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Sample records for current medical legal

  1. Medical photography: current technology, evolving issues and legal perspectives.

    PubMed

    Harting, M T; DeWees, J M; Vela, K M; Khirallah, R T

    2015-04-01

    Medical photographic image capture and data management has undergone a rapid and compelling change in complexity over the last 20 years. This is because of multiple factors, including significant advances in ease of photograph capture, alongside an evolution of mechanisms of data portability/dissemination, combined with governmental focus on health information privacy. Literature to guide medical, legal, governmental and business professionals when dealing with issues related to medical photography is virtually nonexistent. Herein, we will address the breadth of uses of medical photography, device properties/specific devices utilised for image capture, methods of data transfer and dissemination and patient perceptions and attitudes regarding photography in a medical setting. In addition, we will address the legal implications, including legal precedent, copyright and privacy law, informed consent, protected health information and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), as they pertain to medical photography.

  2. Rape: medical and legal information.

    PubMed

    Price, H R

    1998-01-01

    The author explores the topic of rape in order to help security directors and rape victims better understand the medical and legal procedures a victim might experience. He describes how a rape case might be handled and what to expect.

  3. Legal and regulatory challenges currently facing diabetes treatment providers and related durable medical equipment suppliers.

    PubMed

    Liles, Robert

    2013-03-01

    It has been estimated that 24 million Americans have diabetes, many of whom are Medicare beneficiaries. These individuals carefully monitor their blood glucose levels primarily through the use of in-home blood glucose testing kits. Although the test is relatively simple, the cumulative expense of providing glucose test strips and lancets to patients is ever increasing, both to the Medicare program and to uninsured individuals who must pay out-of-pocket for these testing supplies. This article discusses the diabetes durable medical equipment (DME) coverage under Part B Medicare, the establishment and role of DME Medicare administrative contractors, and national and local coverage requirements for diabetes DME suppliers. This article also discusses the federal government's ongoing concerns regarding the improper billing of diabetes testing supplies. To protect the Medicare Trust Fund, the federal government has contracted with multiple private entities to conduct reviews and audits of questionable Medicare claims. These private sector contractors have conducted unannounced site visits of DME supplier offices, interviewed patients and their families, placed suppliers on prepayment review, and conducted extensive postpayment audits of prior paid Medicare claims. In more egregious administrative cases, Medicare contractors have recommended that problematic providers and/or DME suppliers have their Medicare numbers suspended or, in some instances, revoked. More serious infractions can lead to civil or criminal liability. In the final part of this article, we will examine the future of enforcement efforts by law enforcement and Medicare contractors and the importance of understanding and complying with federal laws when ordering and supplying diabetes testing strips and lancets.

  4. [Legal aspects of selling medical products by gynecologists].

    PubMed

    Urbaniak, Monika; Spaczyński, Robert Z

    2013-07-01

    Sales and distribution of medical products and drugs in Poland remains under strict regulations, especially legal regulation contained in the Medical and Dental Practitioners Act, that banned sales of medical products by doctors. It needs to be emphasized that currently doctors are allowed to sell drugs and medical products only in rigorously specified situations. Knowledge of current legal regulations concerning sales of medical products by gynecologists allows to conform with the law and to distribute drugs and medical products under special and predefined conditions.

  5. Adoption: medical and legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, C K

    1978-06-01

    The problem of abandoned children is of great magnitude in India. Placement of these children in a family environment is essential for their physical, mental, and emotional development. Adoption must be approached from the child welfare perspective. The pediatrician can play an important role in the adoption process. The pediatrician should perform a thorough medical examination of infants to be adopted, both to ensure the child's welfare and to give adoptive parents an assessment of the child's health. Information should be collected on the medical history of the child's biologic parents to aid in the evaluation process. Adoptive parents should also undergo medical and pyschological examinations. Pediatricians can additionally work with social welfare departments in establishing criteria for matching children with adoptive parents. Adoptions in India are currently governed by provisions or the 1956 Hindu Adoptions and Maintenance Act. Since this legislation excludes groups such as Muslims, Christians, and Parsis from its purview, there has been a demand for national legislation providing a uniform adoption law for all the communities in India. The Union Government introduced such a comprehensive bill in 1972, the Adoption of Children Bill; however, no action was ever taken. It is urged that this legislation be reactivated, and that the restriction on the removal of children for adoption outside India be lifted.

  6. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Joyce C; Geraedts, Joep; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C; Dondorp, Wybo; Gianaroli, Luca; Harton, Gary; Milachich, Tanya; Kääriäinen, Helena; Liebaers, Inge; Morris, Michael; Sequeiros, Jorge; Sermon, Karen; Shenfield, Françoise; Skirton, Heather; Soini, Sirpa; Spits, Claudia; Veiga, Anna; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Viville, Stéphane; de Wert, Guido; Macek, Milan

    2013-01-01

    In March 2005, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology met to discuss the interface between genetics and assisted reproductive technology (ART), and published an extended background paper, recommendations and two Editorials. Seven years later, in March 2012, a follow-up interdisciplinary workshop was held, involving representatives of both professional societies, including experts from the European Union Eurogentest2 Coordination Action Project. The main goal of this meeting was to discuss developments at the interface between clinical genetics and ARTs. As more genetic causes of reproductive failure are now recognised and an increasing number of patients undergo testing of their genome before conception, either in regular health care or in the context of direct-to-consumer testing, the need for genetic counselling and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) may increase. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) thus far does not have evidence from randomised clinical trials to substantiate that the technique is both effective and efficient. Whole-genome sequencing may create greater challenges both in the technological and interpretational domains, and requires further reflection about the ethics of genetic testing in ART and PGD/PGS. Diagnostic laboratories should be reporting their results according to internationally accepted accreditation standards (International Standards Organisation – ISO 15189). Further studies are needed in order to address issues related to the impact of ART on epigenetic reprogramming of the early embryo. The legal landscape regarding assisted reproduction is evolving but still remains very heterogeneous and often contradictory. The lack of legal harmonisation and uneven access to infertility treatment and PGD/PGS fosters considerable cross-border reproductive care in Europe and beyond. The aim of this paper is to complement previous publications and

  7. [Medical-legal issues of physical and pharmacological restraint].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Durán, Esperanza L; Guija, Julio A; Ortega-Monasterio, Leopoldo

    2014-03-01

    The use of physical and pharmacological restraint is controversial but is currently accepted as inevitable. It is indicated for controlling behavioral disorders and psychomotor agitation that put patients and third parties at risk. Its indication should be medical, and we should opt for the least restrictive measure. Restraints represent a possible infringement of patients' fundamental rights and require understanding and strict respect for the medical-legal precepts by physicians and other practitioners involved in its application. This article reviews the current legal framework, as well as the medical-legal premises and aspects of applying restraints, with the objective of ensuring maximum respect for patients' rights and the appropriate legal safety in the activity of practitioners.

  8. [Legal aspects of networking of medical activities].

    PubMed

    Preissler, Reinhold

    2005-04-01

    Medical networks lack a legal definition. From the viewpoint of social law, this term means a form of organization of joint-service providers in a non-specified composition for the undertaking of medical care activities; from the point of view of occupational law, this consists of a loose form of joint practice. Such medical network can conclude treatment contracts with the patients and exchange patients' medical records. A practice network can take over services as contract partner of hospitals or other institutions, in the interest of improved competition chances within the integrated care system. The joining of a third partner is basically left open by the MBO, however according to SGB V this is possible only after approval by all contract partners. In advance of a planned medical care center, is it recommended to found a physician network as starting model. Before single practices fuse into a single enterprise, management-, tax-, legal-, as well as psychological aspects must be considered.

  9. Legal aspects of medication administration.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1998-01-01

    The author reviews several cases involving medication errors and advises that one way to make a malpractice case worse is to be accused of delay in informing the patient or family of the circumstances. If fraud or intentional concealment is established, punitive damages may be awarded--which are not covered by malpractice insurance policies since this is an intentional act.

  10. The Medicalization and Legalization of Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newberger, Eli H.; Bourne, Richard

    The authors propose that theoretical confusion and clinical inadequacy regarding child abuse is due, in part, from medical and legal ambiguity concerning child abuse and from dilemmas surrounding social policy and the professional response toward families and children. The dilemmas of social policy (family autonomy versus coercive intervention)…

  11. Medical negligence: Indian legal perspective

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    A basic knowledge of how judicial forums deal with the cases relating to medical negligence is of absolute necessity for doctors. The need for such knowledge is more now than before in light of higher premium being placed by the Indian forums on the value of human life and suffering, and perhaps rightly so. Judicial forums, while seeking to identify delinquents and delinquency in the cases of medical negligence, actually aim at striking a careful balance between the autonomy of a doctor to make judgments and the rights of a patient to be dealt with fairly. In the process of adjudication, the judicial forums tend to give sufficient leeway to doctors and expressly recognize the complexity of the human body, inexactness of medical science, the inherent subjectivity of the process, genuine scope for error of judgment, and the importance of the autonomy of the doctors. The law does not prescribe the limits of high standards that can be adopted but only the minimum standard below which the patients cannot be dealt with. Judicial forums have also signaled an increased need of the doctors to engage with the patients during treatment, especially when the line of treatment is contested, has serious side effects and alternative treatments exist. PMID:27891019

  12. Legal Issues for the Medical Director.

    PubMed

    Trulove, William G

    2015-09-04

    The nephrologist serving as medical director of a dialysis clinic must understand that the role of director is not simply an extension of being a good nephrologist. The two roles-nephrology practice and the leadership of a dialysis clinic-may be filled by a single person. However, each role contains unique tasks, requiring specific skill sets, and each role comes with inherent, associated legal risks. The medical director assumes a new level of responsibility and accountability defined by contractual obligations to the dialysis provider and by state and federal regulations. Hence, a medical director is accountable not only for providing standard-of-care treatment to his or her private practice patients dialyzed at the clinic but also for maintaining the safety of the dialysis clinic patient population and staff. Accordingly, a nephrologist serving in the role of medical director faces distinct legal risks beyond typical professional liability concerns. The medical director must also be mindful of regulatory compliance, unique avenues to licensure board complaints, and implications of careless communication habits. A thoughtful and prepared medical director can mitigate these risk exposures by understanding the sources of these challenges: contractual obligations, pertinent regulatory responsibilities, and the modern electronic communications environment.

  13. Medical marijuana for HIV-associated sensory neuropathy: legal and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Larriviere, Daniel G

    2014-10-01

    The number of states legalizing medical marijuana is increasing. Medical marijuana is possibly effective therapy for HIV-associated sensory neuropathy. Despite legalization at the state level, however, the current and contradictory federal drug enforcement policy creates the risk that physicians who recommend medical marijuana to their patients will lose their ability to prescribe medications. The federal-state tension has legal and ethical implications for neurologists who receive a request for medical marijuana from their patients since neurologists must strive to both relieve suffering and obey relevant laws. Recommendation of medical marijuana by neurologists to their patients is ethically permissible but is not ethically mandatory.

  14. Antiprogestin drugs: ethical, legal and medical issues.

    PubMed

    Cook, R J; Grimes, D A

    1992-01-01

    RU 486 allows women the choice of a medical rather than a surgical abortion, and, for most women, the choice is one of procedure, not of whether to have an abortion. Issues surrounding RU 486 were explored in an American Society of Law and Medicine conference in December 1991 entitled "Antiprogestin Drugs: Ethical, Legal and Medical Issues." An introduction to 14 conference papers provides an overview of the proceedings. Baulieu, the father of RU 486, described updated developments in its use and the medically supervised method of abortion. Bygdeman and Swahn presented their work in Sweden on combining RU 486 with a prostaglandin to make abortion more effective. They suggested that the drug may be an attractive postovulation contraceptive. Greenslad et al. discussed service delivery aspects of the use of RU 486. Holt considered the implications of use of the drug in low-resource settings. A survey of obstetricians and gynecologists, presented by Heilig, indicates that 22% more physicians would perform a medical abortion. Patient perspectives were addressed by David, who stated that measuring acceptability of an abortion technique is difficult; women have historically used whatever method is available. A collaborative research project in India and Cuba on why women chose certain methods was reported by Winikoff et al. (90% of women would choose medical abortion if faced with the choice again). Berer analyzed French data on women's perspectives on medical vs. surgical abortion. The question of adolescent use of the drug was considered by Senderowitz, who lamented the lack of data on the subject and described what is known about adolescent pregnancy. Macklin proposed a framework for ethical analysis and used facts to address ethical questions. Weinstein provided another ethical framework, to analyze whether pharmacists have a right to refuse to provide abortifacient drugs. Buc approached the subject from a legal point of view and concluded that, whereas legal problems

  15. The role of advocacy in occasioning community and organizational change in a medical-legal partnership.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Carpenter, Kaston D; Collie-Akers, Vicki; Colvin, Jeffrey D; Cronin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    Health disparities among low-income individuals remain a significant problem. A number of social determinants are associated with adverse health outcomes. Medical-legal partnerships address legal concerns of low-income individuals to improve health and wellness in adults and children. The Medical-Legal Partnership at Legal Aid of Western Missouri provides free direct legal services for patients with legal concerns affecting health. There is limited evidence regarding the association between advocacy-related efforts and changes within both the medical-legal partnership structure and in health-care facilities. Three health-care organizations in Kansas City, MO participated in implementing the medical-legal partnership model between 2007 and 2010. Advocacy efforts conducted by key medical-legal partnership personnel were strongly associated with changes in health-care organizations and within the medical-legal partnership structure. This study extends the current evidence base by examining the types of advocacy efforts required to bring about community and organizational changes.

  16. Current medico-legal death investigation system in China.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lin; Zhang, Baosheng; Yan, Ping; Fowler, David; Li, Ling

    2011-07-01

    Medico-legal death investigation in China has a long history that can be traced back to the Chhin era in the third century BC. We conducted a national study on the current medico-legal death investigation system in China. Our study showed that, at present, medico-legal death investigations in China are conducted by c. 12,000 forensic medical experts mainly within five relatively independent agencies: the police organizations, the prosecutors' offices, the departments/divisions of forensic medicine/science in medical colleges and universities, the Institute of Forensic Science in the Ministry of Justice, and the government or private forensic societies. Owing to China's large population and area, the medico-legal death investigation is largely based on the administrative divisions. There is a wide variation in the scope, extent, and quality of investigations among the agencies and at the different levels of county/district, municipal, and provincial governments. This article gives a general overview of medicolegal death investigation in modern China.

  17. Legal liability of physicians in medical research.

    PubMed

    Sava, H; Matlow, P T; Sole, M J

    1994-04-01

    The intent of this paper is to provide an overview, in layperson's language, of the concepts in law which may be applicable to a physician who undertakes research. The paper is divided into 2 parts. Part I deals with liability issues and standards of care. It is meant to enable the physician/researcher to recognize a potential liability situation. Part II examines insurance and related issues such as the role of the Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA). The paper begins with a review of 2 potential categories of liability: criminal and civil tort. Next, legal issues surrounding the consent process, which form the majority of negligence claims, are dealt with. The research process is then discussed with emphasis on the Medical Research Council of Canada Guidelines on Human Experimentation. Part II covers how research projects are funded and identifies the parties from whom insurance coverage may be sought. Information is provided from the various sources offering insurance and quasi-insurance protection with special attention on the CMPA. Each source details the circumstances necessary for its particular coverage to be triggered. Other issues addressed include those arising when research is conducted outside Canada and multiple coverage.

  18. [[Selected legal aspects related to medical practice].

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, M

    1998-01-01

    The question of the physician's liability, both that of civil as well as penal law nature--is always emotionally approached. Dynamic development of medical and biological sciences as well as technics is the cause of progress but it also gives rise to the increase of hazards or abuses in medical therapy. If we speak of the therapeutic intervention being originally legal we mean that it is carried out in compliance with the principles of medical art. In such circumstances, even though the intervention resulted in negative effects, the intervening physician cannot be made penally liable. Civil law liability, in its turn, may have either ex contractu or ex delictu basis. When the general prerequisites of this kind of liability are present, the intervening physician (Art. 353 or 415 of Civil Code) or the State Treasury (Art. 417 of Civil Code) may be made liable for causing damage, joint and several liability of the physician and the Treasury being also possible (Art. 420 of Civil Code). The carrying out of therapeutic intervention without the law required consent of the patient may lead--on the basis of Polish law--to the physician's civil law liability for the infringement of the patient's personal interests even though the intervention ended in success (Articles 23 and 24 of Civil Code). From the point of view of Polish penal law such situation may cause the physician's penal liability for the offence against freedom (Art. 192 of Penal Code). The euthanatic homicide should be, and in Polish law, is an offence. Considering the potential abuses arising from making the euthanasia legal, penal law whose major function is that of the guarantee nature, must ensure safeguards vis-à-vis life to the utmost limit. Polish Legislator shows, however, full understanding of the extremely difficult and conflict-generating situation in which the individual committing euthanatic homicide may find himself. Hence, in section 2 of Art. 150 of Penal Code the Legislator declared that "in

  19. Medical-Legal Partnerships: Addressing Competency Needs Through Lawyers

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Edward; Fullerton, Danya Fortess; Cohen, Ellen; Lawton, Ellen; Ryan, Anne; Sandel, Megan

    2009-01-01

    Background Many low- and moderate-income individuals and families have at least one unmet legal need (for example, unsafe housing conditions, lack of access to food and/or income support, lack of access to health care), which, if left unaddressed, can have harmful consequences on health. Eighty unique medical-legal partnership programs, serving over 180 clinics and hospitals nationwide, seek to combine the strengths of medical and legal professionals to address patients' legal needs before they become crises. Each partnership is adapted to serve the specific needs of its own patient base. Intervention This article describes innovative, residency-based medical-legal partnership educational experiences in pediatrics, internal medicine, and family medicine at 3 different sites (Boston, Massachusetts; Newark, New Jersey; and Tucson, Arizona). This article addresses how these 3 programs have been designed to meet the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's 6 competencies, along with suggested methods for evaluating the effectiveness of these programs. Training is a core component of medical-legal partnership, and most medical-legal partnerships have developed curricula for resident education in a variety of formats, including noon conferences, grand rounds, poverty simulations and day-long special sessions. Discussion Medical-legal partnerships combine the skill sets of medical professionals and lawyers to teach social determinants of health by training residents and attending physicians to identify and help address unmet legal needs. Medical-legal partnership doctors and lawyers treat health disparities and improve patient health and well-being by ensuring that public programs, regulations, and laws created to benefit health and improve access to health care are implemented and enforced. PMID:21975996

  20. Where Medical Pot Is Legal, Fatal Car Crashes Often Decline

    MedlinePlus

    ... 162675.html Where Medical Pot Is Legal, Fatal Car Crashes Often Decline It's possible that these state ... and Human Services. More Health News on: Marijuana Motor Vehicle Safety Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health ...

  1. Epilepsy and violence: medical and legal issues.

    PubMed

    Treiman, D M

    1986-01-01

    A possible relationship between epilepsy and violence has been debated for over a century. The debate has taken on new importance because of the increasing use of the "epilepsy defense" in criminal cases. In this review the following issues are addressed: (1) Is epilepsy more common among violent criminals and patients? (2) Is violence more common among epileptics? (3) Can directed violence or aggression occur as part of an epileptic seizure? (4) What medical and legal criteria should be used to determine whether a specific violent crime was the result of an epileptic seizure? Answers to these questions may be summarized as follows. (1) There is a two- to fourfold greater prevalence of epilepsy in prisoners than in control populations, but the prevalence is similar to the prevalence in other lower socioeconomic populations from which most prisoners come. There is no greater prevalence of epilepsy in persons convicted of violent crimes than in other prisoners matched as controls. (2) There is no evidence that violence is more common among epileptics than among non-epileptics, and no evidence that violence is more common in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy than in those with other types of epilepsy. (3) Ictal violence is rare, and when it does occur usually takes the form of "resistive violence" as the result of physical restraint at the end of a seizure, while the patient is still confused. Violence early in a seizure is extremely rare, stereotyped, and never supported by consecutive series of purposeful movements. (4) Five criteria should be used to determine if a specific violent act was the result of an epileptic seizure: a. the diagnosis of epilepsy should be established by a neurologist with special competence in epilepsy; b. the presence of epileptic automatisms should be documented by the case history and closed-circuit TV-EEG; c. aggression during epileptic automatisms should be documented on closed-circuit TV-EEG; d. the aggressive act should be

  2. Affirmative action in medical education: a legal perspective.

    PubMed

    Helms, L B; Helms, C M

    1998-03-01

    The use of affirmative action programs as part of the effort to increase the presence of minorities in medical education and the physician workforce has come under greater legal scrutiny. The authors describe the history of the legal theory behind affirmative action, giving examples from the evolving case law and from Department of Education guidelines. They identify legal pitfalls in the areas of admission and financial aid, including the categorization of students by race, racially disproportionate financial aid awards after accounting for need, racially disproportionate amounts of scholarships as opposed to loans, and, for public medical schools, differential treatment of out-of-state students based on race. Medical schools should be aware of this legal framework so that they can construct affirmative action programs that comply with the law while maintaining momentum toward diversification.

  3. [Teaching the legal aspects of medical practice to medical students in Puerto Rico].

    PubMed

    Lugo Vélez, Luis J

    2014-01-01

    Challenges and changes facing modern medicine make it imperative that physicians acquire knowledge of the legal and regulatory framework of medical practice. Despite the importance of this issue, the curriculum in most medical schools do not include courses that offer medical students the necessary information about their legal duties to practice medicine. The trend should be to offer such courses in medical schools and medical residency programs.

  4. Current Illinois Legal Issues. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopecky, Frank J., Ed.; Wilkin, Rebecca S., Ed.

    Designed as supplementary reading in American government or social studies courses, this compilation of articles is intended to help students gain a better understanding of the judiciary's role in the Illinois legal system. The first of three sections contains articles about judges and the court system. The second section examines the criminal…

  5. [Patient information in urology: current legal situation with particular emphasis on the codification of the contract governing medical treatment in the German Civil Code (BGB)].

    PubMed

    Fischer, C; Petersilie, F

    2014-12-01

    The extent and specification of patient information have so far been defined by case law. Henceforth, the rules of patient information are included in a new type of contract, a contract governing medical treatment (Behandlungsvertrag), codified in §§630a-630e of the German Civil Code (BGB). The main conclusions of the case law are now governed by law; however, some new requirements, such as the obligation to inform patients about treatment errors or the stipulation to deliver copies of undersigned documents have been added. This article gives an overview of the codification of patient information, explains how to inform patients, particularly in urology and illustrates where it is still likely that law courts will be concerned with questions of interpretation. Correct patient information is crucial for declarations of informed consent.

  6. [Obligatory treatment: ethical, medical and legal issues].

    PubMed

    Archambault, Jean-Claude

    2006-06-01

    Legislation passed on 30 June 1838 created a medico-administrative and legal framework for forced hospitalization. Updated in 1990, this law has been evaluated twice. The last evaluation, in 2005, recommended a 72-hour observation period before deciding whether hospitalization was necessary. The situation of violent patients remains unclear. On the one hand, the psychiatrist has no means of impinging on these patients if they decide to stop their treatment once outside the hospital. On the other hand, for patients who are declared to be irresponsible, it would be wise to consider the possibility of being able to judge them, and adapt their sentences accordingly.

  7. Legalization of marijuana for non-medical use: health, policy, socioeconomic, and nursing implications.

    PubMed

    Durkin, Anne

    2014-09-01

    The legalization of marijuana is a controversial issue with implications for health care providers, policy makers, and society at large. The use of marijuana for medical reasons is accepted in many states. However, legal sale of the drug for non-medical use began for the first time on January 1, 2014, in Colorado, following a relaxation of marijuana restrictions that is unprecedented worldwide. News reports have indicated that sales of the drug have been brisk. Marijuana-infused food products have been unexpectedly popular, exceeding sales projections. Marijuana use is associated with numerous physical and mental disorders and could result in addiction. Evidence suggests its potency has increased since the 1980s. Colorado has established regulations regarding the sale of marijuana for non-medical use, but concerns still exist. The current article offers a discussion of the health, public policy, socioeconomic, and nursing implications of the legalization of marijuana for non-medical use.

  8. Telemedicine: medical, legal and ethical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Clark, Peter A; Capuzzi, Kevin; Harrison, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    Technological innovations in medical care have led to the development of telemedicine programs in both rural and urban environments. The necessity for telemedicine has increased immensely as more cost-effective treatment options have become available for both patients and physicians through the addition of telecommunication technologies to medical practice. The development of telemedicine systems began as a means of providing access to health care resources for individuals living in isolated rural areas, grew into advanced medical intervention techniques for soldiers on the battlefield, and have become prevalent in urban medical centers both as a resource to the underserved populations and as a platform for physicians off-site to conduct patient consults remotely. Urban telemedicine systems, as monitored in the Mercy Health System (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) and AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center (Atlantic City, New Jersey), display the enormous benefits of telemedicine as a form of preliminary analysis of patients for the treatment of various medical conditions including chronic disease, mental health disorders and stroke. However, the initiation of telemedicine programs requires new protocols and safeguards to be initiated to protect patient confidentiality/privacy, ensure the appropriate licensure of physicians practicing across state borders, and educate patients on the use of new technological systems. Telemedicine represents the progression of medicine in the presence of improving communication technologies and should be instituted in all urban medical centers. This conclusion is based upon the ethical responsibility to treat all persons with dignity and respect, which in this case, mandates the provision of the most cost-effective, beneficial medical care for all populations.

  9. Legal regulation of the Croatian Medical Journal: model for small academic journals.

    PubMed

    Marusic, Matko; Bosnjak, Darko; Rulic-Hren, Silva; Marusic, Ana

    2003-12-01

    During the last few years, the questions of editorial independence and journal governance have come into the focus of scholarly journals. There is little data on the legal regulation of journals outside mainstream science, although they constitute the largest body of biomedical literature. The Croatian Medical Journal functioned for more than 10 years without much legal regulation but with lot of enthusiasm and hard work. This Editorial presents our attempt to make legal provisions for the current status of the Journal and its future work. We defined our owners, main participants in making of the journal, and their responsibilities and benefits. The Agreement will be signed by all four medical schools in Croatia, which will become owners of the Journal. We hope that our experiences and solutions for strengthening the legal status of the Journal will help other editors from small scientific communities to think about their journal and its governance.

  10. [Legal and medico-legal assessment of medical errors in obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Jurek, Tomasz; Swiatek, Barbara; Rorat, Marta; Drozd, Radosław

    2011-01-01

    The authors review the doctrine of criminal law and the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court in search of a starting point for the legal protection of human life and health. In cases of medical errors in obstetrics concerning a fetus, an act of a perpetrator can be classified as manslaughter or exposure to direct danger of loss of life or great bodily injury depending on whether the fetus is recognized as "a human being". The authors criticize the doctrinal criteria of the beginning of legal protection: spatial, physiological, obstetric, and developmental, pointing to the possibilities of decriminalization of medical errors of omission. A solution to this situation is the presented evolution of the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court. It moves towards establishing the beginning of legal and criminal protection of life and health at the "moment of emergence of objective grounds to necessitate delivery".

  11. Space debris, remarks on current legal issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrest, Armel

    2001-10-01

    A legal definition of space debris must take into consideration its consequences on the legal status of the object. For the purpose of mitigation of space debris at the time of the launch, any object launched in outer pace will turn sooner or later into a space debris. For liability purposes, a definition of a "space object " is more useful that the notion of "space debris". It must be sure that every space debris is considered as a space objet according to the liability convention. At the end and certainly a more difficult issue is the qualification of a space object as a space debris when it will be technically feasible to remove it. The question of the property of the debris or object should be important. States are responsible and liable for space debris. According to article VI and VII of the Outer Space Treaty, they must authorise and control any national space activity and make sure these activities will not be conducted against the law. In the case of an accident and excepting the use of nuclear power sources, the main problem lies on damage in outer space to other spacecraft. In that case, the victim must prove a fault. According with the lack of precise rules it should be difficult. It should be necessary to precise the law applicable to space debris. At the domestic level, rules must be taken to prevent space debris through an assessment of risk within the licensing process. At the international level, the principle of an obligation to mitigate debris should be clearly accepted. Some general rules should be useful to avoid breach of competition between commercial actors. The adoption of a clear and precise code of conduct should be of great help because it would determine the good launching States' behaviour and greatly helps the judge appreciating the proof of a fault in case of an accident.

  12. Sexual harassment in the medical profession: legal and ethical responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Ben; Bismark, Marie M

    2015-08-17

    Sexual harassment of women in medicine has become a subject of national debate after a senior female surgeon stated that if a woman complained of unwanted advances her career would be jeopardised, and subsequent reports suggest that sexual harassment is a serious problem in the medical profession. Sexual harassment of women in the medical profession by their colleagues presents substantial legal, ethical and cultural questions for the profession. Women have enforceable legal rights to gender equality and freedom from sexual harassment in the workplace. Both individual offenders and employers face significant legal consequences for sexual harassment in every Australian state and territory, and individual medical practitioners and employers need to understand their legal and ethical rights and responsibilities in this context. An individual offender may be personally liable for criminal offences, and for breaching anti-discrimination legislation, duties owed in civil law, professional standards and codes of conduct. An employer may be liable for breaching anti-discrimination legislation, workplace safety laws, duties owed in contract law, and a duty of care owed to the employee. Employers, professional colleges and associations, and regulators should use this national debate as an opportunity to improve gender equality and professional culture in medicine; individuals and employers have clear legal and ethical obligations to minimise sexual harassment to the greatest extent possible.

  13. [Medical and legal considerations in whiplash injury].

    PubMed

    Castillo-Chávez, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    Whiplash injury usually occurs in people who suffered an automobile accident, but also occurs as a result of physical assault and other mechanisms. Diagnosis and initial management of the patient by the emergency physician or orthopedist, and prescribing indications, are taken into account by two forensic intervention specialists. One of these is the medical officer, who, through analysis of the injury mechanism, establishes a cause-effect relationship and concludes whether the accident suffered by a worker it is related to work or not, determines how long the worker will remain disabled and if the injury caused permanent disability under Federal Labor Law. The medical examiner by injury classification assists the Public Ministry so that it can frame the crime of injury to the Criminal Code of Federal District. For these reasons a review of medical information about the mechanism of injury, diagnosis, treatment and healing time was performed to help both specialists to standardize their approach in their daily activities.

  14. Rape Survivors' Agency within the Legal and Medical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greeson, Megan R.; Campbell, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Many rape survivors seek help from the legal and medical systems post-assault. Previous studies have examined how social system personnel treat survivors, but less attention has been paid to how survivors attempt to shape their interactions with these systems. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine rape survivors' agency--the active…

  15. Educating Medical Students about Law and the Legal System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Peter C.; Winslade, William

    1995-01-01

    It is argued that the medical school curriculum should include content on jurisprudence to empower physicians to use the law and their legal colleagues to serve patients and promote public welfare. Developing practitioners' skills and changing attitudes are seen as more important than imparting information about particular doctrines and laws. (MSE)

  16. [Legal requirements concerning textile medical products].

    PubMed

    Bríza, J; Krska, Z; Pavlíková, J

    2011-09-01

    Presently, more and more often the medical public is concerned with questions regarding use of textile products intended for multiple application at operating theatres. Such questions have been evoked especially by spreading information on restrictions regarding purchase and us of health care products or medical means made from cotton of intended for multiple application. Based on this information preference is given to significantly more expensive products intended for single-use only. This decision is being reasoned by conditions given by European standard EN 13795 reportedly prohibiting the application of cotton within health care. Since this piece of information is not precise, we would like to sum-up legislative situation within this area.

  17. How bioethics can enrich medical-legal collaborations.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Amy T; Sicklick, Jay; Galowitz, Paula; Retkin, Randye; Fleishman, Stewart B

    2010-01-01

    Medical-legal partnerships (MLPs) - collaborative endeavors between health care clinicians and lawyers to more effectively address issues impacting health care - have proliferated over the past decade. The goal of this interdisciplinary approach is to improve the health outcomes and quality of life of patients and families, recognizing the many non-medical influences on health care and thus the value of an interdisciplinary team to enhance health. This article examines the unique, interrelated ethical issues that confront the clinical and legal partners involved in MLPs. We contend that the ethical precepts of the clinical and legal professions should be seen as opportunities, not barriers, to further the interdisciplinary nature of MLPs. The commonalities in ethical approaches represent a potential bridge between legal and health care advocacy for patient/client well-being. Bioethics has a role to play in building and analyzing this bridge: bioethics may serve as a discourse and method to enhance collaboration by highlighting common ethical foundations and refocusing legal and clinical partners on their similar goals of service for patients/clients. This article explores this bridging role of bioethics, through a series of case studies. It concludes with recommendations to strengthen the collaborations.

  18. Disposal of medical waste: a legal perspective.

    PubMed

    Du Toit, Karen; Bodenstein, Johannes

    2013-09-03

    The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa provides that everyone has the right to an environment that is not harmful to their health and well-being. The illegal dumping of hazardous waste poses a danger to the environment when pollutants migrate into water sources and ultimately cause widespread infection or toxicity, endangering the health of humans who might become exposed to infection and toxins. To give effect to the Constitution, the safe disposal of hazardous waste is governed by legislation in South Africa. Reports of the illegal disposal of waste suggest a general lack of awareness and training in regard to the safe disposal of medical waste. 

  19. [Guidelines on medically assisted reproduction: legal issues and professional liability].

    PubMed

    Molinelli, A; Motroni Gherardi, S M; Picchioni, D M; Ventura, F

    2007-08-01

    The authors analyze the legal and medico-legal issues deriving from the recent Law No. 40 of February 19, 2004 concerning the Medically Assisted Reproduction. In particular, they analyze the contrasting points between the dispositions of Law No. 40/2004 and those of Law No. 194/1978 on the voluntary interruption of pregnancy, and they analyze the guidelines about the procedures and the techniques of the Medically Assisted Reproduction, issued by the Ministry of Health with D.M. of July 21, 2004. The Guidelines, as well as some sentences of several courts, lead to some reflections also about the consent and the professional liability, in particular considering the various moments of the medical action, from the first interview to the carrying out of the assisted reproduction techniques.

  20. [Assisted suicide - medical, legal, and ethical aspects].

    PubMed

    Bosshard, G

    2012-02-01

    Unlike in most European countries, assisted suicide is not illegal in Switzerland. The number of assisted suicides procured by right-to-die organisations such as Exit or Dignitas has sharply increased in the last twenty years. Central part of the doctor's involvement is the prescription of a lethal dose of sodium pentobarbital. In doing so, the doctor has to apply to the rules of medical due care. A proper examination of the patient is required, who must be informed about his diagnosis, about the expected prognosis, and about different treatment options. Verification of the patient's decisional capacity is crucial. In general, a staff member of the organisation but not the doctor is present during suicide. Following death, the assisted suicide has to be reported to the police as an extraordinary death case.

  1. Artificial wombs: medical miracle, legal nightmare.

    PubMed

    Lupton, M L

    1997-01-01

    The fact that the development of the artificial uterus is nearing completion is a mixed blessing. It will provide numerous benefits within the field of pediatric medicine, such as ensuring normal development to term of extremely premature foetuses, but it will pose numerous problems which the law is ill-equipped to handle. The legislature will have to examine the current definition of 'parent' which is based on normal conception practices. It will also have to determine whether only married couples should have access to this technology and under which conditions.

  2. Legal implications of single-use medical device reprocessing.

    PubMed

    Larose, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Over 10 years ago, the Public Health Agency of Canada released the results of a nation-wide survey of hospitals that demonstrated that the reuse of single-use medical devices was widespread in Canadian healthcare institutions. In this article, the author discusses the reuse and reprocessing of these devices, as well as the risks this practice presents. She then goes on to outline the legal implications of reusing single-use devices.

  3. [Harm related to medical device use - legal and organisational risks].

    PubMed

    Hölscher, U M

    2014-12-01

    The effectiveness of the risk management systems established by medical device manufacturers and health-care facilities is clearly mitigated by European and national legal provisions. Laws, regulations and authorities prevent the systematic exchange of much safety-relevant information. The obligation to report adverse events is suspended for many relevant risks associated with medical device use. Reporting into the vigilance system is of little avail for users. Reporting even may endanger the information provider. The federal fragmentation of the German vigilance system poses a risk for patients. Risk management in health-care facilities without risk policy is dangerously incomplete.

  4. Early medical abortion: legal and medical developments in Australia.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kerry A

    2010-07-05

    Mifepristone is a safe, effective and relatively cheap drug that plays an important role in women's health care and is widely used for early medical abortion in many countries. The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) can authorise mifepristone to be imported into and marketed in Australia. To date, no pharmaceutical company has applied to register mifepristone in Australia. The TGA can also permit medical practitioners to prescribe medicine that is not approved for marketing in Australia under the Authorised Prescribers scheme. The number of approvals for mifepristone has gradually increased, in spite of a complicated and protracted application process. Approval under the Authorised Prescribers scheme requires medical practitioners to comply with state or territory legislation. Abortion laws in Australia vary between jurisdictions, and in some states the law is unclear and confusing. The decriminalisation of abortion in all Australian jurisdictions would protect medical practitioners from criminal liability, promote the health interests of Australian women, and discourage the illegal importation of abortifacients that are being used without quality controls or medical supervision. The Victorian Abortion Law Reform Act 2008 is one legislative model for this.

  5. Legal framework conditions for the reprocessing of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Großkopf, Volker; Jäkel, Christian

    2008-09-03

    The processing of single-use products is permissible pursuant to medical device law. This is apparent both from the wording of the German Law on Medical Devices and from the purpose and the objectives underpinning the legislative materials. The prerequisite for processing is, however, compliance with the the Joint Recommendation of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and the Prevention of Infection at the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) and the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Products (BfArM).For medical devices in the category "critical C", the RKI/BfArM-recommendation provides that the processor's quality management system must be certified by a body accredited by the Central Authority of the Federal States for Health Protection with regard to Medicinal Products and Medical Devices (Zentralstelle der Länder für Gesundheitsschutz bei Arzneimitteln und Medizinprodukten, ZLG). The certification must be carried out in accordance with EN ISO 13485:2003+AC:2007.On April 4, 2008 the Federal Health Ministry (Bundesministerium für Gesundheit, BMG) presented a progress report on the processing of medical devices. The BMG concludes that the legal framework for the processing of medical devices is sufficient, and that a prohibition on the processing of single-use products is inappropriate.

  6. Medical Cannabis in Arizona: Patient Characteristics, Perceptions, and Impressions of Medical Cannabis Legalization.

    PubMed

    Troutt, William D; DiDonato, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Many advances have been made toward understanding the benefits of medical cannabis. However, less is known about medical cannabis patients themselves. Prior research has uncovered many important patient characteristics, but most of that work has been conducted with participants in California, who may not represent medical cannabis patients throughout the United States. Furthermore, it is unknown if medical cannabis legalization, which typically imposes strict regulations on cannabis cultivation and sale, impacts patients' experiences acquiring and using cannabis. The goal of this study was to address these limitations by (1) examining the characteristics, perceptions, and behaviors of medical cannabis patients in Arizona; and (2) questioning participants with a history of cannabis use regarding their experiences with cannabis before and after legalization. Patients in Arizona share many characteristics with those in California, but also key differences, such as average age and degree of cannabis consumption. Participants also had positive perceptions of the effect of medical cannabis legalization, reporting that feelings of safety and awareness were higher after legalization compared to before. The results are discussed in relation to evidence from patients in other states and in terms of their potential policy implications.

  7. Public Health Effects of Medical Marijuana Legalization in Colorado

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jonathan M.; Mendelson, Bruce; Berkes, Jay J.; Suleta, Katie; Corsi, Karen F.; Booth, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The public health consequences of the legalization of marijuana, whether for medical or recreational purposes, are little understood. Despite this, numerous states are considering medical or recreational legalization. In the context of abrupt changes marijuana policy in 2009 in Colorado, the authors sought to investigate corresponding changes in marijuana-related public health indicators. Methods This observational, ecologic study used an interrupted time-series analysis to identify changes in public health indicators potentially related to broad policy changes that occurred in 2009. This was records-based research from the state of Colorado and Denver metropolitan area. Data were collected to examine frequency and trends of marijuana-related outcomes in hospital discharges and poison center calls between time periods before and after 2009 and adjusted for population. Analyses were conducted in 2014. Results Hospital discharges coded as marijuana-dependent increased 1% per month (95% CI=0.8, 1.1, p<0.001) from 2007 to 2013. A change in trend was detected in poison center calls mentioning marijuana (p<0.01). After 2009, poison center calls increased 0.8% per month (95% CI=0.2, 1.4, p<0.01). Poison center calls also increased 56% (95% CI=49%, 63%, p<0.001) in the period following the policy change. Further, there was one hospital discharge coded as dependent for every 3,159 (95% CI=2,465, 3,853, p<0.001) medical marijuana registrant applications. Conclusions The abrupt nature of these changes suggests public health effects related to broad policy changes associated with marijuana. This report may be used to assist in policy decisions regarding the short-term public health effects of marijuana legalization. PMID:26385161

  8. Legal considerations of medical-practice employee selection.

    PubMed

    Solomon, R J

    1994-03-01

    This article reviews the legal requirements that physicians face as employers, including Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, as well as the preservation of at-will rights. It also describes the various employment methods that medical practices can use, including structured interviews, tests, work samples, simulations, references, drug tests, and application forms. Finally, the physician's role as supervisor of the employment process is discussed.

  9. Reefer madness: legal & moral issues surrounding the medical prescription of marijuana.

    PubMed

    Barnes, R E

    2000-01-01

    California, Arizona, and several other states have recently legalized medical marijuana. My goal in this paper is to demonstrate that even if one grants the opponents of legalization many of their contentious assumptions, the federal government is still obligated to take several specific steps toward the legalization of medical marijuana. I defend this claim against a variety of objections, including the claims: that marijuana is unsafe, that marijuana cannot be adequately tested or produced as a drug, that the availability of synthetic THC makes marijuana superfluous, and especially that legalizing medical marijuana will increase recreational use by 'sending the wrong message.' I then go on to argue that given the intransigent position of the federal government on this issue, state governments are justified in unilaterally legalizing medical marijuana as an act of civil disobedience. A large portion of this paper consists of an extensive response to the objection that legalizing medical marijuana will 'send the wrong message'--which I take to be the primary impediment to legalization. This objection basically claims that the consequences of withholding legalization (especially preventing increased recreational use) are superior to those of legalizing medical marijuana. I argue that legalization is justified even if one were to grant both that the harms of legalization outweighed its benefits and that utilitarianism is true. This requires a subtle and somewhat extended discussion of utilitarian moral and political theory.

  10. Legal assessment of current situation on orphan patients in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Spokiene, Indre

    2008-01-01

    After Lithuania joined the European Union, the Regulation (EC) No. 141/2000 on orphan medicinal products and Commission Regulation (EC) No. 847/2000 came into force as part of national legislation. Member States must adopt specific measures to increase knowledge on rare diseases and to improve their detection, diagnosis, and treatment. The aim of this article was to present and to assess the current legal situation on orphan patients and their treatment in Lithuania, to identify legislation gaps, and to propose some ideas how to facilitate the solution of the existing problems in this field. For this purpose, European Union and Lithuanian legal documents on rare medicinal products are examined using a comparative method. With reference to inventory of Member States' incentives for rare diseases in national level, the most important issues, which orphan patients face to in Lithuania, are singled out. In Lithuania, the situation of orphan patients in terms of protection of patient rights is insufficiently determined. The access to effective health care services or approved therapies in some cases is restricted. Working relationships between genetic services and various clinical specialists as well as with those in primary care are not legally determined; the number of clinical trials aimed at orphan medicinal products is low. These results suggest a need for awareness raising among Lithuanian Government, health care specialists, patient organizations about the importance to improve practical implementation of European Union legislation and progressive experience of some European countries in this field.

  11. French Current Plans for a National Space Legal Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    France bears the international obligation to authorise and supervise space activities under its jurisdiction and can be liable for damage caused by space objects launched from Kourou (French Guiana) and/or by companies registered in France. The current national framework for the activities carried by Arianespace, Starsem, Eutelsat and for the Ariane European launcher operated from the Guiana Space Centre (CSG) is adequately regulated on the basis of relevant programmatic, contractual and administrative legal regime. But in consequence of the liberalisation of the telecommunications market, of the privatisation of international organisations and State owned companies and of the increasing private demands to access CSG facilities, further regulations could be needed. In this context, the French Ministry of Research's Space Department has convened in 1999, during 2 years, more than 100 technical and legal experts organised in several working groups to propose an upgraded national legal framework for space activities. This constituted working groups dealt with: launching (to implement a licence procedure, considering the responsibility of France and international competition rules), earth observation (for licensing and data policy), telecommunications and navigation, and space objects property and security regime (linked to the registration convention and the Unidroit Space Protocol). Th report of this work named "Space Law Evolution in France Study" was presented to the Minister of Research by the beginnings of this year. The present author has driven the overall study on behalf of the French Research Ministry's Space Department. This paper presents the report's general content with following actions regarding the French national space legal framework.

  12. Integrating Social Workers into Medical-Legal Partnerships: Comprehensive Problem Solving for Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin, Jeffrey David; Nelson, Brooke; Cronin, Katie

    2012-01-01

    Medical-legal partnerships (MLPs) integrate legal services into the health care setting to resolve legal issues that have a negative impact on patient health. These partnerships between attorneys and health care professionals have traditionally focused on physicians. Despite early success and expansion of the MLP model, the literature is only…

  13. Medical Error Disclosure and Patient Safety: Legal Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Guillod, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the number of preventable adverse events has become a public health issue. The paper discusses in which ways the law can contribute to that goal, especially by encouraging a culture of safety among healthcare professionals. It assesses the need or the usefulness to pass so-called disclosure laws and apology laws, to adopt mandatory but strictly confidential Critical Incidents Reporting Systems in hospitals, to change the fault-based system of medical liability or to amend the rules on criminal liability. The paper eventually calls for adding the law to the present agenda of patient safety. Significance for public health The extent of preventable adverse events and the correlative need to improve patient safety are recognized today as a public health issue. In order to lower the toll associated with preventable adverse events, the former culture of professionalism (based on the premise that a good physician doesn’t make mistakes) must be replaced by a culture of safety, which requires a multi-pronged approach that includes all the main stakeholders within the healthcare system. A number of legal reforms could help in prompting such a change. This contribution stresses the need to include legal aspects when trying to find appropriate responses to public health issues. PMID:25170502

  14. [Prevention of medico-legal conflicts in medical practice].

    PubMed

    Minossi, José Guilherme

    2009-02-01

    Generally, medico-legal conflicts which occur in surgical and medical practice are a source of worry for both the medical profession and the society as a whole, because on one hand, they could cause high emotional stress for doctors, and on the other hand, patients could be rejected. Once consolidated, defensive medicine increases treatment costs and the doctor-patient relationship could transform into a tragedy. There are many causes for this, including non-treatment factors, such as an unsupported and disorganized health system, lack of participation from society and the doctor in improving this system, the training machine which launches a large number of young unprepared doctors to practice in this noble profession, along with a lack of continuing training, as there are few public or private institutions providing preparation, or further medical training. The related treatment factors are generally, a deficient doctor-patient relationship, poor work condition, power abuse by the doctor, a lack of clear agreement, and poor medical record keeping. These conflicts cannot be solved by simple creating legislation, or by denying the existence of medical error, which occurs at higher frequency than the actual conflicts. It is very important to improve the doctor-patient relationship because an effective fraternal relationship reduces the chance of a judicial demand. The doctor still needs to fully understand his/her conduct obligations and mainly to avoid power abuse. Doctors must also professionally link themselves with politicians who fight for the individual's rights against the system. Society must also understand that health is not just an issue exclusive for doctors, and people must fight to improve living conditions. Society must seriously show its frustration with the increasing disparity between scientific possibilities and actual wellbeing. The training machine needs immediate profound changes to produce professionals with the highest qualifications equipped

  15. [Medical and legal aspects of inability to participate in legal proceedings and the execution of imprisonment resulting from mental illness].

    PubMed

    Teleśnicki, Stanisław M; Bolechała, Filip

    2004-01-01

    A mental disorder of the criminal can be the cause of reprieving penal conduct or the execution of imprisonment. In the present study the matter of ability to take part in legal proceedings and arrest in preliminary custody were considered. The possibility and propriety of staying in conditions of imprisonment mentally ill persons was also considered. Legal settlements relating to this problem were submitted. We paid attention to medical circumstances in which judicial experts should act in such cases.

  16. Action in the Event Tent! Medical-Legal Issues Facing the Volunteer Event Physician

    PubMed Central

    Ross, David S.; Ferguson, Alishia; Herbert, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Physicians need to consider medical-legal issues when volunteering their time to assist with community mass-participation and athletic events. This article also reviews medical-legal aspects of the volunteer physician’s out-of-state practice. Seven cases illustrate the importance of expertise and planning to avoid legal issues for the volunteer event physician. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant studies, expert opinion, medical-legal legislation, and medical-legal cases were reviewed. Results: Physicians typically make 4 common assumptions regarding these types of events: Good Samaritan legislation, event liability insurance, personal liability insurance, and waivers. We discuss the intent of these assumptions and the reality of how, or how not, they provide any protection to the volunteer event physician. Conclusion: The intent of this article is to make physicians aware of medial-legal issues when volunteering their time for community and athletic events. PMID:24459551

  17. Legal and ethical implications of medically enforced feeding of detained asylum seekers on hunger strike.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Mary A; Silove, Derrick M; Steel, Zachary

    2004-03-01

    The current practice of non-consensual medical treatment of hunger-striking asylum seekers in detention needs closer inquiry. An Australian Government regulation empowers the Department of Immigration and Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs (DIMIA) to authorise non-consensual medical treatment for a person in immigration detention if they are at risk of physical harm, but there are doubts about whether the regulation would withstand legal challenge. Authorisation by DIMIA does not compel medical practitioners to enforce treatment if such action is contrary to their "ethical, moral or religious convictions". The World Medical Association has established guidelines for doctors involved in managing people on hunger strikes. The Declaration of Tokyo (1975) and the Declaration of Malta (1991) both prohibit the use of non-consensual force-feeding of hunger strikers who are mentally competent. If called upon to treat hunger strikers, medical practitioners should be aware of their ethical and legal responsibilities, and that they should act independently of government or institutional interests.

  18. [Responsibility of the anaesthetist in preoperative risk management. Comments on the legal implications of medical publications in this field].

    PubMed

    Bock, R-W; Dudziak, R; Wilke, H J

    2004-06-01

    There is an increasing number of publications in the medical literature which address the medical and legal obligations of a specialist in a given field. These articles, mostly editorials, seek to delineate the optimal course of treatment based on the current state of the art and science of medicine. However, we believe that the unreflected adoption of these often highly theoretical ideas and suggestions carries its own dangers. For one thing, there is the threatening financial crisis in the public health system. In addition, the feasibility of implementing these suggestions in routine medical and surgical practice is questionable. Last but not least, suggestions and guidelines for preoperative risk management by, for instance, Lingnau and Strohmenger 2002 cross the well established boundaries of the various medical and surgical specialties, which obviously demands careful deliberations among the specialties involved. So far, few specialty boards have seen fit to act on these suggestions. Our article on the medical and legal responsibilities of the anaesthesiologist in perioperative risk management restates the aforementioned concerns. We attempt to point out medical and legal points of controversy. In particular, we caution against the ever present danger of a bona fide adoption of visionary guidelines as the "standard of care" by both medical and legal experts. We feel that it is imperative to carefully evaluate editorial comments and suggestions, however well meaning, in the light of established teaching and practice, lest these comments and suggestions become the basis of an unjustified determination of a physicians innocence or guilt in a court of law.

  19. Medical Rights of Minors: Some Answered and Unanswered Legal Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbutt, Lou

    1980-01-01

    Because school counselors work with minors they must keep up with current laws, as well as state and local school policies. Special caution is needed concerning medical rights of minors and parental consent in dealing with student pregnancy, abortion, drug abuse, and child abuse. (JAC)

  20. Cross-border issues in the development of medical tourism in Malaysia: legal challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Nemie, Puteri; Kassim, Jahn

    2009-08-01

    Strategically located at the crossroads of Asia, Malaysia has become one of the key players in the fast-growing and lucrative market for health care services in Asia. Medical travel across international boundaries has been made possible through affordable airfares and the favourable exchange rates of the Malaysian ringgit has contributed to the rise of the "medical tourism phenomenon" where medical travel is combined with visiting popular tourist destinations in Malaysia. Further, competitive medical fees and modern medical facilities have also made Malaysia a popular destination for medical tourists. Nevertheless, the increased number of foreign patients has opened up possibilities of Malaysian health care providers being subjected to malpractice claims and triggering a myriad of cross-border legal issues. Presently, there is no internationally accepted legal framework to regulate medical tourism and issues of legal redress in relation to unsatisfactory provision of treatment across international boundaries. The economic benefits of medical tourism must be based upon a solid legal regulatory framework and strong ethical standards as well as upon high-quality medical and health care services. It is therefore important to assess the existing legal framework affecting the development of medical tourism in Malaysia in order to explore the gaps, deficiencies and possibilities for legal and regulatory reform.

  1. [On meeting sanitary legal requirements in technical regulation of medical equipment safety].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, O K; Prokopenko, L V

    2007-01-01

    The article covered observance of sanitary legal requirements in special technical regulations "On requirements to medical equipment and medical products safety". The authors discussed problems of applied terminology, classification of medical products, occupational risk, control over observance of safety requirements on all stages of medical products circulation--design, production, usage.

  2. Affirmative Action in Medical Education: A Legal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Lelia B.; Helms, Charles M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes history of legal theory behind affirmative action, with examples from case law and Department of Education regulations, identifying legal pitfalls in admissions and financial aid, including categorization of students by race, racially disproportionate financial aid awards after accounting for need, racially disproportionate scholarship…

  3. Medical diagnosis of legal culpability: the impact of early psychiatric testimony in the 19th century English criminal trial.

    PubMed

    Toole, Ciara J

    2012-01-01

    Fast-paced developments in psychiatry, neuroscience and emerging neuroimaging technologies place continual pressure on the legal recognition of mental illness and disease across jurisdictional boundaries. Nevertheless, the Canadian legal definition of exculpatory mental disease in the context of criminal liability has remained largely static, sheltered from the immediate influence of medical theory and advancements. In order to effectively reflect on the intersection of mental health and criminal justice systems in this area, it is important to understand its historical development and the English common law origins of the current approach. Specifically turning to the early 19th century, documented history and accounts of early medical witness testimony on the mental state of the accused provide a unique opportunity to understand the initial collision between fundamental concepts of moral and legal culpability and new scientific understandings of mental function and disease. In this article, I suggest that early psychiatric testimony to the accused's mental state challenged the evolving criminal law of 19th century England to reconcile its restrictive definition of "insanity" with expanding scientific reasoning and accounts of mental disease. The trial of Edward Oxford, an attempted royal assassination case of 1840, is examined as a symbolic height in this conflict prior to the first common law pronouncement of the current approach in 1843. As debate continues on the role of medical advancement in the identification of exculpatory medical disorders in law, this historical perspective may serve as a touchstone in balancing the enforcement of legal culpability with our society's greater appreciation for mental illness.

  4. Serving the Newly Legalized: Their Characteristics and Current Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Susan Forbes; And Others

    The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA) provides for the legalization of undocumented aliens through several programs. IRCA established the State Legalization Impact Assistance Grants (SLIAG) "to alleviate the financial impact on States and local governments that may result from the adjustment of immigrant status" through…

  5. Retail medical clinics: increasing access to low cost medical care amongst a developing legal environment.

    PubMed

    Schleiter, Kristin E

    2010-01-01

    Retail medical clinics are an innovation in health care with the potential to increase access to low-cost basic health care services while changing the delivery model for routine, non-urgent medical care. However, the few states that attempted to directly regulate retail medical clinics have been met with criticism by the FTC due to the proposed legislations' anticompetitive undertones. The relationship between retail medical clinics and the host stores or pharmacies that house them has the potential to spark fraud and abuse concerns. Retail medical clinics must abide by state-specific regulation on scope of practice of the various mid-level practitioners who work for the clinics, particularly to minimize exposure to litigation and keep within the clinics' intended purpose of a supplement to primary care physician offices. The author concludes that the consumer benefits of cost and convenience, combined with the potential for growth and expanded consumer base from a retailers' perspective, make the legal challenge inherent in running a retail medical clinic well worth the effort.

  6. Redressing wounds: finding a legal framework to remedy racial disparities in medical care.

    PubMed

    Shin, Michael S

    2002-12-01

    In recent years, numerous medical studies and reports have documented startling disparities between the health status of African Americans and White Americans. The literature is replete with evidence that one of the main causes of these racial disparities is the different treatment of patients of different racial groups. This Comment addresses the possibility that implicit cognitive bias, in the form of implicit attitudes and stereotypes, significantly contributes to these racial disparities in medical treatment. Finding existing legal frameworks inadequate to address current disparities in health care, this Comment recommends avenues for the reworking of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Specifically, it suggests that disparate-treatment provisions that encompass claims arising from unintentional discrimination should be incorporated into Title VI, and it offers the employment law frameworks of Title VII and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act as models for such reform.

  7. Legal and ethical issues in neuroimaging research: human subjects protection, medical privacy, and the public communication of research results.

    PubMed

    Kulynych, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Humans subjects research entails significant legal and ethical obligations. Neuroimaging researchers must be familiar with the requirements of human subjects protection, including evolving standards for the protection of privacy and the disclosure of risk in "non-therapeutic" research. Techniques for creating veridical surface renderings from volumetric anatomical imaging data raise new privacy concerns, particularly under the federal medical privacy regulation. Additionally, neuroimaging researchers must consider their obligation to communicate research results responsibly. The emerging field of neuroethics should strive to raise awareness of these issues and to involve neuroimaging researchers in the legal, ethical, and policy debates that currently surround human subjects research.

  8. Psychotropics without borders: ethics and legal implications of internet-based access to psychiatric medications.

    PubMed

    Klein, Carolina A

    2011-01-01

    Medical practitioners are revisiting many of the ethics and the legal implications surrounding the clinical frameworks within which we operate. In today's world, distinguishing between virtual and physical reality continues to be increasingly difficult. The physician may be found grappling with the decision of whether to continue to treat a patient who may be obtaining psychotropic medications through the Internet. This article approaches some of the clinical and legal implications and the ethics regarding the availability of prescription psychotropics over the Internet.

  9. Integrating social workers into medical-legal partnerships: comprehensive problem solving for patients.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Jeffrey David; Nelson, Brooke; Cronin, Katie

    2012-10-01

    Medical-legal partnerships (MLPs) integrate legal services into the health care setting to resolve legal issues that have a negative impact on patient health. These partnerships between attorneys and health care professionals have traditionally focused on physicians. Despite early success and expansion of the MLP model, the literature is only beginning to explore the significant role that social workers can play in an MLP's development, process, and success. This article argues that MLPs are greatly enhanced when they seek the active engagement of a health center's social workers. All members of the MLP, however, should be aware of differing ethical and legal obligations in the medical, social work, and legal profession as well as differences in professional cultures that can affect the work of the partnership.

  10. [Current status of medical education in Chile].

    PubMed

    2009-05-01

    The Chilean Academy of Medicine published a "Report on the Current Status of Medical Education in Chile". This report reviews the history of medical education in this country and its close relationship with the Health Care System, public and private; highlights the main changes that took place during the last 25 years in superior and medical education; provides information on the 26 currently existing Medical Schools; refers to the availability of medical doctors and specialists; discusses the mechanisms that control the quality of institutions involved and their programs; and summarizes the results of the Annual National Medical Examination. The members of the Committee on Superior Education of the Academy provided a critical analysis of medical education in Chile and recommendations on how to improve it.

  11. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy. European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

    PubMed

    Harper, Joyce C; Geraedts, Joep; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C; Dondorp, Wybo; Gianaroli, Luca; Harton, Gary; Milachich, Tanya; Kääriäinen, Helena; Liebaers, Inge; Morris, Michael; Sequeiros, Jorge; Sermon, Karen; Shenfield, Françoise; Skirton, Heather; Soini, Sirpa; Spits, Claudia; Veiga, Anna; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Viville, Stéphane; de Wert, Guido; Macek, Milan

    2013-11-01

    In March 2005, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology met to discuss the interface between genetics and assisted reproductive technology (ART), and published an extended background paper, recommendations and two Editorials. Seven years later, in March 2012, a follow-up interdisciplinary workshop was held, involving representatives of both professional societies, including experts from the European Union Eurogentest2 Coordination Action Project. The main goal of this meeting was to discuss developments at the interface between clinical genetics and ARTs. As more genetic causes of reproductive failure are now recognised and an increasing number of patients undergo testing of their genome before conception, either in regular health care or in the context of direct-to-consumer testing, the need for genetic counselling and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) may increase. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) thus far does not have evidence from randomised clinical trials to substantiate that the technique is both effective and efficient. Whole-genome sequencing may create greater challenges both in the technological and interpretational domains, and requires further reflection about the ethics of genetic testing in ART and PGD/PGS. Diagnostic laboratories should be reporting their results according to internationally accepted accreditation standards (International Standards Organisation - ISO 15189). Further studies are needed in order to address issues related to the impact of ART on epigenetic reprogramming of the early embryo. The legal landscape regarding assisted reproduction is evolving but still remains very heterogeneous and often contradictory. The lack of legal harmonisation and uneven access to infertility treatment and PGD/PGS fosters considerable cross-border reproductive care in Europe and beyond. The aim of this paper is to complement previous publications and provide

  12. AIDS on Campus: A Medical and Legal Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Jackie R.; Matteoli, Tom E.

    1989-01-01

    Because an effective vaccine for Human Immunodeficiency Virus is unlikely to be available until late 1990s, higher education must focus on education programs to prevent spread of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) and establish an HIV/AIDS policy before need arises. Legal counsel should review policies and procedures prior to their…

  13. Medical and Legal Implications of Testing for Sexually Transmitted Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschlag, Margaret R.; Guillén, Christina D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in children presents a number of problems for the practitioner that are not usually faced when testing adults for the same infections. The identification of an STI in a child can have, in addition to medical implications, serious legal implications. The presence of an STI is often used to support the presence or allegations of sexual abuse, and conversely, the identification of an STI in a child will prompt an investigation of possible abuse. The purpose of this paper is to review the epidemiology of child sexual abuse, including the epidemiology of major STIs including Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, syphilis, herpes simplex virus (HSV), Trichomonas vaginalis, and human papillomavirus, and the current recommendations for diagnostic testing in this population. PMID:20610820

  14. “Extra Oomph:” Addressing Housing Disparities through Medical Legal Partnership Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Low-income households face common and chronic housing problems that have known health risks and legal remedies. The Medical Legal Partnership (MLP) program presents a unique opportunity to address housing problems and improve patient health through legal assistance offered in clinical settings. Drawn from in-depth interviews with 72 patients, this study investigated the outcomes of MLP interventions and compares results to similarly disadvantaged participants with no access to MLP services. Results indicate that participants in the MLP group were more likely to achieve adequate, affordable and stable housing than those in the comparison group. Study findings suggest that providing access to legal services in the healthcare setting can effectively address widespread health disparities rooted in problematic housing. Implications for policy and scalability are discussed with the conclusion that MLPs can shift professionals’ consciousness as they work to improve housing and health trajectories for indigent groups using legal approaches. PMID:27867247

  15. [Tyramine and serotonin syndromes. Pharmacological, medical and legal remarks].

    PubMed

    Toro-Martínez, Esteban

    2005-01-01

    The tyramine syndrome and the serotonin syndrome are a complex of signs and symptoms that are thought to be largely attributable to drug - drug interactions or drug - food interactions that enhances norepinephrine o serotonin activity. This article reviews: pharmacological basis of those syndromes; clinical features; forbidden foods, drug-drug interactions, and treatment options. Finally a set of legal recommendations are proposed to avoid liability litigations.

  16. The relationship between medical ethics and the legal system in Italy: food for thought.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Carlo; Ricciardi, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Relations between ethics in general - and medical ethics in particular - and legal systems are complex and have been extensively examined in the literature. The topic is important not only for ethicists and jurists, but also for members of the public, who benefit from the services offered by the professions. While the Italian Institute of Health does not claim to propose new avenues for exploration of the relations between ethics and legal systems, it offers some food for thought in the ongoing debate.

  17. Exploring UK medical and social work students' legal literacy: comparisons, contrasts and implications.

    PubMed

    Preston-Shoot, Michael; McKimm, Judy

    2013-05-01

    To ensure acceptable practice standards both doctors and social workers should draw on relevant legal rules when reaching professional judgements concerning, for instance, children requiring protection, people with severe mental distress and adults at risk, information sharing, consent to intervention and service user involvement in their care and treatment. Many practitioners use the law to maintain high standards of professionalism. However, research has uncovered limited awareness of legal rules and poor standards of health and social care. Academic benchmarks and practice requirements for health and social care professions centrally position legal knowledge for secure decision-making. Model curricula exist. However, the outcomes of the taught curriculum on students' confidence in their legal knowledge and skills have been relatively overlooked. This article introduces the concept of legal literacy, a distillation of knowledge, understanding, skills and values that enables practitioners to connect relevant legal rules with their professional practice, to appreciate the roles and duties of other practitioners and to communicate effectively across organisational boundaries. It presents the outcomes for a 2006-2009 study of 1154 UK medical and 638 social work students of their law learning for practice, response rates of 46% and 68%. Significant differences were found between medical and social work students' attitudes towards the law, and in their self-ratings of legal knowledge and skills. Confidence levels were low and anxiety high, especially among medical students, although law teaching had some positive outcomes on knowledge and skill development. Social work and medical students associated different themes with the law, the latter especially foregrounding ethics, negligence and liability, which could affect inter-professional working. Students are not fully prepared for legally literate practice, with a consequent need to review the time allocated for, and

  18. The AIDS crisis and the medical-legal implications of transfusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L J

    1991-06-01

    An increased awareness of the potential to be harmed by blood transfusions has come with the AIDS crisis. Patients and health care providers alike are concerned with the complications of a transfusion, and various alternatives to traditional transfusion therapy have emerged. They include autologous transfusions, directed donations, and outright refusals of transfusion therapy. This article examines the medical-legal considerations that accompany a decision to transfuse. Various legal theories used in cases where persons injured by transfusions have sought legal redress and the outcomes of those cases will be examined. The question of whether directed donations are a reasonable alternative to traditional transfusion therapy will also be explored.

  19. [Topical chemotherapy for conjunctival tumours - the medical and legal bearings of the case].

    PubMed

    Kempin, R; Tost, F

    2014-06-01

    The treatment management of malignant tumours is characterised and limited by specific features of the topographical structure of the eye. The anatomic characteristics of the conjunctival sac, the movable tissue structures and the need to take care of corneal transparency and conjunctival stability are the main concerns of the experts. Clinical studies have revealed adjuvant chemotherapy to have a positive effect as a therapeutic treatment for neoplasia of the conjunctiva and cornea. Although mitomycin and interferon are widely used, there are no phase III studies on local adjuvant chemotherapy (interferon, mitomycin, 5-fluorouracil) that evaluate the proof of effectiveness, potential adverse effects or interactions with other drugs. For this reason, the currently available studies fail to comply with the jurisdiction of the German Federal Social Court. Hence, the Medical Service of the Health Insurance Funds (MDK) regionally does not accept the medical preconditions for reimbursement of the costs in adjuvant local chemotherapy. A doctor's unquestioned acceptance of such an MDK decision could have legal consequences. An off-label use is acceptable by law if there is no alternative treatment available with a higher evidence level that conforms to the medical standard. It is therefore recommendable for the Joint Federal Committee commissions the experts in ophthalmology and oncology on off-label use, to review the scientific evidence regarding adjuvant therapy of malignant tumours of the ocular surface. Only in this way can regional disparities in patient care, and intrusions on the doctor-patient relationship, be avoided.

  20. Legal Implications Associated With New Medical Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, A. E.; Pendergrass, Henry P.; Stephens, W. Hoyt; Partain, C. Leon; Rollo, F. David; Blumstein, James; Calvani, Terry; Hall, Donald; Sherrard, Thomas; Quimby, Charles; Price, Ronald R.

    1982-01-01

    The application of biomedical engineering advances to health care delivery has provided both opportunities and challenges. One of these has been considerations of resource acquisition and distribution. Guidelines, agencies, modalities and devices have become increasingly apparent. Applications of the laws of agency and concepts of vicarious responsibility are particularly relevant. Certificate of Need legislation has led to antitrust considerations that are exceedingly complex. This presentation will attempt to evaluate some of the legal aspects resulting from the acquisition, allocation, and application of the many exciting technologies that are the subject of this symposium.

  1. Medical staff contracting: legal issues in physician-hospital arrangements.

    PubMed

    Caesar, N B

    1993-01-01

    This article--the third in a series analyzing the physician-hospital contracting process from the physician's perspective--addresses the legal issues involved in physician-hospital arrangements, including those arising under federal and state illegal remuneration, antitrust, and tax laws. New applications of these issues to physician-hospital organizations and practice management/practice acquisitions by hospitals are also addressed, as well as other recent hospital efforts to maximize the benefits to be gained from the physician-hospital relationship.

  2. Medical Marijuana Legalization and Co-use in Adult Cigarette Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Julie B.; Cataldo, Janine K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We examined effects of long-term medical marijuana legalization on cigarette co-use in a sample of adults. Methods We conducted secondary analysis using data from the 2014 US Tobacco Attitudes and Beliefs Survey, which consisted of cigarette smokers, aged ≥ 45 years (N = 506). Participants were categorized by their state residence, where medical marijuana was (1) illegal, (2) legalized < 10 years, and (3) legalized ≥ 10 years. The Web-based survey assessed participants’ marijuana use, beliefs and attitudes on marijuana, and nicotine dependence using Fagerstrom Tolerance for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) and Hooked on Nicotine Checklist (HONC) scores. Results In cigarette smokers aged ≥ 45 years, long-term legalization of medical marijuana was associated with stable positive increases in marijuana use prevalence (ever in a lifetime) (p = .005) and frequency (number of days in past 30 days) (unadjusted p = .005; adjusted p = .08). Those who reported marijuana co-use had greater FTND and HONC scores after adjusting for covariates (p = .05). Conclusions These preliminary findings warrant further examination of the potential impact of long-term legalization of medical marijuana on greater cigarette and marijuana co-use in adults and higher nicotine dependence among co-users at the population level. PMID:26931752

  3. Ambulatory surgery centers--current legal issues 2004 (Part 2).

    PubMed

    Becker, Scott; Szabad, Melissa; Foltushansky, Sofia

    2004-05-01

    component of the procedure performed with the equipment, and the vendor then pays the ASC a fee for its lease of ASC space to house the equipment. These types of relationships can raise several legal compliance concerns. An ASC should understand that the arrangement could jeopardize its state ASC license and its Medicare certification even though the arrangement does not involve Medicare certified procedures or Medicare patients. Furthermore, this type of business venture might not comply with state and federal self referral laws. ASCs are also increasingly facing situations where a provider performs a procedure for which there is no facility charge for the ASC, but the physician is receiving a professional fee from Medicare. In this situation, ASCs should implement a policy, similar to the example provided in this article, to avoid even the appearance of providing an inducement or reward for referrals of Medicare or Medicaid business by requiring physicians to pay the Center a fee, consistent with fair market value, for the use of the Center for non-Covered Procedures or for performing multiple procedures within the same operative session. Lastly, as touched upon by this article, in the joint venture context, ASCs must take into account several guidelines in order to steer clear from risks associated with tax-exempt entities as an investor and antitrust price fixing issues. Whether a joint venture, of which a tax exempt entity is an investor, is deemed organized and operated in furtherance of the charitable purposes of a tax-exempt partner as set forth in Section 501(c)(3) of the Code depends on the facts and circumstances of each case. Generally, a joint venture will satisfy the guidelines if the tax-exempt investor in the joint venture retains sufficient control over the joint venture to ensure that the joint venture furthers the charitable purposes of the tax-exempt investor and adequately serves the community. In the ASC physician hospital joint venture arena, the

  4. The medical and legal aspects of maternal mortality.

    PubMed

    Elliott, John P

    2012-02-01

    Sudden unexpected changes in the life of a family create many different emotions in various family members. The death of a young woman during or after her pregnancy is especially difficult because of the strain it places on family dynamics. One of the consequences is that there is, commonly, a newborn, and perhaps other children, without a mother and caregiver. In families that relied on both parents working, there are financial hardships imposed by the death. There is the emotional void that is felt by her partner, parents, sisters, brothers, and extended family. This extreme stress leads to questions about the death that need to be addressed by the health care providers. If the anger that is part of the grieving process is not adequately resolved, healing cannot occur. It is then that the family may pursue the legal process to help obtain answers about what happened and, more importantly, why it happened to their loved one.

  5. [Phytovigilance: A medical requirement and a legal obligation].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, H; Pabst, J-Y

    2016-01-01

    Phytovigilance consists in supervision of side effects and drug interactions consequential to use of herbal medicinal products, herbal food supplements, herbal cosmetics and/or medicinal plants. It includes thus pharmacovigilance applied to phytotherapy, nutrivigilance and cosmetovigilance but also addictovigilance in case of plants, which lead to drug addiction, and toxicovigilance in case of toxic plants. Becoming necessary owing to (acute or chronic) toxicity risks or to drug interactions risks (of pharmacocinetical or pharmacodynamical kind)--as far as it concerns interactions between several associated plants or between a plant and a chemical or biotechnological allopathic medicine--phytovigilance represents moreover a legal obligation. Pharmacovigilance--in case of herbal medicinal products--is indeed becoming mandatory according to title IX of the European directive 2001/83/EC, whereas nutrivigilance is imposed by the European Food Safety Agency (EFSA).

  6. Rape as a legal indication for abortion: implications and consequences of the medical examination requirement.

    PubMed

    Teklehaimanot, K I; Smith, C Hord

    2004-01-01

    A number of countries adopt abortion laws recognizing rape as a legal ground for access to safe abortion service. As rape is a crime, these abortion laws carry with them criminal and health care elements that in turn result in the involvement of legal and medical expertise. The most common objective of the laws should be providing safe abortion services to women survivors of rape. Depending on purposes of a given abortion law, the laws usually require women to undergo a medical examination to qualify for a legal abortion. Some abortion laws are so vague as to result in uncertainties regarding the steps health personnel must follow in conducting medical examination. Another group of abortion laws do not leave room for regulation and remain too rigid to respond to changing socio-economic circumstances. Still others require medical examination as a prerequisite for abortion. As a result, a number of abortion laws remain on the books. The paper attempts to analyze legal and practical issues related to medical examination in rape cases.

  7. [Legal framework of data protection : current requirements in Germany and requirements in planned European Union regulations].

    PubMed

    Schütze, B

    2013-05-01

    The federal system in Germany necessitates that in addition to federal laws, country and church-specific legislations must also be considered during the evaluation of relevant legal stipulations concerning data protection. Furthermore, there are also special legal regulations for hospitals in almost every federal state which are governed by the principle of subsidiarity: special legal regulations are to be preferentially used, so that findings from one federal state are difficult to transfer to another federal state.Patient data may only be used and processed without legal regulations with informed consent of the patient. The use of patient data for purposes of quality assurance, research and further education of students and doctors is possible under the present laws according to a positive weighting of interests. Patient data can also be exchanged via online services for the purposes of patient care; however, informed consent of the patient for medical online services is almost always unavoidable.

  8. [The role and place of pathology services in ensuring and improving the quality of medical care: Organizational and legal aspects].

    PubMed

    Timofeev, I V

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers the legal and organizational issues of the activity of pathology services in improving medical care. It shows the main (diagnostic and medico-organizational) areas of pathology work to improve the quality of medical care.

  9. Medical-Legal Inferences From Functional Neuroimaging Evidence.

    PubMed

    Mayberg

    1996-07-01

    Positron emission (PET) and single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) are validated functional imaging techniques for the in vivo measurement of many neuro-phsyiological and neurochemical parameters. Research studies of patients with a broad range of neurological and psychiatric illness have been published. Reproducible and specific patterns of altered cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism, however, have been demonstrated and confirmed for only a limited number of specific illnesses. The association of functional scan patterns with specific deficits is less conclusive. Correlations of regional abnormalities with clinical symptoms such as motor weakness, aphasia, and visual spatial dysfunction are the most reproducible but are more poorly localized than lesion-deficit studies would suggest. Findings are even less consistent for nonlocalizing behavioral symptoms such as memory difficulties, poor concentration, irritability, or chronic pain, and no reliable patterns have been demonstrated. In a forensic context, homicidal and sadistic tendencies, aberrant sexual drive, violent impulsivity, psychopathic and sociopathic personality traits, as well as impaired judgement and poor insight, have no known PET or SPECT patterns, and their presence in an individual with any PET or SPECT scan finding cannot be inferred or concluded. Furthermore, the reliable prediction of any specific neurological, psychiatric, or behavioral deficits from specific scan findings has not been demonstrated. Unambiguous results from experiments designed to specifically examine the causative relationships between regional brain dysfunction and these types of complex behaviors are needed before any introduction of functional scans into the courts can be considered scientifically justified or legally admissible.

  10. Psychotropic Medication Consultation in Schools: An Ethical and Legal Dilemma for School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, John S.; Thaler, Cara L.; Hirsch, Amanda J.

    2006-01-01

    Assessing, consulting, and intervening with students being treated with psychotropic medications is an increasingly common activity for school psychologists. This article reviews some of the literature providing evidence for the greater need for training in school psychopharmacology. A legal and ethical case study is presented that highlights the…

  11. Medication-Related Practice Roles: An Ethical and Legal Primer for School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahidullah, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Given the prevalence of school-age children and adolescents who are prescribed with and are taking psychotropic medications, a critical issue that school psychologists may likely encounter in contemporary practice is providing both quality and continuity of care to these students in the context of relevant legal and ethical parameters. With a…

  12. 76 FR 54004 - Agency Information Collection (Report of Medical, Legal, and Other Expenses Incident to Recovery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... for Injury or Death) Activity under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of..., and Other Expenses Incident to Recovery for Injury or Death, VA Form 21-8416b. OMB Control Number... injury or death. Such award is considered as countable income; however, medical, legal or other...

  13. Insulin Administration in Catholic Schools: A New Look at Legal and Medical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence indicates that more students with type 1 diabetes are enrolling in Catholic schools across the United States. Meeting the medical needs of these students appears to be a significant challenge--legally and logistically--for many Catholic schools. District officials, school leaders, and school staff need support to understand the…

  14. Current Situation of Medication Adherence in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Vrijens, Bernard; Antoniou, Sotiris; Burnier, Michel; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Volpe, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Despite increased awareness, poor adherence to treatments for chronic diseases remains a global problem. Adherence issues are common in patients taking antihypertensive therapy and associated with increased risks of coronary and cerebrovascular events. Whilst there has been a gradual trend toward improved control of hypertension, the number of patients with blood pressure values above goal has remained constant. This has both personal and economic consequences. Medication adherence is a multifaceted issue and consists of three components: initiation, implementation, and persistence. A combination of methods is recommended to measure adherence, with electronic monitoring and drug measurement being the most accurate. Pill burden, resulting from free combinations of blood pressure lowering treatments, makes the daily routine of medication taking complex, which can be a barrier to optimal adherence. Single-pill fixed-dose combinations simplify the habit of medication taking and improve medication adherence. Re-packing of medication is also being utilized as a method of improving adherence. This paper presents the outcomes of discussions by a European group of experts on the current situation of medication adherence in hypertension. PMID:28298894

  15. Evolving medical service in the information age: a legal analysis of applying telemedicine programs in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsing-Hao

    2008-12-01

    In the face of the information age, Internet and telecommunication technologies have been widely applied in various settings. These innovational technologies have been used in the areas of e-commerce, long distance learning programs, entertainment, e-government, and so on. In recent years, the evolution of Internet technology is also pervading the health care industry. This dramatic trend may significantly alter traditional medical practice as well as the means of delivery of health care. The idea of telemedicine is to use modern information technology as a means or platform to deliver health care service in remote areas and to manage medical information in digitalized forms. The progress of developing telemedicine, however, is rather slow. The main reason for this slow progress is not technological but rather legal. Health care providers are reluctant to promote this innovation in medical service mainly due to uncertain legal consequences and ethical concerns. Although there are many legal challenges surrounding telemedicine, this note will examine major legal issues including licensure, malpractice liability, and privacy protection. Furthermore, I will discuss the potential of applying telemedicine programs in Taiwan's National Health Insurance Program (hereinafter referred to as NHI).

  16. Key Considerations for an Economic and Legal Framework Facilitating Medical Travel

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichs-Krapels, Saba; Bussmann, Sarah; Dobyns, Christopher; Kácha, Ondřej; Ratzmann, Nora; Holm Thorvaldsen, Julie; Ruggeri, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Medical travel has the capacity to counter increasing costs of health care by creating new markets and increased revenue for health services, potentially benefiting local populations, economies, and health-care systems. This paper is part of a broad, comprehensive project aimed at developing a global health access policy (GHAP). It presents key issues to consider in terms of ensuring economic viability, sustainability, and limiting risk to the many stakeholders involved in the rapidly expanding industry of medical travel. The noted economic and legal barriers to medical travel are based on a synthesis of themes found in an extensive review of the available literature. Economic considerations, when setting up a GHAP, include a dynamic approach to pricing that is fair to the local population. Legal considerations include the implementation of international quality standards and the protection of the rights of those traveling as well as those of local populations in recipient countries. By taking into account these opportunities, the GHAP will more adequately address existing gaps in the economic and legal regulation of medical travel. PMID:27066467

  17. [Medico-legal opinionating in cases of medical errors in declaration of death].

    PubMed

    Jurek, Tomasz; Swiatek, Barbara; Drozd, Radosław

    2007-01-01

    Declaration of death is a diagnosis and it has legal consequences. While declaring death, there is a possibility of committing a medical error. The majority of irregularities in declaring an individual dead occur in emergency situations. When a physician declares death, he is released from the professional obligation of saving the individual's life. The studies were based on the results of medico-legal evaluations in criminal cases in medical errors. In case death is erroneously declared, we may face a situation of squandering the chance of saving the life of a human being. Exposure to loss of life or to severe detriment to health are possible charges here, along with failure to offer medical assistance, although a deliberate character of the offence according to article 162 of the Polish penal code renders such a legal qualification dubious in case of medical errors. In both cases verification is needed whether an interest protected by law was still in existence, i.e. whether the individual was still alive when the physician incorrectly declared him dead.

  18. Sexual assault and legal resolution: querying the medical collection of forensic evidence.

    PubMed

    Du Mont, J; Parnis, D

    2000-01-01

    Very little is known about the role of medical evidence in the legal resolution of sexual assault cases. A retrospective review of hospital and police records was conducted to determine whether medico-legal evidence was related to the police laying of charges. Data were obtained from 187 female sexual assault victims who presented to a large urban hospital-based sexual assault treatment center and the police in Ontario, Canada between January 1 and December 31, 1994. Using stepwise logistic regression medico-legal variables were tested while controlling for non-medical factors. Neither the collection of sperm, semen and/or saliva nor the documentation of clinically observed injuries was significant in predicting an arrest and charge. In contrast, non-medical variables such as the victim's age, use of alcohol, resistance and relationship to the assailant, and the corroborating evidence of a witness were related to charge-laying. We question the value of uncritically continuing to collect medical forensic evidence.

  19. INFORMED CONSENT: THE MEDICAL AND LEGAL CHALLENGE OF OUR TIME

    PubMed Central

    Séllos Simões, Luiz Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the real importance of obtaining informed consent, through an appropriate form, and its role in the outcome from civil liability claims. Methods: The wordings of the current Brazilian law and jurisprudence were compared with rulings from the State Court of the State of Rio de Janeiro, in 269 civil liability claims against healthcare professionals and hospitals. Results: Favorable and unfavorable outcomes (i.e. acquittals and convictions) were compared, and possible variations in the verdicts were discussed in relation to whether informed consent forms had been filled out or not. Conclusions: Obtaining informed consent, by means of appropriate forms, is still not a widespread practice in the Brazilian healthcare or judicial systems. It is recommended that this practice be adopted in the manner described in this paper, since this is prescribed in Brazilian law. PMID:27022541

  20. [Medical legal issues associated with the evaluation of herniated discs in seafarers to merchant ships].

    PubMed

    Onofri, E; Salesi, M; Massoni, F; Rosati, M V; Ricci, S

    2012-01-01

    "Seafarer" means person employed with any job on board a ship offshore, whether publicly or privately, excluding ships of war. Day by day a seafarer is forced to confront a reality in constant motion and live in environments that require awkward movements, and restricting the normal mobility of the person. In order to verify the frequency of herniated discs in this particular category of workers, given the recent introduction of INAIL tabulated diseases, a study was conducted on a sample of seafarers. Data analysis showed that 48.3% of the seafarers of the sample has herniated lumbar disc, and 34.5% of these duties in the deck, and 65.5% of the machine. The study of sample, varied as to age and task being performed, supports the assertion that the individual risk factors, especially age and obesity, are not strongly implicated in the genesis of disk herniation suffered by seafarers while the work factors (vibrations) play a more significant role in the onset of this disease. This consideration is part of a context, that of legal medical evaluation and in particular the causal relationship, which currently seems rather lacking in terms of literature and scientific production.

  1. Medical entrepreneurism: the current opportunity in America.

    PubMed

    Lexa, Frank James

    2004-10-01

    This article discusses both the current climate for entrepreneurial activity in the fields of biotechnology, health care services, and medical devices as well as key ideas in the process of successful innovation. Basic issues related to the nature of new medical ventures and its importance in the U.S. economy are discussed. A stepwise overview of the process of innovation is provided, starting from the initial idea, through the early and middle stages of growth, and on to an initial public offering or other alternative harvest strategy. The roles of financing sources in generating health care entrepreneurial activity are explored, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. The article focuses on venture capital investment because of its pivotal role in high-profile successes; however, alternative forms of financing are also covered as appropriate to each stage. In addition, critical nonfinancial issues that affect the success of new enterprises, such as intellectual property protection and the creation of management teams for young companies, are also covered. The magnitude of current investment in the domestic biomedical field is addressed, and future prospects for American medical innovation are briefly discussed.

  2. Induced abortion in Thailand: current situation in public hospitals and legal perspectives.

    PubMed

    Warakamin, Suwanna; Boonthai, Nongluk; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2004-11-01

    Abortion is illegal in Thailand unless the woman's health is at risk or pregnancy is due to rape. This study, carried out in 1999 in 787 government hospitals, examined the magnitude and profile of abortion in Thailand, using data collected prospectively through a review of 45,990 case records (of which 28.5% were classified as induced and 71.5% as spontaneous abortions) and face-to-face interviews with a sub-set of 1854 women patients. The estimated induced abortion ratio was 19.5 per 1000 live births. Almost half the induced abortions were in young women under 25 years of age, many of whom had little or no access to contraception. Socio-economic reasons accounted for 60.2% of abortions. Serious complications were observed in almost a third of cases, especially following abortions performed by non-health personnel. Government physicians' current provision of induced abortion went beyond the provisions of the law in almost half of cases, most commonly for intrauterine death and for congenital anomalies. The paper proposes a framework for policy discussions of the grey areas of maternal and fetal indications leading to legal reform, in order to facilitate safe abortion. A recommendation to amend the abortion law has been proposed to the Ministry of Public Health and the Thai Medical Council.

  3. Occlusion and temporomandibular disorders: a malpractice case with medical legal considerations.

    PubMed

    Bucci, M B; Aversa, M; Guarda-Nardini, L; Manfredini, D

    2011-01-01

    Occlusion and temporomandibular The issue of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) diagnosis and treatment has become a matter of increasing interest in the medical legal field in recent years. The old-fashioned theories based on the occlusal paradigm was proven to be erroneous, and clinicians who still provide irreversible treatments to TMD patients have to be conscious of the potential legal consequences of their behavior. The present paper described an illustrative case report of a patient to whom extensive and irreversible occlusal therapies were performed with the unique aim to provide relief from TMD symptoms. The treatment was unsuccessful and the dental practitioner was called into cause for a professional liability claim. The clinician was judged guilty of malpractice on the basis of the lack of scientific evidence of the irreversible occlusal approaches to TMD, which were erroneously used and did not give the patient any benefit, thus forcing him to a non necessary financial and biological cost. The failure to satisfy the contract with the patient, which is usually not covered by any insurance company, forced the practitioner to give the money back to the patient. The ethical and legal implications of such case were discussed, with particular focus on the concept that medical legal advices need to satisfy the highest standards of evidence and have to be strictly based on scientific knowledge.

  4. Is there any legal and scientific basis for classifying electronic cigarettes as medications?

    PubMed

    Farsalinos, Konstantinos E; Stimson, Gerry V

    2014-05-01

    The rapid growth in the use of electronic cigarettes has been accompanied by substantial discussions by governments, international organisations, consumers and public health experts about how they might be regulated. In the European Union they are currently regulated under consumer legislation but new legislation will regulate them under the Tobacco Products Directive. However, several countries have sought to regulate them under medicines regulations. These claims have been successfully challenged in 6 court cases in European states. Under European legislation a product may be deemed to be a medicine by function if it is used in or administered to human beings either with a view to restoring, correcting or modifying physiological functions by exerting a pharmacological, immunological or metabolic action, or to making a medical diagnosis. It is a medicine by presentation if it is presented (e.g. by a manufacturer or distributor) as having properties for treating or preventing disease in human beings. We assess the legal and scientific basis for the claim that electronic cigarettes should be regulated as medicines. We conclude that they are neither medicine by function nor necessarily by presentation The main reason for their existence is as a harm reduction product in which the liking for and/or dependence on nicotine is maintained, and adoption of use is as a substitute for smoking and not as a smoking cessation product. In reality, they are used as consumer products providing pleasure to the user. They are not used to treat nicotine addiction or other disease, but to enable continued use of nicotine. Their use is adjusted individually by each consumer according to his or her perceived pleasure and satisfaction. Gaps in current regulation regarding safety and quality can be met by tailored regulations.

  5. USMLE (United States medical licensing examination) step 1 examination. Legal vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Templeton, B

    1996-06-01

    Since the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the courts have ruled that sponsors of job entry assessment procedures must demonstrate the absence of discrimination against minorities. If an assessment discriminates, the courts may prohibit the use of the assessment unless the assessment is linked to a job analysis and exhibits validity. In 1994, the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) and the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) instituted a three-step USMLE examination program as a single pathway for medical licensure. The Step 1 examination is not linked to a physician job analysis, exhibits lower scores for minority groups, and lacks construct validity. To avoid the chaos and expense of a protracted legal challenge, the FSMB and the NBME may need to revise the Step 1 examination, or discontinue it as a requirement of medical licensure.

  6. The "amnesty" aftermath: current policy issues stemming from the legalization programs of the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act.

    PubMed

    Baker, S G

    1997-01-01

    "The 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) created two one-time only legalization programs affecting nearly 3 million undocumented immigrants. Legalization has produced important changes among immigrants and in immigration policy. These changes include new patterns of immigrant social and economic adaptation to the United States and new immigrant flows through family ties to IRCA-legalized aliens.... This article combines data from a longitudinal survey of the IRCA-legalized population with qualitative field data on current immigration issues from key informants in eight high-immigration metropolitan areas. It reviews the political evolution and early implementation of legalization, the current socioeconomic position of legalized aliens, and changes in the immigration ¿policy space' resulting from legalization."

  7. Legal Rights of Asbestos Exposure Victims. A Practical Legal Guide for People With Breathing and Other Medical Problems, Possibly Resulting from Exposure to Asbestos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberfeld, Roman M.; Hecht, Richard L.

    This practical legal guide for people with breathing and other medical problems, possibly resulting from exposure to asbestos, provides 19 questions and detailed answers about Asbestosis and other diseases resulting from asbestos exposure. Included is information concerning symptoms, difficulty of diagnosis, necessity of a detailed…

  8. Current medical treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Suayib; Oyan, Basak; Bayraktar, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) consist of a wide group of neoplasms, with different biological behaviors in terms of aggressiveness and hormone production. In the last two decades, significant progress has been observed in our understanding of their biology, diagnosis and treatment. Surgery remains to be the only curative approach, but unfortunately the diagnosis is often delayed due to the slow growth of these tumors and the difficulty in identifying the symptoms related to the tumor-released hormones. In addition to surgery, other approaches to control the disease are biological therapy consisting of somatostatin analogs and interferon (IFN), systemic chemotherapy, radioligand therapy and local therapy with chemoembolization. Several newer cytotoxic agents, including irinotecan, gemcitabine, taxanes, oxaliplatin, capecitabine and PS-341 have been studied in metastatic patients. Considering the high vascularity of these tumors, antiangiogenic agents like endostatin and thalidomide have also been evaluated in advanced NETs. Although these agents seem to have potential activity in NETs and may increase progression free survival, none of these currently available medical therapeutic options are curative. While more efficient novel strategies are to be developed, the rationale use of the current therapeutic options may improve quality of life, control the symptoms related to the hypersecretion of hormones and/or peptides, control tumor proliferation and prolong survival in patients suffering from NETs.

  9. [Medico-legal opinionating in cases of insobriety in medical personnel].

    PubMed

    Jurek, Tomasz; Swiatek, Barbara; Drozd, Radosław

    2009-01-01

    The authors analyzed the medico-legal opinions in cases of insobriety in medical personnel. The studies were based on the results of 157 medico-legal evaluations in criminal cases performed in the years 2005-2007. Expert appraisals included: correctness of medical management, degree of exposure to direct danger of death or grave detriment to health associated with alcohol intoxication of a physician, regardless of his activities being correct in their merits, as well as influence of insobriety on personnel behavior. Penal responsibility is implemented in case of exposing the patient to direct danger to life or severe detriment to health. The necessary analysis should include activities that have been or should have been performed by a physician with respect to his patients, their health status (degree of danged to life or health) and the effect of the physician's alcohol intoxication on his abilities to perceive and assess the reality, make decisions and perform his duties. The Polish law in force lacking the equivalent of Article 147 found in the Polish penal code of 1969 causes problems in penalization of insobriety in medical personnel.

  10. Outsourcing Medical Data Analyses: Can Technology Overcome Legal, Privacy, and Confidentiality Issues?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical data are gold mines for deriving the knowledge that could change the course of a single patient’s life or even the health of the entire population. A data analyst needs to have full access to relevant data, but full access may be denied by privacy and confidentiality of medical data legal regulations, especially when the data analyst is not affiliated with the data owner. Objective Our first objective was to analyze the privacy and confidentiality issues and the associated regulations pertaining to medical data, and to identify technologies to properly address these issues. Our second objective was to develop a procedure to protect medical data in such a way that the outsourced analyst would be capable of doing analyses on protected data and the results would be comparable, if not the same, as if they had been done on the original data. Specifically, our hypothesis was there would not be a difference between the outsourced decision trees built on encrypted data and the ones built on original data. Methods Using formal definitions, we developed an algorithm to protect medical data for outsourced analyses. The algorithm was applied to publicly available datasets (N=30) from the medical and life sciences fields. The analyses were performed on the original and the protected datasets and the results of the analyses were compared. Bootstrapped paired t tests for 2 dependent samples were used to test whether the mean differences in size, number of leaves, and the accuracy of the original and the encrypted decision trees were significantly different. Results The decision trees built on encrypted data were virtually the same as those built on original data. Out of 30 datasets, 100% of the trees had identical accuracy. The size of a tree and the number of leaves was different only once (1/30, 3%, P=.19). Conclusions The proposed algorithm encrypts a file with plain text medical data into an encrypted file with the data protected in such a way that

  11. Accommodating the medical use of marijuana: surveying the differing legal approaches in Australia, the United States and Canada.

    PubMed

    Bogdanoski, Tony

    2010-02-01

    While the scientific and medical communities continue to be divided on the therapeutic benefits and risks of cannabis use, anecdotal evidence from medical users themselves suggests that using cannabis is indeed improving their quality of life by alleviating their pain and discomfort. Notwithstanding the benefits anecdotally claimed by these medical users and the existence of some scientific studies confirming their claims, criminal drug laws in all Australian and most United States jurisdictions continue to prohibit the possession, cultivation and supply of cannabis even for medical purposes. However, in contrast to Australia and most parts of the United States, the medical use of cannabis has been legal in Canada for about a decade. This article reviews these differing legal and regulatory approaches to accommodating the medical use of cannabis (namely, marijuana) as well as some of the challenges involved in legalising it for medical purposes.

  12. The Current State of Medical Education in Chinese Medical Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosik, Russell Oliver; Huang, Lei; Cai, Qiaoling; Xu, Guo-Tong; Zhao, Xudong; Guo, Li; Tang, Wen; Chen, Qi; Fan, Angela Pei-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Today's doctor is as much a humanist as a scientist. Medical schools have responded to this change by introducing a variety of courses, most notably those concerning the humanities and ethics. Thus far, no one has examined the extent of use of these subjects in Chinese medical schools. The goal of this study is to determine how many and in what…

  13. Latin American women's experiences with medical abortion in settings where abortion is legally restricted.

    PubMed

    Zamberlin, Nina; Romero, Mariana; Ramos, Silvina

    2012-12-22

    Abortion is legally restricted in most of Latin America where 95% of the 4.4 million abortions performed annually are unsafe. Medical abortion (MA) refers to the use of a drug or a combination of drugs to terminate pregnancy. Mifepristone followed by misoprostol is the most effective and recommended regime. In settings where mifepristone is not available, misoprostol alone is used.Medical abortion has radically changed abortion practices worldwide, and particularly in legally restricted contexts. In Latin America women have been using misoprostol for self-induced home abortions for over two decades.This article summarizes the findings of a literature review on women's experiences with medical abortion in Latin American countries where voluntary abortion is illegal.Women's personal experiences with medical abortion are diverse and vary according to context, age, reproductive history, social and educational level, knowledge about medical abortion, and the physical, emotional, and social circumstances linked to the pregnancy. But most importantly, experiences are determined by whether or not women have the chance to access: 1) a medically supervised abortion in a clandestine clinic or 2) complete and accurate information on medical abortion. Other key factors are access to economic resources and emotional support.Women value the safety and effectiveness of MA as well as the privacy that it allows and the possibility of having their partner, a friend or a person of their choice nearby during the process. Women perceive MA as less painful, easier, safer, more practical, less expensive, more natural and less traumatic than other abortion methods. The fact that it is self-induced and that it avoids surgery are also pointed out as advantages. Main disadvantages identified by women are that MA is painful and takes time to complete. Other negatively evaluated aspects have to do with side effects, prolonged bleeding, the possibility that it might not be effective, and the

  14. Latin American women’s experiences with medical abortion in settings where abortion is legally restricted

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abortion is legally restricted in most of Latin America where 95% of the 4.4 million abortions performed annually are unsafe. Medical abortion (MA) refers to the use of a drug or a combination of drugs to terminate pregnancy. Mifepristone followed by misoprostol is the most effective and recommended regime. In settings where mifepristone is not available, misoprostol alone is used. Medical abortion has radically changed abortion practices worldwide, and particularly in legally restricted contexts. In Latin America women have been using misoprostol for self-induced home abortions for over two decades. This article summarizes the findings of a literature review on women’s experiences with medical abortion in Latin American countries where voluntary abortion is illegal. Women’s personal experiences with medical abortion are diverse and vary according to context, age, reproductive history, social and educational level, knowledge about medical abortion, and the physical, emotional, and social circumstances linked to the pregnancy. But most importantly, experiences are determined by whether or not women have the chance to access: 1) a medically supervised abortion in a clandestine clinic or 2) complete and accurate information on medical abortion. Other key factors are access to economic resources and emotional support. Women value the safety and effectiveness of MA as well as the privacy that it allows and the possibility of having their partner, a friend or a person of their choice nearby during the process. Women perceive MA as less painful, easier, safer, more practical, less expensive, more natural and less traumatic than other abortion methods. The fact that it is self-induced and that it avoids surgery are also pointed out as advantages. Main disadvantages identified by women are that MA is painful and takes time to complete. Other negatively evaluated aspects have to do with side effects, prolonged bleeding, the possibility that it might not be effective, and

  15. [Legal framework of the medical profession and of the neurology speciality].

    PubMed

    Gil Díaz, C

    2004-12-01

    The law on the general organization of Health Care Professionals (GOHCP) and the Framework Statute make up a new regulatory framework for the practice of medicine, which is completed with the legal debate on the obligatory association to the medical college, pending in the Constitutional Court based on certain regional legal developments. The GOHCP defines the functions of the different professions according to degree, establishes a public registry of physicians, converts the obligation of practicing according to the state of the art into law and updates the training, introduces the Resident core training program and opens the door to superspecialities. It also regulates the professional career, in order to establish a common body of four grades to which the health services can add a fifth one with previous character. Among the novelties of the Framework Statute, there is extensive updating of the offences and sanctions -- that include aspects such as work harassment and adaptation of the workday to the European guidelines, so that the maximum workday is established in 48 hours per week and the complementary (having a voluntary character) cannot exceed 150 hours per year. Lowering retirement age to 65 years foreseen in this guideline will require planning of human resources and has already generated suits in the courts. The obligatory nature of belonging to the medical college has also been modified, this time by some guidelines on the regional level. They would require a decision by the Constitutional Court on whether the college members can be exempted in some cases.

  16. Current Issues and the Veterinary Medical Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nault, Andre J.

    2010-01-01

    Veterinary medical libraries and librarians are unique. There are now 33 veterinary colleges in North America, and in accordance with American Veterinary Medical Association accreditation, each has a library managed by an accredited librarian. Colleges with veterinary programs often maintain specialized branch libraries to support the degree,…

  17. [The possibility of medico-legal opinionating on medical error in cases of waived postmortem examination].

    PubMed

    Kunz, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    For several years now, with the introduction of the health care sector reform we have been observing a considerable drop in the number of postmortem examinations performed in patients who died in hospitals. The decrease amounts to as much as 50 to 70%. This is undoubtedly a consequence of financial restrictions imposed on the management of these inpatient facilities. On the other hand, Departments of Forensic Medicine established to evaluate the so-called medical errors are swamped with an increasing avalanche of complaints concerning the appropriateness of therapeutic management. This leads to a growing number of orders from penal prosecution and jurisdiction agencies with requests for assessment whether a medical error has been committed in a particular case. The result of a postmortem examination is practically the only basis for a factual evaluation of a given case. When no autopsy has been performed, the experts are virtually helpless, and in the majority of such instances, they are forced to refuse passing an expert opinion. The report presents basic principles of medico-legal opinionating in criminal cases (including proceedings pertaining to medical errors), the rules governing the medical error assessment, as well as problems encountered in evaluating the appropriate course of treatment when a post mortem examination has been waived.

  18. Medical devices for the anesthetist: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ingrande, Jerry; Lemmens, Hendrikus JM

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesiologists are unique among most physicians in that they routinely use technology and medical devices to carry out their daily activities. Recently, there have been significant advances in medical technology. These advances have increased the number and utility of medical devices available to the anesthesiologist. There is little doubt that these new tools have improved the practice of anesthesia. Monitoring has become more comprehensive and less invasive, airway management has become easier, and placement of central venous catheters and regional nerve blockade has become faster and safer. This review focuses on key medical devices such as cardiovascular monitors, airway equipment, neuromonitoring tools, ultrasound, and target controlled drug delivery software and hardware. This review demonstrates how advances in these areas have improved the safety and efficacy of anesthesia and facilitate its administration. When applicable, indications and contraindications to the use of these novel devices will be explored as well as the controversies surrounding their use. PMID:24707188

  19. Current medical diagnosis and treatment 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Krupp, M.A.; Chatton, M.J.; Tierney, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 33 chapters. Some of the titles are: Nervous system; Psychiatric disorders; Medical genetics; Endocrine disorders; Introduction to infectious diseases; Disorders due to physical agents; and Anti-infective chemotherapeutic and antibiotic agents.

  20. Urethral catheters and medical malpractice: a legal database review from 1965 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    Osterberg, E. Charles; Chang, Helena; Gaither, Thomas W.; Alwaal, Amjad; Fox, Ryan; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Urethral catheters (UCs) are commonly used in medicine and are associated with complications such as urinary tract infections (UTIs) and trauma. Given UC complications and their ubiquitous usage in healthcare, there is a potential for liability risk. We aim to explore litigation involving UC-related complications. Methods The LexisNexis legal database was queried for all state and federal cases from January 1965 through October 2015 using the terms “urethral catheter” or “Foley catheter” in combination with “medical malpractice”, “negligence”, “medical error”, and “trauma”. Each case was reviewed for reported medical characteristics and legal aspects, including the outcome of the case. Results Our search yielded 29 cases. Urologists were the most common providers cited as defendants (21%), all of whom were successful in their defense. The most common malpractice claim was for traumatic insertion (48%). Pain was the most common type of damage claimed by plaintiffs (28%), followed by UTI (24%). Nineteen (66%) cases favored defendants, while 10 (34%) cases favored the plaintiffs, of which 2 (7%) were settled out of the court. In settled cases, the mean settlement received by plaintiffs was $55,750 (range, $25,000–$86,500). The mean award to plaintiffs for cases determined by the court was $112,991 (range, $4,000–$325,000). Conclusions Despite widespread usage of UC over a 50-year period, lawsuits centered on UC misuse are rare at the state and federal court levels. Of litigated cases, urologists are commonly involved yet have successful defenses. PMID:27785434

  1. Undergraduate medical students' empathy: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Quince, Thelma; Thiemann, Pia; Benson, John; Hyde, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Empathy is important to patient care. It enhances patients' satisfaction, comfort, self-efficacy, and trust which in turn may facilitate better diagnosis, shared decision making, and therapy adherence. Empathetic doctors experience greater job satisfaction and psychological well-being. Understanding the development of empathy of tomorrow's health care professionals is important. However, clinical empathy is poorly defined and difficult to measure, while ways to enhance it remain unclear. This review examines empathy among undergraduate medical students, focusing upon three main questions: How is empathy measured? This section discusses the problems of assessing empathy and outlines the utility of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy - Student Version and Davis's Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Both have been used widely to assess medical students' empathy. Does empathy change during undergraduate medical education? The trajectory of empathy during undergraduate medical education has been and continues to be debated. Potential reasons for contrasting results of studies are outlined. What factors may influence the development of empathy? Although the influence of sex is widely recognized, the impact of culture, psychological well-being, and aspects of undergraduate curricula are less well understood. This review identifies three interrelated issues for future research into undergraduate medical students' empathy. First, the need for greater clarity of definition, recognizing that empathy is multidimensional. Second, the need to develop meaningful ways of measuring empathy which include its component dimensions and which are relevant to patients' experiences. Medical education research has generally relied upon single, self-report instruments, which have utility across large populations but are limited. Finally, there is a need for greater methodological rigor in investigating the possible determinants of clinical empathy in medical education. Greater specificity of context

  2. Undergraduate medical students’ empathy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Quince, Thelma; Thiemann, Pia; Benson, John; Hyde, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Empathy is important to patient care. It enhances patients’ satisfaction, comfort, self-efficacy, and trust which in turn may facilitate better diagnosis, shared decision making, and therapy adherence. Empathetic doctors experience greater job satisfaction and psychological well-being. Understanding the development of empathy of tomorrow’s health care professionals is important. However, clinical empathy is poorly defined and difficult to measure, while ways to enhance it remain unclear. This review examines empathy among undergraduate medical students, focusing upon three main questions: How is empathy measured? This section discusses the problems of assessing empathy and outlines the utility of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Student Version and Davis’s Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Both have been used widely to assess medical students’ empathy. Does empathy change during undergraduate medical education? The trajectory of empathy during undergraduate medical education has been and continues to be debated. Potential reasons for contrasting results of studies are outlined. What factors may influence the development of empathy? Although the influence of sex is widely recognized, the impact of culture, psychological well-being, and aspects of undergraduate curricula are less well understood. This review identifies three interrelated issues for future research into undergraduate medical students’ empathy. First, the need for greater clarity of definition, recognizing that empathy is multidimensional. Second, the need to develop meaningful ways of measuring empathy which include its component dimensions and which are relevant to patients’ experiences. Medical education research has generally relied upon single, self-report instruments, which have utility across large populations but are limited. Finally, there is a need for greater methodological rigor in investigating the possible determinants of clinical empathy in medical education. Greater

  3. [Factors forming opnion on marijuana legalization in Poland among group of students from medical and technical college faculty].

    PubMed

    Suwała, Małgorzata; Gerstenkorn, Andrzej; Szewczyk, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana is the most popular illegal drug in the world. In 2010 17.6% of polish adult population (age 15-64) and 37.3% of youth (age 17-18) declared use of marijuana at least once in their lifetime. Recent years in Poland brought back public discussion regarding decriminalization and legalization of marijuana. The main goal of the study was to reveal the opinion about legalization of marijuana in Poland among students of medical and technical faculty in correlation with chosen socio-demographic factors, college major, attitude to tobacco smoking, use of drugs and religious practice. Study included 230 students (110 from Medical University of Lodz and 120 from Technical University of Lodz). Women consisted on 56.1% of surveyed and men on 43.9%. Study used audit survey as a research method. Results. 40.4% of students considered marijuana as "soft" drug and in majority (65.7%) are convinced that it is not addictive. The main part of studied group (83%) claimed that marijuana is easily accessible in Poland. The majority of the group (38.75%) was against marijuana legalization, a little bit less (35.2%) approved its legalization in Poland and 26.1% had no opinion. Type of college faculty had not been detected as a factor influencing support for legalization. Important factors influencing positive opinion on legalization was: living in the city, tobacco smoking, socializing with legalization supporters, lack of regular religious practice, drug use. CONCLUSION. Young people's diversified opinion regarding legalization of marijuana in Poland should encourage further discussion. Educational and preventive activities within different social groups are necessary to form a conscious opinion on legalization of marijuana in Poland based on the knowledge of actual scientific facts.

  4. Current trend of robotics application in medical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, O. A.; Faieza, A. A.; Syakirah, K.

    2013-06-01

    The applications of robotics in recent years has emerged beyond the field of manufacturing or industrial robots itself. Robotics applications are now widely used in medical, transport, underwater, entertainment and military sector. In medical field, these applications should be emphasized in view of the increasing challenges due to the variety of findings in the field of medicine which requires new inventions to ease work process. The objective of this review paper is to study and presents the past and on-going research in medical robotics with emphasis on rehabilitation (assistive care) and surgery robotics which are certainly the two main practical fields where robots application are commonly used presently. The study found that, rehabilitation and surgery robotics applications grow extensively with the finding of new invention, as well as research that is being undertaken and to be undertaken. The importance of medical robot in medical industry is intended to offer positive outcomes to assist human business through a complicated task that involves a long period, accuracy, focus and other routines that cannot be accomplished by human ability alone.

  5. Current perspectives in medical image perception

    PubMed Central

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Medical images constitute a core portion of the information a physician utilizes to render diagnostic and treatment decisions. At a fundamental level, this diagnostic process involves two basic processes: visually inspecting the image (visual perception) and rendering an interpretation (cognition). The likelihood of error in the interpretation of medical images is, unfortunately, not negligible. Errors do occur, and patients’ lives are impacted, underscoring our need to understand how physicians interact with the information in an image during the interpretation process. With improved understanding, we can develop ways to further improve decision making and, thus, to improve patient care. The science of medical image perception is dedicated to understanding and improving the clinical interpretation process. PMID:20601701

  6. Current medical treatment in pediatric urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Akın, Yiğit; Uçar, Murat; Yücel, Selçuk

    2013-01-01

    Although the prevalence of urolithiasis is nearly 2–3% in childhood, the risk of recurrence may range from 6.5–54%. There has been an increase in urinary stone disease among pediatric age groups, and stone disease has a multifactorial etiology. After the diagnosis, detailed metabolic evaluation is required. High recurrence rates, therapeutic irregularities and deficiency in diagnosis may lead to comorbidities such as loss of kidney function. Following diagnosis, the requirement for surgery, such as stone extraction and correction of anatomical anomalies, is determined. Medical and supportive treatments are also needed to prevent recurrence and urinary tract infections and to preserve renal function. Supportive care includes increased fluid intake and dietary modifications. Medical treatment is dependent on the cause of the urinary stone disease. The morbidities associated with pediatric urolithiasis can be prevented by early diagnosis, detailed metabolic analysis, regular follow-up and medical treatment protocols. PMID:26328120

  7. Medical, social, and legal implications of treating nausea and vomiting of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Brent, Robert

    2002-05-01

    This article will deal with medical, social, and legal implications of treating nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP). Clinical problems occur when the symptoms become exaggerated and result in debilitation, dehydration, and hospitalization. The treatment of NVP in its early stages has the implication that it will prevent the more serious complications, including hospitalization. Therapeutic modalities discussed in this conference that have been used or are being tested are primarily symptomatic treatments (antihistamines, Bendectin (Merrell Dow; Cincinatti, Ohio), phenothiazines, hypnosis, accupressure, relaxation behavioral modification, audiogenic feedback training, newer medications, diet, and nutritional support). Bendectin is probably the most studied medication with regard to its reproductive effects, and the studies clearly demonstrate that therapeutic doses of Bendectin have no measurable reproductive risks to the mother or the fetus. In spite of Bendectin's record of safety, numerous nonmeritorious congenital malformation lawsuits were filed and went to trial, and that junk science was presented at these trials. The Bendectin era focused our attention on the area of nonmeritorious litigation and junk science, which could have an effect on any new or less well-studied therapies, because such a high percentage of women are treated for NVP. Because 3% of the offspring will be affected with birth defects, the potential for litigation is immense. The solutions are (1) for legal problems, the medical community should focus their attention on junk scientists and their junk science, over which physicians should have some authority, and (2) for the treatment problem, it would seem most logical that a major research effort should be directed toward brain receptors that are involved in these physiologic effects. Furthermore, it would be imperative to study the array of molecules, both natural and manufactured, that can interact with these receptors for the

  8. The right to information and their exceptions in medical practices in the Iranian legal system.

    PubMed

    Sheykh-Talimi, Maysam; Shariati-Nasab, Sadegh; Zare, Mohammad Kazem; Omani-Samani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The right to information Act was implemented in the Iranian legal system through accession of the Merida Convention ensuring the right to information as a fundamental right for the public. One significant aspects of this subject is the ratification of the "Disclosure and Access to Information Act" by which it is recognized as a right of all Persian individuals and citizens to access state-held information in Iran administration. The Iranian legislature, with regard to the role of access to information and its significance, clarified the scope, permitted subjects of access, and exceptions of the right to state-held information. In this essay, we will discuss the legal aspects and scope of ensuring access to medical information in the Iranian statutes and their exceptions. It is argued that the Iranian legislation ensures the principle of maximum disclosure, while sensitive subjects', specially classified and private information, are exempted. Therefore, the related rules in Iran's statutes not only do not threaten patient's information, but also protect them by criminalizing the breaching of the mentioned right.

  9. The right to information and their exceptions in medical practices in the Iranian legal system

    PubMed Central

    Sheykh-Talimi, Maysam; Shariati-Nasab, Sadegh; Zare, Mohammad Kazem; Omani-Samani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The right to information Act was implemented in the Iranian legal system through accession of the Merida Convention ensuring the right to information as a fundamental right for the public. One significant aspects of this subject is the ratification of the "Disclosure and Access to Information Act" by which it is recognized as a right of all Persian individuals and citizens to access state-held information in Iran administration. The Iranian legislature, with regard to the role of access to information and its significance, clarified the scope, permitted subjects of access, and exceptions of the right to state-held information. In this essay, we will discuss the legal aspects and scope of ensuring access to medical information in the Iranian statutes and their exceptions. It is argued that the Iranian legislation ensures the principle of maximum disclosure, while sensitive subjects’, specially classified and private information, are exempted. Therefore, the related rules in Iran’s statutes not only do not threaten patient’s information, but also protect them by criminalizing the breaching of the mentioned right. PMID:28050245

  10. [Cartography of psychoactive heterotopias: a look at the medical, legal and social discourses regarding drug use].

    PubMed

    Massó, Paloma

    2015-09-01

    This article traces a map of the social control of drugs through the politics of space, according to the Foucaultian concept of "heterotopia." Firstly, a brief genealogy of the use of psychotropic substances in different times and cultures is described, up to the introduction of the prohibitionist paradigm. Attention is paid to the way in which power has marked, separated and enclosed certain rituals and uses of pleasure in physical and symbolic sites. The itinerary is focused on the Spanish context to establish a dialogue between the various policies of space that have come into being and have overlapped in the construction and management of a problem which has been rendered an object to the gazes, mechanics and discourses of the medical, legal, and social fields. In this way, the intersections between the liminal spaces of drug use and the harm reduction paradigm are analyzed, including therapeutic strategies with prescribed drugs, from methadone programs to the new heroin programs.

  11. Contrasting Medical and Legal Standards of Evidence: A Precision Medicine Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, Gary E.; Scheckel, Kathryn; Campos-Outcalt, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Precis As the health care system transitions to a precision medicine approach that tailors clinical care to the genetic profile of the individual patient, there is a potential tension between the clinical uptake of new technologies by providers and the legal system’s expectation of the standard of care in applying such technologies. We examine this tension by comparing the type of evidence that physicians and courts are likely to rely on in determining a duty to recommend pharmacogenetic testing of patients prescribed the oral anti-coagulant drug warfarin. There is a large body of inconsistent evidence and factors for and against such testing, but physicians and courts are likely to weigh this evidence differently. The potential implications for medical malpractice risk are evaluated and discussed. PMID:27256135

  12. [On the legalization debate of non-medical cannabis consumption : Position paper of the German Association for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics].

    PubMed

    Havemann-Reinecke, U; Hoch, E; Preuss, U W; Kiefer, F; Batra, A; Gerlinger, G; Hauth, I

    2017-03-01

    Calls are increasing for the legalization of cannabis. Some legal experts, various politicians, political parties and associations are demanding a change in drug policy. The legalization debate is lively and receiving wide coverage in the media. The German Association for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics (DGPPN) comments on the most important questions from a medical scientific perspective: can cannabis consumption trigger mental illnesses, what consequences would legalization have for the healthcare system and where is more research needed?

  13. Transsexual legal rights in the United States and United kingdom: employment, medical treatment, and civil status.

    PubMed

    Green, Richard

    2010-02-01

    Whereas hormonal and surgical sex change have been increasingly refined and accepted medically during the past 40 years, legal protections have only recently received attention. This overview focuses on employment, medical treatment, and civil status as male or female in the United States and the United Kingdom. Employment protection in the UK is assured since a court decision in 1994, but in the U.S. is generally uncertain and inconsistent between states. Health care, including surgery, under the UK National Health Service, is assured since a court decision in 1996. In the U.S., the absence of a national insurance program and the reluctance of private insurers to fund treatment remains an obstacle. Military personnel and prisoners are provided treatment in the UK but there is no military-provided treatment in the U.S. and prison treatment is limited. Change in birth certificate sex status is available in the UK since 2004. This permits heterosexual marriage as a person of the reassigned sex. In the U.S., whereas nearly all states permit birth certificate modification, obstacles remain to recognition across state jurisdictions. Some states forbid marriage for a transsexual as a person of their reassigned sex. This can impact on transsexuals as parents.

  14. [Withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration in severe stroke: medical, legal and ethical considerations].

    PubMed

    Tannier, C; Crozier, S; Zuber, M; Constantinides, Y; Delezie, E; Gisquet, E; Grignoli, N; Lamy, C; Louvet, F; Pinel, J-F

    2015-02-01

    In the majority of cases, severe stroke is accompanied by difficulty in swallowing and an altered state of consciousness requiring artificial nutrition and hydration. Because of their artificial nature, nutrition and hydration are considered by law as treatment rather basic care. Withdrawal of these treatments is dictated by the refusal of unreasonable obstinacy enshrined in law and is justified by the risk of severe disability and very poor quality of life. It is usually the last among other withholding and withdrawal decisions which have already been made during the long course of the disease. Reaching a collegial consensus on a controversial decision such as artificial nutrition and hydration withdrawal is a difficult and complex process. The reluctance for such decisions is mainly due to the symbolic value of food and hydration, to the fear of "dying badly" while suffering from hunger and thirst, and to the difficult distinction between this medical act and euthanasia. The only way to overcome such reluctance is to ensure flawless accompaniment, associating sedation and appropriate comfort care with a clear explanation (with relatives but also caregivers) of the rationale and implications of this type of decision. All teams dealing with this type of situation must have thoroughly thought through the medical, legal and ethical considerations involved in making this difficult decision.

  15. [Medical-legal conduct with individuals in judicial or police custody].

    PubMed

    Medallo Muñiz, Jordi; Martín-Fumadó, Carles; Nuno Vieira, Duarte

    2014-03-01

    The problems involved in caring for individuals in custody, as well as deaths that occur during custody, are relevant aspects of legal and forensic medicine in terms of the possible criminal, civil and administrative responsibility of health professionals and/or public or private institutions that might hold individuals in custody and deprived of freedom. The rule of law should ensure that these cases comply with state law and international agreements and treaties related to human rights and the special treatment of individuals deprived of freedom in hospitals or detention centers. Of particular mention is the medical-forensic activity regarding deaths associated with the use of control holds and/or restraint during the detention of individuals by members of the armed forces or law enforcement or in healthcare centers by safety and healthcare personnel. In these cases, both the immediate healthcare treatment subsequent to the events and the medical-forensic study should be particularly careful. These situations, which are often high profile, cause social alarm and involve judicial actions that can result in especially severe liabilities.

  16. The state of ethical-legal oaths in UK medical practice today: Is it time to look at standardising?

    PubMed

    Atenstaedt, R L

    2016-12-01

    The taking of an ethical-legal oath is a "rite of passage" for many medical practitioners. A 1997 paper noted that half of medical schools in the UK administer an oath. I performed a survey of UK medical schools to see whether these are still used today. An electronic survey was sent to 31 UK medical schools, asking them whether the Hippocratic Oath (in any version) was taken by their medical students; non-respondents were followed up by telephone. Information was obtained from 21 UK medical schools, giving a response rate of 68% (21/31). A total of 18 (86%) institutions use an oath. Ethical-legal oaths are therefore taken in the vast majority of UK medical schools today. However, a great variety are used, and there are advantages in standardisation. My recommendation is that the Standard Medical Oath of the UK (SMOUK) is adopted by all medical schools, and that this is also taken regularly by doctors as part of revalidation.

  17. Current trends for medico-legal disputes related to functional nasal surgery in Italy.

    PubMed

    Motta, S; Nappi, S

    2014-06-01

    The problem of professional liability in case of adverse outcomes or failures secondary to surgery is very sensitive in many countries of the European Community. In Italy, a recent sentence of the Supreme Court concerning a patient who underwent septoplasty raised considerable doubts in relation to the guidance to be followed in disputes related to an alleged professional liability, further exacerbating the juridical orientation of recent years in this context. This ruling involves any surgery, as well as rhinologic surgery, and calls into question most regulatory and legal principles that have traditionally been adopted by the Italian Civil Law. The sentence states that the plaintiff is only required to document the failure of surgical treatment, but not the breach of the duty of care by the surgeon, thus shifting the burden of proof to the physician-debtor. It also considers that, in assessing the degree of negligence, reference should be made to the qualifications of the surgeon, according to principles that are not covered by current regulations, denying that in general surgery (i.e., not with aesthetic purposes) the surgeon must only to act with diligence and need not guarantee a favourable outcome. This series of statements, complementing one another and evolving more unfavourably towards physicians, facilitate legal disputes for speculative purposes through complainants, with obvious health and socio-economic implications.

  18. Current trends in medical ethics education.

    PubMed

    Daher, Michel

    2006-01-01

    The unprecedented progress in biomedical sciences and technology during the last few decades has resulted in great transformations in the concepts of health and disease, health systems and healthcare organization and practices. Those changes have been accompanied by the emergence of a broad range of ethical dilemmas that confront the health professionals more frequently in an increasing range of problems and situations. Health care that has been practiced for centuries on the basis of a direct doctor-patient relationship has been increasingly transformed to a more complex process integrating the health-team, the patient (healthcare seeker) and the community. Systematic review of the specialized literature revealed that Healthcare Ethics Education became a basic requirement for any training program for health professionals, and should cover the different stages of undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing education. Both theoretical foundations and practical skills are required for the appropriate ethical reasoning, ethical attitude and decision-making. There is growing evidence that physicians' professional and moral development is not determined by the formal curriculum of ethics, rather more, it is determined by the moral environment of the professional practice, the "hidden curriculum" which deserves serious consideration by medical educators.

  19. Marihuana Medical Access Regulations unconstitutional because they do not provide for legal source or supply of marijuana.

    PubMed

    Betteridge, Glenn

    2003-04-01

    In a 9 January 2003 ruling in Hitzig, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice determined that the Marihuana Medical Access Regulations (MMAR) fail to provide for a legal source and safe supply of marijuana. This failure infringed the applicants' section 7 Charter rights to liberty and security of the person in a manner inconsistent with the principles of fundamental justice. The MMAR could not be saved under section I of the Charter. The Court declared the MMAR invalid, but suspended that order for six months to allow the government to decide how to create a legal source and supply of marijuana.

  20. Recommendations for teaching upon sensitive topics in forensic and legal medicine in the context of medical education pedagogy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Kieran M; Scriver, Stacey

    2016-11-01

    Undergraduate medical curricula typically include forensic and legal medicine topics that are of a highly sensitive nature. Examples include suicide, child abuse, domestic and sexual violence. It is likely that some students will have direct or indirect experience of these issues which are prevalent in society. Those students are vulnerable to vicarious harm from partaking in their medical education. Even students with no direct or indirect experience of these issues may be vulnerable to vicarious trauma, particularly students who are especially empathetic to cases presented. Despite these risks, instruction relating to these topics is necessary to ensure the competencies of graduating doctors to respond appropriately to cases they encounter during their professional careers. However, risk can be minimised by a well-designed and thoughtfully delivered educational programme. We provide recommendations for the successful inclusion of sensitive forensic and legal medicine topics in undergraduate medical curricula.

  1. Legal implications for failure to comply with advance directives: an examination of the incompetent individual's right to refuse life-sustaining medical treatment.

    PubMed

    Perry, Sherynn J

    2002-01-01

    Life-sustaining medical technology in the past century has created a growing body of case law and legislation recognizing the incompetent individual's right to make his or her own end-of-life decisions. This article focuses on California's leadership in the area of these specific end-of-life issues: specifically, exploring the right of an incompetent individual to refuse life-sustaining medical treatment. The article examines advance directives along with various judicial decision-making standards for incompetent individuals and explores the sociobehavioral and legal rationale for compliance with incompetent individual's rights to make end-of-life decisions. Finally this article concludes (i) that advance directives allow competent individuals to state the medical treatment they would prefer in the event they should later become incompetent and (ii) that when advance directives are properly executed in a detailed manner, under laws currently in effect in some jurisdictions, the preferences stated in the directive bind health care providers.

  2. [Individual rights vs public health in the fight against contagious diseases: proposals to improve the current legal framework].

    PubMed

    Salamero Teixidó, Laura

    2016-11-01

    The public health protection constitutional mandate requires public powers to protect the population from contagious diseases. This requires a legal framework that both protects public health effectively and respects individual rights and freedoms that could be undermined by the public administrations. This article analyses, from a legal perspective, the current legal framework regulating the adoption of health measures to protect public health against contagious diseases. It argues that current regulations generate legal uncertainty on the basis of the wide range of discretionary powers they give to the public administration and the lack of provisions for limiting these powers. As a result, the guarantee mechanisms (primarily judicial consent) only weakly protect the rights and freedoms of the citizens affected by health measures. To conclude, the article proposes several amendments to improve public health regulations related to contagious diseases. The purpose is to render a legal framework that offers more legal certainty, in which it is possible to protect individual rights and freedoms when measures are adopted, without sacrificing the effective protection of public health.

  3. What the History of Drugs Can Teach Us About the Current Cannabis Legalization Process: Unfinished Business.

    PubMed

    Adrian, Manuella

    2015-01-01

    Over time, there have been considerable changes in the variety, availability, production, distribution, and use and user(s) of psychoactive substances, the meaning of substance use and its impact on users and their social or physical environment(s). This article reviews the mechanisms of introduction of psychoactive substances such as alcohol, tobacco, coffee, tea and cannabis to populations and communities that did not have them before. It considers the historical tension between early adopters who greet new substances with various levels of enthusiasm in their eagerness to enjoy what they believe to be the benefits of using these substances, and those focused on what they believe to be the negative aspects of use, who decry these new substances with horror. With more nonusers than users in the population, social policies tend to be directed at preventing, restricting, or punishing selected use, users and .drugs., using controls and interventions such regulation, incarceration, death sentence, treatment, prevention, legalization, taxation, among others. Whatever their intent or wished-for impact, all had consequences that produced additional, unplanned for, and (often) negative effects. This paper will consider some of these sequences as they occurred historically with other substances in light of the current shift to legalization and normalization of cannabis, noting the mechanisms of use, controls, and consequences of some types of formal interventions and give some attention to how and what we can learn from our experiences in order to plan ahead and become better prepared to successfully deal with the 'unexpecteds' of that well-known 'hell' paved with good intentions.

  4. Words Can Be Deceiving: A Review of Variation Among Legally Effective Medical Marijuana Laws in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Hunt, Priscillia; Boustead, Anne

    2014-01-01

    When voters in two US states approved the recreational use of marijuana in 2012, public debates for how best to promote and protect public health and safety started drawing implications from states’ medical marijuana laws. However, many of the discussions were simplified to the notion that states either have a medical marijuana law or do not; little reference was made to the fact that legal provisions differ across states. This study seeks to clarify the characteristics of medical marijuana laws in place since 1990 that are most relevant to consumers/patients and categorizes those aspects most likely to affect the prevalence of use, and consequently the intensity of public health and welfare effects. Evidence shows treating medical marijuana laws as homogeneous across states is misleading and does not reflect the reality of medical marijuana lawmaking. This variation likely has implications for use and health outcomes, and thus states’ public health. PMID:25657828

  5. Words Can Be Deceiving: A Review of Variation Among Legally Effective Medical Marijuana Laws in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Hunt, Priscillia; Boustead, Anne

    2014-12-01

    When voters in two US states approved the recreational use of marijuana in 2012, public debates for how best to promote and protect public health and safety started drawing implications from states' medical marijuana laws. However, many of the discussions were simplified to the notion that states either have a medical marijuana law or do not; little reference was made to the fact that legal provisions differ across states. This study seeks to clarify the characteristics of medical marijuana laws in place since 1990 that are most relevant to consumers/patients and categorizes those aspects most likely to affect the prevalence of use, and consequently the intensity of public health and welfare effects. Evidence shows treating medical marijuana laws as homogeneous across states is misleading and does not reflect the reality of medical marijuana lawmaking. This variation likely has implications for use and health outcomes, and thus states' public health.

  6. Medical marijuana laws in 50 states: investigating the relationship between state legalization of medical marijuana and marijuana use, abuse and dependence

    PubMed Central

    Cerdá, Magdalena; Wall, Melanie; Keyes, Katherine M; Galea, Sandro; Hasin, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Background Marijuana is the most frequently used illicit substance in the United States. Little is known of the role that macro-level factors, including community norms and laws related to substance use, play in determining marijuana use, abuse and dependence. We tested the relationship between state-level legalization of medical marijuana and marijuana use, abuse, and dependence. Methods We used the second wave of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a national survey of adults aged 18+ (n=34,653). Selected analyses were replicated using the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), a yearly survey of ~68,000 individuals aged 12+. We measured past-year cannabis use and DSM-IV abuse/dependence. Results In NESARC, residents of states with medical marijuana laws had higher odds of marijuana use (OR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.49-2.47) and marijuana abuse/dependence (OR: 1.81; 95% CI: 1.22-2.67) than residents of states without such laws. Marijuana abuse/dependence was not more prevalent among marijuana users in these states (OR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.67-1.60), suggesting that the higher risk for marijuana abuse/dependence in these states was accounted for by higher rates of use. In NSDUH, states that legalized medical marijuana also had higher rates of marijuana use. Conclusions States that legalized medical marijuana had higher rates of marijuana use. Future research needs to examine whether the association is causal, or is due to an underlying common cause, such as community norms supportive of the legalization of medical marijuana and of marijuana use. PMID:22099393

  7. [An inquiry among medical students. No to legalization of euthanasia, but yes to dropped charges or remission of sentence].

    PubMed

    Nilstun, T

    2001-08-08

    In a questionnaire to medical students in Sweden, only 6 out of 135 answered that they wanted voluntary active euthanasia to be legalized. However, most of the students were of the opinion that the charges brought against the physician could be withdrawn pending assessment by a public prosecutor (55), or alternatively, that remission of sentence could be granted pending assessment by a court (45). A somewhat smaller group (26) answered that prison corresponding to the sentence for manslaughter was reasonable. Only 3 students considered voluntary active euthanasia to be murder. Legal monitoring of each case of active euthanasia was very important to these medical students, but many answered that under specific conditions there should be no punishment.

  8. Principles over principals? How innovation affects the agency relationship in medical and legal practice.

    PubMed

    Polaris, Julian J Z

    2014-01-01

    This Note outlines a conceptual framework for defining and analyzing innovation in the professional practice of medicine and law. The two professions have structural and historical similarities, and both are organized around the principal-agent relationship. Some types of professional activity adhere to the traditional agency model of principal-centered practice, but innovative professionals who develop novel tools and techniques often deviate from the agency model in interesting ways. This Note explores how that distinction plays out by identifying examples from academic medicine, public interest "cause lawyering", and corporate law. The field of medicine is governed by a regulatory regime that strictly differentiates routine practice from the experimental activities of clinical research, but the legal profession is governed by a monolithic code of conduct that does not explicitly acknowledge the types of innovation described here. Certain key events in the twentieth century help to explain why the government has chosen to tightly regulate innovation in medicine but not in law, and it turns out that innovators in both fields have found ways to stretch or bend the rules. These observations shed light on each profession's unique culture and can inform current debates over regulatory reform.

  9. Sleep-Related Violence and Sexual Behavior in Sleep: A Systematic Review of Medical-Legal Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Ingravallo, Francesca; Poli, Francesca; Gilmore, Emma V.; Pizza, Fabio; Vignatelli, Luca; Schenck, Carlos H.; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review systematically medical-legal cases of sleep-related violence (SRV) and sexual behavior in sleep (SBS). Search Methods: We searched Pubmed and PsychINFO (from 1980 to 2012) with pre-specified terms. We also searched reference lists of relevant articles. Selection Criteria: Case reports in which a sleep disorder was purported as the defense during a criminal trial and in which information about the forensic evaluation of the defendant was provided. Data Extraction and Analysis: Information about legal issues, defendant and victim characteristics, circumstantial factors, and forensic evaluation was extracted from each case. A qualitative-comparative assessment of cases was performed. Results: Eighteen cases (9 SRV and 9 SBS) were included. The charge was murder or attempted murder in all SRV cases, while in SBS cases the charge ranged from sexual touching to rape. The defense was based on sleepwalking in 11 of 18 cases. The trial outcome was in favor of the defendant in 14 of 18 cases. Defendants were relatively young males in all cases. Victims were usually adult relatives of the defendants in SRV cases and unrelated young girls or adolescents in SBS cases. In most cases the criminal events occurred 1-2 hours after the defendant's sleep onset, and both proximity and other potential triggering factors were reported. The forensic evaluations widely differed from case to case. Conclusion: SRV and SBS medical-legal cases did not show apparent differences, except for the severity of the charges and the victim characteristics. An international multidisciplinary consensus for the forensic evaluation of SRV and SBS should be developed as an urgent priority. Citation: Ingravallo F, Poli F, Gilmore EV, Pizza F, Vignatelli L, Schenck CH, Plazzi G. Sleep-related violence and sexual behavior in sleep: a systematic review of medical-legal case reports. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(8):927-935. PMID:25126042

  10. The medical-legal quandary of healthcare in capital punishment: an ethical dilemma for the anesthesia provider.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kevin W

    2008-12-01

    The case of Brase v Rees was presented before the US Supreme Court to consider the constitutionality of death by lethal injection as practiced in the state of Kentucky. The 3-drug combination of sodium thiopental, pancuronium bromide, and potassium chloride is a key aspect in question. Capital punishment conflicts with medical and nursing code of ethics preventing providers who are skilled at difficult intravenous (IV) access, assessment of appropriate sedation, and involvement without fear of disciplinary action. Therefore, untrained or undertrained personnel from the prison have been delegated these duties. Cases in which failure to establish or maintain IV access has led to executions lasting up to 90 minutes before the execution was complete. Participation by skilled medical personnel has been a debate between the medical and legal communities since the inception of lethal injection. Healthcare should reevaluate the ethical and moral principle of beneficence as the legal system attempts to evaluate the constitutionality of lethal injection. Can a nurse or doctor step out of the role of medical professional, use knowledge and skill to make death by lethal injection more humane, and not violate the ethical principle of "do no harm"?

  11. Current status and future trends of medical physics in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorin Nieto, J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical Physics is an area that applies the principles of physics to medicine, particularly in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases using ionizing and nonionizing radiation. The main attractive of medical physics is that it has a direct impact on the quality and safety of medical care in humans; this social component with direct implications for the population is of high value for Mexico. This paper describes the concepts of medical physics, trends and the current status of this discipline as a profession, which is directly related to the efforts of clinical research. It is also described what is, in my opinion, the future of medical physics in Mexico, emphasizing the fact that this field requires a substantial boost from universities and hospitals to recruit highly qualified young medical physicists and the support from government agencies such as Secretaria de Salud, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social and Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado through clinical research projects that allow the necessary evolution of medical physics into the hospital setting.

  12. [The diagnosis of brain death: medical and legal aspects with special reference to the German Transplantation Law (TPG)].

    PubMed

    Haupt, W F; Höfling, W

    2002-11-01

    The diagnosis of brain death following total and irreversible cessation of all cerebral functions is based on anthropological assumptions and conventions as well as on the exact medical diagnosis of total loss of brain function. The question whether individual life ends after cerebral function is irreversibly lost cannot be answered by medical definition alone. Clear and unrefutable legal definitions of death and the cessation of the rights of the individual must be provided before organs may be harvested from brain dead individuals. Acceptance of these definitions by the general population is of paramount importance for the practice of organ donation. In the first part of this article, the legal definition of death and the provisions of the German transplantation law are critically reviewed. The legal statements deal with the question of the definition of death and how death can be detected. The provisions of the German transplantation law are referenced with special attention to the provision of prior consent to the removal of organs following after the diagnosis of brain death. The provisions of the German constitution with respect to the preservation of the personal rights of the individual are discussed in the light of organ harvesting. The second part deals with the medical procedure of determining brain death in adults. The medical statements pertain to the diagnostic steps to be taken in the diagnosis and determination of brain death. The prerequisites for entering the diagnostic procedure to determine brain death are described. The clinical signs of total and irreversible cessation of brain function are listed, and the technical examinations to corroborate the clinical signs of brain death as accepted in Germany are delineated. In the perspective of the authors, individuals having suffered brain death still possess the protection of their personal human rights according to the German constitution since it cannot be conclusively demonstrated that total loss

  13. Use of the dead body in healthcare and medical training: mapping and balancing the legal rights and values.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Janne Rothmar

    2011-05-01

    By exploring the central legal principles and issues regarding usage of the dead body in healthcare and especially in medical training, this article aims at drawing some general conclusions on the legal status of the dead body and the protection of the deceased's integrity, dignity and autonomy. The article demonstrates that the use of the cadaveric body for scientific and educational purposes involves a redrawing of the traditional boundaries between the decent and the indecent, making these acts acceptable that would otherwise be regarded as assaults on the sanctity of bodily boundaries. This is made possible by the fact that the underlying principle of dignity is not perceived to be of an absolute nature when applicable to deceased persons.

  14. ["Is there a doctor on board?" - legal aspects of medical care in emergency situations during spare time].

    PubMed

    Lindner, Christina; Lindner, Gregor; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2013-12-11

    Medical emergencies on international flights are not uncommon. In these situations the question often arises whether physicians are obliged to render first aid and whether omission leads to legal consequences. The general obligation to aid those in need applies to everyone, not only to physicians. Evading this duty makes liable to prosecution for omittance of defence of a third person in line with Art. 128 of the Swiss Penal Code, punishable by custodial sentence up to three years or an equivalent punitive fine. Vocational and professional law extend the duty to aid for physicians to urgent cases. Although resulting from the performance of a legal obligation, malpractice occurred in the course of first aid can lead to claims for compensation - even from foreign patients, and that according to their own domestic law.

  15. The Legal Doctrine on 'Limitation of Liability' in the Precedent Analysis on Plastic Surgery Medical Malpractice Lawsuits.

    PubMed

    Park, Bo Young; Pak, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Seung-Eun; Kang, So Ra

    2015-12-01

    This study intended to review the precedents on plastic surgery medical malpractice lawsuits in lower-court trials, classify the reasons of 'limitation of liability' by type, and suggest a standard in the acknowledgement of limitation of liability ratio. The 30 lower-court's rulings on the cases bearing the medical negligence of the defendants acknowledged the liability ratio of the defendants between 30% and 100%. Ten cases ruled that the defendants were wholly responsible for the negligence or malpractice, while 20 cases acknowledged the limitation of liability principle. In the determination of damage compensation amount, the court considered the cause of the victim side, which contributed in the occurrence of the damage. The court also believed that it is against the idea of fairness to have the assailant pay the whole compensation, even there is no victim-side cause such as previous illness or physical constitution of the patient, and applies the legal doctrine on limitation of liability, which is an independent damage compensation adjustment system. Most of the rulings also limited the ratio of responsibility to certain extent. When considering that the legal doctrine on limitation of liability which supports concrete validity for the fair sharing of damage, the tangible classification of causes of limitation of liability suggested in this study would be a useful tool in forecasting the ruling of a plastic surgery medical malpractice lawsuit.

  16. The Legal Doctrine on 'Limitation of Liability' in the Precedent Analysis on Plastic Surgery Medical Malpractice Lawsuits

    PubMed Central

    Kang, So Ra

    2015-01-01

    This study intended to review the precedents on plastic surgery medical malpractice lawsuits in lower-court trials, classify the reasons of 'limitation of liability' by type, and suggest a standard in the acknowledgement of limitation of liability ratio. The 30 lower-court's rulings on the cases bearing the medical negligence of the defendants acknowledged the liability ratio of the defendants between 30% and 100%. Ten cases ruled that the defendants were wholly responsible for the negligence or malpractice, while 20 cases acknowledged the limitation of liability principle. In the determination of damage compensation amount, the court considered the cause of the victim side, which contributed in the occurrence of the damage. The court also believed that it is against the idea of fairness to have the assailant pay the whole compensation, even there is no victim-side cause such as previous illness or physical constitution of the patient, and applies the legal doctrine on limitation of liability, which is an independent damage compensation adjustment system. Most of the rulings also limited the ratio of responsibility to certain extent. When considering that the legal doctrine on limitation of liability which supports concrete validity for the fair sharing of damage, the tangible classification of causes of limitation of liability suggested in this study would be a useful tool in forecasting the ruling of a plastic surgery medical malpractice lawsuit. PMID:26713045

  17. Current legal and institutional issues in the commercialization of phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nimmons, J. T.; Sheehy, K. D.; Singer, J. R.; Gardner, T. C.

    1982-01-01

    Legal and institutional factors affecting the development and commercial diffusion of phosphoric acid fuel cells are assessed. Issues for future research and action are suggested. Perceived barriers and potential opportunities for fuel cells in central and dispersed utility operations and on-site applications are reviewed, as well as the general concept of commercialization as applied to emerging energy technologies.

  18. Current Legal Trends Regarding Abortions for Minors: A Dilemma for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbutt, Lou Culler

    1983-01-01

    Reviews court cases dealing with abortion and the counselor's legal responsibility to both the student and parents. Provides practical recommendations on abortion counseling with minors and suggests that counselors urge minors to discuss abortion plans with parents. Counselor should consider local mores and be knowledgeable about appropriate…

  19. [Medical intervention and assault: On the legal foundations of informed consent in German surgery, 1892-1940].

    PubMed

    Maehle, Andreas-Holger

    2003-01-01

    The recent historiography of informed consent in German medicine has chiefly focused on the issue of consent to human experimentation. This paper widens the historical perspective by demonstrating that the foundations of the concept of informed consent to surgery were laid in German law around 1900. From the 1890s onwards a debate about the legal basis of surgical operations developed in response to cases of medical intervention without full consent. While surgeons were unwilling to accept a legal interpretation of non-consensual treatment as assault, jurists were divided over the issue. Whereas Carl Stooss (1849-1934) and Joseph Heimberger (1865-1927) and Ludwig von Bar (1836-1913), endorsed the view that consent was a crucial requirement for the legality of surgical operations. Moreover, the German Supreme Court (Reichsgericht) in Leipzig consistently emphasized in its decisions the necessity of patients' consent. From 1912 it dealt also with the question of adequate pre-operative information of patients. Despite pressures during the Third Reich to reduce patients' "rule" over their own body in favour of notions of the health of the Volk, the Supreme Court upheld the requirement of individual patient consent in two further decisions, in 1936 and 1940.

  20. Complex regional pain syndrome: medical and legal ramifications of clinical variability and experience and perspective of a practicing clinician

    PubMed Central

    Lazaro, RP

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to demonstrate the ramifications of clinical variability of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and how they can affect the various aspects of this condition, favorably or unfavorably, for both patients and participating medical and legal professionals. Methods Twelve patients diagnosed with CRPS at different times in the past 25 years were followed up, and their signs and symptoms were reviewed for variability. None had preexisting or ongoing medical disorders and prior injury to the peripheral nerves or musculoskeletal tissues. None had been involved in litigation. Physical traumas that triggered CRPS were job-related, vehicular accidents, and personal injuries. The presence of vasomotor symptoms (eg, swelling, skin discoloration, and temperature changes) and allodynia in the affected extremity was the basis for clinical diagnosis in all the patients. The need for imaging studies was precluded in some patients owing to the presence of vasomotor symptoms, which either fluctuated or were steady. Seven of the patients had type 1 CRPS, and five patients had type 2 CRPS. Results Most patients encountered delay in diagnosis and treatment and legal obstacles owing to the lack of “typical” objective signs of CRPS. The patients’ symptoms fluctuated at different times of the day. Eight patients experienced spread of vasomotor symptoms and varying degree of allodynia in the opposite extremity. One patient, who developed signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, 2 months after the injury, continued to have CRPS symptoms in the injured hand. Treatment modalities administered in all the patients were essentially ineffective. All the patients, except one, were unable to return to their original line of work, and their symptoms persisted regardless of the outcome of their legal claims. Conclusion It is likely that patients who continue to complain of pain and vasomotor symptoms followed by a physical injury have CRPS. The complex

  1. Study of the Types of Domestic Violence Committed Against Women Referred to the Legal Medical Organization in Urmia - Iran

    PubMed Central

    Aghakhani, Nader; Sharif Nia, Hamid; Moosavi, Ehsan; Eftekhari, Ali; Zarei, Abbas; Bahrami, Nasim; Nikoonejad, Ali Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Today, domestic violence against women is a growing epidemic that can be observed in many countries. Objectives: This study was carried out to determine the types of domestic violence against women who were referred to the Legal Medical Organization of Iran in Urmia, Iran in 2012. Materials and Methods: The descriptive survey included demographic information, abuse screening, and items regarding partner involvement. Data was gathered using face-to-face structured interviews. The study population included 300, women 18 years of age or older, and data was collected about their demographic characteristics and the types of domestic violence they experienced. SPSS software version 16 was used for the analyses. Results: The majority of participants were in the 25 – 30 age group, and 83% of them were battered by their husbands in various ways. No significant relationships were observed between violence and unemployment, increasing age, and home ownership. Conclusions: The prevalence of abuse reported by women in this population suggests that many women that are referred to the Legal Medical Organization of Iran may have a history of abuse. Abused women may have different reasons for seeking a divorce. If routine screening for abuse is included in counseling, health providers will have the opportunity to develop a safety plan and initiate appropriate referrals. PMID:26834806

  2. Should performance-enhancing drugs in sport be legalized under medical supervision?

    PubMed

    Wiesing, Urban

    2011-02-01

    This review examines the question of whether performance-enhancing drugs should be permitted in sport under the control of physicians, and evaluates the expected outcomes of such a scenario. Such a change in regulation would need to be tightly controlled because of the risks involved. The results of legalizing performance-enhancing drugs in competitive sport would be either unhelpful or negative, and the unwanted aspects of doping control would not disappear. Athletes, including children and adolescents who wanted to pursue competitive sports, would be forced to take additional, avoidable health risks. The 'natural lottery' of athletic talents would be compensated for only partially by use of performance-enhancing agents. It would also be complemented by another 'natural lottery' of variable responses to doping measures, combined with the inventiveness of doping doctors. There would be no gain in 'justice' (i.e. fairer results that reflected efforts made) for athletes as a result of legalizing doping. Legalization would not reduce restrictions on athletes' freedom; the control effort would remain the same, if not increased. Extremely complicated international regulations would have to be adopted. The game of the 'tortoise and the hare' between doping athletes and inspectors would remain because prohibited but not identifiable practices could still provide additional benefits from use of permissible drugs. Audience mistrust, particularly toward athletes who achieved outstanding feats, would remain because it would still be possible that these athletes were reliant on illegal doping practices. Doping entails exposing the athletes to avoidable risks that do not need to be taken to increase the appeal of a sport. Most importantly, the function of sport as a role model would definitely be damaged. It is not necessary to clarify the question of what constitutes the 'spirit of sport' and whether this may be changed. From a practical point of view, a legalization of

  3. CAN I ACCESS MY PERSONAL GENOME? THE CURRENT LEGAL POSITION IN THE UK

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Jane; Kanellopoulou, Nadja; Hawkins, Naomi; Gowans, Heather; Curren, Liam; Melham, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the nature of genomic information, and the moral arguments in support of an individual's right to access it. It analyses the legal avenues an individual might take to access their sequence information. The authors describe the policy implications in this area and conclude that, for now, the law appears to strike an appropriate balance, but new policy will need to be developed to address this issue. PMID:24136352

  4. The current legal regime of the geostationary orbit and prospects for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasentuliyana, N.; Chipman, R.

    The legal status of the geostationary orbit is defined by the 1967 UN Outer Space Treaty, which provides that space is "free for use by all countries", and the ITU Convention and Radio Regulations, which give priority to existing satellite systems, thus arguably limiting the right of other countries to access. Thus arises a conflict between space powers, which favour pragmatic technical co-ordination through the ITU, and developing countries, which look to the United Nations for general political and legal principles based on the equality of all States. A process of compromise is underway in the ITU WARC-ORB conference. While the results of the 1985 session were encouraging, ongoing negotiations will be necessary, with compromises involving both general legal principles and pragmatic mechanisms for co-ordinating existing satellites. While the ITU will be the main negotiating forum, the UN can incorporate general principles into international space law. An Appendix contains the main provisions of international law relating to the orbit.

  5. Legal medicine: assessing mental capacity and writing medical reports for deputy applications

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hui Min; Goh, Lee Gan; Thirumoorthy, T

    2017-01-01

    Medical reports are required to support court applications to appoint a deputy to make decisions on behalf of a person who has lost mental capacity. The doctor writing such a medical report needs to be able to systematically assess the mental capacity of the person in question, in order to gather the necessary evidence for the court to make a decision. If the medical report is not adequate, the application will be rejected and the appointment of the deputy delayed. This article sets out best practices for performing the assessment and writing the medical report, common errors, and issues of concern. PMID:27752705

  6. Good cop, bad cop: federal prosecution of state-legalized medical marijuana use after United States v. Lopez.

    PubMed

    Newbern, A E

    2000-10-01

    The Supreme Court's recent decisions in United States v. Lopez and United States v. Morrison articulate a vision of federalism under which Congress's regulatory authority under the Commerce Clause is severely limited in favor of returning traditional areas of state concern, particularly criminal law enforcement, to local or state control. The Court's decisions in these cases coincide with ballot initiatives legalizing the medical use of marijuana garnering a majority of the vote in California, Arizona, Alaska, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Maine, and Washington D.C. Those who use marijuana for medical purposes under sanction of state law, however, still face the threat of federal prosecution under the Controlled Substances Act. Medical marijuana proponents have traditionally, and unsuccessfully, contested federal prosecution using individual rights arguments under theories of equal protection or substantive due process. This Comment argues that after Lopez and Morrison, the federal government's authority to regulate intrastate use of marijuana for medicinal purposes is not the foregone conclusion it once was. The author suggests that proponents of medical marijuana use should invoke the federalism arguments of Lopez and Morrison and argue for state legislative independence from the federal government on this issue.

  7. Legal Issues in School Health Services and School Psychology: Guidelines for the Administration of Medication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur-Mosiewicz, Anna; Pierson, Eric E.; McIntosh, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The use of psychoactive medications to augment behavioral and psychosocial interventions in schools has significantly increased within the last few decades. Yet, advising, administrating, and supervising the dispensation of medication (including psychostimulants and psychoactive substances) tend to be some of the most risky tasks of school…

  8. Legal and ethical issues in the regulation and development of engineering achievements in medical technology. I.

    PubMed

    Bronzino, J D; Flannery, E J; Wade, M

    1990-01-01

    The statutory and regulatory requirements governing medical device development and approval are reviewed. Some of the procedures that the US Food and Drug Administration has implemented to loosen the strictures that impede development and approval of new medical devices are discussed. Some of the ethical issues associated with these procedures are examined.

  9. Management of menstrual problems and contraception in adolescents with mental retardation: a medical, legal, and ethical review with new suggested guidelines.

    PubMed

    Paransky, Ora I; Zurawin, Robert K

    2003-08-01

    The controversial history of the reproductive rights of the mentally retarded has led to the formulation of laws in the past century designed to protect women from forced sterilization. Significantly, however, in their official ethical guidelines, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists states that "sterilization should not be denied to individuals simply because they also may be vulnerable to coercion" (Int J Gynaecol Obstet 1999; 65:317). Recent advances in medical and surgical methods of contraception and control of menstrual abnormalities have led to a re-evaluation of the management of adolescents with special needs. Physicians, the courts, parents, and caretakers need to be aware of the latest medical and surgical options available, the current applicable laws in each state if such exist, and the ethical guidelines to determine what treatment option is in the best interests of the patient. This review examines the history of the sterilization of the mentally retarded, the latest surgical and pharmacologic treatments available, and the current legal environment and proposes an algorithm to facilitate the management of menstrual hygiene and contraception.

  10. [Current status of DNA databases in the forensic field: new progress, new legal needs].

    PubMed

    Baeta, Miriam; Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña

    2009-01-01

    One of the most polemic issues regarding the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the legal sphere, refers to the creation of DNA databases. Until relatively recently, Spain did not have a law to support the establishment of a national DNA profile bank for forensic purposes, and preserve the fundamental rights of subjects whose data are archived therein. The regulatory law of police databases regarding identifiers obtained from DNA approved in 2007, covers this void in the Spanish legislation and responds to the incessant need to adapt the laws to continuous scientific and technological progress.

  11. Restricted career paths for overseas students graduating from Australian medical schools: legal and policy considerations.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Katie J; Studdert, David M

    2010-05-03

    A sharp increase in the number of students graduating from Australian medical schools over the next few years looks set to outpace available intern positions. Graduating overseas students will be the first to miss out. While this treatment of overseas students is unlikely to be found unlawful, questions of fairness remain. From a policy standpoint, the bottleneck in intern places could be quite damaging as: it encourages Australian-trained medical graduates with high-quality training and culturally-relevant skills to leave; and it extinguishes a valuable opportunity to steer some of these graduates into geographical areas with the greatest medical workforce needs.

  12. Hunger strikers: ethical and legal dimensions of medical complicity in torture at Guantanamo Bay.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Sarah M; Leaning, Jennifer; Greenough, P Gregg; Burkle, Frederick M

    2013-12-01

    Physicians and other licensed health professionals are involved in force-feeding prisoners on hunger strike at the US Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay (GTMO), Cuba, the detention center established to hold individuals captured and suspected of being terrorists in the wake of September 11, 2001. The force-feeding of competent hunger strikers violates medical ethics and constitutes medical complicity in torture. Given the failure of civilian and military law to end the practice, the medical profession must exert policy and regulatory pressure to bring the policy and operations of the US Department of Defense into compliance with established ethical standards. Physicians, other health professionals, and organized medicine must appeal to civilian state oversight bodies and federal regulators of medical science to revoke the licenses of health professionals who have committed prisoner abuses at GTMO.

  13. Medical-legal issues in headache: penal and civil Italian legislation, working claims, social security, off-label prescription.

    PubMed

    Aguggia, M; Cavallini, M; Varetto, L

    2006-05-01

    Primary headaches can be considered simultaneously as symptom and disease itself, while secondary headaches are expressions of a pathological process that can be systemic or locoregional. Because of its subjective features, headache is often difficult to assess and quantify by severity, frequency and invalidity rate, and for these reasons it has often been implicated in legal controversies. Headache has seldom been considered in the criminal law, except when it represents a typical symptom of a disease whose existence can be objectively assessed (i. e. raised intracranial pressure). Therefore, in civil legislation it is not yet coded to start claiming for invalidity compensation. In particular, one of the most debated medical-legal questions is represented by headaches occurring after head injury. Headache is often the principal symptom at the beginning of several toxic chronic syndromes, with many implications, especially in working claims, and, more recently, it may be referred to as one of the most frequent symptoms by victims of mobbing (i. e. psychological harassment in the workplace). The National Institute for Industrial Accident Insurance (INAIL) scales (instituted by the law 38/2000) mention the "Subjective cranial trauma syndrome" and give an invalidity rate evaluation. With reference to other headache forms, no legislation really exists at the present time, and headache is only considered as a symptom of a certain coded disease. Requests for invalidity social pension and the question of off-label prescriptions (drug prescription for a disease, without formal indication for it) are other controversial matters.

  14. Medical negligence: Coverage of the profession, duties, ethics, case law, and enlightened defense - A legal perspective.

    PubMed

    Pandit, M S; Pandit, Shobha

    2009-07-01

    A patient approaching a doctor expects medical treatment with all the knowledge and skill that the doctor possesses to bring relief to his medical problem. The relationship takes the shape of a contract retaining the essential elements of tort. A doctor owes certain duties to his patient and a breach of any of these duties gives a cause of action for negligence against the doctor. The doctor has a duty to obtain prior informed consent from the patient before carrying out diagnostic tests and therapeutic management. The services of the doctors are covered under the provisions of the Consumer Protection Act, 1986 and a patient can seek redressal of grievances from the Consumer Courts. Case laws are an important source of law in adjudicating various issues of negligence arising out of medical treatment.

  15. Medical negligence: Coverage of the profession, duties, ethics, case law, and enlightened defense - A legal perspective

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, M. S.; Pandit, Shobha

    2009-01-01

    A patient approaching a doctor expects medical treatment with all the knowledge and skill that the doctor possesses to bring relief to his medical problem. The relationship takes the shape of a contract retaining the essential elements of tort. A doctor owes certain duties to his patient and a breach of any of these duties gives a cause of action for negligence against the doctor. The doctor has a duty to obtain prior informed consent from the patient before carrying out diagnostic tests and therapeutic management. The services of the doctors are covered under the provisions of the Consumer Protection Act, 1986 and a patient can seek redressal of grievances from the Consumer Courts. Case laws are an important source of law in adjudicating various issues of negligence arising out of medical treatment. PMID:19881134

  16. Frequency and Risk of Marijuana Use among Substance-Using Health Care Patients in Colorado with and without Access to State Legalized Medical Marijuana.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Melissa K; Pampel, Fred C; Rivera, Laura S; Broderick, Kerryann B; Reimann, Brie; Fischer, Leigh

    2015-01-01

    With increasing use of state legalized medical marijuana across the country, health care providers need accurate information on patterns of marijuana and other substance use for patients with access to medical marijuana. This study compared frequency and severity of marijuana use, and use of other substances, for patients with and without state legal access to medical marijuana. Data were collected from 2,030 patients who screened positive for marijuana use when seeking health care services in a large, urban safety-net medical center. Patients were screened as part of a federally funded screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) initiative. Patients were asked at screening whether they had a state-issued medical marijuana card and about risky use of tobacco, alcohol, and other illicit substances. A total of 17.4% of marijuana users had a medical marijuana card. Patients with cards had higher frequency of marijuana use and were more likely to screen at moderate than low or high risk from marijuana use. Patients with cards also had lower use of other substances than patients without cards. Findings can inform health care providers of both the specific risks of frequent, long-term use and the more limited risks of other substance use faced by legal medical marijuana users.

  17. [Legal debate about the definition of medical device and of medicinal drug for human use].

    PubMed

    Ferge, Zsigmond

    2014-03-16

    On 3 October 2013 the European Court of Justice made a decision regarding the interpretation of definitions of medical devices (Directive 93/42/EC) and medicinal product for human use (Directive 2001/83/EC), based on the Article 267 TFEU preliminary ruling. Orv. Hetil., 2014, 155(11), 429-433.

  18. Sickle Cell Screening: Medical, Legal, Ethical, Psychological and Social Problems; A Sickle Cell Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, James E.

    In recent years, sickle cell screening programs have been initiated by community groups, health centers, hospitals, medical schools, health departments, school systems, city and State governments, various branches of the Federal Government, fraternal and social clubs, and other organizations. Problems have resulted from mass sickle cell screening,…

  19. Current state of the art of medical foods.

    PubMed

    Blum, Stephanie; Brito, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one of the five most prevalent gastrointestinal disease burdens in the US, with an overall health care cost of more than USD 1.7 billion. It commonly requires a lifetime of care, and accounts for more than 700,000 physician visits, 100,000 hospitalizations, and disability in 119,000 patients each year. IBD is a multifactorial disease and comprises genetic susceptibility, uncontrolled immune responses, and environmental factors which play a role in the pathogenesis and course of the disease. IBD patients are lifelong on medication, either for induction or maintenance therapy. Current treatment option (corticosteroids, immune suppressants, biologics), administered in mono- or combination therapy, are still unsatisfactory. Due to the nature of disease, 20-40% of patients relapse within the first 12 months. Although modern treatment algorithms have diminished the risk of surgery, the treatments harbor significant side effects, which impacts patients' quality of life. The role of nutrition in IBD has gathered high interest, especially in pediatric Crohn's disease, where studies have shown that exclusive enteral nutrition can induce remission in mild-to-moderate disease comparable to corticosteroids. Thus, gastroenterologists and patients become increasingly aware that specific nutritional interventions offered in addition to the standard of care are an appealing option for a safe long-term disease management. Such specific nutritional solutions should be based on scientific/clinical evidence and specifically designed to address the patients' distinct nutritional requirements. As per definition, these nutrition products fall under the regulatory framework of a Medical Food (Foods for Special Medical Purposes in Europe).

  20. A current perspective on medical informatics and health sciences librarianship

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Gerald J.; Roderer, Nancy K.; Assar, Soraya

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The article offers a current perspective on medical informatics and health sciences librarianship. Narrative: The authors: (1) discuss how definitions of medical informatics have changed in relation to health sciences librarianship and the broader domain of information science; (2) compare the missions of health sciences librarianship and health sciences informatics, reviewing the characteristics of both disciplines; (3) propose a new definition of health sciences informatics; (4) consider the research agendas of both disciplines and the possibility that they have merged; and (5) conclude with some comments about actions and roles for health sciences librarians to flourish in the biomedical information environment of today and tomorrow. Summary: Boundaries are disappearing between the sources and types of and uses for health information managed by informaticians and librarians. Definitions of the professional domains of each have been impacted by these changes in information. Evolving definitions reflect the increasingly overlapping research agendas of both disciplines. Professionals in these disciplines are increasingly functioning collaboratively as “boundary spanners,” incorporating human factors that unite technology with health care delivery. PMID:15858622

  1. Medical telerobotic systems: current status and future trends.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Sotiris; Christoforou, Eftychios G; Panayides, Andreas S; Voskarides, Sotos; Novales, Cyril; Nouaille, Laurence; Pattichis, Constantinos S; Vieyres, Pierre

    2016-08-12

    Teleoperated medical robotic systems allow procedures such as surgeries, treatments, and diagnoses to be conducted across short or long distances while utilizing wired and/or wireless communication networks. This study presents a systematic review of the relevant literature between the years 2004 and 2015, focusing on medical teleoperated robotic systems which have witnessed tremendous growth over the examined period. A thorough insight of telerobotics systems discussing design concepts, enabling technologies (namely robotic manipulation, telecommunications, and vision systems), and potential applications in clinical practice is provided, while existing limitations and future trends are also highlighted. A representative paradigm of the short-distance case is the da Vinci Surgical System which is described in order to highlight relevant issues. The long-distance telerobotics concept is exemplified through a case study on diagnostic ultrasound scanning. Moreover, the present review provides a classification into short- and long-distance telerobotic systems, depending on the distance from which they are operated. Telerobotic systems are further categorized with respect to their application field. For the reviewed systems are also examined their engineering characteristics and the employed robotics technology. The current status of the field, its significance, the potential, as well as the challenges that lie ahead are thoroughly discussed.

  2. [Rotator cuff diseases in occupational medicine between occupational diseases and accidents: medical-legal considerations].

    PubMed

    Spigno, F; Galli, R; Casali, C; Lagattolla, N; De Lucchi, M

    2010-01-01

    The authors have gone through the complaints concerning all the cases of shoulder accidents at work filed by the Genoa office of the Italian Workers' National compensation Agency (INAIL) during the two years' period 2006-2007, reviewing in particular those somehow affecting rotator components. The aim of this paper is to assess the real role played by the occupational trauma in the rotator cuff tear. The data gathered so far have shown, on the one hand, a high prevalence of pre-existing inflammatory and degenerative diseases and, on the other, a rather modest influence of the trauma which, for this reason, has usually borne, as an immediate medico-legal consequence, the rejection of a cause-effect relationship between the accident and the rotator cuff lesion, without taking into any account whether the worker was likely to be affected by an occupational disease (ex table Ministerial Decree n. 81 April 9th 2008- item 78). In such cases a systematic and in-depth investigation of the occupational case history is suggested, in order to highlight the possible pre-existence of a former biomechanical overload of the upper limbs, so as to allow the physician to detect a pathology often misdiagnosed.

  3. Advanced patient records: some ethical and legal considerations touching medical information space.

    PubMed

    Kluge, E H

    1993-04-01

    The application of advanced computer-based information technology to patient records presents an opportunity for expanding the informational resource base that is available to health-care providers at all levels. Consequently, it has the potential for fundamentally restructuring the ethics of the physician/patient relationship and the ethos of contemporary health-care delivery. At the same time, the technology raises several important ethical problems. This paper explores some of these implications. It suggests that the fundamental ethical issue at stake in these developments is the status of the electronic record which functions as the analog of the health-care consumer in health-care decision making. Matters such as control and patient dignity are implicated. Other important ethical issues requiring solution include data ownership, data liability, informed consent to use and retrieval, security and access. The paper suggests that the ethical problems that arise cannot be solved in piecemeal fashion and on a purely national basis. They should be addressed in a coordinated international fashion and receive appropriate legal expression in the relevant countries and be incorporated into appropriate codes of ethics.

  4. Bilingual Encounters: Spanish-English Medical and Legal Dialogues. A Practical Resource for Educators and Students of Interpreting. Interpreting and Translation Publications Series, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Sandra

    Thirty-eight dialogues are presented, each illustrating a common, real-life interpreting situation involving medical and/or legal issues and terminology. Each involves both Spanish and English languages, and the situations are specific to New South Wales, Australia. They are designed to be used as a resource in teaching interpreting. The…

  5. Do we need a critical care ultrasound certification program? Implications from an Australian medical-legal perspective.

    PubMed

    Huang, Stephen J; McLean, Anthony S

    2010-01-01

    Medical practitioners have a duty to maintain a certain standard of care in providing their services. With critical care ultrasound gaining popularity in the ICU, it is envisaged that more intensivists will use the tool in managing their patients. Ultrasound, especially echocardiography, can be an 'easy to learn, difficult to manage' skill, and the competency in performing the procedure varies greatly. In view of this, several recommendations for competency statements have been published in recent years to advocate the need for a unified approach to training and certification. In this paper, we take a slightly different perspective, from an Australian medical-legal viewpoint, to argue for the need to implement a critical care ultrasound certification program. We examine various issues that can potentially lead to a breach of the standard of care, hence exposing the practitioners and/or the healthcare institutions to lawsuits in professional negligence or breach of contract. These issues, among others, include the failure to use ultrasound in appropriate situations, the failure of hospitals to ensure practitioners are properly trained in the skills, the failure of practitioners to perform an ultrasound study that is of a reasonable standard, and the failure of practitioners to keep themselves abreast of the latest developments in treatment and management. The implications of these issues and the importance of having a certification process are discussed.

  6. Structured communication for patient safety in emergency medical services: a legal case report.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Mark J; Heninger, Jacob R

    2010-01-01

    Providers of emergency medical services (EMS) must communicate vital information during critical phases of operations. Errors in communications, for example, the failure to hear a directive, will compromise safe and effective patient care. This article presents a case that resulted in litigation because of communication failures during the interfacility transfer of a trauma patient who subsequently died in the ambulance. The communication failure involved members of a ground ambulance crew, their dispatcher, and a supervisor. The failure of the emergency medical technician (EMT) who was driving to hear from the treating EMT and her dispatcher vital information pertaining to changes in their destination and of plans to intercept another ambulance, or alternatively, the driver's ignoring this information, led to a delay in care and may have contributed to the patient's death. Factors contributing to the cause of this communication failure may have been related to the nature of the EMS setting: the physical separation between crew members (the driver, and the care provider in the back of the ambulance); the noise of the ground ambulance transport environment, most notably, the siren; and the stress of treating a patient in critical condition. The case highlights the importance of using structured forms of communication, specifically the read-back tool and the critical assertion strategy, to limit failures in communication during EMS operations and in operations in other high-risk medical settings.

  7. Legal and ethical issues in the regulation and development of engineering achievements in medical technology. II.

    PubMed

    Bronzino, J D; Flannery, E J; Wade, M

    1990-01-01

    For pt.I see ibid., vol.9, no.2, p.79-81 (1990). The ethical issues raised by the fact that patients/subjects are less protected in non-investigational-device-exemption (non-IDE) use of unapproved medical devices than in IDE use are examined. Practice, research, and nonvalidated practice, an intervention that falls into the region between pure practice and pure research, are defined and examined with respect to non-IDE use of unapproved medical devices. Two types of non-IDE use are considered: that which would be permitted under the feasibility studies mechanism, and emergency use. Ethical issues in both cases are discussed. It is concluded that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) must not only expand the freedom of scientific investigators to develop new medical devices, allowing flexibility in defined non-IDE contexts that will not jeopardize the safety or welfare of patients, but also clearly and concisely define the procedures which outline this expanded freedom.

  8. MEDICAL AND LEGAL ISSUES OF THE DECISIONS RENDERED BY THE EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS.

    PubMed

    Chakhvadze, B; Chakhvadze, G

    2017-01-01

    The European Convention on Human rights is a document that protects human rights and fundamental freedoms of individuals, and the European Court of Human Rights and its case-law makes a convention a powerful instrument to meet the new challenges of modernity and protect the principles of rule of law and democracy. This is important, particularly for young democracies, including Georgia. The more that Georgia is a party to this convention. Article 3 of the convention deals with torture, inhuman and degrading treatment, while article 8 deals with private life, home and correspondence. At the same time, the international practice of the European court of human rights shows that these articles are often used with regard to medical rights. The paper highlights the most recent and interesting cases from the case-law of the ECHR, in which the courts conclusions are based solely on the European Convention on Human Rights. In most instances, the European Court of Human Rights uses the principle of democracy with regard to medical rights. The European court of human rights considers medical rights as moral underpinning rights. Particularly in every occasion, the European Court of Human Rights acknowledges an ethical dimension of these rights. In most instances, it does not matter whether a plaintiff is a free person or prisoner, the European court of human rights make decisions based on fundamental human rights and freedoms of individuals.

  9. Genetic discrimination in health insurance: current legal protections and industry practices.

    PubMed

    Pollitz, Karen; Peshkin, Beth N; Bangit, Eliza; Lucia, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Most states have enacted genetic nondiscrimination laws in health insurance, and federal legislation is pending in Congress. Scientists worry fear of discrimination discourages some patients from participating in clinical trials and hampers important medical research. This paper describes a study of medical underwriting practices in the individual health insurance market related to genetic information. Underwriters from 23 companies participated in a survey that asked them to underwrite four pairs of hypothetical applicants for health insurance. One person in each pair had received a positive genetic test result indicating increased risk of a future health condition--breast cancer, hemochromatosis, or heart disease--for a total of 92 underwriting decisions on applications involving genetic information. In seven of these 92 applications, underwriters said they would deny coverage, place a surcharge on premiums,or limit covered benefits based on an applicant's genetic information.

  10. Rights of persons with conditions associated with disability: current legal framework.

    PubMed

    Moya, Graciela

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this review study is to promote the dissemination of the legislation in force in Argentina for the protection of the rights of persons with conditions that might cause disability. Articles of bills and laws that protect the rights of these families are reviewed, so that health care providers assisting them have better access to them. Argentina has a wide range of laws and regulations dedicated to protecting them, but they are generally not clearly recognized by citizens. The aim is to disseminate this information in the medical setting so that health care providers can help patients recognize their rights through empowerment.

  11. Financial impact of radiological reports on medical-legal evaluation of compensation for meniscal lesions.

    PubMed

    Lelario, M; Ciuffreda, P; Lupo, P; Bristogiannis, C; Vinci, R; Stoppino, L P; De Filippo, M; Macarini, L

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate any discrepancy between radiological reports for clinical purposes and for medicolegal purposes and to quantify its economic impact on repayments made by private insurance companies for meniscal injuries of the knee. The medical records obtained pertaining to 108 knee injury patients (mean age 43.3 years) assessed over a period of 12 months were analysed. Clinical medical reports, aimed at assessing the lesion, and medicolegal reports, drawn up with a view to quantifying compensation, were compared. Unlike reports for clinical purposes in reports for medicolegal purposes, in the evaluation of meniscal lesions, in addition to morphological features of lesions, chronological, topographical, severity and exclusion criteria were applied. To estimate the economic impact resulting from the biological damage, we consulted an actuarial table based on the 9-point minor incapacity classification system. Meniscal lesions not compatible with a traumatic event and therefore not eligible for an insurance payout were found in 56 patients. Of these, 37 failed exclusion criteria, while 19 failed to meet chronological criteria. This difference resulted in a reduction in compensation made by private insurance companies with savings estimated with a saving between euro 203,715.41 and euro 622,315.39. The use of a clinical report for medicolegal purposes can be a source of valuation error, as chronological and/or dynamic information regarding the trauma mechanism may be lacking. Therefore, the use of a full radiological appraisal allows a better damage's assessment and an adequate compensation for injuries.

  12. [The early semiautomatic defibrillation: legislative Italian framing and medical-legal aspects].

    PubMed

    Fontana, Alessandro; Zancaner, Silvano

    2004-10-01

    Following Anglosaxon experience, automatic external defibrillators (AEDs), devices capable of automatically identifying a defibrillating rhythm and triggering a life-saving discharge, are now becoming widespread in Italy too. Their extremely simple functioning, and diagnostic sensitivity combined with diagnostic specificity all mean that AEDs can even be used by non-medical personnel (nurses) and, more extensively and after proper training, also by "first responders" who are not necessarily healthcare-related (red cross volunteers, members of the police force, firemen, etc.). In this sense Italian law no. 120/2001, enacted in the interests of the collectivity, and its later provisions approved at the conference of the Italian state and regional authorities in 2003, admits this type of application. AED safety assurance means that these devices can also be used by ordinary people who are not trained and have no specific obligations, but who suddenly find themselves in an emergency situation. However, medical personnel, paramedics and non-healthcare-related "first responders" trained in the use of AEDs, are required to apply them in suitable circumstances and, if they do not, may be accused of refusal to act in an official capacity, omission of first aid, and manslaughter.

  13. [Legal medical evaluation of the sequels derived from moderate-serious cranioencephalic traumas].

    PubMed

    Vilardell Molas, J; Pérez-Bouton, M P; Martí Agustí, G

    2007-12-01

    Currently, the increasing number of subjects who survive a moderate to severe cranioencephalic traumatism (CET) has led to a greater number of sequels. This has made it necessary to study these sequels more specifically. Thus, we have wanted to manifest which are the most common sequels in the cases of patients who have suffered moderate to severe CET through our professional experience and current research done on this. Furthermore, we indicate the need to become aware of these deficits since these (specifically neuropsychological) are often too specific if we compare them with the generality of the standard used for their evaluation.

  14. The current medical education system in the world.

    PubMed

    Nara, Nobuo; Suzuki, Toshiya; Tohda, Shuji

    2011-07-04

    To contribute to the innovation of the medical education system in Japan, we visited 35 medical schools and 5 institutes in 12 countries of North America, Europe, Australia and Asia in 2008-2010 and observed the education system. We met the deans, medical education committee and administration affairs and discussed about the desirable education system. We also observed the facilities of medical schools.Medical education system shows marked diversity in the world. There are three types of education course; non-graduate-entry program(non-GEP), graduate-entry program(GEP) and mixed program of non-GEP and GEP. Even in the same country, several types of medical schools coexist. Although the education methods are also various among medical schools, most of the medical schools have introduced tutorial system based on PBL or TBL and simulation-based learning to create excellent medical physicians. The medical education system is variable among countries depending on the social environment. Although the change in education program may not be necessary in Japan, we have to innovate education methods; clinical training by clinical clerkship must be made more developed to foster the training of the excellent clinical physicians, and tutorial education by PBL or TBL and simulation-based learning should be introduced more actively.

  15. [Current problems of information technologies application for forces medical service].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Korneenkov, A A; Bogomolov, V D; Borisov, D N; Rezvantsev, M V

    2013-06-01

    The modern information technologies are the key factors for the upgrading of forces medical service. The aim of this article is the analysis of prospective information technologies application for the upgrading of forces medical service. The authors suggested 3 concepts of information support of Russian military health care on the basis of data about information technologies application in the foreign armed forces, analysis of the regulatory background, prospects of military-medical service and gathered experience of specialists. These three concepts are: development of united telecommunication network of the medical service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation medical service, working out and implementation of standard medical information systems for medical units and establishments, monitoring the military personnel health state and military medical service resources. It is noted that on the assumption of sufficient centralized financing and industrial implementation of the military medical service prospective information technologies, by the year 2020 the united information space of the military medical service will be created and the target information support effectiveness will be achieved.

  16. Medicalization: Current Concept and Future Directions in a Bionic Society

    PubMed Central

    Maturo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The article illustrates the main features of the concept of medicalization, starting from its theoretical roots. Although it is the process of extending the medical gaze on human conditions, it appears that medicalization cannot be strictly connected to medical imperialism anymore. Other “engines” of medicalization are influential: consumers, biotechnology and managed care. The growth of research and theoretical reflections on medicalization has led to the proposal of other parallel concepts like pharmaceuticalization, genetization and biomedicalization. These new theoretical tools could be useful in the analysis of human enhancement. Human enhancement can be considered as the use of biomedical technology to improve performance on a human being who is not in need of a cure: a practice that is increasingly spreading in what might be defined as a “bionic society”. PMID:22654387

  17. Problems in deceptive medical procedures: an ethical and legal analysis of the administration of placebos

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Beth

    1978-01-01

    The use of placebos in therapy or research poses ethical questions. What are the benefits and the costs in ethical terms of condoning deception of the patient or subject? What does the deception mean for the patient's or subject's right to give informed consent to his treatment? Doctors are rightly expected to disclose to their patient facts which would in their judgement best enable him to give informed consent to treatment. On occasion, the degree of this disclosure may be limited by the need to avoid hazarding the success of treatment of an unstable patient whose condition threatens his life, but doctors should have no right to withhold information just to prevent a patient refusing consent to therapy. No such limitation should apply in experiments where full disclosure must operate to enable the subject to give his informed consent. The potential medical benefits for the patient of placebo therapy have to be weighed against all the ethical costs of the deception and dishonesty involved, including the longer term repercussions on doctor/patient trust: similar ethical costs may arise in experiments involving the use of placebos without disclosure of this as a possibility to the subject. Deception is ethically degrading to both parties not only being a breach of trust, but denying the moral autonomy of the patient or subject to make his own choice. The writer concludes that placebos should be used only with full disclosure and consent whether in therapy or in research, and that this need not impede the success of either. PMID:739513

  18. [The state of forensic medical expertise of civil cases concerning medical disputes].

    PubMed

    Barinov, E Kh; Romodanovskiĭ, P O

    2013-01-01

    It is concluded that the current state of forensic medical expertise of civil cases concerning disputable issues, such as causing harm to health in medical practice, does not meet the requirements of the relevant legal procedures.

  19. [Euthanasia and other decisions at the end of life (Proposal for a more transparent terminology and some thoughts on the legal framework of medical treatment)].

    PubMed

    Vadász, Gábor

    2010-10-24

    Indication of euthanasia is only one of several medical decisions at the end of life. Precise definition of this topic related to the clinical events happening around the sick-bed is not complete in the legal and medical literature. The present review attempts to classify the different end of life events with the aim of clarifying which of these do not belong to the concept of passive euthanasia. Euthanasia is not a legal category. The everyday expressions of active and passive euthanasia are simplifications, which cover actions of different purposes. Use of these in medical and legal literature can be confusing and misleading. We differentiate decisions at the end of life on basis of their purpose. Based on the definition and category of the Hungarian Doctors' Chamber, euthanasia is the act or the lack of action in order to mercifully shorten or end the life of a suffering fellow-man to help him. Concepts of active, passive and forced euthanasia are defined. The terms of indirect and intermediate euthanasia are not used in order to avoid misunderstanding. Help and participation of non-professionals in the implementation cannot be completely excluded from the concept of euthanasia, and we believe euthanasia is not merely related to doctors. We outline those medical decisions at the end of life which do not belong to the category of passive euthanasia, namely: withdrawal of ineffective and life sustaining treatments, letting go of the patient, contra-indication of therapy escalation, use of palliative therapy, pain-relieving treatment, compromise medicine, consideration of reanimation and choosing cost-effective therapy. We touch upon the subject of the living will, why it cannot be applied, and its relation to active and passive euthanasia. With reference to the legal regulation of life saving and life sustaining treatment, we deal with the expected spirit of medical legislation.

  20. Neurologists' Views of Current Medications: Spasticity and Athetosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obringer, S. John; Coffey, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Medications to treat individuals with cerebral palsy have increased significantly over the last few decades. The purpose of this article was to randomly survey practicing neurologists on a national level to determine prescribing patterns for both spasticity and athetosis. The results indicated that the most frequently prescribed medication for…

  1. Review of the Italian current legislation on research biobanking activities on the eve of the participation of national biobanks’ network in the legal consortium BBMRI-ERIC.

    PubMed

    Calzolari, Alessia; Napolitano, Mariarosaria; Bravo, Elena

    2013-04-01

    The ethical-legal framework of research biobanking activities is still scarcely defined in Italy, and this constitutes a major obstacle to exploit the potential benefits of existing bioresource patrimony at the national and international levels. Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure (BBMRI), which aims to become a major interface between biological samples and data and top-level biological and medical research, is undertaking the crucial transformation to the ERIC (European Research Infrastructure Consortium) legal entity. In this scenario, there is a need to address the national legal and ethical concerns that are strictly correlated with the use of human biosources in research across European countries participating (and not) in BBMRI. In this perspective, this article aims to review the legal framework applying to research biobanking in Italy, including both "soft" nonbinding instruments and binding regulations. Since ethical and societal aspects impact biobanking research activities, the article discusses both the critical ethical and legal open issues that need to be implemented at the national level.

  2. Review of the Italian Current Legislation on Research Biobanking Activities on the Eve of the Participation of National Biobanks' Network in the Legal Consortium BBMRI-ERIC

    PubMed Central

    Calzolari, Alessia; Napolitano, Mariarosaria

    2013-01-01

    The ethical-legal framework of research biobanking activities is still scarcely defined in Italy, and this constitutes a major obstacle to exploit the potential benefits of existing bioresource patrimony at the national and international levels. Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure (BBMRI), which aims to become a major interface between biological samples and data and top-level biological and medical research, is undertaking the crucial transformation to the ERIC (European Research Infrastructure Consortium) legal entity. In this scenario, there is a need to address the national legal and ethical concerns that are strictly correlated with the use of human biosources in research across European countries participating (and not) in BBMRI. In this perspective, this article aims to review the legal framework applying to research biobanking in Italy, including both “soft” nonbinding instruments and binding regulations. Since ethical and societal aspects impact biobanking research activities, the article discusses both the critical ethical and legal open issues that need to be implemented at the national level. PMID:23840925

  3. Eugenic sterilization: a discussion of certain legal, medical, and moral aspects of present practices in our public mental institutions.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, M

    1961-03-18

    Eugenic sterilization is defined as sterilization of a person who is either mentally ill or mentally defective and will either severely handicap any future offspring through heredity or is unable to properly care for a child. When an institutionalized mentally disordered person of reproductive age reaches a stage when he is able to return to the community, 3 possibilities arise: 1) eugenic surgical sterilization; 2) eugenic institutional sterilization, where the patient is effectively sterilized by being kept in the institution; and 3) discharge without eugenic sterilization. 3 cases of patients discharged without sterilization are presented. A review of the law of eugenic surgical sterilization reveals that 22 states have laws that permit compulsory eugenic sterilization without patient consent. Even though a state does not specifically authorize eugenic sterilization, it does not mean that such a procedure cannot be done legally. However, fewer and fewer eugenic sterilizations are being performed. Decisions relating to sterilization more often are made by medical men than by judges. Medically, the Committee of the American Neurological Association for the Investigation of Eugenical Sterilization, in a report made 25 years ago, condemned on both medical and philosophical grounds widespread eugenic surgical sterilizations except in certain cases. Morally, the author believes that patients and physicians are incapable of acting as moral beings in dealing with the question of eugenic sterilization because of 1) lack of proper facilities to allow freedom of choice, and 2) lack of knowledge of available relevant facts. With respect to the 3 alternatives for dealing with mental patients who are capable of reproducing, the author asks: Is it morally just to sterilize a person without first offering adequate treatment, rehabilitation, and follow-up that a well-equipped institution could offer? Is it just to incarcerate a patient without offering the personnel and

  4. The war against junk science: the use of expert panels in complex medical-legal scientific litigation.

    PubMed

    Price, J M; Rosenberg, E S

    1998-08-01

    In the legal context, junk science is defined as evidence that is outside of mainstream scientific or medical views. Junk science does not have indicia of reliability and is not generally accepted. Despite the lack of scientific reliability, US courts, expert witnesses and juries are increasingly reliant on junk science in making causation decisions in complex medical liability cases. Courts have accepted junk science even where reliable scientific evidence is available. The United States silicone gel breast implant litigation is a prime example of this phenomenon. The issue of whether silicone breast implants are associated with disease has been a controversial subject for scientists and physicians, an emotional issue for women who have breast implants, and a lucrative business for the lawyers and expert witnesses who are the proponents of junk science. Junk science has provided to juries a quick and convenient explanation for claimed diseases or syndromes which have required years for reliable scientists to conclude are not related to breast implants. The breast implant litigation highlights the often dramatic difference between decisions based upon junk science and decisions grounded in scientific method, fact and reality. Recently, judges involved in the breast implant litigation have become concerned about the use of junk science in light of the growing body of legitimate scientific evidence that breast implants do not cause disease. Several judges have been motivated to take the unique and novel approach of convening scientific panels of independent experts to study the scientific issues and make findings to the court. Through the use of independent scientific experts, several judges have meaningfully assessed the evidence that the litigants present and have prevented or strictly limited the use of junk science in the courtroom. Using this procedure, other judges are weighing the evidence for future cases. This paper will briefly explore the background of

  5. Internet medical usage in Japan: current situation and issues.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, H; Mitani, H; Haruki, Y; Ogushi, Y

    2001-01-01

    Internet use by physicians and patients has become very popular in Japan. Fifty percent of physicians use the Internet to search for medical and other information. Over the past year, 22% of patients used the Internet to obtain medical information. Because there are no restrictions within Japan on using Web sites to advertise medical treatment, information can be freely sent out, and over the past two or three years this practice has increased dramatically. Internet medical information provides information about illnesses and medications, and it helps improve the quality of life of patients and families. Yet, depending on the content of the information provided and the way this information is used, there is a potential negative side as well. On principle, users are responsible for the way information is used, but there is a need for information providers to consider users safety and to make the information effective for use. Because there is no absolute standard for evaluating the value of medical information, it is necessary to establish a system that opens a dialogue with society and that continuously accumulates high-quality information through the collection of various evaluations, rather than rely on an established authority. For industries and organizations related to commercial pursuits, in particular, it is most effective to establish their own codes for ethical conduct, rather than rely on governmental regulations. At the same time, it is important to have a confirmation function to evaluate how goals set by the outside are being implemented. Aiming at establishing a framework for the Internet medical usage, the Japan Internet Medical Association (JIMA) was founded in 1998 by medical professionals, lawyers, researchers, consumer representatives, patients and their families. We propose a system that would combine feedback from users, who would take on the role of evaluators of the implementation of an ethical code, with a displayed mark that verifies the

  6. [Medical rehabilitation in the Armed Forces: history, current state and prospects].

    PubMed

    Fisun, A Ia; Shchegol'kov, A M; Iudin, V E; Ponomarenko, G N

    2014-08-01

    Authors analyzed history, current state and prospects of medical rehabilitation in the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation. Current system of medical rehabilitation in the Armed Forces provides all categories of military personnel and members of their families complete rehabilitative and remedial measures. An integration of rehabilitative experience of the medical service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation into the State system of medical rehabilitation, active participation of the medical service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation in activity of National association of specialists of medical rehabilitation and regenerative medicine will allow to increase the effectiveness of the rehabilitation system of the Armed Forces.

  7. The legal aspects of the termination of unwanted pregnancies and the risks faced by the medical doctor: a UK perspective.

    PubMed

    Gibson, C

    2003-03-01

    Historical perspective of terminations of unwanted pregnancies in the UK. Moral and ethical considerations imposed by established church's teachings becoming increasingly in conflict with the wishes and expectations of a more secular society. Recognition that illegal abortion was, as a matter of fact available, at great risk to vulnerable girls and women. Eventually public demand and a radical and reforming government led to the current Statutory Framework. Statutory provisions: Offences against the Person Act 1861, Sections 58 and 59; Infant Life Preservation Act 1929 Section 1. Recognition of the limited flexibility allowed by the law in the original restrictive statutory framework. The direction to the jury in July 1938 by Macnaghten J in the case of R. v. Bourne [1939] 1 KB 687, where an eminent obstetrician was acquitted after carrying out an abortion on a young rape victim. Then the modern statutory provisions: Abortion Act 1967, amended by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990. The statutory framework provides for healthcare professionals not to have to take part in terminations if they have a conscientious objection to doing so. While there are still fierce challenges from moral pressure groups when any changes in the detail of the law are proposed--such as reducing the maximum gestation period for a lawful termination--as a whole society seems to have accepted the current law. Issues affecting doctors who consider and provide terminations; current medico-legal problems relating to wanted pregnancies that have been lost by reason of clinical negligence, and unwanted children that have been born by reason of clinical negligence.

  8. Medical abortion and manual vacuum aspiration for legal abortion protect women's health and reduce costs to the health system: findings from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Maria Isabel; Mendoza, Willis Simancas; Guerra-Palacio, Camilo; Guzman, Nelson Alvis; Tolosa, Jorge E

    2015-02-01

    The majority of abortions in Colombia continue to take place outside the formal health system under a range of conditions, with the majority of women obtaining misoprostol from a thriving black market for the drug and self-administering the medication. We conducted a cost analysis to compare the costs to the health system of three approaches to the provision of abortion care in Colombia: post-abortion care for complications of unsafe abortions, and for legal abortions in a health facility, misoprostol-only medical abortion and vacuum aspiration abortion. Hospital billing records from three institutions, two large maternity hospitals and one specialist reproductive health clinic, were analysed for procedure and complication rates, and costs by diagnosis. The majority of visits (94%) were to the two hospitals for post-abortion care; the other 6% were for legal abortions. Only one minor complication was found among the women having legal abortions, a complication rate of less than 1%. Among the women presenting for post-abortion care, 5% had complications during their treatment, mainly from infection or haemorrhage. Legal abortions were associated not only with far fewer complications for women, but also lower costs for the health system than for post-abortion care. We calculated based on our findings that for every 1,000 women receiving post-abortion care instead of a legal abortion within the health system, 16 women experienced avoidable complications, and the health system spent US $48,000 managing them. Increasing women's access to safe abortion care would not only reduce complications for women, but would also be a cost-saving strategy for the health system.

  9. Targeting Oral and Cultural Proficiency for Medical Personnel: An Examination of Current Medical Spanish Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Karol

    2012-01-01

    Demand for medical Spanish courses has grown with the rising needs of Spanish-speaking patients in the United States, but while there is no shortage of beginning medical Spanish textbooks, very few target the intermediate level. This article examines eighteen medical Spanish texts published in the last twenty years with respect to seven factors:…

  10. Incidental findings found in “healthy” volunteers during imaging performed for research: current legal and ethical implications

    PubMed Central

    Booth, T C; Jackson, A; Wardlaw, J M; Taylor, S A; Waldman, A D

    2010-01-01

    Incidental findings found in “healthy” volunteers during research imaging are common and have important implications for study design and performance, particularly in the areas of informed consent, subjects' rights, clinical image analysis and disclosure. In this study, we aimed to determine current practice and regulations concerning information that should be given to research subjects when obtaining consent, reporting of research images, who should be informed about any incidental findings and the method of disclosure. We reviewed all UK, European and international humanitarian, legal and ethical agencies' guidance. We found that the guidance on what constitutes incidental pathology, how to recognise it and what to do about it is inconsistent between agencies, difficult to find and less complete in the UK than elsewhere. Where given, guidance states that volunteers should be informed during the consent process about how research images will be managed, whether a mechanism exists for identifying incidental findings, arrangements for their disclosure, the potential benefit or harm and therapeutic options. The effects of incidentally discovered pathology on the individual can be complex and far-reaching. Radiologist involvement in analysis of research images varies widely; many incidental findings might therefore go unrecognised. In conclusion, guidance on the management of research imaging is inconsistent, limited and does not address the interests of volunteers. Improved standards to guide management of research images and incidental findings are urgently required. PMID:20335427

  11. Cost-shifting in the current medical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, William H.

    1994-12-01

    `Cost shifting' occurs when there is not a fair or accurate match of the payment and use of medical services. A common `cost shifting' occurs when an insured patient is charged more to cover free services provided to an uninsured patient. This paper documents the multiple negative consequences of the many categories of cost shifting, reviews forces which are leading both to an increase and decrease in the magnitude of cost shifting, and evaluates the consequences of cost shifting on the goals of U.S. health care reform and investment in medical technology. Policy to minimize the negative consequences of cost shifting is recommended.

  12. Institutional and legal arrangements in the Nile river basin: suggestions to improve the current situation toward adaptive integrated water resources management.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Khalid Mohamed El Hassan

    2008-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted in this work in order to investigate the current situation in the Nile river basin (NRB) regarding the institutional and legal arrangements needed to support the adaptive integrated water resources management (AIWRM) strategy. Two similar river basins were selected to achieve this comparison and to introduce suggestions to reform the current situation in the basin. Before that, the ideal situation is investigated to be as a yardstick for the desired situation. The study indicated that the necessary AIWRM criteria may include regulatory as well as implementation organizations that support shared-vision reaching with its all necessary features (cooperation, stakeholders' participation, subsidiarity, and information and knowledge exchange). Thus the main features of the desired situations regarding AIWRM in river basins are stakeholders' participation, learning-driven ability, quick response to risks and uncertainties, and finally a legal framework that could support these criteria. Although the AIWRM criteria seem to be satisfied in NRB, the basin lacks the necessary regulatory institutions as well as the legal framework. According to this, this study recommends to reform the current situation in NRB by creating regulator institutions (policy and decision making level) as well a legal framework to legitimate them.

  13. Current trends in developing medical students' critical thinking abilities.

    PubMed

    Harasym, Peter H; Tsai, Tsuen-Chiuan; Hemmati, Payman

    2008-07-01

    Health care is fallible and prone to diagnostic and management errors. The major categories of diagnostic errors include: (1) no-fault errors--the disease is present but not detected; (2) system errors--a diagnosis is delayed or missed because of the imperfection in the health care system; and (3) cognitive errors--a misdiagnosis from faulty data collection or interpretation, flawed reasoning, or incomplete knowledge. Approximately one third of patient problems are mismanaged because of diagnostic errors. Part of the solution lies in improving the diagnostic skills and critical thinking abilities of physicians as they progress through medical school and residency training. However, this task is challenging since both medical problem-solving and the learning environments are complex and not easily understood. There are many interacting variables including the motivation of the medical student (e.g. deep versus surface learning), the acquisition and evolution of declarative and conditional knowledge (e.g. reduced, dispersed, elaborated, scheme, and scripted), problem-solving strategies (e.g. procedural knowledge-guessing, hypothetical deductive, scheme inductive, and pattern recognition), curricular models (e.g. apprenticeship, discipline-based, body system-based, case-based, clinical presentation-based), teaching strategies (e.g. teaching general to specific or specific to general), the presented learning opportunities (PBL versus scheme inductive PBL), and the nature of the learning environment (e.g. modeling critical thinking and expert problem-solving). This paper elaborates on how novices differ from experts and how novices can be educated in a manner that enhances their level of expertise and diagnostic abilities as they progress through several years of medical training.

  14. Legalization of marijuana: potential impact on youth.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Alain

    2004-06-01

    As experts in the health care of children and adolescents, pediatricians may be called on to advise legislators concerning the potential impact of changes in the legal status of marijuana on adolescents. Parents, too, may look to pediatricians for advice as they consider whether to support state-level initiatives that propose to legalize the use of marijuana for medical purposes or to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana. This policy statement provides the position of the American Academy of Pediatrics on the issue of marijuana legalization, and the accompanying technical report (available online) reviews what is currently known about the relationship between adolescents' use of marijuana and its legal status to better understand how change might influence the degree of marijuana use by adolescents in the future.

  15. Current medical treatments of dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Tack, Jan F

    2010-09-01

    Dyspepsia is a highly prevalent condition characterized by symptoms originating in the gastroduodenal region without underlying organic disorder. Treatment modalities include acid-suppressive drugs, gastroprokinetic drugs, Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy, tricyclic antidepressants, and psychological therapies. Irritable bowel syndrome is a multifactorial, lower functional gastrointestinal disorder involving disturbances of the brain-gut axis. The pathophysiology provides the basis for pharmacotherapy: abnormal gastrointestinal motor functions, visceral hypersensitivity, psychosocial factors, intraluminal changes, and mucosal immune activation. Medications targeting chronic constipation or diarrhea may also relieve irritable bowel syndrome. Novel approaches to treatment require approval, and promising agents are guanylate cyclase cagonists, atypical benzodiazepines, antibiotics, immune modulators, and probiotics.

  16. Genomics education for medical professionals - the current UK landscape.

    PubMed

    Slade, Ingrid; Subramanian, Deepak N; Burton, Hilary

    2016-08-01

    Genomics education in the UK is at an early stage of development, and its pace of evolution has lagged behind that of the genomics research upon which it is based. As a result, knowledge of genomics and its applications remains limited among non-specialist clinicians. In this review article, we describe the complex landscape for genomics education within the UK, and highlight the large number and variety of organisations that can influence, direct and provide genomics training to medical professionals. Postgraduate genomics education is being shaped by the work of the Health Education England (HEE) Genomics Education Programme, working in conjunction with the Joint Committee on Genomics in Medicine. The success of their work will be greatly enhanced by the full cooperation and engagement of the many groups, societies and organisations involved with medical education and training (such as the royal colleges). Without this cooperation, there is a risk of poor coordination and unnecessary duplication of work. Leadership from an organisation such as the HEE Genomics Education Programme will have a key role in guiding the formulation and delivery of genomics education policy by various stakeholders among the different disciplines in medicine.

  17. Ethical and legal aspects in teaching students of medicine.

    PubMed

    Wlasienko, Pawel

    2005-01-01

    Due to the rapid advances in medical technology, medical students are now being faced with increasingly complex and unparalleled ethical and practical dilemmas during their training. The new and future challenges of high-tech medicine demand improvements in current medical education, not only by meeting the needs of students through humanized training programs, but also by involving them in finding solutions to the ethical and legal quandaries they encounter. Today's students of medical universities must acquire knowledge and understanding of the ethical and legal issues relevant to the practice of medicine, and we have to do everything possible to introduce these students to the current discussions on more or less controversial ethical and legal topics. Although final answers may not be found, the very discussion, argumentation, and awakening of students' interest should become an essential part of the core curriculum of every doctor.

  18. Current perspectives of nanoparticles in medical and dental biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed Hamouda, Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology is gaining tremendous impetus due to its capability of modulating metals into their nanosize, which drastically changes the chemical, physical and optical properties of metals. Nanoparticles have been introduced as materials with good potential to be extensively used in biological and medical applications. Nanoparticles are clusters of atoms in the size range of 1-100 nm. Inorganic nanoparticles and their nano-composites are applied as good antibacterial agents. Due to the outbreak of infectious diseases caused by different pathogenic bacteria and the development of antibiotic resistance, pharmaceutical companies and researchers are searching for new antibacterial agents. The metallic nanoparticles are the most promising as they show good antibacterial properties due to their large surface area to volume ratios, which draw growing interest from researchers due to increasing microbial resistance against metal ions, antibiotics and the development of resistant strains. Metallic nanoparticles can be used as effective growth inhibitors in various microorganisms and thereby are applicable to diverse medical devices. Nanotechnology discloses the use of elemental nanoparticles as active antibacterial ingredient for dental materials. In dentistry, both restorative materials and oral bacteria are believed to be responsible for restoration failure. Secondary caries is found to be the main reason to restoration failure. Secondary caries is primarily caused by invasion of plaque bacteria (acid-producing bacteria) such as Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli in the presence of fermentable carbohydrates. To make long-lasting restorations, antibacterial materials should be made. The potential of nanoparticles to control the formation of biofilms within the oral cavity is also coming under increasing scrutiny. Possible uses of nanoparticles as topically applied agents within dental materials and the application of nanoparticles in the control of oral infections are

  19. Plasma medicine—current state of research and medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltmann, K.-D.; von Woedtke, Th

    2017-01-01

    Plasma medicine means the direct application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) on or in the human body for therapeutic purposes. Further, the field interacts strongly with results gained for biological decontamination. Experimental research as well as first practical application is realized using two basic principles of CAP sources: dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) and atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ). Originating from the fundamental insights that the biological effects of CAP are most probably caused by changes of the liquid environment of cells, and are dominated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS), basic mechanisms of biological plasma activity are identified. It was demonstrated that there is no increased risk of cold plasma application and, above all, there are no indications for genotoxic effects. The most important biological effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma were identified: (1) inactivation of a broad spectrum of microorganisms including multidrug resistant ones; (2) stimulation of cell proliferation and tissue regeneration with lower plasma treatment intensity (treatment time); (3) inactivation of cells by initialization of programmed cell death (apoptosis) with higher plasma treatment intensity (treatment time). In recent years, the main focus of clinical applications was in the field of wound healing and treatment of infective skin diseases. First CAP sources are CE-certified as medical devices now which is the main precondition to start the introduction of plasma medicine into clinical reality. Plasma application in dentistry and, above all, CAP use for cancer treatment are becoming more and more important research fields in plasma medicine. A further in-depth knowledge of control and adaptation of plasma parameters and plasma geometries is needed to obtain suitable and reliable plasma sources for the different therapeutic indications and to open up new fields of medical application.

  20. Current perspectives of nanoparticles in medical and dental biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Hamouda, Ibrahim

    2012-05-01

    Nanotechnology is gaining tremendous impetus due to its capability of modulating metals into their nanosize, which drastically changes the chemical, physical and optical properties of metals. Nanoparticles have been introduced as materials with good potential to be extensively used in biological and medical applications. Nanoparticles are clusters of atoms in the size range of 1-100 nm. Inorganic nanoparticles and their nano-composites are applied as good antibacterial agents. Due to the outbreak of infectious diseases caused by different pathogenic bacteria and the development of antibiotic resistance, pharmaceutical companies and researchers are searching for new antibacterial agents. The metallic nanoparticles are the most promising as they show good antibacterial properties due to their large surface area to volume ratios, which draw growing interest from researchers due to increasing microbial resistance against metal ions, antibiotics and the development of resistant strains. Metallic nanoparticles can be used as effective growth inhibitors in various microorganisms and thereby are applicable to diverse medical devices. Nanotechnology discloses the use of elemental nanoparticles as active antibacterial ingredient for dental materials. In dentistry, both restorative materials and oral bacteria are believed to be responsible for restoration failure. Secondary caries is found to be the main reason to restoration failure. Secondary caries is primarily caused by invasion of plaque bacteria (acid-producing bacteria) such as Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli in the presence of fermentable carbohydrates. To make long-lasting restorations, antibacterial materials should be made. The potential of nanoparticles to control the formation of biofilms within the oral cavity is also coming under increasing scrutiny. Possible uses of nanoparticles as topically applied agents within dental materials and the application of nanoparticles in the control of oral infections are

  1. Ethical and legal implications of the risks of medical tourism for patients: a qualitative study of Canadian health and safety representatives’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Valorie A; Turner, Leigh; Cohen, I Glenn; Bristeir, Janet; Snyder, Jeremy; Casey, Victoria; Whitmore, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Medical tourism involves patients’ intentional travel to privately obtain medical care in another country. Empirical evidence regarding health and safety risks facing medical tourists is limited. Consideration of this issue is dominated by speculation and lacks meaningful input from people with specific expertise in patient health and safety. We consulted with patient health and safety experts in the Canadian province of British Columbia to explore their views concerning risks that medical tourists may be exposed to. Herein, we report on the findings, linking them to existing ethical and legal issues associated with medical tourism. Design We held a focus group in September 2011 in Vancouver, British Columbia with professionals representing different domains of patient health and safety expertise. The focus group was transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Participants Seven professionals representing the domains of tissue banking, blood safety, health records, organ transplantation, dental care, clinical ethics and infection control participated. Results Five dominant health and safety risks for outbound medical tourists were identified by participants: (1) complications; (2) specific concerns regarding organ transplantation; (3) transmission of antibiotic-resistant organisms; (4) (dis)continuity of medical documentation and (5) (un)informed decision-making. Conclusions Concern was expressed that medical tourism might have unintended and undesired effects upon patients’ home healthcare systems. The individual choices of medical tourists could have significant public consequences if healthcare facilities in their home countries must expend resources treating postoperative complications. Participants also expressed concern that medical tourists returning home with infections, particularly antibiotic-resistant infections, could place others at risk of exposure to infections that are refractory to standard treatment regimens and thereby pose

  2. Health care professionals’ comprehension of the legal status of end-of-life practices in Quebec

    PubMed Central

    Marcoux, Isabelle; Boivin, Antoine; Arsenault, Claude; Toupin, Mélanie; Youssef, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine health care professionals’ understanding of the current legal status of different end-of-life practices and their future legal status if medical aid in dying were legalized, and to identify factors associated with misunderstanding surrounding the current legal status. Design Cross-sectional survey using 6 clinical scenarios developed from a validated European questionnaire and from a validated classification of end-of-life practices. Setting Quebec. Participants Health care professionals (physicians and nurses). Main outcome measures Perceptions of the current legal status of the given scenarios and whether or not the practices would be authorized in the event that medical aid in dying were legalized. Results Among the respondents (n = 271, response rate 88.0%), more than 98% knew that the administration or prescription of lethal medication was currently illegal. However, 45.8% wrongly thought that it was not permitted to withdraw a potentially life-prolonging treatment at the patient’s request, and this misconception was more common among nurses and professionals who had received their diplomas longer ago. Only 39.5% believed that, in the event that medical aid in dying were legalized, the use of lethal medication would be permitted at the patient’s request, and 34.6% believed they would be able to give such medication to an incompetent patient upon a relative’s request. Conclusion Health care professionals knew which medical practices were illegal, but some wrongly believed that current permitted practices were not legal. There were various interpretations of what would or would not be allowed if medical aid in dying were legalized. Education on the clinical implications of end-of-life practice legislation should be promoted. PMID:26052600

  3. Current medical and surgical management of Raynaud's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Landry, Gregory J

    2013-06-01

    Raynaud's syndrome (RS) is characterized by episodic digital ischemia induced by cold or emotional stress. Pathophysiologic mechanisms include temporary vasospasm and fixed digital artery obstruction. A number of pharmacologic and invasive therapies have been studied to treat RS symptoms; however, there are no specific treatments that are currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration specifically for RS. Of the available pharmacologic agents, calcium-channel blockers remain the preferred initial treatment for vasospastic RS, although many vasodilators have been studied and found to be efficacious. Vasodilators are less effective in treating digital artery obstruction, and no treatments have been found to be universally beneficial, although the phosphodiesterase V inhibitors have been gaining in popularity. Invasive therapies may have a role in selective cases. In this review, the current evidence of treatment for RS is summarized.

  4. [Current and future medical treatment of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Lemper, J C

    2005-09-01

    The current treatment of Alzheimer's disease (MA) is based on a symptomatic pharmacological therapy of the cognitive decline and the behavioural disturbances. Progress towards understanding the cellular and molecular alterations responsible for the disease promise therapeutic strategies based upon the pathological processes. Corrections of dysregulations of the brain's neurotransmitters (cholinergic deficit and glutamatergic overstimulation) bring significant but modest therapeutic improvement. The pivotal role of the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in neuronal death suggests pharmacological inhibition of the secretases; amyloid antiaggregant therapies are possible, vaccination against AB wil need new immunisation protocols, Anti-inflammatory drugs and antioxydant agents as calcium channel blockers could help against the neurotoxic cascade of Abeta, some cholesterol-lowering drugs could enhance its clearance. This article reviews the available data on current pharmacological treatments, and the future possible strategies that could modify the evolution, or prevent Alzheimer's disease.

  5. [Medico-legal assessment in neurological malpractice based on casework material collected at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical University of Białystok].

    PubMed

    Ptaszyńska-Sarosiek, Iwona; Niemcunowicz-Janica, Anna; Janica, Jerzy; Dopierała, Tomasz; Załuski, Janusz; Wardaszka, Zofia

    2007-01-01

    Medical malpractice results from inadequate professional knowledge, incompliance to the present state of medical knowledge or negligence and inattention. The aim of the paper was the analysis of medical malpractice cases based on material in the field of neurology. The cases were assessed according to the number and type in 32 medico-legal opinions issued by specialist teams of forensic medicine and neurology in the Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical University of Białystok in the years 2001-2006. In 11 cases (34%) medical malpractice was concluded with reference to improper treatment after head injury or brain pathology, inadequate care at neurology unit, lacked or delayed diagnostics of head pathology and injury, non-referral to hospital by neurologists. In the material analysed diagnostic errors predominated. Majority of them originated from the open health care system. Incompetence of neurologists with regard to differential diagnostics resulting in misdiagnosis and improper therapy was noted. In one third of the overall cases medical malpractice was concluded. The most common causes included misinterpretation of disease signs and symptoms, misapplication of available diagnostic potential and unjustified delay before commencing diagnostics.

  6. Dementia and legal competency.

    PubMed

    Filaković, Pavo; Erić, Anamarija Petek; Mihanović, Mate; Glavina, Trpimir; Molnar, Sven

    2011-06-01

    execution, language difficulties, loosing perception of time and space, changes in mood and behaviour, personality alterations, loss of interests and initiative). Towards more accurate determination of legal competency the psychometric tests are being used. The appliance of these tests must be guided with basic question during evaluation: "For what is or is not he/she capable?" In prediction of possible dementia development, the modern diagnostic procedures are used as help for potentially demented individuals in order to plan own affairs and by oneself determine future guardian. This ensures the maximal respect and protection of rights among persons with dementia in order to independently manage life one step ahead of progressive illness. Finally, it is to be distinguished medical concept of legal capacity which is universal and judicial concept which is restricted by rules of national legal system differing from country to country.

  7. Promoting public health legal preparedness for emergencies: review of current trends and their relevance in light of the Ebola crisis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Odeya; Feder-Bubis, Paula; Bar-Dayan, Yaron; Adini, Bruria

    2015-01-01

    Background Public health legal preparedness (PHLP) for emergencies is a core component of the health system response. However, the implementation of health legal preparedness differs between low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) and developed countries. Objective This paper examines recent trends regarding public health legal preparedness for emergencies and discusses its role in the recent Ebola outbreak. Design A rigorous literature review was conducted using eight electronic databases as well as Google Scholar. The results encompassed peer-reviewed English articles, reports, theses, and position papers dating from 2011 to 2014. Earlier articles concerning regulatory actions were also examined. Results The importance of PHLP has grown during the past decade and focuses mainly on infection–disease scenarios. Amid LMICs, it mostly refers to application of international regulations, whereas in developed states, it focuses on independent legislation and creation of conditions optimal to promoting an effective emergency management. Among developed countries, the United States’ utilisation of health legal preparedness is the most advanced, including the creation of a model comprising four elements: law, competencies, information, and coordination. Only limited research has been conducted in this field to date. Nevertheless, in both developed and developing states, studies that focused on regulations and laws activated in health systems during emergencies, identified inconsistency and incoherence. The Ebola outbreak plaguing West Africa since 2014 has global implications, challenges and paralleling results, that were identified in this review. Conclusions The review has shown the need to broaden international regulations, to deepen reciprocity between countries, and to consider LMICs health capacities, in order to strengthen the national health security. Adopting elements of the health legal preparedness model is recommended. PMID:26449204

  8. Bassoonists' medical problems-current state of knowledge.

    PubMed

    Dawson, William J

    2012-06-01

    Specific musical instruments can be a source of physical problems to their players. Based on reviews of the literature and personal experience, this paper summarizes current knowledge of problems affecting musicians who play instruments in the bassoon family (including the bassoon, contrabassoon, and several other instruments). Prevalence rates are higher in reports of surveys (ranging up to 86%), compared to clinical reports of patients seen and treated. Significant risk factors include young age, small body size, female gender, and use of large instruments. Problems unique to bassoonists are rare; most physical difficulties also are seen in general musculoskeletal clinical practices and in musicians playing all types of instruments. The left upper extremity is more commonly affected by overuse-related conditions in bassoonists. Non-playing-related problems are equally important for consideration (such as degenerative disorders and acute trauma), since they also affect practice and performance. Little experimental data exist to validate current and widely-held principles of treatment, rehabilitation, and prevention.

  9. Ethical and professional conduct of medical students: review of current assessment measures and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Boon, K; Turner, J

    2004-01-01

    As medical education increasingly acknowledges the importance of the ethical and professional conduct of practitioners, and moves towards more formal assessment of these issues, it is important to consider the evidence base which exists in this area. This article discusses literature about the health needs and problems experienced by medical practitioners as a background to a review of the current efforts in medical education to promote ethical conduct and develop mechanisms for the detection and remediation of problems. PMID:15082823

  10. Electronic health records and online medical records: an asset or a liability under current conditions?

    PubMed

    Allen-Graham, Judith; Mitchell, Lauren; Heriot, Natalie; Armani, Roksana; Langton, David; Levinson, Michele; Young, Alan; Smith, Julian A; Kotsimbos, Tom; Wilson, John W

    2017-01-20

    Objective The aim of the present study was to audit the current use of medical records to determine completeness and concordance with other sources of medical information.Methods Medical records for 40 patients from each of five Melbourne major metropolitan hospitals were randomly selected (n=200). A quantitative audit was performed for detailed patient information and medical record keeping, as well as data collection, storage and utilisation. Using each hospital's current online clinical database, scanned files and paperwork available for each patient audited, the reviewers sourced as much relevant information as possible within a 30-min time allocation from both the record and the discharge summary.Results Of all medical records audited, 82% contained medical and surgical history, allergy information and patient demographics. All audited discharge summaries lacked at least one of the following: demographics, medication allergies, medical and surgical history, medications and adverse drug event information. Only 49% of records audited showed evidence the discharge summary was sent outside the institution.Conclusions The quality of medical data captured and information management is variable across hospitals. It is recommended that medical history documentation guidelines and standardised discharge summaries be implemented in Australian healthcare services.What is known about this topic? Australia has a complex health system, the government has approved funding to develop a universal online electronic medical record system and is currently trialling this in an opt-out style in the Napean Blue Mountains (NSW) and in Northern Queensland. The system was originally named the personally controlled electronic health record but has since been changed to MyHealth Record (2016). In Victoria, there exists a wide range of electronic health records used to varying degrees, with some hospitals still relying on paper-based records and many using scanned medical records. This

  11. [Changes in medical standards and the need for adjusting legal standards of care from the point of view of criminal law].

    PubMed

    Erlinger, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the possibility of adjusting medical standards to the limited resources in health care, which is also included in civil law, German criminal law provides various other instruments. These include (1) the subjective person-related standard of diligence, (2) a restriction of the associated legal concept of "Ubernahmeverschulden" (fault by assumption), (3) admissible risk, (4) social adequacy, and (5) reasonableness and possibility within the scope of criminal omission. Although especially social adequacy and reasonableness and possibility from the point of view of criminal law may lead to satisfactory solutions, the adjustment of medical standards should--for the sake of the unity of law--be preferred so that synchronization with civil law liability may thus be achieved.

  12. Current medical treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lumachi, Franco; Santeufemia, Davide A; Basso, Stefano MM

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 80% of breast cancers (BC) are estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and thus endocrine therapy (ET) should be considered complementary to surgery in the majority of patients. The advantages of oophorectomy, adrenalectomy and hypophysectomy in women with advanced BC have been demonstrated many years ago, and currently ET consist of (1) ovarian function suppression (OFS), usually obtained using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa); (2) selective estrogen receptor modulators or down-regulators (SERMs or SERDs); and (3) aromatase inhibitors (AIs), or a combination of two or more drugs. For patients aged less than 50 years and ER+ BC, there is no conclusive evidence that the combination of OFS and SERMs (i.e., tamoxifen) or chemotherapy is superior to OFS alone. Tamoxifen users exhibit a reduced risk of BC, both invasive and in situ, especially during the first 5 years of therapy, and extending the treatment to 10 years further reduced the risk of recurrences. SERDs (i.e., fulvestrant) are especially useful in the neoadjuvant treatment of advanced BC, alone or in combination with either cytotoxic agents or AIs. There are two types of AIs: type I are permanent steroidal inhibitors of aromatase, while type II are reversible nonsteroidal inhibitors. Several studies demonstrated the superiority of the third-generation AIs (i.e., anastrozole and letrozole) compared with tamoxifen, and adjuvant therapy with AIs reduces the recurrence risk especially in patients with advanced BC. Unfortunately, some cancers are or became ET-resistant, and thus other drugs have been suggested in combination with SERMs or AIs, including cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitors (palbociclib) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, such as everolimus. Further studies are required to confirm their real usefulness. PMID:26322178

  13. Legal Preparedness

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Brooke; Hodge, James G.; Toner, Eric S.; Roxland, Beth E.; Penn, Matthew S.; Devereaux, Asha V.; Dichter, Jeffrey R.; Kissoon, Niranjan; Christian, Michael D.; Powell, Tia

    2015-01-01

    contribute to protecting hospitals and practitioners who act in good faith from liability. Finally, to address anticipated staffing shortages during severe and prolonged disasters and pandemics, governments should develop approaches to formally expand the availability of qualified health-care workers, such as through using official foreign medical teams. CONCLUSIONS As a fundamental element of health-care and public health emergency planning and preparedness, the law underlies critical aspects of disaster and pandemic responses. Effective responses require comprehensive advance planning efforts that include assessments of complex legal issues and authorities. Recent disasters have shown that although law is a critical response tool, it can also be used to hold health-care stakeholders who fail to appropriately plan for or respond to disasters and pandemics accountable for resulting patient or staff harm. Claims of liability from harms allegedly suffered during disasters and pandemics cannot be avoided altogether. However, appropriate planning and legal protections can help facilitate sound, consistent decision-making and support response participation among health-care entities and practitioners. PMID:25144203

  14. Medical Gas Containers and Closures; Current Good Manufacturing Practice Requirements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-11-18

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is amending its current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) and labeling regulations regarding medical gases. FDA is requiring that portable cryogenic medical gas containers not manufactured with permanent gas use outlet connections have gas-specific use outlet connections that cannot be readily removed or replaced except by the manufacturer. FDA is also requiring that portable cryogenic medical gas containers and high-pressure medical gas cylinders meet certain labeling, naming, and color requirements. These requirements are intended to increase the likelihood that the contents of medical gas containers are accurately identified and reduce the likelihood of the wrong gas being connected to a gas supply system or container. FDA is also revising an existing regulation that conditionally exempts certain medical gases from certain otherwise-applicable labeling requirements in order to add oxygen and nitrogen to the list of gases subject to the exemption, and to remove cyclopropane and ethylene from the list.

  15. Current trends in medical English education and the Japan College of Rheumatology International School.

    PubMed

    Jego, Eric Hajime; Amengual, Olga

    2017-04-11

    In light of the present revolution happening in medical education in Japan as medical schools implement new curricula to conform to global standards, there is a growing demand for more internationalization and higher quality practical medical English education. In response, many institutions including governmental organizations, universities and academic associations are moving ahead with new initiatives to adapt to these changing demands. This paper reviews the current trends and innovations in medical English education in Japan. This paper also describes one initiative by the Japan College of Rheumatology (JCR) known as the JCR International School held yearly in Karuizawa. By examining recent trends and innovations in medical English education in Japan, the most relevant and applicable can be elucidated to illuminate a path forward for improved medical English education within the JCR.

  16. WHAT ROLE SHOULD PUBLIC OPINION PLAY IN ETHICO-LEGAL DECISION MAKING? THE EXAMPLE OF SELECTING SEX FOR NON-MEDICAL REASONS USING PREIMPLANTATION GENETIC DIAGNOSIS.

    PubMed

    Fovargue, Sara; Bennett, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we consider the prohibition on the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis to select an embryo on the basis of its sex for non -: medical reasons. We use this as a case study to explore the role that public consultations have and should play in ethico-legal decision-making. Until the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 was amended by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008, non-medical sex selection of an embryo was not statutorily regulated, but it was the policy of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority that such selection should not occur. However, since 2009, it has been a criminal offence to select an embryo on the basis of its sex for non-medical reasons. We consider the reasons given for this change and explore the role that 'public opinion' had in the decision-making process. On the face of it, asking the public what they think seems reasonable, fair and democratic, and those who are not in favour of public consultations being accorded great weight in matters of policy may appear out of touch and as wanting to impose their moral views on the public at large. But there are problems with doing so, especially when seeking to regulate ethically controversial issues. We discuss whether regulation should be influenced by public opinion obtained via 'public consultations', and utilise sex selection for non-medical reasons as an example of how (apparently) public opinion was used to support the criminalisation of this practice.

  17. Teaching transfusion medicine: current situation and proposals for proper medical training

    PubMed Central

    Flausino, Gustavo de Freitas; Nunes, Flávio Ferreira; Cioffi, Júnia Guimarães Mourão; Proietti, Anna Bárbara de Freitas Carneiro

    2014-01-01

    The current curricula in medical schools and hospital residence worldwide lack exposure to blood transfusion medicine, and require the reformulation of academic programs. In many countries, training in blood transfusion is not currently offered to medical students or during residency. Clinical evidence indicates that blood transfusions occur more frequently than recommended, contributing to increased risk due to this procedure. Therefore, the rational use of blood and its components is essential, due to the frequent undesirable reactions, to the increasing demand of blood products and the cost of the process. Significant improvements in knowledge of and skills in transfusion medicine are needed by both students and residents. Improvements are needed in both background knowledge and the practical application of this knowledge to improve safety. Studies prove that hemovigilance has an impact on transfusion safety and helps to prevent the occurrence of transfusion-related adverse effects. To ensure that all these aspects of blood transfusion are being properly addressed, many countries have instituted hospital transfusion committees. From this perspective, the interventions performed during the formation of medical students and residents, even the simplest, have proven effective in the acquisition of knowledge and medical training, thereby leading to a reduction in inappropriate use of blood. Therefore, we would like to emphasize the importance of the exposure of medical students and residents to blood services and transfusion medicine in order for them to acquire adequate medical training, as well as to discuss some changes in the current medical curricula regarding transfusion medicine that we judge critical. PMID:25638770

  18. Prevalence of Alcohol-Interactive Prescription Medication Use among Current Drinkers: United States, 1999–2010

    PubMed Central

    Breslow, Rosalind A.; Dong, Chuanhui; White, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of Americans consume alcoholic beverages. Alcohol interacts negatively with numerous commonly prescribed medications. Yet, on a population level, little is known about use of alcohol interactive (AI) prescription medications among drinkers. Purpose To determine the prevalence of AI prescription medication use among current drinkers in the US population. Methods Data were from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 1999–2010); 26,657 adults aged ≥20 years had data on past year alcohol consumption and past month prescription medication use. Analyses were adjusted for covariates: age, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, and smoking. Statistical procedures accounted for survey stratification, clustering, and non-response. Analyses were weighted to be nationally representative. Results The unadjusted total prevalence of AI medication use was 42.8% (95% CI [CI] 41.5–44.0). Among current drinkers, adjusted prevalence was 41.5% (CI 40.3–42.7). Among participants aged ≥65 total prevalence of AI medication use was 78.6% (CI 77.3–79.9) and adjusted prevalence among current drinkers was 77.8% (CI 75.7–79.7). The AI medications most commonly used by current drinkers were cardiovascular agents, central nervous system (CNS) agents, and metabolic agents. Conclusions Our results suggest that there could be substantial simultaneous exposure to alcohol and AI prescription medications in the US population. Given the adverse health risks of combining alcohol with AI prescription medications, future efforts are needed to collect data to determine actual simultaneous prevalence. PMID:25597432

  19. The current state of medical school education in bioethics, health law, and health economics.

    PubMed

    Persad, Govind C; Elder, Linden; Sedig, Laura; Flores, Leonardo; Emanuel, Ezekiel J

    2008-01-01

    Current challenges in medical practice, research, and administration demand physicians who are familiar with bioethics, health law, and health economics. Curriculum directors at American Association of Medical Colleges-affiliated medical schools were sent confidential surveys requesting the number of required hours of the above subjects and the years in which they were taught, as well as instructor names. The number of relevant publications since 1990 for each named instructor was assessed by a PubMed search. In sum, teaching in all three subjects combined comprises less than two percent of the total hours in the American medical curriculum, and most instructors have not recently published articles in the fields they teach. This suggests that medical schools should reevaluate their curricula and instructors in bioethics, health law, and health economics.

  20. [Ethical, technical and legal procedures of the medical doctor responsibility to accomplish the road enforcement law about driving under the influence of alcohol and psychotropic substances].

    PubMed

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Nunes, Rui; Carvalho, Félix; Santos, Agostinho; Teixeira, Helena; Vieira, Duarte Nuno; Magalhães, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The forensic toxicology (TF) is a science of analytical basis, aiming to clarify legal issues related to poisoning, whether or not fatal, within the various areas of law (criminal, civil, labor, etc.). The analysis that are more often requested (with a tendency to increase and gaining rising attention) are those concerning the procedures involving supervision of driving under the influence of alcohol and psychotropic substances, in the living individual and in the cadaver. The key players in this process, are: (a) the police agents carrying out the screening and quantification of alcohol on the exhaled breath and the screening of psychotropic and stupefacient substances in saliva; (b) the public health services that perform qualitative analysis of these substances in urine (if the test was not previously performed in saliva); (c) the doctor that collects blood samples from the living, or the dead victim; (d) the forensic toxicologist who conducts toxicological analysis in blood (or, eventually in another biological sample) and (e) the magistrate prosecutors that ultimately will receive the toxicological report to apply the law. Therefore it is important to understand and be acquainted with the road law enforcement of driving under the influence of alcohol and psychotropic substances, particularly in what concerns to the role of the medical doctor. Consequently, this paper aimed to review these topics, namely highlighting the necessary information to clarify the interested parties about the technical, ethical and legal procedures to consider.

  1. The use of personal data from medical records and biological materials: ethical perspectives and the basis for legal restrictions in health research.

    PubMed

    Regidor, Enrique

    2004-11-01

    This paper discusses the moral justification for using personal data without informed consent, from both medical records and biological materials, in research where subjects are not physically present in the study and will never have any contact with the study investigators. Although the idea of waiving the requirement for informed consent in certain investigations has been mentioned in several ethical guidelines formulated by epidemiologists and physicians since the late 1980s, these guidelines are now of limited use due to legal restrictions on the use of personal data in most western countries. Several misconceptions that form the basis for legal restriction of health research are discussed: lack of knowledge of the need to link personal information from health services with personal information produced outside the health system in many biomedical investigations; the assumption of a deterministic model of disease causation in which the prediction of disease occurrence is based on a genetic association despite the fact that most genotypes for common diseases are incompletely penetrant; the lack of a logical rationale for the recommendation in the Declaration of Helsinki that only research that offers some benefit to study subjects is justified; the great lack of knowledge about research methodology revealed in some alternatives proposed to avoid using personal data; and the lack of a debate about the ethical double standard of institutions and investigators in countries that prohibit the use of personal data but finance and carry out studies in other countries where it is permitted.

  2. Training and learning professionalism in the medical school curriculum: current considerations.

    PubMed

    van Mook, Walther N K A; de Grave, Willem S; van Luijk, Scheltus J; O'Sullivan, Helen; Wass, Valerie; Schuwirth, Lambert W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2009-07-01

    Recommendations in the literature concerning measures to address the challenges to professionalism have converged on the establishment of an education community, on a structured curriculum dealing with professionalism, on developing programs for role modelling and mentoring, and on attention to the assessment of professional conduct. The interventions in the field of medical education appear central among these efforts, since it is during medical school that the template for professional conduct in medicine is primarily learned. This article attempts to provide a more in-depth discussion of the goals, purposes and current factors influencing teaching and learning professional behaviour in the medical school curriculum and the residency programs.

  3. Statement on access to relevant medical and other health records and relevant legal records for forensic medical evaluations of alleged torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

    PubMed

    Alempijevic, D; Beriashvili, R; Beynon, J; Duque, M; Duterte, P; Fernando, R; Fincanci, S; Hansen, S; Hardi, L; Hougen, H; Iacopino, V; Mendonça, M; Modvig, J; Mendez, M; Özkalipci, Ö; Payne-James, J; Peel, M; Rasmussen, O; Reyes, H; Rogde, S; Sajantila, A; Treue, F; Vanezis, P; Vieira, D

    2013-04-01

    In some jurisdictions attempts have been made to limit or deny access to medical records for victims of torture seeking remedy or reparations or for individuals who have been accused of crimes based on confessions allegedly extracted under torture. The following article describes the importance of full disclosure of all medical and other health records, as well as legal documents, in any case in which an individual alleges that they have been subjected to torture or other forms of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment of punishment. A broad definition of what must be included in the terms medical and health records is put forward, and an overview of why their full disclosure is an integral part of international standards for the investigation and documentation of torture (the Istanbul Protocol). The fact that medical records may reveal the complicity or direct participation of healthcare professionals in acts of torture and other ill-treatment is discussed. A summary of international law and medical ethics surrounding the right of access to personal information, especially health information in connection with allegations of torture is also given.

  4. Women's experiences with the use of medical abortion in a legally restricted context: the case of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Silvina; Romero, Mariana; Aizenberg, Lila

    2015-02-01

    This article presents the findings of a qualitative study exploring the experiences of women living in Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area, Argentina, with the use of misoprostol for inducing an abortion. We asked women about the range of decisions they had to make, their emotions, the physical experience, strategies they needed to use, including seeking health care advice and in dealing with a clandestine medical abortion, and their overall evaluation of the experience. An in-depth interview schedule was used. The women had either used misoprostol and sought counselling or care at a public hospital (n=24) or had used misoprostol based on the advice of a local hotline, information from the internet or from other women (n=21). Four stages in the women's experiences were identified: how the decision to terminate the pregnancy was taken, how the medication was obtained, how the tablets were used, and reflections on the outcome whether or not they sought medical advice. Safety and privacy were key in deciding to use medical abortion. Access to the medication was the main obstacle, requiring a prescription or a friendly drugstore. Correct information about the number of pills to use and dosage intervals was the least easy to obtain and caused concerns. The possibility of choosing a time of privacy and having the company of a close one was highlighted as a unique advantage of medical abortion. Efforts to improve abortion law, policy and service provision in Argentina in order to ensure the best possible conditions for use of medical abortion by women should be redoubled.

  5. The current format and ongoing advances of medical education in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gishen, Kriya; Ovadia, Steven; Arzillo, Samantha; Avashia, Yash; Thaller, Seth R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the current system of medical education along with the advances that are being made to support the demands of a changing health care system. American medical education must reform to anticipate the future needs of a changing health care system. Since the dramatic transformations to medical education that followed the publication of the Flexner report in 1910, medical education in the United States has largely remained unaltered. Today, the education of future physicians is undergoing modifications at all levels: premedical education, medical school, and residency training. Advances are being made with respect to curriculum design and content, standardized testing, and accreditation milestones. Fields such as plastic surgery are taking strides toward improving resident training as the next accreditation system is established. To promote more efficacious medical education, the American Medical Association has provided grants for innovations in education. Likewise, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlined 6 core competencies to standardize the educational goals of residency training. Such efforts are likely to improve the education of future physicians so that they are able to meet the future needs of American health care.

  6. Current integration of dissection in medical education in Australia and New Zealand: Challenges and successes.

    PubMed

    Bouwer, Hope Ellen; Valter, Krisztina; Webb, Alexandra Louise

    2016-01-01

    The reduced use of dissection associated with the introduction of integrated systems problem-based learning curricula, graduate-entry programs and medical school expansion is a frequent topic of discussion and debate in modern medical training. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of these changes to the medical education landscape, by looking at the current utilization and integration of dissection in medical schools, in Australia and New Zealand. A survey and an invitation to participate in an interview were distributed to all Australian Medical Council-accredited medical schools. Sixteen schools (76%) responded to the survey and five interviews (24%) were conducted. Dissection was a component of the medical program in 12 of the 16 schools surveyed. The opportunity for medical students to dissect human cadavers was found to be related to whether the medical school was established pre- or post-2000 (P = 0.003) but was not significantly associated to undergraduate- or graduate-entry (P = 0.64), program length (P = 0.59) or the number of commencing students (P = 0.07). The methods used for the delivery and integration of dissection varied between schools. Despite substantial changes to the delivery of anatomy in Australian and New Zealand medical schools, a variety of approaches have been adopted to ensure dissection remains an integral component of medical student education. Based on our findings, a number of recommendations were formulated to encourage the integration of dissection, regardless of the didactics of the program, to enhance the anatomical knowledge of students.

  7. Avoiding the Legal “Blemish”

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, Brent D.; Momin, Saira B.

    2009-01-01

    In today’s legal environment, it is unlikely that a physician will complete a medical career without being introduced to the legal system in some way. Despite this, medical education often does not incorporate a basic teaching of general legal principles, and many physicians are left unaware of some of the important legal aspects of practicing medicine. The purpose of this article is to provide a background of the essential legal principles of a malpractice action as well as review the fundamentals of the legal process, provide published caselaw of prior dermatological pitfalls, and ultimately, provide suggestions to better prepare the dermatologist to practice medicine. PMID:20725583

  8. The AAFP Patient Safety Reporting System: Development and Legal Issues Pertinent to Medical Error Tracking and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    International Taxonomy of Medical Errors in Primary Care have been developed and revised based on four research studies carried out in family...percentages for column four reflect the percent of error codes. Qualitative findings from AAFP error-report studies The supplemental AHRQ grant to the

  9. Health informatics in UK Medical Education: an online survey of current practice

    PubMed Central

    Walpole, Sarah; Taylor, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective Health informatics has growing importance in clinical practice with successive General Medical Council recommendations. However, prior data suggest that undergraduate medical education largely neglects this area. An up-to-date, UK-wide view of health informatics training in medical schools is required. Design An online survey was developed using current guidance and recommendations of UK professional bodies. Participants and Setting Senior academic staff and health informatics educators at all 34 UK medical schools were invited to complete the survey. Main outcome measures Quantitative and qualitative data regarding health informatics in the undergraduate medical curriculum. Results A total of 26/34 (76%) of UK medical schools responded and 23 provided full information. Aspects most frequently mentioned were literature searching and research governance. Seventeen per cent of respondents felt there was little or no HI training, although clinical record keeping was addressed by all medical schools. Pedagogies used to teach health informatics were self-directed learning (78%) to lecture based (70%), seminars (70%), informal teaching in clinical settings (57%) and problem-based learning (22%). Health informatics was usually integrated vertically and horizontally across the curriculum (76%). Assessment and updates of the health informatics curriculum are limited (57 and 41%, respectively). Thirty-two per cent of respondents reported a low level of confidence among students to use health informatics as doctors. In the most up-to-date survey of health informatics teaching in UK medical schools, there are three major findings. First, the proportion of health informatics in the medical undergraduate curriculum is low. Second, there was variation in content, pedagogy and timing across medical schools. Third, health informatics is rarely assessed and course content is not regularly updated. Conclusions There is a role for national guidelines and further research in

  10. Currently available medical engineering degrees in the UK. Part 1: Undergraduate degrees.

    PubMed

    Joyce, T

    2009-05-01

    This paper reviews mechanical-engineering-based medical engineering degrees which are currently provided at undergraduate level in the UK. At present there are 14 undergraduate degree programmes in medical engineering, offered by the University of Bath, University of Birmingham, University of Bradford, Cardiff University, University of Hull, Imperial College London, University of Leeds, University of Nottingham, University of Oxford, Queen Mary University of London, University of Sheffield, University of Southampton, University of Surrey, and Swansea University. All these undergraduate courses are delivered on a full-time basis, both 3 year BEng and 4 year MEng degrees. Half of the 14 degree courses share a core first 2 years with a mechanical engineering stream. The other seven programmes include medical engineering modules earlier in their degrees. Within the courses, a very wide range of medical-engineering-related modules are offered, although more common modules include biomaterials, biomechanics, and anatomy and physiology.

  11. The use of elearning in medical education: a review of the current situation

    PubMed Central

    Choules, A P

    2007-01-01

    Computers are increasingly used in medical education. Electronic learning (elearning) is moving from textbooks in electronic format (that are increasingly enhanced by the use of multimedia adjuncts) to a truly interactive medium that can be delivered to meet the educational needs of students and postgraduate learners. Computer technology can present reliable, reusable content in a format that is convenient to the learner. It can be used to transcend geographical boundaries and time zones. It is a valuable tool to add to the medical teacher's toolkit, but like all tools it must be used appropriately. This article endeavours to review the current “state of the art2 in use of elearning and its role in medical education alongside non‐electronic methods—a combination that is currently referred to as “blended” learning. PMID:17403945

  12. The use of elearning in medical education: a review of the current situation.

    PubMed

    Choules, A P

    2007-04-01

    Computers are increasingly used in medical education. Electronic learning (elearning) is moving from textbooks in electronic format (that are increasingly enhanced by the use of multimedia adjuncts) to a truly interactive medium that can be delivered to meet the educational needs of students and postgraduate learners. Computer technology can present reliable, reusable content in a format that is convenient to the learner. It can be used to transcend geographical boundaries and time zones. It is a valuable tool to add to the medical teacher's toolkit, but like all tools it must be used appropriately. This article endeavours to review the current "state of the art2 in use of elearning and its role in medical education alongside non-electronic methods-a combination that is currently referred to as "blended" learning.

  13. Brief Review of Current Research in FXS: Implications for Treatment with Psychotropic Medication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdovinos, Maria G.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief review of current research in fragile X syndrome (FXS) with regards to the morphology and behavioral phenotype associated with FXS and the use of psychotropic medication for the treatment of behavior problems (e.g., aggression) often seen in FXS (full mutation). The lack of production of the fragile…

  14. [Medical surveillance in university: organizational difficulties, legal problems, scientific e technical specificities. Experience of University of Milan Bicocca].

    PubMed

    D'Orso, M I; Giuliani, C; Assini, R; Riva, M A; Cesana, G

    2012-01-01

    Our research describes activities of Occupational Health carried out during last year in University of Milan Bicocca by Occupational Doctors. We describe results of medical surveillance in 1153 employees or students exposed to occupational risks for health and safety. We report results obtained, technical difficulties, organizational problems, and preventive actions decided to improve functionality of our activity. Students seem to be less protected and consequently seem to have higher professional safety and health risks.

  15. Incorporation of web-based applications and online resources in undergraduate medical education in the Irish Republic. Can new changes be incorporated in the current medical curriculum?

    PubMed Central

    Dhatt, Karanvir Singh; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim: Significant change has been happening in the introduction of technology in medical teaching all over the world. We aim to determine if the undergraduate medical students and teachers are open to incorporating changes in the current medical curriculum or if there is a need for the same in the Republic of Ireland. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study involving 202 participants of whom 152 were medical students and 50 medical professionals (teachers and hospital doctors) were carried out involving three different medical universities namely; University College Cork (UCC), University College Dublin (UCD), and National University of Ireland in Galway (NUIG). Participants were requested to answer a series of 15 questions designed incorporating various fields of technology necessary for the study. The data was collected and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software to determine statistical significance. Results: The participants overall had a positive attitude toward the utility of modern technology and web-based applications in current medical curriculum. Ninety-one percent of the participants preferred the introduction of modern technology into medical education and 7% were against the idea and a further 2% of them remained undecided. Conclusion: There seems to be a “technology gap” in the current undergraduate medical curriculum in Ireland. A large-scale study involving more participants from all the medical schools in Ireland is recommended. We believe, changes can be brought into the current medical teaching and learning to make the process more fruitful and successful. PMID:25097432

  16. Euthanasia: Some Legal Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koza, Pamela

    1976-01-01

    Several sections of the Criminal Code of Canada which are relevant to the issue of euthanasia are discussed. In addition, the value placed on the sanctity of life by the law, the failure to recognize motive in cases of euthanasia, and disparate legal and medical definitions of death are also considered. (Author)

  17. Medical Big Data for Research Use: Current Status and Related Issues*1

    PubMed Central

    ISHIKAWA, Koichi Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Advances in the computerization of information and development of technology have mitigated restrictions on handling of a large amount of information. This has resulted in growth of expectations for the use of large-scale databases, or so-called “big data.” This is also the case in the field of healthcare. Projects that involve building of the national receipt database (NDB) of medical fee bill (receipt) information and special health check-up information based on the Act on Assurance of Medical Care for Elderly People and the development of medical information databases have been pursued by the national government, and considerable attention has also been focused on researches conducted through the secondary uses of publicly collected data. Aside from these trends, there are numerous projects which collect diagnosis procedure combination (DPC) data to build large-scale databases for research purposes. Following to the ethics guidelines for epidemiologic studies, they collect and analyze anonymized DPC data from cooperating institutions. This communication concentrates on the use of DPC data, and outlines the scale of data currently available for research use. Examples on the use of DPC data will be shown for analysis on the current status of clinical practice from the microscopic perspective and macroscopic analysis of community medical care provision. Additionally, potential for extending studies to long-term outcomes research, limitations and issues related to the use of medical big data will also be discussed. PMID:28299245

  18. Medical Big Data for Research Use: Current Status and Related Issues.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Koichi Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    Advances in the computerization of information and development of technology have mitigated restrictions on handling of a large amount of information. This has resulted in growth of expectations for the use of large-scale databases, or so-called "big data." This is also the case in the field of healthcare. Projects that involve building of the national receipt database (NDB) of medical fee bill (receipt) information and special health check-up information based on the Act on Assurance of Medical Care for Elderly People and the development of medical information databases have been pursued by the national government, and considerable attention has also been focused on researches conducted through the secondary uses of publicly collected data. Aside from these trends, there are numerous projects which collect diagnosis procedure combination (DPC) data to build large-scale databases for research purposes. Following to the ethics guidelines for epidemiologic studies, they collect and analyze anonymized DPC data from cooperating institutions. This communication concentrates on the use of DPC data, and outlines the scale of data currently available for research use. Examples on the use of DPC data will be shown for analysis on the current status of clinical practice from the microscopic perspective and macroscopic analysis of community medical care provision. Additionally, potential for extending studies to long-term outcomes research, limitations and issues related to the use of medical big data will also be discussed.

  19. [Legal issues of physician-assisted euthanasia. Part III--Passive euthanasia, comparison of international legislation, conclusions for medical practice].

    PubMed

    Laux, Johannes; Röbel, Andreas; Parzeller, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The generic term "passive euthanasia" includes different issues dealing with the omission, discontinuation or termination of life-sustaining or life-prolonging medical treatments. The debate around passive euthanasia focuses on the constitutional right of self-determination of every human being on the one hand and the constitutional mandate of the State to protect human life on the other. Issues of passive euthanasia always require a differentiated approach. Essentially, it comes down to the following: In Germany, the human right of self-determination includes the right to prohibit the performance of life-sustaining treatments, even if this leads to the death of the patient. A physician who does not take life-sustaining treatment measures because this is the free will expressed by the patient is not subject to prosecution. On the other hand, if the physician treats the patient against his will, this can be deemed a punishable act of bodily injury. The patient's will is decisive even if his concrete state of health does no longer allow him to freely express his will. In the Patient's Living Will Act of 2009, the German legislator clarified the juridical assessment of such constellations being of particular relevance in practice. A written living will of a person in which he requests to take or not to take certain medical treatment measures in case that he is no longer able to make the decision himself shall be binding for the people involved in the process of medical treatment. If there is no living will, the supposed will of the patient shall be relevant. In its judgment in the "Putz case", the German Federal Court of Justice ruled in 2010 that actions terminating a life-sustaining treatment that does not correspond to the patient's will must be limited to letting an already ongoing disease process run its course. In this context it is not important, however, whether treatment is discontinued by an active act or by omission. Under certain circumstances, the

  20. An Interdisciplinary Seminar on Legal Issues in Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dale L.

    1989-01-01

    A seminar on legal issues in medicine brings together medical (obstetrics/gynecology) and law students to promote mutual understanding of the legal and medical realms, their effects on each other, and the potential for cooperation. (MSE)

  1. Assessing the public health impacts of legalizing recreational cannabis use in the USA.

    PubMed

    Hall, W; Weier, M

    2015-06-01

    A major challenge in assessing the public health impact of legalizing cannabis use in Colorado and Washington State is the absence of any experience with legal cannabis markets. The Netherlands created a de facto legalized cannabis market for recreational use, but policy analysts disagree about how it has affected rates of cannabis use. Some US states have created de facto legal supply of cannabis for medical use. So far this policy does not appear to have increased cannabis use or cannabis-related harm. Given experience with more liberal alcohol policies, the legalization of recreational cannabis use is likely to increase use among current users. It is also likely that legalization will increase the number of new users among young adults but it remains uncertain how many may be recruited, within what time frame, among which groups within the population, and how many of these new users will become regular users.

  2. Low current performance of the Bern medical cyclotron down to the pA range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M.; Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Nesteruk, K. P.; Scampoli, P.

    2015-09-01

    A medical cyclotron accelerating H- ions to 18 MeV is in operation at the Bern University Hospital (Inselspital). It is the commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker. This feature is unique for a hospital-based facility and makes it possible to conduct routine radioisotope production for PET diagnostics in parallel with multidisciplinary research activities, among which are novel particle detectors, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. Several of these activities, such as radiobiology experiments for example, require low current beams down to the pA range, while medical cyclotrons are designed for high current operation above 10 μA. In this paper, we present the first results on the low current performance of a PET medical cyclotron obtained by ion source, radio-frequency and main coil tuning. With this method, stable beam currents down to (1.5+/- 0.5 ) pA were obtained and measured with a high-sensitivity Faraday cup located at the end of the beam transport line.

  3. The Role of Social Networks, Medical-Legal Climate, and Patient Advocacy on Surgical Options: A New Era.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Erin E; Bortoletto, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    The dissemination of information online and resultant public discourse through social media and other online channels has influenced the practice of medicine in dramatic ways. Physicians have historically worked to develop new techniques and devices for the benefit of their patients. It is only a more recent phenomenon, however, that these tools are either removed or their use is curtailed largely driven by anecdotal reports; passionate, vocal, often media-savvy advocates; and plaintiff attorneys. The use of power morcellation, hysteroscopic tubal sterilization, and mesh in urogynecologic procedures all have been victims of these societal pressures. It is important for health care professionals to be involved in the debate to ensure that public outcry does not unduly influence what we, as clinicians, are able to safely offer our patients. By being better advocates for our field, our instruments, and our patients, we can ensure medical decision-making is driven by good science and not public fervor.

  4. [Current status on storage, processing and risk communication of medical radioactive waste in Japan].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Kida, Tetsuo; Hiraki, Hitoshi; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Maehara, Yoshiaki; Tsukamoto, Atsuko; Koizumi, Mitsue; Kimura, Yumi; Horitsugi, Genki

    2013-03-01

    Decay-in-storage for radioactive waste including that of nuclear medicine has not been implemented in Japan. Therefore, all medical radioactive waste is collected and stored at the Japan Radioisotope Association Takizawa laboratory, even if the radioactivity has already decayed out. To clarify the current situation between Takizawa village and Takizawa laboratory, we investigated the radiation management status and risk communication activities at the laboratory via a questionnaire and site visiting survey in June 2010. Takizawa laboratory continues to maintain an interactive relationship with local residents. As a result, Takizawa village permitted the acceptance of new medical radioactive waste containing Sr-89 and Y-90. However, the village did not accept any non-medical radioactive waste such as waste from research laboratories. To implement decay-in-storage in Japan, it is important to obtain agreement with all stakeholders. We must continue to exert sincere efforts to acquire the trust of all stakeholders.

  5. A Brief Historical Review of Specific Religious Denominations: How History Influences Current Medical-Religious Partnerships.

    PubMed

    Galiatsatos, Panagis; Lehmijoki-Gardner, Maiju; Daniel Hale, W

    2016-04-01

    Improving health care in the twenty-first century will require new and creative approaches, with special attention given to health literacy and patient engagement since these two variables play a significant role in chronic health issues and their management. In order to better improve these key variables, strong partnerships between patients, their communities, and medical institutions must be developed. One way of facilitating these relationships is through medical-religious partnerships. Religious leaders are in regular contact with people who need education about and support with health issues. However, identifying the most effective way to approach specific congregations can pose a challenge to healthcare providers and institutions. In this paper, we provide a brief historical review of certain religious traditions and how their history plays a role in current medical-religious partnerships.

  6. Implantable and ingestible medical devices with wireless telemetry functionalities: a review of current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kiourti, Asimina; Psathas, Konstantinos A; Nikita, Konstantina S

    2014-01-01

    Wireless medical telemetry permits the measurement of physiological signals at a distance through wireless technologies. One of the latest applications is in the field of implantable and ingestible medical devices (IIMDs) with integrated antennas for wireless radiofrequency (RF) communication (telemetry) with exterior monitoring/control equipment. Implantable medical devices (MDs) perform an expanding variety of diagnostic and therapeutic functions, while ingestible MDs receive significant attention in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Design of such wireless IIMD telemetry systems is highly intriguing and deals with issues related to: operation frequency selection, electronics and powering, antenna design and performance, and modeling of the wireless channel. In this paper, we attempt to comparatively review the current status and challenges of IIMDs with wireless telemetry functionalities. Full solutions of commercial IIMDs are also recorded. The objective is to provide a comprehensive reference for scientists and developers in the field, while indicating directions for future research.

  7. A New Approach to Campus Legal Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roster, Michael; Woodward, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Stanford University (California) restructured its legal services office, for both cost containment and service improvement, by outsourcing legal work. The new system consists of a smaller in-house legal staff, for largely preventive work (academic and medical affairs, policy formation), and contracts with three outside law firms to work in…

  8. Improving medical students’ knowledge of genetic disease: a review of current and emerging pedagogical practices

    PubMed Central

    Wolyniak, Michael J; Bemis, Lynne T; Prunuske, Amy J

    2015-01-01

    Genetics is an essential subject to be mastered by health professional students of all types. However, technological advances in genomics and recent pedagogical research have changed the way in which many medical training programs teach genetics to their students. These advances favor a more experience-based education focused primarily on developing student’s critical thinking skills. In this review, we examine the current state of genetics education at both the preclinical and clinical levels and the ways in which medical and pedagogical research have guided reforms to current and emerging teaching practices in genetics. We discover exciting trends taking place in which genetics is integrated with other scientific disciplines both horizontally and vertically across medical curricula to emphasize training in scientific critical thinking skills among students via the evaluation of clinical evidence and consultation of online databases. These trends will produce future health professionals with the skills and confidence necessary to embrace the new tools of medical practice that have emerged from scientific advances in genetics, genomics, and bioinformatics. PMID:26604852

  9. Current State of Evidence for Medication Treatment of Preschool Internalizing Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Barterian, Justin A.; Seif, Erin L.; Watson, Gabriel; Ham, Hannah; Carlson, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Psychotropic medications are being prescribed off-label by psychiatrists to treat preschool children diagnosed with internalizing disorders. In this review, the current state of evidence is presented for medications used to treat preschool children (ages 2–5 year olds) diagnosed with anxiety and/or depressive disorders. Eleven studies were systematically identified for this review based on a priori criteria. Overall, the available literature revealed that studies addressing the medication treatment of internalizing disorders in preschoolers are extremely limited and represent relatively weak research methodologies. Given the increasing prevalence of the use of psychotropic medications to treat preschool children and the unique challenges associated with working with this population, it is imperative that mental health practitioners are aware of the current, albeit limited, research on this practice to help make informed treatment decisions. Suggestions about how to monitor potential costs and benefits in those unique cases in which psychopharmacological treatments might be considered for young children are given. Moreover, areas of additional research for this population are discussed. PMID:24600324

  10. Nanomaterials and synergistic low-intensity direct current (LIDC) stimulation technology for orthopedic implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Shirwaiker, Rohan A; Samberg, Meghan E; Cohen, Paul H; Wysk, Richard A; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A

    2013-01-01

    Nanomaterials play a significant role in biomedical research and applications because of their unique biological, mechanical, and electrical properties. In recent years, they have been utilized to improve the functionality and reliability of a wide range of implantable medical devices ranging from well-established orthopedic residual hardware devices (e.g., hip implants) that can repair defects in skeletal systems to emerging tissue engineering scaffolds that can repair or replace organ functions. This review summarizes the applications and efficacies of these nanomaterials that include synthetic or naturally occurring metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites in orthopedic implants, the largest market segment of implantable medical devices. The importance of synergistic engineering techniques that can augment or enhance the performance of nanomaterial applications in orthopedic implants is also discussed, the focus being on a low-intensity direct electric current (LIDC) stimulation technology to promote the long-term antibacterial efficacy of oligodynamic metal-based surfaces by ionization, while potentially accelerating tissue growth and osseointegration. While many nanomaterials have clearly demonstrated their ability to provide more effective implantable medical surfaces, further decisive investigations are necessary before they can translate into medically safe and commercially viable clinical applications. The article concludes with a discussion about some of the critical impending issues with the application of nanomaterials-based technologies in implantable medical devices, and potential directions to address these.

  11. Nanomaterials and synergistic low intensity direct current (LIDC) stimulation technology for orthopaedic implantable medical devices

    PubMed Central

    Samberg, Meghan E.; Cohen, Paul H.; Wysk, Richard A.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials play a significant role in biomedical research and applications due to their unique biological, mechanical, and electrical properties. In recent years, they have been utilised to improve the functionality and reliability of a wide range of implantable medical devices ranging from well-established orthopaedic residual hardware devices (e.g. hip implants) that can repair defects in skeletal systems to emerging tissue engineering scaffolds that can repair or replace organ functions. This review summarizes the applications and efficacies of these nanomaterials that include synthetic or naturally occurring metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites in orthopaedic implants, the largest market segment of implantable medical devices. The importance of synergistic engineering techniques that can augment or enhance the performance of nanomaterial applications in orthopaedic implants is also discussed,, the focus being on a low intensity direct electric current (LIDC) stimulation technology to promote the long-term antibacterial efficacy of oligodynamic metal-based surfaces by ionization, while potentially accelerating tissue growth and osseointegration. While many nanomaterials have clearly demonstrated their ability to provide more effective implantable medical surfaces, further decisive investigations are necessary before they can translate into medically safe and commercially viable clinical applications. The paper concludes with a discussion about some of the critical impending issues with the application of nanomaterials-based technologies in implantable medical devices, and potential directions to address these. PMID:23335493

  12. [Biological risk in health. Risk to third parties: medical-legal focus. Responsible behavior of the competent physician].

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    The responsibility of the occupational physician (OP) is discussed within the particular topic of biological risk generated by health care workers (HCW) versus third parties in health care settings. The present contribution offers keys of interpretation regarding current Italian legislation and passed sentences, taking into account principles of occupational medicine, the ICOH code of ethics for occupational health professionals, as well as duties and tasks of OP, employers and employees. Most of the responsibilities stand on employers, but OP has a primary duty of information and to judge fitness for work. It is underlined the difficult interpretation of the current legislation and indications. Behaviour of the OP could be censored in case of particular fitness for work or in case of inadequate information, as well as if the comprehension of information is not verified or when indication to minimize the risk are not controlled.

  13. Legal and regulatory responses to innovative treatment.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tracey Evans

    2013-01-01

    Developments in medical technology, healthcare delivery, and commercial interests in medicine have increased both the potential for conflicts of interest on the part of physicians, and doubts over the sufficiency of patient autonomy as a justification for administering innovative therapy. The legal and regulatory treatment of innovative therapy is therefore an important question, on which there is a current lack of consensus on a number of issues. This paper discusses recent developments in Singapore and uses them as a springboard to flesh out basic regulatory issues that arise from the deployment of innovative treatment: the distinction between innovative treatment and clinical research, the adequacy of the current post hoc scrutiny of innovative therapy under existing legal principles and the need for further specialised regulatory oversight.

  14. What is legal medicine--are legal and forensic medicine the same?

    PubMed

    Beran, Roy G

    2010-04-01

    Some consider the terms "forensic" and "legal" medicine to be synonymous but this is counter to the title of the Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine or the dual strands for progression to fellowship of the Australian College of Legal Medicine. The paper examines a very brief historical background to legal medicine and develops a definition of the strands thereof, namely legal and forensic medicine. It demonstrates that the two are different components of the application of medical knowledge upon the legal system. Legal medicine has greater relevance to civil and tort law, impacting upon patient care, whereas forensic medicine relates to criminal law and damage to, or by, patients.

  15. High-level disinfection, sterilization, and antisepsis: current issues in reprocessing medical and surgical instruments.

    PubMed

    Seavey, Rose

    2013-05-01

    Technology is rapidly changing many aspects of health care. The intricate design of instruments, the configuration of instrument trays, and evidence-based practice have resulted in the need for complicated and specific reprocessing recommendations from instrument manufacturers. Patient safety depends on instruments that are appropriately cared for and adequately reprocessed. This article covers current issues that sterile processing and operating room professionals must deal with regarding reprocessing of medical and surgical instruments.

  16. The impact of marijuana policies on youth: clinical, research, and legal update.

    PubMed

    Ammerman, Seth; Ryan, Sheryl; Adelman, William P

    2015-03-01

    This technical report updates the 2004 American Academy of Pediatrics technical report on the legalization of marijuana. Current epidemiology of marijuana use is presented, as are definitions and biology of marijuana compounds, side effects of marijuana use, and effects of use on adolescent brain development. Issues concerning medical marijuana specifically are also addressed. Concerning legalization of marijuana, 4 different approaches in the United States are discussed: legalization of marijuana solely for medical purposes, decriminalization of recreational use of marijuana, legalization of recreational use of marijuana, and criminal prosecution of recreational (and medical) use of marijuana. These approaches are compared, and the latest available data are presented to aid in forming public policy. The effects on youth of criminal penalties for marijuana use and possession are also addressed, as are the effects or potential effects of the other 3 policy approaches on adolescent marijuana use. Recommendations are included in the accompanying policy statement.

  17. The U.S. Forest Service's analysis of cumulative effects to wildlife: A study of legal standards, current practice, and ongoing challenges on a National Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Courtney A.

    2012-01-15

    Cumulative effects analysis (CEA) allows natural resource managers to understand the status of resources in historical context, learn from past management actions, and adapt future activities accordingly. U.S. federal agencies are required to complete CEA as part of environmental impact assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Past research on CEA as part of NEPA has identified significant deficiencies in CEA practice, suggested methodologies for handling difficult aspects of CEA, and analyzed the rise in litigation over CEA in U.S. courts. This article provides a review of the literature and legal standards related to CEA as it is done under NEPA and then examines current practice on a U.S. National Forest, utilizing qualitative methods in order to provide a detailed understanding of current approaches to CEA. Research objectives were to understand current practice, investigate ongoing challenges, and identify impediments to improvement. Methods included a systematic review of a set of NEPA documents and semi-structured interviews with practitioners, scientists, and members of the public. Findings indicate that the primary challenges associated with CEA include: issues of both geographic and temporal scale of analysis, confusion over the purpose of the requirement, the lack of monitoring data, and problems coordinating and disseminating data. Improved monitoring strategies and programmatic analyses could support improved CEA practice.

  18. Legal Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baril, Cecile; Couchman, Ian S. B.

    1976-01-01

    The legal processes following a rape charge mortify, denigrate and transfer guilt to the victim. Rape laws reinforce traditional sex roles and restrict the options available to women in defining their personal and sexual careers. (Author/AM)

  19. [National system of protection against electromagnetic fields 0 Hz-300 GHz in the light of current legal regulations].

    PubMed

    Aniołczyk, Halina

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) occurs when man is exposed to the effect of electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields and contact currents different from those resulting from physiological processes in the organism or other natural phenomena. In Poland, the system of protection against EMF has been functioning for over 35 years. In 2001, when the Minister of Labor and Social Policy issued the regulation introducing the maximum admissible intensities (MAI) for electromagnetic fields and radiation within the range of 0 Hz-300 GHz, the system was directed mainly towards evaluation of exposure to EMF occurring in the occupational environment. The system is linked via MAI values with human protection in the natural environment. In this paper, the background, principles and the range of the national system of protection against EMF and its monitoring are presented. The project of implementation of EU directives, following Poland's accession to the European Union is also discussed.

  20. The value of postmortem experience in undergraduate medical education: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bamber, Andrew R; Quince, Thelma A

    2015-01-01

    The autopsy has traditionally been used as a tool in undergraduate medical education, but recent decades have seen a sharp decline in their use for teaching. This study reviewed the current status of the autopsy as a teaching tool by means of systematic review of the medical literature, and a questionnaire study involving UK medical schools. Teachers and students are in agreement that autopsy-based teaching has many potential benefits, including a deeper knowledge of basic clinical sciences, medical fallibility, end of life issues, audit and the “hidden curriculum”. The reasons underlying the decline in teaching are complex, but include the decreasing autopsy rate, increasing demands on teachers’ time, and confusion regarding the law in some jurisdictions. Maximal use of autopsies for teaching may be achieved by involvement of anatomical pathology technologists and trainee pathologists in teaching, the development of alternative teaching methods using the principles of the autopsy, and clarification of the law. Students gain most benefit from repeated attendance at autopsies, being taught by enthusiastic teachers, when they have been effectively prepared for the esthetic of dissection and the mortuary environment. PMID:25792862

  1. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis for hospitalized medical patients, current status and strategies to improve

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Razeq, Hikmat

    2010-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), comprising life-threatening pulmonary embolism (PE) and its precursor deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), is commonly encountered problem. Although most patients survive DVT, they often develop serious and costly long-term complications. Both unfractionated heparin and low molecular weight heparins significantly reduce the incidence of VTE and its associated complications. Despite the evidence demonstrating significant benefit of VTE prophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients, several registries have shown significant underutilization. This underutilization indicates the need for educational and audit programs in order to increase the number of medical patients receiving appropriate prophylaxis. Many health advocacy groups and policy makers are paying more attention to VTE prophylaxis; the National Quality Forum and the Joint Commission recently endorsed strict VTE risk assessment evaluation for each patient upon admission and regularly thereafter. In the article, all major studies addressing this issue in medical patients have been reviewed from the PubMed. The current status of VTE prophylaxis in hospitalized medical patients is addressed and some improvement strategies are discussed. PMID:20981179

  2. Toward a more materialistic medicine: the value of authentic materialism within current and future medical practice.

    PubMed

    Leder, Drew; Krucoff, Mitchell W

    2011-09-01

    Modern medicine is often accused by diverse critics of being "too materialistic" and therefore insufficiently holistic and effective. Yet, this critique can be misleading, dependent upon the ambiguous meanings of "materialism." The term can refer to the prevalence of financial concerns in driving medical practice. Alternatively, it can refer to "mechanistic materialism," the patient viewed as a body-machine. In each case, this article shows that this represents not authentic "materialism" at play, but a focus upon high-level abstractions. "Bottom-line" financial or diagnostic numbers can distract practitioners from the embodied needs of sick patients. In this sense, medical practice is not materialist enough. Through a series of clinical examples, this article explores how an authentic materialism would look in current and future practice. The article examines the use of prayer/comfort shawls at the bedside; hospitals and nursing homes redesigned as enriched healing environments; and a paradigmatic medical device--the implantable cardioverter defibrillator--as it might be presented to patients, in contrast to current practice.

  3. The importance of health advocacy in Canadian postgraduate medical education: current attitudes and issues

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, Alexander; Rose, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Background Health advocacy is currently a key component of medical education in North America. In Canada, Health Advocate is one of the seven roles included in the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada’s CanMEDS competency framework. Method A literature search was undertaken to determine the current state of health advocacy in Canadian postgraduate medical education and to identify issues facing educators and learners with regards to health advocacy training. Results The literature revealed that the Health Advocate role is considered among the least relevant to clinical practice by educators and learners and among the most challenging to teach and assess. Furthermore learners feel their educational needs are not being met in this area. A number of key barriers affecting health advocacy education were identified including limited published material on the subject, lack of clarity within the role, insufficient explicit role modeling in practice, and lack of a gold standard for assessment. Health advocacy is defined and its importance to medical practice is highlighted, using pediatric emergency medicine as an example. Conclusions Increased published literature and awareness of the role, along with integration of the new 2015 CanMEDS framework, are important going forward to address concerns regarding the quality of postgraduate health advocacy education in Canada. PMID:27004077

  4. The current status of education and career paths of students after completion of medical physicist programs in Japan: a survey by the Japanese Board for Medical Physicist Qualification.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Karasawa, Kumiko; Sumida, Iori; Arimura, Hidetaka; Yamada, Syogo

    2015-07-01

    To standardize educational programs and clinical training for medical physics students, the Japanese Board for Medical Physicist Qualification (JBMP) began to accredit master's, doctorate, and residency programs for medical physicists in 2012. At present, 16 universities accredited by the JBMP offer 22 courses. In this study, we aimed to survey the current status of educational programs and career paths of students after completion of the medical physicist program in Japan. A questionnaire was sent in August 2014 to 32 universities offering medical physicist programs. The questionnaire was created and organized by the educational course certification committee of the JBMP and comprised two sections: the first collected information about the university attended, and the second collected information about characteristics and career paths of students after completion of medical physicist programs from 2008 to 2014. Thirty universities (16 accredited and 14 non-accredited) completed the survey (response rate 94 %). A total of 209, 40, and 3 students graduated from the master's, doctorate, and residency programs, respectively. Undergraduates entered the medical physicist program constantly, indicating an interest in medical physics among undergraduates. A large percentage of the students held a bachelor's degree in radiological technology (master's program 94 %; doctorate program 70 %); graduates obtained a national radiological technologist license. Regarding career paths, although the number of the graduates who work as medical physicist remains low, 7 % with a master's degree and 50 % with a doctorate degree worked as medical physicists. Our results could be helpful for improving the medical physicist program in Japan.

  5. Whatever happened to the Norwegian Medical Need Clause? Lessons for current debates in EU pharmaceutical regulation.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Eleanor; Geyer, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Until 1994, pharmaceutical products seeking market authorisation in Norway were required to demonstrate a fulfilment of unmet medical need. This clause enabled the national regulator to dramatically limit the number of products on the market whilst encouraging price competition to keep drug expenditure low and was credited with encouraging the development of drugs with genuine added therapeutic value and reducing the incidence of antimicrobial resistance. Norway was forced to abandon its Medical Need Clause (MNC) when it joined the European Economic Area as it was incompatible with the acquis communautaire of the European Union. This article reviews Norway's experience with its MNC in light of contemporary debates in European health policy. It discusses the potential contribution of an MNC-style regulation to improving health, reducing illness, ensuring sustainable health systems and fostering pharmaceutical innovation. It concludes by asking how these findings can inform current European Union debates over the growing cost of prescription drugs and direction of pharmaceutical development.

  6. Quality management of eLearning for medical education: current situation and outlook

    PubMed Central

    Abrusch, Jasmin; Marienhagen, Jörg; Böckers, Anja; Gerhardt-Szép, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In 2008, the German Council of Science had advised universities to establish a quality management system (QMS) that conforms to international standards. The system was to be implemented within 5 years, i.e., until 2014 at the latest. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a QMS suitable for electronic learning (eLearning) domain of medical education to be used across Germany has meanwhile been identified. Methods: We approached all medical universities in Germany (n=35), using an anonymous questionnaire (8 domains, 50 items). Results: Our results (response rate 46.3%) indicated very reluctant application of QMS in eLearning and a major information deficit at the various institutions. Conclusions: Authors conclude that under the limitations of this study there seems to be a considerable need to improve the current knowledge on QMS for eLearning, and that clear guidelines and standards for their implementation should be further defined. PMID:26038685

  7. [Legal aspects of toxicological care].

    PubMed

    Teijeira, R

    2003-01-01

    The care of poisoned patients in the sphere of the hospital emergency services is an increasingly frequent phenomenon. Any patient, whether or not they die, who is subjected to medical care in the course of a poisoning generates certain obligations from the medical-legal point of view. This paper reviews the most frequent causes of medical care in living patients, or in those who have died because of a poisoning, the legal obligations that care gives rise to, and the suitable form for approaching and resolving these.

  8. Wielding the wand without facing the music: allowing utilization review physicians to trump doctors' orders, but protecting them from legal risk ordinarily attached to the medical degree.

    PubMed

    Record, Katherine L

    2010-02-01

    This Note identifies a discrepancy in the law governing the decisionmaking that directs patient care. Seeking treatment that a third party will pay for, a patient needs not only a physician-prescribed course of treatment but also an insurer's verification that the cost is medically necessary or otherwise covered by the patient's plan. Both of these decisions directly impact the ultimate care delivered to the patient, but are governed by two very different liability regimes. A patient who suffers an adverse outcome may sue his physician in tort, while a patient who suffers from a lack of coverage may generally sue his insurer only under contract. In other words, when a patient suffers from inadequate care, his potential remedies vary considerably depending on whether the physician or the insurer is the defendant. This discrepancy in liability is the consequence of the federal law governing the administration of employer-sponsored health plans, and its extensive preemption of related state law. Many commentators have called for legal reform to address the distortion of managed care liability that results, arguing that managed care liability must be consistent or that wronged beneficiaries must have access to meaningful remedies. This Note argues that the federal law governing managed care organizations is problematic for a different reason and that the first step toward reform may be more elementary than previously suggested. Specifically, it suggests that the law governing insurers' coverage decisions is inconsistent with the law governing treatment recommendations. Patients suffer the same harm from error in both contexts-but because they can recover substantially more from treating physicians, doctors are named as defendants even when the insurers make errors. Further, this Note argues that simply aligning these two standards might offer a gateway to reform.

  9. The legal status of cannabis (marijuana) and cannabidiol (CBD) under U.S. law.

    PubMed

    Mead, Alice

    2017-02-03

    In the United States, federal and state laws regarding the medical use of cannabis and cannabinoids are in conflict and have led to confusion among patients, caregivers, and healthcare providers. Currently, cannabis is legal for medical purposes in 50% of the states, and another seventeen states allow products that are high in cannabidiol (CBD) and low in THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) for medical use. Many of these artisanal products are sold in dispensaries or over the internet. However, none of these products has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Understanding how federal laws apply to clinical research and practice can be challenging, and the complexity of these laws has resulted in particular confusion regarding the legal status of CBD. This paper provides an up-to-date overview (as of August 2016) of the legal aspects of cannabis and cannabidiol, including cultivation, manufacture, distribution, and use for medical purposes. This article is part of a Special Issue title, Cannabinoids and Epilepsy.

  10. Teaching cultural diversity: current status in U.K., U.S., and Canadian medical schools.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Nisha; Reitmanova, Sylvia; Carter-Pokras, Olivia

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we present the current state of cultural diversity education for undergraduate medical students in three English-speaking countries: the United Kingdom (U.K.), United States (U.S.) and Canada. We review key documents that have shaped cultural diversity education in each country and compare and contrast current issues. It is beyond the scope of this paper to discuss the varied terminology that is immediately evident. Suffice it to say that there are many terms (e.g. cultural awareness, competence, sensitivity, sensibility, diversity and critical cultural diversity) used in different contexts with different meanings. The major issues that all three countries face include a lack of conceptual clarity, and fragmented and variable programs to teach cultural diversity. Faculty and staff support and development, and ambivalence from both staff and students continue to be a challenge. We suggest that greater international collaboration may help provide some solutions.

  11. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Business and Office and Related Technology Cluster. Office Systems Technology (CIP: 52.0401--Administrative Assistant/Secretarial). Accounting Technology (CIP: 52.0302). Medical Office Technology (CIP: 52.0404--Medical Admin. Asst./Secretarial). Microcomputer Technology (CIP: 52.0490). Court Reporting Technology (CIP: 52.0405). Paralegal Technology (CIP: Paralegal/Legal Assistant).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for four programs in the postsecondary-level business and office cluster (office systems, accounting, medical office, and microcomputer technologies) and two programs in the legal cluster (court reporting and paralegal…

  12. Current medical research with the application of coupled techniques with mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Summary The most effective methods of analysis of organic compounds in biological fluids are coupled chromatographic techniques. Capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) allows the most efficient separation, identification and quantification of volatile metabolites in biological fluids. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is especially suitable for the analysis of non-volatile and/or thermally unstable compounds. A major drawback of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry is that no standard spectral libraries such as NIST and Wiley for GC-MS are available to facilitate the identification of unknown compounds. Moreover, the identification of potential new compounds, especially new biomarkers in LC-MS, is much more challenging than in GC-MS. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry (CE-MS) has been widely used to characterize metabolomes. Capillary electrophoresis is a powerful technique for the separation of charged metabolites, offering high analyte resolution. The advantages of CE-MS are applicability for hydrophilic metabolites, robust separation efficiency and short duration of analysis. This review provides an overview of current chromatographic methods – gas chromatography – mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry and capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry – and their applications in current medical research. The focus is on the description of metabonomics research, strategies for biomarkers identification, medical diagnoses of diseases and research of drugs. PMID:21525822

  13. Impact of current video game playing on robotic simulation skills among medical students

    PubMed Central

    Öge, Tufan; Borahay, Mostafa A.; Achjian, Tamar; Kılıç, Sami Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of current and prior video game playing on initial robotic simulation skill acquisition. Material and Methods This cross-sectional descriptive study (Canadian Task Force Classification II-1) was conducted at a medical university training center. The study subjects were medical students who currently played video games (Group I) and those who had not played video games in the last 2 years (Group II). The robotic skills of both groups were assessed using simulation. Results Twenty-two students enrolled in this study; however, only 21 completed it. The median age of the participants was 23 (22–24) years and 24 (23–26) years in Groups I and II, respectively. Among the participants, 15 (71.4%) were male and 6 (28.5%) were female, and 90.4% of the students started playing video games in primary school. When the 2 groups were compared according to the completion time of each exercise, Group I finished more quickly than Group II in the Peg Board-1 exercise (p>0.05), whereas Group II had better results in 3 exercises including Pick and Place, Ring and Rail, and Thread the Rings-1. However, none of the differences were found to be statistically significant (p>.05), and according to the overall scores based on the time to complete exercises, economy of motion, instrument collision, use of excessive instrument force, instruments out of view, and master workspace range, the scores were not statistically different between Groups I and II (p>.05). Conclusion According to the basic robotic simulation exercise results, there was no difference between medical students who used to play video games and those who still played video games. Studies evaluating baseline visuospatial skills with larger sample sizes are needed. PMID:25788841

  14. Preparing Medical Graduates for an Interconnected World: Current Practices and Future Possibilities for Internationalizing the Medical Curriculum in Different Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stütz, Alexander; Green, Wendy; McAllister, Lindy; Eley, Diann

    2015-01-01

    Preparing medical graduates who are competent to work in a global environment requires broad integration of international and intercultural perspectives throughout the medical curriculum. Employing Leask and Bridge's "conceptual framework of internationalisation of the curriculum," this article first highlights the emphasis placed on…

  15. [The current situation and consideration on the quality of medical device standards in China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaofang; Mu, Rui hong; Li, Jingli

    2014-09-01

    Through the analysis of the present problems of the quality of medical device standards in China, combined with the development trend of the last ten years of medical devices, the paper made proposals on the medical device standards quality evaluation system, so as to improve the medical device standards management level and the quality of medical device standard in our country.

  16. A Current Overview of Veterinary Medical Education in the South: A Staff Report to the Southern Regional Education Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    The need for veterinarians and the capacity of the South for providing veterinary medical education are examined. Summarized are eight current veterinary medical education programs in the region and planned developments in education (in Kentucky, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, and Arkansas). Projected are the effects of the…

  17. Medical marijuana and children.

    PubMed

    Stubblefield, Sam

    2014-11-01

    Medical marijuana is legal for use by minors in many states, but not Delaware. Anecdotes have accumulated suggesting efficacy in managing seizures in children and several other conditions in adults. Currently well-designed studies in children are lacking. Challenges to effective pediatric medical marijuana use remain at the level of biochemistry, the individual patient, and society. Appropriate and effective use of medical marijuana in children will require significant legislative changes at the state and federal level, as well as high-quality research and standardization of marijuana strains.

  18. Minimally legally invasive dentistry.

    PubMed

    Lam, R

    2014-12-01

    One disadvantage of the rapid advances in modern dentistry is that treatment options have never been more varied or confusing. Compounded by a more educated population greatly assisted by online information in an increasingly litigious society, a major concern in recent times is increased litigation against health practitioners. The manner in which courts handle disputes is ambiguous and what is considered fair or just may not be reflected in the judicial process. Although legal decisions in Australia follow a doctrine of precedent, the law is not static and is often reflected by community sentiment. In medical litigation, this has seen the rejection of the Bolam principle with a preference towards greater patient rights. Recent court decisions may change the practice of dentistry and it is important that the clinician is not caught unaware. The aim of this article is to discuss legal issues that are pertinent to the practice of modern dentistry through an analysis of legal cases that have shaped health law. Through these discussions, the importance of continuing professional development, professional association and informed consent will be realized as a means to limit the legal complications of dental practice.

  19. TH-C-204-01: Vision for Medical Physics and Status of Current Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Williamson, J

    2016-06-01

    In this presentation, the Editors will outline our vision for the future of Medical Physics and review recent work-in-progress initiatives to implement this vision. Finally, we will close with guidance to authors on how to write a good Medical Physics paper. A major focus will be the transition to a new publisher in 2017 following a more than 40-year association with American Institute of Physics Publishing (AIPP). Vision for Medical Physics and status of current initiatives: Jeff Williamson, Editor-in-Chief The broad vision of Medical Physics is "to continue the Journal's tradition of publishing the very best science that propels our discipline forward and improves our contribution to patient care." More concretely, the Journal should be the preeminent forum for exchange of cutting edge medical physics science. We seek to identify the best contributions in (a) high impact clinical physics innovations; (b) clinical translation and validation of basic science innovations; and (c) cutting edge basic science developments with potential for patient care improvements. Among the challenges and opportunities, we face are: electronic-only and open access publishing; competition from new radiological science journals; trends towards more interactive, social-media based scientific communities; and diversification of the medical physics research, authorship, and readership domains, including clinical applications quite foreign to core ABR clinical competencies. Recently implemented and ongoing initiatives include: 1) Revised Table of Contents (TOC) and more contemporary topical submission categories 2) Structured review template in HTML format 3) Comprehensive hierarchical taxonomy for identifying reviewer expertise 4) Formal process for soliciting high quality and impact Review and Vision 20/20 Articles We have recruited four Review Article Co-editors: John Rowlands and Ingrid Reiser (imaging physics) and Joao Seco and Tim Zhu (therapy physics). The Co-Editors will identify

  20. Same-Sex Couples: Legal Complexities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswald, Ramona Faith; Kuvalanka, Katherine A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a typology for organizing our current knowledge regarding same-sex couples in the United States who have and have not established legal ties between partners. This framework is complemented by a discussion of key rulings that define what is legally possible as well as the introduction of "legal consciousness,"…

  1. [Current knowledge among students of the Silesian Medical Academy about the importance and role of medical care funds].

    PubMed

    Tyrpień, Mirosław; Jaskólecki, Henryk; Steplewski, Zygmunt; Miarczyńska-Jończyk, Halina; Woźniak, Joanna; Malara, Beata

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this research was verification and comparison of the present state of knowledge among the students of different departments and years of study. The questions concerned the role of Medical Care Funds in the up-to-now healthcare system and the patient's rights as far as the students' future professions as doctors, dentists, healthcare managers and medical rescuers is concerned. The questionnaire included 15 questions referring to the problem of functioning of the medical care institutions after the reform of healthcare services introduced in 1999. Distinct from most of the published works of this kind, the authors adopted a uniform "assessment" method following the principles of didactic measurement. The researchers calculated: Range, Modal, Mediana, Arithmetic Average, Variance, Standard Deviation, Easiness of the Task, Difficulty of the Task, Skip Fraction, the Task's Differentiating Power, Reliability Coefficient of the Test. The calculation was conducted with the use of the Excel programme modified by the researchers to suit the needs of didactic measurement. The survey included 104 students of the 3rd year of Dental Department, 116 of the students 4th year of Dental Department, 31 students of Bachelor's Medical Rescue Studies by the Medical Department in Zabrze, 18 students of Post-Graduate Management and Administration in Healthcare by the Medical Department in Zabrze and Silesian Technical University, 151 4th year students of the Medical Department in Zabrze and 121 6th year students of the Medical Department in Zabrze. It has been proved that between the particular groups there are significant differences as far as the students' knowledge is concerned ("the healthcare managers" demonstrated quite a high knowledge ratio). And that the questions were at different difficulty levels depending on the branch and year of study represented by the respondents.

  2. Problems and the potential direction of reforms for the current individual medical savings accounts in the Chinese health care system.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangjin; Yang, Yang; Gong, Fuqing; Zhao, Mingjie

    2012-12-01

    Individual health savings accounts are an important part of the current basic medical insurance system for urban workers in China. Since 1998 when the system of personal medical insurance accounts was first implemented, there has been considerable controversy over its function and significance within different social communities. This paper analyzes the main problems in the practical implementation of individual medical insurance accounts and discusses the social and cultural foundations for the establishment of family health savings accounts from the perspective of Chinese Confucian familism. Accordingly, it addresses the direction of the reform and the development of the current system of individual health insurance accounts in China.

  3. Medical radiation countermeasures for nuclear and radiological emergencies: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Rajesh; Chawla, Raman; Marwah, Rohit; Kumar, Vinod; Goel, Rajeev; Arora, Preeti; Jaiswal, Sarita; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear and radiological emergencies (NREs) occurred globally and recent incidences in India are indicating toward the need for comprehensive medical preparedness required both at incident site and hospitals. The enhanced threat attributed toward insurgency is another causative factor of worry. The response capabilities and operational readiness of responders (both health and non-health service providers) in contaminated environment need to be supported by advancement in R & D and technological efforts to develop prophylactics and radiation mitigators. It is essential to develop phase 1 alternatives of such drugs for unseen threats as a part of initial preparedness. At the incident site and hospital level, external decontamination procedures need to be standardized and supported by protective clothing and Shudika kits developed by INMAS. The medical management of exposure requires systematic approach to perform triage, resuscitation and curative care. The internal contamination requires decorporation agents to be administered based on procedural diagnostics. Various key issues pertaining to policy decisions, R & D promotion, community awareness, specialized infrastructure for NREs preparedness has been discussed. The present review is an attempt to provide vital information about the current status of various radiation countermeasures and future perspective(s) ahead. PMID:21829316

  4. Current status of health outcome assessment of medical treatment in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuroi, Katsumasa; Shimozuma, Kojiro; Ohsumi, Shozo; Imai, Hirohisa; Ono, Michikazu

    2007-01-01

    Recent research has shown the importance of the patient's point of view on the goals of medical care, and now health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) has become an important endpoint of clinical studies. However, as HR-QOL is essentially a subjective, personal concept determined from the viewpoint of the patient, it is fundamentally important to understand the concept and use the HR-QOL assessment, to express both the subjective and qualitative concept of HR-QOL in an objective and quantitative way that meets the patient's true needs, and also to obtain high-quality information about HR-QOL. In this article, we describe the concept of HR-QOL, the purpose of HR-QOL measurement, the approach to the HR-QOL assessment, instruments used in the measurement of HR-QOL, and general principles of HR-QOL measurements. We also review the current status of HR-QOL assessment of medical treatment in breast cancer.

  5. American Board of Medical Specialties Maintenance of Certification: theory and evidence regarding the current framework.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Richard E; Lipner, Rebecca S; Ham, Hazen P; Wagner, Robin; Holmboe, Eric S

    2013-01-01

    The American Board of Medical Specialties Maintenance of Certification Program (ABMS MOC) is designed to provide a comprehensive approach to physician lifelong learning, self-assessment, and quality improvement (QI) through its 4-part framework and coverage of the 6 competencies previously adopted by the ABMS and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). In this article, the theoretical rationale and exemplary empiric data regarding the MOC program and its individual parts are reviewed. The value of each part is considered in relation to 4 criteria about the relationship of the competencies addressed within that part to (1) patient outcomes, (2) physician performance, (3) validity of the assessment or educational methods utilized, and (4) learning or improvement potential. Overall, a sound theoretical rationale and a respectable evidence base exists to support the current structure and elements of the MOC program. However, it is incumbent on the ABMS and ABMS member boards to continue to examine their programs moving forward to assure the public and the profession that they are meeting expectations, are clinically relevant, and provide value to patients and participating physicians, and to refine and improve them as ongoing research indicates.

  6. Current pulse: can a production system reduce medical errors in health care?

    PubMed

    Printezis, Antonios; Gopalakrishnan, Mohan

    2007-01-01

    One of the reasons for rising health care costs is medical errors, a majority of which result from faulty systems and processes. Health care in the past has used process-based initiatives such as Total Quality Management, Continuous Quality Improvement, and Six Sigma to reduce errors. These initiatives to redesign health care, reduce errors, and improve overall efficiency and customer satisfaction have had moderate success. Current trend is to apply the successful Toyota Production System (TPS) to health care since its organizing principles have led to tremendous improvement in productivity and quality for Toyota and other businesses that have adapted them. This article presents insights on the effectiveness of TPS principles in health care and the challenges that lie ahead in successfully integrating this approach with other quality initiatives.

  7. Legal abortion in Europe.

    PubMed

    1978-01-01

    Abortion on medical and eugenic grounds has been legal in most European countries for several years. In Austria, abortions are performed following obligatory counseling, and physicians can abstain conscientiously from performing them. In Denmark, first trimester abortion is performed on request for women over age 17. Abortion has been legal in Finland since 1950; the abortion rate reached its peak in 1973, and has been declining since then. First trimester abortion is legal in France, but a woman seeking admission to a hospital must present a physician's certificate, a counselor's certificate, and her own written consent. Delays in the processing of the application are not unusual and the whole procedure can be lengthy and discouraging. First trimester abortion was legalized in the German Democratic Republic in 1972, and in 1973 in the Federal Republic of Germany, where 79% of abortions are requested on grave social grounds. Applications for abortions are seldom refused in Hungary, where the abortion rate reached 81.1/1000 women in 1971. Abortion on request is expected to be legalized shortly in Norway, while it prevails in Poland, where 98% of abortions are performed for social indications. In Sweden, abortion is performed only in public hospitals, and contraceptive advice and fitting is free. The availability of abortion in the United Kingdom is limited by the restrictive attitude of some National Health Service physicians, and nearly all abortions on nonresidents (32% in 1973) are performed on private premises. In Yugoslavia, abortion is the constitutional right of every woman, but only the Republic of Slovenia has, so far, legislated fertility regulation as a whole, and termination of pregnancy can be performed only with the approval of a special committee.

  8. Evaluation of legal capacity by doctors and lawyers: the need for collaborative assessment.

    PubMed

    Purser, Kelly J; Rosenfeld, Tuly

    2014-10-20

    Balancing the interests of individual autonomy and protection is an escalating challenge confronting an ageing Australian society. One way this is manifested is in the current ad hoc and unsatisfactory way that capacity is assessed in the context of wills, enduring powers of attorney and advance health directives. The absence of nationally accepted assessment guidelines results in terminological and methodological miscommunication and misunderstanding between legal and medical professionals. Expectations between legal and medical professionals can be clarified to provide satisfactory capacity assessments based on the development of a sound assessment paradigm.

  9. Current and emerging medical treatments for non-small cell lung cancer: a primer for pulmonologists.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Peter; Mekhail, Tarek

    2012-04-01

    Pulmonary physicians commonly develop relationships with lung cancer patients through the evaluation and staging of the disease prior to the discussion of treatment options with oncologists. Given the relationship that develops, a pulmonologist is often asked about aspects of the treatment plan that may be slightly outside of their comfort zone. The aim of this overview of medical treatment of non-small cell lung cancer is to provide the pulmonologist with an overview of the evidence guiding current practice so that they can be more comfortable answering their patients' questions while awaiting the expert opinion of the oncologist. We discuss standard chemotherapeutic agents, their common side effects, and their use in the adjuvant and neoadjuvant setting, as definitive therapy for locally advanced disease, as palliative therapy for advanced disease, and as maintenance therapy. We also discuss the mechanisms of action and side effects of targeted therapies (including inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR] signaling and the anaplastic lymphoma kinase [ALK] protein), their currently accepted uses, and upcoming phase III trials, the results of which may influence standard practice.

  10. Alcohol: the clinician's role in evaluating legal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Lande, R G

    1993-11-01

    Alcohol-related misconduct poses a challenge for society, the legal system, and the medical profession. The debate is centered on alcohol abuse and the determination of responsibility for misbehavior. In assessing responsibility, the legal system often requests the expertise of the medical professional. The knowledgeable clinician can contribute to the just resolution of complex medico-legal cases. The best contribution considers medical facts in relation to the evolution of legal thinking. This article explores the historical, social, and legal approaches to alcohol-related misconduct. The article concludes with a discussion of a model clinical assessment.

  11. Current Medications for the Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Brigette S.; Roberts, Holly J.; Needelman, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is common among children. Fortunately, ADHD is highly treatable with medication. The purpose of this article is to serve as a primer on medication treatment for ADHD for school psychologists. The article discusses the available stimulant and nonstimulant medication for the treatment of ADHD.…

  12. Current Integration of Dissection in Medical Education in Australia and New Zealand: Challenges and Successes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouwer, Hope Ellen; Valter, Krisztina; Webb, Alexandra Louise

    2016-01-01

    The reduced use of dissection associated with the introduction of integrated systems problem-based learning curricula, graduate-entry programs and medical school expansion is a frequent topic of discussion and debate in modern medical training. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of these changes to the medical education…

  13. The Current State of the System of Mechanisms of Realisation and Protection of the Rights of the Child: Conceptual and Legal Aspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drozdova, Alexandra Michailowna; Gulakova, Violetta Yurevna; Ivanchenko, Elena Anatolevna; Lesnichenko, Inna Pavlovna; Tereshchenko, Elena Anatolevna

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to the analytical understanding of the problems in the field of realisation and protection of the rights of children in Russia to identify and highlight existing problems in order to try to remove shortcomings and embark on further development and improvement of the legal and social mechanisms for the protection of…

  14. Legal Weapons of Mass Destruction Consequence Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-01

    LEGAL WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION CONSEQUENCE MANAGEMENT SEMINAR REPORT Defense Threat Reduction Agency Advanced Systems ...guidance documents pertinent to WMD CM ; • Contribute to the development of a Federal Legal Reference Deskbook for WMD consequence management . The...of medical responders during a Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)–Consequence Management ( CM ) event. Use of the Military Posse Comitatus

  15. Attitudes to legalizing cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jenny; van Ours, Jan C; Grossman, Michael

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relationship between cannabis use and attitudes to legalizing the use of cannabis. Predictions from theory provide a means of learning about the roles of information, self interest and regret in explaining differences in attitudes to legalization between those who currently use, those who have used in the past and those who have never used. Our empirical investigation suggests that users have a greater awareness of cannabis not being as harmful as abstainers think it is. This may explain why individuals are more inclined to be in favor of legalizing cannabis once they have used it themselves. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. [Diagnosis of HIV infections in legal regulations].

    PubMed

    Zaba, Czesław; Zaba, Zbigniew; Klimberg, Aneta; Swiderski, Paweł

    2007-01-01

    The study aimed at presenting current legal regulations associated with the management of patients suspected of being infected with HIV. Diagnostic management of infections with HIV represents a complex issue that is associated with several problems, not only of a legal, but also practical character. Drawing a blood sample from the patient and its testing for HIV results in infringement of the patient's privacy, and the latter is legally protected. Before conducting the test for HIV infection, the doctor is obliged to obtain the consent of the patient and, when the result is available, he should inform the individual in question and provide recommendations, as recommended by WHO. The patient has the right to be tested anonymously. Blood samples for HIV detection may be collected without the patient's consent in cases of obligatory tests performed as an element of a disease prevention program, in individuals who are charged with or convicted of a crime, or in case of a medical treatment. Unlawful activities result in infringement of the patient's right to self-determination and constitute acts against his/her interests.

  17. Legal issues related to postoperative pulmonary thromboembolism in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bo Young; Kim, Min Ji; Kang, So Ra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Currently, development of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) after surgery is frequently being followed by legal action in Korea, as consequences may be fatal. In the current study, we assessed possible countermeasures that medical teams can take when faced with conflicting opinions on responsibility for PTE. Methods A retrospective analysis of claims handled by the Supreme Court and subordinate courts, from 1999 to 2015, was performed. We analyzed the type of procedure, associated complications, and critical legal points from the recorded judgments along with any liability limitations on surgeons. Results After reviewing cases between 1999 and 2015, a total of 18 cases were analyzed. There were no cases in which the surgeon was held accountable between 1999 and 2002. From 2003, there were instances of the surgeon being held accountable, with a peak of cases in 2013. Legal standards applied in judicial decision-making related to appropriate use of preventive measures, operation characteristics, doctor's reaction towards symptom occurrence, obligation of postoperative medical care, and duty of explanation. Conclusion The courts in Korea have changed their position from one of denying doctors' liability to one of enforcing responsibility for PTE. Surgeons are therefore being held responsible with greater frequency, depending on the details of the case. Lessons can be learnt from precedents that can be incorporated into medical education and training programs with the aim of reducing both major PTE complication rates and litigation costs. PMID:27904854

  18. Impact of antipsychotic medication on transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) effects in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sri Mahavir; Bose, Anushree; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Chhabra, Harleen; Kalmady, Sunil V; Varambally, Shivarama; Nitsche, Michael A; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2016-01-30

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has generated interest as a treatment modality for schizophrenia. Dopamine, a critical pathogenetic link in schizophrenia, is also known to influence tDCS effects. We evaluated the influence of antipsychotic drug type (as defined by dopamine D2 receptor affinity) on the impact of tDCS in schizophrenia. DSM-IV-TR-diagnosed schizophrenia patients [N=36] with persistent auditory hallucinations despite adequate antipsychotic treatment were administered add-on tDCS. Patients were divided into three groups based on the antipsychotic's affinity to D2 receptors. An auditory hallucinations score (AHS) was measured using the auditory hallucinations subscale of the Psychotic Symptom Rating Scales (PSYRATS). Add-on tDCS resulted in a significant reduction inAHS. Antipsychotic drug type had a significant effect on AHS reduction. Patients treated with high affinity antipsychotics showed significantly lesser improvement compared to patients on low affinity antipsychotics or a mixture of the two. Furthermore, a significant sex-by-group interaction occurred; type of medication had an impact on tDCS effects only in women. Improvement differences could be due to the larger availability of the dopamine receptor system in patients taking antipsychotics with low D2 affinity. Sex-specific differences suggest potential estrogen-mediated effects. This study reports a first-time observation on the clinical utility of antipsychotic drug type in predicting tDCS effects in schizophrenia.

  19. The current status of animal use and alternatives in Korean veterinary medical schools.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gwi Hyang; Choe, Byung In; Kim, Jin Suk; Hart, Lynette A; Han, Jin Soo

    2010-06-01

    Two new Korean laws regulating animal welfare and the humane use of animals in science came into effect in 2008 and 2009. Both these laws impose ethical committee review prior to the performance of animal experiments in research, testing and education. This study briefly summarises the new Korean laws, and investigates the current status regarding the numbers of animals used, the alternatives to animals which are used, the curricula relating to the humane use of animals, and ethical review practices in Korean veterinary education. Approximately 4,845 animals, representing 20 different species, were used in veterinary medical education in Korea in 2007. Korea has begun to introduce formal courses on animal welfare for the humane treatment of animals used in experiments, and an ethical protocol review system prior to animal use in education. Korea is moving toward better animal welfare, by incorporating practices consistent with international standards. The information presented represents the first such data gathered in Korea, which should prove useful for monitoring the implementation of replacement, reduction, and refinement measures in animal use for education purposes.

  20. Current Status of Home Medical Care Waste Collection by Nurses in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yukihiro

    2017-02-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted to determine the current status of home medical care (HMC) waste collection by nurses for individual items and whether the collection rate differs with city size. The questionnaire was mailed to 1,022 nursing offices, of which 645 offices provided valid responses. Offices were classified into three groups according to the local population size. Responses indicated that used syringes and needles, except for pen-type self-injection needles, were collected by >50% of HMC nurses. On the other hand, enteral nutrients, nutritional adjustment diet vessels, feeding tubes, portable injectors, ventilator masks, endotracheal suction catheters, tracheal cannulas, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) bags, and urinary catheters and bags had a low collection rate in comparison with syringes or needles. The collection percentage of used syringes, needles, and infusion needles (p < 0.05) and that for infusion bags, tubes, and catheters (p < 0.001) differed among the three population groups. Although municipalities are responsible for collect all HMC waste, sharp or infectious items should be collected by HMC doctors or nurses. On the contrary, nonhazardous HMC waste should be collected by municipalities.

  1. Medication management policy, practice and research in Australian residential aged care: Current and future directions.

    PubMed

    Sluggett, Janet K; Ilomäki, Jenni; Seaman, Karla L; Corlis, Megan; Bell, J Simon

    2017-02-01

    Eight percent of Australians aged 65 years and over receive residential aged care each year. Residents are increasingly older, frailer and have complex care needs on entry to residential aged care. Up to 63% of Australian residents of aged care facilities take nine or more medications regularly. Together, these factors place residents at high risk of adverse drug events. This paper reviews medication-related policies, practices and research in Australian residential aged care. Complex processes underpin prescribing, supply and administration of medications in aged care facilities. A broad range of policies and resources are available to assist health professionals, aged care facilities and residents to optimise medication management. These include national guiding principles, a standardised national medication chart, clinical medication reviews and facility accreditation standards. Recent Australian interventions have improved medication use in residential aged care facilities. Generating evidence for prescribing and deprescribing that is specific to residential aged care, health workforce reform, medication-related quality indicators and inter-professional education in aged care are important steps toward optimising medication use in this setting.

  2. DNA paternity tests in Spain without the mother's consent: the legal responsibility of the laboratories.

    PubMed

    Barrot, C; Sánchez, C; Ortega, M; De Alcaraz-Fossoul, J; Carreras, C; Medallo, J; Bono, N; Royes, A; Gené, M

    2014-01-01

    It is technically feasible to perform paternity diagnosis testing solely involving an alleged father and his descendent. However, there are serious legal and ethical problems for forensic genetics laboratories when it comes to paternity testing cases for investigating the alleged father-child relationship if the biological mother has not given consent to access her genetic information. Based on the Spanish Constitution, the new Code of Ethics of the Spanish Medical Association includes several articles on studies about genetic information and their acceptance by all the individuals involved. This problem is greater when the child is a minor, mentally incapacitated or psychologically incapable, because current Spanish law requires informed consent from legal representatives, but the law does not typify what happens when one parent gives consent (the putative father) and the other parent (the mother) does not agree. The aim of this study is to put forward legal solutions to avoid potential legal problems.

  3. What emergency physicians should know about informed consent: legal scenarios, cases, and caveats.

    PubMed

    Moore, Gregory P; Moffett, Peter M; Fider, Cyril; Moore, Malia J

    2014-08-01

    The basic concept of obtaining informed consent is familiar to emergency physicians, and many consider themselves well versed on the topic; however, lack of obtaining proper informed consent is a frequent source of lawsuits. The legal definitions and nuances of informed consent might surprise even the most experienced physician. This article will detail the historical legal evolution of the concept of informed consent. It will also report defining and recent court cases that illustrate the current medical-legal status of informed consent. Special scenarios, caveats, and documentation recommendations are discussed. After reading this article the emergency physician will know how to practice and document the appropriate aspects of informed consent in emergency medicine, as well as understand available legal defenses if a lawsuit should arise.

  4. The Ethical and Legal Framework for the Decision Not to Resuscitate

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Melinda A.; Cassel, Christine K.

    1984-01-01

    Practicing physicians are frequently faced with the question of whether or not to institute cardiopulmonary resuscitation in case of cardiac or respiratory arrest in a patient in hospital. Medical training has usually not included any systematic analysis of this issue from either an ethical or a legal standpoint. Many physicians may be unaware that ethical and legal principles, as well as professional guidelines, exist to guide such decision making. In practice, physicians make this decision without the benefit of training in ethical analysis. The problem is especially acute in teaching hospitals when young physicians unacquainted with formal ethics or the law must often make decisions emergently. Studies show some discrepancy between ethical and legal principles and the actual decision making by physicians. For this reason, we recommend an approach that will enable physicians to make and implement decisions not to resuscitate that are consistent with current ethical and legal standards. PMID:6702189

  5. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part I: an overview and medical treatments

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Wai Tong; Yip, Annie LK

    2013-01-01

    During the last three decades, an increasing understanding of the etiology, psychopathology, and clinical manifestations of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, in addition to the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, has optimized the potential for recovery from the illness. Continued development of various models of psychosocial intervention promotes the goal of schizophrenia treatment from one of symptom control and social adaptation to an optimal restoration of functioning and/or recovery. However, it is still questionable whether these new treatment approaches can address the patients’ needs for treatment and services and contribute to better patient outcomes. This article provides an overview of different treatment approaches currently used in schizophrenia spectrum disorders to address complex health problems and a wide range of abnormalities and impairments resulting from the illness. There are different treatment strategies and targets for patients at different stages of the illness, ranging from prophylactic antipsychotics and cognitive–behavioral therapy in the premorbid stage to various psychosocial interventions in addition to antipsychotics for relapse prevention and rehabilitation in the later stages of the illness. The use of antipsychotics alone as the main treatment modality may be limited not only in being unable to tackle the frequently occurring negative symptoms and cognitive impairments but also in producing a wide variety of adverse effects to the body or organ functioning. Because of varied pharmacokinetics and treatment responsiveness across agents, the medication regimen should be determined on an individual basis to ensure an optimal effect in its long-term use. This review also highlights that the recent practice guidelines and standards have recommended that a combination of treatment modalities be adopted to meet the complex health needs of people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In view of the heterogeneity of the

  6. Integrating Radiology and Anatomy Teaching in Medical Education in the UK--The Evidence, Current Trends, and Future Scope.

    PubMed

    Heptonstall, N B; Ali, T; Mankad, K

    2016-04-01

    This review article presents the current evidence of the importance of integrating radiology and anatomy in medical education in the UK, a recommendation by a number of key anatomy, education, and radiology organizations. Current evidence highlights that on average only 5% of total teaching time in medical education is dedicated to radiology. Often, radiology teaching does not adequately fulfill students' learning needs and potentially leaves them underprepared for medical practice. Benefits of integrating radiology and anatomy include improved clinical application of anatomy, an increase in student's interest in anatomy, and ultimately improved radiological interpretation. Various modalities exist for the integration of radiology and anatomy, facilitated by the vast portability of radiological images. It appears that combining radiological resources with traditional anatomy teaching methodology in a blended approach is most beneficial.

  7. [Legal aspects of ritual circumcision].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, M; Schott, G E; Rascher, W; Bender, A W

    2009-12-01

    Female circumcision (genital mutilation) is a criminal violation of human rights under German law. Even with consent of the person to be circumcised and/or her legal representative this procedure must not be carried out since a consent to female circumcision is unethical and therefore void. As much consent as there is on female circumcision the legal situation with ritual male circumcision is very unclear. In practice and unnoticed by the public male circumcision is carried out - be it for medical or ritual reasons - without deeper-going reflexions on the clearness of the medical indication or the legal situation with ritual circumcision. From the medical aspect there are big differences between female and male circumcision but also certain parallels. Various reasons, partly founded in prejudice and misinformation, make people refrain from regarding circumcision of boys also as illegal. Contrary to the prevailing opinion male circumcision also represents a bodily harm which a doctor can only carry out after a preoperative interview and with the consent of the affected person. Since ritual male circumcision does not serve the wellbeing of a child it is not possible for the parents to give their consent to the circumcision in lieu of the child. Male circumcision is only permitted if the child has given his consent and is thus only legally permitted if the child has reached an age at which he is mature enough to understand the meaning and extent of such an action which is hardly the case before he has completed his 16 (th) year.

  8. [Current situations and problems of quality control for medical imaging display systems].

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Takayuki; Setojima, Tsuyoshi; Ueda, Katsumi; Takada, Katsumi; Okuno, Teiichi; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Nakajima, Tadashi; Fujisawa, Ichiro

    2015-04-01

    Diagnostic imaging has been shifted rapidly from film to monitor diagnostic. Consequently, Japan medical imaging and radiological systems industries association (JIRA) have recommended methods of quality control (QC) for medical imaging display systems. However, in spite of its need by majority of people, executing rate is low. The purpose of this study was to validate the problem including check items about QC for medical imaging display systems. We performed acceptance test of medical imaging display monitors based on Japanese engineering standards of radiological apparatus (JESRA) X-0093*A-2005 to 2009, and performed constancy test based on JESRA X-0093*A-2010 from 2010 to 2012. Furthermore, we investigated the cause of trouble and repaired number. Medical imaging display monitors had 23 inappropriate monitors about visual estimation, and all these monitors were not criteria of JESRA about luminance uniformity. Max luminance was significantly lower year-by-year about measurement estimation, and the 29 monitors did not meet the criteria of JESRA about luminance deviation. Repaired number of medical imaging display monitors had 25, and the cause was failure liquid crystal panel. We suggested the problems about medical imaging display systems.

  9. [The teaching of pharmacology in medical schools: current status and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carranza, Rodolfo; Vidrio, Horacio; Campos-Sepúlveda, Efraín

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacology is a core course in all medical school curricula. In most medical schools, pharmacology is taught during the second year and teaching covers both basic aspects and useful drugs for the treatment of human diseases. It is assumed that relevant pharmacologic knowledge is revisited during the clinical clerkships and that students are adequately trained to prescribe drugs upon graduation. However, for many years it has been noted that pharmacological training is sometimes insufficient and that inadequate and irrational prescription of drugs is a very common problem in clinical settings. Information overload and proliferation of new drugs have been recognized as two of the major contributing factors. To address this issue, many authors have recommended the development of a core curricula in pharmacology which all students would have to complete coupled with a restricted list of drugs. Based on our own teaching experience we have identified what should constitute the core content of pharmacology courses in medical schools and have written a study guide for this discipline. Both documents provide an organizational framework to help second year medical students ascertain what part of the vast knowledge in pharmacology they need to learn. The number of drugs that students have to manage is limited to 168. Our program constitutes the first effort to medicalize the teaching of pharmacology in medical schools. We expect that most medical schools will follow our guidelines as our program is applicable to all curricula modalities.

  10. What are the risks and the benefits of current and emerging weight-loss medications?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jamie R; Niswender, Kevin D

    2009-10-01

    Obesity is epidemic; new medications and therapeutic options are urgently needed to reduce the associated health care burden. The initial clinical strategy for weight loss is lifestyle modification involving a combination of diet, exercise, and behavior change. However, it is difficult for many to achieve and maintain weight loss solely through this approach. Only two drugs, orlistat and sibutramine, have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat obesity long term, and both medications have undesirable side effects, leaving an enormous unmet need for efficacious and safe therapy for obesity. Other medications with weight-loss effects have been approved by the FDA for short-term treatment of obesity or for disorders other than obesity, but these also have potential adverse effects. This article discusses the perceived benefits and risks of these approved medications along with emerging drugs that have shown weight-loss effects.

  11. The Current Practices in Injury Prevention and Safety Helmet Use in an Air Force Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    Clinic at Malcom Grow Medical Center, Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. Preventive counseling Preventing the occurrence of both mental and physical ...of their care. The primary care provider assumes ongoing responsibility for health maintenance and therapy for illness, including consultation with...PA) or a Medical Doctor (M.D.). Doctor of Osteopathy (D.O.), or Registered Nurse (R.N.). Safety helmet For the purpose of this study, the safety

  12. IEC80001 and Future Ramifications for Health Systems not currently classed as Medical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Ian

    Traditionally a medical device is viewed as a standalone hospital system with a carefully segregated private network running on specialist bespoke equipment, managed by highly skilled medical technicians. The regulations in force implementing the Medical Devices Directive support this view. The emerging reality in the modern health organisation is a patient-centric shared electronic record, networked over the organisation's local area network, with medical devices hanging as endpoints off that shared network and contributing to the central pool of patient data - all the time reliant on the shared network services. The IEC80001 standard has been developed to provide guidance on the measures that the medical devices community considers are required best practice in order to ensure that the integrity and safety of the interconnected medical device is not compromised. This in itself is both a laudable and pragmatic action. The question that it immediately prompts for those left with the new and very real task of 'compliance' with the new standards - primarily the over worked health organisation's IT department, is 'what impact does this have on me?'. A number of papers exist prepared from a health-system-supplier standpoint. This paper is principally focused on examining the ramifications of IEC80001 from a health organisation stand point. This paper seeks to identify the areas where a health organisation may expect to have their business-as-usual IT processes impacted, and offers a simple framework to address these challenges.

  13. [Regulatory Program for Medical Devices in Cuba: experiences and current challenges].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Dulce María Martínez; Rodríguez, Yadira Álvarez; Valdés, Yamila Cedeño; Ribas, Silvia Delgado

    2016-05-01

    Regulatory control of medical devices in Cuba is conducted through a system based on the Regulatory Program for Medical Devices as a way to ensure the safety, efficacy, and effectiveness of these technologies, which are in use by the National Health System. This program was launched in 1992, when the Regulations for State Evaluation and Registration of Medical Devices were approved. Its successive stages and the merging of regulatory activities for drugs and medical equipment have meant progress toward stronger, more transparent strategies and greater control of industry and the National Health System. Throughout its course the Cuban program has met with challenges and difficulties that it has addressed by drawing on its own experiences. During the new period, the greatest challenges revolve around ensuring that regulatory systems incorporate scientific evaluation, risk levels, maximum rigor through the use of technical standards, and the implementation of international recommendations, together with the application of the ISO 13485 certification scheme, enhanced market monitoring, and classification of medical devices in accordance with their relevance to the country's national health policies. From the regional standpoint, the greatest challenge lies in working toward regulatory convergence. The Collaborating Centre for the Regulation of Health Technologies will support the proposed regulatory strategy and established regional priorities, in particular in connection with the implementation of actions involving medical devices.

  14. Computer-aided diagnosis in medical imaging: historical review, current status and future potential.

    PubMed

    Doi, Kunio

    2007-01-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) has become one of the major research subjects in medical imaging and diagnostic radiology. In this article, the motivation and philosophy for early development of CAD schemes are presented together with the current status and future potential of CAD in a PACS environment. With CAD, radiologists use the computer output as a "second opinion" and make the final decisions. CAD is a concept established by taking into account equally the roles of physicians and computers, whereas automated computer diagnosis is a concept based on computer algorithms only. With CAD, the performance by computers does not have to be comparable to or better than that by physicians, but needs to be complementary to that by physicians. In fact, a large number of CAD systems have been employed for assisting physicians in the early detection of breast cancers on mammograms. A CAD scheme that makes use of lateral chest images has the potential to improve the overall performance in the detection of lung nodules when combined with another CAD scheme for PA chest images. Because vertebral fractures can be detected reliably by computer on lateral chest radiographs, radiologists' accuracy in the detection of vertebral fractures would be improved by the use of CAD, and thus early diagnosis of osteoporosis would become possible. In MRA, a CAD system has been developed for assisting radiologists in the detection of intracranial aneurysms. On successive bone scan images, a CAD scheme for detection of interval changes has been developed by use of temporal subtraction images. In the future, many CAD schemes could be assembled as packages and implemented as a part of PACS. For example, the package for chest CAD may include the computerized detection of lung nodules, interstitial opacities, cardiomegaly, vertebral fractures, and interval changes in chest radiographs as well as the computerized classification of benign and malignant nodules and the differential diagnosis of

  15. Towards interprofessional networking in medication management of the aged: current challenges and potential solutions in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Sonja; Kumpusalo-Vauhkonen, Anne; Järvensivu, Timo; Mäntylä, Antti; Pohjanoksa-Mäntylä, Marika; Airaksinen, Marja

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Finnish Medicines Agency (Fimea) initiated a programme in 2012 for enhancing interprofessional networking in the medication management of the aged. The goal is to develop national guidelines for interprofessional collaboration with respect to medication management. This study aims to explore the challenges and potential solutions experienced by existing health care teams in managing medication of the aged: (1) at the individual and team level (micro level), (2) organisational level (meso level) and (3) structural level (macro level). Design Group discussions (n = 10), pair (n = 3) and individual interviews (n = 2). Abductive content analysis combining data and theory was applied. Networking was used as a theoretical framework. Setting Meetings (n = 15) organised by Fimea in the formation phase of the interprofessional network in 2012. Subjects Health care professionals (n = 55). Main outcome measures Challenges and solutions in the medication management of the aged at the micro, meso and macro levels. Results Challenges in interprofessional collaboration, problems with patient record systems, and the organisation of work and lack of resources were present at all the levels contributing to patients’ medication problems. Participants suggested multiple potential solutions to improve interprofessional collaboration, sharing of tasks and responsibilities, better exploitation of pharmaceutical knowledge and developing tools as being the most commonly mentioned. Conclusions Optimising medication use of the aged requires new systemic solutions within and between different system levels. The main challenges can be solved by clarifying responsibilities, enhancing communication and applying operational models that involve pharmacists and the use of information technology in medication management. KEY POINTSAn interprofessional team approach has been suggested as a solution to promote rational medicine use among the aged.Fragmented health

  16. [Implementation of quality management in medical rehabilitation--current challenges for rehabilitation facilities].

    PubMed

    Enge, M; Koch, A; Müller, T; Vorländer, T

    2010-12-01

    The legal responsibilities imposed upon rehabilitation facilities under section 20 (2a) SGB IX, necessitate fundamental decisions to be taken regarding the development of quality management systems over and above the existing framework. This article is intended to provide ideas and suggestions to assist rehabilitation facilities in implementing a quality management system, which is required in addition to participation in the quality assurance programmes stipulated by the rehabilitation carriers. In this context, the additional internal benefit a functioning quality management system can provide for ensuring a high level of quality and for maintaining the competitiveness of the rehabilitation facility should be taken into account. The core element of these observations, hence, is a list of requirements which enables assessment of the quality of consultants' performance in setting up a quality management system.

  17. [Current state of medical care of polytrauma and mass casualty incidents in Germany. Are we well-prepared?].

    PubMed

    Brodauf, L; Heßing, K; Hoffmann, R; Friemert, B

    2015-10-01

    The white paper on the medical care of the severely injured published in 2006 is a collection of proposals and recommendations concerning structure, organization and equipment for the medical care of severely injured patients. Since its publication 50 networks ( http://www.dgu-traumanetzwerk.de/index ) have been established as part of the trauma network. This and the trauma register have helped to continuously improve the medical care of severely injured patients since 1993 [26]. Numerous studies have documented the progress made in measures required by the trauma network [4, 6]. For example, the mortality rate of severely injured patients has dropped from 25 % to approximately 10 % in the past 15 years. From the register and network data it is difficult to tell how each of these measures is implemented in the participating hospitals, who provides medical treatment to patients when, and how medical care is organized in detail. This is why a survey on medical care for polytrauma and in mass casualty situations was conducted among medical directors in German surgical hospitals who are members of the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU). Thanks to the 211 participants (most of whom specialize in orthopedic and trauma surgery) a detailed description of how medical treatment is currently organized and performed could be acquired. The survey showed that care of patients with polytrauma (i.e. medical treatment and management) is important irrespective of the level of training of physicians and of the level of patient treatment in hospitals. The central role of traumatologists was emphasized not only in terms of actual treatment but also as an administrator for organizational and management matters. Almost all hospitals have plans for a mass casualty situation; however, the levels of preparedness show considerable variation. A highly critical view is taken of the new surgical specialists with respect to interdisciplinary and comprehensive emergency medical treatment

  18. The current provision of community-based teaching in UK medical schools: an online survey and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sandra W W; Clement, Naomi; Tang, Natalie; Atiomo, William

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the current provision and outcome of community-based education (CBE) in UK medical schools. Design and data sources An online survey of UK medical school websites and course prospectuses and a systematic review of articles from PubMed and Web of Science were conducted. Articles in the systematic review were assessed using Rossi, Lipsey and Freeman's approach to programme evaluation. Study selection Publications from November 1998 to 2013 containing information related to community teaching in undergraduate medical courses were included. Results Out of the 32 undergraduate UK medical schools, one was excluded due to the lack of course specifications available online. Analysis of the remaining 31 medical schools showed that a variety of CBE models are utilised in medical schools across the UK. Twenty-eight medical schools (90.3%) provide CBE in some form by the end of the first year of undergraduate training, and 29 medical schools (93.5%) by the end of the second year. From the 1378 references identified, 29 papers met the inclusion criteria for assessment. It was found that CBE mostly provided advantages to students as well as other participants, including GP tutors and patients. However, there were a few concerns regarding the lack of GP tutors’ knowledge in specialty areas, the negative impact that CBE may have on the delivery of health service in education settings and the cost of CBE. Conclusions Despite the wide variations in implementation, community teaching was found to be mostly beneficial. To ensure the relevance of CBE for ‘Tomorrow's Doctors’, a national framework should be established, and solutions sought to reduce the impact of the challenges within CBE. Strengths and limitations of this study This is the first study to review how community-based education is currently provided throughout Medical Schools in the UK. The use of Rossi, Lipsey and Freeman's method of programme evaluation means that the literature was analysed

  19. Missing the mark: Current practices in teaching the male urogenital examination to Canadian undergraduate medical students

    PubMed Central

    McAlpine, Kristen; Steele, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The urogenital physical examination is an important aspect of patient encounters in various clinical settings. Introductory clinical skills sessions are intended to provide support and alleviate students’ anxiety when learning this sensitive exam. The techniques each Canadian medical school uses to guide their students through the initial urogenital examination has not been previously reported. Methods: This study surveyed pre-clerkship clinical skills program directors at the main campus of English-speaking Canadian medical schools regarding the curriculum they use to teach the urogenital examination. Results: A response rate of 100% was achieved, providing information on resources and faculty available to students, as well as the manner in which students were evaluated. Surprisingly, over one-third of the Canadian medical schools surveyed failed to provide a setting in which students perform a urogenital examination on a patient in their pre-clinical years. Additionally, there was no formal evaluation of this skill set reported by almost 50% of Canadian medical schools prior to clinical training years. Conclusions: To ensure medical students are confident and accurate in performing a urogenital examination, it is vital they be provided the proper resources, teaching, and training. As we progress towards a competency-based curriculum, it is essential that increased focus be placed on patient encounters in undergraduate training. Further research to quantify students’ exposure to the urogenital examination during clinical years would be of interest. Without this commitment by Canadian medical schools, we are doing a disservice not only to the medical students, but also to our patient population. PMID:27878052

  20. Strategies and methods for aligning current and best medical practices. The role of information technologies.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, E C; Eisenberg, J M

    1998-01-01

    Rapid change in American medicine requires that physicians adjust established behaviors and acquire new skills. In this article, we address three questions: What do we know about how to change physicians' practices? How can physicians take advantage of new and evolving information technologies that are likely to have an impact on the future practice of medicine? and What strategic educational interventions will best enable physicians to show competencies in information management and readiness to change practice? We outline four guiding principles for incorporating information systems tools into both medical education and practice, and we make eight recommendations for the development of a new medical school curriculum. This curriculum will produce a future medical practitioner who is capable of using information technologies to systematically measure practice performance, appropriateness, and effectiveness while updating knowledge efficiently. PMID:9614787

  1. Physiologists at US Medical Schools: Education, Current Status, and Trends in Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matyas, Marsha Lakes; Frank, Martin

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes data concerning the status of faculty at American medical schools who hold Ph.D. degrees in physiology and faculty members with appointments in departments of physiology. Data show a decline in numbers of Ph.D.s in animal and human physiology awarded to Americans since 1980. Discusses programs and initiatives to increase student interest…

  2. Sexual Health Curricula in U.S. Medical Schools: Current Educational Objectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galletly, Carol; Lechuga, Julia; Layde, Joseph B.; Pinkerton, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors identify the explicit and implicit objectives that shape decisions about what medical schools teach regarding human sexuality. Methods: The authors reviewed relevant articles in journals, physician licensing examinations, and publications by professional organizations to identify learning objectives for human sexuality in…

  3. The current status of the use of oral medication to prevent HIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ramjee, Gita

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This review was designed to evaluate the progress in studies of the use of oral and topical antiretroviral medication for primary HIV prevention. Recent findings Non-human primate data has suggested that the administration of antiretroviral medication before or after retroviral exposure can protect against the establishment of chronic infection. Over the past two decades, observational studies have demonstrated the safety of antiretroviral agents for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and more recent efficacy studies have demonstrated that tenofovir with or without emtricitabine can protect against HIV when used as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Efficacy studies have been conducted in diverse populations, including men and transgender women who have sex with men, young African heterosexuals, and injection drug users. Three studies in African women evaluating oral and topical tenfovir-based regimens did not demonstrate efficacy, in large part because of suboptimal medication adherence. Further research is underway to determine the optimal ways to provide chemoprophylaxis, the optimal medications, and dosing regimens. Summary PrEP can be effective in decreasing HIV transmission to at risk uninfected persons, but further research is needed to determine the optimal modes of delivery. PMID:26049946

  4. Medical students and research: Is there a current discrepancy between education and demands?

    PubMed

    Mileder, Lukas Peter

    2014-01-01

    This article refers to a correspondence letter recently published in The Lancet, describing successful student-led research initiatives in Latin America, which were introduced because of low support from universities and governments. As a final-year medical student with keen interest in science, the topic of student engagement in research activities caught my interest. Literature shows that while junior doctors are required to perform research on their own and face intense pressure to publish, formal training in principles of research and scientific writing is often neglected by medical schools. This contrast is worrying, as the progression of the medical profession and the quality of patient care depend on high-quality research and on future generations of physician-scientists being both enthusiastic and competent. Hence, this article summarizes suggestions to increase both students' research proficiency and participation in scientific activities, and offers a critical view on this important topic, as medical schools without curricular research education and without active student integration should urgently consider revising their policies.

  5. The urgent need to change the current medical approach on tobacco cessation in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Ponciano-Rodríguez, Guadalupe

    2010-01-01

    Despite of the accumulation of scientific evidence confirming the health consequences of smoking and the new paradigm of smoking as a disease where nicotine is the drug that modifies the functional and morphological characteristics of the brain in dependent smokers, tobacco smoking continues as an important public health problem in many Latin American countries. In contrast with big advances in the tobacco control area, as an example the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control signed by 168 countries, the role of health professional in the fight against tobacco is still less than ideal. In many Latin American schools of medicine, deficiencies in medical education has led to insecure physicians when they have to motivate their patients to stop smoking or to prevent young people to begin tobacco consumption. If each general practitioner or specialist during their daily medical assistance could talk to their smoker patients about the big benefits of stop smoking and support them to get free of tobacco, we would be winning a battle against smoking. Also if we could achieve generations of young non smoking doctors, who could be a real example for patients, this could also impact the prevalence of smokers. In this article we analyze the neurobiological bases of nicotine addiction, which we think are missing in the medical curriculum and could help doctors to understand tobacco smoking as a disease rather than a risk factor, and discuss the main reasons supporting an urgent change in the medical approach of tobacco cessation in Latin America as well as the need to actualize the medical curriculum in order to give physicians the skills needed to intervene successfully with their smoker patients and to be themselves non smokers.

  6. Medication development and testing in children and adolescents. Current problems, future directions.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, B; Jensen, P S

    1997-09-01

    Progress in pediatric psychopharmacological research has suffered notable delay, especially compared with the achievements in adult psychopharmacology. Although safety and efficacy of the use of many psychotropic agents in children remain largely unproved, their pediatric use has been increasing and their widespread off-label prescribing by practitioners has raised some important concerns. The National Institute of Mental Health, in cooperation with the Food and Drug Administration and leading researchers, has coordinated systematic efforts to identify the major obstacles to research in pediatric psychopharmacology and to propose feasible solutions. In 1995, a conference cosponsored by the national Institute of Mental Health and the Food and Drug Administration gathered more than 100 research experts, family and patient advocates, and representatives of mental health professional associations. Participants met in working groups focused on specific aspects of child research and reached consensus on various recommendations. Each of the various aspects relevant to conducting research in this area (methodological, ethical, legal, regulatory, financial, and family or community context) presents specific challenges, which are herein outlined. Recommendations for possible solutions are presented, some of which are being implemented. Because data about drug safety and efficacy in adults can rarely be extrapolated to children, there is no substitute for pediatric psychopharmacological research. Successful strategies for overcoming the many obstacles with which this research has to contend must enlist the concerted efforts of all the relevant parties (investigators, clinicians, industry, federal agencies, ethicists, families, and community representatives).

  7. Legal constraints on the use of race in biomedical research: toward a social justice framework.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Dorothy E

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses three questions concerning the legal regulation of the use of race as a category in biomedical research: how does the law currently encourage the use of race in biomedical research?; how might the existing legal framework constrain its use?; and what should be the law's approach to race-based biomedical research? It proposes a social justice approach that aims to promote racial equality by discouraging the use of "race" as a biological category while encouraging its use as a socio-political category to understand and investigate ways to eliminate disparities in health status, access to health care, and medical treatment.

  8. Legal aspects of satellite teleconferencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    The application of satellite communications for teleconferencing purposes is discussed. The legal framework within which such a system or series of systems could be developed is considered. The analysis is based on: (1) satellite teleconferencing regulation, (2) the options available for such a system, (3) regulatory alternatives, and (4) ownership and management aspects. The system is designed to provide a capability for professional education, remote medical diagnosis, business conferences, and computer techniques.

  9. The Employment and Wages of Legalized Immigrants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borjas, George J.; Tienda, Marta

    1993-01-01

    Analyzes employment and wages of recently legalized immigrants using the Legalization Application Processing System file which is based on individual records of amnesty applicants and draws comparisons with sample of foreign-born population from Current Population Surveys of 1983, 1986, and 1988. Among demographic differences of total foreign-born…

  10. [Legal aspects of transplant and donation].

    PubMed

    Teijeira, R

    2006-01-01

    The Spanish model of organ and tissue donation enjoys great prestige in the world medical sphere and has been the object of study and imitation in different countries. Part of this success is due to the fact that since the year 1979 different legal norms have been enacted that have regulated and facilitated donation. The current legislation on the donation and transplant of organs and tissues is based on the principles of the gratuity and confidentiality of the donation, indicating the need for facilitating the formation of organisations at the level of the autonomous communities and at the national level. It also contains the requisites for donation of both live donors and deceased donors, establishing the norms for certification of death due to cardiorespiratory arrest and due to the irreversible cease of brain functions.

  11. ‘E-learning’ modalities in the current era of Medical Education in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Jawaid, Masood; Aly, Syed Moyn

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of e-Learning modalities, some or all of which may be used throughout a medical, dental, nursing or any other health related undergraduate curriculum. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe what e-learning is along with some of the modalities, their common advantages and limitations. This publication ends with practical implications of these modalities for Pakistan. PMID:25225547

  12. 'E-learning' modalities in the current era of Medical Education in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Masood; Aly, Syed Moyn

    2014-09-01

    There are a number of e-Learning modalities, some or all of which may be used throughout a medical, dental, nursing or any other health related undergraduate curriculum. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe what e-learning is along with some of the modalities, their common advantages and limitations. This publication ends with practical implications of these modalities for Pakistan.

  13. [Forensic-medical examination of the effect of current synthetic detergents on the exhibits].

    PubMed

    Galitskiĭ, F A; Musabekova, S A

    2007-01-01

    A test for trace quantities of synthetic detergents on fabric is described in detail. Feasibility of detergents identification in the spots on the exhibits with thin-layer chromatography on silufol is shown and cases of such identification in biological material are given for illustration. Adequacy of the results is confirmed. Such investigation in forensic-medical practice will raise informative value of expert certification in cases when standard biological methods are unable to provide necessary precision.

  14. Model VESL Program Guide, Office Information Systems, International: One Semester Intensive Training Certificate of Achievement Programs in General, Medical, and Legal Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Irma J.

    The Office Information Systems-International Program at Southwestern College, in California, was designed to provide Hispanic students with training for entry-level office employment. This model program guide stems from a project to improve curricula and delivery and focuses on changes in three intensive bilingual programs in general, medical, and…

  15. Computerised physician order entry-related medication errors: analysis of reported errors and vulnerability testing of current systems

    PubMed Central

    Schiff, G D; Amato, M G; Eguale, T; Boehne, J J; Wright, A; Koppel, R; Rashidee, A H; Elson, R B; Whitney, D L; Thach, T-T; Bates, D W; Seger, A C

    2015-01-01

    Importance Medication computerised provider order entry (CPOE) has been shown to decrease errors and is being widely adopted. However, CPOE also has potential for introducing or contributing to errors. Objectives The objectives of this study are to (a) analyse medication error reports where CPOE was reported as a ‘contributing cause’ and (b) develop ‘use cases’ based on these reports to test vulnerability of current CPOE systems to these errors. Methods A review of medication errors reported to United States Pharmacopeia MEDMARX reporting system was made, and a taxonomy was developed for CPOE-related errors. For each error we evaluated what went wrong and why and identified potential prevention strategies and recurring error scenarios. These scenarios were then used to test vulnerability of leading CPOE systems, asking typical users to enter these erroneous orders to assess the degree to which these problematic orders could be entered. Results Between 2003 and 2010, 1.04 million medication errors were reported to MEDMARX, of which 63 040 were reported as CPOE related. A review of 10 060 CPOE-related cases was used to derive 101 codes describing what went wrong, 67 codes describing reasons why errors occurred, 73 codes describing potential prevention strategies and 21 codes describing recurring error scenarios. Ability to enter these erroneous order scenarios was tested on 13 CPOE systems at 16 sites. Overall, 298 (79.5%) of the erroneous orders were able to be entered including 100 (28.0%) being ‘easily’ placed, another 101 (28.3%) with only minor workarounds and no warnings. Conclusions and relevance Medication error reports provide valuable information for understanding CPOE-related errors. Reports were useful for developing taxonomy and identifying recurring errors to which current CPOE systems are vulnerable. Enhanced monitoring, reporting and testing of CPOE systems are important to improve CPOE safety. PMID:25595599

  16. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Comparison of Current Knowledge, Attitudes and Interest among German Medical Students and Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Münstedt, Karsten; Harren, Hildegard; von Georgi, Richard; Hackethal, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Although it has been agreed that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be included in the German medical curriculum, there is no consensus on which methods and how it should be taught. This study aimed to assess needs for CAM education by evaluating current knowledge, attitudes and interests of medical students, general physicians and gynecologists. Two instruments based on established and validated questionnaires were developed. One was given to seventh semester medical students and the other to office-based doctors. Data were analyzed by bivariate correlation and cross-tabulation. Altogether 550 questionnaires were distributed—280 to doctors and 270 to medical students. Completed questionnaires were returned by 80.4% of students and 78.2% of doctors. Although 73.8% (160/219) of doctors and 40% (87/217) of students had already informed themselves about CAM, neither group felt that they knew much about CAM. Doctors believed that CAM was most useful in general medicine, supportive oncology, pediatrics, dermatology and gynecology, while students believed that dermatology, general medicine, psychiatry and rheumatology offered opportunities; both recommended that CAM should be taught in these areas. Both groups believed that CAM should be included in medical education; however, they believed that CAM needed more investigation and should be taught “critically". German doctors and students would like to be better informed about CAM. An approach which teaches fundamental competences to students, chooses specific content based on evidence, demographics and medical conditions and provides students with the skills they need for future learning should be adopted. PMID:19098296

  17. Legal principles of confidentiality and other public interests: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Fullbrook, Suzanne

    The principles of confidentiality are of paramount importance to nurses and all health professionals. This is explicitly so as the Common Law recognizes confidentiality and supports its importance. However, current practice must take cognizance of the realities of 21st century healthcare delivery - we live in an age of electronic data that is potentially very difficult to keep secret. New rules, protocols and guidelines are being formulated, and regulatory bodies such as the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) reflect such rules in their codes of professional conduct. There is, however, a debate that is suggesting that the rules that relate to confidentiality may need to expand or even bend a little as innovate ways of obtaining, storing, utilizing and communicating data continue to occupy the minds of government and those who formulate legal principles (British Medical Association, 2005). This series of three articles will explore these issues. The first part is a review of case law that explores the fundamental legal principles that underpin confidentiality. The second will concentrate on a review of the guidelines that are to be found in professional regulatory documentation - the NMC and the General Medical Council as they relate to the legal principles. The third and last part will review and reflect on issues that relate expressly to the implementation of electronic patient records, with a review of appropriate statutory legislation and principles of common law.

  18. [Euthanasia: medications and medical procedures].

    PubMed

    Lossignol, D

    2008-09-01

    The Belgian law relative to euthanasia has been published in 2002. A physician is allowed to help a patient with intractable suffering (physical or psychological). Legal conditions are clear. However, nothing is said about medical procedures or medications to be used. The present paper will present specific clinical situations at the end of life, practical procedures and medications. A special focus is made on psychological impact of euthanasia.

  19. Medical information and the right to privacy

    SciTech Connect

    Drell, D.

    1994-06-01

    This report is a compilation of submitted abstracts of papers presented at the DOE-supported workshop on medical information and the right to privacy held at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, on June 9 and 10, 1994. The aim of this meeting is to provide a forum to discuss the legal, ethical and practical issues related to the computerization and use of medical data, as well as the potential impact the use of these data may have on an individual`s privacy. Topical areas include an overview of the Federal and legal requirements to collect medical data, historical experiences with worker screening programs, currently available medical surveillance technologies (both biomedical and computer technologies) and their limitations. In addition, an-depth assessment of the needs and interests of a wide spectrum of parties as they relate to the use of medical data from both a legal and privacy perspective is provided. The needs of the individual, the public (e.g., blood and tissue banks), private enterprises (e.g., industry and insurance carriers), and the government (e.g., FBI) are discussed. Finally, the practical and legal issues relating to the use of computers to carry, store and transmit this information are also examined. The abstracts are presented in the intended order of presentation as indicated in the agenda for the meeting.

  20. Retention in care and medication adherence: current challenges to antiretroviral therapy success.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Carol W; Brady, Kathleen A; Yehia, Baligh R

    2015-04-01

    Health behaviors such as retention in HIV medical care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) pose major challenges to reducing new HIV infections, addressing health disparities, and improving health outcomes. Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use provides a conceptual framework for understanding how patient and environmental factors affect health behaviors and outcomes, which can inform the design of intervention strategies. Factors affecting retention and adherence among persons with HIV include patient predisposing factors (e.g., mental illness, substance abuse), patient-enabling factors (e.g., social support, reminder strategies, medication characteristics, transportation, housing, insurance), and healthcare environment factors (e.g., pharmacy services, clinic experiences, provider characteristics). Evidence-based recommendations for improving retention and adherence include (1) systematic monitoring of clinic attendance and ART adherence; (2) use of peer or paraprofessional navigators to re-engage patients in care and help them remain in care; (3) optimization of ART regimens and pharmaceutical supply chain management systems; (4) provision of reminder devices and tools; (5) general education and counseling; (6) engagement of peer, family, and community support groups; (7) case management; and (8) targeting patients with substance abuse and mental illness. Further research is needed on effective monitoring strategies and interventions that focus on improving retention and adherence, with specific attention to the healthcare environment.

  1. Current research on the epidemiology, medical and psychiatric effects, and treatment of methamphetamine use

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a drug that is widely used in many parts of the world. It has multiple neurobiological impacts on the nervous system, some of which are transitory and some more long lasting. MA activates the reward system of the brain and produces effects that are highly reinforcing, which can lead to abuse and dependence. Routes of administration that produce rapid onset of the drug’s effects (i.e., smoking and injection) are likely to lead to more rapid addiction and more medical and psychiatric effects. The medical effects of MA use are extensive, and chronic use of MA can produce significant neurological damage as well as damage to cardiovascular, pulmonary, and other organ systems. Both acute and chronic MA use can lead to extreme paranoia, anxiety, and depression, and following discontinuation of MA use, cognitive deficits and anhedonia can persist for months. No effective pharmacotherapies have been developed for the treatment of MA dependence, although this is an area of very active research. Several behavioral treatments have been shown to reduce MA use, but better treatments are needed. The research agenda for MA is substantial, with development of effective pharmacotherapies as one of the most important priorities. PMID:25214749

  2. Current Research on Methamphetamine: Epidemiology, Medical and Psychiatric Effects, Treatment, and Harm Reduction Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Radfar, Seyed Ramin; Rawson, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine (MA) which is known as “shisheh” in Iran is a drug that widely is used in many parts of the world and it is near to a decade that is available for the most drug users and has a considerable prevalence of use. Due to high abuse prevalence and very new challenging phenomenon, it is very important that researchers and treatment providers become more familiar with different aspects of MA. Discussion It has multiple neurobiological impacts on the nervous system, some of which are transitory and some longer lasting. MA activates the reward system of the brain and produces effects that are highly reinforcing, which can lead to abuse and dependence. Routes of administration that produce rapid onset of the drug’s effects (i.e., smoking and injection) are likely to lead to more rapid addiction and more medical and psychiatric effects. No effective pharmacotherapies have been developed for the treatment of MA dependence; although, this is an area of very active research. Several behavioral treatments have been shown to reduce MA use, but better treatments are needed. Conclusion Harm reduction strategies for non-treatment seeking MA users are needed to reduce the risk of human immunodeficiency virus and other medical risks. The research agenda for MA is substantial, with development of effective pharmacotherapies as one of the most important priorities. Appropriate and effective response for prevention, treatment and harm reduction services due to increasing problems regarding MA in Iran and some other countries in the region. PMID:25984282

  3. [Current status of the development of wireless sensors for medical applications].

    PubMed

    Moor, C; Braecklein, M; Jörns, N

    2005-01-01

    Wireless near-field transmission has been a challenge for scientists developing medical sensors for a long time. Here, instruments which measure a patient's ECG, oxygen saturation, blood pressure, peak flow, weight, blood glucose etc. are to be equipped with suitable transmission technology. Application scenarios for these sensors can be found in all medical areas where cable connections are irritating for the doctor, patient and other care personnel. This problem is especially common in sport medicine, sleep medicine, emergency medicine and intensive care. Based on its beneficial properties with regard to power consumption, range, data security and network capability, the worldwide standard radio technology Bluetooth was selected to transmit measurements. Since digital data is sent to a receiving station via Bluetooth, the measurement pre-processing now takes place in the patient sensor itself, instead of being processed by the monitor. In this article, a Bluetooth ECG, Bluetooth pulse oximeter, Bluetooth peak flow meter and Bluetooth event recorder will be introduced. On the one hand, systems can be realized with these devices, which allow patients to be monitored online (ECG, pulse oximeter). These devices can also be integrated in disease management programs (peak flow meter) and can be used to monitor high-risk patients in their home environment (event recorder).

  4. Structural and legal implications of e-health.

    PubMed

    Terry, N P

    2000-01-01

    Web and attendant e-Commerce phenomena are irretrievably at odds with the traditional structure and hence legal regulation of health delivery. E-Health delivers healthcare information, diagnosis, treatment, care, and prescribing of drugs in a nonlinear, nonhierarchical manner that encourages patients to "enter" the system at an infinite number of points, thus defying current regulatory constructs. Similarly, e-Commerce fundamentals such as disintermediation and disaggregation result in medical information being delivered through unfamiliar channels, creating immensely difficult questions for health lawyers.

  5. The impact of marijuana policies on youth: clinical, research, and legal update.

    PubMed

    2015-03-01

    This policy statement is an update of the American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement "Legalization of Marijuana: Potential Impact on Youth," published in 2004. Pediatricians have special expertise in the care of children and adolescents and may be called on to advise legislators about the potential impact of changes in the legal status of marijuana on adolescents. Parents also may look to pediatricians for advice as they consider whether to support state-level initiatives that propose to legalize the use of marijuana for medical and nonmedical purposes or to decriminalize the possession of small amounts of marijuana. This policy statement provides the position of the American Academy of Pediatrics on the issue of marijuana legalization. The accompanying technical report reviews what is currently known about the relationships of marijuana use with health and the developing brain and the legal status of marijuana and adolescents' use of marijuana to better understand how change in legal status might influence the degree of marijuana use by adolescents in the future.

  6. Substitute decision making in medicine: comparative analysis of the ethico-legal discourse in England and Germany.

    PubMed

    Jox, Ralf J; Michalowski, Sabine; Lorenz, Jorn; Schildmann, Jan

    2008-06-01

    Health care decision making for patients without decisional capacity is ethically and legally challenging. Advance directives (living wills) have proved to be of limited usefulness in clinical practice. Therefore, academic attention should focus more on substitute decision making by the next of kin. In this article, we comparatively analyse the legal approaches to substitute medical decision making in England and Germany. Based on the current ethico-legal discourse in both countries, three aspects of substitute decision making will be highlighted: (1) Should there be a legally predefined order of relatives who serve as health care proxies? (2) What should be the respective roles and decisional powers of patient-appointed versus court-appointed substitute decision-makers? (3) Which criteria should be determined by law to guide substitute decision-makers?

  7. Screening: the legal view.

    PubMed

    Eaden, J; Mayberry, M K; Sherr, A; Mayberry, J F

    2001-05-01

    Screening has become central to the effective prevention of several diseases, but implementation suffers from difficulties with targeting and rates of compliance. Such issues are also complicated by the need to consider legal provisions regarding confidentiality of patients and other human rights issues. Screening has been an inexact science in relation to, e.g., faecal occult blood testing for colorectal cancer, false positive and false negative tests for HIV, and there have been inadequate quality controls in breast cancer screening programmes. The public need to be made aware of what the screening programmes really offer, balanced against the expectations they may have. There needs to be a clearer understanding of the nature of the contractual and other legal rights of patients/consumers as against providers. A positive screening test may carry adverse consequences as well as benefits. It could alert an insurance company to a risk and lead to additional weighting or even outright rejection for life insurance policies. Job prospects may also be affected for employees. The method of informing patients in relation to screening and screening failure has already been considered by the courts. Realistic information about both screening and treatment efficiency needs to be offered to patients so that they can have a real understanding of what can and cannot be achieved by current science. The development of understanding of the human genome makes the need for clearer legislation in this are more urgent.

  8. Legal and Administrative Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Hans

    1977-01-01

    A discussion of legal and administrative language, and the necessity for accurate translation of this language in the field of international relations. Topics treated are: characteristic features of legal and administrative terminology; the interpretation of it; and the technique of translating legal and administrative texts. (AMH)

  9. The Principal's Legal Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, William E., Ed.; And Others

    The principal is faced with myriad legal issues on a daily basis, making it imperative that he or she keep abreast with developing legal issues. The first of four sections, "Students and the Law," surveys federal statutes and landmark Supreme Court decisions pertaining to the rights of students. It addresses legal issues regarding search and…

  10. Managing Legal Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Richard H.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses school administrators' legal-affairs management responsibilities regarding legal advice, law versus ethics, and sources of law. Suggests strategies for retaining and managing legal counsel and avoiding situations involving litigation, torts, and conflict resolution. Explains general counsel services; outlines education,…

  11. Current and potential cyber attacks on medical journals; guidelines for improving security.

    PubMed

    Dadkhah, Mehdi; Seno, Seyed Amin Hosseini; Borchardt, Glenn

    2017-03-01

    At the moment, scholarly publishing is faced with much academic misconduct and threats such as predatory journals, hijacked journals, phishing, and other scams. In response, we have been discussing this misconduct and trying to increase the awareness of researchers, but it seems that there is a lack of research that presents guidelines for editors to help them protect themselves against these threats. It seems that information security is missing in some parts of scholarly publishing that particularly involves medical journals. In this paper, we explain different types of cyber-attacks that especially threaten editors and academic journals. We then explain the details involved in each type of attack. Finally, we present general guidelines for detection and prevention of the attacks. In some cases, we use small experiments to show that our claim is true. Finally, we conclude the paper with a prioritization of these attacks.

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopy for medical applications: Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu

    2016-04-01

    The near-infrared radiation (NIR) window, also known as the "optical window" or "therapeutic window", is the range of wavelengths that has the maximum depth of penetration in tissue. Indeed, because NIR is minimally absorbed by water and hemoglobin, spectra readings can be easily collected from the body surface. Recent reports have shown the potential of NIR spectroscopy in various medical applications, including functional analysis of the brain and other tissues, as well as an analytical tool for diagnosing diseases. The broad applicability of NIR spectroscopy facilitates the diagnosis and therapy of diseases as well as elucidating their pathophysiology. This review introduces recent advances and describes new studies in NIR to demonstrate potential clinical applications of NIR spectroscopy.

  13. Medical marijuana: Medical necessity versus political agenda

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter A.; Capuzzi, Kevin; Fick, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Summary Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as an illegal Schedule I drug which has no accepted medical use. However, recent studies have shown that medical marijuana is effective in controlling chronic non-cancer pain, alleviating nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, treating wasting syndrome associated with AIDS, and controlling muscle spasms due to multiple sclerosis. These studies state that the alleviating benefits of marijuana outweigh the negative effects of the drug, and recommend that marijuana be administered to patients who have failed to respond to other therapies. Despite supporting evidence, the DEA refuses to reclassify marijuana as a Schedule II drug, which would allow physicians to prescribe marijuana to suffering patients. The use of medical marijuana has continued to gain support among states, and is currently legal in 16 states and the District of Columbia. This is in stark contrast to the federal government’s stance of zero-tolerance, which has led to a heated legal debate in the United States. After reviewing relevant scientific data and grounding the issue in ethical principles like beneficence and nonmaleficence, there is a strong argument for allowing physicians to prescribe marijuana. Patients have a right to all beneficial treatments and to deny them this right violates their basic human rights. PMID:22129912

  14. Legally high? Legal considerations of Salvia divinorum.

    PubMed

    Griffin, O Hayden; Miller, Bryan Lee; Khey, David N

    2008-06-01

    The legal status of the hallucinogenic plant Salvia divinorum has been rapidly changing. Legal prohibitions on this plant native to Oaxaca, Mexico have emerged at the state level, a phenomenon that has not occurred since the passage of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). Included will be a brief description of the plant that has only recently crept into the popular American consciousness, and a review of the different legal mechanisms through which states have controlled the plant and the pending legislation proposing controls. Lastly, the implications of various state laws are discussed.

  15. Current Medical Treatment of Patients with Non-Colorectal Liver Metastases: Primary Tumor Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liedtke, Cornelia; Kolberg, Hans-Christian

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background (Metastatic) breast cancer is a heterogeneous entity in which every disease subtype requires an individualized systemic treatment approach. Methods We reviewed the currently available data regarding systemic therapy of breast cancer and present a review of historical and current treatment approaches, with the publications cited covering a time span from 1896 to the last ASCO 2015. Results Systemic therapy of metastatic breast cancer may include chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, and targeted therapies (e.g. antibody-based approaches). Based on the patient's breast cancer subtype, these agents may be employed alone or in combination. Therefore, characterization of the phenotype of the disease is necessary and may include biopsy of the metastatic site. Novel therapeutic approaches include immunologic therapies as well as PARP, PI3K and CDK 4/6 inhibitors, which are currently under investigation in clinical trials. Conclusion Systemic therapy of metastatic breast cancer requires complex and individualized treatment approaches that are best offered in an interdisciplinary setting. PMID:26889146

  16. Current state of information technologies for the clinical research enterprise across academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Shawn N; Dubey, Anil; Embi, Peter J; Harris, Paul A; Richter, Brent G; Turisco, Fran; Weber, Griffin M; Tcheng, James E; Keogh, Diane

    2012-06-01

    Information technology (IT) to support clinical research has steadily grown over the past 10 years. Many new applications at the enterprise level are available to assist with the numerous tasks necessary in performing clinical research. However, it is not clear how rapidly this technology is being adopted or whether it is making an impact upon how clinical research is being performed. The Clinical Research Forum's IT Roundtable performed a survey of 17 representative academic medical centers (AMCs) to understand the adoption rate and implementation strategies within this field. The results were compared with similar surveys from 4 and 6 years ago. We found the adoption rate for four prominent areas of IT-supported clinical research had increased remarkably, specifically regulatory compliance, electronic data capture for clinical trials, data repositories for secondary use of clinical data, and infrastructure for supporting collaboration. Adoption of other areas of clinical research IT was more irregular with wider differences between AMCs. These differences appeared to be partially due to a set of openly available applications that have emerged to occupy an important place in the landscape of clinical research enterprise-level support at AMC's.

  17. Current status of medical and veterinary entomology in France: endangered discipline or promising science?

    PubMed

    Cuisance, Dominique; Antoine Rioux, Jean

    2004-09-01

    Following alarming statements (French Senate, Académie des Sciences) on the present situation concerning entomology and systematics in France, the Conseil Général Vétérinaire designated one of us (D.C.) to carry out a survey on the status of medical and veterinary entomology (MVE) with respect to research orientations and university curricula. Around 100 participants, including scientists, teachers and several directors of research and educational bodies, were interviewed and filled in questionnaires for this survey. On the basis of the results, it was concluded that the deterioration of MVE in France is associated with: (1) the hasty reorganisation of training and research in the life sciences, leading to the disappearance of several disciplines. Hence, the postgraduate DEA degree in entomology was eliminated, and even the name 'entomology' no longer appears in teaching programmes or on research contracts; (2) France's withdrawal from action research programmes in developing countries. Although these programmes were efficient in controlling outbreaks of major endemic diseases, integrated pest and vector management programmes have been replaced by basic health care ('Health for everyone in 2000') and vaccination programmes; (3) the general shift from field to laboratory research, focused mainly on molecular mechanisms. The survey results confirmed generally acknowledged trends concerning many points and highlighted several specific problems, such as the disappearance of systematics experts. Several potential solutions are proposed.

  18. Implications of marijuana legalization for adolescent substance use.

    PubMed

    Hopfer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana that is legally available for adults has multiple implications for adolescent substance use. One potential effect that legalization may have is an increase in adolescent use to due increased availability, greater social acceptance, and possibly lower prices. Legalization may also facilitate the introduction of new formulations of marijuana (edible, vaporized) and with potentially higher potencies. It is unknown what adolescent consumption patterns will be if marijuana is widely available and marketed in different forms, or what effects different patterns of adolescent use will have on cognition, the development of marijuana use disorders, school performance, and the development of psychotic illnesses. Also unclear is whether adolescent users will be experiencing higher levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) compared with previous generations of users due to higher potencies. Although previous studies of the effects of adolescent marijuana use provide some guidance for current policy and public health recommendations, many new studies will be needed that answer questions in the context of use within a legal adult environment. Claims that marijuana has medicinal benefits create additional challenges for adolescent prevention efforts, as they contrast with messages of its harmfulness. Prevention and treatment approaches will need to address perceptions of the safety of marijuana, claims of its medicinal use, and consider family-wide effects as older siblings and parents may increasingly openly consume and advocate for marijuana use. Guidance for primary care physicians will be needed regarded screening and counseling. Widespread legalization and acceptance of marijuana implies that as law enforcement approaches for marijuana control decline, public health, medical, and scientific efforts to understand and reduce negative consequences of adolescent marijuana use need to be substantially increased to levels commensurate with those efforts for tobacco and alcohol.

  19. Implications of Marijuana Legalization for Adolescent Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Hopfer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana that is legally available for adults has multiple implications for adolescent substance use. One potential effect that legalization may have is an increase in adolescent use to due increased availability, greater social acceptance, and possibly lower prices. Legalization may also facilitate the introduction of new formulations of marijuana (edible, vaporized) and with potentially higher potencies. It is unknown what adolescent consumption patterns will be if marijuana is widely available and marketed in different forms, or what effects different patterns of adolescent use will have on cognition, the development of marijuana use disorders, school performance, and the development of psychotic illnesses. Also unclear is whether adolescent users will be experiencing higher levels of THC compared with previous generations of users due to higher potencies. While previous studies of the effects of adolescent marijuana use provide some guidance for current policy and public health recommendations, many new studies will be needed that answer questions in the context of use within a legal adult environment. Claims that marijuana has medicinal benefits create additional challenges for adolescent prevention efforts as they contrast with messages of its harmfulness. Prevention and treatment approaches will need to address perceptions of the safety of marijuana, claims of its medicinal use, and consider family-wide effects as older siblings and parents may increasingly openly consume and advocate for marijuana use. Guidance for primary care physicians will be needed regarded screening and counseling. Widespread legalization and acceptance of marijuana implies that as law enforcement approaches for marijuana control decline, public health, medical, and scientific efforts to understand and reduce negative consequences of adolescent marijuana use need to be substantially increased to levels commensurate with those efforts for tobacco and alcohol. PMID:25127003

  20. Challenges of access to medicine and the responsibility of pharmaceutical companies: a legal perspective.

    PubMed

    Ahmadiani, Saeed; Nikfar, Shekoufeh

    2016-05-04

    The right to health as a basic human right- and access to medicine as a part of it- have been a matter of attention for several decades. Also the responsibilities of different parties- particularly pharmaceutical companies- in realization of this right has been emphasized by World Health Organization. This is while many companies find no incentive for research and development of medicines related to rare diseases. Also some legal structures such as "patent agreements" clearly cause huge difficulties for access to medicine in many countries. High prices of brand medicine and no legal production of generics can increase the catastrophic costs- as well as morbidity-mortality of medication in lower income countries. Here we evidently review the current challenges in access to medicine and critically assess its legal roots. How societies/governors can make the pharmaceutical companies responsible is also discussed to have a look on possible future and actions that policy makers- in local or global level- can take.

  1. [The fiscal position of medical specialists].

    PubMed

    Stevens, S; Moors, M

    2013-01-01

    Independent medical specialists in the Netherlands are treated as entrepreneurs for tax purposes and therefore enjoy tax benefits. A change in the legal relationship between medical specialists and hospitals is foreseen in 2015. Independent medical specialists will then no longer be considered to be entrepreneurs. This could negatively affect their tax position. The Dutch government has adopted a policy aimed at controlling expenses arising from medical specialists' fees. According to this policy, the formation of regional practices or mega-practices of specialists will be discouraged. In contrast, the current fiscal legislation encourages medical specialists to incorporate their practice into regional practices or mega-practices or to become shareholders of their hospitals. It has been proposed that fiscal benefits be linked to certain aspects of entrepreneurship, such as investing in medical equipment or employing medical personnel.

  2. Overview of the current attempts toward the medical treatment of cataract

    SciTech Connect

    Kador, P.F.

    1983-04-01

    A variety of agents are currently available that claim to either prevent, delay, or reverse cataracts associated with aging (senile cataracts), radiation, or diabetes and galactosemia (sugar cataracts). Senile cataract therapy includes formulation containing inorganic salts, nutritional supplements, natural product extracts, sulfhydryl, and sulfonic acid containing compounds and miscellaneous redox and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory compounds. Agents associated with the treatment of radiation cataracts include antioxidants and free radial scavengers. Aldose reductase inhibitors have been effective in the prevention of sugar cataracts. A summary of these agents and their potential ocular effects are presented.

  3. The Legal Implications of Student Use of Social Networking Sites in the UK and US: Current Concerns and Lessons for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Mark R.; Lee, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a comparative snapshot of the current state of the law in the US and UK with respect to potential liability of university and college students for use (and misuse) of social networking sites. It reviews the limited case law on this topic, highlights the differences in the two nations' laws of defamation and the various possible…

  4. Preemptive clinical pharmacogenetics implementation: current programs in five US medical centers.

    PubMed

    Dunnenberger, Henry M; Crews, Kristine R; Hoffman, James M; Caudle, Kelly E; Broeckel, Ulrich; Howard, Scott C; Hunkler, Robert J; Klein, Teri E; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2015-01-01

    Although the field of pharmacogenetics has existed for decades, practioners have been slow to implement pharmacogenetic testing in clinical care. Numerous publications describe the barriers to clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics. Recently, several freely available resources have been developed to help address these barriers. In this review, we discuss current programs that use preemptive genotyping to optimize the pharmacotherapy of patients. Array-based preemptive testing includes a large number of relevant pharmacogenes that impact multiple high-risk drugs. Using a preemptive approach allows genotyping results to be available prior to any prescribing decision so that genomic variation may be considered as an inherent patient characteristic in the planning of therapy. This review describes the common elements among programs that have implemented preemptive genotyping and highlights key processes for implementation, including clinical decision support.

  5. Decontamination of the Activation Product Based on a Legal Revision of the Cyclotron Vault Room on the Non-self-shield Compact Medical Cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Komiya, Isao; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Nakamura, Kazumasa; Baba, Shingo; Honda, Hiroshi

    The non-self-shield compact medical cyclotron and the cyclotron vault room were in operation for 27 years. They have now been decommissioned. We efficiently implemented a technique to identify an activation product in the cyclotron vault room. Firstly, the distribution of radioactive concentrations in the concrete of the cyclotron vault room was estimated by calculation from the record of the cyclotron operation. Secondly, the comparison of calculated results with an actual measurement was performed using a NaI scintillation survey meter and a high-purity germanium detector. The calculated values were overestimated as compared to the values measured using the NaI scintillation survey meter and the high-purity germanium detector. However, it could limit the decontamination area. By simulating the activation range, we were able to minimize the concrete core sampling. Finally, the appropriate range of radioactivated area in the cyclotron vault room was decontaminated based on the results of the calculation. After decontamination, the radioactive concentration was below the detection limit value in all areas inside the cyclotron vault room. By these procedures, the decommissioning process of the cyclotron vault room was more efficiently performed.

  6. Lethal envenomation: medicolegal aspects of snakebites and religious snake handlers in Kentucky: a report of three cases with comment on medical, legal, and public policy ramifications.

    PubMed

    Hunsaker, Donna M; Hunsaker, John C; Clayton, Tara; Spiller, Henry A

    2005-11-01

    Ritualistic serpent qua snake handling, which rests upon inveterate religious conviction arising out of literal interpretation of selected passages of the New Testament, is a rare ceremony practiced by a distinct minority of Christians predominantly in rural Appalachian regions of the United States commonly referred to as the Bible belt. The fervent, frenzied pursuit by anointed "sign-followers" of intimate contact with a variety of poisonous snakes, however, puts the handler together with sect members or bystanders at risk for lethal envenomation, particularly when prompt medical attention is held by the congregation of faith to contravene God's will. The authors report three separate cases of death due to envenomation by snakebite during a church service and the handler's faith-based refusal to seek treatment. Postmortem examination of each yielded similar physical findings attributable to various toxic sequelae of the complex venoms. A review of the injurious constituents of these chemical toxins also includes a discussion of complex pathophysiological mechanisms causing death. In addition, the authors review the history of representative legislative and judicial responses to the sensationally mortal phenomenon, all of which ineluctably grapple with fundamental Constitutional issues devolving from such controversial religious practices. We underscore the view that a thoroughly documented medicolegal investigation and autopsy are indispensable to both inform matters of public health and thereby contribute to the formulation of sound public policy.

  7. Faculty perceptions of the strengths, weaknesses and future prospects of the current medical undergraduate experimental physiology curriculum in Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Paralikar, Swapnil; Shah, Chinmay

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, an opinion has emerged in India that the current practical curricula in medical schools fail to meet many of the objectives for which they were instituted. Hence, this study has assessed the perception of physiology faculty members regarding the current experimental physiology curriculum in one Indian state, Gujarat. The faculty were of the opinion that many of the topics currently taught in experimental physiology (amphibian nerve-muscle and heart muscle experiments) were outdated and clinically irrelevant: Therefore, the faculty advocated that duration of teaching time devoted to some of these topics should be reduced and topics with clinical relevance should be introduced at the undergraduate level. The faculty also felt that more emphasis should be laid on highlighting the clinical aspect related to each concept taught in experimental physiology . Moreover, a majority of faculty members were in favour of replacing the current practice in Gujarat of teaching experimental physiology only by explanation of graphs obtained from experiments conducted in the previous years, with computer assisted learning in small groups.

  8. Medical marijuana: A panacea or scourge.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Surender; Kashyap, Kartikeya

    2014-04-01

    Marijuana (Cannabis sativa) has been used for recreational and medical purposes since ages. Marijuana smoking is an evil, which is on the rise with about 180.6 million active users worldwide. The recent legalization of marijuana in Uruguay has generated global interest. The purpose of this short review is to describe the various preparations, uses and adverse effects of medical marijuana. It also deals with the adverse effects of marijuana smoking when used for recreational purposes. ased on the current literature, medical use of marijuana is justified in certain conditions as an alternative therapy.

  9. Have the Answers to Common Legal Questions Concerning Nutrition Support Changed Over the Past Decade? 10 Questions for 10 Years.

    PubMed

    Barrocas, Albert; Cohen, Michael L

    2016-06-01

    Clinical nutrition specialists (CNSs) are often confronted with technological, ethical, and legal questions, that is, what can be done technologically, what should be done ethically, and what must be done legally, which conflict at times. The conflict represents a "troubling trichotomy" as discussed in the lead article of this issue of Nutrition in Clinical Practice (NCP). During Clinical Nutrition Week in 2006, a symposium covering these 3 topics was presented, and later that year, an article covering the same topic was published in NCP In this article, we revisit several legal questions/issues that were raised 10 years ago and discuss current answers and approaches. Some of the answers remain unchanged. Other answers have been modified by additional legislation, court decisions, or regulations. In addition, new questions/issues have arisen. Some of the most common questions regarding nutrition support involve the following: liability, informed consent, medical decisional incapacity vs legal competence, advance directive specificity, surrogate decision making, physician orders for life-sustaining treatment and electronic medical orders for life-sustaining treatment, legal definition of death, patient vs family decision making, the noncompliant patient, and elder abuse obligations. In the current healthcare environment, these questions and issues are best addressed via a transdisciplinary team that focuses on function rather than form. The CNS can play a pivotal role in dealing with these challenges by applying the acronym ACT: being Accountable and Communicating with all stakeholders while actively participating as an integral part of the transdisciplinary Team.

  10. Anti-dementia medications: current prescriptions in clinical practice and new agents in progress

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Florindo; Radanovic, Márcia; Canineu, Paulo Renato; de Paula, Vanessa J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Almost three decades after the publication of the first clinical studies with tacrine, the pharmacological treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remains a challenge. Randomized clinical trials have yielded evidence of significant – although modest and transient – benefit from cholinergic replacement therapy for people diagnosed with AD, and disease modification with antidementia compounds is still an urgent, unmet need. The natural history of AD is very long, and its pharmacological treatment must acknowledge different needs according to the stage of the disease process. Cognitive and functional deterioration evolves gradually since the onset of clinical symptoms, which may be preceded by several years or perhaps decades of silent, presymptomatic neurodegeneration. Therefore, the pharmacological treatment of AD must ideally comprise both a symptomatic effect to preserve or improve cognition and a disease-modifying effect to tackle the progression of the pathological process. Primary prevention is the ultimate goal, should these strategies be delivered to patients with preclinical AD. In this article, we briefly address the pharmaceutical compounds that are currently used for the symptomatic treatment of AD and discuss the ongoing strategies designed to modify its natural course. PMID:26301069

  11. [Role of classical oral glucose-lowering medications in current treatment].

    PubMed

    Carramiñana Barrera, F C

    2014-07-01

    Classical oral glucose were discovered in the mid twentieth century. Despite the time elapsed since then and the lack of large studies to support the use of some of these drugs, they continue to be employed, are indicated in all clinical practice guidelines and consensus documents and, overall, remain among the most widely prescribed drugs in the national health system. The main arguments for their continued use are their widespread and prolonged prescription, their effectiveness, and cost. Their main disadvantages have always been and continue to be their adverse gastrointestinal effects, weight gain, the risk of hypoglycemia and other adverse effects, which have encouraged the development of new glucose-lowering drugs with an improved pharmacological profile that would cover the various mechanisms of hyperglycemia. Currently, deep knowledge of glucose-lowering drugs is required in the patient-centered management of diabetes. Furthermore, this knowledge should be adapted to each individual patient to acquire the experience necessary to achieve effective metabolic control, delay the development of chronic complications, and improve the quality of life and life expectancy of patients with diabetes.

  12. Medic Bleep.

    PubMed

    2017-03-15

    Medic Bleep is a secure instant messaging app that enables clinicians to discuss patient care quickly, securely and legally. It looks and feels like WhatsApp, but has been designed for the healthcare market to enable staff to communicate with each other, and to help speed up conversations between clinicians to increase efficiency.

  13. Current and upcoming erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, iron products, and other novel anemia medications.

    PubMed

    Macdougall, Iain C; Ashenden, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Treatment for anemia has come a long way in the last 20 years since the first recombinant human erythropoietins were licensed for the management of anemia in chronic kidney disease. The first-generation epoetins were succeeded by the development and production of a longer-acting erythropoietin (EPO) analog, darbepoetin alpha, which allowed less frequent dosing, usually once weekly or once every 2 weeks. More recently, another EPO-related molecule has been manufactured called Continuous Erythropoietin Receptor Activator with an even longer half-life, and although for patent reasons this is not available in the United States, it is licensed and is already being used in Europe. Other molecules are in development or are becoming licensed in Europe, including biosimilar epoetin products/follow-on biologics, and elsewhere in the world there are cheaper-production "copy" epoetins. Indeed, it is estimated that up to 80 such products may be sold in countries with less stringent regulatory control of pharmaceutical products. Two different biosimilar epoetins have already been licensed in Europe, one under 2 different brand names and one under 3 different brand names, and others may follow. Hematide is a synthetic peptide-based EPO receptor agonist that, interestingly, has no structural homology with EPO, and yet is still able to activate the EPO receptor and stimulate erythropoiesis. This agent is currently in phase III clinical trials. Research continues for orally active antianemic therapies, and several strategies are being investigated, although none is imminently available. Two new intravenous iron preparations have recently been developed, one in the United States (Ferumoxytol; AMAG Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cambridge, MA) and one recently licensed in Europe (ferric carboxymaltose [Ferinject; Vifor Pharma, Zurich, Switzerland]). In conclusion, the development of effective therapies for the treatment of anemia has been a highly active field, both scientifically and

  14. Endocannabinoid system: An overview of its potential in current medical practice.

    PubMed

    Mouslech, Zadalla; Valla, Vasiliki

    2009-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a lipid signalling system, comprising of the endogenous cannabis-like ligands (endocannabinoids) anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), which derive from arachidonic acid. These bind to a family of G-protein-coupled receptors, called CB1 and CB2. The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) is distributed in brain areas associated with motor control, emotional responses, motivated behaviour and energy homeostasis. In the periphery, the same receptor is expressed in the adipose tissue, pancreas, liver, GI tract, skeletal muscles, heart and the reproduction system. The CB2R is mainly expressed in the immune system regulating its functions. Endocannabinoids are synthesized and released upon demand in a receptor-dependent way. They act as retrograde signalling messengers in GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses and as modulators of postsynaptic transmission, interacting with other neurotransmitters. Endocannabinoids are transported into cells by a specific uptake system and degraded by the enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). The ECS is involved in various pathophysiological conditions in central and peripheral tissues. It is implicated in the hormonal regulation of food intake, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, immune, behavioral, antiproliferative and mammalian reproduction functions. Recent advances have correlated the ECS with drug addiction and alcoholism. The growing number of preclinical and clinical data on ECS modulators is bound to result in novel therapeutic approaches for a number of diseases currently treated inadequately. The ECS dysregulation has been correlated to obesity and metabolic syndrome pathogenesis. Rimonabant is the first CB1 blocker launched to treat cardiometabolic risk factors in obese and overweight patients. Phase III clinical trials showed the drug's ability to regulate intra-abdominal fat tissue levels, lipidemic, glycemic and inflammatory parameters. However

  15. Current medical treatment of diabetes type 2 and long term morbidity: how to balance efficacy and safety?

    PubMed

    Carrera Boada, C A; Martínez-Moreno, J M

    2013-03-01

    Current medical treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) requires special attention to different comorbidities that often are associated with hyperglycemia, such as overweight or obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, microvascular or macrovascular complications, etc. .. The control of these factors risk to health is as important as the glucose control in diabetes type 2, it is essential for the antidiabetes drugs consider these risk factors. The consensus statement published by the ADA/EASD and AACE emphasizes that the potential effects of antidiabetes medications on CV risk factors besides hyperglycemia (ie, overweight/obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia) should be considered in pharmacotherapy selection. Since T2DM is a progressive disease with worsening HbA1C values over time, monotherapy, even with different agents, will eventually fail to maintain the glycemic target. Because insulin resistance occurs in a variety of organs and tissues, many patients may achieve fasting glycemic control but develop postprandial hyperglycemia. Other issues include the risk for hypoglycaemia or weight gain with traditional glucose-lowering medications. The AACE/ACE algorithm for glycemic control is structured according to categories of HbA1C and suggests an HbA1C goal of =6.5%, although that may not be appropriate for all patients.42 The algorithm recommends monotherapy, dual therapy, or triple therapy based on initial HbA1C level of 6.5% to 7.5%, 7.6% to 9%, and >9% and reserves initiation of insulin therapy until treatment with oral or other injectable agents has failed. GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors are novel options to improve glycemic control and reduce the incidence of weight gain. Combination therapy with newer and traditional agents improves glycemic control with a low incidence of hypoglycemia.

  16. The current and future role of the medical oncologist in the professional care for cancer patients: a position paper by the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO).

    PubMed

    Popescu, R A; Schäfer, R; Califano, R; Eckert, R; Coleman, R; Douillard, J-Y; Cervantes, A; Casali, P G; Sessa, C; Van Cutsem, E; de Vries, E; Pavlidis, N; Fumasoli, K; Wörmann, B; Samonigg, H; Cascinu, S; Cruz Hernández, J J; Howard, A J; Ciardiello, F; Stahel, R A; Piccart, M

    2014-01-01

    The number of cancer patients in Europe is rising and significant advances in basic and applied cancer research are making the provision of optimal care more challenging. The concept of cancer as a systemic, highly heterogeneous and complex disease has increased the awareness that quality cancer care should be provided by a multidisciplinary team (MDT) of highly qualified healthcare professionals. Cancer patients also have the right to benefit from medical progress by receiving optimal treatment from adequately trained and highly skilled medical professionals. Built on the highest standards of professional training and continuing medical education, medical oncology is recognised as an independent medical specialty in many European countries. Medical oncology is a core member of the MDT and offers cancer patients a comprehensive and systemic approach to treatment and care, while ensuring evidence-based, safe and cost-effective use of cancer drugs and preserving the quality of life of cancer patients through the entire 'cancer journey'. Medical oncologists are also engaged in clinical and translational research to promote innovation and new therapies and they contribute to cancer diagnosis, prevention and research, making a difference for patients in a dynamic, stimulating professional environment. Medical oncologists play an important role in shaping the future of healthcare through innovation and are also actively involved at the political level to ensure a maximum contribution of the profession to Society and to tackle future challenges. This position paper summarises the multifarious and vital contributions of medical oncology and medical oncologists to today's and tomorrow's professional cancer care.

  17. Aid-in-dying practice in Europe and the United States: Legal and ethical perspectives for pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Varadarajan, Ranjani; Freeman, Robert A; Parmar, Jayesh R

    This article briefly reviews 'aid-in-dying' options such as euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in Europe and the US Physician-assisted suicide is now legal in four US States. Current practices, medications used and statistics relating to prescription frequency and death rates from the participating States are briefly discussed. This paper also examines the role of pharmacists in assisted suicides; legal, ethical and professional challenges that they face, and future implications on pharmacist education to enable them to make an educated decision about their involvement in aid-in-dying practices.

  18. [Deceased organ donors, legal regulations governing diagnosis of brain death, overview of donors and liver transplants in the Czech Republic].

    PubMed

    Pokorná, E

    2013-08-01

    The key restriction of transplantation medicine globally, as well as in the Czech Republic, concerns the lack of organs. The number of deceased donors, and thus the availability of organ transplants, has been stagnating in our country. The paper describes current legal regulations governing the dia-gnosis of brain death and primary legal and medical criteria for the contraindication of the deceased for organ explantation, gives an overview of the number of liver transplants, age structure, and diagnosis resulting in brain death of the deceased liver donors in the Czech Republic.

  19. Health and Legal Services in a Disadvantaged Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Challenor, Bernard; Onyeani, Loretta

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the role legal services play in public health care delivery in disadvantaged communities in relation to such socio-medical problems as lead poisoning, child abuse, involuntary mental commitment, and housing code violations. Recommends a legal advocacy program to ensure adequate public health care. (Author/SF)

  20. 42 CFR 35.12 - Solicitation of legal business prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Solicitation of legal business prohibited. 35.12 Section 35.12 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT General § 35.12 Solicitation of legal...

  1. 42 CFR 35.12 - Solicitation of legal business prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Solicitation of legal business prohibited. 35.12 Section 35.12 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT General § 35.12 Solicitation of legal...

  2. 42 CFR 35.12 - Solicitation of legal business prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Solicitation of legal business prohibited. 35.12 Section 35.12 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT General § 35.12 Solicitation of legal...

  3. Medical education on cannabis and cannabinoids: Perspectives, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Ware, M A; Ziemianski, D

    2015-06-01

    The global regulatory landscape regarding the medical use of cannabis and cannabinoids is changing rapidly. This has considerable impact on health care professionals who currently receive little or no education on issues regarding medical cannabis. We propose a 'cannabis curriculum' that covers the spectrum of historical, botanical, physiological, clinical and legal issues to allow health care professionals to engage in meaningful discussions with their patients and colleagues around this stigmatized and controversial subject.

  4. Hereditary breast and gynecological tumors: Italian legal issues.

    PubMed

    DI Vella, Giancarlo

    2016-10-01

    The availability of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that lower the risk for developing hereditary family-related tumors is weighed against Italian ethical and legal provisions. The healthcare environment in which a professional works should require that he possess specific technical, relational and medical competencies based upon legal orientation in addition to scientific evidence. Particular emphasis is attributed to the doctor-patient relationship, with explicit reference to the following: 1) all of the information at hand that is required to achieve a "therapeutic alliance" that combines the best interests of the patient with treatment options; 2) the completeness and intelligibility of health records, as they are likely to explain the background logic and the following of scientific clinical procedure; 3) the observance of guidelines and protocols, and their relevance to the legal responsibility of the individual and health care companies; 4) the need of a multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of these patients and the obligation of the team to have malpractice insurance. Advances on "provisions concerning liability of health personnel", which is currently awaiting approval, allows the professional to protect the patient's health without the fear of being unnecessarily censured, and unjustified from a penal or civil point of view which can deteriorate the relationship of trust and cooperation established.

  5. [Advance directives: the legal situation in Belgium].

    PubMed

    Herremans, Jacqueline

    2008-01-01

    In 2002, Belgium passed laws on de-criminalizing euthanasia, on palliative care and on patients' rights. These legislations, fundamental in the field of medical law, have sanctioned the patient's right to personal autonomy, as well the principle of freedom of conscience for everyone, including the doctors. The anticipated declarations - or livings wills - both for euthanasia and for the patient's right to refuse medical treatment have become legal.

  6. Nursing Homes as Teaching Institutions: Legal Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the trend toward affiliation of nursing homes with educational programs as clinical teaching institutions for medical, nursing, and allied health students. Reviews potential ethical and legal issues for the nursing home administrator, professional staff member, educator, and student, including informed consent, supervisory…

  7. Legal Aspects of Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, William; Herbert, David L.

    1988-01-01

    A medical model is used to examine liability issues related to cardiac rehabilitation programs. Obtaining effective informed consent from patients, standardizing policies and procedures, and exercise prescription and monitoring are among the proposed elements of a risk management model for developing safe and legally defensible programs. (IAH)

  8. The legal status of Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamura, M.; Ferraris, L.; Miozzo, D.; Musso, L.; Siccardi, F.

    2011-03-01

    An exponential improvement of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models was observed during the last decade (Lynch, 2008). Civil Protection (CP) systems exploited Meteo services in order to redeploy their actions towards the prediction and prevention of events rather than towards an exclusively response-oriented mechanism1. Nevertheless, experience tells us that NWP models, even if assisted by real time observations, are far from being deterministic. Complications frequently emerge in medium to long range forecasting, which are subject to sudden modifications. On the other hand, short term forecasts, if seen through the lens of criminal trials2, are to the same extent, scarcely reliable (Molini et al., 2009). One particular episode related with wrong forecasts, in the Italian panorama, has deeply frightened CP operators as the NWP model in force missed a meteorological adversity which, in fact, caused death and dealt severe damage in the province of Vibo Valentia (2006). This event turned into a very discussed trial, lasting over three years, and intended against whom assumed the legal position of guardianship within the CP. A first set of data is now available showing that in concomitance with the trial of Vibo Valentia the number of alerts issued raised almost three folds. We sustain the hypothesis that the beginning of the process of overcriminalization (Husak, 2008) of CPs is currently increasing the number of false alerts with the consequent effect of weakening alert perception and response by the citizenship (Brezntiz, 1984). The common misunderstanding of such an issue, i.e. the inherent uncertainty in weather predictions, mainly by prosecutors and judges, and generally by whom deals with law and justice, is creating the basis for a defensive behaviour3 within CPs. This paper intends, thus, to analyse the social and legal relevance of uncertainty in the process of issuing meteo-hydrological alerts by CPs. Footnotes: 1 The Italian Civil Protection is working

  9. 20 CFR 725.512 - Support of legally dependent spouse, child, or parent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., or parent. 725.512 Section 725.512 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS... Provisions § 725.512 Support of legally dependent spouse, child, or parent. If current maintenance needs of a... the legally dependent spouse, a legally dependent child, or a legally dependent parent of...

  10. 20 CFR 725.512 - Support of legally dependent spouse, child, or parent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., or parent. 725.512 Section 725.512 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS... Provisions § 725.512 Support of legally dependent spouse, child, or parent. If current maintenance needs of a... the legally dependent spouse, a legally dependent child, or a legally dependent parent of...

  11. 20 CFR 725.512 - Support of legally dependent spouse, child, or parent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., or parent. 725.512 Section 725.512 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION... Provisions § 725.512 Support of legally dependent spouse, child, or parent. If current maintenance needs of a... the legally dependent spouse, a legally dependent child, or a legally dependent parent of...

  12. 20 CFR 725.512 - Support of legally dependent spouse, child, or parent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., or parent. 725.512 Section 725.512 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS... Provisions § 725.512 Support of legally dependent spouse, child, or parent. If current maintenance needs of a... the legally dependent spouse, a legally dependent child, or a legally dependent parent of...

  13. 20 CFR 725.512 - Support of legally dependent spouse, child, or parent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., or parent. 725.512 Section 725.512 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS... Provisions § 725.512 Support of legally dependent spouse, child, or parent. If current maintenance needs of a... the legally dependent spouse, a legally dependent child, or a legally dependent parent of...

  14. Legal responsibility and accountability.

    PubMed

    Cox, Chris

    2010-06-01

    Shifting boundaries in healthcare roles have led to anxiety among some nurses about their legal responsibilities and accountabilities. This is partly because of a lack of education about legal principles that underpin healthcare delivery. This article explains the law in terms of standards of care, duty of care, vicarious liability and indemnity insurance.

  15. Learning the Legalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Victoria

    1987-01-01

    Certain types of crises cry out for legal counsel. Becoming familiar with the basics of media law is suggested for public relations offices. Three types of crises that call for legal advice include: litigation or potential litigation; a violation of a law or regulation; or incidents with any hint of liability. (MLW)

  16. Legal Commission Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The Legal Commission of the International Non-Governmental Organizations Conference on Discrimination Against Indigenous Populations adopted the following agenda: legal status of indigenous populations; the land question; indigenous laws and courts; discrimination against indigenous peoples in existing laws and their application; and creation of…

  17. Should Drugs Be Legalized?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambliss, William; Scorza, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    Presents two opposing viewpoints concerning the legalization of drugs. States that control efforts are not cost effective and suggests that legalization with efforts at education is a better course of action (W. Chambliss). The opposing argument contends that the cost in human suffering negates any savings in dollars gained through legalization…

  18. Accreditation's Legal Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graca, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Like most issues in higher education, the accreditation paradigm in the United States is defined in large measure by the legal and political climate in which the academy finds itself. In the case of accreditation in particular, the legal substrate is of particular importance given the central role of accreditation in a college's ability to receive…

  19. Database Reviews: Legal Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiser, Virginia

    Detailed reviews of two legal information databases--"Laborlaw I" and "Legal Resource Index"--are presented in this paper. Each database review begins with a bibliographic entry listing the title; producer; vendor; cost per hour contact time; offline print cost per citation; time period covered; frequency of updates; and size…

  20. A Legal Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cincinnati Public Schools, OH.

    This publication was developed by the Cincinnati (Ohio) Public Schools for use as a resource in adult basic education classes. It presents, in simple format, the basic legal rights of citizens of the United States and points out legal problem areas that average adults may encounter in daily life. The book is organized into nine parts containing 2…

  1. Cannabis, pesticides and conflicting laws: the dilemma for legalized States and implications for public health.

    PubMed

    Stone, Dave

    2014-08-01

    State laws on the legalization of medical and recreational cannabis are rapidly evolving. Similar to other crops, cannabis is susceptible to multiple pests during cultivation. Growers have an economic incentive to produce large yields and high quality plants, and may resort to pesticides to achieve these outcomes. Currently, there are no pesticides registered for cannabis in the United States, given its illegal status by the federal government. This discrepancy creates a regulatory vacuum and dilemma for States with legal medical and recreational cannabis that seek to balance lawful compliance with pesticides and worker or public health. Pesticide use presents occupational safety issues that can be mitigated through established worker protection measures. The absence of approved products for cannabis may result in consumer exposures to otherwise more hazardous pesticides or higher residue levels. While many legal and scientific hurdles exist to register conventional pesticides for use on cannabis, legalized States have explored other opportunities to leverage the present regulatory infrastructure. Stakeholder engagement and outreach to the cannabis industry from credible sources could mitigate pesticide misuse and harm.

  2. Tuskegee redux: Evolution of legal mandates for human experimentation

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Robert S.; Williams, Jamila C.; Kilbourne, Barbara A.; Juarez, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Human health experiments systematically expose people to conditions beyond the boundaries of medical evidence. Such experiments have included legal-medical collaboration, exemplified in the US by the PHS Syphilis Study (Tuskegee). That medical experiment was legal, conforming to segregationist protocols and specific legislative authorization which excluded a selected group of African Americans from any medical protection from syphilis. Subsequent corrective action outlawed unethical medical experiments but did not address other forms of collaboration, including PHS submission to laws which may have placed African American women at increased risk from AIDS and breast cancer. Today, anti-lobbying law makes it a felony for PHS workers to openly question legally anointed suspension of medical evidence. African Americans and other vulnerable populations may thereby face excess risks -- not only from cancer, but also from motor vehicle crashes, firearm assault, end stage renal disease and other problems -- with PHS workers as silent partners. PMID:23124504

  3. Tuskegee redux: evolution of legal mandates for human experimentation.

    PubMed

    Levine, Robert S; Williams, Jamila C; Kilbourne, Barbara A; Juarez, Paul D

    2012-11-01

    Human health experiments systematically expose people to conditions beyond the boundaries of medical evidence. Such experiments have included legal-medical collaboration, exemplified in the U.S. by the Public Health Service (PHS) Syphilis Study (Tuskegee). That medical experiment was legal, conforming to segregationist protocols and specific legislative authorization which excluded a selected group of African Americans from any medical protection from syphilis. Subsequent corrective action outlawed unethical medical experiments but did not address other forms of collaboration, including PHS submission to laws which may have placed African American women at increased risk from AIDS and breast cancer. Today, anti-lobbying law makes it a felony for PHS workers to openly challenge legally anointed suspension of medical evidence. African Americans and other vulnerable populations may thereby face excess risks-not only from cancer, but also from motor vehicle crashes, firearm assault, end stage renal disease, and other problems-with PHS workers as silent partners.

  4. Moral Discourse and Legalism in Legal Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, James R.

    1982-01-01

    Legal education fails to prepare students to engage in moral discourse, exploring the ethical/moral dimension of the profession. Moral discourse suggests that the lawyer's professional ethos is problematic for the good person, and moves the profession to confront more directly the public image of lawyers. (MSE)

  5. [Legal repercussions of Clinical Ethics Committees reports].

    PubMed

    Couceiro V, Azucena; Beca I, Juan Pablo

    2006-04-01

    Clinical Ethics Committees and Research Ethics Committees have their own specific roles. The Clinical Ethics Committee's pronouncements have an advisory function, whereas Research Ethics Committees' decisions are binding. This article analyzes the legal impact of the Clinical Ethics Committees' reports. Legal and medical reasoning share the same practical nature. Both can have several correct answers to the same situation. Clinical Ethics Committees deliberate about these alternatives and analyze the involved values. Their conclusions are non-compulsory recommendations. They do not replace nor diminish the doctor's personal responsibility. Even though the Clinical Ethics Committees' reports are not binding, they constitute a sort of "expert's opinion", expressed by qualified professionals, who assume their own professional responsibility as advisors. The members' behavior is necessarily subject to constitutional and legal regulations. When judges review the Clinical Ethics Committee's reports, they must realize that their nature is advisory, and also consider them an essential element to reduce the gap between the medical and legal fields. In this way, the problem of increasingly transforming medicine into a legal issue can be prevented.

  6. [Depression and legal capacity to stand trial].

    PubMed

    Bolechała, Filip; Skupień, Elzbieta

    2006-01-01

    The criteria for assessment of legal capacity to stand trial have long been a significant issue in the Polish criminal law. The main problem in opinionating practice is the fact that the code of penal procedure and the executive penal code do not provide any univocal criteria of a mental disease that should be met according to the legal regulations in force. Because of their nature and lack of uniformity, depression and affective disorders pose a particularly great problem for experts who should opinionate on the legal capacity of the suspected and the accused to stand trial. On the one hand, it cannot be accepted that a mental illness renders a person unable to substantially understand legal proceedings and to make a rational defense. On the other hand, however, emotional reactions and mild-degree depression disorders that are only natural when an individual violates law should not be allowed to be regarded as a grave disease and to paralyze legal proceedings. In the present study, the authors have attempted to describe the guidelines that should be followed by court-appointed experts in psychiatry that are commissioned by the court to assess the mental state of an individual. The report emphasizes that in such cases, a thorough analysis, based on medical and legal premises and the experience of the involved court experts are necessary.

  7. Legal challenges in neurological practice

    PubMed Central

    Jayalakshmi, Sita; Vooturi, Sudhindra

    2016-01-01

    Clinical neuroscience has made tremendous advances over the last century. Neurology as a discipline is still considered challenging and at times risky due to the natural history and progressive course of few of the neurological diseases. Encouragingly, the patient and their caregivers are now increasingly willing to be actively involved in making decisions. The patients’ relationship with the doctor is a reflection of the society. A society that is orienting itself toward “rating” and “feedback” has made this doctor–patient relationship, a consumer–service provider relationship. This perhaps is due to commercialization of health that usually accompanies globalization. Moreover, a rapid influx of information from potential erroneous sources such as the Internet has also made patient and caregivers not being hesitant to taking legal course in the case of adverse events during treatment or simply because of dissatisfaction. The purpose of the legal process initiated by patients with neurological ailments is more often to compensate for the income lost, physical and psychological anguish that accompanies disease and its treatment, and to fund treatment or rehabilitation requirements. However, it is not clearly established if monetary benefits acquired lead to better opportunities for recovery of the patient. The consumer protection act and commercialization of medical services may well have an adverse effect on the doctor and patient relationship. Hence, there is a great need for all medical professionals to mutually complement and update each other. This review examines legal (litigation) processes with special interest on medicolegal system in patients with neurological ailments and the challenges faced by the neurologist during day-to-day clinical practice. PMID:27891018

  8. Innovative Legal Approaches to Address Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Pomeranz, Jennifer L; Teret, Stephen P; Sugarman, Stephen D; Rutkow, Lainie; Brownell, Kelly D

    2009-01-01

    Context: The law is a powerful public health tool with considerable potential to address the obesity issue. Scientific advances, gaps in the current regulatory environment, and new ways of conceptualizing rights and responsibilities offer a foundation for legal innovation. Methods: This article connects developments in public health and nutrition with legal advances to define promising avenues for preventing obesity through the application of the law. Findings: Two sets of approaches are defined: (1) direct application of the law to factors known to contribute to obesity and (2) original and innovative legal solutions that address the weak regulatory stance of government and the ineffectiveness of existing policies used to control obesity. Specific legal strategies are discussed for limiting children's food marketing, confronting the potential addictive properties of food, compelling industry speech, increasing government speech, regulating conduct, using tort litigation, applying nuisance law as a litigation strategy, and considering performance-based regulation as an alternative to typical regulatory actions. Finally, preemption is an overriding issue and can play both a facilitative and a hindering role in obesity policy. Conclusions: Legal solutions are immediately available to the government to address obesity and should be considered at the federal, state, and local levels. New and innovative legal solutions represent opportunities to take the law in creative directions and to link legal, nutrition, and public health communities in constructive ways. PMID:19298420

  9. Intern doctors’ views on the current and future antibiotic resistance situation of Chattagram Maa O Shishu Hospital Medical College, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Rozina; Mostafa, Asma; Haque, Mainul

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacterial resistance due to antibiotic misuse is reported every day. Such threat calls for a consensus to develop new strategies to prevent the development of antibiotic resistance of bacteria. Medical doctors must play a pivotal role to control and prevent the misuse of antibiotics. There were complaints that prescribers are lacking behind in updates and advancement in the field. To address such knowledge gap, a study was conducted to know the views of interns on the current antibiotic resistance situation in a teaching hospital in Bangladesh. Methods This study was a cross-sectional, randomized, and questionnaire-based survey. Interns of the medicine, gynecology, and surgery departments of Chattagram Maa O Shishu Hospital Medical College were the study population. Results Out of 50 respondents, 98% would like more education on antibiotic selection. All respondents believed that prescribing inappropriate or unnecessary antibiotics was professionally unethical. Ninety percent of the participants were confident in making an accurate diagnosis of infection. Eighty-four percent of them were confident about dosage schedule. In all, 98% participants thought that antibiotic resistance is a national problem and 64% of the respondents thought that same problem also existed in their hospital. Study participants were of the view that 41%–60% of antibiotic usages are irrational in Bangladesh. Fifty-eight percent of the study population thought that antimicrobial resistance (AR) would be a greater problem in the future. Conclusion The interns believe that there is a knowledge gap on AR. More emphasis should be given to AR and its implications in the undergraduate curriculum. Latest national and international guidelines for antimicrobial therapy and resistance should be made available to the interns. PMID:26316762

  10. Management of mydriasis and pain in cataract and intraocular lens surgery: review of current medications and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Seanna R; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Luis A; Daly, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of mydriasis and the control of postoperative pain and inflammation are critical to the safety and success of cataract and intraocular lens replacement surgery. Appropriate mydriasis is usually achieved by topical and/or intracameral administration of anticholinergic agents, sympathomimetic agents, or both, with the most commonly used being cyclopentolate, tropicamide, and phenylephrine. Ocular inflammation is common after cataract surgery. Topical steroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are widely used because they have been proved effective to control postsurgical inflammation and decrease pain. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have also been shown to help maintain dilation. However, use of multiple preoperative drops for pupil dilation, inflammation, and pain control have been shown to be time consuming, resulting in delays to the operating room, and they cause dissatisfaction among perioperative personnel; their use can also be associated with systemic side effects. Therefore, ophthalmologists have been in search of new options to streamline this process. This article will review the current medications commonly used for intraoperative mydriasis, as well as pain and inflammation control. In addition, a new combination of ketorolac, an anti-inflammatory agent, and phenylephrine, a mydriatic agent has recently been designed to maintain intraoperative mydriasis and to reduce postoperative pain and irritation from intraocular lens replacement surgery. Two Phase III clinical trials evaluating this combination have demonstrated statistically significant differences when compared to placebo in maintaining intraoperative mydriasis (P<0.00001) and in reducing pain in the early postoperative period (P=0.0002). This medication may be of benefit for use in cataract and lens replacement surgery in the near future. PMID:25061276

  11. Medical innovation laws: an unnecessary innovation.

    PubMed

    Richards, Bernadette

    2016-06-01

    Objective This paper aims to demonstrate that any suggestion that there is a need for specific innovation laws is flawed. Innovation is central to good medical practice and is adequately supported by current law. Methods The paper reviews the nature of medical innovation and outlines recent attempts in the UK to introduce specific laws aimed at 'encouraging' and 'supporting' innovation. The current legal framework is outlined and the role of the law in relation to medical innovation explored. Results The analysis demonstrates the cyclic relationship between medical advancement and the law and concludes that there is no requirement for specific innovation laws. Conclusions The law not only supports innovation and development in medical treatment but encourages it as central to a functioning medical system. There is no need to introduce specific laws aimed at medical innovation; to do so represents an unnecessary legal innovation and serves to complicate matters. What is known about the topic? Over recent months, there has been a great deal of discussion surrounding the law in the context of medical innovation. This was driven by the attempts in the UK to introduce specific laws in the Medical Innovation Bill. The general subject matter - negligence and the expected standard of care in the provision of treatment - is very well understood, but not in cases where the treatment can be described as innovative. The general rhetoric in both the UK and Australia around the Medical Innovation Bill demonstrates a lack of understanding of the position of the law with regards to innovative treatment. What does this paper add? This paper adds clarity to the debate. It presents the law and explains the manner in which the law can operate around innovative treatment. The paper asserts that medical innovation is both supported and encouraged by existing legal principles. What are the implications for practitioners? The paper presents an argument that can guide the policy position

  12. Medical-Legal Partnership for Health Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Harkin, Tom [D-IA

    2011-09-22

    09/22/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (text of measure as introduced: CR S5907-5908) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Medical-Legal Partnership for Health Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Harkin, Tom [D-IA

    2010-07-29

    07/29/2010 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (text of measure as introduced: CR S6525-6526) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Current Legal I-O Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ofsanko, Frank

    This report focuses on a myriad of national, state, and local laws, regulations and court decisions which govern the everyday work of industrial and organizational psychologists. Legislation already in effect and legislation still pending are discussed. Citing relevant legislation and court decisions throughout the text, the paper addresses such…

  15. Assisted suicide: Models of legal regulation in selected European countries and the case law of the European Court of Human Rights.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Claudia; Grosse, Alexandra

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents three different models of the legal regulation of assisted suicide in European countries. First, the current legal regime governing assisted suicide in the Netherlands is described where both euthanasia and assisted suicide have been legalised. This section also includes some empirical data on euthanasia and assisted-suicide practices in the Netherlands, as well as a comparison with the current legal legislation in Belgium and Luxembourg. Next, Switzerland is presented as a country where euthanasia is punishable by law but assisted suicide is legally allowed, provided it is not carried out with selfish motives. This section also focuses on the assisted-suicide-related case law of the Swiss Federal Supreme Court and the European Court of Human Rights. Last, the current legal situation regarding assisted suicide in Austria and Germany is described. While the Austrian Penal Code explicitly prohibits assisted suicide, assistance with suicide is not specifically regulated by the German Penal Code. However, medical doctors are not allowed to assist suicides according to the professional codes of conduct drawn up by the German medical associations under the supervision of the health authorities.

  16. [Temporary disability and its legal implications].

    PubMed

    Martin-Fumadó, Carles; Martí Amengual, Gabriel; Puig Bausili, Lluïsa; Arimany-Manso, Josep

    2014-03-01

    Temporary disability is the condition that workers face when, as the result of illness (common or professional) or accident (work-related or not), they are temporarily prevented from performing their work and require health care. The management of temporary disability is a medical act that involves (in addition to a complex clinical assessment) obvious social, occupational and financial connotations and requires continuing medical follow-up from doctors, as well as responses to medical-legal conflicts. The regulatory framework on the subject is extensive in the Spanish setting and highly diverse in the European setting. Beyond the regulatory framework, the repercussions of temporary disability are self-evident at all levels. Although determining temporary disability is a common medical act for practicing physicians, it is not exempt from risks or difficulties arising from the assessment itself and the characteristics of practicing medical care. Established medical-legal conflicts include the processing of health data and the requirements for transferring information related to workers' temporary disability to their company's medical services. The interest and usefulness demonstrated by the data obtained from forensic medicine for public health require the incorporation of these data into general healthcare information, as it could be essential to the surveillance of worker health. The recommendations established by medical societies, as good practice guidelines, are especially useful in this type of conflict.

  17. The employment and wages of legalized immigrants.

    PubMed

    Borjas, G J; Tienda, M

    1993-01-01

    "This article analyzes the employment and wages of recently legalized immigrants [in the United States] using the Legalization Application Processing System (LAPS) file, an administrative file based on the individual records of amnesty applicants, and draws comparisons with a sample of the foreign-born population from the Current Population Surveys of 1983, 1986 and 1988. Compared to the total foreign-born population, the legalized immigrant population differs in four important respects that bear on labor market position: 1) a younger age structure; 2) a less balanced gender composition; 3) a greater representation of Latin Americans; and 4) few years of U.S. residence. LAPS data reveal high rates of labor force participation among legalized immigrants, which exceeded the rates of the foreign-born population by approximately 5 and 17 percent for men and women, respectively."

  18. Legalizing a market for cannabis for pleasure: Colorado, Washington, Uruguay and beyond.

    PubMed

    Room, Robin

    2014-03-01

    Colorado, Washington state and Uruguay are currently designing legal non-medical markets for cannabis. These clearly contravene the 1961 and 1988 drug conventions; options for what may happen next are discussed. The current provisions in the three regulatory schemes are summarized. From a public health perspective, the emphasis should be on holding down consumption with regulatory measures, but the public health agenda does not seem to be a strong consideration in the implementation of the US schemes, and they are paying little attention to what can be learned from the history of alcohol and tobacco regulation. While alternative paths to a cannabis market under the conventions are noted, the legalization initiatives underline the need to revise the drug conventions, making prohibition of domestic markets an optional matter. Such changes would also ease the path for including alcohol under the conventions, which would be an important step forward in global health.

  19. Acute postsurgical suppurative parotitis: current prevalence at Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo University Medical School.

    PubMed

    Belczak, Sergio Quilici; Cleva, Roberto D E; Utiyama, Edivaldo M; Cecconello, Ivan; Rasslan, Samir; Parreira, José Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    Postsurgical acute suppurative parotitis is a bacterial gland infection that occurs from a few days up to some weeks after abdominal surgical procedures. In this study, the authors analyze the prevalence of this complication in Hospital das Clínicas/São Paulo University Medical School by prospectively reviewing the charts of patients who underwent surgeries performed by the gastroenterological and general surgery staff from 1980 to 2005. Diagnosis of parotitis or sialoadenitis was analyzed. Sialolithiasis and chronic parotitis previous to hospitalization were exclusion criteria. In a total of 100,679 surgeries, 256 patients were diagnosed with parotitis or sialoadenitis. Nevertheless, only three cases of acute postsurgical suppurative parotitis associated with the surgery were identified giving an incidence of 0.0028%. All patients presented with risk factors such as malnutrition, immunosuppression, prolonged immobilization and dehydration. In the past, acute postsurgical suppurative parotitis was a relatively common complication after major abdominal surgeries. Its incidence decreased as a consequence of the improvement of perioperative antibiotic therapy and postoperative support. In spite of the current low incidence, we believe it is important to identify risks and diagnose as quick as possible, in order to introduce prompt and appropriate therapeutic measures and avoid potentially fatal complications with the evolution of the disease.

  20. Draft secure medical database standard.

    PubMed

    Pangalos, George

    2002-01-01

    Medical database security is a particularly important issue for all Healthcare establishments. Medical information systems are intended to support a wide range of pertinent health issues today, for example: assure the quality of care, support effective management of the health services institutions, monitor and contain the cost of care, implement technology into care without violating social values, ensure the equity and availability of care, preserve humanity despite the proliferation of technology etc.. In this context, medical database security aims primarily to support: high availability, accuracy and consistency of the stored data, the medical professional secrecy and confidentiality, and the protection of the privacy of the patient. These properties, though of technical nature, basically require that the system is actually helpful for medical care and not harmful to patients. These later properties require in turn not only that fundamental ethical principles are not violated by employing database systems, but instead, are effectively enforced by technical means. This document reviews the existing and emerging work on the security of medical database systems. It presents in detail the related problems and requirements related to medical database security. It addresses the problems of medical database security policies, secure design methodologies and implementation techniques. It also describes the current legal framework and regulatory requirements for medical database security. The issue of medical database security guidelines is also examined in detailed. The current national and international efforts in the area are studied. It also gives an overview of the research work in the area. The document also presents in detail the most complete to our knowledge set of security guidelines for the development and operation of medical database systems.

  1. A primer on medical education in the United States through the lens of a current resident physician

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Physician training and standards for medical licensure differ widely across the globe. The medical education process in the United States (US) typically involves a minimum of 11 years of formal training and multiple standardized examinations between graduating from secondary school and becoming an attending physician with full medical licensure. Students in the US traditionally enter a 4-year medical school after completing an undergraduate bachelor’s degree, in contrast to most other countries where medical training begins after graduation from high school. Medical school seniors planning to practice medicine in the US must complete postgraduate clinical training, referred to as residency, within the specialty of their choosing. The duration of residency varies depending on specialty, typically lasting between 3 and 7 years. For subspecialty fields, additional clinical training is often required in the form of a fellowship. Many experts have called for changes in the medical education system to shorten medical training in the US, and reforms are ongoing in some institutions. However, physician education in the US generally remains a progression from undergraduate premedical coursework to 4 years of medical school, followed by residency training with an optional subspecialty fellowship. PMID:26605316

  2. A primer on medical education in the United States through the lens of a current resident physician

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Physician training and standards for medical licensure differ widely across the globe. The medical education process in the United States (US) typically involves a minimum of 11 years of formal training and multiple standardized examinations between graduating from secondary school and becoming an attending physician with full medical licensure. Students in the US traditionally enter a 4-year medical school after completing an undergraduate bachelor’s degree, in contrast to most other countries where medical training begins after graduation from high school. Medical school seniors planning to practice medicine in the US must complete postgraduate clinical training, referred to as residency, within the specialty of their choosing. The duration of residency varies depending on specialty, typically lasting between 3 and 7 years. For subspecialty fields, additional clinical training is often required in the form of a fellowship. Many experts have called for changes in the medical education system to shorten medical training in the US, and reforms are ongoing in some institutions. However, physician education in the US generally remains a progression from undergraduate premedical coursework to 4 years of medical school, followed by residency training with an optional subspecialty fellowship. PMID:26623123

  3. Legal Issues in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branton, Wiley A.

    1984-01-01

    Legal problems that colleges and universities might avoid are identified. Colleges are being sued over a broad range of legal issues and are expending money for legal and court fees, settlements, and judgments. Legal problems include right of admission to particular colleges, the right to stay in school, questions of faculty promotion and tenure,…

  4. Defending diversity: affirmative action and medical education.

    PubMed Central

    DeVille, K

    1999-01-01

    Affirmative action programs of all types are under attack legally and politically. Although medical schools have not been specifically targeted, their affirmative action programs, like others in higher education, are potentially in danger. This article examines the current legal status of affirmative action in medical education and concludes that a refurbished defense of such programs is essential if they are to survive impending judicial and political scrutiny. An analysis of existing case law and available evidence suggests that a carefully reinvigorated diversity argument is the tactic most likely to pass constitutional muster, as well as the justification most likely to blunt growing public and political opposition to admissions policies that take race and ethnicity into consideration. PMID:10432920

  5. Understanding the current anatomical competence landscape: Comparing perceptions of program directors, residents, and fourth-year medical students.

    PubMed

    Fillmore, Erin P; Brokaw, James J; Kochhar, Komal; Nalin, Peter M

    2016-07-08

    A mixed methods survey of fourth-year medical students, resident physicians, and residency program directors at the Indiana University School of Medicine gathered perceptions of anatomical competence-defined as the anatomical education necessary for effective clinical practice. The survey items explored numerous aspects of anatomical competence, including the most effective modes of instruction, perceptions of readiness for clinical practice, and specific suggestions for improving anatomical education during medical school and residency. The response rate was 46% for fourth-year medical students, 47% for residents (as graduates from 137 medical schools), and 71% for program directors. A majority of students and residents reported that their course in Gross Anatomy prepared them well for clinical practice; that cadaveric dissection was important in the early development of their anatomical competence; and that placing a greater emphasis on clinical relevance in medical school would have improved their anatomical competence even further. However, in terms of anatomical preparedness upon entering residency, the program directors rated their residents less prepared than the residents rated themselves. All three groups agreed that there is need for additional opportunities for anatomical educational during medical school and residency. Suggestions for improving anatomical education included the following: providing more opportunities for cadaveric dissection during medical school and residency; more consistent teaching of anatomy for clinical practice; more workshops that review anatomy; and better integration of anatomy with the teaching of other subjects during medical school. Anat Sci Educ 9: 307-318. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  6. The Use of Psychotropic Medication for People with Severe Disabilities and Challenging Behavior: Current Status and Future Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Craig H.; Meyer, Kim A.

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews basic literature on behavioral pharmacology and integrates these findings with existing applied research regarding psychotropic medication. Suggestions are provided for improving research practices, increasing the diversity of people in decision-making regarding medication use, and developing consumer-friendly strategies for…

  7. Marijuana Legalization: Impact on Physicians and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Samuel T.; Yarnell, Stephanie; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Ball, Samuel A.; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana is becoming legal in an increasing number of states for both medical and recreational use. Considerable controversy exists regarding the public health impact of these changes. The evidence for the legitimate medical use of marijuana or cannabinoids is limited to a few indications, notably HIV/AIDS cachexia, nausea/vomiting related to chemotherapy, neuropathic pain, and spasticity in multiple sclerosis. Although cannabinoids show therapeutic promise in other areas, robust clinical evidence is still lacking. The relationship between legalization and prevalence is still unknown. Although states where marijuana use is legal have higher rates of use than nonlegal states, these higher rates were generally found even prior to legalization. As states continue to proceed with legalization for both medical and recreational use, certain public health issues have become increasingly relevant, including the effects of acute marijuana intoxication on driving abilities, unintentional ingestion of marijuana products by children, the relationship between marijuana and opioid use, and whether there will be an increase in health problems related to marijuana use, such as dependence/addiction, psychosis, and pulmonary disorders. In light of this rapidly shifting legal landscape, more research is urgently needed to better understand the impact of legalization on public health. PMID:26515984

  8. Marijuana Legalization: Impact on Physicians and Public Health.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Samuel T; Yarnell, Stephanie; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Ball, Samuel A; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana is becoming legal in an increasing number of states for both medical and recreational use. Considerable controversy exists regarding the public health impact of these changes. The evidence for the legitimate medical use of marijuana or cannabinoids is limited to a few indications, notably HIV/AIDS cachexia, nausea/vomiting related to chemotherapy, neuropathic pain, and spasticity in multiple sclerosis. Although cannabinoids show therapeutic promise in other areas, robust clinical evidence is still lacking. The relationship between legalization and prevalence is still unknown. Although states where marijuana use is legal have higher rates of use than nonlegal states, these higher rates were generally found even prior to legalization. As states continue to proceed with legalization for both medical and recreational use, certain public health issues have become increasingly relevant, including the effects of acute marijuana intoxication on driving abilities, unintentional ingestion of marijuana products by children, the relationship between marijuana and opioid use, and whether there will be an increase in health problems related to marijuana use, such as dependence/addiction, psychosis, and pulmonary disorders. In light of this rapidly shifting legal landscape, more research is urgently needed to better understand the impact of legalization on public health.

  9. Assessment of biophysical therapy in the management of pain in current medical practice compared with ibuprofen and placebo: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Foletti, A; Baron, P; Sclauzero, E; Bucci, G; Rinaudo, A; Rocco, R

    2014-01-01

    Pain management is a daily part of current medical practice. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the efficacy of a biophysical procedure (Med Select 729) compared to a usual pain killer drug (Ibuprofen), and to placebo in order to disclose some effective procedures to be employed especially in elderly people with multiple comorbidities, in patients with allergy to chemical drugs or previous side effects, in non-responders to usual medications, and in chronic diseases to reduce overload. A total of 66 patients were divided in 3 groups. After one week of biophysical therapy they showed similar effect to ibuprofen and after one month the statistical significance was achieved with p less than 0.02 in comparison to placebo. We conclude that biophysical therapy was shown to be an effective and safe procedure for the management of pain in current medical practice.

  10. Legal Services: Judge Advocate Legal Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    page 22 The Commandant, The Judge Advocate General’s School , U.S. Army. • 10–2, page 22 Technical supervision • 10–3, page 23 Implementation • 10–4...Advocate General’s Funded Legal Education Program, page 37 General Duties • 14–1, page 37 Nonwaivable eligibility requirements • 14–2, page 37 Law School ...Admission Test • 14–3, page 37 Procedures • 14–4, page 37 Selection of law school • 14–5, page 38 Assignments • 14–6, page 38 Evaluation reports • 14–7

  11. The legal self: executive processes and legal theory.

    PubMed

    Hirstein, William; Sifferd, Katrina

    2011-03-01

    When laws or legal principles mention mental states such as intentions to form a contract, knowledge of risk, or purposely causing a death, what parts of the brain are they speaking about? We argue here that these principles are tacitly directed at our prefrontal executive processes. Our current best theories of consciousness portray it as a workspace in which executive processes operate, but what is important to the law is what is done with the workspace content rather than the content itself. This makes executive processes more important to the law than consciousness, since they are responsible for channelling conscious decision-making into intentions and actions, or inhibiting action. We provide a summary of the current state of our knowledge about executive processes, which consists primarily of information about which portions of the prefrontal lobes perform which executive processes. Then we describe several examples in which legal principles can be understood as tacitly singling out executive processes, including principles regarding defendants' intentions or plans to commit crimes and their awareness that certain facts are the case (for instance, that a gun is loaded), as well as excusatory principles which result in lesser responsibility for those who are juveniles, mentally ill, sleepwalking, hypnotized, or who suffer from psychopathy.

  12. Medical leasing.

    PubMed

    Holden, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Leases for medical space can have far-reaching (and sometimes unintentional) consequences for the future of the practice and the costs of the business. In order to prevent hardship and expense down the line, it is especially important to review the lease to make sure that it reflects the practice's goals, needs, and structure. This article provides a number of provisions that are especially crucial to review and negotiate when leasing medical space, including use restrictions, assignment and subleasing clauses, build-out terms, and legal compliance requirements.

  13. Comparative legal aspects of pain management.

    PubMed

    Vansweevelt, T

    2008-12-01

    Administering pain medication to terminal patients can cause legal problems when it has a life-shortening effect, because according to some authors it equates with manslaughter. The legal basis of the acceptance of pain alleviation with life-shortening effect can be found on the grounds of necessity. In different countries physicians have been prosecuted because of their pain management, which to the public prosecutor was in fact a sort of euthanasia. On the other hand, it is not unknown that physicians administer opioids to mask euthanasia. Pain management needs some rules, which can reassure the physician who alleviates pain. The physician who alleviates pain with life-shortening effect will have to act with due care to avoid a liability risk. This implies at least an informed consent, to observe the proportionality rule, and to keep a medical record.

  14. Mental Retardation and the Law: A Report on Status of Current Court Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Committee on Mental Retardation, Washington, DC.

    The document reports the status of over 100 current court cases relating to the rights of handicapped individuals. Court cases are divided into the following categories: commitment, community living, criminal law, discrimination, guardianship, institutions and deinstitutionalization, medical-legal issues, parental rights and sexuality, special…

  15. Adherence to cardiovascular medications in the South Asian population: A systematic review of current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Akeroyd, Julia M; Chan, Winston J; Kamal, Ayeesha K; Palaniappan, Latha; Virani, Salim S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review methods of assessing adherence and strategies to improve adherence to cardiovascular disease (CVD) medications, among South Asian CVD patients. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of English language studies that examined CVD medication adherence in South Asian populations from 1966 to April 1, 2015 in SCOPUS and PubMed. Working in duplicate, we identified 61 studies. After exclusions, 26 studies were selected for full text review. Of these, 17 studies were included in the final review. We abstracted data on several factors including study design, study population, method of assessing adherence and adherence rate. RESULTS: These studies were conducted in India (n = 11), Pakistan (n = 3), Bangladesh (n = 1), Nepal (n = 1) and Sri Lanka (n = 1). Adherence rates ranged from 32%-95% across studies. Of the 17 total publications included, 10 focused on assessing adherence to CVD medications and 7 focused on assessing the impact of interventions on medication adherence. The validated Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) was used as the primary method of assessing adherence in five studies. Three studies used validated questionnaires similar to the MMAS, and one study utilized Medication Event Monitoring System caps, with the remainder of the studies utilizing pill count and self-report measures. As expected, studies using non-validated self-report measures described higher rates of adherence than studies using validated scale measurements and pill count. The included intervention studies examined the use of polypill therapy, provider education and patient counseling to improve medication adherence. CONCLUSION: The overall medication adherence rates were low in the region, which suggest a growing need for future interventions to improve adherence. PMID:26730300

  16. [Legal aspects and the treatment procedure of gender dysphoria in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Kórász, Krisztián

    2015-07-26

    The legal process of gender transition in Hungary had previously been more developed as in most European countries, as the law enabled transsexual people to change their name and gender before or without a medical treatment, which was unique at the time. Over the years, however, lots of European countries developed legal frameworks and accepted international standards of care for the treatment of gender dysphoria that Hungary did not follow. Currently in Hungary there is no consistent legal framework of gender transition, there is no official regulation or guidelines regarding gender transition process, no institution with the obligation to accommodate the process, and there is no nominated specialist in the state health care system whose remit included dealing with transsexual patients. The information on gender transition options both to the professionals and to the patients is limited and incoherent. This paper reviews the legal aspects and clinical management process of gender dysphoria in Hungary. Some issues regarding the Hungarian practice and possible solutions based on examples from the United Kingdom are addressed within the paper.

  17. Computer Access: Selected Legal Issues Affecting Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sermersheim, Michael D.

    This pamphlet analyzes some of the legal issues colleges and universities face in regard to faculty and student access to computers and the World Wide Web, evaluates current legal developments, and offers guidelines for developing policies for computer access. It examines sample acceptable-use standards, procedures for suspending or terminating a…

  18. A Transformative Approach to Work Integrated Learning in Legal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babacan, Alperhan; Babacan, Hurriyet

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the current context, scope and problems in the provision of work-integrated learning (WIL) in legal education and how the adoption transformative pedagogies in WIL which is offered in legal education can foster personal and social transformation in addition to enhancing lawyering skills. The paper…

  19. Current trends in use of intracanal medications in dental care facilities: questionnaire-based survey on training dental hygienists at educational institutions.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Masahiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Hosokawa, Souhei; Ariizumi, Yuugo

    2013-01-01

    The success of root canal therapy is dependent not only on removal of infected pulp (pulpectomy) followed by root canal enlargement, but also on the pharmacological effects of intracanal medications. Various intracanal medications are used. Formaldehyde preparations such as formocresol were common in the past, but these are no longer used in Europe or the US due to the biological toxicity of formaldehyde. In this study, a questionnaire was used to determine current trends in the use of intracanal medications at dental care facilities where dental hygiene students undergo practical training. The questionnaire comprised questions regarding the types of frequently used intracanal medications and their methods of application at dental care facilities in Saitama and Shizuoka prefectures. The results indicated that calcium hydroxide preparations were more commonly used in Europe or the US. However, these results also revealed that formaldehyde preparations were frequently used, which slightly differs from the scenario in Europe and the US. This study revealed that multiple intracanal medications were used for root canal therapy. Furthermore, it was also observed that cotton plugs were generally used as applicator tips for intracanal medications, whereas the use of absorbent paper points was relatively uncommon. The results suggest that the cost of absorbent paper points needs to be reduced.

  20. Patient safety related to the use of medical devices: a review and investigation of the current status in the medical device industry.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Norman; Byrnes, Trevor; Lauer, Wolfgang; Radermacher, Klaus; Kotzsch, Susanne; Korb, Werner; Hölscher, Uvo M

    2013-02-01

    To reduce the risk of application error, the federal legislator has demanded a development process which is oriented towards usability (DIN EN 62366). Therefore, the research question concerns the application of this standard by medical device manufacturers. Questionnaires were filled out by five trained interviewers in fully standardized face-to-face interviews at MEDICA Düsseldorf 2010. The results are based on 65 interviews. Almost all companies evaluated usability as relevant for product development; however, the understanding of usability through companies can still be improved as well as increasing the amount of trained usability experts in the process.

  1. Social media in the health-care setting: benefits but also a minefield of compliance and other legal issues.

    PubMed

    Moses, Richard E; McNeese, Libra G; Feld, Lauren D; Feld, Andrew D

    2014-08-01

    Throughout the past 20 years, the rising use of social media has revolutionized health care as well as other businesses. It allows large groups of people to create and share information, ideas, and experiences through online communications, and develop social and professional contacts easily and inexpensively. Our Gastroenterology organizations, among others, have embraced this technology. Although the health-care benefits may be many, social media must be viewed through a legal lens, recognizing the accompanying burdens of compliance, ethical, and litigation issues. Theories of liability and risk continue to evolve as does the technology. Social media usage within the medical community is fraught with potential legal issues, requiring remedial responses to meet patients' needs and comply with current laws, while not exposing physicians to medical malpractice and other tort risks.

  2. [The legal basis of organ transplantation (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Pribilla, O

    1976-10-27

    Report on the legal basis of organ transplantation in Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Great Britain, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Iceland and Finland. Reference is made to the legal uncertainty in the Federal Republic of Western Germany. The Federation probably has no legislative competence for an adequate transplantation law. Amendments of the xi 168 StGB suggested by individual Federal States are discussed. The synopsis of the existing legal rules in the above mentioned countries suggests the proposal of general legal principles which should guarantee 1. the best medical care in transplantation medicine especially in renal explantates 2. a legal protection for the physician 3. a protection for personal rights of the donor. The author feels that the rights of those persons who provide for the corpses should be superceded by these considerations.

  3. Biobanks for research. Ethical and legal aspects in human biological samples collections in France.

    PubMed

    Noiville, Christine

    2012-06-01

    Because they gather huge quantities of human biological samples and information allowing for better understanding of diseases, biobanks appear as a very powerful tool for boosting both medical research and public health as a whole. Although France does not really appear as a leader in biobanking compared to China or UK, biobanks and other samples collections abound in our country and have then been regulated, even though french law does not use the term biobank as such. The present article gives an overview of the current legal framework and explores the remaining ethical and legal issues, concerning particularly the protection of donors, the sharing of biobanks content and the sharing of biobanks benefits. The article explains how these universal questions arise in this country and what answers (sometimes specific) they get or could get in the following years.

  4. Mobile health applications: the patchwork of legal and liability issues suggests strategies to improve oversight.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y Tony; Silverman, Ross D

    2014-02-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) technology has facilitated the transition of care beyond the traditional hospital setting to the homes of patients. Yet few studies have evaluated the legal implications of the expansion of mHealth applications, or "apps." Such apps are affected by a patchwork of policies related to medical licensure, privacy and security protection, and malpractice liability. For example, the privacy protections of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 may apply to only some uses of the apps. Similarly, it is not clear what a doctor's malpractice liability would be if he or she injured a patient as the result of inaccurate information supplied by the patient's self-monitoring health app. This article examines the legal issues related to the oversight of health apps, discusses current federal regulations, and suggests strategies to improve the oversight of these apps.

  5. Legal Issues in Public School Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckham, Joseph, Ed.; Zirkel, Perry A., Ed.

    The relationship between public schools and their employees is one of the most frequently litigated aspects of American education. Accordingly, the chapters in this text present a comprehensive and current report of legal issues in public school employment. Chapter titles and authors are as follows: (1) "Critical Elements of the Employment…

  6. The Legal Deposit of Electronic Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickery, Jim

    1998-01-01

    Discusses electronic publication and legal deposit (the requirement that publications produced within a certain jurisdiction be deposited, usually in designated libraries which include the national library). The need for extension of deposit requirements to electronic materials, issues of concern, current legislation worldwide, and the role of…

  7. Evaluation of the current status of Rehabilitation, Physical Medicine and Naturopathy education 10 years after the reform of the Medical Licensure Act - a nationwide survey of German Medical Universities.

    PubMed

    Stock-Schröer, Beate; Huber, Roman; Joos, Stefanie; Klose, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: After the reform of the German Medical Licensure Act of 2003, Rehabilitation, Naturopathy and Physical Medicine were integrated into one discipline to be taught in Medical University. The aim of this survey is to determine the outcome of this change by evaluating the current status of education of these three disciplines based on the experience and satisfaction reported by lecturers responsible for teaching these subjects to medical students. Methods: A questionnaire-based survey. A paper version of the questionnaire for each discipline was posted to each Medical University in Germany. The first part asked about the current status of teaching; the second part asked about facilities and requirements; the third part asked respondents to give information on their career and teaching experience in this subject Results: The response rate was 51.5% for Rehabilitation, 48.5% for Physical Medicine and 60.6% for Naturopathy. A vast range of people and faculties were involved in the curricula. The percentage of each discipline taught was unevenly distributed: the major proportion being rehabilitation (38%), then naturopathy 34% lastly physical medicine with less than a third (28%). The main delivery of these disciplines was through lectures in plenary sessions. Modern teaching methods were not in evidence. Lecturers were generally pleased to be working with the combination of the three disciplines. Conclusion: Future medical education should improve upon teaching coordination and aim towards a common curriculum for these three disciplines. Expected future changes to medical curricula will provide opportunities to improve the implementation of Rehabilitation, Physical Medicine and Naturopathy in teaching and research.

  8. Evaluation of the current status of Rehabilitation, Physical Medicine and Naturopathy education 10 years after the reform of the Medical Licensure Act – a nationwide survey of German Medical Universities

    PubMed Central

    Stock-Schröer, Beate; Huber, Roman; Joos, Stefanie; Klose, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: After the reform of the German Medical Licensure Act of 2003, Rehabilitation, Naturopathy and Physical Medicine were integrated into one discipline to be taught in Medical University. The aim of this survey is to determine the outcome of this change by evaluating the current status of education of these three disciplines based on the experience and satisfaction reported by lecturers responsible for teaching these subjects to medical students. Methods: A questionnaire-based survey. A paper version of the questionnaire for each discipline was posted to each Medical University in Germany. The first part asked about the current status of teaching; the second part asked about facilities and requirements; the third part asked respondents to give information on their career and teaching experience in this subject Results: The response rate was 51.5% for Rehabilitation, 48.5% for Physical Medicine and 60.6% for Naturopathy. A vast range of people and faculties were involved in the curricula. The percentage of each discipline taught was unevenly distributed: the major proportion being rehabilitation (38%), then naturopathy 34% lastly physical medicine with less than a third (28%). The main delivery of these disciplines was through lectures in plenary sessions. Modern teaching methods were not in evidence. Lecturers were generally pleased to be working with the combination of the three disciplines. Conclusion: Future medical education should improve upon teaching coordination and aim towards a common curriculum for these three disciplines. Expected future changes to medical curricula will provide opportunities to improve the implementation of Rehabilitation, Physical Medicine and Naturopathy in teaching and research. PMID:28293670

  9. Medical device reimbursement coverage and pricing rules in Korea: current practice and issues with access to innovation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Soo; Salole, Eugene

    2014-06-01

    The development of health funding policy in Korea has followed the country's rapid economic development, with a comprehensive National Health Insurance (NHI) system in place by 1989. The funding of medical devices has followed this progression, with incorporation into the NHI reimbursement system in 2000 (several years later than pharmaceuticals), but important issues affecting patient access remain. Although the effect of devices on the NHI budget is relatively modest (only about 4%), because of concerns about NHI sustainability, attention has increasingly been paid to their management and funding. Unlike pharmaceuticals, however, it has been quite challenging to develop clear and fair criteria for reimbursement coverage and pricing of medical devices. The two key and longstanding issues around the reimbursement of medical devices in Korea are how to expedite market entry of improved or innovative medical devices at appropriate prices, and how to satisfactorily lower the reimbursement levels of older devices, thereby making headroom for new technologies to be reimbursed. Despite protracted discussions over the last decade, industry and government have been unable to reach full agreement. There has been some progress (e.g., introduction of the Value Appraisal and the Revaluation Systems), but there remains urgent need for productive discussion and consensus between government and industry regarding reasonable funding rules, transparency, and clarity in the reimbursement pricing process for medical devices.

  10. Helicopter emergency medical services: a report on the current status in a metropolitan area of South Korea.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young-Hoon; Moon, Sung-Woo; Lee, Sung-Woo; Choi, Sung-Hyuk; Cho, Han-Jin; Kim, Jung-Yun

    2011-06-01

    This report introduces and discusses the present state of the helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) in the metropolitan area of South Korea. The data of patients transported by HEMS from April 2007 to June 2009 were provided by Seoul Metropolitan Fire and Disaster Management Department. The data of patients subsequently transported to Korea University Guro Hospital were analyzed. During the study period, 725 emergency rescue calls were dispatched and 703 patients were rescued, of which 562 patients were judged by an emergency medical technician to be in a nonemergent condition and were referred to ground emergency medical services and 141 patients were judged as having an emergent situation and were directly transported to a nearby hospital. The data of patients who were transported to Korea University Guro Hospital by HEMS were as follows. The mean age was 51.7±12.1 years; 75.6% were male patients; 28 patients (68.3%) were traumatically injured; the mean of the injury severity score was 13.5±14.7, and 13 patients (46.4%) had an injury severity score of more than 15. No procedures other than basic life support were performed by the emergency medical technicians during transport. The role of HEMS in South Korea is limited to transporting injured patients from locations that cannot be approached by ground emergency medical services. Even though HEMS is essential considering the local mountainous geography of Seoul, Korea, overutilization of HEMS is still suspected in the metropolitan area.

  11. Mediation and Legal Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    This study uses fieldwork to investigate the sponsorship of legal literacy within a court mediation program. This examination of institutional involvement in literacy sponsorship demonstrates the ideological nature of literacy by showing the importance of context, investigating literacy-based relationships, and uncovering the intertwined nature of…

  12. Analysis: A Legal Perspective.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jack

    2016-01-01

    This commentary summarizes the uncertain state of the law regarding consent for posthumous gamete retrieval. The emergence of a legal framework will be aided by the kind of ethical analysis prompted by this family's request for removal and preservation of a deceased patient's ovaries.

  13. Legal Policy Optimizing Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Stuart; Neef, Marian

    1977-01-01

    The use of mathematical models originally developed by economists and operations researchers is described for legal process research. Situations involving plea bargaining, arraignment, and civil liberties illustrate the applicability of decision theory, inventory modeling, and linear programming in operations research. (LBH)

  14. A Legal Constant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2009-01-01

    The 21st century has brought many technological, social, and economic changes--nearly all of which have affected schools and the students, administrators, and faculty members who are in them. Luckily, as some things change, other things remain the same. Such is true with the fundamental legal principles that guide school administrators' actions…

  15. Roundtable: Legal Abortion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guttmacher, Alan F.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    A roundtable discussion on legal abortion includes Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher, President of The Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Robert Hall, Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Christopher Tietze, a diretor of The Population Council, and Harriet Pilpel, a lawyer.…

  16. Legal Challenges and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyward, Salome

    2011-01-01

    For legal issues in the field of disability compliance, this is an exciting time in postsecondary education. The twentieth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) signals a reawakening of the commitment to provide equal access to individuals with disabilities. This chapter explores three of the compliance issues that will be of…

  17. Legal Issues in Clinical Supervision. ACA Legal Series, Volume 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Disney, M. Janelle; Stephens, Anthony M.

    In recent decades, mental health professionals have expanded their role in the legal process. This monograph tries to help clinical supervisors avoid legal pitfalls by explaining some of the legal principles involved in their work. Although familiarity with relevant ethical standards is important, a discussion of these standards is presented only…

  18. Consent--its medico legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Yadwad, B S; Gouda, H

    2005-10-01

    One of the duties of a doctor towards his patients is to obtain consent before any medical examination. Any such examination without prior consent amounts to an assault on the patient. Consent is defined under Indian Contract Act (because Doctor Patient relationship isa contract) as "two or more persons are said to consent when they agree to the same thing in the same sense." Consent may be implied, expressed or informed depending upon the circumstances. But the consent of the patient is not required in situations like medical emergency, for vaccination etc. If the patient is not medically or legally competent to give consent, the consent of the parents or guardians or any person present at the time with the patient can be taken. Any research on a potential subject, removal of organs for transplantation, publication of information obtained during medical examination also require consent of the concerned person.

  19. Perceptions of Medical School Seniors of the Current Changes in the U.S. Health Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Veloski, J. Jon; Louis, Daniel Z.; Xu, Gang; Ibarra, David; Gottlieb, Jonathan E.; Erdmann, James B.

    1999-01-01

    Surveyed 196 medical college seniors about changes in the health-care system. Of the respondents, 79% believed that cost reduction rather than quality of care is the primary consideration behind recent changes, and 78% thought that managed-care organizations hamper physician ability in rendering optimal care. Discusses implications for curricular…

  20. Legal briefing: conscience clauses and conscientious refusal.

    PubMed

    Pope, Thaddeus Mason

    2010-01-01

    This issue's "Legal Briefing" column covers legal developments pertaining to conscience clauses and conscientious refusal. Not only has this topic been the subject of recent articles in this journal, but it has also been the subject of numerous public and professional discussions. Over the past several months, conscientious refusal disputes have had an unusually high profile not only in courthouses, but also in legislative and regulatory halls across the United States. Healthcare providers' own moral beliefs have been obstructing and are expected to increasingly obstruct patients' access to medical services. For example, some providers, on ethical or moral grounds, have denied: (1) sterilization procedures to pregnant patients, (2) pain medications in end-of-life situations, and (3) information about emergency contraception to rape victims. On the other hand, many healthcare providers have been forced to provide medical treatment that is inconsistent with their moral beliefs. There are two fundamental types of conscientious objection laws. First, there are laws that permit healthcare workers to refuse providing - on ethical, moral, or religious grounds healthcare services that they might otherwise have a legal or employer-mandated obligation to provide. Second, there are laws directed at forcing healthcare workers to provide services to which they might have ethical, moral, or religious objections. Both types of laws are rarely comprehensive, but instead target: (1) certain types of healthcare providers, (2) specific categories of healthcare services, (3) specific patient circumstances, and (4) certain conditions under which a right or obligation is triggered. For the sake of clarity, I have grouped recent legal developments concerning conscientious refusal into eight categories: 1. Abortion: right to refuse 2. Abortion: duty to provide 3. Contraception: right to refuse 4. Contraception: duty to provide 5. Sterilization: right to refuse 6. Fertility, HIV, vaccines

  1. World Biomedical Journals, 1951-60: A Study of the Relative Significance of 1,388 Titles Indexed in Current List of Medical Literature*

    PubMed Central

    Raisig, L. Miles

    1966-01-01

    This study is an application of the relationship of serial articles published to serial articles cited, developed in theory in the author's “Statistical Bibliography in the Health Sciences” (Bulletin 50: 450-461, July 1962). A ranked list of the indexes of significance of most of the serials indexed in Current List of Medical Literature was derived and erected from 21,000 citations secured in a random sampling of 1962 and 1961 biomedical journals regularly received in the Yale Medical Library. The author measures the gross indexing effectiveness of Current List against his indexes of significance, offers his method and results as means to reach objective standards for indexing and abstracting, and projects his results as measures of general value of the serials analyzed. PMID:5952248

  2. Legal Challenges to Christian Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, W. Richard

    Legal challenges faced by Christian liberal arts colleges affiliated with the Christian College Coalition were studied in 1983. Fifty-one of the 70 college presidents that were contacted returned questionnaires. The following areas were assessed: direct legal involvements during the past 5 years, threatened legal involvements, expected types of…

  3. Did Legalized Abortion Lower Crime?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Ted

    2004-01-01

    Changes in homicide and arrest rates were compared among cohorts born before and after legalization of abortion and those who were unexposed to legalized abortion. It was found that legalized abortion improved the lives of many women as they could avoid unwanted births.

  4. Admission and Retention Policies in Teacher Preparation Programs: Legal and Practical Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsberg, Rick; Whaley, David

    2003-01-01

    Examined the legal climate regarding admissions and retention in teacher preparation programs and the current practices of selected programs. Data from legal/archival research and an online survey of 27 universities indicated that teacher preparation programs have more legal latitude than is being employed for admission and retention decisions.…

  5. 78 FR 27343 - Medical Examiner's Certification Integration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... transmit medical variance information (exemptions, skills performance evaluation certificates and... also transmit medical variance information (exemptions, skills performance evaluation certificates and... Legacy for Users SDLA State Driver's Licensing Agencies SPE Skill Performance Evaluation IV. Legal...

  6. Twenty-two survivors over the age of 1 year with full trisomy 18: presenting and current medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Deborah; Campbell, Emily

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to provide data about 22 survivors over the age of 1 year with full trisomy 18 (12-59 months). Mothers completed the online, mixed method Tracking Rare Incidence Syndrome (TRIS) Survey provides data on birth information (e.g., gestational age, birth weight) and medical conditions identified at birth and at the time of survey completion. Data indicate similar birth characteristics to other studies and presence of syndrome related medical conditions including cardiac conditions, use of a variety of feeding methods, apnea, respiratory difficulties, and kidney issues. Associated interventions, sometimes considered "aggressive" or "intensive" treatments including cardiac surgeries were noted in the sample. Implications for treatment are provided and the need for additional research with this clinical subgroup is needed.

  7. Immigrant health: legal tools/legal barriers.

    PubMed

    Moua, Mee; Guerra, Fernando A; Moore, Jill D; Valdiserri, Ronald O

    2002-01-01

    The United States is a country of immigrants, our government having been formed by recent arrivals. This trend has continued throughout our history; according to the Center for Immigration Studies, more than 26 million immigrants have settled in the United States since 1970, and approximately one million new immigrants come to the United States each year. The immigrant population faces highly diverse health issues that states, cities, and counties must address, many of which pose significant legal and policy issues. Social, cultural, and linguistic factors complicate those challenges, as does the overlay of federal immigration and health policy. Two federal laws, the Welfare Reform Act of 1996 and Title VI of the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, have affected immigrants in two very different ways. The former made it difficult for immigrants to qualify for publicly funded benefits. In contrast, Title VI made it easier for immigrants to obtain benefits by requiring federally funded service providers to offer translating services to persons with limited English language skills. Tuberculosis treatment is perhaps the most pressing health need among recent arrivals to the United States. Methods to slow down and hopefully eliminate this disease are underway, but a more comprehensive approach to not only tuberculosis but to immigrant health in general is needed. Indeed, it will benefit those directly affected by tuberculosis and will have serious implications for the entire population for generations to come.

  8. The degree of certainty in brain death: probability in clinical and Islamic legal discourse.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Faisal; Ewell, Joshua C; Munawar, Ayla; Asrar, Usman; Khan, Nadir

    2013-04-01

    The University of Michigan conference "Where Religion, Policy, and Bioethics Meet: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Islamic Bioethics and End-of-Life Care" in April 2011 addressed the issue of brain death as the prototype for a discourse that would reflect the emergence of Islamic bioethics as a formal field of study. In considering the issue of brain death, various Muslim legal experts have raised concerns over the lack of certainty in the scientific criteria as applied to the definition and diagnosis of brain death by the medical community. In contrast, the medical community at large has not required absolute certainty in its process, but has sought to eliminate doubt through cumulative diagnostic modalities and supportive scientific evidence. This has recently become a principal model, with increased interest in data analysis and evidence-based medicine with the intent to analyze and ultimately improve outcomes. Islamic law has also long employed a systematic methodology with the goal of eliminating doubt from rulings regarding the question of certainty. While ample criticism of the scientific criteria of brain death (Harvard criteria) by traditional legal sources now exists, an analysis of the legal process in assessing brain death, geared toward informing the clinician's perspective on the issue, is lacking. In this article, we explore the role of certainty in the diagnostic modalities used to establish diagnoses of brain death in current medical practice. We further examine the Islamic jurisprudential approach vis-à-vis the concept of certainty (yaqīn). Finally, we contrast the two at times divergent philosophies and consider what each perspective may contribute to the global discourse on brain death, understanding that the interdependence that exists between the theological, juridical, ethical, and medical/scientific fields necessitates an open discussion and active collaboration between all parties. We hope that this article serves to continue the

  9. Compensation for subjects of medical research: the moral rights of patients and the power of research ethics committees.

    PubMed Central

    Guest, S

    1997-01-01

    Awareness of the morally significant distinction between research and innovative therapy reveals serious gaps in the legal provision for compensation in the UK for injured subjects of medical research. Major problems are limitations inherent in negligence actions and a culture that emphasises indemnifying researchers before compensating victims. Medical research morally requires compensation on a no-fault basis even where there is proper consent on the part of the research subject. In particular, for drug research, there is insufficient provision in the current patient guidelines of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry, since they make "no legal commitment" to paying compensation for injury to patient subjects. There is a need for the provision of both adequate insurance and contractual arrangements for making payments. The solution is for Local Research Ethics Committees (LRECs) to make use of their power to withhold approval of medical research where compensation is not legally enforceable. PMID:9220333

  10. Effectiveness of current teaching methods in Cardiology: the SKILLS (medical Students Knowledge Integration of Lower Level clinical Skills) study

    PubMed Central

    Lavranos, G; Koliaki, C; Briasoulis, A; Nikolaou, A; Stefanadis, C

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the study is to assess reported changes in medical students’ capacity to attain five basic cardiological clinical skills, following a one-month intensive cardiology course provisioned in the core curriculum. Materials and Methods: An anonymous questionnaire comprising self reported performance in the five skills, namely 1) arterial blood pressure measurement, 2) cardiac auscultation, 3) electrocardiogram (ECG) carry out, 4) ECG interpretation and 5) defibrillation, was distributed to 177 fifth year students of the Athens Medical School upon initiating the cardiology course (pre-training group) and to 59 students matched for sex, age, year of study and training centre, following completion of the course (post training group). Comparison of pre- and post- training performance was evaluated using the χ2 test. Results: No change was noted with regards to blood pressure measurement, cardiac auscultation or defibrillation. By contrast, a statistically significant improvement was reported for ECG execution (54.3 versus 81.4%; p<0.001) and interpretation (from 33.1 to 89.8%; p<0.001). Conclusions: Improvement in the execution and interpretation of ECGs seems to be among the strengths of the cardiology training program. Further studies including larger samples from multiple medical schools and objective assessment of skill execution might facilitate accurate training evaluation and define opportunities for improvement. PMID:23935341

  11. [Assistance in hunger strikes: legal guidelines].

    PubMed

    Gevers, J K

    2000-05-20

    Hunger strikes raise ethical and legal issues, in addition to societal and medical ones. The World Medical Association adopted resolutions in 1975 (Declaration of Tokyo) and 1991 (Declaration of Malta) in which respect for the decision to refuse food was confirmed. A survey of the relevant international and national standards shows that in the Netherlands law and policy are more supportive of respect for food refusal (and against forced feeding) than would seem to be the case at the international level. However, respect for the decision of the hunger striker requires that it is well-considered, informed, and free from group coercion. The existence of an unambiguous legal framework will not save the advising physician from difficult dilemmas which will in particular occur in case of a protracted hunger strike. In anticipation of expected loss of judgement capacities in protracted hunger strikers it is advisable that the wishes of the striker and the professional policy that the physician will adopt are written down. In case of hunger strike legal standards cannot fully replace psychological insight, professional ethics and conscience, however.

  12. Legal Translator Training: Partnership between Teachers of English for Legal Purposes and Legal Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northcott, Jill; Brown, Gillian

    2006-01-01

    Training legal English specialists is one area in which cooperation between discipline and language specialists is particularly valuable. Seven short excerpts from a short training course run jointly by teachers of English for legal purposes and legal specialists are presented and analysed to illustrate the contribution an ESP oriented approach,…

  13. Legal abortion mortality.

    PubMed

    Kestelman, P

    1978-04-01

    Statistics on legal abortion in Britain between 1968-1974 are presented. There was a mortality rate of 10+ or -2 per 100,000 abortions: 27+ or -11 in 1968-1969, 12+ or -4 in 1970-1972, and 6+ or -3 in 1973-1974. Legal abortion mortality increased from 4+ or -3 when performed at gestation under 9 weeks to 5+ or -2 at 9-12 weeks, 13+ or -7 at 13-16 weeks, and 62+ or -33 at 17 weeks and over. The ratio was 11+ or -6 for women under 20 years of age, increasing to 5+ or -3 at age 20-29, 10+ or -6 at age 30-39, and 23+ or -19 at age 40 and over. The parity had little influence on abortion mortality, but the technique used had a great influence. Hysterotomy, hypertonic saline, and abortifacient paste were the most dangerous, in increasing order, with mortality rates of 39+ or -30, 106+ or -75, and 152+ or -89, respectively. The rates for aspiration and curretage were 4+ or -2 and 4+ or -3, respectively. There was a higher mortality risk with abortion with sterilization. The main causes of legal abortion mortality were infection, pulmonary embolism, and complications of general anesthesia. The high incidence of mortality associated with legal abortion in Britain is partially caused by: 1) high incidence of concurrent sterilization, 2) former use of dangerous techniques, 3) significant incidence of second trimester abortion, 4) routine use of general anesthesia, and 5) previous ill health of some of the women.

  14. Orbital Debris: Technical and Legal Issues and Solutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    This thesis examines the current technological and legal issues concerning orbital debris (space debris). The unique physical characteristics of the...space environment are identified and explained. The thesis then explores the causes of orbital debris and examines the risk posed by debris to the...most frequently used orbital areas. Significant environmental, legal, political, and economic consequences of orbital debris are described. The current

  15. Is there need for a transformational change to overcome the current problems with postgraduate medical education in India?

    PubMed

    Ananthakrishnan, N; Arora, N K; Chandy, G; Gitanjali, B; Sood, R; Supe, A; Nagarajan, S

    2012-01-01

    In spite of the existence of a dual system of postgraduation, one under the Medical Council of India (MCI) and the other on a parallel track under the National Board of Examinations, postgraduate medical education in India is beset with several problems. For example, the curriculum has not been revised comprehensively for several decades. The diploma course under the MCI has become unpopular and is largely a temporary refuge for those who do not get admission to degree courses. The level of skills of the outgoing graduate is falling and the increase in the number of seats is taking place in a haphazard manner, without reference to the needs. In spite of increase in seats, there is a shortage of specialists at the secondary and tertiary care levels, especially in medical colleges, to share teaching responsibilities. Further, the distribution of specialists is skewed, with some states having far more than others. To remedy these ills and fulfil the requirements of the country over the next two decades, a working group appointed by the erstwhile governors of the MCI was asked to suggest suitable modifications to the existing postgraduate system. After an extensive review of the lacunae in the present system, the needs at various levels and the pattern of postgraduate education in other countries, it was felt that a competency-based model of a 2-year postgraduate course across all specialties, the use of offsite facilities for training and a criterion-based evaluation system entailing continuous monitoring would go a long way to correct some of the deficiencies of the existing system. The details of the proposal and its merits are outlined for wider discussion and to serve as a feedback to the regulatory agencies engaged in the task of improving the medical education system in India. We feel that the adoption of the proposed system would go a long way in improving career options, increasing the availability of teachers and dissemination of specialists to the secondary

  16. Statements from Youth in Legal Contexts: Effects of Consistency, Legal Role, and Age.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, Peter F; Malloy, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Jurors are often asked to evaluate statements provided by young victims, witnesses, and suspects. When, over time, youths' statements contain inconsistent information or recantations of prior statements, jurors face a difficult task in evaluating the validity of the initial claim. The underlying reasons for inconsistencies and recantation of young people's statements, particularly in cases of child sexual abuse, have been debated. Of primary interest here is whether inconsistencies (e.g., recantation) are evaluated differently by fact finders depending on the youth's age and role in a legal case. The current study examined effects of consistency of juvenile statements, legal role, and age on perceptions of testimony in a child sexual abuse investigation. Participants (N = 693) read vignettes describing child sexual abuse in which consistency of a follow-up statement (consistent, inconsistent, recanted), legal role (victim, witness, suspect), and age (10 years, 16 years) of the juvenile providing testimony were manipulated. The results revealed that judgments of initial statement quality, blameworthiness, and guilt were dependent on the consistency of follow-up statements and on the interactive effects of a juvenile's legal role and age. The current study has theoretical implications for understanding juror decision-making and practical implications for legal professionals and fact finders evaluating youths' statements. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. California's county hospitals and the University of California graduate medical education system. Current issues and future directions.

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, W J; Pierce, K; Martin, D K

    1998-01-01

    California's county hospitals train 45% of the state's graduate medical residents, including 33% of residents in the University of California system. This paper describes the interrelationships of California's county hospitals and the University of California (UC) graduate medical education (GME) programs, highlighting key challenges facing both systems. The mission of California's county health care systems is to serve all who need health care services regardless of ability to pay. Locating UC GME programs in county hospitals helps serve the public missions of both institutions. Such partnerships enhance the GME experience of UC residents, provide key primary care training opportunities, and ensure continued health care access for indigent and uninsured populations. Only through affiliation with university training programs have county hospitals been able to run the cost-effective, quality programs that constitute an acceptable safety net for the poor. Financial stress, however, has led county hospitals and UC's GME programs to advocate for reform in both GME financing and indigent care funding. County hospitals must participate in constructing strategies for GME reform to assure that GME funding mechanisms provide for equitable compensation of county hospitals' essential role. Joint advocacy will also be essential in achieving significant indigent care policy reform. PMID:9614786

  18. "Legal highs" - new players in the old drama.

    PubMed

    Zawilska, Jolanta B

    2011-06-01

    Recently, a new class of "designer drugs" has emerged on the drug use market, known as "legal highs" or "herbal highs". They include a wide range of products, from natural plant-originated substances to synthetic compounds, that can be purchased both online and from high street retailers. "Legal highs" mimic psychoactive effects of illicit drugs of abuse. However, they are claimed to consist of compounds that are legal to sell, possess and use. Based on the spectrum of their actions on the cognitive processes, mood, and behavior "legal highs" can be classified into three basic categories: amphetamine- and ecstasy-like psychostimulants, hallucinogens, and synthetic cannabinoids ("spice"). This review surveys the current state of knowledge regarding the pharmacological properties of "legal highs". It also addresses the negative consequences of using these products.

  19. Ethical and legal aspects of stem cell practices in Turkey: where are we?

    PubMed

    Ozturk Turkmen, H; Arda, B

    2008-12-01

    Advances in medical technology and information have facilitated clinical practices that favourably affect the success rates of treatment for diseases. Regenerative medicine has been the focus of the recent medical agenda, to the extent of fundamentally changing treatment paradigms. Stem cell practices, their efficacy, and associated ethical concerns have been debated intensively in many countries. Stem cell research is carried out along with the treatment of patients. Thus, various groups affected by the practices inevitably participate in the discussions. In addition to discussions based on avoiding any harm, providing benefits and respecting personal autonomy and justice, problems arise owing to the lack of legal regulations for stem cell research and practice. The dimensions of the problems vary in the developing countries, with widespread use of advanced medical technology but with lack of sources allocated for healthcare, dominance of paternalistic physician-patient relationships and failure to achieve a sufficient level of awareness of patients' rights. This article discusses the current situation of stem cell practices within the context of regenerative medicine in Turkey and ethical concerns about some of the legal regulations, such as the Regulation for Umblical Cord Blood Banking and Guidelines for Non-embryonic Stem Cell Study for Non-clinical Purposes directing the research on this issue.

  20. A Cross-sectional Study of Current Doctors’ Performance in a Modified Version of a Medical School Admission Aptitude Test

    PubMed Central

    Blackmur, James P.; Lone, Nazir I.; Stone, Oliver D.; Webb, David J.; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The 2-hour long United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) is used by many universities in the United Kingdom as part of their selection process for undergraduate medical and dentistry degrees. We aimed to compare the performance of senior doctors in primary and secondary care and across a range of specialties, in a modified version of the medical school entrance examination—the mUKCAT. Lay people were also included in the study. Despite its widespread use, this is the first study that examines the performance of senior clinicians in the UKCAT. The study used a prospective cross-sectional design. It used mock questions from the UKCAT website to generate an mUKCAT that was anticipated to take 15 minutes to complete. In all, 167 doctors at consultant, general practitioner (GP), or specialty trainee grade and 26 lay people took part. The overall mean mUKCAT score of all participants was 2486 (69.1%). Of the total cohort, 126 (65.3%) scored above our designated threshold of 2368 and were deemed to have passed the mUKCAT. Excluding lay people, 113 (67.7%) of the 167 doctors scored above that threshold. Medical specialty was associated with overall score (P = 0.003), with anesthetists/intensive care physicians scoring highest (n = 20, mean score 2660) and GPs scoring lowest (n = 38, mean score 2302). Academics outperformed nonacademics (mean score of academics, n = 44 vs nonacademics, n = 123: 2750 vs 2406; P < 0.001). Those clinicians in senior management positions scored lower than those in “standard” roles (mean score of senior management, n = 31 vs standard roles, n = 136: 2332 vs 2534, mean difference 202, 95% confidence interval 67–337, P = 0.004). In the situational judgement section, there was no evidence that specialty was associated with score (P = 0.15). Academics exhibited greater situational judgement than their nonacademic colleagues (academics vs nonacademics: 69.8 vs 63.6%; P = 0.01). The