Science.gov

Sample records for current durability model

  1. "Low-Li2O" Frits: Selecting Glasses that Support the Melt Rate Studies and Challenge the Current Durability Model

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.

    2005-07-30

    During the progressive development of the cold cap model (as it applies to a potential melt rate predictive tool), the formation of an Al-Li-silicate phase was identified as an intermediate reaction phase that could possibly hinder melt rate for SB4. To test this theory, six glasses were designed (using Frit 320's composition as the baseline) to maintain a constant 20 wt% sum of alkali content (in frit) by varying Na{sub 2}O to Li{sub 2}O ratios. The Li{sub 2}O concentration ranged from 8 wt% down to 0% in either 2% or 1% increments with the differences being accounted for by an increase in Na{sub 2}O concentration. Although the primary objective of the ''lower Li{sub 2}O'' frits was to evaluate the potential for melt rate improvements, assessments of durability (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) were also performed. The results suggest that durable glasses can be produced with these ''lower Li{sub 2}O'' frits should it be necessary to pursue this option for improving melt rate. In addition to the series of glasses to support melt rate assessments, a series of frits were also developed to challenge the current durability model based on the limits proposed by Edwards et al. (2004). Although the ''new'' limits allow access into compositional regions of interest (i.e., higher alkali systems) which can improve melt rate and/or waste loading, there may still be ''additional'' conservatism. In this report, two series of glasses were developed to challenge the ''new'' durability limits for the SB4 system. In the first series, the total alkali of the Frit 320-based glasses (designed to support the melt rate program) was increased from 20 wt% to 21 wt% (in the frit), but the series also evaluated the possible impact of various Na{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}O mass ratio differences. The second series pushed the alkali limit in the frit even further with frits containing either 22 or 24 wt% total alkali as well as various Na{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}O mass ratios. The

  2. Evaluation of models of waste glass durability

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, A.

    1995-08-01

    The main variable under the control of the waste glass producer is the composition of the glass; thus a need exists to establish functional relationships between the composition of a waste glass and measures of processability, product consistency, and durability. Many years of research show that the structure and properties of a glass depend on its composition, so it seems reasonable to assume that there also is relationship between the composition of a waste glass and its resistance to attack by an aqueous solution. Several models have been developed to describe this dependence, and an evaluation their predictive capabilities is the subject of this paper. The objective is to determine whether any of these models describe the ``correct`` functional relationship between composition and corrosion rate. A more thorough treatment of the relationships between glass composition and durability has been presented elsewhere, and the reader is encouraged to consult it for a more detailed discussion. The models examined in this study are the free energy of hydration model, developed at the Savannah River Laboratory, the structural bond strength model, developed at the Vitreous State Laboratory at the Catholic University of America, and the Composition Variation Study, developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

  3. Glass Durability Modeling, Activated Complex Theory (ACT)

    SciTech Connect

    CAROL, JANTZEN

    2005-02-04

    dissolution modeling using simple atomic ratios is shown to represent the structural effects of the glass on the dissolution and the formation of activated complexes in the glass leached layer. This provides two different methods by which a linear glass durability model can be formulated. One based on the quasi- crystalline mineral species in a glass and one based on cation ratios in the glass: both are related to the activated complexes on the surface by the law of mass action. The former would allow a new Thermodynamic Hydration Energy Model to be developed based on the hydration of the quasi-crystalline mineral species if all the pertinent thermodynamic data were available. Since the pertinent thermodynamic data is not available, the quasi-crystalline mineral species and the activated complexes can be related to cation ratios in the glass by the law of mass action. The cation ratio model can, thus, be used by waste form producers to formulate durable glasses based on fundamental structural and activated complex theories. Moreover, glass durability model based on atomic ratios simplifies HLW glass process control in that the measured ratios of only a few waste components and glass formers can be used to predict complex HLW glass performance with a high degree of accuracy, e.g. an R{sup 2} approximately 0.97.

  4. On the problems of stability and durability of field-emission current sources for electrovacuum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, Alexander N.; Aban'shin, Nikolay P.; Akchurin, Garif G.; Akchurin, Georgy G.; Avetisyan, Yuri A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of the practical implementation of the concept of field-emission current source with high average current density of 0.1-0.3 A-cm-2 are shown. The durability of cathode samples at a level of 6000 hours is achieved under conditions of technical vacuum. A phenomenological model is suggested that describes the tunneling of both equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrons in a vacuum from the zone of concentration of electrostatic field. Conditions are discussed as the resulting increase in the emission current due to the connection mechanism of the photoelectric effect is thermodynamically favorable, that is not accompanied by an undesirable increase in the temperature of the local emission zone. It is shown that to ensure stability and durability of the cathode is also important to limit the concentration of equilibrium carriers using composite structures «DLC film on Mo substrate." This helps to reduce the criticality of the CVC. A possible alternative is to use a restrictive resistance in the cathode. However, this increases the heat losses and thus decreases assembly efficiency. The results of experimental studies of the structure showing the saturation of photoemission current component with an increase in operating voltage. This fact suggests the existence of an effective mechanism for control of emission at constant operating voltage. This is fundamentally important for the stabilization of field emission cathode, providing a reliability and durability. The single-photon processes and the small thickness DLC films (15-20 nm) provide high-speed process of control.

  5. Evolutionary model of an anonymous consumer durable market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaldasch, Joachim

    2011-07-01

    An analytic model is presented that considers the evolution of a market of durable goods. The model suggests that after introduction goods spread always according to a Bass diffusion. However, this phase will be followed by a diffusion process for durable consumer goods governed by a variation-selection-reproduction mechanism and the growth dynamics can be described by a replicator equation. The theory suggests that products play the role of species in biological evolutionary models. It implies that the evolution of man-made products can be arranged into an evolutionary tree. The model suggests that each product can be characterized by its product fitness. The fitness space contains elements of both sites of the market, supply and demand. The unit sales of products with a higher product fitness compared to the mean fitness increase. Durables with a constant fitness advantage replace other goods according to a logistic law. The model predicts in particular that the mean price exhibits an exponential decrease over a long time period for durable goods. The evolutionary diffusion process is directly related to this price decline and is governed by Gompertz equation. Therefore it is denoted as Gompertz diffusion. Describing the aggregate sales as the sum of first, multiple and replacement purchase the product life cycle can be derived. Replacement purchase causes periodic variations of the sales determined by the finite lifetime of the good (Juglar cycles). The model suggests that both, Bass- and Gompertz diffusion may contribute to the product life cycle of a consumer durable. The theory contains the standard equilibrium view of a market as a special case. It depends on the time scale, whether an equilibrium or evolutionary description is more appropriate. The evolutionary framework is used to derive also the size, growth rate and price distribution of manufacturing business units. It predicts that the size distribution of the business units (products) is lognormal

  6. Progressive Damage Modeling of Durable Bonded Joint Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Lin, Shih-Yung; Smeltzer, Stan; Girolamo, Donato; Ghose, Sayata; Guzman, Juan C.; McCarville, Duglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of durable bonded joint technology for assembling composite structures for launch vehicles is being pursued for the U.S. Space Launch System. The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology applicable to a wide range of sandwich structures for a Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented Durable Redundant Joint. Both designs involve a honeycomb sandwich with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined with adhesively bonded doublers. Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage. For structures that include multiple materials, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be considered increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The joints were modeled using Abaqus parametric finite element models, in which damage was modeled with user-written subroutines. Each ply was meshed discretely, and layers of cohesive elements were used to account for delaminations and to model the adhesive layers. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and predicted failure mechanisms.

  7. Durability to Electromigration of an Annealing-Twinned Ag-4Pd Alloy Wire Under Current Stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Tung-Han; Lin, Hsin-Jung; Chuang, Chien-Hsun; Tsai, Chih-Hsin; Lee, Jun-Der; Tsai, Hsing-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Ag-4Pd binary alloy wire has been produced as an alternative to a previously developed Ag-8Au-3Pd ternary alloy wire to meet requirements for high electrical conductivity and low cost. The electrical resistivity of this Ag-4Pd bonding wire, manufactured with a conventional method, is 3.7 μΩ cm, close to the values of traditional 3N Au wire (3.5 μΩ cm) and Pd-coated Cu wire (1.8 μΩ cm). To further improve the performance of this bonding wire, a large amount of annealing twins were introduced in this Ag-4Pd alloy wire through an innovative concept of sequential drawing and multiple annealing processes. The resulting electrical resistivity of this annealing-twinned Ag-4Pd wire is 3.5 μΩ cm. In contrast to the apparent increase in grain size in the conventional Ag-4Pd wire under electrical stressing with a current density of 1.23 × 105 A/cm2 for various times, the grains in this annealing-twinned wire grow much more slowly. The breaking load and elongation of this annealing-twinned Ag-4Pd wire are also higher than those of conventional wire. Furthermore, annealing twins increase the durability to electromigration of this Ag-4Pd wire under electrical stressing with various current densities.

  8. Prediction of radioactive waste glass durability by the hydration thermodynamic model: Application to saturated repository environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M. ); Ramsey, W.G. . Dept. of Ceramic Engineering)

    1989-01-01

    The effects of groundwater chemistry on glass durability were examined using the hydration thermodynamic model. The relative durabilities of SiO{sub 2}, obsidians, basalts, nuclear waste glasses, medieval window glasses, and a frit glass were determined in tuffaceous groundwater, basaltic groundwater, WIPP-A brine, and Permian-A brine using the monolithic MCC-1 durability test. For all the groundwaters, the free energy of hydration, calculated from the glass composition and the final experimental pH, was linearly related to the logarithm of the measured silica concentration. The linear equation was identical to that observed previously for these glasses during MCC-1 testing in deionized water. In the groundwater-dominated MCC-1 experiments, the pH values for all the glasses tested appeared to be buffered by the groundwater-precipitate chemistry. The behavior of poorly durable glasses demonstrated that the silica release is a function of the ionic strength of the solution. The ionic strength, in turn, reflects the effect of the groundwater chemistry on the pH. Using the hydration thermodynamic model, nuclear waste glass durability in saturated repository environments can be predicted from the glass composition and the groundwater and the groundwater pH. 47 refs., 3 figs. 1 tab.

  9. Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Durability Modeling; An Overview and Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, A.; Bhatt, R. T.; Grady, J. E.; Zhu, D.

    2012-01-01

    A study outlining a fracture mechanics based model that is being developed to investigate crack growth and spallation of environmental barrier coating (EBC) under thermal cycling conditions is presented. A description of the current plan and a model to estimate thermal residual stresses in the coating and preliminary fracture mechanics concepts for studying crack growth in the coating are also discussed. A road map for modeling life and durability of the EBC and the results of FEA model(s) developed for predicting thermal residual stresses and the cracking behavior of the coating are generated and described. Further initial assessment and preliminary results showed that developing a comprehensive EBC life prediction model incorporating EBC cracking, degradation and spalling mechanism under stress and temperature gradients typically seen in turbine components is difficult. This is basically due to mismatch in thermal expansion difference between sub-layers of EBC as well as between EBC and substrate, diffusion of moisture and oxygen though the coating, and densification of the coating during operating conditions as well as due to foreign object damage, the EBC can also crack and spall from the substrate causing oxidation and recession and reducing the design life of the EBC coated substrate.

  10. Transparent superwetting nanofilms with enhanced durability at model physiological condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwangbo, Sunghee; Heo, Jiwoong; Lin, Xiangde; Choi, Moonhyun; Hong, Jinkee

    2016-01-01

    There have been many studies on superwetting surfaces owing to the variety of their potential applications. There are some drawbacks to developing these films for biomedical applications, such as the fragility of the microscopic roughness feature that is vital to ensure superwettability. But, there are still only a few studies that have shown an enhanced durability of nanoscale superwetting films at certain extreme environment. In this study, we fabricated intrinsically stable superwetting films using the organosilicate based layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method in order to control nano-sized roughness of the multilayer structures. In order to develop mechanically and chemically robust surfaces, we successfully introduced polymeric silsesquioxane as a building block for LbL assembly with desired fashion. Even in the case that the superhydrophobic outer layers were damaged, the films maintained their superhydrophobicity because of the hydrophobic nature of their inner layers. As a result, we successfully fabricated superwetting nano-films and evaluated their robustness and stability.

  11. Transparent superwetting nanofilms with enhanced durability at model physiological condition

    PubMed Central

    Hwangbo, Sunghee; Heo, Jiwoong; Lin, Xiangde; Choi, Moonhyun; Hong, Jinkee

    2016-01-01

    There have been many studies on superwetting surfaces owing to the variety of their potential applications. There are some drawbacks to developing these films for biomedical applications, such as the fragility of the microscopic roughness feature that is vital to ensure superwettability. But, there are still only a few studies that have shown an enhanced durability of nanoscale superwetting films at certain extreme environment. In this study, we fabricated intrinsically stable superwetting films using the organosilicate based layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method in order to control nano-sized roughness of the multilayer structures. In order to develop mechanically and chemically robust surfaces, we successfully introduced polymeric silsesquioxane as a building block for LbL assembly with desired fashion. Even in the case that the superhydrophobic outer layers were damaged, the films maintained their superhydrophobicity because of the hydrophobic nature of their inner layers. As a result, we successfully fabricated superwetting nano-films and evaluated their robustness and stability. PMID:26764164

  12. New Accelerated Testing and Lifetime Modeling Methods Promise Faster Development of More Durable MEAs

    SciTech Connect

    Pierpont, D. M.; Hicks, M. T.; Turner, P. L.; Watschke, T. M.

    2005-11-01

    For the successful commercialization of fuel cell technology, it is imperative that membrane electrode assembly (MEA) durability is understood and quantified. MEA lifetimes of 40,000 hours remain a key target for stationary power applications. Since it is impractical to wait 40,000 hours for durability results, it is critical to learn as much information as possible in as short a time period as possible to determine if an MEA sample will survive past its lifetime target. Consequently, 3M has utilized accelerated testing and statistical lifetime modeling tools to develop a methodology for evaluating MEA lifetime. Construction and implementation of a multi-cell test stand have allowed for multiple accelerated tests and stronger statistical data for learning about durability.

  13. Durability-Based Design Guide for an Automotive Structural Composite: Part 2. Background Data and Models

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; Brinkman, C.R.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.; Weitsman, Y.J.; Yahr, G.T.

    1998-02-01

    This background report is a companion to the document entitled ''Durability-Based Design Criteria for an Automotive Structural Composite: Part 1. Design Rules'' (ORNL-6930). The rules and the supporting material characterization and modeling efforts described here are the result of a U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Automotive Materials project entitled ''Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures.'' The overall goal of the project is to develop experimentally based, durability-driven design guidelines for automotive structural composites. The project is closely coordinated with the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC). The initial reference material addressed by the rules and this background report was chosen and supplied by ACC. The material is a structural reaction injection-molded isocyanurate (urethane), reinforced with continuous-strand, swirl-mat, E-glass fibers. This report consists of 16 position papers, each summarizing the observations and results of a key area of investigation carried out to provide the basis for the durability-based design guide. The durability issues addressed include the effects of cyclic and sustained loadings, temperature, automotive fluids, vibrations, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. The position papers cover these durability issues. Topics include (1) tensile, compressive, shear, and flexural properties; (2) creep and creep rupture; (3) cyclic fatigue; (4) the effects of temperature, environment, and prior loadings; (5) a multiaxial strength criterion; (6) impact damage and damage tolerance design; (7) stress concentrations; (8) a damage-based predictive model for time-dependent deformations; (9) confirmatory subscale component tests; and (10) damage development and growth observations.

  14. TTK Chitra tilting disc heart valve model TC2: An assessment of fatigue life and durability.

    PubMed

    Subhash, N N; Rajeev, Adathala; Sujesh, Sreedharan; Muraleedharan, C V

    2017-08-01

    Average age group of heart valve replacement in India and most of the Third World countries is below 30 years. Hence, the valve for such patients need to be designed to have a service life of 50 years or more which corresponds to 2000 million cycles of operation. The purpose of this study was to assess the structural performance of the TTK Chitra tilting disc heart valve model TC2 and thereby address its durability. The TC2 model tilting disc heart valves were assessed to evaluate the risks connected with potential structural failure modes. To be more specific, the studies covered the finite element analysis-based fatigue life prediction and accelerated durability testing of the tilting disc heart valves for nine different valve sizes. First, finite element analysis-based fatigue life prediction showed that all nine valve sizes were in the infinite life region. Second, accelerated durability test showed that all nine valve sizes remained functional for 400 million cycles under experimental conditions. The study ensures the continued function of TC2 model tilting disc heart valves over duration in excess of 50 years. The results imply that the TC2 model valve designs are structurally safe, reliable and durable.

  15. Modeling the Rate-Dependent Durability of Reduced-Ag SAC Interconnects for Area Array Packages Under Torsion Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Vikram; Menon, Sandeep; Osterman, Michael; Pecht, Michael G.

    2013-08-01

    Solder durability models frequently focus on the applied strain range; however, the rate of applied loading, or strain rate, is also important. In this study, an approach to incorporate strain rate dependency into durability estimation for solder interconnects is examined. Failure data were collected for SAC105 solder ball grid arrays assembled with SAC305 solder that were subjected to displacement-controlled torsion loads. Strain-rate-dependent (Johnson-Cook model) and strain-rate-independent elastic-plastic properties were used to model the solders in finite-element simulation. Test data were then used to extract damage model constants for the reduced-Ag SAC solder. A generalized Coffin-Manson damage model was used to estimate the durability. The mechanical fatigue durability curve for reduced-silver SAC solder was generated and compared with durability curves for SAC305 and Sn-Pb from the literature.

  16. First-order model for durability of Hanford waste glasses as a function of composition

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, P.; Piepel, G.F.; Schweiger, M.J.; Smith, D.E.

    1992-04-01

    Two standard chemical durability tests, the static leach test MCC-1 and product consistency test PCT, were conducted on simulated borosilicate glasses that encompass the expected range of compositions to be produced in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). A first-order empirical model was fitted to the data from each test method. The results indicate that glass durability is increased by addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, moderately increased by addition of ZrO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}, and decreased by addition of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and MgO. Addition of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO produce an indifferent or reducing effect on durability according to the test method. This behavior and a statistically significant lack of fit are attributed to the effects of multiple chemical reactions occurring during glass-water interaction. Liquid-liquid immiscibility is suspected to be responsible for extremely low durability of some glasses.

  17. First-order model for durability of Hanford waste glasses as a function of composition

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, P.; Piepel, G.F.; Schweiger, M.J.; Smith, D.E.

    1992-04-01

    Two standard chemical durability tests, the static leach test MCC-1 and product consistency test PCT, were conducted on simulated borosilicate glasses that encompass the expected range of compositions to be produced in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). A first-order empirical model was fitted to the data from each test method. The results indicate that glass durability is increased by addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, moderately increased by addition of ZrO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}, and decreased by addition of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and MgO. Addition of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO produce an indifferent or reducing effect on durability according to the test method. This behavior and a statistically significant lack of fit are attributed to the effects of multiple chemical reactions occurring during glass-water interaction. Liquid-liquid immiscibility is suspected to be responsible for extremely low durability of some glasses.

  18. Durability and life prediction modeling in polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    1995-01-01

    Sudden appearance of cracks on a macroscopically smooth surface of brittle materials due to cooling or drying shrinkage is a phenomenon related to many engineering problems. Although conventional strength theories can be used to predict the necessary condition for crack appearance, they are unable to predict crack spacing and depth. On the other hand, fracture mechanics theory can only study the behavior of existing cracks. The theory of crack initiation can be summarized into three conditions, which is a combination of a strength criterion and laws of energy conservation, the average crack spacing and depth can thus be determined. The problem of crack initiation from the surface of an elastic half plane is solved and compares quite well with available experimental evidence. The theory of crack initiation is also applied to concrete pavements. The influence of cracking is modeled by the additional compliance according to Okamura's method. The theoretical prediction by this structural mechanics type of model correlates very well with the field observation. The model may serve as a theoretical foundation for future pavement joint design. The initiation of interactive cracks of quasi-brittle material is studied based on a theory of cohesive crack model. These cracks may grow simultaneously, or some of them may close during certain stages. The concept of crack unloading of cohesive crack model is proposed. The critical behavior (crack bifurcation, maximum loads) of the cohesive crack model are characterized by rate equations. The post-critical behavior of crack initiation is also studied.

  19. Legal and regulatory challenges currently facing diabetes treatment providers and related durable medical equipment suppliers.

    PubMed

    Liles, Robert

    2013-03-01

    It has been estimated that 24 million Americans have diabetes, many of whom are Medicare beneficiaries. These individuals carefully monitor their blood glucose levels primarily through the use of in-home blood glucose testing kits. Although the test is relatively simple, the cumulative expense of providing glucose test strips and lancets to patients is ever increasing, both to the Medicare program and to uninsured individuals who must pay out-of-pocket for these testing supplies. This article discusses the diabetes durable medical equipment (DME) coverage under Part B Medicare, the establishment and role of DME Medicare administrative contractors, and national and local coverage requirements for diabetes DME suppliers. This article also discusses the federal government's ongoing concerns regarding the improper billing of diabetes testing supplies. To protect the Medicare Trust Fund, the federal government has contracted with multiple private entities to conduct reviews and audits of questionable Medicare claims. These private sector contractors have conducted unannounced site visits of DME supplier offices, interviewed patients and their families, placed suppliers on prepayment review, and conducted extensive postpayment audits of prior paid Medicare claims. In more egregious administrative cases, Medicare contractors have recommended that problematic providers and/or DME suppliers have their Medicare numbers suspended or, in some instances, revoked. More serious infractions can lead to civil or criminal liability. In the final part of this article, we will examine the future of enforcement efforts by law enforcement and Medicare contractors and the importance of understanding and complying with federal laws when ordering and supplying diabetes testing strips and lancets.

  20. Legal and Regulatory Challenges Currently Facing Diabetes Treatment Providers and Related Durable Medical Equipment Suppliers

    PubMed Central

    Liles, Robert

    2013-01-01

    It has been estimated that 24 million Americans have diabetes, many of whom are Medicare beneficiaries. These individuals carefully monitor their blood glucose levels primarily through the use of in-home blood glucose testing kits. Although the test is relatively simple, the cumulative expense of providing glucose test strips and lancets to patients is ever increasing, both to the Medicare program and to uninsured individuals who must pay out-of-pocket for these testing supplies. This article discusses the diabetes durable medical equipment (DME) coverage under Part B Medicare, the establishment and role of DME Medicare administrative contractors, and national and local coverage requirements for diabetes DME suppliers. This article also discusses the federal government’s ongoing concerns regarding the improper billing of diabetes testing supplies. To protect the Medicare Trust Fund, the federal government has contracted with multiple private entities to conduct reviews and audits of questionable Medicare claims. These private sector contractors have conducted unannounced site visits of DME supplier offices, interviewed patients and their families, placed suppliers on prepayment review, and conducted extensive postpayment audits of prior paid Medicare claims. In more egregious administrative cases, Medicare contractors have recommended that problematic providers and/or DME suppliers have their Medicare numbers suspended or, in some instances, revoked. More serious infractions can lead to civil or criminal liability. In the final part of this article, we will examine the future of enforcement efforts by law enforcement and Medicare contractors and the importance of understanding and complying with federal laws when ordering and supplying diabetes testing strips and lancets. PMID:23566989

  1. Models of current sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angst, Sebastian; Engelke, Lukas; Winterer, Markus; Wolf, Dietrich E.

    2017-06-01

    Densification of (semi-)conducting particle agglomerates with the help of an electrical current is much faster and more energy efficient than traditional thermal sintering or powder compression. Therefore, this method becomes more and more common among experimentalists, engineers, and in industry. The mechanisms at work at the particle scale are highly complex because of the mutual feedback between current and pore structure. This paper extends previous modelling approaches in order to study mixtures of particles of two different materials. In addition to the delivery of Joule heat throughout the sample, especially in current bottlenecks, thermoelectric effects must be taken into account. They lead to segregation or spatial correlations in the particle arrangement. Various model extensions are possible and will be discussed.

  2. Quantifying the competing relationship between durability and kinematics of total knee replacements using multiobjective design optimization and validated computational models.

    PubMed

    Willing, Ryan; Kim, Il Yong

    2012-01-03

    Durability and kinematics are two critical factors which must be considered during total knee replacement (TKR) implant design. It is hypothesized, however, that there exists a competing relationship between these two performance measures, such that improvement of one requires sacrifice with respect to the other. No previous studies have used rigorous and systematic methods to quantify this relationship. During this study, multiobjective design optimization (MOO) using the adaptive weighted sum (AWS) method is used to determine a set of Pareto-optimal implant designs considering durability and kinematics simultaneously. Previously validated numerical simulations and a parametric modeller are used in conjunction with the AWS method in order to generate a durability-versus-kinematics Pareto curve. In terms of kinematics, a design optimized for kinematics alone outperformed a design optimized for durability by 61.8%. In terms of durability, the design optimized for durability outperformed the kinematics-optimized design by 70.6%. Considering the entire Pareto curve, a balanced (1:1) trade-off could be obtained when equal weighting was placed on both performance measures; however improvement of one performance measure required greater sacrifices with respect to the other when the weighting was extremized. For the first time, the competing relationship between durability and kinematics was confirmed and quantified using optimization methods. This information can aid future developments in TKR design and can be expanded to other total joint replacement designs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Application of the hydration thermodynamic model for glass durability under saturated tuff repository conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, W.G.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1990-12-31

    The effects of tuff repository groundwater on glass dissolution and surface layer formation was examined utilizing the hydration thermodynamic model. A 28 day MCC-1 monolithic durability test was performed on the following glasses: SiO{sub 2}, obsidian, basalt, medieval window glasses, frit glass, and simulated nuclear waste glass. Silica dissolution was compared with the pH corrected free energy of hydration and shown to have the theoretical slope, ln(1/2.303RT), in agreement with MCC-1 tests using deionized water. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy identified clays of the saponite family and carbonates, on the glass surfaces leached in tuff groundwater. 31 refs.

  4. Test validation of environmental barrier coating (EBC) durability and damage tolerance modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Najafi, Ali; Abdi, Frank; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Grady, Joseph E.

    2014-03-01

    Protection of Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) is rather an important element for the engine manufacturers and aerospace companies to help improve the durability of their hot engine components. The CMC's are typically porous materials which permits some desirable infiltration that lead to strength enhancements. However, they experience various durability issues such as degradation due to coating oxidation. These concerns are being addressed by introducing a high temperature protective system, Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) that can operate at temperature applications1, 3 In this paper, linear elastic progressive failure analyses are performed to evaluate conditions that would cause crack initiation in the EBC. The analysis is to determine the overall failure sequence under tensile loading conditions on different layers of material including the EBC and CMC in an attempt to develop a life/failure model. A 3D finite element model of a dogbone specimen is constructed for the analyses. Damage initiation, propagation and final failure is captured using a progressive failure model considering tensile loading conditions at room temperature. It is expected that this study will establish a process for using a computational approach, validated at a specimen level, to predict reliably in the future component level performance without resorting to extensive testing.

  5. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in evaluating the durability and reliability of fuel cell buses being demonstrated in transit service. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technology Validation team in the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

  6. Open circuit voltage durability study and model of catalyst coated membranes at different humidification levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sumit; Fowler, Michael W.; Simon, Leonardo C.; Abouatallah, Rami; Beydokhti, Natasha

    Fuel cell material durability is an area of extensive research today. Chemical degradation of the ionomer membrane is one important degradation mechanism leading to overall failure of fuel cells. This study examined the effects of relative humidity on the chemical degradation of the membrane during open circuit voltage testing. Five Gore™ PRIMEA ® series 5510 catalyst coated membranes were degraded at 100%, 75%, 50%, and 20% RH. Open circuit potential and cumulative fluoride release were monitored over time. Additionally scanning electron microscopy images were taken at end of the test. The results showed that with decreasing RH fluoride release rate increased as did performance degradation. This was attributed to an increase in gas crossover with a decrease in RH. Further, it is also shown that interruptions in testing may heavily influence cumulative fluoride release measurements where frequent stoppages in testing will cause fluoride release to be underestimated. SEM analysis shows that degradation occurred in the ionomer layer close to the cathode catalyst. A chemical degradation model of the ionomer membrane was used to model the results. The model was able to predict fluoride release trends, including the effects of interruptions, showing that changes in gas crossover with RH could explain the experimental results.

  7. Urban Decline and Durable Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaeser, Edward L.; Gyourko, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Urban decline is not the mirror image of growth, and durable housing is the primary reason the nature of decline is so different. This paper presents a model of urban decline with durable housing and verifies these implications of the model: (1) city growth rates are skewed so that cities grow more quickly than they decline; (2) urban decline is…

  8. Time-Dependent Deformation Modelling for a Chopped-Glass Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, W

    2001-08-24

    Time-dependent deformation behavior of a polymeric composite with chopped-glass-fiber reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications, The material under stress was exposed to representative automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on time-dependent deformation behavior of the material. The data were analyzed and experimentally-based models developed for the time-dependent deformation behavior as a basis for automotive structural durability design criteria.

  9. Mathematical Modelling of Turbidity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, G. L.; Fowler, A.; Howell, P.

    2011-12-01

    A turbidity current is a submarine sediment flow which propagates downslope through the ocean into the deep sea. Turbidity currents can occur randomly and without much warning and consequently are hard to observe and measure. The driving force in a turbidity current is the presence of sediment in the current - gravity acts on the sediment in suspension, causing it to move downstream through the ocean water. A phenomenon known as ignition or autosuspension has been observed in turbidity currents in submarine canyons, and it occurs when a current travelling downslope gathers speed as it erodes sediment from the sea floor in a self-reinforcing cycle. Using the turbidity current model of Parker et al. (Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 1986) we investigate the evolution of a 1-D turbidity current as it moves downstream. To seek a better understanding of the dynamics of flow as the current evolves in space and time, we present analytical results alongside computed numerical solutions, incorporating entrainment of water and erosion and deposition of sediment. We consider varying slope functions and inlet conditions and attempt to predict when the current will become extinct. We examine currents which are in both supercritical and subcritical flow regimes and consider the dynamics of the flow as the current switches regime.

  10. Biostability, durability and calcification of cryopreserved human pericardium after rapid glutaraldehyde-stabilization versus multistep ADAPT(R) treatment in a subcutaneous rat model.

    PubMed

    Neethling, William; Brizard, Christian; Firth, Laura; Glancy, Ross

    2014-04-01

    Autologous pericardium rapidly fixed with glutaraldehyde (GA) in theatre is considered in many cardiac surgery centres the best material currently available for intracardiac, valvular or vascular repair. Implanted non-fixed autologous tissues suffer rapid degeneration, shrinkage and absorption whereas standard xenotypic fixed tissues cause local cytotoxicity and calcification. In the present study, using a subcutaneous rat model, we tested the biostability, durability and calcification potential of four different pericardium patches treated with GA and relevant to current clinical practice. Pericardium samples were divided into four groups according to the method of treatment. Group I consisted of bovine pericardium (BP) fixed with 0.6% GA (control), Group II cryopreserved human pericardium (CHP) rapidly fixed with 0.6% GA for 4 min and detoxified with MgCl2, Group III CHP treated with the multistep ADAPT(®) process (delipidized, decellularized with Tx-100, deoxycholate, IgePal CA-630 and denucleased, fixed in 0.05% monomeric GA and detoxified) and Group IV BP treated with the multistep ADAPT(®) process (CardioCel(®)). Biostability was determined by shrinkage temperature which measures the degree of cross-linking, and durability assessed by resistance to a mixture of proteinases (pronase digestion). Treated pericardium samples (n = 10 in each of Groups I-IV) were implanted in the subcutaneous rat model for 8 and 16 weeks, followed by histology and calcium analysis (atomic absorption spectrophotometry). The biostability and the durability of both CHP and BP after the multistep ADAPT(®) treatment remained stable without any microscopic calcification. Extractable calcium levels of CHP were significantly (P < 0.01) reduced in Group II (1.89 ± 0.77 μg Ca/mg tissue) compared with Group I (64.37 ± 6.25 μg/mg) after 8 weeks. Calcification of CHP (Group III) and BP (Group IV) after the multistep ADAPT(®) treatment was significantly reduced (1.43 ± 0.48 µg/mg and

  11. WOODSTOVE DURABILITY TESTING PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development of an accelerated laboratory test to simulate in-home woodstove aging and degradation. nown as a stress test, the protocol determines the long-term durability of woodstove models in a 1- to 2-week time frame. wo avenues of research have been t...

  12. WOODSTOVE DURABILITY TESTING PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development of an accelerated laboratory test to simulate in-home woodstove aging and degradation. nown as a stress test, the protocol determines the long-term durability of woodstove models in a 1- to 2-week time frame. wo avenues of research have been t...

  13. Limitations of bootstrap current models

    SciTech Connect

    Belli, Emily A.; Candy, Jefferey M.; Meneghini, Orso; Osborne, Thomas H.

    2014-03-27

    We assess the accuracy and limitations of two analytic models of the tokamak bootstrap current: (1) the well-known Sauter model and (2) a recent modification of the Sauter model by Koh et al. For this study, we use simulations from the first-principles kinetic code NEO as the baseline to which the models are compared. Tests are performed using both theoretical parameter scans as well as core- to-edge scans of real DIII-D and NSTX plasma profiles. The effects of extreme aspect ratio, large impurity fraction, energetic particles, and high collisionality are studied. In particular, the error in neglecting cross-species collisional coupling – an approximation inherent to both analytic models – is quantified. Moreover, the implications of the corrections from kinetic NEO simulations on MHD equilibrium reconstructions is studied via integrated modeling with kinetic EFIT.

  14. Limitations of bootstrap current models

    DOE PAGES

    Belli, Emily A.; Candy, Jefferey M.; Meneghini, Orso; ...

    2014-03-27

    We assess the accuracy and limitations of two analytic models of the tokamak bootstrap current: (1) the well-known Sauter model and (2) a recent modification of the Sauter model by Koh et al. For this study, we use simulations from the first-principles kinetic code NEO as the baseline to which the models are compared. Tests are performed using both theoretical parameter scans as well as core- to-edge scans of real DIII-D and NSTX plasma profiles. The effects of extreme aspect ratio, large impurity fraction, energetic particles, and high collisionality are studied. In particular, the error in neglecting cross-species collisional couplingmore » – an approximation inherent to both analytic models – is quantified. Moreover, the implications of the corrections from kinetic NEO simulations on MHD equilibrium reconstructions is studied via integrated modeling with kinetic EFIT.« less

  15. Limitations of bootstrap current models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.; Meneghini, O.; Osborne, T. H.

    2014-04-01

    We assess the accuracy and limitations of two analytic models of the tokamak bootstrap current: (1) the well-known Sauter model (1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834, 2002 Phys. Plasmas 9 5140) and (2) a recent modification of the Sauter model by Koh et al (2012 Phys. Plasmas 19 072505). For this study, we use simulations from the first-principles kinetic code NEO as the baseline to which the models are compared. Tests are performed using both theoretical parameter scans as well as core-to-edge scans of real DIII-D and NSTX plasma profiles. The effects of extreme aspect ratio, large impurity fraction, energetic particles, and high collisionality are studied. In particular, the error in neglecting cross-species collisional coupling—an approximation inherent to both analytic models—is quantified. Furthermore, the implications of the corrections from kinetic NEO simulations on MHD equilibrium reconstructions is studied via integrated modeling with kinetic EFIT.

  16. Combustor liner durability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, V.

    1981-01-01

    An 18 month combustor liner durability analysis program was conducted to evaluate the use of advanced three dimensional transient heat transfer and nonlinear stress-strain analyses for modeling the cyclic thermomechanical response of a simulated combustor liner specimen. Cyclic life prediction technology for creep/fatigue interaction is evaluated for a variety of state-of-the-art tools for crack initiation and propagation. The sensitivity of the initiation models to a change in the operating conditions is also assessed.

  17. In vivo tissue response and durability of five novel synthetic polymers in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Sahin, E; Cingi, C; Eskiizmir, G; Altintoprak, N; Calli, A; Calli, C; Yilgör, I; Yilgör, E

    2016-04-01

    Alloplastic materials are frequently used in facial plastic surgeries such as rhinoplasty and nasal reconstruction. Unfortunately, the ideal alloplastic material has not been found. This experimental study evaluates the tissue response and durability of five novel polymers developed as an alloplastic material. In this experimental study involving a tertiary university hospital, six subcuticular pockets were formed at the back of 10 rabbits for the implantation of each polymer and sham group. Each pocket was excised with its adjacent tissue after three months, and collected for histopathological examination. Semi-quantitative examination including neovascularisation, inflammation, fibrosis, abscess formation, multinucleated foreign body giant cells was performed, and integrity of polymer was evaluated. A statistical comparison was performed. No statically significant difference was detected in neovascularisation, inflammation, fibrosis, abscess formation and multinucleated foreign body giant cells when a paired comparison between sham and polymer II, III and IV groups was performed individually. Nevertheless, the degree of fibrosis was less than sham group in polymer I (p = .027) and V (p = .018), although the other variables were almost similar. The integrity of polymers III (9 intact, 1 fragmented) and IV (8 intact, 2 absent) was better than the other polymers. These novel synthetic polymers could be considered as good candidates for clinical applicability. All polymers provided satisfactory results in terms of tissue response; however, fibrovascular integration was higher in polymers II, III and IV. In addition, the durability of polymer III and IV was better than the others.

  18. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell model for aging predictions: Simulated equivalent active surface area loss and comparisons with durability tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, C.; Gérard, M.; Quinaud, M.; d'Arbigny, J.; Bultel, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The prediction of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) lifetime is one of the major challenges to optimize both material properties and dynamic control of the fuel cell system. In this study, by a multiscale modeling approach, a mechanistic catalyst dissolution model is coupled to a dynamic PEMFC cell model to predict the performance loss of the PEMFC. Results are compared to two 2000-h experimental aging tests. More precisely, an original approach is introduced to estimate the loss of an equivalent active surface area during an aging test. Indeed, when the computed Electrochemical Catalyst Surface Area profile is fitted on the experimental measures from Cyclic Voltammetry, the computed performance loss of the PEMFC is underestimated. To be able to predict the performance loss measured by polarization curves during the aging test, an equivalent active surface area is obtained by a model inversion. This methodology enables to successfully find back the experimental cell voltage decay during time. The model parameters are fitted from the polarization curves so that they include the global degradation. Moreover, the model captures the aging heterogeneities along the surface of the cell observed experimentally. Finally, a second 2000-h durability test in dynamic operating conditions validates the approach.

  19. Current Challenges in Dynamo Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2001-12-01

    Three-dimensional, dynamically self-consistent, numerical simulations have been used for two decades to study the generation of global magnetic fields in the deep fluid interiors of planets and stars. In particular, the number of geodynamo models has increased significantly within the last five years. These simulations of magnetic field generation by laminar convection have provided considerable insight to the dynamo process and have produced large-scale fields similar to those observed. However, no global convective dynamo simulation has yet been able to afford the spatial resolution required to simulate turbulent convection, which surely must exist in these low-viscosity fluids. They have all employed greatly enhanced eddy diffusivities to stabilize the low resolution numerical solutions and crudely account for the transport and mixing by the unresolved turbulence. A grand challenge for the next generation of geodynamo models is to produce a simulation with the thermal and viscous (eddy) diffusivities set no larger than the actual magnetic diffusivity of the Earth's fluid core (2 m2/s), while using the core's dimensions, mass, rotation rate and heat flow. This would correspond to the Ekman and magnetic Ekman numbers both set to 10-9 and the Rayleigh number being many orders of magnitude greater than critical. Dynamo models for stars and planets present an additional complication: the large variation of density with radius. A grand challenge for the next generation of these models is to reach similarly low Ekman numbers and high Rayleigh numbers with a density that decreases by at least three orders of magnitude from the base of the convection zone to the model's outer boundary. The advances in numerical methods and massively parallel computing needed to meet these challenges will be discussed.

  20. Durability of laser probes in interstitial thermotherapy: investigations on an ex vivo model of effect of carbonization.

    PubMed

    Köhrmann, K U; Vöhringer, P; Michel, M S; Henkel, T; Alken, P

    2001-12-01

    Interstitial laser application is successful for clinical tissue ablation in various organs. One great drawback of this method is the high costs caused by the vulnerability of the probes. Our objective was to investigate whether the prevention of carbonization deposits on laser probes averts reduced transmission after the application of high laser energy. Interstitial laser probes were used to pierce an in vitro kidney model, and 9900 J of energy (Nd:YAG laser) was applied. The transmission of the laser probe was determined and compared with that of a reference probe. The application of laser energy, up to a total of 49,500 J, did not reduce transmission. The deviation of the transmission comparing working probes and the reference probe was between 2% and 7%. The application of high energy (40 W) over a longer period (>20 seconds) led to carbonization and consequent distinct reduction of transmission. The durability of laser probes can be prolonged by preventing carbonization. The economic effect achieved is the repeated use of the probes at less expense.

  1. Current Status in Cavitation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Ashok K.; Avva, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation is a common problem for many engineering devices in which the main working fluid is in liquid state. In turbomachinery applications, cavitation generally occurs on the inlet side of pumps. The deleterious effects of cavitation include: lowered performance, load asymmetry, erosion and pitting of blade surfaces, vibration and noise, and reduction of the overall machine life. Cavitation models in use today range from rather crude approximations to sophisticated bubble dynamics models. Details about bubble inception, growth and collapse are relevant to the prediction of blade erosion, but are not necessary to predict the performance of pumps. An engineering model of cavitation is proposed to predict the extent of cavitation and performance. The vapor volume fraction is used as an indicator variable to quantify cavitation. A two-phase flow approach is employed with the assumption of the thermal equilibrium between liquid and vapor. At present velocity slip between the two phases is selected. Preliminary analyses of 2D flows shows qualitatively correct results.

  2. Modeling the cathode in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell using density functional theory How the carbon support can affect durability and activity of a platinum catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, Michael Nelson

    The current global energy and environmental challenges need to be addressed by developing a new portfolio of clean power producing devices. The proton exchange membrane fuel cell has the potential to be included and can fit into a variety of niches ranging from portable electronics to stationary residential applications. One of the many barriers to commercial viability is the cost of the cathode layer which requires too much platinum metal to achieve a comparable power output as well as would need to be replaced more frequently when compared to conventional sources for most applications. Using density functional theory, an ab initio modeling technique, these durability and activity issues are examined for platinum catalysts on graphene and carbon nanotube supports. The carbon supports were also doped by replacing individual carbon atoms with other second row elements (beryllium, boron, nitrogen, and oxygen) and the effect on the platinum-surface interaction along with the interaction between the platinum and the oxygen reduction reaction intermediates are discussed. Keywords: proton exchange membrane fuel cell, density functional theory, platinum catalyst, oxygen reduction reaction, doped carbon surfaces

  3. Modeling the durability of ZOSTAVAX® vaccine efficacy in people ≥60 years of age.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Jane H; Betts, Robert F; Morrison, Vicki A; Xu, Ruifeng; Itzler, Robbin F; Acosta, Camilo J; Dasbach, Erik J; Pellissier, James M; Johnson, Gary R; Chan, Ivan S F

    2015-03-17

    Since 2006, the vaccine, ZOSTAVAX(®), has been licensed to prevent herpes zoster. Only limited clinical follow-up data are available to evaluate duration of protection, an important consideration when developing HZ vaccination policy recommendations. Four Poisson regression models were developed based on an integrated analysis of data from the Shingles Prevention Study and its Short Term Persistence extension to estimate the effects of years-since-vaccination and chronological-age on vaccine efficacy among people ≥60 years old. The models included number of HZ cases parsed into categories by chronological-age and time-since-vaccination as the dependent variable with different explanatory variables in each model. In all models, the interaction between vaccine-group and chronological-age was statistically significant indicating that vaccine efficacy decreases with the expected effects of advancing age but the interaction between vaccine-group and time-since-vaccination was not statistically significant indicating that much of the reduction in vaccine efficacy over time-since-vaccination can be explained by increasing age.

  4. Durable sequence stability and bone marrow tropism in a macaque model of human pegivirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Adam L.; Lauck, Michael; Mohns, Mariel; Peterson, Eric J.; Beheler, Kerry; Brunner, Kevin G.; Crosno, Kristin; Mejia, Andres; Mutschler, James; Gehrke, Matthew; Greene, Justin; Ericsen, Adam J.; Weiler, Andrea; Lehrer-Brey, Gabrielle; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Sibley, Samuel D.; Kallas, Esper G.; Capuano, Saverio; Rogers, Jeffrey; Goldberg, Tony L.; Simmons, Heather A.; O’Connor, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Human Pegivirus (HPgV) – formerly known as GB virus C and hepatitis G virus – is a poorly characterized RNA virus that infects approximately one-sixth of the global human population and is transmitted frequently in the blood supply. Here, we create an animal model of HPgV infection by infecting macaque monkeys with a new simian pegivirus (SPgV) discovered in wild baboons. Using this model, we provide a high-resolution, longitudinal picture of SPgV viremia where the dose, route, and timing of infection are known. We detail the highly-variable acute-phase of SPgV infection, showing that the viral load trajectory early in infection is dependent upon the infecting dose, whereas the chronic-phase viremic set-point is not. We also show that SPgV has an extremely low propensity for accumulating sequence variation, with no consensus-level variants detected during the acute phase of infection and an average of only 1.5 variants generated per 100 infection days. Finally, we show that SPgV RNA is highly concentrated in only two tissues: spleen and bone marrow, with bone marrow likely producing the majority of virus detected in plasma. Together, these results reconcile several paradoxical observations from cross-sectional analyses of HPgV in humans and provide an animal model for studying pegivirus biology. PMID:26378244

  5. Modeling Harris Current Sheets with Themis Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepko, L.; Angelopoulos, V.; McPherron, R. L.; Apatenkov, S.; Glassmeier, K.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Current sheets are ubiquitous in nature. occurring in such varied locations as the solar atmosphere. the heliosphere, and the Earth's magnetosphere. The simplest current sheet is the one-dimensional Harris neutral sheet, with the lobe field strength and scale-height the only free parameters. Despite its simplicity, confirmation of the Harris sheet as a reasonable description of the Earth's current sheet has remained elusive. In early 2009 the orbits of the 5 THEMIS probes fortuitously aligned such that profiles of the Earth's current sheet could be modeled in a time dependent manner. For the few hours of alignment we have calculated the time history of the current sheet parameters (scale height and current) in the near-Earth region. during both quiet and active times. For one particular substorm. we further demonstrate good quantitative agreement with the diversion of cross tail current inferred from the Harris modeling with the ionospheric current inferred from ground magnetometer data.

  6. Transparency Durability Test Criteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-01

    includes laboratory coupon durability testing and field service data acquisition. These areas were used to advance the development, measurement, and...comparison of coupon testing to in-service aircraft transparency durability, where durability is defined as the continued ability of the transparency to...meet specified performance requirements. Summaries of coupon tests and field service data acquisition and analysis are reported. New coupon tests

  7. Durable solar mirror films

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Mark B.; Henderson, Andrew J.; Hebrink, Timothy J.; Katare, Rajesh K.; Jing, Naiyong; North, Diane; Peterson, Eric M.

    2017-02-14

    The present disclosure generally relates to durable solar mirror films, methods of making durable solar mirror films, and constructions including durable solar mirror films. In one embodiment, the present disclosure relates to a solar mirror film comprising: a multilayer optical film layer including having a coefficient of hygroscopic expansion of less than about 30 ppm per percent relative humidity; and a reflective layer having a coefficient of hygroscopic expansion.

  8. Thermal fatigue durability for advanced propulsion materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    1989-01-01

    A review is presented of thermal and thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) crack initiation life prediction and cyclic constitutive modeling efforts sponsored recently by the NASA Lewis Research Center in support of advanced aeronautical propulsion research. A brief description is provided of the more significant material durability models that were created to describe TMF fatigue resistance of both isotropic and anisotropic superalloys, with and without oxidation resistant coatings. The two most significant crack initiation models are the cyclic damage accumulation model and the total strain version of strainrange partitioning. Unified viscoplastic cyclic constitutive models are also described. A troika of industry, university, and government research organizations contributed to the generation of these analytic models. Based upon current capabilities and established requirements, an attempt is made to project which TMF research activities most likely will impact future generation propulsion systems.

  9. Achieving Durable Resistance Against Plant Diseases: Scenario Analyses with a National-Scale Spatially Explicit Model for a Wind-Dispersed Plant Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Elisabeth Lof, Marjolein; de Vallavieille-Pope, Claude; van der Werf, Wopke

    2017-05-01

    Genetic resistance in crops is a cornerstone of disease management in agriculture. Such genetic resistance is often rapidly broken due to selection for virulence in the pathogen population. Here, we ask whether there are strategies that can prolong the useful life of plant resistance genes. In a modeling study, we compared four deployment strategies: gene pyramiding, sequential use, simultaneous use, and a mixed strategy. We developed a spatially explicit model for France and parameterized it for the fungal pathogen Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (causing wheat yellow rust) to test management strategies in a realistic spatial setting. We found that pyramiding two new resistance genes in one variety was the most durable solution only when the virulent genotype had to emerge by mutation. Deploying single-gene-resistant varieties concurrently with the pyramided variety eroded the durability of the gene pyramid. We found that continuation of deployment of varieties with broken-down resistance prolonged the useful life of simultaneous deployment of four single-gene-resistant varieties versus sequential use. However, when virulence was already present in the pathogen population, durability was low and none of the deployment strategies had effect. These results provide guidance on effective strategies for using resistance genes in crop protection practice.

  10. Modeling Jupiter's current disc - Pioneer 10 outbound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. E.; Melville, J. G., II; Blake, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    A model of the magnetic field of the Jovian current disk is presented. The model uses Euler functions and the Biot-Savart law applied to a series of concentric, but not necessarily coplanar current rings. It was found that the best fit to the Pioneer 10 outbound perturbation magnetic field data is obtained if the current disk is twisted, and also bent to tend toward parallelism with the Jovigraphic equator. The inner and outer radii of the disk appear to be about 7 and 150 Jovian radii, respectively; because of the observed current disk penetrations, the bent disk also requires a deformation in the form of a bump or wrinkle whose axis tends to exhibit spiraling. Modeling of the azimuthal field shows that it is due to a thin radial current sheet, but it may actually be due in large part to penetration of a tail current sheet as suggested by Voyager observations.

  11. Environmental barrier coating (EBC) durability modeling using a progressive failure analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Abumeri, Galib; Troha, William; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Grady, Joseph E.; Zhu, D.

    2012-04-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are getting the attention of most engine manufacturers and aerospace firms for turbine engine and other related applications. This is because of their potential weight advantage and performance benefits. As a protecting guard for these materials, a highly specialized form of environmental barrier coating (EBC) is being developed and explored for high temperature applications that are greater than 1100 °C1,2. The EBCs are typically a multilayer of coatings and are on the order of hundreds of microns thick. CMCs are generally porous materials and this feature is somewhat beneficial since it allows some desirable infiltration of the EBC. Their degradation usually includes coating interface oxidation as opposed to moisture induced matrix degradation which is generally seen at a higher temperature. A variety of factors such as residual stresses, coating process related flaws, and casting conditions may influence the strength of degradation. The cause of such defects which cause cracking and other damage is that not much energy is absorbed during fracture of these materials. Therefore, an understanding of the issues that control crack deflection and propagation along interfaces is needed to maximize the energy dissipation capabilities of layered ceramics. Thus, evaluating components and subcomponents made out of CMCs under gas turbine engine conditions is suggested to demonstrate that these material will perform as expected and required under these aggressive environmental circumstances. Progressive failure analysis (PFA) is applied to assess the damage growth of the coating under combined thermal and mechanical loading conditions. The PFA evaluation is carried out using a full-scale finite element model to account for the average material failure at the microscopic or macroscopic levels. The PFA life prediction evaluation identified the root cause for damage initiation and propagation. It indicated that delamination type damage

  12. A new murine model of sustainable and durable chronic critical limb ischemia fairly mimicking human pathology.

    PubMed

    Lejay, A; Choquet, P; Thaveau, F; Singh, F; Schlagowski, A; Charles, A-L; Laverny, G; Metzger, D; Zoll, J; Chakfe, N; Geny, B

    2015-02-01

    To establish a chronic mouse model of critical limb ischemia (CLI) with in vivo and ex vivo validation, closely mimicking human pathology. Swiss mice (n = 28) were submitted to sequential unilateral femoral (day 0) and iliac (day 4) ligatures. Ischemia was confirmed by clinical scores (tissue and functional damages) and methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) scintigraphies at days 0, 4, 6, 10, 20, and 30. At days 10, 20, and 30, muscle mitochondrial respiration, calcium retention capacity (CRC), and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were investigated, together with transcripts of mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant enzymes. Histological analysis was also performed. Clinical and functional damage confirmed CLI. MIBI scintigraphies showed hypoperfusion of the ischemic limb, which remained stable until day 30. Mitochondrial respiration was impaired in ischemic muscles compared with controls (Vmax = 7.93 ± 0.99 vs. 10.09 ± 2.87 mmol/L O2/minute/mg dry weight [dw]; p = .01), together with impaired CRC (7.4 ± 1.6 mmol/L minute/mg dw vs. 11.9 ± 0.9 mmol/L minute/mg dw; p < .001) and biogenesis (41% decrease in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator [PGC]-1α, 49% decrease in PGC-1β, and 41% decrease in nuclear respiratory factor-1). Ischemic muscles also demonstrated increased production of ROS under electron paramagnetic resonance (0.084 ± 0.029 vs. 0.051 ± 0.031 mmol/L minute/mg dw; p = .03) and with dihydroethidium staining (3622 ± 604 arbitrary units of fluorescence vs. 1224 ± 324; p < .01), decreased antioxidant enzymes (32% decrease in superoxide dismutase [SOD]1, 41% decrease in SOD2, and 49% decrease in catalase), and myopathic features (wider range in fiber size, rounded shape, centrally located nuclei, and smaller cross-sectional areas). All defects were stable over time. Sequential femoral and iliac ligatures closely mimic human functional, clinical, scintigraphic, and skeletal muscle

  13. Phase VI Glove Durability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 -- 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a dust free, manufactured microgravity EVA environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 -- 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 -- 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of International Space Station (ISS)-based EVA tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected periodically throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the

  14. Phase VI Glove Durability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 - 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a clean, controlled ISS environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 - 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 - 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of ISS-based tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected at periodic intervals throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the development of improved cycle model tables. This paper provides a

  15. Plasmasphere Modeling with Ring Current Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guiter, S. M.; Fok, M.-C.; Moore, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    Coulomb collisions between ring current ions and the thermal plasma in the plasmasphere will heat the plasmaspheric electrons and ions. During a storm such heating would lead to significant changes in the temperature and density of the thermal plasma. This was modeled using a time- dependent, one-stream hydrodynamic model for plasmaspheric flows, in which the model flux tube is connected to the ionosphere. The model simultaneously solves the coupled continuity, momentum, and energy equations of a two-ion (H(+) and O(+) quasineutral, currentless plasma. Heating rates due to collisions with ring current ions were calculated along the field line using a kinetic ring current model. First, diurnally reproducible results were found assuming only photoelectron heating of the thermal electrons. Then results were found with heating of the H(+) ions by the ring current during the recovery phase of a magnetic storm.

  16. Radiation Belt and Ring Current Forecasting Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, M.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2001-12-01

    A model has been developed to predict the radiation belt and ring current environment. The core of this forecasting model is a kinetic model, which solves the convection-diffusion equation of particle distributions at 10 keV to MeV energy range. This forecasting model is solely driven by the solar wind and IMF conditions. We will present the model logic, and the model validation by comparing measured particle fluxes during several magnetic storms with model calculations. In addition, we will estimate the radiation dose collected during these active periods. Finally, future development of this forecasting model will be discussed.

  17. Current distribution modeling for novel alumina electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, D.P. . Alcoa Labs.)

    1991-01-01

    One-, two- and three-dimensional secondary current distributions are calculated for anode designs and electrolysis being investigated for a novel alumina electrolysis process using a three dimensional or extended area anode design. Agreement with measured polarization is good. The results indicate that for a particular configuration and electrolyte, the maximum local current density will be 28% of the superficial current density. An alternative design giving a maximum of 15% of the superficial current density was also investigated with the models. Evaluation of some other electrolyte systems indicates that they will not be suitable for use in the high surface area configuration. 18 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Highly Dispersed Alloy Catalyst for Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek S. Murthi; Izzo, Elise; Bi, Wu; Guerrero, Sandra; Protsailo, Lesia

    2013-01-08

    Achieving DOE's stated 5000-hr durability goal for light-duty vehicles by 2015 will require MEAs with characteristics that are beyond the current state of the art. Significant effort was placed on developing advanced durable cathode catalysts to arrive at the best possible electrode for high performance and durability, as well as developing manufacturing processes that yield significant cost benefit. Accordingly, the overall goal of this project was to develop and construct advanced MEAs that will improve performance and durability while reducing the cost of PEMFC stacks. The project, led by UTC Power, focused on developing new catalysts/supports and integrating them with existing materials (membranes and gas diffusion layers (GDLs)) using state-of-the-art fabrication methods capable of meeting the durability requirements essential for automotive applications. Specifically, the project work aimed to lower platinum group metals (PGM) loading while increasing performance and durability. Appropriate catalysts and MEA configuration were down-selected that protects the membrane, and the layers were tailored to optimize the movements of reactants and product water through the cell to maximize performance while maintaining durability.

  19. Durability of the first antiretroviral treatment regimen and reasons for change in patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    De La Torre-Lima, Javier; Aguilar, Ana; Santos, Jesus; Jiménez-Oñate, Francisco; Marcos, Miguel; Núñez, Victoria; Olalla, Julian; Del Arco, Alfonso; Prada, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    To study the durability of the drugs and coformulations currently used in the first treatment regimen of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV patients, and to examine the reasons for changing this medication. A retrospective observational multicenter study of patients with HIV infection who started a first-line ART regimen between January 2007 and June 2010. The primary outcome variable was the durability of this first ART regimen until discontinued or amended and the reasons for the change. Survival analysis of durability was performed using Kaplan-Meyer curves analysis, and a Cox multiple regression model was constructed to identify associated factors. A first-line ART regimen was initiated for 600 patients; after 1 year, it had been changed in 172 (28%) cases, with a median duration of 31 months. The main reason for change was toxicity (20.5% of all patients), followed by loss to follow-up (8.3%) and virological failure (5.3%). The most common type of toxicity was gastrointestinal (30%), followed by cutaneous (23%) and neuropsychiatric (18%). The use of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) was associated with greater durability than that of protease inhibitors (43 months vs 21 months; P = .001). The durability of the first-line ART regimen, based on current antiretroviral drugs and coformulations, is about 2.5 years, with toxicity being the main reason for its modification. Gastrointestinal toxicity is the type most commonly reported. NNRTI treatment is associated with greater durability of the first treatment regimen.

  20. Circulation-based Modeling of Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiburg, E. H.; Borden, Z.

    2013-05-01

    Atmospheric and oceanic flows driven by predominantly horizontal density differences, such as sea breezes, thunderstorm outflows, powder snow avalanches, and turbidity currents, are frequently modeled as gravity currents. Efforts to develop simplified models of such currents date back to von Karman (1940), who considered a two-dimensional gravity current in an inviscid, irrotational and infinitely deep ambient. Benjamin (1968) presented an alternative model, focusing on the inviscid, irrotational flow past a gravity current in a finite-depth channel. More recently, Shin et al. (2004) proposed a model for gravity currents generated by partial-depth lock releases, considering a control volume that encompasses both fronts. All of the above models, in addition to the conservation of mass and horizontal momentum, invoke Bernoulli's law along some specific streamline in the flow field, in order to obtain a closed system of equations that can be solved for the front velocity as function of the current height. More recent computational investigations based on the Navier-Stokes equations, on the other hand, reproduce the dynamics of gravity currents based on the conservation of mass and momentum alone. We propose that it should therefore be possible to formulate a fundamental gravity current model without invoking Bernoulli's law. The talk will show that the front velocity of gravity currents can indeed be predicted as a function of their height from mass and momentum considerations alone, by considering the evolution of interfacial vorticity. This approach does not require information on the pressure field and therefore avoids the need for an energy closure argument such as those invoked by the earlier models. Predictions by the new theory are shown to be in close agreement with direct numerical simulation results. References Von Karman, T. 1940 The engineer grapples with nonlinear problems, Bull. Am. Math Soc. 46, 615-683. Benjamin, T.B. 1968 Gravity currents and related

  1. Estimates of current debris from flux models

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Flux models that balance accuracy and simplicity are used to predict the growth of space debris to the present. Known and projected launch rates, decay models, and numerical integrations are used to predict distributions that closely resemble the current catalog-particularly in the regions containing most of the debris.

  2. Integrated water resources management of the Ichkeul basin taking into account the durability of its wetland ecosystem using WEAP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabou, M.; Lili-Chabaane, Z.; Gastli, W.; Chakroun, H.; Ben Abdallah, S.; Oueslati, I.; Lasram, F.; Laajimi, R.; Shaiek, M.; Romdhane, M. S.; Mnajja, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Conservation of coastal wetlands in the Mediterranean area is generally faced with development issues. It is the case of Tunisia where the precipitation is irregular in time and space. For the equity of water use (drinking, irrigation), there is a planning at the national level allowing the possibility of water transfer from regions rich in water resources to poor ones. This plan was initially done in Tunisia without taking into account the wetlands ecosystems and their specificities. The main purpose of this study is to find a model able to integrate simultaneously available resources and various water demands within a watershed by taking into account the durability of related wetland ecosystems. It is the case of the Ichkeul basin. This later is situated in northern of Tunisia, having an area of 2080 km2 and rainfall of about 600 mm/year. Downstream this basin, the Ichkeul Lake is characterized by a double alternation of seasonal high water and low salinity in winter and spring and low water levels and high salinity in summer and autumn that makes the Ichkeul an exceptional ecosystem. The originality of this hydrological system of Lake-marsh conditions is related to the presence of aquatic vegetation in the lake and special rich and varied hygrophilic in the marshes that constitutes the main source of food for large migrating water birds. After the construction of three dams on the principle rivers that are feeding the Ichkeul Lake, aiming particularly to supply the local irrigation and the drinking water demand of cities in the north and the east of Tunisia, freshwater inflow to the lake is greatly reduced causing a hydrological disequilibrium that influences the ecological conditions of the different species. Therefore, to ensure the sustainability of the water resources management, it's important to find a trade off between the existing hydrological and ecological systems taking into account water demands of various users (drinking, irrigation fishing, and

  3. Flare models. [solar physics current status review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of solar flare modeling is reviewed. Primary and secondary observational features that a proposed flare model should be capable of explaining are discussed, including energy storage and release, particle acceleration, mass ejection, heating of the temperature minimum region, X-ray, EUV, UV, visible and radio emission and mass flow. Consideration is then given to the twisted flux tube paramagnetic recombination model of Gold and Hoyle (1960), the current model of Alfven and Carlqvist (1967), closed current-sheet models such as those of Syrovatskii (1966, 1969, 1977) and Uchida and Sakurai (1977), open-field models such as those of Carmichael (1964) and Barnes and Sturrock (1972), the emerging flux model of Heyvaerts and Priest (1974, 1977, 1978) and the loop-flare models of Spicer (1977) and Colgate (1978). It is noted that no one model can yet account for all the observational features, and that there may turn out to be several types of flare, each requiring its own explanation.

  4. Flare models. [solar physics current status review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of solar flare modeling is reviewed. Primary and secondary observational features that a proposed flare model should be capable of explaining are discussed, including energy storage and release, particle acceleration, mass ejection, heating of the temperature minimum region, X-ray, EUV, UV, visible and radio emission and mass flow. Consideration is then given to the twisted flux tube paramagnetic recombination model of Gold and Hoyle (1960), the current model of Alfven and Carlqvist (1967), closed current-sheet models such as those of Syrovatskii (1966, 1969, 1977) and Uchida and Sakurai (1977), open-field models such as those of Carmichael (1964) and Barnes and Sturrock (1972), the emerging flux model of Heyvaerts and Priest (1974, 1977, 1978) and the loop-flare models of Spicer (1977) and Colgate (1978). It is noted that no one model can yet account for all the observational features, and that there may turn out to be several types of flare, each requiring its own explanation.

  5. Model of current enhancement at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.S.; Melendez, R.E.

    1983-04-05

    A model is proposed to account for the phenomenon of net current enhancement at high pressures recently observed on the Experimental Test Accelerator. The proposed mechanism involves energetic secondary electrons (delta rays) which are pushed forward by the self-magnetic field of the electron beam. For high current beams, the forward delta ray current can build up to a significant fraction of the beam current. Analytic calculations of the steady-state solution as well as the rate of buildup of the delta ray current are presented in this paper. In addition, numerical results from a nonlocal Boltzmann code, NUTS, are presented. The analytic and numerical results have many features which are in qualitative agreement with the experiments, but quantitative discrepancies still exist.

  6. A simple model of Birkeland currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, David P.

    1993-01-01

    The paper develops a simple representation of the global circuit of Birkeland currents on the basis of a representation of the current density (j) in terms of Euler potentials (alpha, chi). The underlying magnetic field, which shares the potential alpha with j, is assumed to be dipolar, making the model applicable chiefly to region 2 Birkeland currents. A form of j is chosen that gives a current sheet with peak outflow at dawn and peak inflow at dusk (or vice versa), connected across a flat polar cap sheet. The superposition of harmonics of the same type, centered at different 'foci', are found to provide a flexible and powerful representation of harmonic functions, accurate within less than 1 percent. An interpolation formula by which current sheets of finite width could be consistently represented is developed.

  7. Current Challenges in Bayesian Model Choice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clyde, M. A.; Berger, J. O.; Bullard, F.; Ford, E. B.; Jefferys, W. H.; Luo, R.; Paulo, R.; Loredo, T.

    2007-11-01

    Model selection (and the related issue of model uncertainty) arises in many astronomical problems, and, in particular, has been one of the focal areas of the Exoplanet working group under the SAMSI (Statistics and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute) Astrostatistcs Exoplanet program. We provide an overview of the Bayesian approach to model selection and highlight the challenges involved in implementing Bayesian model choice in four stylized problems. We review some of the current methods used by statisticians and astronomers and present recent developments in the area. We discuss the applicability, computational challenges, and performance of suggested methods and conclude with recommendations and open questions.

  8. Three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1995-01-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawnside and duskside of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L = 2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H(+) fluxes at tens of keV, which are always overestimated. A newly invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion differential flux. Important features of storm time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (less than 10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, J(sub o)(1 + Ay(sup n)), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (less than 30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n.

  9. Modeling of underground cathodic protection stray currents

    SciTech Connect

    Brichau, F.; Deconinck, J.; Driesens, T.

    1996-06-01

    OKAPPI, a numerical model for calculating cathodic protection (CP) problems involving underground pipelines, was extended to situations involving stray currents. Aboveground structures such as rail bars, power stations, electric train or tram vehicles, and overhead lifelines were integrated in the existing model in a straightforward and transparent way. As a result, it was shown that the model can be used to deal with most of the CP problems encountered with underground pipes. Situations where the sources of stray current, such as other CP installations or earthing systems located in the soil, were modeled and compared with theory. Cases involving the four standard kinds of CP interference (anodic, cathodic, combined, and induced) were calculated and discussed. A few complex situations involving overhead systems such as trams or railways were investigated. The theoretically expected phenomena were confirmed by the calculations.

  10. The use of plasma ashers and Monte Carlo modeling for the projection of atomic oxygen durability of protected polymers in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Auer, Bruce M.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Degroh, Kim K.; Gebauer, Linda

    1992-01-01

    The results of ground laboratory and in-space exposure of polymeric materials to atomic oxygen has enabled the development of a Monte Carlo computational model which simulates the oxidation processes of both environments. The cost effective projection of long-term low-Earth-orbital durability of protected polymeric materials such as SiO(x)-coated polyimide Kapton photovoltaic array blankets will require ground-based testing to assure power system reliability. Although silicon dioxide thin film protective coatings can greatly extend the useful life of polymeric materials in ground-based testing, the projection of in-space durability based on these results can be made more reliable through the use of modeling which simulates the mechanistic properties of atomic oxygen interaction, and replicates test results in both environments. Techniques to project long-term performance of protected materials, such as the Space Station Freedom solar array blankets, are developed based on ground laboratory experiments, in-space experiments, and computational modeling.

  11. Durable resistance of crops to disease: a Darwinian perspective.

    PubMed

    Brown, James K M

    2015-01-01

    This review takes an evolutionary view of breeding crops for durable resistance to disease. An understanding of coevolution between hosts and parasites leads to predictors of potentially durable resistance, such as corresponding virulence having a high fitness cost to the pathogen or resistance being common in natural populations. High partial resistance can also promote durability. Whether or not resistance is actually durable, however, depends on ecological and epidemiological processes that stabilize genetic polymorphism, many of which are absent from intensive agriculture. There continues to be no biological, genetic, or economic model for durable resistance. The analogy between plant breeding and natural selection indicates that the basic requirements are genetic variation in potentially durable resistance, effective and consistent selection for resistance, and an efficient breeding process in which trials of disease resistance are integrated with other traits. Knowledge about genetics and mechanisms can support breeding for durable resistance once these fundamentals are in place.

  12. Dynamic modeling of lower hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ignat, D.W.; Valeo, E.J.; Jardin, S.C.

    1993-10-01

    A computational model of lower hybrid current drive in the presence of an electric field is described and some results are given. Details of geometry, plasma profiles and circuit equations are treated carefully. Two-dimensional velocity space effects are approximated in a one-dimensional Fokker-Planck treatment.

  13. Microscopic models for bridging electrostatics and currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, L.; DeAmbrosis, A.; Mascheretti, P.

    2007-03-01

    A teaching sequence based on the use of microscopic models to link electrostatic phenomena with direct currents is presented. The sequence, devised for high school students, was designed after initial work carried out with student teachers attending a school of specialization for teaching physics at high school, at the University of Pavia. The results obtained with them are briefly presented, because they directed our steps for the development of the teaching sequence. For both the design of the experiments and their interpretation, we drew inspiration from the original works of Alessandro Volta; in addition, a structural model based on the particular role of electrons as elementary charges both in electrostatic phenomena and in currents was proposed. The teaching sequence starts from experiments on charging objects by rubbing and by induction, and engages students in constructing microscopic models to interpret their observations. By using these models and by closely examining the ideas of tension and capacitance, the students acknowledge that a charging (or discharging) process is due to the motion of electrons that, albeit for short time intervals, represent a current. Finally, they are made to see that the same happens in transients of direct current circuits.

  14. Nearshore Operational Model for Rip Current Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembiring, L. E.; Van Dongeren, A. R.; Van Ormondt, M.; Winter, G.; Roelvink, J.

    2012-12-01

    waves with peak period greater than 7 seconds and propagate relatively from the North. Further investigations will focus on these findings in order to improve model skill during swimming season. The flow model results are analyzed for the dominant tidal constituents. The results show that for tidal amplitude, differences between observation and modeled are in range of 2 cm to maximum 14 cm. For the tidal phase, all stations considered along the Dutch coastline give differences less than 10 degrees between observations and predictions. A local XBeach model for the Egmond aan Zee resort is constructed in order to predict rip currents events. This model is applied during the August 2011 period, where the bathymetry produced by model-data assimilation is compared against surveyed bathymetry. In general, this method is able to produce bathymetry converging towards the observations. An offshore bar exists in the field data can be reproduced by this method. Moreover, it shows a potential ability of depicting rip channels features near the shoreline. Rip currents flow fields simulated over measured and modeled bathymetries are compared in order to assess the performance of the proposed forecast system in terms of offshore rip current strength, location and duration, which are all important information for local life guards. Keywords: operational model, SWAN, Delft3D, bathymetry, Argus, rip currents, XBeach

  15. Interdisciplinary modeling of the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C. A.; Veneziani, M.; Broquet, G.; Goebel, N.; Moore, A. M.; Zehr, J. P.; Follows, M.

    2008-12-01

    The California Current System (CCS) refers to the collection of poleward and equatorward surface and subsurface currents that extends along the west coast of North America and a thousand kilometers offshore where it merges with the larger Pacific circulation. It exhibits strong seasonal fluctuations and rich mesoscale variability and supports a productive and diverse ecosystem with geographically varying communities. We report on the development and evaluation of an interdisciplinary modeling effort for this region. For the physical model, we use the Regional Ocean Modeling System, driven at the surface by output from the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System and coupled at the lateral boundaries to GODAE- derived fields from the project, Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean. The forward physical model is evaluated using in situ hydrographic measurements and satellite-derived data. An incremental, strong-constraint, 4-dimensional variational approach assimilates this data, with evaluations based on model- data error statistics of both analysis and forecast fields. The ecosystem model, run in the forward model, supports 78 phytoplankton species and demonstrates self-organizing behavior. We focus this talk on the challenges associated with complex model evaluation in the coastal ocean. ~

  16. PDT Dose Parameters Impact Tumoricidal Durability and Cell Death Pathways in a 3D Ovarian Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Imran; Anbil, Sriram; Alagic, Nermina; Celli, Jonathan P.; Zheng, Lei Zak; Palanisami, Akilan; Glidden, Michael D.; Pogue, Brian W.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2013-01-01

    The successful implementation of photodynamic therapy (PDT)-based regimens depends on an improved understanding of the dosimetric and biological factors that govern therapeutic variability. Here, the kinetics of tumor destruction and regrowth are characterized by systematically varying benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD)-light combinations to achieve fixed PDT doses (M × J/cm2). Three endpoints were used to evaluate treatment response: 1.) Viability evaluated every 24 hours for 5 days post-PDT; 2.) Photobleaching assessed immediately post-PDT; and 3.) Caspase-3 activation determined 24-hours post-PDT. The specific BPD-light parameters used to construct a given PDT dose significantly impact not only acute cytotoxic efficacy, but also treatment durability. For each dose, PDT with 0.25 μM BPD produces the most significant and sustained reduction in normalized viability compared to 1 μM and 10 μM BPD. Percent photobleaching correlates with normalized viability for a range of PDT doses achieved within BPD concentrations. To produce a cytotoxic response with 10 μM BPD that is comparable to 0.25 μM and 1 μM BPD a reduction in irradiance from 150 mW/cm2 to 0.5 mW/cm2 is required. Activated caspase-3 does not correlate with normalized viability. The parameter-dependent durability of outcomes within fixed PDT doses provides opportunities for treatment customization and improved therapeutic planning. PMID:23442192

  17. Current progress in patient-specific modeling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We present a survey of recent advancements in the emerging field of patient-specific modeling (PSM). Researchers in this field are currently simulating a wide variety of tissue and organ dynamics to address challenges in various clinical domains. The majority of this research employs three-dimensional, image-based modeling techniques. Recent PSM publications mostly represent feasibility or preliminary validation studies on modeling technologies, and these systems will require further clinical validation and usability testing before they can become a standard of care. We anticipate that with further testing and research, PSM-derived technologies will eventually become valuable, versatile clinical tools. PMID:19955236

  18. Model Performance of Water-Current Meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of discharge in natural streams requires hydrographers to use accurate water-current meters that have consistent performance among meters of the same model. This paper presents the results of an investigation into the performance of four models of current meters - Price type-AA, Price pygmy, Marsh McBirney 2000 and Swoffer 2100. Tests for consistency and accuracy for six meters of each model are summarized. Variation of meter performance within a model is used as an indicator of consistency, and percent velocity error that is computed from a measured reference velocity is used as an indicator of meter accuracy. Velocities measured by each meter are also compared to the manufacturer's published or advertised accuracy limits. For the meters tested, the Price models werer found to be more accurate and consistent over the range of test velocities compared to the other models. The Marsh McBirney model usually measured within its accuracy specification. The Swoffer meters did not meet the stringent Swoffer accuracy limits for all the velocities tested.

  19. Conserved Current for General Teleparallel Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itin, Y.

    The obstruction for the existence of an energy-momentum tensor for the gravitational field in GR is connected with vanishing of first order invariants in (pseudo) Riemannian geometry. This specific geometric property is not valid in alternative geometrical structures1,2. A parallelizable differentiable 4D-manifold endowed with a class of smooth coframe fields ϑa is considered. A general 3-parameter class of global Lorentz invariant teleparallel models is considered. It includes a 1-parameter subclass of models with the Schwarzschild coframe solution (generalized teleparallel equivalent of gravity) 3. By introducing the notion of a 3-parameter conjugate field strength F linear in the strength Ca = dϑa the coframe Lagrangian is rewritten in the Maxwell-Yang-Mills form L = 1/2Fa ∧ Ca. The field equation turns out to have a form d * Fa = Ta completely similar to the Maxwell field equation. By applying the Noether procedure, the source 3-form Ta is shown to be connected with the diffeomorphism invariance of the Lagrangian. Thus the source Ta of the coframe field is interpreted as the total conserved energy-momentum current of the coframe field and matter4. The energy-momentum tensor is defined as a map of the module of current 3-forms into the module of vector fields 5. Thus an energy-momentum tensor for the coframe is defined in a diffeomorphism invariant and a translational covariant way. The total energy-momentum current of a system is conserved. Thus a redistribution of the energy-momentum current between material and coframe (gravity) field is possible in principle, unlike as in the standard GR. The result is: The standard GR has a neighborhood of viable models with the same Schwarzschild solutions. These models however have a better Lagrangian behavior and produce an invariant energy-momentum tensor.

  20. Benchmarking an Unstructured-Grid Model for Tsunami Current Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinglong J.; Priest, George; Allan, Jonathan; Stimely, Laura

    2016-12-01

    We present model results derived from a tsunami current benchmarking workshop held by the NTHMP (National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program) in February 2015. Modeling was undertaken using our own 3D unstructured-grid model that has been previously certified by the NTHMP for tsunami inundation. Results for two benchmark tests are described here, including: (1) vortex structure in the wake of a submerged shoal and (2) impact of tsunami waves on Hilo Harbor in the 2011 Tohoku event. The modeled current velocities are compared with available lab and field data. We demonstrate that the model is able to accurately capture the velocity field in the two benchmark tests; in particular, the 3D model gives a much more accurate wake structure than the 2D model for the first test, with the root-mean-square error and mean bias no more than 2 cm s-1 and 8 mm s-1, respectively, for the modeled velocity.

  1. Durability of structural panels

    Treesearch

    Eddie W. Price; [Editor

    1984-01-01

    Twenty papers from the proceedings of a workshop are presented on the durability of a group of structural panels for use in roof, wall, and floor sheathing applications. The panel types are waferboard,flakeboard, strandboard, oriented structural board, and structural particleboard. A summary of the proceedings is given as the final presentation.

  2. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOEpatents

    Schissel, Paul O.; Kennedy, Cheryl E.; Jorgensen, Gary J.; Shinton, Yvonne D.; Goggin, Rita M.

    1994-01-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

  3. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOEpatents

    Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

    1994-11-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

  4. Durability of oxygen sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snapp, L.

    1985-03-01

    This report describes the results of dynamometer and vehicle durability testing from a variety of sources, as well as common causes of failure for oxygen sensors. The data indicates that oxygen sensors show low failure rates, even at mileages of 80,000 miles and beyond.

  5. Coating WPC's using co-extrusion to improve durability

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Laurent M. Matuana

    2007-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites (WPCs) have been gaining market share in the residential construction industry as lumber for decking, roof tiles, and siding. The durability of these materials in exterior environments is just beginning to be understood. Current research suggests that controlling moisture absorption by the composite is key to improving durability. Methods to...

  6. Nonlinear energy principle for model current sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.; Lui, Anthony T.Y.

    2006-01-15

    It is demonstrated on the basis of exact invariants of nonlinear Vlasov equation and model current sheets that the change in magnetic topology (i.e., reconnection) in a finite closed system leads to the conversion of magnetic-field energy to particle energy. It is also shown that the volume-averaged conversion efficiency diminishes as the spatial average is taken over larger and larger system size, while it increases when the system size becomes smaller. This finding may have an important implication for numerical simulation of reconnection processes under finite geometry.

  7. Current mathematical models for cancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Carrara, Letizia; Lavezzi, Silvia Maria; Borella, Elisa; De Nicolao, Giuseppe; Magni, Paolo; Poggesi, Italo

    2017-08-01

    Pharmacometric models represent the most comprehensive approaches for extracting, summarizing and integrating information obtained in the often sparse, limited, and less-than-optimally designed experiments performed in the early phases of oncology drug discovery. Whilst empirical methodologies may be enough for screening and ranking candidate drugs, modeling approaches are needed for optimizing and making economically viable the learn-confirm cycles within an oncology research program and anticipating the dose regimens to be investigated in the subsequent clinical development. Areas covered: Papers appearing in the literature of approximately the last decade reporting modeling approaches applicable to anticancer drug discovery have been listed and commented. Papers were selected based on the interest in the proposed methodology or in its application. Expert opinion: The number of modeling approaches used in the discovery of anticancer drugs is consistently increasing and new models are developed based on the current directions of research of new candidate drugs. These approaches have contributed to a better understanding of new oncological targets and have allowed for the exploitation of the relatively sparse information generated by preclinical experiments. In addition, they are used in translational approaches for guiding and supporting the choice of dosing regimens in early clinical development.

  8. A generalized definition for waste form durability.

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, T. H.; Bauer, T. H.; Morris, E. E.; Wigeland, R. A.

    2002-06-26

    When evaluating waste form performance, the term ''durability'' often appears in casual discourse, but in the technical literature, the focus is often on waste form ''degradation'' in terms of mass lost per unit area per unit time. Waste form degradation plays a key role in developing models of the long-term performance in a repository environment, but other factors also influence waste form performance. These include waste form geometry; density, porosity, and cracking; the presence of cladding; in-package chemistry feedback; etc. The paper proposes a formal definition of waste form ''durability'' which accounts for these effects. Examples from simple systems as well as from complex models used in the Total System Performance Assessment of Yucca Mountain are provided. The application of ''durability'' in the selection of bounding models is also discussed.

  9. A study of model bivalve siphonal currents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monismith, Stephen G.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Thompson, Janet K.; O'Riordan, Catherine A.; Nepf, Heidi M.

    1990-01-01

    We carried out experiments studying the hydrodynamics of bivalve siphonal currents in a laboratory flume. Rather than use living animals, we devised a simple, model siphon pair connected to a pump. Fluorescence-based flow visualization was used to characterize siphon-jet flows for several geometric configurations and flow speeds. These measurements show that the boundary-layer velocity profile, siphon height, siphon pair orientation, and size of siphon structure all affect the vertical distribution of the excurrent flow downstream of the siphon pair and the fraction of excurrent that is refiltered. The observed flows may effect both the clearance rate of an entire population of siphonate bivalves as well as the efficiency of feeding of any individual. Our results imply that field conditions are properly represented in laboratory flume studies of phytoplankton biomass losses to benthic bivalves when the shear velocity and bottom roughness are matched to values found in the field. Numerical models of feeding by a bivalve population should include an effective sink distribution which is created by the combined incurrent-excurrent flow field. Near-bed flows need to be accounted for to properly represent these benthic-pelagic exchanges. We also present velocity measurements made with a laser-Doppler anemometer (LDA) for a single configuration (siphons flush with bed, inlet downstream) that show that the siphonal currents have a significant local effect on the properties of a turbulent boundary layer.

  10. Quantile Regression Models for Current Status Data.

    PubMed

    Ou, Fang-Shu; Zeng, Donglin; Cai, Jianwen

    2016-11-01

    Current status data arise frequently in demography, epidemiology, and econometrics where the exact failure time cannot be determined but is only known to have occurred before or after a known observation time. We propose a quantile regression model to analyze current status data, because it does not require distributional assumptions and the coefficients can be interpreted as direct regression effects on the distribution of failure time in the original time scale. Our model assumes that the conditional quantile of failure time is a linear function of covariates. We assume conditional independence between the failure time and observation time. An M-estimator is developed for parameter estimation which is computed using the concave-convex procedure and its confidence intervals are constructed using a subsampling method. Asymptotic properties for the estimator are derived and proven using modern empirical process theory. The small sample performance of the proposed method is demonstrated via simulation studies. Finally, we apply the proposed method to analyze data from the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging.

  11. Dental adhesion: mechanism, techniques and durability.

    PubMed

    Manuja, N; Nagpal, R; Pandit, I K

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary dental adhesives show favorable immediate results in terms of bonding effectiveness. However, the durability of resin-dentin bonds is their major problem. It appears that simplification of adhesive techniques is rather detrimental to the long-term stability of resin-tooth interface. The hydrostatic pulpal pressure, the dentinal fluid flow and the increased dentinal wetness in vital dentin can affect the intimate interaction of certain dentin adhesives with dentinal tissue. Bond degradation occurs via water sorption, hydrolysis of ester linkages of methacrylate resins, and activation of endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases. The three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives still remain the gold standard in terms of durability. This review discusses the fundamental process of adhesion to enamel and dentin with different adhesive techniques, factors affecting the long-term bonding performance of modern adhesives and addresses the current perspectives for improving bond durability.

  12. Transferable Durability: Enhancing decay resistance of non-durable species with extractives from durable wood species

    Treesearch

    G.T. Kirker; A.B. Blodgett; S. Lebow; C.A. Clausen

    2013-01-01

    Extractive content and composition is a vital component of naturally durable woods; however, variability in extractives can limit their usefulness in the field. Two extractive-free, non-durable wood species were pressure treated with ethanol-toluene extractives from 8 durable wood species. Extracted Southern pine, Paulownia and unextracted Southern pine blocks were...

  13. Environmental durability of polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Palmese, G.R.; Chawalwala, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past two decades, polymer concrete has increasingly been used for a number of applications including piping, machine bases, chemically resistant flooring, and bridge overlays. Currently, the use of polymer concrete as a wear surface for polymeric composite bridge decks is being investigated. Polymer concrete is a particulate composite comprised of mineral aggregate bound by a polymeric matrix. Such materials possess significantly higher mechanical properties than Portland cement concrete. However, the mechanical characteristics and environmental durability of polymer concrete are influenced by a number of factors. Among these are the selection of aggregate and resin, surface treatment, and cure conditions. In this work the influence of matrix selection and cure history on the environmental durability of polymer concrete was investigated. Particular attention was given to the effects of water on composite properties and to the mechanisms by which degradation occurs. The basalt-based polymer concrete systems investigated were susceptible to attack by water. Furthermore, results suggest that property loss associated with water exposure was primarily a result of interfacial weakening.

  14. The Durability of Public Goods Changes the Dynamics and Nature of Social Dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sam P.; Taddei, François

    2007-01-01

    An implicit assumption underpins basic models of the evolution of cooperation, mutualism and altruism: The benefits (or pay-offs) of cooperation and defection are defined by the current frequency or distribution of cooperators. In social dilemmas involving durable public goods (group resources that can persist in the environment–ubiquitous from microbes to humans) this assumption is violated. Here, we examine the consequences of relaxing this assumption, allowing pay-offs to depend on both current and past numbers of cooperators. We explicitly trace the dynamic of a public good created by cooperators, and define pay-offs in terms of the current public good. By raising the importance of cooperative history in determining the current fate of cooperators, durable public goods cause novel dynamics (e.g., transient increases in cooperation in Prisoner's Dilemmas, oscillations in Snowdrift Games, or shifts in invasion thresholds in Stag-hunt Games), while changes in durability can transform one game into another, by moving invasion thresholds for cooperation or conditions for coexistence with defectors. This enlarged view challenges our understanding of social cheats. For instance, groups of cooperators can do worse than groups of defectors, if they inherit fewer public goods, while a rise in defectors no longer entails a loss of social benefits, at least not in the present moment (as highlighted by concerns over environmental lags). Wherever durable public goods have yet to reach a steady state (for instance due to external perturbations), the history of cooperation will define the ongoing dynamics of cooperators. PMID:17611625

  15. Duct Tape Durability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2004-04-01

    Duct leakage is a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums, or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections, a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have shown that taped seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been testing sealant durability for several years using accelerated test methods and found that typical duct tape (i.e., cloth-backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) fails more rapidly than other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing over two years for four UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (two cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The tests involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars. Periodic air leakage tests and visual inspection were used to document changes in sealant performance. After two years of testing, the flex-to-collar connections showed little change in air leakage, but substantial visual degradation from some products. A surprising experimental result was failure of most of the clamps used to mechanically fasten the connections. This indicates that the durability of clamps also need to be addressed ensure longevity of the duct connection. An accelerated test method developed during this study has been used as the basis for an ASTM standard (E2342-03).

  16. The full current model of MOV modeling with PSPICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yi-jin; Du, Zhi-hang; Yang, Wen-bing

    2013-03-01

    The Metal Oxide Varistors (MOV), of which the application features have been extensively researched, are widely used in the follow-up lightning protection in the low voltage power distribution system. However, to facilitate the design process, the simulation is always carried out to have preliminary study on the model selection of MOV, and therefore the MOV modeling becomes important. In this paper, based on the PSPICE, two characteristics of MOV, i.e., the V-A characteristic in the low current region and the response characteristic under fast impulses, are considered, for a circuit model to be translated into and further a MOV model under total current conditions given. What's more, the 8/20μs impulse current generator and the square wave circuit with a rising edge of 2ns are utilized to have actual measurement, to a conclusion that the simulation results verify the feasibility of the model. This is of a certain application value to engineering design.

  17. Cross-Resistance between Cry1 Proteins in Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) May Affect the Durability of Current Pyramided Bt Maize Hybrids in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Daniel; Salmeron, Eloisa; Horikoshi, Renato Jun; Bernardi, Oderlei; Dourado, Patrick Marques; Carvalho, Renato Assis; Martinelli, Samuel; Head, Graham P; Omoto, Celso

    2015-01-01

    , indicates that current Cry1-based maize hybrids face a challenge in managing S. frugiperda in Brazil and highlights the importance of effective insect resistance management for these technologies.

  18. Cross-Resistance between Cry1 Proteins in Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) May Affect the Durability of Current Pyramided Bt Maize Hybrids in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Daniel; Salmeron, Eloisa; Horikoshi, Renato Jun; Bernardi, Oderlei; Dourado, Patrick Marques; Carvalho, Renato Assis; Martinelli, Samuel; Head, Graham P.; Omoto, Celso

    2015-01-01

    , indicates that current Cry1-based maize hybrids face a challenge in managing S. frugiperda in Brazil and highlights the importance of effective insect resistance management for these technologies. PMID:26473961

  19. Low Cost, Durable Seal

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

    2010-12-17

    Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

  20. High Durability Missile Domes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    LE"VEL ~i SWHIGH DURABILITY MISSILE DOMES.) SRaytheon Company ,4 Research Division "Waltham, MA 02154 F R. / man, E. /Maguire J. / pappi / D- ,ec s t_...30 Sept 1978 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPqprNUMBER S-2439 " 7. AUTHOR(s) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) R. Gentilman E. Maguire N00014-76-C-0635 J. Pappis 9...Arthur M. Diness is the project scientist. The work was carried out at Raytheon Research Division, Advanced Materials Department. Dr. J. Pappis is the

  1. Modeling Earth's Ring Current Using The CIMI Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, J. D., II; Perez, J. D.; Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M. C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's ring current is a result of the injection of charged particles trapped in the magnetosphere from solar storms. The enhancement of the ring current particles produces magnetic depressions and disturbances to the Earth's magnetic field known as geomagnetic storms, which have been modeled using the comprehensive inner magnetosphere-ionosphere (CIMI) model. The purpose of this model is to identify and understand the physical processes that control the dynamics of the geomagnetic storms. The basic procedure was to use the CIMI model for the simulation of 15 storms since 2009. Some of the storms were run multiple times, but with varying parameters relating to the dynamics of the Earth's magnetic field, particle fluxes, and boundary conditions of the inner-magnetosphere. Results and images were placed in the TWINS online catalog page for further analysis and discussion. Particular areas of interest were extreme storm events. A majority of storms simulated had average DST values of -100 nT; these extreme storms exceeded DST values of -200 nT. The continued use of the CIMI model will increase knowledge of the interactions and processes of the inner-magnetosphere as well as lead to a better understanding of extreme solar storm events for the future advancement of space weather physics.

  2. Dark current model for ILC main linac

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Romanov, G.; Mokhov, N.V.; Eidelman, Y.; Tam, Wai-Ming; /Indiana U.

    2008-06-01

    In the ILC Main Linac, the dark current electrons, generated in SRF cavity can be accelerated to hundreds of MeV before being kicked out by quadrupoles and thus will originate electromagnetic cascade showers in the surrounding materials. Some of the shower secondaries can return back into vacuum and be re-accelerated again. The preliminary results of simulation of the dark current generation in ILC cavity, its dynamics in linac are discussing in this paper.

  3. Prediction of glass durability as a function of environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C M

    1988-01-01

    A thermodynamic model of glass durability is applied to natural, ancient, and nuclear waste glasses. The durabilities of over 150 different natural and man-made glasses, including actual ancient Roman and Islamic glasses (Jalame ca. 350 AD, Nishapur 10-11th century AD and Gorgon 9-11th century AD), are compared. Glass durability is a function of the thermodynamic hydration free energy, ..delta..G/sub hyd/, which can be calculated from glass composition and solution pH. The durability of the most durable nuclear waste glasses examined was /approximately/10/sup 6/ years. The least durable waste glass formulations were comparable in durability to the most durable simulated medieval window glasses of /approximately/10/sup 3/ years. In this manner, the durability of nuclear waste glasses has been interpolated to be /approximately/10/sup 6/ years and no less than 10/sup 3/ years. Hydration thermodynamics have been shown to be applicable to the dissolution of glass in various natural environments. Groundwater-glass interactions relative to geologic disposal of nuclear waste, hydration rind dating of obsidians, andor other archeological studies can be modeled, e.g., the relative durabilities of six simulated medieval window glasses have been correctly predicted for both laboratory (one month) and burial (5 years) experiments. Effects of solution pH on glass dissolution has been determined experimentally for the 150 different glasses and can be predicted theoretically by hydration thermodynamics. The effects of solution redox on dissolution of glass matrix elements such as SI and B have shown to be minimal. The combined effects of solution pH and Eh have been described and unified by construction of thermodynamically calculated Pourbaix (pH-Eh) diagrams for glass dissolution. The Pourbaix diagrams have been quantified to describe glass dissolution as a function of environmental conditions by use of the data derived from hydration thermodynamics. 56 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Diffusion Decision Model: Current Issues and History

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, Roger; Smith, Philip L.; Brown, Scott D.; McKoon, Gail

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in diffusion models to represent the cognitive and neural processes of speeded decision making. Sequential-sampling models like the diffusion model have a long history in psychology. They view decision making as a process of noisy accumulation of evidence from a stimulus. The standard model assumes that evidence accumulates at a constant rate during the second or two it takes to make a decision. This process can be linked to the behaviors of populations of neurons and to theories of optimality. Diffusion models have been used successfully in a range of cognitive tasks and as psychometric tools in clinical research to examine individual differences. In this article, we relate the models to both earlier and more recent research in psychology. PMID:26952739

  5. Nanocomposites for Improved Physical Durability of Porous PVDF Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chi Yan; Groth, Andrew; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    Current commercial polymer membranes have shown high performance and durability in water treatment, converting poor quality waters to higher quality suitable for drinking, agriculture and recycling. However, to extend the treatment into more challenging water sources containing abrasive particles, micro and ultrafiltration membranes with enhanced physical durability are highly desirable. This review summarises the current limits of the existing polymeric membranes to treat harsh water sources, followed by the development of nanocomposite poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes for improved physical durability. Various types of nanofillers including nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nanoclays were evaluated for their effect on flux, fouling resistance, mechanical strength and abrasion resistance on PVDF membranes. The mechanisms of abrasive wear and how the more durable materials provide resistance was also explored. PMID:24957121

  6. Nanocomposites for Improved Physical Durability of Porous PVDF Membranes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chi Yan; Groth, Andrew; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel

    2014-02-24

    Current commercial polymer membranes have shown high performance and durability in water treatment, converting poor quality waters to higher quality suitable for drinking, agriculture and recycling. However, to extend the treatment into more challenging water sources containing abrasive particles, micro and ultrafiltration membranes with enhanced physical durability are highly desirable. This review summarises the current limits of the existing polymeric membranes to treat harsh water sources, followed by the development of nanocomposite poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes for improved physical durability. Various types of nanofillers including nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nanoclays were evaluated for their effect on flux, fouling resistance, mechanical strength and abrasion resistance on PVDF membranes. The mechanisms of abrasive wear and how the more durable materials provide resistance was also explored.

  7. Decision-analytic models: current methodological challenges.

    PubMed

    Caro, J Jaime; Möller, Jörgen

    2014-10-01

    Modelers seeking to help inform decisions about insurance (public or private) coverage of the cost of pharmaceuticals or other health care interventions face various methodological challenges. In this review, which is not meant to be comprehensive, we cover those that in our experience are most vexing. The biggest challenge is getting decision makers to trust the model. This is a major problem because most models undergo only cursory validation; our field has lacked the motivation, time, and data to properly validate models intended to inform health care decisions. Without documented, adequate validation, there is little basis for decision makers to have confidence that the model's results are credible and should be used in a health technology appraisal. A fundamental problem for validation is that the models are very artificial and lack sufficient depth to adequately represent the reality they are simulating. Typically, modelers assume that all resources have infinite capacity so any patient needing care receives it immediately; there are no waiting times or queues, contrary to the common experience in actual practice. Moreover, all the patients enter the model simultaneously at time zero rather than over time as happens in actuality; differences between patients are ignored or minimized and structural modeling choices that make little sense (e.g., using states to represent events) are forced by commitment to a technique (and even to specific spreadsheet software!). The resulting structural uncertainty is rarely addressed, because methods are lacking and even probabilistic analysis of parameter uncertainty suffers from weak consideration of correlation and arbitrary distribution choices. Stakeholders must see to it that models are fit for the stated purpose and provide the best possible estimates given available data-the decisions at stake deserve nothing less.

  8. Particle Models with Self Sustained Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangeli, M.; De Masi, A.; Presutti, E.

    2017-06-01

    We present some computer simulations run on a stochastic cellular automaton (CA). The CA simulates a gas of particles which are in a channel,the interval [1, L] in Z, but also in "reservoirs" R_1 and R_2. The evolution in the channel simulates a lattice gas with Kawasaki dynamics with attractive Kac interactions; the temperature is chosen smaller than the mean field critical one. There are also exchanges of particles between the channel and the reservoirs and among reservoirs. When the rate of exchanges among reservoirs is in a suitable interval the CA reaches an apparently stationary state with a non zero current; for different choices of the initial condition the current changes sign. We have a quite satisfactory theory of the phenomenon but we miss a full mathematical proof.

  9. Current status: Animal models of nausea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    The advantages, and possible benefits of a valid, reliable animal model for nausea are discussed, and difficulties inherent to the development of a model are considered. A principle problem for developing models arises because nausea is a subjective sensation that can be identified only in humans. Several putative measures of nausea in animals are considered, with more detailed consideration directed to variation in cardiac rate, levels of vasopressin, and conditioned taste aversion. Demonstration that putative measures are associated with reported nausea in humans is proposed as a requirement for validating measures to be used in animal models. The necessity for a 'real-time' measure of nausea is proposed as an important factor for future research; and the need for improved understanding of the neuroanatomy underlying the emetic syndrome is discussed.

  10. Energy modelling: Clean grids with current technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2016-05-01

    The need for new energy storage is often seen as an obstacle to integrating renewable electricity into national power systems. Modelling shows that existing technologies could provide significant emissions reductions in the US without the need for storage, however.

  11. 25. CURRENT METERS: GURLEY MODEL NO. 665 AT CENTER, GURLEY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. CURRENT METERS: GURLEY MODEL NO. 665 AT CENTER, GURLEY MODEL NO. 625 'PYGMY' CURRENT METER AT LEFT, AND WES MINIATURE PRICE-TYPE CURRENT METER AT RIGHT. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  12. [Stretching--do current explanatory models suffice?].

    PubMed

    Freiwald, J; Engelhardt, M; Jäger, M; Gnewuch, A; Reuter, I; Wiemann, K; Starischka, S

    1998-06-01

    The opinion that mobility in the usual performance if the "straight leg raise" test for the evaluation of stretching techniques is subject to solety muscular limitations is critically appraised. With integration of recent results from molecular biological research and our own measurements, we can show that not only mechanical but also neurophysiological factors must be considered in the limitation of mobility. In the majority of the examined patients stretching of the ischiadic nerve seems to be responsible for restrictions in movement. The presented results cast doubt on the currently held assumptions and basic principles of stretching in therapy and sport.

  13. Analysis of a PEMFC durability test under low humidity conditions and stack behaviour modelling using experimental design techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahdame, Bouchra; Candusso, Denis; Harel, Fabien; François, Xavier; Péra, Marie-Cécile; Hissel, Daniel; Kauffmann, Jean-Marie

    A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack has been operated under low humidity conditions during 1000 h. The fuel cell characterisation is based both on polarisation curves and electrochemical impedance spectra recorded for various stoichiometry rates, performed regularly throughout the ageing process. Some design of experiment (DoE) techniques, and in particular the response surface methodology (RSM), are employed to analyse the results of the ageing test and to propose some numerical/statistical laws for the modelling of the stack performance degradation. These mathematical relations are used to optimise the fuel cell operating conditions versus ageing time and to get a deeper understanding of the ageing mechanisms. The test results are compared with those obtained from another stack operated in stationary regime at roughly nominal conditions during 1000 h (reference test). The final objective is to ensure for the next fuel cell systems proper operating conditions leading to extended lifetimes.

  14. Modeling of fracture and durability of paste-bonded composite joints subjected to hygro-thermal-mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David Lee

    The objective of the research is to characterize the behavior of composite/composite joints with paste adhesive using both experimental testing and analytical modeling. In comparison with the conventional tape adhesive, joining composites using paste adhesive provides several advantages. The carbon fiber laminate material systems employed in this study included IM7 carbon fibers and 977-3 epoxy matrix assembled in prepreg tape, and AS4 carbon fibers and 977-3 epoxy matrix as a five-harness satin weave. The adhesive employed was EA 9394 epoxy. All laminates and test specimens were fabricated and inspected by Boeing using their standard propriety procedures. Three types of test specimens were used in the program. They were bonded double-lap shear (DLS), bonded double cantilever beam (DCB) and bonded interlaminar tension (ILT) specimens. A group of specimens were conditioned at elevated temperature and humidity in an environmental chamber at Boeing's facility and their moisture absorption recorded with time. Specimens were tested at room temperature dry and elevated temperatures. DCB and DLS specimens were tested in fatigue as well as static conditions. Two-dimensional finite element models of the three configurations were developed for determining stresses and strains using the ABAQUS finite element package code. Due to symmetry, only the one-half of the specimen needed to be considered thus reducing computational time. The effect of the test fixture is not taken into account instead equivalent distributed stresses are applied directly on the composite laminates. For each of the specimen, the distribution of Mises stress and the first strain invariant J1 are obtained to identify potential failure locations within a specimen.

  15. Observational support for the current sheet catastrophe model of substorm current disruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Lopez, R. E.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Speiser, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    The principles of the current sheet catastrophe models are briefly reviewed, and observations of some of the signatures predicted by the theory are presented. The data considered here include AMPTE/CCE observations of fifteen current sheet disruption events. According to the model proposed here, the root cause of the current disruption is some process, as yet unknown, that leads to an increase in the k sub A parameter. Possible causes for the increase in k sub A are discussed.

  16. Current Density and Continuity in Discretized Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boykin, Timothy B.; Luisier, Mathieu; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Discrete approaches have long been used in numerical modelling of physical systems in both research and teaching. Discrete versions of the Schrodinger equation employing either one or several basis functions per mesh point are often used by senior undergraduates and beginning graduate students in computational physics projects. In studying…

  17. Current SPE Hydrodynamic Modeling and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban

    2012-08-14

    Extensive work has been conducted on SPE analysis efforts: Fault effects Non-uniform weathered layer analysis MUNROU: material library incorporation, parallelization, and development of non-locking tets Development of a unique continuum-based-visco-plastic strain-rate-dependent material model With corrected SPE data path is now set for a multipronged approach to fully understand experimental series shot effects.

  18. Current Density and Continuity in Discretized Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boykin, Timothy B.; Luisier, Mathieu; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Discrete approaches have long been used in numerical modelling of physical systems in both research and teaching. Discrete versions of the Schrodinger equation employing either one or several basis functions per mesh point are often used by senior undergraduates and beginning graduate students in computational physics projects. In studying…

  19. 24. CURRENT VELOCITYDIRECTION INDICATOR, AND GURLEY MODEL NO. 665 PRICETYPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. CURRENT VELOCITY-DIRECTION INDICATOR, AND GURLEY MODEL NO. 665 PRICE-TYPE CURRENT METER. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  20. TMG-123, a novel glucokinase activator, exerts durable effects on hyperglycemia without increasing triglyceride in diabetic animal models

    PubMed Central

    Tsushima, Yu; Tamura, Azusa; Hasebe, Makiko; Kanou, Masanobu; Kato, Hirotsugu; Kobayashi, Tsunefumi

    2017-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) plays a critical role for maintaining glucose homeostasis with regulating glucose uptake in liver and insulin secretion in pancreas. GK activators have been reported to decrease blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, clinical development of GK activators has failed due to the loss of glucose-lowering effects and increased plasma triglyceride levels after chronic treatment. Here, we generated a novel GK activator, TMG-123, examined its in vitro and in vivo pharmacological characteristics, and evaluated its risks of aforementioned clinical issues. TMG-123 selectively activated GK enzyme activity without increasing Vmax. TMG-123 improved glucose tolerance without increasing plasma insulin levels in both insulin-deficient (Goto-Kakizaki rats) and insulin-resistant (db/db mice) models. The beneficial effect on glucose tolerance was greater than results observed with clinically available antidiabetic drugs such as metformin and glibenclamide in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats. TMG-123 also improved glucose tolerance in combination with metformin. After 4 weeks of administration, TMG-123 reduced the Hemoglobin A1c levels without affecting liver and plasma triglyceride levels in Goto-Kakizaki rats and Diet-Induced Obesity mice. Moreover, TMG-123 sustained its effect on Hemoglobin A1c levels even after 24 weeks of administration without affecting triglycerides. Taken together, these data indicate that TMG-123 exerts glucose-lowering effects in both insulin-deficient and -resistant diabetes, and sustains reduced Hemoglobin A1c levels without affecting hepatic and plasma triglycerides even after chronic treatment. Therefore, TMG-123 is expected to be an antidiabetic drug that overcomes the concerns previously reported with other GK activators. PMID:28207836

  1. TMG-123, a novel glucokinase activator, exerts durable effects on hyperglycemia without increasing triglyceride in diabetic animal models.

    PubMed

    Tsumura, Yoshinori; Tsushima, Yu; Tamura, Azusa; Hasebe, Makiko; Kanou, Masanobu; Kato, Hirotsugu; Kobayashi, Tsunefumi

    2017-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) plays a critical role for maintaining glucose homeostasis with regulating glucose uptake in liver and insulin secretion in pancreas. GK activators have been reported to decrease blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, clinical development of GK activators has failed due to the loss of glucose-lowering effects and increased plasma triglyceride levels after chronic treatment. Here, we generated a novel GK activator, TMG-123, examined its in vitro and in vivo pharmacological characteristics, and evaluated its risks of aforementioned clinical issues. TMG-123 selectively activated GK enzyme activity without increasing Vmax. TMG-123 improved glucose tolerance without increasing plasma insulin levels in both insulin-deficient (Goto-Kakizaki rats) and insulin-resistant (db/db mice) models. The beneficial effect on glucose tolerance was greater than results observed with clinically available antidiabetic drugs such as metformin and glibenclamide in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats. TMG-123 also improved glucose tolerance in combination with metformin. After 4 weeks of administration, TMG-123 reduced the Hemoglobin A1c levels without affecting liver and plasma triglyceride levels in Goto-Kakizaki rats and Diet-Induced Obesity mice. Moreover, TMG-123 sustained its effect on Hemoglobin A1c levels even after 24 weeks of administration without affecting triglycerides. Taken together, these data indicate that TMG-123 exerts glucose-lowering effects in both insulin-deficient and -resistant diabetes, and sustains reduced Hemoglobin A1c levels without affecting hepatic and plasma triglycerides even after chronic treatment. Therefore, TMG-123 is expected to be an antidiabetic drug that overcomes the concerns previously reported with other GK activators.

  2. Boussinesq Modeling of Alongshore Swash Zone Currents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    carefully investigated (Gobbi et al 2006). Second, numerical implementation of porous effects into a one-dimensional Boussinesq wave model has been...sandy beach is often treated as an impermeable bottom because of its low permeability, there are many beaches on Earth where the effects of the...made of porous materials. The effects of a porous bed on surface waves include the attenuation of wave energy and modification of wave kinematics, which

  3. An Improved Model Predictive Current Controller of Switched Reluctance Machines Using Time-Multiplexed Current Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bingchu; Ling, Xiao; Huang, Yixiang; Gong, Liang; Liu, Chengliang

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a fixed-switching-frequency model predictive current controller using multiplexed current sensor for switched reluctance machine (SRM) drives. The converter was modified to distinguish currents from simultaneously excited phases during the sampling period. The only current sensor installed in the converter was time division multiplexing for phase current sampling. During the commutation stage, the control steps of adjacent phases were shifted so that sampling time was staggered. The maximum and minimum duty ratio of pulse width modulation (PWM) was limited to keep enough sampling time for analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion. Current sensor multiplexing was realized without complex adjustment of either driver circuit nor control algorithms, while it helps to reduce the cost and errors introduced in current sampling due to inconsistency between sensors. The proposed controller is validated by both simulation and experimental results with a 1.5 kW three-phase 12/8 SRM. Satisfied current sampling is received with little difference compared with independent phase current sensors for each phase. The proposed controller tracks the reference current profile as accurately as the model predictive current controller with independent phase current sensors, while having minor tracking errors compared with a hysteresis current controller. PMID:28513554

  4. An Improved Model Predictive Current Controller of Switched Reluctance Machines Using Time-Multiplexed Current Sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Bingchu; Ling, Xiao; Huang, Yixiang; Gong, Liang; Liu, Chengliang

    2017-05-17

    This paper presents a fixed-switching-frequency model predictive current controller using multiplexed current sensor for switched reluctance machine (SRM) drives. The converter was modified to distinguish currents from simultaneously excited phases during the sampling period. The only current sensor installed in the converter was time division multiplexing for phase current sampling. During the commutation stage, the control steps of adjacent phases were shifted so that sampling time was staggered. The maximum and minimum duty ratio of pulse width modulation (PWM) was limited to keep enough sampling time for analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion. Current sensor multiplexing was realized without complex adjustment of either driver circuit nor control algorithms, while it helps to reduce the cost and errors introduced in current sampling due to inconsistency between sensors. The proposed controller is validated by both simulation and experimental results with a 1.5 kW three-phase 12/8 SRM. Satisfied current sampling is received with little difference compared with independent phase current sensors for each phase. The proposed controller tracks the reference current profile as accurately as the model predictive current controller with independent phase current sensors, while having minor tracking errors compared with a hysteresis current controller.

  5. Eddy Current Modeling of Coils in Boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoulidis, Theodoros P.; Bowler, John R.

    2007-03-01

    In both aircraft bolt-hole and steam generator tube inspections, eddy current probes are utilized to scan the inner surface of the cylindrical structure for defects. A combination of integral methods and analytical approaches provide an effective means of simulating such inspections thereby quantifying their performance and providing a means of characterizing flaws. For integral methods to be successful, a knowledge of the relevant integral kernel is required but there is also a need for fast computations of the electromagnetic field. In this paper we show that by truncating the solution domain, traditional incident field calculations can be accelerated and extended to new configurations. Both the field and probe signal are expressed in the form of a double series instead of an integral and a series. The double series form provides an efficient means of evaluating the field in a finite hole or tube using analytical expressions. As an example, double-series impedance calculations for a coil whose axis is offset and parallel to that of the hole are shown to give good agreement with experiment.

  6. Low ratio current transformer models in the electromagnetic transients program

    SciTech Connect

    Wrate, G.T.; Mork, B.; Mustaphi, K.

    1995-09-01

    Low ratio current transformers are sometimes applied for both overload and fault protection. If sized for overload or neutral imbalance protection of a circuit, the current transformer can be driven deeply into saturation during faults. This could have an effect on the ability of its associated relay to operate properly. To investigate this effect, an EMTP model of a current transformer is developed using a duality derivation. Unlike other models in the literature, this model includes only a small impedance on the primary.

  7. Vacuum vessel eddy current modeling for TFTR adiabatic compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    DeLucia, J.; Bell, M.; Wong, K.L.

    1985-07-01

    A relatively simple current filament model of the TFTR vacuum vessel is described. It is used to estimate the three-dimensional structure of magnetic field perturbations in the vicinity of the plasma that arise from vacuum vessel eddy currents induced during adiabatic compression. Eddy currents are calculated self-consistently with the plasma motion. The Shafranov formula and adiabatic scaling laws are used to model the plasma. Although the specific application is to TFTR, the present model is of generation applicability.

  8. Multinucleon Ejection Model for Two Body Current Neutrino Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczyk, Jan T.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    A model is proposed to describe nucleons ejected from a nucleus as a result of two-body-current neutrino interactions. The model can be easily implemented in Monte Carlo neutrino event generators. Various possibilities to measure the two-body-current contribution are discussed. The model can help identify genuine charge current quasielastic events and allow for a better determination of the systematic error on neutrino energy reconstruction in neutrino oscillation experiments.

  9. Inter-Hemispherical Currents for Realistic Model of Ionospheric Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyatsky, S.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2013-12-01

    We present results of modeling of the global 3-D ionosphere-magnetosphere current system including in addition to the R1 and R2 field-aligned currents also inter-hemispherical currents. The inter-hemispherical currents flow between Northern and Southern conjugate ionospheres in case of a North-South asymmetry in ionospheric conductivity in two hemispheres. These currents link together the ionospheric currents in two hemispheres, so the currents observed in one hemisphere can provide us with information about currents in the opposite hemisphere, which is especially important when their magnitude can not be obtained from direct observation (e.g., in Antarctica). In this study, we investigate the generation of the inter-hemispherical currents for several distributions of ionospheric conductivity in two hemispheres including a simplified model of ionospheric conductivity, which is important for better understanding of the expected distribution and magnitude of these currents, and a more realistic model of ionospheric conductivity, which is observed during magnetospheric substorms, when the geometry of the inter-hemispherical currents is more complicated. Simulation results show that the inter-hemispherical currents during substorms could play a very significant role, and neglecting these currents does not allow obtaining the correct picture of 3-D magnetosphere-ionosphere current system. These currents are an important part of 3-D field-aligned current system, and they are especially strong during summer-winter months, when they are comparable in magnitude with the R2 currents (about ~0.5 MA). Inter-hemispherical currents map. Left panel is related to Northern hemisphere, right panel to Southern. R1 and R2 currents are not shown; their locations are indicated by the red and blue dashed circles, respectively. The inter-hemispherical currents appear inside the auroral zone in the region of conductivity gradient. The currents in both hemispheres are equal in magnitude and

  10. Impact of Cooling Rate on the Durability of PHA Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.B.

    2001-06-04

    This study was conducted to determine the effect, if any, on the PCT responses of glasses cooled at different rates. Two bounding cooling profiles were used in this study: rapidly quenched and a canister centerline cooling curve. Glasses were selected based on a number of criteria, but mainly to challenge the regions where amorphous phase separation is expected based upon current model predictions. The current DWPF homogeneity constraint, imposed to preclude regions of phase separation, predicted that most of the glasses selected would be phase separated. It was, therefore, important to ensure that deleterious phase separation does not occur at either cooling profile. In this case, deleterious phase separation is defined as the formation of an amorphous phase in the glass that significantly decreases the glass durability as measured by the PCT response.

  11. Designing durable icephobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, Kevin; Kobaku, Sai P. R.; Lee, Duck Hyun; DiLoreto, Edward T.; Mabry, Joseph M.; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-01-01

    Ice accretion has a negative impact on critical infrastructure, as well as a range of commercial and residential activities. Icephobic surfaces are defined by an ice adhesion strength τice < 100 kPa. However, the passive removal of ice requires much lower values of τice, such as on airplane wings or power lines (τice < 20 kPa). Such low τice values are scarcely reported, and robust coatings that maintain these low values have not been reported previously. We show that, irrespective of material chemistry, by tailoring the cross-link density of different elastomeric coatings and by enabling interfacial slippage, it is possible to systematically design coatings with extremely low ice adhesion (τice < 0.2 kPa). These newfound mechanisms allow for the rational design of icephobic coatings with virtually any desired ice adhesion strength. By using these mechanisms, we fabricate extremely durable coatings that maintain τice < 10 kPa after severe mechanical abrasion, acid/base exposure, 100 icing/deicing cycles, thermal cycling, accelerated corrosion, and exposure to Michigan wintery conditions over several months. PMID:26998520

  12. Designing durable icephobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Kevin; Kobaku, Sai P R; Lee, Duck Hyun; DiLoreto, Edward T; Mabry, Joseph M; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-03-01

    Ice accretion has a negative impact on critical infrastructure, as well as a range of commercial and residential activities. Icephobic surfaces are defined by an ice adhesion strength τice < 100 kPa. However, the passive removal of ice requires much lower values of τice, such as on airplane wings or power lines (τice < 20 kPa). Such low τice values are scarcely reported, and robust coatings that maintain these low values have not been reported previously. We show that, irrespective of material chemistry, by tailoring the cross-link density of different elastomeric coatings and by enabling interfacial slippage, it is possible to systematically design coatings with extremely low ice adhesion (τice < 0.2 kPa). These newfound mechanisms allow for the rational design of icephobic coatings with virtually any desired ice adhesion strength. By using these mechanisms, we fabricate extremely durable coatings that maintain τice < 10 kPa after severe mechanical abrasion, acid/base exposure, 100 icing/deicing cycles, thermal cycling, accelerated corrosion, and exposure to Michigan wintery conditions over several months.

  13. Snowdrift Forecasting An D Modelling: Current Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Y.; Guyomarc'h, G.; Mérindol, L.

    Over the last 5 years, the Snow Study Centre (Météo-France, CNRM) has started to develop some tools in order to improve the forecasting of blowing snow periods and to better understand that phenomenon. These works use recent in-situ researches carried out on a multi-field experimental site. This observation site is dedicated to the studies concerning the wind effect on the distribution of snow in mountainous region and its consequences on the risk of avalanche release. This paper will present several axis of developments : firstly, different ways have been investigated in order to have a fine scale (mesh around 100m) wind modelling in a mountainous context and secondly, by using the results of the first approach, a modelling of snow distribution has been developed on a 5X5 km domain including our experimental site. The development of these new tools is based on a strong constraint, they have to be available for the operational avalanche hazard forecast. The purpose of this work is thus to daily diagnose and estimate the amount of moved snow and then simulate the distribution of snow on a two dimensional domain in taking into account the local topography. The different formulations and empirical laws of this approach will be verified and validated by using data from our experimental site.

  14. Long-term micro-Deval durability of andesite aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czinder, Balázs; Török, Ákos

    2017-04-01

    Micro-Deval tests have been intensively used for analysing aggregate durability. The tests procedure described in details in the European Norm (EN 1097-1:2011). The current research intends to evaluate the long term durability of andesite aggregate by using extended micro-Deval tests. Andesite aggregate from Recsk (Hungary) was used for the tests. The tested andesite is a massive porphyritic biotite amphibol andesite that was formed during Eocene volcanism and forms a part of Mátra Mountains volcanic complex in NE Hungary. The aggregates were crushed and screened. Size fractions of 10.0/14.0 mm representing minimum and maximum grain sizes were used in the tests. 500 g of aggregate specimens were loaded in the steel drum and 2500 ml of water was added besides the 5000 g of steel balls into the device. The steel balls have a diameter of 10 mm according to EN. The test material - in the first stage - was subjected to 12,000 revolutions in the drum. This number is suggested by the EN. The micro-Deval coefficient was calculated after this first stage. Further wear of the andesitic material was tested by using additional revolutions. The increase in revolutions of the drum was in 12,000 rotation steps, reached 48,000 revolutions as a maximum. The tests were aimed to model the wear of aggregate on a longer term. It was also used to assess the durability of the aggregate when it is applied in engineering structures. The micro-Deval test results suggest that additional revolutions caused additional loss in material, i.e. increase in micro-Deval coefficient. A correlation is suggested between the revolution and andesite wear.

  15. Durability Evaluation of Superconducting Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Akihiko; Ogata, Masafumi; Nakauchi, Masahiko; Asahara, Tetsuo; Herai, Toshiki; Nishikawa, Yoichi

    2006-06-01

    It is one of the most essential things to verify the durability of devices and components of JR-Maglev system to realize the system into the future inauguration. Since the load requirements were insufficient in terms of the durability under vibrations under mere running tests carried out on Yamanashi Maglev Test Line hereinafter referred to YMTL, we have developed supplemental method with bench tests. Superconducting magnets hereinafter referred to SCM as used in the experimental running for the last seven years on the YMTL were brought to Kunitachi Technical Research Institute; we conducted tests to evaluate the durability of SCM up to a period of the service life in commercial use. The test results have indicated that no irregularity in each part of SCM proving that SCM are sufficiently durable for the practical application.

  16. Durability of Expedient Repair Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    by the Flofida Department of Transportation. I&. SUWIUET" TERMS 󈧓. NUMBER OF 1A1ES Expedient Repair Materials 21PAGE Shotcrete Air Force Base...produced by CTS Cemem Company. A dry process shotcrete standard, MicrosilR, and a State of Florida corrosion - resistant concrete system, referred to as...34 durability of the rapid repair materials tested by conventional methods for determining durability. E. CONCLUSIONS The blended Rapid-SetR shotcrete system

  17. Current algebra and the nonlinear σ-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.

    2007-06-01

    We present the current algebra of a particular form in the nonlinear σ-model. The algebra has a non-Abelian form with field-dependent structure functions. We comment on the connection of the model with noncommutative space.

  18. Current-induced dissipation in spectral wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapizo, H.; Babanin, A. V.; Provis, D.; Rogers, W. E.

    2017-03-01

    Despite many recent developments of the parameterization for wave dissipation in spectral models, it is evident that when waves propagate onto strong adverse currents the rate of energy dissipation is not properly estimated. The issue of current-induced dissipation is studied through a comprehensive data set in the tidal inlet of Port Phillip Heads, Australia. The wave parameters analyzed are significantly modulated by the tidal currents. Wave height in conditions of opposing currents (ebb tide) can reach twice the offshore value, whereas during coflowing currents (flood), it can be reduced to half. The wind-wave model SWAN is able to reproduce the tide-induced modulation of waves and the results show that the variation of currents is the dominant factor in modifying the wave field. In stationary simulations, the model provides an accurate representation of wave height for slack and flood tides. During ebb tides, wave energy is highly overestimated over the opposing current jet. None of the four parameterizations for wave dissipation tested performs satisfactorily. A modification to enhance dissipation as a function of the local currents is proposed. It consists of the addition of a factor that represents current-induced wave steepening and it is scaled by the ratio of spectral energy to the threshold breaking level. The new term asymptotes to the original form as the current in the wave direction tends to zero. The proposed modification considerably improves wave height and mean period in conditions of adverse currents, whereas the good model performance in coflowing currents is unaltered.

  19. Development of an efficient and durable photocatalytic system for hydride reduction of an NAD(P)+ model compound using a ruthenium(II) complex based on mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Yasuo; Koga, Kichitaro; Kobayashi, Atsuo; Konno, Hideo; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Morimoto, Tatsuki; Ishitani, Osamu

    2010-08-04

    The mechanism of photocatalytic reduction of 1-benzylnicotinamidium cation (BNA(+)) to the 1,4-dihydro form (1,4-BNAH) using [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(L)](2+) (Ru-L(2+), where tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, and L = pyridine and MeCN) as a photocatalyst and NEt(3) as a reductant has been clarified. On the basis of this mechanistic study, an efficient and durable photocatalytic system for selective hydride reduction of an NAD(P)(+) model compound has been developed. The photocatalytic reaction is initiated by the formation of [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(NEt(3))](2+) (Ru-NEt(3)(2+)) via the photochemical ligand substitution of Ru-L(2+). For this reason, the production rate of 1,4-BNAH using [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(MeCN)](2+) (Ru-MeCN(2+)) as a photocatalyst, from which the quantum yield of photoelimination of the MeCN ligand is greater than that of the pyridine ligand from [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(pyridine)](2+) (Ru-py(2+)), was faster than that using Ru-py(2+), especially in the first stage of the photocatalytic reduction. The photoexcitation of Ru-NEt(3)(2+) yields [Ru(tpy)(bpy)H](+) (Ru-H(+)), which reacts with BNA(+) to give 1:1 adduct [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(1,4-BNAH)](2+) (Ru-BNAH(2+)). In the presence of excess NEt(3) in the reaction solution, a deprotonation of the carbamoyl group in Ru-BNAH(2+) proceeds rapidly, mainly forming [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(1,4-BNAH-H(+))](+) (Ru-(BNAH-H(+))(+)). Although photocleavage of the adduct yields 1,4-BNAH and the cycle is completed by the re-coordination of a NEt(3) molecule to the Ru(II) center, this process competes with hydride abstraction from Ru-(BNAH-H(+))(+) by BNA(+) giving 1,4-BNAH and [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(BNA(+)-H(+))](2+). This adduct was observed as the major complex in the reaction solution after the photocatalysis was depressed and is a dead-end product because of its stability. Based on the information about the reaction mechanism and the deactivation process, we have successfully developed a new photocatalytic system using Ru-MeCN(2+) with 2 M of NEt(3) as

  20. Durability Evaluation of Reversible Solid Oxide Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaoyu Zhang; James E. O'Brien; Robert C. O'Brien; Gregory K. Housley

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide cells (SOCs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. Reversible operation of SOCs includes electricity generation in the fuel cell mode and hydrogen generation in the electrolysis mode. Degradation is a more significant issue when operating SOCs in the electrolysis mode. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOCs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. A new test apparatus for single cell and small stack tests has been developed for this purpose. Cells were obtained from four industrial partners. Cells from Ceramatec Inc. and Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) showed improved durability in electrolysis mode compared to previous stack tests. Cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials Inc. (St. Gobain) and SOFCPower Inc. demonstrated stable performance in the fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode, especially at high current density. Electrolyte-electrode delamination was found to have a significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the electrode microstructure helped to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements were performed during the tests to characterize cell performance and degradation.

  1. PEM fuel cell durability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L; Davey, John R; Ofstad, Axel B; Xu, Hui

    2008-01-01

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization for stationary and transportation power applications. For transportation applications, the durability target for fuel cell power systems is a 5,000 hour lifespan and able to function over a range of vehicle operating conditions (-40{sup o} to +40{sup o}C). However, durability is difficult to quantify and improve because of the quantity and duration of testing required, and also because the fuel cell stack contains many components, for which the degradation mechanisms, component interactions and effects of operating conditions are not fully understood. These requirements have led to the development of accelerated testing protocols for PEM fuel cells. The need for accelerated testing methodology is exemplified by the times required for standard testing to reach their required targets: automotive 5,000 hrs = {approx} 7 months; stationary systems 40,000 hrs = {approx} 4.6 years. As new materials continue to be developed, the need for relevant accelerated testing increases. In this investigation, we examine the durability of various cell components, examine the effect of transportation operating conditions (potential cycling, variable RH, shut-down/start-up, freeze/thaw) and evaluate durability by accelerated durability protocols. PEM fuel cell durability testing is performed on single cells, with tests being conducted with steady-state conditions and with dynamic conditions using power cycling to simulate a vehicle drive cycle. Component and single-cell characterization during and after testing was conducted to identify changes in material properties and related failure mechanisms. Accelerated-testing experiments were applied to further examine material degradation.

  2. A nonlinear viscoelastic approach to durability predictions for polymer based composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, Hal F.

    1991-01-01

    Current industry approaches for the durability assessment of metallic structures are briefly reviewed. For polymer based composite structures, it is suggested that new approaches must be adopted to include memory or viscoelastic effects which could lead to delayed failures that might not be predicted using current techniques. A durability or accelerated life assessment plan for fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) developed and documented over the last decade or so is reviewed and discussed. Limitations to the plan are outlined and suggestions to remove the limitations are given. These include the development of a finite element code to replace the previously used lamination theory code and the development of new specimen geometries to evaluate delamination failures. The new DCB model is reviewed and results are presented. Finally, it is pointed out that new procedures are needed to determine interfacial properties and current efforts underway to determine such properties are reviewed. Suggestions for additional efforts to develop a consistent and accurate durability predictive approach for FRP structures are outlined.

  3. A nonlinear viscoelastic approach to durability predictions for polymer based composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, Hal F.; Hiel, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Current industry approaches for the durability assessment of metallic structures are briefly reviewed. For polymer based composite structures, it is suggested that new approaches must be adopted to include memory or viscoelastic effects which could lead to delayed failures that might not be predicted using current techniques. A durability or accelerated life assessment plan for fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) developed and documented over the last decade or so is reviewed and discussed. Limitations to the plan are outlined and suggestions to remove the limitations are given. These include the development of a finite element code to replace the previously used lamination theory code and the development of new specimen geometries to evaluate delamination failures. The new DCB model is reviewed and results are presented. Finally, it is pointed out that new procedures are needed to determine interfacial properties and current efforts underway to determine such properties are reviewed. Suggestions for additional efforts to develop a consistent and accurate durability predictive approach for FRP structures is outlined.

  4. Transcranial current brain stimulation (tCS): models and technologies.

    PubMed

    Ruffini, Giulio; Wendling, Fabrice; Merlet, Isabelle; Molaee-Ardekani, Behnam; Mekonnen, Abeye; Salvador, Ricardo; Soria-Frisch, Aureli; Grau, Carles; Dunne, Stephen; Miranda, Pedro C

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we provide a broad overview of models and technologies pertaining to transcranial current brain stimulation (tCS), a family of related noninvasive techniques including direct current (tDCS), alternating current (tACS), and random noise current stimulation (tRNS). These techniques are based on the delivery of weak currents through the scalp (with electrode current intensity to area ratios of about 0.3-5 A/m2) at low frequencies (typically < 1 kHz) resulting in weak electric fields in the brain (with amplitudes of about 0.2-2 V/m). Here we review the biophysics and simulation of noninvasive, current-controlled generation of electric fields in the human brain and the models for the interaction of these electric fields with neurons, including a survey of in vitro and in vivo related studies. Finally, we outline directions for future fundamental and technological research.

  5. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Durability-Composition Models and the Applicability of the Associated Reduction of Constraints (ROC) Criteria for High TiO2 Containing Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C. M.; Edwards, T. B.; Trivelpiece, C. L.

    2016-08-30

    Radioactive high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the DWPF since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it has been poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than relying on statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to determine, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository. The DWPF SPC system is known as the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). One of the process models within PCCS is known as the Thermodynamic Hydration Energy Reaction MOdel (THERMO™). The DWPF will soon be receiving increased concentrations of TiO2-, Na2O-, and Cs2O-enriched wastes from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The SWPF has been built to pretreat the high-curie fraction of the salt waste to be removed from the HLW tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms at the SRS. In order to validate the existing TiO2 term in THERMO™ beyond 2.0 wt% in the DWPF, new durability data were developed over the target range of 2.00 to 6.00 wt% TiO2 and evaluated against the 1995 durability model. The durability was measured by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. This study documents the adequacy of the existing THERMO™ terms. It is recommended that the modified THERMO™ durability models and

  6. (Durability of building materials and components)

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.

    1990-11-27

    The traveler participated in the fourth meeting of RILEM 100-TSL, Techniques for Service Life Prediction,'' and The Fifth International Conference on Durability of Building Materials and Components.'' In addition, the traveler met with staff members at Taywood Engineering Ltd., Electricite de France, and AEA Technology. The meeting pertained to performance of concrete materials in nuclear power plant structures, time variation of concrete material properties, methods for evaluating concrete structures, and modeling to predict the effects of degradation factors on concrete materials. As many of the concrete structures in general civil engineering applications as well as nuclear power plant applications in Europe are aging, there is increasing emphasis on assessing the durability of these structures. Information was provided of direct application to the Structural Aging Program which would not have been available without these visits. Of equal, or possibly more importance, was the individual contacts established at the organizations visited. Each organization was extremely interested in both the approach and scope of the Structural Aging Program and requested that they be informed of progress. The initial steps were taken to cooperate with several of these researchers and this should help the Structural Aging Program keep abreast of related European activities. In summary, information obtained during this trip will benefit the ongoing Structural Aging Program by informing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) of the extensive European research programs addressing the durability of concrete structures, and also by forming and strengthening acquaintances with counterparts in other countries, thus enhancing the basis for possible international cooperation.

  7. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    SciTech Connect

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  8. Durability of polymer composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liu

    The purpose of this research is to examine structural durability of advanced composite materials under critical loading conditions, e.g., combined thermal and mechanical loading and shear fatigue loading. A thermal buckling model of a burnt column, either axially restrained or under an axial applied force was developed. It was predicted that for a column exposed to the high heat flux under simultaneous constant compressive load, the response of the column is the same as that of an imperfection column; the instability of the burnt column happens. Based on the simplified theoretical prediction, the post-fire compressive behavior of fiberglass reinforced vinyl-ester composite columns, which have been exposed to high heat flux for a certain time was investigated experimentally, the post-fire compressive strength, modulus and failure mode were determined. The integrity of the same column under constant compressive mechanical loading combined with heat flux exposure was examined using a specially designed mechanical loading fixture that mounted directly below a cone calorimeter. All specimens in the experiments exhibited compressive instability. The experimental results show a thermal bending moment exists and has a significant influence on the structural behavior, which verified the thermal buckling model. The trend of response between the deflection of the column and exposure time is similar to that predicted by the model. A new apparatus was developed to study the monotonic shear and cyclic-shear behavior of sandwich structures. Proof-of-concept experiments were performed using PVC foam core polymeric sandwich materials. Shear failure occurred by the extension of cracks parallel to the face-sheet/core interface, the shear modulus degraded with the growth of fatigue damage. Finite element analysis was conducted to determine stress distribution in the proposed specimen geometry used in the new technique. Details for a novel apparatus used for the fatigue testing of thin

  9. Current filamentation model for the Weibel/Filamentation instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Chang-Mo; Huynh, Cong Tuan; Kim, Chul Min

    2016-10-01

    A current filamentaion model for a nonrelativistic plasma with e +/e- beam has been presented together with PIC simulations, which can explain the mangetic field enhancement during the Weibel/ Filamentation instabilities. This filament model assumes the Hammer-Rostoker equilibrium. In addition, this model predicts preferential acceleration/deceleration for electron-ion plasmas depending on the injected beam to be e +/e-.

  10. On the current sheet model with {kappa} distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.; Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Sheldon, Robert B.

    2006-10-15

    The present paper (re)derives current sheet equilibrium solutions on the basis of the so-called {kappa} distribution functions for the particles. The present work builds upon a recent paper [W.-Z. Fu and L.-N. Hau, Phys. Plasmas 12, 070701 (2005)], where the authors formulated the equilibrium current sheet model with the {kappa} distribution. According to their work, however, the global temperature profile monotonically increases in the asymptotic regime. In the present paper it is shown that the presence of a finite stationary background population of the particles arrests the unlimited increase of the global temperature profile in the asymptotic limit. The present paper further extends the analysis by considering a current sheet model where the electron current is embedded within a thicker ion current layer, and where there exists a weak electrostatic potential drop across the current sheet.

  11. Durable silver coating for mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Jesse D.; Thomas, Norman L.

    2000-01-01

    A durable multilayer mirror includes reflective layers of aluminum and silver and has high reflectance over a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to visible to infrared. An adhesion layer of a nickel and/or chromium alloy or nitride is deposited on an aluminum surface, and a thin layer of silver is then deposited on the adhesion layer. The silver layer is protected by a passivation layer of a nickel and/or chromium alloy or nitride and by one or more durability layers made of metal oxides and typically a first layer of metal nitride. The durability layers may include a composite silicon aluminum nitride and an oxinitride transition layer to improve bonding between nitride and oxide layers.

  12. Eddy current modeling of silicon steel for use on SPICE

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Toru; Tahara, Ryoichi

    1995-11-01

    The relation between the equivalent eddy current field He and the instantaneous flux density rate dB/dt is experimentally obtained for current transformers made of silicon steel. The results show that He is proportional to (dB/dt){sup 0.6-0.7} in the operating frequency range ({approximately}100 Hz) of the current transformers. The ac B-H loop calculated by combining the proposed eddy current model with the Jiles-Atherton model agrees well with the measured data. In addition, this combined model allows magnetic component characteristics using SPICE to be simulated. The simulated secondary voltage waveforms of current transformers are in satisfactory agreement with the measured values.

  13. CURRENT METHODS AND RESEARCH STRATEGIES FOR MODELING ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The atmospheric pathway of the global mercury cycle is known to be the primary source of mercury contamination to most threatened aquatic ecosystems. Current efforts toward numerical modeling of atmospheric mercury are hindered by an incomplete understanding of emissions, atmosp...

  14. CURRENT METHODS AND RESEARCH STRATEGIES FOR MODELING ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The atmospheric pathway of the global mercury cycle is known to be the primary source of mercury contamination to most threatened aquatic ecosystems. Current efforts toward numerical modeling of atmospheric mercury are hindered by an incomplete understanding of emissions, atmosp...

  15. Currents to the ionosphere from thunderstorm generators - A model study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nisbet, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    A computer model (Nisbet, 1983) was used to evaluate the role of thunderstorm clouds in generating the currents necessary for the maintenance of the ionospheric potential. The effects of variations in the breakdown electric field below the lower charge center, heights of the upper and lower charge centers, generator currents and geometry, as well as of the conductivity profile of the cloud, the surrounding air, and the ionosphere, on the currents to the ionosphere were examined. It was shown that the most important single variable controlling the ionospheric current/generator current ratio for both very active storms and for storms that do not produce lightning is the height of the lower active center. The ionospheric conductivity has a negligible effect on the total current to the ionosphere, although it is very important in controlling the electric field and current density waveforms above the cloud.

  16. Modelling of the ring current in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampieri, G.; Dougherty, M.

    2004-02-01

    . The existence of a ring current inside Saturn's magnetosphere was first suggested by smith80 and ness81,ness82, in order to explain various features in the magnetic field observations from the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. connerney83 formalized the equatorial current model, based on previous modelling work of Jupiter's current sheet and estimated its parameters from the two Voyager data sets. Here, we investigate the model further, by reconsidering the data from the two Voyager spacecraft, as well as including the Pioneer 11 flyby data set. First, we obtain, in closed form, an analytic expression for the magnetic field produced by the ring current. We then fit the model to the external field, that is the difference between the observed field and the internal magnetic field, considering all the available data. In general, through our global fit we obtain more accurate parameters, compared to previous models. We point out differences between the model's parameters for the three flybys, and also investigate possible deviations from the axial and planar symmetries assumed in the model. We conclude that an accurate modelling of the Saturnian disk current will require taking into account both of the temporal variations related to the condition of the magnetosphere, as well as non-axisymmetric contributions due to local time effects.

  17. Modeling dilute pyroclastic density currents on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, A. B.; Brand, B. D.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.

    2013-12-01

    The surface of Mars has been shaped extensively by volcanic activity, including explosive eruptions that may have been heavily influenced by water- or ice-magma interaction. However, the dynamics of associated pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) under Martian atmospheric conditions and controls on deposition and runout from such currents are poorly understood. This work combines numerical modeling with terrestrial field measurements to explore the dynamics of dilute PDC dynamics on Earth and Mars, especially as they relate to deposit characteristics. We employ two numerical approaches. Model (1) consists of simulation of axi-symmetric flow and sedimentation from a steady-state, depth-averaged density current. Equations for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy are solved simultaneously, and the effects of atmospheric entrainment, particle sedimentation, basal friction, temperature changes, and variations in current thickness and density are explored. The Rouse number and Brunt-Väisälä frequency are used to estimate the wavelength of internal gravity waves in a density-stratified current, which allows us to predict deposit dune wavelengths. The model predicts realistic runout distances and bedform wavelengths for several well-documented field cases on Earth. The model results also suggest that dilute PDCs on Mars would have runout distances up to three times that of equivalent currents on Earth and would produce longer-wavelength bedforms. In both cases results are heavily dependent on source conditions, grain-size characteristics, and entrainment and friction parameters. Model (2) relaxes several key simplifications, resulting in a fully 3D, multiphase, unsteady model that captures more details of propagation, including density stratification, and depositional processes. Using this more complex approach, we focus on the role of unsteady or pulsatory vent conditions typically associated with phreatomagmatic eruptions. Runout distances from Model (2) agree

  18. Modeled and Observed Transitions Between Rip Currents and Alongshore Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, M.; Elgar, S.; Warner, J. C.; Raubenheimer, B.

    2014-12-01

    Predictions of rip currents, alongshore currents, and the temporal transitions between these circulation patterns are important for swimmer safety and for estimating the transport of sediments, biota, and pollutants in the nearshore. Here, field observations are combined with hydrodynamic modeling to determine the dominant processes that lead rip currents to turn on and off with changing waves, bathymetry, and tidal elevation. Waves, currents, mean sea levels, and bathymetry were measured near and within five shore-perpendicular channels (on average 2-m deep, 30-m wide) that were dredged with the propellers of a landing craft at different times on a long straight Atlantic Ocean beach near Duck, NC in summer 2012. The circulation was measured for a range of incident wave conditions and channel sizes, and included rapid transitions between strong (0.5 to 1 m/s) rip current jets flowing offshore through the channels and alongshore currents flowing across the channels with no rip currents. Meandering alongshore currents (alongshore currents combined with an offshore jet at the downstream edge of the channel) also were observed. Circulation patterns near and within idealized rip channels simulated with COAWST (a three-dimensional phase-averaged model that couples ROMS and SWAN) are compared with the observations. In addition, the model is used to investigate the hydrodynamic response to a range of wave conditions (angle, height, period) and bathymetries (channel width, depth, and length; tidal elevations; shape of sandbar or terrace). Rip current speeds are largest for the deepest perturbations, and decrease as incident wave angles become more oblique. For obliquely incident waves, the rip currents are shifted in the direction of the alongshore flow, with an increasing shift for increasing alongshore current speed or increasing bathymetric perturbation depth.

  19. Ring Current Modeling in a Realistic Magnetic Field Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Moore, T. E.

    1997-01-01

    A 3-dimensional kinetic model has been developed to study the dynamics of the storm time ring current in a dipole magnetic field. In this paper, the ring current model is extended to include a realistic, time-varying magnetic field model. The magnetic field is expressed as the cross product of the gradients of two Euler potentials and the bounce-averaged particle drifts are calculated in the Euler potential coordinates. A dipolarization event is modeled by collapsing a tail-like magnetosphere to a dipole-like configuration. Our model is able to simulate the sudden enhancements in the ring current ion fluxes and the corresponding ionospheric precipitation during the substorm expansion.

  20. Inter-model analysis of tsunami-induced coastal currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynett, Patrick J.; Gately, Kara; Wilson, Rick; Montoya, Luis; Arcas, Diego; Aytore, Betul; Bai, Yefei; Bricker, Jeremy D.; Castro, Manuel J.; Cheung, Kwok Fai; David, C. Gabriel; Dogan, Gozde Guney; Escalante, Cipriano; González-Vida, José Manuel; Grilli, Stephan T.; Heitmann, Troy W.; Horrillo, Juan; Kânoğlu, Utku; Kian, Rozita; Kirby, James T.; Li, Wenwen; Macías, Jorge; Nicolsky, Dmitry J.; Ortega, Sergio; Pampell-Manis, Alyssa; Park, Yong Sung; Roeber, Volker; Sharghivand, Naeimeh; Shelby, Michael; Shi, Fengyan; Tehranirad, Babak; Tolkova, Elena; Thio, Hong Kie; Velioğlu, Deniz; Yalçıner, Ahmet Cevdet; Yamazaki, Yoshiki; Zaytsev, Andrey; Zhang, Y. J.

    2017-06-01

    To help produce accurate and consistent maritime hazard products, the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program organized a benchmarking workshop to evaluate the numerical modeling of tsunami currents. Thirteen teams of international researchers, using a set of tsunami models currently utilized for hazard mitigation studies, presented results for a series of benchmarking problems; these results are summarized in this paper. Comparisons focus on physical situations where the currents are shear and separation driven, and are thus de-coupled from the incident tsunami waveform. In general, we find that models of increasing physical complexity provide better accuracy, and that low-order three-dimensional models are superior to high-order two-dimensional models. Inside separation zones and in areas strongly affected by eddies, the magnitude of both model-data errors and inter-model differences can be the same as the magnitude of the mean flow. Thus, we make arguments for the need of an ensemble modeling approach for areas affected by large-scale turbulent eddies, where deterministic simulation may be misleading. As a result of the analyses presented herein, we expect that tsunami modelers now have a better awareness of their ability to accurately capture the physics of tsunami currents, and therefore a better understanding of how to use these simulation tools for hazard assessment and mitigation efforts.

  1. Stirling engine - Approach for long-term durability assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Michael T.; Bartolotta, Paul A.; Halford, Gary R.; Freed, Alan D.

    1992-01-01

    The approach employed by NASA Lewis for the long-term durability assessment of the Stirling engine hot-section components is summarized. The approach consists of: preliminary structural assessment; development of a viscoplastic constitutive model to accurately determine material behavior under high-temperature thermomechanical loads; an experimental program to characterize material constants for the viscoplastic constitutive model; finite-element thermal analysis and structural analysis using a viscoplastic constitutive model to obtain stress/strain/temperature at the critical location of the hot-section components for life assessment; and development of a life prediction model applicable for long-term durability assessment at high temperatures. The approach should aid in the provision of long-term structural durability and reliability of Stirling engines.

  2. Stirling engine - Approach for long-term durability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Michael T.; Bartolotta, Paul A.; Halford, Gary R.; Freed, Alan D.

    The approach employed by NASA Lewis for the long-term durability assessment of the Stirling engine hot-section components is summarized. The approach consists of: preliminary structural assessment; development of a viscoplastic constitutive model to accurately determine material behavior under high-temperature thermomechanical loads; an experimental program to characterize material constants for the viscoplastic constitutive model; finite-element thermal analysis and structural analysis using a viscoplastic constitutive model to obtain stress/strain/temperature at the critical location of the hot-section components for life assessment; and development of a life prediction model applicable for long-term durability assessment at high temperatures. The approach should aid in the provision of long-term structural durability and reliability of Stirling engines.

  3. Electric currents above Saint-Santin. II - Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaudier, C.; Blanc, M.

    1982-04-01

    An empirical model of local horizontal electric current flow seasonal variations above Saint-Santin, France, is generated by means of Ohm's law and a combination of ionosphere electrodynamic parameter local models derived from previous incoherent scatter studies. The Hall and Pedersen, neutral wind-driven and electric field-driven contributions to the total current are explicitly obtained, and the local time variations of the two components of the total, height-integrated horizontal current are compared with the magnetic variation at another location. The zonal component is found to be weak in all seasons, due to the equal and opposite contributions of the electric field and neutral winds. Both the net northward flow of charges revealed by the ionospheric data, and the observed discrepancy between calculated ionospheric currents and magnetic data, suggest that field-aligned currents are flowing from the northern to the southern hemisphere in the authors' longitude sector during at least part of the day.

  4. Durability Assessment of Gamma Tial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, Susan L.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Pereira, J. Michael; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Arya, Vinod K.; Zhuang, Wyman

    2004-01-01

    Gamma TiAl was evaluated as a candidate alloy for low-pressure turbine blades in aeroengines. The durability of g-TiAl was studied by examining the effects of impact or fretting on its fatigue strength. Cast-to-size Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb was studied in impact testing with different size projectiles at various impact energies as the reference alloy and subsequently fatigue tested. Impacting degraded the residual fatigue life. However, under the ballistic impact conditions studied, it was concluded that the impacts expected in an aeroengine would not result in catastrophic damage, nor would the damage be severe enough to result in a fatigue failure under the anticipated design loads. In addition, other gamma alloys were investigated including another cast-to-size alloy, several cast and machined specimens, and a forged alloy. Within this Ti-48-2-2 family of alloys aluminum content was also varied. The cracking patterns as a result of impacting were documented and correlated with impact variables. The cracking type and severity was reasonably predicted using finite element models. Mean stress affects were also studied on impact-damaged fatigue samples. The fatigue strength was accurately predicted based on the flaw size using a threshold-based, fracture mechanics approach. To study the effects of wear due to potential applications in a blade-disk dovetail arrangement, the machined Ti-47-2-2 alloy was fretted against In-718 using pin-on-disk experiments. Wear mechanisms were documented and compared to those of Ti-6Al-4V. A few fatigue samples were also fretted and subsequently fatigue tested. It was found that under the conditions studied, the fretting was not severe enough to affect the fatigue strength of g-TiAl.

  5. Durability of hardboard siding

    Treesearch

    Anton TenWolde; Charles Carll

    2004-01-01

    In response to concerns about hardboard siding failures, a study was performed to assess if performance in a current hardboard industry quality assurance test procedure correlated with in-service performance and how well this performance might be predicted by use of alternative or additional test procedures. A variety of laboratory tests were performed on a large...

  6. A 3D fully coupled wave-current-sediment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Shen, L.; Feddy, A.; Bennis, A. C.; Mouazé, D.; Chareyre, B.

    2016-02-01

    In the framework of new energy sources, marine energy can contribute to diversification of energy mix. The study site is the Alderney Race where tidal velocities can exceed 4 meters per second. With this high current speeds, this site represents one of the best opportunities for exploitation of the tidal stream. Our aim is to investigate the influence of this high current speeds on the sediment transport. Modeling the sediment transport in the coastal environment requires an accurate prediction of current velocity and bottom shear stress. For that, the numerical wave-current model MARS-WW3 will be used to analyze the wave-current interaction and comparisons with experimental ADCP data will be presented. To simulate the non-cohesive sediment transport (such as sand, gravel or pebbles), this numerical model will be coupled with a discrete element model like YADE. In first time, the discrete model used will be validated with different tests cases. After, we will present the coupling MARS-WW3-YADE, in particular the expression and exchange of different forces exerted by the fluid flow on the sediments and by sediments on the fluid. Finally, simulations of the sediment transport will be shown and we will interest in particular to the influence of size and density of sediments. We also investigate the effects of tide and wave currents on the sediment displacement.

  7. Residential energy demand models: Current status and future improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peabody, G.

    1980-12-01

    Two models currently used to analyze energy use by the residential sector are described. The ORNL model is used to forecast energy use by fuel type for various end uses on a yearly basis. The MATH/CHRDS model analyzes variations in energy expenditures by households of various socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. The essential features of the ORNL and MATH/CHRDS models are retained in a proposed model and integrated into a framework that is more flexible than either model. The important determinants of energy use by households are reviewed.

  8. Saturn's Magnetodisc Current Sheet: Observations, Theory and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, C. S.; Russell, C. T.; Khurana, K. K.; Dougherty, M. K.

    Pioneer 11 Observations at Saturn identified a thin current sheet on the dawn flank which was interpreted as the cross-tail current sheet [Smith et al. 1981]. Observations by the Cassini spacecraft have rediscovered this thin current sheet but has been interpreted as a magnetodisc in Saturn's magnetosphere, not unlike the magnetodisc in the jovian magnetosphere [Arridge et al., Eos Trans. AGU 87(36)]. Studies of the MHD stress balance in this current sheet provide evidence that the centrifugal force causes the disc-like configuration [Arridge et al., submitted manuscript], in agreement with Voyager studies of the stress balance in the quasi-dipolar region of the magnetosphere [McNutt 1984]. In this talk we use magnetometer data to discuss the observational properties of this current sheet, discuss the ballooning of the field into the magnetodisc from a theoretical perspective, and efforts to develop global 3D empirical models of the current sheet.

  9. Experimental modelling of eddy currents and deflection for tokamak limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, T.Q.; Knott, M.J.; Turner, L.R.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1986-11-01

    During plasma disruptions in a tokamak fusion reactor, eddy currents are induced in the limiters and other conducting structures surrounding the plasma. Interactions between these currents with the toroidal field causes deflection and stress in the structural components. The structural motion in the strong magnetic field induces additional eddy current opposing the initial eddy current and modifying subsequent structural dynamics. Therefore, the motion and current are coupled and must be solved simultaneously. The coupling between current and deflection in cantilevered beams was investigated experimentally. The beams provide a simple model for the limiter blade of a tokamak fusion reactor. Several test pieces and various magnetic field conditions were employed to study the extend of the coupling effect from weak to strong coupling. Experimental results are compared with analytical predictions.

  10. Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries

    DOEpatents

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O; Dudney, Nancy J; Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Armstrong, Beth L

    2013-05-21

    A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

  11. Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries

    DOEpatents

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar [Lenoir City, TN; An, Ke [Knoxville, TX; Kiggans, Jr., James O.; Dudney, Nancy J [Knoxville, TN; Contescu, Cristian I [Knoxville, TN; Baker, Frederick S [Oak Ridge, TN; Armstrong, Beth L [Clinton, TN

    2011-09-13

    A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

  12. Durability of adhesives in plywood

    Treesearch

    Robert H. Gillespie; Bryan H. River

    1976-01-01

    Seven different adhesives were evaluated for durability as plywood adhesives by exposing panels and shear-test specimens to weathering at the Madison exposure site for nearly 8 years. Wet-strength loss and wood-failure changes were measured as a function of exposure time. The method of exposure accelerated the degradation that would have resulted from exposure in most...

  13. Durability of building joint sealants

    Treesearch

    Christopher C. White; Kar Tean Tan; Donald L. Hunston; R. Sam Williams

    2009-01-01

    Predicting the service life of building joint sealants exposed to service environments in less than real time has been a need of the sealant community for many decades. Despite extensive research efforts to design laboratory accelerated tests to duplicate the failure modes occurring in field exposures, little success has been achieved using conventional durability...

  14. Teaching Direct Current Theory Using a Field Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocklmayer, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Principles of direct current have long been recognised in the literature as presenting difficulties for learners. Most of these difficulties have been reported in the context of the traditional electron flow model. In this paper, an alternative approach for high school students using a field model is explored. Findings from a range of short pilot…

  15. Teaching Direct Current Theory Using a Field Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocklmayer, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Principles of direct current have long been recognised in the literature as presenting difficulties for learners. Most of these difficulties have been reported in the context of the traditional electron flow model. In this paper, an alternative approach for high school students using a field model is explored. Findings from a range of short pilot…

  16. Merging imagery and models for river current prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Cheryl Ann; Linzell, Robert S.; McKay, Paul

    2011-06-01

    To meet the challenge of operating in river environments with denied access and to improve the riverine intelligence available to the warfighter, advanced high resolution river circulation models are combined with remote sensing feature extraction algorithms to produce a predictive capability for currents and water levels in rivers where a priori knowledge of the river environment is limited. A River Simulation Tool (RST) is developed to facilitate the rapid configuration of a river model. River geometry is extracted from the automated processing of available imagery while minimal user input is collected to complete the parameter and forcing specifications necessary to configure a river model. Contingencies within the RST accommodate missing data such as a lack of water depth information and allow for ensemble computations. Successful application of the RST to river environments is demonstrated for the Snohomish River, WA. Modeled currents compare favorably to in-situ currents reinforcing the value of the developed approach.

  17. Phenomenological Model of Current Sheet Canting in Pulsed Electromagnetic Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, Thomas; Choueiri, E. Y.

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of current sheet canting in pulsed electromagnetic accelerators is the departure of the plasma sheet (that carries the current) from a plane that is perpendicular to the electrodes to one that is skewed, or tipped. Review of pulsed electromagnetic accelerator literature reveals that current sheet canting is a ubiquitous phenomenon - occurring in all of the standard accelerator geometries. Developing an understanding of current sheet canting is important because it can detract from the propellant sweeping capabilities of current sheets and, hence, negatively impact the overall efficiency of pulsed electromagnetic accelerators. In the present study, it is postulated that depletion of plasma near the anode, which results from axial density gradient induced diamagnetic drift, occurs during the early stages of the discharge, creating a density gradient normal to the anode, with a characteristic length on the order of the ion skin depth. Rapid penetration of the magnetic field through this region ensues, due to the Hall effect, leading to a canted current front ahead of the initial current conduction channel. In this model, once the current sheet reaches appreciable speeds, entrainment of stationary propellant replenishes plasma in the anode region, inhibiting further Hall-convective transport of the magnetic field; however, the previously established tilted current sheet remains at a fairly constant canting angle for the remainder of the discharge cycle, exerting a transverse J x B force which drives plasma toward the cathode and accumulates it there. This proposed sequence of events has been incorporated into a phenomenological model. The model predicts that canting can be reduced by using low atomic mass propellants with high propellant loading number density; the model results are shown to give qualitative agreement with experimentally measured canting angle mass dependence trends.

  18. Structure of high latitude currents in magnetosphere-ionosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltberger, M. J.; Lyon, J.; Merkin, V. G.; Rigler, E. J.

    2016-12-01

    Using three resolutions of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global magnetosphere-ionosphere model (LFM) and the Weimer 2005 empirical model the structure of the high latitude field-aligned current patterns is examined. Each LFM resolution was run for the entire Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI), which contained two high-speed solar wind streams and modest interplanetary magnetic field strengths. Average states of the field-aligned current (FAC) patterns for 8 interplanetary magnetic field clock angle directions are computed using data from these runs. Generally speaking the patterns obtained agree well with results from the Weimer 2005 computed using the solar wind and IMF conditions that correspond to each bin. As the simulation resolution increases the currents become more intense and confined. A machine learning analysis of the FAC patterns shows that the ratio of Region 1 (R1) to Region 2 (R2) currents decreases as the simulation resolution increases. This brings the simulation results into better agreement with observational predictions and the Weimer 2005 model results. The increase in R2 current strengths in the model also results in a better shielding of mid- and low-latitude ionosphere from the polar cap convection, also in agreement with observations. Current-voltage relationships between the R1 strength and the cross-polar cap potential (CPCP) are quite similar at the higher resolutions indicating the simulation is converging on a common solution. We conclude that LFM simulations are capable of reproducing the statistical features of FAC patterns.

  19. Durability/life of fiber composites in hygrothermomechanical environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Statistical analysis and multiple regression were used to determine and quantify the significant hygrothermomechanical variables which influence the tensile durability/life (cycle loading, fatigue) of boron-fiber/epoxy-matrix (B/E) and high-modulus-fiber/epoxy-matrix (HMS/E) composites. The use of the multiple regression analysis reduced the variables from fifteen, assumed initially, to six or less with a probability of greater than 0.999. The reduced variables were used to derive predictive models for compression and intralaminar shear durability/life of B/E and HMS/E composites assuming isoparametric fatigue behavior. The predictive models were subsequently generalized to predict the durability/life of graphite/fiber-r generalized model is of simple form, predicts conservative values compared with measured data and should be adequate for use in preliminary designs. Previously announced in STAR as N82-14287

  20. Durability/life of fiber composites in hygrothermomechanical environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Statistical analysis and multiple regression were used to determine and quantify the significant hygrothermomechanical variables which infuence the tensile durability/life (cycle loading, fatigue) of boron-fiber/epoxy-matrix (B/E) and high-modulus-fiber/epoxy-matrix (HMS/E) composites. The use of the multiple regression analysis reduced the variables from fifteen, assumed initially, to six or less with a probability of greater than 0.999. The reduced variables were used to derive predictive models for compression an intralaminar shear durability/life of B/E and HMS/E composites assuming isoparametric fatigue behavior. The predictive models were subsequently generalized to predict the durability/life of graphite-fiber-r generalized model is of simple form, predicts conservative values compared with measured data and should be adequate for use in preliminary designs.

  1. Modeling the Inner Magnetosphere: Radiation Belts, Ring Current, and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The space environment is a complex system defined by regions of differing length scales, characteristic energies, and physical processes. It is often difficult, or impossible, to treat all aspects of the space environment relative to a particular problem with a single model. In our studies, we utilize several models working in tandem to examine this highly interconnected system. The methodology and results will be presented for three focused topics: 1) Rapid radiation belt electron enhancements, 2) Ring current study of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs), Dst, and plasma composition, and 3) Examination of the outflow of ionospheric ions. In the first study, we use a coupled MHD magnetosphere - kinetic radiation belt model to explain recent Akebono/RDM observations of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. In the second study, we present initial results of a ring current study using a newly coupled kinetic ring current model with an MHD magnetosphere model. Results of a dst study for four geomagnetic events are shown. Moreover, direct comparison with TWINS ENA images are used to infer the role that composition plays in the ring current. In the final study, we directly model the transport of plasma from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. We especially focus on the role of photoelectrons and and wave-particle interactions. The modeling methodology for each of these studies will be detailed along with the results.

  2. Adhesive groups and how they relate to the durability of bonded wood

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2009-01-01

    There is a need to develop models that evaluate the interaction of wood adhesives at the macroscopic level to explain observations on the durability of bonded wood laminate products with changing moisture conditions. This paper emphasizes a model that relates durability to strain on the bondline caused by wood swelling. The effect of this strain is discussed in...

  3. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing...

  4. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing...

  5. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing...

  6. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing in...

  7. 40 CFR 1065.415 - Durability demonstration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Durability demonstration. 1065.415... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Selection, Preparation, and Maintenance § 1065.415 Durability demonstration. If the standard-setting part requires durability testing, you must accumulate service in a way...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.415 - Durability demonstration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Durability demonstration. 1065.415... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Selection, Preparation, and Maintenance § 1065.415 Durability demonstration. If the standard-setting part requires durability testing, you must accumulate service in a way...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.415 - Durability demonstration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Durability demonstration. 1065.415... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Selection, Preparation, and Maintenance § 1065.415 Durability demonstration. If the standard-setting part requires durability testing, you must accumulate service in a way...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.415 - Durability demonstration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Durability demonstration. 1065.415... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Selection, Preparation, and Maintenance § 1065.415 Durability demonstration. If the standard-setting part requires durability testing, you must accumulate service in a way...

  11. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-04-24

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

  12. Application of heat flow models to SOI current mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Feixia; Cheng, Ming-C.

    2004-11-01

    An analytical heat flow model for SOI circuits is presented. The model is able to account for heat exchanges among devices and heat loss from the silicon film and interconnects to the substrate through the buried oxide. The developed model can accurately and efficiently predict the temperature distribution in the interconnect/poly-lines and SOI devices. The model is applied to SOI current mirrors to study heat flow in different layout designs. The results from the developed model are verified with those from Raphael, a 3D numerical simulator that can provide the detailed 3D temperature distribution in interconnect/poly-lines.

  13. Numerical Model for Conduction-Cooled Current Lead Heat Loads

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.J.; Wang, X.L.; Brueck, H.D.; /DESY

    2011-06-10

    Current leads are utilized to deliver electrical power from a room temperature junction mounted on the vacuum vessel to a superconducting magnet located within the vacuum space of a cryostat. There are many types of current leads used at laboratories throughout the world; however, conduction-cooled current leads are often chosen for their simplicity and reliability. Conduction-cooled leads have the advantage of using common materials, have no superconducting/normal state transition, and have no boil-off vapor to collect. This paper presents a numerical model for conduction-cooled current lead heat loads. This model takes into account varying material and fluid thermal properties, varying thicknesses along the length of the lead, heat transfer in the circumferential and longitudinal directions, electrical power dissipation, and the effect of thermal intercepts. The model is validated by comparing the numerical model results to ideal cases where analytical equations are valid. In addition, the XFEL (X-Ray Free Electron Laser) prototype current leads are modeled and compared to the experimental results from testing at DESY's XFEL Magnet Test Stand (XMTS) and Cryomodule Test Bench (CMTB).

  14. Meson exchange current (MEC) models in neutrino interaction generators

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei

    2015-05-15

    Understanding of the so-called 2 particle-2 hole (2p-2h) effect is an urgent program in neutrino interaction physics for current and future oscillation experiments. Such processes are believed to be responsible for the event excesses observed by recent neutrino experiments. The 2p-2h effect is dominated by the meson exchange current (MEC), and is accompanied by a 2-nucleon emission from the primary vertex, instead of a single nucleon emission from the charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) interaction. Current and future high resolution experiments can potentially nail down this effect. For this reason, there are world wide efforts to model and implement this process in neutrino interaction simulations. In these proceedings, I would like to describe how this channel is modeled in neutrino interaction generators.

  15. Comparative durability of timber bridges in the USA

    Treesearch

    James P. Wacker; Brian K. Brashaw

    2017-01-01

    As engineers begin to utilize life-cycle-cost design approaches for timber bridges, there is a necessity for more reliable data about their durability and expected service life. This paper summarizes a comprehensive effort to assess the current condition of more than one hundred timber highway bridge superstructures throughout the United States. This national study was...

  16. Emerging materials: what will durable materials look like in 2020?

    Treesearch

    Jerrold E. Winandy

    2002-01-01

    What materials will emerge from today’s research ideas to become the commonly accepted building products of 2020? What will durable materials look like in 2020? This paper attempts to address these questions by considering some current trends and then presenting a series of ideas of what the next 2 decades may hold from an emerging materials standpoint for North...

  17. Community Benchmarking of Tsunami-Induced Nearshore Current Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynett, P. J.; Wilson, R. I.; Gately, K.

    2015-12-01

    To help produce accurate and consistent maritime hazard products, the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) Strategic Plan includes a requirement to develop and run a benchmarking workshop to evaluate the numerical tsunami modeling of currents. For this workshop, five different benchmarking datasets were organized. These datasets were selected based on characteristics such as geometric complexity, currents that are shear/separation driven (and thus are de-coupled from the incident wave forcing), tidal coupling, and interaction with the built environment. While tsunami simulation models have generally been well validated against wave height and runup, comparisons with speed data are much less common. As model results are increasingly being used to estimate or indicate damage to coastal infrastructure, understanding the accuracy and precision of speed predictions becomes of important. As a result of this 2-day workshop held in early 2015, modelers now have a better awareness of their ability to accurately capture the physics of tsunami currents, and therefore a better understanding of how to use these simulation tools for hazard assessment and mitigation efforts. In this presentation, the model results - from 14 different modelers - will be presented and summarized, with a focus on statistical and ensemble properties of the current predictions.

  18. Probability of detection models for eddy current NDE methods

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, S. N.

    1993-04-30

    The development of probability of detection (POD) models for a variety of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods is motivated by a desire to quantify the variability introduced during the process of testing. Sources of variability involved in eddy current methods of NDE include those caused by variations in liftoff, material properties, probe canting angle, scan format, surface roughness and measurement noise. This thesis presents a comprehensive POD model for eddy current NDE. Eddy current methods of nondestructive testing are used widely in industry to inspect a variety of nonferromagnetic and ferromagnetic materials. The development of a comprehensive POD model is therefore of significant importance. The model incorporates several sources of variability characterized by a multivariate Gaussian distribution and employs finite element analysis to predict the signal distribution. The method of mixtures is then used for estimating optimal threshold values. The research demonstrates the use of a finite element model within a probabilistic framework to the spread in the measured signal for eddy current nondestructive methods. Using the signal distributions for various flaw sizes the POD curves for varying defect parameters have been computed. In contrast to experimental POD models, the cost of generating such curves is very low and complex defect shapes can be handled very easily. The results are also operator independent.

  19. Structure of High Latitude Currents in Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltberger, M.; Rigler, E. J.; Merkin, V.; Lyon, J. G.

    2017-03-01

    Using three resolutions of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global magnetosphere-ionosphere model (LFM) and the Weimer 2005 empirical model we examine the structure of the high latitude field-aligned current patterns. Each resolution was run for the entire Whole Heliosphere Interval which contained two high speed solar wind streams and modest interplanetary magnetic field strengths. Average states of the field-aligned current (FAC) patterns for 8 interplanetary magnetic field clock angle directions are computed using data from these runs. Generally speaking the patterns obtained agree well with results obtained from the Weimer 2005 computing using the solar wind and IMF conditions that correspond to each bin. As the simulation resolution increases the currents become more intense and narrow. A machine learning analysis of the FAC patterns shows that the ratio of Region 1 (R1) to Region 2 (R2) currents decreases as the simulation resolution increases. This brings the simulation results into better agreement with observational predictions and the Weimer 2005 model results. The increase in R2 current strengths also results in the cross polar cap potential (CPCP) pattern being concentrated in higher latitudes. Current-voltage relationships between the R1 and CPCP are quite similar at the higher resolution indicating the simulation is converging on a common solution. We conclude that LFM simulations are capable of reproducing the statistical features of FAC patterns.

  20. Current animal models of obsessive compulsive disorder: an update.

    PubMed

    Albelda, N; Joel, D

    2012-06-01

    During the last 30 years there have been many attempts to develop animal models of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), in the hope that they may provide a route for furthering our understanding and treatment of this disorder. The present review provides the reader with an overview of the currently active animal models of OCD, their strengths and limitations, so that the reader can use the review as a guide for establishing new animal models of OCD, evaluating existing animal models and choosing among them according to one's needs. We review current genetic, pharmacological, neurodevelopmental and behavioral animal models of OCD, and evaluate their face validity (derived from phenomenological similarity between the behavior in the animal model and the specific symptoms of the human condition), predictive validity (derived from similarity in response to treatment) and construct validity (derived from similarity in the underlying mechanisms [physiological or psychological]). On the basis of this evaluation we discuss the usefulness of the different models for screening drugs for anti-compulsive activity, detecting new targets for high frequency stimulation, studying the neural mechanisms of OCD and unraveling the role of gonadal hormones. We then describe potential new treatment strategies that emerge from the convergence of data obtained in different models on the one hand, and how different models can be used to model different subtypes or dimensions of OCD, on the other hand.

  1. Comparison of analytical eddy current models using principal components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contant, S.; Luloff, M.; Morelli, J.; Krause, T. W.

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring the gap between the pressure tube (PT) and the calandria tube (CT) in CANDU® fuel channels is essential, as contact between the two tubes can lead to delayed hydride cracking of the pressure tube. Multifrequency transmit-receive eddy current non-destructive evaluation is used to determine this gap, as this method has different depths of penetration and variable sensitivity to noise, unlike single frequency eddy current non-destructive evaluation. An Analytical model based on the Dodd and Deeds solutions, and a second model that accounts for normal and lossy self-inductances, and a non-coaxial pickup coil, are examined for representing the response of an eddy current transmit-receive probe when considering factors that affect the gap response, such as pressure tube wall thickness and pressure tube resistivity. The multifrequency model data was analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA), a statistical method used to reduce the data set into a data set of fewer variables. The results of the PCA of the analytical models were then compared to PCA performed on a previously obtained experimental data set. The models gave similar results under variable PT wall thickness conditions, but the non-coaxial coil model, which accounts for self-inductive losses, performed significantly better than the Dodd and Deeds model under variable resistivity conditions.

  2. A three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1994-01-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawn and dusk sides of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L = 2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H+ fluxes at tens of keV, which are always over-estimated. A newly-invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion differential flux. Important features of storm-time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (less than 10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, j(sub o)(1+Ay(exp n)), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (less than 30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n.

  3. Application of HF radar currents to oil spill modelling.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Ana J; Castanedo, Sonia; Medina, Raul; Losada, Inigo J; Alvarez-Fanjul, Enrique

    2009-02-01

    In this work, the benefits of high-frequency (HF) radar currents for oil spill modeling and trajectory analysis of floating objects are analyzed. The HF radar performance is evaluated by means of comparison between a drifter buoy trajectory and the one simulated using a Lagrangian trajectory model. A methodology to optimize the transport model performance and to calculate the search area of the predicted positions is proposed. This method is applied to data collected during the Galicia HF Radar Experience. This experiment was carried out to explore the capabilities of this technology for operational monitoring along the Spanish coast. Two long-range HF radar stations were installed and operated between November 2005 and February 2006 on the Galician coast. In addition, a drifter buoy was released inside the coverage area of the radar. The HF radar currents, as well as numerical wind data were used to simulate the buoy trajectory using the TESEO oil spill transport model. In order to evaluate the contribution of HF radar currents to trajectory analysis, two simulation alternatives were carried out. In the first one, wind data were used to simulate the motion of the buoy. In the second alternative, surface currents from the HF radar were also taken into account. For each alternative, the model was calibrated by means of the global optimization algorithm SCEM-UA (Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis) in order to obtain the probability density function of the model parameters. The buoy trajectory was computed for 24h intervals using a Monte Carlo approach based on the results provided in the calibration process. A bivariate kernel estimator was applied to determine the 95% confidence areas. The analysis performed showed that simulated trajectories integrating HF radar currents are more accurate than those obtained considering only wind numerical data. After a 24h period, the error in the final simulated position improves using HF radar currents. Averaging the

  4. Animal models of frailty: current applications in clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Alice E; Hilmer, Sarah N; Mach, John; Mitchell, Sarah J; de Cabo, Rafael; Howlett, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    The ethical, logistical, and biological complications of working with an older population of people inherently limits clinical studies of frailty. The recent development of animal models of frailty, and tools for assessing frailty in animal models provides an invaluable opportunity for frailty research. This review summarizes currently published animal models of frailty including the interleukin-10 knock-out mouse, the mouse frailty phenotype assessment tool, and the mouse clinical frailty index. It discusses both current and potential roles of these models in research into mechanisms of frailty, interventions to prevent/delay frailty, and the effect of frailty on outcomes. Finally, this review discusses some of the challenges and opportunities of translating research findings from animals to humans. PMID:27822024

  5. Modelling of current loads on aquaculture net cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, Trygve; Faltinsen, Odd M.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we propose and discuss a screen type of force model for the viscous hydrodynamic load on nets. The screen model assumes that the net is divided into a number of flat net panels, or screens. It may thus be applied to any kind of net geometry. In this paper we focus on circular net cages for fish farms. The net structure itself is modelled by an existing truss model. The net shape is solved for in a time-stepping procedure that involves solving a linear system of equations for the unknown tensions at each time step. We present comparisons to experiments with circular net cages in steady current, and discuss the sensitivity of the numerical results to a set of chosen parameters. Satisfactory agreement between experimental and numerical prediction of drag and lift as function of the solidity ratio of the net and the current velocity is documented.

  6. Animal models of frailty: current applications in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Kane, Alice E; Hilmer, Sarah N; Mach, John; Mitchell, Sarah J; de Cabo, Rafael; Howlett, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    The ethical, logistical, and biological complications of working with an older population of people inherently limits clinical studies of frailty. The recent development of animal models of frailty, and tools for assessing frailty in animal models provides an invaluable opportunity for frailty research. This review summarizes currently published animal models of frailty including the interleukin-10 knock-out mouse, the mouse frailty phenotype assessment tool, and the mouse clinical frailty index. It discusses both current and potential roles of these models in research into mechanisms of frailty, interventions to prevent/delay frailty, and the effect of frailty on outcomes. Finally, this review discusses some of the challenges and opportunities of translating research findings from animals to humans.

  7. Finite element modeling of pulsed eddy current NDT phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.; Ida, N.; Lord, W.

    1985-05-15

    Transient fields for nondestructive testing (pulsed eddy current methods) have been used experimentally for such applications as coating thickness measurements and the inspection of reactor fuel tubing. The lack of suitable models to facilitate understanding of the interaction of the pulsed field with the test specimen has hindered a wider acceptance of the method as a tool in NDT. Two models, based on the finite element technique are described. The first model, used for repetitive pulse train sources makes use of the Fourier series of the source current to solve a steady state problem for each significant harmonic. The harmonic solutions are then summed to produce the total EMF in the pickup coil. The second model is used for single pulse application. The response is calculated using an iterative time stepping solution. In both cases axisymmetric geometries are studied using a magnetic vector potential formulation. Solutions are compared with experimental results. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Encapsulation of TRISO particle fuel in durable soda-lime-silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Paul G.; Corkhill, Claire L.; Stennett, Martin C.; Hand, Russell J.; Meyer, Willem C. H. M.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2013-05-01

    Tri-Structural Isotropic (TRISO) coated particle-fuel is a key component in designs for future high temperature nuclear reactors. This study investigated the suitability of three soda lime silicate glass compositions, for the encapsulation of simulant TRISO particle fuel. A cold press and sinter (CPS) methodology was employed to produce TRISO particle-glass composites. Composites produced were determined to have an aqueous durability, fracture toughness and Vickers' hardness comparable to glasses currently employed for the disposal of high level nuclear wastes. Sintering at 700 °C for 30 min was found to remove all interconnected porosity from the composite bodies and oxidation of the outer pyrolytic carbon layer during sintering was prevented by processing under a 5% H2/N2 atmosphere. However, the outer pyrolytic carbon layer was not effectively wetted by the encapsulating glass matrix. The aqueous durability of the TRISO particle-glass composites was investigated using PCT and MCC-1 tests combined with geochemical modelling. It was found that durability was dependent on silicate and calcium solution saturation. This study provides significant advancements in the preparation of TRISO particle encapsulant waste forms. The potential for the use of non-borosilicate sintered glass composites for TRISO particle encapsulation has been confirmed, although further refinements are required.

  9. A turbidity current model for real world applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, Jorge; Castro, Manuel J.; Morales, Tomás

    2016-04-01

    Traditional turbidity current models suffer from several drawbacks. Among them not preserving freshwater mass, a missing pressure term, or not including terms related to deposition, erosion and entrainment in the momentum equation. In Morales et al.(2009) a new turbidity current model was proposed trying to overcome all these drawbacks. This model takes into account the interaction between the turbidity current and the bottom, considering deposition and erosion effects as well as solid bedload transport of particles at the bed due to the current. Moreover, this model includes the effects of the deposition, erosion and water entrainment into the momentum equation,commonly neglected in this type of models and, finally, in the absence of water entrainment, freshwater mass in the turbidity current is preserved. Despite these improvements, the numerical results obtained by this model when applied to real river systems were not satisfactory due to the simple form of the friction term that was considered. In the present work we propose a different parameterization of this term, where bottom and interface fluid frictions are separately parameterized with more complex expressions. Moreover, the discretization of the deposition/erosion terms is now performed semi-implicitly which guarantees the positivity of the volumetric concentration of sediments in suspension and in the erodible sediment layer at the bed. The numerical simulations obtained with this new turbidity current model (component of HySEA numerical computing platform) greatly improve previous numerical results for simplified geometries as well as for real river systems. Acknowledgements: This research has been partially supported by the Junta de Andalucía research project TESELA (P11-RNM7069) and the Spanish Government Research project DAIFLUID (MTM2012-38383-C02-01) and Universidad de Málaga, Campus de Excelencia Andalucía TECH. References: T. Morales, M. Castro, C. Parés, and E. Fernández-Nieto (2009). On

  10. Durable antistatic coating for polymethylmethacrylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadek, V.; Somoano, R. B.; Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A durable antistatic coating is achieved on polymethylmethacrylate plastic without affecting its optical clarity by applying to the surface of the plastic a low molecular weight solvent having a high electron affinity and a high dipole moment, such as acentonitrile or nitromethane alone or in the presence of photopolymerizable monomer. The treated polymethylmethacrylate plastic dissipates most of the induced electrostatic charge and retains its optical clarity. The antistatic behavior persists after washing, rubbing and vacuum treatment.

  11. Medicare and durable medical equipment.

    PubMed

    Coviello, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Medicare coverage of wheelchairs, hospital beds and other durable medical equipment (DME) is a major source of confusion for people with Medicare, their families and the professionals who work with them. Yet, consumer publications rarely touch on it. In this brief we offer an overview of DME coverage issues and payment policies, including potential costs for consumers and their rights to appeal denials of payment.

  12. Current State of the Art Historic Building Information Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, C.; Murphy, M.

    2017-08-01

    In an extensive review of existing literature a number of observations were made in relation to the current approaches for recording and modelling existing buildings and environments: Data collection and pre-processing techniques are becoming increasingly automated to allow for near real-time data capture and fast processing of this data for later modelling applications. Current BIM software is almost completely focused on new buildings and has very limited tools and pre-defined libraries for modelling existing and historic buildings. The development of reusable parametric library objects for existing and historic buildings supports modelling with high levels of detail while decreasing the modelling time. Mapping these parametric objects to survey data, however, is still a time-consuming task that requires further research. Promising developments have been made towards automatic object recognition and feature extraction from point clouds for as-built BIM. However, results are currently limited to simple and planar features. Further work is required for automatic accurate and reliable reconstruction of complex geometries from point cloud data. Procedural modelling can provide an automated solution for generating 3D geometries but lacks the detail and accuracy required for most as-built applications in AEC and heritage fields.

  13. On current sheet approximations in models of eruptive flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bungey, T. N.; Forbes, T. G.

    1994-01-01

    We consider an approximation sometimes used for current sheets in flux-rope models of eruptive flares. This approximation is based on a linear expansion of the background field in the vicinity of the current sheet, and it is valid when the length of the current sheet is small compared to the scale length of the coronal magnetic field. However, we find that flux-rope models which use this approximation predict the occurrence of an eruption due to a loss of ideal-MHD equilibrium even when the corresponding exact solution shows that no such eruption occurs. Determination of whether a loss of equilibrium exists can only be obtained by including higher order terms in the expansion of the field or by using the exact solution.

  14. Current fluctuations in a two dimensional model of heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; Garrido, Pedro L.; Hurtado, Pablo I.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we study numerically and analytically current fluctuations in the two-dimensional Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti (KMP) model of heat conduction. For that purpose, we use a recently introduced algorithm which allows the direct evaluation of large deviations functions. We compare our results with predictions based on the Hydrodynamic Fluctuation Theory (HFT) of Bertini and coworkers, finding very good agreement in a wide interval of current fluctuations. We also verify the existence of a well-defined temperature profile associated to a given current fluctuation which depends exclusively on the magnitude of the current vector, not on its orientation. This confirms the recently introduced Isometric Fluctuation Relation (IFR), which results from the time-reversibility of the dynamics, and includes as a particular instance the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem in this context but adds a completely new perspective on the high level of symmetry imposed by timereversibility on the statistics of nonequilibrium fluctuations.

  15. A current sheet model for the Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, Daniel R.; Pollack, Gerald L.

    1998-09-01

    As an example in magnetostatics we consider the main magnetic field of the Earth and its current sources. The measured field on the surface is accurately given, in tables of the International Geological Reference Field, in terms of Gaussian coefficients. By applying Maxwell's equations to these data we calculate the extended field, inside the Earth, and give graphical representations of it. We also construct a simple theoretical model of the source of the field, in which the field is the result of currents flowing on the surface of a sphere inside the Earth. The current sources which give the observed field are calculated in terms of vector spherical harmonics. The stream function and currents are displayed on a Mercator projection for a sphere whose radius is half the Earth's radius. Interesting properties of vector operations on the Mercator plane are analytically and graphically described.

  16. Gompertz kinetics model of fast chemical neurotransmission currents.

    PubMed

    Easton, Dexter M

    2005-10-01

    At a chemical synapse, transmitter molecules ejected from presynaptic terminal(s) bind reversibly with postsynaptic receptors and trigger an increase in channel conductance to specific ions. This paper describes a simple but accurate predictive model for the time course of the synaptic conductance transient, based on Gompertz kinetics. In the model, two simple exponential decay terms set the rates of development and decline of transmitter action. The first, r, triggering conductance activation, is surrogate for the decelerated rate of growth of conductance, G. The second, r', responsible for Y, deactivation of the conductance, is surrogate for the decelerated rate of decline of transmitter action. Therefore, the differential equation for the net conductance change, g, triggered by the transmitter is dg/dt=g(r-r'). The solution of that equation yields the product of G(t), representing activation, and Y(t), which defines the proportional decline (deactivation) of the current. The model fits, over their full-time course, published records of macroscopic ionic current associated with fast chemical transmission. The Gompertz model is a convenient and accurate method for routine analysis and comparison of records of synaptic current and putative transmitter time course. A Gompertz fit requiring only three independent rate constants plus initial current appears indistinguishable from a Markov fit using seven rate constants.

  17. Data Assimilation and Model Simulations in the California Current

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Data Assimilation and Model Simulations in the California Current Robert L. Haney Department of Meteorology (MR/Hy) Naval Postgraduate School 589...5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School,Department of Meteorology (MR/Hy),589 Dyer Rd

  18. Modeling current climate conditions for forest pest risk assessment

    Treesearch

    Frank H. Koch; John W. Coulston

    2010-01-01

    Current information on broad-scale climatic conditions is essential for assessing potential distribution of forest pests. At present, sophisticated spatial interpolation approaches such as the Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) are used to create high-resolution climatic data sets. Unfortunately, these data sets are based on 30-year...

  19. Current Models and Innovative Strategies in Management Education in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zhong-Ming

    1999-01-01

    Current models of management education in China include national training, on-the-job technical training, and the national master's of business administration supervisory committee. Effective strategies being used include teamwork, process skills, action learning, cross-cultural management learning, and competency-based management development. (SK)

  20. Experimental modeling of eddy currents and defections for tokamak limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, T.Q.; Knott, M.J.; Turner, L.R.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    In a tokamak fusion reactor or other magnetically confined fusion device, a rapid decay of the magnetic field due to a disrupting plasma current induces eddy currents in the surrounding structures. These include the limiters, blanket, first wall, and vacuum vessel. The eddy currents, through interaction with the applied toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, produce large mechanical torques and forces that deflect the structural components. An important coupling effect exists between the dynamic behavior of the structure and the transient eddy current. This coupling occurs when, as it deflects, the component intercepts additional magnetic flux. The coupling between deflection and eddy current could reduce the peak current, deflection, and other electromagnetic effects to a level far less severe than would be predicted if coupling is disregarded. In this study, experiments were performed to investigate deflection, current, and material stress in cantilever beams with the Fusion ELectromagnetic Induction eXperiment (FELIX) at the Argonne National Laboratory. Since structures near the plasma are typically cantilevered, the beams provide a good model for the limiter blades of a tokamak fusion reactor. 2 figs.

  1. Parametric overdispersed frailty models for current status data.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Steven; Aerts, Marc; Molenberghs, Geert; Hens, Niel

    2017-03-27

    Frailty models have a prominent place in survival analysis to model univariate and multivariate time-to-event data, often complicated by the presence of different types of censoring. In recent years, frailty modeling gained popularity in infectious disease epidemiology to quantify unobserved heterogeneity using Type I interval-censored serological data or current status data. In a multivariate setting, frailty models prove useful to assess the association between infection times related to multiple distinct infections acquired by the same individual. In addition to dependence among individual infection times, overdispersion can arise when the observed variability in the data exceeds the one implied by the model. In this article, we discuss parametric overdispersed frailty models for time-to-event data under Type I interval-censoring, building upon the work by Molenberghs et al. () and Hens et al. (). The proposed methodology is illustrated using bivariate serological data on hepatitis A and B from Flanders, Belgium anno 1993-1994. Furthermore, the relationship between individual heterogeneity and overdispersion at a stratum-specific level is studied through simulations. Although it is important to account for overdispersion, one should be cautious when modeling both individual heterogeneity and overdispersion based on current status data as model selection is hampered by the loss of information due to censoring.

  2. International Low-Earth-Orbit Spacecraft Materials Test Program Initiated for Better Prediction of Durability and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1999-01-01

    Spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) are subjected to many components of the environment, which can cause them to degrade much more rapidly than intended and greatly shorten their functional life. The atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, and cross contamination present in LEO can affect sensitive surfaces such as thermal control paints, multilayer insulation, solar array surfaces, and optical surfaces. The LEO Spacecraft Materials Test (LEO-SMT) program is being conducted to assess the effects of simulated LEO exposure on current spacecraft materials to increase understanding of LEO degradation processes as well as to enable the prediction of in-space performance and durability. Using ground-based simulation facilities to test the durability of materials currently flying in LEO will allow researchers to compare the degradation evidenced in the ground-based facilities with that evidenced on orbit. This will allow refinement of ground laboratory test systems and the development of algorithms to predict the durability and performance of new materials in LEO from ground test results. Accurate predictions based on ground tests could reduce development costs and increase reliability. The wide variety of national and international materials being tested represent materials being functionally used on spacecraft in LEO. The more varied the types of materials tested, the greater the probability that researchers will develop and validate predictive models for spacecraft long-term performance and durability. Organizations that are currently participating in the program are ITT Research Institute (USA), Lockheed Martin (USA), MAP (France), SOREQ Nuclear Research Center (Israel), TNO Institute of Applied Physics (The Netherlands), and UBE Industries, Ltd. (Japan). These represent some of the major suppliers of thermal control and sensor materials currently flying in LEO. The participants provide materials that are exposed to selected levels of atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet

  3. Model for Current-Driven Edge-Localized Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Gimblett, C.G.; Hastie, R.J.; Helander, P.

    2006-01-27

    Edge-localized modes (ELMs) are cyclic disturbances in the outer region of tokamak plasmas that are influential in determining present and future tokamak performance. In this Letter, we outline an approach to modeling ELMs in which we envisage toroidal peeling modes initiating a Taylor relaxation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 33, 1139 (1974)] of a tokamak outer region plasma. Relaxation produces a peeling destabilizing flattened edge current profile and a stabilizing plasma-vacuum current sheet; the balance between the two determines the radial extent of the relaxed region. The model can be used to predict the energy losses due to an ELM and reproduces experimentally observed variations with edge safety factor and plasma collisionality. There is an intrinsic 'deterministic scatter' in the model that also accords with observation.

  4. Current animal models of hemophilia: the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Yen, Ching-Tzu; Fan, Meng-Ni; Yang, Yung-Li; Chou, Sheng-Chieh; Yu, I-Shing; Lin, Shu-Wha

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia is the most well-known hereditary bleeding disorder, with an incidence of one in every 5000 to 30,000 males worldwide. The disease is treated by infusion of protein products on demand and as prophylaxis. Although these therapies have been very successful, some challenging and unresolved tasks remain, such as reducing bleeding rates, presence of target joints and/or established joint damage, eliminating the development of inhibitors, and increasing the success rate of immune-tolerance induction (ITI). Many preclinical trials are carried out on animal models for hemophilia generated by the hemophilia research community, which in turn enable prospective clinical trials aiming to tackle these challenges. Suitable animal models are needed for greater advances in treating hemophilia, such as the development of better models for evaluation of the efficacy and safety of long-acting products, more powerful gene therapy vectors than are currently available, and successful ITI strategies. Mice, dogs, and pigs are the most commonly used animal models for hemophilia. With the advent of the nuclease method for genome editing, namely the CRISPR/Cas9 system, it is now possible to create animal models for hemophilia other than mice in a short period of time. This review presents currently available animal models for hemophilia, and discusses the importance of animal models for the development of better treatment options for hemophilia.

  5. Modeling of current characteristics of segmented Langmuir probe on DEMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Imtiaz, Nadia; Marchand, Richard; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre

    2013-05-15

    We model the current characteristics of the DEMETER Segmented Langmuir probe (SLP). The probe is used to measure electron density and temperature in the ionosphere at an altitude of approximately 700 km. It is also used to measure the plasma flow velocity in the satellite frame of reference. The probe is partitioned into seven collectors: six electrically insulated spherical segments and a guard electrode (the rest of the sphere and the small post). Comparisons are made between the predictions of the model and DEMETER measurements for actual ionospheric plasma conditions encountered along the satellite orbit. Segment characteristics are computed numerically with PTetra, a three-dimensional particle in cell simulation code. In PTetra, space is discretized with an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, thus, enabling a good representation of the probe geometry. The model also accounts for several physical effects of importance in the interaction of spacecraft with the space environment. These include satellite charging, photoelectron, and secondary electron emissions. The model is electrostatic, but it accounts for the presence of a uniform background magnetic field. PTetra simulation results show different characteristics for the different probe segments. The current collected by each segment depends on its orientation with respect to the ram direction, the plasma composition, the magnitude, and the orientation of the magnetic field. It is observed that the presence of light H{sup +} ions leads to a significant increase in the ion current branch of the I-V curves of the negatively polarized SLP. The effect of the magnetic field is demonstrated by varying its magnitude and direction with respect to the reference magnetic field. It is found that the magnetic field appreciably affects the electron current branch of the I-V curves of certain segments on the SLP, whereas the ion current branch remains almost unaffected. PTetra simulations are validated by comparing the computed

  6. Current results on the asymptotics of dynamo models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, H. P.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic field generation and evolution models that are capable of describing a large body of observational material are currently available for different celestial bodies. Despite recent decades of great success in numerical magnetic hydrodynamics and in detailed research into some specific problems, asymptotic methods still have to be used to clarify the magnetic field generation mechanism in dynamo theory. In this review, current asymptotic methods are presented together with the results of their application to the simulation of solar, stellar, and galactic magnetic activities.

  7. Advances in Modeling Eddy-Current NDE of Ferromagnetic Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.

    2003-03-01

    We apply our proprietary volume-integral eddy-current code, VIC-3D©, to the solution of challenging NDE problems that involve ferromagnetic anomalies or workpieces. These include problems with "wear scars and permeable crusts" in steam-generator tubing, characterization of coatings with electrical and magnetic layers, and flaws in ferromagnetic workpieces. Validation of the code by the use of benchmark experiments will also be described. Finally, we will explain the development of the mathematical model in terms of volume-integral equations through the use of Amperian currents for magnetic effects.

  8. Empirical Model of the Pressure in the Earth's Ring Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotirelis, T.; Gkioulidou, M.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; MacDonald, E.

    2014-12-01

    Plasma in the inner magnetosphere produces the Earth's ring current through its pressure. Changes in the plasma pressure dramatically effects the ring current, and the magnetic field which guides particle motion. Here, the pressure in the inner magnetosphere is empirically modeled using Van Allen Probes observations by the RBSPICE and ECT-HOPE instruments. The radial and local-time dependence of both the parallel and perpendicular components of plasma pressure are assessed and the contributions of Helium and Oxygen are measured. Correlation studies are used to further understand the causal roles played by various drivers. Simultaneous observations from the two Van Allen Probes permit an understanding of global versus local variations.

  9. Mathematical models of current losses in bipolar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangwen; Duan, Shuzhen; Tian, Qiuzhan; Wu, Tan

    1990-08-01

    A thorough study of current losses in bipolar cells has been made for the development of the great energy-saving potential of bipolar cells. A proper equivalent circuit for bipolar cells has been proposed, and mathematical methods for computing current losses for all types of polar-ization have been developed. For linear polarization, the current losses can be computed by solving either a tridiagonal matrix or a second-order ordinary differential equation. These values can be used to evaluate the minimum current losses at given conditions. For other kinds of polarization, the current losses can be computed by similar methods if the necessary experiments of measuring the cell voltages of each electrolytic compartment have been made. These values can be used to design practical bipolar cells. Extensive experiments have been made to evaluate the effects of electrode polarization, electromotive force (emf) of the galvanic cell for the for-mation of electrolyzed substance, gaseous products, geometric dimensions of electrolytic cells, specific resistance of electrolyte used, and the total and ordinal number of electrolytic com-partments on current losses. This was the first time such systematic experimental research had been undertaken. Experiments showed that theoretical models were in good agreement with measured data and that DC energy consumption of 0.45 kwh/kg Pb for lead electrolysis from molten chlorides could be achieved in a cell with seven bipolar electrodes.

  10. A review of clinical decision making: models and current research.

    PubMed

    Banning, Maggi

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the current literature clinical decision-making models and the educational application of models to clinical practice. This was achieved by exploring the function and related research of the three available models of clinical decision making: information-processing model, the intuitive-humanist model and the clinical decision-making model. Clinical decision making is a unique process that involves the interplay between knowledge of pre-existing pathological conditions, explicit patient information, nursing care and experiential learning. Historically, two models of clinical decision making are recognized from the literature; the information-processing model and the intuitive-humanist model. The usefulness and application of both models has been examined in relation the provision of nursing care and care related outcomes. More recently a third model of clinical decision making has been proposed. This new multidimensional model contains elements of the information-processing model but also examines patient specific elements that are necessary for cue and pattern recognition. Literature review. Evaluation of the literature generated from MEDLINE, CINAHL, OVID, PUBMED and EBESCO systems and the Internet from 1980 to November 2005. The characteristics of the three models of decision making were identified and the related research discussed. Three approaches to clinical decision making were identified, each having its own attributes and uses. The most recent addition to the clinical decision making is a theoretical, multidimensional model which was developed through an evaluation of current literature and the assessment of a limited number of research studies that focused on the clinical decision-making skills of inexperienced nurses in pseudoclinical settings. The components of this model and the relative merits to clinical practice are discussed. It is proposed that clinical decision making improves as the nurse gains experience of

  11. Animal Models of Psychosis: Current State and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Alexandra D.; Coto, Carlos A.; Siegel, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Psychosis is an abnormal mental state characterized by disorganization, delusions and hallucinations. Animal models have become an increasingly important research tool in the effort to understand both the underlying pathophysiology and treatment of psychosis. There are multiple animal models for psychosis, with each formed by the coupling of a manipulation and a measurement. In this manuscript we do not address the diseases of which psychosis is a prominent comorbidity. Instead, we summarize the current state of affairs and future directions for animal models of psychosis. To accomplish this, our manuscript will first discuss relevant behavioral and electrophysiological measurements. We then provide an overview of the different manipulations that are combined with these measurements to produce animal models. The strengths and limitations of each model will be addressed in order to evaluate its cross-species comparability. PMID:25215267

  12. Physical model of bathymetric effects on the Antarctic circumpolar current

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, D.L.; Ruirong Chen; Lijun Tao ); Davies, P.A. )

    1993-02-15

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to simulate some of the effects of the bathymetry of the southern ocean on the physical characteristics of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). An idealized zonal wind stress, which varied inversely with the distance from the model Antarctic continent, was simulated in the laboratory model by a radially inward sink-source flow in a thin layer along the surface of the circular test cell. The present model, however, has the limitation of not accounting for such factors as the longitudinal variations in the wind shear and the decrease in wind stress on approaching the Antarctic continent from the north. Planetary beta effects were neglected because the topographic beta term can be shown to dominate over large portions of the model area. The neglect of beta effects is also a limitation of the model. In spite of these limitations, however, the simulations of the physical model for both the homogeneous and linearly stratified cases were shown to be in good agreement with observations of the ACC. These include well-defined strong currents along the mid-ocean ridge; strong perturbations in the vicinity of the Macquarie Ridge, Campbell Plateau, and Kerguelen Gaussberg Plateau; strong meridional transport to the east of the Drake Passage; and anomalies to the south (wave troughs) and to the north (wave ridges) of the main circumpolar current over ocean basins and mountain ridges, respectively. It was shown that the Eltanin and Udintsev fracture zones in the vicinity of 135[degrees]W are important factors in directing the ACC eastward across the Southeast Pacific Basin to the Drake Passage. The estimated volume transports through the Drake Passage based on the model results are in fair agreement with oceanic observations. Estimates of the spin-up time of the system for homogeneous and stratified cases have been provided. 28 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Modeling ion-induced electrons in the High Current Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltz, P.H.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Cohen, R.H.; Molvik, A.W.; Vay, J.-L.; Veitzer, S.A.

    2006-05-15

    A primary concern for high current ion accelerators is contaminant electrons. These electrons can interfere with the beam ions, causing emittance growth and beam loss. Numerical simulation is a main tool for understanding the interaction of the ion beam with the contaminant electrons, but these simulations then require accurate models of electron generation. These models include ion-induced electron emission from ions hitting the beam pipe walls or diagnostics. However, major codes for modeling ion beam transport are written in different programming languages and used on different computing platforms. For electron generation models to be maximally useful, researchers should be able to use them easily from many languages and platforms. A model of ion-induced electrons including the electron energy distribution is presented here, including a discussion of how to use the Babel software tool to make these models available in multiple languages and how to use the GNU Autotools to make them available on multiple platforms. An application to simulation of the end region of the High Current Experiment is shown. These simulations show formation of a virtual cathode with a potential energy well of amplitude 12.0 eV, approximately six times the most probable energy of the ion-induced electrons. Oscillations of the virtual cathode could lead to possible longitudinal and transverse modulation of the density of the electrons moving out of the virtual cathode.

  14. Modeling ion-induced electrons in the High Current Experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltz, P. H.; Verboncoeur, J. P.; Cohen, R. H.; Molvik, A. W.; Vay, J.-L.; Veitzer, S. A.

    2006-05-01

    A primary concern for high current ion accelerators is contaminant electrons. These electrons can interfere with the beam ions, causing emittance growth and beam loss. Numerical simulation is a main tool for understanding the interaction of the ion beam with the contaminant electrons, but these simulations then require accurate models of electron generation. These models include ion-induced electron emission from ions hitting the beam pipe walls or diagnostics. However, major codes for modeling ion beam transport are written in different programming languages and used on different computing platforms. For electron generation models to be maximally useful, researchers should be able to use them easily from many languages and platforms. A model of ion-induced electrons including the electron energy distribution is presented here, including a discussion of how to use the Babel software tool to make these models available in multiple languages and how to use the GNU Autotools to make them available on multiple platforms. An application to simulation of the end region of the High Current Experiment is shown. These simulations show formation of a virtual cathode with a potential energy well of amplitude 12.0eV, approximately six times the most probable energy of the ion-induced electrons. Oscillations of the virtual cathode could lead to possible longitudinal and transverse modulation of the density of the electrons moving out of the virtual cathode.

  15. A fluid mechanical model for current-generating-feeding jellyfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John

    2008-11-01

    Many jellyfish species, e.g. moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita, use body motion to generate fluid currents which carry their prey to the vicinity of their capture appendages. In this study, a model was developed to understand the fluid mechanics for this current-generating-feeding mode of jellyfish. The flow generated by free-swimming Aurelia aurita was measured using digital particle image velocimetry. The dynamics of prey (e.g., brine shrimp Artemia) in the flow field were described by a modified Maxey-Riley equation which takes into consideration the inertia of prey and the escape forces, which prey exert in the presence of predator. A Lagrangian analysis was used to identify the region of the flow in which prey can be captured by the jellyfish and the clearance rate was quantified. The study provides a new methodology to study biological current-generating-feeding and the transport and mixing of particles in fluid flow in general.

  16. 3-dimensional current collection model. [of Tethered Satellite System 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Kai-Shen; Shiah, A.; Wu, S. T.; Stone, N.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent current collection model of a satellite has been developed for the TSS-1 system. The system has been simulated particularly for the Research of Plasma Electrodynamics (ROPE) experiment. The Maxwellian distributed particles with the geomagnetic field effects are applied in this numerical simulation. The preliminary results indicate that a ring current is observed surrounding the satellite in the equatorial plane. This ring current is found between the plasma sheath and the satellite surface and is oscillating with a time scale of approximately 1 microsec. This is equivalent to the electron plasma frequency. An hour glass shape of electron distribution was observed when the viewing direction is perpendicular to the equatorial plane. This result is consistent with previous findings from Linson (1969) and Antoniades et al. (1990). Electrons that are absorbed by the satellite are limited from the background ionosphere as indicated by Parker and Murphy (1967).

  17. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Farges, Francois; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; Haddi, Amine; Trocellier, Patrick; Curti, Enzo; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-02

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

  18. Durable Tactile Glove for Human or Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butzer, Melissa; Diftler, Myron A.; Huber, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A glove containing force sensors has been built as a prototype of tactile sensor arrays to be worn on human hands and anthropomorphic robot hands. The force sensors of this glove are mounted inside, in protective pockets; as a result of this and other design features, the present glove is more durable than earlier models.

  19. Structural Integrity and Durability of Reusable Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A two-day conference on the structural integrity and durability of reusable space propulsion systems was held on May 12 and 13, 1987, at the NASA Lewis research Center. Aerothermodynamic loads; instrumentation; fatigue, fracture, and constitutive modeling; and structural dynamics were discussed.

  20. Idealized model of polar cap currents, fields, and auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwall, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    During periods of northward Bz, the electric field applied to the magnetosphere is generally opposite to that occurring during southward Bz and complicated patterns of convection result, showing some features reversed in comparison with the southward Bz case. A study is conducted of a simple generalization of early work on idealized convection models, which allows for coexistence of sunward convection over the central polar cap and antisunward convection elsewhere in the cap. The present model, valid for By approximately 0, has a four-cell convection pattern and is based on the combination of ionospheric current conservation with a relation between parallel auroral currents and parallel potential drops. Global magnetospheric issues involving, e.g., reconnection are not considered. The central result of this paper is an expression giving the parallel potential drop for polar cap auroras (with By approximately 0) in terms of the polar cap convection field profile.

  1. Effect of glass composition on waste form durability: A critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, A.J.G.; Mazer, J.J.; Ebert, W.L.

    1994-11-01

    This report reviews literature concerning the relationship between the composition and durability of silicate glasses, particularly glasses proposed for immobilization of radioactive waste. Standard procedures used to perform durability tests are reviewed. It is shown that tests in which a low-surface area sample is brought into contact with a very large volume of solution provide the most accurate measure of the intrinsic durability of a glass composition, whereas high-surface area/low-solution volume tests are a better measure of the response of a glass to changes in solution chemistry induced by a buildup of glass corrosion products. The structural chemistry of silicate and borosilicate glasses is reviewed to identify those components with the strongest cation-anion bonds. A number of examples are discussed in which two or more cations engage in mutual bonding interactions that result in minima or maxima in the rheologic and thermodynamic properties of the glasses at or near particular optimal compositions. It is shown that in simple glass-forming systems such interactions generally enhance the durability of glasses. Moreover, it is shown that experimental results obtained for simple systems can be used to account for durability rankings of much more complex waste glass compositions. Models that purport to predict the rate of corrosion of glasses in short-term durability tests are evaluated using a database of short-term durability test results for a large set of glass compositions. The predictions of these models correlate with the measured durabilities of the glasses when considered in large groupings, but no model evaluated in this review provides accurate estimates of durability for individual glass compositions. Use of these models in long-term durability models is discussed. 230 refs.

  2. Current plate motions. [continental groupings and global modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Argus, D. F.; Stein, S.

    1990-01-01

    A global plate motion model, named NUVEL-1, which describes current plate motions between 12 rigid plates is described, with special attention given to the method, data, and assumptions used. Tectonic implications of the patterns that emerged from the results are discussed. It is shown that wide plate boundary zones can form not only within the continental lithosphere but also within the oceanic lithosphere; e.g., between the Indian and Australian plates and between the North American and South American plates. Results of the model also suggest small but significant diffuse deformation of the oceanic lithosphere, which may be confined to small awkwardly shaped salients of major plates.

  3. Considering digits in a current model of numerical development.

    PubMed

    Roesch, Stephanie; Moeller, Korbinian

    2014-01-01

    Numerical cognition has long been considered the perfect example of abstract information processing. Nevertheless, there is accumulating evidence in recent years suggesting that the representation of number magnitude may not be entirely abstract but may present a specific case of embodied cognition rooted in the sensory and bodily experiences of early finger counting and calculating. However, so far none of the existing models of numerical development considers the influence of finger-based representations. Therefore, we make first suggestions on (i) how finger-based representations may be integrated into a current model of numerical development; and (ii) how they might corroborate the acquisition of basic numerical competencies at different development levels.

  4. Persistent current in an almost staggered Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasserman, A.; Berkovits, R.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we study the persistent current (PC) of a staggered Harper model, close to the half-filling. The Harper model is different than other one dimensional disordered systems which are always localized, since it is a quasi-periodic system with correlated disorder resulting in the fact that it can be in the metallic regime. Nevertheless, the PC for a wide range of parameters of the Harper model does not show typical metallic behavior, although the system is in the metallic regime. This is a result of the nature of the central band states, which are a hybridization of Gaussian states localized in superlattice points. When the superlattice is not commensurate with the system length, the PC behaves as an insulator. Thus even in the metallic regime a typical finite Harper model may exhibit a PC expected from an insulator.

  5. MNESIS: towards the integration of current multisystem models of memory

    PubMed Central

    Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice

    2008-01-01

    After a brief description of the “diseases of memory” which have made the greatest contribution to theoretical developments in the past years, we turn our attention to the most important concepts to have arisen from the dissociations brought to light in different neuropsychological syndromes. This is followed by a critical review of the tasks currently used to assess each memory system. We then describe the monohierarchical model proposed by E. Tulving (1995), together with other recent concepts, notably Baddeley’s model of working memory with its latest component, the episodic buffer. Lastly, we attempt to reconcile these models with several other theoretical propositions, which we have linked together in a macromodel - the Memory NEo-Structural Inter-Systemic model (MNESIS). PMID:18311523

  6. Fokker-Planck modeling of current penetration during electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Merkulov, A.; Westerhof, E.; Schueller, F. C.

    2007-05-15

    The current penetration during electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the resistive time scale is studied with a Fokker-Planck simulation, which includes a model for the magnetic diffusion that determines the parallel electric field evolution. The existence of the synergy between the inductive electric field and EC driven current complicates the process of the current penetration and invalidates the standard method of calculation in which Ohm's law is simply approximated by j-j{sub cd}={sigma}E. Here it is proposed to obtain at every time step a self-consistent approximation to the plasma resistivity from the Fokker-Planck code, which is then used in a concurrent calculation of the magnetic diffusion equation in order to obtain the inductive electric field at the next time step. A series of Fokker-Planck calculations including a self-consistent evolution of the inductive electric field has been performed. Both the ECCD power and the electron density have been varied, thus varying the well known nonlinearity parameter for ECCD P{sub rf}[MW/m{sup -3}]/n{sub e}{sup 2}[10{sup 19} m{sup -3}] [R. W. Harvey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 62, 426 (1989)]. This parameter turns out also to be a good predictor of the synergetic effects. The results are then compared with the standard method of calculations of the current penetration using a transport code. At low values of the Harvey parameter, the standard method is in quantitative agreement with Fokker-Planck calculations. However, at high values of the Harvey parameter, synergy between ECCD and E{sub parallel} is found. In the case of cocurrent drive, this synergy leads to the generation of large amounts of nonthermal electrons and a concomitant increase of the electrical conductivity and current penetration time. In the case of countercurrent drive, the ECCD efficiency is suppressed by the synergy with E{sub parallel} while only a small amount of nonthermal electrons is produced.

  7. Operational advances in ring current modeling using RAM-SCB

    SciTech Connect

    Welling, Daniel T; Jordanova, Vania K; Zaharia, Sorin G; Morley, Steven K

    2010-12-03

    The Ring current Atmosphere interaction Model with Self-Consistently calculated 3D Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) combines a kinetic model of the ring current with a force-balanced model of the magnetospheric magnetic field to create an inner magnetospheric model that is magnetically self consistent. RAM-SCB produces a wealth of outputs that are valuable to space weather applications. For example, the anisotropic particle distribution of the KeV-energy population calculated by the code is key for predicting surface charging on spacecraft. Furthermore, radiation belt codes stand to benefit substantially from RAM-SCB calculated magnetic field values and plasma wave growth rates - both important for determining the evolution of relativistic electron populations. RAM-SCB is undergoing development to bring these benefits to the space weather community. Data-model validation efforts are underway to assess the performance of the system. 'Virtual Satellite' capability has been added to yield satellite-specific particle distribution and magnetic field output. The code's outer boundary is being expanded to 10 Earth Radii to encompass previously neglected geosynchronous orbits and allow the code to be driven completely by either empirical or first-principles based inputs. These advances are culminating towards a new, real-time version of the code, rtRAM-SCB, that can monitor the inner magnetosphere conditions on both a global and spacecraft-specific level. This paper summarizes these new features as well as the benefits they provide the space weather community.

  8. The Role of Wakes in Modelling Tidal Current Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Daniel; Roc, Thomas; Greaves, Deborah

    2010-05-01

    The eventual proper development of arrays of Tidal Current Turbines (TCT) will require a balance which maximizes power extraction while minimizing environmental impacts. Idealized analytical analogues and simple 2-D models are useful tools for investigating questions of a general nature but do not represent a practical tool for application to realistic cases. Some form of 3-D numerical simulations will be required for such applications and the current project is designed to develop a numerical decision-making tool for use in planning large scale TCT projects. The project is predicated on the use of an existing regional ocean modelling framework (the Regional Ocean Modelling System - ROMS) which is modified to enable the user to account for the effects of TCTs. In such a framework where mixing processes are highly parametrized, the fidelity of the quantitative results is critically dependent on the parameter values utilized. In light of the early stage of TCT development and the lack of field scale measurements, the calibration of such a model is problematic. In the absence of explicit calibration data sets, the device wake structure has been identified as an efficient feature for model calibration. This presentation will discuss efforts to design an appropriate calibration scheme which focuses on wake decay and the motivation for this approach, techniques applied, validation results from simple test cases and limitations shall be presented.

  9. Homology Modeling a Fast Tool for Drug Discovery: Current Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, V. K.; Ukawala, R. D.; Ghate, M.; Chintha, C.

    2012-01-01

    Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery. PMID:23204616

  10. Homology modeling a fast tool for drug discovery: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vyas, V K; Ukawala, R D; Ghate, M; Chintha, C

    2012-01-01

    Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery.

  11. Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Spernjak, Dusan; Baker, Andrew M.; Lujan, Roger W.; Langlois, David Alan; Ahluwalia, Rajesh; Papadia, D. D.; Weber, Adam Z.; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Shi, Shouwnen; More, K. L.; Grot, Steve

    2015-08-03

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. By investigating cell component degradation modes and defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions, new materials can be designed to improve durability. To achieve a deeper understanding of PEM fuel cell durability and component degradation mechanisms, we utilize a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary team with significant experience investigating these phenomena.

  12. Status report on Corsica modeling for current drive scenario development

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T. A.; Crotinger, J.; Moller, J.M.; Pearlstein, L.D.

    1996-09-01

    This milestone report covers the progress and status of Corsica modeling for DIII-D experiments over the past year, since our previous report in September, 1995. During this time, we have concentrated on improvements to the code in support of our ability to do self-consistent, predictive modeling of DIII-D discharges. Our interest is in obtaining a tool, benchmarked with experimental data, for developing advanced tokamak operations scenarios including simulation and analysis of high performance negative central shear (NCS) discharges and control of the current profile evolution. Our major focus has been on installing and improving the neutral beam current drive mode in Corsica; this element is critical to modeling the evolution of DIII-D discharges. The NFREYA neutral beam deposition code was installed (starting with a version consistent with GA`s ONETWO code) and the capability for following particle orbits, including the effects of drifts, was added for determining the current driven by neutral beam -injection. In addition, improved methods for more easily integrating experimental profile measurements into the code operation and for calculating Z{sub eff} either from models or from impurity density measurements have been added. We have recently begun to turn on various transport models in our simulation of discharge evolution. We have concentrated on the NCS configuration and have simulated the evolution of two different high neutron reactivity discharges; an NCS discharge with L-mode edge and a single- null, weak NCS discharge from the JET/ITER/DIII-D equivalent shape experiments. Corsica simulation results for these discharges were presented at the EPS meeting in Kiev, Ukraine in June, 1996.

  13. Out of hospital point of care ultrasound: current use models and future directions.

    PubMed

    Nelson, B P; Sanghvi, A

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound has evolved from a modality that was once exclusively reserved to certain specialities of its current state, in which its portability and durability lend to its broadly increasing applications. This review describes portable ultrasound in the hospital setting and its comparison to gold standard imaging modalities. Also, this review summarizes current literature describing portable ultrasound use in prehospital, austere and remote environments, highlighting successes and barriers to use in these environments. Prehospital ultrasound has the ability to increase diagnostic ability and allow for therapeutic intervention in the field. In austere environments, ultrasound may be the only available imaging modality and thus can guide diagnosis, therapeutics and determine which patients may need emergent transfer to a healthcare facility. The most cutting edge applications of portable ultrasound employ telemedicine to obtain and transmit ultrasound images. This technology and ability to transmit images via satellite and cellular transmission can allow for even novice users to obtain interpretable images in austere environments. Portable ultrasound uses have steadily grown and will continue to do so with the introduction of more portable and durable technologies. As applications continue to grow, certain technologic considerations and future directions are explored.

  14. Interpreting snowpack radiometry using currently existing microwave radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Do-Hyuk; Tang, Shurun; Kim, Edward J.

    2015-10-01

    A radiative transfer model (RTM) to calculate the snow brightness temperatures (Tb) is a critical element in terrestrial snow parameter retrieval from microwave remote sensing observations. The RTM simulates the Tb based on a layered snow by solving a set of microwave radiative transfer equations. Even with the same snow physical inputs to drive the RTM, currently existing models such as Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS), Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT-QMS), and Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) models produce different Tb responses. To backwardly invert snow physical properties from the Tb, differences from RTMs are first to be quantitatively explained. To this end, this initial investigation evaluates the sources of perturbations in these RTMs, and reveals the equations where the variations are made among the three models. Modelling experiments are conducted by providing the same but gradual changes in snow physical inputs such as snow grain size, and snow density to the 3 RTMs. Simulations are conducted with the frequencies consistent with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer- E (AMSR-E) at 6.9, 10.7, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0 GHz. For realistic simulations, the 3 RTMs are simultaneously driven by the same snow physics model with the meteorological forcing datasets and are validated against the snow insitu samplings from the CLPX (Cold Land Processes Field Experiment) 2002-2003, and NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment) 2009-2010.

  15. Current and new cytomegalovirus antivirals and novel animal model strategies.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Alistair

    2010-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a significant health problem among immunosuppressed individuals. In particular, transplant and AIDS patients and the developing fetus in utero are highly susceptible to CMV. In these vulnerable populations, infection leads to life threatening end organ viral disease or in surviving newborn babies to deafness or to mental retardation. Currently, the most effective way to control CMV infection, given the lack of an effective vaccine, is by antiviral therapy. However, available antivirals suffer from complications associated with prolonged use, such as drug toxicity as well as the emergence of resistant strains of virus. Additionally, since CMV has multiple complex immune evasion strategies, to avoid innate and adaptive immune responses, there is a need for new antiviral development. Any antiviral should be tested in a controlled animal model but species specificity of HCMV precludes the direct study of the virus in an animal model. Consequently, animal CMV in their respective animal host are used to study intervention strategies. In this review, both current and new antiviral strategies are discussed as are the various animal models and strategies to improve existing antiviral animal models by humanizing animal CMV.

  16. Thermoregulatory models. Recent research, current applications and future development.

    PubMed

    Werner, J

    1989-01-01

    This review traces the efforts of different fields of thermoregulatory modeling. The aims of the three diverging branches can be characterized by (i) insight into functional physiological mechanisms and prediction of physiological phenomena, (ii) prediction of human performance for the protection of industrial workers or military personnel, and (iii) prediction of the impact of accidents, diseases, and clinical treatments. Common current and future efforts may be recognized which improve the physiological quality of the models for purposes either of physiological research itself or of promotion of the field of application, namely, (i) to approach the models to real geometry and anatomy of the human body, (ii) to simulate more adequately heat transport processes induced by the circulating blood, (iii) to implement more sophisticated regulatory concepts, (iv) to take into account interaction with other regulatory systems. "Environmental Ergonomics" should be an adequate forum for linking these diversified fields together.

  17. A 3D Current Loop Model of Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, James

    1992-05-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model is developed to study magnetic clouds (Burlaga et al. 1981). In this model, magnetic clouds observed near 1 AU are treated as a consequence of eruptive solar current loops. It is shown that current loops intially in MHD equilibrium can be triggered to rise rapidly, propelling material of up to 10(16) g at up to ~ 1000 km s(-1) and dissipating ~ 10(32) erg of magnetic energy in tens of minutes. The initial rise profile is consistent with observed height-time profiles of erupting filaments (Kahler et al. 1988). Two triggering mechanisms for eruption are suggested: (1)subphotospheric energy storage and trigger and (2) in situ (coronal) energy storage and trigger. In the former, eruption occurs as a result of changes in the subphotospheric magnetic topology and subsequent relaxation to a new equilibrium. In the latter, the current loop can evolve to exceed a local maximum in the magnetic potential associated with the ambient magnetic fields. The former scenario leads to more energetic and longer-lasting eruption than the latter. Burlaga, L. F., Sittler, E., Mariani, F., and Schwenn, R. 1981, J. Geophys. Res., 86, 6673. Kahler, S. W., Moore, R. L., Kane, S. R., and Zirin, H. 1988, Ap. J., 328, 824.

  18. Durability-based design criteria for an automotive structural composite

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; Brinkman, C.R.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.; Yahr, G.T.

    1998-11-01

    Before composite structures can be widely used in automotive applications, their long-term durability must be assured. The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was established by the US Department of Energy to help provide that assurance. The project is closely coordinated with the Automotive Composites Consortium. The experimentally-based, durability-driven design criteria described in this paper are the result of the initial project thrust. The criteria address a single reference composite, which is an SRIM (Structural Reaction Injection Molded) polyurethane, reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass fibers. The durability issues addressed include the effects of cyclic and sustained loadings, temperature, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) on strength, stiffness, and deformation. The criteria provide design analysis guidance, a multiaxial strength criterion, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loading, and damage tolerance design guidance. Environmental degradation factors and the degrading effects of prior loadings are included. Efforts are currently underway to validate the criteria by application to a second random-glass-fiber composite. Carbon-fiber composites are also being addressed.

  19. Interpreting snowpack radiometry using currently existing microwave radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D. H.; Tan, S.; Kim, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    A radiative transfer model (RTM) to calculate a snow brightness temperature (Tb) is a critical element to retrieve terrestrial snow from microwave remote sensing observations. The RTM simulates the Tb based on a layered snow by solving a set of microwave radiative transfer formulas. Even with the same snow physical inputs used for the RTM, currently existing models such as Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS), Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT-Tsang), and Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) models produce different Tb responses. To backwardly invert snow physical properties from the Tb, the differences from the RTMs are to be quantitatively explained. To this end, the paper evaluates the sources of perturbations in the RTMs, and reveals the equations where the variations are made among three models. Investigations are conducted by providing the same but gradual changes in snow physical inputs such as snow grain size, and snow density to the 3 RTMs. Simulations are done with the frequencies consistent with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-E (AMSR-E) at 6.9, 10.7, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0 GHz. For realistic simulations, the 3 RTMs are simultaneously driven by the same snow physics model with the meteorological forcing datasets and are validated from the snow core samplings from the CLPX (Cold Land Processes Field Experiment) 2002-2003, and NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment) 2009-2010.

  20. Current models of the intensely ionizing particle environment in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Effects on MicroElectronics (CREME) model that is currently in use to estimate single event effect rates in spacecraft is described. The CREME model provides a description of the radiation environment in interplanetary space near the orbit of the earth that contains no major deficiencies. The accuracy of the galactic cosmic ray model is limited by the uncertainties in solar modulation. The model for solar energetic particles could be improved by making use of all the data that has been collected on solar energetic particle events. There remain major uncertainties about the environment within the earth's magnetosphere, because of the uncertainties over the charge states of the heavy ions in the anomalous component and solar flares, and because of trapped heavy ions. The present CREME model is valid only at 1 AU, but it could be extended to other parts of the heliosphere. There is considerable data on the radiation environment from 0.2 to 35 AU in the ecliptic plane. This data could be used to extend the CREME model.

  1. Advances in modeling of lower hybrid current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Nilsson, E.; Artaud, J.-F.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Ding, B.; Li, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Shiraiwa, S.; Madi, M.

    2016-04-01

    First principle modeling of the lower hybrid (LH) current drive in tokamak plasmas is a longstanding activity, which is gradually gaining in accuracy thanks to quantitative comparisons with experimental observations. The ability to reproduce simulatenously the plasma current and the non-thermal bremsstrahlung radial profiles in the hard x-ray (HXR) photon energy range represents in this context a significant achievement. Though subject to limitations, ray tracing calculations are commonly used for describing wave propagation in conjunction with Fokker-Planck codes, as it can capture prominent features of the LH wave dynamics in a tokamak plasma-like toroidal refraction. This tool has been validated on several machines when the full absorption of the LH wave requires the transfer of a small fraction of power from the main lobes of the launched power spectrum to a tail at a higher parallel refractive index. Conversely, standard modeling based on toroidal refraction only becomes more challenging when the spectral gap is large, except if other physical mechanisms may dominate to bridge it, like parametric instabilities, as suggested for JET LH discharges (Cesario et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 175002), or fast fluctuations of the launched power spectrum or ‘tail’ LH model, as shown for Tore Supra (Decker et al 2014 Phys. Plasma 21 092504). The applicability of the heuristic ‘tail’ LH model is investigated for a broader range of plasma parameters as compared to the Tore Supra study and with different LH wave characteristics. Discrepancies and agreements between simulations and experiments depending upon the different models used are discussed. The existence of a ‘tail’ in the launched power spectrum significantly improves the agreement between modeling and experiments in plasma conditions for which the spectral gap is large in EAST and Alcator C-Mod tokamaks. For the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, the experimental evolution of the HXR profiles with density suggests

  2. Modeling geomagnetic induced currents in Australian power networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, R. A.; Kelly, A.; Van Der Walt, T.; Honecker, A.; Ong, C.; Mikkelsen, D.; Spierings, A.; Ivanovich, G.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2017-07-01

    Geomagnetic induced currents (GICs) have been considered an issue for high-latitude power networks for some decades. More recently, GICs have been observed and studied in power networks located in lower latitude regions. This paper presents the results of a model aimed at predicting and understanding the impact of geomagnetic storms on power networks in Australia, with particular focus on the Queensland and Tasmanian networks. The model incorporates a "geoelectric field" determined using a plane wave magnetic field incident on a uniform conducting Earth, and the network model developed by Lehtinen and Pirjola (1985). Model results for two intense geomagnetic storms of solar cycle 24 are compared with transformer neutral monitors at three locations within the Queensland network and one location within the Tasmanian network. The model is then used to assess the impacts of the superintense geomagnetic storm of 29-31 October 2003 on the flow of GICs within these networks. The model results show good correlation with the observations with coefficients ranging from 0.73 to 0.96 across the observing sites. For Queensland, modeled GIC magnitudes during the superstorm of 29-31 October 2003 exceed 40 A with the larger GICs occurring in the south-east section of the network. Modeled GICs in Tasmania for the same storm do not exceed 30 A. The larger distance spans and general east-west alignment of the southern section of the Queensland network, in conjunction with some relatively low branch resistance values, result in larger modeled GICs despite Queensland being a lower latitude network than Tasmania.

  3. MEPAS exposure model updates to meet current EPA guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Strenge, D.L.; Droppo, J.G. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) is a software package developed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a management tool to screen the many potential hazardous waste problems at DOE facilities across the country. The program considers both radioactive and chemical pollutants in estimating potential human health risks based on site-specific waste, environmental transport, and exposure characteristics. To support various DOE programs, recent modifications have been made to MEPAS to increase its applicability in analyzing the problems of mixed hazardous waste. Such analyses are needed to evaluate remediation options for mixed hazardous waste sites. This paper presents an overview of the MEPAS program and summarizes the current models used to translate environmental concentration values into projected intake by humans and, finally, into estimates of health risk. The recent modifications are described consistent with current EPA guidance for exposure and human health impact assessment.

  4. European Project to Improve Models of Geomagnetically Induced Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljanen, Ari

    2011-07-01

    Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) from solar storms pose a risk to the operation of power transmission grids in Europe and across the globe. The European Risk from Geomagnetically Induced Currents (EURISGIC) project, which began in March 2011 and is supported by the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Union, seeks to mitigate this natural hazard by developing European capabilities for GIC forecasting and warning. Recent well-recognized GIC events were the province-wide blackout in Quebec, Canada, in March 1989 and the blackout in the city of Malmö, in southern Sweden, during the Halloween storm of October 2003. The progressive integration of interconnected and geographically wide power transmission grids is obviously increasing the GIC risk. Hence, there is a need for greater scientific understanding of phenomena in the solar-terrestrial environment that lead to GICs and for the development of systems that facilitate GIC modeling, forecasting, and mitigation.

  5. Two-current nucleon observables in Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemtob, Marc

    1987-11-01

    Three independent two-current nucléon observables are studied within the two-flavor Skyrme model for the παω system. The effective lagrangian is that of the gauged chiral symmetry approach, consistent with the vector meson dominance, in the linear realization (for the vector mesons) of the global chiral symmetry. The first application deals with the nucleon electric polarizability and magnetic susceptibilty. Both seagull and dispersive contributions appear and we evaluate the latter in terms of the sums over intermediate states. The results are compared with existing quark model results as well as with empirical determinations. The second application concerns the zero-point quantum correction to the skyrmion mass. We apply a chiral perturbation theory approach to evaluate the pion loop contribution to the nucleon mass. The comparison with the conventional Skyrme model result reveals an important sensitivity to the stabilization mechanism. The third application is to lepton-nucleon deep inelastic scattering in the Bjorken scaling limit. The structure tensor is calculated in terms of the representation as a commutator product of two currents. Numerical results are presented for the scaling function F2( x). An essential use is made of the large Nc. (number of colors) approximation in all these applications. In the numerical computations we ignore the distortion effects, relative to the free plane wave limit, on the pionic fluctuations.

  6. Atomic Oxygen Durability of Aluminized Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Judith C.

    2003-01-01

    The atomic oxygen durability of aluminized polymers will be investigated. Such aluminized polymers are commonly used in space and specifically on the International Space Station. Recent data from in-space results indicates that vapor deposited aluminum coatings are highly defected with many small pin windows. However, electron microscopy to validate the size and aerial density of such defects remains to be demonstrated. The research project is planned to compare electron microscopy analysis of pristine and atomic oxygen exposed aluminized polyimide Kapton with the results of ground laboratory atomic oxygen erosion data, in-space results and computational Monte Carlo modeling to develop a self consistent understanding of the atomic oxygen degradation processes and effects.

  7. Animal models of transcranial direct current stimulation: Methods and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Mark P; Rahman, Asif; Lafon, Belen; Kronberg, Gregory; Ling, Doris; Parra, Lucas C; Bikson, Marom

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this review is to summarize the contribution of animal research using direct current stimulation (DCS) to our understanding of the physiological effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). We comprehensively address experimental methodology in animal studies, broadly classified as: (1) transcranial stimulation; (2) direct cortical stimulation in vivo and (3) in vitro models. In each case advantages and disadvantages for translational research are discussed including dose translation and the overarching "quasi-uniform" assumption, which underpins translational relevance in all animal models of tDCS. Terminology such as anode, cathode, inward current, outward current, current density, electric field, and uniform are defined. Though we put key animal experiments spanning decades in perspective, our goal is not simply an exhaustive cataloging of relevant animal studies, but rather to put them in context of ongoing efforts to improve tDCS. Cellular targets, including excitatory neuronal somas, dendrites, axons, interneurons, glial cells, and endothelial cells are considered. We emphasize neurons are always depolarized and hyperpolarized such that effects of DCS on neuronal excitability can only be evaluated within subcellular regions of the neuron. Findings from animal studies on the effects of DCS on plasticity (LTP/LTD) and network oscillations are reviewed extensively. Any endogenous phenomena dependent on membrane potential changes are, in theory, susceptible to modulation by DCS. The relevance of morphological changes (galvanotropy) to tDCS is also considered, as we suggest microscopic migration of axon terminals or dendritic spines may be relevant during tDCS. A majority of clinical studies using tDCS employ a simplistic dose strategy where excitability is singularly increased or decreased under the anode and cathode, respectively. We discuss how this strategy, itself based on classic animal studies, cannot account for the

  8. A Model for Axial Magnetic Bearings Including Eddy Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Ladislav; Ahrens, Markus

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical method of modelling eddy currents inside axial bearings. The problem is solved by dividing an axial bearing into elementary geometric forms, solving the Maxwell equations for these simplified geometries, defining boundary conditions and combining the geometries. The final result is an analytical solution for the flux, from which the impedance and the force of an axial bearing can be derived. Several impedance measurements have shown that the analytical solution can fit the measured data with a precision of approximately 5%.

  9. A statistical model of magnetic islands in a current layer

    SciTech Connect

    Fermo, R. L.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2010-01-15

    This letter describes a statistical model of the dynamics of magnetic islands in very large current layers that develop in space plasma. Two parameters characterize the island distribution: the flux psi contained in the island and the area A it encloses. The integrodifferential evolution equation for this distribution function is based on rules that govern the small-scale generation of secondary islands, the rates of island growth, and island merging. The numerical solutions of this equation produce island distributions relevant to the magnetosphere and solar corona. The solution of a differential equation for large islands explicitly shows the role merging plays in island growth.

  10. Cloud fractional coverage: A key uncertainty in current climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Walcek, C.J.

    1996-12-31

    Climate models being used to study global warming use highly uncertain and widely divergent methods for calculating fractional cloudiness, which plays a significant role in regulating global albedo and climate. In this study the author compares cloud cover formulations used by various climate models with observations of fractional cloudiness and related meteorology derived from surface reports, upper atmospheric soundings, and satellites. He found that relative humidity is the best single predictor of cloud coverage, in agreement with most climate model formulations. However, the precise functional relationships used by climate models to estimate cloud coverage disagree significantly with observed cloud relationships. In the middle troposphere, most climate models probably underestimate cloud coverage since they specify zero cloud amounts when relative humidities are below 60--80%, while observed cloud amounts range from 20--60% at these height and humidity ranges. At humidities close to saturation, current algorithms probably overestimate cloud coverage. Cloud fractional cover observations compiled in this study suggest that at any level in the atmosphere, cloud amount decreases exponentially as humidity falls below 100%, and there is no evidence for critical humidities below which no clouds exist.

  11. Current state of genome-scale modeling in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael R

    2015-06-01

    The group of filamentous fungi contains important species used in industrial biotechnology for acid, antibiotics and enzyme production. Their unique lifestyle turns these organisms into a valuable genetic reservoir of new natural products and biomass degrading enzymes that has not been used to full capacity. One of the major bottlenecks in the development of new strains into viable industrial hosts is the alteration of the metabolism towards optimal production. Genome-scale models promise a reduction in the time needed for metabolic engineering by predicting the most potent targets in silico before testing them in vivo. The increasing availability of high quality models and molecular biological tools for manipulating filamentous fungi renders the model-guided engineering of these fungal factories possible with comprehensive metabolic networks. A typical fungal model contains on average 1138 unique metabolic reactions and 1050 ORFs, making them a vast knowledge-base of fungal metabolism. In the present review we focus on the current state as well as potential future applications of genome-scale models in filamentous fungi.

  12. Maternal hypothyroidism: An overview of current experimental models.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Mahboubeh; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2017-08-11

    Maternal hypothyroidism (MH) is the most common cause of transient congenital hypothyroidism. Different animal models are used for assessing developmental effects of MH in offspring. The severity and status of hypothyroidism in animal models must be a reflection of the actual conditions in humans. To obtain comparable results with different clinical conditions, which lead to MH in humans, several factors have been suggested for researchers to consider before designing the experimental models. Regarding development of fetal body systems during pregnancy, interference at different times provides different results and the appropriate time for induction of hypothyroidism should be selected based on accurate time of development of the system under assessment. Other factors that should be taken into consideration include, physiological and biochemical differences between humans and other species, thyroid hormone-independent effects of anti-thyroid drugs, circadian rhythms in TSH secretion, sex differences, physical and psychological stress. This review addresses essential guidelines for selecting and managing the optimal animal model for MH as well as discussing the pros and cons of currently used models. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Structural Analyses of Stirling Power Convertor Heater Head for Long-Term Reliability, Durability, and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Shah, Ashwin; Arya, Vinod K.; Krause, David L.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    2002-01-01

    Deep-space missions require onboard electric power systems with reliable design lifetimes of up to 10 yr and beyond. A high-efficiency Stirling radioisotope power system is a likely candidate for future deep-space missions and Mars rover applications. To ensure ample durability, the structurally critical heater head of the Stirling power convertor has undergone extensive computational analyses of operating temperatures (up to 650 C), stresses, and creep resistance of the thin-walled Inconel 718 bill of material. Durability predictions are presented in terms of the probability of survival. A benchmark structural testing program has commenced to support the analyses. This report presents the current status of durability assessments.

  14. Penalized estimation for proportional hazards models with current status data.

    PubMed

    Lu, Minggen; Li, Chin-Shang

    2017-09-05

    We provide a simple and practical, yet flexible, penalized estimation method for a Cox proportional hazards model with current status data. We approximate the baseline cumulative hazard function by monotone B-splines and use a hybrid approach based on the Fisher-scoring algorithm and the isotonic regression to compute the penalized estimates. We show that the penalized estimator of the nonparametric component achieves the optimal rate of convergence under some smooth conditions and that the estimators of the regression parameters are asymptotically normal and efficient. Moreover, a simple variance estimation method is considered for inference on the regression parameters. We perform 2 extensive Monte Carlo studies to evaluate the finite-sample performance of the penalized approach and compare it with the 3 competing R packages: C1.coxph, intcox, and ICsurv. A goodness-of-fit test and model diagnostics are also discussed. The methodology is illustrated with 2 real applications. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. LORENTZ SELF-FORCE OF AN ELLIPSE CURRENT LOOP MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang Jie; Kunkel, Valbona

    2013-07-10

    In this work, the Lorentz self-force of an ellipse current loop model is derived. We are motivated by the fact that it has been reported in the literature that coronal mass ejection morphology can resemble an ellipse in the field of view of coronagraph images. Deriving the Lorentz self-force using an ellipse geometry has the advantage of being able to be solved analytically, as opposed to other more complex geometries. The derived ellipse model is compared with the local curvature approximation, where the Lorentz self-force at the ellipse major/minor axis is compared with the Lorentz self-force of a torus with curvature equal to the local curvature at the ellipses major/minor axis. It is found that the local curvature approximation is valid for moderate values of eccentricity.

  16. Considering digits in a current model of numerical development

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Stephanie; Moeller, Korbinian

    2015-01-01

    Numerical cognition has long been considered the perfect example of abstract information processing. Nevertheless, there is accumulating evidence in recent years suggesting that the representation of number magnitude may not be entirely abstract but may present a specific case of embodied cognition rooted in the sensory and bodily experiences of early finger counting and calculating. However, so far none of the existing models of numerical development considers the influence of finger-based representations. Therefore, we make first suggestions on (i) how finger-based representations may be integrated into a current model of numerical development; and (ii) how they might corroborate the acquisition of basic numerical competencies at different development levels. PMID:25628559

  17. Environmental Durability of Electroplated Black Chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Report describes tests of durability of electroplated black chromium coatings on solar-collector panels in rural, industrial, and seacoast environments for 60, 36, and 13 months, respectively. Black-chromium coating showed exceptionally-good optical durability in all three environments.

  18. 14 CFR 35.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Durability. 35.19 Section 35.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Design and Construction § 35.19 Durability. Each part of the propeller must be...

  19. 14 CFR 35.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Durability. 35.19 Section 35.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Design and Construction § 35.19 Durability. Each part of the propeller must be...

  20. 14 CFR 35.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Durability. 35.19 Section 35.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Design and Construction § 35.19 Durability. Each part of the propeller must be...

  1. 14 CFR 35.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Durability. 35.19 Section 35.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Design and Construction § 35.19 Durability. Each part of the propeller must be...

  2. Outdoor durability of wood-polymer composites

    Treesearch

    N. M. Stark; D. J. Gardner

    2008-01-01

    Wood-plastic composite (WPC) lumber is promoted as a low-maintenance, high-durability product (Clemons, 2002). However, after a decade of exterior use in the construction industry, questions have arisen regarding durability. These questions are based on documented evidence of failures in the field of WPC decking products due to such impacts as polymer degradation (...

  3. Environmental Durability of Electroplated Black Chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Report describes tests of durability of electroplated black chromium coatings on solar-collector panels in rural, industrial, and seacoast environments for 60, 36, and 13 months, respectively. Black-chromium coating showed exceptionally-good optical durability in all three environments.

  4. Durable Solutions for Developing Country Refugees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Barry N.

    1986-01-01

    There are only three durable solutions to the refugee problem--voluntary repatriation, local settlement, and third-country resettlement--and all depend on political will, diplomacy, and statesmanship. It is important to remember, however, that humanitarian concerns must outweigh costs consciousness when durable solutions are sought. (Author/GC)

  5. Enduring Legacy? Charles Tilly and Durable Inequality.

    PubMed

    Voss, Kim

    2010-12-01

    This article assesses Charles Tilly's Durable Inequality and traces its influence. In writing Durable Inequality, Tilly sought to shift the research agenda of stratification scholars. But the book's initial impact was disappointing. In recent years, however, its influence has grown, suggesting a more enduring legacy.

  6. Are epoxy-wood bonds durable enough?

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2005-01-01

    An important aspect of any adhesive bond is that the bond maintains its integrity during its end use. Epoxies form highly durable bonds with many substrates but are usually not considered capable of forming completely durable bonds with wood by standard accelerated tests. However, epoxies are sold for wood boat construction, and some data have indicated that epoxies...

  7. Durable soy-based adhesive dispersions

    Treesearch

    James M. Wescott; Amy Traska; Charles R. Frihart; Linda Lorenz

    2005-01-01

    An important aspect of any adhesive bond is that the bond maintains its integrity during its end use. Epoxies form highly durable bonds with many substrates but are usually not considered capable of forming completely durable bonds with wood by standard accelerated tests. However, epoxies are sold for wood boat construction, and some data have indicated that epoxies...

  8. Surface Current Skill Assessment of Global and Regional forecast models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard has been using SAROPS since January 2007 at all fifty of its operational centers to plan search and rescue missions. SAROPS relies on an Environmental Data Server (EDS) that integrates global, national, and regional ocean and meteorological observation and forecast data. The server manages spatial and temporal aggregation of hindcast, nowcast, and forecast data so the SAROPS controller has the best available data for search planning. The EDS harvests a wide range of global and regional forecasts and data, including NOAA NCEP's global HYCOM model (RTOFS), the U.S. Navy's Global HYCOM model, the 5 NOAA NOS Great Lakes models and a suite of other reginal forecasts from NOS and IOOS Regional Associations. The EDS also integrates surface drifter data as the U.S. Coast Guard regularly deploys Self-Locating Datum Marker Buoys (SLDMBs) during SAR cases and a significant set of drifter data has been collected and the archive continues to grow. This data is critically useful during real-time SAR planning, but also represents a valuable scientific dataset for analyzing surface currents. In 2014, a new initiative was started by the U.S. Coast Guard to evaluate the skill of the various models to support the decision making process during search and rescue planning. This analysis falls into 2 categories: historical analysis of drifter tracks and model predictions to provide skill assessment of models in different regions and real-time analysis of models and drifter tracks during a SAR incident. The EDS, using Liu and Wiesberg's (2014) autonomously determines surface skill measurements of the co-located models' simulated surface trajectories versus the actual drift of the SLDMBs (CODE/Davis style surface drifters GPS positioned at 30min intervals). Surface skill measurements are archived in a database and are user retrieval by lat/long/time cubes. This paper will focus on the comparison of models from in the period from 23 August to 21 September 2015. Surface

  9. Beyond standard model physics at current and future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a multinational experiment which began running in 2009, is highly expected to discover new physics that will help us understand the nature of the universe and begin to find solutions to many of the unsolved puzzles of particle physics. For over 40 years the Standard Model has been the accepted theory of elementary particle physics, except for one unconfirmed component, the Higgs boson. The experiments at the LHC have recently discovered this Standard-Model-like Higgs boson. This discovery is one of the most exciting achievements in elementary particle physics. Yet, a profound question remains: Is this rather light, weakly-coupled boson nothing but a Standard Model Higgs or a first manifestation of a deeper theory? Also, the recent discoveries of neutrino mass and mixing, experimental evidences of dark matter and dark energy, matter-antimatter asymmetry, indicate that our understanding of fundamental physics is currently incomplete. For the next decade and more, the LHC and future colliders will be at the cutting-edge of particle physics discoveries and will shed light on many of these unanswered questions. There are many promising beyond-Standard-Model theories that may help solve the central puzzles of particle physics. To fill the gaps in our knowledge, we need to know how these theories will manifest themselves in controlled experiments, such as high energy colliders. I discuss how we can probe fundamental physics at current and future colliders directly through searches for new phenomena such as resonances, rare Higgs decays, exotic displaced signatures, and indirectly through precision measurements on Higgs in this work. I explore beyond standard model physics effects from different perspectives, including explicit models such as supersymmetry, generic models in terms of resonances, as well as effective field theory approach in terms of higher dimensional operators. This work provides a generic and broad overview of the physics

  10. Modeling Surface Currents in the Eastern Levantine Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Leila; Brajard, Julien; Fakhri, Milad; Mortier, Laurent; Poulain, Pierre-Marie

    2015-04-01

    We consider the problem of reconstructing the meso-scale features of the currents in the Eastern Levantine Mediterranean from combining in-situ and satellite altimetry data. Mathematically, this is an inverse problem where the objective is to invert Lagrangian trajectories, which are positions of drifters launched at sea, in order to improve the coarse Eulerian velocity, provided by the altimetric satellite measurements. We shall use a variational assimilation approach, whereby the eulerian velocity correction is obtained by minimizing the distance between the simulated position from a velocity background and actual observations. One important property of our approach is that it is model free, so that it is inexpensive and can be easily cast into real-time oceanic operational products. Our method is first validated with twin experiments, where we conduct sensitivity analysis to parameters such as number of drifters, assimilation time window and spatial filter length. The approach is next validated with past and present data from the Levantine Mediterranean by correcting velocity fields derived from altimetry by assimilating drifters' data. The drifters' data used here were collected in the context of the MedSVP program and more recently by the National Lebanese Marine Center (CNSM) in September 2013. The CNSM with its boat CANA has developed an important activity of data collection along the Lebanese coast so far and this activity will permit it to extend its collaborations further by integrating the modeling and data assimilation methods for reconstructing the surface currents.

  11. A Catapult (Slingshot) Current Sheet Relaxation Model for Substorm Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.

    2010-12-01

    Based on the results of our superposed epoch analysis of Geotail data, we have proposed a catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation model in which earthward flows are produced in the central plasma sheet (CPS) due to the catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation, together with the rapid enhancement of Poynting flux toward the CPS in the lobe around X ~ -15 Re about 4 min before the substrom onset. These earthward flows are characterized by plasma pressure decrease and large amplitude magnetic field fluctuations. When these flows reach X ~ 12Re in the magnetotail, they give significant disturbances to the inner magnetosphere to initiate some instability such as a ballooning instability or other instabilities, and the substorm starts in the inner magnetosphere. The occurrence of the magnetic reconnection is a natural consequence of the initial convective earthward flows, because the relaxation of a highly stretched catapult current sheet produces a very thin current at its tailward edge being surrounded by intense magnetic fields which were formerly the off-equatorial lobe magnetic fields. Recently, Nishimura et al. [2010] reported that the substorm onset begins when faint poleward discrete arcs collide with equatorward quiet arcs. The region of earthward convective flows correlatively moves earthward prior to the onset. Thus, this region of the earthward convective flows seems to correspond to the faint poleward discrete arcs. Interestingly, our statistical analysis shows that the earthward convective flows are not produced by the magnetic reconnection, but they are attributed to the dominance of the earthward JxB force over the tailward pressure associated with the progress of the plasma sheet thinning.

  12. Ceramics: Durability and radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W.; Weber, W.J.

    1996-05-01

    At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (1) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (2) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass {open_quotes}logs{close_quotes}; (3) deep borehole disposal. The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  13. Highly Sensitive, Durable, and Multifunctional Sensor Inspired by a Spider.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chengzhi; Jia, Junji; Gong, Youning; Wang, Zhongchi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2017-06-14

    Sensitivity, durability, and multifunction are the essential requirements for a high-performance wearable sensor. Here, we report a novel multifunctional sensor with high sensitivity and durability by using a buckled spider silk-like single-walled carbon nanotubes (SSL-SWNTs) film as the conducting network and a crack-shaped Au film as the sensitive transducer. Its high sensitivity is inspired by the crack-shaped structure of the spider's slit organs, while the high durability is inspired by the mechanical robustness of the spider silk. Similar to the spider's slit organs that can detect slight vibrations, our sensor also exhibits a high sensitivity especially to tiny strain. The proposed quantum tunneling model is consistent with experimental data. In addition, this sensor also responds sensitively to temperature with the sensitivity of 1.2%/°C. Because of the hierarchical structure like spider silk, this sensor possesses combined superiority of fast response (<60 ms) and high durability (>10 000 cycles). We also fabricate a wearable device for monitoring various human physiological signals. It is expect that this high-performance sensor will have wide potential applications in intelligent devices, fatigue detection, body monitoring, and human-machine interfacing.

  14. Damage Tolerance and Durability of Material Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifsnider, Kenneth L.; Case, Scott W.

    2002-04-01

    A daring, original approach to understanding and predicting the mechanical behavior of materials "Damage is an abstraction . . . Strength is an observable, an independent variable that can be measured, with clear and familiar engineering definitions." -from the Preface to Damage Tolerance and Durability of Material Systems Long-term behavior is one of the most challenging and important aspects of material engineering. There is a great need for a useful conceptual or operational framework for measuring long-term behavior. As much a revolution in philosophy as an engineering text, Damage Tolerance and Durability of Material Systems postulates a new mechanistic philosophy and methodology for predicting the remaining strength and life of engineering material. This philosophy associates the local physical changes in material states and stress states caused by time-variable applied environments with global properties and performance. There are three fundamental issues associated with the mechanical behavior of engineering materials and structures: their stiffness, strength, and life. Treating these issues from the standpoint of technical difficulty, time, and cost for characterization, and relationship to safety, reliability, liability, and economy, the authors explore such topics as: * Damage tolerance and failure modes * Factors that determine composite strength * Micromechanical models of composite stiffness and strength * Stiffness evolution * Strength evolution during damage accumulation * Non-uniform stress states * Lifetime prediction With a robust selection of example applications and case studies, this book takes a step toward the fulfillment of a vision of a future in which the prediction of physical properties from first principles will make possible the creation and application of new materials and material systems at a remarkable cost savings.

  15. Tsunami-HySEA model validation for tsunami current predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, Jorge; Castro, Manuel J.; González-Vida, José Manuel; Ortega, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Model ability to compute and predict tsunami flow velocities is of importance in risk assessment and hazard mitigation. Substantial damage can be produced by high velocity flows, particularly in harbors and bays, even when the wave height is small. Besides, an accurate simulation of tsunami flow velocities and accelerations is fundamental for advancing in the study of tsunami sediment transport. These considerations made the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) proposing a benchmark exercise focussed on modeling and simulating tsunami currents. Until recently, few direct measurements of tsunami velocities were available to compare and to validate model results. After Tohoku 2011 many current meters measurement were made, mainly in harbors and channels. In this work we present a part of the contribution made by the EDANYA group from the University of Malaga to the NTHMP workshop organized at Portland (USA), 9-10 of February 2015. We have selected three out of the five proposed benchmark problems. Two of them consist in real observed data from the Tohoku 2011 event, one at Hilo Habour (Hawaii) and the other at Tauranga Bay (New Zealand). The third one consists in laboratory experimental data for the inundation of Seaside City in Oregon. Acknowledgements: This research has been partially supported by the Junta de Andalucía research project TESELA (P11-RNM7069) and the Spanish Government Research project DAIFLUID (MTM2012-38383-C02-01) and Universidad de Málaga, Campus de Excelencia Andalucía TECH. The GPU and multi-GPU computations were performed at the Unit of Numerical Methods (UNM) of the Research Support Central Services (SCAI) of the University of Malaga.

  16. Supporting Current Energy Conversion Projects through Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S. C.; Roberts, J.

    2016-02-01

    The primary goals of current energy conversion (CEC) technology being developed today are to optimize energy output and minimize environmental impact. CEC turbines generate energy from tidal and current systems and create wakes that interact with turbines located downstream of a device. The placement of devices can greatly influence power generation and structural reliability. CECs can also alter the environment surrounding the turbines, such as flow regimes, sediment dynamics, and water quality. These alterations pose potential stressors to numerous environmental receptors. Software is needed to investigate specific CEC sites to simulate power generation and hydrodynamic responses of a flow through a CEC turbine array so that these potential impacts can be evaluated. Moreover, this software can be used to optimize array layouts that yield the least changes to the environmental (i.e., hydrodynamics, sediment dynamics, and water quality). Through model calibration exercises, simulated wake profiles and turbulence intensities compare favorably to the experimental data and demonstrate the utility and accuracy of a fast-running tool for future siting and analysis of CEC arrays in complex domains. The Delft3D modeling tool facilitates siting of CEC projects through optimization of array layouts and evaluation of potential environmental effect all while provide a common "language" for academics, industry, and regulators to be able to discuss the implications of marine renewable energy projects. Given the enormity of any full-scale marine renewable energy project, it necessarily falls to modeling to evaluate how array operations must be addressed in an environmental impact statement in a way that engenders confidence in the assessment of the CEC array to minimize environmental effects.

  17. Modelling ac ripple currents in HTS coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhihan; Grilli, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Dc transmission using high temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors (CCs) offers a promising solution to the globally growing demand for effective, reliable and economic transmission of green energy up to the gigawatt level over very long distances. The credible estimation of the losses and thereby the heat dissipation involved, where ac ripples (introduced in rectification/ac-dc conversion) are viewed as a potential source of notable contribution, is highly essential for the rational design of practical HTS dc transmission cables and corresponding cryogenic systems to fulfil this demand. Here we report a targeted modelling study into the ac losses in a HTS CC subject to dc and ac ripple currents simultaneously, by solving Maxwell’s equations using the finite element method (FEM) in the commercial software package COMSOL. It is observed that the instantaneous loss exhibits only one peak per cycle in the HTS CC subject to sinusoidal ripples, given that the amplitude of the ac ripples is smaller than approximately 20% of that of the dc current. This is a distinct contrast to the usual observation of two peaks per cycle in a HTS CC subject to ac currents only. The unique mechanism is also revealed, which is directly associated with the finding that, around any local minima of the applied ac ripples, the critical state of -J c is never reached at the edges of the HTS CC, as it should be according to the Bean model. When running further into the longer term, it is discovered that the ac ripple loss of the HTS CC in full-wave rectification decays monotonically, at a speed which is found to be insensitive to the frequency of the applied ripples within our targeted situations, to a relatively low level of approximately 1.38 × 10-4 W m-1 in around 1.7 s. Comparison between this level and other typical loss contributions in a HTS dc cable implies that ac ripple currents in HTS CCs should only be considered as a minor source of dissipation in superconducting dc

  18. Current Translational Research and Murine Models For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Merryl; Echigoya, Yusuke; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. Mutations in the DMD gene result in the absence of dystrophin, a protein required for muscle strength and stability. Currently, there is no cure for DMD. Since murine models are relatively easy to genetically manipulate, cost effective, and easily reproducible due to their short generation time, they have helped to elucidate the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency and to assess therapies for treating DMD. Recently, several murine models have been developed by our group and others to be more representative of the human DMD mutation types and phenotypes. For instance, mdx mice on a DBA/2 genetic background, developed by Fukada et al., have lower regenerative capacity and exhibit very severe phenotype. Cmah-deficient mdx mice display an accelerated disease onset and severe cardiac phenotype due to differences in glycosylation between humans and mice. Other novel murine models include mdx52, which harbors a deletion mutation in exon 52, a hot spot region in humans, and dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), which displays a severe dystrophic phenotype due the absence of utrophin, a dystrophin homolog. This paper reviews the pathological manifestations and recent therapeutic developments in murine models of DMD such as standard mdx (C57BL/10), mdx on C57BL/6 background (C57BL/6-mdx), mdx52, dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), mdxβgeo, Dmd-null, humanized DMD (hDMD), mdx on DBA/2 background (DBA/2-mdx), Cmah-mdx, and mdx/mTRKO murine models. PMID:27854202

  19. Shigella vaccine development: prospective animal models and current status.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Jeong; Yeo, Sang-Gu; Park, Jae-Hak; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Shigella was first discovered in 1897 and is a major causative agent of dysenteric diarrhea. The number of affected patients has decreased globally because of improved sanitary conditions; however, Shigella still causes serious problems in many subjects, including young children and the elderly, especially in developing countries. Although antibiotics may be effective, a vaccine would be the most powerful solution to combat shigellosis because of the emergence of drug-resistant strains. However, the development of a vaccine is hampered by several problems. First, there is no suitable animal model that can replace human-based studies for the investigation of the in vivo mechanisms of Shigella vaccines. Mouse, guinea pig, rat, rabbit, and nonhuman primates could be used as models for shigellosis, but they do not represent human shigellosis and each has its own weaknesses. However, a recent murine model based on peritoneal infection with virulent S. flexneri 2a is promising. Moreover, although the inflammatory responses and mechanisms such as pathogenassociated molecular patterns and danger-associated molecular patterns have been studied, the pathology and immunology of Shigella are still not clearly defined. Despite these obstacles, many vaccine candidates have been developed, including live attenuated, killed whole cells, conjugated, and subunit vaccines. The development of Shigella vaccines also demands considerations of the cost, routes of administration, ease of storage (stability), cross-reactivity, safety, and immunogenicity. The main aim of this review is to provide a detailed introduction to the many promising vaccine candidates and animal models currently available, including the newly developed mouse model.

  20. Do Downscaled General Circulation Models Reliably Simulate Current Climatic Conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, L.; Bock, A. R.; McCabe, G. J., Jr.; Markstrom, S. L.; Atkinson, D.

    2016-12-01

    The accuracy of statistically-downscaled (SD) General Circulation Model (GCM) simulations of monthly surface climate for historical conditions (1950-2000) used to drive a monthly water balance model (MWBM) were assessed for the conterminous United States (CONUS). SD monthly precipitation (PPT) and atmospheric temperature (TAVE) from 95 GCMs (38 from the coupled model intercomparison project (CMIP) 3 and 57 from CMIP5) were used as inputs to a MWBM. Input (PPT, TAVE) and output (snow water equivalent (SWE), and runoff (RUN)) MWBM variables were evaluated by comparing variables computed using historical climate forcings (developed from gridded station data (GSD)) with those computed using historical SD climate. Distributions of GSD- and SD-based MWBM variables were compared using the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (KS Test). When all MWBM variables were considered, the KS Test results showed an overall improvement by the CMIP5- relative to CMIP3-based simulations, likely due to improvements in PPT simulations. Results from this study indicate that for the majority of the CONUS, there are downscaled GCMs that can reliably simulate current climatic conditions. But, in some locations (particularly in California), there are no downscaled GCMs tested that replicate historical conditions for all four MWBM variables. In these locations, improved GCM simulations of precipitation are needed to more reliably estimate components of the hydrologic cycle.

  1. Current Capabilities of the Fuel Performance Modeling Code PARFUME

    SciTech Connect

    G. K. Miller; D. A. Petti; J. T. Maki; D. L. Knudson

    2004-09-01

    The success of gas reactors depends upon the safety and quality of the coated particle fuel. A fuel performance modeling code (called PARFUME), which simulates the mechanical and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation, is under development at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Among current capabilities in the code are: 1) various options for calculating CO production and fission product gas release, 2) a thermal model that calculates a time-dependent temperature profile through a pebble bed sphere or a prismatic block core, as well as through the layers of each analyzed particle, 3) simulation of multi-dimensional particle behavior associated with cracking in the IPyC layer, partial debonding of the IPyC from the SiC, particle asphericity, kernel migration, and thinning of the SiC caused by interaction of fission products with the SiC, 4) two independent methods for determining particle failure probabilities, 5) a model for calculating release-to-birth (R/B) ratios of gaseous fission products, that accounts for particle failures and uranium contamination in the fuel matrix, and 6) the evaluation of an accident condition, where a particle experiences a sudden change in temperature following a period of normal irradiation. This paper presents an overview of the code.

  2. Computational modeling of cardiac hemodynamics: Current status and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat; Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; Choi, Young J.; Liu, Hang; Huang, H. Howie; Jain, Saurabh; Younes, Laurent; Abraham, Theodore; George, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of four-dimensional imaging technologies, increasing computational speeds, improved simulation algorithms, and the widespread availability of powerful computing platforms is enabling simulations of cardiac hemodynamics with unprecedented speed and fidelity. Since cardiovascular disease is intimately linked to cardiovascular hemodynamics, accurate assessment of the patient's hemodynamic state is critical for the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease. Unfortunately, while a variety of invasive and non-invasive approaches for measuring cardiac hemodynamics are in widespread use, they still only provide an incomplete picture of the hemodynamic state of a patient. In this context, computational modeling of cardiac hemodynamics presents as a powerful non-invasive modality that can fill this information gap, and significantly impact the diagnosis as well as the treatment of cardiac disease. This article reviews the current status of this field as well as the emerging trends and challenges in cardiovascular health, computing, modeling and simulation and that are expected to play a key role in its future development. Some recent advances in modeling and simulations of cardiac flow are described by using examples from our own work as well as the research of other groups.

  3. Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System, Coverage and Payment for Renal Dialysis Services Furnished to Individuals With Acute Kidney Injury, End-Stage Renal Disease Quality Incentive Program, Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics and Supplies Competitive Bidding Program Bid Surety Bonds, State Licensure and Appeals Process for Breach of Contract Actions, Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics and Supplies Competitive Bidding Program and Fee Schedule Adjustments, Access to Care Issues for Durable Medical Equipment; and the Comprehensive End-Stage Renal Disease Care Model. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-11-04

    This rule updates and makes revisions to the End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Prospective Payment System (PPS) for calendar year 2017. It also finalizes policies for coverage and payment for renal dialysis services furnished by an ESRD facility to individuals with acute kidney injury. This rule also sets forth requirements for the ESRD Quality Incentive Program, including the inclusion of new quality measures beginning with payment year (PY) 2020 and provides updates to programmatic policies for the PY 2018 and PY 2019 ESRD QIP. This rule also implements statutory requirements for bid surety bonds and state licensure for the Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics, and Supplies (DMEPOS) Competitive Bidding Program (CBP). This rule also expands suppliers' appeal rights in the event of a breach of contract action taken by CMS, by revising the appeals regulation to extend the appeals process to all types of actions taken by CMS for a supplier's breach of contract, rather than limit an appeal for the termination of a competitive bidding contract. The rule also finalizes changes to the methodologies for adjusting fee schedule amounts for DMEPOS using information from CBPs and for submitting bids and establishing single payment amounts under the CBPs for certain groupings of similar items with different features to address price inversions. Final changes also are made to the method for establishing bid limits for items under the DMEPOS CBPs. In addition, this rule summarizes comments on the impacts of coordinating Medicare and Medicaid Durable Medical Equipment for dually eligible beneficiaries. Finally, this rule also summarizes comments received in response to a request for information related to the Comprehensive ESRD Care Model and future payment models affecting renal care.

  4. Proton Therapy Expansion Under Current United States Reimbursement Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstiens, John; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether all the existing and planned proton beam therapy (PBT) centers in the United States can survive on a local patient mix that is dictated by insurers, not by number of patients. Methods and Materials: We determined current and projected cancer rates for 10 major US metropolitan areas. Using published utilization rates, we calculated patient percentages who are candidates for PBT. Then, on the basis of current published insurer coverage policies, we applied our experience of what would be covered to determine the net number of patients for whom reimbursement is expected. Having determined the net number of covered patients, we applied our average beam delivery times to determine the total number of minutes needed to treat that patient over the course of their treatment. We then calculated our expected annual patient capacity per treatment room to determine the appropriate number of treatment rooms for the area. Results: The population of patients who will be both PBT candidates and will have treatments reimbursed by insurance is significantly smaller than the population who should receive PBT. Coverage decisions made by insurers reduce the number of PBT rooms that are economically viable. Conclusions: The expansion of PBT centers in the US is not sustainable under the current reimbursement model. Viability of new centers will be limited to those operating in larger regional metropolitan areas, and few metropolitan areas in the US can support multiple centers. In general, 1-room centers require captive (non–PBT-served) populations of approximately 1,000,000 lives to be economically viable, and a large center will require a population of >4,000,000 lives. In areas with smaller populations or where or a PBT center already exists, new centers require subsidy.

  5. Current Trends in Modeling Research for Turbulent Aerodynamic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, Thomas B.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Manceau, Remi

    2007-01-01

    The engineering tools of choice for the computation of practical engineering flows have begun to migrate from those based on the traditional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach to methodologies capable, in theory if not in practice, of accurately predicting some instantaneous scales of motion in the flow. The migration has largely been driven by both the success of Reynolds-averaged methods over a wide variety of flows as well as the inherent limitations of the method itself. Practitioners, emboldened by their ability to predict a wide-variety of statistically steady, equilibrium turbulent flows, have now turned their attention to flow control and non-equilibrium flows, that is, separation control. This review gives some current priorities in traditional Reynolds-averaged modeling research as well as some methodologies being applied to a new class of turbulent flow control problems.

  6. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR TIDES AND CURRENTS WITH FIELD APPLICATIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    A finite element model, based upon the shallow water equations, is used to calculate tidal amplitudes and currents for two field-scale test problems. Because tides are characterized by line spectra, the governing equations are subjected to harmonic decomposition. Thus the solution variables are the real and imaginary parts of the amplitude of sea level and velocity rather than a time series of these variables. The time series is recovered through synthesis. This scheme, coupled with a modified form of the governing equations, leads to high computational efficiency and freedom from excessive numerical noise. Two test-cases are presented. The first is a solution for eleven tidal constituents in the English Channel and southern North Sea, and three constituents are discussed. The second is an analysis of the frequency response and tidal harmonics for south San Francisco Bay.

  7. Space charge templates for high-current beam modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, Leonid G.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    A computational method to evaluate space charge potential and gradients of charged particle beam in the presence of conducting boundaries, has been introduced. The three-dimensional (3D) field of the beam can be derived as a convolution of macro Green's functions (template fields), satisfying the same boundary conditions, as the original beam. Numerical experiments gave a confidence that space charge effects can be modeled by templates with enough accuracy and generality within dramatically faster computational times than standard combination: a grid density + Poisson solvers, realized in the most of Particle in Cell codes. The achieved rapidity may significantly broaden the high-current beam design space, making the optimization in automatic mode possible, which so far was only feasible for simplest self-field formulations such as rms envelope equations. The template technique may be used as a standalone program, or as an optional field solver in existing beam dynamics codes both in one-passage structures and in rings.

  8. Numerically Modeling Pulsed-Current, Kinked Wire Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filbey, Gordon; Kingman, Pat

    1999-06-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has embarked on a program to provide far-term land fighting vehicles with electromagnetic armor protection. Part of this work seeks to establish robust simulations of magneto-solid-mechanics phenomena. Whether describing violent rupture of a fuse link resulting from a large current pulse or the complete disruption of a copper shaped-charge jet subjected to high current densities, the simulations must include effects of intense Lorentz body forces and rapid Ohmic heating. Material models are required that describe plasticity, flow and fracture, conductivity, and equation of state (EOS) parameters for media in solid, liquid, and vapor phases. An extended version of the Eulerian wave code CTH has been used to predict the apex motion of a V-shaped (``kinked'') copper wire 3mm in diameter during a 400 kilo-amp pulse. These predictions, utilizing available material, EOS, and conductivity data for copper and the known characteristics of an existing capacitor-bank pulsed power supply, were then used to configure an experiment. The experiments were in excellent agreement with the prior simulations. Both computational and experimental results (including electrical data and flash X-rays) will be presented.

  9. Experimental modeling of eddy currents and deflections for tokamak limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, T.Q.; Knott, M.J.; Turner, L.R.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, experiments were performed to investigate deflection, current, and material stress in cantilever beams with the Fusion ELectromagnetic Induction eXperiment (FELIX) at the Argonne National Laboratory. Since structures near the plasma are typically cantilevered, the beams provide a good model for the limiter blades of a tokamak fusion reactor. The test pieces were copper, aluminum, phosphor bronze, and brass cantilever beams, clamped rigidly at one end with a nonconducting support frame inside the FELIX test volume. The primary data recorded as functions of time were the beam deflection measured with a noncontact electro-optical device, the total eddy current measured with a Rogowski coil and linking through a central hole in the beam, and the material stress extracted from strain gauges. Measurements of stress and deflection were taken at selected positions along the beam. The extent of the coupling effect depends on several factors. These include the size, the electrical and mechanical properties of the beam, segmenting of the beam, the decay rate of the dipole field, and the strength of the solenoid field.

  10. Pedogenic Magnetic Minerals in Soils: Some Tests of Current Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, R.

    2008-12-01

    The magnetic enhancement of soils is increasingly used as a proxy for continental climate, since it is related to the formation of pedogenic iron minerals under warm, humid conditions. Ultrafine magnetite is believed to be the major responsible of the magnetic enhancement, however, very little is known on the detailed formation mechanism, ant its relation to the soil iron cycle. Furthermore, the 'textbook' case of the Chinese Loess Plateau is not well replicated around the World: Loessic soils from the Midwestern US are systematically less enhanced than their Chinese counterpart under similar climatic conditions, and many loessic soils in Argentina are not enhanced at all. In trying to find a rationale behind these differences, I will address three main questions that need to be answered in a bottom-up approach to the problem. The first question is whether susceptibility is indeed controlled by fine magnetite, excluding any significant role of other minerals such as ferrihydrite, goethite, and hematite. This is a rock magnetic problem addressing the interpretation of magnetic measurements: is susceptibility an adequate proxy for the concentration of magnetic minerals in soils? Answering this question allows us to think directly in terms of abundance specific magnetic minerals, which is fundamental for any subsequent interpretation. The second question is directed to understanding the role of magnetic minerals in the soil iron cycle and how they are formed. This brings us to a discussion of the transfer function linking magnetic enhancement with climate. Is indeed rainfall the only parameter controlling pedogenesis? Why is rainfall apparently related with the logarithm of susceptibility in enhanced soils? Can we test current pedogenetic models against this empirical transfer function? The third question points to the role of parent material and later dust inputs. Midwestern US and Argentinian loesses are different from Chinese loess. Is this a reason for the

  11. Durable Airtightness in Single-Family Dwellings - Field Measurementsand Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2015-06-01

    Here, durability of the building envelope is important to new homes that are increasingly built with improved levels of airtightness. It is also important to weatherized homes such that energy savings from retrofit measures, such as air sealing, are persistent. This paper presents a comparison of air leakage measurements collected in November 2013 through March 2014, with two sets of prior data collected between 2001-2003 from 17 new homes located near Atlanta, GA, and 17 homes near Boise, ID that were weatherized in 2007- 2008. The purpose of the comparison is to determine if there are changes to the airtightnessmore » of building envelopes over time. The air leakage increased in all but one of the new homes, with a mean increase of about 25%. The weatherized homes also showed an increase in the mean air leakage (12%). A regression analysis was performed to describe the relationship between prior and current measurements in terms of normalized leakage (NL). The best estimate of the ageing factor predicts a 15% increase in NL over ten years. Further analysis using ResDB data (LBNL’s Residential Diagnostic Database) showed the expected changes in air leakage if ageing were modelled. These results imply the need to examine the causes of increased leakage and methods to avoid them. This increase in leakage with time should be accounted for in long-term population-wide energy savings estimates, such as those used in ratings or energy savings programs.« less

  12. Durable Airtightness in Single-Family Dwellings - Field Measurementsand Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2015-06-01

    Here, durability of the building envelope is important to new homes that are increasingly built with improved levels of airtightness. It is also important to weatherized homes such that energy savings from retrofit measures, such as air sealing, are persistent. This paper presents a comparison of air leakage measurements collected in November 2013 through March 2014, with two sets of prior data collected between 2001-2003 from 17 new homes located near Atlanta, GA, and 17 homes near Boise, ID that were weatherized in 2007- 2008. The purpose of the comparison is to determine if there are changes to the airtightness of building envelopes over time. The air leakage increased in all but one of the new homes, with a mean increase of about 25%. The weatherized homes also showed an increase in the mean air leakage (12%). A regression analysis was performed to describe the relationship between prior and current measurements in terms of normalized leakage (NL). The best estimate of the ageing factor predicts a 15% increase in NL over ten years. Further analysis using ResDB data (LBNL’s Residential Diagnostic Database) showed the expected changes in air leakage if ageing were modelled. These results imply the need to examine the causes of increased leakage and methods to avoid them. This increase in leakage with time should be accounted for in long-term population-wide energy savings estimates, such as those used in ratings or energy savings programs.

  13. Durable Airtightness in Single-Family Dwellings: Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2015-06-01

    Durability of building envelope is important to new homes that are increasingly built with improved levels of airtightness. It is also important to weatherized homes such that energy savings from retrofit measures, such as air sealing, are persistent. We presented a comparison of air leakage measurements collected in November 2013 through March 2014, with two sets of prior data collected between 2001-2003 from 17 new homes located near Atlanta, GA, and 17 homes near Boise, ID that were weatherized in 2007-2008. The purpose of the comparison is to determine if there are changes to the airtightness of building envelopes over time. The air leakage increased in all but one of the new homes, with a mean increase of about 25%. The weatherized homes also showed an increase in the mean air leakage (12%). We performed a regression analysis to describe the relationship between prior and current measurements in terms of normalized leakage (NL). The best estimate of the aging factor predicts a 15% increase in NL over ten years. Further analysis using ResDB data (LBNL’s Residential Diagnostic Database) showed the expected changes in air leakage if aging were modeled. These results imply that we should examine the causes of increased leakage and methods to avoid them. This increase in leakage with time should be accounted for in long-term population-wide energy savings estimates, such as those used in ratings or energy savings programs.

  14. Methodology for prediction of rip currents using a three-dimensional numerical, coupled, wave current model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voulgaris, George; Kumar, Nirnimesh; Warner, John C.; Leatherman, Stephen; Fletemeyer, John

    2011-01-01

    Rip current currents constitute one of the most common hazards in the nearshore that threaten the lives of the unaware public that makes recreational use of the coastal zone. Society responds to this danger through a number of measures that include: (a) the deployment of trained lifeguards; (b) public education related to the hidden hazards of the nearshore; and (c) establishment of warning systems.

  15. The effect of compositional parameters on the TCLP and PCT durability of environmental glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Resce, J.L.; Overcamp, T.J.; Cicero, C.A.; Bickford, D.F.

    1995-12-01

    The relationship between glass composition and the chemical durability of environmental waste glass is very important for both the development of glass formulations and the prediction of glass durability for process control. The development of such a model is extremely difficult for several reasons. Firstly, chemical durability is dependent upon the type of leach test employed; the leach tests themselves being only crude approximations of actual environmental conditions or long term behavior. Secondly, devitrification or crystallinity can also play a major role in durability, but is much more difficult to quantify. Lastly, the development of any one model for all glass types is impractical because of the wide variety of wastestreams, the heterogeneity of the wastestreams, and the large variety of components within each wastestream. Several ongoing efforts have been directed toward this goal, but as yet, no model has been proven acceptable.

  16. Analytical modeling for transient probe response in eddy current testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel

    Analytical models that describe the electromagnetic field interactions arising between field generating and sensing coils in close proximity to conducting structures can be used to enhance analysis and information extracted from signals obtained using electromagnetic non-destructive evaluation technologies. A novel strategy, which enables the derivation of exact solutions describing all electromagnetic interactions arising in inductively coupled circuits due to a voltage excitation, is developed in this work. Differential circuit equations are formulated in terms of an arbitrary voltage excitation and of the magnetic fields arising in inductive systems, using Faraday's law and convolution, and solved using the Fourier transform. The approach is valid for systems containing any number of driving and receiving coils, and include nearby conducting and ferromagnetic structures. In particular, the solutions account for feedback between a ferromagnetic conducting test piece and the driving and sensing coils, providing correct voltage response of the coils. Also arising from the theory are analytical expressions for complex inductances in a circuit, which account for real (inductive) and imaginary (loss) elements associated with conducting and ferromagnetic structures. A novel model-based method for simultaneous characterization of material parameters, which includes magnetic permeability, electrical conductivity, wall thickness and liftoff, is subsequently developed from the forward solutions. Furthermore, arbitrary excitation waveforms, such as a sinusoid or a square wave, for applications in conventional and transient eddy current, respectively, may be considered. Experimental results, obtained for a square wave excitation, are found to be in excellent agreement with the analytical predictions.

  17. Modeling the heliospheric current sheet: Solar cycle variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Pete; Linker, J. A.; Mikić, Z.

    2002-07-01

    In this report we employ an empirically driven, three-dimensional MHD model to explore the evolution of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) during the course of the solar cycle. We compare our results with a simpler ``constant-speed'' approach for mapping the HCS outward into the solar wind to demonstrate that dynamic effects can substantially deform the HCS in the inner heliosphere (<~5 AU). We find that these deformations are most pronounced at solar minimum and become less significant at solar maximum, when interaction regions are less effective. Although solar maximum is typically associated with transient, rather than corotating, processes, we show that even under such conditions, the HCS can maintain its structure over the course of several solar rotations. While the HCS may almost always be topologically equivalent to a ``ballerina skirt,'' we discuss an interval approaching the maximum of solar cycle 23 (Carrington rotations 1960 and 1961) when the shape would be better described as ``conch shell''-like. We use Ulysses magnetic field measurements to support the model results.

  18. A geomagnetically induced current warning system: model development and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, A.; Clarke, E.; Reay, S.; Thomson, A.

    Geomagnetically Induced Currents (GIC), which can flow in technological systems at the Earth's surface, are a consequence of magnetic storms and Space Weather. A well-documented practical problem for the power transmission industry is that GIC can affect the lifetime and performance of transformers within the power grid. Operational mitigation is widely considered to be one of the best strategies to manage the Space Weather and GIC risk. Therefore in the UK a magnetic storm warning and GIC monitoring and analysis programme has been under development by the British Geological Survey and Scottish Power plc (the power grid operator for Central Scotland) since 1999. Under the auspices of the European Space Agency's service development activities BGS is developing the capability to meet two key user needs that have been identified. These needs are, firstly, the development of a near real-time solar wind shock/ geomagnetic storm warning, based on L1 solar wind data and, secondly, the development of an integrated surface geo-electric field and power grid network model that should allow prediction of GIC throughout the power grid in near real time. While the final goal is a `seamless package', the components of the package utilise diverse scientific techniques. We review progress to date with particular regard to the validation of the individual components of the package. The Scottish power grid response to the October 2003 magnetic storms is also discussed and model and validation data are presented.

  19. A Durability Analysis of Super-Quiet Pavement Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srirangam, Santosh Kumar; Anupam, Kumar; Scarpas, Tom; Kasbergen, Cor; The, Peter

    Poro Elastic Road Surfacings (PERS) as a substitute for conventional noise barriers or other traditional pavement surfacings like open graded mixes are currently attracting significant attention. Ascertaining the durability of PERS material itself and its bonding with the underlying pavement layer against high traffic and high load intensities is of primary importance. In this contribution, results are presented of nonlinear finite element simulations of a high volume pavement profile comprised of a PERS top layer bonded to a conventional open asphalt top layer. Traffic loading was applied by means of a simulated truck tire moving load for various operating conditions. The paper focuses on investigation of the influence on the structural pavement response of various loading conditions and material properties of PERS and adhesive layer. The study concludes with guidelines for the optimum combination of design parameters that lead to increased durability of pavements constructed with a PERS top layer.

  20. Durability Challenges for Next Generation of Gas Turbine Engine Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive fuel burn and carbon dioxide emission reduction goals for future gas turbine engines will require higher overall pressure ratio, and a significant increase in turbine inlet temperature. These goals can be achieved by increasing temperature capability of turbine engine hot section materials and decreasing weight of fan section of the engine. NASA is currently developing several advanced hot section materials for increasing temperature capability of future gas turbine engines. The materials of interest include ceramic matrix composites with 1482 - 1648 C temperature capability, advanced disk alloys with 815 C capability, and low conductivity thermal barrier coatings with erosion resistance. The presentation will provide an overview of durability challenges with emphasis on the environmental factors affecting durability for the next generation of gas turbine engine materials. The environmental factors include gaseous atmosphere in gas turbine engines, molten salt and glass deposits from airborne contaminants, impact from foreign object damage, and erosion from ingestion of small particles.

  1. Recent Simulation Results on Ring Current Dynamics Using the Comprehensive Ring Current Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Zaharia, Sorin G.; Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Fok, Mei-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Plasma sheet conditions and electromagnetic field configurations are both crucial in determining ring current evolution and connection to the ionosphere. In this presentation, we investigate how different conditions of plasma sheet distribution affect ring current properties. Results include comparative studies in 1) varying the radial distance of the plasma sheet boundary; 2) varying local time distribution of the source population; 3) varying the source spectra. Our results show that a source located farther away leads to a stronger ring current than a source that is closer to the Earth. Local time distribution of the source plays an important role in determining both the radial and azimuthal (local time) location of the ring current peak pressure. We found that post-midnight source locations generally lead to a stronger ring current. This finding is in agreement with Lavraud et al.. However, our results do not exhibit any simple dependence of the local time distribution of the peak ring current (within the lower energy range) on the local time distribution of the source, as suggested by Lavraud et al. [2008]. In addition, we will show how different specifications of the magnetic field in the simulation domain affect ring current dynamics in reference to the 20 November 2007 storm, which include initial results on coupling the CRCM with a three-dimensional (3-D) plasma force balance code to achieve self-consistency in the magnetic field.

  2. Recent Simulation Results on Ring Current Dynamics Using the Comprehensive Ring Current Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Zaharia, Sorin G.; Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Fok, Mei-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Plasma sheet conditions and electromagnetic field configurations are both crucial in determining ring current evolution and connection to the ionosphere. In this presentation, we investigate how different conditions of plasma sheet distribution affect ring current properties. Results include comparative studies in 1) varying the radial distance of the plasma sheet boundary; 2) varying local time distribution of the source population; 3) varying the source spectra. Our results show that a source located farther away leads to a stronger ring current than a source that is closer to the Earth. Local time distribution of the source plays an important role in determining both the radial and azimuthal (local time) location of the ring current peak pressure. We found that post-midnight source locations generally lead to a stronger ring current. This finding is in agreement with Lavraud et al.. However, our results do not exhibit any simple dependence of the local time distribution of the peak ring current (within the lower energy range) on the local time distribution of the source, as suggested by Lavraud et al. [2008]. In addition, we will show how different specifications of the magnetic field in the simulation domain affect ring current dynamics in reference to the 20 November 2007 storm, which include initial results on coupling the CRCM with a three-dimensional (3-D) plasma force balance code to achieve self-consistency in the magnetic field.

  3. Dust Composition in Climate Models: Current Status and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.; Perlwitz, J. P.; Kok, J. F.; Scanza, R.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust created by wind erosion of soil particles is the dominant aerosol by mass in the atmosphere. It exerts significant effects on radiative fluxes, clouds, ocean biogeochemistry, and human health. Models that predict the lifecycle of mineral dust aerosols generally assume a globally uniform mineral composition. However, this simplification limits our understanding of the role of dust in the Earth system, since the effects of dust strongly depend on the particles' physical and chemical properties, which vary with their mineral composition. Hence, not only a detailed understanding of the processes determining the dust emission flux is needed, but also information about its size dependent mineral composition. Determining the mineral composition of dust aerosols is complicated. The largest uncertainty derives from the current atlases of soil mineral composition. These atlases provide global estimates of soil mineral fractions, but they are based upon massive extrapolation of a limited number of soil samples assuming that mineral composition is related to soil type. This disregards the potentially large variability of soil properties within each defined soil type. In addition, the analysis of these soil samples is based on wet sieving, a technique that breaks the aggregates found in the undisturbed parent soil. During wind erosion, these aggregates are subject to partial fragmentation, which generates differences on the size distribution and composition between the undisturbed parent soil and the emitted dust aerosols. We review recent progress on the representation of the mineral and chemical composition of dust in climate models. We discuss extensions of brittle fragmentation theory to prescribe the emitted size-resolved dust composition, and we identify key processes and uncertainties based upon model simulations and an unprecedented compilation of observations.

  4. Predicting the Impact of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Cement Hydration Products and Durability of Cementitious Matrix Using Artificial Neural Network Modeling Technique

    PubMed Central

    Fakhim, Babak; Hassani, Abolfazl; Rashidi, Alimorad; Ghodousi, Parviz

    2013-01-01

    In this study the feasibility of using the artificial neural networks modeling in predicting the effect of MWCNT on amount of cement hydration products and improving the quality of cement hydration products microstructures of cement paste was investigated. To determine the amount of cement hydration products thermogravimetric analysis was used. Two critical parameters of TGA test are PHPloss and CHloss. In order to model the TGA test results, the ANN modeling was performed on these parameters separately. In this study, 60% of data are used for model calibration and the remaining 40% are used for model verification. Based on the highest efficiency coefficient and the lowest root mean square error, the best ANN model was chosen. The results of TGA test implied that the cement hydration is enhanced in the presence of the optimum percentage (0.3 wt%) of MWCNT. Moreover, since the efficiency coefficient of the modeling results of CH and PHP loss in both the calibration and verification stages was more than 0.96, it was concluded that the ANN could be used as an accurate tool for modeling the TGA results. Another finding of this study was that the ANN prediction in higher ages was more precise. PMID:24489487

  5. Analytical Model of Human Body Model Electrostatic Discharge Current Distribution and Novel Electrostatic Discharge Protection Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Jiaw-Ren; Lee, Jian-Hsing; Hwang, Huey-Liang; Liew, Boon-Khim; Chiang, Shang-Yi

    1999-08-01

    Conventionally, the n-p-n bipolar transistor with a substrate resistor operated in the snapback region has been the basic model used to explain the discharge behavior of a lightly doped drain (LDD) N-channel metal-oxide semiconductor (NMOS) transistor under a positive human-body model (HBM) electrostatic discharge (ESD) zapping event. However, this simple model ignores the geometry effect by the P-well pick-up position and does not explain the current-crowding effect. In this paper, a new transmission-line equivalent-circuit model with the equal-potential-region (EPR) formation is proposed to study the ESD zapping current distribution. The simulation result shows that maximum current density is in the region near the P-well pick-up, which corresponds to the damage sites determined by failure analysis. Based on this new model, a novel protection structure with P+ diffusion in each source region is proposed to improve current uniformity, which is verified to have an excellent ESD failure threshold. In addition, from the measurement of real-time current voltage (I V) characteristics during ESD zapping, a phenomenon called the self-biasing Effect is observed. When the effective substrate resistance decreases, the device's snapback voltage will inherently increase to generate more impact ionization current so as to sustain a sufficient substrate potential to keep the bipolar turned on. However, this Vsp increase will not necessarily lead to a lower ESD failure threshold.

  6. Durability of flexible ureteroscopes: a randomized, prospective study.

    PubMed

    Monga, Manoj; Best, Sara; Venkatesh, Ramakrishna; Ames, Caroline; Lee, Courtney; Kuskowski, Michael; Schwartz, Steven; Vanlangendock, Richard; Skenazy, Jason; Landman, Jaime

    2006-07-01

    We performed a randomized, prospective, multi-institutional study evaluating the durability of commercially available flexible ureteroscopes. A total of 192 patients were randomized to the use of 7 less than 9Fr flexible ureteroscopes, including the Storz 11274AA and Flex-X, the ACMI DUR-8 and DUR-8 Elite, Wolf models 7330.170 and 7325.172, and the Olympus URF-P3. Information about total and lower pole use time, the number and method of ureteroscope insertion, and they type and duration of accessory instrumentation was recorded. Surgeons were asked to rate the visibility and maneuverability of the instrument on a scale of 0-poor to 10-excellent. The indication for ureteroscopy was upper tract calculi in 87% of cases. Of ureteroscope insertions 97% were performed through an access sheath. The average of number of cases before repair ranged from 3.25 for the Wolf 7325 to 14.4 for the ACMI DUR-8 Elite. Average ureteroscope operative time was statistically longer for the DUR-8 Elite (494 minutes) than for the Flex-X (p = 0.047), and the Wolf 7325 and 7330 (p = 0.001 and 0.001, respectively). Duration of use before repair for the URF-P3 (373 minutes) was statistically longer than for the Wolf 7325 and 7330 (p = 0.016 and 0.017, respectively). Minutes of use with an instrument in the working channel were significantly more with the DUR-8 Elite and the URF-P3 than the Wolf 7330 (p = 0.017 and 0.008) and 7325 (p = 0.012 and 0.005, respectively). The ureteroscope that experienced the greatest average duration of lower pole use was the URF-P3, while the shortest was the Wolf 7325 (103 vs 20 minutes, p = 0.005). Average minutes of laser use before breakage was significantly longer for the DUR-8 Elite than for the Wolf 7325 (110 vs 21 minutes, p = 0.021) and 7330 (24 minutes, p = 0.025). Currently available less than 9Fr flexible ureteroscopes remain fragile instruments. The DUR-8 Elite and Olympus URF-P3 proved to be the most durable devices.

  7. Method of determining glass durability

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-12-08

    A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

  8. Method of determining glass durability

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol Maryanne; Pickett, John Butler; Brown, Kevin George; Edwards, Thomas Barry

    1998-01-01

    A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

  9. Durable coatings for IR windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Jha, Santosh K.; Gunda, Nilesh; Cooke, Rick; Agarwal, Neeta; Sastri, Suri A.; Harker, Alan; Kirsch, Jim

    2005-05-01

    Durable coatings of silicon-carbon-oxy-nitride (a.k.a. SiCON) are being developed to protect high-speed missile windows from the environmental loads during flight. Originally developed at Rockwell Scientific Corporation (RSC) these coatings exhibited substantial promise, but were difficult to deposit. Under a DoD DARPA SBIR Phase I program, Surmet Corporation, working closely with RSC, is depositing these coatings using an innovative vacuum vapor deposition process. High rate of coating deposition and the ease of manipulating the process variables, make Surmet"s process suitable for the deposition of substantially thick films (up to 30 μm) with precisely controlled chemistry. Initial work has shown encouraging results, and the refinement of the coating and coating process is still underway. Coupons of SiN and SiCON coatings with varying thickness on a variety of substrates such as Si-wafer, ZnS and ALON were fabricated and used for the study. This paper will present and discuss the results of SiN and SiCON coatings deposition and characterization (physical, mechanical and optical properties) as a basis for evaluating their suitability for high speed missile windows application.

  10. Comparison of Hemostatic Durability between N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Gelatin Sponge Particles in Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in a Coagulopathic Condition in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yonemitsu, Takafumi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Takasaka, Isao; Nakai, Motoki; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Sahara, Shinya; Iwasaki, Yasuhiro; Naka, Toshio; Shinozaki, Masahiro

    2010-12-15

    This study was designed to compare the efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) or gelatin sponge particles (GSP) for acute arterial bleeding in a coagulopathic condition using a swine model. Four healthy swine were divided into two coagulopathic conditions: mild and severe. Five hemorrhages were created in each swine (10 hemorrhages per coagulopathy). Mild coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 10% of the total circulatory whole blood and preserving activated clotting time (ACT) less than 200 s (ACT < 200 s state); severe coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 30% and preserving ACT > 400 s (ACT > 400-second state). For each state, of ACT < 200 s or ACT > 400 s, TAE was conducted with GSP or NBCA to control five hemorrhages arising from artificially created renal and splenic injuries. Angiography immediately after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed complete occlusion in both coagulopathic conditions. In the ACT < 200-second state, follow-up angiography at 5-30 min after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed no evidence of recurrent hemorrhage. In the ACT > 400-second state, follow-up angiography showed recurrent hemorrhage in four (80%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with GSP and in one (20%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with NBCA. Microscopically, red thrombi were observed densely surrounding GSP in mild coagulopathy but were scarce in severe coagulopathy. In a condition with severe coagulopathy, TAE with NBCA was more effective in durability to cease active arterial bleeding than with GSP.

  11. Fiber composite structural durability and damage tolerance: Simplified predictive methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Ginty, Carol A.

    1987-01-01

    Simplified predictive methods and models (theory) to evaluate fiber/polymer-matrix composite material for determining structural durability and damage tolerance are presented and described. This theory includes equations for (1) fatigue and fracture of composites without and with defects, (2) impact resistance and residual strength after impact, (3) thermal fatigue, and (4) combined stress fatigue. Several examples are included to illustrate applications of the theory and to identify significant parameters and sensitivities. Comparisons with limited experimental data are made.

  12. 40 CFR 1065.415 - Durability demonstration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 1065.415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Selection, Preparation, and Maintenance § 1065.415 Durability.... Perform emission tests to determine deterioration factors consistent with good engineering...

  13. Space Durability of Materials, 1983-1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Enclosed is the latest update of NASA Langley Research Center's Space Durability of Materials bibliography. The bibliography lists documents detailing research in the area of materials for space applications conducted by members of the Materials Division.

  14. Drought Duration Biases in Current Global Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Heewon; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Several droughts in the recent past are characterized by their increased duration and intensity. In particular, substantially prolonged droughts have brought major societal and economic losses in certain regions, yet climate change projections of such droughts in terms of duration is subject to large uncertainties. This study analyzes the biases of drought duration in state-of-the-art global climate model (GCM) simulations from the 5th phase of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Drought durations are defined as negative precipitation anomalies and evaluated with three observation-based datasets in the period of 1901-2010. Large spread in biases of GCMs is commonly found in all regions, with particular strong biases in North East Brazil, Africa, Northern Australia, Central America, Central and Northern Europe, Sahel and Asia. Also in most regions, the interquartile range of bias lies below 0, meaning that the GCMs tend to underestimate drought durations. Meanwhile in some regions such as Western South America, the Amazon, Sahel, West and South Africa, and Asia, considerable inconsistency among the three observation-based datasets were found. These results indicate substantial uncertainties and errors in current GCMs for simulating drought durations as well as a large spread in observation-based datasets, both of which are found to be particularly strong in those regions that are often considered to be hot spots of projected future drying. The underlying sources of these uncertainties need to be identified in further study and will be applied to constrain GCM-based drought projections under climate change.

  15. Delamination durability of composite materials for rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin

    1988-01-01

    Delamination is the most commonly observed failure mode in composite rotorcraft dynamic components. Although delamination may not cause immediate failure of the composite part, it often precipitates component repair or replacement, which inhibits fleet readiness, and results in increased life cycle costs. A fracture mechanics approach for analyzing, characterizing, and designing against delamination will be outlined. Examples of delamination problems will be illustrated where the strain energy release rate associated with delamination growth was found to be a useful generic parameter, independent of thickness, layup, and delamination source, for characterizing delamination failure. Several analysis techniques for calculating strain energy release rates for delamination from a variety of sources will be outlined. Current efforts to develop ASTM standard test methods for measuring interlaminar fracture toughness and developing delamination failure criteria will be reviewed. A technique for quantifying delamination durability due to cyclic loading will be presented. The use of this technique for predicting fatigue life of composite laminates and developing a fatigue design philosophy for composite structural components will be reviewed.

  16. Durability of Composite Materials and Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-02

    Michigan State University Composite Materials and Structures Center 2100 Engineering Building , East Lansing, MI 48824-1226 6.1 Objectives The...DATES COVERED (From - To) February 7, 2005 - January 31. 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DURABILITY OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES 5a...Manager: Dr. Yapa D.S. Rajapakse Office of Naval Research 875 N. Randolph Street Arlington, VA 22203-1995 DURABILITY OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND

  17. Mechanistic Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsman, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under “real world” conditions is an issue for commercial deployment. In particular cathode exposure to moisture, CO2, Cr vapor (from interconnects and BOP), and particulates results in long-term performance degradation issues. Here, we have conducted a multi-faceted fundamental investigation of the effect of these contaminants on cathode performance degradation mechanisms in order to establish cathode composition/structures and operational conditions to enhance cathode durability.

  18. Durability of Structural Adhesively Bonded Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    define the specific yield criterion. Rather than the classical Von-Mises and Drucker - Prager criteria, a modified yield criterion is used in this work...f STAN[DAR[DS iqg A . .e,’- *..’,,. oA- i..-. * in.. .. * .. n..-. . . . .. ., Ck N DURABILITY OF STRUCTURAL I 0 ADHESIVELY BONDED SYSTEMS c-.. by 0...Release: Distribution Unlimited 6 0- 26 DURABILITY OF STRUCTURAL ADHESIVELY -BONDED SYSTEMS by 0. Ishai, G. Yaniv and P. Bar-Yoseph December 1985

  19. Organotypic liver culture models: Meeting current challenges in toxicity testing

    PubMed Central

    LeCluyse, Edward L.; Witek, Rafal P.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Powers, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of chemical-induced hepatotoxicity in humans from in vitro data continues to be a significant challenge for the pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Generally, conventional in vitro hepatic model systems (i.e. 2-D static monocultures of primary or immortalized hepatocytes) are limited by their inability to maintain histotypic and phenotypic characteristics over time in culture, including stable expression of clearance and bioactivation pathways, as well as complex adaptive responses to chemical exposure. These systems are less than ideal for longer-term toxicity evaluations and elucidation of key cellular and molecular events involved in primary and secondary adaptation to chemical exposure, or for identification of important mediators of inflammation, proliferation and apoptosis. Progress in implementing a more effective strategy for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation and human risk assessment depends on significant advances in tissue culture technology and increasing their level of biological complexity. This article describes the current and ongoing need for more relevant, organotypic in vitro surrogate systems of human liver and recent efforts to recreate the multicellular architecture and hemodynamic properties of the liver using novel culture platforms. As these systems become more widely used for chemical and drug toxicity testing, there will be a corresponding need to establish standardized testing conditions, endpoint analyses and acceptance criteria. In the future, a balanced approach between sample throughput and biological relevance should provide better in vitro tools that are complementary with animal testing and assist in conducting more predictive human risk assessment. PMID:22582993

  20. Geomagnetically induced currents in Uruguay: Sensitivity to modelling parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraballo, R.

    2016-11-01

    According to the traditional wisdom, geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) should occur rarely at mid-to-low latitudes, but in the last decades a growing number of reports have addressed their effects on high-voltage (HV) power grids at mid-to-low latitudes. The growing trend to interconnect national power grids to meet regional integration objectives, may lead to an increase in the size of the present energy transmission networks to form a sort of super-grid at continental scale. Such a broad and heterogeneous super-grid can be exposed to the effects of large GIC if appropriate mitigation actions are not taken into consideration. In the present study, we present GIC estimates for the Uruguayan HV power grid during severe magnetic storm conditions. The GIC intensities are strongly dependent on the rate of variation of the geomagnetic field, conductivity of the ground, power grid resistances and configuration. Calculated GIC are analysed as functions of these parameters. The results show a reasonable agreement with measured data in Brazil and Argentina, thus confirming the reliability of the model. The expansion of the grid leads to a strong increase in GIC intensities in almost all substations. The power grid response to changes in ground conductivity and resistances shows similar results in a minor extent. This leads us to consider GIC as a non-negligible phenomenon in South America. Consequently, GIC must be taken into account in mid-to-low latitude power grids as well.

  1. Catapult current sheet relaxation model confirmed by THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Nose, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we show the result of superposed epoch analysis on the THEMIS probe data during the period from November, 2007 to April, 2009 by setting the origin of time axis to the substorm onset determined by Nishimura with THEMIS all sky imager (THEMS/ASI) data (http://www.atmos.ucla.edu/~toshi/files/paper/Toshi_THEMIS_GBO_list_distribution.xls). We confirmed the presence of earthward flows which can be associated with north-south auroral streamers during the substorm growth phase. At around X = -12 Earth radii (Re), the northward magnetic field and its elevation angle decreased markedly approximately 4 min before substorm onset. A northward magnetic-field increase associated with pre-onset earthward flows was found at around X = -17Re. This variation indicates the occurrence of the local depolarization. Interestingly, in the region earthwards of X = -18Re, earthward flows in the central plasma sheet (CPS) reduced significantly about 3min before substorm onset. However, the earthward flows enhanced again at t = -60 sec in the region around X = -14 Re, and they moved toward the Earth. At t = 0, the dipolarization of the magnetic field started at X ~ -10 Re, and simultaneously the magnetic reconnection started at X ~ -20 Re. Synthesizing these results, we can confirm the validity of our catapult current sheet relaxation model.

  2. A Review of Current Models of Cometary Tail Disconnection Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, Daniel

    The plasma tail of a comet is susceptible to influences from the solar wind and its embedded magnetic field. The ion tail can show fluctuations, kinks , and moving structures. In addition, it is possible that a disconnection event (DE) might occur, when the ion tail separates from the comet and reforms a few hours later as recently observed in the tail of comet Encke by A. Vourlidas et al. [Ap.J.Lett. 668, L79-82 (2007)] using the Heliospheric Imager onboard NASA's STEREO Mission. The solar wind has a permanent abrupt, and well-known change in magnetic field direction located close to the solar equator, which the comet will intersect. The Sun also releases a large amount of ionized gases from fast-moving disturbances, such as Coronal Mass Ejections as observed by the LASCO instrument onboard ESA's SOHO Mission. In addition, highspeed streams and interplanetary shocks in the solar wind are plausible mechanisms for causing cometary tail disturbances. These types of solar phenomenon can dramatically alter the comet's tail and, on rare occasions, cause a disconnection event. In this paper, we will review the relevant observations and models of disconnection events and summarize our current state of knowledge, highlighting outstanding problems for future research. Acknowledgements. We acknowledge funding and support from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program and the NASA Discovery Data Analysis Program.

  3. Teeth: Among Nature's Most Durable Biocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawn, Brian R.; Lee, James J.-W.; Chai, Herzl

    2010-08-01

    This paper addresses the durability of natural teeth from a materials perspective. Teeth are depicted as smart biocomposites, highly resistant to cumulative deformation and fracture. Favorable morphological features of teeth at both macroscopic and microscopic levels contribute to an innate damage tolerance. Damage modes are activated readily within the brittle enamel coat but are contained from spreading catastrophically into the vulnerable tooth interior in sustained occlusal loading. Although tooth enamel contains a multitude of microstructural defects that can act as sources of fracture, substantial overloads are required to drive any developing cracks to ultimate failure—nature's strategy is to contain damage rather than avoid it. Tests on model glass-shell systems simulating the basic elements of the tooth enamel/dentin layer structure help to identify important damage modes. Fracture and deformation mechanics provide a basis for analyzing critical conditions for each mode, in terms of characteristic tooth dimensions and materials properties. Comparative tests on extracted human and animal teeth confirm the validity of the model test approach and point to new research directions. Implications in biomechanics, especially as they relate to dentistry and anthropology, are outlined.

  4. Field-aligned Currents on Board of Intercosmos Bulgaria-1300 Satellite in Comparison with Modelled Large-scale Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danov, D.; Koleva, R.

    2007-08-01

    The large-scale field-aligned currents (FACs) are well examined experimentally and described by different models, but the small scale FACs are less investigated and there exists a controversy about their intensity and dimensions. A possible source for the discrepancy is the assumption of infinite homogeneous current sheet which allowed their deriving from one-satellite measurements. We present a new method for identification of finite size current sheets, which we applied to derive FACs from magnetic field measurements aboard the INTERCOSMOS BULGARIA-1300 satellite. Then we compare one case of FAC, detected on 22 August 1981, with empirical (Tsyganenko 2001) and a magneto-hydrodynamic Block-Adaptive-Tree-Solar-wind-Roe-Upwind-Scheme (BATS-R-US) model of large-scale currents. We discuss the possible reasons for the observed discrepancy between the measured and modelled FACs.

  5. Modelling Monsoons: Understanding and Predicting Current and Future Behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, A; Sperber, K R; Slingo, J M; Meehl, G A; Mechoso, C R; Kimoto, M; Giannini, A

    2008-09-16

    including, but not limited to, the Mei-Yu/Baiu sudden onset and withdrawal, low-level jet orientation and variability, and orographic forced rainfall. Under anthropogenic climate change many competing factors complicate making robust projections of monsoon changes. Without aerosol effects, increased land-sea temperature contrast suggests strengthened monsoon circulation due to climate change. However, increased aerosol emissions will reflect more solar radiation back to space, which may temper or even reduce the strength of monsoon circulations compared to the present day. A more comprehensive assessment is needed of the impact of black carbon aerosols, which may modulate that of other anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Precipitation may behave independently from the circulation under warming conditions in which an increased atmospheric moisture loading, based purely on thermodynamic considerations, could result in increased monsoon rainfall under climate change. The challenge to improve model parameterizations and include more complex processes and feedbacks pushes computing resources to their limit, thus requiring continuous upgrades of computational infrastructure to ensure progress in understanding and predicting the current and future behavior of monsoons.

  6. Toward improved durability in advanced aircraft engine hot sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Daniel E. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The conference on durability improvement methods for advanced aircraft gas turbine hot-section components discussed NASA's Hot Section Technology (HOST) project, advanced high-temperature instrumentation for hot-section research, the development and application of combustor aerothermal models, and the evaluation of a data base and numerical model for turbine heat transfer. Also discussed are structural analysis methods for gas turbine hot section components, fatigue life-prediction modeling for turbine hot section materials, and the service life modeling of thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines.

  7. Durability of Low Platinum Fuel Cells Operating at High Power Density

    SciTech Connect

    Polevaya, Olga; Blanchet, Scott; Ahluwalia, Rajesh; Borup, Rod; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2014-03-19

    was correlated with the upper potential limit in the cycle tests, although the performance degradation was found to be a strong function of initial Pt loading. A large fraction of the voltage degradation was found due to increased mass transfer overpotentials, especially in the lower Pt loading cells. Increased mass transfer overpotentials were responsible for a large fraction of the voltage degradation at high current densities. Analysis of the impedance and polarization data indicated O2 diffusion in the aged electrode ionomer to be the main source of the increased mass transfer overpotentials. Results from the experimental parametric studies were used to inform and calibrate newly developed durability model, simulating lifetime performance of the fuel cell under variety of load-cycle protocols, electrode loadings and throughout wide range of operating conditions, including elevated-to-3.0A/cm2 current densities. Complete durability model included several sub-models: platinum dissolution-and-growth as well as reaction-diffusion model of cathode electrode, applied sequentially to study the lifetime predictions of ECSA and polarization performance in the ASTs and NSTs. These models establish relations between changes in overpotentials, ECSA and oxygen mass transport in fuel cell cathodes. The model was calibrated using single cells with land-channel and open flowfield architectures. The model was validated against Nuvera Orion® (open flowfield) short stack data in the load cycle durability tests. The reaction-diffusion model was used to correlate the effective mass transfer coefficients for O2 diffusion in cathode ionomer and separately in gas pores with the operating conditions (pressure, temperature, gas velocity in flow field and current density), Pt loading, and ageing related growth in Pt particles and thinning of the electrode. Achievements of both modeling and experimental objectives were demonstrated in a full format, subscale stacks operating in a simulated

  8. Moisture Durability with Vapor-Permeable Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect

    Lepage, R.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-09-01

    Exterior sheathing insulation is an effective strategy in increasing the overall R-value of wall assemblies; other benefits include decreasing the effects of thermal bridging and increasing the moisture durability of the built assembly. Vapor-permeable exterior insulation, such as mineral board or expanded polystyrene foam, are one such product that may be used to achieve these benefits. However,uncertainty exists on the effects of inward driven moisture and the interaction of increased sheathing temperatures on the moisture durability of the edifice. To address these concerns, Building Science Corporation (BSC) conducted a series of hygrothermal models for cities representing a range of different climate zones. This report describes the research project, key research questions, and theprocedures utilized to analyse the problems.

  9. Moisture Durability with Vapor-Permeable Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect

    Lepage, R.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-09-01

    Exterior sheathing insulation is an effective strategy in increasing the overall R-value of wall assemblies; other benefits include decreasing the effects of thermal bridging and increasing the moisture durability of the built assembly. Vapor-permeable exterior insulation, such as mineral board or expanded polystyrene foam, are one such product that may be used to achieve these benefits. However, uncertainty exists on the effects of inward driven moisture and the interaction of increased sheathing temperatures on the moisture durability of the edifice. To address these concerns, Building Science Corporation (BSC) conducted a series of hygrothermal models for cities representing a range of different climate zones. This report describes the research project, key research questions, and the procedures utilized to analyse the problems.

  10. Engine cyclic durability by analysis and material testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Halford, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of calculating turbine engine component durability is addressed. Nonlinear, finite-element structural analyses, cyclic constitutive behavior models, and an advanced creep-fatigue life prediction method called strainrange partitioning were assessed for their applicability to the solution of durability problems in hot-section components of gas turbine engines. Three different component or subcomponent geometries are examined: a stress concentration in a turbine disk; a louver lip of a half-scale combustor liner; and a squealer tip of a first-stage high-pressure turbine blade. Cyclic structural analyses were performed for all three problems. The computed strain-temperature histories at the critical locations of the combustor linear and turbine blade components were imposed on smooth specimens in uniaxial, strain-controlled, thermomechanical fatigue tests of evaluate the structural and life analysis methods.

  11. Durability of organobentonite-amended liner for decelerating chloroform transport.

    PubMed

    He, Shichong; Zhu, Lizhong

    2016-04-01

    Chloroform is added to landfill for suppressing methane generation, which however may transport through landfill liners and lead to contamination of groundwater. To decelerate chloroform transport, the enhanced sorption ability of clay liners following organobentonite addition was tested. In this study, we used batch sorption to evaluate sorption capacity of chloroform to organobentonite, followed by column tests and model simulations for assessing durability of different liners. Results show that adding 10% CTMAB-bentonite (organobentonite synthesized using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) increased the duration of a bentonite liner by 88.5%. CTMAB-bentonite consistently showed the highest sorption capacity (Qm) among six typical organobentonites under various environmental conditions. The removal rate of chloroform by CTMAB-bentonite was 3.6-23 times higher than that by natural soils. According to the results derived by model simulation, a 70-cm 10% CTMAB-bentonite liner exhibited much better durability than a 100-cm compact clay liner (CCL) and natural bentonite liner evidenced by the delayed and lower peak of eluent concentration. A minimum thickness of 65.8 cm of the 10% CTMAB-bentonite liner could completely sorb the chloroform in a 100-m-high landfill. The 10% CTMAB-bentonite liner exhibiting much better durability has the promise for reducing environmental risk of chloroform in landfill.

  12. Wind-Forced Modeling Studies of Currents, Meanders, Eddies, and Filaments of the Canary Current System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    superficial layers; arrows indicate the cyclonic course of the southward coastal jet and the westerward filament current (F) over the rough bottom topography...for detected (full line) and fictive (broken line) patterns of geostrophic motions within the superficial layers; arrows indicate the cyclonic course...in E. Suess and J. Thiede (Editors), Coastal Upwelling. Its Sediment Record. Plenum Press, New York, pp. 85-97, 1983. Fiuza, A. F. de G., Hidrologia e

  13. Individualized model predicts brain current flow during transcranial direct-current stimulation treatment in responsive stroke patient.

    PubMed

    Datta, Abhishek; Baker, Julie M; Bikson, Marom; Fridriksson, Julius

    2011-07-01

    Although numerous published reports have demonstrated the beneficial effects of transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) on task performance, fundamental questions remain regarding the optimal electrode configuration on the scalp. Moreover, it is expected that lesioned brain tissue will influence current flow and should therefore be considered (and perhaps leveraged) in the design of individualized tDCS therapies for stroke. The current report demonstrates how different electrode configurations influence the flow of electrical current through brain tissue in a patient who responded positively to a tDCS treatment targeting aphasia. The patient, a 60-year-old man, sustained a left hemisphere ischemic stroke (lesion size = 87.42 mL) 64 months before his participation. In this study, we present results from the first high-resolution (1 mm(3)) model of tDCS in a brain with considerable stroke-related damage; the model was individualized for the patient who received anodal tDCS to his left frontal cortex with the reference cathode electrode placed on his right shoulder. We modeled the resulting brain current flow and also considered three additional reference electrode positions: right mastoid, right orbitofrontal cortex, and a "mirror" configuration with the anode over the undamaged right cortex. Our results demonstrate the profound effect of lesioned tissue on resulting current flow and the ability to modulate current pattern through the brain, including perilesional regions, through electrode montage design. The complexity of brain current flow modulation by detailed normal and pathologic anatomy suggest: (1) That computational models are critical for the rational interpretation and design of individualized tDCS stroke-therapy; and (2) These models must accurately reproduce head anatomy as shown here.

  14. Determinants of Long-Term Durable Glycemic Control in New-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Jin; Choi, Ju Hee; Kim, Kyeong Jin; An, Jee Hyun; Kim, Hee Young; Kim, Sin Gon; Kim, Nam Hoon

    2017-08-01

    Long-term durable glycemic control is a difficult goal in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We evaluated the factors associated with durable glycemic control in a real clinical setting. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 194 new-onset, drug-naïve patients with T2DM who were diagnosed between January 2011 and March 2013, and were followed up for >2 years. Glycemic durability was defined as the maintenance of optimal glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] <7.0%) for 2 years without substitution or adding other glucose-lowering agents. Clinical factors and glycemic markers associated with glycemic durability were compared between two groups: a durability group and a non-durability group. Patients in the durability group had a higher baseline body mass index (26.1 kg/m² vs. 24.9 kg/m²) and lower HbA1c (8.6% vs. 9.7%) than the non-durability group. The initial choice of glucose-lowering agents was similar in both groups, except for insulin and sulfonylureas, which were more frequently prescribed in the non-durability group. In multiple logistic regression analyses, higher levels of education, physical activity, and homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function (HOMA-β) were associated with glycemic durability. Notably, lower HbA1c (<7.0%) at baseline and first follow-up were significantly associated with glycemic durability (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 7.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.51 to 22.3) (adjusted OR, 9.27; 95% CI, 1.62 to 53.1, respectively), after adjusting for confounding variables including the types of glucose-lowering agents. Early achievement of HbA1c level within the glycemic target was a determinant of long-term glycemic durability in new-onset T2DM, as were higher levels of education, physical activity, and HOMA-β.

  15. Determinants of Long-Term Durable Glycemic Control in New-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Jin; Choi, Ju Hee; Kim, Kyeong Jin; An, Jee Hyun; Kim, Hee Young; Kim, Sin Gon

    2017-01-01

    Background Long-term durable glycemic control is a difficult goal in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We evaluated the factors associated with durable glycemic control in a real clinical setting. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 194 new-onset, drug-naïve patients with T2DM who were diagnosed between January 2011 and March 2013, and were followed up for >2 years. Glycemic durability was defined as the maintenance of optimal glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] <7.0%) for 2 years without substitution or adding other glucose-lowering agents. Clinical factors and glycemic markers associated with glycemic durability were compared between two groups: a durability group and a non-durability group. Results Patients in the durability group had a higher baseline body mass index (26.1 kg/m2 vs. 24.9 kg/m2) and lower HbA1c (8.6% vs. 9.7%) than the non-durability group. The initial choice of glucose-lowering agents was similar in both groups, except for insulin and sulfonylureas, which were more frequently prescribed in the non-durability group. In multiple logistic regression analyses, higher levels of education, physical activity, and homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function (HOMA-β) were associated with glycemic durability. Notably, lower HbA1c (<7.0%) at baseline and first follow-up were significantly associated with glycemic durability (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 7.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.51 to 22.3) (adjusted OR, 9.27; 95% CI, 1.62 to 53.1, respectively), after adjusting for confounding variables including the types of glucose-lowering agents. Conclusion Early achievement of HbA1c level within the glycemic target was a determinant of long-term glycemic durability in new-onset T2DM, as were higher levels of education, physical activity, and HOMA-β. PMID:28868826

  16. Numerical modeling of lower hybrid heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Valeo, E.J.; Eder, D.C.

    1986-03-01

    The generation of currents in toroidal plasma by application of waves in the lower hybrid frequency range involves the interplay of several physical phenomena which include: wave propagation in toroidal geometry, absorption via wave-particle resonances, the quasilinear generation of strongly nonequilibrium electron and ion distribution functions, and the self-consistent evolution of the current density in such a nonequilibrium plasma. We describe a code, LHMOD, which we have developed to treat these aspects of current drive and heating in tokamaks. We present results obtained by applying the code to a computation of current ramp-up and to an investigation of the possible importance of minority hydrogen absorption in a deuterium plasma as the ''density limit'' to current drive is approached.

  17. Integrated approach for investigating the durability of self-consolidating concrete to sulfate attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassuoni, Mohamed Tamer F.

    The growing use of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) in various infrastructure applications exposed to sulfate-rich environments necessitates conducting comprehensive research to evaluate its durability to external sulfate attack. Since the reliability and adequacy of standard sulfate immersion tests have been questioned, the current thesis introduced an integrated testing approach for assessing the durability of a wide scope of SCC mixtures to external sulfate attack. This testing approach involved progressive levels of complexity from single to multiple damage processes. A new series of sulfate attack tests involving multiple field-like parameters and combined damage mechanisms (various cations, controlled pH, wetting-drying, partial immersion, freezing-thawing, and cyclic cold-hot conditions with or without sustained flexural loading) were designed to evaluate the performance (suitability) of the SCC mixtures under various sulfate attack exposure scenarios. The main mixture design variables of SCC included the type of binder (single, binary, ternary and quaternary), air-entrainment, sand-to-aggregate mass ratio and hybrid fibre reinforcement. The comprehensive database and knowledge obtained from this research were used to develop smart models (fuzzy and neuro-fuzzy inference systems) based on artificial-intelligence to evaluate and predict the performance of the SCC mixtures under various sulfate attack exposure regimes implemented in this study. In full immersion tests involving high concentration sodium and magnesium sulfate solutions with controlled pH, the low penetrability of SCC was responsible for the high durability of specimens. Ternary and quaternary cementitious systems with or without limestone materials provided a passivating layer, with or without acid neutralization capacity, which protected SCC from severe damage in the aggressive sulfuric acid and ammonium sulfate solutions. In contrast to conclusions drawn from the sodium sulfate immersion

  18. Revised model of thermally stimulated current in MOS capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.

    1997-06-01

    It is shown analytically and experimentally that thermally stimulated current (TSC) measurements at negative bias incompletely describe oxide-trap charge in SIMOX and bipolar base oxides irradiated at 0 V. Positive-bias TSC is also required.

  19. The PRISM data/model co-operative: current modelling activities, future plans and data requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Alan

    2010-05-01

    Here we review current activities and future model and data requirements associated with the palaeoclimate modelling arm of the PRISM data/model co-operative. The talk will begin with a description of modelling focussed on understanding the behaviour of climate phenomena that are responsible for generating significant regional decadal and sub-decadal climate variability (ENSO and NAO), and the challenges associated with linking such predictions to mid-Piacenzian palaeoenvironmental data. Secondly, we will examine current efforts to understand the role of changing sea-surface temperatures, in relation to other important boundary conditions, in driving global and regional climate/environmental shifts recognised in the proxy data. Thirdly, we will examine initial results from coupled climate and ice sheet modelling examining the response of the Greenland and East Antarctic Ice Sheets to orbital variations and how these predicted changes relate to current estimates of mid-Piacenzian mean sea level and sea level variability. Our future plans centre on (a) the development of the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project, (b) understanding uncertainty in climate model predictions of mid-Piacenzian climates and (c) moving towards an Earth System Modelling framework for the PRISM interval. With the 4th iteration of the PRISM palaeoenvironmental data set under construction we briefly outline how the demands of modern climate and earth system models will partly shape PRISM4, as well as the new scientific opportunities that will stem from it (e.g. the advent of isotope enabled models, higher resolution boundary conditions, river routing schemes and palaeobathymetry).

  20. Micromagnetic modeling of critical current oscillations in magnetic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Bol'ginov, V. V.; Stolyarov, V. S.; Abramov, N. N.; Ben Hamida, A.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Stolyarov, B. S.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Golubov, A. A.; Ryazanov, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we propose and explore an effective numerical approach for investigation of critical current dependence on applied magnetic field for magnetic Josephson junctions with in-plane magnetization orientation. This approach is based on micromagnetic simulation of the magnetization reversal process in the ferromagnetic layer with introduced internal magnetic stiffness and subsequent reconstruction of the critical current value using total flux or reconstructed actual phase difference distribution. The approach is flexible and shows good agreement with experimental data obtained on Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic barriers. Based on this approach we have obtained a critical current dependence on applied magnetic field for rectangular magnetic Josephson junctions with high size aspect ratio. We have shown that the rectangular magnetic Josephson junctions can be considered for application as an effective Josephson magnetic memory element with the value of critical current defined by the orientation of magnetic moment at zero magnetic field. An impact of shape magnetic anisotropy on critical current is revealed and discussed. Finally, we have considered a curling magnetic state in the ferromagnetic layer and demonstrated its impact on critical current.

  1. Therapeutic administration of IL-15 superagonist complex ALT-803 leads to long-term survival and durable antitumor immune response in a murine glioblastoma model.

    PubMed

    Mathios, Dimitrios; Park, Chul-Kee; Marcus, Warren D; Alter, Sarah; Rhode, Peter R; Jeng, Emily K; Wong, Hing C; Pardoll, Drew M; Lim, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary central nervous system malignancy with a poor prognosis in patients. Despite the need for better treatments against glioblastoma, very little progress has been made in discovering new therapies that exhibit superior survival benefit than the standard of care. Immunotherapy has been shown to be a promising treatment modality that could help improve clinical outcomes of glioblastoma patients by assisting the immune system to overcome the immunosuppressive tumor environment. Interleukin-15 (IL-15), a cytokine shown to activate several effector components of the immune system, may serve as an excellent immunotherapeutic candidate for the treatment of glioblastoma. Thus, we evaluated the efficacy of an IL-15 superagonist complex (IL-15N72D:IL-15RαSu-Fc; also known as ALT-803) in a murine GL261-luc glioblastoma model. We show that ALT-803, as a single treatment as well as in combination with anti-PD-1 antibody or stereotactic radiosurgery, exhibits a robust antitumor immune response resulting in a prolonged survival including complete remission in tumor bearing mice. In addition, ALT-803 treatment results in long-term immune memory against glioblastoma tumor rechallenge. Flow cytometric analysis of tumor infiltrating immune cells shows that ALT-803 leads to increased percentage of CD8+-cell infiltration, but not the NK cells, and IFN-γ production into the tumor microenvironment. Cell depletion studies, in accordance with the flow cytometric results, show that the ALT-803 therapeutic effect is dependent on CD4+ and CD8+ cells. These results provide a rationale for evaluating the therapeutic activity of ALT-803 against glioblastoma in the clinical setting.

  2. Durability evaluation of biopolymer coating on titanium alloy substrate.

    PubMed

    Ryan Stanfield, J; Bamberg, Stacy

    2014-07-01

    For this study, a commercially available phosphorylcholine (PC) polymer was applied to Ti6Al4V ELI. A multivariate approach to design a statistically significant array of experiments was employed to evaluate and estimate optimization of PC-immobilization process factors. The seven process factors analyzed were (1) power level for RFGD plasma treatment, (2) duration of plasma treatment, (3) concentration of PC solution used to coat samples, (4) rate at which samples were dipped in/out of the solution, (5) temperature for curing, (6) relative humidity level during curing, and (7) duration of curing. Imaging and analysis of the coating were done via fluorescence microscopy (FM), confirming the uniform coverage of PC polymer on titanium substrate. The process factors were evaluated by three measured responses: initial thickness, coating durability and degree of cross-linked coating, which were assessed by FM, a spray test and extraction in IPA, respectively. Variations in PC solution concentration showed no impact on fouling resistance of the resultant coating. It was hypothesized that the PC-application process factors could be optimized to yield favorable outcomes in durability and degree of cross-linked coating responses. The resulting statistical model indicates that PC solution concentration, dip rate, and cure temperature are the three greatest singular effects on both durability and degree of cross-linking. In addition, plasma treatment of the substrate with O2 was effective in enhancing the degree of cross-linking of the polymer surface. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Survey of current situation in radiation belt modeling.

    PubMed

    Fung, Shing F

    2004-01-01

    The study of Earth's radiation belts is one of the oldest subjects in space physics. Despite the tremendous progress made in the last four decades, we still lack a complete understanding of the radiation belts in terms of their configurations, dynamics, and detailed physical accounts of their sources and sinks. The static nature of early empirical trapped radiation models, for examples, the NASA AP-8 and AE-8 models, renders those models inappropriate for predicting short-term radiation belt behaviors associated with geomagnetic storms and substorms. Due to incomplete data coverage, these models are also inaccurate at low altitudes (e.g., <1000 km) where many robotic and human space flights occur. The availability of radiation data from modern space missions and advancement in physical modeling and data management techniques have now allowed the development of new empirical and physical radiation belt models. In this paper, we will review the status of modern radiation belt modeling.

  4. Subsurface Counter Current beneath the Tsushima Warm Current Reproduced by a Data Assimilative Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, A.; Watanabe, T.; Takayama, K.

    2012-12-01

    In the Japan Sea, the Tsushima Warm Current (TWC) dominates the surface layer, and the TWC water flows roughly northeastward along the coast of Japan. From early summer to autumn, a seasonal circulation often forms beneath the TWC. This seasonal circulation is referred to as the subsurface counter current (SSCC) because it flows over the Japanese continental slope in the opposite direction to the surface TWC. The SSCC has been investigated in both observational and numerical studies, and some numerical studies have proposed that subsurface clockwise gyres that form off the Japanese coast induce the SSCC. However, the preceding numerical studies have focused on the climatological representation of the SSCC, and so more realistic year-to-year examination of the SSCC has been needed. Hence we analyzed 13-year data-assimilative products of JADE (JApan sea Data assimilation Experiment), an ocean forecast system operated at Japan Sea National Fisheries Research Institute, Fisheries Research Agency. The JADE products from 1999 to 2011 reproduced the climatological view of the SSCC reported by the preceding numerical studies: Subsurface clockwise gyres appeared off the Japanese coast from May to October, inducing the SSCC over the continental slope; Core of the SSCC (or the gyre) was found around 140-200 m depth. The subsurface gyres showed year-to-year variation in its position, magnitude and duration, thus magnitude and duration of the SSCC at a fixed location notably varied year-to-year. The reproduced SSCC showed 10-20 cm/s velocity that well corresponded to the observed values. Formation of the subsurface gyres was characterized by seasonal enhancement of clockwise vortices that were trapped in embayments of the bottom relief. The vortices were surface-intensified and showed vertically-coherent negative vorticity from the surface to about 300 m depth. Because the vortices were embedded into the more surface-intensified TWC, the clockwise gyre flow (or the SSCC) was

  5. Modeling Current Transfer from PV Modules Based on Meteorological Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hacke, Peter; Smith, Ryan; Kurtz, Sarah; Jordan, Dirk; Wohlgemuth, John

    2016-11-21

    Current transferred from the active cell circuit to ground in modules undergoing potential-induced degradation (PID) stress is analyzed with respect to meteorological data. Duration and coulombs transferred as a function of whether the module is wet (from dew or rain) or the extent of uncondensed surface humidity are quantified based on meteorological indicators. With this, functions predicting the mode and rate of coulomb transfer are developed for use in estimating the relative PID stress associated with temperature, moisture, and system voltage in any climate. Current transfer in a framed crystalline silicon module is relatively high when there is no condensed water on the module, whereas current transfer in a thin-film module held by edge clips is not, and displays a greater fraction of coulombs transferred when wet compared to the framed module in the natural environment.

  6. Thermal cyclic durability testing of ceramic materials for turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal cyclic durability of commercial ceramic materials for turbine engines was under evaluation since 1978. Ceramic materials are exposed to cyclic diesel-fired burner exhaust at either 1204 or 1371 C (2200 or 2500 F) for up to 3500 hours. The test conditions are selected to simulate the environment experienced by the hot flow path components in an automotive gas turbine engine. The silicon nitride and silicon carbide materials tested are the same ceramic materials currently used on the AGT100 and AGT101 ceramic turbine engine program.

  7. Medicare Beneficiary Satisfaction with Durable Medical Equipment Suppliers

    PubMed Central

    Hoerger, Thomas J.; Finkelstein, Eric A.; Bernard, Shulamit L.

    2001-01-01

    CMS has recently launched a series of initiatives to control Medicare spending on durable medical equipment (DME) and prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies (DMEPOS). An important question is how these initiatives will affect beneficiary satisfaction. Using survey data, we analyze Medicare beneficiary satisfaction with DMEPOS suppliers in two Florida counties. Our results show that beneficiaries are currently highly satisfied with their DMEPOS suppliers. Beneficiary satisfaction is positively related to rapid delivery, training, dependability, and frequency of service. Results of our analysis can be used as baseline estimates in evaluating CMS initiatives to reduce Medicare payments for DMEPOS. PMID:12500367

  8. Thermal cyclic durability testing of ceramic materials for turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal cyclic durability of commercial ceramic materials for turbine engines was under evaluation since 1978. Ceramic materials are exposed to cyclic diesel-fired burner exhaust at either 1204 or 1371 C (2200 or 2500 F) for up to 3500 hours. The test conditions are selected to simulate the environment experienced by the hot flow path components in an automotive gas turbine engine. The silicon nitride and silicon carbide materials tested are the same ceramic materials currently used on the AGT100 and AGT101 ceramic turbine engine program.

  9. Metabolic models of ruminant metabolism: recent improvements and current status.

    PubMed

    Hanigan, M D; Bateman, H G; Fadel, J G; McNamara, J P

    2006-03-01

    The NC-1009 regional research project has two broad goals of quantifying the properties of feeds and the metabolic interactions among nutrients that influence nutrient availability for milk production and that alter synthesis of milk, and using those quantitative relationships to challenge and refine computer-based nutrition systems for dairy cattle. The objective of this paper was to review progress in modeling. Significant progress has been made in model refinements over the past 10 yr as exemplified by the most recent NRC model (2001) and work on the Molly model of Baldwin and colleagues (1987). These models have different objectives but share many properties. The level of aggregation of the NRC model (2001) does not allow detailed analyses of specific metabolic reactions that affect nutritional efficiency. The Baldwin model is aggregated at the pathway level and is therefore amenable to assessment with a broad range of biological measurements. Recent improvements to that model include the addition of an ingredient based input scheme, use of in situ data to set ruminal protein degradation rates, and refinement of the representation of mammary cell numbers and activity. Although the Baldwin model appears to be appropriate structurally, several parameters are known to be inadequate. Predictions of ruminal N metabolism and total-tract starch digestions have similar accuracy as the NRC model. However, the NRC more accurately predicts total-tract fiber digestion and both models significantly overpredict total-tract lipid digestion. These errors contribute to overpredictions of weight retention when simulating full lactations with the Baldwin model and may result in performance prediction errors with the NRC model. Limitations remain in the descriptions of metabolism and metabolic regulation of the splanchnic, viscera, adipose tissue, body muscle, and mammary tissue. Integration of genetic control mechanisms can expand these efforts to assist genetic selection as well

  10. Current Trends in Distance Education: An Administrative Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compora, Daniel P.

    2003-01-01

    Current practices and procedures of distance education programs at selected institutions in higher education in Ohio were studied. Relevant data was found in the areas of: (1) content of the distance education program's mission statement; (2) needs assessment procedures; (3) student demographics; (4) course acquisition, development, and evaluation…

  11. Model of vertical plasma motion during the current quench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiramov, D. I.; Breizman, B. N.

    2017-10-01

    Tokamak disruptions impair plasma position control, which allows the plasma column to move and hit the wall. These detrimental events enhance thermal and mechanical loads due to halo currents and runaway electron losses. Their fundamental understanding and prevention is one of the high-priority items for ITER.

  12. Analysis of equilibrium and kinetic models of internal reforming on solid oxide fuel cell anodes: Effect on voltage, current and temperature distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Khaliq; Fӧger, Karl

    2017-03-01

    The SOFC is well-established as a high-efficiency energy conversion technology with demonstrations of micro-CHP systems delivering 60% net electrical efficiency [1]. However, there are key challenges in the path to commercialization. Foremost among them is stack durability. Operating at high temperatures, the SOFC invariably suffers from thermally induced material degradation. This is compounded by thermal stresses within the SOFC stack which are generated from a number of interacting factors. Modelling is used as a tool for predicting undesirable temperature and current density gradients. For an internal reforming SOFC, fidelity of the model is strongly linked to the representation of the fuel reforming reactions, which dictate species concentrations and net heat release. It is critical for simulation of these profiles that the set of reaction rate expressions applicable for the particular anode catalyst are chosen in the model. A relatively wide spectrum of kinetic correlations has been reported in the literature. This work presents a comparative analysis of the internal distribution of temperature, current, voltage and compositions on a SOFC anode, using various combinations of reaction kinetics and equilibrium expressions for the reactions. The results highlight the significance of the fuel reforming chemistry and kinetics in the prediction of cell performance.

  13. Current Experimental Basis for Modeling Ice Accretions on Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a review of the experimental basis for modeling ice accretions on swept wings. Experimental work related to ice accretion physics on swept wings conducted between 1954 and 2004 is reviewed. Proposed models or explanations of scallop formations are singled out and discussed. Special emphasis is placed on reviewing the work done to determine the basic macroscopic mechanisms of scallop formation. The role of feather growth and its connection to scallop growth is discussed. Conceptual steps in modeling scallop formations are presented. Research elements needed for modeling are discussed.

  14. The NRC's SPAR Models: Current Status, Future Development, and Modeling Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Buell

    2008-09-01

    Probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) play an increasingly important role in the regulatory framework of the U.S. nuclear power industry. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) relies on a set of plant-specific Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models to provide critical risk-based input to the regulatory process. The Significance Determination Process (SDP), Management Directive 8.3 - NRC Incident Investigation Program, Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) and Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) programs are among the regulatory initiatives that receive significant input from the SPAR models. Other uses of the SPAR models include: Screening & Resolution of Generic Safety Issues, License Amendment reviews and Notice of Enforcement Discretion (NOEDs). This paper presents the current status of SPAR model development activities, future development objectives, and issues related to the development, verification and maintenance of the SPAR models.

  15. Mathematical model for prediction of currents, magnetic fields, melt velocities, melt topography and current efficiency in Hall-Heroult cells

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.W.; Zundelevich, Y.; Sharma, D.

    1981-06-01

    The magnetic fields, current densities, metal and electrolyte velocities, current efficiencies and topography of the electrolyte-metal interface within the Hall-Heroult cell used to produce aluminum have been predicted from first principles. The computation of current densities was carried out by solving Ohms law enabling the calculation of magnetic field vectors from the Biot-Savart law. The cross product of the current densities and magnetic fields then yielded the electromagnetic stirring forces acting on the molten metal and electrolyte. By employing a turbulence model and the time averaged Navier-Stokes equations, velocities within these two liquids could be calculated. The solution of the fluid flow equations yielded the pressure distribution within both electrolyte and metal, permitting the calculation of the shape of the interface betweeen these two liquids.

  16. Comparison of transcatheter aortic valve and surgical bioprosthetic valve durability: A fatigue simulation study.

    PubMed

    Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei

    2015-09-18

    Transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) intervention is now the standard-of-care treatment for inoperable patients and a viable alternative treatment option for high-risk patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis. While the procedure is associated with lower operative risk and shorter recovery times than traditional surgical aortic valve (SAV) replacement, TAV intervention is still not considered for lower-risk patients due in part to concerns about device durability. It is well known that bioprosthetic SAVs have limited durability, and TAVs are generally assumed to have even worse durability, yet there is little long-term data to confirm this suspicion. In this study, TAV and SAV leaflet fatigue due to cyclic loading was investigated through finite element analysis by implementing a computational soft tissue fatigue damage model to describe the behavior of the pericardial leaflets. Under identical loading conditions and with identical leaflet tissue properties, the TAV leaflets sustained higher stresses, strains, and fatigue damage compared to the SAV leaflets. The simulation results suggest that the durability of TAVs may be significantly reduced compared to SAVs to about 7.8 years. The developed computational framework may be useful in optimizing TAV design parameters to improve leaflet durability, and assessing the effects of underexpanded, elliptical, or non-uniformly expanded stent deployment on TAV durability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamic finite-element model for efficient modelling of electric currents in electroporated tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langus, J.; Kranjc, M.; Kos, B.; Šuštar, T.; Miklavčič, D.

    2016-05-01

    In silico experiments (numerical simulations) are a valuable tool for non-invasive research of the influences of tissue properties, electrode placement and electric pulse delivery scenarios in the process of electroporation. The work described in this article was aimed at introducing time dependent effects into a finite element model developed specifically for electroporation. Reference measurements were made ex vivo on beef liver samples and experimental data were used both as an initial condition for simulation (applied pulse voltage) and as a reference value for numerical model calibration (measured pulse current). The developed numerical model is able to predict the time evolution of an electric pulse current within a 5% error over a broad range of applied pulse voltages, pulse durations and pulse repetition frequencies. Given the good agreement of the current flowing between the electrodes, we are confident that the results of our numerical model can be used both for detailed in silico research of electroporation mechanisms (giving researchers insight into time domain effects) and better treatment planning algorithms, which predict the outcome of treatment based on both spatial and temporal distributions of applied electric pulses.

  18. Carbon nanocages: a new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-03-24

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for "real world" application.

  19. Carbon nanocages: A new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-01-01

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for “real world” application. PMID:24658614

  20. Carbon nanocages: A new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-03-01

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for ``real world'' application.

  1. Understanding the Current 30-Year Shipbuilding Plan Through Three Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    policy. The direction by which the current President, Barack Obama , chose to guide the DOD is evident in the 2012 strategic guidance; Sustaining U.S...Commandant views as important. Historically the role has involved budgetary decisions. But the biography of General Paxton presents someone whose particular...2014, from: http://forbes.house.gov/ biography / Forbes, J. R. (2014b, October 6). Document: July letter from Rep Randy Forbes to CNO Adm. Jonathan

  2. Wave-current interactions: model development and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayet, Clement; Lyard, Florent; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    The coastal area concentrates many uses that require integrated management based on diagnostic and predictive tools to understand and anticipate the future of pollution from land or sea, and learn more about natural hazards at sea or activity on the coast. The realistic modelling of coastal hydrodynamics needs to take into account various processes which interact, including tides, surges, and sea state (Wolf [2008]). These processes act at different spatial scales. Unstructured-grid models have shown the ability to satisfy these needs, given that a good mesh resolution criterion is used. We worked on adding a sea state forcing in a hydrodynamic circulation model. The sea state model is the unstructured version of WAVEWATCH III c (Tolman [2008]) (which version is developed at IFREMER, Brest (Ardhuin et al. [2010]) ), and the hydrodynamic model is the 2D barotropic module of the unstructured-grid finite element model T-UGOm (Le Bars et al. [2010]). We chose to use the radiation stress approach (Longuet-Higgins and Stewart [1964]) to represent the effect of surface waves (wind waves and swell) in the barotropic model, as previously done by Mastenbroek et al. [1993]and others. We present here some validation of the model against academic cases : a 2D plane beach (Haas and Warner [2009]) and a simple bathymetric step with analytic solution for waves (Ardhuin et al. [2008]). In a second part we present realistic application in the Ushant Sea during extreme event. References Ardhuin, F., N. Rascle, and K. Belibassakis, Explicit wave-averaged primitive equations using a generalized Lagrangian mean, Ocean Modelling, 20 (1), 35-60, doi:10.1016/j.ocemod.2007.07.001, 2008. Ardhuin, F., et al., Semiempirical Dissipation Source Functions for Ocean Waves. Part I: Definition, Calibration, and Validation, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 40 (9), 1917-1941, doi:10.1175/2010JPO4324.1, 2010. Haas, K. A., and J. C. Warner, Comparing a quasi-3D to a full 3D nearshore circulation model: SHORECIRC and

  3. Current status of GFZ's operational Earth System model GFZESM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Robert; Dobslaw, Henryk; Thomas, Maik

    2017-04-01

    GFZ revised his operational Earth system model GFZESM to provide in quasi-real-time a consistent product data-set of gravity variations, Earth rotation excitation, and surface load deformations related to modeled atmospheric, oceanic, and hydrological mass re-distributions. ECMWFs ERA Interim and operational atmospheric data is reduced to a fixed defined high-resolution reference topography in order to avoid inconsistencies between different ECMWF model setups and due to routinely updated orography background models in the operational atmospheric data. Consistently with the new GRACE de-aliasing product AOD1B release 06 the modeled mass re-distributions from atmospheric surface pressure (ECMWF)and oceanic bottom pressure (calculated by the oceanic model MPIOM) are corrected for tidal signals and the inverse barometric effect over the ocean. In combination with the hydrological model LSDM, the following consistent set of operational products is provided daily: GRACE AOD1B release 06 spherical harmonic coefficients (d/o 180, 3h); Earth rotation excitation AAM (3h), OAM (3h), and HAM (24); non-tidal Loading Surface Deformations NTAL (0.5°, 3h), NTOL (0.5°, 3h), and HYDL(0.5°, 24h). In addition, 6-day forecasts for all the products are available.

  4. Current State of Animal (Mouse) Modeling in Melanoma Research

    PubMed Central

    Kuzu, Omer F.; Nguyen, Felix D.; Noory, Mohammad A.; Sharma, Arati

    2015-01-01

    Despite the considerable progress in understanding the biology of human cancer and technological advancement in drug discovery, treatment failure remains an inevitable outcome for most cancer patients with advanced diseases, including melanoma. Despite FDA-approved BRAF-targeted therapies for advanced stage melanoma showed a great deal of promise, development of rapid resistance limits the success. Hence, the overall success rate of melanoma therapy still remains to be one of the worst compared to other malignancies. Advancement of next-generation sequencing technology allowed better identification of alterations that trigger melanoma development. As development of successful therapies strongly depends on clinically relevant preclinical models, together with the new findings, more advanced melanoma models have been generated. In this article, besides traditional mouse models of melanoma, we will discuss recent ones, such as patient-derived tumor xenografts, topically inducible BRAF mouse model and RCAS/TVA-based model, and their advantages as well as limitations. Although mouse models of melanoma are often criticized as poor predictors of whether an experimental drug would be an effective treatment, development of new and more relevant models could circumvent this problem in the near future. PMID:26483610

  5. Survey of current situation in radiation belt modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.

    2004-01-01

    The study of Earth's radiation belts is one of the oldest subjects in space physics. Despite the tremendous progress made in the last four decades, we still lack a complete understanding of the radiation belts in terms of their configurations, dynamics, and detailed physical accounts of their sources and sinks. The static nature of early empirical trapped radiation models, for examples, the NASA AP-8 and AE-8 models, renders those models inappropriate for predicting short-term radiation belt behaviors associated with geomagnetic storms and substorms. Due to incomplete data coverage, these models are also inaccurate at low altitudes (e.g., <1000 km) where many robotic and human space flights occur. The availability of radiation data from modern space missions and advancement in physical modeling and data management techniques have now allowed the development of new empirical and physical radiation belt models. In this paper, we will review the status of modern radiation belt modeling. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  6. Survey of current situation in radiation belt modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.

    2004-01-01

    The study of Earth's radiation belts is one of the oldest subjects in space physics. Despite the tremendous progress made in the last four decades, we still lack a complete understanding of the radiation belts in terms of their configurations, dynamics, and detailed physical accounts of their sources and sinks. The static nature of early empirical trapped radiation models, for examples, the NASA AP-8 and AE-8 models, renders those models inappropriate for predicting short-term radiation belt behaviors associated with geomagnetic storms and substorms. Due to incomplete data coverage, these models are also inaccurate at low altitudes (e.g., <1000 km) where many robotic and human space flights occur. The availability of radiation data from modern space missions and advancement in physical modeling and data management techniques have now allowed the development of new empirical and physical radiation belt models. In this paper, we will review the status of modern radiation belt modeling. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  7. The equatorial electrojet current modelling from SWARM satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaissa, Mahfoud

    2016-07-01

    Equatorial ElectroJet (EEJ) is an intense eastward electric current circulating in the ionospheric magnetic equator band between 100 and 130 km of altitude in E region. These currents vary by day, by season, by solar activity, and also with the main magnetic field of internal origin. The irregularity of the ionosphere has a major impact on the performance of communication systems and navigation (GPS), industry.... Then it becomes necessary study the characteristics of EEJ. In this paper, we present a study of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) phenomenon along one year (2014) period. In addition, the satellite data used in this study are obtained with SWARM satellite scalar magnetometer data respecting magnetically quiet days with KP < 2. In this paper, we process to separate and extract the electrojet intensity signal from other recorded signal-sources interfering with the main signal and reduce considerably the signal to noise ratio during the SWARM measurements. This pre-processing step allows removing all external contributions in regard to EEJ intensity value. Key words: Ionosphere (Equatorial ionosphere; Electric fields and currents; Equatorial electrojet (EEJ)); SWARM.

  8. Current advancements and challenges in soil-root interactions modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Huber, Katrin; Abesha, Betiglu; Meunier, Felicien; Leitner, Daniel; Roose, Tiina; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Roots change their surrounding soil chemically, physically and biologically. This includes changes in soil moisture and solute concentration, the exudation of organic substances into the rhizosphere, increased growth of soil microorganisms, or changes in soil structure. The fate of water and solutes in the root zone is highly determined by these root-soil interactions. Mathematical models of soil-root systems in combination with non-invasive techniques able to characterize root systems are a promising tool to understand and predict the behaviour of water and solutes in the root zone. With respect to different fields of applications, predictive mathematical models can contribute to the solution of optimal control problems in plant recourse efficiency. This may result in significant gains in productivity, efficiency and environmental sustainability in various land use activities. Major challenges include the coupling of model parameters of the relevant processes with the surrounding environment such as temperature, nutrient concentration or soil water content. A further challenge is the mathematical description of the different spatial and temporal scales involved. This includes in particular the branched structures formed by root systems or the external mycelium of mycorrhizal fungi. Here, reducing complexity as well as bridging between spatial scales is required. Furthermore, the combination of experimental and mathematical techniques may advance the field enormously. Here, the use of root system, soil and rhizosphere models is presented through a number of modelling case studies, including image based modelling of phosphate uptake by a root with hairs, model-based optimization of root architecture for phosphate uptake from soil, upscaling of rhizosphere models, modelling root growth in structured soil, and the effect of root hydraulic architecture on plant water uptake efficiency and drought resistance.

  9. Current Advancements and Challenges in Soil-Root Interactions Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, A.; Huber, K.; Abesha, B.; Meunier, F.; Leitner, D.; Roose, T.; Javaux, M.; Vanderborght, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Roots change their surrounding soil chemically, physically and biologically. This includes changes in soil moisture and solute concentration, the exudation of organic substances into the rhizosphere, increased growth of soil microorganisms, or changes in soil structure. The fate of water and solutes in the root zone is highly determined by these root-soil interactions. Mathematical models of soil-root systems in combination with non-invasive techniques able to characterize root systems are a promising tool to understand and predict the behaviour of water and solutes in the root zone. With respect to different fields of applications, predictive mathematical models can contribute to the solution of optimal control problems in plant recourse efficiency. This may result in significant gains in productivity, efficiency and environmental sustainability in various land use activities. Major challenges include the coupling of model parameters of the relevant processes with the surrounding environment such as temperature, nutrient concentration or soil water content. A further challenge is the mathematical description of the different spatial and temporal scales involved. This includes in particular the branched structures formed by root systems or the external mycelium of mycorrhizal fungi. Here, reducing complexity as well as bridging between spatial scales is required. Furthermore, the combination of experimental and mathematical techniques may advance the field enormously. Here, the use of root system, soil and rhizosphere models is presented through a number of modelling case studies, including image based modelling of phosphate uptake by a root with hairs, model-based optimization of root architecture for phosphate uptake from soil, upscaling of rhizosphere models, modelling root growth in structured soil, and the effect of root hydraulic architecture on plant water uptake efficiency and drought resistance.

  10. a Circuit Model of Quantum Cascade Lasers Applicable to both Small and Large Current Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, M. K.; Webb, J. F.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, a circuit model is devised to analyze nonlinear behaviour of quantum cascade lasers. Such nonlinear behavior influences the light output when the laser is driven by currents comparable to the average (DC) current. The simplified 2-level rate equations are first improved. Next, the circuit model is obtained following the approach for interband lasers. The difference between the circuit models of quantum cascade lasers and interband lasers is pointed out. The circuit model is simpler compared to that obtained from a 3-level model. Unlike a circuit model derived earlier from the 2-level model, the present model can handle both small and large current drives.

  11. Modeling of the influences of multiple modulated electron cyclotron current drive on NTMs in rotating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chen; Jinyuan, Liu; Ping, Duan; Guangrui, Liu; Xingyu, Bian

    2017-02-01

    In this work, physical models of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) including bootstrap current and multiple modulated electron cyclotron current drive model are applied. Based on the specific physical problems during the suppression of NTMs by driven current, this work compares the efficiency of continuous and modulated driven currents, and simulates the physical processes of multiple modulated driven currents on suppressing rotating magnetic island. It is found that when island rotates along the poloidal direction, the suppression ability of continuous driven current can be massively reduced due to current deposition outside the island separatrix and reverse deposition direction at the X point, which can be avoided by current drive modulation. Multiple current drive has a better suppressing effect than single current drive. This work gives realistic numerical simulations by optimizing the model and parameters based on the experiments, which could provide references for successful suppression of NTMs in future advanced tokamak such as international thermonuclear experimental reactor.

  12. Current themes and recent advances in modelling species occurrences

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have seen a huge expansion in the range of methods and approaches that are being used to predict species occurrences. This expansion has been accompanied by many improvements in statistical methods, including more accurate ways of comparing models, better null models, methods to cope with autocorrelation, and greater awareness of the importance of scale and prevalence. However, the field still suffers from problems with incorporating temporal variation, overfitted models and poor out-of-sample prediction, confusion between explanation and prediction, simplistic assumptions, and a focus on pattern over process. The greatest advances in recent years have come from integrative studies that have linked species occurrence models with other themes and topics in ecology, such as island biogeography, climate change, disease geography, and invasive species. PMID:20948597

  13. The Integrated Landscape Modeling partnership - Current status and future directions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mushet, David M.; Scherff, Eric J.

    2016-01-28

    The Integrated Landscape Modeling (ILM) partnership is an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to identify, evaluate, and develop models to quantify services derived from ecosystems, with a focus on wetland ecosystems and conservation effects. The ILM partnership uses the Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST) modeling platform to facilitate regional quantifications of ecosystem services under various scenarios of land-cover change that are representative of differing conservation program and practice implementation scenarios. To date, the ILM InVEST partnership has resulted in capabilities to quantify carbon stores, amphibian habitat, plant-community diversity, and pollination services. Work to include waterfowl and grassland bird habitat quality is in progress. Initial InVEST modeling has been focused on the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of the United States; future efforts might encompass other regions as data availability and knowledge increase as to how functions affecting ecosystem services differ among regions.The ILM partnership is also developing the capability for field-scale process-based modeling of depressional wetland ecosystems using the Agricultural Policy/Environmental Extender (APEX) model. Progress was made towards the development of techniques to use the APEX model for closed-basin depressional wetlands of the PPR, in addition to the open systems that the model was originally designed to simulate. The ILM partnership has matured to the stage where effects of conservation programs and practices on multiple ecosystem services can now be simulated in selected areas. Future work might include the continued development of modeling capabilities, as well as development and evaluation of differing conservation program and practice scenarios of interest to partner agencies including the USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) and Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). When

  14. A return stroke model based purely on the current dissipation concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Vernon

    2015-12-01

    A return stroke model based purely on the current dissipation concept is introduced. With three model parameters the model is capable of generating electric and magnetic fields that are in reasonable agreement with experimentally observed electromagnetic fields.

  15. Current Scientific Evidence for a Polarized Cardiovascular Endurance Training Model.

    PubMed

    Hydren, Jay R; Cohen, Bruce S

    2015-12-01

    Recent publications have provided new scientific evidence for a modern aerobic or cardiovascular endurance exercise prescription that optimizes the periodization cycle and maximizes potential endurance performance gains in highly trained individuals. The traditional threshold, high volume, and high-intensity training models have displayed limited improvement in actual race pace in (highly) trained individuals while frequently resulting in overreaching or overtraining (physical injury and psychological burnout). A review of evidence for replacing these models with the proven polarized training model seems warranted. This review provides a short history of the training models, summarizes 5 key studies, and provides example training programs for both the pre- and in-season periods. A polarized training program is characterized by an undulating nonlinear periodization model with nearly all the training time spent at a "light" (≤13) and "very hard" (≥17) pace with very limited time at "hard" (14-16) or race pace (6-20 Rating of Perceived Exertion [RPE] scale). To accomplish this, the polarization training model has specific high-intensity workouts separated by one or more long slow distance workouts, with the exercise intensity remaining below ventilatory threshold (VT) 1 and/or blood lactate of less than 2 mM (A.K.A. below race pace). Effect sizes for increasing aerobic endurance performance for the polarized training model are consistently superior to that of the threshold training model. Performing a polarized training program may be best accomplished by: going easy on long slow distance workouts, avoiding "race pace" and getting after it during interval workouts.

  16. A Final Approach Trajectory Model for Current Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Chester; Sadovsky, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Predicting accurate trajectories with limited intent information is a challenge faced by air traffic management decision support tools in operation today. One such tool is the FAA's Terminal Proximity Alert system which is intended to assist controllers in maintaining safe separation of arrival aircraft during final approach. In an effort to improve the performance of such tools, two final approach trajectory models are proposed; one based on polynomial interpolation, the other on the Fourier transform. These models were tested against actual traffic data and used to study effects of the key final approach trajectory modeling parameters of wind, aircraft type, and weight class, on trajectory prediction accuracy. Using only the limited intent data available to today's ATM system, both the polynomial interpolation and Fourier transform models showed improved trajectory prediction accuracy over a baseline dead reckoning model. Analysis of actual arrival traffic showed that this improved trajectory prediction accuracy leads to improved inter-arrival separation prediction accuracy for longer look ahead times. The difference in mean inter-arrival separation prediction error between the Fourier transform and dead reckoning models was 0.2 nmi for a look ahead time of 120 sec, a 33 percent improvement, with a corresponding 32 percent improvement in standard deviation.

  17. Outflows from Seyfert galaxies: a challenge to current models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proga, Daniel

    2004-07-01

    We propose to continue our study of outflows from active galactic nuclei {AGN}. This phenomenon has been extensively observed with HST as well as modeled. The overall result from previous studies, including our own ongoing HST program, is that broad absorption lines {BAL} in QSOs can be well understood and reproduced within the framework of radiation-driven disk wind models. It is also very likely that the same model is capable of explaining broad emission lines. However, this model is less successful in explaining narrow absorption lines {NAL} observed in Seyfert galaxies. Therefore, we propose to extend the model by including magnetic field effects. Hydromagnetic propulsion is a likely mechanism responsible for producing low velocity outflows from larger radii and thus explaining NAL and their lack of short-term variability. We will continue to use the multi-dimensional, time-dependent, magnetohydrodynamical code ZEUS to compute the wind structure. We will also compute synthetic line profiles and continuum spectra based on the theoretical model and compare the results with HST/STIS and other observations. In general, we propose to follow the procedure which we successfully applied to winds in cataclysmic variables and BAL QSOs.

  18. Upwelling and coastal current biases in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, P.; Small, J.

    2016-12-01

    The upwelling regions at the eastern edges of the world's subtropical oceans exhibit pronounced SST biases in leading global coupled climate models. Reducing the SST and upwelling biases is important to climate variability and predictability, as well as projections of how coastal ecosystems respond to changing climate, including fishery and other impacts. In the southeastern tropical Atlantic, the wind-stress curl associated with the Benguela atmospheric low-level coastal jet (LLCJ) plays a major role in determining the coastal circulation and the spatial distribution of SST. Realistic representation of the detailed structure of the Benguela LLCJ, including both the double core structure and coastal wind drop-off, is critical to reducing the coastal ocean bias in the southeastern tropical Atlantic and is highly dependent on model resolution. In recent experiments with coupled models, it is found that increasing atmospheric model resolution substantially improves the LLCJ core structure, whilst in order to get a realistic upwelling system, a high-resolution ocean model is also required. Further, coupled feedbacks between SST and wind and cloud are important. Hence, attempting to derive parameterizations to reduce the bias remains a significant challenge in low or standard resolution climate models, as it involves deficiencies in the atmosphere and ocean, and estimation of the feedbacks. However, on the bright side, there is substantial theoretical, numerical, and observational work that can be brought to address the problem. The presentation will hopefully motivate discussion of parameterizations in the light of this work.

  19. Phenomenological models of holographic superconductors and hall currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, Francesco; Franco, Sebastián; Rodríguez-Gómez, Diego; Russo, Jorge G.

    2010-05-01

    We study general models of holographic superconductivity parametrized by four arbitrary functions of a neutral scalar field of the bulk theory. The models can accommodate several features of real superconductors, like arbitrary critical temperatures and critical exponents in a certain range, and perhaps impurities or boundary or thickness effects. We find analytical expressions for the critical exponents of the general model and show that they satisfy the Rushbrooke identity. An important subclass of models exhibit second order phase transitions. A study of the specific heat shows that general models can also describe holographic superconductors undergoing first, second and third (or higher) order phase transitions. We discuss how small deformations of the HHH model can lead to the appearance of resonance peaks in the conductivity, which increase in number and become narrower as the temperature is gradually decreased, without the need for tuning mass of the scalar to be close to the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. Finally, we investigate the inclusion of a generalized “theta term” producing Hall effect without magnetic field.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition modeling: An assessment of current status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1991-01-01

    The shortcomings of earlier approaches that assumed thermochemical equilibrium and used chemical vapor deposition (CVD) phase diagrams are pointed out. Significant advancements in predictive capabilities due to recent computational developments, especially those for deposition rates controlled by gas phase mass transport, are demonstrated. The importance of using the proper boundary conditions is stressed, and the availability and reliability of gas phase and surface chemical kinetic information are emphasized as the most limiting factors. Future directions for CVD are proposed on the basis of current needs for efficient and effective progress in CVD process design and optimization.

  1. Boussinesq modeling of HB06 tracer releases Part 1: Wave and current model-data comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feddersen, F.; Clark, D. B.; Guza, R. T.

    2010-12-01

    During the HB06 experiment (Fall 2006 at Huntington Beach), a cross-shore array of current meters and pressure sensors were deployed from the shoreline to 4-m depth to make Eulerian wave and current measurements. Five dye tracer releases were performed. In each, the mean tracer plume was advected alongshore and dispersed in the cross-shore in a manner consistent with a wall bounded plume [Clark et al. JGR, in press 2010]. The mechanisms of horizontal tracer dispersion are complex and include mixing by breaking waves and stirring by the horizontal eddy field that is driven by both shear-waves and finite-crest-length breaking due to directionally-spread waves. Thus acurate simulation of surfzone tracer evolution requires a model that resolves that resolves individual waves such as the time-dependent Boussinesq model funwaveC. Such models have not been extensively validated with field observations. Prior to simulating the time- and spatial-dependent evolution of a surfzone tracer field (Part 2), the model is first used to simulate the wave and current conditions during the 5 dye releases (Part 1). The observed bathymetery is used with a shoreline sponge layer (at typically 0.25 m depth) to absorb excess wave anergy. The modeled random and directionally spread wave field is forced approximately 350 m offshore in 7 m depth with O(1000) discrete frequencies. Standard values of the model coefficients for wave breaking and bottom friction are chosen. For the 5 tracer releases, the model is run for roughly 3 hours. With the inputs of the observed bathymetry and the offshore wave spectra, the Boussinesq model funwaveC reproduces well the 1. cross-shore structure of signficant wave height, wave angle, and directional spread and 2. the cross-shore evolution of the wave spectra in the sea-swell band from outside the surfzone through the surfzone The good Eulerian model-data agreement demonstrates that the funwaveC model may be useful in understanding and characterizing surfzone

  2. Modelling primary blast lung injury: current capability and future direction.

    PubMed

    Scott, Timothy; Hulse, E; Haque, M; Kirkman, E; Hardman, J; Mahoney, P

    2017-04-01

    Primary blast lung injury frequently complicates military conflict and terrorist attacks on civilian populations. The fact that it occurs in areas of conflict or unpredictable mass casualty events makes clinical study in human casualties implausible. Research in this field is therefore reliant on the use of some form of biological or non-biological surrogate model. This article briefly reviews the modelling work undertaken in this field until now and describes the rationale behind the generation of an in silico physiological model. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Modeling Ballistic Current Flow in Carbon Nanotube Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Experiments have shown carbon nanotubes (CNT) to be almost perfect conductors at small applied biases. The features of the CNT band structure, large velocity of the crossing subbands and the small number of modes that an electron close to the band center / Fermi energy can scatter into, are the reasons for the near perfect small bias conductance. We show that the CNT band structure does not help at large applied biases - electrons injected into the non crossing subbands can either be Bragg reflected or undergo Zener-type tunneling. This limits the current carrying capacity of CNT. We point out that the current carrying capacity of semiconductor quantum wires in the ballistic limit is different, owing to its band structure. The second aspect addressed is the relationship of nanotube chirality in determining the physics of metal-nanotube coupling. We show that a metallic-zigzag nanotube couples better than an armchair nanotube to a metal contact. This arises because in the case of armchair nanotubes, while the pi band couples well, the pi* band does not couple well to the metal. In the case of zigzag nanotube both crossing modes couple reasonably well to the metal. Many factors such as the role of curvature, strain and defects will play a role in determining the suitability of nanotubes as nanowires. From the limited view point of metal-nanotube coupling, we feel that metallic-zigzag nanotubes are preferable to armchair nanotubes.

  4. Modeling of velocity effects in eddy current applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Nathan

    1988-04-01

    The effects of velocity on moving sources are encountered in many practical eddy current applications. In many instances these effects are ignored either because velocities are relatively low, because of our inability to quantify these effects, or for purposes of simplifying the solution. There are, however, a number of important applications in which this cannot be done and full account of velocity must be taken. Some obvious applications are magnetic recording, magnetic braking, and nondestructive testing. This work presents a finite element formulation for eddy current problems that takes into account the relative movement of sources. Results are presented indicating that velocity effects are significant at high velocities, and are important for correct signal interpretation. The effect of velocity on nondestructive testing signals is investigated and shown to display significant deviation from static behavior. Because of the form of the governing equations, spurious, nonphysical solutions may be generated. These are eliminated by two separate methods. One involves refinement of the finite element mesh and the second, upwinding of the finite elements.

  5. Development and current status of the "Cambridge" loudness models.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J

    2014-10-13

    This article reviews the evolution of a series of models of loudness developed in Cambridge, UK. The first model, applicable to stationary sounds, was based on modifications of the model developed by Zwicker, including the introduction of a filter to allow for the effects of transfer of sound through the outer and middle ear prior to the calculation of an excitation pattern, and changes in the way that the excitation pattern was calculated. Later, modifications were introduced to the assumed middle-ear transfer function and to the way that specific loudness was calculated from excitation level. These modifications led to a finite calculated loudness at absolute threshold, which made it possible to predict accurately the absolute thresholds of broadband and narrowband sounds, based on the assumption that the absolute threshold corresponds to a fixed small loudness. The model was also modified to give predictions of partial loudness-the loudness of one sound in the presence of another. This allowed predictions of masked thresholds based on the assumption that the masked threshold corresponds to a fixed small partial loudness. Versions of the model for time-varying sounds were developed, which allowed prediction of the masked threshold of any sound in a background of any other sound. More recent extensions incorporate binaural processing to account for the summation of loudness across ears. In parallel, versions of the model for predicting loudness for hearing-impaired ears have been developed and have been applied to the development of methods for fitting multichannel compression hearing aids. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Process modeling - It's history, current status, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duttweiler, Russell E.; Griffith, Walter M.; Jain, Sulekh C.

    1991-04-01

    The development of process modeling is reviewed to examine the potential of process applications to prevent and solve problems associated with the aerospace industry. The business and global environments is assessed, and the traditional approach to product/process design is argued to be obsolete. A revised engineering process is described which involves planning and prediction before production by means of process simulation. Process simulation can permit simultaneous engineering of unit processes and complex processes, and examples are given in the cross-coupling of forging-process variance. The implementation of process modeling, CAE, and computer simulations are found to reduce costs and time associated with technological development when incorporated judiciously.

  7. Manufacturing metrology for c-Si photovoltaic module reliability and durability, Part I: Feedstock, crystallization and wafering

    SciTech Connect

    Seigneur, Hubert; Mohajeri, Nahid; Brooker, R. Paul; Davis, Kristopher O.; Schneller, Eric J.; Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Rodgers, Marianne P.; Wohlgemuth, John; Shiradkar, Narendra S.; Scardera, Giuseppe; Rudack, Andrew C.; Schoenfeld, Winston V.

    2016-06-01

    This article is the first in a three-part series of manufacturing metrology for c-Si photovoltaic (PV) module reliability and durability. Here in Part 1 we focus on the three primary process steps for making silicon substrates for PV cells: (1) feedstock production; (2) ingot and brick production; and (3) wafer production. Each of these steps can affect the final reliability/durability of PV modules in the field with manufacturing metrology potentially playing a significant role. This article provides a comprehensive overview of historical and current processes in each of these three steps, followed by a discussion of associated reliability challenges and metrology strategies that can be employed for increased reliability and durability in resultant modules. Gaps in the current state of understanding in connective metrology data during processing to reliability/durability in the field are then identified along with suggested improvements that should be considered by the PV community.

  8. 14 CFR 35.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Design and Construction § 35.19 Durability. Each part of the propeller must be designed and constructed to minimize the development of any unsafe condition of the propeller...

  9. Durability of wood-plastic composite lumber

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach

    2010-01-01

    Wood-plastic composite (WPC) lumber has been marketed as a low-maintenance, high-durability product. Retail sales in the United States were slightly less than $1 billion in 2008. Applications include docking, railing, windows, doors, fencing, siding, moldings, landscape timbers, car interior parts, and furniture. The majority of these products are used outdoors and...

  10. Machine tests crease durability of sheet materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. K.; Stanford, H. B.

    1964-01-01

    To test the crease resistance of sheet materials, the mid-section is folded over crease-control blades. One end is clamped to a motor-driven eccentric, the other to a spring, and durability is measured by the cycles required to produce failure.

  11. Facile preparation of super durable superhydrophobic materials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Zhang, Junping; Li, Bucheng; Fan, Ling; Li, Lingxiao; Wang, Aiqin

    2014-10-15

    The low stability, complicated and expensive fabrication procedures seriously hinder practical applications of superhydrophobic materials. Here we report an extremely simple method for preparing super durable superhydrophobic materials, e.g., textiles and sponges, by dip coating in fluoropolymers (FPs). The morphology, surface chemical composition, mechanical, chemical and environmental stabilities of the superhydrophobic textiles were investigated. The results show how simple the preparation of super durable superhydrophobic textiles can be! The superhydrophobic textiles outperform their natural counterparts and most of the state-of-the-art synthetic superhydrophobic materials in stability. The intensive mechanical abrasion, long time immersion in various liquids and repeated washing have no obvious influence on the superhydrophobicity. Water drops are spherical in shape on the samples and could easily roll off after these harsh stability tests. In addition, this simple dip coating approach is applicable to various synthetic and natural textiles and can be easily scaled up. Furthermore, the results prove that a two-tier roughness is helpful but not essential with regard to the creation of super durable superhydrophobic textiles. The combination of microscale roughness of textiles and materials with very low surface tension is enough to form super durable superhydrophobic textiles. According to the same procedure, superhydrophobic polyurethane sponges can be prepared, which show high oil absorbency, oil/water separation efficiency and stability.

  12. Enhancing composite durability : using thermal treatments

    Treesearch

    Jerrold E. Winandy; W. Ramsay Smith

    2007-01-01

    The use of thermal treatments to enhance the moisture resistance and aboveground durability of solid wood materials has been studied for years. Much work was done at the Forest Products Laboratory in the last 15 years on the fundamental process of both short-and long-term exposure to heat on wood materials and its interaction with various treatment chemicals. This work...

  13. 14 CFR 33.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... pitch control system which is a part of the engine type design must meet the requirements of §§ 35.21... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.19 Durability. (a) Engine design and construction must minimize the development of an unsafe condition of the engine between overhaul periods. The...

  14. 14 CFR 33.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... pitch control system which is a part of the engine type design must meet the requirements of §§ 35.21... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.19 Durability. (a) Engine design and construction must minimize the development of an unsafe condition of the engine between overhaul periods. The...

  15. 14 CFR 33.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... pitch control system which is a part of the engine type design must meet the requirements of §§ 35.21... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.19 Durability. (a) Engine design and construction must minimize the development of an unsafe condition of the engine between overhaul periods. The...

  16. Issues and concepts for making durable composites

    Treesearch

    Frederick A. Kamke; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2008-01-01

    Perhaps the greatest obstacle facing the acceptance of engineered wood composite products into new markets is the perceived lack of durability. Public perception is that particleboard and other wood-based composites fall apart when exposed to water. This paper will review the unique characteristics of wood based composites that make them more or less susceptible to...

  17. Durable Fluorocarbon-Based Coatings for Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-11-01

    synthesized. Polyols and polyesters were prepared from the perfluoroalkyl-branched diols. The branching perfluoroalkyl groups are expected to form a...protective layer between the polymer backbone and the atmosphere. Thus, the fluorinated polyols and polyesters could be key ingredients for the...development of durable for military aircraft. 14. SUBJECT TERMS fluorinated resin, branched perfluoroalkyl diols, branched perfluoroalkyl polyols , branched

  18. 14 CFR 33.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.19 Durability. (a) Engine design and... blade failure. Energy levels and trajectories of fragments resulting from rotor blade failure that lie outside the compressor and turbine rotor cases must be defined. (b) Each component of the propeller...

  19. 14 CFR 33.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.19 Durability. (a) Engine design and... blade failure. Energy levels and trajectories of fragments resulting from rotor blade failure that lie outside the compressor and turbine rotor cases must be defined. (b) Each component of the propeller...

  20. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY... problems, deterioration in spark plug life, increase in carburetor or combustion chamber deposits, or...

  1. DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-12-04

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  2. Taenia solium: current understanding of laboratory animal models of taeniosis.

    PubMed

    Flisser, A; Avila, G; Maravilla, P; Mendlovic, F; León-Cabrera, S; Cruz-Rivera, M; Garza, A; Gómez, B; Aguilar, L; Terán, N; Velasco, S; Benítez, M; Jimenez-Gonzalez, D E

    2010-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a public health problem in many developing countries and is the most frequent parasitic disease of the brain. The human tapeworm carrier is the main risk factor for acquiring neurocysticercosis. Since the parasite lodges only in the human intestine, experimental models of Taenia solium taeniosis have been explored. Macaques, pigs, dogs, cats and rabbits are unsuccessful hosts even in immunodepressed status. By contrast, rodents are adequate hosts since tapeworms with mature, pregravid and, in some cases, gravid proglottids develop after infection. In this review, information that has been generated with experimental models of taeniosis due to T. solium is discussed. Initially, the use of the model for immunodiagnosis of human taeniosis and evaluation of intervention measures is summarized. Next, descriptions of tapeworms and comparison of hamsters, gerbils and other mammals as experimental models are discussed, as well as data on the humoral immune response, the inflammatory reaction and the production of cytokines associated to Th1 and Th2 responses in the intestinal mucosa. Finally, evaluation of protection induced against the development of tapeworms by recombinant T. solium calreticulin in hamsters is summarized and compared to other studies.

  3. Current Status of Superheat Spray Modeling With NCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.; Bulzan, Dan L.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of liquid fuel behavior at superheat conditions is identified to be a topic of importance in the design of modern supersonic engines. As a part of the NASA's supersonics project office initiative on high altitude emissions, we have undertaken an effort to assess the accuracy of various existing CFD models used in the modeling of superheated sprays. As a part of this investigation, we have completed the implementation of a modeling approach into the national combustion code (NCC), and then applied it to investigate the following three cases: (1) the validation of a flashing jet generated by the sudden release of pressurized R134A from a cylindrical nozzle, (2) the differences between two superheat vaporization models were studied based on both hot and cold flow calculations of a Parker-Hannifin pressure swirl atomizer, (3) the spray characteristics generated by a single-element LDI (Lean Direct Injector) experiment were studied to investigate the differences between superheat and non-superheat conditions. Further details can be found in the paper.

  4. Toxicity of Nanoparticles and an Overview of Current Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing field having potential applications in many areas. Nanoparticles (NPs) have been studied for cell toxicity, immunotoxicity, and genotoxicity. Tetrazolium-based assays such as MTT, MTS, and WST-1 are used to determine cell viability. Cell inflammatory response induced by NPs is checked by measuring inflammatory biomarkers, such as IL-8, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor, using ELISA. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay is used for cell membrane integrity. Different types of cell cultures, including cancer cell lines have been employed as in vitro toxicity models. It has been generally agreed that NPs interfere with either assay materials or with detection systems. So far, toxicity data generated by employing such models are conflicting and inconsistent. Therefore, on the basis of available experimental models, it may be difficult to judge and list some of the more valuable NPs as more toxic to biological systems and vice versa. Considering the potential applications of NPs in many fields and the growing apprehensions of FDA about the toxic potential of nanoproducts, it is the need of the hour to look for new internationally agreed free of bias toxicological models by focusing more on in vivo studies. PMID:26286636

  5. Toxicity of Nanoparticles and an Overview of Current Experimental Models.

    PubMed

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing field having potential applications in many areas. Nanoparticles (NPs) have been studied for cell toxicity, immunotoxicity, and genotoxicity. Tetrazolium-based assays such as MTT, MTS, and WST-1 are used to determine cell viability. Cell inflammatory response induced by NPs is checked by measuring inflammatory biomarkers, such as IL-8, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor, using ELISA. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay is used for cell membrane integrity. Different types of cell cultures, including cancer cell lines have been employed as in vitro toxicity models. It has been generally agreed that NPs interfere with either assay materials or with detection systems. So far, toxicity data generated by employing such models are conflicting and inconsistent. Therefore, on the basis of available experimental models, it may be difficult to judge and list some of the more valuable NPs as more toxic to biological systems and vice versa. Considering the potential applications of NPs in many fields and the growing apprehensions of FDA about the toxic potential of nanoproducts, it is the need of the hour to look for new internationally agreed free of bias toxicological models by focusing more on in vivo studies.

  6. Durability assessments of concrete using electrical properties and acoustic emission testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todak, Heather N.

    Premature damage deterioration has been observed in pavement joints throughout the Midwestern region of the United States. Over time, severe joint damage creates a transportation safety concern and the necessary repairs can be an extreme economic burden. The deterioration is due in part to freeze-thaw damage associated with fluid accumulation at the pavement joints. This very preventable problem is an indication that current specifications and construction practices for freeze-thaw durability of concrete are inadequate. This thesis serves to create a better understanding of moisture ingress, freeze-thaw damage mechanisms, and the effect of variations in mixture properties on freeze-thaw behavior of concrete. The concepts of the nick point degree of saturation, sorptivity rates, and critical degree of saturation are discussed. These factors contribute to service life, defined in this study as the duration of time a concrete element remains below levels of critical saturation which are required for damage development to initiate. A theoretical model and a simple experimental procedure are introduced which help determine the nick point for a series of 32 concrete mixtures with unique mixture proportions and air entrainment properties. This simple experimental procedure is also presented as a method to measure important electrical properties in order to establish the formation factor, a valuable measure of concrete transport properties. The results of freeze-thaw testing with acoustic emission monitoring are presented to help understand and quantify damage development in concrete specimens when conditioned to various degrees of saturation. This procedure was used to study the relationship between air entrainment properties and the critical degree of saturation. Applying the concepts of degree of saturation and sorptivity, a performance-based model is proposed as a new approach to specifications for freeze-thaw durability. Finally, a conceptual model is presented to

  7. A coronal magnetic field model with horizontal volume and sheet currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Xuepu; Hoeksema, J. Todd

    1994-01-01

    When globally mapping the observed photospheric magnetic field into the corona, the interaction of the solar wind and magnetic field has been treated either by imposing source surface boundary conditions that tacitly require volume currents outside the source surface or by limiting the interaction to thin current sheets between oppositely directed field regions. Yet observations and numerical Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) calculations suggest the presence of non-force-free volume currents throughout the corona as well as thin current sheets in the neighborhoods of the interfaces between closed and open field lines or between oppositely directed open field lines surrounding coronal helmet-streamer structures. This work presents a model including both horizontal volume currents and streamer sheet currents. The present model builds on the magnetostatic equilibria developed by Bogdan and Low and the current-sheet modeling technique developed by Schatten. The calculation uses synoptic charts of the line-of-sight component of the photospheric magnetic field measured at the Wilcox Solar Observatory. Comparison of an MHD model with the calculated model results for the case of a dipole field and comparison of eclipse observations with calculations for CR 1647 (near solar minimum) show that this horizontal current-current-sheet model reproduces polar plumes and axes of corona streamers better than the source-surface model and reproduces polar plumes and axes of corona streamers better than the source-surface model and reproduces coro nal helmet structures better than the current-sheet model.

  8. A microscopic model of current-induced switching of magnetization.

    PubMed

    Sandschneider, N; Nolting, W

    2010-01-20

    The behaviour of the magnetization in a ferromagnetic metal/nonmagnetic insulator/ferromagnetic metal/paramagnetic metal tunnel junction is studied, using the nonequilibrium Keldysh formalism. The two ferromagnets are described using the single-band Hubbard model. The left one is treated in the mean field approximation and the right ferromagnet within a (nonequilibrium) spectral density approach which takes interactions beyond the mean field into account. When a voltage is applied to the junction we observe a change of the relative orientation of the two magnetizations, which can be switched from parallel to antiparallel alignment and vice versa. This switching appears in a self-consistent way, so there is no need to use half-classical methods like the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation one. The dependence of the critical voltage at which the magnetization changes its sign on the model parameters can be studied in a systematic way. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd

  9. Cognitive mechanisms of mindfulness: A test of current models.

    PubMed

    Isbel, Ben; Mahar, Doug

    2015-12-15

    Existing models of mindfulness describe the self-regulation of attention as primary, leading to enhanced decentering and ability to access and override automatic cognitive processes. This study compared 23 experienced and 21 non-meditators on tests of mindfulness, attention, decentering, and ability to override automatic cognitive processes to test the cognitive mechanisms proposed to underlie mindfulness practice. Experienced meditators had significantly higher mindfulness and decentering than non-meditators. No significant difference between groups was found on measures of attention or ability to override automatic processes. These findings support the prediction that mindfulness leads to enhanced decentering, but do not support the cognitive mechanisms proposed to underlie such enhancement. Since mindfulness practice primarily involves internally directed attention, it may be the case that cognitive tests requiring externally directed attention and timed responses do not accurately assess mindfulness-induced cognitive changes. Implications for the models of mindfulness and future research are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Numerical Techniques for Coupled Ring Current - Radiation Belts Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseev, Nikita; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam; Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of electrons in the Earth's radiation belts can be described by the Fokker-Planck equation, which includes radial and local diffusion processes. The Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code was developed to solve the Fokker-Planck equation for electron PSD. It incorporates a range of numerical techniques, which are appropriate for this purpose. The code has been recently extended to include convection and now solves the convection-diffusion problem in 4D. This report is devoted to several numerical algorithms for modeling of the Earth's radiation belts. We concentrate on a comparison of 3rd and 9th-order schemes for solution of an advection problem, and show some results on the basis of the numerical solution of the local diffusion problem including mixed terms in 2D. Recent 4D modeling of storm events using the VERB-4D code will be also presented.

  11. Current state of the mass storage system reference model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, Robert

    1993-01-01

    IEEE SSSWG was chartered in May 1990 to abstract the hardware and software components of existing and emerging storage systems and to define the software interfaces between these components. The immediate goal is the decomposition of a storage system into interoperable functional modules which vendors can offer as separate commercial products. The ultimate goal is to develop interoperable standards which define the software interfaces, and in the distributed case, the associated protocols to each of the architectural modules in the model. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: IEEE SSSWG organization; IEEE SSSWG subcommittees & chairs; IEEE standards activity board; layered view of the reference model; layered access to storage services; IEEE SSSWG emphasis; and features for MSSRM version 5.

  12. Endpoints for Mouse Abdominal Tumor Models: Refinement of Current Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Paster, Eden V; Villines, Kimberly A; Hickman, Debra L

    2009-01-01

    Accurate, rapid, and noninvasive health assessments are required to establish more appropriate endpoints in mouse cancer models where tumor size is not easily measured. We evaluated potential endpoints in mice with experimentally induced peritoneal lymphoma, an abdominal tumor model, by comparing body weight, body condition, and behavior with those of a control group of mice not developing lymphoma. Our hypothesis was that body weight would increase or plateau, whereas body condition and behavioral scores would decrease, as disease progressed. Results indicated that body weight did not differ significantly between the control and experimental groups, but the experimental group experienced significant decreases in both body condition and behavioral scores. Our results support the use of body condition and behavioral scoring as adjunctive assessment methods for mice involved in abdominal lymphoma tumor studies in which health may decline despite an increase or plateau in body weight. PMID:19619413

  13. Oxide film microstructure: the link between surface preparation processes and strength/durability of adhesively bonded aluminum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, K. Jimmy; Pearlstein, Arne J.; Scheeline, Alexander; Shang, Jian Ku

    2000-11-30

    Strength and durability of adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys structures are intrinsically determined by the surface microstructures and interfacial failure micromechanisms. The current project presents a multidisciplinary approach to addressing critical issues controlling the strength and durability of adhesive bonds of aluminum alloys. Three main thrust areas have been pursued: surface treatment technology development to achieve desirable surface microstructures; relationship between surface structure and properties of adhesive bonds; and failure mechanisms of adhesively bonded components.

  14. Structural Integrity and Durability of Reusable Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A two-day conference on the structural integrity and durability of reusable space propulsion systems was held on 14 to 15 May 1991 at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Presentations were made by industry, university, and government researchers organized into four sessions: (1) aerothermodynamic loads; (2) instrumentation; (3) fatigue, fracture, and constitutive modeling; and (4) structural dynamics. The principle objectives were to disseminate research results and future plans in each of four areas. This publication contains extended abstracts and the visual material presented during the conference. Particular emphasis is placed on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and the SSME turbopump.

  15. Coating-Substrate Systems for Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-30

    Technical Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Coating - Substrate Systems for Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Tresa Pollock 3...Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils Final Report ONRGrant#N00014-l 1-1-0616 Technical Contact (Principal Investigator) Tresa M. Pollock Materials...Substrate Systems for Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils 1. Summary In the severe operating environments encountered in Naval ship

  16. 40 CFR 86.1822-01 - Durability data vehicle selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Durability data vehicle selection. 86...-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1822-01 Durability data vehicle selection. (a) Within each durability group, the vehicle configuration which is expected to generate the highest...

  17. 40 CFR 86.1822-01 - Durability data vehicle selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Durability data vehicle selection. 86...-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1822-01 Durability data vehicle selection. (a) Within each durability group, the vehicle configuration which is expected to generate the highest...

  18. 40 CFR 94.219 - Durability data engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Durability data engine selection. 94... Durability data engine selection. (a) For Category 1 and Category 2 engines, the manufacturer shall select for durability testing, from each engine family, the engine configuration which is expected to...

  19. 40 CFR 86.1822-01 - Durability data vehicle selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Durability data vehicle selection. 86..., and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1822-01 Durability data vehicle selection. (a) Within each durability group, the vehicle configuration which is expected to generate the highest level of...

  20. 40 CFR 94.219 - Durability data engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Durability data engine selection. 94... Durability data engine selection. (a) For Category 1 and Category 2 engines, the manufacturer shall select for durability testing, from each engine family, the engine configuration which is expected to...

  1. 40 CFR 94.219 - Durability data engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Durability data engine selection. 94... Durability data engine selection. (a) For Category 1 and Category 2 engines, the manufacturer shall select for durability testing, from each engine family, the engine configuration which is expected to...

  2. 40 CFR 94.219 - Durability data engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Durability data engine selection. 94... Durability data engine selection. (a) For Category 1 and Category 2 engines, the manufacturer shall select for durability testing, from each engine family, the engine configuration which is expected to...

  3. 40 CFR 86.1822-01 - Durability data vehicle selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Durability data vehicle selection. 86...-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1822-01 Durability data vehicle selection. (a) Within each durability group, the vehicle configuration which is expected to generate the highest...

  4. Investigation of titanium nitride as catalyst support material and development of durable electrocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avasarala, Bharat K.

    The impending energy and climatic crisis makes it imperative for human society to seek non-fossil based alternative sources for our energy needs. Although many alternative energy technologies are currently being developed, fuel cell technology provides energy solutions, which satisfy a wide range of applications. But the current fuel cell technology is far from its target of large scale commercialization mainly because of its high cost and poor durability. Considerable work has been done in reducing the cost but its durability still needs significant improvement. Of the various materials in a PEM fuel cell, the degradation of electrocatalyst affects its durability the most, leading to performance loss. Carbon black (C) support corrosion plays a significant role in the electrocatalyst degradation and its severe affects due to potential cycling has been identified through my research. Through my resaerch, I introduce titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiN NP) as alternative catalyst supports replacing carbon black. TiN NP has higher electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance compared to that of C. The physical and electrochemical properties of TiN NP were studied and the Pt/TiN electrocatalyst was synthesized using polyol process. Upon optimizing using DOE, for desired catalyst particle size and activity, Pt/TiN is shown to have higher catalytic performance than conventional Pt/C. TiN NP are significantly influenced by the electrochemical conditions and show 'active' or 'passive' nature depending on the temperature and acidic concentration; and a temperature dependence model is proposed to understand the active/passive nature of TiN NP. A one-to-one comparison between TiN NP and C electrodes under similar electrochemical conditions show a superior performance of TiN NP as a catalyst support. The durability of the Pt/TiN electrocatalyst is also tested and it agrees well with the proposed model of active/passive nature of the TiN NP. Through theoretical calculation

  5. Therma1 Conductivity and Durability of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperature and reduce cooling, thus helping to achieve engine emission and efficiency goals. Future TBCs must be designed with increased phase stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved sintering and thermal stress resistance in order to effectively protect engine hot-section components. Advanced low conductivity TBCs are being developed at NASA by incorporating multi-component oxide dopants into zirconia-yttria or hafnia-yttria to promote the formation of thermodynamically stable defect clusters within the coating structures. This presentation will primarily focus on thermal conductivity and durability of the novel defect cluster thermal barrier coatings for turbine airfoil and combustor applications, determined by a unique CO2 laser heat-flux approach. The laser heat-flux testing approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity under simulated engine temperature and thermal gradient conditions. The conductivity increase due to coating sintering (and/or phase change) and the conductivity decrease due to coating delamination have been determined under steady-state, cyclic, uniform or non-uniform heat-flux conditions. The coating radiation flux resistance has been evaluated by varying coating thermal gradients, and also by using a laser-heated radiative-flux source. Advanced multi-component TBC systems have been shown to have significantly reduced thermal conductivity and improved high temperature stability due to the nano-sized, low mobility defect clusters associated with the paired rare earth dopant additions. The effect of oxide defect cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, thermal stability and furnace cyclic durability will also be discussed. The current low conductivity TBC systems have demonstrated long-term cyclic durability at very high

  6. Durability Characterization of Advanced Polymeric Composites at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, T. S.

    2001-01-01

    The next generation of reusable launch vehicles will require technology development in several key areas. Of these key areas, the development of polymeric composite cryogenic fuel tanks promises to present one of the most difficult technical challenges. It is envisioned that a polymer matrix composite (PMC) tank would be a large shell structure capable of containing cryogenic fuels and carrying a range of structural loads. The criteria that will be imposed on such a design include reduced weight, conformal geometry, and impermeability. It is this last criterion, impermeability, that will provide the focus of this paper. The essence of the impermeability criterion is that the tank remains leak free throughout its design lifetime. To address this criterion, one of the first steps is to conduct a complete durability assessment of the PMC materials. At Langley Research Center, a durability assessment of promising new polyimide-based PMCs is underway. This durability program has focused on designing a set of critical laboratory experiments that will determine fundamental material properties under combined thermal-mechanical loading at cryogenic temperatures. The test program provides measurements of lamina and laminate properties, including strength, stiffness, and fracture toughness. The performance of the PMC materials is monitored as a function of exposure conditions and aging time. Residual properties after exposure are measured at cryogenic temperatures and provide quantitative values of residual strength and stiffness. Primary degradation mechanisms and the associated damage modes are measured with both destructive and nondestructive techniques. In addition to mechanical properties, a range of physical properties, such as weight, glass transition, and crack density, are measured and correlated with the test conditions. This paper will report on the progress of this research program and present critical results and illustrative examples of current findings.

  7. Therma1 Conductivity and Durability of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperature and reduce cooling, thus helping to achieve engine emission and efficiency goals. Future TBCs must be designed with increased phase stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved sintering and thermal stress resistance in order to effectively protect engine hot-section components. Advanced low conductivity TBCs are being developed at NASA by incorporating multi-component oxide dopants into zirconia-yttria or hafnia-yttria to promote the formation of thermodynamically stable defect clusters within the coating structures. This presentation will primarily focus on thermal conductivity and durability of the novel defect cluster thermal barrier coatings for turbine airfoil and combustor applications, determined by a unique CO2 laser heat-flux approach. The laser heat-flux testing approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity under simulated engine temperature and thermal gradient conditions. The conductivity increase due to coating sintering (and/or phase change) and the conductivity decrease due to coating delamination have been determined under steady-state, cyclic, uniform or non-uniform heat-flux conditions. The coating radiation flux resistance has been evaluated by varying coating thermal gradients, and also by using a laser-heated radiative-flux source. Advanced multi-component TBC systems have been shown to have significantly reduced thermal conductivity and improved high temperature stability due to the nano-sized, low mobility defect clusters associated with the paired rare earth dopant additions. The effect of oxide defect cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, thermal stability and furnace cyclic durability will also be discussed. The current low conductivity TBC systems have demonstrated long-term cyclic durability at very high

  8. An Analytical Model of Wave-Induced Longshore Current Based on Power Law Wave Height Decay.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    34I ANALYtTICAL MODEL OF NAVE-INDUCED LON6SHORE CURRENT BASED ON PONE* LAW.. (U) COASTAL ENG INEERING RESEAKNH CENTER VICKSBURG NS J N SMITH ET AL...j . - .L .V . : ; * AN ANALYTICAL MODEL OF WAVE-INDUCED ~ z * LONGSHORE CURRENT BASED ON POWER LAW * - WAVE HEIGHT DECAY by Jane McKee...I_ I IF 31592 11. TITLE (Include Security Classfication) • An Analytical Model of Wave-Induced Longshore Current Based on Power Law . Wave

  9. A generalized hinged-magnetodisc model of Jupiter's nightside current sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, Krishan K.

    1992-01-01

    A nonaxial hinged magnetodisk model of Jupiter's nightside current sheet is presented. The model organizes the current sheet crossings equally successfully for all three of the spacecraft that have visited the nightside of Jupiter. The model assumes that the hinging is caused by the action of the solar wind forcing on the magnetotail of Jupiter. It is found necessary to include both the hinging of the current sheet and the propagation delay to obtain good fits to the observations.

  10. A generalized hinged-magnetodisc model of Jupiter's nightside current sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, Krishan K.

    1992-01-01

    A nonaxial hinged magnetodisk model of Jupiter's nightside current sheet is presented. The model organizes the current sheet crossings equally successfully for all three of the spacecraft that have visited the nightside of Jupiter. The model assumes that the hinging is caused by the action of the solar wind forcing on the magnetotail of Jupiter. It is found necessary to include both the hinging of the current sheet and the propagation delay to obtain good fits to the observations.

  11. Projected current density comparison in tDCS block and smooth FE modeling.

    PubMed

    Indahlastari, Aprinda; Chauhan, Munish; Sadleir, Rosalind J

    2016-08-01

    Current density distribution and projected current density calculation following transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) forward model in a human head were compared between two modeling pipelines: block and smooth. Block model was directly constructed from MRI voxel resolution and simulated in C. Smooth models underwent a boundary smoothing process by applying recursive Gaussian filters and simulated in COMSOL. Three smoothing levels were added to determine their effects on current density distribution compared to block models. Median current density percentage differences were calculated in anterior superior temporal gyrus (ASTG), hippocampus (HIP), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), occipital lobes (OCC) and precentral gyrus (PRC) and normalized against a baseline value. A maximum of + 20% difference in median current density was found for three standard electrode montages: F3-RS, T7-T8 and Cz-Oz. Furthermore, median current density percentage differences in each montage target brain structures were found to be within + 7%. Higher levels of smoothing increased median current density percentage differences in T7-T8 and Cz-Oz target structures. However, while demonstrating similar trends in each montage, additional smoothing levels showed no clear relationship between their smoothing effects and calculated median current density in the five cortical structures. Finally, relative L2 error in reconstructed projected current density was found to be 17% and 21% for block and smooth pipelines, respectively. Overall, a block model workflow may be a more attractive alternative for simulating tDCS stimulation because involves a shorter modeling time and independence from commercial modeling platforms.

  12. Current Methods of Natural Hazards Communication used within Catastrophe Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawber, C.; Latchman, S.

    2012-04-01

    In the field of catastrophe modelling, natural hazards need to be explained every day to (re)insurance professionals so that they may understand estimates of the loss potential of their portfolio. The effective communication of natural hazards to city professionals requires different strategies to be taken depending on the audience, their prior knowledge and respective backgrounds. It is best to have at least three sets of tools in your arsenal for a specific topic, 1) an illustration/animation, 2) a mathematical formula and 3) a real world case study example. This multi-faceted approach will be effective for those that learn best by pictorial means, mathematical means or anecdotal means. To show this we will use a set of real examples employed in the insurance industry of how different aspects of natural hazards and the uncertainty around them are explained to city professionals. For example, explaining the different modules within a catastrophe model such as the hazard, vulnerability and loss modules. We highlight how recent technology such as 3d plots, video recording and Google Earth maps, when used properly can help explain concepts quickly and easily. Finally we also examine the pitfalls of using overly-complicated visualisations and in general how counter-intuitive deductions may be made.

  13. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-03-03

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  14. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-02-20

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  15. Parameterizing total storm conduction currents in the Community Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalb, Christina; Deierling, Wiebke; Baumgaertner, Andreas; Peterson, Michael; Liu, Chuntao; Mach, Douglas

    2016-11-01

    Electrified clouds are known to play a major role in the Global Electric Circuit. These clouds produce upward currents which maintain the potential difference between Earth's surface and the upper atmosphere. In this study, model output from two simulations of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) are compared with conduction currents and other data derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, including both the Lightning Imaging Sensor and Precipitation Radar. The intention is to determine CESM's skill at representing these microphysical and dynamical properties of clouds. Then, these cloud properties are used to develop a model parameterization to compute conduction currents from electrified clouds. Specifically, we evaluate the ability of global mean convective mass flux, ice water path, and convective precipitation to represent conduction current sources. Parameterizations using these variables yield derived global mean currents that agree well with the geographical patterns of TRMM currents. In addition, comparing the diurnal variations of modeled global mean current to the observed diurnal variations of electric potential gradient, root-mean-square (RMS) errors range between 6.5% and 8.1%, but the maximum occurs 4 to 6 h early in all three variables. Output currents derived from the model variables generally match well to the currents derived from TRMM, and the total global current estimates agree well with past studies. This suggests that cloud parameters are well suited for representing the global distribution and strength of currents in a global model framework.

  16. Durability aspects of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethuraman, Vijay Anand

    activity. The H2O 2 selectivity in ORR was independent of oxygen concentration but increased with decrease in water activity (i.e., decreased humidity). Presences of trace impurities (such as CO, H2S, NH3, etc.) in the fuel also affect PEMFC durability. Among these impurities, H 2S causes significantly higher performance loss and irreversible catalytic poisoning. A concise mechanism for the poisoning kinetics of H2S on composite solid polymer electrolyte Pt (SPE-Pt) electrode was validated experimentally by charge balances and theoretically by a model, which predicted the oxidation current as a function of the applied potential. H2S dissociatively adsorbed onto SPE-Pt electrode as linear and bridge bonded sulfur (S) species and, under favorable potentials, underwent electro-oxidation to sulfur and then to sulfur dioxide (SO2). Fraction of the adsorbed S species remained as 'hard-to-oxidize' adsorbents and caused irreversible loss of catalytic activity. Deactivation of bridge sites occurred first followed by the loss of linear sites. A method to estimate the catalytic sites irreversibly lost due to sulfur poisoning was developed.

  17. Dual dimensional nanostructures with highly durable non-wetting properties under dynamic and underwater conditions.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seunghyeon; Kim, Wuseok; Jeon, Sangmin; Yong, Kijung

    2017-03-23

    Non-wetting states with high durability under both dynamic and underwater conditions are very desirable for practical applications of superhydrophobic surfaces in various fields. Despite increasing demands for this dual stability of non-wetting surfaces, studies investigating both the impact dynamics and underwater stability are very rare. In the current study, we performed water droplet impact dynamics and underwater stability studies using ZnO/Si hierarchical nanostructures (HNs) as a model system. The effects of the surface structure on the non-wetting states under dynamic conditions were first studied by comparing various surface structures, such as ZnO nanowires (NWs), Si microposts (MPs), ZnO/Si HNs with controlled MP interspacings, and lotus leaf (LL). The growth of ZnO NWs on Si MPs drastically improves the non-wetting properties of Si MPs under dynamic conditions. The transition of wetting states from the Cassie-Baxter state to the Wenzel state occurs on ZnO/Si HNs as the impact velocity increases. Measurement of the critical We number during transition enables us to determine the important parameters of wetting pressure using a simple model. Moreover, compared to Si MPs, ZnO NWs, and LL, our ZnO/Si HNs exhibit dramatically increased air pocket lifetimes under underwater conditions, which is due to the enhanced capillary pressure originating from the dual dimensional hierarchical structure. Our study indicates that optimally designed hierarchical surfaces have remarkably high durability non-wetting states under both dynamic and underwater conditions, expanding the potential application of non-wetting surfaces.

  18. Durability of glasses from the Hg-doped Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1992-08-30

    The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) for the vitrification of high-level radioactive wastes is designed and constructed to be a 1/9th scale prototype of the full scale Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. The IDMS facility is the first engineering scale melter system capable of processing mercury, and flowsheet levels of halides and noble metals. In order to determine the effects of mercury on the feed preparation process, the off-gas chemistry, glass melting behavior, and glass durability, a three-run mercury (Hg) campaign was conducted. The glasses produced during the Hg campaign were composed of Batch 1 sludge, simulated precipitate hydrolysis aqueous product (PHA) from the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF), and Frit 202. The glasses were produced using the DWPF process/product models for glass durability, viscosity, and liquidus. The durability model indicated that the glasses would all be more durable than the glass qualified in the DWPF Environmental Assessment (EA). The glass quality was verified by performing the Product Consistency Test (PCT) which was designed for glass durability testing in the DWPF.

  19. World agriculture and climate change: Current modeling issues

    SciTech Connect

    Darwin, R.

    1996-12-31

    Recent studies suggest that although global increases in temperature and changes in precipitation patterns during the next century will affect world agriculture, farmer adaptations are likely to prevent climate change from jeopardizing world food production. The costs and benefits of global climate change, however, are not equally distributed around the world. Agricultural production may increase in high latitude and alpine areas, but decrease in tropical and some other areas. Also, land use changes that accompany climate-induced shifts in cropland and permanent pasture are likely to raise additional social and environmental issues. Despite these advances, some important aspects of climate change have not been adequately simulated in global models. These include the effects that climate-induced changes in water resources are likely to have on agricultural production, the well-documented beneficial effects of higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide on plant growth and water use, and the cooling effects of tropospheric emissions of sulfur dioxide. In addition, past research generally relied on equilibrium climates based on a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Now, however, results from transient climate change experiments are available.

  20. Proton currents constrain structural models of voltage sensor activation

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Aaron L; Mokrab, Younes; Bennett, Ashley L; Sansom, Mark SP; Ramsey, Ian Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Hv1 proton channel is evidently unique among voltage sensor domain proteins in mediating an intrinsic ‘aqueous’ H+ conductance (GAQ). Mutation of a highly conserved ‘gating charge’ residue in the S4 helix (R1H) confers a resting-state H+ ‘shuttle’ conductance (GSH) in VGCs and Ci VSP, and we now report that R1H is sufficient to reconstitute GSH in Hv1 without abrogating GAQ. Second-site mutations in S3 (D185A/H) and S4 (N4R) experimentally separate GSH and GAQ gating, which report thermodynamically distinct initial and final steps, respectively, in the Hv1 activation pathway. The effects of Hv1 mutations on GSH and GAQ are used to constrain the positions of key side chains in resting- and activated-state VS model structures, providing new insights into the structural basis of VS activation and H+ transfer mechanisms in Hv1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18017.001 PMID:27572256

  1. Blended learning in anesthesia education: current state and future model.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Jaya; Kurup, Viji

    2012-12-01

    Educators in anesthesia residency programs across the country are facing a number of challenges as they attempt to integrate blended learning techniques in their curriculum. Compared with the rest of higher education, which has made advances to varying degrees in the adoption of online learning anesthesiology education has been sporadic in the active integration of blended learning. The purpose of this review is to discuss the challenges in anesthesiology education and relevance of the Universal Design for Learning framework in addressing them. There is a wide chasm between student demand for online education and the availability of trained faculty to teach. The design of the learning interface is important and will significantly affect the learning experience for the student. This review examines recent literature pertaining to this field, both in the realm of higher education in general and medical education in particular, and proposes the application of a comprehensive learning model that is new to anesthesiology education and relevant to its goals of promoting self-directed learning.

  2. Current understanding of divertor detachment: experiments and modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Wischmeier, W; Groth, M; Kallenbach, A; Chankin, A; Coster, D; Dux, R; Herrmann, A; Muller, H; Pugno, R; Reiter, D; Scarabosio, A; Watkins, J; Team, T D; Team, A U

    2008-05-23

    A qualitative as well as quantitative evaluation of experimentally observed plasma parameters in the detached regime proves to be difficult for several tokamaks. A series of ohmic discharges have been performed in ASDEX Upgrade and DIII-D at similar as possible plasma parameters and at different line averaged densities, {bar n}{sub e}. The experimental data represent a set of well diagnosed discharges against which numerical simulations are compared. For the numerical modeling the fluid-code B2.5 coupled to the Monte Carlo neutrals transport code EIRENE is used. Only the combined enhancement of effects, such as geometry, drift terms, neutral conductance, increased radial transport and divertor target composition, explains a significant fraction of the experimentally observed asymmetries of the ion fluxes as a function of {bar n}{sub e} to the inner and outer target plates in ASDEX Upgrade. The relative importance of the mechanisms leading to detachment are different in DIII-D and ASDEX Upgrade.

  3. Electric field and current density distribution in an anatomical head model during transcranial direct current stimulation for tinnitus treatment.

    PubMed

    Parazzini, Marta; Fiocchi, Serena; Ravazzani, Paolo

    2012-09-01

    Tinnitus is considered an auditory phantom percept. Recently, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been proposed as a new approach for tinnitus treatment including, as potential targets of interest, either the temporal and temporoparietal cortex or prefrontal areas. This study investigates and compares the spatial distribution of the magnitude of the electric field and the current density in the brain tissues during tDCS of different brain targets. A numerical method was applied on a realistic human head model to calculate these field distributions in different brain structures, such as the cortex, white matter, cerebellum, hippocampus, medulla oblongata, pons, midbrain, thalamus, and hypothalamus. Moreover, the same distributions were evaluated along the auditory pathways. Results of this study show that tDCS of the left temporoparietal cortex resulted in a widespread diffuse distribution of the magnitude of the electric fields (and also of the current density) on an area of the cortex larger than the target brain region. On the contrary, tDCS of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex resulted in a stimulation mainly concentrated on the target itself. Differences in the magnitude distribution were also found on the structures along the auditory pathways. A sensitivity analysis was also performed, varying the electrode position and the human head models. Accurate estimation of the field distribution during tDCS in different regions of the head could be valuable to better determine and predict efficacy of tDCS for tinnitus suppression. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Persistent current and Drude weight for the one-dimensional Hubbard model from current lattice density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Akande, A; Sanvito, S

    2012-02-08

    The Bethe ansatz local density approximation (LDA) to lattice density functional theory (LDFT) for the one-dimensional repulsive Hubbard model is extended to current-LDFT (CLDFT). The transport properties of mesoscopic Hubbard rings threaded by a magnetic flux are then systematically investigated by this scheme. In particular we present calculations of ground state energies, persistent currents and Drude weights for both a repulsive homogeneous and a single impurity Hubbard model. Our results for the ground state energies in the metallic phase compare favorably well with those obtained with numerically accurate many-body techniques. Also the dependence of the persistent currents on the Coulomb and the impurity interaction strength, and on the ring size are all well captured by LDA-CLDFT. Our study demonstrates the value of CLDFT in describing the transport properties of one-dimensional correlated electron systems. As its computational overheads are rather modest, we propose this method as a tool for studying problems where both disorder and interaction are present.

  5. Development of film- and- fabric composite materials durability assessing methodology under time-dependent influences of temperature and solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayumov, R. A.; Muhamedova, I. Z.; Suleymanov, A. M.; Tazyukov, B. F.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present the design of stress-strain state calculation and film-and- fabric composite materials durability under stresses and solar radiation. We have constructed a two-dimensional finite-state-element computer model of the deforming process of the low- level cell of film-and-fabric-based composite material for the evaluation of its durability which takes into account non-linear viscoelasticity, temperature variations, ageing of the material, the process of upbuilding of microdamage and photodegradation. Qualitative research of operational factors influence (UV, temperature) on film-and-fabric composite materials durability was conducted.

  6. A model for the shell current in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, P.A. . Dept. of Physics); Robertson, S.H. )

    1990-04-01

    A model is presented for the current in a resistive shell in a reversed field pinch (RFP). The model is compared to experimental measurements. The model is applied to experiments performed on the Reversatron II RFP and is shown to provide an approximate description of the shell current. This model provides a means for including the effect of the shell in the design of feedback control systems that may be used on existing or future RFP's having resistive shells.

  7. Gate-to-body tunneling current model for silicon-on-insulator MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing-Qing; Chen, Jing; Luo, Jie-Xin; Lü, Kai; Yu, Tao; Chai, Zhan; Wang, Xi

    2013-10-01

    A gate-to-body tunneling current model for silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices is simulated. As verified by the measured data, the model, considering both gate voltage and drain voltage dependence as well as image force-induced barrier low effect, provides a better prediction of the tunneling current and gate-induced floating body effect than the BSIMSOI4 model. A delayed gate-induced floating body effect is also predicted by the model.

  8. Spatial Structure and Asymmetries of Magnetospheric Currents Inferred from High-Resolution Empirical Geomagnetic Field Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnov, M. I.; Stephens, G. K.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Brandt, P. C.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Reconstruction of the large-scale magnetospheric current systems from data has long been based on ad hoc assumptions regarding their spatial structure. A dramatic increase of amount of data provided by space-borne magnetometers from geosynchronous satellites, IMP 8, Geotail, Polar, Cluster, THEMIS, and Van Allen Probes missions enabled the development of a new approach to empirical geomagnetic field modeling. In this approach the custom-tailored modules prescribing the configuration of magnetospheric current systems were replaced by basis function expansions making the model structure free from previous a priori constraints. The new approach reveals a complex structure of the magnetospheric current systems and, in particular, their substantial dawn-dusk asymmetry during magnetic storms. This includes the formation of the hook-shaped current in the main phase, the double partial ring current near the Sym-H minimum, ring current erosion, and near-magnetopause eastward current in the pre-noon sector. With the help of data from the Van Allen Probes mission, the highest-resolution empirical models have resolved the eastward current in the innermost magnetosphere and its local-time asymmetry, including the so-called banana-current structures. At the same time, the increase of the number of degrees of freedom of the empirical model in the description of field-aligned currents has shown that the hook-shaped equatorial current corresponds to the spiral structure of the large-scale upward Birkeland currents, which can now be resolved in detail by AMPERE.

  9. Durability and Design Issues of Thermal/environmental Barrier Coatings on Sic/sic Ceramic Matrix Composites Under 1650 C Test Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal/environmental barrier coatings for SiC-based ceramics will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating durability remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. Currently, advanced T/EBC systems, which typically include a high temperature capable zirconia- (or hahia-) based oxide top coat (thermal barrier) on a less temperature capable mullite/barium-strontium-aluminosilicate (BSAS)/Si inner coat (environmental barrier), are being developed and tested for higher temperature capability Sic combustor applications. In this paper, durability of several thermal/environmental barrier coating systems on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites was investigated under laser simulated engine thermal gradient cyclic, and 1650 C (3000 F) test conditions. The coating cracking and delamination processes were monitored and evaluated. The effects of temperature gradients and coating configurations on the ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation were analyzed using finite element analysis (FEA) models based on the observed failure mechanisms, in conjunction with mechanical testing results. The environmental effects on the coating durability will be discussed. The coating design approach will also be presented.

  10. Neural network analysis of nuclear waste glass composition vs durability

    SciTech Connect

    Seibel, C.K.

    1994-04-01

    The relationship between the chemical composition of oxide glasses and their physical properties is poorly understood, but it is becoming more important as vitrification (transformation into glass) of high-level nuclear waste becomes the favored method for long-term storage. The vitrified waste will be stored deep in geologic repositories where it must remain intact for at least 10,000 years. A strong resistance to groundwater exposure; i.c. a slow rate of glass dissolution, is of great importance. This project deals specifically with glass samples developed and tested for the nuclear fuel reprocessing facility near West Valley, New York. This facility needs to dispose of approximately 2.2 million liters of high-level radioactive liquid waste currently stored in stainless steel tanks. A self-organizing, artificial neural network was used to analyze the trends in the glass dissolution data for the effects of composition and the resulting durability of borosilicate glasses in an aqueous environment. This durability data can be used to systematically optimize the properties of the complex nuclear glasses and slow the dissolution rate of radionuclides into the environment.

  11. Durability Testing of Commercial Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schienle, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    Technical efforts by AlliedSignal Engines in DOE/NASA-funded project from February, 1978 through December, 1995 are reported in the fields ceramic materials for gas turbine engines and cyclic thermal durability testing. A total of 29 materials were evaluated in 40 cyclic oxidation exposure durability tests. Ceramic test bars were cyclically thermally exposed to a hot combustion environment at temperatures up to 1371 C (2500 F) for periods of up to 3500 hours, simulating conditions typically encountered by hot flowpath components in an automotive gas turbine engine. Before and after exposure, quarter-point flexure strength tests were performed on the specimens, and fractography examinations including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed to determine failure origins.

  12. Verification tests of durable TPS concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shideler, J. L.; Webb, G. L.; Pittman, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    Titanium multiwall, superalloy honeycomb, and Advanced Carbon-carbon (ACC) multipost Thermal Protection System (TPS) concepts are being developed to provide durable protection for surfaces of future space transportation systems. Verification tests including thermal, vibration, acoustic, water absorption, lightning strike, and aerothermal tests are described. Preliminary results indicate that the three TPS concepts are viable up to a surface temperature in excess of 2300 F.

  13. Effects of Irradiation on Albite's Chemical Durability.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsuan; La Plante, Erika Callagon; Krishnan, N M Anoop; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2017-10-04

    Albite (NaAlSi3O8), a framework silicate of the plagioclase feldspar family and a common constituent of felsic rocks, is often present in the siliceous mineral aggregates that compose concrete. When exposed to radiation (e.g., in the form of neutrons) in nuclear power plants, the crystal structure of albite can undergo significant alterations. These alterations may degrade its chemical durability. Indeed, careful examinations of Ar(+)-implanted albite carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and molecular dynamics simulations show that albite's crystal structure, upon irradiation, undergoes progressive disordering, resulting in an expansion in its molar volume (i.e., a reduction of density) and a reduction in the connectivity of its atomic network. This loss of network connectivity (i.e., rigidity) results in an enhancement of the aqueous dissolution rate of albite-measured using vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) in alkaline environments-by a factor of 20. This enhancement in the dissolution rate (i.e., reduction in chemical durability) of albite following irradiation has significant impacts on the durability of felsic rocks and of concrete containing them upon their exposure to radiation in nuclear power plant (NPP) environments.

  14. Creep Behavior and Durability of Cracked CMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Fox, Dennis; Smith, Craig

    2015-01-01

    To understand failure mechanisms and durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), Melt Infiltration (MI) SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-iBN fibers and full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-ion bombarded BN (iBN) and Hi-Nicalon -S fibers were pre-cracked between 150 to 200 megapascal and then creep and Sustained Peak Low Cycle Fatigue (SPLCF) tested at 13150 C at stress levels from 35 to 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace and burner rig conditions. In addition creep testing was also conducted on pre-cracked full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites at 14500 C between 35 and 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace conditions. If the specimens survived the 200 hour durability tests, then they were tensile tested at room temperature to determine their residual tensile properties. The failed specimens were examined by Scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine the failure modes and mechanisms. The influence of crack healing matrix, fiber types, crack density, testing modes and interface oxidation on durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be discussed.

  15. Improving the durability of a drag-reducing nanocoating by enhancing its mechanical stability.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mengjiao; Zhang, Songsong; Dong, Hongyu; Han, Shihui; Wei, Hao; Shi, Feng

    2015-02-25

    The durability of superhydrophobic surface is a major problem to restrict industrial application of superhydrophobic materials from laboratory research, which can be attributed to a more general issue of mechanical stability for superhydrophobic coatings. Therefore, in order to handle this issue, we have fabricated a mechanically stable drag-reducing coating composed of elastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and hydrophobic copper particles on model ships, which can resist mechanical abrasion and has displayed a durable drag-reducing effect. In comparison with normal Au superhydrophobic coatings, the as-prepared PDMS/copper coatings showed durable drag reduction performance with a similar drag-reducing rate before (26%) and after (24%) mechanical abrasion. The mechanism for the enhanced mechanical stability and maintained drag reduction of the superhydrophobic surfaces was investigated through characterizations of surface morphology, surface wettability, and water adhesive force evaluation before and after abrasion. This is the first demonstration to realize the application of durable drag reduction by improving the mechanical stability of superhydrophobic coatings. We do believe that superhydrophobic surfaces with good resistance to mechanical abrasion or scratching may draw wide attention and gain significant applications with durable drag-reducing properties.

  16. Experimental study on durability improvement of fly ash concrete with durability improving admixture.

    PubMed

    Quan, Hong-zhu; Kasami, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the durability of fly ash concrete, a series of experimental studies are carried out, where durability improving admixture is used to reduce drying shrinkage and improve freezing-thawing resistance. The effects of durability improving admixture, air content, water-binder ratio, and fly ash replacement ratio on the performance of fly ash concrete are discussed in this paper. The results show that by using durability improving admixture in nonair-entraining fly ash concrete, the compressive strength of fly ash concrete can be improved by 10%-20%, and the drying shrinkage is reduced by 60%. Carbonation resistance of concrete is roughly proportional to water-cement ratio regardless of water-binder ratio and fly ash replacement ratio. For the specimens cured in air for 2 weeks, the freezing-thawing resistance is improved. In addition, by making use of durability improving admixture, it is easier to control the air content and make fly ash concrete into nonair-entraining one. The quality of fly ash concrete is thereby optimized.

  17. Experimental Study on Durability Improvement of Fly Ash Concrete with Durability Improving Admixture

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Hong-zhu; Kasami, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the durability of fly ash concrete, a series of experimental studies are carried out, where durability improving admixture is used to reduce drying shrinkage and improve freezing-thawing resistance. The effects of durability improving admixture, air content, water-binder ratio, and fly ash replacement ratio on the performance of fly ash concrete are discussed in this paper. The results show that by using durability improving admixture in nonair-entraining fly ash concrete, the compressive strength of fly ash concrete can be improved by 10%–20%, and the drying shrinkage is reduced by 60%. Carbonation resistance of concrete is roughly proportional to water-cement ratio regardless of water-binder ratio and fly ash replacement ratio. For the specimens cured in air for 2 weeks, the freezing-thawing resistance is improved. In addition, by making use of durability improving admixture, it is easier to control the air content and make fly ash concrete into nonair-entraining one. The quality of fly ash concrete is thereby optimized. PMID:25013870

  18. The comparison between modeling of edge localized modes with a current relaxation model and experiment on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, J. Q.; Liang, Y.; Pearson, J.; Zhang, T.; Zang, Q.; Wu, M. Q.; Huang, J.; Team1, EAST

    2017-08-01

    The distinctions of edge localized mode (ELM) frequency distributions between moderate and high edge current density cases were observed on the experiment advanced superconducting tokamak. In this paper, a current relaxation model is applied to explain this new observation. It has been demonstrated that the ELM frequency is very sensitive to the edge current density and the edge safety factor by the model predictions. The results also show that, in the large edge current density case, the ELM frequency is subject to a single-peak distribution; while in the moderate edge current density case, the ELM frequency is subject to a roughly multi-peak distribution.

  19. Individualised prediction of pulmonary homograft durability in tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Bokma, Jouke P; Winter, Michiel M; Oosterhof, Thomas; Vliegen, Hubert W; van Dijk, Arie P; Hazekamp, Mark G; Koolbergen, Dave R; Groenink, Maarten; Mulder, Barbara J M; Bouma, Berto J

    2015-11-01

    In patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF), multiple reoperations or percutaneous interventions after pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) may be necessary due to limited homograft durability. However, data to guide individualised prediction of homograft durability remain scarce. The aim of this study was to provide risk models for RV to pulmonary artery homograft durability. This retrospective multicentre study included consecutive patients with rTOF who had undergone PVR at an age of >12 years. Homograft dysfunction was defined as at least moderate pulmonary regurgitation (PR) or pulmonary stenosis (PS) (pressure gradient ≥36 mm Hg) as assessed by echocardiography. Reintervention was defined as percutaneous intervention or redo-PVR. A total of 153 patients with rTOF were included (62% male, mean age at PVR 31±11 years, pulmonary homograft 96%, follow-up 9.6 years (IQR 5.9, 13.3)). Average freedom from homograft dysfunction and reintervention after 10 years was 74% and 89%, respectively. In multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis, postoperative PS ≥20 mm Hg (HR 6.52, 95% CI 3.09 to 13.7), postoperative PR ≥ grade 1 (HR 3.13, 95% CI 1.45 to 6.74) and age at PVR <18 years (HR 3.52, 95% CI 1.64 to 7.53) were independently predictive for homograft dysfunction. In patients without any risk factor, 10-year freedom from homograft dysfunction and reintervention was excellent (91% and 96%, respectively) in contrast to patients with ≥2 risk factors (25% and 73%, respectively). Individualised prediction of homograft durability in patients with rTOF can be guided by early postoperative echocardiography. In adult patients without early postoperative PS or PR, homograft dysfunction and reintervention are unlikely to occur within 10 years, and follow-up may be less stringent. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Wetland methane modelling over the Scandinavian Arctic: Performance of current land-surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, Garry; Quiquet, Aurélien; Gedney, Nicola; Clark, Douglas; Friend, Andrew; George, Charles; Prigent, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Wetlands are generally accepted as being the largest, but least well quantified, single natural source of CH4, with global emission estimates ranging from 100-231 Tg yr-1 [1] and for which the Boreal and Arctic regions make a significant contribution [2, 3]. The recent review by Melton et al. [4] has provided a summary of the current state of knowledge on the modelling of wetlands and the outcome of the WETCHIMP model intercomparison exercise. Melton et al. found a large variation in the wetland areas and associated methane emissions from the participating models and varying responses to climate change. In this paper, we report results from offline runs of two land surface models over Scandinavia (JULES, the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator [5, 6] and HYBRID8 [7]), using the same driving meteorological dataset (CRU-NCEP) for the period from January 1980 to December 2010. Although the two land surface models are very different, both models have used a TOPMODEL approach to derive the wetland area and have similar parameterisations of the methane wetland emissions. We find that both models give broadly similar results. They underestimate the wetland areas over Northern Scandinavia, compared to remote sensing and map-based datasets of wetlands [8]. This leads to lower predicted methane emissions compared to those observed on the ground and from aircraft [9]. We will present these findings and identify possible reasons for the underprediction. We will show the sensitivity to using the observed wetland areas to improve the methane emission estimates. References [1] Denman, K., et al.,: Couplings Between Changes in the Climate System and Biogeochemistry, In Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis, Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Cambridge University Press, United Kingdom, 2007; [2] Smith, L. C., et al.: Siberian peatlands a net carbon sink and global methane source since the early

  1. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Inverse computation for cardiac sources using single current dipole and current multipole models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Ma, Ping; Lu, Hong; Tang, Xue-Zheng; Hua, Ning; Tang, Fa-Kuan

    2009-12-01

    Two cardiac functional models are constructed in this paper. One is a single current model and the other is a current multipole model. Parameters denoting the properties of these two models are calculated by a least-square fit to the measurements using a simulated annealing algorithm. The measured signals are detected at 36 observation nodes by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). By studying the trends of position, orientation and magnitude of the single current dipole model and the current multipole model in the QRS complex during one time span and comparing the reconstructed magnetocardiography (MCG) of these two cardiac models, we find that the current multipole model is a more appropriate model to represent cardiac electrophysiological activity.

  2. Engine rotor health monitoring: an experimental approach to fault detection and durability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Woike, Mark R.; Clem, Michelle; Baaklini, George

    2015-03-01

    Efforts to update and improve turbine engine components in meeting flights safety and durability requirements are commitments that engine manufacturers try to continuously fulfill. Most of their concerns and developments energies focus on the rotating components as rotor disks. These components typically undergo rigorous operating conditions and are subject to high centrifugal loadings which subject them to various failure mechanisms. Thus, developing highly advanced health monitoring technology to screen their efficacy and performance is very essential to their prolonged service life and operational success. Nondestructive evaluation techniques are among the many screening methods that presently are being used to pre-detect hidden flaws and mini cracks prior to any appalling events occurrence. Most of these methods or procedures are confined to evaluating material's discontinuities and other defects that have mature to a point where failure is eminent. Hence, development of more robust techniques to pre-predict faults prior to any catastrophic events in these components is highly vital. This paper is focused on presenting research activities covering the ongoing research efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) rotor dynamics laboratory in support of developing a fault detection system for key critical turbine engine components. Data obtained from spin test experiments of a rotor disk that relates to investigating behavior of blade tip clearance, tip timing and shaft displacement based on measured data acquired from sensor devices such as eddy current, capacitive and microwave are presented. Additional results linking test data with finite element modeling to characterize the structural durability of a cracked rotor as it relays to the experimental tests and findings is also presented. An obvious difference in the vibration response is shown between the notched and the baseline no notch rotor disk indicating the presence of some type of irregularity.

  3. A numerical model of ionospheric convection derived from field-alignment currents and the corresponding conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, L. G.; Marklund, G. T.

    1991-08-01

    A numerical model for the calculation of ionospheric convection patterns from given distributions of field aligned current and ionospheric conductivity is described. The model includes a coupling between the conductivity and the field aligned current. The input contributions, the field aligned current and the conductivity, are parametrized. From the primary model output a number of other quantities can be computed: the potential in the inertial frame, the potential in the magnetospheric equatorial plane, the distribution of ionosheric current, and the Joule heating in the ionosphere. This model was used together with a technique to caculate the high latitude potential distribution prevailing during a particular event by combining information from global auroral images and local measurements of fields and particles. The model potential variation along the satellite orbit was found to be in agreement with that calculated from the measured electric field. The model was also used to study some fundamental properties of the electrodynamics of the high latitude ionosphere.

  4. Spacecraft Charging Current Balance Model Applied to High Voltage Solar Array Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Emily M.; Pour, Maria Z. A.

    2016-01-01

    Spacecraft charging induced by high voltage solar arrays can result in power losses and degradation of spacecraft surfaces. In some cases, it can even present safety issues for astronauts performing extravehicular activities. An understanding of the dominant processes contributing to spacecraft charging induced by solar arrays is important to current space missions, such as the International Space Station, and to any future space missions that may employ high voltage solar arrays. A common method of analyzing the factors contributing to spacecraft charging is the current balance model. Current balance models are based on the simple idea that the spacecraft will float to a potential such that the current collecting to the surfaces equals the current lost from the surfaces. However, when solar arrays are involved, these currents are dependent on so many factors that the equation becomes quite complicated. In order for a current balance model to be applied to solar array operations, it must incorporate the time dependent nature of the charging of dielectric surfaces in the vicinity of conductors1-3. This poster will present the factors which must be considered when developing a current balance model for high voltage solar array operations and will compare results of a current balance model with data from the Floating Potential Measurement Unit4 on board the International Space Station.

  5. Finite-elements numerical model of the current-sheet movement and shaping in coaxial discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, Federico; Moreno, Cesar; Clausse, Alejandro

    2005-08-01

    The movement and shaping of the current sheath in coaxial plasma guns is numerically modelled by means of a dynamic finite-elements representation. Numerical instabilities are avoided by a reshaping algorithm applied during the tracking of the current sheath acceleration. Improving upon older versions of the algorithm, the present model includes a delay model to treat the dielectric breakdown. Comparison against experimental measurements showed very good performances in representing the arrival times of the shock front at different filling pressures.

  6. Green technology for durable finishing of viscose fibers via self-formation of AuNPs.

    PubMed

    Emam, Hossam E; El-Hawary, Nancy S; Ahmed, Hanan B

    2017-03-01

    Sensitivity of dyes' colors to the surrounding environment causes lower durability and stability of color, which reflects the importance of durable finishing treatment. Current technique offered antimicrobial/durable finishing of viscose fibers through direct formation of AuNPs inside fibers macromolecules without using any external agents. By using the reducing properties of cellulose in viscose, Au(+3) was reduced to AuNPs and CHO/OH of cellulose subsequently were oxidized to COOH. For comparison, two different media were used; aqueous and alkaline. Increasing the reactivity and accessibility of cellulose macromolecules in alkali leaded to enlargement of the reduction process and more incorporation of AuNPs. Size of AuNPs inside fiber was recorded to be in range of 22-112nm and 14-100nm, in case of using aqueous and alkaline medium, respectively. Structure and properties of fibers were not changed by treatment according to XRD and ATR-FTIR data. The treated fibers were acquired durable violet color by the action of LSPR for AuNPs and darker color obtained using higher Au(+3) concentration. The treated fibers exhibited good inhibition against different pathogenic microbes including bacteria and fungi. One-pot, quite simple, inexpensive, green and industrial viable are the significant advantages of the current technique for viscose finishing (pigmentation and antimicrobial action). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Durable Resistance to Crop Pathogens: An Epidemiological Framework to Predict Risk under Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Lo Iacono, Giovanni; van den Bosch, Frank; Gilligan, Chris A.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing the durability of crop resistance to plant pathogens is one of the key goals of virulence management. Despite the recognition of the importance of demographic and environmental stochasticity on the dynamics of an epidemic, their effects on the evolution of the pathogen and durability of resistance has not received attention. We formulated a stochastic epidemiological model, based on the Kramer-Moyal expansion of the Master Equation, to investigate how random fluctuations affect the dynamics of an epidemic and how these effects feed through to the evolution of the pathogen and durability of resistance. We focused on two hypotheses: firstly, a previous deterministic model has suggested that the effect of cropping ratio (the proportion of land area occupied by the resistant crop) on the durability of crop resistance is negligible. Increasing the cropping ratio increases the area of uninfected host, but the resistance is more rapidly broken; these two effects counteract each other. We tested the hypothesis that similar counteracting effects would occur when we take account of demographic stochasticity, but found that the durability does depend on the cropping ratio. Secondly, we tested whether a superimposed external source of stochasticity (for example due to environmental variation or to intermittent fungicide application) interacts with the intrinsic demographic fluctuations and how such interaction affects the durability of resistance. We show that in the pathosystem considered here, in general large stochastic fluctuations in epidemics enhance extinction of the pathogen. This is more likely to occur at large cropping ratios and for particular frequencies of the periodic external perturbation (stochastic resonance). The results suggest possible disease control practises by exploiting the natural sources of stochasticity. PMID:23341765

  8. Inner Magnetosphere Modeling at the CCMC: Ring Current, Radiation Belt and Magnetic Field Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastaetter, L.; Mendoza, A. M.; Chulaki, A.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Zheng, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of the inner magnetosphere has entered center stage with the launch of the Van Allen Probes (RBSP) in 2012. The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) has drastically improved its offerings of inner magnetosphere models that cover energetic particles in the Earth's ring current and radiation belts. Models added to the CCMC include the stand-alone Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere (CIMI) model by M.C. Fok, the Rice Convection Model (RCM) by R. Wolf and S. Sazykin and numerous versions of the Tsyganenko magnetic field model (T89, T96, T01quiet, TS05). These models join the LANL* model by Y. Yu hat was offered for instant run earlier in the year. In addition to these stand-alone models, the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) by M.C. Fok and N. Buzulukova joined as a component of the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) in the magnetosphere model run-on-request category. We present modeling results of the ring current and radiation belt models and demonstrate tracking of satellites such as RBSP. Calculations using the magnetic field models include mappings to the magnetic equator or to minimum-B positions and the determination of foot points in the ionosphere.

  9. Genetic Markers Predict Primary Non-Response and Durable Response To Anti-TNF Biologic Therapies in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Barber, Grant E; Yajnik, Vijay; Khalili, Hamed; Giallourakis, Cosmas; Garber, John; Xavier, Ramnik; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

    2016-12-01

    One-fifth of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) are primary non-responders to anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy, and an estimated 10-15% will fail therapy annually. Little is known about the genetics of response to anti-TNF therapy. The aim of our study was to identify genetic factors associated with primary non-response (PNR) and loss of response to anti-TNFs in CD. From a prospective registry, we characterized the response of 427 CD patients to their first anti-TNF therapy. Patients were designated as achieving primary response, durable response, and non-durable response based on clinical, endoscopic, and radiologic criteria. Genotyping was performed on the Illumina Immunochip. Separate genetic scores based on presence of predictive genetic alleles were calculated for PNR and durable response and performance of clinical and genetics models were compared. From 359 patients, 36 were adjudged to have PNR (10%), 200 had durable response, and 74 had non-durable response. PNRs had longer disease duration and were more likely to be smokers. Fifteen risk alleles were associated with PNR. Patients with PNR had a significantly higher genetic risk score (GRS) (P =8 × 10(-12)). A combined clinical-genetic model more accurately predicted PNR when compared with a clinical only model (0.93 vs. 0.70, P <0.001). Sixteen distinct single nucleotide polymorphisms predicted durable response with a higher GRS (P =7 × 10(-13)). The GRSs for PNR and durable response were not mutually correlated, suggesting distinct mechanisms. Genetic risk alleles can predict primary non-response and durable response to anti-TNF therapy in CD.

  10. Modified model of gate leakage currents in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan-Gang; Feng, Zhi-Hong; Lv, Yuan-Jie; Tan, Xin; Dun, Shao-Bo; Fang, Yu-Long; Cai, Shu-Jun

    2016-10-01

    It has been reported that the gate leakage currents are described by the Frenkel-Poole emission (FPE) model, at temperatures higher than 250 K. However, the gate leakage currents of our passivated devices do not accord with the FPE model. Therefore, a modified FPE model is developed in which an additional leakage current, besides the gate (I II), is added. Based on the samples with different passivations, the I II caused by a large number of surface traps is separated from total gate currents, and is found to be linear with respect to (φ B-V g)0.5. Compared with these from the FPE model, the calculated results from the modified model agree well with the I g-V g measurements at temperatures ranging from 295 K to 475 K. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61306113).

  11. Model development and validation of geometrically complex eddy current coils using finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alexander; Eviston, Connor

    2017-02-01

    Multiple FEM models of complex eddy current coil geometries were created and validated to calculate the change of impedance due to the presence of a notch. Capable realistic simulations of eddy current inspections are required for model assisted probability of detection (MAPOD) studies, inversion algorithms, experimental verification, and tailored probe design for NDE applications. An FEM solver was chosen to model complex real world situations including varying probe dimensions and orientations along with complex probe geometries. This will also enable creation of a probe model library database with variable parameters. Verification and validation was performed using other commercially available eddy current modeling software as well as experimentally collected benchmark data. Data analysis and comparison showed that the created models were able to correctly model the probe and conductor interactions and accurately calculate the change in impedance of several experimental scenarios with acceptable error. The promising results of the models enabled the start of an eddy current probe model library to give experimenters easy access to powerful parameter based eddy current models for alternate project applications.

  12. Graphitic mesoporous carbon as a durable fuel cell catalyst support

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Liang, Chengdu; Shanahan, Paul; Xu, Lianbin; Waje, Mahesh; Yan, Y.S.

    2008-01-01

    Highly stable graphitic mesoporous carbons (GMPCs) are synthesized by heat-treating polymer-templated mesoporous carbon (MPC) at 2600 C. The electrochemical durability of GMPC as Pt catalyst support (Pt/GMPC) is compared with that of carbon black (Pt/XC-72). Comparisons are made using potentiostatic and cyclic voltammetric techniques on the respective specimens under conditions simulating the cathode environment of PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell). The results indicate that the Pt/GMPC is much more stable than Pt/XC-72, with 96% lower corrosion current. The Pt/GMPC also exhibits a greatly reduced loss of catalytic surface area: 14% for Pt/GMPC vs. 39% for Pt/XC-72.

  13. Environmental Durability and Stress Rupture of EBC/CMCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on the strength and creep performance of SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems under complex simulated engine environments. Tensile-strength and stress-rupture testing was conducted to illustrate the material properties under isothermal and thermal gradient conditions. To determine material durability, further testing was conducted under exposure to thermal cycling, thermal gradients and simulated combustion environments. Emphasis is placed on experimental techniques as well as implementation of non-destructive evaluation, including modal acoustic emission and electrical resistivity monitoring, to characterize strength degradation and damage mechanisms. Currently, little is known about the behavior of EBC-CMCs under these conditions; consequently, this work will prove invaluable in the development of structural components for use in high temperature applications.

  14. Durability tests of a five centimeter diameter ion thruster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakanishi, S.

    1972-01-01

    A modified Hughes SIT-5 system is being tested for durability at the Lewis Research Center. As of October 1, 1972, the thruster subsystem has logged over 8000 hours of operation. The initial 2023 hours were run with a translating screen thrust vector grid. The thruster is currently operating with an electrostatic type vector grid. Profiles and maps taken at widely separated intervals show that performance and operating characteristics have remained essentially constant. Overall efficiency is about 32 percent and power to thrust ratio is 170 watts per millipound at a specific impulse of 2500 seconds. Telescopic examination of the vector grid shows some sputtering erosion due to charge exchange and direct impingement ions.

  15. A model of a rapidly-adapting mechanosensitive current generated by a dorsal root ganglion neuron.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kazuhisa

    2014-06-01

    I propose a model that replicates the kinetics of a rapidly-adapting mechanosensitive current generated by a dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron. When the DRG neuron is mechanically stimulated, an ionic current called a mechanosensitive current flows across its membrane. The kinetics of mechanosensitive currents are broadly classified into three types; rapidly adapting (RA), intermediately adapting, and slowly adapting. The kinetics of RA mechanosensitive currents are particularly intriguing. An RA mechanosensitive current is initially evoked by and rapidly adapts to a mechanical stimulus, but can also respond to an additional stimulus. Furthermore, an antecedent stimulus immediately followed by an additional stimulus suppresses reactivation of the current. The features of the kinetics depend on the characteristics of the mechanotransducer channels. Physiologists have proposed three factors associated with mechanotransducer channels, invoking activation, adaptation, and inactivation. In the present study, these factors are incorporated into an RA mechanosensitive current model. Computer simulations verified that the proposed model replicates the kinetics of real RA DRG mechanosensitive currents. The mechanosensitive current elicited by successive pulse-form stimuli was predominantly desensitized by the inactivating factor. Both the inactivating and adapting factors were involved in desensitization of a double-decker stimulus. The reduction of the sensitivity with decreasing velocity of the stimulus was mainly controlled by the adapting factor.

  16. Design and fabrication of durable owner-built wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queeney, R. A.

    To find the configuration of materials that will produce lightweight, durable wind tubine blades, a composite material blade consisting of an aluminum tubing spar, a foam insulating filler and a glass reinforced plastic skin was analyzed. Various tensile and creep tests were conducted on model blades, and a computer analysis determined the best configuration for the blade.

  17. Revisiting single photon avalanche diode current-voltage modeling and transient characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Javitt, M.; Savuskan, V. Merhav, T.; Nemirovsky, Y.

    2014-05-28

    A model for the current-voltage and transient behavior of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) based on device physics is presented. The results of the model are compared to actual measurements and a reasonable fit is seen. Additionally, the model provides a useful tool for designing quenching circuitry and determining optimal operation conditions of the SPAD.

  18. Operational prediction of rip currents using numerical model and nearshore bathymetry from video images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembiring, L.; Van Ormondt, M.; Van Dongeren, A. R.; Roelvink, J. A.

    2017-07-01

    Rip currents are one of the most dangerous coastal hazards for swimmers. In order to minimize the risk, a coastal operational-process based-model system can be utilized in order to provide forecast of nearshore waves and currents that may endanger beach goers. In this paper, an operational model for rip current prediction by utilizing nearshore bathymetry obtained from video image technique is demonstrated. For the nearshore scale model, XBeach1 is used with which tidal currents, wave induced currents (including the effect of the wave groups) can be simulated simultaneously. Up-to-date bathymetry will be obtained using video images technique, cBathy 2. The system will be tested for the Egmond aan Zee beach, located in the northern part of the Dutch coastline. This paper will test the applicability of bathymetry obtained from video technique to be used as input for the numerical modelling system by comparing simulation results using surveyed bathymetry and model results using video bathymetry. Results show that the video technique is able to produce bathymetry converging towards the ground truth observations. This bathymetry validation will be followed by an example of operational forecasting type of simulation on predicting rip currents. Rip currents flow fields simulated over measured and modeled bathymetries are compared in order to assess the performance of the proposed forecast system.

  19. Relativistic model of 2p-2h meson exchange currents in (anti)neutrino scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Simo, I.; E Amaro, J.; Barbaro, M. B.; De Pace, A.; Caballero, J. A.; Donnelly, T. W.

    2017-06-01

    We develop a model of relativistic, charged meson-exchange currents (MEC) for neutrino-nucleus interactions. The two-body current is the sum of seagull, pion-in-flight, pion-pole and Δ-pole operators. These operators are obtained from the weak pion-production amplitudes for the nucleon derived in the nonlinear σ-model together with weak excitation of the {{Δ }}(1232) resonance and its subsequent decay into Nπ . With these currents we compute the five 2p-2h response functions contributing to ({ν }l,{l}-) and ({\\overline{ν }}l,{l}+) reactions in the relativistic Fermi gas model. The total current is the sum of vector and axial two-body currents. The vector current is related to the electromagnetic MEC operator that contributes to electron scattering. This allows one to check our model by comparison with the results of De Pace et al (2003 Nucl. Phys. A 726 303). Thus, our model is a natural extension of that model to the weak sector with the addition of the axial MEC operator. The dependences of the response functions on several ingredients of the approach are analyzed. Specifically we discuss relativistic effects, quantify the size of the direct-exchange interferences, and the relative importance of the axial versus vector current.

  20. A new parametrized model of the global horizontal and vertical ionospheric current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundal, Karl M.; Finlay, Christopher C.; Olsen, Nils; Reistad, Jone P.; Tenfjord, Paul; Snekvik, Kristian; Østgaard, Nikolai

    2017-04-01

    We present a newly developed global empirical model of the ionospheric magnetic disturbance field, and the associated horizontal and vertical currents. The field is represented in terms of spherical harmonics, parametrized in terms of solar wind drivers, dipole tilt angle, and the F10.7 index. The model parameters are estimated by using magnetic field measurements from ESA's CHAMP and Swarm missions. The model represents an improvement compared to other empirical models of ionospheric currents by the following three characteristics: 1) Distortions due to Earth's main magnetic field are taken into account and essentially corrected for by use of magnetic apex coordinates. This allows us to interpret resulting currents independently of longitudinal, hemispheric, and temporal variations in the Earth's magnetic field. 2) We do not impose any symmetry between hemispheres, so that inter-hemispheric differences can be investigated. 3) We estimate both the Birkeland currents (and its closure) and the horizontal divergence-free currents (the equivalent current) simultaneously. They can be combined to calculate the true height-integrated horizontal current. This is only possible, without additional data or assumptions, because we use magnetic field measurements from low Earth orbit. In this presentation we compare modeled magnetic field perturbations at ground and in space with independent observations. We find that the total field aligned currents in the model are very well correlated with the total currents measured by AMPERE. We also show that, on time scales of > 1h, the model is well correlated with measured ground magnetic field perturbations. Neither AMPERE nor any ground magnetometers were used to estimate model coefficients.