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Sample records for current treatment concepts

  1. Citrin deficiency and current treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    Saheki, Takeyori; Inoue, Kanako; Tushima, Anmi; Mutoh, Kozo; Kobayashi, Keiko

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the historical aspects of citrin and citrin deficiency, characteristic food preference and food aversion of citrin-deficient subjects, and carbohydrate toxicity in relation to ureogenesis and issues of the conventional treatment procedures for hyperammonemia in citrin deficiency, leading to current treatment concepts for citrin deficiency. We also emphasize the importance of a citrin deficiency mouse model in elucidating the pathophysiology and developing novel therapeutics based on the pathophysiology, such as sodium pyruvate. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mastocytosis: current concepts in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Escribano, L; Akin, C; Castells, M; Orfao, A; Metcalfe, D D

    2002-12-01

    Mastocytosis consists of a group of disorders characterized by a pathologic increase in mast cells in tissues including skin, bone marrow, liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Mastocytosis is a rare disease. Because of this, general practitioners have limited exposure to its clinical manifestations, diagnosis, classification, and management. Diagnosis of mastocytosis is suspected on clinical grounds and is established by histopathologic examination of involved tissues such as skin and bone marrow. The most common clinical sign of mastocytosis is the presence of typical skin lesions of urticaria pigmentosa. Most patients experience symptoms related to mast cell mediator release, and prevention of the effects of these mediators on tissues constitutes the major therapeutic goal in the management of mastocytosis. Despite recent advances in knowledge about the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and classification of mastocytosis, a curative treatment for mastocytosis does not now exist. Management of patients within all categories of mastocytosis includes: (1) a careful counseling of patients (parents in pediatric cases) and care providers, (2) avoidance of factors triggering acute mediator release, (3) treatment of acute mast cell mediator release, (4) treatment of chronic mast cell mediator release, and if indicated (5) an attempt to treat organ infiltration by mast cells. The goal of this manuscript is to provide an overview of the mediators produced and released by mast cells, the diagnostic criteria for the different variants of mastocytosis, and the treatment options currently available.

  3. Female pattern hair loss: Current treatment concepts

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Quan Q; Sinclair, Rodney

    2007-01-01

    Fewer than 45% of women go through life with a full head of hair. Female pattern hair loss is the commonest cause of hair loss in women and prevalence increases with advancing age. Affected women may experience psychological distress and impaired social functioning. In most cases the diagnosis can be made clinically and the condition treated medically. While many women using oral antiandrogens and topical minoxidil will regrow some hair, early diagnosis and initiation of treatment is desirable as these treatments are more effective at arresting progression of hair loss than stimulating regrowth. Adjunctive nonpharmacological treatment modalities such as counseling, cosmetic camouflage and hair transplantation are important measures for some patients. The histology of female pattern hair loss is identical to that of male androgenetic alopecia. While the clinical pattern of the hair loss differs between men, the response to oral antiandrogens suggests that female pattern hair loss is an androgen dependant condition, at least in the majority of cases. Female pattern hair loss is a chronic progressive condition. All treatments need to be continued to maintain the effect. An initial therapeutic response often takes 12 or even 24 months. Given this delay, monitoring for treatment effect through clinical photography or standardized clinical severity scales is helpful. PMID:18044135

  4. Female pattern hair loss: current treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Quan Q; Sinclair, Rodney

    2007-01-01

    Fewer than 45% of women go through life with a full head of hair. Female pattern hair loss is the commonest cause of hair loss in women and prevalence increases with advancing age. Affected women may experience psychological distress and impaired social functioning. In most cases the diagnosis can be made clinically and the condition treated medically. While many women using oral antiandrogens and topical minoxidil will regrow some hair, early diagnosis and initiation of treatment is desirable as these treatments are more effective at arresting progression of hair loss than stimulating regrowth. Adjunctive nonpharmacological treatment modalities such as counseling, cosmetic camouflage and hair transplantation are important measures for some patients. The histology of female pattern hair loss is identical to that of male androgenetic alopecia. While the clinical pattern of the hair loss differs between men, the response to oral antiandrogens suggests that female pattern hair loss is an androgen dependant condition, at least in the majority of cases. Female pattern hair loss is a chronic progressive condition. All treatments need to be continued to maintain the effect. An initial therapeutic response often takes 12 or even 24 months. Given this delay, monitoring for treatment effect through clinical photography or standardized clinical severity scales is helpful.

  5. Medical treatment of radiological casualties: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Kristi L; Goans, Ronald E; Hatchett, Richard J; Mettler, Fred A; Schumacher, Thomas A; Noji, Eric K; Jarrett, David G

    2005-06-01

    The threat of radiologic or nuclear terrorism is increasing, yet many physicians are unfamiliar with basic treatment principles for radiologic casualties. Patients may present for care after a covert radiation exposure, requiring an elevated level of suspicion by the physician. Traditional medical and surgical triage criteria should always take precedence over radiation exposure management or decontamination. External contamination from a radioactive cloud is easily evaluated using a simple Geiger-Muller counter and decontamination accomplished by prompt removal of clothing and traditional showering. Management of surgical conditions in the presence of persistent radioactive contamination should be dealt with in a conventional manner with health physics guidance. To be most effective in the medical management of a terrorist event involving high-level radiation, physicians should understand basic manifestations of the acute radiation syndrome, the available medical countermeasures, and the psychosocial implications of radiation incidents. Health policy considerations include stockpiling strategies, effective use of risk communications, and decisionmaking for shelter-in-place versus evacuation after a radiologic incident.

  6. Current concepts of gunshot wound treatment: a trauma surgeon's perspective.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, Edward E

    2003-03-01

    Trauma remains a significant and persistent public health problem, accounting for 90,000 deaths and 20 million people disabled annually. Current concepts of appropriate triage and emergency treatment of gunshot wounds are addressed from a trauma surgeon's perspective. Recent studies regarding prehospital transport policy, and acute diagnostic studies allow optimal treatment guidelines to be formulated. Specifically, rapid transport rather than prolonged on-scene treatment (including maneuvers such as formal thoracolumbar immobilization) should be given the highest priority. Also, routine arteriography (another time-consuming and invasive procedure) in the treatment of gunshot wounds to the extremity is no longer the standard of care.

  7. Current treatment concepts for "terrible triad" injuries of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Kevin; Ipaktchi, Kyros; Livermore, Meryl; Cao, Jue; Banegas, Rodrigo

    2014-12-01

    Elbow fracture-dislocations destabilize the elbow, preventing functional rehabilitation. If left untreated, they commonly result in functional compromise and poor outcomes. The "terrible triad" injury is classically described as a combination of a coronoid process and radial head fractures, as well as a posterolateral elbow dislocation. Surgical treatment to restore stable elbow range of motion has evolved in the past few decades based on increased understanding of elbow biomechanics and the anatomy of these injuries. This article highlights current concepts in the treatment of these complicated injuries.

  8. [Current treatment concepts for olecranon and prepatellar bursitis in Austria].

    PubMed

    Baumbach, S F; Michel, M; Wyen, H; Buschmann, C T; Kdolsky, R; Kanz, K-G

    2013-04-01

    The limited evidence available on the diagnosis and treatment of olecranon and prepatellar bursitis indicates nationally varying treatment approaches. Therefore the aim of this study was to survey the current treatment concepts of olecranon and prepatellar bursitis in Austria. An online questionnaire comprising of demographic data, questions regarding diagnostics and differentiation between septic bursitis (SB) and non-septic bursitis (NSB) as well as two case reports for therapy appraisal were sent to members of the Austrian Society of Orthopaedics and Orthopaedic Surgery (ÖGO) and the Austrian Society of Traumatology (ÖGU). The overall response rates were 46 % (ÖGU)/12 % (ÖGO). Differentiation between SB and NSB was predominantly based on medical history/clinical presentation (ÖGU: 100 %/ÖGO: 84 %) and blood sampling (ÖGU: 82 %/ÖGO: 77 %). 64/36 % of surveyed members of ÖGO/OGU performed a bursal aspiration. 95/55 % of Austrian ÖGU opinion leaders favoured a surgical treatment approach in cases of SB/NSB. Conversely, ÖGO members rather favoured a conservative treatment approach (28/27 %). Significant differences were found between ÖGO and ÖGU, with the latter favouring a surgical treatment approach in cases of SB and NSB. However, the international literature argues for a conservative treatment approach. Further high quality research is needed to establish an evidence-based treatment approach. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Rumination syndrome: a review of current concepts and treatments.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Reza A; McCallum, Richard W

    2014-10-01

    Rumination is a normal and common phenomenon among ruminant animals; but in humans, it is always regarded as symptom indicative of abnormal function of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and understanding of the mechanisms explaining this event are still evolving. Learning-based theories, organic factors such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and psychological disturbances (eg, depression, anxiety) and the role of life stresses have been postulated as potential mechanisms of rumination. In this review, we take the approach that rumination syndrome is a distinct and discrete functional gastroduodenal disorder. We review current concepts of the pathophysiology of this entity and diagnostic approaches, then detail the treatment paradigms that have been pursued in rumination syndrome in adults. Patients with rumination syndrome have a very distinct set of symptoms. It was focused on the immediate postprandial period, but recently, there is an awareness of an expanding spectrum of the clinical presentation. This includes the concept of "conditioned vomiting" occurring in the setting of delayed gastric emptying (gastroparesis). Physicians' awareness of rumination syndrome is essential in the diagnosis and management of this disorder. Stress and psychological aspects in rumination syndrome are invariably in the background and have to be addressed. The crucial steps in the treatment strategy for rumination syndrome rely on reassurance, education and a physiologic explanation to the patient and family that this is not a "disease," followed by behavioral and relaxation programs and addressing stress factors.

  10. The Unstable Elbow: Current Concepts in Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tashjian, Robert Z; Wolf, Brian R; van Riet, Roger P; Steinmann, Scott P

    2016-01-01

    Elbow instability is common and may occur after a variety of injuries, including falls or direct blows. Instability can be classified as either acute or chronic. Acute instability is classified as simple (without fracture) or complex (with associated fracture). Chronic instability is classified as a chronically dislocated or recurrently unstable elbow. Recurrent instability commonly presents as isolated medial or lateral collateral ligament insufficiency. A chronically dislocated elbow is often more complex, involving both osseous and ligamentous injuries. The treatment of simple dislocations typically involves closed reduction and nonsurgical management. Chronic recurrent lateral and medial collateral ligament insufficiencies have very different clinical characteristics, but definitive treatment frequently involves ligament reconstruction. Complex instability usually requires surgery, which includes open reduction and internal fixation of coronoid and olecranon fractures, repair or replacement of radial head fractures, and lateral collateral ligament repair. Medial collateral ligament repair and/or external fixation are rarely required to restore stability. It is important for surgeons to understand current concepts in the diagnosis and management of acute and chronic elbow instability as well as the preferred surgical treatments and techniques for the management of these injuries.

  11. Current pharmacotherapeutic concepts for the treatment of obesity in adults.

    PubMed

    Idelevich, Evgeny; Kirch, Wilhelm; Schindler, Christoph

    2009-02-01

    Obesity is one of the greatest public health challenges of the twenty-first century. The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that in 2005 approximately 1.6 billion adults were overweight and at least 400 million adults were obese. The prevalence of obesity is still continuing to increase dramatically. Overweight and obese people carry a higher risk for a variety of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral occlusive artery disease. Weight loss is considered to be the initial step which helps to prevent or to control the clinical consequences of obesity. In a great number of patients who are not able to reduce weight by means of non-pharmacological measures, drug therapy can assist in reaching the weight management targets. Drug treatment should only be considered as part of a systematic weight management program including dietary and lifestyle changes. This review summarizes current pharmacotherapeutic concepts for the treatment of obesity in adults focusing on efficacy and safety of anti-obesity drugs.

  12. Syringomyelia: current concepts in pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rusbridge, Clare; Greitz, Dan; Iskandar, Bermans J

    2006-01-01

    Syringomyelia is a condition that results in fluid-containing cavities within the parenchyma of the spinal cord as a consequence of altered cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. This review discusses the history and the classification of the disorder, the current theories of pathogenesis, and the advanced imaging modalities used in the diagnosis. The intramedullary pulse pressure theory (a new pathophysiologic concept of syringomyelia) also is presented. In addition, the current understanding of the painful nature of this condition is discussed and the current trends in medical and surgical management are reviewed.

  13. Current concepts in the treatment of cartilage damage. A review.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Loreto, Carla; Castorina, Sergio; Imbesi, Rosa; Leonardi, Rosalia; Castrogiovanni, Paola

    2013-01-01

    A literature review of tile treatment of cartilage defects was conducted, examining the current literature on the well-known treatments. In particular, advantages and drawbacks of each of the discussed treatments were evaluated considering outcomes available in literature. The literature search was conducted on PubMed and Scopus using appropriate keywords in relation to cartilage defects. Main research articles were selected for review. Cartilage damage affects thousands of persons each year; they are treated with implants and surgery. A major problem in the treatment of cartilage defects is the inability of cartilage to repair, which reduces the effectiveness of the treatment. In addition, cyclic loading of joints further degrades cartilage even after treatment. In relation to the conditions of cartilage lesions and the features of patients, a specific treatment is required in each case. Current treatments are often unpredictable in results but result in long term improvements for many patients, especially young patients. The well established treatments such as osteochondral implants, bone marrow stimulation techniques, chondrogenic cell implantations have advantages and drawbacks, so that the search has not been interrupted for new strategies, such as scaffold materials. In this review we describe benefits and disadvantages of the established methods of cartilage regeneration that seem to have a better long-term effectiveness.

  14. Treatment for Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis: Current Concepts and New Evidence.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Andre M; Moore, Harold G; Cunningham, Matthew E

    2017-10-09

    Current guidelines for the optimal treatment degenerative spondylolisthesis are weak and based on limited high-quality evidence. There is some moderate evidence that decompression alone may be a feasible treatment with lower surgical morbidity and similar outcomes to fusion when performed in a select population with a low-grade slip. Similarly, addition of interbody fusion may be best suited to a subset of patients with high-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis, although this remains controversial. Minimally invasive techniques are increasingly being utilized for both decompression and fusion surgeries with more and more studies showing similar outcomes and lower postoperative morbidity for patients. This will likely be an area of continued intense research. Finally, the role of spondylolisthesis reduction will likely be determined as further investigation into optimal sagittal balance and spinopelvic parameters is conducted. Future identification of ideal thresholds for sagittal vertical axis and slip angle that will prevent progression and reoperation will play an important role in surgical treatment planning. Current evidence supports surgical treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis. While posterolateral spinal fusion remains the treatment of choice, the use of interbodies and decompressions without fusion may be efficacious in certain populations. However, additional high-quality evidence is needed, especially in newer areas of practice such as minimally invasive techniques and sagittal balance correction.

  15. Current concepts in diagnosis and treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Roliński, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most commonly diagnosed type of leukemia in Western Europe and North America, and represents about 30% of all leukemias in adults. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a disease of the elderly, who are often in poorer general health and burdened with multiple comorbidities. These factors affect the decision making when choosing an appropriate method of treatment. In recent years there has been significant progress in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, first due to the introduction of immunochemotherapy with monoclonal antibodies and latterly small molecules, like tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting B-cell receptor signaling. This article discusses the current diagnostic principles, the most important prognostic factors and therapeutic options, available in first-line treatment and in refractory/resistant disease, including high-risk CLL, both for patients with good and those with poor performance status. It also presents important novel molecules which have been evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:26793019

  16. Current Concepts on Diagnosis and Treatment of Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Magliacane, D.; Parente, R.; Triggiani, M.

    2014-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by a clonal proliferation and accumulation of mast cells in one or more organ, primarily in the skin and bone marrow. The clinical spectrum of the disease varies from relatively benign forms with isolated skin lesions to very aggressive variants with extensive systemic involvement and poor prognosis. The growth and proliferation of clonal mast cells is caused by an activating mutation of the tyrosine kinase receptor Kit for Stem Cell Factor, the main growth factor for mast cells. Clinical symptoms are related to mast-cell mediator release, to the tissue mast cell infiltration or both. The degree of infiltration and cell activation determines the highly variable clinical and morphological features. Current treatment of mastocytosis includes symptomatic, antimediator drugs and cytoreductive targeted therapies. PMID:24778999

  17. Current concepts in the treatment of sports concussions.

    PubMed

    Putukian, Margot; Kutcher, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    The management of patients with sports-related concussion (SRC) is comprehensive and includes preseason planning, education, initial evaluation, postinjury assessment, disposition, return-to-play decisions, and consideration of long-term brain health. Several recent publications have addressed sports concussion management using the best available evidence, and we review them here. The diagnosis and management of sports concussion have evolved over the past several decades, and with a greater understanding of the importance of both short- and long-term sequelae, there has been a clear trend toward recognizing and treating these brain injuries more cautiously and developing a proactive approach to management and return-to-play decision making. Although each of these used different methodologies in their review of the literature, their conclusions are fairly consistent, providing basic guidelines for contemporary approaches to management of SRC. Although many questions remain unanswered, there are several areas of agreement including the importance of education, preseason assessment, the benefit and utility of a standardized multimodal assessment on the sidelines, individualized treatment and return-to-play protocols, and the benefit of a multidisciplinary team in managing complicated injuries. This paper reviews these current sports concussion guidelines and the best available evidence that guides current management of SRC.

  18. Current concepts in the treatment of cartilage lesions with special regard to the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Widuchowski, Wojciech; Tomaszewski, Wiesław; Widuchowski, Jerzy; Czamara, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    The last twenty years have been marked by a rapid development of articular cartilage treatment and regeneration techniques. We present current concepts in the treatment of cartilage lesions and injuries, including gene therapy and tissue engineering.

  19. Irritable bowel syndrome: a concise review of current treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    Wall, Geoffrey C; Bryant, Ginelle A; Bottenberg, Michelle M; Maki, Erik D; Miesner, Andrew R

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders causing patients to seek medical treatment. It is relatively resource intensive and the source of significant morbidity. Recent insights into the pathophysiology and treatment of IBS has given clinicians more options than ever to contend with this disorder. The purpose of our paper is to review older, "classic" treatments for IBS as well as newer agents and "alternative" therapies. We discuss the evidence base of these drugs and provide context to help develop appropriate treatment plans for IBS patients.

  20. Irritable bowel syndrome: A concise review of current treatment concepts

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Geoffrey C; Bryant, Ginelle A; Bottenberg, Michelle M; Maki, Erik D; Miesner, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders causing patients to seek medical treatment. It is relatively resource intensive and the source of significant morbidity. Recent insights into the pathophysiology and treatment of IBS has given clinicians more options than ever to contend with this disorder. The purpose of our paper is to review older, “classic” treatments for IBS as well as newer agents and “alternative” therapies. We discuss the evidence base of these drugs and provide context to help develop appropriate treatment plans for IBS patients. PMID:25083054

  1. Current concepts for the treatment of acute scaphoid fractures.

    PubMed

    Arsalan-Werner, A; Sauerbier, M; Mehling, I M

    2016-02-01

    Fractures of the scaphoid are common injuries, accounting for approximately 80 % of carpal fractures. Differentiation between stable and unstable fractures (Herbert classification) cannot be made with conventional X-rays, so evaluation by computed tomography should additionally be performed. Under most circumstances, minimally invasive surgery with cannulated screws is the treatment of choice. A longer cast immobilization after minimal-invasive surgery is not necessary. Conservative treatment still has a place if the fracture is not dislocated nor unstable, but operative treatment can be offered to reduce the period of cast immobilization. Displaced fractures have a greater risk for nonunion and therefore should be treated operatively. Proximal pole fractures are definitely unstable, requiring treatment with screw fixation. The surgical approach depends on the location of the fracture and the preference of the surgeon.

  2. Current concepts in the treatment of gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhen-hua; Waizy, Hazibullah

    2013-02-01

    Gouty arthritis is an extremely painful condition that causes functional impairment. Gouty arthritis has become increasingly complex because of multiple comorbidities, iatrogenic factors and hyperuricemia that is refractory to treatment. In this review, we present a general overview of gouty arthritis including its pathophysiology, clinical presentations, diagnosis, predisposing factors and prophylactic therapy for preventing gouty arthritis flares.

  3. Current concepts and pharmacologic treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri

    2002-04-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common diagnoses and reason for hospitalization in the United States. Ace inhibitors, diuretics, beta-blockers and digitalis are the leading agents in pharmacologic management of heart failure. In order to improve patient outcomes, adult-health nurses need to understand the diagnosis, pathophysiology, nursing interventions, and pharmacologic treatment of this common disorder.

  4. Treatment of Anthrax in Man: Historical and Current Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-22

    been used in the treatment of cutaneous anthrax, but irr some cases this therapy.in not succe-.sful (9). Polymyxin and neomycin are not effective (35...Enhancement of Infection with Bacillus anthracis by chicken yolk.’Jap. J. Bact. 11:477- 480, 1956 75,. Rhian M, Riley JM, Wolfe VL, et al: Change in

  5. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN THE TREATMENT OF PATELLAR TENDINOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendon pain is a significant problem in athletes who participate in jumping and running sports and can interfere with athletic participation. This clinical commentary reviews patellar tendon anatomy and histopathology, the language used to describe patellar tendon pathology, risk factors for patellar tendinopathy and common interventions used to address patellar tendon pain. Evidence is presented to guide clinicians in their decision-making regarding the treatment of athletes with patellar tendon pain. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27904789

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of osteochondral lesions of the ankle: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Prado, Marcelo Pires; Kennedy, John G; Raduan, Fernando; Nery, Caio

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a wide-ranging review of the literature regarding osteochondral lesions of the ankle, with the aim of presenting the current concepts, treatment options, trends and future perspectives relating to this topic.

  7. Chronic migraine: current pathophysiologic concepts as targets for treatment.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Bert B

    2009-02-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) affects approximately 4% of the population and exerts a significant degree of disability on its sufferers. Chronic migraine (CM) is a subset of CDH that represents migraine without aura occurring on 15 or more days per month for at least 3 months. Although numerous risk factors are associated with the development of CM, the pathophysiology governing its genesis is largely unknown. The role of neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, as well as disruptions of antinociceptive systems and structures, are implicated in CM and are supported by the fact that treatments targeting these abnormalities are effective.

  8. Stress fractures. Current concepts of diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Reeder, M T; Dick, B H; Atkins, J K; Pribis, A B; Martinez, J M

    1996-09-01

    The stress fracture is a common injury seen by healthcare professionals caring for athletes. They have been described in numerous areas of the skeletal system and in multiple sports. However, they are most commonly seen in the lower extremities, with running the reported cause in most cases. Stress fractures result from repetitive, cyclic loading of bone which overwhelms the reparative ability of the skeletal system. Mechanically, three events may lead to stress fractures. First, the applied load can be increased. Secondly, the number of applied stresses can increase. Finally, the surface area over which the load is applied can be decreased. Diagnosis requires thorough clinical evaluation with a high index of suspicion for stress fractures. History must focus on examining the athletes training regimen, especially any changes in distance, running surface and type of shoe. Physical examination varies depending on the location of the stress fracture. Ultrasound is a possible adjunct to the physical examination. Initial plain radiological evaluation may be normal, especially early in the course of a stress fracture. Further radiological evaluation may be necessary to make a definitive diagnosis. Repeating plain radiographs, bone scintigraphy, magnetic resonance imaging and computerised tomography are all possible options. Treatment options begin with rest and cessation of the precipitating activity. This should be 'active rest' in which the athlete continues to exercise depending on the site of the fracture. The athlete should be evaluated from a biomechanical point of view and any abnormalities dealt with prior to rehabilitation. Possible adjuncts to treatment include pneumatic braces and electromagnetic field therapy. There are specific stress fractures that must be considered at-risk for complications of healing. The treatment of these fractures begins with immobilisation and may require surgery pending response to therapy. Stress fractures occur more frequently in

  9. Breast Cancer and Pregnancy: Current Concepts in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy presents a challenging situation for the patient, family, and caregivers. Case series have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of using anthracycline-based chemotherapy during the second and third trimesters. Additionally, patients should be seen, evaluated, and treated in a multidisciplinary setting with facilitated communication among the medical oncologist, surgical oncologist, obstetrician, radiation oncologist, pathologist, and radiologist. This review details the available data regarding the diagnosis and management of the pregnant breast cancer patient. PMID:21147871

  10. [Treatment of immune thrombopenic purpura in adults. Current concepts].

    PubMed

    Efira, A

    1983-02-10

    In immune thrombopenic purpura (ITP) therapy is aimed at achieving a safe blood platelet level, i.e. 50000/mm3. Platelet transfusions are helpful only in the case of serious bleeding. Corticosteroids are usually given first, but long-term efficiency can be expected in only one-third of patients. Splenectomy remains the best treatment, providing long-term remission in 50 to 85% of cases. Immunosuppressant therapy is used in intractable ITP; vinca alcaloids are the most effective agents. The value of plasma exchange, especially in cases of uncontrolled bleeding, and of high-dose intravenous gammaglobulin, is emphasized.

  11. Current Concepts in Treatment of Patellofemoral Osteochondritis Dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Paine, Russ; Chicas, Eric; Gardner, Emily; Bailey, Lane; McDermott, James

    2016-01-01

    Identification, protection, and management of patellofemoral articular cartilage lesions continue to remain on the forefront of sports medicine rehabilitation. Due to high-level compression forces that are applied through the patellofemoral (PF) joint, managing articular cartilage lesions is challenging for sports medicine specialists. Articular cartilage damage may exist in a wide spectrum of injuries ranging from small, single areas of focal damage to wide spread osteoarthritis involving large chondral regions. Management of these conditions has evolved over the last two centuries, most recently using biogenetic materials and cartilage replacement modalities. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss PF articular cartilage injuries, etiological variables, and investigate the evolution in management of articular cartilage lesions. Rehabilitation of these lesions will also be discussed with a focus on current trends and return to function criteria. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27904793

  12. Current Concepts in Treatment of Patellofemoral Osteochondritis Dissecans.

    PubMed

    Juneau, Chris; Paine, Russ; Chicas, Eric; Gardner, Emily; Bailey, Lane; McDermott, James

    2016-12-01

    Identification, protection, and management of patellofemoral articular cartilage lesions continue to remain on the forefront of sports medicine rehabilitation. Due to high-level compression forces that are applied through the patellofemoral (PF) joint, managing articular cartilage lesions is challenging for sports medicine specialists. Articular cartilage damage may exist in a wide spectrum of injuries ranging from small, single areas of focal damage to wide spread osteoarthritis involving large chondral regions. Management of these conditions has evolved over the last two centuries, most recently using biogenetic materials and cartilage replacement modalities. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss PF articular cartilage injuries, etiological variables, and investigate the evolution in management of articular cartilage lesions. Rehabilitation of these lesions will also be discussed with a focus on current trends and return to function criteria.

  13. CURRENT CONCEPTS AND TREATMENT OF PATELLOFEMORAL COMPRESSIVE ISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Patellofemoral disorders, commonly encountered in sports and orthopedic rehabilitation settings, may result from dysfunction in patellofemoral joint compression. Osseous and soft tissue factors, as well as the mechanical interaction of the two, contribute to increased patellofemoral compression and pain. Treatment of patellofemoral compressive issues is based on identification of contributory impairments. Use of reliable tests and measures is essential in detecting impairments in hip flexor, quadriceps, iliotibial band, hamstrings, and gastrocnemius flexibility, as well as in joint mobility, myofascial restrictions, and proximal muscle weakness. Once relevant impairments are identified, a combination of manual techniques, instrument-assisted methods, and therapeutic exercises are used to address the impairments and promote functional improvements. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to describe the clinical presentation, contributory considerations, and interventions to address patellofemoral joint compressive issues. PMID:27904792

  14. Achilles tendinopathy: A review of the current concepts of treatment.

    PubMed

    Roche, A J; Calder, J D F

    2013-10-01

    The two main categories of Achilles tendon disorder are broadly classified by anatomical location to include non-insertional and insertional conditions. Non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy is often managed conservatively, and many rehabilitation protocols have been adapted and modified, with excellent clinical results. Emerging and popular alternative therapies, including a variety of injections and extracorporeal shockwave therapy, are often combined with rehabilitation protocols. Surgical approaches have developed, with minimally invasive procedures proving popular. The management of insertional Achilles tendinopathy is improved by recognising coexisting pathologies around the insertion. Conservative rehabilitation protocols as used in non-insertional disorders are thought to prove less successful, but such methods are being modified, with improving results. Treatment such as shockwave therapy is also proving successful. Surgical approaches specific to the diagnosis are constantly evolving, and good results have been achieved.

  15. Pelvic inflammatory disease: current concepts in pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Caroline; Prabhu, Malavika

    2013-12-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is characterized by infection and inflammation of the upper genital tract in women and can cause significant reproductive health sequelae for women. Although a definitive diagnosis of PID is made by laparoscopic visualization of inflamed, purulent fallopian tubes, PID is generally a clinical diagnosis and thus represents a diagnostic challenge. Therefore, diagnosis and treatment algorithms advise a high index of suspicion for PID in any woman of reproductive age with pelvic or abdominal pain. Antibiotic therapy should be started early, and given for an adequate period of time to reduce the risk of complications. Coverage for anaerobic organisms should be considered in most cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Post-hypoxic Myoclonus: Current Concepts, Neurophysiology, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Harsh V.; Caviness, John N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Myoclonus may occur after hypoxia. In 1963, Lance and Adams described persistent myoclonus with other features after hypoxia. However, myoclonus occurring immediately after hypoxia may demonstrate different syndromic features from classic Lance–Adams syndrome (LAS). The aim of this review is to provide up-to-date information about the spectrum of myoclonus occurring after hypoxia with emphasis on neurophysiological features. Methods A literature search was performed on PubMed database from 1960 to 2015. The following search terms were used: “myoclonus,” “post anoxic myoclonus,” “post hypoxic myoclonus,” and “Lance Adams syndrome.” The articles describing clinical features, neurophysiology, management, and prognosis of post-hypoxic myoclonus cases were included for review. Results Several reports in the literature were separated clinically into “acute post-hypoxic myoclonus,” which occurred within hours of severe hypoxia, and “chronic post-hypoxic myoclonus,” which occurred with some recovery of mental status as the LAS. Acute post-hypoxic myoclonus was generalized in the setting of coma. Chronic post-hypoxic myoclonus presented as multifocal cortical action myoclonus that was significantly disabling. There was overlap of neurophysiological findings for these two syndromes but also different features. Treatment options for these two distinct clinical–neurophysiologic post-hypoxic myoclonus syndromes were approached differently. Discussion The review of clinical and neurophysiological findings suggests that myoclonus after hypoxia manifests in one or a combination of distinct syndromes: acute and/or chronic myoclonus. The mechanism of post-hypoxic myoclonus may arise either from cortical and/or subcortical structures. More research is needed to clarify mechanisms and treatment of post-hypoxic myoclonus. PMID:27708982

  17. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN THE TREATMENT OF GROSS PATELLOFEMORAL INSTABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Grant; Czarkowski, Brian; Giangarra, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Patellofemoral instability is a painful and commonly recurring condition, which often must be managed surgically. Diagnosis can be aided by the use of a variety of physical exam signs, such as the Q angle, Beighton hypermobility score, glide test, J sign, patellar tilt test, and apprehension test. Imaging modalities including x-ray, CT, and MRI guide both diagnosis and management by revealing trochlear dysplasia, bony malalignment, and ligamentous injury that contribute to instability. Following an initial patellar dislocation, nonoperative management with bracing and physical therapy is an acceptable option, despite limited evidence that operative management may improve functional outcome and reduce recurrent dislocations. For recurrent dislocations, operative management is indicated, and the appropriate procedure depends on the patient's anatomy and the cause of instability. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) restores the primary soft tissue restraint to lateral patellar dislocations, and can be performed using a variety of techniques. In patients whose instability is related to bony malalignment, a tibial tubercle osteotomy is commonly performed to realign the extensor mechanism and establish proper patellar tracking. In patients with trochlear dysplasia, a trochleoplasty may be performed to create a sufficient groove for the patella to traverse. Often these procedures must be combined to address all causes of instability. The reported outcomes following all three of these procedures are generally very good, with the majority of patients experiencing functional improvements and a low rate of recurrent instability, although more large randomized controlled trials are needed to determine which techniques are most effective. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide an overview of the current methods employed by orthopedic surgeons to diagnose and manage patellar instability. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27904790

  18. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN THE TREATMENT OF GROSS PATELLOFEMORAL INSTABILITY.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Grant; Torres, LeeAnne; Czarkowski, Brian; Giangarra, Charles E

    2016-12-01

    Patellofemoral instability is a painful and commonly recurring condition, which often must be managed surgically. Diagnosis can be aided by the use of a variety of physical exam signs, such as the Q angle, Beighton hypermobility score, glide test, J sign, patellar tilt test, and apprehension test. Imaging modalities including x-ray, CT, and MRI guide both diagnosis and management by revealing trochlear dysplasia, bony malalignment, and ligamentous injury that contribute to instability. Following an initial patellar dislocation, nonoperative management with bracing and physical therapy is an acceptable option, despite limited evidence that operative management may improve functional outcome and reduce recurrent dislocations. For recurrent dislocations, operative management is indicated, and the appropriate procedure depends on the patient's anatomy and the cause of instability. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) restores the primary soft tissue restraint to lateral patellar dislocations, and can be performed using a variety of techniques. In patients whose instability is related to bony malalignment, a tibial tubercle osteotomy is commonly performed to realign the extensor mechanism and establish proper patellar tracking. In patients with trochlear dysplasia, a trochleoplasty may be performed to create a sufficient groove for the patella to traverse. Often these procedures must be combined to address all causes of instability. The reported outcomes following all three of these procedures are generally very good, with the majority of patients experiencing functional improvements and a low rate of recurrent instability, although more large randomized controlled trials are needed to determine which techniques are most effective. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide an overview of the current methods employed by orthopedic surgeons to diagnose and manage patellar instability. 5.

  19. Evolution of the Treatment Integrity Concept: Current Status and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Frank M.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of treatment integrity cuts across a diversity of fields involved with providing treatments or interventions to individuals. In medical treatments, the concept of "treatment compliance" or "treatment adherence" is an important and problematic issue. In the field of nutrition, the concept of "dietary adherence" is important for…

  20. Evolution of the Treatment Integrity Concept: Current Status and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Frank M.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of treatment integrity cuts across a diversity of fields involved with providing treatments or interventions to individuals. In medical treatments, the concept of "treatment compliance" or "treatment adherence" is an important and problematic issue. In the field of nutrition, the concept of "dietary adherence" is important for…

  1. Current Concepts in Conception Control

    PubMed Central

    Ringrose, C. A. Douglas

    1963-01-01

    The progressive increase in world population has become a most urgent global problem in recent years. Man has, however, been interested in controlling his reproductivity at the family level for many centuries. Historical aspects of this saga are reviewed. The modern era of conception control was ushered in by Makepeace et al. in 1937 when ovulation inhibition by progesterone was demonstrated. Confirmation of this by Pincus and associates, and development of the potent oral progestational agents, the 19-norsteroids, have made efficient reliable contraception a reality. Experience with one of these agents (Ortho-Novum, 2 mg.) in 115 patients through 805 cycles is presented. Conception control was 100% effective at this dosage. Side effects were minimal. Only three of the women discontinued the tablets because of these effects. All but five in this group of 115 preferred the oral contraceptives to methods previously employed. PMID:13973987

  2. Late-onset hypogonadism: current concepts and controversies of pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Huhtaniemi, Ilpo

    2014-01-01

    long-term risks, is not yet available. In this review, we will summarize the current concepts and controversies in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of LOH.

  3. Invited Hand Article: Current Concepts in Treatment of Fracture-Dislocations of the Proximal Interphalangeal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Steven C.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Proximal interphalangeal joint fracture-dislocations are common injuries that require expedient and attentive treatment for the best outcomes. Management can range from protective splinting and early mobilization to complex operations. In this review, the current concepts surrounding the managment of these injuries are reviewed. Methods A literature review was performed of all recent articles pertaining to proximal interphalangeal joint fracture-dislocation, with specific focus on middle phalangeal base fractures. Where appropriate, older articles, or articles on closely related injury types were included for completeness. The methodology and outcomes of each study were analyzed. Results When small avulsion fractures are present, good results are routinely obtained with reduction and early mobilization of stable injuries. Strategies for management of the unstable dorsal fracture-dislocation have evolved over time. To provide early stability, a variety of techniques have evolved, including closed, percutaneous, external, and internal fixation methods. Although each of these techniques can be successful in skilled hands, none have been subjected to rigorous, prospective, comparative trials. Volar dislocations fare less well, with significant loss of motion in many studies. Pilon fractures represent the most complicated injuries, and return of normal motion is not expected. Conclusion The best outcomes can be achieved by (1) establishing enough stability to allow early motion, (2) restoring gliding joint motion rather than non-congruent motion, and (3) restoring the articular surface congruity when possible. Although the majority of literature on this topic consists of expert opinion and retrospective case series, the consensus appears to favor less invasive techniques whenever possible. PMID:25415092

  4. Snapping scapula syndrome: current concepts review in conservative and surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, Giovanni; Cerciello, Simone; Paladini, Paolo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Summary The snapping scapula, also called “washboard syndrome” is a controversial condition attributed to bony and soft tissue abnormalities. The syndrome was understimated for long time and often associated only with specific osseous abnormalities. The nodal point in the overview of the syndrome is that crepitus associated with symptomatic bursitis may be physiologic and is not uncommon a clinical presentation without any form of crepitus or craquement. In the current rewiew we analyzed the current concepts in the conservative and surgical management of snapping scapula syndrome, preceded by a description of scapular anatomy, pathophysiology of scapulothoracic articulation and clinical features of snapping scapula. PMID:23888290

  5. Football injuries: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Olson, David E; Sikka, Robby Singh; Hamilton, Abigail; Krohn, Austin

    2011-01-01

    Football is one of the most popular sports in the United States and is the leading cause of sports-related injury. A large focus in recent years has been on concussions, sudden cardiac death, and heat illness, all thought to be largely preventable health issues in the young athlete. Injury prevention through better understanding of injury mechanisms, education, proper equipment, and practice techniques and preseason screening may aid in reducing the number of injuries. Proper management of on-field injuries and health emergencies can reduce the morbidity associated with these injuries and may lead to faster return to play and reduced risk of future injury. This article reviews current concepts surrounding frequently seen football-related injuries.

  6. Birdshot chorioretinopathy: current knowledge and new concepts in pathophysiology, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment.

    PubMed

    Minos, Evangelos; Barry, Robert J; Southworth, Sue; Folkard, Annie; Murray, Philip I; Duker, Jay S; Keane, Pearse A; Denniston, Alastair K

    2016-05-12

    Birdshot chorioretinopathy (BCR) is a rare form of chronic, bilateral, posterior uveitis with a distinctive clinical phenotype, and a strong association with HLA-A29. It predominantly affects people in middle age. Given its rarity, patients often encounter delays in diagnosis leading to delays in adequate treatment, and thus risking significant visual loss. Recent advances have helped increase our understanding of the underlying autoimmune mechanisms involved in disease pathogenesis, and new diagnostic approaches such as multimodality imaging have improved our ability to both diagnose and monitor disease activity. Whilst traditional immunosuppressants may be effective in BCR, increased understanding of immune pathways is enabling development of newer treatment modalities, offering the potential for targeted modulation of immune mediators. In this review, we will discuss current understanding of BCR and explore recent developments in diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of this disease. Synonyms for BCR: Birdshot chorioretinopathy, Birdshot retinochoroiditis, Birdshot retino-choroidopathy, Vitiliginous choroiditis. Orphanet number: ORPHA179 OMIM: 605808.

  7. Current concepts in the treatment of intra-articular calcaneal fractures: results of a nationwide survey

    PubMed Central

    van Lieshout, E. M. M.; van Ginhoven, T. M.; Heetveld, M. J.; Patka, P.

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of intra-articular calcaneal fractures is controversial and randomised clinical trials are scarce. Moreover, the socio-economic cost remains unclear. The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence, treatment preferences and socio-economic cost of this complex fracture in the Netherlands. This data may aid in planning future clinical trials and support education. The method of study was of a cross-sectional survey design. A written survey was sent to one representative of both the traumatology and the orthopaedic staff in each hospital in the Netherlands. Data on incidence, treatment modalities, complications and follow-up strategies were recorded. The socio-economic cost was calculated. The average response rate was 70%. Fracture classifications, mostly by Sanders and Essex-Lopresti, were applied by 29%. Annually, 920 intra-articular calcaneal fractures (0.4% incidence rate) were treated, mainly with ORIF (46%), conservative (39%) and percutaneous (10%) treatment. The average non-weight-bearing mobilisation was 9 weeks (SD 2 weeks). An outcome score, mainly AOFAS, was documented by 7%. A secondary arthrodesis was performed in 21% of patients. The socio-economic cost was estimated to be €21.5–30.7 million. Dutch intra-articular calcaneal fracture incidence is at least 0.4% of all fractures presenting to hospitals. Better insight into treatment modalities currently employed and costs in the Netherlands was obtained. PMID:17564705

  8. Dumping Syndrome: A Review of the Current Concepts of Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Berg, Patrick; McCallum, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Gastric surgery has long been known to be a cause of dumping syndrome (DS). However, the increasing incidence of gastric bypass surgery, as well as reports of DS unrelated to previous gastric surgeries, has increased the importance of understanding DS in recent years. DS is due to the gastrointestinal response to voluminous and hyperosmolar chyme that is rapidly expelled from the stomach into the small intestine. This response involves neural and hormonal mechanisms. This review encompasses the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment approaches of DS and also focuses on the current research status of the pathophysiology of DS.

  9. Intralesional antigen immunotherapy for the treatment of warts: current concepts and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Nofal, Ahmad; Salah, Eman; Nofal, Eman; Yosef, Ayman

    2013-08-01

    Many destructive and immunotherapeutic modalities have been used for the management of warts; however, an optimal treatment with high efficacy and absent or low recurrence has not been explored to date. Recently, the use of intralesional immunotherapy with different antigens has shown promising efficacy in the treatment of warts. We review the different aspects of this new modality, including candidates, types of warts treated, dosage, number and interval between treatment sessions, mode of action, efficacy, adverse effects, recurrence rate, advantages, disadvantages, current place and future prospects. A literature review revealed that healthy immune subjects are the best candidates, and a pre-sensitization test is usually done before the start of therapy. The dosage, the number and interval between sessions, and the success rates varied among the different studies. The mode of action is still uncertain, but is essentially mediated through stimulation of T helper-1 cell cytokine response. Adverse effects are mild and generally insignificant, and the recurrence rate is absent or low. Intralesional antigen immunotherapy seems to be a promising, effective and safe treatment modality for viral warts. Future well-designed and controlled studies would help to more clearly define its place in the challenging field of wart therapy.

  10. Multimodality Imaging of the Painful Elbow: Current Imaging Concepts and Image-Guided Treatments for the Injured Thrower's Elbow.

    PubMed

    Gustas, Cristy N; Lee, Kenneth S

    2016-09-01

    Elbow pain in overhead sport athletes is not uncommon. Repetitive throwing can lead to chronic overuse and/or acute injury to tendons, ligaments, bones, or nerves about the elbow. A thorough history and physical examination of the thrower's elbow frequently establishes the diagnosis for pain. Imaging can provide additional information when the clinical picture is unclear or further information is necessary for risk stratification and treatment planning. This article focuses on current imaging concepts and image-guided treatments for injuries commonly affecting the adult throwing athlete's elbow.

  11. The Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Intraluminal Thrombus: Current Concepts of Development and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Piechota-Polanczyk, Aleksandra; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Nowak, Witold; Eilenberg, Wolf; Neumayer, Christoph; Malinski, Tadeusz; Huk, Ihor; Brostjan, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) shows several hallmarks of atherosclerotic and atherothrombotic disease, but comprises an additional, predominant feature of proteolysis resulting in the degradation and destabilization of the aortic wall. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on AAA development, involving the accumulation of neutrophils in the intraluminal thrombus and their central role in creating an oxidative and proteolytic environment. Particular focus is placed on the controversial role of heme oxygenase 1/carbon monoxide and nitric oxide synthase/peroxynitrite, which may exert both protective and damaging effects in the development of the aneurysm. Treatment indications as well as surgical and pharmacological options for AAA therapy are discussed in light of recent reports. PMID:26664891

  12. Treatment of juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the talus: current concepts review

    PubMed Central

    VANNINI, FRANCESCA; CAVALLO, MARCO; BALDASSARRI, MATTEO; CASTAGNINI, FRANCESCO; OLIVIERI, ALESSANDRA; FERRANTI, ENRICO; BUDA, ROBERTO; GIANNINI, SANDRO

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the talus (JODT) affects the subchondral bone primarily and, in a skeletally immature population, articular cartilage secondarily. It probably consists of aseptic bone necrosis whose spontaneous healing is impaired by microtraumas, resulting in an osteochondral injury and, in some cases, in osteoarthritis. In many cases the clinical presentation is asymptomatic. Mild chronic pain is frequent, sometimes accompanied by swelling, stiffness or locking. Few data are currently available on this topic and, moreover, most existing data were obtained from mixed groups and populations; it is therefore difficult to outline a scheme for the treatment of JODT. However, the most suitable treatment in the first stages of the disease is conservative. The presence of a loose body is an indication for surgical fixation, drilling or regenerative procedures, depending on the presence/extent of subchondral bone sclerosis and the surgeon’s experience. Drilling has been shown to promote the healing of lesions with minimal surgical trauma. Microfractures, since they induce fibrocartilage repair, are to be considered only for small injuries. Mosaicplasty and osteochondral autograft transplantation may cause donor site morbidity and are techniques little reported in JODT. Regenerative techniques and fresh allografts give good results in osteochondral lesions, but further studies are required to describe the results that can be obtained in JODT alone. PMID:25750908

  13. Treatment of juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the talus: current concepts review.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Francesca; Cavallo, Marco; Baldassarri, Matteo; Castagnini, Francesco; Olivieri, Alessandra; Ferranti, Enrico; Buda, Roberto; Giannini, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the talus (JODT) affects the subchondral bone primarily and, in a skeletally immature population, articular cartilage secondarily. It probably consists of aseptic bone necrosis whose spontaneous healing is impaired by microtraumas, resulting in an osteochondral injury and, in some cases, in osteoarthritis. In many cases the clinical presentation is asymptomatic. Mild chronic pain is frequent, sometimes accompanied by swelling, stiffness or locking. Few data are currently available on this topic and, moreover, most existing data were obtained from mixed groups and populations; it is therefore difficult to outline a scheme for the treatment of JODT. However, the most suitable treatment in the first stages of the disease is conservative. The presence of a loose body is an indication for surgical fixation, drilling or regenerative procedures, depending on the presence/extent of subchondral bone sclerosis and the surgeon's experience. Drilling has been shown to promote the healing of lesions with minimal surgical trauma. Microfractures, since they induce fibrocartilage repair, are to be considered only for small injuries. Mosaicplasty and osteochondral autograft transplantation may cause donor site morbidity and are techniques little reported in JODT. Regenerative techniques and fresh allografts give good results in osteochondral lesions, but further studies are required to describe the results that can be obtained in JODT alone.

  14. Current concepts in anal fissures.

    PubMed

    Ayantunde, Abraham A; Debrah, Samuel A

    2006-12-01

    Anal fissure is a common and distressing problem the true incidence of which is probably higher than recorded. There is a progressive understanding of the etiopathogenesis of this entity and the changing trend in its management approach. This is a systematic review of available published literature looking at current management options in anal fissures. A MEDLINE-based search of the relevant literature from 1970 to 2004 was performed on the current concepts in etiopathogenesis and management of anal fissure. The current opinion is a drift toward conservative measures as the first- and second-line approaches rather than surgery for treatment of anal fissure. Simple and readily available measures with less complication, good patient compliance, and satisfaction requiring no hospitalization should first be considered. Most anal fissures heal with medical therapy, but their limitations include side effects, poor compliance, and recurrence of the fissure. A cautious surgical approach is required to treat those who do not respond to medical therapy.

  15. Current concepts in psychodermatology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhulika A; Gupta, Aditya K

    2014-06-01

    Several diagnoses in the new DSM-5 chapter on 'Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders' directly relate to psychodermatology. The new excoriation (skin-picking) disorder (SPD) and trichotillomania (TTM) both manifest as recurrent body-focused repetitive behaviors that have compulsive and dissociative features, the latter being more prevalent in TTM than SPD. The DSM-5 refers to SPD and TTM occurring without full awareness or preceding tension, however does not specifically mention the possible role of dissociation. This has important treatment implications, as patients with high dissociative symptoms are not likely to respond to the standard treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), which is frequently associated with cutaneous body image (CBI) dissatisfaction, is present in 9%-15% of dermatology patients. Treatment guidelines in dermatology are increasingly considering the psychosocial morbidity related to CBI in their treatment outcome measures. The presence of BDD, if unrecognized, may therefore directly affect the dermatologic treatment regimens offered to the patient.

  16. HIV Disease: Current Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Describes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), newly characterized human retrovirus which causes chronic, progressive, immune deficiency disease, the most severe phase of which is Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Reviews most important current epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic information about HIV and HIV disease and provides…

  17. HIV Disease: Current Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Describes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), newly characterized human retrovirus which causes chronic, progressive, immune deficiency disease, the most severe phase of which is Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Reviews most important current epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic information about HIV and HIV disease and provides…

  18. Current concepts of immune based treatments for patients with HCC: from basic science to novel treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Greten, Tim F; Wang, Xin W; Korangy, Firouzeh

    2015-05-01

    The recent approval of two immune checkpoint inhibitors for the treatment of malignant melanoma has sparked great interest by physicians and basic scientists searching for novel therapeutics for GI cancer. Chronic inflammation is recognised as a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and makes this type of cancer a potentially ideal target for an immune based treatment approach. Further evidence for a critical role of immune responses in patients with HCC is derived from the fact that immune signatures and profiles predict patients' outcome as well as the fact that tumour-induced spontaneous antitumour immunity can be detected. In addition ablative therapies can lead to changes in the number, phenotype and function of different immune cell subsets, which correlate with patients' survival. Various HCC-specific mouse models have been developed, which improve our understanding of hepatocarcinogenesis and tumour-immune cell interactions, and lead to the development of novel immune based treatment approaches, which are currently being evaluated in preclinical and in early clinical settings. Immune checkpoint blockade along with adoptive immune cell therapy and vaccine approaches are currently being evaluated either alone or in combination with other treatments. Here, we provide an overview for the rationale of immunotherapy in HCC, summarise ongoing studies and provide a perspective for immune based approaches in patients with HCC.

  19. Transgender youth: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In many countries throughout the world, increasing numbers of gender nonconforming/transgender youth are seeking medical services to enable the development of physical characteristics consistent with their experienced gender. Such medical services include use of agents to block endogenous puberty at Tanner stage II with subsequent use of cross-sex hormones, and are based on longitudinal studies demonstrating that those individuals who were first identified as gender dysphoric in early or middle childhood and continue to meet the mental health criteria for being transgender at early puberty are likely to be transgender as adults. This review addresses terms and definitions applicable to gender nonconforming youth, studies that shed light on the biologic determinants of gender identity, current clinical practice guidelines for transgender youth, challenges to optimal care, and priorities for research. PMID:28164070

  20. Current concepts: mallet finger.

    PubMed

    Alla, Sreenivasa R; Deal, Nicole D; Dempsey, Ian J

    2014-06-01

    Loss of the extensor mechanism at the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint leads to mallet finger also known as baseball finger or drop finger. This can be secondary to tendon substance disruption or to a bony avulsion. Soft tissue mallet finger is the result of a rupture of the extensor tendon in Zone 1, and a bony mallet finger is the result of an avulsion of the extensor tendon from the distal phalanx with a small fragment of bone attached to the avulsed tendon. Mallet finger leads to an imbalance in the distribution of the extensor force between the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and DIP joints. If left untreated, mallet finger leads to a swan neck deformity from PIP joint hyper extension and DIP joint flexion. Most mallet finger injuries can be managed non-surgically, but occasionally surgery is recommended for either an acute or a chronic mallet finger or for salvage of failed prior treatment.

  1. Tic Disorders and Tourette Syndrome: Current Concepts of Etiology and Treatment in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tagwerker Gloor, Friederike; Walitza, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Tic disorders (TD), including chronic/persistent TD (CTD) and Tourette syndrome, have been described and studied for many years. Within the last two decades, intensified study efforts led to more specific assumptions about genesis and influences of both hereditary and environmental factors. TD in children and adolescents are very often accompanied by attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) as comorbid disorders. Comorbidities are aggravating factors concerning prognosis and treatment opportunities. Therefore, etiological considerations and treatment strategies have to take associated psychiatric disorders into account. Treatment approaches are symptom targeted and include behavioral treatments and/or medication and show positive outcomes concerning tic symptomatology, global functioning, and associated psychopathology. This review presents an update of the research, definitions, and classification according to ICD-10 and DSM-5 and summarizes the diagnostic procedures and most effective clinical strategies.

  2. Stroke: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Albertson, Megan; Sharma, Jitendra

    2014-11-01

    , but so far they are only experimental treatment options. The best preventative measures for first time or recurrent stroke are: starting or switching antiplatelet therapy, treatment of cardiovascular risk factors (atrial fibrillation and carotid stenosis), optimization of hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus management, and smoking cessation.

  3. Anaphyllaxis management: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Shrikant; Jambure, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Anaphylactic shock is medical emergency characterized by circulatory collapse resulted from severe acute allergic reactions, namely anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reaction. Anaphylaxis is an acute, systemic, IgE-mediated, and immediate hypersensitivity reaction caused by the release of mediators by mast cells and basophils after exposure to antigens. The pathophysiology involves activated mast cells and basophils releasing preformed, granule-associated mediators, and newly formed lipid mediators, as well as generating cytokines and chemokines. These cause vasodilatation, increased capillary permeability, and smooth muscle contraction, and attract new cells to the area. Positive feedback mechanisms amplify the reaction, although conversely reactions can self-limit. Anaphylaxis is a clinical diagnosis with a combinations of symptoms and signs that include weakness, dizziness, flushing, angioedema, urticaria of the skin, congestion, and sneezing. More severe symptoms include bronchial constriction, hypotension, vascular collapse associated with angioedema and urticaria, gastrointestinal distress, cardiovascular arrhythmias, and arrest. Prompt administration of epinephrine is critical for the success in the treatment of acute anaphylaxis. PMID:25885603

  4. Adolescence and polycystic ovary syndrome: current concepts on diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Spritzer, P M; Motta, A B

    2015-11-01

    Adolescence is a time characterised by changes in reproductive hormones and menstrual patterns, which makes it difficult to diagnose polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in this population. The diagnosis of PCOS has a great physical and psychosocial impact on the young person. Despite the importance of a diagnosis of PCOS at adolescence, data available are limited. This review focuses on analysing markers of PCOS diagnosis and possible treatments in adolescence. Although, during adolescence, diagnosis criteria of PCOS overlap with physiological changes including clinical manifestations of hyperandrogenism (acne and hirsutism), oligo/amenorrhoea, anovulation and ovarian microcysts, there is agreement that irregular menses and hyperandrogenaemia should be used to diagnose PCOS in this population. Moreover, considering that PCOS phenotype could change through the reproductive age and that adolescents display heterogeneous ovarian morphology, it has been proposed that diagnosis of PCOS should be confirmed after the age of 18. The first-line treatment for menstrual irregularity and hirsutism are oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) and for obesity and metabolic abnormalities are lifestyle changes. Insulin-sensitizer drugs, such as metformin, may be added to the treatment in the presence of metabolic alterations. Antiandrogen drugs may also be associated for treating moderate to severe hirsutism. During adolescence, physiological changes overlap with signs and symptoms of PCOS; thus the diagnosis criteria should be carefully considered. Regarding the treatment of adolescents with PCOS, non-pharmacological interventions include lifestyle changes. Pharmacological treatments comprise OCPs, antiandrogens and metformin, used isolated or combined. During adolescence, physiological changes overlap with signs and symptoms of PCOS; thus the diagnosis criteria should be carefully considered. Regarding the treatment of adolescents with PCOS, non-pharmacological interventions include

  5. Current concepts of oral and maxillofacial rehabilitation and treatment in aviation.

    PubMed

    Yuce, Esra; Koçer, Gulperi; Çini, Turan Atila

    2016-01-01

    Aerospace medicine is the medical discipline responsible for assessing and conserving the health, safety, and performance of individuals involved in air and space travel. With the upward trend in airline travel, flight-related oral conditions requiring treatment have become a source of concern for aircrew members. Awareness and treatment of any potential physiological problems for these aircrews have always been critical components of aviation safety. In a flight situation, oral and maxillofacial problems may in fact become life-threatening clinical conditions. The unusual nature of aerospace medicine requires practitioners to have unique expertise. Special attention to aerospace medicine will open the way for professionals to develop and apply their skills and capabilities. Both dentists and aviators should be aware of the issues involved in aviation dentistry. This article presents the principles of prevention, treatment guidelines, and dental-related flight restrictions.

  6. Treatment of acute periprosthetic infections with prosthesis retention: Review of current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Jesse WP; Willink, Robin Tjeenk; Moojen, Dirk Jan F; van den Bekerom, Michel PJ; Colen, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a devastating complication after total joint arthroplasty, occurring in approximately 1%-2% of all cases. With growing populations and increasing age, PJI will have a growing effect on health care costs. Many risk factors have been identified that increase the risk of developing PJI, including obesity, immune system deficiencies, malignancy, previous surgery of the same joint and longer operating time. Acute PJI occurs either postoperatively (4 wk to 3 mo after initial arthroplasty, depending on the classification system), or via hematogenous spreading after a period in which the prosthesis had functioned properly. Diagnosis and the choice of treatment are the cornerstones to success. Although different definitions for PJI have been used in the past, most are more or less similar and include the presence of a sinus tract, blood infection values, synovial white blood cell count, signs of infection on histopathological analysis and one or more positive culture results. Debridement, antibiotics and implant retention (DAIR) is the primary treatment for acute PJI, and should be performed as soon as possible after the development of symptoms. Success rates differ, but most studies report success rates of around 60%-80%. Whether single or multiple debridement procedures are more successful remains unclear. The use of local antibiotics in addition to the administration of systemic antibiotic agents is also subject to debate, and its pro’s and con’s should be carefully considered. Systemic treatment, based on culture results, is of importance for all PJI treatments. Additionally, rifampin should be given in Staphylococcal PJIs, unless all foreign material is removed. The most important factors contributing to treatment failure are longer duration of symptoms, a longer time after initial arthroplasty, the need for more debridement procedures, the retention of exchangeable components, and PJI caused by Staphylococcus (aureus or

  7. Current Concepts in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Sleep Disorders in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Kevin; McCall, W Vaughn

    2015-06-01

    Sleep disorders are a pervasive problem throughout all patient populations but represent an especially important health problem for the elderly. Alterations in sleep architecture that occur as a part of normal aging will contribute to sleep problems as we grow older. Other contributing factors-including comorbid medical conditions, changes in lifestyle and schedule, altered circadian rhythm, among a host of others-can have detrimental effects on the health of the elderly. Coupled with a number of sleep disorders that either emerge or exacerbate with age, the effects of poor sleep often result in an overall worsening of quality of life. Treatment options can be unique in this population and often more difficult due to the effects of normal aging, as well as polypharmacy and possible medication interactions. The following article will focus on the common sleep disorders that can besiege this population, symptoms to aid in diagnosis, and specific treatment options to help improve quality of life in the elderly.

  8. Current challenges and concepts of the thermomechanical treatment of nickel-titanium instruments.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ya; Zhou, Hui-min; Zheng, Yu-feng; Peng, Bin; Haapasalo, Markus

    2013-02-01

    The performance and mechanical properties of nickel-titanium (NiTi) instruments are influenced by factors such as cross-section, flute design, raw material, and manufacturing processes. Many improvements have been proposed by manufacturers during the past decade to provide clinicians with safer and more efficient instruments. The mechanical performance of NiTi alloys is sensitive to their microstructure and associated thermomechanical treatment history. Heat treatment or thermal processing is one of the most fundamental approaches toward adjusting the transition temperature in NiTi alloy, which affects the fatigue resistance of NiTi endodontic files. The newly developed NiTi instruments made from controlled memory wire, M-Wire (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK), or R-phase wire represent the next generation of NiTi alloys with improved flexibility and fatigue resistance. The advantages of NiTi files for canal cleaning and shaping are decreased canal transportation and ledging, a reduced risk of file fracture, and faster and more efficient instrumentation. The clinician must understand the nature of different NiTi raw materials and their impact on instrument performance because many new instruments are introduced on a regular basis. This review summarizes the metallurgical properties of next-generation NiTi instruments, the impact of thermomechanical treatment on instrument flexibility, and the resistance to cyclic fatigue and torsion. The aim of this review was to provide clinicians with the knowledge necessary for evidence-based practices, maximizing the benefits from the selection and application of NiTi rotary instruments for root canal treatment. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Achilles Tendinopathy: Current Concepts about the Basic Science and Clinical Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is one of the most frequently ankle and foot overuse injuries, which is a clinical syndrome characterized by the combination of pain, swelling, and impaired performance. The two main categories of Achilles tendinopathy are classified according to anatomical location and broadly include insertional and noninsertional tendinopathy. The etiology of Achilles tendinopathy is multifactorial including both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Failed healing response and degenerative changes were found in the tendon. The failed healing response includes three different and continuous stages (reactive tendinopathy, tendon disrepair, and degenerative tendinopathy). The histological studies have demonstrated an increased number of tenocytes and concentration of glycosaminoglycans in the ground substance, disorganization and fragmentation of the collagen, and neovascularization. There are variable conservative and surgical treatment options for Achilles tendinopathy. However, there has not been a gold standard of these treatments because of the controversial clinical results between various studies. In the future, new level I researches will be needed to prove the effect of these treatment options. PMID:27885357

  10. Achilles Tendinopathy: Current Concepts about the Basic Science and Clinical Treatments.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Yun; Hua, Ying-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is one of the most frequently ankle and foot overuse injuries, which is a clinical syndrome characterized by the combination of pain, swelling, and impaired performance. The two main categories of Achilles tendinopathy are classified according to anatomical location and broadly include insertional and noninsertional tendinopathy. The etiology of Achilles tendinopathy is multifactorial including both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Failed healing response and degenerative changes were found in the tendon. The failed healing response includes three different and continuous stages (reactive tendinopathy, tendon disrepair, and degenerative tendinopathy). The histological studies have demonstrated an increased number of tenocytes and concentration of glycosaminoglycans in the ground substance, disorganization and fragmentation of the collagen, and neovascularization. There are variable conservative and surgical treatment options for Achilles tendinopathy. However, there has not been a gold standard of these treatments because of the controversial clinical results between various studies. In the future, new level I researches will be needed to prove the effect of these treatment options.

  11. Central nervous system involvement in pediatric rheumatic diseases: current concepts in treatment.

    PubMed

    Duzova, Ali; Bakkaloglu, Aysin

    2008-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) manifestations are not rare in pediatric rheumatic diseases. They may be a relatively common feature of the disease, as in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Behçet's disease. Direct CNS involvement of a systemic rheumatic disease, primary CNS vasculitis, indirect involvement secondary to hypertension, hypoxia and metabolic changes, and drug associated adverse events may all result in CNS involvement. We have reviewed the CNS manifestations of SLE, Behçet's disease, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, polyarteritis nodosa, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, familial Mediterranean fever, scleroderma, sarcoidosis, Wegener's granulomatosis, Takayasu's arteritis, CINCA syndrome, Kawasaki disease, and primary CNS vasculitis; and adverse CNS effects of anti-rheumatic drugs in pediatric patients. The manifestations are diverse; ranging from headache, seizures, chorea, changes in personality, depression, memory and concentration problems, cognitive impairment, cerebrovascular accidents to coma, and death. The value of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination (pleocytosis, high level of protein), auto-antibodies in serum and CSF, electroencephalography, neuroimaging with computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, SPECT, PET, and angiography depends on the disease. Brain biopsy is gold standard for the diagnosis of CNS vasculitis, however it may be inconclusive in 25% of cases. A thorough knowledge of the rheumatic diseases and therapy-related adverse events is mandatory for the management of a patient with rheumatic disease and CNS involvement. Severe CNS involvement is associated with poor prognosis, and high mortality rate. High dose steroid and cyclophosphamide (oral or intravenous) are first choice drugs in the treatment; plasmapheresis, IVIG, thalidomide, and intratechal treatment may be valuable in treatment-resistant, and serious cases.

  12. Current Concepts in the Evaluation and Treatment of the Shoulder in Overhead Throwing Athletes, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Reinold, Michael M.; Gill, Thomas J.; Wilk, Kevin E.; Andrews, James R.

    2010-01-01

    The overhead throwing athlete is an extremely challenging patient in sports medicine. The repetitive microtraumatic stresses imposed on the athlete’s shoulder joint complex during the throwing motion constantly place the athlete at risk for injury. Treatment of the overhead athlete requires the understanding of several principles based on the unique physical characteristics of the overhead athlete and the demands endured during the act of throwing. These principles are described and incorporated in a multiphase progressive rehabilitation program designed to prevent injuries and rehabilitate the injured athlete, both nonoperatively and postoperatively. PMID:23015928

  13. Optimal treatment for patients after myocardial infarction: some current concepts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Gajos, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    Acute coronary syndromes areone of the most common causes for hospitalizations in developed countries. It is estimated that there are around 1 million patients in Poland after myocardial infarction (MI) requiring medical care. Implementation of optimal treatment in these patients is a significant clinical and social problem. Clinical practice guidelines published by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) are focused on the crucial tasks such as regular physical activity sufficient to increase exercise capacity, smoking cessation, a Mediterranean diet, intensive control of risk factors for atherosclerosis (hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia), combination pharmacotherapy and in selected cases, coronary revascularization. Of particular importance is that all patients who have had an acute MI should receive optimal treatment with a combination of the drugs that are recommended as class I by the ESC guidelines. Recent registries showed that some of these drugs, including aspirin, clopidogrel, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers and statins, are commonly used in clinical practice in Poland. Recently, it has been highlighted that pharmacological therapy in MI patients should be extended by adding newer agents of the class I recommendations such as omega-3 acid ethyl esters and in selected patients, eplerenone.

  14. Nerve injury complicating multiligament knee injury: current concepts and treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Mook, William Randolph; Ligh, Cassandra A; Moorman, Claude T; Leversedge, Fraser J

    2013-06-01

    Multiligament knee injuries account for <0.02% of all orthopaedic injuries, and 16% to 40% of these patients suffer associated injury to the common peroneal nerve (CPN). The proximity of the CPN to the proximal fibula predisposes the nerve to injury during local trauma and dislocation; the nerve is highly vulnerable to stretch injury during varus stress, particularly in posterolateral corner injuries. CPN injuries have a poor prognosis compared with that of other peripheral nerve injuries. Management is determined based on the severity and location of nerve injury, timing of presentation, associated injuries requiring surgical management, and the results of serial clinical evaluations and electrodiagnostic studies. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthosis wear and physical therapy. Surgical management includes one or more of the following: neurolysis, primary nerve repair, intercalary nerve grafting, tendon transfer, and nerve transfer. Limited evidence supports the use of early one-stage nerve reconstruction combined with tendon transfer; however, optimal management of these rare injuries continues to change, and treatment should be individualized.

  15. Molecular and cellular biology of cerebral arteriovenous malformations: a review of current concepts and future trends in treatment.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Russin, Jonathan J; Martinez-Del-Campo, Eduardo; Soriano-Baron, Hector; Spetzler, Robert F; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are classically described as congenital static lesions. However, in addition to rupturing, AVMs can undergo growth, remodeling, and regression. These phenomena are directly related to cellular, molecular, and physiological processes. Understanding these relationships is essential to direct future diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The authors performed a search of the contemporary literature to review current information regarding the molecular and cellular biology of AVMs and how this biology will impact their potential future management. A PubMed search was performed using the key words "genetic," "molecular," "brain," "cerebral," "arteriovenous," "malformation," "rupture," "management," "embolization," and "radiosurgery." Only English-language papers were considered. The reference lists of all papers selected for full-text assessment were reviewed. Current concepts in genetic polymorphisms, growth factors, angiopoietins, apoptosis, endothelial cells, pathophysiology, clinical syndromes, medical treatment (including tetracycline and microRNA-18a), radiation therapy, endovascular embolization, and surgical treatment as they apply to AVMs are discussed. Understanding the complex cellular biology, physiology, hemodynamics, and flow-related phenomena of AVMs is critical for defining and predicting their behavior, developing novel drug treatments, and improving endovascular and surgical therapies.

  16. Stuttering in Lima, Peru: a qualitative case study of current concepts, theories, and treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Gorin, L C

    1980-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate within an ethnographic framework, certain cultural variables which may be factors in the etiology and presentation of stuttering as well as in the care provided for those who stutter. An assessment was made of the cultural influences upon the following variables of the transcultural investigation of stuttering: 1) epidemiological characteristics of stuttering; 2) attitudes of the stutterer and the stutterer's family, friends, therapists towards the defect; 3) cultural expectations which may be part of the etiology/perpetuation of the problem of stuttering, including an examination of these cultural expectations within the context of the stutterer's past and present home, work, and recreational lifestyles: 4) current theories and therapies.

  17. Current concepts in the etiopathogenesis and treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed

    Manolios, N; Schrieber, L

    1986-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disorder that occurs spontaneously in humans and mice. Genetic factors play an important role in the predisposition to and expression of disease. Environmental factors augment the expression of illness and in the absence of normal control mechanisms may provide the stimulus to autoimmunity. Sex hormones modulate the immune response and tend to modify disease expression. Disordered immune regulation may be due to a primary or secondary abnormality in cellular, cytokine, and/or humoral function. Therapy for SLE is directed towards suppression of exaggerated immunological and inflammatory activity. This review will re-evaluate current therapy and describe newer approaches including the use of pharmacological, hormonal, immunological, dietary, and physical modalities.

  18. Current concepts in the treatment of Anderson Type II odontoid fractures in the elderly in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Löhrer, L; Raschke, M J; Thiesen, D; Hartensuer, R; Surke, C; Ochman, S; Vordemvenne, T

    2012-04-01

    Although currently there are many different recommendations and strategies in the therapy of odontoid fractures in the elderly, there are still no generally accepted guidelines for a structured and standardised treatment. Moreover, the current opinion of spine surgeons regarding the optimal treatment of odontoid fractures Type II of the elderly is unknown. In order to have an objective insight into the diverging strategies for the management of Anderson Type II odontoid fractures and form a basis for future comparisons, this study investigated the current concepts and preferences of orthopaedic, neuro- and trauma surgeons. Spine surgeons from 34 medical schools and 8 hospitals in Germany, 4 university hospitals in Austria and 5 in Switzerland were invited to participate in an online survey using a 12-item 1-sided questionnaire. A total of 44 interviewees from 34 medical institutions participated in the survey, consisting of trauma (50%), orthopaedic (20.5%) and neurosurgeons (27.3%). Out of these, 70.5% treated 1-20 fractures per year; 63.6% favoured the anterior screw fixation as therapy for Type II odontoid fractures, the open posterior Magerl transarticular C1/C2 fusion, the posterior Harms C1/C2 fusion, and conservative immobilisation by cervical orthosis was preferred by 9.1% in each case. 59.1% preferred the anterior odontoid screw fixation as an appropriate treatment of Anderson Type II odontoid fractures in the elderly. 79.5% chose cervical orthosis for postsurgical treatment. Following operative treatment, nonunion rates were reported to be <10% and <20% by 40.9% and 70% of the surgeons, respectively. 56.8% reported changing from primary conservative to secondary operative treatment in <10% of cases. The most favoured technique in revision surgery of nonunions was the open posterior Magerl transarticular fusion technique, chosen by 38.6% of respondents. 18.2% preferred the posterior Harms C1/C2 fusion technique, 11.4% the percutaneous posterior Magerl

  19. Current concepts in the pathogenesis and treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rahul; Lisi, Christopher V.; Gerring, Robert; Mittal, Jeenu; Mathee, Kalai; Narasimhan, Giri; Azad, Rajeev K.; Yao, Qi; Grati, M'hamed; Yan, Denise; Eshraghi, Adrien A.; Angeli, Simon I.; Telischi, Fred F.

    2015-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is an inflammation of the middle ear associated with infection. Despite appropriate therapy, acute OM (AOM) can progress to chronic suppurative OM (CSOM) associated with ear drum perforation and purulent discharge. The effusion prevents the middle ear ossicles from properly relaying sound vibrations from the ear drum to the oval window of the inner ear, causing conductive hearing loss. In addition, the inflammatory mediators generated during CSOM can penetrate into the inner ear through the round window. This can cause the loss of hair cells in the cochlea, leading to sensorineural hearing loss. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are the most predominant pathogens that cause CSOM. Although the pathogenesis of AOM is well studied, very limited research is available in relation to CSOM. With the emergence of antibiotic resistance as well as the ototoxicity of antibiotics and the potential risks of surgery, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapeutic strategies against CSOM. This warrants understanding the role of host immunity in CSOM and how the bacteria evade these potent immune responses. Understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to CSOM will help in designing novel treatment modalities against the disease and hence preventing the hearing loss. PMID:26248613

  20. Current concepts in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fleshman, James W; Smallwood, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    The history of rectal cancer management informs current therapy and points us in the direction of future improvements. Multidisciplinary team management of rectal cancer will move us to personalized treatment for individuals with rectal cancer in all stages.

  1. Complex trauma to the shoulder girdle, including the proximal humerus, the clavicle, and the scapula: current concepts in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mighell, Mark A; Hatzidakis, Armodios M; Otto, Randall J; Watson, J Tracy; Cottrell, Benjamin J; Cusick, Michael C; Pappou, Ioannis P

    2015-01-01

    Fractures to the shoulder girdle are common injuries in an aging population. Many techniques and theories lie behind the treatment of such injuries. Knowledge and understanding of current concepts for diagnosing and treating proximal humeral, clavicular, and scapular fractures and the theory behind them will help surgeons make informed decisions with regard to patient care.

  2. [Transjugular portosystemic shunt. The current concepts].

    PubMed

    Ferral, H; Alcántara-Peraza, A; Kimura-Fujikami, Y; Castañeda-Zúñiga, W

    1994-01-01

    The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is an alternative therapeutic approach in the treatment of hemorrhagic portal hypertension. The use of this procedure was established in 1988 and since then, its use has extended impressively. Currently, the accepted indication for TIPS is the variceal bleeding secondary to portal hypertension refractory to medical management or sclerotherapy. In this paper the basic concepts of the TIPS procedure are reviewed, including historical perspective, technical aspects, indications, contraindications and complications.

  3. Marijuana: current concepts(†).

    PubMed

    Greydanus, Donald E; Hawver, Elizabeth K; Greydanus, Megan M; Merrick, Joav

    2013-10-10

    Marijuana (cannabis) remains a controversial drug in the twenty-first century. This paper considers current research on use of Cannabis sativa and its constituents such as the cannabinoids. Topics reviewed include prevalence of cannabis (pot) use, other drugs consumed with pot, the endocannabinoid system, use of medicinal marijuana, medical adverse effects of cannabis, and psychiatric adverse effects of cannabis use. Treatment of cannabis withdrawal and dependence is difficult and remains mainly based on psychological therapy; current research on pharmacologic management of problems related to cannabis consumption is also considered. The potential role of specific cannabinoids for medical benefit will be revealed as the twenty-first century matures. However, potential dangerous adverse effects from smoking marijuana are well known and should be clearly taught to a public that is often confused by a media-driven, though false message and promise of benign pot consumption.

  4. Current concepts of severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Ray, Anuradha; Raundhal, Mahesh; Oriss, Timothy B; Ray, Prabir; Wenzel, Sally E

    2016-07-01

    The term asthma encompasses a disease spectrum with mild to very severe disease phenotypes whose traditional common characteristic is reversible airflow limitation. Unlike milder disease, severe asthma is poorly controlled by the current standard of care. Ongoing studies using advanced molecular and immunological tools along with improved clinical classification show that severe asthma does not identify a specific patient phenotype, but rather includes patients with constant medical needs, whose pathobiologic and clinical characteristics vary widely. Accordingly, in recent clinical trials, therapies guided by specific patient characteristics have had better outcomes than previous therapies directed to any subject with a diagnosis of severe asthma. However, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of the full scope of this disease that hinder the development of effective treatments for all severe asthmatics. In this Review, we discuss our current state of knowledge regarding severe asthma, highlighting different molecular and immunological pathways that can be targeted for future therapeutic development.

  5. [Current Concepts of Human Microsporidiosis].

    PubMed

    Timofeev, S A

    2015-01-01

    Microsporidiosis is an ubiquitous opportunistic disease that usually appears in immunocompromised patients: AIDS patients or organ-transplant recipients. The infectious agents of disease are fungi-related obligate intracellular parasites - microsporidia. Alongside with Cryptosporidium and Cytomegalovirus, these parasites are the most common causative agents of diarrhea in HIV-infected patients. Intestinalform of microsporidiosis has been mostfrequently observed, but microsporidia can affect almost any organs of the human body, eyes, lungs, muscles, organs of the nervous system. The present paper overviews the current data on the etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment methods of microsporidiosis.

  6. Frontal Sinus Fractures: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Strong, E. Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Frontal sinus injuries may range from isolated anterior table fractures resulting in a simple aesthetic deformity to complex fractures involving the frontal recess, orbits, skull base, and intracranial contents. The risk of long-term morbidity can be significant. Optimal treatment strategies for the management of frontal sinus fractures remain controversial. However, it is critical to have a thorough understanding of frontal sinus anatomy as well as the current treatment strategies used to manage these injuries. A thorough physical exam and thin-cut, multiplanar (axial, coronal, and sagittal) computed tomography scan should be performed in all patients suspected of having a frontal sinus fracture. The most appropriate treatment strategy can be determined by assessing five anatomic parameters including the: frontal recess, anterior table integrity, posterior table integrity, dural integrity, and presence of a cerebrospinal fluid leak. A well thought out management strategy and meticulous surgical techniques are critical to success. The primary surgical goal is to provide a safe sinus while minimizing patient morbidity. This article offers an anatomically based treatment algorithm for the management of frontal sinus fractures and highlights the key steps to surgical repair. PMID:22110810

  7. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank—Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Iain R.; LaPrade, Robert F.; Musahl, Volker; Geeslin, Andrew G.; Zlotnicki, Jason P.; Mann, Barton J.; Petrigliano, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common and result in considerable morbidity. Tears within the tendon substance or at its insertion into the humeral head represent a considerable clinical challenge because of the hostile local environment that precludes healing. Tears often progress without intervention, and current surgical treatments are inadequate. Although surgical implants, instrumentation, and techniques have improved, healing rates have not improved, and a high failure rate remains for large and massive rotator cuff tears. The use of biologic adjuvants that contribute to a regenerative microenvironment have great potential for improving healing rates and function after surgery. This article presents a review of current and emerging biologic approaches to augment rotator cuff tendon and muscle regeneration focusing on the scientific rationale, preclinical, and clinical evidence for efficacy, areas for future research, and current barriers to advancement and implementation. PMID:27099865

  8. Current Concepts of Maternal Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Lowensohn, Richard I.; Stadler, Diane D.; Naze, Christie

    2016-01-01

    Background A nutrient-rich maternal diet before and during pregnancy is associated with improved fetal health, more appropriate birth weight, and increased rates of maternal and infant survival. Physicians need a better understanding of the role of diet in shaping fetal outcomes. Given this background, we reviewed and summarized articles on maternal nutrition found in MEDLINE since 1981, written in English, and limited to human subjects. For the Offspring Maternal diets high in sugar and fat lead to an increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease later in life. Folic acid should be supplemented prior to conception and continued through at least the first 28 days of fetal life to prevent neural tube defects, and vitamin C should be given to women who smoke to lower the incidence of asthma and wheezing in the children. Iodine deficiency is increasing, and iodine should be included in prenatal supplements. If the maternal hemoglobin is 7 g/dL or more, there is no evidence that iron supplementation is needed. Fish intake during pregnancy is protective against atopic outcomes, whereas high-meat diets contribute to elevated adult blood pressure and hypersecretion of cortisol. For the Mother Calcium supplementation lowers the risk of preeclampsia and hypertensive disease in pregnancy. Conclusions Given the limits of our current knowledge, a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and selected fish is desirable for the best outcomes. Diets high in sugar and fat lead to higher rates of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Folic acid, iodine, and calcium in all pregnant women and vitamin C in smokers are the only supplements so far shown to be of value for routine use. The physician treating a pregnant woman should be ready to advise a healthy diet for the benefit of the fetus. Target Audience Obstetricians and gynecologists, family physicians Learning Objectives After participating in this activity, the

  9. Evaluation of the current treatment concepts in Germany, Austria and Switzerland for acute traumatic lesions to the prepatellar and olecranon bursa.

    PubMed

    Baumbach, Sebastian F; Domaszewski, Florian; Wyen, Hendrick; Kalcher, Klaudius; Mutschler, Wolf; Kanz, Karl-Georg

    2013-11-01

    Although traumatic lacerations of the olecranon (OB) and praepatellar bursae (PB) are common entities often associated with complications, no study could be found on this injury. The aim of this study was to survey the current treatment concepts for acute traumatic laceration of the OB and PB in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. An international online survey was conducted among orthopaedic and trauma surgeons in Germany (TraumaNetwork DGU), Austria (Austrian Society of Trauma (ÖGU) and Orthopaedic (ÖGO) Surgeons) and Switzerland (Swiss Orthopaedic Surgeons and Swiss Society of Infectious Disease (CH)) (n=1967). The survey comprised of five demographical questions, the current treatment concepts were evaluated using a case study. The overall-response-rate was 16% (12-46%). 88% of the responding physicians were male, aged 47.5 ± 10.2 years with a mean working experience of 20.1 ± 10.6 years. 54% of the surveyed physicians were either senior or chief physicians. Treatment concepts varied significantly between DGU and ÖGO/CH (p=0.02/p=0.006), no significant differences could be found between DGU and ÖGU. Generally, German and Austrian trauma surgeons favoured bursectomy (86.7%/90.9%) and immobilisation (68.3%/77.3%). Austrian orthopaedic surgeons performed fewer bursectomies (69.3%) but had the highest proportion for administering antibiotics (73.9%). Less than 50% of Swiss physicians indicated bursectomy as a treatment option. Overall, this survey revealed a significant heterogeneity in treatment approaches in Central Europe. Further evidence is needed to identify the best treatment concepts for traumatic lacerations of the OB and PB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts.

    PubMed

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Zagury, Julyana Gomes; Thomas, Davis; Ananthan, Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as "an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions." BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also report taste alterations and oral dryness along with the burning. The etiopathogenesis is complex and is not well-comprehended. The more accepted theories point toward a neuropathic etiology, but the gustatory system has also been implicated in this condition. BMS is frequently mismanaged, partly because it is not well-known among healthcare providers. Diagnosis of BMS is made after other local and systemic causes of burning have been ruled out as then; the oral burning is the disease itself. The management of BMS still remains a challenge. Benzodiazepines have been used in clinical practice as the first-line medication in the pharmacological management of BMS. Nonpharmacological management includes cognitive behavioral therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this review is to familiarize healthcare providers with the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and general characteristics of primary BMS while updating them with the current treatment options to better manage this group of patients.

  11. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Zagury, Julyana Gomes; Thomas, Davis; Ananthan, Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as “an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions.” BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also report taste alterations and oral dryness along with the burning. The etiopathogenesis is complex and is not well-comprehended. The more accepted theories point toward a neuropathic etiology, but the gustatory system has also been implicated in this condition. BMS is frequently mismanaged, partly because it is not well-known among healthcare providers. Diagnosis of BMS is made after other local and systemic causes of burning have been ruled out as then; the oral burning is the disease itself. The management of BMS still remains a challenge. Benzodiazepines have been used in clinical practice as the first-line medication in the pharmacological management of BMS. Nonpharmacological management includes cognitive behavioral therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this review is to familiarize healthcare providers with the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and general characteristics of primary BMS while updating them with the current treatment options to better manage this group of patients. PMID:26929531

  12. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank—Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 3

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnicki, Jason P.; Geeslin, Andrew G.; Murray, Iain R.; Petrigliano, Frank A.; LaPrade, Robert F.; Mann, Barton J.; Musahl, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Focal chondral defects of the articular surface are a common occurrence in the field of orthopaedics. These isolated cartilage injuries, if not repaired surgically with restoration of articular congruency, may have a high rate of progression to posttraumatic osteoarthritis, resulting in significant morbidity and loss of function in the young, active patient. Both isolated and global joint disease are a difficult entity to treat in the clinical setting given the high amount of stress on weightbearing joints and the limited healing potential of native articular cartilage. Recently, clinical interest has focused on the use of biologically active compounds and surgical techniques to regenerate native cartilage to the articular surface, with the goal of restoring normal joint health and overall function. This article presents a review of the current biologic therapies, as discussed at the 2015 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Biologics Think Tank, that are used in the treatment of focal cartilage deficiencies. For each of these emerging therapies, the theories for application, the present clinical evidence, and specific areas for future research are explored, with focus on the barriers currently faced by clinicians in advancing the success of these therapies in the clinical setting. PMID:27123466

  13. Diabetic foot infections: current concept review

    PubMed Central

    Hobizal, Kimberlee B.; Wukich, Dane K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to provide a current concept review on the diagnosis and management of diabetic foot infections which are among the most serious and frequent complications encountered in patients with diabetes mellitus. A literature review on diabetic foot infections with emphasis on pathophysiology, identifiable risk factors, evaluation including physical examination, laboratory values, treatment strategies and assessing the severity of infection has been performed in detail. Diabetic foot infections are associated with high morbidity and risk factors for failure of treatment and classification systems are also described. Most diabetic foot infections begin with a wound and once an infection occurs, the risk of hospitalization and amputation increases dramatically. Early identification of infection and prompt treatment may optimize the patient's outcome and provide limb salvage. PMID:22577496

  14. Cognitive development, memory, trauma, treatment: An integration of psychoanalytic and behavioral concepts in light of current neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Hutterer, Jeffrey; Liss, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    The goal of Freud's Project was to place all psychological functioning on a neurological foundation; however, the resources of his time were inadequate for the task. This article attempts to link basic psychoanalytic and behavioral constructs to current neuroscience, specifically the memory paradigm of multiple trace theory. We propose that Freud's theory of early cognitive development, in which primary process is succeeded by secondary process, corresponds to the progression from a noncontextual taxon-based memory system to a locale system (mediated by hippocampal and cortical structures) in which memories are formed within space/time contexts. The effects of trauma within these models is then examined by noting how Freud's views of repression and regression parallel neuropsychological hypotheses about the ways in which traumatic experience impacts specific brain areas. Finally, the treatment implications of this theoretical synthesis are explored. We posit that transference resembles the learning theory construct of generalization, and the non-contextualized coding of the taxon system. In conclusion, we suggest that orthodox psychoanalytic approaches may have overestimated the efficacy of words and intellectual vectors in effecting therapeutic change. Nonverbal strategies may be required to reach material that is stored in early developing brain areas that may be inaccessible to words.

  15. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 1: Biologics Overview, Ligament Injury, Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    LaPrade, Robert F; Geeslin, Andrew G; Murray, Iain R; Musahl, Volker; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Petrigliano, Frank; Mann, Barton J

    2016-12-01

    Biologic therapies, including stem cells, platelet-rich plasma, growth factors, and other biologically active adjuncts, have recently received increased attention in the basic science and clinical literature. At the 2015 AOSSM Biologics II Think Tank held in Colorado Springs, Colorado, a group of orthopaedic surgeons, basic scientists, veterinarians, and other investigators gathered to review the state of the science for biologics and barriers to implementation of biologics for the treatment of sports medicine injuries. This series of current concepts reviews reports the summary of the scientific presentations, roundtable discussions, and recommendations from this think tank.

  16. Dementia with Lewy bodies: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Buracchio, Teresa; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Gorbien, Martin

    2005-01-01

    As life expectancy continues to increase over time, dementia is becoming an increasingly more common problem and a major cause of disability in older persons. It is now more important than ever to identify and manage common causes of dementia given variations in disease course, treatments and the possibility for modification of risk factors. Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is a dementia syndrome characterized by progressive cognitive decline, with fluctuating cognition, recurrent detailed and well-formed hallucinations, and parkinsonism. This article aims to provide an overview of current concepts of DLB, including a description of the key clinical features and neuropathology, neurochemistry, and genetics of DLB, then a discussion of the relationship of DLB with Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, and, finally, a summary of current management strategies available for this disorder.

  17. Current concepts in pediatric endocrinology

    SciTech Connect

    Styne, D.M.; Brook, C.G.D.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains seven chapters. They are: Recombinant DNA Technology; The HLA System in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia; Neuroendocrinology; Circadian Rhythms; Basic Aspects and Pediatric Implications; New Treatment Methods in Diabetes Mellitus; The Insulin-Like Growth Factors; and Hypopituitarism: Review of Behavioral Data.

  18. Current Concepts of Treating Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Theresa

    1977-01-01

    Vaginitis can be a frustrating entity to treat, since the incidence of recurrence is high. This paper examines evidence from the literature concerning diagnosis and treatment of Candida albicans, Trichomonas vaginalis, Corynebacterium vaginale, herpes simplex type 2 and gonorrhea. A protocol based on these readings is outlined. PMID:21304797

  19. Current NASA lunar base concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barney B.; Connolly, John F.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Office of Aeronautics, Exploration, and Technology has completed a Systems Engineering and Integration effort to define a point design for an evolving lunar base that supports substantial science, exploration, and resource production objectives. This study addressed the following: systems level design; element requirements and conceptual design; assessments of precursor and technology needs; and operations concepts. The central base is assumed to be located equatorially on the lunar nearside north of the crater Moltke in Mare Tranquilliatis. The study considers an aggressive case with three main phases. The initial Man-Tended Phase established basic enabling facilities that include a modular habitat that periodically houses a crew of four. During the Experimental Phase, the base becomes permanently manned with the construction of a larger habitat that provides augmented workshop and laboratory volumes and housing for crew. The Operational Phase expands base capabilities to a substantially mature level while reducing reliance on Earth. The analysis classifies base characteristics into several major functional areas: Human Systems; Assembly and Construction; Energy Management; Launch and Landing; Surface Transportation; In-Situ Resources Utilization; User Accommodations; and Telecommunications, Navigation, and Information Management. Results of various NASA-sponsored studies were synthesized to meet requirements. The system level architecture was determined, the physical layout was developed from a set of proximity criteria and related functions, and the evlotuionary path of the base was analyzed. Conclusions include a summary of technology needs, design drivers, high leverage items, and important issues.

  20. Myasthenia Gravis—Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Christian; Lindstrom, Jon M.; Keesey, John C.; Mulder, Donald G.

    1985-01-01

    An edited summary of an Interdepartmental Conference arranged by the Department of Medicine of the UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles. The Director of Conferences is William M. Pardridge, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine. Current findings indicate that autoimmune myasthenia gravis is an acquired immune complex disorder of neuromuscular transmission in voluntary striated muscle. There is a break in immunologic tolerance leading to blocking and degradation of acetylcholine receptors, together with widening of the synaptic cleft associated with partial destruction, simplification and shortening of the postjunctional membrane. Thymic hyperplasia and thymoma may be present. A decremental response to nerve-muscle stimulation, blocking and jitter on single-fiber electromyography and circulating antibodies to acetylcholine receptor are detectable in most patients with generalized weakness. Although the cause of this abnormal immunologic mechanism remains to be discovered, anticholinesterases, corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, plasmapheresis or thymectomy (individually or in combination) provide control and better prognosis in most patients. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:3895751

  1. NEPHROGENIC SYSTEMIC FIBROSIS: CURRENT CONCEPTS

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Prasanta; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) was first described in 2000 as a scleromyxedema-like illness in patients on chronic hemodialysis. The relationship between NSF and gadolinium contrast during magnetic resonance imaging was postulated in 2006, and subsequently, virtually all published cases of NSF have had documented prior exposure to gadolinium-containing contrast agents. NSF has been reported in patients from a variety of ethnic backgrounds from America, Europe, Asia and Australia. Skin lesions may evolve into poorly demarcated thickened plaques that range from erythematous to hyperpigmented. With time, the skin becomes markedly indurated and tethered to the underlying fascia. Extracutaneous manifestations also occur. The diagnosis of NSF is based on the presence of characteristic clinical features in the setting of chronic kidney disease, and substantiated by skin histology. Differential diagnosis is with scleroderma, scleredema, scleromyxedema, graft-versus-host disease, etc. NSF has a relentlessly progressive course. While there is no consistently successful treatment for NSF, improving renal function seems to slow or arrest the progression of this condition. Because essentially all cases of NSF have developed following exposure to a gadolinium-containing contrast agent, prevention of this devastating condition involves the careful avoidance of administering these agents to individuals at risk. PMID:21572795

  2. GENETICS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Gain and loss of function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor and associated proteins: current treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Bernhard; Schnabel, Dirk; Dörr, Helmuth-Günther; Schöfl, Christof

    2016-05-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) is the main calcium sensor in the maintenance of calcium metabolism. Mutations of the CASR, the G protein alpha 11 (GNA11) and the adaptor-related protein complex 2 sigma 1 subunit (AP2S1) genes can shift the set point for calcium sensing causing hyper- or hypo-calcemic disorders. Therapeutic concepts for these rare diseases range from general therapies of hyper- and hypo-calcemic conditions to more pathophysiology oriented approaches such as parathyroid hormone (PTH) substitution and allosteric CASR modulators. Cinacalcet is a calcimimetic that enhances receptor function and has gained approval for the treatment of hyperparathyroidism. Calcilytics in turn attenuate CASR activity and are currently under investigation for the treatment of various diseases. We conducted a literature search for reports about treatment of patients harboring inactivating or activating CASR, GNA11 or AP2S1 mutants and about in vitro effects of allosteric CASR modulators on mutated CASR. The therapeutic concepts for patients with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH), neonatal hyperparathyroidism (NHPT), neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) and autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) are reviewed. FHH is usually benign, but symptomatic patients benefit from cinacalcet. In NSHPT patients pamidronate effectively lowers serum calcium, but most patients require parathyroidectomy. In some patients cinacalcet can obviate the need for surgery, particularly in heterozygous NHPT. Symptomatic ADH patients respond to vitamin D and calcium supplementation but this may increase calciuria and renal complications. PTH treatment can reduce relative hypercalciuria. None of the currently available therapies for ADH, however, prevent tissue calcifications and complications, which may become possible with calcilytics that correct the underlying pathophysiologic defect. © 2016 European Society of Endocrinology.

  3. Oxygen therapeutics--current concepts.

    PubMed

    Hill, S E

    2001-04-01

    In an effort to develop agents that enhance the oxygen-delivery capability of blood without the risks associated with allogeneic blood transfusions, several products are undergoing development and clinical trials. These oxygen transport agents can be divided into two main groups, perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions and modified hemoglobin solutions. Articles from the literature on the development and clinical trials of oxygen therapeutic agents were reviewed. PFCs are synthetic fluorinated hydrocarbons that increase dissolved oxygen in the fluid phase of the blood without binding the oxygen molecule. They enhance oxygen delivery significantly and may be used to augment the technique of intraoperative autologous donation. Two PFC products have been tested in Phase III clinical trials. Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) are either cross-linked or microencapsulated hemoglobin molecules. Modification of the human hemoglobin molecule with intra- and inter-molecular cross-linking eliminates renal toxicity and improves the oxygen dissociation characteristics of the molecule. These modifications are necessary because stroma-free hemoglobin (Hb) does not release oxygen in the physiologic range and dissociates into dimers which can be rapidly filtered by the kidney, leading to renal toxicity. In addition to human Hb, bovine hemoglobin is another source of raw material for HBOC products. Recombinant human Hb has also been produced, using an E. coli expression system, for HBOC manufacturing. Four cross-linked hemoglobin products have been tested in Phase III clinical trials. While no product has yet been approved for clinical use, preliminary studies with oxygen therapeutics show promising results, with effective oxygen carrying capacity and acceptable side effect profiles. In the future, the formation of a hybrid product which combines the best features from several of the products currently undergoing development may yield the ideal oxygen therapeutic agent.

  4. Cleft palate only: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    TETTAMANTI, L.; AVANTAGGIATO, A.; NARDONE, M.; SILVESTRE-RANGIL, J.; TAGLIABUE, A.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Cleft palate only (CPO) is one of the most common congenital malformations worldwide. The etiopathogenesis of CPO is not completely understood. Environmental factors, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, intake of drugs during pregnancy, advanced paternal age, have been demonstrated to be a risk of CPO, but conflicting results have also been published. Insufficient intake of folic acid during the pregnancy has been suggested to increase the risk for CPO. The demonstrated risk for siblings and the higher risk for monozygotic twins suggest a genetic etiopathogenesis for CPO. In some cases of CPO a prevalent mode of inheritance has been reported, but oligogenic models with reduced penetrance, and the risk related to environmental factors have also been proved. One of the first manifestations associated with CPO is difficulty with feeding. Aerophagia is a problem in these infants with CPO and requires more frequent burping and slower feeding. The inability to generate intraoral breath pressure due to nasal air emission in CPO children frequently manifests as articulation difficulties, particularly consonant weakness, and unintelligible speech. Hearing disorders are prevalent among individuals with CPO, as a result of chronic otitis media with effusion due to eustachian tube dysfunction. A multidisciplinary team is essential to manage the many aspects of CPO. In treating CPO, the reconstructive surgeon works in cooperation with otolaryngologists, dentists and orthodontists, speech pathologists, audiologists, geneticists, psychiatrists, maxillofacial surgeons, social workers, and prosthodontists. CPO can be considered a genetically complex disease, but new knowledge and new therapeutic approaches have greatly improved the quality of life of these children. Prenatal diagnosis is an important step in the treatment of this disease. PMID:28757935

  5. Cleft palate only: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Tettamanti, L; Avantaggiato, A; Nardone, M; Silvestre-Rangil, J; Tagliabue, A

    2017-01-01

    Cleft palate only (CPO) is one of the most common congenital malformations worldwide. The etiopathogenesis of CPO is not completely understood. Environmental factors, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, intake of drugs during pregnancy, advanced paternal age, have been demonstrated to be a risk of CPO, but conflicting results have also been published. Insufficient intake of folic acid during the pregnancy has been suggested to increase the risk for CPO. The demonstrated risk for siblings and the higher risk for monozygotic twins suggest a genetic etiopathogenesis for CPO. In some cases of CPO a prevalent mode of inheritance has been reported, but oligogenic models with reduced penetrance, and the risk related to environmental factors have also been proved. One of the first manifestations associated with CPO is difficulty with feeding. Aerophagia is a problem in these infants with CPO and requires more frequent burping and slower feeding. The inability to generate intraoral breath pressure due to nasal air emission in CPO children frequently manifests as articulation difficulties, particularly consonant weakness, and unintelligible speech. Hearing disorders are prevalent among individuals with CPO, as a result of chronic otitis media with effusion due to eustachian tube dysfunction. A multidisciplinary team is essential to manage the many aspects of CPO. In treating CPO, the reconstructive surgeon works in cooperation with otolaryngologists, dentists and orthodontists, speech pathologists, audiologists, geneticists, psychiatrists, maxillofacial surgeons, social workers, and prosthodontists. CPO can be considered a genetically complex disease, but new knowledge and new therapeutic approaches have greatly improved the quality of life of these children. Prenatal diagnosis is an important step in the treatment of this disease.

  6. Current concepts of leg lengthening.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Carol C; Krieg, Andreas H

    2012-06-01

    are compensated by lower treatment costs. Overall, limb lengthening, particularly in combination with multi-planar deformity correction, can still be an arduous endeavour. In any case, wise judgement of the patient's deformity, medical and biological situation, psychosocial environment, selection of the appropriate method and hardware, as well as meticulous operating technique by an experienced surgeon are the cornerstones of successful outcomes.

  7. Current Concepts in Neuroendocrine Disruption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  8. Current concepts in combination therapy for the treatment of hypertension: combined calcium channel blockers and RAAS inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F; Castro-Serna, David; Barrera, Cesar I Elizalde; Ramos-Brizuela, Luz M

    2009-01-01

    Recent guidelines for the management of hypertension recommend target blood pressures <140/90 mmHg in hypertensive patients, or <130/80 mmHg in subjects with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, or coronary artery disease. Despite the availability and efficacy of antihypertensive drugs, most hypertensive patients do not reach the recommended treatment targets with monotherapy, making combination therapy necessary to achieve the therapeutic goal. Combination therapy with 2 or more agents is the most effective method for achieving strict blood pressure goals. Fixed-dose combination simplifies treatment, reduces costs, and improves adherence. There are many drug choices for combination therapy, but few data are available about the efficacy and safety of some specific combinations. Combination therapy of calcium antagonists and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) are efficacious and safe, and have been considered rational by both the JNC 7 and the 2007 European Society of Hypertension – European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension. The aim of this review is to discuss some relevant issues about the use of combinations with calcium channel blockers and RAAS inhibitors in the treatment of hypertension. PMID:21949615

  9. Vaginismus: review of current concepts and treatment using botox injections, bupivacaine injections, and progressive dilation with the patient under anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Pacik, Peter T

    2011-12-01

    Vaginismus is a poorly understood condition affecting approximately 1-7% of females worldwide. This article aims to bring attention to this disorder and to review the use of Botox injections to treat these patients. Vaginismus, also known as vaginal penetration disorder, is an aversion to any form of vaginal penetration as a result of painful attempts and a fear of anticipated pain. It is involuntary and uncontrolled and functions much the same as any reflex to avoid injury. It is the most common reason for unconsummated marriages. The etiology is thought to be unknown. Numerous papers note a history of religious or strict sexual upbringing or aversion to penetration because of perceived pain and bleeding with first-time intercourse. Sexual molestation may be more prevalent in this group of patients. The Lamont classification is very helpful in stratifying these patients for treatment. Lamont grade 5 vaginismus is introduced. Vaginal Botox injections for the treatment of vaginismus has received increasing attention since the technique was first described in a 1997 case report. Plastic surgeons worldwide with their experience using Botox are well positioned to learn more about this relatively unknown entity and render treatment.

  10. Current concepts of rotator cuff tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Factor, David; Dale, Barry

    2014-04-01

    Tendinopathies are a broad topic that can be examined from the lab to their impact upon function. Improved understanding will serve to bring this pathology to the forefront of discussion, whether in the clinic or the classroom. The purpose of this current concepts clinical commentary is to explore intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms of rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy in order to improve clinical and research understanding. Pubmed, Medline, Cinahl, PEDro, and Cochrane databases were searched, limiting results to those published in the English language, between the years of 2005 and 2012. The key search terms utilized were intrinsic mechanisms, tendinopathy, stem cells, biologics, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), healing, rotator cuff tears, full-thickness tears, tests, impingement, imaging, ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), radiograph, shoulder advances, treatment, diagnoses, tendon disorders, pathogenesis, matrix metalloproteinase, injections, and RC repair. Over 150 abstracts were reviewed and 43 articles were analyzed for quality and relevance using the University of Alberta Evidence Based Medicine Toolkit. Current evidence suggests that tendinopathies arise from a multivariate etiology.It is increasingly evident that intrinsic mechanisms play a greater role than extrinsic mechanisms in this process. Emphasis should be placed on patient information (i.e. background information and personal description of symptoms) and imaging/ injection techniques in order to aid in diagnosis. Future treatment technologies such as cell therapy and biological engineering offer the hope of improving patient outcomes and quality of life. Level 5 - Clinical Commentary Related to a Review of Literature.

  11. Autogenous grafts for condylar reconstruction in treatment of TMJ ankylosis: current concepts and considerations for the future.

    PubMed

    Khadka, A; Hu, J

    2012-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is characterized by difficulty or inability to open the mouth due to fusion of the temporal and the mandible, resulting in facial symmetry/deformity, malocclusion and dental problems. The only treatment option for TMJ ankylosis is surgical with or without condylar reconstruction. Various autogenous grafts are available for condylar reconstruction after freeing the ankylotic mass such as costochondral, sternoclavicular, fibular, coronoid, and metatarsophalangeal. Costochondral graft is preferred by surgeons, but distraction osteogenesis is slowly gaining popularity and may ultimately become the standard procedure, providing a cost-effective approach with low morbidity and excellent functional outcomes. Tissue engineering is another budding field which has shown promising results in animal studies but has not been applied to humans. To date, there is no ideal autogenous graft for condylar reconstruction that satisfies the complex anatomy and the myriad of functions of a missing condyle.

  12. Salivary Gland Tumors: Current Concepts and Controversies.

    PubMed

    Seethala, Raja R

    2017-03-01

    This current review focuses on current concepts and controversies for select key salivary gland epithelial neoplasms. Rather than the traditional organization of benign and malignant tumors, this review is structured around select key topics: biphasic tumors, mammary analogue secretory carcinoma, and the controversy surrounding polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma and cribriform adenocarcinoma of (minor) salivary gland origin.

  13. Prefrontal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation for Treatment of Schizophrenia With Predominant Negative Symptoms: A Double-Blind, Sham-Controlled Proof-of-Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Palm, Ulrich; Keeser, Daniel; Hasan, Alkomiet; Kupka, Michael J; Blautzik, Janusch; Sarubin, Nina; Kaymakanova, Filipa; Unger, Ina; Falkai, Peter; Meindl, Thomas; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Padberg, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Negative symptoms are highly relevant in the long-term course of schizophrenia and are an important target domain for the development of novel interventions. Recently, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the prefrontal cortex has been investigated as a treatment option in schizophrenia. In this proof-of-concept study, 20 schizophrenia patients with predominantly negative symptoms were randomized to either 10 sessions of add-on active (2 mA, 20min) or sham tDCS (anode: left DLPFC/F3; cathode: right supraorbital/F4). Primary outcome measure was the change in the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) sum score; secondary outcomes included reduction in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) scores and improvement of depressive symptoms, cognitive processing speed, and executive functioning. Sixteen patients underwent 4 functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) scans (pre and post 1st and pre and post 10th tDCS) to investigate changes in resting state network connectivity after tDCS. Per-protocol analysis showed a significantly greater decrease in SANS score after active (-36.1%) than after sham tDCS (-0.7%). PANSS sum scores decreased significantly more with active (-23.4%) than with sham stimulation (-2.2%). Explorative analysis of fcMRI data indicated changes in subgenual cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) connectivity within frontal-thalamic-temporo-parietal networks. The results of this first proof-of-concept study indicate that prefrontal tDCS may be a promising intervention for treatment of schizophrenia with predominant negative symptoms. Large-scale randomized controlled studies are needed to further establish prefrontal tDCS as novel treatment for negative symptoms in schizophrenia. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Eosinophilic esophagitis: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Redd, Matthew; Schey, Ron

    2013-03-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a relatively new entity with a significant amount of increased recognition over the last decade. The mainstay treatments of EoE are designed to eliminate the causative allergens or to reduce their effects on the esophageal mucosa. Common treatments include dietary modification, proton pump inhibitors, systemic and topical corticosteroids, and endoscopic treatments. As the pathogenesis of EoE is explored, new and novel treatments are being studied that target specific pathways and chemokines identified in as precipitating agents of EoE. This is a rapidly evolving field with significant ongoing research and clinical studies. Our review will therefore focus on current and novel treatment approaches to the disease.

  15. Current therapeutic concepts in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Jan; Poloczkova, Hana; Nemec, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a relatively rare disease characterized by systolic heart failure occuring towards the end of pregnancy or during the months following birth. It is most often seen in women of African descent, and its incidence seems to be slightly increasing in recent years. Other etiologies of heart failure should be excluded to determine the diagnosis of PPCM. The clinical picture corresponds to systolic heart failure. The rapid onset of the symptoms in relation to pregnancy is striking. The essential diagnostic procedures such as echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsy may be beneficial in certain situations. The etiology of the disease remains unclear. Speculated causes include myocarditis, autoimmune disorders, cardiotropic virus infection, and abnormal responses to hemodynamic and hormonal changes during pregnancy. Particular attention is currently given to the concept of increased oxidative stress inducing production of proapoptotic, angiostatic and proinflammatory mediators. Recovery of left ventricular systolic function occurs in about half of the cases. Mortality has been decreasing in recent years, especially in the United States, but is still between 10-15% in less developed countries where therapeutic possibilities are limited. In addition to standard heart failure therapy, specific treatments (pentoxyfilline, bromocriptine, immunomodulatory therapy) have been tested. Mechanical circulatory support is sometimes needed. Heart transplantation is the therapeutic option for the most severe heart failure and is used in about 10% of the cases. Recurrence in subsequent pregnancy is common and therefore, another pregnancy is not recommended in many cases.

  16. Pediatric Ankle Fractures: Concepts and Treatment Principles

    PubMed Central

    Su, Alvin W.; Larson, A. Noelle

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Current clinical concepts are reviewed regarding the epidemiology, anatomy, evaluation and treatment of pediatric ankle fractures. Correct diagnosis and management relies on appropriate exam, imaging, and knowledge of fracture patterns specific to children. Treatment is guided by patient history, physical examination, plain film radiographs and, in some instances, CT. Treatment goals are to restore acceptable limb alignment, physeal anatomy, and joint congruency. For high risk physeal fractures, patients should be monitored for growth disturbance as needed until skeletal maturity. PMID:26589088

  17. The pathogenesis of Charcot neuroarthropathy: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Larson, Shelly A M; Burns, Patrick R

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) has been poorly understood by clinicians and scientists alike. Current researchers have made progress toward understanding the cause of CN and possible treatment options. The authors review the current literature on the pathogenesis of this debilitating disorder and attempt to explain the roles of inflammation, bone metabolism, and advanced glycation end products.

  18. Aphasia: Current Concepts in Theory and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Tippett, Donna C.; Niparko, John K.; Hillis, Argye E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging contribute to a new insights regarding brain-behavior relationships and expand understanding of the functional neuroanatomy of language. Modern concepts of the functional neuroanatomy of language invoke rich and complex models of language comprehension and expression, such as dual stream networks. Increasingly, aphasia is seen as a disruption of cognitive processes underlying language. Rehabilitation of aphasia incorporates evidence based and person-centered approaches. Novel techniques, such as methods of delivering cortical brain stimulation to modulate cortical excitability, such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation, are just beginning to be explored. In this review, we discuss the historical context of the foundations of neuroscientific approaches to language. We sample the emergent theoretical models of the neural substrates of language and cognitive processes underlying aphasia that contribute to more refined and nuanced concepts of language. Current concepts of aphasia rehabilitation are reviewed, including the promising role of cortical stimulation as an adjunct to behavioral therapy and changes in therapeutic approaches based on principles of neuroplasticity and evidence-based/person-centered practice to optimize functional outcomes. PMID:24904925

  19. Anticoagulation in Atrial Fibrillation – Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Gersh, Bernard J; Camm, A John

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the current status of the use of anticoagulation for the treatment of AF, particularly with the use of non-vitamin K-dependent anticoagulants. Comparisons between these agents and warfarin are made and methods for assessment of anticoagulant activity and reversal are discussed. PMID:26835109

  20. Status epilepticus. Current concepts and management.

    PubMed Central

    Starreveld, E.; Starreveld, A. A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To inform primary care physicians about current issues around generalized convulsive status epilepticus (GCSE) emphasizing definition, pathophysiology, treatment, and prognosis. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE (1994 to 1999) provided 479 references using the MeSH terms "status epilepticus" and "treatment." From these we selected 30 English-language articles covering clinical aspects, treatment, and animal research. Key source documents from previous years and information from modern textbooks and recent symposia were also included. MAIN MESSAGE: Generalized convulsive status epilepticus continues to be a medical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. It must be managed promptly and effectively. The operational definition of GCSE is a seizure that lasts longer than 5 minutes or two or more seizures between which patients do not recover. Main differential diagnosis is nonepileptic status. Intravenous therapy with combined lorazepam and phenytoin is the initial treatment of choice. Other preferred medications are diazepam, midazolam, and propofol. Some of these medications should be considered before arrival at hospital. Prognosis of GCSE is determined by underlying cause, delay in adequate treatment, and comorbidity. Patients with GCSE lasting longer than 30 minutes require intensive care and electroencephalogram monitoring. CONCLUSION: Intravenous lorazepam and phenytoin are currently the most effective drugs for initial management of GCSE. Timely administration of antiepileptic medication can prevent development of GCSE in some patients with known epilepsy. Main differential diagnosis is nonepileptic status. PMID:11013800

  1. Chordoma: current concepts, management, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Nahed, Brian V; Mohyeldin, Ahmed; Coumans, Jean-Valery; Kahle, Kristopher T; Ferreira, Manuel J

    2012-02-01

    Chordoma is a rare bone cancer that is aggressive, locally invasive, and has a poor prognosis. Chordomas are thought to arise from transformed remnants of notochord and have a predilection for the axial skeleton, with the most common sites being the sacrum, skull base, and spine. The gold standard treatment for chordomas of the mobile spine and sacrum is en-bloc excision with wide margins and postoperative external-beam radiation therapy. Treatment of clival chordomas is unique from other locations with an enhanced emphasis on preservation of neurological function, typified by a general paradigm of maximally safe cytoreductive surgery and advanced radiation delivery techniques. In this Review, we highlight current standards in diagnosis, clinical management, and molecular characterisation of chordomas, and discuss current research.

  2. Carotid Endarterectomy: Current Concepts and Practice Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sibu P.; Saha, Subhajit; Vyas, Krishna S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stroke is the number one cause of disability and third leading cause of death among adults in the United States. A major cause of stroke is carotid artery stenosis (CAS) caused by atherosclerotic plaques. Randomized trials have varying results regarding the equivalence and perioperative complication rates of stents versus carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in the management of CAS. Objectives We review the evidence for the current management of CAS and describe the current concepts and practice patterns of CEA. Methods A literature search was conducted using PubMed to identify relevant studies regarding CEA and stenting for the management of CAS. Results The introduction of CAS has led to a decrease in the percentage of CEA and an increase in the number of CAS procedures performed in the context of all revascularization procedures. However, the efficacy of stents in patients with symptomatic CAS remains unclear because of varying results among randomized trials, but the perioperative complication rates exceed those found after CEA. Conclusions Vascular surgeons are uniquely positioned to treat carotid artery disease through medical therapy, CEA, and stenting. Although data from randomized trials differ, it is important for surgeons to make clinical decisions based on the patient. We believe that CAS can be adopted with low complication rate in a selected subgroup of patients, but CEA should remain the standard of care. This current evidence should be incorporated into practice of the modern vascular surgeon. PMID:26417192

  3. Safety pharmacology--current and emerging concepts.

    PubMed

    Hamdam, Junnat; Sethu, Swaminathan; Smith, Trevor; Alfirevic, Ana; Alhaidari, Mohammad; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Ayala, Mimieveshiofuo; Box, Helen; Cross, Michael; Delaunois, Annie; Dermody, Ailsa; Govindappa, Karthik; Guillon, Jean-Michel; Jenkins, Rosalind; Kenna, Gerry; Lemmer, Björn; Meecham, Ken; Olayanju, Adedamola; Pestel, Sabine; Rothfuss, Andreas; Sidaway, James; Sison-Young, Rowena; Smith, Emma; Stebbings, Richard; Tingle, Yulia; Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Williams, Awel; Williams, Dominic; Park, Kevin; Goldring, Christopher

    2013-12-01

    Safety pharmacology (SP) is an essential part of the drug development process that aims to identify and predict adverse effects prior to clinical trials. SP studies are described in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) S7A and S7B guidelines. The core battery and supplemental SP studies evaluate effects of a new chemical entity (NCE) at both anticipated therapeutic and supra-therapeutic exposures on major organ systems, including cardiovascular, central nervous, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal. This review outlines the current practices and emerging concepts in SP studies including frontloading, parallel assessment of core battery studies, use of non-standard species, biomarkers, and combining toxicology and SP assessments. Integration of the newer approaches to routine SP studies may significantly enhance the scope of SP by refining and providing mechanistic insight to potential adverse effects associated with test compounds.

  4. Cancer Treatment - Cancer Currents Blog

    Cancer.gov

    A catalog of posts from NCI’s Cancer Currents blog on cancer treatment research. Includes posts on new treatments for cancer and their effects, clinical trial results, and overcoming treatment resistance.

  5. Current concepts of shockwave therapy in stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Leal, Carlos; D'Agostino, Cristina; Gomez Garcia, Santiago; Fernandez, Arnold

    2015-12-01

    Stress fractures are common painful conditions in athletes, usually associated to biomechanical overloads. Low risk stress fractures usually respond well to conservative treatments, but up to one third of the athletes may not respond, and evolve into high-risk stress fractures. Surgical stabilization may be the final treatment, but it is a highly invasive procedure with known complications. Shockwave treatments (ESWT), based upon the stimulation of bone turnover, osteoblast stimulation and neovascularization by mechanotransduction, have been successfully used to treat delayed unions and avascular necrosis. Since 1999 it has also been proposed in the treatment of stress fractures with excellent results and no complications. We have used focused shockwave treatments in professional athletes and military personnel with a high rate of recovery, return to competition and pain control. We present the current concepts of shockwave treatments for stress fractures, and recommend it as the primary standard of care in low risk patients with poor response to conventional treatments.

  6. Current treatments for scabies.

    PubMed

    Buffet, M; Dupin, N

    2003-04-01

    Scabies is a frequent interhuman ectoparasitic infection. Several treatments are available worldwide. There are local treatments: synthetic pyrethrins, benzyl benzoate, lindane, crotamiton. Recently a few studies were published concerning ivermectin, systemic antiparasitic agent use in onchocercosis treatment. We reviewed the literature with an evidence-based medicine method. We attempt to answer two questions in particular: what is the treatment of choice for common scabies in a patient otherwise in good health? What is the role of systemic ivermectin? We also report specific situations. Among local treatments, studies are heterogeneous according to products, countries, group of treated patients, with or without contact subjects, and the method of treatment application. There are very few high proof-level controlled studies. In France, a combination of benzyl benzoate 10% and sulfiram 2% is used most, according to professional consensus. The most studied product is the cream permethrin 5%, available in the USA and UK. Its efficacy seems slightly superior to lindane and less toxic. It is more efficient than crotamiton. There is no study comparing benzyl benzoate and permethrin. Concerning systemic ivermectin, five controlled studies showed its efficiency in common scabies. But its relative efficiency over local treatment has not been established. A few open studies showed its efficacy in institutional epidemic, profuse scabies and in HIV-positive patients. Local treatment of choice in common scabies remains to be determined among the four principal molecules. There is no study comparing permethrin or esdepallethrin to benzyl benzoate. In what cases should we prescribe crotamiton or lindane? Indication of ivermectin seems proved in common scabies and probably for HIV-positive patients. It remains to be determined if it should be prescribed in the first instance, be double or triple, be associated or not with local treatment. In case of keratotic scabies, ivermectin

  7. [Food allergies in paediatrics: Current concepts].

    PubMed

    Plaza-Martin, Ana María

    2016-07-01

    The concept of allergic reaction currently includes all those where an immunological reaction depends on a reaction mediated by IgE, as well as those that involve other immune mechanisms, such as T-cell regulators. There are many different clinical situations, like the classic immediate reactions (IgE mediated) such as urticaria, angioedema, immediate vomiting, abdominal pain, both upper respiratory (aphonia or rhinitis) and lower (wheezing or dyspnoea) symptom, and cardiovascular symptoms. The reactions that involve more than one organ, such as anaphylaxis, which could be an anaphylactic shock if there is cardiovascular involvement. The clinical signs and symptoms produced by non-IgE mediated reactions are usually more insidious in how they start, such as vomiting hours after the ingestion of food in enterocolitis, diarrhoea after days or weeks from starting food, dermatitis sometime after starting food. In these cases it is more difficult to associate these clinical symptoms directly with food. In this article, we attempt to clarify some concepts such as sensitisation/allergy, allergen/allergenic source, or the relationship of different clinical situations with food allergy, in order to help the paediatrician on the one hand, to prescribe strict diets in case of a suspicion based on the cause/effect relationship with the food, and on the other hand not to introduce unnecessary diets that very often have to last an excessively long time, and could lead to nutritional deficiencies in the children. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Partial Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Matthewson, Graeme; Beach, Cara J.; Nelson, Atiba A.; Woodmass, Jarret M.; Ono, Yohei; Boorman, Richard S.; Lo, Ian K. Y.; Thornton, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Partial thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of pain in the adult shoulder. Despite their high prevalence, the diagnosis and treatment of partial thickness rotator cuff tears remains controversial. While recent studies have helped to elucidate the anatomy and natural history of disease progression, the optimal treatment, both nonoperative and operative, is unclear. Although the advent of arthroscopy has improved the accuracy of the diagnosis of partial thickness rotator cuff tears, the number of surgical techniques used to repair these tears has also increased. While multiple repair techniques have been described, there is currently no significant clinical evidence supporting more complex surgical techniques over standard rotator cuff repair. Further research is required to determine the clinical indications for surgical and nonsurgical management, when formal rotator cuff repair is specifically indicated and when biologic adjunctive therapy may be utilized. PMID:26171251

  9. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 2: Rotator Cuff.

    PubMed

    Murray, Iain R; LaPrade, Robert F; Musahl, Volker; Geeslin, Andrew G; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Mann, Barton J; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-03-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common and result in considerable morbidity. Tears within the tendon substance or at its insertion into the humeral head represent a considerable clinical challenge because of the hostile local environment that precludes healing. Tears often progress without intervention, and current surgical treatments are inadequate. Although surgical implants, instrumentation, and techniques have improved, healing rates have not improved, and a high failure rate remains for large and massive rotator cuff tears. The use of biologic adjuvants that contribute to a regenerative microenvironment have great potential for improving healing rates and function after surgery. This article presents a review of current and emerging biologic approaches to augment rotator cuff tendon and muscle regeneration focusing on the scientific rationale, preclinical, and clinical evidence for efficacy, areas for future research, and current barriers to advancement and implementation.

  10. Current Biomechanical Concepts for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For the past few decades, the repair of rotator cuff tears has evolved significantly with advances in arthroscopy techniques, suture anchors and instrumentation. From the biomechanical perspective, the focus in arthroscopic repair has been on increasing fixation strength and restoration of the footprint contact characteristics to provide early rehabilitation and improve healing. To accomplish these objectives, various repair strategies and construct configurations have been developed for rotator cuff repair with the understanding that many factors contribute to the structural integrity of the repaired construct. These include repaired rotator cuff tendon-footprint motion, increased tendon-footprint contact area and pressure, and tissue quality of tendon and bone. In addition, the healing response may be compromised by intrinsic factors such as decreased vascularity, hypoxia, and fibrocartilaginous changes or aforementioned extrinsic compression factors. Furthermore, it is well documented that torn rotator cuff muscles have a tendency to atrophy and become subject to fatty infiltration which may affect the longevity of the repair. Despite all the aforementioned factors, initial fixation strength is an essential consideration in optimizing rotator cuff repair. Therefore, numerous biomechanical studies have focused on elucidating the strongest devices, knots, and repair configurations to improve contact characteristics for rotator cuff repair. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind current rotator cuff repair techniques will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:23730471

  11. Safety pharmacology — Current and emerging concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdam, Junnat; Sethu, Swaminathan; Smith, Trevor; Alfirevic, Ana; Alhaidari, Mohammad; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Ayala, Mimieveshiofuo; Box, Helen; Cross, Michael; Delaunois, Annie; Dermody, Ailsa; Govindappa, Karthik; Guillon, Jean-Michel; Jenkins, Rosalind; Kenna, Gerry; Lemmer, Björn; Meecham, Ken; Olayanju, Adedamola; Pestel, Sabine; Rothfuss, Andreas; and others

    2013-12-01

    Safety pharmacology (SP) is an essential part of the drug development process that aims to identify and predict adverse effects prior to clinical trials. SP studies are described in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) S7A and S7B guidelines. The core battery and supplemental SP studies evaluate effects of a new chemical entity (NCE) at both anticipated therapeutic and supra-therapeutic exposures on major organ systems, including cardiovascular, central nervous, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal. This review outlines the current practices and emerging concepts in SP studies including frontloading, parallel assessment of core battery studies, use of non-standard species, biomarkers, and combining toxicology and SP assessments. Integration of the newer approaches to routine SP studies may significantly enhance the scope of SP by refining and providing mechanistic insight to potential adverse effects associated with test compounds. - Highlights: • SP — mandatory non-clinical risk assessments performed during drug development. • SP organ system studies ensure the safety of clinical participants in FiH trials. • Frontloading in SP facilitates lead candidate drug selection. • Emerging trends: integrating SP-Toxicological endpoints; combined core battery tests.

  12. Current Treatment of Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, J. David

    1987-01-01

    Psoriasis is a relatively common chronic dermatosis that is genetically determined and environmentally influenced. Because it is ideopathic, therapy is presently supportive, directed at optimal control, patient understanding, and prevention of recurrence. Because this multifactorial condition may involve skin and nails, musculoskeletal system, and psyche in various combinations and degrees, an organized co-operative team approach involving the patient, the family, and appropriately experienced health-care providers is most beneficial. Many topical and systemic medications, as well as physical therapeutic modalities, both established and innovative, are available for use sequentially or in various combinations to suite the individual and his/her particular psoriasis. This brief review will outline the better established dermatologic therapeutic principles and options currently available for this patient group. PMID:21263959

  13. Nonulcer dyspepsia. Current concepts and management.

    PubMed

    Mc Namara, D A; Buckley, M; O'Morain, C A

    2000-12-01

    NUD is a common heterogeneous condition with a multifactorial cause. NUD is a cause of considerable morbidity with an annual incidence of 8% and similar incidence of spontaneous resolution. Its economic effects are considerable. The estimated annual cost to the community of NUD is $431 per patient for the initial 6 months after diagnosis. The annual Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) expenditure on acid-related disorders in one Northern California HMO was estimated to be $59.4 million, of which NUD represented a significant proportion. The association of H. pylori infection with NUD is controversial. There are strong epidemiologic evidence and supportive pathophysiological mechanisms to implicate H. pylori causally in a subset of cases. Treatment studies are likewise conflicting. Evidence suggests that treatment cannot guarantee improvement in all cases of H. pylori-related NUD but that a subset would benefit with complete symptom resolution in the long term. It is not possible currently to predict which patients would or would not respond to eradication therapy. The strength of evidence is such that empiric eradication therapy, based on noninvasive H. pylori testing, can be advocated in young patients with dyspepsia safely and effectively with resultant financial savings.

  14. Tuberculosis of hip: A current concept review

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Shyam Kumar; Tuli, Surendra Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) of the hip is second to spine only hence a good number of cases are visiting the medical facilities every year. Many present in the advanced stage of the disease due to delayed diagnosis. In early stages of TB of hip, there is a diagnostic dilemma when plain X-rays are negative. In the present time, diagnostic modalities have improved from the days when diagnosis was based essentially on clinicoradiological presentation alone. By the time definite radiological changes appear on plain X-ray, the disease has moderately advanced. The modern diagnostic facilities like ultrasonography (USG) or magnetic resonance imaging of the hip joint, USG guided aspiration of synovial fluid and obtaining the material for polymerase chain reaction and tissue diagnosis must be utilized. In the treatment, current emphasis is more on mobility with stability at hip. Joint debridement, skeletal traction, and mobilization exercises may give more satisfying results as compared to the immobilization by hip spica. Adults with advanced arthritis and healed infection should be informed and discussed the various treatment modalities including the joint replacement. More and more surgeons are taking up the challenge of putting the total hip replacement in the active stage of the disease. Until the long term results in active disease are well established, we recommend it for the healed disease only in selected cases. PMID:25593352

  15. Current Concepts in Sports-Related Concussion.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Dipal; Frumberg, David B; Mulchandani, Neil B; Eldib, Ahmed M; Xavier, Fred; Barbash, Scott E; Saha, Subrata; Urban, William P

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, specifically concussion, is prevalent in contact sports. In the United States (US) each year, 170 million adults participate in physical recreational activities, and 38 million children and adolescents participate in organized sports. The Centers for Disease Control estimate that in this group ~1.6 to 3.8 million concussions occur annually. Recent class-action lawsuits in the US filed by professional athletes against their respective leagues allege negligence in protecting them from concussions, and this has contributed to the attention received in the popular media. In response, concussion-related publications have increased exponentially during the past several years. Recent studies have challenged earlier assumptions that the effects of concussion are transient. Stronger links between concussion and neurodegenerative processes such as Alzheimer's disease-like conditions, depression, and heightened risk for suicide are being elucidated. In this article, we explore the current knowledge on concussion, including pathophysiology, management, and long-term effects. We conclude that more evidence-based results regarding guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, and return to play (RTP) are needed and should be the focus of future investigations. Attributing the etiology of certain neurodegenerative conditions to a history of concussion has been suggested in the current literature, but additional quantitative data regarding the pathophysiology and causality are needed as well. Bioengineers can have an important role in measuring the dynamic forces encountered during head impacts and their effects on the brain. These results can be effective in designing better helmets as well as improved playing surfaces to reduce the impact of such injuries. At this time, we believe that groups of people with heightened risk for concussion should be followed closely during longer periods of time and compared to matched controls. Such long-term studies are urgently

  16. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 3: Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Geeslin, Andrew G; Murray, Iain R; Petrigliano, Frank A; LaPrade, Robert F; Mann, Barton J; Musahl, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Focal chondral defects of the articular surface are a common occurrence in the field of orthopaedics. These isolated cartilage injuries, if not repaired surgically with restoration of articular congruency, may have a high rate of progression to posttraumatic osteoarthritis, resulting in significant morbidity and loss of function in the young, active patient. Both isolated and global joint disease are a difficult entity to treat in the clinical setting given the high amount of stress on weightbearing joints and the limited healing potential of native articular cartilage. Recently, clinical interest has focused on the use of biologically active compounds and surgical techniques to regenerate native cartilage to the articular surface, with the goal of restoring normal joint health and overall function. This article presents a review of the current biologic therapies, as discussed at the 2015 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Biologics Think Tank, that are used in the treatment of focal cartilage deficiencies. For each of these emerging therapies, the theories for application, the present clinical evidence, and specific areas for future research are explored, with focus on the barriers currently faced by clinicians in advancing the success of these therapies in the clinical setting.

  17. Current concepts and future directions of CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Bredt, J.

    1984-01-01

    The components of a bioregenerative life-support system intended for use in space are described and the requirements for system control are discussed. Concepts of such systems include the use of higher plants and/or micro-algae as sources of oxygen, CO2 absorption, potable water, and food. In order to focus on the specific problem of reservoirs and buffers, bioregenerative life support in space is contrasted to terrestrial ecological concepts. Some of the future directions of the NASA CELSS (controlled ecological life-support system) program are outlined.

  18. Giggle incontinence: Evolution of concept and treatment.

    PubMed

    Logan, Bridget Linehan; Blais, Samantha

    2017-06-07

    Giggle incontinence is a sudden and involuntary episode of urinary incontinence that is provoked by an episode of laughter. Decades of case studies and small research studies have formed the basis of what is known about giggle incontinence; however, much remains unknown about this type of incontinence, leaving the recommendations for clinical management somewhat unguided. A systematic review of 22 articles on the topic of "giggle incontinence" and related terms was conducted, including all published articles and commentaries since the term was first seen in print in 1959. This review provides a historical context for the diagnosis, a summary of what is known about its etiology, and a summary of current treatments. There is disagreement about the pathophysiology of laughter incontinence, with two differing explanations. The first emphasizes the neurologic origin of the cascade of events during laughter and urination, and draws a likeness to cataplexy and other CNS disorders, and emphasizes treatment with methylphenidate. The second emphasizes urologic dysfunction, with biofeedback and bladder retraining as the recommended therapy. Comprehensive treatment of children with laughter incontinence requires an appreciation of both concepts. Since inception of the concept there has been question about the appropriateness of the term "giggle incontinence." This review encourages discussion among readers/clinicians about the term and the essential qualities of the diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Melanotic and non-melanotic malignancies of the face and external ear - A review of current treatment concepts and future options.

    PubMed

    Kolk, Andreas; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Smeets, Ralf; Kesting, Marco; Hein, Rüdiger; Eckert, Alexander W

    2014-08-01

    Skin has the highest incidence and variety of tumors of all organs. Its structure is of great complexity, and every component has the potential to originate a skin neoplasm (SN). Because of its exposed nature, skin is vulnerable to carcinogenic stimuli such as UV radiation. Various entities can cause SN. Nonmelanotic skin cancers (NMSC) are the most common of all cancers, with over one million cases diagnosed annually in the US. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) accounts for approximately 80% of all NMSC, most of the remaining 20% being squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The skin of the head and neck is the most common site for tumors, accounting for more than 80% of all NMSC. BCC, SCC, and malignant melanomas (MM) represent 85-90% of all SN. Merkel cell tumors (MCC), lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas of the skin (LELCS), dermato-fibro-sarcomas, leiomyosarkomas, and Kaposi-sarcomas are less frequent in the facial skin region and the external ear. Based on data from the German Federal Cancer Registry (2003/2004), 140,000 people in Germany were affected by SN (100,000 BCC, 22,000 SCC, 22,000 MM). This number increases considerably if malignant precursors, such as actinic keratosis, are included. Each year, the frequency of SN diagnosis rises by 3-7%. Among all known malignant tumors, MM exhibits the highest rate of increase in incidence. In the past, SN was primarily diagnosed in people aged 50 years or older. However, recently, the risk for developing SN has shifted, and younger people are also affected. Early diagnosis is significantly correlated with prognosis. Resection of SN creates defects that must be closed with local or microvascular flaps to avoid functional disturbing scar formation and deflection of the nose, eyelids, or lips. All therapeutic strategies for SN, the current standard for adjuvant and systemic treatment, and the management of the increasing number of patients under permanent blood thinner medication are described with regard to the treatment of SN.

  20. Current concepts in the pharmacotherapy of paraphilias.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Frederico D; Thibaut, Florence

    2011-04-16

    Concerns about paraphilia and its treatment have grown in the past few years. Although the aetiology of paraphilia disorder is still not completely understood, pharmacological treatments have been proposed for this disorder. Paraphilias are a major burden for patients and society; nevertheless, only a few individuals with paraphilias voluntarily seek treatment. Antidepressants have been used in the treatment of certain types of mild (e.g. exhibitionism) and juvenile paraphilias. Antilibidinal hormonal treatments, such as steroidal antiandrogens and gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, have also been studied and they seem to be effective in paraphilic disorders, although caution should be taken in the prescription of these treatments in order to avoid or minimize adverse effects and the risk of victimization. The combination of psychotherapy and pharmacological therapy is associated with better efficacy compared with either treatment as monotherapy. Paraphilia is a chronic disorder and a minimal duration of treatment of 3-5 years is highly recommended for severe paraphilia with a high risk of sexual violence. In conclusion, this review of the literature provides suggestive evidence that paraphilias are well characterized disorders marked by pathological dimensions. Although further research is necessary to confirm treatment efficacy and to improve our knowledge of long-term tolerance, available data on the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, steroidal antiandrogens and GnRH analogues strongly suggest the efficacy of these treatments for paraphilic disorders.

  1. Management of femoral head osteonecrosis: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Goyal, Tarun; Sen, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) is a disabling condition of young individuals with ill-defined etiology and pathogenesis. Remains untreated, about 70-80% of the patients progress to secondary hip arthritis. Both operative and nonoperative treatments have been described with variable success rate. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key for success in preserving the hip joint. Once femoral head collapses (>2 mm) or if there is secondary degeneration, hip conservation procedures become ineffective and arthroplasty remains the only better option. We reviewed 157 studies that evaluate different treatment modalities of ONFH and then a final consensus on treatment was made. PMID:25593355

  2. MANAGEMENT OF VARICEAL HEMORRHAGE: CURRENT CONCEPTS

    PubMed Central

    COELHO, Fabricio Ferreira; PERINI, Marcos Vinícius; KRUGER, Jaime Arthur Pirola; FONSECA, Gilton Marques; de ARAÚJO, Raphael Leonardo Cunha; MAKDISSI, Fábio Ferrari; LUPINACCI, Renato Micelli; HERMAN, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The treatment of portal hypertension is complex and the the best strategy depends on the underlying disease (cirrhosis vs. schistosomiasis), patient's clinical condition and time on it is performed (during an acute episode of variceal bleeding or electively, as pre-primary, primary or secondary prophylaxis). With the advent of new pharmacological options and technical development of endoscopy and interventional radiology treatment of portal hypertension has changed in recent decades. Aim To review the strategies employed in elective and emergency treatment of variceal bleeding in cirrhotic and schistosomotic patients. Methods Survey of publications in PubMed, Embase, Lilacs, SciELO and Cochrane databases through June 2013, using the headings: portal hypertension, esophageal and gastric varices, variceal bleeding, liver cirrhosis, schistosomiasis mansoni, surgical treatment, pharmacological treatment, secondary prophylaxis, primary prophylaxis, pre-primary prophylaxis. Conclusion Pre-primary prophylaxis doesn't have specific treatment strategies; the best recommendation is treatment of the underlying disease. Primary prophylaxis should be performed in cirrhotic patients with beta-blockers or endoscopic variceal ligation. There is controversy regarding the effectiveness of primary prophylaxis in patients with schistosomiasis; when indicated, it is done with beta-blockers or endoscopic therapy in high-risk varices. Treatment of acute variceal bleeding is systematized in the literature, combination of vasoconstrictor drugs and endoscopic therapy, provided significant decline in mortality over the last decades. TIPS and surgical treatment are options as rescue therapy. Secondary prophylaxis plays a fundamental role in the reduction of recurrent bleeding, the best option in cirrhotic patients is the combination of pharmacological therapy with beta-blockers and endoscopic band ligation. TIPS or surgical treatment, are options for controlling rebleeding on

  3. Emergency treatment of status epilepticus: current thinking.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Dan; Rice, Brian; Silbergleit, Robert

    2009-02-01

    Current thinking about the acute treatment of status epilepticus (SE) emphasizes a more aggressive clinical approach to this common life-threatening neurologic emergency. In this review, the authors consider four concepts that can accelerate effective treatment of SE. These include (1) updating the definition of SE to make it more clinically relevant, (2) consideration of faster ways to initiate first-line benzodiazepine therapy in the prehospital environment, (3) moving to second-line agents more quickly in refractory status in the emergency department, and (4) increasing detection and treatment of unrecognized nonconvulsive SE in comatose neurologic emergency patients.

  4. Nightguard vital bleaching: current concepts and research.

    PubMed

    Haywood, V B

    1997-04-01

    Nightguard vital bleaching, or NGVB, which involves the use of a 10 percent carbamide peroxide in a custom-fitted mouthguard, has been used with much success since its introduction in 1989. Normal bleaching treatment time is one to two weeks, although times may be extended to months for difficult stains. When used in a professionally supervised manner, nightguard vital bleaching is as safe as any other routinely used dental treatment.

  5. Current Concepts and Future Directions of CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Bredt, J.

    1985-01-01

    Bioregenerative life support systems for use in space were studied. Concepts of such systems include the use of higher plants and/or microalgae as sources of food, potable water and oxygen, and as sinks for carbon dioxide and metabolic wastes. Recycling of materials within the system will require processing of food organism and crew wastes using microbiological and/or physical chemical techniques. The dynamics of material flow within the system will require monitoring, control, stabilization and maintenance imposed by computers. Studies included higher plant and algal physiology, environmental responses, and control; flight experiments for testing responses of organisms to weightlessness and increased radiation levels; and development of ground based facilities for the study of recycling within a bioregenerative life support system.

  6. Cardiovascular calcification: current controversies and novel concepts.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jessica L; Hutcheson, Joshua D; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular calcification is a commonly observed but incompletely understood mechanism of increased atherosclerotic plaque instability and accelerated aortic valve stenosis. Traditional histological staining and imaging techniques are nonspecific for the type of mineral present in calcified tissues, information that is critical for proper validation of in vitro and in vivo models. This review highlights current gaps in our understanding of the biophysical implications and the cellular mechanisms of valvular and vascular calcification and how they may differ between the two tissue types. We also address the hindrances of current cell culture systems, discussing novel platforms and important considerations for future studies of cardiovascular calcification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Microbial biofilm modulation by ultrasound: current concepts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Erriu, Matteo; Blus, Cornelio; Szmukler-Moncler, Serge; Buogo, Silvano; Levi, Raffaello; Barbato, Giulio; Madonnaripa, Daniele; Denotti, Gloria; Piras, Vincenzo; Orrù, Germano

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm elimination is often necessary during antimicrobial therapy or industrial medical manufacturing decontamination. In this context, ultrasound treatment has been frequently described in the literature for its antibiofilm effectiveness, but at the same time, various authors have described ultrasound as a formidable enhancer of bacterial viability. This discrepancy has found no solution in the current literature for around 9 years; some works have shown that every time bacteria are exposed to an ultrasonic field, both destruction and stimulation phenomena co-exist. This co-existence proves to have different final effects based on various factors such as: ultrasound frequency and intensity, the bacterial species involved, the material used for ultrasound diffusion, the presence of cavitation effects and the forms of bacterial planktonic or biofilm. The aim of this work is to analyze current concepts regarding ultrasound effect on prokaryotic cells, and in particular ultrasound activity on bacterial biofilm.

  8. Nelson syndrome: historical perspectives and current concepts.

    PubMed

    Hornyak, Mark; Weiss, Martin H; Nelson, Don H; Couldwell, William T

    2007-01-01

    The appearance of an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing tumor after bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing disease was first described by Nelson in 1958. The syndrome that now bears his name was characterized by hyperpigmentation, a sellar mass, and increased plasma ACTH levels. The treatment of Cushing disease has changed drastically since the 1950s, when the choice was adrenalectomy. Thus, the occurrence, diagnosis, and treatment of Nelson syndrome have changed as well. In the modern era of high-resolution neuroimaging, transsphenoidal microneurosurgery, and stereotactic radiosurgery, Nelson syndrome has become a rare entity. The authors describe the history of the diagnosis and treatment of Nelson syndrome. In light of the changes described, the authors believe this disease must be reevaluated in the contemporary era and a modern paradigm adopted.

  9. Posterolateral Corner of the Knee: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; Dean, Chase S.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the posterolateral corner (PLC) comprise a significant portion of knee ligament injuries. A high index of suspicion is necessary when evaluating the injured knee to detect these sometimes occult injuries. Moreover, a thorough physical examination and a comprehensive review of radiographic studies are necessary to identify these injuries. In this sense, stress radiographs can help to objectively determine the extent of these lesions. Non-operative and operative treatment options have been reported depending on the extent of the injury. Complete PLC lesions rarely heal with non-operative treatment, and are therefore most often treated surgically. The purpose of this article was to review the anatomy and clinically relevant biomechanics, diagnosis algorithms, treatment and rehabilitation protocols for PLC injuries. PMID:27200384

  10. Current concepts in the management of tendon disorders.

    PubMed

    Rees, J D; Wilson, A M; Wolman, R L

    2006-05-01

    Primary disorders of tendons are common and constitute a high proportion of referrals to rheumatologists. Certain tendons are particularly vulnerable to degenerative pathology; these include the Achilles, patella, elements of the rotator cuff, forearm extensors, biceps brachi and tibialis posterior tendons. Disorders of these tendons are often chronic and can be difficult to manage successfully in the long term. Significant advances have been made in understanding the pathophysiology of these conditions. Histopathological evidence, together with advances in imaging techniques, has made us more appreciative of the degenerative (rather that inflammatory) nature of these conditions. Additionally the presence of neovascularization is now well-recognized in long-standing tendinopathy. We review the mechanical, vascular and developing neural theories that attempt to explain the aetiology of degenerative tendinopathy. We also explore theories of why specific tendons (such as the Achilles and supraspinatus tendons) are particularly prone to degenerative pathology. Traditionally, treatments have placed a heavy emphasis on anti-inflammatory strategies, which are often inappropriate. Recently, however, significant advances in the practical management of tendon disorders have been made. In particular the advent of 'eccentric loading' training programmes has revolutionized the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy in some patients. This concept is currently being extended to include other commonly injured tendons. Other current treatments are reviewed, as are potential future treatments.

  11. [Arm rehabilitation : Current concepts and therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Platz, T; Schmuck, L

    2016-10-01

    Arm paralysis after a stroke is a major cause of impairment. Presentation of therapeutic options and the efficacy in arm rehabilitation after stroke. Based on a systematic critical appraisal of randomized controlled trials (RCT) the therapeutic procedures for arm paralysis after stroke in the context of their effectiveness are introduced, including robotic therapy, mirror therapy, constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT), arm basis training, arm ability training, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, bilateral and task-specific training, mental training and transcranial stimulation techniques, such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Several therapeutic procedures with proven efficacy are currently available for arm rehabilitation after stroke. Their differential indications are presented and associated with conclusions for clinical practice.

  12. A Report on Current Logistics System Concepts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    This modernization represents a quantum improvement over current systems, that have a 6- hour lag between movement and management visibility. NAVY...Unified Material Management System 0 DSSC - Direct Support Stock Control 0 SASSY-Supported Activities Supply System 0 Base Property Control Office...support contract has been awarded and Phase I and II completed (I -establish the M3S standard data structure, and [I-convert SASSY/ DSSC to a DBMS at the

  13. Alzheimer disease: current concepts & future directions.

    PubMed

    Musiek, Erik S; Schindler, Suzanne E

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in individuals over age 65, and is expected to cause a major public health crisis as the number of older Americans rapidly expands in the next three decades. Herein, we review current strategies for diagnosis and management of AD, and discuss ongoing clinical research and future therapeutic directions in the battle against this devastating disease.

  14. Pediatric asthma self-management: current concepts.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, L. D.

    1999-01-01

    The concept of asthma self-management began in asthma camps in the 1970s. Today all asthma camps are required to provide an educational asthma self-management program. The interaction between children and educators is brief, and if the children do not continue in an associated program after camp, the benefits may be lost. Open Airways, the first program developed specifically for minority children, has been the prototype for community asthma self-management. School-based intervention programs have incorporated asthma education into the health curriculum. Some asthma education programs include an emphasis on the environment. Another approach is to develop intervention projects with parents, as in the Head Start program. This program has been very effective in increasing early recognition of asthma and decreasing recidivism in a high-risk population. Another type of project addressed the reading ability and reading comprehension of asthmatic children. Improvement in reading skills resulted in a 47% decrease in asthma recidivism. After 18 months, there were only two hospitalizations among the enrolled participants. Asthma self-management programs that are most effective for inner-city children provide an interactive, culturally relevant form of asthma education and address issues such as literacy and continuity. PMID:12653391

  15. Cancer symptom clusters: current concepts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Aynur

    2013-03-01

    Cluster research examines complex interrelationships between multiple concurrent symptoms and their mechanisms. An individual's varying understanding of the cluster concept and variations in assessment tools results in discrepancies. This article will focus on the conceptual and methodological issues associated with definitions, symptom interrelationships, and outcomes of cancer symptom clusters. An important issue in symptom cluster research is to clarify the definition of a cluster. Some evidence suggests that 'symptom pairs' should be treated as clusters. There is substantial evidence (both qualitative and quantitative) to support a psychoneurological symptom cluster in cancer patients. It has been proposed that consistent clusters are those that have similar 'core' symptoms over time. Research has also shown that a 'sentinel' symptom can predict the presence of other relevant symptoms within a cluster. Identification of patient subgroups with higher symptom severity may be useful in targeting the most needy individuals for intervention. Symptom clusters are predictors of patient outcomes, including decreased functional performance and shorter cancer survival. Additional efforts should refine the cluster definition and elucidate the cluster stability and sentinel symptom. Both conceptual and empirical contributions should advance symptom cluster research. The qualitative approaches can explore the experience of symptom clusters and provide a conceptual basis for future research.

  16. Current concepts in laser tattoo removal.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, S M

    2010-03-01

    Today, more than 10% of the Western population has at least 1 tattoo, with prevalence of up to one-fourth in the cohort younger than 30 years of age. Many of these individuals come to regret their decision within months due to several reasons, often socially-related, and seek medical treatment. The discovery of selective photothermolysis has enabled the targeted destruction of tattoo pigments with only minimal damage to the surrounding tissue and limited risk of adverse effects, which contrasts previously used nonspecific methods. This treatment modality requires laser pulses of short durations (nanoseconds) and high intensities. However, the inappropriate use of laser parameters, such as inadequate pulse duration, can unnecessarily increase the incidence of permanent adverse effects. This article provides an overview of applicable laser systems and therapeutic strategies for optimized tattoo removal.

  17. Spondyloarthritis: from unifying concepts to improved treatment.

    PubMed

    Paramarta, Jacqueline E; Baeten, Dominique

    2014-09-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disease with diverse phenotypic manifestations including spondylitis, arthritis, enthesitis and extra-articular manifestations (psoriasis, uveitis, inflammatory bowel disease). The common genetic risk factors, the strong familial aggregation and the overlapping immunopathology suggest that these different phenotypic manifestations share common pathogenic pathways. This concept is further strengthened by the good clinical response of all different SpA manifestations to TNF-blocking therapies. However, the phenotypic diversity of SpA is still a major challenge in properly diagnosing, classifying and monitoring the disease and may lead to undertreatment of less typical SpA cases such as undifferentiated SpA. The optimal use of current treatments and the development of novel therapies, including compounds targeting the IL-23/IL-17 axis, thus requires a detailed understanding of both the clinical presentation and the underlying pathogenic pathways in SpA.

  18. Aging Periodontium, Aging Patient: Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Mark

    2015-08-01

    A functioning natural dentition is essential to maintaining overall health in the elderly patient. While age-related alterations in periodontal tissues and the immune system may make an elderly patient more susceptible to periodontal breakdown, age itself is not a major risk factor for periodontal diseases. Rather, individual age-associated factors such as systemic diseases, medications and changes in behavior, motor function and cognitive function should be considered for each elderly patient when making treatment decisions.

  19. Osteonecrosis of the knee: current clinical concepts.

    PubMed

    Patel, D V; Breazeale, N M; Behr, C T; Warren, R F; Wickiewicz, T L; O'Brien, S J

    1998-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the knee should be differentiated into two main categories: (1) primary, spontaneous, or idiopathic osteonecrosis and (2) secondary osteonecrosis (e.g., secondary to factors such as steroid therapy, systemic lupus erythematosus, alcoholism, Caisson decompression sickness, Gaucher's disease, hemoglobinopathies, etc.). Spontaneous or primary osteonecrosis of the knee presents with an acute knee pain in elderly patients. It is three times more common in women than in men. Traumatic and vascular theories have been proposed as a causative factor of osteonecrosis of the knee, but the precise etiology still remains speculative. High index of clinical awareness and a good history and physical examination are essential to make an early, accurate diagnosis. Plain radiographs are often normal during the early course of the disease and, in such instances, radioisotope bone scan and magnetic resonance imaging may be helpful. In the early stage of the disease, nonoperative treatment is indicated and many patients, if diagnosed early, have a benign course with a satisfactory pain relief and a good knee function. In patients with advanced stage of the disease, treatment options include arthroscopic debridement, curettage or drilling of the lesion, bone grafting, high tibial osteotomy, use of osteochondral allograft, and unicompartmental or total knee arthroplasty. The choice of treatment should be based on factors such as age of the patient, severity of symptoms, activity level and functional demands on the knee, site and stage of the lesion, and extent of deformity and secondary osteoarthritis. The clinical features and treatment of steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the knee are briefly discussed. In recent years, "postmeniscectomy" osteonecrosis has been reported, but at present its prevalence and pathophysiology remain unknown. It is possible that this may be a preexisting condition that was not recognized at the time of initial consultation or osteonecrosis may

  20. Current concepts on imaging in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lecchi, Michela; Fossati, Piero; Elisei, Federica; Orecchia, Roberto; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2008-04-01

    New high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or hadrontherapy, allow better dose distribution within the target and spare a larger portion of normal tissue than conventional RT. These techniques require accurate tumour volume delineation and intrinsic characterization, as well as verification of target localisation and monitoring of organ motion and response assessment during treatment. These tasks are strongly dependent on imaging technologies. Among these, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonography (US) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been applied in high-precision RT. For tumour volume delineation and characterization, PET has brought an additional dimension to the management of cancer patients by allowing the incorporation of crucial functional and molecular images in RT treatment planning, i.e. direct evaluation of tumour metabolism, cell proliferation, apoptosis, hypoxia and angiogenesis. The combination of PET and CT in a single imaging system (PET/CT) to obtain a fused anatomical and functional dataset is now emerging as a promising tool in radiotherapy departments for delineation of tumour volumes and optimization of treatment plans. Another exciting new area is image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), which focuses on the potential benefit of advanced imaging and image registration to improve precision, daily target localization and monitoring during treatment, thus reducing morbidity and potentially allowing the safe delivery of higher doses. The variety of IGRT systems is rapidly expanding, including cone beam CT and US. This article examines the increasing role of imaging techniques in the entire process of high-precision radiotherapy.

  1. Current concepts in C3 glomerulopathy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S; Ranganathan, D; Francis, L; Madhan, K; John, G T

    2014-11-01

    Complement component 3 glomerulopathy (C3G) is a recently defined entity comprising of dense deposit disease and C3 glomerulonephritis. The key histological feature is the presence of isolated C3 deposits without immunoglobulins. Often masqueradng as some of the common glomerulonephritides this is a prototype disorder occurring from dysregulated alternate complement pathway with recently identified genetic defects and autoantibodies. We review the pathophysiology, clinical features, and diagnostic and treatment strategies.

  2. Current concepts review: Fractures of the patella

    PubMed Central

    Gwinner, Clemens; Märdian, Sven; Schwabe, Philipp; Schaser, Klaus-D.; Krapohl, Björn Dirk; Jung, Tobias M.

    2016-01-01

    Fractures of the patella account for about 1% of all skeletal injuries and can lead to profound impairment due to its crucial function in the extensor mechanism of the knee. Diagnosis is based on the injury mechanism, physical examination and radiological findings. While the clinical diagnosis is often distinct, there are numerous treatment options available. The type of treatment as well as the optimum timing of surgical intervention depends on the underlying fracture type, the associated soft tissue damage, patient factors (i.e. age, bone quality, activity level and compliance) and the stability of the extensor mechanism. Regardless of the treatment method an early rehabilitation is recommended in order to avoid contractures of the knee joint capsule and cartilage degeneration. For non-displaced and dislocated non-comminuted transverse patellar fractures (2-part) modified anterior tension band wiring is the treatment of choice and can be combined – due to its biomechanical superiority – with cannulated screw fixation. In severe comminuted fractures, open reduction and fixation with small fragment screws or new angular stable plates for anatomic restoration of the retropatellar surface and extension mechanism results in best outcome. Additional circular cerclage wiring using either typical metal cerclage wires or resorbable PDS/non-resorbable FiberWires increases fixation stability and decreases risk for re-dislocation. Distal avulsion fractures should be fixed with small fragment screws and should be protected by a transtibial McLaughlin cerclage. Partial or complete patellectomy should be regarded only as a very rare salvage operation due to its severe functional impairment. PMID:26816667

  3. Antiviral therapy: current concepts and practices.

    PubMed Central

    Bean, B

    1992-01-01

    Drugs capable of inhibiting viruses in vitro were described in the 1950s, but real progress was not made until the 1970s, when agents capable of inhibiting virus-specific enzymes were first identified. The last decade has seen rapid progress in both our understanding of antiviral therapy and the number of antiviral agents on the market. Amantadine and ribavirin are available for treatment of viral respiratory infections. Vidarabine, acyclovir, ganciclovir, and foscarnet are used for systemic treatment of herpesvirus infections, while ophthalmic preparations of idoxuridine, trifluorothymidine, and vidarabine are available for herpes keratitis. For treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infections, zidovudine and didanosine are used. Immunomodulators, such as interferons and colony-stimulating factors, and immunoglobulins are being used increasingly for viral illnesses. While resistance to antiviral drugs has been seen, especially among AIDS patients, it has not become widespread and is being intensely studied. Increasingly, combinations of agents are being used: to achieve synergistic inhibition of viruses, to delay or prevent resistance, and to decrease dosages of toxic drugs. New approaches, such as liposomes carrying antiviral drugs and computer-aided drug design, are exciting and promising prospects for the future. PMID:1576586

  4. Boundary cartilage lubrication: review of current concepts.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Matej

    2014-03-01

    Effective lubrication of synovial joints is important to prevent cartilage degeneration and to keep the joints healthy. This paper sets out the basics of engineering lubrication with respect to the composition and properties of synovial fluid constituents. Two basic types of boundary lubrication are discussed: the presence of highly hydrophilic proteoglycans that provide a water liquid film, and the existence of multilamellar phospholipids lubricating layers at the surface ofarticular cartilage. Based on current knowledge, we may conclude that no single mechanism of boundary lubrication exists, and that effective boundary lubrication of synovial joints is maintained by the synergic effect of all synovial fluid constituents.

  5. Periprosthetic proximal femur fractures: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Javad; Vegari, David N

    2011-06-01

    With the increase in demand for total hip and knee arthroplasty, the orthopaedic community has seen a dramatic increase in periprosthetic fractures. Given the high morbidity and mortality associated with these fractures, the orthopaedic surgeon needs to be prepared to deal with this difficult problem. The purpose of this article is to provide the surgeon with an algorithmic approach that allows for easy classification and treatment options for periprosthetic fractures of the proximal femur. Such an approach should prevent the mismanagement of these complications.

  6. Bone regeneration: current concepts and future directions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Bone regeneration is a complex, well-orchestrated physiological process of bone formation, which can be seen during normal fracture healing, and is involved in continuous remodelling throughout adult life. However, there are complex clinical conditions in which bone regeneration is required in large quantity, such as for skeletal reconstruction of large bone defects created by trauma, infection, tumour resection and skeletal abnormalities, or cases in which the regenerative process is compromised, including avascular necrosis, atrophic non-unions and osteoporosis. Currently, there is a plethora of different strategies to augment the impaired or 'insufficient' bone-regeneration process, including the 'gold standard' autologous bone graft, free fibula vascularised graft, allograft implantation, and use of growth factors, osteoconductive scaffolds, osteoprogenitor cells and distraction osteogenesis. Improved 'local' strategies in terms of tissue engineering and gene therapy, or even 'systemic' enhancement of bone repair, are under intense investigation, in an effort to overcome the limitations of the current methods, to produce bone-graft substitutes with biomechanical properties that are as identical to normal bone as possible, to accelerate the overall regeneration process, or even to address systemic conditions, such as skeletal disorders and osteoporosis. PMID:21627784

  7. Current Concepts in Hip Preservation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Kelly L.; Cook, P. Christopher; Yen, Yi-Meng; Giordano, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Context: An evolution in conceptual understanding, coupled with technical innovations, has enabled hip preservation surgeons to address complex pathomorphologies about the hip joint to reduce pain, optimize function, and potentially increase the longevity of the native hip joint. Technical aspects of hip preservation surgeries are diverse and range from isolated arthroscopic or open procedures to hybrid procedures that combine the advantages of arthroscopy with open surgical dislocation, pelvic and/or proximal femoral osteotomy, and biologic treatments for cartilage restoration. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched to identify relevant scientific and review articles from January 1920 to January 2015 using the search terms hip preservation, labrum, surgical dislocation, femoroacetabular impingement, peri-acetabular osteotomy, and rotational osteotomy. Reference lists of included articles were reviewed to locate additional references of interest. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Thoughtful individualized surgical procedures are available to optimize the femoroacetabular joint in the presence of hip dysfunction. Conclusion: A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between femoral and pelvic orientation, morphology, and the development of intra-articular abnormalities is necessary to formulate a patient-specific approach to treatment with potential for a successful long-term result. PMID:26502445

  8. Current Concepts of Mechanisms in Drug-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Russmann, Stefan; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Grattagliano, Ignazio

    2009-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) has become a leading cause of severe liver disease in Western countries and therefore poses a major clinical and regulatory challenge. Whereas previously drug-specific pathways leading to initial injury of liver cells were the main focus of mechanistic research and classifications, current concepts see these as initial upstream events and appreciate that subsequent common downstream pathways and their attenuation by drugs and other environmental and genetic factors also have a profound impact on the risk of an individual patient to develop overt liver disease. This review summarizes current mechanistic concepts of DILI in a 3-step model that limits its principle mechanisms to three main ways of initial injury, i.e. direct cell stress, direct mitochondrial impairment, and specific immune reactions. Subsequently, initial injury initiates further downstream events, i.e. direct and death receptor-mediated pathways leading to mitochondrial permeability transition, which then results in apoptotic or necrotic cell death. For all mechanisms, mitochondria play a central role in events leading to apoptotic vs. necrotic cell death. New treatment targets consequently focus on interference with downstream pathways that mediate injury and therefore determine the ultimate outcome of DILI. Genome wide and targeted pharmacogenetic as well as metabonomic approaches are now used in order to reach the key goals of a better understanding of mechanisms in hepatotoxicity, and to develop new strategies for its prediction and treatment. However, the complexity of interactions between genetic and environmental risk factors is considerable, and DILI therefore currently remains unpredictable for most hepatotoxins. PMID:19689281

  9. Current concepts on airborne particles and health

    SciTech Connect

    Mauderly, J.L.

    1994-11-01

    Epidemiological evidence of associations between environmental particulate concentrations and both acute and chronic health effects has grown with numerous recent studies conducted in the US and other countries. An association between short-term changes in particulate levels and acute mortality now seems certain. The association is consistent among studies and coherent among indicators of mortality and morbidity. Effects observed at surprisingly low pollution levels have raised concern for current exposures even in modestly polluted cities. Toxicology did not predict the acute mortality effect, and causal mechanisms are difficult to rationalize. Present data suggest that the fine fraction of particulate pollution is more toxic than larger particles, but the contribution of specific particulate species is poorly understood.

  10. Medial thighplasty: Current concepts and practices.

    PubMed

    Bertheuil, N; Carloni, R; De Runz, A; Herlin, C; Girard, P; Watier, E; Chaput, B

    2016-02-01

    Medial thighplasty, also known as medial thigh lift, is a procedure that has been carried out for five decades. The original "Lewis" technique has undergone many changes, and thereby been rendered widely available to plastic surgeons. Given the increasingly high number of surgical reconstructions after massive weight loss, this technique is now an integral part of a surgeon's therapeutic arsenal as he strives to meet the evolving demands of patients. The objective of this article, which is based on a comprehensive review of the literature, is to summarize current knowledge on medial thighplasty and thereby allow plastic surgeons to adopt the operating technique best suited to the deformations presented by their patients and to the overall context. The different techniques, outcomes and complications are successively discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Neck dissection: current concepts and future directions.

    PubMed

    Rigual, Nestor R; Wiseman, Sam M

    2004-01-01

    For individuals diagnosed with head and neck cancer, neck dissection may be performed for therapy or disease staging. The classification of neck dissection and the definition of precise anatomic landmarks have allowed for this operation, and its many variations, to become standardized world-wide. SLNBX shows promise in its ability to accurately stage NO head and neck cancer and may allow patients with no micro metastatic disease to avoid neck dissection. Before this technique becomes adopted into routine clinical practice, however, it must first be prospectively scrutinized in large patient populations. Regardless of the future role of SLNBX in the management of head and neck cancer, currently it is only through a complete understanding of the clinical, theoretic, and technical aspects of neck dis-section that surgeons may benefit individual patients and the head and neck cancer patient population as a whole.

  12. Current concepts of ocular adnexal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Maria; Geerling, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery is a specialized area of ophthalmology that deals with the management of deformities and abnormalities of the eyelids, lacrimal system and the orbit. An ophthalmoplastic surgeon is able to identify and correct abnormalities of the ocular adnexae such as ectropion, lid retraction, conjunctival scarring with severe entropion, that can cause secondary ocular surface disorders; manage patients with watering eye, and when needed intervene with a dacryocystorhinostomy by external or endonasal approach and moreover minimize disfigurement following enucleation or evisceration and prevent further corneal damage, alleviate complains of tearing and grittiness, but also cosmetic complaints in patients with Graves’ orbitopathy. Aim of this manuscript was to review current established and recently evolving surgical procedures. PMID:26504698

  13. Current concepts in the management of amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    de Zárate, Blanca Ruiz; Tejedor, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    Traditional treatment of amblyopia, although still in use and of great value, has recently been challenged by data from studies relative to efficacy of different modalities and regimens of therapy. LogMAR-based acuity charts should be used, whenever possible, for diagnosis and monitoring. Refractive errors of certain magnitude should be prescribed, and correction worn for at least 4 months before occlusion or penalization are used. Occlusion has a linear dose-response effect (1 logMAR line gain per 120 hours of patching), and outcomes of 2 hour/day dosage are similar to more extended therapy, at least in moderate amblyopia, but increasing dosage beyond hastens the response. Pharmacologic, optical, or combined penalization is useful as an alternative or maintaining therapy, and is presumably of particular efficacy in anisometropic amblyopia. At least in moderate amblyopia, atropine penalization is as effective as patching in terms of visual acuity improvement and stereoacuity outcome. PMID:19668517

  14. Current concepts in the management of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Waanders, F; Visser, F W; Gans, R O B

    2013-11-01

    Although much progress has been made in slowing the progression of diabetic nephropathy, renal dysfunction and development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain major concerns in diabetes. In addition, diabetic patients with microalbuminuria have an increased cardiovascular mortality. Therefore, new treatment modalities or strategies are needed to prevent or slow the progression of diabetic nephropathy and prevent cardiovascular disease in diabetes. In this review we describe current concepts in pathophysiology, treatment goals and we discuss future developments in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Common risk factors for diabetic nephropathy and its progression are longer duration, poor glycaemic control, hypertension and the presence of albuminuria. Available treatment options, especially renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade, but also better blood pressure and blood glucose control, decrease the incidence of cardiovascular disease and renal disease in diabetes. It is important that treatment goals are tailored to the individual patient with individual treatment goals of glycaemic control and blood pressure, depending on age, type of diabetes and diabetes duration. Aggressive treatment of glucose control and blood pressure might not always be best practice for every patient. Since the proportion of ESRD due to diabetic nephropathy remains high, optimisation of RAAS blockade is advocated and can be achieved by adequate sodium restriction and/or diuretic treatment. Moreover, aldosterone blockade might be a valuable strategy, which has potency to slow the progression of diabetic renal disease. Other possible future interventions are under investigation, but large clinical trials have to be awaited to confirm the safety and efficacy of these drugs.

  15. Current Concepts in Disorders of Sexual Development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) with or without ambiguous genitalia require medical attention to reach a definite diagnosis. Advances in identification of molecular causes of abnormal sex, heightened awareness of ethical issues and this necessitated a re-evaluation of nomenclature. The term DSD was proposed for congenital conditions in which chromosomal, gonadal or anatomical sex is atypical. In general, factors influencing sex determination are transcriptional regulators, whereas factors important for sex differentiation are secreted hormones and their receptors.The current intense debate on the management of patients with intersexuality and related conditions focus on four major issues: 1) aetiological diagnosis, 2) assignment of gender, 3) indication for and timing of genital surgery, 4) the disclosure of medical information to the patient and his/her parents. The psychological and social implications of gender assignment require a multidisciplinary approach and a team which includes ageneticist, neonatologist, endocrinologist, gynaecologist, psychiatrist, surgeon and a social worker. Each patient should be evaluated individually by multidisciplinary approach. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21911322

  16. Medications and breast-feeding: Current concepts.

    PubMed

    Nice, Frank J; Luo, Amy C

    2012-01-01

    To describe the various factors that come into play when a breast-feeding mother is taking medications, including use of prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, recreational drugs, galactogogues, and herbal remedies and to provide a framework used for counseling breast-feeding women. Community and hospital pharmacy and health care settings. Consultative services provided to breast-feeding mothers who had been prescribed or were using medications. Use of pharmacokinetic factors, maternal and child factors, a list of questions to ask breast-feeding mothers, and a stepwise approach to counsel breast-feeding mothers on the compatibility of using medications while breast-feeding. By positive intervention of pharmacists and health care providers, up to 1 million breast-feeding mothers, who must use medications, can continue to breast-feed while taking medications. Objectively weighing the benefits of drugs and breast-feeding versus the risks of drugs and not breast-feeding, in most cases, allows for pharmacists to give current and practical advice to mothers and other health professionals who counsel mothers.

  17. Managing the injured tendon: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Evans, Roslyn B

    2012-01-01

    Despite advances in understanding of the mechanical aspects of tendon management with improved suture technique and early stress application with postoperative therapy, clinical results remain inconsistent after repair, especially within the synovial regions. Complementary research to enhance the intrinsic pathway of healing, suppress the extrinsic pathway of healing, and manipulate frictional resistance to tendon gliding is now the focus of current basic science research on tendons. In the future, application of these new biologic therapies may increase the "safety zone" (or tolerance for load and excursion without dysfunctional gapping) as therapists apply stress to healing tendons and may alter future rehabilitation protocols by allowing greater angles of motion (and thus tendon excursion), increased external load, and decreased time in protective orthoses (splints). However, at this time, the stronger repair techniques and the application of controlled stress remain the best and most well-supported intervention after tendon injury and repair in the recovery of functional tendon excursion and joint range of motion. The hand therapist's role in this process remains a critical component contributing to satisfactory outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Current Concepts for PrEP Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Haberer, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This review describes 1) the current understanding of adherence to oral PrEP, 2) methods for adherence measurement, 3) approaches to supporting PrEP adherence, and 4) guidance for defining PrEP adherence goals within the larger context of HIV prevention. Recent findings PrEP adherence has generally been higher in recent trials, open-label extensions, and demonstration projects compared to the initial clinical trials; potential explanations include known PrEP efficacy and different motivations to take PrEP. Recent studies have explored adherence monitoring through electronic pill containers, short message service (SMS), and drug concentrations in hair and dried blood spots. The few PrEP adherence interventions developed to date include combinations of enhanced counseling, feedback of objective adherence measurement, and SMS. Conceptualization of PrEP adherence is evolving. The goal is not 100% adherence indefinitely, as it was in clinical trials. PrEP adherence should be defined with respect to HIV exposure, which varies over time by sexual behavior and use of other prevention strategies. Summary PrEP adherence beyond clinical trials has generally been high enough to achieve reliable HIV prevention. Future efforts to measure and support PrEP adherence should focus on the context of risk for HIV acquisition, accounting for dynamic behaviors and choices among HIV prevention options. PMID:26633638

  19. Airway epithelial cells: current concepts and challenges.

    PubMed

    Crystal, Ronald G; Randell, Scott H; Engelhardt, John F; Voynow, Judith; Sunday, Mary E

    2008-09-15

    The adult human bronchial tree is covered with a continuous layer of epithelial cells that play a critical role in maintaining the conduit for air, and which are central to the defenses of the lung against inhaled environmental concomitants. The epithelial sheet functions as an interdependent unit with the other lung components. Importantly, the structure and/or function of airway epithelium is deranged in major lung disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and bronchogenic carcinoma. Investigations regarding the airway epithelium have led to many advances over the past few decades, but new developments in genetics and stem cell/progenitor cell biology have opened the door to understanding how the airway epithelium is developed and maintained, and how it responds to environmental stress. This article provides an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding airway epithelial stem/progenitor cells, gene expression, cell-cell interactions, and less frequent cell types, and discusses the challenges for future areas of investigation regarding the airway epithelium in health and disease.

  20. Osteochondral lesions of the talus: Current concept.

    PubMed

    Laffenêtre, O

    2010-09-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus (OTL) are among those injuries that we should not fail to recognize, especially following any type of hindfoot injury. They were thoroughly described 15 years ago in a round table session organized by Doré and Rosset for the Société orthopédique de l'Ouest. Their physiopathology has not yet been definitely determined, even though some of the pathogenic mechanisms are known. They are best characterized using the fractures, osteonecroses, geodes (FOG) radiological classification. Both their diagnosis and their surgical treatment remain a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon: some basic surgical principles apply to all of the lesions, such as cartilage debridement and shaving of necrotic tissues, while others will be used depending on the location and size of the lesions as well as the surgeon's experience. Finally, no specific technique appears to be superior to the others. Arthroscopy appears to be the most effective procedure for lesions smaller than 1 cm(2), whereas larger lesions should be filled, either with cancellous bone or with an osteochondral graft or using autogenous chondrocyte implantation. The data available in the literature should also incite orthopaedists to consider the results of surgical management with some modesty, and conservative management should remain among the therapeutic options. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Current Concepts in Hip Preservation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Kelly L.; Cook, P. Christopher; Geisler, Paul R.; Yen, Yi-Meng; Giordano, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Successful treatment of nonarthritic hip pain in young athletic individuals remains a challenge. A growing fund of clinical knowledge has paralleled technical innovations that have enabled hip preservation surgeons to address a multitude of structural variations of the proximal femur and acetabulum and concomitant intra-articular joint pathology. Often, a combination of open and arthroscopic techniques are necessary to treat more complex pathomorphologies. Peri- and postoperative recovery after such procedures can pose a substantial challenge to the patient, and a dedicated, thoughtful approach may reduce setbacks, limit morbidity, and help optimize functional outcomes. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched to identify relevant scientific and review articles through December 2014 using the search terms hip preservation, labrum, surgical dislocation, femoroacetabular impingement, postoperative rehabilitation, peri-acetabular osteotomy, and rotational osteotomy. Reference lists of included articles were reviewed to locate additional references of interest. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Hip preservation procedures and appropriate rehabilitation have allowed individuals to return to a physically active lifestyle. Conclusion: Effective postoperative rehabilitation must consider modifications and precautions specific to the particular surgical techniques used. Proper postoperative rehabilitation after hip preservation surgery may help optimize functional recovery and maximize clinical success and patient satisfaction. PMID:26733593

  2. Sludge treatment: Current research trends.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanguo; Hu, Jianjun; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Yingju; Lee, Yu-Jen

    2017-07-15

    Sludge is produced during wastewater treatment as a residue containing most insoluble and adsorbed soluble impurities in wastewaters. This paper summarized the currently available review papers on sludge treatments and proposed the research trends based on the points raised therein. On partition aspect, sludge production rate and the reduction of production rate and the fate and transformation of involved emergent contaminants including endocrine disrupting chemicals and pharmaceuticals and personal care products are widely studied. On release aspect, development of thermal processes on sludge with migration and transformation of heavy metals in sludge during treatment is a research focus. The use of detailed fluid and biological reaction models and advanced instrumentation and control systems is studied to optimize treatment performances. On recovery part, co-digestion of sludge with co-substrates at mesophilic and hyperthermophilic conditions and the recovery of phosphorus at low costs are research highlights. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Current concept of insulin therapy intensification, and the role of human regular insulin and rapid-acting insulin analogs in insulin treatment].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Tomoya; Sadahiro, Katsuhiko; Satoh, Tomomi

    2015-03-01

    The evolution of insulin therapy from animal insulin to recombinant human regular insulin has improved diabetes treatment. Generating of rapid-acting insulin analogs, mimicking physiologic insulin action enables us to provide better control of post-prandial glucose level and lower incidence of hypoglycemia compared with human regular insulin. These rapid-acting insulin analogs show lower susceptibility of insulin precipitation and catheter occlusions, and are suitable for insulin pump therapy of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Insulin lispro and insulin aspart are also applicable for diabetic patients with pregnancy, requiring excellent glycemic control. In some studies, stepwise addition of prandial insulin, as well as full basal-bolus regimen can improve glycemic control with less hypoglycemia. Treatment intensification with rapid-acting insulin analogs may offer a proper method to reach glycemic goals.

  4. Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy: An overview of current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Prabudh; Choudhury, Subhasis Roy

    2012-01-01

    Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) is relatively rare but one of the most important causes of severe neonatal hypoglycemia. Recognition of this entity becomes important due to the fact that the hypoglycemia is so severe and frequent that it may lead to severe neurological damage in the infant manifesting as mental or psychomotor retardation or even a life-threatening event if not recognized and treated effectively in time. Near-total pancreatectomy may be required for patients with intractable hypoglycemia despite medical treatment; however, that may result in diabetes mellitus or recurrent postoperative hypoglycemia. This review aims to consolidate the traditional concepts and current information related to the pathogenesis and management of PHHI. PMID:22869973

  5. Isolated Robin sequence in siblings: review of current concepts.

    PubMed

    Nunes da Costa, João; Matias, Júlio

    2014-11-01

    Robin sequence is a condition that includes the triad of micrognathia, glossoptosis and upper airway obstruction, although many authors now consider that cleft palate is also an important part of the sequence. It can be classified as isolated, syndromic or associated with other anomalies without an identifiable syndrome. A possible genetic cause for isolated Robin sequence is yet under preliminary investigation, and the finding of siblings with the same condition, as are the two children we present in this work, is extremely rare, with only nine similar cases previously described. Our article includes the description of the treatment plan and outcome for both children. We review the current concepts and trends of epidemiology, genetics, diagnosis and different treatment options available. We conclude that in cases of failure of more conservative measures in the first weeks, mandibular distraction osteogenesis may be a good and rational option for the management of isolated Robin sequence, as is currently supported in recent literature, providing a reliable way of avoiding tracheostomy.

  6. Current concepts and controversies on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Alok; Tsirikos, Athanasios I

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is the most common spinal deformity encountered by General Orthopaedic Surgeons. Etiology remains unclear and current research focuses on genetic factors that may influence scoliosis development and risk of progression. Delayed diagnosis can result in severe deformities which affect the coronal and sagittal planes, as well as the rib cage, waistline symmetry, and shoulder balance. Patient's dissatisfaction in terms of physical appearance and mechanical back pain, as well as the risk for curve deterioration are usually the reasons for treatment. Conservative management involves mainly bracing with the aim to stop or slow down scoliosis progression during growth and if possible prevent the need for surgical treatment. This is mainly indicated in young compliant patients with a large amount of remaining growth and progressive curvatures. Scoliosis correction is indicated for severe or progressive curves which produce significant cosmetic deformity, muscular pain, and patient discontent. Posterior spinal arthrodesis with Harrington instrumentation and bone grafting was the first attempt to correct the coronal deformity and replace in situ fusion. This was associated with high pseudarthrosis rates, need for postoperative immobilization, and flattening of sagittal spinal contour. Segmental correction techniques were introduced along with the Luque rods, Harri-Luque, and Wisconsin systems. Correction in both coronal and sagittal planes was not satisfactory and high rates of nonunion persisted until Cotrel and Dubousset introduced the concept of global spinal derotation. Development of pedicle screws provided a powerful tool to correct three-dimensional vertebral deformity and opened a new era in the treatment of scoliosis. PMID:23682172

  7. Current Treatment Options for Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lambova, Sevdalina; Hermann, Walter; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2017-08-29

    Osteoarthritis (ОА) is the most common joint disease and a leading cause for impaired function and disability with significant treatment costs and socio-economic burden. Despite recent achievements in the knowledge on disease pathogenesis, the treatment is still a challenge and contrary to inflammatory joint diseases, no disease-modifying drugs are currently available for OA. Different response in different localizations of the disease further complicates the therapeutic choice. The standard pharmacologic treatment includes agents for control of pain and inflammation (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics including opioids, intraarticular corticosteroids) and the group of the symptomatic slow acting drugs for OA such as glucosamine sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, diacerein, unsaponifiables extract of soybean and avocado administered orally and intrarticular hyaluronic acid. In addition, a number of studies investigate the efficacy of classical disease-modifying drugs used in inflammatory arthritides and antiresoptive agents as potential future therapies that could prevent structural progression of the disease. In a number of small studies therapeutic efficacy of hydroxychloroquine (HCT) in OA has been suggested, but the results are contradictory. The first results from a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial focused on symptomatic hand OA were recently reported (British HERO study). It has been concluded that HCQ was not superior than placebo as analgesic treatment or for reduction of the radiographic progression in hand OA. Placebo-controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of HCT in inflammatory and erosive hand OA is under way. Another field of recent research is the efficacy of TNF-alpha blockers based on the knowledge of their high efficacy in inflammatory joint diseases and the significant role of TNF-alpha in the pathogenesis of OA. However, current evidence from the available studies does not support use of TNF

  8. Current concepts and future approaches to vestibular rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Tjernström, Fredrik; Zur, Oz; Jahn, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades methods of vestibular rehabilitation to enhance adaptation to vestibular loss, habituation to changing sensory conditions, and sensory reweighting in the compensation process have been developed. However, the use of these techniques still depends to a large part on the educational background of the therapist. Individualized assessment of deficits and specific therapeutic programs for different disorders are sparse. Currently, vestibular rehabilitation is often used in an unspecific way in dizzy patients irrespective of the clinical findings. When predicting the future of vestibular rehabilitation, it is tempting to foretell advances in technology for assessment and treatment only, but the current intense exchange between clinicians and basic scientists also predicts advances in truly understanding the complex interactions between the peripheral senses and central adaptation mechanisms. More research is needed to develop reliable techniques to measure sensory dependence and to learn how this knowledge can be best used--by playing off the patient's sensory strength or working on the weakness. To be able using the emerging concepts, the neuro-otological community must strive to educate physicians, physiotherapists and nurses to perform the correct examinations for assessment of individual deficits and to look for factors that might impede rehabilitation.

  9. Spondylodiscitis: standards of current treatment.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Alberto; Papapietro, Nicola; Lanotte, Angela; Russo, Fabrizio; Vadalà, Gianluca; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-05-01

    Spinal infections are an important clinical problem that often require aggressive medical therapy, and sometimes even surgery. Known risk factors are advanced age, diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, immunosuppression, alcoholism, long-term steroid use, concomitant infections, poly-trauma, malignant tumor, and previous surgery or invasive procedures (discography, chemonucleolysis, and surgical procedures involving or adjacent to the intervertebral disc space). The most common level of involvement is at the lumbar spine, followed by the thoracic, cervical and sacral levels: lesions at the thoracic spine tend to lead more frequently to neurological symptoms. The aim of the current paper is to describe current evidence-based standards of therapy in the management of SD by emphasizing pharmacological therapy and principles and indications for bracing and surgery. A PubMed and Google Scholar search using various forms and combinations of the key words: spondylodiscitis, spine, infection, therapy, surgery, radiology, treatment. Reference citations from publications identified in the literature search were reviewed. Publications highlighted in this article were extracted based on relevancy to established, putative, and emerging diagnostic and therapeutic standards, either conservative (antibiotic therapy and bracing) or surgical. To date, conservative therapy, based on targeted antibiotic therapy plus bracing, represents the mainstay in the management of SD. Proper diagnosis and tailored therapy can improve clinical results and decrease the chance of failure. Surgery should be an option only for patients with complications of this disease, namely deformity, neural compression and neurological compromise. Current standards in the setting of SD are continuously evolving, as can be seen in the recent advances in the field of radiological diagnostics, and the use of growth factors and cell-therapy strategies to promote infection eradication and bone healing after surgery.

  10. Current treatments in familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Fuente-Mora, Cristina; Percival, Leila; Mendoza-Santiesteban, Carlos; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2014-12-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (type III). The disease is caused by a point mutation in the IKBKAP gene that affects the splicing of the elongator-1 protein (ELP-1) (also known as IKAP). Patients have dramatic blood pressure instability due to baroreflex failure, chronic kidney disease, and impaired swallowing leading to recurrent aspiration pneumonia, which results in chronic lung disease. Diminished pain and temperature perception result in neuropathic joints and thermal injuries. Impaired proprioception leads to gait ataxia. Optic neuropathy and corneal opacities lead to progressive visual loss. This article reviews current therapeutic strategies for the symptomatic treatment of FD, as well as the potential of new gene-modifying agents. Therapeutic focus on FD is centered on reducing the catecholamine surges caused by baroreflex failure. Managing neurogenic dysphagia with effective protection of the airway passages and prompt treatment of aspiration pneumonias is necessary to prevent respiratory failure. Sedative medications should be used cautiously due to the risk of respiratory depression. Non-invasive ventilation during sleep effectively manages apneas and prevents hypercapnia. Clinical trials of compounds that increase levels of IKAP (ELP-1) are underway and will determine whether they can reverse or slow disease progression.

  11. Current Treatments in Familial Dysautonomia

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Kaufmann, Lucy; Fuente, Cristina; Percival, Leila; Mendoza, Carlos; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (type III). The disease is caused by a point mutation in the IKBKAP gene that affects the splicing of the elongator-1 protein (also known as IKAP). Patients have dramatic blood pressure instability due to baroreflex failure, chronic kidney disease, and impaired swallowing leading to recurrent aspiration pneumonia, which results in chronic lung disease. Diminished pain and temperature perception results in neuropathic joints and thermal injuries. Impaired proprioception leads to gait ataxia. Optic neuropathy and corneal opacities lead to progressive visual loss. Areas covered This article reviews current therapeutic strategies for the symptomatic treatment of FD, as well as the potential of new gene modifying agents. Expert opinion Therapeutic focus on FD is centered on reducing the catecholamine surges caused by baroreflex failure. Managing neurogenic dysphagia with effective protection of the airway passages and prompt treatment of aspiration pneumonias is necessary to prevent respiratory failure. Sedative medications should be used cautiously due to risk of respiratory depression. Non-invasive ventilation during sleep effectively manages apneas and prevents hypercapnia. Clinical trials of compounds that increase levels of IKAP (ELP-1) are underway and will determine whether they can reverse or slow disease progression. PMID:25323828

  12. Current concepts of mechanical and neural factors in ocular motility

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Joseph L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of review The oculomotor periphery was classically regarded as a simple mechanism executing complex behaviors specified explicitly by neural commands. A competing view has emerged that many important aspects of ocular motility are properties of the extraocular muscles and their associated connective tissue pulleys. This review considers current concepts regarding aspects of ocular motility that are mechanically determined versus those that are specified explicitly as innervation. Recent findings While it was established several years ago that the rectus extraocular muscles have connective tissue pulleys, recent functional imaging and histology has suggested that the rectus pulley array constitutes an inner mechanism, analogous to a gimbal, that is rotated torsionally around the orbital axis by an outer mechanism driven by the oblique extraocular muscles. This arrangement may account mechanically for several commutative aspects of ocular motor control, including Listing’s Law, yet permits implementation of non-commutative motility. Recent human behavioral studies, as well as neurophysiology in monkeys, are consistent with implementation of Listing’s Law in the oculomotor periphery, rather than centrally. Summary Varied evidence now strongly supports the conclusion that Listing’s Law and other important ocular kinematics are mechanically determined. This finding implies more limited possibilities for neural adaptation to some ocular motor pathologies, but indicates possibilities for surgical treatments. PMID:16415671

  13. Current concepts in wound management and wound healing products.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Jacqueline R

    2015-05-01

    Current concepts in wound management are summarized. The emphasis is on selection of the contact layer of the bandage to promote a moist wound environment. Selection of an appropriate contact layer is based on the stage of wound healing and the amount of wound exudate. The contact layer can be used to promote autolytic debridement and enhance wound healing.

  14. Tinnitus--Current Concepts in Diagnosis and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the causes of tinnitus, sound or noise in the ears or head without any external stimulation. Classification of tinnitus, the essentials of medical evaluation of a patient with tinnitus, essential test procedures, and current concepts in the management of tinnitus are addressed. (CR)

  15. Current Concepts and Terms in Adult ESL. ERIC Q & A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florez, MaryAnn Cunningham

    Terms and concepts currently in use in adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instruction are defined and explained. They include: authentic or alternative assessment; computer-assisted language learning; critical literacy theory; family and intergenerational literacy; multiple intelligences and learning styles; practitioner inquiry, reflective…

  16. Current nutritional treatments of obesity.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Ashli

    2006-01-01

    Obesity in our country is a growing concern. There are several different options for weight loss; however, individuals must be self-motivated and amendable to change in order to achieve success with their weight loss goals. Several strategies used by professionals in the US today to treat overweight and obesity, include diet therapy, exercise, behavior modification, pharmacotherapy, and surgery. The focus of the American Dietetic Association (ADA) Weight Management Position Statement is no longer just on weight loss but now on weight management. Reaching one's ideal body weight is recommended but not often realistic. Frequently, the goal of treatment shifts to maintenance of ones current weight or attempts at moderate weight loss. Lifestyle modification or behavioral modification interventions rely on analyzing behavior to identify events that are associated with appropriate vs. inappropriate eating, exercise, or thinking habits. Certain primary strategies that have been found to be useful for helping people change their behaviors so that they can lose weight and maintain their weight loss, include self-monitoring, stimulus control, cognitive restructuring, stress management, social support, physical activity, and relapse prevention. Weight loss programs should strive to combine a nutritionally balanced dietary regimen with exercise and lifestyle modifications at the lowest possible cost. There are several different methods used for dietary modifications; low calorie diets, very low calorie diets, fasting, formula diets and meal replacement programs, and popular diets. Bariatric surgery is gaining popularity as it has been an effective way to treat obesity. Following gastric bypass surgery, the patients must be prepared to modify their eating behaviors and dietary selections to assist with weight loss and prevent potential complications. Patients should be educated on the dietary guidelines extensively prior to surgery and again post-operatively.

  17. Thirty Meter Telescope: current operations concepts and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, David R.

    2008-07-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) will be a ground-based, 30-m optical-IR telescope with a highly segmented primary mirror located in a remote location. From the start of operations, TMT will provide a rich and diverse mix of seeing-limited and diffraction-limited instrumentation. Initially, only classical observing will be supported, although remote observing will follow almost immediately. Queue (or service) observing may be supported at a later date. TMT users will expect high facility uptime and observing efficiency as well as effective user support for planning and execution of observations. Those expectations are captured in the high-level Operations Concept Definition (OCD) document. The services and staffing needed to implement those concepts are described in the TMT Operations Plan. In this paper, high-level TMT operational concepts are summarized followed by a description of the current operations plan, including staffing model.

  18. Current treatment of Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, T.; Shimaoka, K.; Mimura, T.; Ito, K.

    1987-04-01

    In this review we have described the rationale for the appropriate treatment of patients with Graves' disease. Because the etiology of this disorder remains obscure, its management remains controversial. Since antithyroid drugs and radioiodine became readily available in the early 1950s, they have been widely used for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis, and the number of cases treated surgically has markedly decreased. However, almost four decades of experience have disclosed an unexpectedly high incidence of delayed hypothyroidism after radioiodine treatment and a low remission rate after antithyroid therapy. As a result, surgery is again being advocated as the treatment of choice. The three modalities of treatment have different advantages and disadvantages, and selection of treatment is of importance. In principle, we believe that for most patients a subtotal thyroidectomy should be performed after the patient has been rendered euthyroid by antithyroid drugs. We attempt to leave a thyroid remnant of 6 to 8 gm.36 references.

  19. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MUSCLE STRETCHING FOR EXERCISE AND REHABILITATION

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Stretching is a common activity used by athletes, older adults, rehabilitation patients, and anyone participating in a fitness program. While the benefits of stretching are known, controversy remains about the best type of stretching for a particular goal or outcome. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss the current concepts of muscle stretching interventions and summarize the evidence related to stretching as used in both exercise and rehabilitation. PMID:22319684

  20. Transport distraction osteogenesis for maxillomandibular reconstruction: current concepts and applications.

    PubMed

    Neelakandan, R S; Bhargava, Darpan

    2012-09-01

    Reconstruction of the facial skeleton remains a herculean task for a reconstructive surgeon, even with the availability of ample reconstructive options. Transport distraction osteogenesis is a novel reconstructive modality in the armamentarium of a maxillofacial reconstructive surgeon with obvious advantages of osteogenesis and histogenesis from the residual host tissues after tumor ablative surgeries or trauma and also, precludes donor site morbidity. This paper reviews the current concepts, principles involved and applications of transport distraction osteogenesis in maxillomandibular reconstruction.

  1. Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. Current concepts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G H; Salter, R B

    1987-10-01

    Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease is a common, controversial pediatric hip disorder. It is currently accepted that the disorder represents idiopathic avascular necrosis (osteonecrosis) of the capital femoral epiphysis. Treatment by conservative or surgical containment is recommended primarily for older children with extensive femoral head involvement. The results of containment treatment indicate improved results over the natural history of the disease process.

  2. [Strongyloidiasis and its current treatment].

    PubMed

    Prokopowicz, D; Lachowicz-Wawrzyniak, A; Sosnowska, D

    1990-04-15

    A case of strongyloidosis and giardiasis was observed in a women aged 62 years. The treatment included tinidazole, metronidazole and ercefuryl. Modern views on the epidemiology, clinical course and therapy of this parasitic infestation are discussed.

  3. The Role of Current Techniques and Concepts in Peripheral Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Houschyar, K. S.; Momeni, A.; Pyles, M. N.; Cha, J. Y.; Maan, Z. N.; Duscher, D.; Jew, O. S.; Siemers, F.; van Schoonhoven, J.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with peripheral nerve injuries, especially severe injury, often face poor nerve regeneration and incomplete functional recovery, even after surgical nerve repair. This review summarizes treatment options of peripheral nerve injuries with current techniques and concepts and reviews developments in research and clinical application of these therapies. PMID:26904282

  4. Current evidence for osteoarthritis treatments.

    PubMed

    Anandacoomarasamy, Ananthila; March, Lyn

    2010-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and the leading cause of chronic disability among older people. The burden of the disease is expected to rise with an aging population and the increasing prevalence of obesity. Despite this, there is as yet no cure for OA. However, in recent years, a number of potential therapeutic advances have been made, in part due to improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiology. This review provides the current evidence for symptomatic management of OA including nonpharmacological, pharmacological and surgical approaches. The current state of evidence for disease-modifying therapy in OA is also reviewed.

  5. Current Evidence for Osteoarthritis Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Anandacoomarasamy, Ananthila; March, Lyn

    2010-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and the leading cause of chronic disability among older people. The burden of the disease is expected to rise with an aging population and the increasing prevalence of obesity. Despite this, there is as yet no cure for OA. However, in recent years, a number of potential therapeutic advances have been made, in part due to improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiology. This review provides the current evidence for symptomatic management of OA including nonpharmacological, pharmacological and surgical approaches. The current state of evidence for disease-modifying therapy in OA is also reviewed. PMID:22870434

  6. Noncardiac chest pain: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Schey, Ron; Villarreal, Autumn; Fass, Ronnie

    2007-04-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is very common, affecting up to 25% of the adult population in the United States. Treatment for NCCP has markedly evolved in the past decade and is presently focused on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and visceral hypersensitivity. Aggressive treatment with proton pump inhibitors has become the standard of care for GERD-related NCCP. Pain modulators such as tricyclics, trazodone, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are considered the mainstay of therapy for non-GERD-related NCCP Other therapeutic modalities such as botulinum toxin injections and hypnotherapy have demonstrated promise in small clinical trials.

  7. Tropical and travel-associated norovirus: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Sarah-Blythe; Saito, Mayuko; Mirelman, Andrew J.; Bern, Caryn; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review We highlight recent advances relevant to understanding norovirus infections in the tropics, both in populations living in developing settings and travelers to these regions. Recent findings Because of the decrease in diarrheal disease associated with the global rollout of vaccines against rotavirus, norovirus is emerging as the predominant cause of diarrhea morbidity among children in the tropics, and evidence suggests that it contributes to adult disease in endemic populations and travelers. In addition to identifying potential target populations for preventive measures, we provide an update on norovirus vaccine development and concepts related to their implementation in low-income and middle-income countries. Summary These current concepts related to norovirus-attributable disease burden, clinical significance, and economic impact can potentially be applied to tailoring efforts to prevent and mitigate the effects of this important enteropathogen. PMID:26237546

  8. Current Concepts in the Management of Meconium Aspiration Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chettri, Subhash; Bhat, B Vishnu; Adhisivam, B

    2016-10-01

    In developing countries, meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among neonates. The concepts of pathophysiology and management of meconium stained amniotic fluid (MSAF) and meconium aspiration syndrome have undergone tremendous change in recent years. Routine intranatal and postnatal endotracheal suctioning of meconium in vigorous infants is no longer recommended. Recent studies have challenged its role even in non-vigorous infants. Supportive therapy like oxygen supplementation, mechanical ventilation and intravenous fluids are the cornerstone in the management of meconium aspiration syndrome. Availability of surfactant, inhaled nitric oxide, high frequency ventilators and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has made it possible to salvage more infants with meconium aspiration syndrome. In this review the authors have discussed the current concepts in the pathophysiology and management of MAS. Drugs in trials and future therapeutic targets are also discussed briefly.

  9. Safe direct current stimulator 2: concept and design.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Gene Y; Della Santina, Charles C

    2013-01-01

    Essentially all neuroprostheses use alternating biphasic current pulses to stimulate neural tissue. While this method can effectively excite neurons, it is not very effective for inhibiting them. In contrast, direct current (DC) can excite, inhibit, and modulate sensitivity of neurons. However, DC stimulation is biologically unsafe because it violates safe charge injection criteria. We have previously described the concept of a safe direct current stimulator (SDCS) that overcomes this constraint. The SDCS drives DC ionic current into the tissue by switching fluid valves in phase with biphasic current pulses delivered to the metal electrodes within the device. The original prototype of this device, SDCS1, could both suppress and excite the vestibular nerve with DC stimulation delivered by the device. In the process of building the SDCS1 we identified several problems that must be addressed to further develop this technology. Consequently, we designed the SDCS2, which eliminates periodic interruptions in stimulation current flow observed in the original SDCS1 design and is small enough for head-mounted use in chronic animal studies.

  10. Applications of Tissue Engineering in Joint Arthroplasty: Current Concepts Update.

    PubMed

    Zeineddine, Hussein A; Frush, Todd J; Saleh, Zeina M; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2017-07-01

    Research in tissue engineering has undoubtedly achieved significant milestones in recent years. Although it is being applied in several disciplines, tissue engineering's application is particularly advanced in orthopedic surgery and in degenerative joint diseases. The literature is full of remarkable findings and trials using tissue engineering in articular cartilage disease. With the vast and expanding knowledge, and with the variety of techniques available at hand, the authors aimed to review the current concepts and advances in the use of cell sources in articular cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Current concepts of polytrauma management: from ATLS to "damage control"].

    PubMed

    Stahel, P F; Heyde, C E; Wyrwich, W; Ertel, W

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, the implementation of standardized protocols for polytrauma management has led to a significant improvement in trauma care as well as to a decrease in post-traumatic morbidity and mortality. As such, the "Advanced Trauma Life Support" (ATLS) protocol of the American College of Surgeons for the acute management of severely injured patients has been established as a gold standard in most European countries since the 1990s. Continuative concepts to the ATLS program include the "Definitive Surgical Trauma Care" (DSTC) algorithm and the concept of "damage control" surgery for polytraumatized patients with immediate life-threatening injuries. These phase-oriented therapeutic strategies appraise the injured patient of the whole extent of the sustained injuries and are in sharp contrast to previous modalities of "early total care" which advocate immediate definitive surgical intervention. The approach of "damage control" surgery takes into account the influence of systemic post-traumatic inflammatory and metabolic reactions of the organism and is aimed at reducing both the primary and the secondary, delayed, mortality in severely injured patients. The present paper provides an overview of the current state of management algorithms for polytrauma patients, with a focus on the standard concepts of ATLS and "damage control".

  12. Current treatment of severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, S; Bel, E H

    2012-05-01

    Severe asthma is considered a heterogeneous disease in which a variety of clinical, physiological and inflammatory markers determine disease severity. Pivotal studies in the last 5 years have led to substantial progress in many areas, ranging from a more accurate definition of truly severe, refractory asthma, to classification of the disease into distinct clinical phenotypes, and introduction of new therapies. This review focuses on three common clinical phenotypes of severe asthma in adults (early onset severe allergic asthma, late onset non-atopic eosinophilic asthma, late onset non-eosinophilic asthma with obesity), and provides an overview of recent developments regarding treatment options that are best suited for each of these phenotypes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. [The Concept and Treatment of Kleptomania].

    PubMed

    Takemura, Michio

    2016-10-01

    Research on kleptomania has lagged behind that of other mental disorders, and very few clinicians specialize in treating such patients. Futhermore, the descriptive outline of kleptomania in the DSM-5 is vague. In 2008, we started a registration system for patients suffering from habitual theft, which has recorded 1430 cases since its inauguration. In this report, we explain the concept of kleptomania and describe our clinical experience in the treatment of patients suffering from this mental disorder. The most frequent complication of kleptomania was found to be eating disorder (especially bulimia). Although many factors contribute to the close relationship between these two mental disorders, the theory of "saving money on food expenses" as the motive for thefts committed by eating disorder patients, oversimplifies a complicated matter, and is inadequate as an explanation of the mechanism of this relationship. Medical treatment for kleptomania presently comprises counseling (individual psychotherapy), cognitive behavioral therapy, family therapy, group psychotherapy, psychodrama, and self-help groups, among others. In our addiction treatment approach, we have developed and implemented a program wherein recovered (recovering) patients share their personal experiences with newcomers and beginners, as well as their family members. We strongly encourage patients with kleptomania to participate in self-help groups.

  14. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies. PMID:23403618

  15. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies.

  16. Chronic constipation: Current treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Louis Wing Cheong

    2011-01-01

    Chronic constipation is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder that affects patients of all ages. In 2007, a consensus group of 10 Canadian gastroenterologists developed a set of recommendations pertaining to the management of chronic constipation and constipation-dominant irritable bowel syndrome. Since then, tegaserod has been withdrawn from the Canadian market. A new, highly selective serotonin receptor subtype 4 agonist, prucalopride, has been examined in several large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrating its efficacy and safety in the management of patients with chronic constipation. Additional studies evaluating the use of stimulant laxatives, polyethylene glycol and probiotics in the management of chronic constipation have also been published. The present review summarizes the previous recommendations and new evidence supporting different treatment modalities – namely, diet and lifestyle, bulking agents, stool softeners, osmotic and stimulant laxatives, prucalopride and probiotics in the management of chronic constipation. A brief summary of lubiprostone and linaclotide is also presented. The quality of evidence is presented by adopting the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Finally, a management pyramid for patients with chronic constipation is proposed based on the quality of evidence, impact of each modality on constipation and on general health, and their availabilities in Canada. PMID:22114754

  17. Current concepts in the management of periocular infantile (capillary) hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Ni, Nina; Guo, Suqin; Langer, Paul

    2011-09-01

    To review and evaluate the medical literature on new treatments for periocular infantile (capillary) hemangioma. Recent studies have shown a promising new therapy for infantile hemangioma using nonselective β-blockers, including oral propranolol and topical timolol. Conventional treatments for infantile hemangioma include the use of corticosteroids, laser, surgery, and immunomodulator therapy. Recently, systemic and topical β-blockers have been used to successfully treat infantile hemangioma. The drugs' mechanism of action remains uncertain, but plausible theories include vasoconstriction, modulation of pro-survival signal transduction pathways, and endothelial cell apoptosis. Whereas no life-threatening adverse events from β-blocker treatment have been described, there have been reports of bradycardia, hypotension, bronchospasm, hypoglycemia, and electrolyte disturbances resulting from systemic use of propranolol to treat infantile hemangioma. Sleep and gastrointestinal disturbances have also been frequently reported. Topical timolol application for localized, superficial tumors may confer similar efficacy as oral propranolol while reducing systemic effects. Despite the recent explosion of interest surrounding this novel treatment, current treatment and protocol-monitoring recommendations are based largely on the experience of individual centers. Several randomized controlled studies are currently underway, the results of which will guide future standard-of-care treatment for infantile hemangioma.

  18. Long Term Treatment Concepts and Proactive Therapy for Atopic Eczema

    PubMed Central

    Ehmann, Laura Maximiliane

    2012-01-01

    Atopic eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is a frequent, highly pruritic, chronic skin disease, which is typically running in flares. The traditional treatment mainly consists of the reactive application of topical anti-inflammatory agents such as topical corticosteroids and topical calcineurin inhibitors. The short term benefit of this approach is well known, but long term remission between flares is difficult to achieve. Therefore, innovative long-term treatment strategies targeting flare prevention and skin barrier stabilization are needed. We and others have shown that normal looking, non-lesional skin of atopic dermatitis patients is immunobiologially not normal but characterized by an invisible inflammation and barrier defect. This has led to the novel concept of proactive therapy, which is defined as long-term, low-dose intermittent application of anti-inflammatory therapy to the previously affected skin, together with an ongoing emollient treatment of unaffected skin. This review article describes the most important long-term treatment options for atopic dermatitis, which includes emollient therapy, the novel concept of proactive treatment, the different ultraviolet light modalities and a selection of systemic immunosuppressive drugs and biologics. Current trial data, licensed indications, off-label use and relevant side effects of the different treatment modalities are summarized. PMID:22879707

  19. Anthelmintic treatment strategies: current status and future.

    PubMed

    Williams, J C

    1997-11-01

    Despite the array of anthelmintics and endectocides and delivery systems available for use in the prevention and control of nematode parasites of ruminants, the number of highly effective control programs that have been developed and even the number of such programs that have been successfully implemented in commercial animal production, there have been no recent innovations or discoveries in regard to strategies, new anthelmintics, or systems for controlling nematode parasites through anthelmintic use. In the traditional sense of chemotherapy-chemoprophylaxis, we have probably achieved the maximum effect of what is possible from excellent anthelmintics developed by the pharmaceutical industry over the last 35 years, i.e. from thiabendazole through levamisole and morantel tartrate, to more advanced benzimidazoles and to the avermectins and milbemycins. At the core of all anthelmintic treatment-related problems is the lingering conception among a large body of animal producers that anthelmintic treatment is the only effort needed to control parasitism and its effects on host animals. This concept has given rise to the long-standing difficulty of drug resistance in sheep nematodes and the not remote possibility of its development in nematodes of cattle. Along with this are serious concerns over environmental toxicity, tissue residues and enormous financial investment to develop new and novel anthelmintic compounds. Progress is being made in current and intensive searches for development and testing of control approaches alternative to anthelmintics, e.g. helminth vaccines, biological control agents such as fungi, selection of resistant sires, alternative chemicals and nematode growth regulators. A timetable for when alternative controls can be developed fully and put into practical use cannot be predicted. It is universally acknowledged among parasitologists that existing anthelmintics must be preserved and utilized judiciously to ensure continued effectiveness. A

  20. Single dose treatment of malaria - current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mischlinger, Johannes; Agnandji, Selidji T; Ramharter, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Despite increased international efforts for control and ultimate elimination, malaria remains a major health problem. Currently, artemisinin-based combination therapies are the treatment of choice for uncomplicated malaria exhibiting high efficacy in clinical trial settings in sub-Saharan Africa. However, their administration over a three-day period is associated with important problems of treatment adherence resulting in markedly reduced effectiveness of currently recommended antimalarials under real world settings. Antimalarial drug candidates and antimalarial drug combinations currently under advanced clinical development for the indication as single dose antimalarial therapy. Expert commentary: Several new drug candidates and combinations are currently undergoing pivotal proof-of-concept studies or clinical development programmes. The development of a single dose combination therapy would constitute a breakthrough in the control of malaria. Such an innovative treatment approach would simultaneously close the effectiveness gap of current three-day therapies and revolutionize population based interventions in the context of malaria elimination campaigns.

  1. Current Concepts in Orthopedic Management of Multiple Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kucukdurmaz, Fatih; Alijanipour, Pouya

    2015-01-01

    Multiple trauma patients frequently present challenging clinical scenarios with musculoskeletal injuries being the most common indications for surgical procedures in these patients. Despite our substantial knowledge, a universally approved objective definition for “multiple trauma” is yet to be delineated. Several controversial aspects of economics, pathophysiology, animal models, diagnosis, management and outcome of patients with multiple trauma have recently been explored and although some progress has been made, it seems that the available evidence is still inconclusive in some occasions. This manuscript revisits several current concepts of multiple trauma that have been the focus of recent investigation. We aim to provide the reader with an updated perspective based on the most recently published literature in the field of multiple trauma. PMID:26312111

  2. [Understanding a new conception of addiction in current clinical practices].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Toshihiko

    2012-02-01

    This paper described the historical process that the conception of "addiction" and "dependence" have been formed and changed. Before, the "addiction" was a prejudiced word used when people contempt an individual with compulsive drinking or taking psychoactive drugs, and this word implied moralistic and ethical faults of the individual. After that, this word describing an individual without control of drinking was taken place by the "dependence." This is the neutral and medical conception, defined by presence of tolerance and withdrawal symptoms, although it was based on the "alcoholism." which originated in the citizen movement in 1930s in U.S. Recently some professionals have preferred to use the "addiction" when describing an individual losing control of deviated, impulsive, and repetitive behavior including pathological gambling and compulsive buying. These behaviors have been discriminated form substance dependence, while clinically applied to analogical treatment to substance dependence. However, the DSM-5 draft which the American Psychiatric Association has published as a draft of new diagnostic criteria for mental disorders has classified both of substance dependence and addictive behavior into the same category, and has removed the word "dependence" in the description. In this paper, we looked back on historical conflicts between the two words of "dependence" and "addiction," and discussed the clinical meanings and problems of these words.

  3. Current Concepts in the Management of the Rheumatoid Hand

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C; Pushman, Allison G

    2011-01-01

    Hand surgeons are an integral part of the management team for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. There is now a greater understanding of the national utilization of rheumatoid hand surgery, which highlights the differences between hand surgeons and rheumatologists regarding the treatment of the rheumatoid hand. Advances in medical treatments have also decreased the prevalence of hand deformities caused by this disease. Hand surgeons today have less exposure to treating rheumatoid hand, but despite more effective medical options, surgery may still offer patients hope for improvement of hand function and appearance. This article will summarize the current state of rheumatoid hand surgery and discuss the surgical treatment strategies for optimizing outcomes for patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:21463736

  4. Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis: A review of current concepts in management

    PubMed Central

    Pihos, Andria M.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) is an ocular surface infection caused by adenovirus. To date, there are no approved topical antiadenoviral therapeutics to treat EKC. Recent research reveals that treatment with topical corticosteroids for symptomatic relief of EKC enhances adenovirus replication and delays cell shedding from the ocular surface which delays adenovirus elimination. The current management of EKC largely revolves around accurate diagnosis of the condition and implementation of disinfection protocol to prevent its spread. Development of an effective antiviral treatment that addresses inflammation and does not prolong viral shedding would provide significant benefit. The literature reports on a variety of therapeutics that could potentially satisfy this deficiency. Topical ganciclovir and povidone-iodine combination drops have shown the most recent potential, but both therapeutics need to be investigated in larger scale studies. Until an antiadenoviral option is produced, the treatment of EKC should maintain a judicious case by case approach aiming to contain its dissemination and prevent visual consequences.

  5. Current Concepts in the Neurophysiologic Basis of Sleep; a Review

    PubMed Central

    Ezenwanne, EB

    2011-01-01

    Background: Sleep is a very vital physiological mechanism, which involves complex interactions in the nervous system. These interactions are not well understood and have been a subject of controversy in contemporary medical practice. Objectives: To review of the neurophysiological factors in the subject of sleep, and recent research findings that forms the basis for the current knowledge on sleep. Methods: Information sources consulted included, published works of past researchers, current articles on sleep in conference papers, recent editions of textbooks on neuroscience, articles in seminar papers, reports extracted from newspaper and magazine articles on sleep, reports accessed from the Internet using Google Search Engines and lecture notes. Results: It was noted that emphasis has now shifted from the concept that sleep was predominantly the product of activities in the neural systems in phylogenetically old reticular core of the brain through withdrawal of sensory input, to emphasis on the role of neurotransmitter systems, especially - Ach, serotonin and GABA. This review also noted that, among others, emphasis is further shifting to the PGO waves which is fast gaining prominence as the mechanism involved in the production of REM sleep and dreams in particular. Conclusion: It became obvious from this review, that full knowledge of the neurophysiological processes involved in sleep production appear generally to still be more of speculative, and are yet far from full understanding. PMID:23209972

  6. Bovine digital dermatitis: Current concepts from laboratory to farm.

    PubMed

    Evans, N J; Murray, R D; Carter, S D

    2016-05-01

    Bovine digital dermatitis (DD) is a severe infectious disease causing lameness in dairy cattle worldwide and is an important ruminant welfare problem that has considerable economic issues. Bovine DD is endemic in many regions worldwide and it is important to understand this major disease so that effective control strategies can be identified. There is substantial evidence that specific treponeme phylotypes play an important causative role in bovine DD. This review considers current research, including DD Treponema spp. investigations, associated DD pathobiology, and current and potential treatment and control options. Epidemiological data, alongside new microbiological data, help delineate important transmission routes and reservoirs of infection that allow effective interventions to be identified. Better on-farm housing hygiene, pasture access, routine footbathing and claw trimming with disinfected equipment need to be implemented to significantly reduce the incidence of DD. There is a paucity of peer reviewed research into both commonly used and novel treatments. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility studies of DD treponemes and effective treatment of human treponematoses clearly indicate that antibiotics frequently selected for DD treatments are not the most efficacious. Whilst there are understandable concerns over milk withdrawal times in dairy cattle, more needs to be done to identify, license and implement more appropriate antibiotic treatments, since continued overuse of less efficacious antibiotics, applied incorrectly, will lead to increased disease recurrence and transmission. More research is needed into methods of preventing DD that circumvent the use of antibiotics, including vaccination and transmission blocking studies, to reduce or hopefully eradicate DD in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Current concepts in transarterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Peter

    2011-12-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) has the potential to improve survival in patients with intermediate stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Careful selection of patients is mandatory to gain survival benefit and safe quality of life. Basic principles of TACE in HCC include selective treatment via intrahepatic and extrahepatic arteries, proper management of side effects and continuation of treatment guided by imaging. After conventional TACE, based on delivery of cytotoxic drugs emulsified in iodized oil and embolization of various types of particles, has been used for more than 20 years, the new concept of drug-eluting microspheres has been introduced. This technology effectively combines enhanced local drug delivery and ischemic embolization effects. Clinical studies showed intensified local necroses and reduced systemic toxic side effects compared to conventional TACE. Embolization of HCC with sub-100 μm particles penetrating deeply into the tumor vascular bed is another promising new option. Very effective devascularization of HCC nodules has been shown after 40 μm bland embolizations, however, potential risks like passage of particles into hepatic veins and systemic circulation have to be considered. Today the indication for TACE in intermediate stage HCC patients is widely accepted; however, there is no clear methodical standard so far. Further studies are necessary to define how to adapt various available methods to individual HCC and patients characteristics.

  8. Bronchiectasis in Children: Current Concepts in Immunology and Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Pizzutto, Susan J.; Hare, Kim M.; Upham, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is a complex chronic respiratory condition traditionally characterized by chronic infection, airway inflammation, and progressive decline in lung function. Early diagnosis and intensive treatment protocols can stabilize or even improve the clinical prognosis of children with bronchiectasis. However, understanding the host immunologic mechanisms that contribute to recurrent infection and prolonged inflammation has been identified as an important area of research that would contribute substantially to effective prevention strategies for children at risk of bronchiectasis. This review will focus on the current understanding of the role of the host immune response and important pathogens in the pathogenesis of bronchiectasis (not associated with cystic fibrosis) in children. PMID:28611970

  9. Current concepts in management of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common hip condition that can be disabling. In this review, we provide an orientation on current trends in the clinical management of SCFE including conventional procedures and specialised surgical developments. Different methods of fixation of the epiphysis, risks of complications, and the rationale of addressing deformity, primarily or secondarily, are presented. Although improved understanding of the anatomy, vascularity and implications of residual deformity have changed management strategies, the best modality of treatment that would restore complete vascularity to the femoral head and prevent any residual deformity, impingement and early osteoarthritis remains elusive.

  10. Current Treatment Options in Vestibular Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Mark; Strupp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1% of the general population in western industrialized countries suffers from vestibular migraine. However, it remains widely unknown and often under diagnosed despite the recently published diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine. Treatment trials that specialize on vestibular migraine are scarce and systematic randomized controlled clinical trials are now only emerging. This review summarizes the knowledge on the currently available treatment options that were tested specifically for vestibular migraine and gives an evidence-based, informed treatment recommendation with all its limitations. To date only two randomized controlled treatment trials provide limited evidence for the use of rizatriptan and zolmitriptan for the treatment of vestibular migraine attacks because of methodological shortcomings. There is an ongoing multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial testing metoprolol 95 mg vs. placebo (PROVEMIG-trial). Therefore, the therapeutic recommendations for the prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine are currently widely based on the guidelines of migraine with and without aura as well as expert opinion. PMID:25538676

  11. Arthritis of the thumb and digits: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the hand continues to be a problem in an aging population and affects the proximal and distal interphalangeal, metacarpophalangeal, and carpometacarpal joints in the hands. Heberden nodes develop in the distal interphalangeal joints and typically present as a deformed and enlarged joint and can cause pain. Surgery rarely is necessary because functional difficulties are uncommon; however, there may be problems if the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints are involved because cartilage destruction generates pain and causes weakness and motion loss. Implant arthroplasty typically can improve pain but does not reliably improve range of motion, and complication and revision rates are substantial. Arthrodesis continues as a treatment for digital osteoarthritis, but the surgeon must balance the risks of complications with the benefits of improved patient outcomes. The opposable thumb, which is critical for hand dexterity and strength, can be severely disabled by basal joint arthritis. The complex architecture of the basal joint continues to be defined by its relationship to the surrounding bony and ligamentous anatomy and its effect on the trapeziometacarpal joint. Nonsurgical treatment may be beneficial, but surgical options, including arthroscopy, osteotomy, and arthroplasty, should be considered if nonsurgical management fails. Prosthetic arthroplasty has a historically poor record; therefore, trapeziectomy remains the hallmark of current reconstructive techniques. Ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition arthroplasty are the most commonly performed surgical procedures, but hematoma distraction arthroplasty and various methods of suspensionplasty also are currently used.

  12. [Anaplastic glioma. Neuropathology, molecular diagnostics and current study concepts].

    PubMed

    Wick, W; Weller, M

    2010-08-01

    According to the current WHO classification anaplastic gliomas comprise pure astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas and mixed tumors. This review summarizes findings, discusses problems and defines new questions from the phase III trials on anaplastic gliomas. The molecular subgroup analyses of the NOA-04 trial identified three molecular parameters, which predict longer progression-free and overall survival independent from the mode of therapy, radiotherapy or alkylating chemotherapy-. These are 1p/19q codeletion, methylation of the promoter of the O(6)-methylguanyl methyltransferase (MGMT) gene and hot-spot mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene. The prognostic relevance of these markers is not lower than that of histopathological subclassification but determination is potentially more robust. Therefore, marker profiles should be included into the next WHO brain tumor classification. The current standard of care for first-line treatment in anaplastic gliomas is radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The next steps, e.g. within the international CATNON trial, are to define the role and optimal sequencing of combined modality treatment focusing on radiotherapy and temozolomide. Inclusion in this trial is already based on the WHO grade and the 1p/19q status and not on the histopathological subtype. Furthermore, anaplastic gliomas are an important group of brain tumors for developing future molecular targeted therapies and should therefore be in the main focus of academic and industrial drug development, which aims at improved efficacy and avoiding long-term side-effects.

  13. Current orthopaedic treatment of ballistic injuries.

    PubMed

    Volgas, David A; Stannard, James P; Alonso, Jorge E

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine current orthopaedic treatment of gunshot wounds. Surgeons are increasingly confronted by gunshot wounds that occur in both military and civilian settings. Much of the published work has been from military settings. In the United States, low-energy gunshot wounds are very common, and their incidence is increasing elsewhere in the world. Current treatment and its rationale is reviewed and a systematic approach to the assessment and treatment of these injuries is offered, taking into account the entirety of the injury, rather than simply the velocity of the missile.

  14. Current concepts on osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Angeler, Joaquin; Gianakos, Arianna L; Villa, Jordan C; Ni, Amelia; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that 20000 to 30000 new patients are diagnosed with osteonecrosis annually accounting for approximately 10% of the 250000 total hip arthroplasties done annually in the United States. The lack of level 1 evidence in the literature makes it difficult to identify optimal treatment protocols to manage patients with pre-collapse avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and early intervention prior to collapse is critical to successful outcomes in joint preserving procedures. There have been a variety of traumatic and atraumatic factors that have been identified as risk factors for osteonecrosis, but the etiology and pathogenesis still remains unclear. Current osteonecrosis diagnosis is dependent upon plain anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral radiographs of the hip, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Generally, the first radiographic changes seen by radiograph will be cystic and sclerotic changes in the femoral head. Although the diagnosis may be made by radiograph, plain radiographs are generally insufficient for early diagnosis, therefore MRI is considered the most accurate benchmark. Treatment options include pharmacologic agents such as bisphosphonates and statins, biophysical treatments, as well as joint-preserving and joint-replacing surgeries. the surgical treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head can be divided into two major branches: femoral head sparing procedures (FHSP) and femoral head replacement procedures (FHRP). In general, FHSP are indicated at pre-collapse stages with minimal symptoms whereas FHRP are preferred at post-collapse symptomatic stages. It is difficult to know whether any treatment modality changes the natural history of core decompression since the true natural history of core decompression has not been delineated. PMID:26396935

  15. Current concepts on osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Moya-Angeler, Joaquin; Gianakos, Arianna L; Villa, Jordan C; Ni, Amelia; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-09-18

    It is estimated that 20000 to 30000 new patients are diagnosed with osteonecrosis annually accounting for approximately 10% of the 250000 total hip arthroplasties done annually in the United States. The lack of level 1 evidence in the literature makes it difficult to identify optimal treatment protocols to manage patients with pre-collapse avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and early intervention prior to collapse is critical to successful outcomes in joint preserving procedures. There have been a variety of traumatic and atraumatic factors that have been identified as risk factors for osteonecrosis, but the etiology and pathogenesis still remains unclear. Current osteonecrosis diagnosis is dependent upon plain anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral radiographs of the hip, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Generally, the first radiographic changes seen by radiograph will be cystic and sclerotic changes in the femoral head. Although the diagnosis may be made by radiograph, plain radiographs are generally insufficient for early diagnosis, therefore MRI is considered the most accurate benchmark. Treatment options include pharmacologic agents such as bisphosphonates and statins, biophysical treatments, as well as joint-preserving and joint-replacing surgeries. the surgical treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head can be divided into two major branches: femoral head sparing procedures (FHSP) and femoral head replacement procedures (FHRP). In general, FHSP are indicated at pre-collapse stages with minimal symptoms whereas FHRP are preferred at post-collapse symptomatic stages. It is difficult to know whether any treatment modality changes the natural history of core decompression since the true natural history of core decompression has not been delineated.

  16. Current concepts and techniques in complete denture final impression procedures.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Vicki C; Rashedi, Behnoush

    2003-12-01

    In 2001, a survey of U.S. dental schools was conducted to determine which concepts, techniques and materials are currently prevalent in the teaching of final impression procedures for complete dentures in the predoctoral clinical curriculum. The questionnaire was mailed to the chairperson of the prosthodontic/restorative departments of 54 U.S. dental schools. Of these, 44 schools returned the completed survey resulting in a response rate of 82%. Results from this survey show that the majority of schools (71%) teach the selective-pressure technique for final impression making; the majority of the schools (64%) use modeling plastic impression compound for border molding the final impression tray; 39% of the schools do not place vent holes in the final impression tray, 30% of schools place more than one hole and 27% place one hole only; the majority of the schools (98%) are using custom trays for final impressions. Ninety-eight percent of the schools are border molding the custom tray and 70% of schools are using a visible light-cured (VLC) composite resin material to make the trays. Thirty-six percent of the schools are teaching the Boucher impression technique and 34% are teaching the modified Boucher impression technique. Predoctoral clinical complete denture educational programs agree on many aspects of final impression making, however, there is variability in their teachings regarding the impression philosophy and the materials used.

  17. Physiology of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. Current concepts.

    PubMed

    Goes, R; Beart, R W

    1995-09-01

    Increasing experience with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) associated with increasing knowledge about anorectal physiology has lead to a large number of publications. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current understanding of fecal continence as revealed by the evolution of the ileoanal procedure. Review of the literature covering the most important physiologic parameters involved in fecal continence was undertaken. Rectoanal inhibitory reflex is probably absent after IPAA but is preserved when distal anorectal mucosa is spared. Anal resting pressure decreases but is less affected when the internal anal sphincter is less traumatized. Squeeze pressure is not importantly affected, and the importance of reservoir function as a determinant of stool frequency is emphasized. IPAA does not affect the coordination between pouch and anal canal motility in the majority of cases. Normal continence is preserved, even during the night, by preserving a gradient of pressure between the pouch and anal canal. Physiologic concepts are well established, but controversies about the continence mechanism related to IPAA remain. The IPAA procedure has allowed discrimination of details about the function of multiple structures involved in fecal continence.

  18. Current concepts and controversies on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Alok; Tsirikos, Athanasios I

    2013-01-01

    A new era in the surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) opened with the introduction of pedicle screw instrumentation, which provides 3-column vertebral fixation and allows major deformity correction on the coronal, sagittal, and axial planes. A steep learning curve can be expected for spinal surgeons to become familiar with pedicle screw placement and correction techniques. Potential complications including injury to adjacent neural, vascular, and visceral structures can occur due to screw misplacement or pull-out during correction maneuvers. These major complications are better recognized as pedicle screw techniques become more popular and may result in serious morbidity and mortality. Extensive laboratory and clinical training is mandatory before pedicle screw techniques in scoliosis surgery are put to practice. Wider application, especially in developing countries, is limited by the high cost of implants. Refined correction techniques are currently developed and these utilize a lesser number of pedicle anchors which are strategically positioned to allow optimum deformity correction while reducing the neurological risk, surgical time, and blood loss, as well as instrumentation cost. Such techniques can be particularly attractive at a time when cost has major implications on provision of health care as they can make scoliosis treatment available to a wider population of patients. Pedicle screw techniques are currently considered the gold standard for scoliosis correction due to their documented superior biomechanical properties and ability to produce improved clinical outcomes as reflected by health-related quality-of-life questionnaires. Ongoing research promises further advances with the future of AIS treatment incorporating genetic counseling and possibly fusionless techniques. PMID:23798750

  19. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    PubMed Central

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-01-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided. PMID:26587391

  20. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training.

    PubMed

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-10-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided.

  1. Flea control in cats: new concepts and the current armoury.

    PubMed

    Siak, Meng; Burrows, Mandy

    2013-01-01

    Flea allergic dermatitis is one of the most common skin diseases of cats presented for veterinary attention. It is therefore important for the practitioner to be able to design an appropriate flea management plan for their patients. There is no 'one size fits all' flea control programme for cats. Successful flea management requires an understanding of flea biology and knowledge of the mode of action of commercial flea products, of which there is a wide range available. Management of owner expectations can often present a challenge. Cat owners generally attribute a persistence of fleas after the administration of routine flea control to be a reflection of product failure. Owners may also be sceptical that fleas are responsible for the clinical signs of overgrooming in their cat and perceive a lack of response to flea adulticide treatment to be evidence of this fact. This article reviews an extensive body of published literature to update some concepts in flea control and discuss how judicious use of traditional and newer flea products can contribute to an integrated flea control strategy for cats.

  2. Human error in hospitals and industrial accidents: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Spencer, F C

    2000-10-01

    Most data concerning errors and accidents are from industrial accidents and airline injuries. General Electric, Alcoa, and Motorola, among others, all have reported complex programs that resulted in a marked reduction in frequency of worker injuries. In the field of medicine, however, with the outstanding exception of anesthesiology, there is a paucity of information, most reports referring to the 1984 Harvard-New York State Study, more than 16 years ago. This scarcity of information indicates the complexity of the problem. It seems very unlikely that simple exhortation or additional regulations will help because the problem lies principally in the multiple human-machine interfaces that constitute modern medical care. The absence of success stories also indicates that the best methods have to be learned by experience. A liaison with industry should be helpful, although the varieties of human illness are far different from a standardized manufacturing process. Concurrent with the studies of industrial and nuclear accidents, cognitive psychologists have intensively studied how the brain stores and retrieves information. Several concepts have emerged. First, errors are not character defects to be treated by the classic approach of discipline and education, but are byproducts of normal thinking that occur frequently. Second, major accidents are rarely causedby a single error; instead, they are often a combination of chronic system errors, termed latent errors. Identifying and correcting these latent errors should be the principal focus for corrective planning rather than searching for an individual culprit. This nonpunitive concept of errors is a key basis for an effective reporting system, brilliantly demonstrated in aviation with the ASRS system developed more than 25 years ago. The ASRS currently receives more than 30,000 reports annually and is credited with the remarkable increase in safety of airplane travel. Adverse drug events constitute about 25% of hospital

  3. Chapter 8: Current techniques and concepts in peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Siemionow, Maria; Brzezicki, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    Despite the progress in understanding the pathophysiology of peripheral nervous system injury and regeneration, as well as advancements in microsurgical techniques, peripheral nerve injuries are still a major challenge for reconstructive surgeons. Thorough knowledge of anatomy, pathophysiology, and surgical reconstruction is a prerequisite of proper peripheral nerve injury management. This chapter reviews the currently available surgical treatment options for different types of nerve injuries in clinical conditions. In overview of direct nerve repair, various end-to-end coaptation techniques and the role of end-to-side repair for proximal nerve injuries is described. When primary repair cannot be performed without undue tension, nerve grafting or tubulization techniques are required. Current gold standard for bridging nerve gaps is nerve autografting. However, disadvantages of this approach, such as donor site morbidity and limited length of available graft material encouraged the search for alternative means of nerve gap reconstruction. Nerve allografting was introduced for repair of extensive nerve injuries. Tubulization techniques with natural or artificial conduits are applicable as an alternative for bridging short nerve defects without the morbidities associated with harvesting of autologous nerve grafts. Achieving better outcomes depends both on the advancements in microsurgical techniques and introduction of molecular biology discoveries into clinical practice. The field of peripheral nerve research is dynamically developing and concentrates on more sophisticated approaches tested at the basic science level. Future directions in peripheral nerve reconstruction including, tolerance induction and minimal immunosuppression for nerve allografting, cell based supportive therapies and bioengineering of nerve conduits are also reviewed in this chapter.

  4. Current concepts of oxygen management in retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Owen, Leah A; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a potentially blinding disorder in premature infants. The underlying pathophysiology is incompletely understood, limiting the prevention and treatment of this devastating condition. Current therapies are directed toward management of aberrant neovascularization thought to result from retinal ischemia in the developing preterm retina. The molecular mediators important for development of retinal ischemia and subsequent neovascular pathology are not fully understood. However, oxygen has been shown to be a key mediator of disease and the oxygen environment for preterm infants has been extensively studied. Despite this, the optimal oxygen environment for preterm infants remains unclear and recent works seeking to clarify this relationship demonstrate somewhat disparate findings. These data further substantiate that ROP is a complex disease with multifactorial etiology including genetic and environmental factors. Therefore, while environmental factors such as oxygen are important to our understanding of the disease process and care of preterm infants, identification of the molecular mediators downstream of oxygen which are necessary for development of ROP pathology will be critical to improve prevention, diagnosis and treatment strategies.

  5. Precision medicine in pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma: current and future concepts.

    PubMed

    Björklund, P; Pacak, K; Crona, J

    2016-12-01

    Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (PPGL) are rare diseases but are also amongst the most characterized tumour types. Hence, patients with PPGL have greatly benefited from precision medicine for more than two decades. According to current molecular biology and genetics-based taxonomy, PPGL can be divided into three different clusters characterized by: Krebs cycle reprogramming with oncometabolite accumulation or depletion (group 1a); activation of the (pseudo)hypoxia signalling pathway with increased tumour cell proliferation, invasiveness and migration (group 1b); and aberrant kinase signalling causing a pro-mitogenic and anti-apoptotic state (group 2). Categorization into these clusters is highly dependent on mutation subtypes. At least 12 different syndromes with distinct genetic causes, phenotypes and outcomes have been described. Genetic screening tests have a documented benefit, as different PPGL syndromes require specific approaches for optimal diagnosis and localization of various syndrome-related tumours. Genotype-tailored treatment options, follow-up and preventive care are being investigated. Future new developments in precision medicine for PPGL will mainly focus on further identification of driver mechanisms behind both disease initiation and malignant progression. Identification of novel druggable targets and prospective validation of treatment options are eagerly awaited. To achieve these goals, we predict that collaborative large-scale studies will be needed: Pheochromocytoma may provide an example for developing precision medicine in orphan diseases that could ultimately aid in similar efforts for other rare conditions. © 2016 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  6. Current concepts in the management of prosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Aboltins, C; Daffy, J; Choong, P; Stanley, P

    2014-09-01

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a serious complication of arthroplasty that is associated with significant mortality, morbidity and costs. PJI is difficult to cure because causative bacteria form and persist in biofilm adherent to the prosthesis surface. PJI can be classified into early, delayed or late according to the time of onset after insertion of the prosthesis, and this classification can help determine pathogenesis and appropriate management. Traditional treatment has been with prolonged intravenous antibiotics and prosthesis exchange, which has been successful in treating infection but is technically difficult and has high rates of associated morbidity. On the basis of in vitro and animal studies, interest has turned to the use of antimicrobials that are particularly active against biofilm-associated bacteria. Recent clinical evidence shows success in more than 77% of early PJI with surgical debridement, retention of prosthesis and the use of rifampicin-based combinations for staphylococcal PJI. Fluoroquinolones are preferred for Gram-negative PJI. Optimal antimicrobial treatment duration and the management of polymicrobial, enterococcal, fungal and culture-negative infections are still yet to be defined but will become more clear as the results of current research comes to hand. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  7. Current concepts in the biopsy of musculoskeletal tumors.

    PubMed

    Traina, Francesco; Errani, Costantino; Toscano, Angelo; Pungetti, Camilla; Fabbri, Daniele; Mazzotti, Antonio; Donati, Davide; Faldini, Cesare

    2015-01-07

    A musculoskeletal tumor biopsy can involve fine needle aspiration, core needle biopsy, or incisional biopsy. Controversy regarding the diagnostic yield of these biopsy techniques continues. The purpose of this article is to summarize the current concepts in the biopsy of musculoskeletal tumors. We performed a literature review of clinical articles reporting on the biopsy of bone and soft-tissue primary tumors. Clinical articles were excluded on the basis on abstract content if they represented case reports, review or opinion articles, or technique descriptions. Eighteen of the thirty-nine articles that remained were excluded because the results did not indicate the diagnostic accuracy of the various biopsy techniques. Thus, twenty-one articles with diagnostic data on the biopsy of bone and soft-tissue tumors were included in this review. Core needle biopsy appeared to be more accurate than fine needle aspiration, and incisional biopsy appeared to be more accurate than both of these techniques, but the differences did not reach significance. Incisional biopsy was more expensive than the percutaneous biopsy methods. In deep musculoskeletal tumors, incorporation of ultrasonography or computed tomography for guidance is easy and safe and can be useful for increasing the accuracy of the biopsy. Advantages of a percutaneous technique compared with an incisional one are the low risk of contamination and the minimally invasive nature. Certain anatomic locations and histologic types were associated with diagnostic difficulty. Vertebral tumors had the lowest diagnostic accuracy regardless of the biopsy technique. Myxoid, infection, and round cell histologies were associated with the lowest diagnostic accuracy. The current literature has not clarified the optimal biopsy technique for the diagnosis of bone and soft-tissue tumors. However, core needle biopsy is usually preferable to incisional biopsy because of the low risk of contamination and the low cost. In addition, the

  8. Treatment of follicular lymphoma: current status.

    PubMed

    Tilly, Hervé; Zelenetz, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    With the recent proliferation of treatment options for patients with follicular lymphoma (FL), median survival has been shown to have improved, from 84 months between 1983 and 1989 to 93 months between 1993 and 1999. Nevertheless, relapse is common in this patient group, and treatment options that extend the duration of remission without increased toxicity are still required. Rituximab has made a major contribution to the treatment of patients with FL, improving outcomes and making new treatment schedules possible. It is now a standard practice to administer rituximab with first-line combination chemotherapy in patients with FL. In addition, a number of current trials are examining the potential role of rituximab maintenance therapy in improving outcomes in FL. However, at present it is not clear which schedules or combinations are the most effective, and further randomised controlled trials of treatment strategies incorporating rituximab are needed to provide the evidence that will allow clinicians to maximise the potential of this drug. Second-line options for the treatment of FL include allogeneic stem cell transplantation, radioimmunotherapy targeted to CD20 and, in selected patients, autologous stem cell transplantation. New treatment approaches for FL currently being investigated in the second-line setting include the proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib and novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies.

  9. Ranula: Current Concept of Pathophysiologic Basis and Surgical Management Options.

    PubMed

    Kokong, Daniel; Iduh, Augustine; Chukwu, Ikechukwu; Mugu, Joyce; Nuhu, Samuel; Augustine, Sule

    2017-06-01

    There is no consensus opinion on a definitive surgical management option for ranulas to curtail recurrence, largely from the existing gap in knowledge on the pathophysiologic basis. To highlight the current scientific basis of ranula development that informed the preferred surgical approach. Retrospective cohort study. Public Tertiary Academic Health Institution. A 7-year 7-month study of ranulas surgically managed at our tertiary health institution was undertaken-June 1, 2008-December 31, 2015-from case files retrieved utilising the ICD-10 version 10 standard codes. Twelve cases, representing 0.4 and 1.2% of all institutional and ENT operations, respectively, were managed for ranulas with a M:F = 1:1. The ages ranged from 5/12 to 39 years, mean = 18.5 years, and the disease was prevalent in the third decade of life. Main presentation in the under-fives was related to airway and feeding compromise, while in adults, cosmetic facial appearance. Ranulas in adults were plunging (n = 8, 58.3%), left-sided save one with M:F = 2:1. All were unilateral with R:L = 1:2. Treatment included aspiration (n = 2, 16.7%) with 100% recurrence, intra-/extraoral excision of ranula only (n = 4, 33.3%) with recurrence rate of 50% (n = 2, 16.7%), while marsupialisation in children (n = 1, 8.3%) had no recurrence. Similarly, transcervical approach (n = 5, 41.7%) with excision of both the ranula/sublingual salivary gland recorded zero recurrence. Recurrence was the main complication (n = 4, 33.3%). With the current knowledge on the pathophysiologic basis, extirpation of both the sublingual salivary gland and the ranula by a specialist surgeon is key for a successful outcome.

  10. Stereotactic radiosurgery of glomus jugulare tumors: current concepts, recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sager, Omer; Dincoglan, Ferrat; Beyzadeoglu, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), a very highly focused form of therapeutic irradiation, has been widely recognized as a viable treatment option in the management of intracranial pathologies including benign tumors, malign tumors, vascular malformations and functional disorders. The applications of SRS are continuously expanding thanks to the ever-increasing advances and corresponding improvements in neuroimaging, radiation treatment techniques, equipment, treatment planning and delivery systems. In the context of glomus jugulare tumors (GJT), SRS is being more increasingly used both as the upfront management modality or as a complementary or salvage treatment option. As its safety and efficacy is being evident with compiling data from studies with longer follow-up durations, SRS appears to take the lead in the management of most patients with GJT. Herein, we address current concepts, recent advances and future perspectives in SRS of GJT in light of the literature.

  11. Current and emerging treatments for vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Michelle; Ezzedine, Khaled; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Pandya, Amit G; Harris, John E

    2017-07-01

    Clinicians should be aware that vitiligo is not merely a cosmetic disease and that there are safe and effective treatments available for vitiligo. It is important to recognize common and uncommon presentations and those with active disease, as well as their implications for clinical management; these were discussed in the first article in this continuing medical education series. Existing treatments include topical and systemic immunosuppressants, phototherapy, and surgical techniques, which together may serve to halt disease progression, stabilize depigmented lesions, and encourage repigmentation. We discuss how to optimize the currently available treatments and highlight emerging treatments that may improve treatment efficacy in the future. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Current treatment options for Dientamoeba fragilis infections

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Noriyuki; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John T.; Stark, Damien

    2012-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis belongs to the trichomonad group of protozoan parasites and it has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease with world-wide prevalences ranging from 0.5% to 16%. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints. Chronic symptoms are common with up to a third of patients exhibiting persistent diarrhoea. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Treatments reported to be successful for dientamoebiasis include carbarsone, diphetarsone, tetracyclines, paromomycin, erythromycin, hydroxyquinolines and the 5-nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, secnidazole, tinidazole and ornidazole. It is of note that most current treatment data is based only on small number of case reports. No large scale double blind randomised placebo controlled trials testing the efficacy of antimicrobial agents against D. fragilis has been undertaken highlighting the need for further study. In addition there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism making some current treatment options questionable. The aim of this review is to critically discuss all treatment options currently available for dientamoebiasis. PMID:24533282

  13. BIOREMEDIATION USING THE LAND TREATMENT CONCEPT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is designed to be used by those who are involved with the use of land treatment technologies for the remediation of contaminated solid phase materials. In addition to a discussion of the basic processes which drive land treatment applications, the parameters involv...

  14. BIOREMEDIATION USING THE LAND TREATMENT CONCEPT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is designed to be used by those who are involved with the use of land treatment technologies for the remediation of contaminated solid phase materials. In addition to a discussion of the basic processes which drive land treatment applications, the parameters involv...

  15. Current and emerging treatment options for spinal cord ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Pikija, Slaven; Mutzenbach, J Sebastian; Seidl, Martin; Leis, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen; Sellner, Johann

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord infarction (SCI) is a rare but disabling disorder caused by a wide spectrum of conditions. Given the lack of randomized-controlled trials, contemporary treatment concepts are adapted from guidelines for cerebral ischemia, atherosclerotic vascular disease, and acute traumatic spinal cord injury. In addition, patients with SCI are at risk for several potentially life-threatening but preventable systemic and neurologic complications. Notably, there is emerging evidence from preclinical studies for the use of neuroprotection in acute ischemic injury of the spinal cord. In this review, we discuss the current state of the art for the therapy and prevention of SCI and highlight potential emerging treatment concepts awaiting translational adoption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment motivation: An attempt for clarification of an ambiguous concept.

    PubMed

    Drieschner, Klaus H; Lammers, Sylvia M M; van der Staak, Cees P F

    2004-01-01

    Although the concept of treatment motivation is generally regarded as highly relevant, it has since long been surrounded by conceptual confusion, resulting in miscommunication, ambiguous measures, and contradictory conclusions of research. This article provides an analysis of three major sources of confusion in the conceptualization of treatment motivation: (a) negligence of the concepts' intrinsic relationship with behavior, (b) entanglement of the concept with its determining factors and behavioral consequences, and (c) conceptualization in a stage model. Following the conceptual analysis, causes of the problems and implications for clinical praxis and research are considered. Finally, a more adequate conceptualization of treatment motivation is proposed and suggestions for future research are made.

  17. Current and future treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schlachterman, Alexander; Craft, Willie W; Hilgenfeldt, Eric; Mitra, Avir; Cabrera, Roniel

    2015-07-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents a unique challenge for physicians and patients. There is no definitively curative treatment. Rather, many treatment and management modalities exist with differing advantages and disadvantages. Both current guidelines and individual patient concerns must be taken into account in order to properly manage HCC. In addition, quality of life issues are particularly complex in patients with HCC and these concerns must also be factored into treatment strategies. Thus, considering all the options and their various pros and cons can quickly become complex for both clinicians and patients. In this review, we systematically discuss the current treatment modalities available for HCC, detailing relevant clinical data, risks and rewards and overall outcomes for each approach. Surgical options discussed include resection, transplantation and ablation. We also discuss the radiation modalities: conformal radiotherapy, yttrium 90 microspheres and proton and heavy ion radiotherapy. The biologic agent Sorafenib is discussed as a promising new approach, and recent clinical trials are reviewed. We then detail currently described molecular pathways implicated in the initiation and progression of HCC, and we explore the potential of each pathway as an avenue for drug exploitation. We hope this comprehensive and forward-looking review enables both clinicians and patients to understand various options and thereby make more informed decisions regarding this disease.

  18. Current and future treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schlachterman, Alexander; Craft Jr, Willie W; Hilgenfeldt, Eric; Mitra, Avir; Cabrera, Roniel

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents a unique challenge for physicians and patients. There is no definitively curative treatment. Rather, many treatment and management modalities exist with differing advantages and disadvantages. Both current guidelines and individual patient concerns must be taken into account in order to properly manage HCC. In addition, quality of life issues are particularly complex in patients with HCC and these concerns must also be factored into treatment strategies. Thus, considering all the options and their various pros and cons can quickly become complex for both clinicians and patients. In this review, we systematically discuss the current treatment modalities available for HCC, detailing relevant clinical data, risks and rewards and overall outcomes for each approach. Surgical options discussed include resection, transplantation and ablation. We also discuss the radiation modalities: conformal radiotherapy, yttrium 90 microspheres and proton and heavy ion radiotherapy. The biologic agent Sorafenib is discussed as a promising new approach, and recent clinical trials are reviewed. We then detail currently described molecular pathways implicated in the initiation and progression of HCC, and we explore the potential of each pathway as an avenue for drug exploitation. We hope this comprehensive and forward-looking review enables both clinicians and patients to understand various options and thereby make more informed decisions regarding this disease. PMID:26229392

  19. [Current treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Lozano, María L; Vicente, Vicente

    2014-05-06

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia, also termed immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by premature platelet destruction and impaired platelet production. Traditional treatment of ITP has predominantly consisted of immune suppression and/or modulation. However, the understanding of the immune mediated impairment of platelet production has led to the development of new treatments that target the thrombopoietin receptor, promoting formation of megakaryocytes and increasing platelet counts. Best practice for the management of ITP has not yet been established because data from comparative studies are lacking. While some disagreement might still remain among experts concerning therapy (when, who, and how should be treated), in recent years different evidence-based practice guidelines have been published to assist healthcare professionals in the diagnosis and treatment of ITP. This review describes the current treatment landscape of ITP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Kenneth C; Guha, Somes Chandra

    2014-01-01

    A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care.[1] It is a snapshot of a patient's total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors.[2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), as used at our institution (CAMC), and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) may vary widely from country to country and payment system.[3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons.[1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise. PMID:25593414

  1. Current concepts in the management of inguinal hernia and hydrocele in pediatric patients in laparoscopic era.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Ciro; Escolino, Maria; Turrà, Francesco; Roberti, Agnese; Cerulo, Mariapina; Farina, Alessandra; Caiazzo, Simona; Cortese, Giuseppe; Servillo, Giuseppe; Settimi, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    The surgical repair of inguinal hernia and hydrocele is one of the most common operations performed in pediatric surgery practice. This article reviews current concepts in the management of inguinal hernia and hydrocele based on the recent literature and the authors׳ experience. We describe the principles of clinical assessment and anesthetic management of children undergoing repair of inguinal hernia, underlining the differences between an inguinal approach and minimally invasive surgery (MIS). Other points discussed include the current management of particular aspects of these pathologies such as bilateral hernias; contralateral patency of the peritoneal processus vaginalis; hernias in premature infants; direct, femoral, and other rare hernias; and the management of incarcerated or recurrent hernias. In addition, the authors discuss the role of laparoscopy in the surgical treatment of an inguinal hernia and hydrocele, emphasizing that the current use of MIS in pediatric patients has completely changed the management of pediatric inguinal hernias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemotherapy for Good-Risk Nonseminomatous Germ Cell Tumors: Current Concepts and Controversies.

    PubMed

    In, Gino; Dorff, Tanya

    2015-08-01

    The rate of diagnosis of germ cell tumors has remained fairly constant. By the International Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Classification, roughly 60% of all metastatic germ cell tumors are classified as good risk. This group of patients has an excellent prognosis, with greater than 90% expectation of cure. Treatment standards have not changed much in recent years. This article focuses on key concepts in the development of the currently accepted first-line regimens and addresses some evolving areas of interest, if not controversy.

  3. Dhat syndrome: Evolution of concept, current understanding, and need of an integrated approach

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Sujita Kumar; Sarkar, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Dhat syndrome has often been construed as a culture-bound sexual neurosis of the Indian subcontinent. Symptoms similar to that of Dhat syndrome has been described in other cultures across different time periods. The present paper looks at the evolution of the concept of Dhat syndrome in India. The review also takes an overview of the current understanding of this syndrome in terms of nosological status as a distinct entity and its “culture-bound” status. The narrative finally attempts to discuss the integrated approach for the treatment of this disorder. PMID:26538854

  4. The all-on-four treatment concept: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Penaloza, David; Zaragozí-Alonso, Regino; Penarrocha-Diago, María

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To systematically review the literature on the “all-on-four” treatment concept regarding its indications, surgical procedures, prosthetic protocols and technical and biological complications after at least three years in function. Study Design The three major electronic databases were screened: MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library of the Cochrane Collaboration (CENTRAL). In addition, electronic screening was made of the ‘grey literature’ using the System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe - Open Grey, covering the period from January 2005 up to and including April 2016. Results A total of 728 articles were obtained from the initial screening process. Of these articles, 24 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality assessment showed sample size calculation to be reported by only one study, and follow-up did not include a large number of participants - a fact that may introduce bias and lead to misleading interpretations of the study results. Conclusions The all-on-four treatment concept offers a predictable way to treat the atrophic jaw in patients that do not prefer regenerative procedures, which increase morbidity and the treatment fees. The results obtained indicate a survival rate for more than 24 months of 99.8%. However, current evidence is limited due the scarcity of information referred to methodological quality, a lack of adequate follow-up, and sample attrition. Biological complications (e.g., peri-implantitis) are reported in few patients after a mean follow-up of two years. Adequate definition of the success / survival criteria is thus necessary, due the high prevalence of peri-implant diseases. Key words:All-on-four, all-on-4, tilted implants, dental prostheses, immediate loading. PMID:28298995

  5. Treatment of Hypogonadism: Current and Future Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, Arthi; Berkseth, Kathryn E.; Amory, John K.

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of hypogonadism in men is of great interest to both patients and providers. There are a number of testosterone formulations currently available and several additional formulations under development. In addition, there are some lesser-used alternative therapies for the management of male hypogonadism, which may have advantages for certain patient groups. The future of hypogonadism therapy may lie in the development of selective androgen receptor modulators that allow the benefits of androgens whilst minimizing unwanted side effects. PMID:28149506

  6. Invisalign: current guidelines for effective treatment.

    PubMed

    Kuncio, Daniel A

    2014-03-01

    Invisalign is an increasingly popular technique for aligning teeth and correcting malocclusions orthodontically. This article analyzes the current professional literature published on Invisalign and the benefits and risks of using the technique for both patients and doctors. The steady increase in the number of cases treated with Invisalign and where the technique is going in the future is investigated. Ten guidelines for Invisalign treatment and patient selection are given, along with case examples.

  7. Mastocytosis 2016: Updated WHO Classification and Novel Emerging Treatment Concepts.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Akin, Cem; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2016-12-28

    Over the past few years substantial advances have been made in understanding the pathogenesis, evolution, and complexity of mast cell neoplasms. New diagnostic and prognostic parameters and novel therapeutic targets with demonstrable clinical impact have been identified. A number of these new markers, molecular targets, and therapeutic approaches have been validated and translated into clinical practice. At the same time, the classification of mastocytosis and related diagnostic criteria have been refined and updated by the consensus group and the World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, more specific therapies tailored towards prognostic sub-groups of patients have been developed. Emerging treatment concepts employ drugs directed against KIT and other relevant targets in neoplastic mast cells, and will hopefully receive recognition by health authorities in the near future. The current article provides an overview of recent developments in the field, with emphasis on the updated WHO classification, refined criteria, additional prognostic parameters, and novel therapeutic approaches. Based on these emerging concepts, the prognosis, quality of life, and survival of patients with advanced mastocytosis are expected to improve in the coming years.

  8. Medicalization: Current Concept and Future Directions in a Bionic Society

    PubMed Central

    Maturo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The article illustrates the main features of the concept of medicalization, starting from its theoretical roots. Although it is the process of extending the medical gaze on human conditions, it appears that medicalization cannot be strictly connected to medical imperialism anymore. Other “engines” of medicalization are influential: consumers, biotechnology and managed care. The growth of research and theoretical reflections on medicalization has led to the proposal of other parallel concepts like pharmaceuticalization, genetization and biomedicalization. These new theoretical tools could be useful in the analysis of human enhancement. Human enhancement can be considered as the use of biomedical technology to improve performance on a human being who is not in need of a cure: a practice that is increasingly spreading in what might be defined as a “bionic society”. PMID:22654387

  9. Anaplastic glioma: current treatment and management.

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Taillibert, Sophie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic glioma (AG) is divided into three morphology-based groups (anaplastic astrocytoma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, anaplastic oligoastrocytoma) as well as three molecular groups (glioma-CpG island methylation phenotype [G-CIMP] negative, G-CIMP positive non-1p19q codeleted tumors and G-CIMP positive codeleted tumors). The RTOG 9402 and EORTC 26951 trials established radiotherapy plus (procarbazine, lomustine, vincristine) chemotherapy as the standard of care in 1p/19q codeleted AG. Uni- or non-codeleted AG are currently best treated with radiotherapy only or alkylator-based chemotherapy only as determined by the NOA-04 trial. Maturation of NOA-04 and results of the currently accruing studies, CODEL (for codeleted AG) and CATNON (for uni or non-codeleted AG), will likely refine current up-front treatment recommendations for AG.

  10. Atrial fibrillation: review of current treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Joshua; Luc, Jessica G Y; Phan, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent cardiac arrhythmia in modern clinical practice, with an estimated prevalence of 1.5-2%. The prevalence of AF is expected to double in the next decades, progressing with age and increasingly becoming a global medical challenge. The first-line treatment for AF is often medical treatment with either rate control or anti-arrhythmic agents for rhythm control, in addition to anti-coagulants such as warfarin for stroke prevention in patient at risk. Catheter ablation has emerged as an alternative for AF treatment, which involves myocardial tissue lesions to disrupt the underlying triggers and substrates for AF. Surgical approaches have also been developed for treatment of AF, particularly for patients requiring concomitant cardiac surgery or those refractory to medical and catheter ablation treatments. Since the introduction of the Cox-Maze III, this procedure has evolved into several modern variations, including the use of alternative energy sources (Cox-Maze IV) such as radiofrequency, cryo-energy and microwave, as well as minimally invasive thoracoscopic epicardial approaches. Another recently introduced technique is the hybrid ablation approach, where in a single setting both epicardial thoracoscopic ablation lesions and endocardial catheter ablation lesions are performed by the cardiothoracic surgeon and cardiologist. There remains controversy surrounding the optimal approach for AF ablation, energy sources, and lesion sets employed. The goal of this article is review the history, classifications, pathophysiology and current treatment options for AF.

  11. Atrial fibrillation: review of current treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Joshua; Luc, Jessica G. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent cardiac arrhythmia in modern clinical practice, with an estimated prevalence of 1.5–2%. The prevalence of AF is expected to double in the next decades, progressing with age and increasingly becoming a global medical challenge. The first-line treatment for AF is often medical treatment with either rate control or anti-arrhythmic agents for rhythm control, in addition to anti-coagulants such as warfarin for stroke prevention in patient at risk. Catheter ablation has emerged as an alternative for AF treatment, which involves myocardial tissue lesions to disrupt the underlying triggers and substrates for AF. Surgical approaches have also been developed for treatment of AF, particularly for patients requiring concomitant cardiac surgery or those refractory to medical and catheter ablation treatments. Since the introduction of the Cox-Maze III, this procedure has evolved into several modern variations, including the use of alternative energy sources (Cox-Maze IV) such as radiofrequency, cryo-energy and microwave, as well as minimally invasive thoracoscopic epicardial approaches. Another recently introduced technique is the hybrid ablation approach, where in a single setting both epicardial thoracoscopic ablation lesions and endocardial catheter ablation lesions are performed by the cardiothoracic surgeon and cardiologist. There remains controversy surrounding the optimal approach for AF ablation, energy sources, and lesion sets employed. The goal of this article is review the history, classifications, pathophysiology and current treatment options for AF. PMID:27747025

  12. Nephrotic syndrome: a nursing care plan based on current pathophysiologic concepts.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D L

    1989-01-01

    The classic conception of the pathophysiology of the nephrotic syndrome (NS) is now being seriously questioned, on the basis of current research findings. New conceptions of the syndrome, with its proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and edema, are providing explanations for the discrepancies between the original theory and clinical data from individual patients, particularly related to edema formation. Many of the edema-preventing mechanisms are normal in patients with NS, but may fail when plasma osmotic pressure falls significantly. Plasma volumes, blood volumes, and blood pressures of patients with NS have been found to be generally normal or slightly increased, in contrast to the classic "hypovolemia" theory. Activation of the renin-angiotension-aldosterone system is variable and cannot fully explain the sodium and water retention. The decreased renal filtration rates and abnormal sodium retention/excretion rates are now best explained by an intrarenal defect, on the basis of multiple research approaches. These research conceptions of the pathophysiology of NS are significant for nurses because they can be used in patient assessment, interpretation of patient data, monitoring during treatment, collaboration about the plan of care, development of nursing care plans, and patient teaching. Several nursing diagnoses may be appropriate for patients with NS: alteration in fluid volume: excess; potential for infection; alteration in nutrition: less than body requirements, potential alteration in comfort; knowledge deficit; and potential disturbance in self-concept: body image.

  13. Current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Gerald G; Saunders, Amanda Vaughn

    2010-09-01

    There is neither proven effective prevention for Alzheimer disease nor a cure for patients with this disorder. Nevertheless, a spectrum of biopsychosocial therapeutic measures is available for slowing progression of the illness and enhancing quality of life for patients. These measures include a range of educational, psychological, social, and behavioral interventions that remain fundamental to effective care. Also available are a number of pharmacologic treatments, including prescription medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for Alzheimer disease, "off-label" uses of medications to manage target symptoms, and controversial complementary therapies. Physicians must make the earliest possible diagnosis to use these treatments most effectively. Physicians' goals should be to educate patients and their caregivers, to plan long-term care options, to maximally manage concurrent illnesses, to slow and ameliorate the most disabling symptoms, and to preserve effective functioning for as long as possible. The authors review the various current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

  14. Pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders: Current treatments and future directions✩

    PubMed Central

    Farach, Frank J.; Pruitt, Larry D.; Jun, Janie J.; Jerud, Alissa B.; Zoellner, Lori A.; Roy-Byrne, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Modern pharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders are safer and more tolerable than they were 30 years ago. Unfortunately, treatment efficacy and duration have not improved in most cases despite a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of anxiety. Moreover, innovative treatments have not reached the market despite billions of research dollars invested in drug development. In reviewing the literature on current treatments, we argue that evidence-based practice would benefit from better research on the causes of incomplete treatment response as well as the comparative efficacy of drug combinations and sequencing. We also survey two broad approaches to the development of innovative anxiety treatments: the continued development of drugs based on specific neuroreceptors and the pharmacological manipulation of fear-related memory. We highlight directions for future research, as neither of these approaches is ready for routine clinical use. PMID:23023162

  15. Multidisciplinary Treatment Options of Tooth Avulsion Considering Different Therapy Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Kostka, Eckehard; Meissner, Simon; Finke, Christian H; Mandirola, Manlio; Preissner, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Avulsion of permanent front teeth is a rare accident, mostly affecting children between seven and nine years of age. Replanted and splinted, these teeth often develop inflammation, severe resorption or ankylosis affecting alveolar bone development and have to be extracted sooner or later. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate different therapy concepts to create a structured concept for the treatment of avulsions. Results: Based on existing therapy concepts, a concept for different initial conditions (dry time, age, growth, tooth, hard and soft tissues) was developed and is presented here. Conclusion: A great deal of research has been performed during recent years and guidelines for the management of avulsions have been published. With the help of this literature it is possible to identify the best treatment procedure for each tooth. Clinical Relevance: The prognosis of avulsed teeth can be improved by considering evidence-based therapy concepts. Resorption, ankylosis and tooth loss could be minimized. PMID:25352922

  16. Unifying concept of serotonin transporter-associated currents.

    PubMed

    Schicker, Klaus; Uzelac, Zeljko; Gesmonde, Joan; Bulling, Simon; Stockner, Thomas; Freissmuth, Michael; Boehm, Stefan; Rudnick, Gary; Sitte, Harald H; Sandtner, Walter

    2012-01-02

    Serotonin (5-HT) uptake by the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) is driven by ion gradients. The stoichiometry of transported 5-HT and ions is predicted to result in electroneutral charge movement. However, hSERT mediates a current when challenged with 5-HT. This discrepancy can be accounted for by an uncoupled ion flux. Here, we investigated the mechanistic basis of the uncoupled currents and its relation to the conformational cycle of hSERT. Our observations support the conclusion that the conducting state underlying the uncoupled ion flux is in equilibrium with an inward facing state of the transporter with K+ bound. We identified conditions associated with accumulation of the transporter in inward facing conformations. Manipulations that increased the abundance of inward facing states resulted in enhanced steady-state currents. We present a comprehensive kinetic model of the transport cycle, which recapitulates salient features of the recorded currents. This study provides a framework for exploring transporter-associated currents.

  17. The current theoretical assumptions of the Bobath concept as determined by the members of BBTA.

    PubMed

    Raine, Sue

    2007-01-01

    The Bobath concept is a problem-solving approach to the assessment and treatment of individuals following a lesion of the central nervous system that offers therapists a framework for their clinical practice. The aim of this study was to facilitate a group of experts in determining the current theoretical assumptions underpinning the Bobath concept.A four-round Delphi study was used. The expert sample included all 15 members of the British Bobath Tutors Association. Initial statements were identified from the literature with respondents generating additional statements. Level of agreement was determined by using a five-point Likert scale. Level of consensus was set at 80%. Eighty-five statements were rated from the literature along with 115 generated by the group. Ninety-three statements were identified as representing the theoretical underpinning of the Bobath concept. The Bobath experts agreed that therapists need to be aware of the principles of motor learning such as active participation, opportunities for practice and meaningful goals. They emphasized that therapy is an interactive process between individual, therapist, and the environment and aims to promote efficiency of movement to the individual's maximum potential rather than normal movement. Treatment was identified by the experts as having "change of functional outcome" at its center.

  18. Oral Field Cancerization: An Update on Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Meenakshi; Jagannathan, Nithya

    2014-01-01

    There always exists a field with genetically altered cells with a high risk of developing premalignant and malignant lesions. It may often happen that an individual stem cell is genetically altered and can cause the formation of a clone or a patch which is likely to turn into a tumor. This explains the higher recurrence rates following tumor resections. It is essential to identify and to treat this field in order to have greater chances to prevent cancer and achieve a better outcome. This article reports concepts, theories and markers for the assessment of field cancerization. PMID:25992232

  19. Narcolepsy: current treatment options and future approaches.

    PubMed

    Billiard, Michel

    2008-06-01

    The management of narcolepsy is presently at a turning point. Three main avenues are considered in this review: 1) Two tendencies characterize the conventional treatment of narcolepsy. Modafinil has replaced methylphenidate and amphetamine as the first-line treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and sleep attacks, based on randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of modafinil, but on no direct comparison of modafinil versus traditional stimulants. For cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic hallucinations, new antidepressants tend to replace tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in spite of a lack of randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of these compounds; 2) The conventional treatment of narcolepsy is now challenged by sodium oxybate, the sodium salt of gammahydroxybutyrate, based on a series of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials and a long-term open label study. This treatment has a fairly good efficacy and is active on all symptoms of narcolepsy. Careful titration up to an adequate level is essential both to obtain positive results and avoid adverse effects; 3) A series of new treatments are currently being tested, either in animal models or in humans, They include novel stimulant and anticataplectic drugs, endocrine therapy, and, more attractively, totally new approaches based on the present state of knowledge of the pathophysiology of narcolepsy with cataplexy, hypocretine-based therapies, and immunotherapy.

  20. Current treatment of psoriasis with biologics.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Manfred

    2009-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a significant number of patients suffering from additional joint involvement and other co-morbidities. The precise pathomechanisms of this disease are still unknown. But based on recent findings a picture emerges putting a new subset of inflammatory T cells, so-called Th17 T cells, into the centre of psoriasis pathogenesis. These cells secrete interleukin (IL)-17 and a further set of so-called Th17 cytokines such as IL-21 and IL-22, the latter of which appears to significantly contribute to the epidermal changes observed in this disease. Differentiation and maintenance of Th17 cells depends on IL-23 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, secreted by activated monocytes or macrophages within the dermal compartment. In recent years, a plethora of new treatment approaches was introduced using antibodies or small molecule inhibitors specifically targeting inflammatory cytokines, cellular receptors or signalling mechanisms. Based on current results from large clinical trials, a more individualized treatment for affected patients may be achieved in the near future. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about treatment of psoriasis with biological agents targeting inflammatory mechanisms.

  1. Clinical review: Current treatment of malignant pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Tim; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Pacak, Karel; Dralle, Henning; Lehnert, Hendrik

    2007-04-01

    Pheochromocytomas are rare tumors of predominantly adrenal origin that often produce and secrete catecholamines. Malignancy occurs in a variable percentage of cases depending on genetic background and tumor location. Definitive diagnosis relies on the detection of distant metastases. Treatments for malignant pheochromocytoma include surgical debulking, pharmacological control of hormone-mediated symptoms, targeted methods such as external irradiation, and systemic antineoplastic therapy. Different agents and protocols for this purpose are reviewed, and their therapeutic potential is discussed. Literature on antineoplastic therapies for malignant pheochromocytoma was identified by searching the PubMed database with restriction to articles published in English during the past 30 yr. Because of the rarity of the condition, no randomized clinical trials concerning the treatment of malignant pheochromocytoma have been performed. The strategy established best is [131I]meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) therapy, which is well tolerated. Similar to cytotoxic chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and dacarbazine, MIBG can induce remission for a limited period in a significant proportion of patients. Octreotide as a single agent seems to be largely ineffective. MIBG radiotherapy and cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and dacarbazine chemotherapy are comparable with respect to response rate and toxicity. It is unclear whether combining both can improve the outcome. Future developments may include new multimodal concepts with focus on inhibition of angiogenetic factors and heat shock protein 90. Any present or new therapeutic approach must take into account the highly variable natural course of the disease.

  2. Current concepts in locking plate fixation of proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Laux, Christoph J; Grubhofer, Florian; Werner, Clément M L; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Osterhoff, Georg

    2017-09-25

    Despite numerous available treatment strategies, the management of complex proximal humeral fractures remains demanding. Impaired bone quality and considerable comorbidities pose special challenges in the growing aging population. Complications after operative treatment are frequent, in particular loss of reduction with varus malalignment and subsequent screw cutout. Locking plate fixation has become a standard in stabilizing these fractures, but surgical revision rates of up to 25% stagnate at high levels. Therefore, it seems of utmost importance to select the right treatment for the right patient. This article provides an overview of available classification systems, indications for operative treatment, important pathoanatomic principles, and latest surgical strategies in locking plate fixation. The importance of correct reduction of the medial cortices, the use of calcar screws, augmentation with bone cement, double-plate fixation, and auxiliary intramedullary bone graft stabilization are discussed in detail.

  3. MCL Injuries of the Knee: Current Concepts Review

    PubMed Central

    Phisitkul, Phinit; James, Stan L; Wolf, Brian R; Amendola, Annunziato

    2006-01-01

    Medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury is one of the most common knee injuries, especially in young athletic patients. Most MCL injuries can be managed conservatively with good results. However, a complete understanding of knee anatomy and the involved structures is necessary to make intelligent treatment decisions. We will review the anatomy and biomechanics of the MCL, classification systems for MCL injuries, and operative and nonoperative treatment for acute and chronic MCL injuries. PMID:16789454

  4. [The Concept and Treatment of Internet Addiction].

    PubMed

    Elsalhy, Muhammad; Muramatsu, Taro; Higuchi, Susumu; Mimura, Masaru

    2016-10-01

    The Internet now plays a very important role in our lives. However, for some people, Internet use can lead to a state that appears to meet the DSM definition for a mental disorder. In this review, we briefly discuss definition, symptoms, risk factors, prevalence, comorbidities, and personality traits of people who are susceptible to becoming addicts. In the second section of the article, various types of Internet addiction are discussed, focusing mainly on Internet Gaming Disorder and social networking survices (SNS) addiction. Regarding Internet Gaming Disorder, we discuss various types of the newly emerged Massive Multiplayer Online Games (MMO), as well as theories about why people become addicted to them. We do the same for the SNS Addiction for sites like Facebook and LINE; again, different types, as well as theories about why some people become addicts to such sites are discussed. Finally, preventive measures are introduced, focusing on a number of commonly used treatment methods, perticulary cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy.

  5. Pathophysiological Concepts and Treatment of Camptocormia

    PubMed Central

    Margraf, N.G.; Wrede, A.; Deuschl, G.; Schulz-Schaeffer, W.J.

    2016-01-01

    Camptocormia is a disabling pathological, non-fixed, forward bending of the trunk. The clinical definition using only the bending angle is insufficient; it should include the subjectively perceived inability to stand upright, occurrence of back pain, typical individual complaints, and need for walking aids and compensatory signs (e.g. back-swept wing sign). Due to the heterogeneous etiologies of camptocormia a broad diagnostic approach is necessary. Camptocormia is most frequently encountered in movement disorders (PD and dystonia) and muscles diseases (myositis and myopathy, mainly facio-scapulo-humeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)). The main diagnostic aim is to discover the etiology by looking for signs of the underlying disease in the neurological examination, EMG, muscle MRI and possibly biopsy. PD and probably myositic camptocormia can be divided into an acute and a chronic stage according to the duration of camptocormia and the findings in the short time inversion recovery (STIR) and T1 sequences of paravertebral muscle MRI. There is no established treatment of camptocormia resulting from any etiology. Case series suggest that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is effective in the acute but not the chronic stage of PD camptocormia. In chronic stages with degenerated muscles, treatment options are limited to orthoses, walking aids, physiotherapy and pain therapy. In acute myositic camptocormia an escalation strategy with different immunosuppressive drugs is recommended. In dystonic camptocormia, as in dystonia in general, case reports have shown botulinum toxin and DBS of the globus pallidus internus (GPi-DBS) to be effective. Camptocormia in connection with primary myopathies should be treated according to the underlying illness. PMID:27314757

  6. Unifying Concept of Serotonin Transporter-associated Currents*

    PubMed Central

    Schicker, Klaus; Uzelac, Zeljko; Gesmonde, Joan; Bulling, Simon; Stockner, Thomas; Freissmuth, Michael; Boehm, Stefan; Rudnick, Gary; Sitte, Harald H.; Sandtner, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) uptake by the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) is driven by ion gradients. The stoichiometry of transported 5-HT and ions is predicted to result in electroneutral charge movement. However, hSERT mediates a current when challenged with 5-HT. This discrepancy can be accounted for by an uncoupled ion flux. Here, we investigated the mechanistic basis of the uncoupled currents and its relation to the conformational cycle of hSERT. Our observations support the conclusion that the conducting state underlying the uncoupled ion flux is in equilibrium with an inward facing state of the transporter with K+ bound. We identified conditions associated with accumulation of the transporter in inward facing conformations. Manipulations that increased the abundance of inward facing states resulted in enhanced steady-state currents. We present a comprehensive kinetic model of the transport cycle, which recapitulates salient features of the recorded currents. This study provides a framework for exploring transporter-associated currents. PMID:22072712

  7. Spin currents, spin torques, and the concept of spin superfluidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rückriegel, Andreas; Kopietz, Peter

    2017-03-01

    In magnets with noncollinear spin configuration the expectation value of the conventionally defined spin current operator contains a contribution which renormalizes an external magnetic field and hence affects only the precessional motion of the spin polarization. This term, which has been named angular spin current by Sun and Xie [Phys. Rev. B 72, 245305 (2005)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.72.245305, does not describe the translational motion of magnetic moments. We give a prescription for how to separate these two types of spin transport and show that the translational movement of the spin is always polarized along the direction of the local magnetization. We also show that at vanishing temperature the classical magnetic order parameter in magnetic insulators cannot carry a translational spin current and elucidate how this affects the interpretation of spin supercurrents.

  8. Presurgical hand antisepsis: concepts and current habits of veterinary surgeons.

    PubMed

    Verwilghen, Denis; Grulke, Sigrid; Kampf, Günter

    2011-07-01

    To assess current habits for surgical hand preparation among veterinary surgical specialists and to compare data with current guidelines for hand asepsis techniques. Survey of veterinary surgical specialists. Diplomates of the American (ACVS) and European Colleges of Veterinary Surgeons (ECVS). An internet-based survey of hand preparation methods before surgical procedures was conducted of 1300 listed ACVS and ECVS Diplomates. A 42.6% response rate was obtained. Approximately, 80% of respondents use disinfecting soaps as a primary method for hand antisepsis. Of those, 81% use chlorhexidine-based scrubs and 7% use a neutral soap followed by a hydroalcoholic solution. Contrary to current recommendations of the World Health Organization and scientific evidence supporting use of hydro-alcoholic rubs for presurgical hand preparation, veterinary surgical specialists still use surgical scrub solutions containing disinfecting soaps. © Copyright 2011 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  9. Diabetic neuropathy: Clinical manifestations and current treatments

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Brian C.; Cheng, Hsinlin; Stables, Catherine L.; Smith, Andrea L.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a prevalent, disabling condition. The most common manifestation is a distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP), but many patterns of nerve injury can occur. Currently, the only effective treatments are glucose control and pain management. While glucose control dramatically decreases the development of neuropathy in those with type 1 diabetes, the effect is likely much smaller in those with type 2 diabetes. High levels of evidence support the use of certain anticonvulsants and antidepressants for pain management in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. However, the lack of disease modifying therapies for diabetic DSP makes the identification of new modifiable risk factors essential. Intriguingly, growing evidence supports an association between metabolic syndrome components, including pre-diabetes, and neuropathy. Future studies are needed to further explore this relationship with implications for new treatments for this common disease. PMID:22608666

  10. Fibromyalgia: knowns, unknowns, and current treatment.

    PubMed

    Solitar, Bruce M

    2010-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic syndrome of diffuse musculoskeletal pain with tenderness at specific locations, often associated with persistent fatigue, cognitive and mood disorders, joint stiffness, and insomnia. Understanding the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia and the establishment of effective treatments have been complex endeavors that have not yielded simple answers. Nevertheless, recent studies have shed light on the roles of central pain processing, genetic abnormalities, and external factors on development of the fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). These findings have led to the use of new therapies that have shown beneficial effects on symptoms. This review discusses ideas that have become accepted as well as novel associations under consideration in regard to the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia and the current and emerging therapeutics for its treatment.

  11. Current and future treatments for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Salloway, Stephen

    2009-08-01

    There are currently >5 million people in the United States who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. That prevalence rate is expected to triple as the population ages. The health and economic burden due to Alzheimer's disease is a worldwide problem, with some of the greatest burden coming from the developing world as people live longer in those societies. Throughout the world, the projected growth of Alzheimer's disease is dramatic. This is a worldwide public health problem of the highest order, and there is a compelling need to develop new treatments and methods of earlier diagnosis need to slow the progression of the disease and lessen its impact.

  12. Topical negative pressure therapy: current concepts and practice.

    PubMed

    Malahias, M; Hindocha, S; Saedi, F; McArthur, P

    2012-10-01

    Research into topical negative pressure therapy (TNPT) started in 1989 with Dr Louis Argenta and Prof Michael Morykwas of Wake Forest University School of Medicine in North Carolina, USA. In 1997, Morykwas and Argenta concluded that TNPT both enhanced granulation tissue formation and helped bacterial clearance, through the actions of negative pressure Armstrong and Lavery confirmed this in 2005, concluding that TNPT therapy was promoting the development of granulation tissue. Numerous other studies have proved that TNPT is beneficial for a myriad of other wounds including: sternotomy wounds, extensive de-gloving injuries, various soft tissue injuries prior to surgical closure, skin grafting, pressure sores, leg ulcers, sacral pressure ulcers, acute traumatic soft tissue defects, and soft tissue defects following rigid stabilisation of lower extremity fractures. This review aims to summarise the clinical and scientific concepts of TNPT and its future applications.

  13. Current concepts in the management of hidradenitis suppurativa in children.

    PubMed

    Danby, F William

    2015-08-01

    This review is intended to provide the background aetiopathogenetic framework upon which management of this disorder can be based, particularly with relation to new concepts of the pathogenesis of the disorder. The emphasis is on the prevention of the disorder's full expression by addressing the metabolic changes that drive the underlying structural damage and the immune system's subsequent reaction to this damage. The mechanism by which dietary factors impact on this disease are elucidated, the anatomic defect suspected to be responsible for the disorder is introduced, and an updated flow sheet describing and linking the clinicopathological changes recently described are provided. Recent work in the understanding of the induction and evolution of the lesions provides a background upon which the preventive regimen and both the medical and surgical approaches can be effectively based.

  14. History and current concepts in the analysis of facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Bashour, Mounir

    2006-09-01

    Facial attractiveness research has yielded many discoveries in the past 30 years, and facial cosmetic, plastic, and reconstructive surgeons should have a thorough understanding of these findings. Many of the recent studies were conducted by social, developmental, cognitive, and evolutionary psychologists, and although the findings have been published in the psychology literature, they have not been presented in a comprehensive manner appropriate to surgeons. The author reviews the findings of facial attractiveness research from antiquity to the present day and highlights and analyzes important concepts necessary for a thorough understanding of facial attractiveness. Four important cues emerge as being the most important determinants of attractiveness: averageness (prototypicality), sexual dimorphism, youthfulness, and symmetry. A surgeon planning facial cosmetic, plastic, or reconstructive surgery can potentially gain both profound insight and better quality surgical results by appreciating these findings.

  15. Cariology for the 21st Century: current caries management concepts for dental practice.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Margherita; Cabezas, Carlos Gonzalez; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this manuscript is to provide an overview of currently accepted, evidence-based and/or expert opinion recommendations for the prevention and management of dental caries in dental practice. Discussions are centered on current concepts for caries lesion detection (e.g., cavitated and non-cavitated lesions) and diagnosis (e.g., active vs. arrested lesions), including thresholds for non-surgical (e.g., fluorides, sealant) and surgical (i.e., restorative) interventions, risk assessment, and a review of caries management interventions for caries disease management. The goal is to prevent and manage the caries disease process using patient-centered, risk-based interventions supported by the best available evidence, taking into account the dentist's clinical expertise and the patient's treatment needs and preferences, in order to maintain or re-establish health and preserve tooth structure.

  16. Cutaneous tuberculosis overview and current treatment regimens.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, Lindi; du Plessis, Jeanetta; Viljoen, Joe

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the oldest diseases known to humankind and it is currently a worldwide threat with 8-9 million new active disease being reported every year. Among patients with co-infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), tuberculosis is ultimately responsible for the most deaths. Cutaneous tuberculosis (CTB) is uncommon, comprising 1-1.5% of all extra-pulmonary tuberculosis manifestations, which manifests only in 8.4-13.7% of all tuberculosis cases. A more accurate classification of CTB includes inoculation tuberculosis, tuberculosis from an endogenous source and haematogenous tuberculosis. There is furthermore a definite distinction between true CTB caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and CTB caused by atypical mycobacterium species. The lesions caused by mycobacterium species vary from small papules (e.g. primary inoculation tuberculosis) and warty lesions (e.g. tuberculosis verrucosa cutis) to massive ulcers (e.g. Buruli ulcer) and plaques (e.g. lupus vulgaris) that can be highly deformative. Treatment options for CTB are currently limited to conventional oral therapy and occasional surgical intervention in cases that require it. True CTB is treated with a combination of rifampicin, ethambutol, pyrazinamide, isoniazid and streptomycin that is tailored to individual needs. Atypical mycobacterium infections are mostly resistant to anti-tuberculous drugs and only respond to certain antibiotics. As in the case of pulmonary TB, various and relatively wide-ranging treatment regimens are available, although patient compliance is poor. The development of multi-drug and extremely drug-resistant strains has also threatened treatment outcomes. To date, no topical therapy for CTB has been identified and although conventional therapy has mostly shown positive results, there is a lack of other treatment regimens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hepatitis C Treatment: current and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a member of Flaviviridae family and one of the major causes of liver disease. There are about 175 million HCV infected patients worldwide that constitute 3% of world's population. The main route of HCV transmission is parental however 90% intravenous drug users are at highest risk. Standard interferon and ribavirin remained a gold standard of chronic HCV treatment having 38-43% sustained virological response rates. Currently the standard therapy for HCV is pegylated interferon (PEG-INF) with ribavirin. This therapy achieves 50% sustained virological response (SVR) for genotype 1 and 80% for genotype 2 & 3. As pegylated interferon is expensive, standard interferon is still the main therapy for HCV treatment in under developed countries. On the other hand, studies showed that pegylated IFN and RBV therapy has severe side effects like hematological complications. Herbal medicines (laccase, proanthocyandin, Rhodiola kirilowii) are also being in use as a natural and alternative way for treatment of HCV but there is not a single significant report documented yet. Best SVR indicators are genotype 3 and 2, < 0.2 million IU/mL pretreatment viral load, rapid virological response (RVR) rate and age <40 years. New therapeutic approaches are under study like interferon related systems, modified forms of ribavirin, internal ribosome entry site (HCV IRES) inhibitors, NS3 and NS5a inhibitors, novel immunomodulators and specifically targeted anti-viral therapy for hepatitis C compounds. More remedial therapies include caspase inhibitors, anti-fibrotic agents, antibody treatment and vaccines. PMID:21040548

  18. Current Surgical Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rönn, Karolin; Reischl, Nikolaus; Gautier, Emanuel; Jacobi, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Osteoathritis (OA) of the knee is common, and the chances of suffering from OA increase with age. Its treatment should be initially nonoperative—and requires both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment modalities. If conservative therapy fails, surgery should be considered. Surgical treatments for knee OA include arthroscopy, cartilage repair, osteotomy, and knee arthroplasty. Determining which of these procedures is most appropriate depends on several factors, including the location, stage of OA, comorbidities on the one side and patients suffering on the other side. Arthroscopic lavage and débridement is often carried out, but does not alter disease progression. If OA is limited to one compartment, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty or unloading osteotomy can be considered. They are recommended in young and active patients in regard to the risks and limited durability of total knee replacement. Total arthroplasty of the knee is a common and safe method in the elderly patients with advanced knee OA. This paper summarizes current surgical treatment strategies for knee OA, with a focus on the latest developments, indications and level of evidence. PMID:22046517

  19. Current surgical treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rönn, Karolin; Reischl, Nikolaus; Gautier, Emanuel; Jacobi, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Osteoathritis (OA) of the knee is common, and the chances of suffering from OA increase with age. Its treatment should be initially nonoperative-and requires both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment modalities. If conservative therapy fails, surgery should be considered. Surgical treatments for knee OA include arthroscopy, cartilage repair, osteotomy, and knee arthroplasty. Determining which of these procedures is most appropriate depends on several factors, including the location, stage of OA, comorbidities on the one side and patients suffering on the other side. Arthroscopic lavage and débridement is often carried out, but does not alter disease progression. If OA is limited to one compartment, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty or unloading osteotomy can be considered. They are recommended in young and active patients in regard to the risks and limited durability of total knee replacement. Total arthroplasty of the knee is a common and safe method in the elderly patients with advanced knee OA. This paper summarizes current surgical treatment strategies for knee OA, with a focus on the latest developments, indications and level of evidence.

  20. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Orozco, Breanna Z

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength), negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass), increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer.

  1. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Orozco, Breanna Z

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength), negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass), increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:26543382

  2. LLNL current meter array--concept and system description

    SciTech Connect

    Mantrom, D.D.

    1994-11-15

    A measurement capability using a horizontal array of 10 S4 current meters mounted on a stiff floating structure with 35 m aperture has been developed to support interpretation of radar imaging of surface effects associated with internal waves. This system has been fielded three times and most recently, has collected data alongside the sea-surface footprint of a land-fixed radar imaging ship-generated internal waves. The underlying need for this measurement capability is described. The specifications resulting from this need are presented and the engineering design and deployment procedures of the platform and systems that resulted are described The current meter data are multiplexed along with meteorological and system status data on board the floating platform and are telemetered to a shore station and on to a data acquisition system. The raw data are recorded, and are then processed to form space-time images of current and strain rate (a spatial derivative of the current field). Examples of raw and processed data associated with ship-generated internal waves are presented.

  3. Onco-nephrology: current concepts and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kitai, Yuichiro; Matsubara, Takeshi; Yanagita, Motoko

    2015-07-01

    Onco-nephrology is a new and evolving subspecialized area in nephrology that deals with kidney diseases in cancer patients. As many newer cancer therapies emerge in the field of oncology, cancer patients are surviving longer than ever before. However, the benefits of the remarkable advances in cancer management have not been fully appreciated. Not only is cancer often associated with abnormalities that affect the kidney, but cancer therapy often leads to both acute and chronic kidney diseases. The development of cancer-associated kidney complications is associated with poor prognosis, whereas prompt recognition and treatment initiation are associated with improved outcomes in this population. Therefore, both nephrologists and oncologists should be familiar with the diagnosis and management of cancer-associated kidney complications. Another unique aspect of onco-nephrology is that significant improvements in predialysis and dialysis care in recent years have led to prolonged survival and a higher incidence of patients with chronic kidney disease suffering from cancer. Therefore, research is urgently needed to establish treatment for patients with chronic kidney disease. This update addresses the pathophysiology and treatment of various cancer-associated kidney complications, and highlights cancer treatment for patients with chronic kidney disease.

  4. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MANAGEMENT OF ORAL CANCER – SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jatin P.; Gil, Ziv

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, with a high prevalence in South Asia. Tobacco and alcohol consumption remain the most dominant etiologic factors, however HPV has been recently implicated in oral cancer. Surgery is the most well established mode of initial definitive treatment for a majority of oral cancers. The factors that affect choice of treatment are related to the tumor and the patient. Primary site, location, size, proximity to bone, and depth of infiltration are factors which influence a particular surgical approach. Tumors that approach or involve the mandible require specific understanding of the mechanism of bone involvement. This facilitates the employment of mandible sparing approaches such as marginal mandibulectomy and mandibulotomy. Reconstruction of major surgical defects in the oral cavity requires use of a free flap. The radial forearm free flap provides excellent soft tissue and lining for soft tissue defects in the oral cavity. The fibula free flap remains the choice for mandibular reconstruction. Over the course of the past thirty years there has been improvement in the overall survival of patients with oral carcinoma largely due to the improved understanding of the biology of local progression, early identification and treatment of metastatic lymph nodes in the neck, and employment of adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. The role of surgery in primary squamous cell carcinomas in other sites in the head and neck has evolved with integration of multidisciplinary treatment approaches employing chemotherapy and radiotherapy either sequentially or concurrently. Thus, larynx preservation with concurrent chemoradiotherapy has become the standard of care for locally advanced carcinomas of the larynx or pharynx requiring total laryngectomy. On the other hand, for early staged tumors of the larynx and pharynx, transoral laser microsurgery has become an effective means of local control of these lesions

  5. Viral encephalitis: current treatments and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Renan Barros

    2012-12-01

    Several viruses may cause central nervous system infections that lead to a broad range of clinical manifestations. The course of the viral encephalitis can be acute, sub acute, or chronic. Some viruses have the ability to enter into the brain and cause direct injury, while others activate inflammatory cells that attack the central nervous system (CNS) secondarily. Some types of viral encephalitis occur in previously healthy individuals, while others affect immunocompromised patients. The epidemiology of viral encephalitis has undergone changes in recent years. Factors such as evolving lifestyles and ecological changes have had a considerable impact on the epidemiology of some types of viral encephalitis. The result is a change in the etiology spectrum of viral encephalitis, with new types of encephalitis arising or returning from time to time. Many scientific achievements in neuroimaging, molecular diagnosis, antiviral therapy, immunomodulatory treatments, and neurointensive care have allowed more precise and earlier diagnoses and more efficient treatments, resulting in improved outcomes. Despite these advances, there is still considerable morbidity and mortality related to these disorders. This aim of this article is to review the current knowledge of the current drugs used in the management of the most important viral encephalitis, focusing on the mechanisms of action, efficacy, and side effects of the drugs. In addition, future perspectives in this area will be addressed. Despite the technological advances, much effort has yet to be undertaken to reduce the impact of these potentially devastating diseases.

  6. Current state of sewage treatment in China.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lingyun; Zhang, Guangming; Tian, Huifang

    2014-12-01

    The study reported and analyzed the current state of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in urban China from the aspects of scale, treatment processes, sludge handling, geographical distribution, and discharge standards. By 2012, there were 3340 WWTPs in operation in China with a capacity of 1.42 × 10(8) m(3)/d. The number of medium-scale WWTPs (1-10 × 10(4) m(3)/d) counted for 75% of total WWTPs. On average, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies of small-scale, medium-scale, large-scale and super-large-scale WWTPs were 81, 85.5, 87.5 and 86.5%, respectively. Generally speaking, the nutrients removal instead of COD removal was of concern. As to the different processes, oxidation ditch, anaerobic-anoxic-oxic (A(2)/O) and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) were the mainstream technologies in China. These technologies had minor difference in terms of overall COD removal efficiency. The sludge treatment in WWTPs was basically "thickening-coagulation-mechanical dehydration" and the major disposal method was sanitary landfill in China. The distributions of WWTPs and their utilization showed significant regional characteristics. The sewage treatment capacity of China concentrated on the coastal areas and middle reaches of Yangtze River, which were the economically developed zones. Besides, most WWTPs enforced the Class 1 or Class 2 discharge standards, but few realized wastewater reuse. Finally, existing problems were discussed, including low removal efficiency of nitrogen and phosphorus, emerging contaminants, low reuse of reclaimed water, poor sludge treatment and disposal, low execution standard of effluent, and emissions of greenhouse gas from WWTPs. Suggestions regarding potential technical and administrative measures were given.

  7. Current concepts in simulation-based trauma education.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Robert A; Ali, Jameel

    2008-11-01

    The use of simulation-based technology in trauma education has focused on providing a safe and effective alternative to the more traditional methods that are used to teach technical skills and critical concepts in trauma resuscitation. Trauma team training using simulation-based technology is also being used to develop skills in leadership, team-information sharing, communication, and decision-making. The integration of simulators into medical student curriculum, residency training, and continuing medical education has been strongly recommended by the American College of Surgeons as an innovative means of enhancing patient safety, reducing medical errors, and performing a systematic evaluation of various competencies. Advanced human patient simulators are increasingly being used in trauma as an evaluation tool to assess clinical performance and to teach and reinforce essential knowledge, skills, and abilities. A number of specialty simulators in trauma and critical care have also been designed to meet these educational objectives. Ongoing educational research is still needed to validate long-term retention of knowledge and skills, provide reliable methods to evaluate teaching effectiveness and performance, and to demonstrate improvement in patient safety and overall quality of care.

  8. Reverse polarity shoulder replacement: Current concepts and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ling Hong; Desai, Aravind

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder replacement in cuff tear arthropathy (CTA) is an unsolved challenge. CTA poses a soft tissue deficiency in an arthritic glenohumeral joint which the anatomical total shoulder replacement and hemiarthroplasty cannot reliably provide stability, range of movement, function or satisfactory long term outcome. In the past two decades since the introduction of the reverse shoulder replacement, the prosthesis has evolved and has shown promising results. It is a partially constraint joint by virtue of its design features. The reversal of the concavity and convexity of the joint to the proximal humerus and the glenoid, respectively, also shifts and improves its center of rotation onto the osseous surface of the glenoid with less exposure to shear stress. It is a successful pain relieving procedure, offering good outcome in patients with irreparable massive rotator cuff tear with or without osteoarthritis. Consequently, this has led to wider use and expansion of its indication to include more complex elective and trauma cases. Whereas originally used in the more elderly patients, there is increasingly more demand in the younger patients. It is important to have good quality long term data to support these increasing indications. Therefore, we review the literature on the concepts of reverse shoulder replacement and the contemporary evidence. PMID:25035828

  9. [A review of current concepts in evidence-based radiology].

    PubMed

    Roldán-Valadez, Ernesto; Lee, Angel; Jiménez-Corona, Aída; Vega-González, Iván; Martínez-López, Manuel; Vázquez-LaMadrid, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    It has been noted that "Good doctors use both individual clinical expertise and the best available external evidence, and neither alone is enough. " Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is defined as the process of systematically finding, critically appraising, and using contemporary research published in the medical literature as a basis to make decisions regarding individual patient care and health care policy. In radiology, including its diagnostic and interventional aspects, the principles and practice of EBM have not been thoroughly studied. In this brief review article, we describe key aspects of evidence-based radiology (EBR), concepts and steps followed in EBM and meta-analysis. The skills required to practice EBR are identified, and the roles of EBR in radiologic practice, education, and research are discussed. The application of EBM principles to diagnostic imaging facilitates the interpretation of imaging studies and produces a sound and comprehensive radiologic evaluation. This review could be useful for radiologists and clinicians at any stage of their training or career. It encourages the practice of EBM and EBR especially in developing countries.

  10. Diagnostic ultrasound in sports medicine: current concepts and advances.

    PubMed

    Nofsinger, Charles; Konin, Jeff G

    2009-03-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound is a valuable imaging tool that is slowly gaining in popularity among sports medicine clinicians. Commonly referred to as "musculoskeletal ultrasound," its valuable role in assisting with sports medicine diagnoses has been to date underused for a variety of reasons. Effective clinical usage for sports medicine diagnoses includes commonly seen conditions such as rotator cuff disease, ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow injury, and internal derangement of the knee, among many others. Limitation of clinical usage has been deterred by the cost of the unit, perception of time associated with assessment procedures, and the lack of formal training associated with diagnostic implementation. However, when properly used, musculoskeletal ultrasound can increase the accuracy of diagnosis and treatment, improve time to treatment intervention, and improve patient satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to review the fundamentals of musculoskeletal ultrasound and present its specific diagnostic uses.

  11. Current concepts in the understanding and management of hemifacial microsomia.

    PubMed

    Cousley, R R; Calvert, M L

    1997-10-01

    Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is a complex congenital condition. This review discusses recent research findings which affect all aspects of HFM, and addresses some prevailing misconceptions. Firstly, the broad phenotype is outlined, with an emphasis on the facial anomalies which are important for diagnosis, classification and treatment. The range of HFM anomalies and their possible embryology also account for the varied terms used in the literature. In addition, consideration of causation helps to shape our understanding of HFM as a clinical entity. Aetiology is described with particular emphasis on the involvement of genetic factors, although at present this is largely hypothetical. Finally, the principles of HFM management are reviewed. Attention is given to the integrated planning and team approach necessary to treat such patients. In addition, the possible attributes of new treatments, such as distraction osteogenesis, are highlighted.

  12. Current concepts: diagnosis and management of food allergy in children.

    PubMed

    Mims, James W

    2016-06-01

    Advances in the prevention and treatment of food allergy have been published in the last few years and are placed in context using a review format. Preventing food allergy has been studied for years with questions of whether avoidance or exposure was a better strategy. Recent research has suggested that peanut allergy can be substantially reduced in high-risk infants through intentional oral exposure. For children with food allergy, the primary treatment remains avoidance, but controlled trials have shown some success with oral immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy. Providers who see children with food allergies should be aware of the newer recommendations of preventing peanut allergy and the emerging therapies for children with immunoglobulin E-mediated food allergy.

  13. Halitosis: Current concepts on etiology, diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Uditi; Sharma, Gaurav; Juneja, Manish; Nagpal, Archna

    2016-01-01

    Halitosis or oral malodor is an offensive odor originating from the oral cavity, leading to anxiety and psychosocial embarrassment. A patient with halitosis is most likely to contact primary care practitioner for the diagnosis and management. With proper diagnosis, identification of the etiology and timely referrals certain steps are taken to create a successful individualized therapeutic approach for each patient seeking assistance. It is significant to highlight the necessity of an interdisciplinary method for the treatment of halitosis to prevent misdiagnosis or unnecessary treatment. The literature on halitosis, especially with randomized clinical trials, is scarce and additional studies are required. This article succinctly focuses on the development of a systematic flow of events to come to the best management of the halitosis from the primary care practitioner's point of view. PMID:27095913

  14. Hip replacement in femoral head osteonecrosis: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Celli, Fabio; Casella, Francesco; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive disease that usually affects young adults with high functional demands and can have devastating effects on hip joint. The treatment depends on extent and location of the necrosis lesion and on patient’s factors, that suggest disease progression, collapse probability and also implants survival. Non-idiopathic osteonecrosis patients had the worst outcome. There is not a gold standard treatment and frequently it is necessary a multidisciplinary approach. Preservation procedures of the femoral head are the first choice and can be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Replacement procedure remains the main treatment after failure of preserving procedures and in the late-stage ONFH, involving collapse of the femoral head and degenerative changes to the acetabulum. Resurfacing procedure still has good results but the patient selection is a critical factor. Total hip arthroplasties had historically poor results in patients with osteonecrosis. More recently, reports have shown excellent results, but implant longevity and following revisions are still outstanding problems. PMID:27134633

  15. Hip replacement in femoral head osteonecrosis: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Celli, Fabio; Casella, Francesco; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive disease that usually affects young adults with high functional demands and can have devastating effects on hip joint. The treatment depends on extent and location of the necrosis lesion and on patient's factors, that suggest disease progression, collapse probability and also implants survival. Non-idiopathic osteonecrosis patients had the worst outcome. There is not a gold standard treatment and frequently it is necessary a multidisciplinary approach. Preservation procedures of the femoral head are the first choice and can be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Replacement procedure remains the main treatment after failure of preserving procedures and in the late-stage ONFH, involving collapse of the femoral head and degenerative changes to the acetabulum. Resurfacing procedure still has good results but the patient selection is a critical factor. Total hip arthroplasties had historically poor results in patients with osteonecrosis. More recently, reports have shown excellent results, but implant longevity and following revisions are still outstanding problems.

  16. [Cutaneous Melanoma (CM): Current Diagnosis and Treatment].

    PubMed

    Gallegos Hernández, José Francisco; Nieweg, Omgo E

    2014-12-01

    Cutaneous melanoma (CM) is the third most common cancer of the skin, but it is the neoplasia with the greatest impact on mortality. Its etiology is multifactorial and it has been reported that its prevalence has increased in the last two decades. In Mexico, CM ranks seventh in frequency among all malignancies and 80% of cases are in locally advanced stages. The prognosis depends on the stage. The prognostic factors with greatest impact in survival are nodal status, tumor thickness or Breslow depth, ulceration, and in thin melanomas (< 1 mm thickness, without ulceration and Clarck level III), the mitotic index. The diagnostic approach is of great importance to achieve adequate treatment. Adherence to global guidelines of treatment allows us to obtain the best rates of locoregional control, which is the first target to be achieved in patients with CM. The goal of this manuscript is to provide a synthesis of the most important aspects in the diagnosis and treatment of CM, based on current evidence obtained in the literature.

  17. Current status and prospects of HIV treatment.

    PubMed

    Cihlar, Tomas; Fordyce, Marshall

    2016-06-01

    Current antiviral treatments can reduce HIV-associated morbidity, prolong survival, and prevent HIV transmission. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) containing preferably three active drugs from two or more classes is required for durable virologic suppression. Regimen selection is based on virologic efficacy, potential for adverse effects, pill burden and dosing frequency, drug-drug interaction potential, resistance test results, comorbid conditions, social status, and cost. With prolonged virologic suppression, improved clinical outcomes, and longer survival, patients will be exposed to antiretroviral agents for decades. Therefore, maximizing the safety and tolerability of cART is a high priority. Emergence of resistance and/or lack of tolerability in individual patients require availability of a range of treatment options. Development of new drugs is focused on improving safety (e.g. tenofovir alafenamide) and/or resistance profile (e.g. doravirine) within the existing drug classes, combination therapies with improved adherence (e.g. single-tablet regimens), novel mechanisms of action (e.g. attachment inhibitors, maturation inhibitors, broadly neutralizing antibodies), and treatment simplification with infrequent dosing (e.g. long-acting injectables). In parallel with cART innovations, research and development efforts focused on agents that target persistent HIV reservoirs may lead to prolonged drug-free remission and HIV cure.

  18. Tuberculosis: current trends in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bello, A K; Njoku, C H; Njoku, A K

    2005-12-01

    Among communicable diseases, tuberculosis (TB) is the second leading cause of death worldwide, killing nearly 2 million people each year. It is estimated that about one-third of the world population are infected with TB (2 billion people) and about 10% of this figure will progress to disease state. Most cases are in the less-developed countries of the world. Tuberculosis incidence has been on the increase in Africa, mainly as a result of the burden of HIV infection. Definitive diagnosis of tuberculosis remains based on culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but rapid diagnosis of infectious tuberculosis by simple sputum smear for acid fast bacilli remains an important tool, as more rapid molecular techniques are being developed. Treatment with several drugs for 6 months or more can cure more than 95% of patients. Direct observation of treatment, a component of the recommended five-element DOTS strategy, is judged to be the standard of care by most authorities. Currently only a third of cases worldwide are treated using this approach. There may be need to modify the treatment modalities especially with the choice of drugs and duration of therapy when TB infection occurs in special situation like pregnancy, liver disease, renal failure or even in coexistence with HlV/AIDS or the drug resistant state.

  19. Current opinions in sialolithiasis diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Andretta, M; Tregnaghi, A; Prosenikliev, V; Staffieri, A

    2005-01-01

    Summary The introduction, 15 years ago, of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in the treatment of salivary gland calculi, has changed the therapeutic approach in these patients. Aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of lithotripsy in sialolithiasis, after 10 years follow-up. A review has been made of the literature to establish current opinions in diagnosis and treatment of sialolithiasis. The role of ultrasonography, radiography and, in particular, of sialo-magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis of salivary lithiasis has been evaluated. The greater efficiency of the extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy treatment for parotid, compared to submandibular calculi, has been demonstrated (57% versus 33%). In 68% of our patients, lithotripsy was resolutive after 10 years. Ultrasonograpy should be considered first choice examination in diagnosis of salivary calculi. Sialo-magnetic resonance imaging is a recent, non-invasive diagnostic procedure with the advantage of no radiation exposure, and with better definition of anatomical and functional state of glandular parenchyma and duct, compared to other available techniques. PMID:16450768

  20. Current HIV treatment guidelines--an overview.

    PubMed

    Rathbun, R C; Lockhart, S M; Stephens, J R

    2006-01-01

    Use of highly active antiretroviral therapy has resulted in significant reductions in HIV-related morbidity and mortality. Current therapeutic approaches target cellular entry, viral transcription, and maturation of newly formed virus. Combination therapy is necessary to provide durable suppression of viral replication and immune reconstitution. A variety of consensus treatment guidelines addressing prophylaxis and treatment of HIV infection and opportunistic infections have been developed to serve as resources for clinicians. A summary of U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Guidelines for Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents and International AIDS Society-USA Panel recommendations for Treatment of Adult HIV infection are presented. Considerations for selection of antiretroviral therapy in special populations (e.g., pregnancy, coinfection with tuberculosis, hepatitis B and C virus) are highlighted. U.S. Public Health Service guidelines for management of occupational exposure to HIV and initiation of postexposure prophylaxis are discussed as well as World Health Organization recommendations for use of antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings. The pathophysiology of HIV infection, viral load testing methods, viral dynamics, and classification of antiretrovirals are also briefly reviewed.

  1. Concussions in the National Football League: A Current Concepts Review.

    PubMed

    Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Johnson, Daniel J; Zuckerman, Scott L; Solomon, Gary S

    2016-03-01

    Significant attention has been directed toward the immediate and long-term effects of sport-related concussions on athletes participating in contact sports, particularly football. The highest level of football, the National Football League (NFL), has received significant attention and criticism regarding player management and safety after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Several review articles have reported data related to concussion in the NFL, but a succinct review and synthesis of data regarding NFL concussions is currently lacking. To (1) review systematically the published data regarding concussion in the NFL and assess limitations of the studies, (2) elucidate areas where further research is needed, and (3) identify methods to improve future investigations of concussion in the NFL. Systematic review of literature. English-language titles and abstracts published between 1900 and September 2014 were searched systematically across electronic databases, and a review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Peer-reviewed journal articles were included if they contained NFL concussion data with or without additional associated long-term effects. Reviews, editorials, letters to the editor, and comments were not included. Of the 344 records screened for review, 88 articles were assessed for eligibility. There were 31 studies that met the inclusion criteria and formed the basis of the evidence synthesis. Included in the current review were 8 case-control studies (Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine evidence level 3b), 6 descriptive epidemiological studies (level 4), 6 cross-sectional studies (level 4), 6 cohort studies (level 2b), and 5 case series (level 4). The study of concussions in the NFL has been limited by lack of recent empirical data, reliance on self-reported concussion history, and ascertainment bias of brains donated for autopsy studies. The scientific community

  2. Current Concepts and Future Directions in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Donald SA

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview on the biology, monitoring and management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), with particular attention to issues of relevance to clinical chemistry. The incidence of DTC appears to be increasing and management strategies are evolving as we learn more about its natural history and response to therapy. Clinical chemistry techniques play a central role in these protocols. Technical limitations inherent in current monitoring tools can hamper follow-up, although progress is being made. The molecular basis of DTC is being delineated with the potential to develop new strategies for diagnosis, monitoring and management of this condition. PMID:20179793

  3. Current concepts in acute respiratory support for neonates and children.

    PubMed

    Arca, Marjorie J; Uhing, Michael; Wakeham, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Current trends in mechanical respiratory support are evolving toward gentle approaches to avoid short- and long-term problems that are historically associated with mechanical ventilation. These ventilator-associated issues include the need for long-term sedation, muscle deconditioning, ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This article will describe recent trends of ventilatory support in neonates and children: (1) utilization of volume ventilation in infants, (2) synchrony and improving patient-ventilator interaction specifically using neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA), and (3) use of noninvasive ventilation techniques. When applicable, their uses in the surgical newborn and pediatric patients are described.

  4. [Current concepts in diagnostics and therapy of diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Adolf, C; Freibothe, I; Seißler, J; Lechner, A

    2015-04-01

    In Germany approximately 7.2% of the population currently suffer from diabetes mellitus. A further increase in the prevalence is expected in the coming years. Many therapy options, sometimes even without a risk of hypoglycemia, are now available. The foundations of a sufficient therapy of type 2 diabetes are, however, still lifestyle measures, such as weight reduction, optimized nutrition and increased physical activity. Optimization of cardiac and cerebrovascular risk factors is also an essential component of management of diabetes in order to reduce or even avoid secondary complications.

  5. Current concepts, classification, and results in short stem hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Falez, Francesco; Casella, Filippo; Papalia, Matteo

    2015-03-01

    Various short hip stems have been introduced with differing implant concepts of femoral fixation and implant length. There is a lack of proper classification for short hip stems, with a clear and accepted definition for implant length and extent of bone preservation in the metaphyseal and diaphyseal femur. This study analyzed the length of short hip stems. Stems were divided into collum, partial collum, and trochanter-sparing implants. An additional category was added, trochanter harming, which was defined as interruption of the circumferential integrity of the femoral neck. For all of the femoral components described, the designs were compared, excluding stems with insufficient clinical data. The 15 finally selected stems were classified as collum (1 stem), partial collum (7 stems), trochanter sparing (4 stems), and trochanter harming (3 stems). Mid-term results (>5 years of follow-up) were available for only 3 designs in the partial collum group. Taking into account the results of short-term studies (<5 years of follow-up), the femoral revision rate per 100 observed component years was <1 for most total hip arthroplasties. However, the studies varied greatly regarding level of significance, and short hip stems without published results are available commercially. Short hip stems cannot be circumscribed by a simple length limit. For some designs, clinical data collected from large patient cohorts showed a survivorship comparable to traditional stems. In cases that must be revised, this often can be performed with a conventional primary stem, fulfilling the promise to preserve bone for potential future revisions in younger patients. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Current concepts in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation and joint destruction that causes significant morbidity and mortality. However, the combined use of methotrexate, a synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), and biologic DMARD has revolutionized treatment of RA. Clinical remission is now realistic targets, achieved by a large proportion of RA patients, and rapid and appropriate induction of remission by intensive treatment with biological DMARD and methotrexate is prerequisite to halt joint damage and functional disabilities. However, biological DMARD is limited to intravenous or subcutaneous uses and orally available small but strong molecules have been developed. Oral administration of tofacitinib targeting the Janus kinase (JAK) is significantly effective than placebo in active patients with methotrexatenaïve, inadequately responsive to methotrexate or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-inhibitors. The efficacy was rapid and as strong as adalimumab, a TNF-inhibitor. Meanwhile, association of tofacitinib on carcinogenicity and malignancy is under debate and further investigation on post-marketing survey would be warranted. On the other hand, discontinuation of a biological DMARD without disease flare is our next goal and desirable from the standpoint of risk reduction and cost effectiveness, especially for patients with clinical remission. Recent reports indicate that more than half of early RA patients could discontinue TNF-targeted biological DMARD without clinical flare and functional impairment after obtaining clinical remission. Contrarily, for established RA, fewer patients sustained remission after the discontinuation of biological DMARD and "deep remission" at the discontinuation was a key factor to keep the treatment holiday of biological DMARD.

  7. Current concepts in immunosuppressive drug therapy of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lehman, T J

    1992-04-01

    The routine use of intravenous cyclophosphamide has led to advances in the preservation of renal function and quality of life for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus complicated by diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis. Most patients receiving 3 years of intravenous cyclophosphamide according to a rigorous protocol experience longterm remission of their disease. However, in some the disease continues to progress or flares recurrently. Early intervention and combined immunosuppressive regimens modeled on protocols developed for the treatment of neoplastic disease appear to offer the greatest likelihood of attaining permanent remission for large numbers of patients. Pilot studies of these regimens are in progress.

  8. [Current concepts in pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Kubicka-Trząska, Agnieszka; Karska-Basta, Izabella; Romanowska-Dixon, Bożena

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of central blindness in elderly population of the western world. The pathogenesis of this disease, likely multifactorial, is not well known, although a number of theories have been put forward, including oxidative stress, genetic interactions, hemodynamic imbalance, immune and inflammatory processes. The understanding of age-related macular degeneration pathogenesis will give rise to new approaches in prevention and treatment of the early and late stages of both atrophic and neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

  9. Current concepts in systemic and topical therapy for superficial mycoses.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Larry E

    2010-03-04

    There presently exists a wide selection of choices in the treatment of superficial mycoses. The main categories of broad-spectrum agents are the allylamines and imidazoles, which have been tried and proven over more than 2 decades of usage with good safety. Nystatin and griseofulvin have even longer experience of about 5 decades but have niche usage for yeasts and dermatophytes, respectively. Although no new therapeutic groups have appeared, extensive development of vehicles and delivery systems has enhanced therapeutic results and increased patient compliance.

  10. The Path to Fusion Energy for Concepts Currently at the Concept Exploration Level

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, E B

    2003-01-09

    Concept Exploration (CE) experiments within the Innovative Confinement Concept Program have a unique role which impacts their contributions to the development of fusion energy. As stated in the FESAC ''Report on Alternate Concepts:'' These [CE] programs are aimed at innovation and basic understanding of relevant scientific phenomena. The emphasis on innovation motivates their application to the search for a better fusion reactor configuration. In addition, because of their unique character the CE experiments offer excellent opportunities to couple fusion-plasma physics to other sciences. A recent example of coupling is the fusion self-organized plasmas to reconnection physics and extra-terrestrial plasmas. Perhaps of even greater importance is the education of the future scientists needed for developing fusion energy. The CE experiments, both at universities and national labs, are of a size students can ''get their hands around;'' young scientists and engineers will be attracted by this intellectual challenge combined with the vision of low-pollution energy for mankind represented by a burning-plasma experiment. A CE concept showing promise for fusion energy is expected to advance to the Proof-of-Principal stage. Experience has shown that this progression may occur in several ways: NSTX followed from success in START, a CE-level experiment in England; NCSX built on a broad base of theory and a strong international stellarator data base, without a CE experiment to test quasi-axisymmetry; and MST is following an upgrade path from the CE experiment of the same name. The lesson to be learned is a highly positive one, namely that the portfolio approach--with its five stages of development--is being applied in a flexible and pragmatic manner without artificial constraints from strategic planning. This lesson also makes it clear that as we move towards the development of fusion energy we need to determine the best way forward for each promising configuration, taking

  11. Binary concepts and standardization in counter-current separation technology.

    PubMed

    Friesen, J B; Pauli, G F

    2009-05-08

    Counter-current separation (CS) technology is currently faced with the challenge of being fit for the purpose of omics analysis, which involves highly complex samples and digitized research environments. Resembling a network of binary decisions, CS requires standardization of operation parameters in order to be efficient. While recent CS engineering solutions uniformly involve centrifugal force designs to overcome the limitation of the earth's 1xg force, factors of instrument design, operation, and graphical representation of the outcome are equally important targets for standardization. For example, chromatograms that emphasize the unique K-based nature of CS, such as reciprocal symmetry (ReS) plots, foster the fundamental understanding of CS operation. Because significant differences exist in underlying mechanism (e.g., stationary phase volume), outcome (e.g., construction of chromatograms), and scale (e.g., factors affecting overall method sensitivity) of solid-liquid vs. liquid-liquid chromatography technologies, standardization will enable the systematic exploration of the differential properties of the two LC technologies, and will be key to making CS fit for the digital omics age.

  12. Current status of endovascular stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Philip M; Schumacher, H Christian; Connolly, E Sander; Heyer, Eric J; Gray, William A; Higashida, Randall T

    2011-06-07

    interventional methods. Few would challenge neurologists over the responsibility for emergency evaluation and triage of stroke victims for intra intravenous fibrinolysis, even though emergency physicians are most commonly the first to evaluate these patients. There are many unanswered questions about the role of imaging in defining best treatment. Perfusion imaging with CT or MRI appears to have relevance even though its role remains undefined and is the subject of ongoing research. Meanwhile, investigators are exploring new, and perhaps more specific,imaging methods with cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen and cellular acid-base imbalance. There are currently 6 ongoing trials of stroke intervention, many with proprietary technologies and private funding, competing for the same patient population as multicenter trials funded by the NIH. At the same time, much of the interventional stroke treatment currently occurs outside of trials in the community and academic settings without the collection of much-needed data. Market forces will certainly shape future stroke therapy, but it is unclear whether the current combination of private and public funding for these endeavors is the best method of development.

  13. Management of achilles tendon injury: A current concepts systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Vivek; Jaggard, Matthew; Al-Nammari, Shafic Said; Uzoigwe, Chika; Gulati, Pooja; Ismail, Nizar; Gibbons, Charles; Gupte, Chinmay

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture has been on the rise over recent years due to a variety of reasons. It is a debilitating injury with a protracted and sometimes incomplete recovery. Management strategy is a controversial topic and evidence supporting a definite approach is limited. Opinion is divided between surgical repair and conservative immobilisation in conjunction with functional orthoses. A systematic search of the literature was performed. Pubmed, Medline and EmBase databases were searched for Achilles tendon and a variety of synonymous terms. A recent wealth of reporting suggests that conservative regimens with early weight bearing or mobilisation have equivalent or improved rates of re-rupture to operative regimes. The application of dynamic ultrasound assessment of tendon gap may prove crucial in minimising re-rupture and improving outcomes. Studies employing functional assessments have found equivalent function between operative and conservative treatments. However, no specific tests in peak power, push off strength or athletic performance have been reported and whether an advantage in operative treatment exists remains undetermined. PMID:25992315

  14. Current Concepts in Hip Preservation Surgery: Part I.

    PubMed

    Adler, Kelly L; Cook, P Christopher; Yen, Yi-Meng; Giordano, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    An evolution in conceptual understanding, coupled with technical innovations, has enabled hip preservation surgeons to address complex pathomorphologies about the hip joint to reduce pain, optimize function, and potentially increase the longevity of the native hip joint. Technical aspects of hip preservation surgeries are diverse and range from isolated arthroscopic or open procedures to hybrid procedures that combine the advantages of arthroscopy with open surgical dislocation, pelvic and/or proximal femoral osteotomy, and biologic treatments for cartilage restoration. PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched to identify relevant scientific and review articles from January 1920 to January 2015 using the search terms hip preservation, labrum, surgical dislocation, femoroacetabular impingement, peri-acetabular osteotomy, and rotational osteotomy. Reference lists of included articles were reviewed to locate additional references of interest. Clinical review. Level 4. Thoughtful individualized surgical procedures are available to optimize the femoroacetabular joint in the presence of hip dysfunction. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between femoral and pelvic orientation, morphology, and the development of intra-articular abnormalities is necessary to formulate a patient-specific approach to treatment with potential for a successful long-term result. © 2015 The Author(s).

  15. Current concepts and management approaches in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Attar, Bashar M; Van Thiel, David H

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of liver dysfunction worldwide. NAFLD may progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and in turn cirrhosis. Importantly, hepatic cancer can occur in NASH in the absence of cirrhosis. The cardinal histologic feature of NAFLD is the presence of an excessive accumulation of triacylglycerols and diacylglycerols in hepatocytes. The presence of obesity and insulin resistance lead to an increased hepatic-free fatty acid (FFA) flux creating an environment appropriate for the development of NAFLD. The generation of toxic reactive oxygen species with the production of hepatic injury and inflammation as a consequence of FFA oxidation will ultimately lead to the initiation and progression of fibrosis. Lifestyle modifications specifically weight loss, physical exercise, and cognitive behavior therapy have been recommended as treatments for NASH. Dietary fructose is an independent risk factor for the development of NAFLD. Pioglitazone can be used to treat biopsy-proven NASH; however, its safety risks should be considered carefully. Greater consumption for coffee, independent of its caffeine component, has been associated with a significant reduced risk of advanced fibrosis in NASH. Additional data are needed before recommending bariatric surgery as an established option for the specific treatment of NASH.

  16. Hip arthroscopy: current concepts and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Vijay D; Villar, Richard N

    2007-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of intra‐articular hip problems in young patients present a challenge to hip surgeons. Previous studies have shown that non‐invasive investigations such as radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide limited help. Non‐operative treatment is likely to result in persistent symptoms, and surgical options for intra‐articular hip problems involve open arthrotomy of the hip joint, which carries potential risks associated with joint dislocation. Arthroscopy of the hip joint, therefore, seems to be an attractive option. It was once thought that introduction of a straight arthroscope into the ball‐and‐socket hip joint was almost impossible. Hip arthroscopy has seen several advances since then, and the speed at which it developed in recent years directly corresponded to the rate at which the conditions affecting the hip joint were identified. Athletes and other young individuals with hip injuries are increasingly being diagnosed with an ever evolving series of conditions. Many of these conditions were previously unrecognised and thus left untreated, resulting in premature ends to the patients' competitive careers. Hip arthroscopy, as with any procedure, is not without risks. The procedure is not widely available as it requires specialist equipment and takes a long time to learn. Complications are few, occurring in <5% of patients. PMID:17138638

  17. Image-guided radiotherapy: from current concept to future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jaffray, David A

    2012-12-01

    Radiotherapy is a highly effective, targeted therapy for the management of cancer. Technological innovations have enabled the direct integration of imaging technology into the radiation treatment device to increase the precision and accuracy of radiation delivery. As well as addressing a clinical need to better control the placement of the dose within the body, image-guided radiotherapy has enabled innovators in the field to accelerate their exploration of a number of different paradigms of radiation delivery, including toxicity reduction, dose escalation, hypofractionation, voxelization, and adaptation. Although these approaches are already innovative trends in radiation oncology, it is anticipated that they will work synergistically with other innovations in cancer management (including biomarker strategies, novel systemic and local therapies) as part of the broader goal of personalized cancer medicine. This Review discusses the rationale for adopting image-guidance approaches in radiotherapy, and the technology for achieving precision and accuracy in the context of different paradigms within the evolving radiation oncology practice. It also examines exciting advances in radiotherapy technology that suggest a convergence of radiotherapy practice in which patient-specific radiotherapy treatment courses are one of the most personalized forms of intervention in cancer medicine.

  18. Current pathophysiological concepts and management of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, André P; Fontoura, Dulce; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F

    2012-03-22

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), increasingly recognized as a major health burden, remains underdiagnosed due mainly to the unspecific symptoms. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has been extensively investigated. Pathophysiological knowledge derives mostly from experimental models. Paradoxically, common non-PAH PH forms remain largely unexplored. Drugs targeting lung vascular tonus became available during the last two decades, notwithstanding the disease progresses in many patients. The aim of this review is to summarize recent advances in epidemiology, pathophysiology and management with particular focus on associated myocardial and systemic compromise and experimental therapeutic possibilities. PAH, currently viewed as a panvasculopathy, is due to a crosstalk between endothelial and smooth muscle cells, inflammatory activation and altered subcellular pathways. Cardiac cachexia and right ventricular compromise are fundamental determinants of PH prognosis. Combined vasodilator therapy is already mainstay for refractory cases, but drugs directed at these new pathophysiological pathways may constitute a significant advance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Current Concepts of Immunology and Diagnosis in Amniotic Fluid Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity in developed countries. Current thinking about pathophysiology has shifted away from embolism toward a maternal immune response to the fetus. Two immunologic mechanisms have been studied to date. Anaphylaxis appears to be doubtful while the available evidence supports a role for complement activation. With the mechanism remaining to be elucidated, AFE remains a clinical diagnosis. It is diagnosed based on one or more of four key signs/symptoms: cardiovascular collapse, respiratory distress, coagulopathy, and/or coma/seizures. The only laboratory test that reliably supports the diagnosis is the finding of fetal material in the maternal pulmonary circulation at autopsy. Perhaps the most compelling mystery surrounding AFE is not why one in 20,000 parturients are afflicted, but rather how the vast majority of women can tolerate the foreign antigenic presence of their fetus both within their uterus and circulation? PMID:21969840

  20. Current concepts in the management of complex elbow trauma.

    PubMed

    Morrey, B F

    2009-06-01

    Complex instability of the elbow, also known as fracture dislocation of the elbow, is one of the most challenging injuries of the musculoskeletal system. A clear understanding of the biomechanics of the joint with special focus on the relative contributions of the articular components and the ligamentous constraints is critical to the proper management of these injuries. The accurate recognition and implications of associated injuries offers a rationale for approaching these difficult problems by appropriately addressing the elements of the trauma. Further, doing so in a timely fashion enhances the outcome. Currently, even the most devastating of injuries are felt to have a more favourable prognosis than was present in the past if the principles contained herein are followed.

  1. Current Concepts on the Physiopathological Relevance of Dopaminergic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ledonne, Ada; Mercuri, Nicola B.

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a key neurotransmitter modulating essential functions of the central nervous system (CNS), like voluntary movement, reward, several cognitive functions and goal-oriented behaviors. The factual relevance of DAergic transmission can be well appreciated by considering that its dysfunction is recognized as a core alteration in several devastating neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Parkinson’s disease (PD) and associated movement disorders, as well as, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and addiction. Here we present an overview of the current knowledge on the involvement of DAergic receptors in the regulation of key physiological brain activities, and the consequences of their dysfunctions in brain disorders such as PD, schizophrenia and addiction. PMID:28228718

  2. [Pathophysiology of hypertension : What are our current concepts?].

    PubMed

    Jordan, J

    2015-03-01

    In the year 2015, many questions regarding the pathophysiology of essential arterial hypertension remain unresolved. Substantial scientific progress has been made in various medical areas aided by novel molecular"omics" techniques. The findings could then be implemented in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In the field of hypertension research such methods have been applied in very large cohorts but have contributed less to pathophysiological understanding and clinical management than expected. The findings on the pathophysiological importance of baroreflex mechanisms, natriuretic peptides and osmotically inactive sodium storage discussed in this article all have something in common: all are based on small, carefully conducted human physiological investigations and often challenge current textbook knowledge. Nevertheless, these findings have opened up new research fields and are likely to affect clinical care.

  3. [Asperger syndrome: evolution of the concept and current clinical data].

    PubMed

    Aussilloux, C; Baghdadli, A

    2008-05-01

    Although Asperger syndrome is described by international classifications as a category of pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), its validity as a specific entity distinct from autistic disorders remains controversial. The syndrome, first described by Hans Asperger, could not be distinguished from high functioning autism (onset, symptoms, outcome...). However, international classifications propose a distinction between the two syndromes based on a delayed onset, the absence of speech delay, the presence of motor disorders and a better outcome in Asperger syndrome. This categorical differentiation is not confirmed by current studies and in the absence of biological markers, no clinical, neuropsychological or epidemiological criteria makes it possible to distinguish high functioning autism from Asperger syndrome. From a clinical perspective, it is nevertheless of interest to isolate Asperger syndrome from other autistic disorders to propose specific assessment and therapy.

  4. Current concepts of immunology and diagnosis in amniotic fluid embolism.

    PubMed

    Benson, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity in developed countries. Current thinking about pathophysiology has shifted away from embolism toward a maternal immune response to the fetus. Two immunologic mechanisms have been studied to date. Anaphylaxis appears to be doubtful while the available evidence supports a role for complement activation. With the mechanism remaining to be elucidated, AFE remains a clinical diagnosis. It is diagnosed based on one or more of four key signs/symptoms: cardiovascular collapse, respiratory distress, coagulopathy, and/or coma/seizures. The only laboratory test that reliably supports the diagnosis is the finding of fetal material in the maternal pulmonary circulation at autopsy. Perhaps the most compelling mystery surrounding AFE is not why one in 20,000 parturients are afflicted, but rather how the vast majority of women can tolerate the foreign antigenic presence of their fetus both within their uterus and circulation?

  5. Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Limbs: Current Concepts and Management

    PubMed Central

    Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Malahias, Marco; Hindocha, Sandip; Khan, Wasim; Juma, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) of the limb refers to a constellation of symptoms, which occur following a rise in the pressure inside a limb muscle compartment. A failure or delay in recognising ACS almost invariably results in adverse outcomes for patients. Unrecognised ACS can leave patients with nonviable limbs requiring amputation and can also be life–threatening. Several clinical features indicate ACS. Where diagnosis is unclear there are several techniques for measuring intracompartmental pressure described in this review. As early diagnosis and fasciotomy are known to be the best determinants of good outcomes, it is important that surgeons are aware of the features that make this diagnosis likely. This clinical review discusses current knowledge on the relevant clinical anatomy, aetiology, pathophysiology, risk factors, clinical features, diagnostic procedures and management of an acute presentation of compartment syndrome. PMID:23248724

  6. Current concepts of active vasodilation in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Brett J.; Hollowed, Casey G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In humans, an increase in internal core temperature elicits large increases in skin blood flow and sweating. The increase in skin blood flow serves to transfer heat via convection from the body core to the skin surface while sweating results in evaporative cooling of the skin. Cutaneous vasodilation and sudomotor activity are controlled by a sympathetic cholinergic active vasodilator system that is hypothesized to operate through a co-transmission mechanism. To date, mechanisms of cutaneous active vasodilation remain equivocal despite many years of research by several productive laboratory groups. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advancements in the field of cutaneous active vasodilation framed in the context of some of the historical findings that laid the groundwork for our current understanding of cutaneous active vasodilation. PMID:28349094

  7. Sebum, inflammasomes and the skin: current concepts and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Oyewole, Anne O; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2015-09-01

    Increasing evidence has identified ultraviolet radiation (UVR) as the skins most potent mutagen as over exposure results in sunburn, inflammation and DNA damage, thus contributing to a photo-ageing phenotype and possibly skin carcinogenesis. The lipid-rich sebum secreted onto the surface of the skin plays an important physiological role in protecting the skin against external challenges. When skin is photosensitised by UVR, the lipid constituents of sebum are easily oxidised, generating several lipid photo-oxidative products (e.g. squalene peroxides). These photo-oxidative products have been shown to exert diverse toxicological, biological and immunological effects in the skin and have therefore been implicated in several detrimental skin alterations including premature skin ageing. The involvement of lipid peroxidation products in UVR-induced inflammatory responses has been inadequately studied and highly controversial. Furthermore, it is unclear to what extent these oxidative products contribute to the underlying mechanisms of skin photo-ageing. Therefore, this viewpoint essay will discuss the current knowledge on the effect of UVR exposure on skin surface lipids and how these may mediate UVR-induced inflammatory responses which may be key contributors to photo-damage in skin. This essay will also examine the potential role of inflammasomes (innate immune complexes) in the inflammatory response associated with UVR-induced lipid peroxidation. Limited evidence is available on the interactions between sebaceous lipids, downstream mediators and concomitant immune response in sun-exposed skin and clearer elucidation may lead to novel biomarkers of photo-ageing and the incorporation of new molecules into current skin therapies which better target oxidised lipids and or downstream mediators/pathways. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Vitamin D and assisted reproduction technologies: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Vanni, Valeria S; Vigano', Paola; Somigliana, Edgardo; Papaleo, Enrico; Paffoni, Alessio; Pagliardini, Luca; Candiani, Massimo

    2014-05-31

    Accumulating evidence from animal and human studies suggests that vitamin D is involved in many functions of the human reproductive system in both genders, but no comprehensive analysis of the potential relationship between vitamin D status and Assisted Reproduction Technologies (ART) outcomes is currently available. On this basis, the purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to perform an in-depth evaluation of clinical studies assessing whether vitamin D status of patients undergoing ART could be related to cycle outcome variables. This issue is of interest considering that vitamin D deficiency is easily amenable to correction and oral vitamin D supplementation is cheap and without significant side effects. Surprisingly, no studies are currently available assessing vitamin D status among male partners of couples undergoing ART, while seven studies on vitamin D status of women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for ART were found and included in the review. Results show that vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent among women undergoing COH, ranging from 21% to 31% across studies conducted in Western countries and reaching 75-99% in Iranian studies. Data on vitamin D deficiency (25-hydroxyvitamin D serum levels <20 ng/ml) in relation to ART outcomes could be extracted from three studies and included in the meta-analysis, yielding a common risk ratio (RR) of 0.89 (95% CI 0.53-1.49) and showing a lower but not statistically significant likelihood of clinical pregnancy for vitamin-D-deficient women compared with vitamin-D-sufficient patients. In conclusion, there is insufficient evidence to support the routine assessment of vitamin D status to predict the clinical pregnancy rate in couples undergoing ART. The partly conflicting results of the available studies, potentially explaining the lack of statistical significance for a negative influence of vitamin D deficiency on clinical pregnancy rate, are likely secondary to confounders

  9. Current concepts in the management of Clostridium tetani infection.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2008-06-01

    This review summarizes the microbiology, management and prevention of tetanus. Tetanus is an acute toxemic illness caused by Clostridium tetani infection at a laceration or break in the skin. It can also occur as a complication of burns, puerperal infections, umbilical stumps (tetanus neonatorum) and surgical-site infection. Tetanus is an intoxication, manifested mostly by neuromuscular dysfunction, caused by tetanal exotoxin (tetanospasmin), a potent exotoxin produced by C. tetani. It starts with tonic spasms of the skeletal muscles and is followed by paroxysmal contractions. The muscle stiffness initially involves the jaw (lockjaw) and neck and later becomes generalized. Treatment goals include interrupting the production of toxin, neutralizating the unbound toxin, controlling muscle spasms, managing dysautonomia and appropriate supportive management. Specific therapy includes intramuscular administration of tetanus immunoglobulin to neutralize circulating toxin before it binds to neuronal cell membranes. The disease can be prevented by immunization with tetanal toxoid and appropriate wound care.

  10. Terrible triad injury of the elbow: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Paul K; Athwal, George S; King, Graham J W

    2009-03-01

    Fracture-dislocations of the elbow remain among the most difficult injuries to manage. Historically, the combination of an elbow dislocation, a radial head fracture, and a coronoid process fracture has had a consistently poor outcome; for this reason, it is called the terrible triad. An elbow dislocation associated with a displaced fracture of the radial head and coronoid process almost always renders the elbow unstable, making surgical fixation necessary. The primary goal of surgical fixation is to stabilize the elbow to permit early motion. Recent literature has improved our understanding of elbow anatomy and biomechanics along with the pathoanatomy of this injury, thereby allowing the development of a systematic approach for treatment and rehabilitation. Advances in knowledge combined with improved implants and surgical techniques have contributed to better outcomes.

  11. Comorbidities of epilepsy: current concepts and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Keezer, Mark R; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Sander, Josemir W

    2016-01-01

    The burden of comorbidity in people with epilepsy is high. Several diseases, including depression, anxiety, dementia, migraine, heart disease, peptic ulcers, and arthritis are up to eight times more common in people with epilepsy than in the general population. Several mechanisms explain how epilepsy and comorbidities are associated, including shared risk factors and bidirectional relations. There is a pressing need for new and validated screening instruments and guidelines to help with the early detection and treatment of comorbid conditions. Preliminary evidence suggests that some conditions, such as depression and migraine, negatively affect seizure outcome and quality of life. Further investigation is needed to explore these relations and the effects of targeted interventions. Future advances in the investigation of the comorbidities of epilepsy will strengthen our understanding of epilepsy and could play an important part in stratification for genetic studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Current concepts in biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Paul D; Olson, Michael E

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a highly significant nosocomial pathogen mediating infections primarily associated with indwelling biomaterials (e.g., catheters and prostheses). In contrast to Staphylococcus aureus, virulence properties associated with S. epidermidis are few and biofilm formation is the defining virulence factor associated with disease, as demonstrated by animal models of biomaterial-related infections. However, other virulence factors, such as phenol-soluble modulins and poly-γ-DL-glutamic acid, have been recently recognized that thwart innate immune system mechanisms. Formation of S. epidermidis biofilm is typically considered a four-step process consisting of adherence, accumulation, maturation and dispersal. This article will discuss recent advances in the study of these four steps, including accumulation, which can be either polysaccharide or protein mediated. It is hypothesized that studies focused on understanding the biological function of each step in staphylococcal biofilm formation will yield new treatment modalities to treat these recalcitrant infections. PMID:20521936

  13. Current concepts in psoriatic arthritis: pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    de Vlam, Kurt; Gottlieb, Alice B; Mease, Philip J

    2014-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis occurs in a subset of psoriasis patients and is therefore commonly encountered in dermatology practice. Although its exact pathogenesis is unknown, psoriatic arthritis is thought to share common mechanisms with psoriatic skin symptoms. Innate and adaptive immune responses are abnormally activated in psoriasis and may acquire the ability to attack peripheral joints and other sites following an environmental trigger (e.g. mechanical stress, trauma, infection) in genetically susceptible patients. The increased cardiovascular risk inherent in psoriasis appears further enhanced in psoriatic arthritis, likely reflecting the overall burden of systemic inflammation contributing to atherogenic processes. Basic research and clinical trials have suggested that tumour necrosis factor is important in psoriatic arthritis pathophysiology, and accumulating evidence suggests that Th17 cells and interleukin-17A may also be important. Basic research and clinical trials inform our understanding of psoriatic arthritis pathophysiology and, in turn, help dermatologists to make better treatment decisions.

  14. The heart of epilepsy: Current views and future concepts.

    PubMed

    Shmuely, S; van der Lende, M; Lamberts, R J; Sander, J W; Thijs, R D

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) comorbidities are common in people with epilepsy. Several mechanisms explain why these conditions tend to co-exist including causal associations, shared risk factors and those resulting from epilepsy or its treatment. Various arrhythmias occurring during and after seizures have been described. Ictal asystole is the most common cause. The converse phenomenon, arrhythmias causing seizures, appears extremely rare and has only been reported in children following cardioinihibitory syncope. Arrhythmias in epilepsy may not only result from seizure activity but also from a shared genetic susceptibility. Various cardiac and epilepsy genes could be implicated but firm evidence is still lacking. Several antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) triggering conduction abnormalities can also explain the co-existence of arrhythmias in epilepsy. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that people with epilepsy have a higher prevalence of structural cardiac disease and a poorer CV risk profile than those without epilepsy. Shared CV risk factors, genetics and etiological factors can account for a significant part of the relationship between epilepsy and structural cardiac disease. Seizure activity may cause transient myocardial ischaemia and the Takotsubo syndrome. Additionally, certain AEDs may themselves negatively affect CV risk profile in epilepsy. Here we discuss the fascinating borderland of epilepsy and cardiovascular conditions. The review focuses on epidemiology, clinical presentations and possible mechanisms for shared pathophysiology. It concludes with a discussion of future developments and a call for validated screening instruments and guidelines aiding the early identification and treatment of CV comorbidity in epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biomechanics of Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty: 
Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Adam J; Stone, Geoffrey P; Simon, Peter; Frankle, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of reverse shoulder arthroplasty has provided surgeons with new solutions for many complex shoulder problems. A primary goal of orthopaedics is the restoration or re-creation of functional anatomy to reduce pain and improve function, which can be accomplished by either repairing injured structures or replacing them as anatomically as possible. If reconstructible tissue is lacking or not available, which is seen in patients who have complex shoulder conditions such as an irreparable rotator cuff-deficient shoulder, cuff tear arthropathy, or severe glenoid bone loss, substantial problems may arise. Historically, hemiarthroplasty or glenoid grafting with total shoulder arthroplasty yielded inconsistent and unsatisfactory results. Underlying pathologies in patients who have an irreparable rotator cuff-deficient shoulder, cuff tear arthropathy, or severe glenoid bone loss can considerably alter the mechanical function of the shoulder and create treatment dilemmas that are difficult to overcome. A better biomechanical understanding of these pathologic adaptations has improved treatment options. In the past three decades, reverse total shoulder arthroplasty was developed to treat these complex shoulder conditions not by specifically re-creating the anatomy but by using the remaining functional tissue to improve shoulder balance. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty has achieved reliable improvements in both pain and function. Initial implant designs lacked scientific evidence to support the design rationale, and many implants failed because surgeons did not completely understand the forces involved or the pathology being treated. Implant function and clinical results will continue to improve as surgeons' biomechanical understanding of shoulder disease and reverse shoulder arthroplasty implants increases.

  16. Current medical treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Suayib; Oyan, Basak; Bayraktar, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) consist of a wide group of neoplasms, with different biological behaviors in terms of aggressiveness and hormone production. In the last two decades, significant progress has been observed in our understanding of their biology, diagnosis and treatment. Surgery remains to be the only curative approach, but unfortunately the diagnosis is often delayed due to the slow growth of these tumors and the difficulty in identifying the symptoms related to the tumor-released hormones. In addition to surgery, other approaches to control the disease are biological therapy consisting of somatostatin analogs and interferon (IFN), systemic chemotherapy, radioligand therapy and local therapy with chemoembolization. Several newer cytotoxic agents, including irinotecan, gemcitabine, taxanes, oxaliplatin, capecitabine and PS-341 have been studied in metastatic patients. Considering the high vascularity of these tumors, antiangiogenic agents like endostatin and thalidomide have also been evaluated in advanced NETs. Although these agents seem to have potential activity in NETs and may increase progression free survival, none of these currently available medical therapeutic options are curative. While more efficient novel strategies are to be developed, the rationale use of the current therapeutic options may improve quality of life, control the symptoms related to the hypersecretion of hormones and/or peptides, control tumor proliferation and prolong survival in patients suffering from NETs.

  17. Vestibular compensation and vestibular rehabilitation. Current concepts and new trends.

    PubMed

    Deveze, A; Bernard-Demanze, L; Xavier, F; Lavieille, J-P; Elziere, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present the current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the vestibular compensation and demonstrating how the vestibular rehabilitation is conducted to help the recovery of balance function. Vestibular rehabilitation is based on improving the natural phenomenon called vestibular compensation that occurs after acute vestibular disturbance or chronic and gradual misbalance. Central compensation implies three main mechanisms namely adaptation, substitution and habituation. The compensation, aided by the rehabilitation aimed to compensate and/or to correct the underused or misused of the visual, proprioceptive and vestibular inputs involved in the postural control. As the strategy of equilibration is not corrected, the patient is incompletely cured and remains with inappropriate balance control with its significance on the risk of fall and impact on quality of life. The vestibular rehabilitation helps to correct inappropriate strategy of equilibrium or to accelerate a good but slow compensation phenomenon. Nowadays, new tools are more and more employed for the diagnosis of vestibular deficit (that may include various sources of impairment), the assessment of postural deficit, the control of the appropriate strategy as well to facilitate the efficiency of the rehabilitation especially in elderly people.

  18. Current concepts for oil decontamination of crush injuries: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This anecdotal, non-systematic review serves to explore the principles and methods of effective oil decontamination from cutaneous wounds, particularly crush injuries. The current expansion of the petroleum industry is necessary to meet increasing world demands for oil. Most stages of oil refining and applications involve significant injury risks, particularly for crush injuries that become contaminated with petroleum compounds. A literature review regarding a standard of care for effective cutaneous oil decontamination is lacking. Based on case reports, animal models, and in vitro studies identified in our expert opinion review, standard water and soap cleansing may not be an appropriate approach. Instead, the principle of ‘like dissolves like’ guides the use of lipophilic, petroleum-derived solvents to attract and subsequently dissolve the petroleum contaminant from the skin injury. Limitations include paucity of and dated literature sources regarding the topic as well as no models specifically addressing crush injuries. Our literature review found that oil decontamination of cutaneous injuries may be best accomplished with oil-based cleansers. Certainly, this topic has significant importance for the potentially carcinogenic petroleum compounds that pervade virtually every aspect of modern human life. PMID:24855490

  19. Current and future concepts in helmet and sports injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Hoshizaki, T Blaine; Post, Andrew; Oeur, R Anna; Brien, Susan E

    2014-10-01

    Since the introduction of head protection, a decrease in sports-related traumatic brain injuries has been reported. The incidence of concussive injury, however, has remained the same or on the rise. These trends suggest that current helmets and helmet standards are not effective in protecting against concussive injuries. This article presents a literature review that describes the discrepancy between how helmets are designed and tested and how concussions occur. Most helmet standards typically use a linear drop system and measure criterion such as head Injury criteria, Gadd Severity Index, and peak linear acceleration based on research involving severe traumatic brain injuries. Concussions in sports occur in a number of different ways that can be categorized into collision, falls, punches, and projectiles. Concussive injuries are linked to strains induced by rotational acceleration. Because helmet standards use a linear drop system simulating fall-type injury events, the majority of injury mechanisms are neglected. In response to the need for protection against concussion, helmet manufacturers have begun to innovate and design helmets using other injury criteria such as rotational acceleration and brain tissue distortion measures via finite-element analysis. In addition to these initiatives, research has been conducted to develop impact protocols that more closely reflect how concussions occur in sports. Future research involves a better understanding of how sports-related concussions occur and identifying variables that best describe them. These variables can be used to guide helmet innovation and helmet standards to improve the quality of helmet protection for concussive injury.

  20. Current concepts for oil decontamination of crush injuries: a review.

    PubMed

    Karimkhani, Chante; Amir, Mahsa; Dellavalle, Robert P; Ipaktchi, Kyros

    2014-01-01

    This anecdotal, non-systematic review serves to explore the principles and methods of effective oil decontamination from cutaneous wounds, particularly crush injuries. The current expansion of the petroleum industry is necessary to meet increasing world demands for oil. Most stages of oil refining and applications involve significant injury risks, particularly for crush injuries that become contaminated with petroleum compounds. A literature review regarding a standard of care for effective cutaneous oil decontamination is lacking. Based on case reports, animal models, and in vitro studies identified in our expert opinion review, standard water and soap cleansing may not be an appropriate approach. Instead, the principle of 'like dissolves like' guides the use of lipophilic, petroleum-derived solvents to attract and subsequently dissolve the petroleum contaminant from the skin injury. Limitations include paucity of and dated literature sources regarding the topic as well as no models specifically addressing crush injuries. Our literature review found that oil decontamination of cutaneous injuries may be best accomplished with oil-based cleansers. Certainly, this topic has significant importance for the potentially carcinogenic petroleum compounds that pervade virtually every aspect of modern human life.

  1. Current concepts in the management of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Gautham; Venkatakrishnan, L.; Sambandam, Swaminathan; Singh, Gursharan; Kaur, Maninder; Janarthan, Krishnaveni; John, B. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis (AP) are based on the Western experience, which may be difficult to extrapolate in India due to socioeconomic constraints. Hence, modifications based on the available resources and referral patterns should be introduced so as to ensure appropriate care. We reviewed the current literature on the management of AP available in English on Medline and proposed guidelines locally applicable. Patients of AP presenting with systemic inflammatory response syndrome are at risk of moderate-severe pancreatitis and hence, should be referred to a tertiary center early. The vast majority of patients with AP have mild disease and can be managed at smaller centers. Early aggressive fluid resuscitation with controlled fluid expansion, early enteral nutrition, and culture-directed antibiotics improve outcomes in AP. Infected pancreatic necrosis should be managed in a tertiary care hospital within a multidisciplinary setup. The “step up” approach involving antibiotics, percutaneous drainage, and minimally invasive necrosectomy instituted sequentially based on clinical response has improved the outcomes in this subgroup of patients. PMID:28348985

  2. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in musculoskeletal diseases: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Dallaudière, B; Lecouvet, F; Vande Berg, B; Omoumi, P; Perlepe, V; Cerny, M; Malghem, J; Larbi, A

    2015-04-01

    MR imaging is currently regarded as a pivotal technique for the assessment of a variety of musculoskeletal conditions. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) is a relatively recent sequence that provides information on the degree of cellularity of lesions. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value provides information on the movement of water molecules outside the cells. The literature contains many studies that have evaluated the role of DWI in musculoskeletal diseases. However, to date they yielded conflicting results on the use and the diagnostic capabilities of DWI in the area of musculoskeletal diseases. However, many of them have showed that DWI is a useful technique for the evaluation of the extent of the disease in a subset of musculoskeletal cancers. In terms of tissue characterization, DWI may be an adjunct to the more conventional MR imaging techniques but should be interpreted along with the signal of the lesion as observed on conventional sequences, especially in musculoskeletal cancers. Regarding the monitoring of response to therapy in cancer or inflammatory disease, the use of ADC value may represent a more reliable additional tool but must be compared to the initial ADC value of the lesions along with the knowledge of the actual therapy.

  3. Neural Synchrony in Cortical Networks: History, Concept and Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Uhlhaas, Peter J.; Pipa, Gordon; Lima, Bruss; Melloni, Lucia; Neuenschwander, Sergio; Nikolić, Danko; Singer, Wolf

    2009-01-01

    Following the discovery of context-dependent synchronization of oscillatory neuronal responses in the visual system, the role of neural synchrony in cortical networks has been expanded to provide a general mechanism for the coordination of distributed neural activity patterns. In the current paper, we present an update of the status of this hypothesis through summarizing recent results from our laboratory that suggest important new insights regarding the mechanisms, function and relevance of this phenomenon. In the first part, we present recent results derived from animal experiments and mathematical simulations that provide novel explanations and mechanisms for zero and nero-zero phase lag synchronization. In the second part, we shall discuss the role of neural synchrony for expectancy during perceptual organization and its role in conscious experience. This will be followed by evidence that indicates that in addition to supporting conscious cognition, neural synchrony is abnormal in major brain disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. We conclude this paper with suggestions for further research as well as with critical issues that need to be addressed in future studies. PMID:19668703

  4. Current Concepts in Osteoradionecrosis after Head and Neck Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dhanda, J; Pasquier, D; Newman, L; Shaw, R

    2016-07-01

    Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the jaws is a feared complication of head and neck radiotherapy. ORN causes significant morbidity for patients and controversy among clinicians. This overview considers the variations in definition and classification of the condition that affect estimates of incidence and also the interpretation of evidence. The influence of newer radiotherapy techniques in reducing ORN through reduced dose and xerostomia is balanced against a probable increase in a vulnerable population through a rising head and neck cancer incidence. Theories of pathophysiology of ORN include radiation-induced osteomyelitis, hypoxic and hypovascular theory and fibroatrophic theory. Prevention strategies include restorative dentistry and radiation planning techniques. Treatments range from conservative 'watch and wait' through to more radical surgical strategies. Newer medical management strategies are available with a limited evidence base. The use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy remains controversial and the background and need for newer hyperbaric oxygen trials is discussed. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Current Concepts in Hip Preservation Surgery: Part II--Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Adler, Kelly L; Cook, P Christopher; Geisler, Paul R; Yen, Yi-Meng; Giordano, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    Successful treatment of nonarthritic hip pain in young athletic individuals remains a challenge. A growing fund of clinical knowledge has paralleled technical innovations that have enabled hip preservation surgeons to address a multitude of structural variations of the proximal femur and acetabulum and concomitant intra-articular joint pathology. Often, a combination of open and arthroscopic techniques are necessary to treat more complex pathomorphologies. Peri- and postoperative recovery after such procedures can pose a substantial challenge to the patient, and a dedicated, thoughtful approach may reduce setbacks, limit morbidity, and help optimize functional outcomes. PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched to identify relevant scientific and review articles through December 2014 using the search terms hip preservation, labrum, surgical dislocation, femoroacetabular impingement, postoperative rehabilitation, peri-acetabular osteotomy, and rotational osteotomy. Reference lists of included articles were reviewed to locate additional references of interest. Clinical review. Level 4. Hip preservation procedures and appropriate rehabilitation have allowed individuals to return to a physically active lifestyle. Effective postoperative rehabilitation must consider modifications and precautions specific to the particular surgical techniques used. Proper postoperative rehabilitation after hip preservation surgery may help optimize functional recovery and maximize clinical success and patient satisfaction. © 2015 The Author(s).

  6. Current concepts on gingival fibromatosis-related syndromes.

    PubMed

    Poulopoulos, Athanasios; Kittas, Dimitrios; Sarigelou, Asimina

    2011-08-01

    Gingival fibromatosis is a rare, benign, slowly-growing fibrous overgrowth of the gingiva, with great genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Gingival fibromatosis/overgrowth can be inherited as an isolated trait (hereditary gingival fibromatosis) and/or as a component of a syndrome, or it can be drug induced. As a clinical manifestation of a syndrome, gingival fibromatosis is usually associated with generalized hypertrichosis, mental retardation, or epilepsy. Gingival fibromatosis and its related syndromes are mainly inherited in an autosomal-dominant manner, but autosomal-recessive inheritance has also been reported. Clinical syndromic presentation includes Zimmermann-Laband syndrome, Ramon syndrome, Rutherford syndrome, Cowden syndrome, Cross syndrome, Göhlich-Ratmann syndrome, Avani syndrome, and I-cell disease. However, a phenotypic overlap has been suggested, as many combinations of their systemic manifestations have been reported. Treatment of choice is usually gingivectomy with gingivoplasty. Before any therapy, clinical practitioners must take into consideration the clinical course of a particular syndrome and every possible functional and esthetic disorder.

  7. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is characterized by fibrotic obstruction of the proximal pulmonary arteries, and it is believed to result from incomplete thrombus resolution after acute pulmonary embolism. While treatment for this condition with surgery and medical therapy has improved outcomes, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying CTEPH is incomplete. Numerous risk factors have been associated with the development of CTEPH, including but not limited to acquired thrombophilias and chronic inflammatory states. A minority of patients with CTEPH have an abnormal fibrin structure that may delay thrombus resolution. Recently, examination of resected scar material in patients with CTEPH has suggested that deficient angiogenesis may play a role in thrombus nonresolution, and there is increasing interest in factors that drive intravascular scar formation. An additional challenge in CTEPH research is understanding the etiology and implications of the small-vessel disease present in many patients. Future work will likely be directed at understanding the pathways important to disease pathogenesis through further examinations of resected tissue material, continued work on animal models, and genomic approaches to identify alterations in gene expression or gene variants that may distinguish CTEPH from other forms of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27252839

  8. Current Concepts in the Use of Voluma, Volift, and Volbella.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Gregory J; Swift, Arthur; Remington, B Kent

    2015-11-01

    Hyaluronic acids (HAs) are very popular temporary fillers with a very good safety record. Improvements and adaptations in clinical use are continuing. We have assessed the available literature to investigate the relatively new Vycross technology that uses a mixture of high- and low-molecular-weight HAs with a relatively low but varying HA concentration with enhanced cross-linking to produce a number of products that have differing clinical indications. Voluma has the highest HA concentration at 20 mg/mL, a high G prime translating into lift capacity and cohesivity keeping the product capable to lift vertically adding structure, form, and volume, whereas Volbella has much lower concentration at 15 mg/mL, a lower G prime and cohesivity allowing it to be used in more a horizontal spreading fashion enabling a superficial approach to lips, lines, and more subtle depressions. Volift at 17.5 mg/mL HA is half way between the 2 other products, allowing more subtle lift capacity but retaining an element of spread making it a useful agent for the perioral region in general and in the treatment of fine lines. A range of products has been released that allows different components of facial structure, volume, and lines to be adequately addressed.

  9. Current Concepts in the Management of Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Misiakos, Evangelos P.; Bagias, George; Patapis, Paul; Sotiropoulos, Dimitrios; Kanavidis, Prodromos; Machairas, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a severe, rare, potentially lethal soft tissue infection that develops in the scrotum and perineum, the abdominal wall, or the extremities. The infection progresses rapidly, and septic shock may ensue; hence, the mortality rate is high (median mortality 32.2%). Prognosis becomes poorer in the presence of co-morbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, immunosuppression, chronic alcohol disease, chronic renal failure, and liver cirrhosis. NF is classified into four types, depending on microbiological findings. Most cases are polymicrobial, classed as type I. The clinical status of the patient varies from erythema, swelling, and tenderness in the early stage to skin ischemia with blisters and bullae in the advanced stage of infection. In its fulminant form, the patient is critically ill with signs and symptoms of severe septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction. The clinical condition is the most important clue for diagnosis. However, in equivocal cases, the diagnosis and severity of the infection can be secured with laboratory-based scoring systems, such as the laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis score or Fournier’s gangrene severity index score, especially in regard to Fournier’s gangrene. Computed tomography or ultrasonography can be helpful, but definitive diagnosis is attained by exploratory surgery at the infected sites. Management of the infection begins with broad-spectrum antibiotics, but early and aggressive drainage and meticulous debridement constitute the mainstay of treatment. Postoperative management of the surgical wound is also important for the patient’s survival, along with proper nutrition. The vacuum-assisted closure system has proved to be helpful in wound management, with its combined benefits of continuous cleansing of the wound and the formation of granulation tissue. PMID:25593960

  10. Current concept of neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and NMO spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Anu; McKeon, Andrew; Nakashima, Ichiro; Sato, Douglas Kazutoshi; Elsone, Liene; Fujihara, Kazuo; de Seze, Jerome

    2013-08-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) has been described as a disease clinically characterised by severe optic neuritis (ON) and transverse myelitis (TM). Other features of NMO include female preponderance, longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (>3 vertebral segments), and absence of oligoclonal IgG bands . In spite of these differences from multiple sclerosis (MS), the relationship between NMO and MS has long been controversial. However, since the discovery of NMO-IgG or aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody (AQP4-antibody), an NMO-specific autoantibody to AQP4, the dominant water channel in the central nervous system densely expressed on end-feet of astrocytes, unique clinical features, MRI and other laboratory findings in NMO have been clarified further. AQP4-antibody is now the most important laboratory finding for the diagnosis of NMO. Apart from NMO, some patients with recurrent ON or recurrent longitudinally extensive myelitis alone are also often positive for AQP4-antibody. Moreover, studies of AQP4-antibody-positive patients have revealed that brain lesions are not uncommon in NMO, and some patterns appear to be unique to NMO. Thus, the spectrum of NMO is wider than mere ON and TM. Pathological analyses of autopsied cases strongly suggest that unlike MS, astrocytic damage is the primary pathology in NMO, and experimental studies confirm the pathogenicity of AQP4-antibody. Importantly, therapeutic outcomes of some immunological treatments are different between NMO and MS, making early differential diagnosis of these two disorders crucial. We provide an overview of the epidemiology, clinical and neuroimaging features, immunopathology and therapy of NMO and NMO spectrum disorders.

  11. Current concepts in pathophysiology and management of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Amal H; Abdulfattah, Hanaa M; Mahmoud, Rasha H; Khalil, Wagdy K B; Ahmed, Hanaa H

    2015-01-01

    Additional approaches to control malignancies are needed due to the emerging trends in the incidence of cancer of different organ sites. Due to the high frequency of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its poor prognosis, preventing HCC is an urgent priority. To explore the antioxidant and apoptotic pathways of grape seed extract (GSE) we induce HCC experimentally by diethylnitrosoamine (DEN) and treated the animals with low and high doses of GSE. The results indicate good therapeutic possibilities for GSE use in treatment of HCC., This was evidenced via regression of liver enzymes' function (ALT&AST), the HCC markers; α-fucosidase, α-fetoprotein and carcinoembrionic antigen (CEA) in HCC groups treated with the grape seed extract. Also, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) showed a significant decrease using GSE in HCC bearing animals. Regarding the apoptotic pathways of GSE, we found a significant down regulation of apoptosis enhancing nuclease (Aen), Bcl2-associated X protein (Bax), B-cell translocation gene 2(Btg2), Cyclin G1 (Ccng1) and Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (Cdkn1a) gene expression in HCC+GSE groups as compared to HCC bearing group. In the same trend, the necrotic/apoptotic rates were significantly higher in the HCC groups treated with GSE vs. the HCC bearing group. Finally, the 8-OHdG/2-dG generation decreased by 73.8% and 52.9% in HCC+GSE at low and high doses, respectively. Based on these encouraging observations, grape seed extract could be a promising natural remedy for attenuating hepatocellular carcinoma that has a great future in approaches directed towards control of HCC.

  12. Coronary heart disease: causes and drug treatment--spouses' conceptions.

    PubMed

    Kärner, Anita; Dahlgren, Madeleine Abrandt; Bergdahl, Björn

    2004-02-01

    Spouses are important in the rehabilitation process of their partner after coronary heart disease event. Their knowledge and attitudes have an impact on their support to the partner concerning lifestyle changes and drug treatment after an event. To explore spouses' conceptions concerning causes of coronary heart disease and drug treatment 1 year after the partner's cardiac event. Qualitative with an empirical and inductive approach. Semi-structured interviews with strategically selected spouses (17 women and eight men) were taped. The transcripts were analysed within the phenomenographic framework. Spouses' conceptions about causes of coronary heart disease and its treatment consisted of correct facts, as judged on a lay level, less elaborated conceptions and misconceptions. Among causes of coronary heart disease, the spouses were most knowledgeable about fat intake. They knew less about contributions from inactivity, stress and smoking. Ambivalent feelings were expressed about benefits vs. side effects of drugs. The treatment was conceived as necessary for the heart, but harmful for other organs. Men and women were evenly distributed in most of the derived categories. More women than men considered stress as a cause of coronary heart disease and also misconceived physical exercise to cause the disease. A variation of spouses' conceptions was revealed about causes of coronary heart disease and drug treatment. There was a lack of understanding concerning important parts of cardiac rehabilitation activities. These misconceptions may have implications by influencing their partner's co-operative behaviour. Spouses' pre-existing conceptions of coronary heart disease and its treatment should be considered in the rehabilitation process of their partner. Couples with misconceptions should be given the opportunity to increase qualitatively their knowledge starting from their point of view rather than from that of the professional perspective.

  13. Biological Concepts. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie, John W.

    This manual contains the textual material for a three-lesson unit which introduces students to the basic concepts applicable to all biological treatment systems. The general topic areas addressed in the lessons are: (1) the microorganisms found in biological systems; (2) the factors that affect the growth and health of biological systems; and (3)…

  14. Comprehensive management of pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury: Current concepts and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Erwin A.; Pires, Marilyn; Ngann, Yvette; Sterling, Michelle; Rubayi, Salah

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury represent a challenging problem for patients, their caregivers, and their physicians. They often lead to recurrent hospitalizations, multiple surgeries, and potentially devastating complications. They present a significant cost to the healthcare system, they require a multidisciplinary team approach to manage well, and outcomes directly depend on patients' education, prevention, and compliance with conservative and surgical protocols. With so many factors involved in the successful treatment of pressure ulcers, an update on their comprehensive management in spinal cord injury is warranted. Current concepts of local wound care, surgical options, as well as future trends from the latest wound healing research are reviewed to aid medical professionals in treating patients with this difficult problem. PMID:24090179

  15. Leishmaniases of the New World: current concepts and implications for future research.

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, G; Tesh, R B

    1993-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies indicate that leishmaniasis in the Americas is far more abundant and of greater public health importance than was previously recognized. The disease in the New World is caused by a number of different parasite species that are capable of producing a wide variety of clinical manifestations. The outcome of leishmanial infection in humans is largely dependent on the immune responsiveness of the host and the virulence of the infecting parasite strain. This article reviews current concepts of the clinical forms, immunology, pathology, laboratory diagnosis, and treatment of the disease as well as aspects of its epidemiology and control. Recommendations for future research on the disease and its control are made. PMID:8358705

  16. Evaluation of a Salutogenetic Concept for Inpatient Psychosomatic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Loew, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The increase of psychosomatic disorders due to cultural changes requires enhanced therapeutic models. This study investigated a salutogenetic treatment concept for inpatient psychosomatic treatment, based on data from more than 11000 patients of a psychosomatic clinic in Germany. The clinic aims at supporting patients' health improvement by fostering values such as humanity, community, and mindfulness. Most of patients found these values realized in the clinical environment. Self-assessment questionnaires addressing physical and mental health as well as symptom ratings were available for analysis of pre-post-treatment effects and long-term stability using one-year follow-up data, as well as for a comparison with other clinics. With respect to different diagnoses, symptoms improved in self-ratings with average effect sizes between 0.60 and 0.98. About 80% of positive changes could be sustained as determined in a 1-year follow-up survey. Patients with a lower concordance with the values of the clinic showed less health improvement. Compared to 14 other German psychosomatic clinics, the investigated treatment concept resulted in slightly higher decrease in symptoms (e.g., depression scale) and a higher self-rated mental and physical improvement in health. The data suggest that a successfully implemented salutogenetic clinical treatment concept not only has positive influence on treatment effects but also provides long-term stability. PMID:24159352

  17. Cancer of the endometrium: current aspects of diagnostics and treatment.

    PubMed

    Münstedt, Karsten; Grant, Phillip; Woenckhaus, Joachim; Roth, Gabriele; Tinneberg, Hans-Rudolf

    2004-07-21

    Endometrial cancer represents a tumor entity with a great variation in its incidence throughout the world (range 1 to 25). This suggests enormous possibilities of cancer prevention due to the fact that the incidence is very much endocrine-related, chiefly with obesity, and thus most frequent in the developed world. As far as treatment is concerned, it is generally accepted that surgery represents the first choice of treatment. However, several recommendations seem reasonable especially with lymphadenectomy, even though they are not based on evidence. All high-risk cases are generally recommended for radiotherapy. A literature search of the Medline was carried out for all articles on endometrial carcinoma related to diagnosis and treatment. The articles were systematically reviewed and were categorized into incidence, etiology, precancerosis, early diagnosis, classification, staging, prevention, and treatment. The article is organized into several similar subheadings. In spite of the overall good prognosis during the early stages of the disease, the survival is poor in advanced stages or recurrences. Diagnostic measures are very well able to detect asymptomatic recurrences. These only seem justified if patients' chances are likely to improve, otherwise such measures increases costs as well as decrease the patients' quality of life. To date neither current nor improved concepts of endocrine treatment or chemotherapy have been able to substantially increase patients' chances of survival. Therefore, newer concepts into the use of antibodies e.g. trastuzumab in HER2-overexpressing tumors and the newer endocrine compounds will need to be investigated. Furthermore, it would seem highly desirable if future studies were to identify valid criteria for an individualized management, thereby maximizing the benefits and minimizing the risks.

  18. Current and future treatment of amyloid diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ankarcrona, M.; Winblad, B.; Monteiro, C.; Fearns, C.; Powers, E. T.; Johansson, J.; Westermark, G. T.; Presto, J.; Ericzon, B-G.; Kelly, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    There are more than 30 human proteins whose aggregation appears to cause degenerative maladies referred to as amyloid diseases or amyloidoses. These disorders are named after the characteristic cross-β-sheet amyloid fibrils that accumulate systemically or are localized to specific organs. In most cases current treatment is limited to symptomatic approaches and thus disease-modifying therapies are needed. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder with amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) plaques and tau neurofibrillary tangles as pathological hallmarks. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted with vaccines and small molecules to target Aβ formation and aggregation and also enhance Aβ clearance; so far such clinical trials have been unsuccessful. Novel strategies are therefore required and here we will discuss the possibility of utilizing the chaperone BRICHOS to prevent Aβ aggregation and toxicity. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is symptomatically treated with insulin. However the disease is linked to the aggregation and progressive accumulation of islet amyloid polypeptide and oligomers of this peptide are cytotoxic. Several compounds have been shown to inhibit islet amyloid aggregation and cytotoxicity in vitro. Future animal studies and clinical trials have to be be conducted to determine their efficacy in vivo. Transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses are a group of systemic degenerative diseases involving multiple organ systems and caused by TTR aggregation. Liver transplantation decreases the generation of misfolded TTR and improves the quality of life for a subgroup of this patient population. Compounds that stabilize the natively folded, non-amyloidogenic, tetrameric conformation of TTR have been developed and the drug tafamidis is available as treatment. PMID:27165517

  19. Current and future treatment of amyloid diseases.

    PubMed

    Ankarcrona, M; Winblad, B; Monteiro, C; Fearns, C; Powers, E T; Johansson, J; Westermark, G T; Presto, J; Ericzon, B-G; Kelly, J W

    2016-08-01

    There are more than 30 human proteins whose aggregation appears to cause degenerative maladies referred to as amyloid diseases or amyloidoses. These disorders are named after the characteristic cross-β-sheet amyloid fibrils that accumulate systemically or are localized to specific organs. In most cases, current treatment is limited to symptomatic approaches and thus disease-modifying therapies are needed. Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder with extracellular amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) fibrils and intracellular tau neurofibrillary tangles as pathological hallmarks. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted with passive and active immunotherapy, and small molecules to inhibit Aβ formation and aggregation or to enhance Aβ clearance; so far such clinical trials have been unsuccessful. Novel strategies are therefore required and here we will discuss the possibility of utilizing the chaperone BRICHOS to prevent Aβ aggregation and toxicity. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is symptomatically treated with insulin. However, the underlying pathology is linked to the aggregation and progressive accumulation of islet amyloid polypeptide as fibrils and oligomers, which are cytotoxic. Several compounds have been shown to inhibit islet amyloid aggregation and cytotoxicity in vitro. Future animal studies and clinical trials have to be conducted to determine their efficacy in vivo. The transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses are a group of systemic degenerative diseases compromising multiple organ systems, caused by TTR aggregation. Liver transplantation decreases the generation of misfolded TTR and improves the quality of life for a subgroup of this patient population. Compounds that stabilize the natively folded, nonamyloidogenic, tetrameric conformation of TTR have been developed and the drug tafamidis is available as a promising treatment.

  20. [Treatment of osteoporosis: current aspects and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Body, J J

    1994-01-01

    The risk of osteoporotic fractures is currently easily assessed by densitometry. The entities "osteopenia" and "osteoporosis" are less and less separated and, along the same line, it becomes somewhat arbitrary to separate "prevention" and "treatment" of osteoporosis when low bone mass has been diagnosed. An adequate calcium intake is most important in childhood and adolescence, pregnancy and lactation, and in the older population which, moreover, often suffers from vitamin D deficiency leading to cortical bone loss. Supplements of calcium and vitamin D to institutionalized elderly people could reduce by more than one third the risk of hip fractures. Estrogen replacement therapy remains the best means to prevent postmenopausal bone loss; too few women are treated but replacement therapy must be given for at least 7 years to keep a significant residual effect in the old age. Calcitonin has a proved analgesic effect for painful crush fractures and its long term administration can prevent postmenopausal trabecular bone loss. Nasal calcitonin considerably improves treatment tolerance and compliance but its price remains prohibitive. Etidronate is the only oral bisphosphonate available in Belgium. It can increase bone mass but its therapeutic index is too narrow and its antifracture efficacy has not been satisfactorily demonstrated. Pamidronate is a second generation bisphosphonate which has a much better therapeutic index but its usefulness is limited by the absence of an oral formulation. The introduction of third generation compounds will improve the therapeutic approach of osteoporosis if adequate therapeutic schemes are used. Much progress is also awaited concerning stimulators of osteoblastic activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. A return stroke model based purely on the current dissipation concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Vernon

    2015-12-01

    A return stroke model based purely on the current dissipation concept is introduced. With three model parameters the model is capable of generating electric and magnetic fields that are in reasonable agreement with experimentally observed electromagnetic fields.

  2. Lactic Acidosis: Current Treatments and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Kraut, Jeffrey A; Madias, Nicolaos E

    2016-09-01

    Mortality rates associated with severe lactic acidosis (blood pH<7.2) due to sepsis or low-flow states are high. Eliminating the triggering conditions remains the most effective therapy. Although recommended by some, administration of sodium bicarbonate does not improve cardiovascular function or reduce mortality. This failure has been attributed to both reduction in serum calcium concentration and generation of excess carbon dioxide with intracellular acidification. In animal studies, hyperventilation and infusion of calcium during sodium bicarbonate administration improves cardiovascular function, suggesting that this approach could allow expression of the positive aspects of sodium bicarbonate. Other buffers, such as THAM or Carbicarb, or dialysis might also provide base with fewer untoward effects. Examination of these therapies in humans is warranted. The cellular injury associated with lactic acidosis is partly due to activation of NHE1, a cell-membrane Na(+)/H(+) exchanger. In animal studies, selective NHE1 inhibitors improve cardiovascular function, ameliorate lactic acidosis, and reduce mortality, supporting future research into their possible use in humans. Two main mechanisms contribute to lactic acid accumulation in sepsis and low-flow states: tissue hypoxia and epinephrine-induced stimulation of aerobic glycolysis. Targeting these mechanisms could allow for more specific therapy. This Acid-Base and Electrolyte Teaching Case presents a patient with acute lactic acidosis and describes current and future approaches to treatment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Current treatment options in systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma).

    PubMed

    Stummvoll, G H

    2002-01-01

    Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) or Scleroderma is a generalized autoimmune disease with variable involvement of the skin and major organs. Etiology and pathogenesis are still largely unknown, but a variety of humoral and cellular autoimmune phenomena can be observed, and a pivotal role of T lymphocytes in SSc pathogenesis is postulated. The rarity of the disease, the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and severity as well as a variable course render therapy in SSc a major challenge. In view of the immunopathogenesis of SSc, many (presumed) immunomodulatory agents have been used, but no single agent has been proven to be convincingly effective. Trials with extracorporeal therapies (such as photopheresis, plasmapheresis) or even stem cell transplantation are in progress. In contrast to the hitherto unsuccessful therapeutic approaches for the overall disease course, some life-threatening organ manifestations can often be treated successfully, e.g. interstitial pneumonitis with i.v. cyclophosphamide and scleroderma renal crisis with ACE inhibitors and haemodialysis, respectively. Furthermore, pharmacological and supportive treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon and gastrointestinal involvement can alleviate the burden of the disease. Current therapeutic options as well as hitherto investigated immunomodulators are reviewed in this article.

  4. Neuroprotection: the emerging concept of restorative neural stem cell biology for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Barbara; Piemonte, Fiorella; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2011-06-01

    During the past decades Neural Stem Cells have been considered as an alternative source of cells to replace lost neurons and NSC transplantation has been indicated as a promising treatment for neurodegenerative disorders. Nevertheless, the current understanding of NSC biology suggests that, far from being mere spare parts for cell replacement therapies, NSCs could play a key role in the pharmacology of neuroprotection and become protagonists of innovative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review this new emerging concept of NSC biology.

  5. Basic Concepts in Opioid Prescribing and Current Concepts of Opioid-Mediated Effects on Driving

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Adam M.; Kaye, Alan D.; Lofton, Elise C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic pain receive substandard analgesic therapy. Incomplete or inadequate care often stems from physician fears of patient addiction and/or drug toxicity. As a result, many chronic pain patients are undertreated and have unrelieved pain that tempts them to overuse or to abuse prescribed pharmacologic treatments. In the last few years, educational efforts have targeted physicians who treat chronic, nonmalignant pain with information to improve prescribing strategies and to appreciate side effects. Additionally, opioid prescribing guidelines and educational programs, including World Health Organization-published guidelines for the management of cancer pain in 1986 and the American Pain Society's promotion of pain as the 5th vital sign, have increased the propensity of pharmacists, physicians, and pain specialists to dispense pain treatments. Methods Controversial and evolving consequences from this explosion of prescription opioid use have emerged and are discussed in this review, including prescribing principles, opioid analgesic side effects, and driving concerns. Conclusion With additional appreciation for the untoward effects of chronic analgesia and a better understanding of opioid pharmacology, physicians can utilize pain management treatments in a safer and more effective manner. PMID:24358001

  6. Acute respiratory distress syndrome following cardiovascular surgery: current concepts and novel therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hoegl, Sandra; Zwissler, Bernhard; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Vohwinkel, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review gives an update on current treatment options and novel concepts on the prevention and treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in cardiovascular surgery patients. Recent findings The only proven beneficial therapeutic options in ARDS are those that help to prevent further ventilator-induced lung injury, such as prone position, use of lung-protective ventilation strategies, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. In the future also new approaches like mesenchymal cell therapy, activation of hypoxia-elicited transcription factors or targeting of purinergic signaling may be successful outside the experimental setting. Owing to the so far limited treatment options, it is of great importance to determine patients at risk for developing ARDS already perioperatively. In this context, serum biomarkers and lung injury prediction scores could be useful. Summary Preventing ARDS as a severe complication in the cardiovascular surgery setting may help to reduce morbidity and mortality. As cardiovascular surgery patients are of greater risk to develop ARDS, preventive interventions should be implemented early on. Especially, use of low tidal volumes, avoiding of fluid overload and restrictive blood transfusion regimes may help to prevent ARDS. PMID:26598954

  7. Natural history of hepatocellular carcinoma and current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Raoul, Jean-Luc

    2008-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most frequent primary liver cancer and the most severe complication of chronic liver disease. The annual number of new cases worldwide is approximately 550,000, representing more than 5% of human cancers and is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. The stages of the malignancy as well as the severity of the underlying liver disease are essential factors in planning the therapeutic approach. Curative treatment options are represented mainly by surgery (ie, resection or transplantation), but most patients are not candidates for a curative option, and only palliative treatment could be given to these patients. Among palliative treatments, only chemoembolization has been proven to be effective, but other options are currently being investigated. Major risk factors for HCC are well known and are dependent on the geographic area. In Europe, the United States, and Japan, the main risk factors are liver cirrhosis, hepatitis B and C virus, alcohol, and tobacco; in contrast, in Africa and Asia, these factors are hepatitis B and C virus, tobacco use, and aflatoxin exposure. Cirrhosis from any cause is a predisposing factor for HCC and could be considered as a premalignant condition. The present concept of carcinogenesis in HCC is a multistage process. This article describes the natural history of HCC and discusses the various treatment options available at present.

  8. Current Status of Interventional Radiology Treatment of Infrapopliteal Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, T.; Uberoi, R.

    2013-06-15

    Treatment of infrapopliteal arteries has developed to a standard technique during the past two decades. With the introduction of innovative devices, a variety of techniques has been created and is still under investigation. Treatment options range from plain balloon angioplasty (POBA), all sorts of stent applications, such as bare metal, balloon expanding, self-expanding, coated and drug-eluting stents, and bio-absorbable stents, to latest developments, such as drug-eluting balloons. Regarding the scientific background, several prospective, randomized studies with relevant numbers of patients have been (or will be) published that are Level I evidence. In contrast to older studies, which primarily were based mostly on numeric parameters, such as diameters or residual stenoses, more recent study concepts focus increasingly on clinical features, such as amputation rate improvement or changes of clinical stages and quality of life standards. Although it is still not decided, which of the individual techniques might be the best one, we can definitely conclude that whatever treatment of infrapopliteal arteries will be used it is of substantial benefit for the patient. Therefore, the goal of this review is to give an overview about the current developments and techniques for the treatment of infrapopliteal arteries, to present clinical and technical results, to weigh individual techniques, and to discuss the recent developments.

  9. [Chronic kidney disease : What is currently available for treatment?

    PubMed

    Fleig, S; Patecki, M; Schmitt, R

    2016-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease is common in the general population with an estimated prevalence of roughly 2 million in Germany. Typically, chronic kidney disease is progressive and in the terminal stage the patients require dialysis or kidney transplantation. In many cases the disease remains silent for a long time but early stages are already associated with increasing morbidity and mortality. Therefore early detection is very important. In recent years several new concepts have been introduced that might help to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease or improve the accompanying risks. Here, we want to provide a nephrologist's perspective on the current guidelines for the treatment and prevention of chronic kidney disease. We summarize which diagnostic approaches are useful for general practitioners and we take a pragmatic look at the existing opportunities for combating renal functional decline. We also shed light on established measures to minimize the risk of comorbidities.

  10. [Treatment of osteoporosis: current data and prospects].

    PubMed

    Reginster, J Y; Deroisy, R; Franchimont, P

    1994-12-15

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is characterized not only by a reduction in bone mass but also by bone microarchitecture alterations, which result in greater bone frailty and in an increased fracture risk. Many drugs have been studied to determine whether they prevent bone loss or reduce the incidence of additional fractures in patients with established osteoporosis. Primary prevention of osteoporosis rests on regular exercising and adequate intake of dietary calcium. For secondary prevention in women undergoing menopause, replacement estrogen therapy given for at least ten years is associated with substantial reductions in fractures of the radius, hip, and spine. Other drugs capable of arresting postmenopausal bone loss include parenteral, nasal or rectal calcitonin and diphosphonates. However, the long-term safety of the latter requires further evaluation. Current studies are evaluating new molecules with potential preventive efficacy, such as ipriflavone. There is no general consensus about the efficacy of treatments for established osteoporosis with fractures. To date, no controlled studies have demonstrated a reduction in the incidence of further fractures in patients given calcium alone. Studies of hydroxylated vitamin D derivatives have been disappointing, although daily administration of vitamin D3 in combination with calcium significantly reduced the incidence of nonvertebral fractures in a population of elderly institutionalized subjects. Plausible explanations for this effect include increased vitamin D levels and reduced parathyroid levels in the bloodstream. Parenteral or nasal calcitonin stabilizes or increases bone mineral content in both cancellous and cortical bone. This effect is especially marked in high-turn-over patients. Several lines of evidence suggest that calcitonin therapy has a protective effect against vertebral and hip fractures. In patients with osteoporosis, oral or intravenous diphosphonates are associated with a significant increase in

  11. Current concepts in severe adult tracheobronchomalacia: evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Daniel H; Wilson, Jennifer L; Parikh, Mihir; Majid, Adnan; Gangadharan, Sidhu P

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) in patients with respiratory complaints, though its true incidence in the adult population remains unknown. Most of these patients have an acquired form of severe diffuse TBM of unclear etiology. The mainstays of diagnosis are dynamic (inspiratory and expiratory) airway computed tomography (CT) scan and dynamic flexible bronchoscopy with forced expiratory maneuvers. While the prevailing definition of TBM is 50% reduction in cross-sectional area, a high proportion of healthy volunteers meet this threshold, thus this threshold fails to identify patients that might benefit from intervention. Therefore, we consider complete or near-complete collapse (>90% reduction in cross-sectional area) of the airway to be severe enough to warrant potential intervention. Surgical central airway stabilization by posterior mesh splinting (tracheobronchoplasty) effectively corrects malacic airways and has been shown to lead to significant improvement in symptoms, health-related quality of life, as well as functional and exercise capacity in carefully selected adults with severe diffuse TBM. A short-term stent trial clarifies a patient's candidacy for surgical intervention. Coordination of care between experienced interventional pulmonologists, radiologists, and thoracic surgeons is essential for optimal outcomes.

  12. Current concepts in severe adult tracheobronchomalacia: evaluation and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago, Daniel H.; Wilson, Jennifer L.; Parikh, Mihir; Majid, Adnan

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) in patients with respiratory complaints, though its true incidence in the adult population remains unknown. Most of these patients have an acquired form of severe diffuse TBM of unclear etiology. The mainstays of diagnosis are dynamic (inspiratory and expiratory) airway computed tomography (CT) scan and dynamic flexible bronchoscopy with forced expiratory maneuvers. While the prevailing definition of TBM is 50% reduction in cross-sectional area, a high proportion of healthy volunteers meet this threshold, thus this threshold fails to identify patients that might benefit from intervention. Therefore, we consider complete or near-complete collapse (>90% reduction in cross-sectional area) of the airway to be severe enough to warrant potential intervention. Surgical central airway stabilization by posterior mesh splinting (tracheobronchoplasty) effectively corrects malacic airways and has been shown to lead to significant improvement in symptoms, health-related quality of life, as well as functional and exercise capacity in carefully selected adults with severe diffuse TBM. A short-term stent trial clarifies a patient’s candidacy for surgical intervention. Coordination of care between experienced interventional pulmonologists, radiologists, and thoracic surgeons is essential for optimal outcomes. PMID:28203438

  13. [Six treatment principles of the basle pressure sore concept].

    PubMed

    Rieger, U; Scheufler, O; Schmid, D; Zweifel-Schlatter, M; Kalbermatten, D; Pierer, G

    2007-06-01

    The treatment of pressure sores has gained importance due to the increase of geriatric patients and general life expectancy as well as improved therapeutic options in patients with spinal cord injuries. The aetiology of pressure sores is multifactorial. Risk factors such as immobility, malnutrition, and other co-morbidities have to be considered. Therapy of pressure sores is time- and cost-consuming and recurrence rates are high. Successful treatment is based on the interdisciplinary cooperation between conservative and surgical disciplines, nursing, as well as on continuous patient education. The Basle pressure sore concept consists of six principles. Over a total treatment period of approximately three months usually two operative interventions are performed. For effective relief of pressure (1st principle) patients are placed on low-airloss beds. Operative debridement of pressure sores is performed early and systemic or local infection is treated (2nd principle). The wound is then conditioned with moist dressings or VAC (3rd principle). Simultaneously concomitant malnutrition is quantified clinically and chemically and treated by oral or, if necessary, parenteral nutrition. Other risk factors are optimised as well as possible (4th principle). Hereby optimal conditions for plastic-surgical coverage are provided (5th principle). Postoperatively a standardised concept of pressure relief and mobilisation is adhered to (6th principle). This multimodal treatment concept is well established at the University Hospital of Basle for many years. Combined with an effective prevention, the rate of pressure sores could be significantly reduced, wounds could be healed, and the number of recurrences diminished. In a two-year period between January 2004 and December 2005 the Basle plastic surgery team treated 170 pressure sores in 142 patients according to this concept in the Swiss paraplegic centre in Nottwil. In 2006, 78 % of these patients (111 patients) were followed up and

  14. Current concepts in fluid resuscitation for prehospital care of combat casualties.

    PubMed

    Dubick, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Historically, hemorrhage accounts for the primary cause of death on the battlefield in conventional warfare. In addition, hemorrhage was associated with 85% of potentially survivable deaths in the current conflicts, approximately two-thirds of which were from noncompressible injuries. Future combat casualty care strategies suggest the likelihood of long transport times or significant time delays in evacuation of casualties. In addition, there are logistical limitations to providing large volumes of resuscitation fluid far-forward, and current guidelines do not recommend infusing large volumes of fluid until bleeding is controlled. Since the medic has few options for treating noncompressible injuries short of infusing fluid to maintain a blood pressure, the concept of damage control resuscitation was developed to promote hemostatic resuscitation. Damage control resuscitation recommends limiting the amount of crystalloids or colloids infused and using plasma and other blood products in more optimal ratios for the treatment of severe hemorrhage to improve battlefield survival and to reduce or prevent early and late deleterious sequelae. Taken together, these efforts have important implications towards the development of optimal fluid resuscitation strategies for stabilization of the combat casualty.

  15. Current status of transcatheter mitral valve repair therapies - From surgical concepts towards future directions.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Sten Lyager

    Transcatheter mitral valve (MV) intervention has emerged as an effective treatment option for symptomatic severe mitral regurgitation (MR) in patients considered to be inoperable or at high operative risk for surgical MV surgery. In primary mitral regurgitation, surgical repair is the standard of care. Transcatheter edge-to-edge MV repair with the MitraClip system has the largest clinical experience to date and offers a sustained clinical benefit in selected surgical high-risk patients. Surgery for secondary MR remains a challenge. Indications and the preferred surgical procedure remain controversial, mainly because of high recurrence rate of MR and the absence of evidence for survival benefit after surgery. Secondary MR is currently the most common indication for MitraClip use in Europe. Many registries show the safety of this procedure and improvements in patient symptoms and quality of life after 1 year, but most patients still have considerable residual MR. Other transcatheter MV repair devices are still in their early experiences. However, durability, safety, and possible damage of adjacent cardiac structures remain important concerns. Future directions for treatment of patients with secondary MR will depend on outcomes from the clinical trials in progress, whatever the use of transcatheter techniques is expected to expand substantially in the next years. This review aims to provide an overview of transcatheter MV interventions, emerging from surgical concepts, including leaflet repair, chordal replacement, and annuloplasty, and to discuss the challenges they face and future directions in achieving successful clinical application.

  16. Plantar fasciitis: current diagnostic modalities and treatments.

    PubMed

    Healey, Kevin; Chen, Katherine

    2010-07-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of heel pain. The diagnosis is made clinically and validated with different diagnostic modalities ranging from ultrasound to magnetic resonance imaging. Treatments vary from stretching exercises to different surgical options. No single treatment is guaranteed to alleviate the heel pain.

  17. Current Treatments Available for Scleroderma Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 inhibitors prevent the metabolism of a signaling molecule called cGMP. Treatment with a PDE type 5 ... Esbriet ® ) Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Nintedanib is a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that targets growth factor ...

  18. Training cognition in ADHD: current findings, borrowed concepts, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Kyle J; van den Bos, Wouter; McClure, Samuel M; Schweitzer, Julie B

    2012-07-01

    With both its high prevalence and myriad of negative outcomes, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) demands a careful consideration of the efficacy of its treatment options. Although the benefits of medication have a robust empirical background, nonpharmaceutical interventions evoke particular interest, as they are often viewed more favorably by parents. This review pays special attention to the use of working memory and recent cognitive training attempts in ADHD, describing its cognitive, behavioral, and biological effects in relation to current neurological theory of the disorder. While these treatments have demonstrated positive effects on some measures, there are limitations, as studies have failed to demonstrate generalization to critical measures, such as teacher-rated classroom behaviors, and have provided limited but growing evidence of functionally significant improvements in behavior. There is also a clear lack of research on the effects of training on reward systems and self-control. These limitations may be addressed by broadening the scope and procedures of the training and incorporating research concepts from other fields of study. First, it is important to consider the developmental trajectories of brain regions in individuals with the disorder, as they may relate to the effectiveness of cognitive training. Notions from behavioral economics, including delay discounting and framing (i.e., context) manipulations that influence present orientation, also have applications in the study of cognitive training in ADHD. In considering these other domains, we may find new ways to conceptualize and enhance cognitive training in ADHD and, in turn, address current limitations of interventions that fall in this category.

  19. Adhesive capsulitis: a review of current treatment.

    PubMed

    Neviaser, Andrew S; Hannafin, Jo A

    2010-11-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is characterized by a painful, gradual loss of both active and passive glenohumeral motion resulting from progressive fibrosis and ultimate contracture of the glenohumeral joint capsule. Variable nomenclature, inconsistent reporting of disease staging, and a multitude of different treatments have created a confusing and contradictory body of literature about this condition. Our purpose is to review the evidence for both nonsurgical and surgical management of adhesive capsulitis with an emphasis on level I and II studies when available. Significant deficits in the literature include a paucity of randomized controlled trials, failure to report response to treatment in a stage-based fashion, and an incomplete understanding of the disease's natural course. Recognition that the clinical stages reflect a progression in the underlying pathological changes should guide future treatments.

  20. Current medical treatment in pediatric urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Akın, Yiğit; Uçar, Murat; Yücel, Selçuk

    2013-01-01

    Although the prevalence of urolithiasis is nearly 2–3% in childhood, the risk of recurrence may range from 6.5–54%. There has been an increase in urinary stone disease among pediatric age groups, and stone disease has a multifactorial etiology. After the diagnosis, detailed metabolic evaluation is required. High recurrence rates, therapeutic irregularities and deficiency in diagnosis may lead to comorbidities such as loss of kidney function. Following diagnosis, the requirement for surgery, such as stone extraction and correction of anatomical anomalies, is determined. Medical and supportive treatments are also needed to prevent recurrence and urinary tract infections and to preserve renal function. Supportive care includes increased fluid intake and dietary modifications. Medical treatment is dependent on the cause of the urinary stone disease. The morbidities associated with pediatric urolithiasis can be prevented by early diagnosis, detailed metabolic analysis, regular follow-up and medical treatment protocols. PMID:26328120

  1. Early-onset scoliosis: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Cunin, V

    2015-02-01

    Early-onset scoliosis, which appears before the age of 10, can be due to congenital vertebral anomalies, neuromuscular diseases, scoliosis-associated syndromes, or idiopathic causes. It can have serious consequences for lung development and significantly reduce the life expectancy compared to adolescent scoliosis. Extended posterior fusion must be avoided to prevent the crankshaft phenomenon, uneven growth of the trunk and especially restrictive lung disease. Conservative (non-surgical) treatment is used first. If this fails, fusionless surgery can be performed to delay the final fusion procedure until the patient is older. The gold standard delaying surgical treatment is the implantation of growing rods as described by Moe and colleagues in the mid-1980s. These rods, which are lengthened during short surgical procedures at regular intervals, curb the scoliosis progression until the patient reaches an age where fusion can be performed. Knowledge of this technique and its complications has led to several mechanical improvements being made, namely use of rods that can be distracted magnetically on an outpatient basis, without the need for anesthesia. Devices based on the same principle have been designed that preferentially attach to the ribs to specifically address chest wall and spine dysplasia. The second category of surgical devices consists of rods used to guide spinal growth that do not require repeated surgical procedures. The third type of fusionless surgical treatment involves slowing the growth of the scoliosis convexity to help reduce the Cobb angle. The indications are constantly changing. Improvements in surgical techniques and greater surgeon experience may help to reduce the number of complications and make this lengthy treatment acceptable to patients and their family. Long-term effects of surgery on the Cobb angle have not been compared to those involving conservative "delaying" treatments. Because the latter has fewer complications associated with

  2. Current Directions in ADHD and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norvilitis, Jill M., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is a matter of ongoing research and debate, with considerable data supporting both psychopharmacological and behavioral approaches. Researchers continue to search for new interventions to be used in conjunction with or in place of the more traditional approaches. These interventions run the…

  3. Current Directions in ADHD and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norvilitis, Jill M., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is a matter of ongoing research and debate, with considerable data supporting both psychopharmacological and behavioral approaches. Researchers continue to search for new interventions to be used in conjunction with or in place of the more traditional approaches. These interventions run the…

  4. ACNE VULGARIS TREATMENT : THE CURRENT SCENARIO

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Sanjay K

    2011-01-01

    Acne Vulgaris is one of the most common skin disorders which dermatologists have to treat. It mainly affect adolescent, though may present at any age. In recent years, due to better understanding of the pathogenesis of acne, new therapeutic modalities and various permutation and combinations have been designed. In topical agents; benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics, retinoids, etc are the mainstay of treatment; can be given in combinations. While systemic therapy includes oral antibiotics, hormonal therapy, and isotretinoin, depending upon the need of patients it has to be selected. Physical treatment in the form of lesion removal, photo-therapy is also helpful in few of them. Since various old and new topical and systemic agents are available to treat acne, it sometime confuse treating dermatologist. To overcome this, panel of physicians and researchers worked together as a global alliance and task force to improve outcomes in acne treatment. They have tried to give consensus recommendation for the treatment of acne. Successful management of acne needs careful selection of anti-acne agents according to clinical presentation and individual patient needs. PMID:21572783

  5. Seasonal affective disorder, winter type: current insights and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Meesters, Ybe; Gordijn, Marijke Cm

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD), winter type, is a seasonal pattern of recurrent major depressive episodes most commonly occurring in autumn or winter and remitting in spring/summer. The syndrome has been well-known for more than three decades, with light treatment being the treatment of first choice. In this paper, an overview is presented of the present insights in SAD. Description of the syndrome, etiology, and treatment options are mentioned. Apart from light treatment, medication and psychotherapy are other treatment options. The predictable, repetitive nature of the syndrome makes it possible to discuss preventive treatment options. Furthermore, critical views on the concept of SAD as a distinct diagnosis are discussed.

  6. Evolution of Concept - But Not Action - in Addiction Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Arria, Amelia M.; McLellan, A. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The Western approach to drug abuse treatment involves a medical or disease orientation to understanding the onset, course and management of addiction and a clinical goal of abstinence or very significant reductions in drug use, usually with a combination of behavioral and pharmacological interventions. Even within this Western approach, and despite several consensually accepted features of addiction, a significant mismatch remains between what this culture has come to accept as the nature of the disease and how that same culture continues to treat the disease. This paper discusses the evolution of these Western concepts over the past decade without a corresponding evolution in the nature, duration or evaluation standards for addiction treatment1. Here we take the position that continuing care and adaptive treatment protocols, combining behavioral therapies, family and social supports, and where needed, medications show much promise to address the typically chronic, relapsing, and heterogeneous nature of most cases of serious addiction. By extension, methods to evaluate effectiveness of addiction treatment should focus upon the functional status of patients during the course of their treatment instead of after treatment has stopped as is the evaluation practice used with most other chronic illnesses. PMID:22676571

  7. Current Antioxidant Treatments in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shaojun; Xue, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the key mechanisms affecting the outcome throughout the course of organ transplantation. It is widely believed that the redox balance is dysregulated during ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) and causes subsequent oxidative injury, resulting from the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, in order to alleviate organ shortage, increasing number of grafts is retrieved from fatty, older, and even non-heart-beating donors that are particularly vulnerable to the accumulation of ROS. To improve the viability of grafts and reduce the risk of posttransplant dysfunction, a large number of studies have been done focusing on the antioxidant treatments for the purpose of maintaining the redox balance and thereby protecting the grafts. This review provides an overview of these emerging antioxidant treatments, targeting donor, graft preservation, and recipient as well. PMID:27403232

  8. Current and emerging treatments for severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Al Efraij, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma, which is poorly controlled despite the elimination of modifiable factors and the correct use of standard therapy, accounts only for 5% of people with asthma but it contributes to approximately 50% of the economic costs of asthma. Because of this unmet need, novel therapies have been developed for optimal treatment of these patients. The use of tiotropium, omalizumab, mepolizumab and thermoplasty in well-selected patients provides better control and most importantly a reduction in asthma exacerbations. PMID:26716048

  9. Current treatment options for recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Carlos; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Shaha, Ashok R.

    2010-01-01

    Loco-regional control rate of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has improved significantly in the past decade. However, local recurrence still represents a major cause of mortality and morbidity in advanced stages, and management of local failure remains a challenging issue in NPC. The best salvage treatment for local recurrent NPC remains to be determined. The options include brachytherapy, external radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, and nasopharyngectomy, either alone or in different combinations. In this article we will discuss the different options for salvage of locally recurrent NPC. Retreatment of locally recurrent NPC using radiotherapy, alone or in combination with other treatment modalities, as well as surgery, can result in long-term local control and survival in a substantial proportion of patients. For small-volume recurrent tumors (T1–T2) treated with external radiotherapy, brachytherapy or stereotactic radiosurgery, comparable results to those obtained with surgery have been reported. In contrast, treatment results of advanced-stage locally recurrent NPC are generally more satisfactory with surgery (with or without postoperative radiotherapy) than with reirradiation. PMID:20865269

  10. Giant cell arteritis: Current treatment and management

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Cristina; Rodrigues, Ana Filipa; O’Neill, Lorraine; Luqmani, Raashid Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids remain the cornerstone of medical therapy in giant cell arteritis (GCA) and should be started immediately to prevent severe consequences of the disease, such as blindness. However, glucocorticoid therapy leads to significant toxicity in over 80% of the patients. Various steroid-sparing agents have been tried, but robust scientific evidence of their efficacy and safety is still lacking. Tocilizumab, a monoclonal IL-6 receptor blocker, has shown promising results in a number of case series and is now being tested in a multi-centre randomized controlled trial. Other targeted treatments, such as the use of abatacept, are also now under investigation in GCA. The need for surgical treatment is rare and should ideally be performed in a quiescent phase of the disease. Not all patients follow the same course, but there are no valid biomarkers to assess therapy response. Monitoring of disease progress still relies on assessing clinical features and measuring inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate). Imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound) are clearly important screening tools for aortic aneurysms and assessing patients with large-vessel involvement, but may also have an important role as biomarkers of disease activity over time or in response to therapy. Although GCA is the most common form of primary vasculitis, the optimal strategies for treatment and monitoring remain uncertain. PMID:26090367

  11. Current Diagnosis and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bystritsky, Alexander; Khalsa, Sahib S.; Cameron, Michael E.; Schiffman, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health conditions. Although they are less visible than schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder, they can be just as disabling. The diagnoses of anxiety disorders are being continuously revised. Both dimensional and structural diagnoses have been used in clinical treatment and research, and both methods have been proposed for the new classification in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-5). However, each of these approaches has limitations. More recently, the emphasis in diagnosis has focused on neuroimaging and genetic research. This approach is based partly on the need for a more comprehensive understanding of how biology, stress, and genetics interact to shape the symptoms of anxiety. Anxiety disorders can be effectively treated with psychopharmacological and cognitive–behavioral interventions. These inter ventions have different symptom targets; thus, logical combinations of these strategies need to be further studied in order to improve future outcomes. New developments are forthcoming in the field of alternative strategies for managing anxiety and for treatment-resistant cases. Additional treatment enhancements should include the development of algorithms that can be easily used in primary care and with greater focus on managing functional impairment in patients with anxiety. PMID:23599668

  12. Current and future treatment options for gonorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Ison, Catherine A; Deal, Carolyn; Unemo, Magnus

    2013-12-01

    The delivery of effective antimicrobial therapy is essential for public health control of gonorrhoea, in the absence of a suitable vaccine. The antimicrobial agent chosen should have high efficacy and quality, lack toxicity and give >95% success when given empirically. Guidelines, which are informed by surveillance data, are used to aid clinicians in their choice of appropriate agent. Historically, gonorrhoea treatment has been delivered as a single, directly observed dose but this has resulted in failure of successive antimicrobial agents which have been replaced by a new antimicrobial to which resistance has been rare or non-existing. Following the drift towards decreased susceptibility and treatment failure to the extended spectrum cephalosporins, and the lack of 'new' alternative antimicrobials, the threat of difficult to treat or untreatable gonorrhoea has emerged. The challenge of maintaining gonorrhoea as a treatable infection has resulted in national, regional and global response or action plans. This review discusses different approaches to the future treatment of gonorrhoea including; use of ceftriaxone, the injectable cephalosporin at increased dosage; dual antimicrobial therapy; use of drugs developed for other infections and use of older agents, directed by rapid point of care tests, to susceptible infections. Finally, it is considered whether the time is right to readdress the possibility of developing an effective gonococcal vaccine, given the major advances in our understanding of natural infection, molecular pathogenesis and the revolution in molecular biology techniques.

  13. Cardiac Remodeling: Concepts, Clinical Impact, Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Pharmacologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is defined as a group of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes that manifest clinically as changes in size, mass, geometry and function of the heart after injury. The process results in poor prognosis because of its association with ventricular dysfunction and malignant arrhythmias. Here, we discuss the concepts and clinical implications of cardiac remodeling, and the pathophysiological role of different factors, including cell death, energy metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, collagen, contractile proteins, calcium transport, geometry and neurohormonal activation. Finally, the article describes the pharmacological treatment of cardiac remodeling, which can be divided into three different stages of strategies: consolidated, promising and potential strategies. PMID:26647721

  14. The basal ganglia in Parkinson's disease: current concepts and unexplained observations.

    PubMed

    Obeso, Jose A; Marin, Concepcio; Rodriguez-Oroz, C; Blesa, Javier; Benitez-Temiño, B; Mena-Segovia, Juan; Rodríguez, Manuel; Olanow, C Warren

    2008-12-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease is reviewed in light of recent advances in the understanding of the functional organization of the basal ganglia (BG). Current emphasis is placed on the parallel interactions between corticostriatal and corticosubthalamic afferents on the one hand, and internal feedback circuits modulating BG output through the globus pallidus pars interna and substantia nigra pars reticulata on the other. In the normal BG network, the globus pallidus pars externa emerges as a main regulatory station of output activity. In the parkinsonian state, dopamine depletion shifts the BG toward inhibiting cortically generated movements by increasing the gain in the globus pallidus pars externa-subthalamic nucleus-globus pallidus pars interna network and reducing activity in "direct" cortico-putaminal-globus pallidus pars interna projections. Standard pharmacological treatments do not mimic the normal physiology of the dopaminergic system and, therefore, fail to restore a functional balance between corticostriatal afferents in the so-called direct and indirect pathways, leading to the development of motor complications. This review emphasizes the concept that the BG can no longer be understood as a "go-through" station in the control of movement, behavior, and emotions. The growing understanding of the complexity of the normal BG and the changes induced by DA depletion should guide the development of more efficacious therapies for Parkinson's disease.

  15. Use of novel proteosome inhibitors as a therapeutic strategy in lymphomas current experience and emerging concepts.

    PubMed

    Abayomi, Emmanuel Akinola; Sissolak, Gerhard; Jacobs, Peter

    2007-08-01

    Precedent from preclinical experiments coupled with two pivotal phase 2 studies in myeloma has focused attention on a potential role for ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in modulating a number of events that occur commonly in the neoplastic process involving proteins in the regulation of cells cycling, growth and differentiation. This influence is vested in the proteasomes which are large complexes of proteolytic enzymes responsible for degradation of many of these intracellular messengers. Logically interest has centred on molecules having the capacity to influence, by degradation, such molecules and although a number of agents are in development bortezomib is the only one currently in clinical use. Velcade, formerly PS-341, is a novel dipeptide boronic acid capable of reversibly inhibiting the 26S proteasome through a range of activities. The latter are anti-proliferative and proapoptotic with the latter blocking nuclear transcription via NF-kappa B in addition to down regulating adhesion and inhibiting angiogenesis. Additional changes are mediated in protein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum and contribute to cell death. These concepts are given focus by considering their introduction into treatment of lymphoreticular malignancy.

  16. Patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: current concepts and concerns: part II.

    PubMed

    Dzeshka, Mikhail S; Brown, Richard A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and coronary artery disease (CAD) often present concomitantly. Given the increased risk of thrombotic complications with either of them but different pathogenesis of clot formation, combined antithrombotic therapy is necessary in patients developing acute coronary syndrome and/or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Different antithrombotic regimens in this group of patients have been summarized and discussed earlier. Triple therapy remains the treatment of choice in these patients despite the increased risk of hemorrhagic complications. Given the absence of evidence from randomized controlled trials, balancing the risk of stroke and stent thrombosis against the risk of major bleeding is a challenge. Precise stroke and bleeding risk assessment is an essential part of the decision making process regarding antithrombotic management. Continuing the discussion of current concepts and concerns of antithrombotic management in AF patients undergoing PCI, we emphasize the importance of various strategies to reduce bleeding in the modern era, namely, radial access combined with careful selection of a P2Y₁₂ receptor inhibitor, use of newer drug-eluting stents, and uninterrupted anticoagulation for patients undergoing procedures. We also focus on the role of the non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (novel oral anticoagulants, eg, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban) which are increasingly used for stroke prevention in AF. Finally, recent recommendations on the management of antithrombotic therapy in AF patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome and/or undergoing PCI as well as ongoing clinical trials and future directions are highlighted.

  17. Current concepts on the use of glucocorticosteroids and beta 2-adrenoreceptor agonists to treat childhood asthma

    PubMed Central

    Nino, Gustavo; Grunstein, Michael M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of Review This article reviews current concepts regarding the clinical and scientific rationale for the combined use of glucocorticosteroids (GC) and beta2-adrenoreceptor (β2AR) agonists in the treatment of childhood asthma. Recent findings Several studies have demonstrated that inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and β2AR-agonists are the most effective medications for the management of asthma in children. Given substantial evidence of an increased clinical benefit when these agents are used together, new studies are being pursued to establish the efficacy and safety of this combinational therapy in infants and children. Ongoing research is also investigating the mechanisms of β2AR and GC signaling and their molecular interactions. This new knowledge will likely lead to novel therapeutic approaches to asthma control. Summary There is increasing evidence demonstrating that the combination of long-acting β2AR-agonists and ICS may be more effective than high dose ICS therapy alone in the management of children with uncontrolled asthma. In addition, the use of a single inhaler containing ICS and a quick-acting β2AR-agonist might be a convenient alternative to prevent and treat asthma exacerbations. Future investigations should be designed to more specifically evaluate the efficacy and safety of these therapies in the different asthmatic phenotypes of infants and children. PMID:20164771

  18. Current and future pharmacologic treatment of sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Yves; Onder, Graziano; Morley, John E; Gillette-Guyonet, Sophie; Abellan van Kan, Gabor; Vellas, Bruno

    2011-08-01

    Sarcopenia is a complex multifactorial condition that can by treated with multimodal approaches. No pharmacologic agent to prevent or treat sarcopenia has been as efficacious as exercise (mainly resistance training) in combination with nutritional intervention (adequate protein and energy intake). However, performing resistance training sessions and following nutritional advice can be challenging, especially for frail, sarcopenic, elderly patients, and results remain only partial. Therefore, new pharmacologic agents may substantially reduce the functional decline in older people. This article reviews the new pharmacologic agents currently being assessed for treating sarcopenia.

  19. Amelogenesis imperfecta: review of diagnostic findings and treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    Sabandal, Martin M I; Schäfer, Edgar

    2016-09-01

    Mineralization defects like amelogenesis imperfecta are often of hereditary origin. This article reviews the diagnostic findings and summarizes the suggested treatment approaches. Currently, there are no defined therapy recommendations available for patients suffering from amelogenesis imperfecta. The mentioned therapies are more or less equal but no comprehensive therapy recommendation is evident. When treating patients suffering from amelogenesis imperfecta, a comprehensive therapy of almost every dental discipline has to be considered. The earlier the diagnosis of amelogenesis imperfecta is confirmed, the better the outcome is. Optimal treatment approaches consist of early diagnosis and treatment approach and frequent dental recall appointments to prevent progressive occlusal wear or early destruction by caries. Full-mouth prosthetic treatment seems to be the best treatment option.

  20. Treatment-resistant panic disorder: clinical significance, concept and management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2016-10-03

    Panic disorder is commonly prevalent in the population, but the treatment response for panic disorder in clinical practice is much less effective than that in our imagination. Increasing evidence suggested existence of a chronic or remitting-relapsing clinical course in panic disorder. In this systematic review, we re-examine the definition of treatment-resistant panic disorder, and present the potential risk factors related to the treatment resistance, including the characteristics of panic disorder, other psychiatric and physical comorbidities, and psychosocial stresses. Furthermore, we summarize the potential pathophysiologies, such as genetic susceptibility, altered brain functioning, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and long-term inflammation, to explain the treatment resistance. Finally, we conclude the current therapeutic strategies for treating treatment-resistant panic disorder from pharmacological and non-pharmacological views. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Historical Aspects of the Concept of "Compulsory Education": Rethinking the Rhetoric of Debates in Current Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    Current Educational Reform in Japan is oddly captured with confused conceptions of "compulsory education." The Ministry of Education blankets such connotations of it, as a national budget system, mandated school curriculum, responsible partnership of school with community and accountabilities of local school board, in defense of vested…

  2. Current Consensus Guidelines for Treatment of Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    García, Hector H.; Evans, Carlton A. W.; Nash, Theodore E.; Takayanagui, Osvaldo M.; White, A. Clinton; Botero, David; Rajshekhar, Vedantam; Tsang, Victor C. W.; Schantz, Peter M.; Allan, James C.; Flisser, Ana; Correa, Dolores; Sarti, Elsa; Friedland, Jon S.; Martinez, S. Manuel; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Gilman, Robert H.; Del Brutto, Oscar H.

    2002-01-01

    Taenia solium neurocysticercosis is a common cause of epileptic seizures and other neurological morbidity in most developing countries. It is also an increasingly common diagnosis in industrialized countries because of immigration from areas where it is endemic. Its clinical manifestations are highly variable and depend on the number, stage, and size of the lesions and the host's immune response. In part due to this variability, major discrepancies exist in the treatment of neurocysticercosis. A panel of experts in taeniasis/cysticercosis discussed the evidence on treatment of neurocysticercosis for each clinical presentation, and we present the panel's consensus and areas of disagreement. Overall, four general recommendations were made: (i) individualize therapeutic decisions, including whether to use antiparasitic drugs, based on the number, location, and viability of the parasites within the nervous system; (ii) actively manage growing cysticerci either with antiparasitic drugs or surgical excision; (iii) prioritize the management of intracranial hypertension secondary to neurocysticercosis before considering any other form of therapy; and (iv) manage seizures as done for seizures due to other causes of secondary seizures (remote symptomatic seizures) because they are due to an organic focus that has been present for a long time. PMID:12364377

  3. Current status of oral cancer treatment strategies: surgical treatments for oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Omura, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The primary treatment modality of oral cancer is generally determined according to the stage of the disease, with surgical treatment remaining the mainstay of multimodal treatment. When selecting the treatment, many factors are taken into consideration, and the treatment should be tailored individually to the patient's needs and consider the quality of life as well as the survival of the patient. Early-stage disease is primarily managed with surgery or brachytherapy without functional morbidity, whereas for advanced-stage disease multidisciplinary treatment is recommended, not only for enhanced survival but also for improved quality of life. After resection of large primary tumors, reconstructive surgery is required. Free tissue transfer currently represents one of the most popular and reliable techniques for oral reconstruction. For cN0 neck, elective neck dissection is recommended when the risk of occult metastases is >20 %, when the neck is entered either for resection of the primary tumor or for reconstruction, or when the patient is unlikely to return for a close follow-up. Sentinel node biopsy is performed investigationally. Modified radical neck dissection is the gold standard for cN+ neck. For patients with multiple node metastases or extracapsular spread, postoperative radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is recommended, with the lymph nodes situated outside the confines of the radical neck dissection, such as the lingual and retropharyngeal nodes, receiving considerable attention. Targeted therapy for oral cancer is still a relatively new concept, and more studies are needed to confirm the clinical effectiveness of these drugs.

  4. Current treatment for colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Misiakos, Evangelos P; Karidis, Nikolaos P; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Surgical resection offers the best opportunity for survival in patients with colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver, with five-year survival rates up to 58% in selected cases. However, only a minority are resectable at the time of diagnosis. Continuous research in this field aims at increasing the percentage of patients eligible for resection, refining the indications and contraindications for surgery, and improving overall survival. The use of surgical innovations, such as staged resection, portal vein embolization, and repeat resection has allowed higher resection rates in patients with bilobar disease. The use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy allows up to 38% of patients previously considered unresectable to be significantly downstaged and eligible for hepatic resection. Ablative techniques have gained wide acceptance as an adjunct to surgical resection and in the management of patients who are not surgical candidates. Current management of colorectal liver metastases requires a multidisciplinary approach, which should be individualized in each case. PMID:22039320

  5. Current diagnosis and treatment of Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    González García, A; Moreno Cobo, M Á; Patier de la Peña, J L

    2016-04-01

    Castleman's disease is not just a single disease but rather an uncommon, heterogeneous group of nonclonal lymphoproliferative disorders, which have a broad spectrum of clinical expression. Three histological types have been reported, along with several clinical forms according to clinical presentation, histological substrate and associated diseases. Interleukin-6, its receptor polymorphisms, the human immunodeficiency virus and the human herpes virus 8 are involved in the etiopathogenesis of Castleman's disease. The study of this disease has shed light on a syndrome whose incidence is unknown. Despite recent significant advances in our understanding of this disease and the increasing therapeutic experience with rituximab, tocilizumab and siltuximab, there are still difficult questions concerning its aetiology, prognosis and optimal treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical Characteristics and Current Treatment of Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Laura P.; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disorder in which degenerating retinal ganglion cells (RGC) produce significant visual disability. Clinically, glaucoma refers to an array of conditions associated with variably elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) that contributes to RGC loss via mechanical stress, vascular abnormalities, and other mechanisms, such as immune phenomena. The clinical diagnosis of glaucoma requires assessment of the ocular anterior segment with slit lamp biomicroscopy, which allows the clinician to recognize signs of conditions that can produce elevated IOP. After measurement of IOP, a specialized prismatic lens called a gonioscope is used to determine whether the angle is physically open or closed. The structural manifestation of RGC loss is optic nerve head atrophy and excavation of the neuroretinal rim tissue. Treatment is guided by addressing secondary causes for elevated IOP (such as inflammation, infection, and ischemia) whenever possible. Subsequently, a variety of medical, laser, and surgical options are used to achieve a target IOP. PMID:24890835

  7. [Current treatments of cancer of the prostate].

    PubMed

    Saussine, C; Bollack, C

    1991-10-19

    Cancer of the prostate mainly occurs in elderly men and is becoming more frequent as the general European population gets older. Only through continuing progress in the already well developed therapeutic methods will mortality due to this cancer be curtailed. Prognosis of cancer limited to the prostate gland has been improved by radical surgery which reduces morbidity and mortality and advanced radiotherapy techniques. The potentially curable forms, still mainly detected by systematic rectal examination, can be defined better with magnetic resonance imagery and biological markers. Hormonal treatment for more extended or metastatic cancers is now based on several effective, well tolerated products. Chemotherapy has not been able to solve the problem of hormonal escape for which other therapeutic techniques are now under study.

  8. [Current diagnosis and treatment of hyperprolactinemia].

    PubMed

    Melgar, Virgilio; Espinosa, Etual; Sosa, Ernesto; Rangel, María José; Cuenca, Dalia; Ramírez, Claudia; Mercado, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    Hyperprolactinemia is a frequent neuroendocrinological condition that should be approached in an orderly and integral fashion, starting with a complete clinical history. Once physiological causes such as pregnancy, systemic disorders such as primary hypothyroidism and the use of drugs with dopamine antagonistic actions such as metochlopramide have been ruled out, the most common cause of hyperprolactinemia is a PRL-secreting pituitary adenoma or prolactinoma. Prolactinomas are usually classified as microprolactinomas (less than 1 cm) or macroprolactinomas (larger than 1 cm), which can either be confined or invasive. The hormonal consequence of hypeprolactinemia is hypogonadism; in women, this is manifested as amenorrhea/oligomenorreha, anovulation and galactorrhea, whereas in men the main complaints are a diminished libido and erectile dysfunction. Macroprolactinomas can also present with symptoms and signs resulting form mass effect of the tumor, such as headaches and visual field defects. Other structural causes of hyperprolactinemia include non-functioning pituitary adenomas and infiltrative disorders, which can interrupt the inhibitory, descending dopaminergic tone. The primary treatment of prolactinomas is pharmacological with dopamine agonists such as cabergoline.

  9. Acute migraine: Current treatment and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Arun A; Elliott, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Migraine is a common disabling primary headache disorder. Despite the need for a perfect treatment of this debilitating condition, the ideal “cure” eludes us. In 1992, the first triptan was released in the US for use in acute migraine. Triptans are more specific for the serotonin receptor 5-hydroxy triptamine (5-HT) 1 than previously prescribed drugs, such as ergotamines, with fewer side effects. This was an important first step in specific acute migraine therapy. Today however, triptans continue to be underutilized. There remains a concern, among practitioners and patients, about possible cardiovascular safety issues, despite the lack of strong evidence of serious adverse events. In fact, triptans now have a safe track record over more than a decade of use. Other perceived downfalls to use, include cost and variable efficacy. The more we learn about the clinical features and pathophysiology of migraine, the closer we are to finding a satisfactory monotherapy. Until then, recognizing that mixed mechanisms underlie migraine symptoms, rational polytherapy can be useful. Research on the roles of serotonin, calcitonin gene related peptide, glutamine and N-methyl-D-aspartate in the trigeminovascular system holds promise for those searching for the perfect migraine headache cure. PMID:18488069

  10. Erythrodermic psoriasis: pathophysiology and current treatment perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rasnik K; Lee, Kristina M; Ucmak, Derya; Brodsky, Merrick; Atanelov, Zaza; Farahnik, Benjamin; Abrouk, Michael; Nakamura, Mio; Zhu, Tian Hao; Liao, Wilson

    2017-01-01

    Erythrodermic psoriasis (EP) is a rare and severe variant of psoriasis vulgaris, with an estimated prevalence of 1%–2.25% among psoriatic patients. The condition presents with distinct histopathologic and clinical findings, which include a generalized inflammatory erythema involving at least 75% of the body surface area. The pathogenesis of EP is not well understood; however, several studies suggest that the disease is associated with a predominantly T helper 2 (Th2) phenotype. Given the morbidity and potential mortality associated with the condition, there is a need for a better understanding of its pathophysiology. The management of EP begins with a comprehensive assessment of the patient's presentation and often requires multidisciplinary supportive measures. In 2010, the medical board of the US National Psoriasis Foundation published consensus guidelines advocating the use of cyclosporine or infliximab as first-line therapy in unstable cases, with acitretin and methotrexate reserved for more stable cases. Since the time of that publication, additional information regarding the efficacy of newer agents has emerged. We review the latest data with regard to the treatment of EP, which includes biologic therapies such as ustekinumab and ixekizumab. PMID:28856115

  11. [Current diagnosis and treatment of acromegaly].

    PubMed

    Melgar, Virgilio; Espinosa, Etual; Cuenca, Dalia; Valle, Vanessa; Mercado, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Acromegaly is a rare condition characterized by the excessive secretion of growth hormone (GH), usually by a pituitary adenoma. The clinical manifestations of acromegaly include enlarged hands, feet and face, headaches, arthralgias, fatigue and hyperhydrosis. This condition is also associated with comorbidities such as hypertension and diabetes in a significant proportion of patients and frequently compromises life quality and life expectancy. The biochemical diagnosis of acromegaly rests on the demonstration of an autonomous secretion of GH by means of the measurement of glucose-suppressed GH levels and the serum concentration of insulin like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1). The localizing method of choice is magnetic resonance image of the selar area, which in 70 % of the cases reveals the presence of a macroadenoma. Even though the primary treatment is usually the transsphenoidal resection of the adenoma, the majority of patients require a multimodal intervention that includes radiotherapy, as well as pharmacological therapy with somatostatin analogs and dopamine agonists. The latter approach has resulted in a significant reduction in mortality and in an improvement in the quality of life.

  12. Ulcerative colitis: current and future treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Lissner, Donata; Siegmund, Britta

    2013-01-01

    Since the incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases including ulcerative colitis is continuously increasing worldwide, there is a strong need for effective treatment strategies. However, there is no therapy allowing for healing ulcerative colitis; consequently, the available medications will have to be applied at their best. The preferred option for mild pan- or left-sided colitis is still mesalazine. One can only emphasize that the formulations allowing for once daily dosing are not only equally effective, but even facilitate the implication of long-term therapy in daily life. In case steroids are frequently required to control disease, further immunosuppressive therapy should be introduced in order to minimize steroid exposure. Thiopurines represent the first-choice immunosuppressive medication. In more severe cases, early escalation to combinatory therapies with anti-TNF antibodies should be considered with the possibility of therapy deescalation after induction of remission. Major difficulties arise with steroid-refractory acute flares. Here cyclosporine as well as anti-TNF strategies can be initiated. However, in case of severe disease, the high 1-year colectomy rate of about 50% should be considered. If short-term surgery is an option due to disease severity, cyclosporine might be advantageous since the half-life is short compared to infliximab or adalimumab. The central problem of all therapeutic approaches is that because we chase after the disease, solid markers that allow for prediction of the future disease course are desirable. In fact, the CD8+ transcriptome might fill this gap and will potentially lead to the classification of patients in low- and high-risk groups. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Current treatment issues in female hyperprolactinaemia.

    PubMed

    Crosignani, Pier Giorgio

    2006-04-01

    High prolactin levels can occur as a physiological condition in females who are pregnant or lactating. As a pathological condition, hyperprolactinaemia is associated with gonadal dysfunction, infertility and an increased risk of long-term complications including osteoporosis. The most frequent cause of persistent hyperprolactinaemia is the presence of a micro- (<10mm diameter) or macroprolactinoma (>/=10mm). These pituitary tumours may produce an excessive amount of prolactin or disrupt the normal delivery of dopamine from the hypothalamus to the pituitary; prolactin secretion from the pituitary is inhibited by dopamine released from neurones in the hypothalamus. Medications including anti-psychotics can induce hyperprolactinaemia, while idiopathic hyperprolactinaemia accounts for 30-40% of cases. The prevalence of hyperprolactinaemia is difficult to establish as not all sufferers are symptomatic or concerned by their symptoms and may remain undiagnosed. Symptoms of hyperprolactinaemia include signs of hypogonadism, with oligomenorrhoea, amenorrhoea and galactorrhoea frequently observed. Pharmacological intervention should be considered the first line therapy and involves the use of dopamine agonists to reduce tumour size and prolactin levels. Bromocriptine has the longest history of use and is a well-established, inexpensive, safe and effective therapy option. However, bromocriptine requires multiple daily dosing and some patients are resistant or intolerant to this therapy. The two newer dopamine agonists, quinagolide and cabergoline, provide more effective and better tolerated treatments compared with bromocriptine and may offer effective therapies for bromocriptine-resistant or intolerant patients. Quinagolide can be used until pregnancy is confirmed and may result in improved compliance in females wishing to become pregnant. For patients with hyperprolactinaemia, pregnancy is safe and can frequently be beneficial, inducing a decrease in prolactin levels. There

  14. Current recommendations for multiple sclerosis treatment in pregnancy and puerperium.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, Angelo; Annovazzi, Pietro; Portaccio, Emilio; Cesari, Elana; Amato, Maria P

    2013-07-01

    As multiple sclerosis (MS) typically starts at about 30 years of age, and is twice more frequent in females than in males, women with MS frequently face issues related to pregnancy and to the effects of medications commonly used in MS treatment. In this review, the authors provide and summarize literature data addressing the effect of MS and its treatments on pregnancy, delivery, postpartum and conception. There is a strong evidence that relapses are fewer during pregnancy but more frequent during postpartum, and that IFN-β and glatiramer acetate do not expose patients and their babies to relevant adverse events; nevertheless, these drugs should be discontinued during pregnancy and before conception. However, if their preventive withdrawal exposes patients to a high risk of disease activity, these medications could be continued until proven conception. Little information is available on the effect of natalizumab and fingolimod.

  15. Use Dose Bricks Concept to Implement Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-Ming; Yu, Tsan-Jung; Yeh, Shyh-An; Chao, Pei-Ju; Huang, Chih-Jou

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. A “dose bricks” concept has been used to implement nasopharyngeal carcinoma treatment plan; this method specializes particularly in the case with bell shape nasopharyngeal carcinoma case. Materials and Methods. Five noncoplanar fields were used to accomplish the dose bricks technique treatment plan. These five fields include (a) right superior anterior oblique (RSAO), (b) left superior anterior oblique (LSAO), (c) right anterior oblique (RAO), (d) left anterior oblique (LAO), and (e) superior inferior vertex (SIV). Nondivergence collimator central axis planes were used to create different abutting field edge while normal organs were blocked by multileaf collimators in this technique. Results. The resulting 92% isodose curves encompassed the CTV, while maximum dose was about 115%. Approximately 50% volume of parotid glands obtained 10–15% of total dose and 50% volume of brain obtained less than 20% of total dose. Spinal cord receives only 5% from the scatter dose. Conclusions. Compared with IMRT, the expenditure of planning time and costing, “dose bricks” may after all be accepted as an optional implementation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma conformal treatment plan; furthermore, this method also fits the need of other nonhead and neck lesions if organ sparing and noncoplanar technique can be executed. PMID:24967395

  16. Evolving concepts in the measurement of treatment effects.

    PubMed

    Leidy, Nancy Kline

    2006-05-01

    This is an interesting time in the evolution of clinical research, as the convergence of scientific, social, and technological advances influences the development of new measurement strategies and creates new challenges and opportunities in the evaluation of treatment outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the forces of change influencing clinical research in general and measurement, specifically, discuss current challenges in the evaluation of treatment outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and propose several areas for further research. Five key challenges are discussed: accuracy in the selection and measurement of endpoints; appropriate timing and recall; measurement efficiencies using aggregation techniques or item response theory; interpretation, including the debate concerning the minimal important difference; and the need for "real world" studies with real-world measures to understand treatment effectiveness. Each of these areas offers interesting challenges and opportunities for further development and research.

  17. Current concepts and future approaches to the development of autologous/autogenous vaccines for veterinary use.

    PubMed

    Tollis, M

    2004-01-01

    Current classification of autologous/autogenous (A/A) vaccines is commonly based on the concept of strain/antigen specificity associated with targeted treatment of a restricted number of animals. However, fulfilling these two conditions is not sufficient for immune-veterinary immunebiologicals to be excluded from the provisions of Directive 2001/82/EC. Indeed, non-inactivated A/A vaccines are not automatically considered out of the scope of the community code relating to veterinary medicinal products, in particular to immune-biologicals. As a major consequence of the "regulatory" exclusion from the requirements of EU rules, A/A vaccines can be usually manufactured and distributed without having obtained a marketing authorization by the competent authority of a Member State. Furthermore, strain specificity enables veterinarians to consider the use of these vaccines in quite a large variety of epidemiological circumstances where no "conventional" vaccines are yet available or are considered efficacious. In addition, in contrast to "conventional" vaccines, which are considered exclusively as a preventive tool against infectious diseases, A/A vaccines can also be used to treat "continuing" infections. Although the limited scientific value of these products and the poor investigations of the effector mechanisms involved are widely recognized, their use is still claimed in conditions where disorders in the immune system are suspected. Today, a more appropriate definition of A/A vaccines is one that takes into account their historical tradition and practical use, such as stable- or herd-specific vaccines, custom ("..ized") vaccines, therapeutic vaccines, pharmavaccines, vaccines used for biological therapy, etc. Although acknowledging the "regulatory autonomy" of A/A vaccines versus "conventional" vaccines, here it will be presented as an overview of the necessary points to consider, to guarantee an acceptable standard in the development and control of this particular

  18. Leading-edge vortex research: Some nonplanar concepts and current challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Osborn, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Some background information is provided for the Vortex Flow Aerodynamics Conference and that current slender wing airplanes do not use variable leading edge geometry to improve transonic drag polar is shown. Highlights of some of the initial studies combining wing camber, or flaps, with vortex flow are presented. Current vortex flap studies were reviewed to show that there is a large subsonic data base and that transonic and supersonic generic studies have begun. There is a need for validated flow field solvers to calculate vortex/shock interactions at transonic and supersonic speeds. Many important research opportunities exist for fundamental vortex flow investigations and for designing advanced fighter concepts.

  19. Self-Recirculating Casing Treatment Concept for Enhanced Compressor Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    A state-of-the-art CFD code (APNASA) was employed in a computationally based investigation of the impact of casing bleed and injection on the stability and performance of a moderate speed fan rotor wherein the stalling mass flow is controlled by tip flow field breakdown. The investigation was guided by observed trends in endwall flow characteristics (e.g., increasing endwall aerodynamic blockage) as stall is approached and based on the hypothesis that application of bleed or injection can mitigate these trends. The "best" bleed and injection configurations were then combined to yield a self-recirculating casing treatment concept. The results of this investigation yielded: 1) identification of the fluid mechanisms which precipitate stall of tip critical blade rows, and 2) an approach to recirculated casing treatment which results in increased compressor stall range with minimal or no loss in efficiency. Subsequent application of this approach to a high speed transonic rotor successfully yielded significant improvements in stall range with no loss in compressor efficiency.

  20. Patients’ Expectations Regarding Medical Treatment: A Critical Review of Concepts and Their Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Laferton, Johannes A. C.; Kube, Tobias; Salzmann, Stefan; Auer, Charlotte J.; Shedden-Mora, Meike C.

    2017-01-01

    Patients’ expectations in the context of medical treatment represent a growing area of research, with accumulating evidence suggesting their influence on health outcomes across a variety of medical conditions. However, the aggregation of evidence is complicated due to an inconsistent and disintegrated application of expectation constructs and the heterogeneity of assessment strategies. Therefore, based on current expectation concepts, this critical review provides an integrated model of patients’ expectations in medical treatment. Moreover, we review existing assessment tools in the context of the integrative model of expectations and provide recommendations for improving future assessment. The integrative model includes expectations regarding treatment and patients’ treatment-related behavior. Treatment and behavior outcome expectations can relate to aspects regarding benefits and side effects and can refer to internal (e.g., symptoms) and external outcomes (e.g., reactions of others). Furthermore, timeline, structural and process expectations are important aspects with respect to medical treatment. Additionally, generalized expectations such as generalized self-efficacy or optimism have to be considered. Several instruments assessing different aspects of expectations in medical treatment can be found in the literature. However, many were developed without conceptual standardization and psychometric evaluation. Moreover, they merely assess single aspects of expectations, thus impeding the integration of evidence regarding the differential aspects of expectations. As many instruments assess treatment-specific expectations, they are not comparable between different conditions. To generate a more comprehensive understanding of expectation effects in medical treatments, we recommend that future research should apply standardized, psychometrically evaluated measures, assessing multidimensional aspects of patients’ expectations that are applicable across various

  1. Seasonal affective disorder, winter type: current insights and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Meesters, Ybe; Gordijn, Marijke CM

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD), winter type, is a seasonal pattern of recurrent major depressive episodes most commonly occurring in autumn or winter and remitting in spring/summer. The syndrome has been well-known for more than three decades, with light treatment being the treatment of first choice. In this paper, an overview is presented of the present insights in SAD. Description of the syndrome, etiology, and treatment options are mentioned. Apart from light treatment, medication and psychotherapy are other treatment options. The predictable, repetitive nature of the syndrome makes it possible to discuss preventive treatment options. Furthermore, critical views on the concept of SAD as a distinct diagnosis are discussed. PMID:27942239

  2. Occlusion in implant dentistry. A review of the literature of prosthetic determinants and current concepts.

    PubMed

    Gross, M D

    2008-06-01

    Today the clinician is faced with widely varying concepts regarding the number, location, distribution and inclination of implants required to support the functional and parafunctional demands of occlusal loading. Primary clinical dilemmas of planning for maximal or minimal numbers of implants, their axial inclination, lengths and required volume and quality of supporting bone remain largely unanswered by adequate clinical outcome research. Planning and executing optimal occlusion schemes is an integral part of implant supported restorations. In its wider sense this includes considerations of multiple inter-relating factors of ensuring adequate bone support, implant location number, length, distribution and inclination, splinting, vertical dimension aesthetics, static and dynamic occlusal schemes and more. Current concepts and research on occlusal loading and overloading are reviewed together with clinical outcome and biomechanical studies and their clinical relevance discussed. A comparison between teeth and implants regarding their proprioceptive properties and mechanisms of supporting functional and parafunctional loading is made and clinical applications made regarding current concepts in restoring the partially edentulous dentition. The relevance of occlusal traumatism and fatigue microdamage alone or in combination with periodontal or peri-implant inflammation is reviewed and applied to clinical considerations regarding splinting of adjacent implants and teeth, posterior support and eccentric guidance schemes. Occlusal restoration of the natural dentition has classically been divided into considerations of planning for sufficient posterior support, occlusal vertical dimension and eccentric guidance to provide comfort and aesthetics. Mutual protection and anterior disclusion have come to be considered as acceptable therapeutic modalities. These concepts have been transferred to the restoration of implant-supported restoration largely by default. However, in

  3. The evolution of the female sexual response concept: treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Damjanović, Aleksandar; Duisin, Dragana; Barisić, Jasmina

    2013-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions have been the most prevalent group of sexual disorders and include a large number of populations of both sexes.The research of sexual behavior and treatment of women with sexual distress arises many questions related to differences in sexual response of men and women. The conceptualization of this response in modern sexology has changed over time.The objective of our paper was to present the changes and evolution of the female's sexual response concept in a summarized and integrated way, to analyze the expanded and revised definitions of the female sexual response as well as implications and recommendations of new approaches to diagnostics and treatment according to the established changes.The lack of adequate empirical basis of the female sexual response model is a critical question in the literature dealing with this issue. Some articles report that linear models demonstrate more correctly and precisely the sexual response of women with normal sexual functions in relation to women with sexual dysfunction. Modification of this model later resulted in a circular model which more adequately presented the sexual response of women with sexual function disorder than of women with normal sexual function.The nonlinear model of female sexual response constructed by Basson incorporates the value of emotional intimacy, sexual stimulus and satisfaction with the relationship. Female functioning is significantly affected by multiple psychosocial factors such as satisfaction with the relationship, self-image, earlier negative sexual experience, etc. Newly revised, expanded definitions of female sexual dysfunction try to contribute to new knowledge about a highly contextual nature of woman's sexuality so as to enhance clinical treatment of dysfunctions.The definitions emphasize the evaluation of the context of women's problematic sexual experiences.

  4. Visceral leishmaniasis: Revisiting current treatments and approaches for future discoveries.

    PubMed

    No, Joo Hwan

    2016-03-01

    The current treatments for visceral leishmaniasis are old and toxic with limited routes of administration. The emergence of drug-resistant Leishmania threatens the efficacy of the existing reservoir of antileishmanials, leading to an urgent need to develop new treatments. It is particularly important to review and understand how the current treatments act against Leishmania in order to identify valid drug targets or essential pathways for next-generation antileishmanials. It is equally important to adapt newly emerging biotechnologies to facilitate the current research on the development of novel antileishmanials in an efficient fashion. This review covers the basic background of the current visceral leishmaniasis treatments with an emphasis on the modes of action. It briefly discusses the role of the immune system in aiding the chemotherapy of leishmaniasis, describes potential new antileishmanial drug targets and pathways, and introduces recent progress on the utilization of high-throughput phenotypic screening assays to identify novel antileishmanial compounds.

  5. 6. View north of the treatment house currently named the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View north of the treatment house currently named the Whitney Water Center. When the water company went to a pre-chlorination process the equipment was housed in this building adjacent to the inlet from the Lake Whitney Dam. The treatment house is currently the building used as an environmental learning center for school children. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Lake Whitney Dam, East side of Whitney Avenue near intersection with Armory Street, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  6. Weighting factors for radiation quality: how to unite the two current concepts.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, Albrecht M

    2004-01-01

    The quality factor, Q(L), used to be the universal weighting factor to account for radiation quality, until--in its 1991 Recommendations--the ICRP established a dichotomy between 'computable' and 'measurable' quantities. The new concept of the radiation weighting factor, w(R), was introduced for use with the 'computable' quantities, such as the effective dose, E. At the same time, the application of Q(L) was restricted to 'measurable' quantities, such as the operational quantities ambient dose equivalent or personal dose equivalent. The result has been a dual system of incoherent dosimetric quantities. The most conspicuous inconsistency resulted for neutrons, for which the new concept of wR had been primarily designed. While its definition requires an accounting for the gamma rays produced by neutron capture in the human body, this effect is not adequately reflected in the numerical values of wR, which are now suitable for mice, but are--at energies of the incident neutrons below 1 MeV--conspicuously too large for man. A recent Report 92 to ICRP has developed a proposal to correct the current imbalance and to define a linkage between the concepts Q(L) and wR. The proposal is here considered within a broader assessment of the rationale that led to the current dual system of dosimetric quantities.

  7. LIMITATIONS OF CURRENT APPROACHES FOR THE TREATMENT OF ACROMEGALY.

    PubMed

    Shanik, Michael H

    2016-02-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disease characterized by hypersecretion of growth hormone (GH), typically from a benign pituitary somatotroph adenoma, that leads to subsequent hypersecretion of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Patients with acromegaly have an increased risk of mortality and progressive worsening of comorbidities. Surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy are currently available treatment approaches for patients with acromegaly, with overall therapeutic goals of lowering GH levels and achieving normal IGF-1 levels, reducing tumor size, improving comorbidities, and minimizing mortality risk. Although surgery can lead to biochemical remission in some patients with acromegaly, many patients will continue to have uncontrolled disease and require additional treatment. We reviewed recently published reports and present a summary of the safety and efficacy of current treatment modalities for patients with acromegaly. A substantial proportion of patients who receive medical therapy or radiotherapy will have persistently elevated GH and/or IGF-1. Because of the serious health consequences of continued elevation of GH and IGF-1, there is a need to improve therapeutic approaches to optimize biochemical control, particularly in high-need patient populations for whom current treatment options provide limited benefit. This review discusses current treatment options for patients with acromegaly, limitations associated with each treatment approach, and areas within the current treatment algorithm, as well as patient populations for which improved therapeutic options are needed. Novel agents in development were also highlighted, which have the potential to improve management of patients with uncontrolled or persistent acromegaly.

  8. [Chronic osteitis of the lower extremities. An interdisciplinary treatment concept].

    PubMed

    Luther, C; Unger, K; Heppert, V; Simon, R; Hitzigrath, C; Germann, G; Sauerbier, M

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was the retrospective analysis of patients with delayed infections, chronic posttraumatic osteitis of the lower extremities and free-flap coverage after radical debridement of bone and soft tissue. From the time period 1994-2003 a total of 22 patients including 4 females and 18 males were investigated. In 16 patients treatment was carried out on the lower leg and in 6 patients the foot was treated with subsequent free-flap coverage. In 14 cases the latissimus dorsi muscle was used, in 5 cases the gracilis muscle, in 2 cases parascapula flaps were used and in 1 case the serratus anterior muscle. The average age of the patients was 43 years (range 17-63 years) and grouping was according to the HOST classification. Functional outcome was evaluated by a standardized questionnaire (Funktionsfragebogen Hannover FFbH-OA 2,0), quality of life and social reintegration by non-standardized questionnaires. In the cases investigated the following results could be achieved: full leg activity 55%, leg pain while walking 73%, special footwear 68%, normal gait 55%, positive quality of life and social reintegration 55%, port activities 36% and reemployment 45%. According to the results of this study the quality of life of patients with chronic osteitis of the lower leg is in general satisfying. In order to improve quality management and cost reduction in public health an interdisciplinary treatment concept of plastic and orthopedic surgeons should be established for complex fracture management as this is the most effective tool in treating chronic osteitis.

  9. Personalized medicine and treatment approaches in hypertension: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, James Brian

    2016-01-01

    In the US, hypertension affects one in three adults. Current guideline-based treatment of hypertension involves little diagnostic testing. A more personalized approach to the treatment of hypertension might be of use. Several methods of personalized treatment have been proposed and vetted to varying degrees. The purpose of this narrative review is to discuss the rationale for personalized therapy in hypertension, barriers to its development and implementation, some influential examples of proposed personalization measures, and a view of future efforts. PMID:27103841

  10. [Recommendations for the treatment of mixed episodes in current guidelines].

    PubMed

    Azorin, J-M; Belzeaux, R; Cermolacce, M; Kaladjian, A; Corréard, N; Dassa, D; Dubois, M; Maurel, M; Micoulaud Franchi, J A; Pringuey, D; Fakra, E

    2013-12-01

    A literature search on the pharmacological treatment of acute bipolar mixed episodes in current guidelines shows that only seven of them address the acute management of mixed episodes as a separate condition, whereas the vast majority of these guidelines include the treatment of mixed episodes in the chapter of mania. As a general rule, most guidelines advise to stop antidepressant treatment and mention the superiority of valproate over lithium. Specific recommendations for the treatment of "mixed states" can be found in two guidelines, while specific recommendations for that of "mixed mania" are present in five of them. Recommendations for the treatment of "mixed depression" exist in only three guidelines. If some consensus may be found for the treatment of "mixed states" as a whole, recommendations for the treatment of "mixed mania" appear to be variable, whereas those for the treatment of "mixed depression" seem to be limited. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  11. Age-related macular degeneration: current treatment and future options.

    PubMed

    Moutray, Tanya; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2011-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of visual impairment among older adults in the developed world. Epidemiological studies have revealed a number of genetic, ocular and environmental risk factors for this condition, which can be addressed by disease reduction strategies. We discuss the various treatment options for dry and exudative age-related macular degeneration available and explain how the recommended treatment depends on the exact type, location and extent of the degeneration. Currently, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition therapy is the best available treatment for exudative age-related macular degeneration but is limited by the need for repeated intravitreal injections. The current treatment regime is being refined through research on optimal treatment frequency and duration and type of anti-VEGF drug. Different modes of drug delivery are being developed and in the future other methods of VEGF inhibition may be used.

  12. The current situation of treatment systems for alcoholism in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee Wook; Lee, Boung Chul; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Choi, Ihn-Geun

    2013-02-01

    Alcoholism is becoming one of the most serious issues in Korea. The purpose of this review article was to understand the present status of the treatment system for alcoholism in Korea compared to the United States and to suggest its developmental direction in Korea. Current modalities of alcoholism treatment in Korea including withdrawal treatment, pharmacotherapy, and psychosocial treatment are available according to Korean evidence-based treatment guidelines. Benzodiazepines and supportive care including vitamin and nutritional support are mainly used to treat alcohol withdrawal in Korea. Naltrexone and acamprosate are the drugs of first choice to treat chronic alcoholism. Psychosocial treatment methods such as individual psychotherapy, group psychotherapy, family therapy, cognitive behavior therapy, cue exposure therapy, 12-step facilitation therapy, self-help group therapy, and community-based treatment have been carried out to treat chronic alcoholism in Korea. However, current alcohol treatment system in Korea is not integrative compared to that in the United States. To establish the treatment system, it is important to set up an independent governmental administration on alcohol abuse, to secure experts on alcoholism, and to conduct outpatient alcoholism treatment programs and facilities in an open system including some form of continuing care.

  13. Current Concepts in the Management of Ankle Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Benjamin; Srinivasan, Suresh; Mangwani, Jitendra

    2015-01-01

    Ankle osteoarthritis is less common than hip or knee osteoarthritis; however, it is a relatively common presentation and is predominantly related to previous trauma. Treatments have traditionally consisted of temporizing measures such as analgesia, physiotherapy, and injections until operative treatment in the form of arthrodesis is required. More recently, interest has been increasing in both nonoperative and alternative operative options, including joint-sparing surgery, minimal access arthrodesis, and new arthroplasty designs. The present systematic instructional review has summarized the current evidence for the treatment options available for ankle osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Mentalization-Based Treatment for Adolescents with Borderline Personality Disorder - Concept and Efficacy].

    PubMed

    Taubner, Svenja; Volkert, Jana; Gablonski, Thorsten-Christian; Rossouw, Trudie

    2017-07-01

    Mentalization-Based Treatment for Adolescents with Borderline Personality Disorder - Concept and Efficacy In recent years, the concept of mentalization has become increasingly important in practice and research. It describes the imaginative ability to understand human behavior in terms of mental states. Mentalization is a central component to understand the etiology and to treat patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Both adult and adolescent patients with BPD have limited mentalization abilities, which can be reliably assessed using the Reflective Functioning Scale. Mentalization-Based Treatment (MBT) was originally developed as an integrative approach for the treatment of adult patients with BPD. It is a manualized psychotherapy with psychodynamic roots with the aim to increase mentalizing abilities of patients. Since then, MBT has been further developed for other mental disorders as well as for the treatment of different age groups. One of these developments is MBT for Adolescents (MBT-A). MBT-A includes both individual as well as family sessions and the average duration of therapy is about twelve months. MBT-A can be applied in inpatient and outpatient settings and aims to improve mentalizing abilities in emotionally important relationships and the whole family system. First studies have found evidence for the efficacy of MBT-A. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) is currently being carried out to evaluate the efficacy of MBT-A for adolescents with conduct disorder. However, further evidence for efficacy and further conceptual development is needed.

  15. Parametric Weight Comparison of Current and Proposed Thermal Protection System (TPS) Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, David E.; Martin, Carl J.; Blosser, Max L.

    1999-01-01

    A parametric weight assessment of advanced metallic panel, ceramic blanket, and ceramic tile thermal protection systems (TPS) was conducted using an implicit, one-dimensional (1 -D) thermal finite element sizing code. This sizing code contained models to ac- count for coatings, fasteners, adhesives, and strain isolation pads. Atmospheric entry heating profiles for two vehicles, the Access to Space (ATS) rocket-powered single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle and a proposed Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), were used to ensure that the trends were not unique to a particular trajectory. Eight TPS concepts were compared for a range of applied heat loads and substructural heat capacities to identify general trends. This study found the blanket TPS concepts have the lightest weights over the majority of their applicable ranges, and current technology ceramic tiles and metallic TPS concepts have similar weights. A proposed, state-of-the-art metallic system which uses a higher temperature alloy and efficient multilayer insulation was predicted to be significantly lighter than the ceramic tile systems and approaches blanket TPS weights for higher integrated heat loads.

  16. Current Concept of Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a catastrophic condition associated with significant neurological deficit, social, and financial burdens. Over the past decades, various treatments including medication, surgery, and rehabilitation therapy for SCI have been performed, but there were no definite treatment option to improve neurological function of patients with chronic SCI. Therefore, new treatment trials with stem cells have been studied to regenerate injured spinal cord. Among various types of stem cells, bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells is highly expected as candidates for the stem cell therapy. The result of the current research showed that direct intramedullary injection to the injured spinal cord site in subacute phase is most effective. Neurological examination, electrophysiologic studies, and magnetic resonance imaging are commonly used to assess the effectiveness of treatment. Diffusion tensor imaging visualizing white matter tract can be also alternative option to identify neuronal regeneration. Despite various challenging issues, stem cell therapy will open new perspectives for SCI treatment. PMID:27857906

  17. Bordetella pertussis: new concepts in pathogenesis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Carbonetti, Nicholas H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss recent findings and selected topics of interest in Bordetella pertussis virulence and pathogenesis and treatment of pertussis. It is not intended to cover issues on immune responses to B. pertussis infection or problems with currently used pertussis vaccines. Recent findings Studies on the activities of various B. pertussis virulence factors include the immunomodulatory activities of filamentous hemagglutinin, fimbriae, and adenylate cyclase toxin. Recently emerging B. pertussis strains show evidence of genetic selection for vaccine escape mutants, with changes in vaccine antigen-expressing genes, some of which may have increased the virulence of this pathogen. Severe and fatal pertussis in young infants continues to be a problem, with several studies highlighting predictors of fatality, including the extreme leukocytosis associated with this infection. Treatments for pertussis are extremely limited, though early antibiotic intervention may be beneficial. Neutralizing pertussis toxin activity may be an effective strategy, as well as targeting two host proteins, pendrin and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors, as novel potential therapeutic interventions. Summary Pertussis is reemerging as a major public health problem and continued basic research is revealing information on bacterial virulence and disease pathogenesis, as well as potential novel strategies for vaccination and targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26906206

  18. Treatment for primary hypothyroidism: current approaches and future possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Chakera, Ali J; Pearce, Simon HS; Vaidya, Bijay

    2012-01-01

    Primary hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease. Although the diagnosis and treatment of hypothyroidism is often considered simple, there are large numbers of people with this condition who are suboptimally treated. Even in those people with hypothyroidism who are biochemically euthyroid on levothyroxine replacement there is a significant proportion who report poorer quality of life. This review explores the historical and current treatment options for hypothyroidism, reasons for and potential solutions to suboptimal treatment, and future possibilities in the treatment of hypothyroidism. PMID:22291465

  19. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman’s active sports life. Sportsman’s hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman’s hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman’s hernia at our hospital between 2011–2014, in light of current literature. PMID:27436937

  20. Current concepts in the diagnosis and management of left ventricular assist device infections.

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Juhsien; Wilhelm, Mark P; Sohail, M Rizwan

    2013-02-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) are increasingly being used both as a bridge to transplantation and for long-term myocardial surrogate destination therapy in patients with end-stage heart failure. Primarily owing to the presence of a driveline that connects the device to an external battery through an open skin incision, the rates of LVAD-related infections (LVADRIs) are high, ranging from 30 to 50%. LVADRIs can be broadly classified into driveline infection, pump pocket infection, bloodstream infection and endocarditis/pump or cannula infection. Diagnostic evaluation and management of these complicated infections can be quite challenging for clinicians involved in the care of these patients. Here, the authors summarize the current epidemiology, microbiology, diagnostic approach and management strategies for each type of LVADRI. The authors also review current concepts regarding antibiotic prophylaxis for LVAD implantation. Finally, the authors highlight the gaps in the knowledge of LVADRI and provide directions for future studies.

  1. The ‘structure-function’ relationship in glaucoma – past thinking and current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Rizwan; Swanson, William H.; Garway-Heath, David F

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the relationship between functional and structural measures in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is necessary for both grading the severity of disease and for understanding the natural history of the condition. This article outlines the current evidence for the nature of this relationship, and highlights the current mathematical models linking structure and function. Large clinical trials demonstrate that both structural and functional change are apparent in advanced stages of disease, while, at an individual level, detectable structural abnormality may precede functional abnormality in some patients whilst the converse in true in other patients. Although the exact nature of the ‘structure-function’ relationship in POAG is still the topic of scientific debate and the subject of continuing research, this article aims to provide the clinician with an understanding of the past concepts and contemporary thinking in relation to the structure-function relationship in POAG. PMID:22339936

  2. Treatment compliance in chronic illness: Current situation and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Conthe, P; Márquez Contreras, E; Aliaga Pérez, A; Barragán García, B; Fernández de Cano Martín, M N; González Jurado, M; Ollero Baturone, M; Pinto, J L

    2014-01-01

    Long-term chronic diseases have a high mortality rate around the world, affecting both genders equally. Despite improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of various health problems, lack of treatment compliance remains an obstacle to improving health and patient quality of life, and it carries a high associated socio-healthcare cost. The objectives of this study were to develop the concept of «therapeutic adherence», which includes both pharmacological compliance as well as non-pharmacological (level of agreement and patient involvement, lifestyle changes, etc.) treatments. The study also aimed to establish the clinical and socio-health impact of non-compliance, the reasons for non-compliance, and methods and strategies to improve compliance. The results of this study support therapeutic adherence as an essential goal of the healthcare system that encompasses all stakeholders involved in patient health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Crohn's disease: a review of treatment options and current research.

    PubMed

    Bandzar, Sean; Gupta, Shabnam; Platt, Manu O

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects nearly 1.4 million Americans. The etiology of Crohn's disease is not completely understood, however, research has suggested a genetic link. There is currently no known cure for Crohn's disease and, as a result, most government-funded research is being conducted to increase the quality of life of afflicted patients (i.e. reducing chronic inflammation and alleviating growth impairment in pediatric patients). A number of treatment options are available including an alpha-4 integrin inhibitor and several TNF-alpha inhibitors. Furthermore, research is being conducted on several alternative treatment options to help understand exactly which cellular mechanisms (i.e. inducing apoptosis in leukocytes) are required for clinical efficacy. This review seeks to chronicle the current available treatment options for patients affected by Crohn's disease to aid in understanding potential cellular mechanistic requirements for an efficacious drug, and shed light on potential options for future treatment.

  4. Pharmacological treatment for Alzheimer's disease: current approaches and future strategies.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ling-Yun; Chiu, Ming-Jang

    2010-12-01

    More than a decade after the first approval of the use of acetylcholine esterase inhibitor on patients with Alzheimer's disease, we still not have a single treatment or combination therapy that can effectively stop or reverse the relentless progression of such neurodegenerative disease. Recently therapeutics targeting amyloid hypothesis have undergone scrutiny by many clinical trials. These include gamma secretase inhibitor for reducing beta amyloid formation, agents for preventing aggregation of amyloid oligomers, and immunotherapy for enhancing clearance of amyloid and plaque. Therapies targeting hyperphosphorylated tau is another promising mechanism to be tackled with. Other agents enforcing mitochondria functions, enhancing serotonin receptors, modulating advanced glycation end products, and neurotrophic factors, as well as other therapies are also emerging. We review current treatments and therapeutic strategies already undergone different stage of clinical trails in this report. We propose that therapeutics of various combination composed of symptomatic treatments and disease modifying therapies will become standard regimens of AD treatment with much better efficacy than current approaches.

  5. Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma: Current Insights in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Matthyssens, Lucas E.; Creytens, David; Ceelen, Wim P.

    2015-01-01

    Retroperitoneal liposarcoma (RLS) is a rare, biologically heterogeneous tumor that present considerable challenges due to its size and deep location. As a consequence, the majority of patients with high-grade RLS will develop locally recurrent disease following surgery, and this constitutes the cause of death in most patients. Here, we review current insights and controversies regarding histology, molecular biology, extent of surgery, (neo)adjuvant treatment, and systemic treatment including novel targeted agents in RLS. PMID:25713799

  6. Current concepts in the management of recurrent anterior gleno-humeral joint instability with bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Ramhamadany, Eamon; Modi, Chetan S

    2016-01-01

    The management of recurrent anterior gleno-humeral joint instability is challenging in the presence of bone loss. It is often seen in young athletic patients and dislocations related to epileptic seizures and may involve glenoid bone deficiency, humeral bone deficiency or combined bipolar lesions. It is critical to accurately identify and assess the amount and position of bone loss in order to select the most appropriate treatment and reduce the risk of recurrent instability after surgery. The current literature suggests that coracoid and iliac crest bone block transfers are reliable for treating glenoid defects. The treatment of humeral defects is more controversial, however, although good early results have been reported after arthroscopic Remplissage for small defects. Larger humeral defects may require complex reconstruction or partial resurfacing. There is currently very limited evidence to support treatment strategies when dealing with bipolar lesions. The aim of this review is to summarise the current evidence regarding the best imaging modalities and treatment strategies in managing this complex problem relating particularly to contact athletes and dislocations related to epileptic seizures. PMID:27335809

  7. REHABILITATION AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR: CURRENT CONCEPTS REVIEW AND EVIDENCE-BASED GUIDELINES

    PubMed Central

    Westgard, Paul; Chandler, Zachary; Gaskill, Trevor R.; Kokmeyer, Dirk; Millett, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the characteristics and timing of rotator cuff healing and provide an update on treatments used in rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs. The authors' protocol of choice, used within a large sports medicine rehabilitation center, is presented and the rationale behind its implementation is discussed. Background: If initial nonsurgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear fails, surgical repair is often the next line of treatment. It is evident that a successful outcome after surgical rotator cuff repair is as much dependent on surgical technique as it is on rehabilitation. To this end, rehabilitation protocols have proven challenging to both the orthopaedic surgeon and the involved physical therapist. Instead of being based on scientific rationale, traditionally most rehabilitation protocols are solely based on clinical experience and expert opinion. Methods: A review of currently available literature on rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair on PUBMED / MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed to illustrate the available evidence behind various postoperative treatment modalities. Results: There is little high-level scientific evidence available to support or contest current postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation protocols. Most existing protocols are based on clinical experience with modest incorporation of scientific data. Conclusion: Little scientific evidence is available to guide the timing of postsurgical rotator cuff rehabilitation. To this end, expert opinion and clinical experience remains a large facet of rehabilitation protocols. This review describes a rotator cuff rehabilitation protocol that incorporates currently available scientific literature guiding rehabilitation. PMID:22530194

  8. Cardiac Involvement in Sarcoidosis: Evolving Concepts in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Joseph P.; Hwang, Jennifer; Bradfield, Jason; Fishbein, Michael; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Tung, Roderick

    2014-01-01

    Clinically evident sarcoidosis involving the heart has been noted in at least 2 to 7% of patients with sarcoidosis, but occult involvement is much higher (> 20%). Cardiac sarcoidosis is often not recognized antemortem, as sudden death may be the presenting feature. Cardiac involvement may occur at any point during the course of sarcoidosis and may occur in the absence of pulmonary or systemic involvement. Sarcoidosis can involve any part of the heart, with protean manifestations. Prognosis of cardiac sarcoidosis is related to extent and site(s) of involvement. Most deaths due to cardiac sarcoidosis are due to arrhythmias or conduction defects, but granulomatous infiltration of the myocardium may be lethal. The definitive diagnosis of isolated cardiac sarcoidosis is difficult. The yield of endomyocardial biopsies is low; treatment of cardiac sarcoidosis is often warranted even in the absence of histologic proof. Radionuclide scans are integral to the diagnosis. Currently, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging scans are the key imaging modalities to diagnose cardiac sarcoidosis. The prognosis of cardiac sarcoidosis is variable, but mortality rates of untreated cardiac sarcoidosis are high. Although randomized therapeutic trials have not been done, corticosteroids (alone or combined with additional immunosuppressive medications) remain the mainstay of treatment. Because of the potential for sudden cardiac death, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators should be placed in any patient with cardiac sarcoidosis and serious ventricular arrhythmias or heart block, and should be considered for cardiomyopathy. Cardiac transplantation is a viable option for patients with end-stage cardiac sarcoidosis refractory to medical therapy. PMID:25007089

  9. Treatment of B-cell lymphoma using peptides. A novel concept.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, K S

    1993-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy remains the major current treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. B-cell lymphoma often has tumor-specific surface immunoglobulins called idiotypes. Clinical trials using murine monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies as a targeting approach have shown some success. I describe a novel concept of using idiotype-specific peptides as an alternative targeting approach for the treatment of B-cell lymphoma. In brief, octapeptides that bind to the surface idiotype of the B-cell lymphoma are isolated from a large synthetic peptide library (10(6) to 10(7) peptides). Once the sequence of a tumor-specific octapeptide ligand is defined, large quantities can be synthesized and conjugated with a radionuclide (such as iodine 131). This should permit highly specific destruction of lymphoma cells that bind the labeled peptide. The theoretic advantages of this approach over the previous use of anti-idiotype antibodies are addressed. Images PMID:8342262

  10. Current concepts in targeting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease pharmacotherapy: making progress towards personalised management.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Prescott G; Agusti, Alvar; Roche, Nicolas; Singh, Dave; Martinez, Fernando J

    2015-05-02

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, complex, and heterogeneous disorder that is responsible for substantial and growing morbidity, mortality, and health-care expense worldwide. Of imperative importance to decipher the complexity of COPD is to identify groups of patients with similar clinical characteristics, prognosis, or therapeutic needs, the so-called clinical phenotypes. This strategy is logical for research but might be of little clinical value because clinical phenotypes can overlap in the same patient and the same clinical phenotype could result from different biological mechanisms. With the goal to match assessment with treatment choices, the latest iteration of guidelines from the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease reorganised treatment objectives into two categories: to improve symptoms (ie, dyspnoea and health status) and to decrease future risk (as predicted by forced expiratory volume in 1 s level and exacerbations history). This change thus moves treatment closer to individualised medicine with available bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory drugs. Yet, future treatment options are likely to include targeting endotypes that represent subtypes of patients defined by a distinct pathophysiological mechanism. Specific biomarkers of these endotypes would be particularly useful in clinical practice, especially in patients in which clinical phenotype alone is insufficient to identify the underlying endotype. A few series of potential COPD endotypes and biomarkers have been suggested. Empirical knowledge will be gained from proof-of-concept trials in COPD with emerging drugs that target specific inflammatory pathways. In every instance, specific endotype and biomarker efforts will probably be needed for the success of these trials, because the pathways are likely to be operative in only a subset of patients. Network analysis of human diseases offers the possibility to improve understanding of disease pathobiological

  11. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: Treatment Update and Current Trends.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Katrina B; Kuerer, Henry

    2015-11-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) traditionally has been managed through various combinations of surgery, radiation, and endocrine therapy. However, concern for under- or over-treatment of DCIS has led many surgeons to question historically standardized approaches and instead begin to tailor treatment based on individual prognostic indicators. Recent and ongoing clinical trials have investigated the potential for active surveillance in DCIS, the possibility of eliminating radiation therapy (RT), and ways in which adjuvant systemic therapy may be refined. This review will summarize the current trends in the treatment of DCIS, as well as highlight the most pertinent clinical trials that are shaping management today.

  12. Current Status of Immunotherapy Treatments for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Luna, Cristina; Prados, Jose; Ortiz, Raul; Melguizo, Consolacion; Torres, Carolina; Caba, Octavio

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a lethal disease representing the seventh most frequent cause of death from cancer worldwide. Resistance of pancreatic tumors to current treatments leads to disappointing survival rates, and more specific and effective therapies are urgently needed. In recent years, immunotherapy has been proposed as a promising approach to the treatment of PC, and encouraging results have been published by various preclinical and clinical studies. This review provides an overview of the latest developments in the immunotherapeutic treatment of PC and summarizes the most recent and important clinical trials.

  13. Treatment of poststroke aphasia: current practice and new directions.

    PubMed

    Fama, Mackenzie E; Turkeltaub, Peter E

    2014-11-01

    Aphasia is an acquired neurologic disorder that impairs an individual's ability to use and/or understand language. It commonly occurs after stroke or other injury to the brain's language network. The authors present the current methods of diagnosis and treatment of aphasia. They include a review of the evidence for the benefits of speech-language therapy, the most widespread approach to aphasia treatment, and a discussion of newer interventions such as medication and brain stimulation. These methods hold much promise for improving patient outcomes in aphasia; however, additional research regarding the best approaches to aphasia treatment will greatly improve our clinical approach.

  14. Modern concepts of treatment and prevention of lightning injuries.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Farinholt, Heidi-Marie A; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D; Long, William B

    2005-01-01

    Lightning is the second most common cause of weather-related death in the United States. Lightning is a natural atmospheric discharge that occurs between regions of net positive and net negative electric charges. There are several types of lightning, including streak lightning, sheet lightning, ribbon lightning, bead lightning, and ball lightning. Lightning causes injury through five basic mechanisms: direct strike, flash discharge (splash), contact, ground current (step voltage), and blunt trauma. While persons struck by lightning show evidence of multisystem derangement, the most dramatic effects involve the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Cardiopulmonary arrest is the most common cause of death in lightning victims. Immediate resuscitation of people struck by lightning greatly affects the prognosis. Electrocardiographic changes observed following lightning accidents are probably from primary electric injury or burns of the myocardium without coronary artery occlusion. Lightning induces vasomotor spasm from direct sympathetic stimulation resulting in severe loss of pulses in the extremities. This vasoconstriction may be associated with transient paralysis. Damage to the central nervous system accounts for the second most debilitating group of injuries. Central nervous system injuries from lightning include amnesia and confusion, immediate loss of consciousness, weakness, intracranial injuries, and even brief aphasia. Other organ systems injured by lightning include the eye, ear, gastrointestinal system, skin, and musculoskeletal system. The best treatment of lightning injuries is prevention. The Lightning Safety Guidelines devised by the Lightning Safety Group should be instituted in the United States and other nations to prevent these devastating injuries.

  15. Current and emerging treatment options for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Daniel E; Lee, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we focus on the current and emerging treatments in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). A detailed evolution of the current standard of care, and new techniques and treatment options will be reviewed. Intergroup 0099 established the role for chemoradiotherapy (chemo-RT) in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Multiple randomized Phase III trials have shown the benefit of chemo-RT; however, none of these studies utilized modern radiotherapy (RT) techniques of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). IMRT has the ability to deliver high doses of radiation to the target structures while sparing adjacent bystander healthy tissues, and has now become the preferred RT treatment modality. Chemotherapy also has had a shifting paradigm of induction and/or adjuvant chemotherapy combined with RT alone, to the investigation with concurrent chemo-RT. New treatment options including targeted monoclonal antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors are being studied in NPC. These new biologic therapies have promising in vitro activity for NPC, and emerging clinical studies are beginning to define their role. RT continues to expand its capabilities, and since IMRT and particle therapy, specifically intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), has reports of impressive dosimetric efficacy in-silica. Adaptive RT is attempting to reduce toxicity while maintaining treatment efficacy, and the clinical results are still in their youth. Lastly, Epstein– Barr virus (EBV) DNA has recently been studied for prediction of tumor response and its use as a biomarker is increasingly promising to aid in early detection as well as supplementing the current staging system. RT with or without chemotherapy remains the standard of care for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Advances in RT technique, timing of chemotherapy, biologically targeted agents, particle therapy, adaptive RT, and the incorporation of EBV DNA as a biomarker may aid in the current and future treatment of

  16. Current Strategies for the Treatment of Aneurysmal Bone Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Brosjö, Otte

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts are benign bone tumors that usually present in childhood and early adulthood. They usually manifest as expansile osteolytic lesions with a varying potential to be locally aggressive. Since their first description in 1942, a variety of treatment methods has been proposed. Traditionally, these tumors were treated with open surgery. Either intralesional surgical procedures or en bloc excisions have been described. Furthermore, a variety of chemical or physical adjuvants has been utilized in order to reduce the risk for local recurrence after excision. Currently, there is a shift to more minimally invasive procedures in order to avoid the complications of open surgical excision. Good results have been reported during percutaneous surgery, or the use of embolization. Recently, sclerotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment, showing effective consolidation of the lesions and functional results that appear to be superior to the ones of open surgery. Lastly, non-invasive treatment, such as pharmaceutical intervention with denosumab or bisphosphonates has been reported to be effective in the management of the disease. Radiotherapy has also been shown to confer good local control, either alone or in conjunction to other treatment modalities, but is associated with serious adverse effects. Here, we review the current literature on the methods of treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts. The indication for each type of treatment along reported outcome of the intervention, as well as potential complications are systematically presented. Our review aims to increase awareness of the different treatment modalities and facilitate decision-making regarding each individual patient. PMID:26793296

  17. Overcoming treatment resistance in cancer: Current understanding and tactics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guang; Wilson, George; George, Jacob; Liddle, Christopher; Hebbard, Lionel; Qiao, Liang

    2017-02-28

    Chemotherapy is the standard treatment for many, if not all, metastatic cancers. While chemotherapy is often capable of inducing cell death in tumors leading to shrinkage of the tumor bulk, many patients suffer from recurrence and ultimately death due to resistance. During the last decade, treatment resistance has attracted great attention followed by some seminal discoveries, including sequential mutations, cancer stem cells, and bidirectional inter-conversion of stem and non-stem cancer cell populations. Nevertheless, the successful treatment of cancer will require a considerable refinement of our knowledge concerning treatment resistance. In doing so, we expect that a more informed and refined approach to treat cancer will be developed and this may improve prognosis of cancer patients. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge concerning the failure of cancer treatments and the potential approaches to overcome therapeutic resistance.

  18. Treatment of spider bites by high voltage direct current.

    PubMed

    Osborn, C D

    1991-06-01

    Between September 7, 1988, and January 15, 1991, 147 cases of confirmed (19) and suspected spider bites have been treated by high voltage direct current (HVDC) shocks. Venom damage to tissue was arrested at the time of treatment. Pain and systemic symptoms usually improved within 15 minutes. Lesion excision or grafts have not been necessary in any of the 127 cases with completed followup.

  19. Current treatment approaches and trials in central sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Khayat, Rami N; Abraham, William T

    2016-03-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is one of the most common comorbidities in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and is associated with negative consequences. Despite several recent advances, there are currently no widely accepted therapies for CSA. In this review we will discuss available therapies for CSA and review the published trials addressing treatment of CSA in HFrEF patients.

  20. Orofacial pain and occlusion: is there a link? An overview of current concepts and the clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Racich, Michael J

    2005-02-01

    This paper addresses the current concepts in orofacial pain and occlusion and queries their possible relationship to each other. English-language peer-reviewed articles were identified using Medline (1990-2003), as well as a hand search. The key words occlusion, orofacial pain , and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were used. Additional references from citations within the articles were obtained, and current textbooks were used as well. The textbooks provided contemporary concept overviews and further additional references.

  1. Systemic Sclerosis: Current Concepts in Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Aspects of Dermatological Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, Vishalakshi; Phiske, Meghana M; Gopalani, Vinay V

    2013-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic, multisystem connective tissue disease with protean clinical manifestations. Recent advances in understanding the pathogenic mechanisms have led to development of target-oriented and vasomodulatory drugs which play a pivotal role in treating various dermatological manifestations. An exhaustive literature search was done using Medline, Embase, and Cochrane library to review the recent concepts regarding pathogenesis and evidence-based treatment of salient dermatological manifestations. The concept of shared genetic risk factors for the development of autoimmune diseases is seen in SSc. It is divided into fibroproliferative and inflammatory groups based on genome-wide molecular profiling. Genetic, infectious, and environmental factors play a key role; vascular injury, fibrosis, and immune activation are the chief pathogenic factors. Vitamin D deficiency has been documented in SSc and correlates with the severity of skin involvement. Skin sclerosis, Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) with digital vasculopathies, pigmentation, calcinosis, and leg ulcers affect the patient's quality of life. Immunosuppressives, biologicals, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are efficacious in skin sclerosis. Endothelin A receptor antagonists, calcium-channel blockers, angiotensin receptor inhibitors, prostacyclin analogs, and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors are the mainstay in RP and digital vasculopathies. Pigmentation in SSc has been attributed to melanogenic potential of endothelin-1 (ET-1); the role of ET 1 antagonists and vitamin D analogs needs to be investigated. Sexual dysfunction in both male and female patients has been attributed to vasculopathy and fibrosis, wherein PDE-5 inhibitors are found to be useful. The future concepts of treating SSc may be based on the gene expression signature. PMID:23918994

  2. Implementation of an active instructional design for teaching the concepts of current, voltage and resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlaineta-Agüero, S.; Del Sol-Fernández, S.; Sánchez-Guzmán, D.; García-Salcedo, R.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work we show the implementation of a learning sequence based on an active learning methodology for teaching Physics, this proposal tends to promote a better learning in high school students with the use of a comic book and it combines the use of different low-cost experimental activities for teaching the electrical concepts of Current, Resistance and Voltage. We consider that this kind of strategy can be easily extrapolated to higher-education levels like Engineering-college/university level and other disciplines of Science. To evaluate this proposal, we used some conceptual questions from the Electric Circuits Concept Evaluation survey developed by Sokoloff and the results from this survey was analysed with the Normalized Conceptual Gain proposed by Hake and the Concentration Factor that was proposed by Bao and Redish, to identify the effectiveness of the methodology and the models that the students presented after and before the instruction, respectively. We found that this methodology was more effective than only the implementation of traditional lectures, we consider that these results cannot be generalized but gave us the opportunity to view many important approaches in Physics Education; finally, we will continue to apply the same experiment with more students, in the same and upper levels of education, to confirm and validate the effectiveness of this methodology proposal.

  3. Overview and Current Status of Analyses of Potential LEU Design Concepts for TREAT

    SciTech Connect

    Connaway, H. M.; Kontogeorgakos, D. C.; Papadias, D. D.; Wright, A. E.

    2015-10-01

    Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyses have been performed to evaluate the performance of different low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design concepts for the conversion of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) from its current high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. TREAT is an experimental reactor developed to generate high neutron flux transients for the testing of nuclear fuels. The goal of this work was to identify an LEU design which can maintain the performance of the existing HEU core while continuing to operate safely. A wide variety of design options were considered, with a focus on minimizing peak fuel temperatures and optimizing the power coupling between the TREAT core and test samples. Designs were also evaluated to ensure that they provide sufficient reactivity and shutdown margin for each control rod bank. Analyses were performed using the core loading and experiment configuration of historic M8 Power Calibration experiments (M8CAL). The Monte Carlo code MCNP was utilized for steady-state analyses, and transient calculations were performed with the point kinetics code TREKIN. Thermal analyses were performed with the COMSOL multi-physics code. Using the results of this study, a new LEU Baseline design concept is being established, which will be evaluated in detail in a future report.

  4. Theory of mind and recognition of facial emotion in dementia: challenge to current concepts.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Morris; Binns, Malcolm A; Black, Sandra E; Murphy, Cara; Stuss, Donald T

    2013-01-01

    Current literature suggests that theory of mind (ToM) and recognition of facial emotion are impaired in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). In contrast, studies suggest that ToM is spared in Alzheimer disease (AD). However, there is controversy whether recognition of emotion in faces is impaired in AD. This study challenges the concepts that ToM is preserved in AD and that recognition of facial emotion is impaired in bvFTD. ToM, recognition of facial emotion, and identification of emotions associated with video vignettes were studied in bvFTD, AD, and normal controls. ToM was assessed using false-belief and visual perspective-taking tasks. Identification of facial emotion was tested using Ekman and Friesen's pictures of facial affect. After adjusting for relevant covariates, there were significant ToM deficits in bvFTD and AD compared with controls, whereas neither group was impaired in the identification of emotions associated with video vignettes. There was borderline impairment in recognizing angry faces in bvFTD. Patients with AD showed significant deficits on false belief and visual perspective taking, and bvFTD patients were impaired on second-order false belief. We report novel findings challenging the concepts that ToM is spared in AD and that recognition of facial emotion is impaired in bvFTD.

  5. Post burn pruritus--a review of current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, Jewel Raj; Rao, Aravind Lakshmana; Prabha, Ratna; Gupta, Ashish Kumar; Paul, M Kingsly; Lamba, Shashank

    2012-08-01

    Post burn pruritus is a well recognised symptom in almost all burn patients. Yet, there is insufficient awareness about the etiopathogenesis and a lack of a systematic approach in the assessment and treatment of this distressing symptom. The current standard therapies include antihistamines, which are effective as sole therapy in only 20% patients, and emollients. There is a lacunae of clear consensus on the care of patients not responding to antihistamines. We review the literature on the etiology and pathogenesis of post burn pruritus, which has both central and peripheral pathways. The published studies on the currently available therapeutic options to treat itch in burns are discussed. On the basis of current evidence in literature, gabapentin used in the treatment of neuropathic pain, has demonstrated great promise, and is suggested as the next option for this subset of patients, not relieved with antihistamines.

  6. Fabry disease - current treatment and new drug development.

    PubMed

    Motabar, Omid; Sidransky, Ellen; Goldin, Ehud; Zheng, Wei

    2010-07-23

    Fabry disease is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder caused by a partial or complete deficiency of α-galactosidase A (GLA), resulting in the storage of excess cellular glycosphingolipids. Enzyme replacement therapy is available for the treatment of Fabry disease, but it is a costly, intravenous treatment. Alternative therapeutic approaches, including small molecule chaperone therapy, are currently being explored. High throughput screening (HTS) technologies can be utilized to discover other small molecule compounds, including non-inhibitory chaperones, enzyme activators, molecules that reduce GLA substrate, and molecules that activate GLA gene promoters. This review outlines the current therapeutic approaches, emerging treatment strategies, and the process of drug discovery and development for Fabry disease.

  7. Current and emerging treatment options for uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Patricia Rusa; Odashiro, Alexandre Nakao; Lim, Li-Anne; Miyamoto, Cristina; Blanco, Paula L; Odashiro, Macanori; Maloney, Shawn; De Souza, Dominique F; Burnier, Miguel N

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor in adults, with a 10-year cumulative metastatic rate of 34%. The most common site of metastasis is the liver (95%). Unfortunately, the current treatment of metastatic UM is limited by the lack of effective systemic therapy. Options for the management of the primary intraocular tumor include radical surgery as well as conservative treatments in order to preserve visual acuity. For metastatic disease, several approaches have been described with no standard method. Nevertheless, median survival after liver metastasis is poor, being around 4–6 months, with a 1-year survival of 10%–15%. In this review, the authors summarize current and promising new treatments for UM. PMID:24003303

  8. Current approaches to the initial treatment of symptomatic multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Jasielec, Jagoda K; Jakubowiak, Andrzej J

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma has dramatically changed since the emergence of proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs. Front-line combination regimens incorporating novel drugs such as thalidomide, bortezomib and lenalidomide, have significantly improved response rates and are the standard of care for induction regimens. Although the timing and role of autologous stem cell transplant are now being questioned, it remains an important part of the treatment paradigm in eligible patients. In addition, the concept of extended sequential therapy has recently emerged, including consolidation and/or maintenance in both the post-transplant setting and in nontransplant candidates. In this article we focus on management strategies in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, including choice of induction regimens in transplant-eligible and -ineligible patients, as well as the role of autologous stem cell transplant, consolidation therapy and maintenance therapy. PMID:24286003

  9. The complement system and its role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, C; Holmstrup, P; Van Dyke, T E; Nielsen, C H

    2015-06-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent inflammatory disease in tooth supporting tissues, induced by bacteria growing in a biofilm on tooth surfaces. Components of the complement system are present in the periodontal tissue and the system is activated in periodontitis. Continuous complement activation and modulation by bacteria within the biofilm in periodontal pockets, however, may enhance local tissue destruction, providing the biofilm with both essential nutrients and space to grow. A more profound understanding of the mechanisms involved in complement-derived tissue degradation may facilitate the development of new treatment concepts for periodontitis. Further studies on the role of complement in periodontitis pathogenesis may also contribute to the understanding of why some individuals fail to resolve periodontitis. Here, we review evidence that links complement to the pathogenesis of periodontitis with an emphasis on interaction of complement with bacteria from periodontitis-associated biofilm. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Consensus on Current Injectable Treatment Strategies in the Asian Face.

    PubMed

    Wu, Woffles T L; Liew, Steven; Chan, Henry H; Ho, Wilson W S; Supapannachart, Nantapat; Lee, Hong-Ki; Prasetyo, Adri; Yu, Jonathan Nevin; Rogers, John D

    2016-04-01

    The desire for and use of nonsurgical injectable esthetic facial treatments are increasing in Asia. The structural and anatomical features specific to the Asian face, and differences from Western populations in facial aging, necessitate unique esthetic treatment strategies, but published recommendations and clinical evidence for injectable treatments in Asians are scarce. The Asian Facial Aesthetics Expert Consensus Group met to discuss current practices and consensus opinions on the cosmetic use of botulinum toxin and hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers, alone and in combination, for facial applications in Southeastern and Eastern Asians. Consensus opinions and statements on treatment aims and current practice were developed following discussions regarding pre-meeting and meeting survey outcomes, peer-reviewed literature, and the experts' clinical experience. The indications and patterns of use of injectable treatments vary among patients of different ages, and among Asian countries. The combination use of botulinum toxin and fillers increases as patients age. Treatment aims in Asians and current practice regarding the use of botulinum toxin and HA fillers in the upper, middle, and lower face of patients aged 18 to >55 years are presented. In younger Asian patients, addressing proportion and structural features and deficiencies are important to achieve desired esthetic outcomes. In older patients, maintaining facial structure and volume and addressing lines and folds are essential to reduce the appearance of aging. This paper provides guidance on treatment strategies to address the complex esthetic requirements in Asian patients of all ages. This journal requires that the authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  11. Differential Treatments in Learning Disjunctive Concepts in Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malo, George Edward

    This study was designed to test the effectiveness of providing students with instruction on how to use the information contained in examples and non-examples of disjunctive concepts, and of five different instructional sequences of examples and non-examples. Students (192) enrolled in a mathematics course for prospective elementary teachers served…

  12. Current trends in endodontic practice: emergency treatments and technological armamentarium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michelle; Winkler, Johnathon; Hartwell, Gary; Stewart, Jeffrey; Caine, Rufus

    2009-01-01

    The current clinical practice of endodontics includes the utilization of a variety of new technological advances and materials. The last comprehensive survey that compared treatment modalities used in endodontic practices was conducted in 1990. The purpose of the current survey was to determine the frequency with which these new endodontic technologies and materials are being used in endodontic practices today. An e-mail questionnaire was sent to the 636 active diplomates of the American Board of Endodontics with current e-mail addresses. Two hundred thirty-two diplomates responded for a response rate of 35%. Calcium hydroxide was found to be the most frequently used intracanal medicament for all cases diagnosed with necrotic pulps. Ibuprofen was the most frequently prescribed medication for pain, and penicillin was the most frequently prescribed antibiotic when an active infection was present. Eighty-two percent of the respondents are still incorporating hand files in some fashion during the cleansing and shaping phase of treatment. Lateral condensation and continuous wave were the most common methods used for obturation. Digital radiography was reported as being used by 72.5% of the respondents, whereas 45.3% reported using the microscope greater than 75% of the patient treatment. Ultrasonics was used by 97.8% of the respondents. It appears from the results that new endodontic technology is currently being used in the endodontic offices of those who responded to the survey.

  13. Photodynamic therapy: current role in the treatment of chorioretinal conditions

    PubMed Central

    Newman, D K

    2016-01-01

    Verteporfin photodynamic therapy (vPDT) is a selective vaso-occlusive treatment that targets choroidal vascular abnormalities. It was initially developed to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration using the ‘standard' vPDT protocol (verteporfin 6 mg/m2, vPDT laser fluence 50 J/cm2). vPDT therapy has subsequently evolved as an important treatment modality for a range of other chorioretinal conditions including choroidal haemangioma, central serous chorioretinopathy, polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy, and peripapillary choroidal neovascularisation. Various ‘safety-enhanced' vPDT protocols have been devised to optimise treatment outcomes, typically using reduced dose verteporfin (verteporfin 3 mg/m2) or reduced fluence vPDT (vPDT laser fluence 25 J/cm2). This paper reviews the current role of vPDT therapy in the treatment of chorioretinal conditions. PMID:26742867

  14. Current and Emerging Directions in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tiffany A.; Keel, Pamela K.

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders are a significant source of psychiatric morbidity in young women and demonstrate high comorbidity with mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. Thus, clinicians may encounter eating disorders in the context of treating other conditions. This review summarizes the efficacy of current and emerging treatments for anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). Treatment trials were identified using electronic and manual searches and by reviewing abstracts from conference proceedings. Family based therapy has demonstrated superiority for adolescents with AN but no treatment has established superiority for adults. For BN, both 60 mg fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) have well-established efficacy. For BED, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, CBT, and interpersonal psychotherapy have demonstrated efficacy. Emerging directions for AN include investigation of the antipsychotic olanzapine and several novel psychosocial treatments. Future directions for BN and BED include increasing CBT disseminability, targeting affect regulation, and individualized stepped-care approaches. PMID:22879753

  15. [Current possibilities of examination and preservative treatment in endometrial hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Kołodziejczak, Małgorzata; Knapp, Paweł; Kuźmicki, Mariusz; Knapp, Piotr

    2011-07-01

    Endometrial hyperplasia is one of the most frequent reasons of pre- and menopausal bleeding. In recent years, knowledge of biology of hyperplastic endometrium has changed some medical guidelines in a group of patients diagnosed with endometrial lesions. In many cases radical procedures have been replaced with preservative treatment, especially for those women who wished to spare their uterus. Also, in many high-risk surgical procedures there are a number of algorithms which allow to perform non-radical treatment in those cases. Enforcement of those strategy should be linked to precise examination of endometrium morphology Summarizing, a preservative treatment in case of endometrial hyperplasia needs sensitive and specific tests which determine safety limits of the procedure. This paper has presented current possibilities of examination and non-radical treatment of endometrial hyperplasia.

  16. Current and emerging options for the drug treatment of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    De la Herrán-Arita, Alberto K; García-García, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    Narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency (now called type 1 narcolepsy) is a lifelong neurologic disorder with well-established diagnostic criteria and etiology. Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and symptoms of dissociated rapid eye movement sleep such as cataplexy (sudden loss of muscle tone), hypnagogic hallucinations (sensory events that occur at the transition from wakefulness to sleep), sleep paralysis (inability to perform movements upon wakening or sleep onset), and nocturnal sleep disruption. As these symptoms are often disabling, most patients need life-long treatment. The treatment of narcolepsy is well defined, and, traditionally, amphetamine-like stimulants (i.e., dopaminergic release enhancers) have been used for clinical management to improve EDS and sleep attacks, whereas tricyclic antidepressants have been used as anticataplectics. However, treatments have evolved to better-tolerated compounds such as modafinil or armodafinil (for EDS) and adrenergic/serotonergic selective reuptake inhibitors (as anticataplectics). In addition, night-time administration of a short-acting sedative, c-hydroxybutyrate (sodium oxybate), has been used for the treatment for EDS and cataplexy. These therapies are almost always needed in combination with non-pharmacologic treatments (i.e., behavioral modification). A series of new drugs is currently being tested in animal models and in humans. These include a wide variety of hypocretin agonists, melanin- concentrating hormone receptor antagonists, antigenspecific immunopharmacology, and histamine H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists (e.g., pitolisant), which have been proposed for specific therapeutic applications, including the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, and more recently, narcolepsy. Even though current treatment is strictly symptomatic, based on the present state of knowledge of the pathophysiology of

  17. Microsurgical reconstruction of the head and neck region: Current concepts of maxillofacial surgery units worldwide.

    PubMed

    Kansy, Katinka; Mueller, Andreas Albert; Mücke, Thomas; Koersgen, Friederike; Wolff, Klaus Dietrich; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian; Hölzle, Frank; Pradel, Winnie; Schneider, Matthias; Kolk, Andreas; Smeets, Ralf; Acero, Julio; Haers, Piet; Ghali, G E; Hoffmann, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Microvascular surgery following tumor resection has become an important field of oral maxillofacial surgery (OMFS). Following the surveys on current reconstructive practice in German-speaking countries and Europe, this paper presents the third phase of the project when the survey was conducted globally. The DOESAK questionnaire has been developed via a multicenter approach with maxillofacial surgeons from 19 different hospitals in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. It was distributed in three different phases to a growing number of maxillofacial units in German-speaking clinics, over Europe and then worldwide. Thirty-eight units from Germany, Austria and Switzerland, 65 remaining European OMFS-departments and 226 units worldwide responded to the survey. There is wide agreement on the most commonly used flaps, intraoperative rapid sections and a trend towards primary bony reconstruction. No uniform concepts can be identified concerning osteosynthesis of bone transplants, microsurgical techniques, administration of supportive medication and postoperative monitoring protocols. Microsurgical reconstruction is the gold standard for the majority of oncologic cases in Europe, but worldwide, only every second unit has access to this technique. The DOESAK questionnaire has proven to be a valid and well accepted tool for gathering information about current practice in reconstructive OMFS surgery. The questionnaire has been able to demonstrate similarities, differences and global inequalities. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Current Concepts for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Criterion–Based Rehabilitation Progression

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, DOUGLAS; LOGERSTEDT, DAVID; HUNTER-GIORDANO, AIRELLE; AXE, MICHAEL J.; SNYDER-MACKLER, LYNN

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction should be evidence based. Since our original published guidelines in 1996, successful outcomes have been consistently achieved with the rehabilitation principles of early weight bearing, using a combination of weight-bearing and non–weight-bearing exercise focused on quadriceps and lower extremity strength, and meeting specific objective requirements for return to activity. As rehabilitative evidence and surgical technology and procedures have progressed, the original guidelines should be revisited to ensure that the most up-to-date evidence is guiding rehabilitative care. Emerging evidence on rehabilitative interventions and advancements in concomitant surgeries, including those addressing chondral and meniscal injuries, continues to grow and greatly affect the rehabilitative care of patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The aim of this article is to update previously published rehabilitation guidelines, using the most recent research to reflect the most current evidence for management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The focus will be on current concepts in rehabilitation interventions and modifications needed for concomitant surgery and pathology. PMID:22402434

  19. Pharmacotherapy for alcohol dependence: status of current treatments.

    PubMed

    Franck, Johan; Jayaram-Lindström, Nitya

    2013-08-01

    The efficacy of medications for alcohol dependence remains modest, and there are no strong clinical predictors of treatment response. Approved medications include acamprosate (an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) modulator), disulfiram (an acetaldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor) and naltrexone (an opioid antagonist) while nalmefene (an opioid antagonist) is currently under review for approval in Europe. Clinical trials suggest that baclofen (a GABA-B agonist) and topiramate (an anticonvulsant) may be promising candidates, while several other drug candidates are currently evaluated at early clinical stages.

  20. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: current treatment options and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Dejan; Patera, Andriani C.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Gerber, Marianne; Liu, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare but debilitating and frequently fatal viral disease of the central nervous system, primarily affecting individuals with chronically and severely suppressed immune systems. The disease was relatively obscure until the outbreak of HIV/AIDS, when it presented as one of the more frequent opportunistic infections in this immune deficiency syndrome. It attracted additional attention from the medical and scientific community following the discovery of significant PML risk associated with natalizumab, a monoclonal antibody used for treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. This was followed by association of PML with other immunosuppressive or immunomodulating drugs. PML is currently untreatable disease with poor outcomes, so it is a significant concern when developing new immunotherapies. Current prophylaxis and treatment of PML are focused on immune reconstitution, restoration of immune responses to JC virus infection, and eventual suppression of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This approach was successful in reducing the incidence of PML and improved survival of PML patients with HIV infection. However, the outcome for the majority of PML patients, regardless of their medical history, is still relatively poor. There is a high unmet need for both prophylaxis and treatment of PML. The aim of this review is to discuss potential drug candidates for prophylaxis and treatment of PML with a critical review of previously conducted and completed PML treatment studies as well as to provide perspectives for future therapies. PMID:26600871