, J.W.; HARVEY, M.; MENG, W.; ZENO, K.

    2006-06-23

    Recent beam experiments at BNL's AGS Booster have enabled us to study in more detail the effects of eddy currents on the lattice structure and our control over the betatron tune. The Booster is capable of operating at ramp rates as high as 9 T/sec. At these ramp rates eddy currents in the vacuum chambers significantly alter the fields and gradients seen by the beam as it is accelerated. The Booster was designed with these effects in mind and to help control the field uniformity and linearity in the Booster Dipoles special vacuum chambers were designed with current windings to negate the affect of the induced eddy currents. In this report results from betatron tune measurements and eddy current simulations will be presented. We will then present results from modeling the accelerator using the results of the magnetic field simulations and compare these to the measurements.

  2. A control-oriented model of the current profile in tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witrant, E.; Joffrin, E.; Brémond, S.; Giruzzi, G.; Mazon, D.; Barana, O.; Moreau, P.

    2007-07-01

    This paper proposes a control-oriented approach to the tokamak plasma current profile dynamics. It is established based on a consistent set of simplified relationships, in particular for the microwave current drive sources, rather than exact physical modelling. Assuming that a proper model for advanced control schemes can be established using the so-called cylindrical approximation and neglecting the diamagnetic effects, we propose a model that focuses on the flux diffusion (from which the current profile is inferred). Its inputs are some real-time measurements available on modern tokamaks and the effects of some major actuators, such as the magnetic coils, lower hybrid (LHCD), electron and ion cyclotron frequency (ECCD and ICRH) systems, are particularly taken into account. More precisely, the non-inductive current profile sources are modelled as 3-parameters functions of the control inputs derived either from approximate theoretical formulae for the ECCD and bootstrap terms or from experimental scaling laws specifically developed from hard x-ray Tore Supra data for the LHCD influence. The use of scaling laws in this model reflects the fact that the operation of future reactors will certainly depend upon a great number of scaling laws and specific engineering parameters. The discretization issues are also specifically addressed, to ensure robustness with respect to discretisation errors and the efficiency (in terms of computation time) of the associated algorithm. This model is compared with experimental results and the CRONOS solver for tore supra tokamak.

  3. Milestone report: Status report on time-dependent modeling for current profile feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T.A.; Crotinger, J.; Haney, S.

    1995-09-29

    During the past year, LLNL efforts in the DIII-D experimental program have expanded to include time-dependent modeling of advanced tokamak (AT) operating modes. Consistent with our involvement in experimental operations, we have directed our initial efforts at modeling the negative central shear (NCS) configuration, an important and attractive mode of operation for reducing the size and cost of future tokamak experiments without sacrificing performance. In this endeavor, we have brought into use the Corsica modeling code as a tool for investigating the time-dependent evolution and control of various operating modes. In our current efforts, we are contributing to the analysis of the NCS experimental data using analysis tools such as the EFIT equilibrium code and the ONETWO and TRANSP transport codes. Results of these analyses are being used for comparisons with the Corsica modeling. Future directions include the modeling of startup and sustaining of NCS (and other AT) configurations, the understanding of current drive effects, the development of current drive scenarios and control algorithms, and the design of experiments and prediction of experimental results. We are currently in the early stages of applying this powerful modeling tool to the DIII-D experimental program.

  4. Non-Inductive Current Drive Modeling Extending Advanced Tokamak Operation to Steady State

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T.A.; Lodestro, L.L.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Porter, G.D.; Murakami, M.; Lao, L.L.; Lin-Lui, Y.R.; St. John, H.E.

    2000-06-06

    A critical issue for sustaining high performance, negative central shear (NCS) discharges is the ability to maintain current distributions that are maximum off axis. Sustaining such hollow current profiles in steady state requires the use of non-inductively driven current sources. On the DIII-D experiment, a combination of neutral beam current drive (NBCD) and bootstrap current have been used to create transient NCS discharges. The electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) system is currently being upgraded from three gyrotrons to six to provide more than 3MW of absorbed power in long-pulse operation to help sustain the required off-axis current drive. This upgrade SuPporrs the long range goal of DIII-D to sustain high performance discharges with high values of normalized {beta}, {beta}{sub n} = {beta}/(I{sub p}/aB{sub T}), confinement enhancement factor, H, and neutron production rates while utilizing bootstrap current fraction, f{sub bs}, in excess of 50%. At these high performance levels, the likelihood of onset of MHD modes that spoil confinement indicates the need to control plasma profiles if we are to extend this operation to long pulse or steady state. To investigate the effectiveness of the EC system and to explore operating scenarios to sustain these discharges, we use time-dependent simulations of the equilibrium, transport and stability. We explore methods to directly alter the safety factor profile, q, through direct current drive or by localized electron heating to modify the bootstrap current profile. Time dependent simulations using both experimentally determined [1] and theory-based [2] energy transport models have been done. Here, we report on simulations exploring parametric dependencies of the heating, current drive, and profiles that affect our ability to sustain stable discharges.

  5. Durability of an inorganic polymer concrete coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, Kenneth

    The objective of the research program reported in this thesis is to evaluate the durability of an inorganic polymer composite coating exposed to freeze/thaw cycling and wet-dry cycling. Freeze/thaw cycling is performed following ASTM D6944-09 Standard Practice for Resistance of Cured Coatings to Thermal Cycling and wet/dry cycling is performed following guidelines set forth in a thesis written by Ronald Garon at Rutgers University. For both sets of experiments, four coating mixture proportions were evaluated. The variables were: silica/alumina ratio, mixing protocol using high shear and normal shear mixing, curing temperatures of 70 and 120 degrees Fahrenheit and use of nano size constituent materials. The mix with highest silica/alumina ratio was designated as Mix 1 and mixes with lower ratios were designated as Mix 2 and Mix 3. Mix 4 had nano silica particles. Four prisms were used for each variable including control that had no coating. The performance of the coating was evaluated using adhesion strength measured using: ASTM D7234 Test Method for Pull-Off Strength of Coatings on Concrete Using Portable Adhesion Testers. Tests were performed after every five consecutive cycles of thermal conditioning and six consecutive cycles of wet-dry exposure. Results from the thermal cycling and wet-dry testing demonstrate that all coating formulations are durable. The minimum adhesion strength was 300 psi even though a relatively weak base concrete surface was chosen for the study. The weak surface was chosen to simulate aged concrete surfaces present in actual field conditions. Due to the inherent nature of the test procedure the variation in test results is high. However, based on the test results, high shear mixer and high temperature curing are not recommended. As expected nano size constituent materials provide better performance.

  6. Strategic Petroleum Reserve equation of state model development : current performance against measured data.

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, David L.; Rudeen, David Keith

    2010-07-01

    This report documents the progression of crude oil phase behavior modeling within the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve vapor pressure program during the period 2004-2009. Improvements in quality control on phase behavior measurements in 2006 coupled with a growing body of degasification plant operations data have created a solid measurement baseline that has served to inform and significantly improve project understanding on phase behavior of SPR oils. Systematic tuning of the model based on proven practices from the technical literature have shown to reduce model bias and match observed data very well, though this model tuning effort is currently in process at SPR and based on preliminary data. The current report addresses many of the steps that have helped to build a strong baseline of data coupled with sufficient understanding of model features so that calibration is possible.

  7. Radiomagnetotelluric two-dimensional forward and inverse modelling accounting for displacement currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalscheuer, Thomas; Pedersen, Laust B.; Siripunvaraporn, Weerachai

    2008-11-01

    Electromagnetic surface measurements with the radiomagnetotelluric (RMT) method in the frequency range between 10 and 300kHz are typically interpreted in the quasi-static approximation, that is, assuming displacement currents are negligible. In this paper, the dielectric effect of displacement currents on RMT responses over resistive subsurface models is studied with a 2-D forward and inverse scheme that can operate both in the quasi-static approximation and including displacement currents. Forward computations of simple models exemplify how responses that allow for displacement currents deviate from responses computed in the quasi-static approximation. The differences become most obvious for highly resistive subsurface models of about 3000Ωm and more and at high frequencies. For such cases, the apparent resistivities and phases of the transverse magnetic (TM) and transverse electric (TE) modes are significantly smaller than in the quasi-static approximation. Along profiles traversing 2-D subsurface models, sign reversals in the real part of the vertical magnetic transfer function (VMT) are often more pronounced than in the quasi-static approximation. On both sides of such sign reversals, the responses computed including displacement currents are larger than typical measurement errors. The 2-D inversion of synthetic data computed including displacement currents demonstrates that serious misinterpretations in the form of artefacts in inverse models can be made if displacement currents are neglected during the inversion. Hence, the inclusion of the dielectric effect is a crucial improvement over existing quasi-static 2-D inverse schemes. Synthetic data from a 2-D model with constant dielectric permittivity and a conductive block buried in a highly resistive layer, which in turn is underlain by a conductive layer, are inverted. In the quasi-static inverse model, the depth to the conductive structures is overestimated, artefactual resistors appear on both sides of the

  8. A new model for marine density-turbidity currents with criteria for ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salusti, E.

    We discuss the hydrodynamic stability properties of a one-dimensional quasi-steady marine current, driven by a density excess caused by low temperature or high salinity, and flowing over a regular slope, taking bottom-erosion phenomena into consideration. The term density-turbidity current is used here for a thermohaline density current, with that density increased by entrained sediment. Thermohaline currents are of fundamental importance with regard to the Earth's climate, and the same must apply to density-turbidity currents. To simplify this complex problem, we schematize the flow as a thin turbulent quasisteady current, with gravitational and frictional forces in approximate equilibrium; the effects of small-scale perturbations, and of interaction with the bottom sediment, are then schematised by assuming a heuristic model of sediment evolution. Indeed, as in recent work by Caserta et al. (1990), we postulate that density variation due to bottom erosion or deposition is a function only of the shear stress exerted on the sea bottom by the current. Using these assumptions, we arrive at a complex nonlinear equation which considers both time and space variability for a realistic two-layer model of these density-turbidity currents. This finally gives a nonlinear heat equation that displays both diffusive behaviour and a peculiar type of time-delayed nonlinear behaviour, a previously-unrecognised effect governed by a criterion which defines explosive perturbations. It is of interest that this criterion is not related to energy considerations, like other criteria discussed in the literature, but is based on hydrodynamic instability considerations. The above model can also be applied to classical turbidity currents, i.e. those in which the interstitial fluid has the same density as the ambient fluid. However, the way in which the initial turbid water is generated is of paramount importance; mechanisms include submarine slumping, underflows from large flooded rivers

  9. Marginal regression approach for additive hazards models with clustered current status data.

    PubMed

    Su, Pei-Fang; Chi, Yunchan

    2014-01-15

    Current status data arise naturally from tumorigenicity experiments, epidemiology studies, biomedicine, econometrics and demographic and sociology studies. Moreover, clustered current status data may occur with animals from the same litter in tumorigenicity experiments or with subjects from the same family in epidemiology studies. Because the only information extracted from current status data is whether the survival times are before or after the monitoring or censoring times, the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator of survival function converges at a rate of n(1/3) to a complicated limiting distribution. Hence, semiparametric regression models such as the additive hazards model have been extended for independent current status data to derive the test statistics, whose distributions converge at a rate of n(1/2) , for testing the regression parameters. However, a straightforward application of these statistical methods to clustered current status data is not appropriate because intracluster correlation needs to be taken into account. Therefore, this paper proposes two estimating functions for estimating the parameters in the additive hazards model for clustered current status data. The comparative results from simulation studies are presented, and the application of the proposed estimating functions to one real data set is illustrated.

  10. Structure of high latitude currents in global magnetospheric-ionospheric models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiltberger, M; Rigler, E. J.; Merkin, V; Lyon, J. G

    2016-01-01

    Using three resolutions of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global magnetosphere-ionosphere model (LFM) and the Weimer 2005 empirical model we examine the structure of the high latitude field-aligned current patterns. Each resolution was run for the entire Whole Heliosphere Interval which contained two high speed solar wind streams and modest interplanetary magnetic field strengths. Average states of the field-aligned current (FAC) patterns for 8 interplanetary magnetic field clock angle directions are computed using data from these runs. Generally speaking the patterns obtained agree well with results obtained from the Weimer 2005 computing using the solar wind and IMF conditions that correspond to each bin. As the simulation resolution increases the currents become more intense and narrow. A machine learning analysis of the FAC patterns shows that the ratio of Region 1 (R1) to Region 2 (R2) currents decreases as the simulation resolution increases. This brings the simulation results into better agreement with observational predictions and the Weimer 2005 model results. The increase in R2 current strengths also results in the cross polar cap potential (CPCP) pattern being concentrated in higher latitudes. Current-voltage relationships between the R1 and CPCP are quite similar at the higher resolution indicating the simulation is converging on a common solution. We conclude that LFM simulations are capable of reproducing the statistical features of FAC patterns.

  11. Intermittent counter-current extraction-Equilibrium cell model, scaling and an improved bobbin design.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, Peter; Sutherland, Ian; Kostanyan, Artak E; Voshkin, Andrei A; Ignatova, Svetlana

    2013-08-16

    This paper describes an equilibrium cell model for intermittent counter-current extraction that is analytically solved for the first time for continuous sample injection between a pair of columns. The model is compared with practice for injections of a model mixture of compounds on a standard high-performance counter-current chromatography instrument giving good agreement for compound elution order and the times to maximum concentration for the eluted components. An improved design of end fittings for the counter-current chromatography bobbins is described which permits on-column switching of the mobile and stationary phases. This on-column switching successfully eliminates the displaced stationary phase seen in fractions when operating ICcE with standard flying leads and gives a 6% reduction in the retention time of compounds and improved resolution due to the elimination of the time delay required to pump the previous mobile phase from standard flying leads.

  12. Exact energy principle in magnetic reconnection for current-sheet models.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Peter H; Lui, Anthony T Y

    2005-05-06

    On the basis of an exact nonlinear energy principle, it is shown that the change in magnetic topology (i.e., reconnection) in a finite-domain system leads to the conversion of magnetic field energy to particle energy. However, it is also shown that the conversion efficiency gradually disappears as the system size increases. This principle is demonstrated with model current-sheet equilibria including Harris and Fadeev solutions, as well as a current-sheet equilibrium which contains a singular current layer. The finding that energy conversion in reconnection is highly dependent on the system size may have an important implication for numerical simulations performed under finite geometry.

  13. Exact Energy Principle in Magnetic Reconnection for Current-Sheet Models

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.; Lui, Anthony T.Y.

    2005-05-06

    On the basis of an exact nonlinear energy principle, it is shown that the change in magnetic topology (i.e., reconnection) in a finite-domain system leads to the conversion of magnetic field energy to particle energy. However, it is also shown that the conversion efficiency gradually disappears as the system size increases. This principle is demonstrated with model current-sheet equilibria including Harris and Fadeev solutions, as well as a current-sheet equilibrium which contains a singular current layer. The finding that energy conversion in reconnection is highly dependent on the system size may have an important implication for numerical simulations performed under finite geometry.

  14. HTS-FCL EMTDC model considering nonlinear characteristics on fault current and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jae-Young; Lee, Seung-Ryul

    2010-06-01

    One of the most serious problems of the KEPCO system is a higher fault current than the CB(Circuit breaker's SCC (Short Circuit Capacity). There are so many alternatives to reduce the higher fault current, such as the isolation of bus ties, enhancement of the CB's SCC, and the application of HVDC-BTB (Back to Back) or FCL (fault current limiter). However, these alternatives have drawbacks from the viewpoint of system stability and cost. As superconductivity technology has been developed, the resistive type (R-type) HTS-FCL (High Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limiter) offers one of the important alternatives in terms of power loss and cost reduction in solving the fault current problem. To evaluate the accurate transient performance of R-type HTS-FCL, it is necessary for the dynamic simulation model to consider transient characteristics during the quenching and the recovery state. Against this background, this paper presents the new HTS-FCL EMTDC (Electro-Magnetic Transients including Direct Current) model considering the nonlinear characteristics on fault current and temperature.

  15. Modeling the effects of anode secondary electron emission on transmitted current in crossed-field diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Venkatesh; Vanderberg, Bo

    1996-11-01

    Recent experimental measurements of transmitted current in a crossed-field switch by Vanderberg and Eninger ( B. H. Vanderberg and J. E. Eninger, ``Space-charge limited current cut-off in crossed fields,'' presented at IEEE ICOPS'95, Madison, Wi. ) have shown that the measured values of transmitted current are significantly smaller than the theoretically predicted limit. The experiments also showed larger decrease in transmitted current for higher magnetic fields, implying an effect due to the higher angle of incidence of incident electrons (i.e., at values of B closer to B_H). Studies by Verboncoeur and Birdsall ( J. P. Verboncoeur and C. K. Birdsall. ``Rapid current transition in a crossed-field diode,'' Phys. Plasmas 3) 3, March 1996. have shown that even small amount ( < 1%) of over injection in a crossed-field diode near cut-off led to substantial decrease in transmitted current. In our current work, we show that the same effect can be triggered by the presence of secondary electron emission from the anode. This study models the dependence of emission upon incident electron angle and energy. Since the yield of secondary electrons increases with incident angle, this model follows the experimental results as B approaches B_Hull accurately. This work was supported in part by ONR under grant FD-N00014-90-J-1198

  16. Dynamics and diversity in interneurons: a model exploration with slowly inactivating potassium currents.

    PubMed

    Saraga, F; Skinner, F K

    2002-01-01

    Recent experimental and model work indicates that slowly inactivating potassium currents might play critical roles in generating population rhythms. In particular, slow (<1-4 Hz) rhythms recorded in the hippocampus correlate with oscillatory behaviors in interneurons in this frequency range. Limiting the ion channels to the traditional Hodgkin-Huxley sodium and potassium currents, a persistent sodium current, and a slowly inactivating potassium current, we explore the role of slowly inactivating conductances in a multi-compartmental interneuronal model. We find a rich repertoire of tonic and bursting behaviors depending on the distribution, density and kinetics of this conductance. Specifically, burst frequencies of appropriate frequencies could be obtained for certain distributions and kinetics of this conductance. Robust (with respect to injected currents) regimes of tonic firing and bursting behaviors are uncovered. In addition, we find a bistable tonic firing pattern that depends on the slowly inactivating potassium current. Therefore, this work shows ways in which different channel distributions and heterogeneities could produce variable signal outputs. We suggest that an understanding of the dynamical profiles of inhibitory neurons based on the density and distribution of their currents is helpful in dissecting out the complex roles played by this heterogeneous group of cells.

  17. New-generation empirical magnetic field models: Increasing resolution of equatorial and Birkeland currents and transition from modeling to nowcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, G. K.; Sitnov, M. I.; Redmon, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Classical empirical geomagnetic field models were built using rigid electric current modules whose amplitude and size were determined by predefined functions of solar wind and global parameters, which limited their ability to reconstruct the global morphology of the magnetosphere and its dynamic evolution during geomagnetic storms. The TS07D model mitigated these limitations by replacing the equatorial current modules with basis-function expansions and by introducing a dynamical binning approach based on nearest neighbors. Here we further progress this avenue. Firstly, the number of basis functions is increased and new data from Van Allen Probes and THEMIS missions is added, allowing the model to resolve the spatial structure and evolution of the innermost eastward and banana currents. Then, an enhanced Birkeland current module that more accurately reconstructs the realistic morphology, including the Harang discontinuity and IMF By dependence, is discussed. Lastly, the performance of various nowcasting versions of the model with different sets of the binning parameters is examined for the first time using their direct validation by in-situ geomagnetic field observations, leading to an optimum nowcasting version of the model. Furthermore, the plasma pressure is reconstructed assuming force balance with the empirical magnetic field, and the role of pressure-driven currents is examined.

  18. Analysis of the heliospheric current sheet at Earth's orbit and model comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Szabo, A.; Peredo, M.; Hoeksema, T.

    1995-01-01

    IMP 8 magnetic field data for the first half of the year 1994, i.e., for about 6 solar rotations, are analyzed around regions of sector boundary crossings with the purpose of obtaining both gross- and fine-scale characteristics of the related heliospheric current sheets separating the observed sectors. For purposes of estimating the attitudes of the normals to the sector boundaries. analysis intervals (sometimes 30 min or more in length) allowing the field to fully complete an excursion of about 180 deg were used in the study, which consisted of variance analyses of the field within those intervals. The resulting boundary normals were analyzed and compared to known (generic) models of projected heliospheric current sheets and to a coronal field model for the same time period. One of the most outstanding features of the resulting ensemble of estimated boundary normals for this period is that they strongly prefer low inclinations, indicating that the observations do not support a 1 AU model that predicts a current sheet whose surface is approximately parallel with the sun's equator, such as the 'sombrero' model. They instead support a model that predicts a relatively high inclination current sheet at 1 AU. Also the normals assume a surprisingly large range of longitudes, somewhat favoring those consistent with a Parker model (45 deg and 225 deg) and/or radial alignment (0 deg and 180 deg). These boundary structures, as defined, are shown typically to be as broad as several hundred proton gyroradii, but having embedded within them very thin structures associated with stronger currents. Such thin structures have normals usually differing markedly from the gross boundary. For some crossings there are indications of a wave-like structure in the current sheet as it passed the spacecraft.

  19. Electric currents in flare ribbons: Observations and three-dimensional standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Janvier, M.; Aulanier, G.; Bommier, V.; Schmieder, B.; Démoulin, P.; Pariat, E.

    2014-06-10

    We present for the first time the evolution of the photospheric electric currents during an eruptive X-class flare, accurately predicted by the standard three-dimensional (3D) flare model. We analyze this evolution for the 2011 February 15 flare using Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager/Solar Dynamics Observatory magnetic observations and find that localized currents in J-shaped ribbons increase to double their pre-flare intensity. Our 3D flare model, developed with the OHM code, suggests that these current ribbons, which develop at the location of extreme ultraviolet brightenings seen with Atmospheric Imaging Assembly imagery, are driven by the collapse of the flare's coronal current layer. These findings of increased currents restricted in localized ribbons are consistent with the overall free energy decrease during a flare, and the shapes of these ribbons also give an indication of how twisted the erupting flux rope is. Finally, this study further enhances the close correspondence obtained between the theoretical predictions of the standard 3D model and flare observations, indicating that the main key physical elements are incorporated in the model.

  20. ENSO Simulation in Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Models: Are the Current Models Better?

    SciTech Connect

    AchutaRao, K; Sperber, K R

    2005-04-29

    Maintaining a multi-model database over a generation or more of model development provides an important framework for assessing model improvement. Using control integrations, we compare the simulation of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and its extratropical impact, in models developed for the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report with models developed in the late 1990's (the so-called Coupled Model Intercomparison Project-2 [CMIP2] models). The IPCC models tend to be more realistic in representing the frequency with which ENSO occurs, and they are better at locating enhanced temperature variability over the eastern Pacific Ocean. When compared with reanalyses, the IPCC models have larger pattern correlations of tropical surface air temperature than do the CMIP2 models during the boreal winter peak phase of El Nino. However, for sea-level pressure and precipitation rate anomalies, a clear separation in performance between the two vintages of models is not as apparent. The strongest improvement occurs for the modeling groups whose CMIP2 model tended to have the lowest pattern correlations with observations. This has been checked by subsampling the multi-century IPCC simulations in a manner to be consistent with the single 80-year time segment available from CMIP2. Our results suggest that multi-century integrations may be required to statistically assess model improvement of ENSO. The quality of the El Nino precipitation composite is directly related to the fidelity of the boreal winter precipitation climatology, highlighting the importance of reducing systematic model error. Over North America distinct improvement of El Nino forced boreal winter surface air temperature, sea-level pressure, and precipitation rate anomalies in the IPCC models occurs. This improvement, is directly proportional to the skill of the tropical El Nino forced precipitation anomalies.

  1. Grassland simulation models: A synthesis of current models and future challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter synthesizes the different kinds of simulation models commonly used to address questions about controls on dynamics of perennial grasslands. Five major classes of models are described using specific models as examples: (1) demographic, (2) physiological, (3) physical, (4) biogeochemistry...

  2. Development of an unstructured-grid wave-current coupled model and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xingru; Yin, Baoshu; Yang, Dezhou

    2016-08-01

    An unstructured grid wave-current coupled model was developed by coupling the SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore) wave model and ADCIRC (Advanced Circulation model) ocean model through the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT). The developed coupled model has high spatial resolution in the coastal area and is efficient for computation. The efficiency of the newly developed SWAN + ADCIRC model was compared with that of the widely-used SWAN + ADCIRC coupled model, in which SWAN and ADCIRC are coupled directly rather than through the MCT. Results show that the directly-coupled model is more efficient when the total number of computational cores is small, but the MCT-coupled model begin to run faster than the directly-coupled model when more computational cores are used. The MCT-coupled model maintains the scalability longer and can increase the simulation efficiency more than 35% by comparing the minimum wall clock time of one day simulation in the test runs. The MCT-coupled SWAN + ADCIRC model was used to simulate the storm surge and waves during the typhoon Usagi which formed in the western Pacific on September 17, 2013 and landed at Shanwei, China. Three numerical experiments were performed to investigate the effect of wave-current interaction on the storm surge and waves. The results show that the coupled model can better simulate the storm surge and waves when considering the wave-induced radiation stress, the wave effect on the wind stress drag coefficient and the modulation of current and water level on waves. During the typhoon Usagi, the effect of wave radiation stress could result in a maximum of 0.75 m increase in the extreme storm surge, and the wave induced wind stress could cause a -0.82∼0.48 m change of the extreme storm surge near the coastal area. Besides, the radiation stress forced currents cannot be ignored either in the study of mass transport at coastal zones. Results of this study are useful for understanding the wave-current interaction processes and

  3. Modelling the potential transport of tropical fish larvae in the Leeuwin Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, A.; Slawinski, D.; Feng, M.; Hutchins, B.; Fearns, P.

    2011-12-01

    Application of an individual-based particle tracking model to the migration of tropical fish larvae along the continental shelf between the Houtman Abrolhos Islands and Rottnest Island (Western Australia) has shown that there is potential for the southwards advection of passive particles/larvae in the Leeuwin Current system throughout the year. However, seasonal variations in the prevailing wind field result in corresponding seasonal changes in the surface current flow (both alongshore and cross-shelf) on the continental shelf, leading to a pulse of modelled particles arriving at Rottnest Island during the autumn months. This matches, within a month, the observed April/May peak in annual recruitment of 2 species of damselfish ( Abudefduf sexfasciatus and A. vaigiensis), at the time when the Leeuwin Current is strengthening. It is assumed that the larvae are in the uppermost 20 m of the water column and that there are no vertical diurnal movements. The model has a 10 km grid spacing, and so can resolve some of the current gradients across the continental shelf. Comparison of the modelled near-surface currents with ADCP measurements at 2 current mooring sites as well as with a broader range of historical current measurements off south-western Australia indicates that the alongshore net transport is reasonably well reproduced by the model, whereas agreement with the cross-shelf flow is not as good (this may be partly attributed to the paucity of high-quality near-surface current measurements in the area of study). Because of limitations in our knowledge of the swimming ability, choice of swimming direction and habitat selection of larval fish, as well as the inability of the model to reproduce the small-scale circulation around Rottnest Island, the swimming capacity of the late-stage larval fish is not specifically included; they are considered as potential settlers once they have reached within 20 km of the Island. The observed inter-annual variability in recruitment

  4. Weak Interaction Models with New Quarks and Right-handed Currents

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wilczek, F. A.; Zee, A.; Kingsley, R. L.; Treiman, S. B.

    1975-06-01

    We discuss various weak interaction issues for a general class of models within the SU(2) x U(1) gauge theory framework, with special emphasis on the effects of right-handed, charged currents and of quarks bearing new quantum numbers. In particular we consider the restrictions on model building which are imposed by the small KL - KS mass difference and by the .I = = rule; and we classify various possibilities for neutral current interactions and, in the case of heavy mesons with new quantum numbers, various possibilities for mixing effects analogous to KL - KS mixing.

  5. Multiscale Modeling in Computational Biomechanics: Determining Computational Priorities and Addressing Current Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Tawhai, Merryn; Bischoff, Jeff; Einstein, Daniel R.; Erdemir, Ahmet; Guess, Trent; Reinbolt, Jeff

    2009-05-01

    Abstract In this article, we describe some current multiscale modeling issues in computational biomechanics from the perspective of the musculoskeletal and respiratory systems and mechanotransduction. First, we outline the necessity of multiscale simulations in these biological systems. Then we summarize challenges inherent to multiscale biomechanics modeling, regardless of the subdiscipline, followed by computational challenges that are system-specific. We discuss some of the current tools that have been utilized to aid research in multiscale mechanics simulations, and the priorities to further the field of multiscale biomechanics computation.

  6. Phase twisted modes and current reversals in a lattice model of waveguide arrays with nonlinear coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Oester, Michael; Johansson, Magnus

    2005-02-01

    We consider a lattice model for waveguide arrays embedded in nonlinear Kerr media. Inclusion of nonlinear coupling results in many phenomena involving complex, phase-twisted, stationary modes. The norm (Poynting power) current of stable plane-wave solutions can be controlled in magnitude and direction, and may be reversed without symmetry-breaking perturbations. Also stable localized phase-twisted modes with zero current exist, which for particular parameter values may be compact and expressed analytically. The model also describes coupled Bose-Einstein condensates.

  7. Tunneling Current of Electron in Armchair Graphene Nanoribbon Bipolar Transistor Model Using Transfer Matrix Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, A. K.; Hasanah, L.; Rusdiana, D.; Aminudin, A.; Suhendi, E.

    2017-03-01

    The tunneling current of n-p-n bipolar junction transistor AGNR-based is modeled with semi-numerical method. The exponential solution from Schrödinger equation is used and solved analytically. The potential profile of n-p-n BJT divided into several segments in the numerical method. Then, the solved analytical result is used in the numerical method to compute the electron transmittance. Transfer Matrix Method (TMM) is the numerical method used to compute the electron transmittance. From the calculated transmittance the tunneling current can be computed by using Landauer formula with aid of Gauss-Legendre Quadrature (GLQ). Next, the tunneling current is computed with several change of variables which are base-emitter voltage (VBE), base-collector voltage (VBC), temperature and the AGNR’s width. The computed tunneling current shows that the larger value of applied voltage for both VBE and VBC results in larger value of tunneling current. At the lower temperature, the current is larger. The computed tunneling current shows that at wider width of AGNR, the current is also larger. This is due to the decreased band-gap energy (Eg) because of the wider width of AGNR.

  8. A gate current 1/f noise model for GaN/AlGaN HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu'an, Liu; Yiqi, Zhuang

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a theoretical and experimental study on the gate current 1/f noise in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. Based on the carrier number fluctuation in the two-dimensional electron gas channel of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs, a gate current 1/f noise model containing a trap-assisted tunneling current and a space charge limited current is built. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experiment. Experiments show that, if Vg < Vx (critical gate voltage of dielectric relaxation), gate current 1/f noise comes from the superimposition of trap-assisted tunneling RTS (random telegraph noise), while Vg > Vx, gate current 1/f noise comes from not only the trap-assisted tunneling RTS, but also the space charge limited current RTS. This indicates that the gate current 1/f noise of the GaN-based HEMTs device is sensitive to the interaction of defects and the piezoelectric relaxation. It provides a useful characterization tool for deeper information about the defects and their evolution in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs.

  9. Surgically-induced mouse models in the study of bone regeneration: Current models and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Bin; Zhao, Yunpeng; Buza, John A.; Li, Wei; Wang, Wenzhao; Jia, Tanghong

    2017-01-01

    Bone regeneration has been extensively studied over the past several decades. The surgically-induced mouse model is the key animal model for studying bone regeneration, of the various research strategies used. These mouse models mimic the trauma and recovery processes in vivo and serve as carriers for tissue engineering and gene modification to test various therapies or associated genes in bone regeneration. The present review introduces a classification of surgically induced mouse models in bone regeneration, evaluates the application and value of these models and discusses the potential development of further innovations in this field in the future. PMID:28138711

  10. Simulations of ion current in realistic models of ion channels: the KcsA potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Burykin, A; Schutz, C N; Villá, J; Warshel, A

    2002-05-15

    Realistic studies of ion current in biologic channels present a major challenge for computer simulation approaches. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations involve serious time limitations that prevent their use in direct evaluation of ion current in channels with significant barriers. The alternative use of Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations can provide the current for simplified macroscopic models. However, the time needed for accurate calculations of electrostatic energies can make BD simulations of ion current expensive. The present work develops an approach that overcomes some of the above challenges and allows one to simulate ion currents in models of biologic channels. Our method provides a fast and reliable estimate of the energetics of the system by combining semimacroscopic calculations of the self-energy of each ion and an implicit treatment of the interactions between the ions, as well as the interactions between the ions and the protein-ionizable groups. This treatment involves the use of the semimacroscopic version of the protein dipole Langevin dipole (PDLD/S) model in its linear response approximation (LRA) implementation, which reduces the uncertainties about the value of the protein "dielectric constant." The resulting free energy surface is used to generate the forces for on-the-fly BD simulations of the corresponding ion currents. Our model is examined in a preliminary simulation of the ion current in the KcsA potassium channel. The complete free energy profile for a single ion transport reflects reasonable energetics and captures the effect of the protein-ionized groups. This calculated profile indicates that we are dealing with the channel in its closed state. Reducing the barrier at the gate region allows us to simulate the ion current in a reasonable computational time. Several limiting cases are examined, including those that reproduce the observed current, and the nature of the productive trajectories is considered. The ability to simulate

  11. A compact model of the reverse gate-leakage current in GaN-based HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoyu; Huang, Junkai; Fang, Jielin; Deng, Wanling

    2016-12-01

    The gate-leakage behavior in GaN-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) is studied as a function of applied bias and temperature. A model to calculate this current is given, which shows that trap-assisted tunneling, trap-assisted Frenkel-Poole (FP) emission, and direct Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunneling have their main contributions at different electric field regions. In addition, the proposed model clearly illustrates the effect of traps and their assistance to the gate leakage. We have demonstrated the validity of the model by comparisons between model simulation results and measured experimental data of HEMTs, and a good agreement is obtained.

  12. Assessing GOCE Gravity Models using Altimetry and In-situ Ocean Current Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole; Honecker, Johanna; Maximenko, Nikolai

    2015-04-01

    The Gravity and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission measures Earth's gravity field with an unprecedented accuracy at short spatial scales. Previous results have demonstrated a significant advance in our ability to determine the ocean's general circulation. The improved gravity models provided by the GOCE mission have enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundaries of those features and the associated geostrophic surface currents reveal improvements for all of the ocean's current systems. In this study, a series of 23 newer gravity models including observations from GOCE are combined with the DTU13MSS mean sea surface to derive models for the Mean Dynamic Topography (MDT). The series of GOCE based MDT models are compared in regional analyses to identify differences and to quantify quality measures associated with the models. By using Fourier techniques the spectral characteristics are obtained as well as their anisotropic patterns. Then, regional analyses are carried out using in-situ observations of the geostrophic surface currents. This is done to analyse correlations and to derive resolution capacities of the MDT models. Also this information is used as quantified quality measures associated with the 23 GOCE gravity models.

  13. Hyperpolarization-Activated Current Induces Period-Doubling Cascades and Chaos in a Cold Thermoreceptor Model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kesheng; Maidana, Jean P; Caviedes, Mauricio; Quero, Daniel; Aguirre, Pablo; Orio, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we describe and analyze the chaotic behavior of a conductance-based neuronal bursting model. This is a model with a reduced number of variables, yet it retains biophysical plausibility. Inspired by the activity of cold thermoreceptors, the model contains a persistent Sodium current, a Calcium-activated Potassium current and a hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) that drive a slow subthreshold oscillation. Driven by this oscillation, a fast subsystem (fast Sodium and Potassium currents) fires action potentials in a periodic fashion. Depending on the parameters, this model can generate a variety of firing patterns that includes bursting, regular tonic and polymodal firing. Here we show that the transitions between different firing patterns are often accompanied by a range of chaotic firing, as suggested by an irregular, non-periodic firing pattern. To confirm this, we measure the maximum Lyapunov exponent of the voltage trajectories, and the Lyapunov exponent and Lempel-Ziv's complexity of the ISI time series. The four-variable slow system (without spiking) also generates chaotic behavior, and bifurcation analysis shows that this is often originated by period doubling cascades. Either with or without spikes, chaos is no longer generated when the Ih is removed from the system. As the model is biologically plausible with biophysically meaningful parameters, we propose it as a useful tool to understand chaotic dynamics in neurons.

  14. A Mathematical Model of Neonatal Rat Atrial Monolayers with Constitutively Active Acetylcholine-Mediated K+ Current

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Rupamanjari; Jangsangthong, Wanchana; Feola, Iolanda; Ypey, Dirk L.; Pijnappels, Daniël A.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent form of arrhythmia occurring in the industrialized world. Because of its complex nature, each identified form of AF requires specialized treatment. Thus, an in-depth understanding of the bases of these arrhythmias is essential for therapeutic development. A variety of experimental studies aimed at understanding the mechanisms of AF are performed using primary cultures of neonatal rat atrial cardiomyocytes (NRAMs). Previously, we have shown that the distinct advantage of NRAM cultures is that they allow standardized, systematic, robust re-entry induction in the presence of a constitutively-active acetylcholine-mediated K+ current (IKACh-c). Experimental studies dedicated to mechanistic explorations of AF, using these cultures, often use computer models for detailed electrophysiological investigations. However, currently, no mathematical model for NRAMs is available. Therefore, in the present study we propose the first model for the action potential (AP) of a NRAM with constitutively-active acetylcholine-mediated K+ current (IKACh-c). The descriptions of the ionic currents were based on patch-clamp data obtained from neonatal rats. Our monolayer model closely mimics the action potential duration (APD) restitution and conduction velocity (CV) restitution curves presented in our previous in vitro studies. In addition, the model reproduces the experimentally observed dynamics of spiral wave rotation, in the absence and in the presence of drug interventions, and in the presence of localized myofibroblast heterogeneities. PMID:27332890

  15. The impact of sea surface currents in wave power potential modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zodiatis, George; Galanis, George; Kallos, George; Nikolaidis, Andreas; Kalogeri, Christina; Liakatas, Aristotelis; Stylianou, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    The impact of sea surface currents to the estimation and modeling of wave energy potential over an area of increased economic interest, the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, is investigated in this work. High-resolution atmospheric, wave, and circulation models, the latter downscaled from the regional Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) of the Copernicus marine service (former MyOcean regional MFS system), are utilized towards this goal. The modeled data are analyzed by means of a variety of statistical tools measuring the potential changes not only in the main wave characteristics, but also in the general distribution of the wave energy and the wave parameters that mainly affect it, when using sea surface currents as a forcing to the wave models. The obtained results prove that the impact of the sea surface currents is quite significant in wave energy-related modeling, as well as temporally and spatially dependent. These facts are revealing the necessity of the utilization of the sea surface currents characteristics in renewable energy studies in conjunction with their meteo-ocean forecasting counterparts.

  16. Non-Hydrostatic Modelling of Waves and Currents over Subtle Bathymetric Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, E.; Mulligan, R. P.; McNinch, J.

    2014-12-01

    Localized areas with high rates of shoreline erosion on beaches, referred to as erosional hotspots, can occur near clusters of relict shore-oblique sandbars. Wave transformation and wave-driven currents over these morphological features could provide an understanding of the hydrodynamic-morphologic coupling mechanism that connects them to the occurrence of erosional hotspots. To investigate this, we use the non-hydrostatic SWASH model that phase-resolves the free surface and fluid motions throughout the water column, allowing for high resolution of wave propagation and breaking processes. In this study we apply a coupled system of nested models including SWAN over a large domain of the North Carolina shelf with smaller nested SWASH domains in areas of interest to determine the hydrodynamic processes occurring over shore oblique bars. In this presentation we focus on a high resolution grid (10 vertical layers, 10 m horizontal resolution) applied to the Duck region with model validation from acoustic wave and current data, and observations from the Coastal Lidar And Radar Imaging System (CLARIS). By altering the bathymetry input for each model run based on bathymetric surveys and comparing the predicted and observed wave heights and current profiles, the effects of subtle bathymetric perturbations have on wave refraction, wave breaking, surf zone currents and vorticity are investigated. The ability to predict wave breaking and hydrodynamics with a non-hydrostatic model may improve our understanding of surf zone dynamics in relation to morphologic conditions.

  17. Modeling and analysis of sub-surface leakage current in nano-MOSFET under cutoff regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swami, Yashu; Rai, Sanjeev

    2017-02-01

    The high leakage current in nano-meter regimes is becoming a significant portion of power dissipation in nano-MOSFET circuits as threshold voltage, channel length, and gate oxide thickness are scaled down to nano-meter range. Precise leakage current valuation and meticulous modeling of the same at nano-meter technology scale is an increasingly a critical work in designing the low power nano-MOSFET circuits. We present a specific compact model for sub-threshold regime leakage current in bulk driven nano-MOSFETs. The proposed logical model is instigated and executed into the latest updated PTM bulk nano-MOSFET model and is found to be in decent accord with technology-CAD simulation data. This paper also reviews various transistor intrinsic leakage mechanisms for nano-MOSFET exclusively in weak inversion, like drain-induced barricade lowering (DIBL), gate-induced drain leakage (GIDL), gate oxide tunneling (GOT) leakage etc. The root cause of the sub-surface leakage current is mainly due to the nano-scale short channel length causing source-drain coupling even in sub-threshold domain. Consequences leading to carriers triumphing the barricade between the source and drain. The enhanced model effectively considers the following parameter dependence in the account for better-quality value-added results like drain-to-source bias (VDS), gate-to-source bias (VGS), channel length (LG), source/drain junction depth (Xj), bulk doping concentration (NBULK), and operating temperature (Top).

  18. Hyperpolarization-Activated Current Induces Period-Doubling Cascades and Chaos in a Cold Thermoreceptor Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kesheng; Maidana, Jean P.; Caviedes, Mauricio; Quero, Daniel; Aguirre, Pablo; Orio, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we describe and analyze the chaotic behavior of a conductance-based neuronal bursting model. This is a model with a reduced number of variables, yet it retains biophysical plausibility. Inspired by the activity of cold thermoreceptors, the model contains a persistent Sodium current, a Calcium-activated Potassium current and a hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) that drive a slow subthreshold oscillation. Driven by this oscillation, a fast subsystem (fast Sodium and Potassium currents) fires action potentials in a periodic fashion. Depending on the parameters, this model can generate a variety of firing patterns that includes bursting, regular tonic and polymodal firing. Here we show that the transitions between different firing patterns are often accompanied by a range of chaotic firing, as suggested by an irregular, non-periodic firing pattern. To confirm this, we measure the maximum Lyapunov exponent of the voltage trajectories, and the Lyapunov exponent and Lempel-Ziv's complexity of the ISI time series. The four-variable slow system (without spiking) also generates chaotic behavior, and bifurcation analysis shows that this is often originated by period doubling cascades. Either with or without spikes, chaos is no longer generated when the Ih is removed from the system. As the model is biologically plausible with biophysically meaningful parameters, we propose it as a useful tool to understand chaotic dynamics in neurons. PMID:28344550

  19. An Investigation of Current Closure within an Auroral Arc: Modeling and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaeppler, S. R.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S. R.; Nicolls, M. J.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Labelle, J. W.; Dombrowski, M. P.; Lessard, M.; Pfaff, R. F.; Rowland, D. E.; Jones, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure (ACES) mission consisted of two sounding rockets launched nearly simultaneously into a dynamic multiple-arc aurora with the goal of obtaining multi-point observations of the 3-D nature of an auroral arc current system. The payloads were flown along nearly conjugate magnetic field footpoints, separated in altitude with small temporal separation. The high altitude payload (ACES High) took in-situ measurements of plasma and electrodynamic parameters that mapped from the magnetosphere that form the input signature into the lower ionosphere. The low-altitude payload (ACES Low) took similar observations within the region where perpendicular cross-field closure current can flow. In-situ observations are presented of the electron flux, electron temperature, electric fields, magnetic fields, and field aligned currents derived from the ACES High magnetometer data for a time frame when the payloads were nearly magnetically conjugate over a quasi-stable auroral arc. All-sky imager data are presented of the auroral event along with observations from the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) of the electron densities and electric fields during the flights. A 2-D model of auroral electrodynamics has been developed to interpret the rocket-borne observations. A model describing the precipitating auroral electron flux has been developed and the model parameters were adjusted to be consistent with the electron flux observed by the ACES Low payload. The precipitating auroral electron flux enhances the ionospheric Hall and Pedersen conductivities. For the condition that the divergence of the current is equal to zero within the arc, the latitudinal and altitudinal current structure is determined using in-situ electric fields and field aligned currents as model inputs. The magnetic field perturbations from the modeled currents are compared with the in-situ observations of the residual magnetic field observed by ACES Low. Multi

  20. Durability of Cement Composites Reinforced with Sisal Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianqiang

    This dissertation focuses mainly on investigating the aging mechanisms and degradation kinetics of sisal fiber, as well as the approaches to mitigate its degradation in the matrix of cement composites. In contrast to previous works reported in the literature, a novel approach is proposed in this study to directly determine the fiber's degradation rate by separately studying the composition changes, mechanical and physical properties of the embedded sisal fibers. Cement hydration is presented to be a crucial factor in understanding fiber degradation behavior. The degradation mechanisms of natural fiber consist of mineralization of cell walls, alkali hydrolysis of lignin and hemicellulose, as well as the cellulose decomposition which includes stripping of cellulose microfibrils and alkaline hydrolysis of amorphous regions in cellulose chains. Two mineralization mechanisms, CH-mineralization and self-mineralization, are proposed. The degradation kinetics of sisal fiber in the cement matrix are also analyzed and a model to predict the degradation rate of cellulose for natural fiber embedded in cement is outlined. The results indicate that the time needed to completely degrade the cellulose in the matrix with cement replacement by 30wt.% metakaolin is 13 times longer than that in pure cement. A novel and scientific method is presented to determine accelerated aging conditions, and to evaluating sisal fiber's degradation rate and durability of natural fiber-reinforced cement composites. Among the static aggressive environments, the most effective approach for accelerating the degradation of natural fiber in cement composites is to soak the samples or change the humidity at 70 °C and higher temperature. However, the dynamic wetting and drying cycling treatment has a more accelerating effect on the alkali hydrolysis of fiber's amorphous components evidenced by the highest crystallinity indices, minimum content of holocellulose, and lowest tensile strength. Based on the

  1. Fluid modeling of radio frequency and direct currents in a biased magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Kubic, M.; Gunn, J.; Colas, L.

    2013-04-15

    This model aims at simulating a magnetized plasma column connected on one side to a probe and on the other side to an ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating) antenna. This is a double probe modeling of a plasma flux tube exchanging perpendicular currents: rf polarization current and dc currents (inertia, viscous, and friction) perpendicular to the magnetic field. A self consistent solution for the rectified potential and the density is obtained under the assumptions of flute hypothesis, inertialess electrons, and no collision in parallel direction. The main effect of rf biasing on the antenna side is to shift the IV characteristic so that the floating potential can be increased up to ln(I{sub 0}(eV{sub rf}/(k{sub B}T{sub e}))), with I{sub 0} the modified Bessel function of the first kind. On the contrary, the effect of dc currents is to decrease the plasma potential and the sheath potential which can be lower than 3k{sub B}T{sub e}/e or even be negative. Experimental characteristics are well matched by the 1D fluid code and exhibit very high negative currents (more than 30 j{sub i} the ion saturation current) for high positive biasing of the probe and for long flux tube (10 m). The non-saturation of the electron current is here due to high transverse transport enhanced by convective fluxes and dc currents able to bring an amount of density around the biased flux tube. During comparisons with experiments, the floating potential measured by a reciprocating probe is recovered by the code revealing that for a 120 V measured peak potential on the probe, the rf potential on the ICRH antenna is twice this value. Finally, the density profile can be flattened or steepened as a function of the transverse dc current direction.

  2. Distributed point source method for the modeling of a three-dimensional eddy current NDE problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bore, T.; Joubert, P.-Y.; Placko, D.

    2014-03-01

    This paper deals with modeling in electromagnetism in the field of eddy current for Non Destructive Evaluation. Several techniques could be used to diagnose structural damages. In eddy current application, a magnetic field generates by an excitation coil (or primary coil), interacts with a conductive target and generates eddy current. Variations in the phase and the magnitude of these eddy currents can be monitored using a second "receiver" coil. Variations in the physical properties (electrical conductivity, magnetic permeability,..) or the presence of any flaw in the target will cause a change in eddy current and a corresponding change in the phase and amplitude of measured signal. The interpretation of the signals requires a good understanding of the interaction between eddy current and structure. Therefore, researchers need analytical or numerical techniques to obtain a clear understanding of wave propagation behaviors. However, modeling of wave scattering phenomenon by conventional numerical techniques such as finite elements requires very fine mesh and heavy computational power. To go further, an innovative implementation of a semi-analytical modeling method, called the Distributed Points Source Method (DPSM), has been developed and used. The DPSM has already shown great potentialities for the versatile and computationally efficient modeling of complex electrostatic, electromagnetic or ultrasounic problems. In this paper, we report on a new implementation of the DPSM, called differential DPSM, which shows interesting prospects for the modeling of complex eddy current problems. In parallel, an Eddy Current Imager (ECI) has been recently developed in our laboratory in the aim of imaging cracks in metallic structures. In this paper, a simplified modeling of the ECI is presented using DPSM technique, the basics of DPSM formalism being firstly developed. A comparison between experimental and computed data obtained for a millimetric surface defect is presented in

  3. Current developments in soil organic matter modeling and the expansion of model applications. A review

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Eleanor E.; Paustian, Keith

    2015-12-23

    It is important to note that Soil organic matter (SOM) is a great natural resource. It is fundamental to soil and ecosystem functions across a wide range of scales, from site-specific soil fertility and water holding capacity to global biogeochemical cycling. It is also a highly complex material that is sensitive to direct and indirect human impacts. In our SOM research, simulation models play an important role by providing a mathematical framework to integrate, examine, and test the understanding of SOM dynamics. Simulation models of SOM are also increasingly used in more ‘applied’ settings to evaluate human impacts on ecosystem function, and to manage SOM for greenhouse gas mitigation, improved soil health, and sustainable use as a natural resource. Within this context, there is a need to maintain a robust connection between scientific developments in SOM modeling approaches and SOM model applications. This need forms the basis of this review. In this review we first provide an overview of SOM modeling, focusing on SOM theory, data-model integration, and model development as evidenced by a quantitative review of SOM literature. Second, we present the landscape of SOM model applications, focusing on examples in climate change policy. Finally, we conclude by discussing five areas of recent developments in SOM modeling including: (1) microbial roles in SOM stabilization; (2) modeling SOM saturation kinetics; (3) temperature controls on decomposition; (4)SOM dynamics in deep soil layers; and (5)SOM representation in earth system models. Our aim is to comprehensively connect SOM model development to its applications, revealing knowledge gaps in need of focused interdisciplinary attention and exposing pitfalls that, if avoided, can lead to best use of SOM models to support policy initiatives and sustainable land management solutions.

  4. Current developments in soil organic matter modeling and the expansion of model applications. A review

    DOE PAGES

    Campbell, Eleanor E.; Paustian, Keith

    2015-12-23

    It is important to note that Soil organic matter (SOM) is a great natural resource. It is fundamental to soil and ecosystem functions across a wide range of scales, from site-specific soil fertility and water holding capacity to global biogeochemical cycling. It is also a highly complex material that is sensitive to direct and indirect human impacts. In our SOM research, simulation models play an important role by providing a mathematical framework to integrate, examine, and test the understanding of SOM dynamics. Simulation models of SOM are also increasingly used in more ‘applied’ settings to evaluate human impacts on ecosystemmore » function, and to manage SOM for greenhouse gas mitigation, improved soil health, and sustainable use as a natural resource. Within this context, there is a need to maintain a robust connection between scientific developments in SOM modeling approaches and SOM model applications. This need forms the basis of this review. In this review we first provide an overview of SOM modeling, focusing on SOM theory, data-model integration, and model development as evidenced by a quantitative review of SOM literature. Second, we present the landscape of SOM model applications, focusing on examples in climate change policy. Finally, we conclude by discussing five areas of recent developments in SOM modeling including: (1) microbial roles in SOM stabilization; (2) modeling SOM saturation kinetics; (3) temperature controls on decomposition; (4)SOM dynamics in deep soil layers; and (5)SOM representation in earth system models. Our aim is to comprehensively connect SOM model development to its applications, revealing knowledge gaps in need of focused interdisciplinary attention and exposing pitfalls that, if avoided, can lead to best use of SOM models to support policy initiatives and sustainable land management solutions.« less

  5. Current developments in soil organic matter modeling and the expansion of model applications: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Eleanor E.; Paustian, Keith

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is an important natural resource. It is fundamental to soil and ecosystem functions across a wide range of scales, from site-specific soil fertility and water holding capacity to global biogeochemical cycling. It is also a highly complex material that is sensitive to direct and indirect human impacts. In SOM research, simulation models play an important role by providing a mathematical framework to integrate, examine, and test the understanding of SOM dynamics. Simulation models of SOM are also increasingly used in more ‘applied’ settings to evaluate human impacts on ecosystem function, and to manage SOM for greenhouse gas mitigation, improved soil health, and sustainable use as a natural resource. Within this context, there is a need to maintain a robust connection between scientific developments in SOM modeling approaches and SOM model applications. This need forms the basis of this review. In this review we first provide an overview of SOM modeling, focusing on SOM theory, data-model integration, and model development as evidenced by a quantitative review of SOM literature. Second, we present the landscape of SOM model applications, focusing on examples in climate change policy. We conclude by discussing five areas of recent developments in SOM modeling including: (1) microbial roles in SOM stabilization; (2) modeling SOM saturation kinetics; (3) temperature controls on decomposition; (4) SOM dynamics in deep soil layers; and (5) SOM representation in earth system models. Our aim is to comprehensively connect SOM model development to its applications, revealing knowledge gaps in need of focused interdisciplinary attention and exposing pitfalls that, if avoided, can lead to best use of SOM models to support policy initiatives and sustainable land management solutions.

  6. Design of permanent magnet eddy current brake for a small scaled electromagnetic launch model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shigui; Yu, Haitao; Hu, Minqiang; Huang, Lei

    2012-04-01

    A variable pole-pitch double-sided permanent magnet (PM) linear eddy current brake (LECB) is proposed for a small scaled electromagnetic launch model. A two-dimensional (2D) analytical steady state model is presented for the double-sided PM-LECB, and the expression for the braking force is derived. Based on the analytical model, the material and eddy current skin effect of the conducting plate are analyzed. Moreover, a variable pole-pitch double-sided PM-LECB is proposed for the effective braking of the moving plate. In addition, the braking force is predicted by finite element (FE) analysis, and the simulated results are in good agreement with the analytical model. Finally, a prototype is presented to test the braking profile for validation of the proposed design.

  7. Variational Study on Loop Currents in Bose Hubbard model with Staggered Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toga, Y.; Yokoyama, H.

    In view of strongly interacting bosons in an optical lattice with a large gauge field, we study phase transitions in a two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model with a staggered flux, on the basis of variational Monte Carlo calculations. Inthe trial states,besides typical onsite and intersite correlation factors, we introduce a configuration-dependent phase factor,which was recently found essential for treating current-carrying states. It is found that this phase factor is qualitativelyvitalfordescribing a Mott insulating (MI) state in the present model. Thereby, the Peierls phasesattached in relevant hopping processes are cancelled out. As a result, local currents completely suppressed in MI states, namely, a chiral Mott state does not appear for the square lattice, in contrast tothecorresponding two-leg ladder model. In addition, we discuss other features of the first-order superfluid-MI transition in this model.

  8. A modeling study of the time-averaged electric currents in the vicinity of isolated thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, Kevin T.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Baginski, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    A thorough examination of the results of a time-dependent computer model of a dipole thunderstorm revealed that there are numerous similarities between the time-averaged electrical properties and the steady-state properties of an active thunderstorm. Thus, the electrical behavior of the atmosphere in the vicinity of a thunderstorm can be determined with a formulation similar to what was first described by Holzer and Saxon (1952). From the Maxwell continuity equation of electric current, a simple analytical equation was derived that expresses a thunderstorm's average current contribution to the global electric circuit in terms of the generator current within the thundercloud, the intracloud lightning current, the cloud-to-ground lightning current, the altitudes of the charge centers, and the conductivity profile of the atmosphere. This equation was found to be nearly as accurate as the more computationally expensive numerical model, even when it is applied to a thunderstorm with a reduced conductivity thundercloud, a time-varying generator current, a varying flash rate, and a changing lightning mix.

  9. Estimation of nighttime dip-equatorial E-region current density using measurements and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Kuldeep; Sekar, R.; Anandarao, B. G.; Gupta, S. P.; Chakrabarty, D.

    2016-08-01

    The existence of the possible ionospheric current during nighttime over low-equatorial latitudes is one of the unresolved issues in ionospheric physics and geomagnetism. A detailed investigation is carried out to estimate the same over Indian longitudes using in situ measurements from Thumba (8.5 ° N, 76.9 ° E), empirical plasma drift model (Fejer et al., 2008) and equatorial electrojet model developed by Anandarao (1976). This investigation reveals that the nighttime E-region current densities vary from ∼0.3 to ∼0.7 A/km2 during pre-midnight to early morning hours on geomagnetically quiet conditions. The nighttime current densities over the dip equator are estimated using three different methods (discussed in methodology section) and are found to be consistent with one another within the uncertainty limits. Altitude structures in the E-region current densities are also noticed which are shown to be associated with altitudinal structures in the electron densities. The horizontal component of the magnetic field induced by these nighttime ionospheric currents is estimated to vary between ∼2 and ∼6 nT during geomagnetically quiet periods. This investigation confirms the existence of nighttime ionospheric current and opens up a possibility of estimating base line value for geomagnetic field fluctuations as observed by ground-based magnetometer.

  10. Online coupled regional meteorology chemistry models in Europe: current status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baklanov, A.; Schlünzen, K.; Suppan, P.; Baldasano, J.; Brunner, D.; Aksoyoglu, S.; Carmichael, G.; Douros, J.; Flemming, J.; Forkel, R.; Galmarini, S.; Gauss, M.; Grell, G.; Hirtl, M.; Joffre, S.; Jorba, O.; Kaas, E.; Kaasik, M.; Kallos, G.; Kong, X.; Korsholm, U.; Kurganskiy, A.; Kushta, J.; Lohmann, U.; Mahura, A.; Manders-Groot, A.; Maurizi, A.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Rao, S. T.; Savage, N.; Seigneur, C.; Sokhi, R. S.; Solazzo, E.; Solomos, S.; Sørensen, B.; Tsegas, G.; Vignati, E.; Vogel, B.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Online coupled mesoscale meteorology atmospheric chemistry models have undergone a rapid evolution in recent years. Although mainly developed by the air quality modelling community, these models are also of interest for numerical weather prediction and regional climate modelling as they can consider not only the effects of meteorology on air quality, but also the potentially important effects of atmospheric composition on weather. Two ways of online coupling can be distinguished: online integrated and online access coupling. Online integrated models simulate meteorology and chemistry over the same grid in one model using one main time step for integration. Online access models use independent meteorology and chemistry modules that might even have different grids, but exchange meteorology and chemistry data on a regular and frequent basis. This article offers a comprehensive review of the current research status of online coupled meteorology and atmospheric chemistry modelling within Europe. Eighteen regional online coupled models developed or being used in Europe are described and compared. Topics discussed include a survey of processes relevant to the interactions between atmospheric physics, dynamics and composition; a brief overview of existing online mesoscale models and European model developments; an analysis on how feedback processes are treated in these models; numerical issues associated with coupled models; and several case studies and model performance evaluation methods. Finally, this article highlights selected scientific issues and emerging challenges that require proper consideration to improve the reliability and usability of these models for the three scientific communities: air quality, numerical meteorology modelling (including weather prediction) and climate modelling. This review will be of particular interest to model developers and users in all three fields as it presents a synthesis of scientific progress and provides recommendations for

  11. Skill Testing a Three-Dimensional Global Tide Model to Historical Current Meter Records

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-17

    Uehara et al., 2006; Griffiths and Peltier, 2008, 2009 ; Green, 2010 ]. The model-data validation in these papers focuses on sea sur- face elevations rather...compared to over 5000 observational velocity records spanning 40 years . We examine the skill of the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) on a regional...Hibiya et al., 2006; Simmons, 2008; Arbic et al., 2010 ; M€uller et al., 2012]. The Arbic et al. [ 2010 ] simulations utilize HYCOM, which is currently

  12. Terminator field-aligned current system: A new finding from model-assimilated data set (MADS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Schunk, R. W.; Scherliess, L.; Sojka, J. J.; Gardner, L. C.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2013-12-01

    Physics-based data assimilation models have been recognized by the space science community as the most accurate approach to specify and forecast the space weather of the solar-terrestrial environment. The model-assimilated data sets (MADS) produced by these models constitute an internally consistent time series of global three-dimensional fields whose accuracy can be estimated. Because of its internal consistency of physics and completeness of descriptions on the status of global systems, the MADS has also been a powerful tool to identify the systematic errors in measurements, reveal the missing physics in physical models, and discover the important dynamical physical processes that are inadequately observed or missed by measurements due to observational limitations. In the past years, we developed a data assimilation model for the high-latitude ionospheric plasma dynamics and electrodynamics. With a set of physical models, an ensemble Kalman filter, and the ingestion of data from multiple observations, the data assimilation model can produce a self-consistent time-series of the complete descriptions of the global high-latitude ionosphere, which includes the convection electric field, horizontal and field-aligned currents, conductivity, as well as 3-D plasma densities and temperatures, In this presentation, we will show a new field-aligned current system discovered from the analysis of the MADS produced by our data assimilation model. This new current system appears and develops near the ionospheric terminator. The dynamical features of this current system will be described and its connection to the active role of the ionosphere in the M-I coupling will be discussed.

  13. Current and Future Development of a Non-hydrostatic Unified Atmospheric Model (NUMA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-09

    Based on Spectral Elements and Discontinuous Galerkin methods –  Tested with simple moist physics (Kessler Physics) •  2010: 3D Mesoscale Atmospheric...Model (NUMA) –  Nonhydrostatic Equations –  Based on Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin methods –  Tested as Limited-Area model (NRBCs...following capabilities: 1.  Highly scalable on current and future computer architectures (exascale computing and beyond and GPUs ) 2.  Flexibility

  14. Analytical model development of an eddy-current-based non-contacting steel plate conveyance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Tsung; Lin, Sheng-Yang; Yang, Yung-Yi; Hwang, Chang-Chou

    A concise model for analyzing and predicting the quasi-static electromagnetic characteristics of an eddy-current-based non-contacting steel plate conveyance system has been developed. Confirmed by three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA), adequacy of the analytical model can be demonstrated. Such an effective approach, which can be conveniently used by the potential industries for preliminary system operational performance evaluations, will be essential for designers and on-site engineers.

  15. Mechanically durable, superomniphobic coatings prepared by layer-by-layer technique for self-cleaning and anti-smudge.

    PubMed

    Brown, Philip S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-10-15

    Superomniphobic surfaces are of interest for anti-fouling, self-cleaning, anti-smudge and low-drag applications. Many bioinspired surfaces developed previously are of limited use due to a lack of mechanical durability. From a previously developed technique, an adapted layer-by-layer approach involving charged species with electrostatic interactions between layers is combined with an uncharged fluorosilane layer to result in a durable, superomniphobic coating. This technique can provide the flexibility needed to improve adhesion to the substrate with the addition of a low surface tension coating at the air interface. In this work, polyelectrolyte binder, SiO2 nanoparticles, and fluorosilane layers are deposited, providing the combination of surface roughness and low surface tension to result in a superomniphobic coating with droplets of liquids with surface tensions from 72 to 21 mN m(-1) displaying contact angles exceeding 155° with low tilt angles. The durability of these coatings was examined through the use of micro- and macrowear experiments. These coatings currently display levels of transparency acceptable for automotive applications. Fabrication via this novel combination of techniques results in durable, superomniphobic coatings displaying improved performance compared to existing work where either the durability or the repellency is compromised.

  16. A mathematical model of phase 2 reentry: role of L-type Ca current.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Shunichiro; Mitamura, Hideo; Fujikura, Kana; Fukuda, Yukiko; Tanimoto, Kojiro; Hagiwara, Yoko; Ita, Makoto; Ogawa, Satoshi

    2003-04-01

    Phase 2 reentry (P2R) is known to be one of the mechanisms of malignant ventricular arrhythmias, especially those associated with Brugada syndrome. However, little is known about the underlying mechanism for P2R. Our aim in this study was to simulate P2R in a mathematical model to enable us to understand its mechanism and identify a potential therapeutic target. A mathematical model of the L-type Ca current was composed according to whole cell current data from guinea pig ventricular myocytes recorded at 37 degrees C. Our mathematical model was incorporated into the modified Luo-Rudy phase 2 model. We set a dispersion in transient outward current (I(to)) density within the theoretical fiber, composed of 80 serially arranged epicardial cells with gap junctions and then observed the P2R. The dispersion in I(to) density within an only 0.8-cm epicardial theoretical fiber generated P2R with our Ca channel but not with the original model. When the P2R developed in the theoretical fiber, the calculated extracellular field potential showed coved-type ST segment elevation. We succeeded in generating P2R in our model for the first time. The local epicardial P2R may contribute the genesis of coved-type ST segment elevation in the Brugada syndrome.

  17. Designing Self-Healing Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Exceptional Mechanical Durability.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Kevin; Boban, Mathew; Mabry, Joseph M; Tuteja, Anish

    2017-03-29

    The past decade saw a drastic increase in the understanding and applications of superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs). Water beads up and effortlessly rolls off a SHS due to its combination of low surface energy and texture. Whether being used for drag reduction, stain repellency, self-cleaning, fog harvesting, or heat transfer applications (to name a few), the durability of a SHS is critically important. Although a handful of purportedly durable SHSs have been reported, there are still no criteria available for systematically designing a durable SHS. In the first part of this work, we discuss two new design parameters that can be used to develop mechanically durable SHSs via the spray coating of different binders and fillers. These parameters aid in the rational selection of material components and allow one to predict the capillary resistance to wetting of any SHS from a simple topographical analysis. We show that not all combinations of sprayable components generate SHSs, and mechanically durable components do not necessarily generate mechanically durable SHSs. Moreover, even the most durable SHSs can eventually become damaged. In the second part, utilizing our new parameters, we design and fabricate physically and chemically self-healing SHSs. The most promising surface is fabricated from a fluorinated polyurethane elastomer (FPU) and the extremely hydrophobic small molecule 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluorodecyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (F-POSS). A sprayed FPU/F-POSS surface can recover its superhydrophobicity even after being abraded, scratched, burned, plasma-cleaned, flattened, sonicated, and chemically attacked.

  18. Study on model current predictive control method of PV grid- connected inverters systems with voltage sag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, N.; Yang, F.; Shang, S. Y.; Tao, T.; Liu, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    According to the limitations of the LVRT technology of traditional photovoltaic inverter existed, this paper proposes a low voltage ride through (LVRT) control method based on model current predictive control (MCPC). This method can effectively improve the photovoltaic inverter output characteristics and response speed. The MCPC method of photovoltaic grid-connected inverter designed, the sum of the absolute value of the predictive current and the given current error is adopted as the cost function with the model predictive control method. According to the MCPC, the optimal space voltage vector is selected. Photovoltaic inverter has achieved automatically switches of priority active or reactive power control of two control modes according to the different operating states, which effectively improve the inverter capability of LVRT. The simulation and experimental results proves that the proposed method is correct and effective.

  19. Determination of a dielectric waveguide propagation constant using a multifilament-current model.

    PubMed

    Cory, H; Altman, Z; Leviatan, Y

    1989-09-15

    A moment method using a multifilament-current model is presented to analyze the modes propagating in a cylindrical dielectric waveguide. In this model, analytically derivable fields of filamentary electric and magnetic currents (of yet unknown propagation constant and amplitude) are used to simulate the field of each mode inside and outside the guiding core. A simple point-matching procedure is subsequently used to enforce the boundary conditions at the core periphery and results in a homogeneous matrix equation. The longitudinal propagation constant of each mode and the currents that yield the field distribution of this mode are then found by solving this equation. As an example, a circular dielectric waveguide is analyzed and the results are presented.

  20. Weighted current sheets supported in normal and inverse configurations - A model for prominence observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoulin, P.; Forbes, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    A technique which incorporates both photospheric and prominence magnetic field observations is used to analyze the magnetic support of solar prominences in two dimensions. The prominence is modeled by a mass-loaded current sheet which is supported against gravity by magnetic fields from a bipolar source in the photosphere and a massless line current in the corona. It is found that prominence support can be achieved in three different kinds of configurations: an arcade topology with a normal polarity; a helical topology with a normal polarity; and a helical topology with an inverse polarity. In all cases the important parameter is the variation of the horizontal component of the prominence field with height. Adding a line current external to the prominence eliminates the nonsupport problem which plagues virtually all previous prominence models with inverse polarity.

  1. Modeling of the sawtooth instability in tokamaks using a current viscosity term

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, D.J.; Jardin, S.C.

    1988-08-01

    We propose a new method for modeling the sawtooth instability and other MHD activity in axisymmetric tokamak transport simulations. A hyper-resistivity (or current viscosity) term is included in the mean field Ohm's law to describe the effects of the three-dimensional fluctuating fields on the evolution of the inverse transform, q, characterizing the mean fields. This term has the effect of flattening the current profile, while dissipating energy and conserving helicity. A fully implicit MHD transport and 2-D toroidal equilibrium code has been developed to calculate the evolution in time of the q-profile and the current profile using this new term. The results of this code are compared to the Kadomtsev reconnection model in the circular cylindrical limit. 17 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Micromagnetic model for studies on Magnetic Tunnel Junction switching dynamics, including local current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, Marek; Czapkiewicz, Maciej; Skowroński, Witold; Stobiecki, Tomasz

    2014-02-01

    We present a model introducing the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with a Slonczewski's Spin-Transfer-Torque (STT) component in order to take into account spin polarized current influence on the magnetization dynamics, which was developed as an Object Oriented MicroMagnetic Framework extension. We implement the following computations: magnetoresistance of vertical channels is calculated from the local spin arrangement, local current density is used to calculate the in-plane and perpendicular STT components as well as the Oersted field, which is caused by the vertical current flow. The model allows for an analysis of all listed components separately, therefore, the contribution of each physical phenomenon in dynamic behavior of Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) magnetization is discussed. The simulated switching voltage is compared with the experimental data measured in MTJ nanopillars.

  3. Loss Current Analysis of Water Tree Degradation in Polyethylene using Equivalent Circuit Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masafumi; Itoh, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Noboru

    It is well known that the degradation of XLPE cable by water tree gives rise to harmonics in the loss current. Many researches by simulation and experiment have been carried out for the purpose of the elucidation of the mechanism of the harmonics in the loss current generation. In the present study, the loss current was calculated from the equivalent circuit model composed of voltage-dependent resistance and condenser. These elements are being connected with the matrix state. As a result, we were able to obtain the good agreement between the experimental value and the calculated value by appropriately choosing the characteristics of the voltage-dependent resistance. The equivalent circuit model determined in this study can consider not only the electrical characteristic of water tree but also its shape.

  4. Durability and Damage Tolerance of High Temperature Polymeric Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Scott W.; Reifsnider, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    Modern durability and damage tolerance predictions for composite material systems rely on accurate estimates of the local stress and material states for each of the constituents, as well as the manner in which the constituents interact. In this work, an number of approaches to estimating the stress states and interactions are developed. First, an elasticity solution is presented for the problem of a penny-shaped crack in an N-phase composite material system opened by a prescribed normal pressure. The stress state around such a crack is then used to estimate the stress concentrations due to adjacent fiber fractures in composite materials. The resulting stress concentrations are then used to estimate the tensile strength of the composite. The predicted results are compared with experimental values. In addition, a cumulative damage model for fatigue is presented. Modifications to the model are made to include the effects of variable amplitude loading. These modifications are based upon the use of remaining strength as a damage metric and the definition of an equivalent generalized time. The model is initially validated using results from the literature. Also, experimental data from APC-2 laminates and IM7/K3B laminates are used in the model. The use of such data for notched laminates requires the use of an effective hole size, which is calculated based upon strain distribution measurements. Measured remaining strengths after fatigue loading are compared with the predicted values for specimens fatigued at room temperature and 350 F (177 C).

  5. Poisson-Nernst-Planck model of ion current rectification through a nanofluidic diode.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Dragoş; Siwy, Zuzanna S

    2007-10-01

    We have investigated ion current rectification properties of a recently prepared bipolar nanofluidic diode. This device is based on a single conically shaped nanopore in a polymer film whose pore walls contain a sharp boundary between positively and negatively charged regions. A semiquantitative model that employs Poisson and Nernst-Planck equations predicts current-voltage curves as well as ionic concentrations and electric potential distributions in this system. We show that under certain conditions the rectification degree, defined as a ratio of currents recorded at the same voltage but opposite polarities, can reach values of over 1000 at a voltage range <-2 V,+2 V>. The role of thickness and position of the transition zone on the ion current rectification is discussed as well. We also show that the rectification degree scales with the applied voltage.

  6. Electromagnetic particle in cell modeling of the plasma focus: Current sheath formation and lift off

    SciTech Connect

    Seng, Y. S.; Lee, P.; Rawat, R. S.

    2014-02-15

    The shaping and formation of the current sheath takes place in the breakdown phase of a plasma focus device and critically controls the device performance. Electrostatic particle in cell codes, with magnetic effects ignored, have been used to model the breakdown phase. This Letter reports the successful development and implementation of an electromagnetic particle in cell (EMPIC) code, including magnetic effects self-consistently, to simulate the breakdown phase; from the ionization, localization and gliding discharge along the insulator to the time instant of current sheath lift off. The magnetic field was found to be appreciable from the time the current sheath came into contact with the anode with increased local current, initiating the voltage breakdown of the device as a result.

  7. The Dynamic Model of a Coverage of the Current National Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cybulski, Radoslaw; Zotova, Kremena

    This report describes the principal problems connected with the registration of documents in the current national bibliography (CNB) of the socialist countries, particularly the Soviet Union, the German Democratic Republic, Bulgaria, and Poland. Sections detail the following: (1) definition of CNB, (2) coverage of CNB, (3) the dynamic model of…

  8. Effect of Polya Problem-Solving Model on Senior Secondary School Students' Performance in Current Electricity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olaniyan, Ademola Olatide; Omosewo, Esther O.; Nwankwo, Levi I.

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the Effect of Polya Problem-Solving Model on Senior School Students' Performance in Current Electricity. It was a quasi experimental study of non- randomized, non equivalent pre-test post-test control group design. Three research questions were answered and corresponding three research hypotheses were tested…

  9. Modeling of screening currents in coated conductor magnets containing up to 40000 turns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, E.

    2016-08-01

    Screening currents caused by varying magnetic fields degrade the homogeneity and stability of the magnetic fields created by REBCO coated conductor coils. They are responsible for the AC loss; which is also important for other power applications containing windings, such as transformers, motors and generators. Since real magnets contain coils exceeding 10000 turns, accurate modeling tools for this number of turns or above are necessary for magnet design. This article presents a fast numerical method to model coils with no loss of accuracy. We model a 10400-turn coil for its real number of turns and coils of up to 40000 turns with continuous approximation, which introduces negligible errors. The screening currents, the screening current induced field (SCIF) and the AC loss is analyzed in detail. The SCIF is at a maximum at the remnant state with a considerably large value. The instantaneous AC loss for an anisotropic magnetic-field dependent J c is qualitatively different than for a constant J c , although the loss per cycle is similar. Saturation of the magnetization currents at the end pancakes causes the maximum AC loss at the first ramp to increase with J c . The presented modeling tool can accurately calculate the SCIF and AC loss in practical computing times for coils with any number of turns used in real windings, enabling parameter optimization.

  10. A magnetospheric magnetic field model with flexible current systems driven by independent physical parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilmer, Robert V.; Voigt, Gerd-Hannes

    1995-01-01

    A tilt-dependent magnetic field model of the Earth's magnetosphere with variable magnetopause standoff distance is presented. Flexible analytic representations for the ring and cross-tail currents, each composed of the elements derived from the Tsyganenko and Usmanov (1982) model, are combined with the fully shielded vacuum dipole configurations of Voigt (1981). Although the current sheet does not warp in the y-z plane, changes in the shape and position of the neutral sheet with dipole tilt are consistent with both MHD equilibrium theory and observations. In addition, there is good agreement with observed Delta B profiles and the average equatorial contours of magnetic field magnitude. While the dipole field is rigorously shielded within the defined magnetopause, the ring and cross-tails currents are not similarly confined, consequently, the model's region of validity is limited to the inner magnetosphere. The model depends on four independent external parameters. We present a simple but limited method of simulating several substorm related magnetic field changes associated with the disrupion of the near-Earth cross-tail current sheet and collapse of the midnight magnetotail field region. This feature further facilitates the generation of magnetic field configuration time sequences useful in plasma convection simulations of real magnetospheric events.

  11. EFFECTS OF WATER CHEMISTRY ON COPPER TOXICITY - WHAT'S MISSING FROM CURRENT MODELS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current models for the acute toxicity of cationic metals to aquatic organisms focus on the binding of free metal ions to gill surfaces. This binding, and the resultant toxicity, can be reduced by metal-complexing ligands in the exposure water, which lower the activity of the free...

  12. A high-latitude, low-latitude boundary layer model of the convection current system

    SciTech Connect

    Siscoe, G.L. ); Lotko, W.; Sonnerup, B.U.O. )

    1991-03-01

    Observations suggest that both the high- and low-latitude boundary layers contribute to magnetospheric convection, and that their contributions are linked. In the interpretation pursued here, the high-latitude boundary layer (HBL) generates the voltage while the low-latitude boundary layer (LBL) generates the current for the part of the convection electric circuit that closes through the ionosphere. This paper gives a model that joins the high- and low-latitude boundary layers consistently with the ionospheric Ohm's law. It describes an electric circuit linking both boundary layers, the region 1 Birkeland currents, and the ionospheric Pedersen closure currents. The model works by using the convection electric field that the ionosphere receives from the HBL to determine two boundary conditions to the equations that govern viscous LBL-ionosphere coupling. The result provides the needed self-consistent coupling between the two boundary layers and fully specifies the solution for the viscous LBL-ionosphere coupling equations. The solution shows that in providing the current required by the ionospheric Ohm's law, the LBL needs only a tenth of the voltage that spans the HBL. The solution also gives the latitude profiles of the ionospheric electric field, parallel currents, and parallel potential. It predicts that the plasma in the inner part of the LBL moves sunward instead of antisunward and that, as the transpolar potential decreases below about 40 kV, reverse polarity (region 0) currents appear at the poleward border of the region 1 currents. A possible problem with the model is its prediction of a thin boundary layer ({approximately}1000 km), whereas thicknesses inferred from satellite data tend to be greater.

  13. Structural analyses of Stirling power-convertor heater head for long-term reliability, durability, and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Shah, Ashwin; Arya, Vinod K.; Krause, David L.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    2002-01-01

    Deep space missions require onboard electric power systems with reliable design lifetimes of up to 10-y and beyond. A high-efficiency Stirling radioisotope power system is a prime candidate for future deep space missions and Mars rover applications. To ensure ample durability, the structurally critical Heater Head of the Stirling Power-Convertor has undergone extensive computational analyses of operating temperatures (up to 650 °C), stresses, and creep-resistance of the thin-walled Inconel 718 bill-of-material. Durability predictions are presented in terms of probability of survival. A benchmark structural testing program has commenced to support the analyses. This paper reports the current status of our durability assessments. .

  14. Channel Base Current Model for Negative Multiple Cloud-to-ground Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarotti, M. G.; Saba, M. M.; Pinto, O.; Lacerda, M.; Williams, E.

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 50% of all negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes have one single ground connection. For this type of flash, the current intensity at the channel base is modeled here as an electronic circuit with especial focus on the current cut-off process. The fundamental concept used is the current instability criteria proposed by Stan Heckman (1992). Considering the total channel resistance (R) and capacitance (C) and the thermodynamic (cooling) channel constant (tau), he hypothesizes that when RC > tau, the channel is unstable and the current cut-off (discrete stroke); and when RC < tau, the channel is stable and there is continuing current as long as there is charge available in the channel. Laboratory arc discharge data based on current measurements are used for R and tau as a function of current. In order to simulate this circuit, three processes were taken into account: (1) power source (lightning upper channel development inside the cloud), (2) electrical breakdown at the channel top (return-stroke initiation) and (3) channel base decay and cut-off (comparing tau, R and C). All processes have a correspondent circuit element/subsystem. The fundamental electronic elements are respectively: (1) a controlled current source as a function of charge density and cloud leader length and cross area; (2) a breakdown device (surge arrester) combined with a cut-off elapsed time-dependent resistance performing the resistive interrupted channel; and (3) a resistance in parallel with a capacitor in series with a switch controlled by a comparator RC versus tau. The primary objective of this modeling is to simulate the current waveform in time, representing the cut-off and transition to another subsequent return-stroke with realistic values for interstroke interval, continuing current and M-components amplitude and duration. Typical values for these parameters will be represented as well as distribution extreme values. These current waveforms will be compared with cloud

  15. Reliability of Current Biokinetic and Dosimetric Models for Radionuclides: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Eckerman, Keith F; Meck, Robert A.

    2008-10-01

    This report describes the results of a pilot study of the reliability of the biokinetic and dosimetric models currently used by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as predictors of dose per unit internal or external exposure to radionuclides. The study examines the feasibility of critically evaluating the accuracy of these models for a comprehensive set of radionuclides of concern to the NRC. Each critical evaluation would include: identification of discrepancies between the models and current databases; characterization of uncertainties in model predictions of dose per unit intake or unit external exposure; characterization of variability in dose per unit intake or unit external exposure; and evaluation of prospects for development of more accurate models. Uncertainty refers here to the level of knowledge of a central value for a population, and variability refers to quantitative differences between different members of a population. This pilot study provides a critical assessment of models for selected radionuclides representing different levels of knowledge of dose per unit exposure. The main conclusions of this study are as follows: (1) To optimize the use of available NRC resources, the full study should focus on radionuclides most frequently encountered in the workplace or environment. A list of 50 radionuclides is proposed. (2) The reliability of a dose coefficient for inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide (i.e., an estimate of dose per unit intake) may depend strongly on the specific application. Multiple characterizations of the uncertainty in a dose coefficient for inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide may be needed for different forms of the radionuclide and different levels of information of that form available to the dose analyst. (3) A meaningful characterization of variability in dose per unit intake of a radionuclide requires detailed information on the biokinetics of the radionuclide and hence is not feasible for many infrequently

  16. A global sensitivity tool for cardiac cell modeling: Application to ionic current balance and hypertrophic signaling.

    PubMed

    Sher, Anna A; Cooling, Michael T; Bethwaite, Blair; Tan, Jefferson; Peachey, Tom; Enticott, Colin; Garic, Slavisa; Gavaghan, David J; Noble, Denis; Abramson, David; Crampin, Edmund J

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the major cause of death in the developed countries. Identifying key cellular processes involved in generation of the electrical signal and in regulation of signal transduction pathways is essential for unraveling the underlying mechanisms of heart rhythm behavior. Computational cardiac models provide important insights into cardiovascular function and disease. Sensitivity analysis presents a key tool for exploring the large parameter space of such models, in order to determine the key factors determining and controlling the underlying physiological processes. We developed a new global sensitivity analysis tool which implements the Morris method, a global sensitivity screening algorithm, onto a Nimrod platform, which is a distributed resources software toolkit. The newly developed tool has been validated using the model of IP3-calcineurin signal transduction pathway model which has 30 parameters. The key driving factors of the IP3 transient behaviour have been calculated and confirmed to agree with previously published data. We next demonstrated the use of this method as an assessment tool for characterizing the structure of cardiac ionic models. In three latest human ventricular myocyte models, we examined the contribution of transmembrane currents to the shape of the electrical signal (i.e. on the action potential duration). The resulting profiles of the ionic current balance demonstrated the highly nonlinear nature of cardiac ionic models and identified key players in different models. Such profiling suggests new avenues for development of methodologies to predict drug action effects in cardiac cells.

  17. Numerical modeling investigation of radiation stress in coastal wave-current coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Changlong; Li, Rui

    2014-05-01

    It is believed that the radiation stress is the main driving force for nearshore wave-induced currents. So far several theoretical formulas of radiation stress have been proposed, among which the vertical structures differ considerably. A numerical wave flume (NWF) have been established on the basis of the CFD software, and applied to simulate the wave motion in various shallow water topography with different incident waves. The results from the NWF is used to analyze the features of radiation stress. It is found, that the vertical integral of the radiation stress is agreeably consistent with the well-known classical result by Longuet-Higgins and Stewart (1964), while the vertical structure of the radiation stress is discontinuous at the surface where the maximum exists, which can be better characterized with the formula by Mellor (2008). The effects of radiation stress and wave roller are implemented in a coupled SWAN-POM model, so that the coupled model is able to simulate the wave setup and wave-induced current. The numerical modeling results have been verified by the field measurements. It is shown that the modelled wave setup corresponding to various radiation stress formulas is well in agreement with the field observation. This means the modeled wave setup is dependent on the vertical integral of radiation stress rather than the vertical structure of that. In comparison with the observed current velocity and direction data, it is shown that the modeled results with Mellor's radiation stress formula plus wave roller is able to be consistent with the filed measurement well. This indicates that the modeled wave-induced current is dependent on the vertical structure of radiation stress rather than the vertical integral of that.

  18. Durability enhancement of intermetallics electrocatalysts via N-anchor effect for fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; An, Li; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Nanlin; Xia, Dingguo; Huang, Weifeng; Chu, Wangsheng; Wu, Ziyu

    2013-11-18

    Insufficient durability and catalytic activity of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalyst are key issues that have to be solved for the practical application of low temperature fuel cell. This paper introduces a new catalyst design strategy using N-anchor to promote the corrosion resistance of electrocatalyst. The as-synthesized N-Pt3Fe1/C shows a high electrocatalytic activity and a superior durability towards ORR. The kinetic current density of N-Pt3Fe1/C as normalized by ECSA is still as high as 0.145 mA cm(-2) and only 7% loss after 20,000 potential cycles from 0.6 to 1.2 V (vs. NHE) in O2-bubbling perchloric acid solution, whereas Pt3Fe1/C shows 49% loss under the same tests. The N-anchor approach offers novel opportunities for the development of ORR catalyst with excellent electrochemical properties.

  19. Development of improved-durability plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.; Ruckle, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to reduce fuel consumption of current commercial aircraft engines, methods were investigated for improving the durability of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for use on vane platforms in the JT9D turbofan engine. Increased durability concepts under evaluation include use of improved strain tolerant microstructures and control of the substrate temperature during coating application. Initial burner rig tests conducted at temperatures of 1010 C (1850 F) indicate that improvements in cyclic life greater than 20:1 over previous ceramic coating systems were achieved. Three plasma sprayed coating systems applied to first stage vane platforms in the high pressure turbine were subjected to a 100-cycle JT9D engine endurance test with only minor damage occurring to the coatings.

  20. Current density and heating patterns in organic solar cells: modelling and imaging experiments (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oettking, Rolf; Fluhr, Daniel; Rösch, Roland; Muhsin, Burhan; Hoppe, Harald

    2016-09-01

    We developed finite element models of organic solar cells in order to investigate current pathways and dissipative losses under different geometries. The models are of purely resistive nature, as this is sufficient to describe the effects under consideration. The overall behaviour of the current mostly steers the resistive behaviour of the device and is a delicate consequence of the interplay between the individual layer properties, namely the resistivities and layer thicknesses in combination. The model calculations solely based on external material parameters, i.e. without fitting, yield the spatial distribution of the current densities, potentials and the according resistive losses. In particular, the current pathways are spread out from the entire length of the top contact towards the entire width of the ground contact, running along the electric potential gradient. On the other hand, current crowding appears at the foremost part of the top electrode, resulting in a respective concentration of the resistive loss in this vicinity. The resistive loss in turn is the origin of the heat pattern, which is visible in DLIT/ILIT experiments. The comparison between experiment and simulation shows remarkable agreement. Having established the description of defect free solar cells, defects were simulated. We utilized the micro-diode-model as another established simulation method to model shunt or blocking contact defects in combination with electro luminescence imaging methods. The respective heat patterns were calculated in FEM. Nice agreement is found between the various experimental and simulation methods. The respective heat patterns then allow identifying several classes of defects such as shunt defects or blocking contact defects in accordance with their patterns from various imaging measurements, bridging the gap between theory and experiment to further the detailed analysis of organic solar cells.