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Sample records for custom lsi structure

  1. Design automation techniques for custom LSI arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, A.

    1975-01-01

    The standard cell design automation technique is described as an approach for generating random logic PMOS, CMOS or CMOS/SOS custom large scale integration arrays with low initial nonrecurring costs and quick turnaround time or design cycle. The system is composed of predesigned circuit functions or cells and computer programs capable of automatic placement and interconnection of the cells in accordance with an input data net list. The program generates a set of instructions to drive an automatic precision artwork generator. A series of support design automation and simulation programs are described, including programs for verifying correctness of the logic on the arrays, performing dc and dynamic analysis of MOS devices, and generating test sequences.

  2. Product assurance technology for custom LSI/VLSI electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.; Jennings, G. A.; Moore, B. T.; Nixon, R. H.; Pina, C. A.; Sayah, H. R.; Sievers, M. W.; Stahlberg, N. F.

    1985-01-01

    The technology for obtaining custom integrated circuits from CMOS-bulk silicon foundries using a universal set of layout rules is presented. The technical efforts were guided by the requirement to develop a 3 micron CMOS test chip for the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). This chip contains both analog and digital circuits. The development employed all the elements required to obtain custom circuits from silicon foundries, including circuit design, foundry interfacing, circuit test, and circuit qualification.

  3. Product assurance technology for procuring reliable, radiation-hard, custom LSI/VLSI electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Allen, R. A.; Blaes, B. R.; Hicks, K. A.; Jennings, G. A.; Lin, Y.-S.; Pina, C. A.; Sayah, H. R.; Zamani, N.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced measurement methods using microelectronic test chips are described. These chips are intended to be used in acquiring the data needed to qualify Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC's) for space use. Efforts were focused on developing the technology for obtaining custom IC's from CMOS/bulk silicon foundries. A series of test chips were developed: a parametric test strip, a fault chip, a set of reliability chips, and the CRRES (Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite) chip, a test circuit for monitoring space radiation effects. The technical accomplishments of the effort include: (1) development of a fault chip that contains a set of test structures used to evaluate the density of various process-induced defects; (2) development of new test structures and testing techniques for measuring gate-oxide capacitance, gate-overlap capacitance, and propagation delay; (3) development of a set of reliability chips that are used to evaluate failure mechanisms in CMOS/bulk: interconnect and contact electromigration and time-dependent dielectric breakdown; (4) development of MOSFET parameter extraction procedures for evaluating subthreshold characteristics; (5) evaluation of test chips and test strips on the second CRRES wafer run; (6) two dedicated fabrication runs for the CRRES chip flight parts; and (7) publication of two papers: one on the split-cross bridge resistor and another on asymmetrical SRAM (static random access memory) cells for single-event upset analysis.

  4. Advanced LSI-based amperometric sensor array with light-shielding structure for effective removal of photocurrent and mode selectable function for individual operation of 400 electrodes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kumi Y; Matsudaira, Masahki; Nakano, Masanori; Ino, Kosuke; Sakamoto, Chika; Kanno, Yusuke; Kubo, Reyushi; Kunikata, Ryota; Kira, Atsushi; Suda, Atsushi; Tsurumi, Ryota; Shioya, Toshihito; Yoshida, Shinya; Muroyama, Masanori; Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Shiku, Hitoshi; Satoh, Shiro; Esashi, Masayoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2015-02-01

    We have developed a large-scale integrated (LSI) complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based amperometric sensor array system called "Bio-LSI" as a platform for electrochemical bio-imaging and multi-point biosensing with 400 measurement points. In this study, we newly developed a Bio-LSI chip with a light-shield structure and a mode-selectable function with the aim of extending the application range of Bio-LSI. The light shield created by the top metal layer of the LSI chip significantly reduces the noise generated by the photocurrent, whose value is less than 1% of the previous Bio-LSI without the light shield. The mode-selectable function enables the individual operation of 400 electrodes in off, electrometer, V1, and V2 mode. The off-mode cuts the electrode from the electric circuit. The electrometer-mode reads out the electrode potential. The V1-mode and the V2-mode set the selected sensor electrode at two different independent voltages and read out the current. We demonstrated the usefulness of the mode-selectable function. First, we displayed a dot picture based on the redox reactions of 2.0 mM ferrocenemethanol at 400 electrodes by applying two different independent voltages using the V1 and V2 modes. Second, we carried out a simultaneous detection of O2 and H2O2 using the V1 and V2 modes. Third, we used the off and V1 modes for the modification of the osmium-polyvinylpyridine gel polymer containing horseradish peroxidase (Os-HRP) at the selected electrodes, which act as sensors for H2O2. These results confirm that the advanced version of Bio-LSI is a promising tool that can be applied to a wide range of analytical fields.

  5. LSI computer for 1980's space mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapp, W. A.; Saultz, J. E.; White, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    The low power, high reliability, SUMC-III-C computer is one member of the Space Ultrareliable Modular Computer (SUMC) family designed by NASA/MSFC to meet a wide range of missions through modularity in word size, throughput, and reliability. The SUMC-III-C, directed at such missions as the Large Space Telescope and Space Tug, uses custom designed CMOS/SOS LSI arrays with critical computer paths packaged on thick-film hybrids. This technology provides 300 to 600 logic gates per array with a typical stage delay of 3 to 5 nsec. SUMC-III-C is fully S/360 compatible at the user level, and includes virtual memory for the first time in an aerospace computer.

  6. Fundamental evaluation of LSI`s using anisotropic reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Sanada, M.; Suzuki, S.; Numaziri, T.; Omata, T.; Yoshida, N.

    1995-12-31

    An electrical and physical evaluation of CMOS LSI`s with multiple-metal layers exposed using a reactive ion etcher (RIE), is described. Anisotropic etching is executed using a parallel plate type reactive ion etcher with 3KV/mm sheath voltage grade and a CF4/02 gas mixture. The formation of small vertical protrusions, known as ``RIE grass``, on the Si-surface is prevented by using a Teflon plate and aluminum foil which covers over the cathode plate and LSI package, except for the LSI chip, itself. High density CMOS LSI`s with 0.5{micro}m design rules and three metal layers, each of which is composed of a sandwiched structure of aluminum between refractory metals (Ti, TiN), are used for an electrical and physical evaluation. Three important results, exhibiting no degradation of transistor characteristics, are discussed: a 10% speed up in circuit operation resulting from removing the isolation layer, a complex change of leakage current value resulting from very small RIE grass, and a change of metal line constitution resulting from removal of the upper refractory metal layer. The absence of transistor degradation shows that RIE is an effective tool for exposing multiple layers of metal lines of LSI`s without destroying any of the electrical functionality of a device. This technique is applied to the failure analysis of a CMOS LSI having an underlying pattern defect. By using an electron beam tester, the complete analysis is executed.

  7. DEC LSI-11/HP9895A software

    SciTech Connect

    Castleton, R.N.

    1984-04-20

    There is a need to exchange MSAD data between LLNL and Monsanto Research Corporation's Mound facility in Ohio. The LLNL tester is DEC LSI-11/23 based (as is all of the analysis software), and the Mound tester is HP9835 based. Data at Mound is stored on double density, double sided, HP-formatted 8 inch floppy disks. The software documented in this report makes possible the reading of these data disks by a DEC LSI-11/23 using an HP9895A disk drive.

  8. Design, processing and testing of LSI arrays hybrid microelectronics task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himmel, R. P.; Stuhlbarg, S. M.; Salmassy, S.

    1978-01-01

    Those factors affecting the cost of electronic subsystems utilizing LSI microcircuits were determined and the most efficient methods for low cost packaging of LSI devices as a function of density and reliability were developed.

  9. SSI/MSI/LSI/VLSI/ULSI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, George

    1984-01-01

    Discusses small-scale integrated (SSI), medium-scale integrated (MSI), large-scale integrated (LSI), very large-scale integrated (VLSI), and ultra large-scale integrated (ULSI) chips. The development and properties of these chips, uses of gallium arsenide, Josephson devices (two superconducting strips sandwiching a thin insulator), and future…

  10. C-MOS bulk metal design handbook. [LSI standard cell (circuits)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edge, T. M.

    1977-01-01

    The LSI standard cell array technique was used in the fabrication of more than 20 CMOS custom arrays. This technique consists of a series of computer programs and design automation techniques referred to as the Computer Aided Design And Test (CADAT) system that automatically translate a partitioned logic diagram into a set of instructions for driving an automatic plotter which generates precision mask artwork for complex LSI arrays of CMOS standard cells. The standard cell concept for producing LSI arrays begins with the design, layout, and validation of a group of custom circuits called standard cells. Once validated, these cells are given identification or pattern numbers and are permanently stored. To use one of these cells in a logic design, the user calls for the desired cell by pattern number. The Place, Route in Two Dimension (PR2D) computer program is then used to automatically generate the metalization and/or tunnels to interconnect the standard cells into the required function. Data sheets that describe the function, artwork, and performance of each of the standard cells, the general procedure for implementation of logic in CMOS standard cells, and additional detailed design information are presented.

  11. Third generation MIL-STD-1553B LSI chip set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, R. D.

    1982-11-01

    Marconi Avionics Limited's experience with MIL-STD-1553 commenced with the implementation of an a standard remote terminal in the Head Up Display for the General Dynamics F16 by our Airborne Displays Division. The Flight Automation Research Laboratory (FARL) has subsequently completed a circuit design for the digital section of a MIL-STD-1553B terminal with the LSI implementation carried out by Marconi Electronic Devices Ltd. These LSI devices are currently available through Circuit Technology Inc. of New York. This paper will review the current LSI terminal activity undertaken by FARL. This activity has used experience gained during the previous five-element 1553B LSI development as the foundation for a third generation two-element 1553 LSI terminal design. The subsequent semiconductor implementation is a collaborative exercise between the GEC Hirst Research Centre and FARL.

  12. CAMAC serial highway interface for the LSI-11

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, N.H.

    1980-04-03

    A CAMAC Serial Highway Interface has been designed for the Local Control and Instrumentation System of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility. There are over 50 distinguishable systems in the facility, each of which consists of the LSI-11 computer, fiber optic communication links, and the CAMAC system. The LSI-11 computer includes a 32k memory, serial modem interface and the CAMAC Serial Highway Interface.

  13. Application of LSI to signal detection: The deltic DFPCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gassaway, J. D.; Whelchel, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The development of the DELTIC DFPCC serial mode signal processor is discussed. The processor is designed to detect in the presence of background noise a signal coded into the zero crossings of the waveform. The unique features of the DELTIC DFPCC include versatility in handling a variety of signals and relative simplicity in implementation. A theoretical performance model is presented which predicts the expected value of the output signal as a function of the input signal to noise ratio. Experimental results obtained with the prototype system, which was breadboarded with LSI, MSI and SSI components, are given. The device was compared with other LSI schemes for signal processing and it was concluded that the DELTIC DFPCC is simpler and in some cases more versatile than other systems. With established LSI technology, low frequency systems applicable to sonar and similar problems are feasible.

  14. 12 CFR Appendix F to Part 360 - Customer File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the institution to identify the customer 2. CS_Tax_ID Customer Tax ID Number Hyphens are optional in... the “+4” code is not available, provide only the 5-digit ZIP code. Hyphens are optional in this...

  15. Rate Structures for Customers With Onsite Generation: Practice and Innovation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, L.; Takahashi, K.; Weston, F.; Murray, C.

    2005-12-01

    Recognizing that innovation and good public policy do not always proclaim themselves, Synapse Energy Economics and the Regulatory Assistance Project, under a contract with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), undertook a survey of state policies on rates for partial-requirements customers with onsite distributed generation. The survey investigated a dozen or so states. These varied in geography and the structures of their electric industries. By reviewing regulatory proceedings, tariffs, publications, and interviews, the researchers identified a number of approaches to standby and associated rates--many promising but some that are perhaps not--that deserve policymakers' attention if they are to promote the deployment of cost-effective DG in their states.

  16. 12 CFR Appendix G to Part 360 - Deposit-Customer Join File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Join File Structure This is the structure of the data file to provide to the FDIC information necessary to link the records in the deposit and customer files. If data or information are not maintained or... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Deposit-Customer Join File Structure G...

  17. Custom large scale integrated circuits for spaceborne SAR processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyree, V. C.

    1978-01-01

    The application of modern LSI technology to the development of a time-domain azimuth correlator for SAR processing is discussed. General design requirements for azimuth correlators for missions such as SEASAT-A, Venus orbital imaging radar (VOIR), and shuttle imaging radar (SIR) are summarized. Several azimuth correlator architectures that are suitable for implementation using custom LSI devices are described. Technical factors pertaining to selection of appropriate LSI technologies are discussed, and the maturity of alternative technologies for spacecraft applications are reported in the context of expected space mission launch dates. The preliminary design of a custom LSI time-domain azimuth correlator device (ACD) being developed for use in future SAR processors is detailed.

  18. A Thermal Survey Instrument Using LSI Data Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop. Jay W.; Jones, James W.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes a developmental system for monitoring the temperature of lakes and rivers. The battery powered instrument is housed in a buoy and requires no external electrical connections. Temperature is periodically sampled and stored in LSI shift register circuits. Depending on the type of data reduction used, storage times from days to weeks are possible. The measurement range is from 0 C to 50 C with an accuracy of +/- 0.1 c. This is accomplished using a novel temperature sensitive C/MOS oscillator together with off-line computer linearization. The electronics is partitioned for eventual C/MOS LSI implementation which should result in a total cost of under $1,000 for the system.

  19. 12 CFR Appendix F to Part 360 - Customer File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... extract. The files will be encrypted using an FDIC-supplied algorithm. The FDIC will transmit the encryption algorithm over FDICconnect. Note: Each record must contain the customer's name and permanent...

  20. 12 CFR Appendix F to Part 360 - Customer File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... extract. The files will be encrypted using an FDIC-supplied algorithm. The FDIC will transmit the encryption algorithm over FDICconnect. Note: Each record must contain the customer's name and permanent...

  1. 12 CFR Appendix F to Part 360 - Customer File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... extract. The files will be encrypted using an FDIC-supplied algorithm. The FDIC will transmit the encryption algorithm over FDICconnect. Note: Each record must contain the customer's name and permanent...

  2. 12 CFR Appendix F to Part 360 - Customer File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... extract. The files will be encrypted using an FDIC-supplied algorithm. The FDIC will transmit the encryption algorithm over FDICconnect. Note: Each record must contain the customer's name and permanent...

  3. Design, processing and testing of LSI arrays: Hybrid microelectronics task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himmel, R. P.; Stuhlbarg, S. M.; Ravetti, R. G.; Zulueta, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical cost factors were generated for both hybrid microcircuit and printed wiring board packaging methods. A mathematical cost model was created for analysis of microcircuit fabrication costs. The costing factors were refined and reduced to formulae for computerization. Efficient methods were investigated for low cost packaging of LSI devices as a function of density and reliability. Technical problem areas such as wafer bumping, inner/outer leading bonding, testing on tape, and tape processing, were investigated.

  4. Chemistry of MOS-LSI radiation hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, P.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this task was to obtain chemical information on MOS test samples. Toward this end, high resolution X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) has been the primary techniques used to characterize the chemistry and structure of the SiO2/Si interface for a variety of MOS structures with differing degrees of susceptibility to damage by ionizing radiation. The major accomplishments of this program are: (1) the identification of a structurally distinct region of SiO2 in the near-interfacial region of thermal SiO2 on Si; (2) the identification in the near-interfacial region of SiO2 structural differences between radiation hard and soft gate oxides; (3) the direct observation of radiation-induced damage sites in thermal SiO2 with XPS using in situ electron stress; (4) the correlation of suboxide state distributions at the SiO2/Si interface with processing parameters and radiation susceptibility; (5) the development of a chemical mechanism for radiation-induced interface state generation in SiO2/Si structures; and (6) the development benign chemical profiling techniques which permit the investigation of oxide/semiconductor structures using surface sensitive electron spectroscopic techniques.

  5. Optical method for inspecting LSI patterns using reflected diffraction waves.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Suda, K; Hase, S; Munakata, C

    1988-03-15

    An optical inspection method has been developed for finding defects in LSI lithographic patterns. A focused He-Ne laser beam scans the patterns on a wafer. The reflected diffraction waves around the wafer are observed. These diffraction waves indicate whether the patterns contain defects. To implement this judgment rapidly, signals of the waves characterizing the patterns are input directly into the address lines of random access memories. The system can detect a defect of ~0.8-microm diameter and inspect a 1-cm(2) chip in 9 s.

  6. Customer involvement in greening the supply chain: an interpretive structural modeling methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Luthra, Sunil; Haleem, Abid

    2013-04-01

    The role of customers in green supply chain management needs to be identified and recognized as an important research area. This paper is an attempt to explore the involvement aspect of customers towards greening of the supply chain (SC). An empirical research approach has been used to collect primary data to rank different variables for effective customer involvement in green concept implementation in SC. An interpretive structural-based model has been presented, and variables have been classified using matrice d' impacts croises- multiplication appliqué a un classement analysis. Contextual relationships among variables have been established using experts' opinions. The research may help practicing managers to understand the interaction among variables affecting customer involvement. Further, this understanding may be helpful in framing the policies and strategies to green SC. Analyzing interaction among variables for effective customer involvement in greening SC to develop the structural model in the Indian perspective is an effort towards promoting environment consciousness.

  7. Biochemical oxygen demand sensor using Serratia marcescens LSY 4.

    PubMed

    Kim, M N; Kwon, H S

    1999-01-01

    A microbial biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) sensor consisting of Serratia marcescens LSY 4 and an oxygen electrode was prepared for estimation of the biochemical oxygen demand. The response of the BOD sensor was insensitive to pH in the range of pH 6.0-8.0, and the baseline drift of the signal was nearly absent even in unbuffered aqueous solution. Because heavy metal ions were precipitated from the phosphate buffer solution, unbuffered solution was used to investigate the effect of the concentration of heavy metal ions on the sensor response. Contrary to previous studies, not only Cu2+ and Ag+ but also Cd2+ and Zn2+ significantly decreased the response of the BOD sensor in unbuffered solution. Graft polymerization of sodium styrene sulfonate on the surface of the porous teflon membrane was carried out to absorb the heavy metal ions permeating through the membrane. Tolerance against Zn2+ was induced for S. marcescens LSY 4 to make the cells less sensitive to the presence of heavy metal ions. The membrane modification and the Zn2+ tolerance induction showed some positive effects in such a way that they reduced the inhibitory effects of Zn2+ and Cd2+ on the sensitivity of the BOD sensor. However, they had no effect on the protection of the cells against the interference of Cu2+ and Ag+ on the performance of the sensor.

  8. The role of the rice aquaporin Lsi1 in arsenite efflux from roots.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang-Jie; Ago, Yukiko; Mitani, Namiki; Li, Ren-Ying; Su, Yu-Hong; Yamaji, Naoki; McGrath, Steve P; Ma, Jian Feng

    2010-04-01

    *When supplied with arsenate (As(V)), plant roots extrude a substantial amount of arsenite (As(III)) to the external medium through as yet unidentified pathways. The rice (Oryza sativa) silicon transporter Lsi1 (OsNIP2;1, an aquaporin channel) is the major entry route of arsenite into rice roots. Whether Lsi1 also mediates arsenite efflux was investigated. *Expression of Lsi1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes enhanced arsenite efflux, indicating that Lsi1 facilitates arsenite transport bidirectionally. *Arsenite was the predominant arsenic species in arsenate-exposed rice plants. During 24-h exposure to 5 mum arsenate, rice roots extruded arsenite to the external medium rapidly, accounting for 60-90% of the arsenate uptake. A rice mutant defective in Lsi1 (lsi1) extruded significantly less arsenite than the wild-type rice and, as a result, accumulated more arsenite in the roots. By contrast, Lsi2 mutation had little effect on arsenite efflux to the external medium. *We conclude that Lsi1 plays a role in arsenite efflux in rice roots exposed to arsenate. However, this pathway accounts for only 15-20% of the total efflux, suggesting the existence of other efflux transporters.

  9. The rice aquaporin Lsi1 mediates uptake of methylated arsenic species.

    PubMed

    Li, Ren-Ying; Ago, Yukiko; Liu, Wen-Ju; Mitani, Namiki; Feldmann, Jörg; McGrath, Steve P; Ma, Jian Feng; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2009-08-01

    Pentavalent methylated arsenic (As) species such as monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)] are used as herbicides or pesticides, and can also be synthesized by soil microorganisms or algae through As methylation. The mechanism of MMA(V) and DMA(V) uptake remains unknown. Recent studies have shown that arsenite is taken up by rice (Oryza sativa) roots through two silicon transporters, Lsi1 (the aquaporin NIP2;1) and Lsi2 (an efflux carrier). Here we investigated whether these two transporters also mediate the uptake of MMA(V) and DMA(V). MMA(V) was partly reduced to trivalent MMA(III) in rice roots, but only MMA(V) was translocated to shoots. DMA(V) was stable in plants. The rice lsi1 mutant lost about 80% and 50% of the uptake capacity for MMA(V) and DMA(V), respectively, compared with the wild-type rice, whereas Lsi2 mutation had little effect. The short-term uptake kinetics of MMA(V) can be described by a Michaelis-Menten plus linear model, with the wild type having 3.5-fold higher V(max) than the lsi1 mutant. The uptake kinetics of DMA(V) were linear with the slope being 2.8-fold higher in the wild type than the lsi1 mutant. Heterologous expression of Lsi1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes significantly increased the uptake of MMA(V) but not DMA(V), possibly because of a very limited uptake of the latter. Uptake of MMA(V) and DMA(V) by wild-type rice was increased as the pH of the medium decreased, consistent with an increasing proportion of the undissociated species. The results demonstrate that Lsi1 mediates the uptake of undissociated methylated As in rice roots.

  10. The Rice Aquaporin Lsi1 Mediates Uptake of Methylated Arsenic Species1[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ren-Ying; Ago, Yukiko; Liu, Wen-Ju; Mitani, Namiki; Feldmann, Jörg; McGrath, Steve P.; Ma, Jian Feng; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2009-01-01

    Pentavalent methylated arsenic (As) species such as monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)] are used as herbicides or pesticides, and can also be synthesized by soil microorganisms or algae through As methylation. The mechanism of MMA(V) and DMA(V) uptake remains unknown. Recent studies have shown that arsenite is taken up by rice (Oryza sativa) roots through two silicon transporters, Lsi1 (the aquaporin NIP2;1) and Lsi2 (an efflux carrier). Here we investigated whether these two transporters also mediate the uptake of MMA(V) and DMA(V). MMA(V) was partly reduced to trivalent MMA(III) in rice roots, but only MMA(V) was translocated to shoots. DMA(V) was stable in plants. The rice lsi1 mutant lost about 80% and 50% of the uptake capacity for MMA(V) and DMA(V), respectively, compared with the wild-type rice, whereas Lsi2 mutation had little effect. The short-term uptake kinetics of MMA(V) can be described by a Michaelis-Menten plus linear model, with the wild type having 3.5-fold higher Vmax than the lsi1 mutant. The uptake kinetics of DMA(V) were linear with the slope being 2.8-fold higher in the wild type than the lsi1 mutant. Heterologous expression of Lsi1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes significantly increased the uptake of MMA(V) but not DMA(V), possibly because of a very limited uptake of the latter. Uptake of MMA(V) and DMA(V) by wild-type rice was increased as the pH of the medium decreased, consistent with an increasing proportion of the undissociated species. The results demonstrate that Lsi1 mediates the uptake of undissociated methylated As in rice roots. PMID:19542298

  11. Cloning, functional characterization and heterologous expression of TaLsi1, a wheat silicon transporter gene.

    PubMed

    Montpetit, Jonatan; Vivancos, Julien; Mitani-Ueno, Namiki; Yamaji, Naoki; Rémus-Borel, Wilfried; Belzile, François; Ma, Jian Feng; Bélanger, Richard R

    2012-05-01

    Silicon (Si) is known to be beneficial to plants, namely in alleviating biotic and abiotic stresses. The magnitude of such positive effects is associated with a plant's natural ability to absorb Si. Many grasses can accumulate as much as 10% on a dry weight basis while most dicots, including Arabidopsis, will accumulate less than 0.1%. In this report, we describe the cloning and functional characterization of TaLsi1, a wheat Si transporter gene. In addition, we developed a heterologous system for the study of Si uptake in plants by introducing TaLsi1 and OsLsi1, its ortholog in rice, into Arabidopsis, a species with a very low innate Si uptake capacity. When expressed constitutively under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter, both TaLsi1 and OsLsi1 were expressed in cells of roots and shoots. Such constitutive expression of TaLsi1 or OsLsi1 resulted in a fourfold to fivefold increase in Si accumulation in transformed plants compared to WT. However, this Si absorption caused deleterious symptoms. When the wheat transporter was expressed under the control of a root-specific promoter (a boron transporter gene (AtNIP5;1) promoter), a similar increase in Si absorption was noted but the plants did not exhibit symptoms and grew normally. These results demonstrate that TaLsi1 is indeed a functional Si transporter as its expression in Arabidopsis leads to increased Si uptake, but that this expression must be confined to root cells for healthy plant development. The availability of this heterologous expression system will facilitate further studies into the mechanisms and benefits of Si uptake. PMID:22351076

  12. ASCA Observations of the Unusual Binary LSI+61 Deg 303

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Leahy, Denis A.; Waltman, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    We present simultaneous 0.5-10 keV X-ray and two-frequency radio observations at 2.25 and 8.3 GHz of the unusual binary system LSI+61 deg 303. This system was observed twice in a single binary orbit by the ASCA satellite, and monitored daily at two radio frequencies during the same orbital cycle with the Greenbank Interferometer. During the first ASCA observation the source was detected with a 1-10 keV luminosity 3.6 x 10(exp 33) (d/2.0 kpc )(exp 2) erg/s and during the second at a similar level with evidence for a decrease in average flux of 30%. During the first pointing the radio source was at a quiescent 8 GHz flux level of 30 mJy while during the second the radio flux was rising dramatically with an average value of 100 mJy. No variability is seen in the X-ray flux during the first pointing, but during the second the flux is variable by approx. 50% on timescales of approx. 30 minutes. No pulsations are seen in either X-ray observation with an upper limit on pulsed flux of 20% . The low X-ray luminosity and lack of observed pulsations indicate that accretion onto a neutron star surface is not the origin for the high-energy emission. Rather, the X-rays must result either from accreted matter which is stopped at the magnetosphere because the magnetospheric boundary is rotating at super-Keplerian rates or due to a shock formed in the interaction of the dense wind of the Be star companion and a moderately young pulsar.

  13. LSI-based amperometric sensor for bio-imaging and multi-point biosensing.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kumi Y; Matsudaira, Masahki; Kubo, Reyushi; Nakano, Masanori; Yoshida, Shinya; Matsuzaki, Sakae; Suda, Atsushi; Kunikata, Ryota; Kimura, Tatsuo; Tsurumi, Ryota; Shioya, Toshihito; Ino, Kosuke; Shiku, Hitoshi; Satoh, Shiro; Esashi, Masayoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2012-09-21

    We have developed an LSI-based amperometric sensor called "Bio-LSI" with 400 measurement points as a platform for electrochemical bio-imaging and multi-point biosensing. The system is comprised of a 10.4 mm × 10.4 mm CMOS sensor chip with 20 × 20 unit cells, an external circuit box, a control unit for data acquisition, and a DC power box. Each unit cell of the chip contains an operational amplifier with a switched-capacitor type I-V converter for in-pixel signal amplification. We successfully realized a wide dynamic range from ±1 pA to ±100 nA with a well-organized circuit design and operating software. In particular, in-pixel signal amplification and an original program to control the signal read-out contribute to the lower detection limit and wide detection range of Bio-LSI. The spacial resolution is 250 μm and the temporal resolution is 18-125 ms/400 points, which depends on the desired current detection range. The coefficient of variance of the current for 400 points is within 5%. We also demonstrated the real-time imaging of a biological molecule using Bio-LSI. The LSI coated with an Os-HRP film was successfully applied to the monitoring of the changes of hydrogen peroxide concentration in a flow. The Os-HRP-coated LSI was spotted with glucose oxidase and used for bioelectrochemical imaging of the glucose oxidase (GOx)-catalyzed oxidation of glucose. Bio-LSI is a promising platform for a wide range of analytical fields, including diagnostics, environmental measurements and basic biochemistry. PMID:22847217

  14. Development of an LSI for Tactile Sensor Systems on the Whole-Body of Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muroyama, Masanori; Makihata, Mitsutoshi; Nakano, Yoshihiro; Matsuzaki, Sakae; Yamada, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Ui; Nakayama, Takahiro; Nonomura, Yutaka; Fujiyoshi, Motohiro; Tanaka, Shuji; Esashi, Masayoshi

    We have developed a network type tactile sensor system, which realizes high-density tactile sensors on the whole-body of nursing and communication robots. The system consists of three kinds of nodes: host, relay and sensor nodes. Roles of the sensor node are to sense forces and, to encode the sensing data and to transmit the encoded data on serial channels by interruption handling. Relay nodes and host deal with a number of the encoded sensing data from the sensor nodes. A sensor node consists of a capacitive MEMS force sensor and a signal processing/transmission LSI. In this paper, details of an LSI for the sensor node are described. We designed experimental sensor node LSI chips by a commercial 0.18µm standard CMOS process. The 0.18µm LSIs were supplied in wafer level for MEMS post-process. The LSI chip area is 2.4mm × 2.4mm, which includes logic, CF converter and memory circuits. The maximum clock frequency of the chip with a large capacitive load is 10MHz. Measured power consumption at 10MHz clock is 2.23mW. Experimental results indicate that size, response time, sensor sensitivity and power consumption are all enough for practical tactile sensor systems.

  15. 76 FR 67184 - California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; Large Spark-Ignition (LSI) Engines...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ...).\\7\\ \\5\\ 59 FR 36969 (July 20, 1994). \\6\\ See 62 FR 67733 (December 30, 1997). The applicable... the California standard. \\7\\ See 59 FR 36969 (July 20, 1994). In order to be consistent with section...; Fleet Requirements for In-Use LSI Forklifts and Other Industrial Equipment; Opportunity for...

  16. A Search for Short-Lived Transient Phenomenon in LSI+61 303

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrader, Chris; Sturner, S.

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by reports of transient behavior on the circumstellar disk of the gamma-ray bright, X-ray binary system LSI +61 303 we have undertaken a search for possible ionizing events. We have utilized the bard-X-ray monitoring database provided by the INTEGRAL Galactic Plane survey program.

  17. Support and utilization of the LSI-11 processor family at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Kieffer, J.; Logg, C.A.; Farwell, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    Microcomputer systems based on the DEC LSI-11 processor family have been in use at SLAC for five years. They are used for a wide variety of applications. The support of these systems is divided into three general areas: engineering, maintenance, and software. Engineering specifies the system to match user requirements. SLAC has been able to design one general purpose system which can be tailored to fit many specific requirements. Maintenance provides system and component diagnostic services and repair. Software support includes software consulting services, assistance in systems design, and the development and support of special purpose operating systems and programs. These support functions are handled as subtasks by three teams in the SLAC Electronics Instrumentation Group. Each of these teams utilizes several LSI-11 systems in the performance of its primary tasks. They work closely together to jointly provide overall support for the larger SLAC community.

  18. Floating point software package for use on LSI-11 computers at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Hendra, R.G.

    1981-06-01

    A floating point software package has been devised to allow full use of the floating point hardware of the LSI-11 and MODEL40 computers. The procedures are written for the most part in the PL-11 language. The package may be run under the RT-11 operating system, or in RAM or EPROM as part of the KERNEL package. The current set of procedures has been run successfully in all three modes.

  19. Integration of Chemical Sensors with LSI Technology — History and Applications —

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tixier-Mita, Agnès; Takahashi, Takuya; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi

    Chemical sensors are one of the oldest fields of research closely related to the semiconductor technology. From the Ion-Sensitive Field-Effect Transistors (ISFET) in the 70's, through Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) sensors from the end of the 80's, chemical sensors are combining in the 90's MEMS technology with LSI intelligence to devise more selective, sensitive and autonomous devices to analyse complex mixtures. A brief history of chemical sensors from the ISFET to the nowadays LSI integrated sensors is first detailed. Then the states-of-the-art of LSI integrated chemical sensors and their wide range of applications are discussed. Finally the authors propose a brand-new usage of integrated wireless MEMS sensors for remote surveillance of chemical substances, such as food-industry or pharmaceutical products, that are stored in closed environment like a bottle, for a long period. In such environment, in-situ analyse is necessary, and electrical cables, for energy supply or data transfer, cannot be used. Thanks to integrated MEMS, an autonomous long-term in-situ quality deterioration tracking system is possible.

  20. Identification and characterization of maize and barley Lsi2-like silicon efflux transporters reveals a distinct silicon uptake system from that in rice.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Namiki; Chiba, Yukako; Yamaji, Naoki; Ma, Jian Feng

    2009-07-01

    Silicon (Si) uptake has been extensively examined in rice (Oryza sativa), but it is poorly understood in other gramineous crops. We identified Low Silicon Rice 2 (Lsi2)-like Si efflux transporters from two important gramineous crops: maize (Zea mays) and barley (Hordeum vulgare). Both maize and barley Lsi2 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed Si efflux transport activity. Furthermore, barley Lsi2 was able to recover Si uptake in a rice mutant defective in Si efflux. Maize and barley Lsi2 were only expressed in the roots. Expression of maize and barley Lsi2 was downregulated in response to exogenously applied Si. Moreover, there was a significant positive correlation between the ability of roots to absorb Si and the expression levels of Lsi2 in eight barley cultivars, suggesting that Lsi2 is a key Si transporter in barley. Immunostaining showed that maize and barley Lsi2 localized only at the endodermis, with no polarity. Protein gel blot analysis indicated that maize and barley Lsi2 localized on the plasma membrane. The unique features of maize and barley Si influx and efflux transporters, including their cell-type specificity and the lack of polarity of their localization in Lsi2, indicate that these crops have a different Si uptake system from that in rice. PMID:19574435

  1. Customization and calibration of BOTDR sensors for underground structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, Wai Lun; Yang, Yaowen; Pravin, Muley

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, it is becoming more common to use fiber optic sensors (FOS) in the structural health monitoring (SHM) sector, especially in the civil engineering field. A number of surface-mountable sensor system for FOS have been developed in the past years, the recent development of Brillouin Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (BOTDR) was a great evolution towards the SHM system development, it inspired the new edge of FOS SHM system. Different from the traditional monitoring instruments, it provides distributed, long distance, real-time, interference free and high accuracy/precision measurement data. It is now possible to achieve "continuous" measurement data and this SHM technique is applicable in area that is inaccessible. The research aims to solve the problems which exist in the convergence measurement using the conventional measuring methods, however, there is still a gap between the lab experiments and field applications. Limited research has been conducted on how to maximize its possible applications due to its brittle and fragile material nature. A number of additional considerations for a successful pairing of these two must be taken into account for successful field applications. This article provides a short review on underground monitoring techniques and FOS SHM systems. The focuses is on examine (i) the feasibility and effectiveness of different BOTDR sensors installation methods (ii) the suitable commercially-available o sensing cable for underground application (iii) the sensing performance of customized sensor protection package BOTDR sensor that manufactured involving layers of fiber reinforced composites. This research serves a bridge in between the technology advancement to the creation of a structure health monitoring system with practical application, numerical simulation and theoretical analysis aspects, and also to provide the insights into the mechanisms of BOTDR.

  2. Hardware synthesis from DDL. [Digital Design Language for computer aided design and test of LSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, A. M.; Shiva, S. G.

    1981-01-01

    The details of the digital systems can be conveniently input into the design automation system by means of Hardware Description Languages (HDL). The Computer Aided Design and Test (CADAT) system at NASA MSFC is used for the LSI design. The Digital Design Language (DDL) has been selected as HDL for the CADAT System. DDL translator output can be used for the hardware implementation of the digital design. This paper addresses problems of selecting the standard cells from the CADAT standard cell library to realize the logic implied by the DDL description of the system.

  3. A Comprehensive Structural Model of Factors Influencing Customers' Intention to Use Biometrics in the Hospitality Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jungsun

    2009-01-01

    Hoteliers have installed new technology, such as self-service and wireless technology, to improve customer service or to increase revenue. However, it seems that they tend to either be unaware of or ignore potential vulnerability of their systems when they add more technologies. The underestimated risks can possibly result in massive losses for…

  4. Imaging of enzyme activity using bio-LSI system enables simultaneous immunosensing of different analytes in multiple specimens.

    PubMed

    Hokuto, Toshiki; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Kunikata, Ryota; Suda, Atsushi; Inoue, Kumi Y; Ino, Kosuke; Matsue, Tomokazu; Mizutani, Fumio

    2016-06-01

    Electrochemical imaging is an excellent technique to characterize an activity of biomaterials, such as enzymes and cells. Large scale integration-based amperometric sensor (Bio-LSI) has been developed for the simultaneous and continuous detection of the concentration distribution of redox species generated by reactions of biomolecules. In this study, the Bio-LSI system was demonstrated to be applicable for simultaneous detection of different anaytes in multiple specimens. The multiple specimens containing human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) and mouse IgG (mIgG) were introduced into each channel of the upper substrate across the antibody lines for hIgG and mIgG on the lower substrate. Hydrogen peroxide generated by the enzyme reaction of glucose oxidase captured at intersections was simultaneously detected by 400 microelectrodes of Bio-LSI chip. The oxidation current increased with increasing the concentrations of hIgG, which can be detected in the range of 0.01-1.0 µg mL(-1) . Simultaneous detection of hIgG and mIgG in multiple specimens was achieved by using line pattern of both antibodies. Therefore, the presence of different target molecules in the multiple samples would be quantitatively and simultaneously visualized as a current image by the Bio-LSI system. PMID:27150897

  5. Potentiometric bioimaging with a large-scale integration (LSI)-based electrochemical device for detection of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yusuke; Ino, Kosuke; Sakamoto, Chika; Inoue, Kumi Y; Matsudaira, Masahki; Suda, Atsushi; Kunikata, Ryota; Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Abe, Hiroya; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2016-03-15

    This paper describes potentiometric bioimaging for enzyme activity using a large-scale integration (LSI)-based electrochemical device with 400 sensors. Potentiometric detection is useful for bioimaging because redox species are not consumed or produced during the detection process; therefore, there is no effect on cell activity and the detectable signal is sustained. In this study, the potentiometer mode of the LSI-based device was applied for the detection of glucose oxidase (GOx) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. The enzyme activities were quantitatively detected within the concentration ranges of 25-250 μg/mL and 0.10-5.0 ng/mL. In addition, GOx activity in hydrogels and the ALP activity of embryoid bodies (EBs) from embryonic stem (ES) cells were successfully imaged based on detection of the open circuit potentials of individual sensors in real time. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of potentiometric imaging using LSI-based electrochemical arrays to detect enzyme activity in ES cells. The LSI-based device is thus demonstrated to be a promising tool for bioimaging of enzyme activity.

  6. Development of image processing LSI "SuperVchip" for real-time vision systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Shoji; Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Otsuka, Yasuo; Shojima, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Takayuki; Imai, Toshihiko; Yamada, Shigeyoshi

    2002-03-01

    A new image processing LSI SuperVchip with high-performance computing power has been developed. The SuperVchip has powerful capability for vision systems as follows: 1. General image processing by 3x3, 5x5, 7x7 kernel for high speed filtering function. 2. 16-parallel gray search engine units for robust template matching. 3. 49 block matching Pes to calculate the summation of the absolution difference in parallel for stereo vision function. 4. A color extraction unit for color object recognition. The SuperVchip also has peripheral function of vision systems, such as video interface, PCI extended interface, RISC engine interface and image memory controller on a chip. Therefore, small and high performance vision systems are realized via SuperVchip. In this paper, the above specific circuits are presented, and an architecture of a vision device equipped with SuperVchip and its performance are also described.

  7. Utility of the Revised Level of Service Inventory (LSI-R) in predicting recidivism after long-term incarceration.

    PubMed

    Manchak, Sarah M; Skeem, Jennifer Lynne; Douglas, Kevin S

    2008-12-01

    Assessing an inmate's risk for recidivism may become more challenging as the length of incarceration increases. Although the population of Long-Term Inmates (LTIs) is burgeoning, no risk assessment tools have been specifically validated for this group. Based on a sample of 1,144 inmates released in a state without parole, we examine the utility of the Level of Service Inventory-Revised (LSI-R) in assessing risk of general and violent felony recidivism for LTIs (n = 555). Results indicate that (a) the LSI-R moderately predicts general, but not necessarily violent, recidivism, and (b) this predictive utility is not moderated by LTI status, and is based in part on ostensibly dynamic risk factors. Implications for informing parole decision-making and risk management for LTIs are discussed.

  8. Functional test generation of digital LSI/VLSI systems using machine symbolic execution technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.

    1985-01-01

    Functional testing is among the promising solutions proposed in recent years for the challenging problems of testing modern digital LSI/VLSI systems. It is aimed at validating the correct operation of a digital system with respect to its functional specification. Functional test generation is performed before functional testing. In this dissertation, a functional test pattern generation algorithm is developed. This algorithm is explicit, systematic, and practical. The whole research work consists of five related topics including theoretical development and computer experiment. First, a register transfer language specially designed for the functional description of a general digital system is defined. Second, a register-transfer (RT) level fault model quite different from the conventional gate-level stuck-at fault model is established and the fault collapsing analysis is performed for better test generation efficiency. Third, the technique of register-transfer-level symbolic execution is explored. The major problems are defined, analyzed, and solved. A register-transfer-level symbolic execution system is designed and implemented. Fourth, an overall RT-level test pattern generation algorithm is developed based on the RT-level fault model and the RT-level symbolic execution technique. The symbolic executions are performed on both fault-free and fault-injected machines for symbolic results. By comparing the symbolic results and path constraints obtained from fault-free and fault-injected machines, an input test pattern which distinguishes each bad machine from the good machine is derived.

  9. SUPERORBITAL MODULATION OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BINARY LSI +61 303

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyakova, M.; Neronov, A.; Molkov, S.; Lutovinov, A.; Pooley, G.

    2012-03-10

    We report the discovery of a systematic constant time lag between the X-ray and radio flares of the gamma-ray binary LSI +61 303, persistent over a long, multi-year timescale. Using the data from the monitoring of the system by RXTE we show that the orbital phase of X-ray flares from the source varies from {phi}{sub X} {approx_equal} 0.35 to {phi}{sub X} {approx_equal} 0.75 on the superorbital 4.6 yr timescale. Simultaneous radio observations show that periodic radio flares always lag the X-ray flare by {Delta}{phi}{sub X-R} {approx_equal} 0.2. We propose that the constant phase lag corresponds to the time of flight of the high-energy particle-filled plasma blobs from inside the binary to the radio emission region at the distance of {approx}10 times the binary separation distance. We put forward a hypothesis that the X-ray bursts correspond to the moments of formation of plasma blobs inside the binary system.

  10. CT Lesion Model-Based Structural Allografts: Custom Fabrication and Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Brune, Jan Claas; Hesselbarth, Uwe; Seifert, Philipp; Nowack, Dimitri; von Versen, Rüdiger; Smith, Mark David; Seifert, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Patients requiring knee and hip revision arthroplasty often present with difficult anatomical situations that limit options for surgery. Customised mega-implants may be one of few remaining treatment options. However, extensive damage to residual bone stock may also be present, and in such cases even customised prosthetics may be difficult to implant. Small quantities of lost bone can be replaced with standard allografts or autologous bone. Larger defects may require structural macro-allografts, sometimes in combination with implants (allograft-prosthesis composites). Methods Herein, we describe a process for manufacturing lesion-specific large structural allografts according to a 3D, full-scale, lithographically generated defect model. These macro-allografts deliver the volume and the mechanical stability necessary for certain complex revisions. They are patient-and implant-matched, negate some requirements for additional implants and biomaterials and save time in the operating theatre by eliminating the requirement for intra-operative sizing and shaping of standard allografts. Conclusion While a robust data set from long-term follow-up of patients receiving customised macro-allografts is not yet available, initial clinical experience and results suggest that lesion-matched macro-allografts can be an important component of revision joint surgery. PMID:23800856

  11. Simultaneous X-Ray and Radio Observations of the Unusual Binary LSI + 61 deg 303

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Leahy, Denis A.; Waltman, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    We present simultaneous 0.5 - 10 keV X-ray and two-frequency radio observations at 2.25 and 8.3 GHz of the unusual binary system LSI + 61 deg. 303. This system was observed twice in a single binary orbit by the ASCA satellite, and monitored daily at two radio frequencies during the same orbital cycle with the Greenbank Interferometer. During the first ASCA observation the source was detected with a 1 - 10 keV luminosity 3.6 x 10(exp 33) (d/2.0 kpc)(exp 2) erg 1/s and during the second at a similar level with evidence for a decrease in average flux of 30%. During the first pointing the radio source was at a quiescent 8 GHz flux level of 30 mJy while during the second the radio flux was rising dramatically with an average value of 100 mJy. No variability is seen in the X-ray flux during the first pointing, but during the second the flux is variable by approx. 50% on timescales of approx. 30 minutes. No pulsations are seen in either X-ray observation with an upper limit on pulsed flux of 20%. The low X-ray luminosity and lack of observed pulsations indicate that accretion onto a neutron star surface is not the origin for the high-energy emission. Rather, the X-rays must result either from accreted matter which is stopped at the magnetosphere because the magnetospheric boundry is rotating at super-Keplerian rates or due to a shock formed in the interaction of the dense wind of the Be star companion and a moderately young pulsar. We derive a required pulsar spin down luminosity of approx. 10(exp 37) erg 1/s, and argue that the shock model more easily explains the observed X-ray radio observations.

  12. Hedging customers.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Ravi; Glazer, Rashi

    2003-05-01

    You are a marketing director with $5 million to invest in customer acquisition and retention. Which customers do you acquire, and which do you retain? Up to a point, the choice is obvious: Keep the consistent big spenders and lose the erratic small ones. But what about the erratic big spenders and the consistent small ones? It's often unclear whether you should acquire or retain them and at what cost. Businesses have begun dealing with unpredictable customer behavior by following the practices of sophisticated investors who own portfolios comprising dozens of stocks with different, indeed divergent, histories and prospects. Each portfolio is diversified so as to produce the investor's desired returns at the particular level of uncertainty he or she can tolerate. Customers, too, are assets--risky assets. As with stocks, the cost of acquiring them is supposed to reflect the cash-flow values they are likely to generate. The authors explain how to construct a portfolio based on the notion that a customer's risk-adjusted lifetime value depends on its anticipated effect on the riskiness of the group it is joining. They also show how this approach was used to identify the best prospects for Myron Corporation, a global leader in the personalized business-gift industry. The concept of risk-adjusted lifetime value has a transforming power: For companies that rely on it, product managers will be replaced by customer managers, and the current method of accounting for profit and loss--which is by product--will be replaced by one that determines each customer's P&L. Once adjusted for risk, those P&Ls will become the firm's key performance and operational metric. PMID:12747165

  13. Hedging customers.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Ravi; Glazer, Rashi

    2003-05-01

    You are a marketing director with $5 million to invest in customer acquisition and retention. Which customers do you acquire, and which do you retain? Up to a point, the choice is obvious: Keep the consistent big spenders and lose the erratic small ones. But what about the erratic big spenders and the consistent small ones? It's often unclear whether you should acquire or retain them and at what cost. Businesses have begun dealing with unpredictable customer behavior by following the practices of sophisticated investors who own portfolios comprising dozens of stocks with different, indeed divergent, histories and prospects. Each portfolio is diversified so as to produce the investor's desired returns at the particular level of uncertainty he or she can tolerate. Customers, too, are assets--risky assets. As with stocks, the cost of acquiring them is supposed to reflect the cash-flow values they are likely to generate. The authors explain how to construct a portfolio based on the notion that a customer's risk-adjusted lifetime value depends on its anticipated effect on the riskiness of the group it is joining. They also show how this approach was used to identify the best prospects for Myron Corporation, a global leader in the personalized business-gift industry. The concept of risk-adjusted lifetime value has a transforming power: For companies that rely on it, product managers will be replaced by customer managers, and the current method of accounting for profit and loss--which is by product--will be replaced by one that determines each customer's P&L. Once adjusted for risk, those P&Ls will become the firm's key performance and operational metric.

  14. Customer Loyalty and Customer Relationship Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengwei; Li, Min; Jiao, Xiaojing; Zhou, Ruijin

    The contemporary company attaches great importance to marketing relationship and customer relations is the core of this relationship. Further, customer satisfaction and loyalty is the core of the customer relationship management. Sometimes, high customer satisfaction causes low profit because enterprises do not realize that strengthening the loyalty of the aimed customer is the key of customer relationship management.

  15. An examination of blood center structure and hospital customer satisfaction: what can centralized and decentralized blood centers learn from each other?

    PubMed

    Carden, Robert; DelliFraine, Jami L

    2005-01-01

    The cost of blood and blood products has increased rapidly over the last several years while the supply of available blood donors has simultaneously decreased. Higher blood costs and donor shortages have put a strain on the relationship between blood suppliers and their hospital customers. This study examines the association between blood center centralization or decentralization and several aspects of hospital satisfaction. Centralized and decentralized blood centers have significant differences in various aspects of hospital customer satisfaction. Advantages and disadvantages of the two structures are discussed, as well as areas for future research.

  16. An examination of blood center structure and hospital customer satisfaction: what can centralized and decentralized blood centers learn from each other?

    PubMed

    Carden, Robert; DelliFraine, Jami L

    2005-01-01

    The cost of blood and blood products has increased rapidly over the last several years while the supply of available blood donors has simultaneously decreased. Higher blood costs and donor shortages have put a strain on the relationship between blood suppliers and their hospital customers. This study examines the association between blood center centralization or decentralization and several aspects of hospital satisfaction. Centralized and decentralized blood centers have significant differences in various aspects of hospital customer satisfaction. Advantages and disadvantages of the two structures are discussed, as well as areas for future research. PMID:16513599

  17. The Customer Service Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Chip R.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses ways to embed customer service learning and customer loyalty including making customers think, examining every aspect of customers' service encounters with staff, providing follow-up, making learning fun, and involving customers in your business. (JOW)

  18. A shape-modification strategy of electron-beam direct writing considering circuit performance in LSI interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midoh, Yoshihiro; Osaki, Atsushi; Nakamae, Koji

    2014-03-01

    As the feature size of LSI shrinks, the cost of mask manufacturing and turn-around-time continue to increase. Maskless lithography using electron beam direct writing (EBDW) technology attracts attention. On the other hands, with continuous scaling and the introduction of low-k dielectrics in Cu interconnect technology, reliability degradation caused by time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) and electromigration has become important issues. Therefore, EBDW in backend process is needed to ensure superior patterning quality and reliability using high-accuracy proximity effect correction (PEC). We have already proposed a dose-modification strategy of EBDW considering reliability for TDDB degradation. In this paper, furthermore, we propose a shape-modification strategy of EBDW considering circuit performance in LSI interconnects for improving EB drawing throughput. We use effectively patterns with rounded corner in order to reduce EB shots increased by PEC and avoid the local high current density at the corner of metal lines. We applied the proposed method to a microprocessor layout synthesized with the Nangate 45nm Open Cell Library. As a result, the drawn pattern by corner rounding and coarse dose adjustment achieved 2.5% higher throughput than that by no corner rounding and fine dose adjustment.

  19. An H.264/AVC High422 Profile and MPEG-2 422 Profile Encoder LSI for HDTV Broadcasting Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Koyo; Iwasaki, Hiroe; Onishi, Takayuki; Sano, Takashi; Sagata, Atsushi; Nakajima, Yasuyuki; Inamori, Minoru; Tanida, Ryuichi; Shimizu, Atsushi; Nakamura, Ken; Ikeda, Mitsuo; Naganuma, Jiro

    An H.264/AVC encoder LSI (named “SARA”) that supports High422 profile, as well as 422 profile of MPEG-2, has been developed for HDTV broadcasting infrastructures. It contains three motion estimation and compensation (ME/MC) engines with wide search ranges of -217.75 to +199.75 horizontally, -109.75 to +145.75 vertically, which can utilize almost all H.264/AVC ME/MC coding tools, such as multiple reference frame, variable block size, quarter-pel prediction, macroblock adaptive field/frame prediction (MBAFF), spatial/temporal direct mode, and weighted prediction. Our evaluations show that it can encode fast moving scenes with 1.2dB to 1.7dB higher than the JM. It was successfully fabricated in a 90-nm technology, and integrates 140 million transistors.

  20. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCustomer-Sited PV: A Study of Commercial Installations inCalifornia

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2007-06-01

    We analyze the impact of retail rate design on the economics of grid-connected commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems in California. The analysis is based on 15-minute interval building load and PV production data for 24 commercial PV installations in California, spanning a diverse set of building load shapes and geographic locations. We derive the annual bill savings per kWh generated for each PV system, under each of 21 distinct retail rates currently offered by the five largest utilities in California. We identify and explain variation in the value of bill savings attributable to differences in the structure of demand and energy charges across rates, as well as variation attributable to other factors, such as the size of the PV system relative to building load, the specific shape of the PV production profile, and the customer load profile. We also identify the optimal rate for each customer, among those rates offered as alternatives to one another, and show how the decision is driven in large measure by the size of the PV system relative to building load. The findings reported here may be of value to regulators and utilities responsible for designing retail rates, as well as to customers and PV retailers who have a need to estimate the prospective bill savings of PV systems.

  1. Talking about Customer Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Mary; Axelroth, Joan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses customer service in information centers and how to define it. Topics include the effects of competition, that give customers more choices; defining customers, and defining services; communications; physical environment; change, in customers and in technology; measuring customer service; and evaluating policies and procedures. (LRW)

  2. Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests.

    SciTech Connect

    Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or thousands of measured surface fuelbeds representing the fine scale variation in fire behavior on the landscape is constrained in terms of creating compatible custom fire behavior fuel models. In this study, we demonstrate an objective method for taking ecologically complex fuelbeds from inventory observations and converting those into a set of custom fuel models that can be mapped to the original landscape. We use an original set of 629 fuel inventory plots measured on an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. From models linking stand conditions to component fuel loads, we impute fuelbeds for over 6000 stands. These imputed fuelbeds were then converted to fire behavior parameters under extreme fuel moisture and wind conditions (97th percentile) using the fuel characteristic classification system (FCCS) to estimate surface fire rate of spread, surface fire flame length, shrub layer reaction intensity (heat load), non-woody layer reaction intensity, woody layer reaction intensity, and litter-lichen-moss layer reaction intensity. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the stands based on the values of the fire behavior parameters. The resulting 7 clusters were the basis for the development of 7 custom fire behavior fuel models from the cluster centroids that were calibrated against the FCCS point data for wind and fuel moisture. The latter process resulted in calibration against flame length as it was difficult to obtain a simultaneous calibration against both rate of spread and flame length. The clusters based on FCCS fire behavior

  3. GAMMA-RAY ATTENUATION IN X-RAY BINARIES: AN APPLICATION TO LSI + 61{sup 0}303

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, Paul D.; LeBohec, Stephan; Vincent, Stephane

    2011-04-20

    The X-ray binary LSI + 61{sup 0}303 consisting of a main-sequence Be star and a compact object has been detected in the TeV range with MAGIC and VERITAS, and showed a clear intensity modulation as a function of the orbital phase. We describe a gamma-ray attenuation model and apply it to this system. Our first result is that interaction of high energy photons with the background radiation produced by the main-sequence star alone does not account for the observed modulation. We then include interactions between very high energy radiation and matter and are able to constrain fundamental parameters of the system such as the mass of the compact object and the density of circumstellar matter around the Be star. In our analysis of the TeV data, we find that the compact object has mass M{sub 2} > 2.5 M{sub sun} at the 99% confidence level, implying it is most likely a black hole. However, we find a column density which conflicts with results from X-ray observations, suggesting that attenuation may not play an important role in the modulation.

  4. X-ray properties of the Be/X-ray system 28 0114+650 = LSI +65deg 010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenigsberger, G.; Swank, J. H.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; White, N. E.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented from experiments on the Einstein Observatory, HEAO 1, and OSO 8 on the temporal and spectral properties of 2S 0114+650. In a 12 hr Einstein monitor proportional counter and solid state spectrometer observation, two episodes of flaring occurred by an order of magnitude over about 1 hr. Variability on shorter time scales showed a preferred period of 14.9 minutes, but periodic pulsations were not seen in the HEAO 1 and OSO 8 data. The spectra above 1 keV were typical of accreting X-ray pulsars; the power law was E exp -alpha with alpha of about 1.2 for the number spectrum up to a cutoff at 14 keV. There is some evidence that the spectrum is steeper when the source is quiescent at low luminosity, but no large spectral changes attended the flares. Absorption column densities were consistent with interstellar reddening of the proposed companion, the Be star LSI +65 deg010. In the minute and hour variability and in the spectral character, 2S0114+650 is similar to other Be star-neutron star binary X-ray sources. Variations over several days in the OSO 8 data suggest orbital effects.

  5. Quantitative assessment of graded burn wounds in a porcine model using spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI)

    PubMed Central

    Ponticorvo, Adrien; Burmeister, David M.; Yang, Bruce; Choi, Bernard; Christy, Robert J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and timely assessment of burn wound severity is a critical component of wound management and has implications related to course of treatment. While most superficial burns and full thickness burns are easily diagnosed through visual inspection, burns that fall between these extremes are challenging to classify based on clinical appearance. Because of this, appropriate burn management may be delayed, increasing the risk of scarring and infection. Here we present an investigation that employs spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI) as non-invasive technologies to characterize in-vivo burn severity. We used SFDI and LSI to investigate controlled burn wounds of graded severity in a Yorkshire pig model. Burn wounds were imaged starting at one hour after the initial injury and daily at approximately 24, 48 and 72 hours post burn. Biopsies were taken on each day in order to correlate the imaging data to the extent of burn damage as indicated via histological analysis. Changes in reduced scattering coefficient and blood flow could be used to categorize burn severity as soon as one hour after the burn injury. The results of this study suggest that SFDI and LSI information have the potential to provide useful metrics for quantifying the extent and severity of burn injuries. PMID:25360365

  6. Educational and Structural Interventions and Their Impact on Condom Use and STI/HIV Prevention for Filipina Women and Male Customers

    PubMed Central

    Morisky, Donald E.; Tiglao, Teodora V.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 30 million people have died of AIDS during the past 27 years. More than 90% of people with HIV live in the developing world. The virus does not discriminate by age, race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or socioeconomic status—anyone is susceptible. HIV/AIDS has been particularly devastating on women and girls who now comprise more than 50% of people aged 15 years and older living with HIV. Successful strategies with significant impact on new HIV infections include strong governmental support, voluntary counseling and treatment, harm-reduction, community outreach, and universal access to treatment. This study presents the results of educational and social structural/environmental behavioral interventions among young women and their male partners. A 10-year study among high-risk populations (female bar workers and their male customers) in the Philippines identifies major components of a model HIV prevention program. PMID:20566548

  7. Design guidelines for advanced LSI microcircuit packaging using thick film multilayer technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peckinpaugh, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    Ceramic multilayer circuitry results from the sequential build-up of two or more layers of pre-determined conductive interconnections separated by dielectric layers and fired at an elevated temperature to form a solidly fused structure. The resultant ceramic interconnect matrix is used as a base to mount active and passive devices and provide the necessary electrical interconnection to accomplish the desired electrical circuit. Many methods are known for developing multilevel conductor mechanisms such as multilayer printed circuits, welded wire matrices, flexible copper tape conductors, and thin and thick-film ceramic multilayers. Each method can be considered as a specialized field with each possessing its own particular set of benefits and problems. This design guide restricts itself to the art of design, fabrication and assembly of ceramic multilayer circuitry and the reliability of the end product.

  8. A customer satisfaction model for a utility service industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Jastini Mohd; Nawawi, Mohd Kamal Mohd; Ramli, Razamin

    2016-08-01

    This paper explores the effect of Image, Customer Expectation, Perceived Quality and Perceived Value on Customer Satisfaction, and to investigate the effect of Image and Customer Satisfaction on Customer Loyalty of mobile phone provider in Malaysia. The result of this research is based on data gathered online from international students in one of the public university in Malaysia. Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) has been used to analyze the data that have been collected from the international students' perceptions. The results found that Image and Perceived Quality have significant impact on Customer Satisfaction. Image and Customer Satisfaction ware also found to have significantly related to Customer Loyalty. However, no significant impact has been found between Customer Expectation with Customer Satisfaction, Perceived Value with Customer Satisfaction, and Customer Expectation with Perceived Value. We hope that the findings may assist the mobile phone provider in production and promotion of their services.

  9. Structural relationships between work environment and service quality perceptions as a function of customer contact intensity: implications for human service strategy.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Dennis J; Harmon, Joel; Behson, Scott J

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses the importance of customer-contact intensity at the service encounter level as a determinant of service quality assessments. Using data from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, it shows that performance-driven human resources practices play an important role as determinants of employee customer orientation and service capability in both high-contact (outpatient healthcare) and low-contact (benefits claim processing) human service contexts. However, there existed significant differences across service delivery settings in the salience of customer orientation and the congruence between employee and customer perceptions of service quality, depending on the intensity of customer contact. In both contexts, managerial attention to high-performance work systems and customer-orientation has the potential to favorably impact perceptions of service quality, amplify consumer satisfaction, and enhance operational efficiency.

  10. Managing customer service.

    PubMed

    Paget, Zoe

    2015-02-28

    Zoe Paget is the customer services manager at YourVets. Her role includes managing the company's call centre, social media marketing, working with the marketing department to develop customer care initiatives and reporting service levels to the company's directors.

  11. Understanding customer experience.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christopher; Schwager, Andre

    2007-02-01

    Anyone who has signed up for cell phone service, attempted to claim a rebate, or navigated a call center has probably suffered from a company's apparent indifference to what should be its first concern: the customer experiences that culminate in either satisfaction or disappointment and defection. Customer experience is the subjective response customers have to direct or indirect contact with a company. It encompasses every aspect of an offering: customer care, advertising, packaging, features, ease of use, reliability. Customer experience is shaped by customers' expectations, which largely reflect previous experiences. Few CEOs would argue against the significance of customer experience or against measuring and analyzing it. But many don't appreciate how those activities differ from CRM or just how illuminating the data can be. For instance, the majority of the companies in a recent survey believed they have been providing "superior" experiences to customers, but most customers disagreed. The authors describe a customer experience management (CEM) process that involves three kinds of monitoring: past patterns (evaluating completed transactions), present patterns (tracking current relationships), and potential patterns (conducting inquiries in the hope of unveiling future opportunities). Data are collected at or about touch points through such methods as surveys, interviews, focus groups, and online forums. Companies need to involve every function in the effort, not just a single customer-facing group. The authors go on to illustrate how a cross-functional CEM system is created. With such a system, companies can discover which customers are prospects for growth and which require immediate intervention.

  12. Understanding customer experience.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christopher; Schwager, Andre

    2007-02-01

    Anyone who has signed up for cell phone service, attempted to claim a rebate, or navigated a call center has probably suffered from a company's apparent indifference to what should be its first concern: the customer experiences that culminate in either satisfaction or disappointment and defection. Customer experience is the subjective response customers have to direct or indirect contact with a company. It encompasses every aspect of an offering: customer care, advertising, packaging, features, ease of use, reliability. Customer experience is shaped by customers' expectations, which largely reflect previous experiences. Few CEOs would argue against the significance of customer experience or against measuring and analyzing it. But many don't appreciate how those activities differ from CRM or just how illuminating the data can be. For instance, the majority of the companies in a recent survey believed they have been providing "superior" experiences to customers, but most customers disagreed. The authors describe a customer experience management (CEM) process that involves three kinds of monitoring: past patterns (evaluating completed transactions), present patterns (tracking current relationships), and potential patterns (conducting inquiries in the hope of unveiling future opportunities). Data are collected at or about touch points through such methods as surveys, interviews, focus groups, and online forums. Companies need to involve every function in the effort, not just a single customer-facing group. The authors go on to illustrate how a cross-functional CEM system is created. With such a system, companies can discover which customers are prospects for growth and which require immediate intervention. PMID:17345685

  13. Electric retail market options: The customer perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, S.W.; Hillsman, E.L.

    1995-07-01

    This report describes various options that are now available for retail electric customers, or that may become available during the next few years as the electric utility industry restructures. These options include different ways of meeting demand for energy services, different providers of service or points of contact with providers, and different pricing structures for purchased services. Purpose of this document is to examine these options from the customer`s perspective: how might being a retail electric customer in 5--10 years differ from now? Seizing opportunities to reduce cost of electric service is likely to entail working with different service providers; thus, transaction costs are involved. Some of the options considered are speculative. Some transitional options include relocation, customer-built/operated transmission lines, municipalization, self-generation, and long-term contracts with suppliers. All these may change or diminish in a restructured industry. Brokers seem likely to become more common unless restructuring takes the form of mandatory poolcos (wholesale). Some options appear robust, ie, they are likely to become more common regardless of how restructuring is accomplished: increased competition among energy carriers (gas vs electric), real-time pricing, etc. This report identified some of the qualitative differences among the various options. For customers using large amounts of electricity, different alternatives are likely to affect greatly service price, transaction costs, tailoring service to customer preferences, and risks for customer. For retail customers using small amounts of electricity, there may be little difference among the options except service price.

  14. Focusing on customer service.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    This booklet is devoted to a consideration of how good customer service in family planning programs can generate demand for products and services, bring customers back, and reduce costs. Customer service is defined as increasing client satisfaction through continuous concern for client preferences, staff accountability to clients, and respect for the rights of clients. Issues discussed include the introduction of a customer service approach and gaining staff commitment. The experience of PROSALUD in Bolivia in recruiting appropriate staff, supervising staff, soliciting client feedback, and marketing services is offered as an example of a successful customer service approach. The key customer service functions are described as 1) establishing a welcoming atmosphere, 2) streamlining client flow, 3) personalizing client services, and 4) organizing and providing clear information to clients. The role of the manager in developing procedures is explored, and the COPE (Client-Oriented Provider-Efficient) process is presented as a good way to begin to make improvements. Techniques in staff training in customer service include brainstorming, role playing, using case studies (examples of which are provided), and engaging in practice sessions. Training also leads to the development of effective customer service attitudes, and the differences between these and organizational/staff-focused attitudes are illustrated in a chart. The use of communication skills (asking open-ended questions, helping clients express their concerns, engaging in active listening, and handling difficult situations) is considered. Good recovery skills are important when things go wrong. Gathering and using client feedback is the next topic considered. This involves identifying, recording, and discussing customer service issues as well as taking action on these issues and evaluating the results. The booklet ends by providing a sample of customer service indicators, considering the maintenance of a

  15. Effect of hydrogel particle additives on water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils: a custom pressure plate apparatus and capillary bundle model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Y; Durian, D J

    2013-05-01

    To probe the effects of hydrogel particle additives on the water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils, we introduce a custom pressure plate method in which the volume of water expelled from a wet granular packing is measured as a function of applied pressure. Using a capillary bundle model, we show that the differential change in retained water per pressure increment is directly related to the cumulative cross-sectional area distribution f(r) of the water-accessible pores with radii less than r. This is validated by measurements of water expelled from a model sandy soil composed of 2-mm-diameter glass beads. In particular, it is found that the expelled water is dramatically dependent on sample height and that analysis using the capillary bundle model gives the same pore size distribution for all samples. The distribution is found to be approximately log normal, and the total cross-sectional area fraction of the accessible pore space is found to be f(0)=0.34. We then report on how the pore distribution and total water-accessible area fraction are affected by superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives, uniformly mixed into a fixed-height sample at varying concentrations. Under both fixed volume and free swelling conditions, the total area fraction of water-accessible pore space in a packing decreases exponentially as the gel concentration increases. The size distribution of the pores is significantly modified by the swollen hydrogel particles, such that large pores are clogged while small pores are formed.

  16. British Sign Name Customs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  17. Customer Relationship Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayerman, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Presents an approach increasingly employed by businesses to track and respond to their customers to provide better and faster services: customer relationship management. Discusses its applicability to the operations of higher education and institutional research and the role it plays in the knowledge management framework. (EV)

  18. Managing customer service.

    PubMed

    Paget, Zoe

    2015-02-28

    Zoe Paget is the customer services manager at YourVets. Her role includes managing the company's call centre, social media marketing, working with the marketing department to develop customer care initiatives and reporting service levels to the company's directors. PMID:25722341

  19. Customized Training Marketing Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lay, Ted

    This report outlines Oregon's Lane Community College's (LCC's) plan for marketing its customized training program for business, community organizations, public agencies, and their employees. Following a mission statement for the customized training program, a brief analysis is provided of the economic environment; of competition from educational…

  20. Design of low-volume, high quality, low cost, VLSI custom circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austen, Clem; Eckstein, Tillmann; Fonden, Wolfgang; Gross, Helmut; Killius, Peter; Klinger, Gislla; Kniel, Monika; Lassek, Karin; Rabethge, Heiko; Radford, Phil

    1986-12-01

    A design system based on standard cell customer LSI was developed. Design rules for 3 micron NMOS technologies were derived. Based on these design rules, a cell library consisting of 75 cells was worked out. A test chip was created to characterize the cell library. An integrated CAD system was developed; a qualification procedure was proposed. The simulation program SPICE 2G5 was modified in the MOS part and an extraction procedure for the parameters was created. Examples of circuits were analyzed using design centering. The design centering method provides information about the functionality of a circuit, allowing an optimization of the yield in consideration of the manufacturing process. This procedure can also be applied for cost reduction.

  1. Customer Communication Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This procedure communicates to the Customers of the Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division (AR&SD) Dynamics Systems Test Branch (DSTB) how to obtain services of the Six-Degrees-Of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS). The scope includes the major communication documents between the SDTS and its Customer. It established the initial communication and contact points as well as provides the initial documentation in electronic media for the customer. Contact the SDTS Manager (SM) for the names of numbers of the current contact points.

  2. A customer's definition of quality.

    PubMed

    Miller, T O

    1992-01-01

    What's the best way to get "close to the customer"? One company has developed a customer feedback system to drive product design, sales, service, and support functions in order to ensure better customer responsiveness.

  3. Customization through Homeschooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes why home school is a natural environment for customizing instruction to meet the individual needs of students, especially those with special needs and talents. (Contains 19 references.) (PKP)

  4. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccot, Sila

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  5. A customer service journey.

    PubMed

    VanDecandelaere, Traci

    2012-01-01

    Converting security team members from simple rule enforcers to superior customer service providers required changes in leadership attitudes, rules, training, and other security traditions, but it has paid off in staff performance and recognition, according to the author.

  6. The customer has escaped.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paul F; Cespedes, Frank V

    2003-11-01

    Every company makes choices about the channels it will use to go to market. Traditionally, the decision to sell through a discount superstore or a pricey boutique, for instance, was guided by customer demographics. A company would identify a target segment of buyers and go with the channel that could deliver them. It was a fair assumption that certain customer types were held captive by certain channels--if not from cradle to grave, then at least from initial consideration to purchase. The problem, the authors say, is that today's customers have become unfettered. As their channel options have proliferated, they've come to recognize that different channels serve their needs better at different points in the buying process. The result is "value poaching." For example, certain channels hope to use higher margin sales to cover the cost of providing expensive high-touch services. Potential customers use these channels to do research, then leap to a cheaper channel when it's time to buy. Customers now hunt for bargains more aggressively; they've become more sophisticated about how companies market to them; and they are better equipped with information and technology to make advantageous decisions. What does this mean for your go-to-market strategy? The authors urge companies to make a fundamental shift in mind-set toward designing for buyer behaviors, not customer segments. A company should design pathways across channels to help its customers get what they need at each stage of the buying process--through one channel or another. Customers are not mindful of channel boundaries--and you shouldn't be either. Instead, they are mindful of the value of individual components in your channels--and you should be, too. PMID:14619155

  7. The customer has escaped.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paul F; Cespedes, Frank V

    2003-11-01

    Every company makes choices about the channels it will use to go to market. Traditionally, the decision to sell through a discount superstore or a pricey boutique, for instance, was guided by customer demographics. A company would identify a target segment of buyers and go with the channel that could deliver them. It was a fair assumption that certain customer types were held captive by certain channels--if not from cradle to grave, then at least from initial consideration to purchase. The problem, the authors say, is that today's customers have become unfettered. As their channel options have proliferated, they've come to recognize that different channels serve their needs better at different points in the buying process. The result is "value poaching." For example, certain channels hope to use higher margin sales to cover the cost of providing expensive high-touch services. Potential customers use these channels to do research, then leap to a cheaper channel when it's time to buy. Customers now hunt for bargains more aggressively; they've become more sophisticated about how companies market to them; and they are better equipped with information and technology to make advantageous decisions. What does this mean for your go-to-market strategy? The authors urge companies to make a fundamental shift in mind-set toward designing for buyer behaviors, not customer segments. A company should design pathways across channels to help its customers get what they need at each stage of the buying process--through one channel or another. Customers are not mindful of channel boundaries--and you shouldn't be either. Instead, they are mindful of the value of individual components in your channels--and you should be, too.

  8. A Time Scheduling Model of Logistics Service Supply Chain Based on the Customer Order Decoupling Point: A Perspective from the Constant Service Operation Time

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Xu, Haitao; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yijia; Liang, Zhicheng

    2014-01-01

    In mass customization logistics service, reasonable scheduling of the logistics service supply chain (LSSC), especially time scheduling, is benefit to increase its competitiveness. Therefore, the effect of a customer order decoupling point (CODP) on the time scheduling performance should be considered. To minimize the total order operation cost of the LSSC, minimize the difference between the expected and actual time of completing the service orders, and maximize the satisfaction of functional logistics service providers, this study establishes an LSSC time scheduling model based on the CODP. Matlab 7.8 software is used in the numerical analysis for a specific example. Results show that the order completion time of the LSSC can be delayed or be ahead of schedule but cannot be infinitely advanced or infinitely delayed. Obtaining the optimal comprehensive performance can be effective if the expected order completion time is appropriately delayed. The increase in supply chain comprehensive performance caused by the increase in the relationship coefficient of logistics service integrator (LSI) is limited. The relative concern degree of LSI on cost and service delivery punctuality leads to not only changes in CODP but also to those in the scheduling performance of the LSSC. PMID:24715818

  9. A time scheduling model of logistics service supply chain based on the customer order decoupling point: a perspective from the constant service operation time.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihua; Yang, Yi; Xu, Haitao; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yijia; Liang, Zhicheng

    2014-01-01

    In mass customization logistics service, reasonable scheduling of the logistics service supply chain (LSSC), especially time scheduling, is benefit to increase its competitiveness. Therefore, the effect of a customer order decoupling point (CODP) on the time scheduling performance should be considered. To minimize the total order operation cost of the LSSC, minimize the difference between the expected and actual time of completing the service orders, and maximize the satisfaction of functional logistics service providers, this study establishes an LSSC time scheduling model based on the CODP. Matlab 7.8 software is used in the numerical analysis for a specific example. Results show that the order completion time of the LSSC can be delayed or be ahead of schedule but cannot be infinitely advanced or infinitely delayed. Obtaining the optimal comprehensive performance can be effective if the expected order completion time is appropriately delayed. The increase in supply chain comprehensive performance caused by the increase in the relationship coefficient of logistics service integrator (LSI) is limited. The relative concern degree of LSI on cost and service delivery punctuality leads to not only changes in CODP but also to those in the scheduling performance of the LSSC.

  10. A time scheduling model of logistics service supply chain based on the customer order decoupling point: a perspective from the constant service operation time.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihua; Yang, Yi; Xu, Haitao; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yijia; Liang, Zhicheng

    2014-01-01

    In mass customization logistics service, reasonable scheduling of the logistics service supply chain (LSSC), especially time scheduling, is benefit to increase its competitiveness. Therefore, the effect of a customer order decoupling point (CODP) on the time scheduling performance should be considered. To minimize the total order operation cost of the LSSC, minimize the difference between the expected and actual time of completing the service orders, and maximize the satisfaction of functional logistics service providers, this study establishes an LSSC time scheduling model based on the CODP. Matlab 7.8 software is used in the numerical analysis for a specific example. Results show that the order completion time of the LSSC can be delayed or be ahead of schedule but cannot be infinitely advanced or infinitely delayed. Obtaining the optimal comprehensive performance can be effective if the expected order completion time is appropriately delayed. The increase in supply chain comprehensive performance caused by the increase in the relationship coefficient of logistics service integrator (LSI) is limited. The relative concern degree of LSI on cost and service delivery punctuality leads to not only changes in CODP but also to those in the scheduling performance of the LSSC. PMID:24715818

  11. Enabling model customization and integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Minho; Fishwick, Paul A.

    2003-09-01

    Until fairly recently, the idea of dynamic model content and presentation were treated synonymously. For example, if one was to take a data flow network, which captures the dynamics of a target system in terms of the flow of data through nodal operators, then one would often standardize on rectangles and arrows for the model display. The increasing web emphasis on XML, however, suggests that the network model can have its content specified in an XML language, and then the model can be represented in a number of ways depending on the chosen style. We have developed a formal method, based on styles, that permits a model to be specified in XML and presented in 1D (text), 2D, and 3D. This method allows for customization and personalization to exert their benefits beyond e-commerce, to the area of model structures used in computer simulation. This customization leads naturally to solving the bigger problem of model integration - the act of taking models of a scene and integrating them with that scene so that there is only one unified modeling interface. This work focuses mostly on customization, but we address the integration issue in the future work section.

  12. Smart customers, dumb companies.

    PubMed

    Locke, C

    2000-01-01

    Customers today are being bombarded with an overwhelming array of choices. To alleviate customer frustration, say Steven Cristol and Peter Sealey in Simplicity Marketing, companies should stop creating new brands and product extensions. Better to consolidate product and service functions by following a four R approach: replace, repackage, reposition, and replenish. That's an outmoded, dictatorial view of markets, says Christopher Locke. Far from being stymied by choices, customers are rapidly becoming smarter than the companies that pretend to serve them. In this networked economy, people are talking among themselves, and that changes everything. Locke predicts we'll see a growing number of well-defined micromarkets--groups of customers converging in real time around entertaining and knowledgeable voices--such as NPR's car guys and the Motley Fool investment site. "Micromedia" Web sites will replace traditional advertising because they'll provide credible user-supplied news about products and services. Locke contends that an open exchange of information solves the "problem" of choice much better than manipulative strategies like simplicity or even permission marketing. Companies can participate in micromarkets through what Locke dubs "gonzo marketing." If Ford, for example, discovers that a subset of its employees are organic gardeners, it may offer support to a big independent organic-gardening Web site with donations and employee volunteers. This marketing effort would be driven not by advertising managers but by people with genuine interest in each micromarket, so it would have credibility with customers. With gonzo marketing, both companies and their markets will benefit.

  13. Application of text mining for customer evaluations in commercial banking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jing; Du, Xiaojiang; Hao, Pengpeng; Wang, Yanbo J.

    2015-07-01

    Nowadays customer attrition is increasingly serious in commercial banks. To combat this problem roundly, mining customer evaluation texts is as important as mining customer structured data. In order to extract hidden information from customer evaluations, Textual Feature Selection, Classification and Association Rule Mining are necessary techniques. This paper presents all three techniques by using Chinese Word Segmentation, C5.0 and Apriori, and a set of experiments were run based on a collection of real textual data that includes 823 customer evaluations taken from a Chinese commercial bank. Results, consequent solutions, some advice for the commercial bank are given in this paper.

  14. Analysis of Customer Loyalty through Total Quality Service, Customer Relationship Management and Customer Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binsar Kristian P., Feliks Anggia; Panjaitan, Hotman

    2014-01-01

    This research talks about total quality service and customer relationship management effects toward customer satisfaction and its impact on customer loyalty. Fast food restaurant KFC, always strives to continue to make improvements in total quality service, so that customer satisfaction can be maintained, which in turn will have an impact on…

  15. Custom uniform source system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcom, John L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this final report is to provide information on the Custom Uniform Source System (CSTM-USS-4000). The report includes documentation and summaries of the results for the work performed under the contract. The Annex contain laboratory test findings, photographs, and drawings of the sphere system.

  16. Chinese Festivals and Customs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Sandra Aili

    Traditional festivals and customs of the Chinese people are described in this publication which can be used with secondary level students. In the margins of the text are numbers which indicate slides and cultural objects that relate to the text. The text, however, can be used without the slides and objects. The following festivals are described:…

  17. Chippewa Customs. Reprint Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densmore, Frances

    Using information obtained between 1907 and 1925 from members of the Chippewa tribe, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the United States National Museum, the book describes various Chippewa customs. Information, collected on six reservations in Minnesota and Wisconsin and the Manitou Rapids Reserve in Ontario, Canada, is provided concerning…

  18. Custom ocular prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Cain, J R

    1982-12-01

    The rehabilitation of a patient who has suffered the psychologic trauma of an ocular loss requires a prosthesis that will provide the optimum cosmetic and functional result. Refinement in the details of custom ocular construction has produced a superior restoration delivered more readily.

  19. Students as Customers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthbert, Rob

    2010-01-01

    The idea that students might be treated as customers triggers academics' antipathy, which in turn can lead to managerial irritation and political frustration. There are different discourses which barely overlap as their protagonists speak past one another. This article argues that these differences can be reconciled by re-conceiving the…

  20. Customer requirements process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Yvonne; Falsetti, Christine M.

    1991-01-01

    Customer requirements are presented through three viewgraphs. One graph presents the range of services, which include requirements management, network engineering, operations, and applications support. Another viewgraph presents the project planning process. The third viewgraph presents the programs and/or projects actively supported including life sciences, earth science and applications, solar system exploration, shuttle flight engineering, microgravity science, space physics, and astrophysics.

  1. Smart customers, dumb companies.

    PubMed

    Locke, C

    2000-01-01

    Customers today are being bombarded with an overwhelming array of choices. To alleviate customer frustration, say Steven Cristol and Peter Sealey in Simplicity Marketing, companies should stop creating new brands and product extensions. Better to consolidate product and service functions by following a four R approach: replace, repackage, reposition, and replenish. That's an outmoded, dictatorial view of markets, says Christopher Locke. Far from being stymied by choices, customers are rapidly becoming smarter than the companies that pretend to serve them. In this networked economy, people are talking among themselves, and that changes everything. Locke predicts we'll see a growing number of well-defined micromarkets--groups of customers converging in real time around entertaining and knowledgeable voices--such as NPR's car guys and the Motley Fool investment site. "Micromedia" Web sites will replace traditional advertising because they'll provide credible user-supplied news about products and services. Locke contends that an open exchange of information solves the "problem" of choice much better than manipulative strategies like simplicity or even permission marketing. Companies can participate in micromarkets through what Locke dubs "gonzo marketing." If Ford, for example, discovers that a subset of its employees are organic gardeners, it may offer support to a big independent organic-gardening Web site with donations and employee volunteers. This marketing effort would be driven not by advertising managers but by people with genuine interest in each micromarket, so it would have credibility with customers. With gonzo marketing, both companies and their markets will benefit. PMID:11184973

  2. The Study on the Preferences of Customer Personal Values with Chinese Culture Background in Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yue

    Customer personal values are the important factors which affect customer behaviors, and they guide and decide the customer's attitudes and behaviors on the products or the services. The paper thinks there are only several important customer personal values to guide customer's decisions, and these values will have -strong cultural differences. This study focuses on discussing the preferences of customer personal values with Chinese culture background when customers consume service and analyzes on the customer preferences of customer personal values with the deep interview method. After interviewing 16 responders with the semi-structured questionnaires, the study finds out some interesting results: (1) Some customers have recognized the existent of customer personal values, even though customer perceived values still have the strong influences on customer behaviors. (2) As they pursue to high quality lives, customers enjoy the lives in easy and pleasure way and care about the safe of the family. Quick response, simple and professional services contribute to enhance the experiences of easy and pleasure lives. (3) Non-rational consumers need the respect from the staff and the companies seriously. In comparison, the rational customers care less about the respect. (4) The sociable requirements have become a common consuming psychology of the customers. More and more customers try to gain the friends by consuming some services. (5) The preferences of customer personal values have a close relationship with the Chinese culture, such as collective values, family conception and "face" culture. The results benefit for service companies improving service brands and service quality.

  3. EOSDIS Customer Support Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, J. F.; Boquist, C. L.

    2006-05-01

    The Earth Observation System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a large, complex data system currently supporting over 18 operational NASA satellite missions including the flagship EOS missions: Terra, Aqua, and Aura. The observations collected by these missions are kept at geographically distributed data centers. EOSDIS manages over four petabytes of data accessed by over 200,000 distinct users last year. The data centers distributed more than 37 million Earth science data products during 2005 to a diverse customer community. An important goal for these data centers is to provide an adequate service at a uniform level for the user community to ensure we get the most benefit from our investment in space resources. This paper discusses the challenges, the ways the data centers coordinate among themselves to provide service, and recent results of measuring customer satisfaction with this service.

  4. Partnership with the customer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trachta, Gregory S.

    1992-01-01

    This discussion will recount some historical observations about establishing partnerships with the customer. It suggests that such partnerships are established as the natural evolutionary product of a continuous improvement culture. Those are warm, ethereal terms about a topic that some people think already suffers from an excess of hot air. We will focus on some real-world activities and workplace artifacts to show there are substantive concepts behind the TQM buzzwords.

  5. Partnership with the customer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachta, Gregory S.

    This discussion will recount some historical observations about establishing partnerships with the customer. It suggests that such partnerships are established as the natural evolutionary product of a continuous improvement culture. Those are warm, ethereal terms about a topic that some people think already suffers from an excess of hot air. We will focus on some real-world activities and workplace artifacts to show there are substantive concepts behind the TQM buzzwords.

  6. CERTS customer adoption model

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, F. Javier; Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi,Kristina S.

    2000-03-01

    This effort represents a contribution to the wider distributed energy resources (DER) research of the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS, http://certs.lbl.gov) that is intended to attack and, hopefully, resolve the technical barriers to DER adoption, particularly those that are unlikely to be of high priority to individual equipment vendors. The longer term goal of the Berkeley Lab effort is to guide the wider technical research towards the key technical problems by forecasting some likely patterns of DER adoption. In sharp contrast to traditional electricity utility planning, this work takes a customer-centric approach and focuses on DER adoption decision making at, what we currently think of as, the customer level. This study reports on Berkeley Lab's second year effort (completed in Federal fiscal year 2000, FY00) of a project aimed to anticipate patterns of customer adoption of distributed energy resources (DER). Marnay, et al., 2000 describes the earlier FY99 Berkeley Lab work. The results presented herein are not intended to represent definitive economic analyses of possible DER projects by any means. The paucity of data available and the importance of excluded factors, such as environmental implications, are simply too important to make such an analysis possible at this time. Rather, the work presented represents a demonstration of the current model and an indicator of the potential to conduct more relevant studies in the future.

  7. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  8. The art of customer service.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jeni

    2007-10-01

    Strategies for improving the consumer service skills of finance staff include: Hire employees who have a customer service background. Work with your human resources department to provide customer service training. Monitor new hires extensively. Offer front-end employees scripted language for situations they may face on the job. Measure the quality of customer service provided. Provide incentives for performance.

  9. Suggested Procedures for Installing Strain Gauges on Langley Research Center Wind Tunnel Balances, Custom Force Measuring Transducers, Metallic and Composite Structural Test Articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas C., Sr.

    2004-01-01

    The character of force and strain measurement testing at LaRC is such that the types of strain gauge installations, the materials upon which the strain gauges are applied, and the test environments encountered, require many varied approaches. In 1997, a NASA Technical Memorandum (NASA TM 110327) was generated to provide the strain gauge application specialist with a listing of recommended procedures for strain gauging various transducers and test articles at LaRC. The technical memorandum offered here is an effort to keep the strain gauge user informed of new technological enhancements in strain-gauging methodology while preserving the strain-gauging guidelines set forth in the 1997 TM. This document provides detailed recommendations for strain gauging LaRC-designed balances and custom transducers, composite materials, cryogenic and high-temperature test articles, and selected non-typical or unique materials or test conditions. Additionally, one section offers details for installing Bragg-Grating type fiber-optic strain sensors for non-typical test scenarios.

  10. Search for Hard X-Ray Emission from Aquila X-1: High Energy Emission from Gamma-ray Radio Star 2CG 135+1/LSI 61 305

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    Several investigations supported by these CCRO grant were completed or are close to completion. The study of EGRET data for the unidentified source 2CG 135+01 was very fruitful. We discovered transient gamma-ray emission by combining several data obtained since 1994 through 1997. It is the first time that time variable emission is established for this enigmatic source, and clearly an interpretation in terms of an isolated radio pulsar (Geminga-like) is disfavored now. Our preferred model is a Galactic source, probably an energetic pulsar (such as PSR129-63) in a binary system producing gamma-rays because of pulsar wind/mass outflow interaction. We also accumulated may data concerning the radio source LSI 61 303, the possible counterpart of 2CG 135+01. We show that a possible anti-correlation between radio and gamma-ray emission exists. This anticorrelation is evident only in the energy range above 100 MeV, as demonstrated by the lack of it obtained from OSSE data. If confirmed, this anti-correlation would prove to be very important for the interpretation of the hundreds of unidentified gamma-ray sources currently discovered by EGRET near the Galactic plane, and would point to a new class of sources in addition to AGNs and isolated pulsars. We also completed the analysis of several time variable gamma-ray sources near the Galactic plane, with the discussion of evidence for transient emission from 2EG J1813-12 and 2EG J1828+01. We completed several investigations regarding gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), including the study of the brightness distribution for different spectral/duration GRB sub-classes, an investigation of acceleration processes and their consequences for GRB afterglow emission [61, the application of the synchrotron shock model of GRBs to X-ray energies.

  11. How do challenges increase customer loyalty to online games?

    PubMed

    Teng, Ching-I

    2013-12-01

    Despite the design of various challenge levels in online games, exactly how these challenges increase customer loyalty to online games has seldom been examined. This study investigates how such challenges increase customer loyalty to online games. The study sample comprises 2,861 online gamers. Structural equation modeling is performed. Analytical results indicate that the relationship between challenge and loyalty intensifies when customers perceive that overcoming challenges takes a long time. Results of this study contribute to efforts to determine how challenges and challenge-related perceptions impact customer loyalty to online games.

  12. How do challenges increase customer loyalty to online games?

    PubMed

    Teng, Ching-I

    2013-12-01

    Despite the design of various challenge levels in online games, exactly how these challenges increase customer loyalty to online games has seldom been examined. This study investigates how such challenges increase customer loyalty to online games. The study sample comprises 2,861 online gamers. Structural equation modeling is performed. Analytical results indicate that the relationship between challenge and loyalty intensifies when customers perceive that overcoming challenges takes a long time. Results of this study contribute to efforts to determine how challenges and challenge-related perceptions impact customer loyalty to online games. PMID:23768072

  13. Imaging functional blood vessels by the laser speckle imaging (LSI) technique using Q-statistics of the generalized differences algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mohammad Zaheer; Cabrera, Humberto; Ramírez-Miquet, Evelio E

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we report about q statistics concept to improve the performance of generalized differences algorithm based on intensity histogram for imaging functional blood vessel structures in a rodent window chamber of a mice. The method uses the dynamic speckle signals obtained by transilluminating the rodent window chamber to create activity maps of vasculatures. The proposed method of generalized differences with q statistics (GDq) is very sensitive to the values of defined parameters such as: camera exposure time, the q value and the camera frame number. Appropriate choice of q values enhances the visibility (contrast) of functional blood vessels but at the same time without sacrificing the spatial resolution, which is of utmost importance for in-vivo vascular imaging.

  14. Customer care in the NHS.

    PubMed

    Ruddick, Fred

    2015-01-20

    Viewing individuals in need of NHS care as customers has the potential to refocus the way their care is delivered. This article highlights some of the benefits of reframing the nurse-patient relationship in terms of customer care, and draws parallels between good customer care and the provision of high quality patient care in the NHS. It explores lessons to be learned from those who have studied the customer experience, which can be adapted to enhance the customer care experience within the health service. Developing professional expertise in the knowledge and skills that underpin good-quality interpersonal encounters is essential to improve the customer experience in health care and should be prioritised alongside the development of more technical skills. Creating a culture where emotional intelligence, caring and compassion are essential requirements for all nursing staff will improve patient satisfaction. PMID:25585766

  15. Customer service providers' attitudes relating to customer service and customer satisfaction in the customer-server exchange.

    PubMed

    Susskind, Alex M; Kacmar, K Michele; Borchgrevink, Carl P

    2003-02-01

    The authors proposed and tested a model describing the relationship between customer service providers' perceptions and attitudes toward their service-related duties and their customers' perceptions of satisfaction with their service experiences. Results indicated that the perception of having standards for service delivery in an organization is strongly related to line-level employees' perceptions of support from coworkers and supervisors. Perceived support from coworkers was significantly related to service providers' customer orientation, whereas perceived support from supervisors showed a weaker relationship to a customer orientation. Ultimately, service providers' customer orientation was strongly related to customers' satisfaction with service. Finally, a set of post hoc analyses indicated that coworker and supervisory support explained a greater proportion of incremental variance in the model than did perceived organizational support alone. PMID:12675405

  16. Predictive Systems for Customer Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Ravi; Albert, Sam; Singh, Vinod Kumar; Kannan, Pallipuram V.

    With the coming of age of web as a mainstream customer service channel, B2C companies have invested substantial resources in enhancing their web presence. Today customers can interact with a company, not only through the traditional phone channel but also through chat, email, SMS or web self-service. Each of these channels is best suited for some services and ill-matched for others. Customer service organizations today struggle with the challenge of delivering seamlessly integrated services through these different channels. This paper will evaluate some of the key challenges in multi-channel customer service. It will address the challenge of creating the right channel mix i.e. providing the right choice of channels for a given customer/behavior/issue profile. It will also provide strategies for optimizing the performance of a given channel in creating the right customer experience.

  17. Customer care in the NHS.

    PubMed

    Ruddick, Fred

    2015-01-20

    Viewing individuals in need of NHS care as customers has the potential to refocus the way their care is delivered. This article highlights some of the benefits of reframing the nurse-patient relationship in terms of customer care, and draws parallels between good customer care and the provision of high quality patient care in the NHS. It explores lessons to be learned from those who have studied the customer experience, which can be adapted to enhance the customer care experience within the health service. Developing professional expertise in the knowledge and skills that underpin good-quality interpersonal encounters is essential to improve the customer experience in health care and should be prioritised alongside the development of more technical skills. Creating a culture where emotional intelligence, caring and compassion are essential requirements for all nursing staff will improve patient satisfaction.

  18. Customer service providers' attitudes relating to customer service and customer satisfaction in the customer-server exchange.

    PubMed

    Susskind, Alex M; Kacmar, K Michele; Borchgrevink, Carl P

    2003-02-01

    The authors proposed and tested a model describing the relationship between customer service providers' perceptions and attitudes toward their service-related duties and their customers' perceptions of satisfaction with their service experiences. Results indicated that the perception of having standards for service delivery in an organization is strongly related to line-level employees' perceptions of support from coworkers and supervisors. Perceived support from coworkers was significantly related to service providers' customer orientation, whereas perceived support from supervisors showed a weaker relationship to a customer orientation. Ultimately, service providers' customer orientation was strongly related to customers' satisfaction with service. Finally, a set of post hoc analyses indicated that coworker and supervisory support explained a greater proportion of incremental variance in the model than did perceived organizational support alone.

  19. Process Improvement: Customer Service.

    PubMed

    Cull, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing the comment section of patient satisfaction surveys, Clark Memorial Hospital in Jeffersonville, IN went through a thoughtful process to arrive at an experience that patients said they wanted. Two Lean Six Sigma tools were used--the Voice of the Customer (VoC) and the Affinity Diagram. Even when using these tools, a facility will not be able to accomplish everything the patient may want. Guidelines were set and rules were established for the Process Improvement Team in order to lessen frustration, increase focus, and ultimately be successful. The project's success is driven by the team members carrying its message back to their areas. It's about ensuring that everyone is striving to improve the patients' experience by listening to what they say is being done right and what they say can be done better. And then acting on it. PMID:26571974

  20. Process Improvement: Customer Service.

    PubMed

    Cull, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing the comment section of patient satisfaction surveys, Clark Memorial Hospital in Jeffersonville, IN went through a thoughtful process to arrive at an experience that patients said they wanted. Two Lean Six Sigma tools were used--the Voice of the Customer (VoC) and the Affinity Diagram. Even when using these tools, a facility will not be able to accomplish everything the patient may want. Guidelines were set and rules were established for the Process Improvement Team in order to lessen frustration, increase focus, and ultimately be successful. The project's success is driven by the team members carrying its message back to their areas. It's about ensuring that everyone is striving to improve the patients' experience by listening to what they say is being done right and what they say can be done better. And then acting on it.

  1. A compass for customer needs.

    PubMed

    Hines, J D; Murray, M

    1998-02-01

    Baldor Electric uses a tool it calls the value formula to help teach its employees to look at their work through the eyes of the customer. In fact, the goal of the value improvement process is to focus everyone on customer value, and the employees, by going through five training courses, learn how improving quality and service and reducing cost and time lead to higher value for the customer.

  2. Utility competition and residential customers

    SciTech Connect

    Studness, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Residential customers have found themselves either ignored or ill-used by the major participants in the struggle over utility competition. No group is seeking to secure them the benefits of competition, and those who oppose competition have curried their favor by conjuring up misleading horror stories about how competition would harm them. Yet residential customers ultimately stand to gain as much from competition as larger customers.

  3. Customer Behavior Clustering Using SVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongying; Su, Xiaolong

    In order to supply better service for network customers, deeply analyzing customers' behavior is required. This paper extracts three features from customers' network behavior which is divided into different categories, such as browsing news, downloading shared resources and real-time communications etc. Support vector machine is used to perform clustering, thanks to its fast and valid executing, especially in the situation of small datasets. Using the analysis results, we can make our applications and services more personalized and easier to be used.

  4. Generating Customized Verifiers for Automatically Generated Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen; Fischer, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Program verification using Hoare-style techniques requires many logical annotations. We have previously developed a generic annotation inference algorithm that weaves in all annotations required to certify safety properties for automatically generated code. It uses patterns to capture generator- and property-specific code idioms and property-specific meta-program fragments to construct the annotations. The algorithm is customized by specifying the code patterns and integrating them with the meta-program fragments for annotation construction. However, this is difficult since it involves tedious and error-prone low-level term manipulations. Here, we describe an annotation schema compiler that largely automates this customization task using generative techniques. It takes a collection of high-level declarative annotation schemas tailored towards a specific code generator and safety property, and generates all customized analysis functions and glue code required for interfacing with the generic algorithm core, thus effectively creating a customized annotation inference algorithm. The compiler raises the level of abstraction and simplifies schema development and maintenance. It also takes care of some more routine aspects of formulating patterns and schemas, in particular handling of irrelevant program fragments and irrelevant variance in the program structure, which reduces the size, complexity, and number of different patterns and annotation schemas that are required. The improvements described here make it easier and faster to customize the system to a new safety property or a new generator, and we demonstrate this by customizing it to certify frame safety of space flight navigation code that was automatically generated from Simulink models by MathWorks' Real-Time Workshop.

  5. Customizing Curriculum with Digital Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    To effectively use digital resources in the classroom, teachers must customize the information, merge it with pre-existing curriculum, differentiate it for diverse student populations, and still meet standards-based learning goals. This article describes a solution to these challenges: the Curriculum Customization Service, which provides access to…

  6. Customer Service in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sines, Robert G., Jr.; Duckworth, Eric A.

    1994-01-01

    It is argued that colleges and universities need to understand the importance of customer service in student retention, particularly in a competitive marketplace. Customer service concepts that work in the private sector are seen as useful in higher education, and a model is proposed. (MSE)

  7. Customer Service in Ontario's Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, John

    2005-01-01

    No doubt there are detractors who cringe at the prospect of connecting the term customer service with an institution of higher education. Some may consider the term demeaning. However, given the college funding crisis and current economic climate, a quality customer service strategy is a prudent adjunct to any marketing activity undertaken. It is…

  8. Patient or customer?

    PubMed

    Parker, J M

    1999-01-01

    This paper investigates caring in practice within the context of the global imperative of increasing rationalisation of care based on an economic ethic. The notion of the global marketplace has spread to the domain of health services, so that 'health' has come to be seen as a commodity, with the body as its site, and the 'patient' a customer; clinicians work to construct standard pathways through the healthcare supermarket. The challenge for nurses is to work within but also to challenge and resist the reductionist impetus of economically based and commercially driven approaches to health care. They must retain the sense of the value of the wholeness of the person, the deeply personal and profoundly significant professional-recipient relationship, and find ways of demonstrating their capacity to deliver high-quality care in a cost-effective way. Proper and appropriate accountability is a key strategy to maintaining quality nursing as a significant aspect of care. The expansion of the role of the advanced practice nurse is very useful in providing holistic and cost-effective care, though there are currently limitations to scope of practice that need to be removed. The metaphor of the marketplace, underpinned by powerful global economic forces, can draw us into unthinking compliance with its imperatives--but other metaphors are available. Metaphor and creativity are linked, and we need to consider how the creative use of language can facilitate the emergence of new ways of understanding in health care. PMID:10401282

  9. Diversifying customer review rankings.

    PubMed

    Krestel, Ralf; Dokoohaki, Nima

    2015-06-01

    E-commerce Web sites owe much of their popularity to consumer reviews accompanying product descriptions. On-line customers spend hours and hours going through heaps of textual reviews to decide which products to buy. At the same time, each popular product has thousands of user-generated reviews, making it impossible for a buyer to read everything. Current approaches to display reviews to users or recommend an individual review for a product are based on the recency or helpfulness of each review. In this paper, we present a framework to rank product reviews by optimizing the coverage of the ranking with respect to sentiment or aspects, or by summarizing all reviews with the top-K reviews in the ranking. To accomplish this, we make use of the assigned star rating for a product as an indicator for a review's sentiment polarity and compare bag-of-words (language model) with topic models (latent Dirichlet allocation) as a mean to represent aspects. Our evaluation on manually annotated review data from a commercial review Web site demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, outperforming plain recency ranking by 30% and obtaining best results by combining language and topic model representations.

  10. Diversifying customer review rankings.

    PubMed

    Krestel, Ralf; Dokoohaki, Nima

    2015-06-01

    E-commerce Web sites owe much of their popularity to consumer reviews accompanying product descriptions. On-line customers spend hours and hours going through heaps of textual reviews to decide which products to buy. At the same time, each popular product has thousands of user-generated reviews, making it impossible for a buyer to read everything. Current approaches to display reviews to users or recommend an individual review for a product are based on the recency or helpfulness of each review. In this paper, we present a framework to rank product reviews by optimizing the coverage of the ranking with respect to sentiment or aspects, or by summarizing all reviews with the top-K reviews in the ranking. To accomplish this, we make use of the assigned star rating for a product as an indicator for a review's sentiment polarity and compare bag-of-words (language model) with topic models (latent Dirichlet allocation) as a mean to represent aspects. Our evaluation on manually annotated review data from a commercial review Web site demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, outperforming plain recency ranking by 30% and obtaining best results by combining language and topic model representations. PMID:25795511

  11. Group decision support system for customer-driven product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhihang; Chen, Hang; Chen, Kuen; Che, Ada

    2000-10-01

    This paper describes the work on the development of a group decision support system for customer driven product design. The customer driven is to develop products, which meet all customer requirements in whole life cycle of products. A process model of decision during product primary design is proposed to formulate the structured, semi-structured and unstructured decision problems. The framework for the decision support system is presented that integrated both advances in the group decision making and distributed artificial intelligent. The system consists of the product primary design tool kit and the collaborative platform with multi-agent structure. The collaborative platform of the system and the product primary design tool kit, including the VOC (Voice of Customer) tool, QFD (Quality Function Deployment) tool, the Conceptual design tool, Reliability analysis tool and the cost and profit forecasting tool, are indicated.

  12. 19 CFR 146.3 - Customs supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs supervision. 146.3 Section 146.3 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES General Provisions § 146.3 Customs supervision. (a) Assignment of...

  13. Achieving excellence--creating customer passion.

    PubMed

    Scheuing, E E

    1999-08-01

    Customers are the lifeblood of any organization. Without them, it loses its meaning and purpose. Customers provide incentive, vitality, and growth. Serving them well requires a customer-focused culture and a customer-friendly system. It also requires unrelenting effort toward continuous improvement, but the rewards are well worth the effort: unflinching customer loyalty, sustainable growth, and impressive performance.

  14. Customer Service: Another Side of TQM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirkin, Arlene Farber

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on the customer satisfaction element of Total Quality Management (TQM) in libraries, including definition of the terms customer and customer satisfaction, determining customer expectations, complaint systems, keeping customers, and empowerment of staff. Appendices list approaches libraries and other organizations have used to improve…

  15. 19 CFR 101.7 - Customs seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs seal. 101.7 Section 101.7 Customs Duties U... GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.7 Customs seal. (a) Design. According to the design furnished by the Department of the Treasury, the Customs seal of the United States shall consist of the seal of the Department...

  16. 19 CFR 101.7 - Customs seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Customs seal. 101.7 Section 101.7 Customs Duties U... GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.7 Customs seal. (a) Design. According to the design furnished by the Department of the Treasury, the Customs seal of the United States shall consist of the seal of the Department...

  17. 19 CFR 101.7 - Customs seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Customs seal. 101.7 Section 101.7 Customs Duties U... GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.7 Customs seal. (a) Design. According to the design furnished by the Department of the Treasury, the Customs seal of the United States shall consist of the seal of the Department...

  18. 19 CFR 101.7 - Customs seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Customs seal. 101.7 Section 101.7 Customs Duties U... GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.7 Customs seal. (a) Design. According to the design furnished by the Department of the Treasury, the Customs seal of the United States shall consist of the seal of the Department...

  19. 19 CFR 101.7 - Customs seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Customs seal. 101.7 Section 101.7 Customs Duties U... GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.7 Customs seal. (a) Design. According to the design furnished by the Department of the Treasury, the Customs seal of the United States shall consist of the seal of the Department...

  20. Hitchhiker: Customer Accommodations and Requirements Specifications (CARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In 1984, NASA Headquarters established projects at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to develop quick-reaction carrier systems for low-cost 'flight of opportunity' or secondary payloads on the Space Transportation System (STS). One of these projects is the Hitchhiker (HH) Program. GSFC has developed a family of carrier equipment known as the Shuttle Payload of Opportunity Carrier (SPOC) system for mounting small payloads such as HH to the side of the Orbiter payload bay. The side-mounted HHs are referred to as Hitchhiker-G (HH-G). MSFC developed a cross-bay 'bridge-type' carrier structure called the Hitchhiker-M (HH-M). In 1987, responsibility for the HH-M carrier was transferred to and is now managed by the HH Project Office at the GSFC. The HH-M carrier now uses the same interchangeable SPOC avionics unit and the same electrical interfaces and services developed for HH-G. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has created this document to acquaint potential HH system customers with the facilities NASA provides and the requirements which customers must satisfy to use these facilities. This publication defines interface items required for integrating customer equipment with the HH carrier system. Those items such as mounting equipment and electrical inputs and outputs; configuration, environmental, command, telemetry, and operational constraints are described as well as weight, power, and communications. The purpose of this publication is to help the customer understand essential integration documentation requirements and to prepare a Customer Payload Requirements (CPR) document.

  1. The quest for customer focus.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Ranjay; Oldroyd, James B

    2005-04-01

    Companies have poured enormous amounts of money into customer relationship management, but in many cases the investment hasn't really paid off. That's because getting closer to customers isn't about building an information technology system. It's a learning journey-one that unfolds over four stages, requiring people and business units to coordinate in progressively more sophisticated ways. The journey begins with the creation of a companywide repository containing each interaction a customer has with the company, organized not by product, purchase, or location, but by customer. Communal coordination is what's called for at this stage, as each group contributes its information to the data pool separately from the others and then taps into it as needed. In the second stage, one-way serial coordination from centralized IT through analytical units and out to the operating units allows companies to go beyond just assembling data to drawing inferences. In stage three, companies shift their focus from past relationships to future behavior. Through symbiotic coordination, information flows back and forth between central analytic units and various organizational units like marketing, sales, and operations, as together they seek answers to questions like "How can we prevent customers from switching to a competitor?" and "Who would be most likely to buy a new product in the future"? In stage four, firms begin to move past discrete, formal initiatives and, through integral coordination, bring an increasingly sophisticated understanding oftheir customers to bear in all day-to-day operations. Skipping stages denies organizations the sure foundation they need to build a lasting customer-focused mind-set. Those that recognize this will invest their customer relationship dollars much more wisely-and will see their customer-focusing efforts pay offon the bottom line. PMID:15807042

  2. Turn customer input into innovation.

    PubMed

    Ulwick, Anthony W

    2002-01-01

    It's difficult to find a company these days that doesn't strive to be customer-driven. Too bad, then, that most companies go about the process of listening to customers all wrong--so wrong, in fact, that they undermine innovation and, ultimately, the bottom line. What usually happens is this: Companies ask their customers what they want. Customers offer solutions in the form of products or services. Companies then deliver these tangibles, and customers just don't buy. The reason is simple--customers aren't expert or informed enough to come up with solutions. That's what your R&D team is for. Rather, customers should be asked only for outcomes--what they want a new product or service to do for them. The form the solutions take should be up to you, and you alone. Using Cordis Corporation as an example, this article describes, in fine detail, a series of effective steps for capturing, analyzing, and utilizing customer input. First come indepth interviews, in which a moderator works with customers to deconstruct a process or activity in order to unearth "desired outcomes." Addressing participants' comments one at a time, the moderator rephrases them to be both unambiguous and measurable. Once the interviews are complete, researchers then compile a comprehensive list of outcomes that participants rank in order of importance and degree to which they are satisfied by existing products. Finally, using a simple mathematical formula called the "opportunity calculation," researchers can learn the relative attractiveness of key opportunity areas. These data can be used to uncover opportunities for product development, to properly segment markets, and to conduct competitive analysis.

  3. Novel customized manufacturable DFM solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mark; Zhou, Cong-shu; Tian, Yi; Goh, Soo Muay; Quek, Shyue-Fong; Lam, Hein-Mun; Zhang, Jian

    2012-11-01

    This paper provides DFM solutions on yield improvement based on a foundry's perspective. We have created a novel work flow for efficient yield enhancement at different stages throughout the process of design-to-silicon. In the design environment, other than conforming to the conventional design rule manual, we may guide the designer to employ the well-characterized regular logic bricks that are built from process validated hotspots. Later, after design sign-off, layout manipulation or layout retargeting are implemented during the mask preparation stage to enlarge the process window when faced with a diversity of layout patterns in the design. At the same time, two crucial methods, namely layout analysis and layout comparison, are used to capture all layout related detractors. The first method can identify the process sensitive hotspots, which will be highlighted and anchored as process limiters during the patterning process. Layout comparison can be an efficient way to narrow down the yield roadblocks by debugging the yield loss on similar process and design styles. Another smart solution is creating customized process control monitoring structures (PCM), which are extracted from previous yield ramping lessons and process hotspots. These PCMs will be dropped into scribe lane of production tapeouts and serve as pioneer testkeys for the initial production ramp up.

  4. The value of customer preference

    SciTech Connect

    Herig, C.; Houston, A.

    1996-05-01

    Customer preference (CP), or green pricing, may be the financial hedge for electric supply industry integration of photovoltaics. CP is currently defined as a voluntary contribution for energy generated with renewable resources. Several utilities have examined the CP financing of renewables through experimental or implemented programs and market research. This paper first expands the concept of customer preference to include both voluntary and involuntary customer contributions. It then categorizes the features of existing and proposed CP programs. The connections between these features and market research and marketing strategies for new product development from a competitive industry are analyzed.

  5. Customer concerns regarding satellite servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rysavy, Gordon

    1987-01-01

    The organization of orbital servicing of satellites is discussed. Provision of servicing equipment; design interfaces between the satellite and the servicing equipment; and the economic viability of the concept are discussed. The proposed solution for satisfying customer concerns is for the servicing organizations to baseline an adequate inventory of servicing equipment with standard interfaces and established servicing costs. With this knowledge, the customer can conduct tradeoff studies and make programmatic decisions regarding servicing options. A dialog procedure between customers and servicing specialists is outlined.

  6. Designing and implementing customer-focused functional support teams

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, L.O.; Cejka, C.L.

    1995-02-01

    The contract services department of a U.S. Department of Energy research laboratory is radically revising how it serves its primary customers--the laboratory research and development staff. The department provides services that include contract research initiation (proposal preparation and contract negotiation) and acquisition of goods and services to support specific research projects. It previously provided these services with approximately 170 staff in four centralized functional units. In reorganizing, the department used a structured analysis and design process to categorize internal customers according to their unique attributes and specific support needs. Concurrently, it identified a number of conceptually distinct customer-focused units that could accomplish the contract processes in different ways and then chose a preferred concept for each customer category. The organizational concepts were designed to enhance customer service and improve staff morale and development opportunities. The new organization will have a total of 10 customer support units as well as other centralized services and activities. It will flatten the organizational structures and encourage more cooperation among contracts staff to meet customer needs for improved timeliness, communication, and teaming with researchers.

  7. Shoe Inserts and Prescription Custom Orthotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feet » Foot Health Information Shoe Inserts and Prescription Custom Orthotics What are Shoe Inserts? You've seen ... hold on to your receipt.) What are Prescription Custom Orthotics? Custom orthotics are specially-made devices designed ...

  8. Customer-experienced rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Fu; Li, Anbo

    2008-12-01

    In order to describe accurately and comprehend quickly the perfect GIS requirements, this article will integrate the ideas of QFD (Quality Function Deployment) and UML (Unified Modeling Language), and analyze the deficiency of prototype development model, and will propose the idea of the Customer-Experienced Rapid Prototyping (CE-RP) and describe in detail the process and framework of the CE-RP, from the angle of the characteristics of Modern-GIS. The CE-RP is mainly composed of Customer Tool-Sets (CTS), Developer Tool-Sets (DTS) and Barrier-Free Semantic Interpreter (BF-SI) and performed by two roles of customer and developer. The main purpose of the CE-RP is to produce the unified and authorized requirements data models between customer and software developer.

  9. Marketing management enhances customer relations.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, I R; Petras, G J; Bradford, C

    1992-10-01

    The implementation of automated marketing management systems in hospitals across the United States can change dramatically the way in which a hospital builds business by managing relationships with prospective customers.

  10. Good customer service for patients.

    PubMed

    Foster, Sam

    2016-08-11

    Sam Foster, Chief Nurse at Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, looks at what the NHS can learn about good customer service from the private sector, and how Always Events can improve patient care. PMID:27523767

  11. 17 CFR 1.36 - Record of securities and property received from customers and option customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of all securities and property received from customers, retail forex customers or option customers in lieu of money to margin, purchase, guarantee, or secure the commodity, retail forex or commodity option transactions of such customers, retail forex customers or option customers. Such record shall show...

  12. Customer-centered brand management.

    PubMed

    Rust, Roland T; Zeithaml, Valarie A; Lemon, Katherine N

    2004-09-01

    Most executives today agree that their efforts should be focused on growing the lifetime value of their customers. Yet few companies have come to terms with the implications of that idea for their marketing management. Oldsmobile, for example, enjoyed outstanding brand equity with many customers through the 1980s. But as the century wore further on, the people who loved the Olds got downright old. So why did General Motors spend so many years and so much money trying to reposition and refurbish the tired,tarnished brand? Why didn't GM managers instead move younger buyers along a path of less resistance, toward another of the brands in GM's stable--or even launch a wholly new brand geared to their tastes? Catering to new customers, even at the expense of the brand, would surely have been the path to profits. The reason, argue the authors, is that in large consumer-goods companies like General Motors, brands are the raison d'etre. They are the focus of decision making and the basis of accountability. But this overwhelming focus on growing brand equity is inconsistent with the goal of growing customer equity. Drawing on a wide range of current examples, the authors offer seven tactics that will put brands in the service of growing customer equity. These include replacing traditional brand managers with a new position--the customer segment manager; targeting brands to as narrow an audience as possible; developing the capability and the mind-set to hand off customers from one brand to another within the company; and changing the way brand equity is measured by basing calculations on individual, rather than average, customer data.

  13. Genetic structure in the coral, Montastraea cavernosa: assessing genetic differentiation among and within Mesophotic reefs.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, Daniel A; Lesser, Michael P; Slattery, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Mesophotic coral reefs (30-150 m) have recently received increased attention as a potential source of larvae (e.g., the refugia hypothesis) to repopulate a select subset of the shallow water (<30 m) coral fauna. To test the refugia hypothesis we used highly polymorphic Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers as a means to assess small-scale genetic heterogeneity between geographic locations and across depth clines in the Caribbean coral, Montastraea cavernosa. Zooxanthellae-free DNA extracts of coral samples (N = 105) were analyzed from four depths, shallow (3-10 m), medium (15-25 m), deep (30-50 m) and very deep (60-90 m) from Little Cayman Island (LCI), Lee Stocking Island (LSI), Bahamas and San Salvador (SS), Bahamas which range in distance from 170 to 1,600 km apart. Using AMOVA analysis there were significant differences in ΦST values in pair wise comparisons between LCI and LSI. Among depths at LCI, there was significant genetic differentiation between shallow and medium versus deep and very deep depths in contrast there were no significant differences in ΦST values among depths at LSI. The assignment program AFLPOP, however, correctly assigned 95.7% of the LCI and LSI samples to the depths from which they were collected, differentiating among populations as little as 10 to 20 m in depth from one another. Discriminant function analysis of the data showed significant differentiation among samples when categorized by collection site as well as collection depth. FST outlier analyses identified 2 loci under positive selection and 3 under balancing selection at LCI. At LSI 2 loci were identified, both showing balancing selection. This data shows that adult populations of M. cavernosa separated by depths of tens of meters exhibits significant genetic structure, indicative of low population connectivity among and within sites and are not supplying successful recruits to adjacent coral reefs less than 30 m in depth.

  14. 7 CFR 1206.4 - Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.4 Customs. Customs means...

  15. 7 CFR 1206.4 - Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.4 Customs. Customs means...

  16. 7 CFR 1206.4 - Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.4 Customs. Customs means...

  17. 7 CFR 1206.4 - Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.4 Customs. Customs means...

  18. 7 CFR 1206.4 - Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.4 Customs. Customs means...

  19. Discussion series on PURPA related topics: information to customers

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, J I

    1980-08-01

    This volume relates primarily to Time-of-Day rates standard, PURPA IB(d)3, and deals with the content and methods of providing rate and conservation information to customers when Time-of-Day rates are used. Information to customers in the Demonstration and Pilot Projects fell mainly into four categories: administrative communications; explanations of new rate structures; information and advice on load management; and facts, recommendations and encouragements about energy conservation and end-use improvement. Administrative communications were about such matters as the existence of Projects, their funding, their periods of performance, the selection of their test customers, conditions of participation, procedural changes during the tests, and the time and conditions of ending the tests. These communications were important to good customer cooperation. All Demonstration Projects devoted considerable effort to the crucial task of clearly explaining the rationale of Time-of-Use (TOU) pricing and the test rate structures. The Projects then presented the concept of TOU pricing as a means of (a) fairly charging customers the true cost of their electricity and (b) rewarding them for shifting consumption to times when costs are less. For the most part, Demonstration Projects gave specific information on the individual customer's own rate structure and none on any others that were under test. The information was presented in face-to-face interviews, group presentations, television, radio, and print media, and traveling exhibits. The results are evaluated. (LCL)

  20. 12 CFR 13.5 - Customer information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Customer information. 13.5 Section 13.5 Banks... PRACTICES § 13.5 Customer information. Prior to the execution of a transaction recommended to a non... obtain information concerning: (a) The customer's financial status; (b) The customer's tax status;...

  1. 7 CFR 1260.129 - Customs Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Customs Service. 1260.129 Section 1260.129... Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.129 Customs Service. Customs Service means the United States Customs Service of the United States Department of the Treasury....

  2. 27 CFR 27.185 - Customs release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs release. 27.185... Distilled Spirits From Customs Custody Free of Tax for Use of the United States § 27.185 Customs release. (a) Upon receipt of appropriate customs entry and a photocopy of a permit, Form 5150.33 or...

  3. 47 CFR 32.6623 - Customer services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer services. 32.6623 Section 32.6623... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Expense Accounts § 32.6623 Customer services. (a... includes: (1) Initiating customer service orders and records; (2) Maintaining and billing customer...

  4. The silent customers: measuring customer satisfaction in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Kleinsorge, I K; Koenig, H F

    1991-12-01

    Nursing home administrators concerned with customer satisfaction and quality of care need a tool to assess and monitor ongoing satisfaction of nursing home residents and family members. The authors report a preliminary effort to develop such a survey using focus groups. PMID:10115898

  5. The silent customers: measuring customer satisfaction in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Kleinsorge, I K; Koenig, H F

    1991-12-01

    Nursing home administrators concerned with customer satisfaction and quality of care need a tool to assess and monitor ongoing satisfaction of nursing home residents and family members. The authors report a preliminary effort to develop such a survey using focus groups.

  6. Employee and customer satisfaction in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Todd; Wood, Ben D

    2010-01-01

    There were multiple factors identified in a literature review that have a relationship to customer satisfaction, customer loyalty, employee satisfaction, and links between employee and customer satisfaction. Some of the factors identified were communication, wait times, perceived value, trust, dissatisfaction with management, changes in the workplace, vision,and fun at work. Managers must identify these topics to ensure customer satisfaction, customer loyalty,and employee satisfaction which will ultimately have a positive impact on their organizations. PMID:22279715

  7. The four faces of mass customization.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, J H; Pine, B J

    1997-01-01

    Virtually all executives today recognize the need to provide outstanding service to customers. Focusing on the customer, however, is both an imperative and a potential curse. In their desire to become customer driven, many companies have resorted to inventing new programs and procedures to meet every customer's request. But as customers and their needs grow increasingly diverse, such an approach has become a surefire way to add unnecessary cost and complexity to operations. Companies around the world have embraced mass customization in an attempt to avoid those pitfalls. Readily available information technology and flexible work processes permit them to customize goods or services for individual customers in high volumes at low cost. But many managers have discovered that mass customization itself can produce unnecessary cost and complexity. They are realizing that they did not examine thoroughly enough what kind of customization their customers would value before they plunged ahead. That is understandable. Until now, no framework has existed to help managers determine the type of customization they should pursue. James Gilmore and Joseph Pine provide managers with just such a framework. They have identified four distinct approaches to customization. When designing or redesigning a product, process, or business unit, managers should examine each approach for possible insights into how to serve their customers best. In some cases, a single approach will dominate the design. More often, however, managers will need a mix of some or all of the four approaches to serve their own particular set of customers. PMID:10174455

  8. The four faces of mass customization.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, J H; Pine, B J

    1997-01-01

    Virtually all executives today recognize the need to provide outstanding service to customers. Focusing on the customer, however, is both an imperative and a potential curse. In their desire to become customer driven, many companies have resorted to inventing new programs and procedures to meet every customer's request. But as customers and their needs grow increasingly diverse, such an approach has become a surefire way to add unnecessary cost and complexity to operations. Companies around the world have embraced mass customization in an attempt to avoid those pitfalls. Readily available information technology and flexible work processes permit them to customize goods or services for individual customers in high volumes at low cost. But many managers have discovered that mass customization itself can produce unnecessary cost and complexity. They are realizing that they did not examine thoroughly enough what kind of customization their customers would value before they plunged ahead. That is understandable. Until now, no framework has existed to help managers determine the type of customization they should pursue. James Gilmore and Joseph Pine provide managers with just such a framework. They have identified four distinct approaches to customization. When designing or redesigning a product, process, or business unit, managers should examine each approach for possible insights into how to serve their customers best. In some cases, a single approach will dominate the design. More often, however, managers will need a mix of some or all of the four approaches to serve their own particular set of customers.

  9. 17 CFR 1.36 - Record of securities and property received from customers and option customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....36 Record of securities and property received from customers and option customers. (a) Each futures... or option customer, such futures commission merchant shall obtain written acknowledgment from such... property received from customers and option customers. 1.36 Section 1.36 Commodity and Securities...

  10. Customized News in Your Mailbox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudich, Joe

    1996-01-01

    Customized Internet services deliver news and selected research via e-mail, fax, Web browser, or their own software. Some are clipping services while others are full-fledged online newspapers. Most charge a monthly subscription fee, but a few are free to registered users. Provides the addresses, cost, scope, and evaluation of eight services. (PEN)

  11. Customer Service & Team Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sabrina Budasi

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a six-session, site-specific training course in customer service and team problem solving for the Claretian Medical Center. The course outline is followed the six lesson plans. Components of each lesson plan include a list of objectives, an outline of activities and discussion topics for the lesson,…

  12. Custom Search Engines: Tools & Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notess, Greg R.

    2008-01-01

    Few have the resources to build a Google or Yahoo! from scratch. Yet anyone can build a search engine based on a subset of the large search engines' databases. Use Google Custom Search Engine or Yahoo! Search Builder or any of the other similar programs to create a vertical search engine targeting sites of interest to users. The basic steps to…

  13. Students: Customers, Clients or Pawns?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tight, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    The metaphor of the student as a consumer or customer is widely used within contemporary higher education, and impacts on the ways in which students, academics and institutions behave. These, and a number of alternative metaphors for the student, are critically reviewed. The alternatives considered include both contemporary (student as client or…

  14. Custom Orthotics Changed My Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holeton, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The narrator relates his life's downward spiral and miraculous rebound from severe foot problems using animated bullet points, images, charts, and graphs. "Custom Orthotics Changed My Life" is a work of presentation fiction, or slideshow fiction, in the form of a video with an original soundtrack. The music was composed by David Kettler, a…

  15. Customer Satisfaction with Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Martin

    2001-01-01

    A model for evaluating customer satisfaction with training programs was tested with training purchasers. The model confirmed two types of projects: training aimed at achieving learning results and at changing job performance. The model did not fit for training intended to support organizational change. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  16. Metamaterials with custom emissivity polarization in the near-infrared.

    PubMed

    Bossard, Jeremy A; Werner, Douglas H

    2013-02-11

    Metamaterials have been previously studied for their ability to tailor the dispersive infrared (IR) emissivity of a surface. Here, we investigate metamaterial coatings based on an electromagnetic band-gap surface for use as near-IR emitters with custom polarization selectivity. A genetic algorithm is successfully employed to optimize the metamaterial structures to exhibit custom linear, circular, and elliptical polarization. A study is also conducted on a bi-anisotropic slab, showing that anisotropic chirality is required in the metamaterial structure in order to achieve circular or elliptical emissivity polarization.

  17. 47 CFR 64.2005 - Use of customer proprietary network information without customer approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS RULES RELATING TO COMMON CARRIERS Customer... a telecommunications carrier provides different categories of service, and a customer subscribes to... the carrier's affiliated entities that provide a service offering to the customer. (2) If...

  18. Customer service in equine veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Blach, Edward L

    2009-12-01

    This article explores customer service in equine veterinary medicine. It begins with a discussion about the differences between customers and clients in veterinary medicine. An overview of the nature of the veterinary-client-patient relationship and its effects on the veterinarian's services sheds light on how to evaluate your customer service. The author reviews a study performed in 2007 that evaluated 24 attributes of customer service and their importance to clients of equine veterinarians in their decision to select a specific veterinarian or hospital. The article concludes with an overview of how to evaluate your customer service in an effort to optimize your service to achieve customer loyalty. PMID:19945637

  19. Customer service in equine veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Blach, Edward L

    2009-12-01

    This article explores customer service in equine veterinary medicine. It begins with a discussion about the differences between customers and clients in veterinary medicine. An overview of the nature of the veterinary-client-patient relationship and its effects on the veterinarian's services sheds light on how to evaluate your customer service. The author reviews a study performed in 2007 that evaluated 24 attributes of customer service and their importance to clients of equine veterinarians in their decision to select a specific veterinarian or hospital. The article concludes with an overview of how to evaluate your customer service in an effort to optimize your service to achieve customer loyalty.

  20. Innovative product design based on comprehensive customer requirements of different cognitive levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Zhao, Wu; Zheng, Yake; Wang, Rui; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    To improve customer satisfaction in innovative product design, a topology structure of customer requirements is established and an innovative product approach is proposed. The topology structure provides designers with reasonable guidance to capture the customer requirements comprehensively. With the aid of analytic hierarchy process (AHP), the importance of the customer requirements is evaluated. Quality function deployment (QFD) is used to translate customer requirements into product and process design demands and pick out the technical requirements which need urgent improvement. In this way, the product is developed in a more targeted way to satisfy the customers. the theory of innovative problems solving (TRIZ) is used to help designers to produce innovative solutions. Finally, a case study of automobile steering system is used to illustrate the application of the proposed approach.

  1. Innovative product design based on comprehensive customer requirements of different cognitive levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Zhao, Wu; Zheng, Yake; Wang, Rui; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    To improve customer satisfaction in innovative product design, a topology structure of customer requirements is established and an innovative product approach is proposed. The topology structure provides designers with reasonable guidance to capture the customer requirements comprehensively. With the aid of analytic hierarchy process (AHP), the importance of the customer requirements is evaluated. Quality function deployment (QFD) is used to translate customer requirements into product and process design demands and pick out the technical requirements which need urgent improvement. In this way, the product is developed in a more targeted way to satisfy the customers. the theory of innovative problems solving (TRIZ) is used to help designers to produce innovative solutions. Finally, a case study of automobile steering system is used to illustrate the application of the proposed approach. PMID:25013862

  2. Innovative Product Design Based on Comprehensive Customer Requirements of Different Cognitive Levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wu; Zheng, Yake; Wang, Rui; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    To improve customer satisfaction in innovative product design, a topology structure of customer requirements is established and an innovative product approach is proposed. The topology structure provides designers with reasonable guidance to capture the customer requirements comprehensively. With the aid of analytic hierarchy process (AHP), the importance of the customer requirements is evaluated. Quality function deployment (QFD) is used to translate customer requirements into product and process design demands and pick out the technical requirements which need urgent improvement. In this way, the product is developed in a more targeted way to satisfy the customers. the theory of innovative problems solving (TRIZ) is used to help designers to produce innovative solutions. Finally, a case study of automobile steering system is used to illustrate the application of the proposed approach. PMID:25013862

  3. Miners custom-make trailer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The Maintenance Department at Glenharold Mine in Stanton, North Dakota, has developed a custom solution to a nagging problem. Employees have fabricated a flatbed trailer to haul large equipment and have saved the mine the expense of investing in a new tractor-trailer. Using Lincoln Electric's Jetweld LH-100M to fillet weld Tl steel, the miners constructed a 200-t-capacity flatbed from scraps. The trailer can haul a D-10 bulldozer or a 60 cu-yd dragline bucket.

  4. Fabricating customized hydrogel contact lens

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Andre; Li, Hao; Lewittes, Daniella M.; Dong, Biqin; Liu, Wenzhong; Shu, Xiao; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Contact lenses are increasingly used in laboratories for in vivo animal retinal imaging and pre-clinical studies. The lens shapes often need modification to optimally fit corneas of individual test subjects. However, the choices from commercially available contact lenses are rather limited. Here, we report a flexible method to fabricate customized hydrogel contact lenses. We showed that the fabricated hydrogel is highly transparent, with refractive indices ranging from 1.42 to 1.45 in the spectra range from 400 nm to 800 nm. The Young’s modulus (1.47 MPa) and hydrophobicity (with a sessile drop contact angle of 40.5°) have also been characterized experimentally. Retinal imaging using optical coherence tomography in rats wearing our customized contact lenses has the quality comparable to the control case without the contact lens. Our method could significantly reduce the cost and the lead time for fabricating soft contact lenses with customized shapes, and benefit the laboratorial-used contact lenses in pre-clinical studies. PMID:27748361

  5. Fabricating customized hydrogel contact lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Andre; Li, Hao; Lewittes, Daniella M.; Dong, Biqin; Liu, Wenzhong; Shu, Xiao; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-10-01

    Contact lenses are increasingly used in laboratories for in vivo animal retinal imaging and pre-clinical studies. The lens shapes often need modification to optimally fit corneas of individual test subjects. However, the choices from commercially available contact lenses are rather limited. Here, we report a flexible method to fabricate customized hydrogel contact lenses. We showed that the fabricated hydrogel is highly transparent, with refractive indices ranging from 1.42 to 1.45 in the spectra range from 400 nm to 800 nm. The Young’s modulus (1.47 MPa) and hydrophobicity (with a sessile drop contact angle of 40.5°) have also been characterized experimentally. Retinal imaging using optical coherence tomography in rats wearing our customized contact lenses has the quality comparable to the control case without the contact lens. Our method could significantly reduce the cost and the lead time for fabricating soft contact lenses with customized shapes, and benefit the laboratorial-used contact lenses in pre-clinical studies.

  6. Identification with the retail organization and customer-perceived employee similarity: effects on customer spending.

    PubMed

    Netemeyer, Richard G; Heilman, Carrie M; Maxham, James G

    2012-09-01

    Two constructs important to academicians and managers are the degree to which employees and customers identify with an organization, employee organizational identification (employee OI) and customer-company identification (customer identification), respectively. This research examines the effects of these identification constructs and the related construct of customer perceived similarity to employees on customer spending. Via a 1-year multilevel study of 12,047 customers and 1,464 store employees (sales associates) covering 212 stores of a specialty apparel retailer, our study contributes to the literature in 2 critical ways. First, we expand the theoretical network of employee OI and customer identification by examining the related construct of a customer's perceived similarity to store employees. We examine the incremental (not fully mediated) main and interaction effects of customer-perceived similarity to employees and employee OI on customer spending. Second, we examine the effect of customer identification on customer spending relative to the effect of customer satisfaction on customer spending. Thus, our study also contributes by demonstrating a potential complementary route to achieve customer spending (customer identification), a route that may be more readily affected by management than the efforts required for a sustained increase in customer satisfaction. Implications for academics and managers are offered.

  7. 12 CFR 368.5 - Customer information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Customer information. 368.5 Section 368.5 Banks... GOVERNMENT SECURITIES SALES PRACTICES § 368.5 Customer information. Prior to the execution of a transaction... make reasonable efforts to obtain information concerning: (a) The customer's financial status; (b)...

  8. 19 CFR 19.34 - Customs supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Wheat § 19.34 Customs supervision. Port directors shall exercise such supervision and control over the... imported wheat and no unauthorized mixing, blending, or commingling of such imported wheat. Importers... wheat in continuous Customs custody shall maintain such records as will enable Customs officers...

  9. 19 CFR 19.34 - Customs supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Wheat § 19.34 Customs supervision. Port directors shall exercise such supervision and control over the... imported wheat and no unauthorized mixing, blending, or commingling of such imported wheat. Importers... wheat in continuous Customs custody shall maintain such records as will enable Customs officers...

  10. 19 CFR 19.34 - Customs supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Wheat § 19.34 Customs supervision. Port directors shall exercise such supervision and control over the... imported wheat and no unauthorized mixing, blending, or commingling of such imported wheat. Importers... wheat in continuous Customs custody shall maintain such records as will enable Customs officers...

  11. 19 CFR 19.34 - Customs supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Wheat § 19.34 Customs supervision. Port directors shall exercise such supervision and control over the... imported wheat and no unauthorized mixing, blending, or commingling of such imported wheat. Importers... wheat in continuous Customs custody shall maintain such records as will enable Customs officers...

  12. 19 CFR 19.34 - Customs supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Wheat § 19.34 Customs supervision. Port directors shall exercise such supervision and control over the... imported wheat and no unauthorized mixing, blending, or commingling of such imported wheat. Importers... wheat in continuous Customs custody shall maintain such records as will enable Customs officers...

  13. 7 CFR 795.16 - Custom farming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Custom farming. 795.16 Section 795.16 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.16 Custom farming. (a) Custom farming is the performance of services on a farm such as land preparation, seeding, cultivating,...

  14. 7 CFR 795.16 - Custom farming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Custom farming. 795.16 Section 795.16 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.16 Custom farming. (a) Custom farming is the performance of services on a farm such as land preparation, seeding, cultivating,...

  15. 7 CFR 795.16 - Custom farming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Custom farming. 795.16 Section 795.16 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.16 Custom farming. (a) Custom farming is the performance of services on a farm such as land preparation, seeding, cultivating,...

  16. 7 CFR 795.16 - Custom farming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Custom farming. 795.16 Section 795.16 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.16 Custom farming. (a) Custom farming is the performance of services on a farm such as land preparation, seeding, cultivating,...

  17. 7 CFR 795.16 - Custom farming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Custom farming. 795.16 Section 795.16 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.16 Custom farming. (a) Custom farming is the performance of services on a farm such as land preparation, seeding, cultivating,...

  18. Trends in Marketing: Customer Relationship Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okula, Susan

    2000-01-01

    Describes the basics of Customer Relationship Management, a process whereby the customer interacts with the company, the company responds by learning to meet that individual's needs, and the customer is more likely to become loyal. Suggests how marketing students can learn the fundamentals of it. (JOW)

  19. 27 CFR 44.227 - Customs procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs procedure. 44.227..., WITHOUT PAYMENT OF TAX, OR WITH DRAWBACK OF TAX Drawback of Tax § 44.227 Customs procedure. The customs... having inspected the articles and supervised the lading thereof on the export carrier, the...

  20. An Overview of Customer Satisfaction Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hom, Willard

    This document is a report on how California community colleges can incorporate customer satisfaction models and theories from business to better serve students. Emphasis is given to two levels of customer satisfaction: macro- and micro-models. Macro-models look at how customer satisfaction relates to other elements or priorities of community…

  1. 7 CFR 1207.313 - Customs Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.313 Customs Service. Customs Service means the United States Customs Service of the United States Department of the Treasury. National...

  2. 7 CFR 1207.313 - Customs Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.313 Customs Service. Customs Service means the United States Customs Service of the United States Department of the Treasury. National...

  3. 7 CFR 1207.313 - Customs Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.313 Customs Service. Customs Service means the United States Customs Service of the United States Department of the Treasury. National...

  4. 7 CFR 1207.313 - Customs Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.313 Customs Service. Customs Service means the United States Customs Service of the United States Department of the Treasury. National...

  5. 7 CFR 1207.313 - Customs Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.313 Customs Service. Customs Service means the United States Customs Service of the United States Department of the Treasury. National...

  6. 12 CFR 13.5 - Customer information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Customer information. 13.5 Section 13.5 Banks... PRACTICES § 13.5 Customer information. Prior to the execution of a transaction recommended to a non-institutional customer, a bank that is a government securities broker or dealer shall make reasonable efforts...

  7. 49 CFR 192.16 - Customer notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer notification. 192.16 Section 192.16... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 192.16 Customer notification. (a) This section applies to each operator of a service line who does not maintain the customer's buried piping...

  8. Local Structure in Ab Initio Liquid Water: Signatures of Amorphous Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, Biswajit; Distasio, Robert A., Jr.; Martelli, Fausto; Car, Roberto

    Within the framework of density functional theory, the inclusion of exact exchange and non-local van der Waals/dispersion interactions is crucial for predicting a microscopic structure of ambient liquid water that quantitatively agrees with experiment. In this work, we have used the local structure index (LSI) order parameter to analyze the local structure in such highly accurate ab initio liquid water. At ambient conditions, the LSI probability distribution, P(I), was unimodal with most water molecules characterized by more disordered high-density-like local environments. With thermal excitations removed, the resultant bimodal P(I) in the inherent potential energy surface (IPES) exhibited a 3:1 ratio between high- and low-density-like molecules, with the latter forming small connected clusters amid the predominant population. By considering the spatial correlations and hydrogen bond network topologies among water molecules with the same LSI identities, we demonstrate that the signatures of the experimentally observed low- and high-density amorphous phases of ice are present in the IPES of ambient liquid water This work was supported by the DOE: DE-SC0008626, DE-SC0005180.

  9. 19 CFR 143.24 - Preparation of Customs Form 7501 and Customs Form 368 or 368A (serially numbered).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preparation of Customs Form 7501 and Customs Form 368 or 368A (serially numbered). 143.24 Section 143.24 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER... Informal Entry § 143.24 Preparation of Customs Form 7501 and Customs Form 368 or 368A (serially...

  10. A customer-friendly Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses the relationship of customers to the Space Station Program currently being defined by NASA. Emphasis is on definition of the Program such that the Space Station will be conducive to use by customers, that is by people who utilize the services provided by the Space Station and its associated platforms and vehicles. Potential types of customers are identified. Scenarios are developed for ways in which different types of customers can utilize the Space Station. Both management and technical issues involved in making the Station 'customer friendly' are discussed.

  11. Gaining customer knowledge: obtaining and using customer judgments for hospitalwide quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E C; Caldwell, C; Quinn, D; Rose, R

    1991-03-01

    Customer knowledge is an essential feature of hospitalwide quality improvement. All systems and processes have customers. The aim is to use customer knowledge and voice of the customer measurement to plan, design, improve, and monitor these systems and processes continuously. In this way, the hospital stands the best chance of meeting customers' needs and, hopefully, delivering services that are so outstanding that customers will be surprised and delighted. There are many methods, both soft and hard, that can be used to increase customer knowledge. One useful strategy is to use a family of quality measures that reflect the voice of the customer. These measures can generate practical and powerful customer knowledge information that is essential to performing strategic planning, deploying quality policy, designing new services, finding targets for improvements, and monitoring those continuous improvements based on customers' judgments.

  12. Business marketing: understand what customers value.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J C; Narus, J A

    1998-01-01

    How do you define the value of your market offering? Can you measure it? Few suppliers in business markets are able to answer those questions, and yet the ability to pinpoint the value of a product or service for one's customers has never been more important. By creating and using what the authors call customer value models, suppliers are able to figure out exactly what their offerings are worth to customers. Field value assessments--the most commonly used method for building customer value models--call for suppliers to gather data about their customers firsthand whenever possible. Through these assessments, a supplier can build a value model for an individual customer or for a market segment, drawing on data gathered form several customers in that segment. Suppliers can use customer value models to create competitive advantage in several ways. First, they can capitalize on the inevitable variation in customers' requirements by providing flexible market offerings. Second, they can use value models to demonstrate how a new product or service they are offering will provide greater value. Third, they can use their knowledge of how their market offerings specifically deliver value to craft persuasive value propositions. And fourth, they can use value models to provide evidence to customers of their accomplishments. Doing business based on value delivered gives companies the means to get an equitable return for their efforts. Once suppliers truly understand value, they will be able to realize the benefits of measuring and monitoring it for their customers.

  13. DSpace and customized controlled vocabularies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skourlas, C.; Tsolakidis, A.; Kakoulidis, P.; Giannakopoulos, G.

    2015-02-01

    The open source platform of DSpace could be defined as a repository application used to provide access to digital resources. DSpace is installed and used by more than 1000 organizations worldwide. A predefined taxonomy of keyword, called the Controlled Vocabulary, can be used for describing and accessing the information items stored in the repository. In this paper, we describe how the users can create, and customize their own vocabularies. Various heterogeneous items, such as research papers, videos, articles and educational material of the repository, can be indexed in order to provide advanced search functionality using new controlled vocabularies.

  14. Custom blending of lamp phosphors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemm, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Spectral output of fluorescent lamps can be precisely adjusted by using computer-assisted analysis for custom blending lamp phosphors. With technique, spectrum of main bank of lamps is measured and stored in computer memory along with emission characteristics of commonly available phosphors. Computer then calculates ratio of green and blue intensities for each phosphor according to manufacturer's specifications and plots them as coordinates on graph. Same ratios are calculated for measured spectrum. Once proper mix is determined, it is applied as coating to fluorescent tubing.

  15. Meeting Market Demands. New Roles for One-Stop Centers: Serving the Business Customer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This booklet explains how local communities can organize and structure their one-stop centers so that business is viewed as a customer of the system. The introduction provides an overview of the booklet's development and purpose. The following key attributes underpinning a workforce investment system that views business as its customer are…

  16. Silo busting: how to execute on the promise of customer focus.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Ranjay

    2007-05-01

    For many senior executives, shifting from selling products to selling solutions--packages of products and services--is a priority in today's increasingly commoditized markets. Companies, however, aren't always structured to make that shift. Knowledge and expertise often reside in silos, and many companies have trouble harnessing their resources across those boundaries in a way that customers value and are willing to pay for. Some companies--like GE Healthcare, Best Buy, and commercial real estate provider Jones Lang LaSalle (JLL)--have restructured themselves around customer needs to deliver true solutions. They did so by engaging in four sets of activities: COORDINATION: To deliver customer-focused solutions, three things must occur easily across boundaries: information sharing, division of labor, and decision making. Sometimes this involves replacing traditional silos with customer-focused ones, but more often it entails transcending existing boundaries. JLL has experimented with both approaches. COOPERATION: Customer-centric companies, such as Cisco Systems, develop metrics for customer satisfaction and incentives that reward customer-focused cooperation. Most also shake up the power structure so that people who are closest to customers have the authority to act on their behalf. CAPABILITY: Delivering customer-focused solutions requires some employees to be generalists instead of specialists. They need experience with more than one product or service, a deep knowledge of customer needs, and the ability to traverse internal boundaries. CONNECTION: By combining their offerings with those of a partner, companies can cut costs even as they create higher-value solutions, as Starbucks has found through its diverse partnerships. To stand out in a commoditized market, companies must understand what customers value. Ultimately, some customers may be better off purchasing products and services piecemeal.

  17. Silo busting: how to execute on the promise of customer focus.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Ranjay

    2007-05-01

    For many senior executives, shifting from selling products to selling solutions--packages of products and services--is a priority in today's increasingly commoditized markets. Companies, however, aren't always structured to make that shift. Knowledge and expertise often reside in silos, and many companies have trouble harnessing their resources across those boundaries in a way that customers value and are willing to pay for. Some companies--like GE Healthcare, Best Buy, and commercial real estate provider Jones Lang LaSalle (JLL)--have restructured themselves around customer needs to deliver true solutions. They did so by engaging in four sets of activities: COORDINATION: To deliver customer-focused solutions, three things must occur easily across boundaries: information sharing, division of labor, and decision making. Sometimes this involves replacing traditional silos with customer-focused ones, but more often it entails transcending existing boundaries. JLL has experimented with both approaches. COOPERATION: Customer-centric companies, such as Cisco Systems, develop metrics for customer satisfaction and incentives that reward customer-focused cooperation. Most also shake up the power structure so that people who are closest to customers have the authority to act on their behalf. CAPABILITY: Delivering customer-focused solutions requires some employees to be generalists instead of specialists. They need experience with more than one product or service, a deep knowledge of customer needs, and the ability to traverse internal boundaries. CONNECTION: By combining their offerings with those of a partner, companies can cut costs even as they create higher-value solutions, as Starbucks has found through its diverse partnerships. To stand out in a commoditized market, companies must understand what customers value. Ultimately, some customers may be better off purchasing products and services piecemeal. PMID:17494254

  18. Childbirth customs in Vietnamese traditions.

    PubMed Central

    Bodo, K.; Gibson, N.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine and understand how differences in the cultural backgrounds of Canadian physicians and their Vietnamese patients can affect the quality and efficacy of prenatal and postnatal treatment. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The information in this paper is based on a review of the literature, supplemented by interviews with members of the Vietnamese community in Edmonton, Alta. The literature was searched with MEDLINE (1966 to present), HEALTHSTAR (1975 to present), EMBASE (1988 to present), and Social Sciences Abstracts (1984 to present). Emphasis was placed on articles and other texts that dealt with Vietnamese customs surrounding childbirth, but information on health and health care customs was also considered. Interviews focused on the accuracy of information obtained from the research and the correlation of those data with personal experiences of Vietnamese community members. MAIN MESSAGE: Information in the texts used to research this paper suggests that traditional Vietnamese beliefs and practices surrounding birth are very different from the biomedical view of the Canadian medical system. The experiences and beliefs of the members of the Vietnamese community support this finding. Such cultural differences could contribute to misunderstandings between physicians and patients and could affect the quality and efficacy of health care provided. CONCLUSIONS: A sensitive and open approach to the patient's belief system and open and frank communication are necessary to ensure effective prenatal and postnatal treatment for recent Vietnamese immigrants and refugees. Education and awareness of cultural differences are necessary for physicians to provide the best and most effective health care possible. Images p692-a PMID:10099808

  19. Identifying web usage behavior of bank customers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Sandro; Silva, Mariano; Weber, Richard

    2002-03-01

    The bank Banco Credito e Inversiones (BCI) started its virtual bank in 1996 and its registered customers perform currently more than 10,000 Internet transactions daily, which typically cause les than 10% of traditional transaction costs. Since most of the customers are still not registered for online banking, one of the goals of the virtual bank is to increase then umber of registered customers. Objective of the presented work was to identify customers who are likely to perform online banking but still do not use this medium for their transactions. This objective has been reached by determining profiles of registered customers who perform many transactions online. Based on these profiles the bank's Data Warehouse is explored for twins of these heavy users that are still not registered for online banking. We applied clustering in order to group the registered customers into five classes. One of these classes contained almost 30% of all registered customers and could clearly be identified as class of heavy users. Next a neural network assigned online customers to the previously found five classes. Applying the network trained on online customers to all the bank customers identified twins of heavy users that, however had not performed online transactions so far. A mailing to these candidates informing about the advantages of online banking doubled the number of registrations compared to previous campaigns.

  20. Manage customer-centric innovation--systematically.

    PubMed

    Selden, Larry; MacMillan, Ian C

    2006-04-01

    No matter how hard companies try, their approaches to innovation often don't grow the top line in the sustained, profitable way investors expect. For many companies, there's a huge difference between what's in their business plans and the market's expectations for growth (as reflected in firms' share prices, market capitalizations, and P/E ratios). This growth gap springs from the fact that companies are pouring money into their insular R&D labs instead of working to understand what the customer wants and using that understanding to drive innovation. As a result, even companies that spend the most on R&D remain starved for both customer innovation and market-capitalization growth. In this article, the authors spell out a systematic approach to innovation that continuously fuels sustained, profitable growth. They call this approach customer-centric innovation, or CCI. At the heart of CCI is a rigorous customer R&D process that helps companies to continually improve their understanding of who their customers are and what they need. By so doing, they consistently create or improve their customer value proposition. Customer R&D also focuses on better ways of communicating value propositions and delivering the complete experience to real customers. Since so much of the learning about customers and so much of the experimentation with different segmentations, value propositions, and delivery mechanisms involve the people who regularly deal with customers, it is absolutely essential for frontline employees to be at the center of the CCI process. Simply put, customer R&D propels the innovation effort away from headquarters and the traditional R&D lab out to those closest to the customer. Using the example of the luggage manufacturer Tumi, the authors provide a step-by-step approach for achieving true customer-centric innovation. PMID:16579418

  1. Employee customer orientation in manufacturing organizations: joint influences of customer proximity and the senior leadership team.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hui; Subramony, Mahesh

    2008-03-01

    Pursuing a customer-focused strategy in manufacturing organizations requires employees across functions to embrace the importance of understanding customer needs and to align their everyday efforts with the goal of satisfying and retaining customers. Little prior research has examined what factors influence employee customer orientation in manufacturing settings. Drawing on the attraction-selection-attrition model, upper-echelons theory, and contingency theories of leadership, this study investigated the joint influences of functional roles' proximity to external customers and the senior leadership team's customer orientation on employee customer orientation. Hierarchical linear modeling results based on data obtained from 4,299 employees and 403 senior leaders from 42 facilities of a global manufacturer operating in 16 countries revealed that employees occupying customer-contact roles had the highest level of customer orientation, followed by employees occupying production roles, and then by those in support roles. In addition, there was a positive relationship between the senior leadership team's customer orientation and employee customer orientation for all 3 functional roles. The positive relationship between the senior leadership team and employee customer orientation was the strongest for employees in support roles, suggesting that lower levels of proximity to external customers may create a greater need for leadership in developing employees' customer-oriented attitudes.

  2. Employee customer orientation in manufacturing organizations: joint influences of customer proximity and the senior leadership team.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hui; Subramony, Mahesh

    2008-03-01

    Pursuing a customer-focused strategy in manufacturing organizations requires employees across functions to embrace the importance of understanding customer needs and to align their everyday efforts with the goal of satisfying and retaining customers. Little prior research has examined what factors influence employee customer orientation in manufacturing settings. Drawing on the attraction-selection-attrition model, upper-echelons theory, and contingency theories of leadership, this study investigated the joint influences of functional roles' proximity to external customers and the senior leadership team's customer orientation on employee customer orientation. Hierarchical linear modeling results based on data obtained from 4,299 employees and 403 senior leaders from 42 facilities of a global manufacturer operating in 16 countries revealed that employees occupying customer-contact roles had the highest level of customer orientation, followed by employees occupying production roles, and then by those in support roles. In addition, there was a positive relationship between the senior leadership team's customer orientation and employee customer orientation for all 3 functional roles. The positive relationship between the senior leadership team and employee customer orientation was the strongest for employees in support roles, suggesting that lower levels of proximity to external customers may create a greater need for leadership in developing employees' customer-oriented attitudes. PMID:18361634

  3. Modeling the customer in electronic commerce.

    PubMed

    Helander, M G; Khalid, H M

    2000-12-01

    This paper reviews interface design of web pages for e-commerce. Different tasks in e-commerce are contrasted. A systems model is used to illustrate the information flow between three subsystems in e-commerce: store environment, customer, and web technology. A customer makes several decisions: to enter the store, to navigate, to purchase, to pay, and to keep the merchandize. This artificial environment must be designed so that it can support customer decision-making. To retain customers it must be pleasing and fun, and create a task with natural flow. Customers have different needs, competence and motivation, which affect decision-making. It may therefore be important to customize the design of the e-store environment. Future ergonomics research will have to investigate perceptual aspects, such as presentation of merchandize, and cognitive issues, such as product search and navigation, as well as decision making while considering various economic parameters. Five theories on e-commerce research are presented.

  4. Companies and the customers who hate them.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Gail; Moon, Youngme

    2007-06-01

    Why do companies bind customers with contracts, bleed them with fees, and baffle them with fine print? Because bewildered customers, who often make bad purchasing decisions, can be highly profitable. Most firms that profit from customers' confusion are on a slippery slope. Over time, their customer-centric strategies for delivering value have evolved into company-centric strategies for extracting it. Not surprisingly, when a rival comes along with a friendlier alternative, customers defect. Adversarial value-extracting strategies are common in such industries as cell phone service, retail banking, and health clubs. Overly complex product and pricing options, for example, may have been designed to serve various segments. But in fact they take advantage of how difficult it is for customers to predict their needs (such as how many cell phone minutes they'll use each month) and make it hard for them to choose the right product. Similarly, penalties and fees, which may have been instituted to offset the costs of undesirable customer behavior, like bouncing checks, turn out to be very profitable. As a result, companies have no incentive to help customers avoid them. Tactics like these generate bad publicity and fuel customer defections, creating opportunities for competitors. Virgin Mobile USA, for example, has lured millions of angry cell phone customers away from the incumbents by offering a straightforward plan with no hidden fees, no time-of-day restrictions, and no contracts. ING Direct, now the fourth-largest thrift bank in the United States, offers accounts with no fees, no tiered interest rates, and no minimums. In industries where squeezing value from customers is commonplace, companies that dismantle these harmful practices and design a transparent, value-creating offer can head off customer retaliation and spur rapid growth. PMID:17580650

  5. Companies and the customers who hate them.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Gail; Moon, Youngme

    2007-06-01

    Why do companies bind customers with contracts, bleed them with fees, and baffle them with fine print? Because bewildered customers, who often make bad purchasing decisions, can be highly profitable. Most firms that profit from customers' confusion are on a slippery slope. Over time, their customer-centric strategies for delivering value have evolved into company-centric strategies for extracting it. Not surprisingly, when a rival comes along with a friendlier alternative, customers defect. Adversarial value-extracting strategies are common in such industries as cell phone service, retail banking, and health clubs. Overly complex product and pricing options, for example, may have been designed to serve various segments. But in fact they take advantage of how difficult it is for customers to predict their needs (such as how many cell phone minutes they'll use each month) and make it hard for them to choose the right product. Similarly, penalties and fees, which may have been instituted to offset the costs of undesirable customer behavior, like bouncing checks, turn out to be very profitable. As a result, companies have no incentive to help customers avoid them. Tactics like these generate bad publicity and fuel customer defections, creating opportunities for competitors. Virgin Mobile USA, for example, has lured millions of angry cell phone customers away from the incumbents by offering a straightforward plan with no hidden fees, no time-of-day restrictions, and no contracts. ING Direct, now the fourth-largest thrift bank in the United States, offers accounts with no fees, no tiered interest rates, and no minimums. In industries where squeezing value from customers is commonplace, companies that dismantle these harmful practices and design a transparent, value-creating offer can head off customer retaliation and spur rapid growth.

  6. 41 CFR 102-85.215 - What if another customer agency forces a GSA customer to move?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What if another customer... § 102-85.215 What if another customer agency forces a GSA customer to move? If a GSA customer agency, or GSA, forces the relocation of another GSA customer agency prior to the expiration of the customer's...

  7. Reinventing information services to increase customer satisfaction

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    In this paper, the author presents her view of the role of an information service and proposes means of improving information customer service and satisfaction. The emphasis of the paper is on placing the primary value on the information customer rather than on the information itself. After receiving a request for information, the information service should strive for speed and accuracy of service to provide full-text sources in a language and format convenient to the customer. The author stresses that information professionals need to re-evaluate their roles to correctly assess and rectify customers` information deficiencies.

  8. 7 CFR 1221.7 - Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.7 Customs....

  9. 7 CFR 1221.7 - Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.7 Customs....

  10. 7 CFR 1221.7 - Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.7 Customs....

  11. 7 CFR 1221.7 - Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.7 Customs....

  12. 7 CFR 1221.7 - Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.7 Customs....

  13. Measuring the value of customer retention

    SciTech Connect

    Monts, K.; Bonevac, B.; Lauer, J.; Tessema, D.

    1997-05-01

    Competition will require changes in how market research is conducted and how customers are pursued. The question remains: How does one approach customer retention in a way that provides meaningful guidelines? The conventional wisdom is that {open_quotes}the business of business is selling.{close_quotes} There is some truth to this, but the key question today is: What bearing does this have on how to run a business in a competitive environment? A recent article in the Harvard Business Review noted that, {open_quotes}Increasingly, companies are less focused on selling products and more interested in keeping customers.{close_quotes} Indeed, some observers have posited a natural societal evolutionary trend toward a shift of emphasis toward customer retention vis-a-vis customer acquisition, as a consequence of the primary marketing communication technology shifting from {open_quotes}broadcast{close_quotes} (where messages are sent out to inchoate masses) to {open_quotes}interactive{close_quotes} (where relationships are cultivated with precisely defined market niches or individual customers). The business of growing a business, then, can be framed as a matter of getting customers and keeping them so as to grow the value of the customer base to its fullest potential. In these terms, setting a marketing budget becomes the task of balancing what is spent on customer acquisition with what is spent on retention.

  14. 47 CFR 64.2005 - Use of customer proprietary network information without customer approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of customer proprietary network information... Proprietary Network Information § 64.2005 Use of customer proprietary network information without customer... not limited to, speed dialing, computer-provided directory assistance, call monitoring, call...

  15. 47 CFR 64.2005 - Use of customer proprietary network information without customer approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of customer proprietary network information without customer approval. 64.2005 Section 64.2005 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS RULES RELATING TO COMMON CARRIERS Customer Proprietary Network Information §...

  16. 47 CFR 64.2005 - Use of customer proprietary network information without customer approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of customer proprietary network information... Proprietary Network Information § 64.2005 Use of customer proprietary network information without customer... not limited to, speed dialing, computer-provided directory assistance, call monitoring, call...

  17. 47 CFR 64.2005 - Use of customer proprietary network information without customer approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of customer proprietary network information... Proprietary Network Information § 64.2005 Use of customer proprietary network information without customer... not limited to, speed dialing, computer-provided directory assistance, call monitoring, call...

  18. 17 CFR 1.36 - Record of securities and property received from customers and option customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... commission merchant and each retail foreign exchange dealer shall maintain, as provided in § 1.31, a record of all securities and property received from customers, retail forex customers or option customers in lieu of money to margin, purchase, guarantee, or secure the commodity, retail forex or commodity...

  19. Listening to the Voice of the Customer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schauerman, Sam; And Others

    One of the major tenets of Total Quality Management (TQM) is that organizations need to adopt a strong customer focus. At El Camino College (ECC) in Torrance, California, a matrix was developed to identify and describe ECC's direct and indirect internal and external customers. ECC then applied Quality Function Deployment (QFD), a strategic tool…

  20. 12 CFR 368.5 - Customer information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY GOVERNMENT SECURITIES SALES PRACTICES § 368.5 Customer information. Prior to the execution of a transaction recommended to a non-institutional customer, a bank that is a government securities broker or dealer...

  1. 12 CFR 368.5 - Customer information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY GOVERNMENT SECURITIES SALES PRACTICES § 368.5 Customer information. Prior to the execution of a transaction recommended to a non-institutional customer, a bank that is a government securities broker or dealer...

  2. 12 CFR 368.5 - Customer information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY GOVERNMENT SECURITIES SALES PRACTICES § 368.5 Customer information. Prior to the execution of a transaction recommended to a non-institutional customer, a bank that is a government securities broker or dealer...

  3. Customized Schooling: Beyond Whole-School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M., Ed.; Manno, Bruno V., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This ambitious book aims to reorient discussions about school reform by moving away from "whole school" solutions to customized services and products. While the best-known entrepreneurial efforts have sought to fix problems at a schoolwide level, this volume looks at "how providers might use new tools to deliver or customize services that do not…

  4. Colorful Event Lands Off Campus Customers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Richard E.

    1978-01-01

    To attract suburban, nonstudent customers, the Yale Cooperative Corporation held a Heirloom Discovery Day. Co-op books and materials were sold to customers who came with antique items to be appraised. Donations from the profits were made to the New Haven Symphony and the University Collection of Musical Instruments. (JMD)

  5. A vigorous approach to customer service.

    PubMed

    Pollock, E K

    1993-01-01

    PPG Industries, Inc. is the world's largest supplier of automotive original coatings. Its business-to-business customers require individualized service based on specific requirements. The company has solidified these relationships by establishing satellite supply facilities, applying the quality process to problem solving, and providing a variety of outlets for customer feedback. PMID:10123420

  6. 48 CFR 11.203 - Customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Customer satisfaction. 11.203 Section 11.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 11.203 Customer...

  7. 48 CFR 11.203 - Customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer satisfaction. 11.203 Section 11.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 11.203 Customer...

  8. Are Students "Customers" of Collegiate Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aliff, John V.

    The emerging economic paradigm of higher education will make enhancing national productivity the primary goal; emphasize the mastery of learning skills over rote learning; and operate around the principle of customer service, viewing students as customers. Total Quality Management (TQM), as applied to education, shares this focus on customer…

  9. 47 CFR 32.4040 - Customers' deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customers' deposits. 32.4040 Section 32.4040 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.4040 Customers'...

  10. 47 CFR 32.4040 - Customers' deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Customers' deposits. 32.4040 Section 32.4040 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.4040 Customers'...

  11. International Variations in Measuring Customer Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Philip J.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of customer expectations of library service quality and SERVQUAL as a measurement tool focuses on two studies: one that compared a survey of Chinese university students' expectations of service quality to New Zealand students; and one that investigated national culture as a source of attitudes to customer service. (Author/LRW)

  12. Customer Service Training in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warshauer, Susan

    1988-01-01

    Front-line service providers can be the origin of customer's perceptions about an institution, and these initial perceptions can color subsequent interactions. To improve customer service, institutions need to offer training and recognition for providers. Characteristics of effective service and providing effective training are discussed. (MLW)

  13. Are Students Customers in Finnish Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuori, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    This study examines Finnish higher education students' perceptions of whether students are customers, based on qualitative interview data. The article contributes to the discussion on students as customers by giving attention to students' own voices from a country where tuition fees are not generally collected. The data are presented and analysed…

  14. Customer value propositions in business markets.

    PubMed

    Anderson, James C; Narus, James A; van Rossum, Wouter

    2006-03-01

    Examples of consumer value propositions that resonate with customers are exceptionally difficult to find. When properly constructed, value propositions force suppliers to focus on what their offerings are really worth. Once companies become disciplined about understanding their customers, they can make smarter choices about where to allocate scarce resources. The authors illuminate the pitfalls of current approaches, then present a systematic method for developing value propositions that are meaningful to target customers and that focus suppliers' efforts on creating superior value. When managers construct a customer value proposition, they often simply list all the benefits their offering might deliver. But the relative simplicity of this all-benefits approach may have a major drawback: benefit assertion. In other words, managers may claim advantages for features their customers don't care about in the least. Other suppliers try to answer the question, Why should our firm purchase your offering instead of your competitor's? But without a detailed understanding of the customer's requirements and preferences, suppliers can end up stressing points of difference that deliver relatively little value to the target customer. The pitfall with this approach is value presumption: assuming that any favorable points of difference must be valuable for the customer. Drawing on the best practices of a handful of suppliers in business markets, the authors advocate a resonating focus approach. Suppliers can provide simple, yet powerfully captivating, consumer value propositions by making their offerings superior on the few elements that matter most to target customers, demonstrating and documenting the value of this superior performance, and communicating it in a way that conveys a sophisticated understanding of the customer's business priorities.

  15. Get inside the lives of your customers.

    PubMed

    Seybold, P B

    2001-05-01

    Many companies have become adept at the art of customer relationship management. They've collected mountains of data on preferences and behavior, divided buyers into ever-finer segments, and refined their products, services, and marketing pitches. But all too often those efforts are too narrow--they concentrate only on the points where the customer comes into contact with the company. Few businesses have bothered to look at what the author calls the customer scenario--the broad context in which customers select, buy, and use products and services. As a result, consultant Patricia Seybold maintains, they've routinely missed chances to deepen loyalty and expand sales. In this article, the author shows how effective three very different companies have been at using customer scenarios as the centerpiece of their marketing plans. Chip maker National Semiconductor looked beyond the purchasing agents that buy in bulk to find ways to make it easier for engineers to design National's components into their specifications for mobile telephones. Each time they do so, it translates into millions of dollars in orders. By developing a customer scenario that describes how people actually shop for groceries, Tesco learned the importance of decentralizing its Web shopping site and how the extra costs of decentralization could be outweighed by the higher profit margins on-line customers generate. And Buzzsaw.com used customer scenarios as the basis for its entire business. It has used the Web to create a better way for the dozens of participants in a construction project to share their drawings and manage their projects. Seybold lays out the steps managers can take to develop their own customer scenarios. By thinking broadly about the challenges your customers face, she suggests, you can almost always find ways to make their lives easier--and thus earn their loyalty. PMID:11345914

  16. Internal marketing, customer orientation, and organizational commitment: moderating effects of work status.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meiju; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2013-08-01

    Associations among internal marketing, customer orientation, and organizational commitment were examined, particularly with regard to the moderating effects of work status on the relationships between internal marketing and customer orientation or organizational commitment, in a cross-sectional design with structural equation modeling. Two studies (Ns = 119 and 251) were conducted among full- and part-time service employees at Taipei Sports Centers. Internal marketing was associated with organizational commitment and customer orientation. Customer orientation was associated with organizational commitment and partially mediated the relation between internal marketing and organizational commitment. Furthermore, work status significantly moderated the relationships between internal marketing and customer orientation but not between internal marketing and organizational commitment. Implications and directions for future research were discussed.

  17. Internal marketing, customer orientation, and organizational commitment: moderating effects of work status.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meiju; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2013-08-01

    Associations among internal marketing, customer orientation, and organizational commitment were examined, particularly with regard to the moderating effects of work status on the relationships between internal marketing and customer orientation or organizational commitment, in a cross-sectional design with structural equation modeling. Two studies (Ns = 119 and 251) were conducted among full- and part-time service employees at Taipei Sports Centers. Internal marketing was associated with organizational commitment and customer orientation. Customer orientation was associated with organizational commitment and partially mediated the relation between internal marketing and organizational commitment. Furthermore, work status significantly moderated the relationships between internal marketing and customer orientation but not between internal marketing and organizational commitment. Implications and directions for future research were discussed. PMID:24340810

  18. Impact of Rate Design Alternatives on Residential Solar Customer Bills. Increased Fixed Charges, Minimum Bills and Demand-based Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, Lori; Davidson, Carolyn; McLaren, Joyce; Miller, John

    2015-09-01

    With rapid growth in energy efficiency and distributed generation, electric utilities are anticipating stagnant or decreasing electricity sales, particularly in the residential sector. Utilities are increasingly considering alternative rates structures that are designed to recover fixed costs from residential solar photovoltaic (PV) customers with low net electricity consumption. Proposed structures have included fixed charge increases, minimum bills, and increasingly, demand rates - for net metered customers and all customers. This study examines the electricity bill implications of various residential rate alternatives for multiple locations within the United States. For the locations analyzed, the results suggest that residential PV customers offset, on average, between 60% and 99% of their annual load. However, roughly 65% of a typical customer's electricity demand is non-coincidental with PV generation, so the typical PV customer is generally highly reliant on the grid for pooling services.

  19. A Study on the Interrelations between the Security-Related Antecedents of Customers' Online Trust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peikari, Hamid Reza

    Despite the wide attention of previous studies to explore the influence of different security-related factors on customers' online trust, the interrelations between such factors and their direct and indirect influences on customers' trust have been neglected. This study investigates the direct and indirect interrelations between the factors authentication, encryption, technical protection and externally provided assurances including third party security and privacy seals with customers' trust in the business-to-customer (B2C) environment. The data was collected from 238 respondents and after the test of reliability and validity of the scale, the hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling. The results showed that customers' perception of encryption and authentication mechanisms implemented by a Website have a positive significant influence on their perceived technical protection while technical protection was found to significantly influence customers' trust to the Website. However, the analysis did not find any relation between the third party assurance and customers' trust, indicating that despite the high expenses companies involve to obtain such assurances from reputed third parties, such mechanisms and assurances do not have any direct or indirect significant influence on customers' trust; which raises questions on the value of such mechanisms .finally, after discussing the findings and implication of this study for both academic and business worlds, suggestions for future studies were made to have a better understanding of the dimensions of the interrelations between the security-related factors.

  20. 19 CFR 122.2 - Other Customs laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other Customs laws and regulations. 122.2 Section 122.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS General Definitions and Provisions § 122.2 Other Customs laws and regulations. Except as otherwise...

  1. 19 CFR 147.43 - Entry under the Customs laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entry under the Customs laws. 147.43 Section 147.43 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF... the Customs laws. (a) Payment of duties and taxes. Any applicable duties and internal revenue taxes...

  2. 19 CFR 146.61 - Constructive transfer to Customs territory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Constructive transfer to Customs territory. 146.61 Section 146.61 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Constructive transfer to Customs territory. The port director shall accept receipt of any entry in proper...

  3. 19 CFR 114.2 - Customs Conventions and Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs Conventions and Agreements. 114.2 Section 114.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CARNETS General Provisions § 114.2 Customs Conventions and Agreements....

  4. 27 CFR 26.303 - Customs inspection and release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs inspection and... Customs Custody to Internal Revenue Bond § 26.303 Customs inspection and release. The customs officer.... If the spirits are in a bulk conveyance, the customs officer shall record the elements of his...

  5. 19 CFR 146.13 - Customs forms and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs forms and procedures. 146.13 Section 146.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES General Provisions § 146.13 Customs forms and...

  6. 19 CFR 122.181 - Definition of Customs security area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of Customs security area. 122.181 Section 122.181 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Access to Customs Security Areas § 122.181 Definition...

  7. 19 CFR 181.114 - Customs response to request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs response to request. 181.114 Section 181.114 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF... Decisions § 181.114 Customs response to request. (a) Time for response. The port director will issue...

  8. 78 FR 48460 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of revocation of a customs broker license. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a customs broker license is being revoked...

  9. 19 CFR 191.152 - Merchandise released from Customs custody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Merchandise released from Customs custody. 191.152 Section 191.152 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Merchandise Exported From Continuous Customs Custody §...

  10. 19 CFR 191.153 - Continuous Customs custody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continuous Customs custody. 191.153 Section 191.153 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Merchandise Exported From Continuous Customs Custody §...

  11. 19 CFR 191.37 - Destruction under Customs supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Destruction under Customs supervision. 191.37 Section 191.37 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Customs supervision. A claimant may destroy merchandise and obtain unused merchandise drawback...

  12. 19 CFR 141.41 - Surety on Customs bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Surety on Customs bonds. 141.41 Section 141.41 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.41 Surety on Customs bonds. Powers...

  13. 19 CFR 101.2 - Authority of Customs officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Authority of Customs officers. 101.2 Section 101.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.2 Authority of Customs officers. (a) Supremacy of delegated...

  14. 19 CFR 141.41 - Surety on Customs bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Surety on Customs bonds. 141.41 Section 141.41 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.41 Surety on Customs bonds. Powers...

  15. 19 CFR 101.2 - Authority of Customs officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Authority of Customs officers. 101.2 Section 101.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.2 Authority of Customs officers. (a) Supremacy of delegated...

  16. 19 CFR 141.41 - Surety on Customs bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surety on Customs bonds. 141.41 Section 141.41 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.41 Surety on Customs bonds. Powers...

  17. 19 CFR 101.2 - Authority of Customs officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Authority of Customs officers. 101.2 Section 101.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.2 Authority of Customs officers. (a) Supremacy of delegated...

  18. 19 CFR 101.2 - Authority of Customs officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Authority of Customs officers. 101.2 Section 101.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.2 Authority of Customs officers. (a) Supremacy of delegated...

  19. 19 CFR 122.5 - Reproduction of Customs forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reproduction of Customs forms. 122.5 Section 122.5 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS General Definitions and Provisions § 122.5 Reproduction of Customs...

  20. 19 CFR 122.5 - Reproduction of Customs forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reproduction of Customs forms. 122.5 Section 122.5 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS General Definitions and Provisions § 122.5 Reproduction of Customs...

  1. 19 CFR 122.5 - Reproduction of Customs forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reproduction of Customs forms. 122.5 Section 122.5 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS General Definitions and Provisions § 122.5 Reproduction of Customs...

  2. 19 CFR 122.5 - Reproduction of Customs forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reproduction of Customs forms. 122.5 Section 122.5 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS General Definitions and Provisions § 122.5 Reproduction of Customs...

  3. 19 CFR 122.5 - Reproduction of Customs forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reproduction of Customs forms. 122.5 Section 122.5 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS General Definitions and Provisions § 122.5 Reproduction of Customs...

  4. 77 FR 36566 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Voluntary Customer Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Voluntary Customer... Voluntary Customer Survey. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of...: Voluntary Customer Survey. OMB Number: 1651-0135. Abstract: Customs and Border Protection (CBP) plans...

  5. 19 CFR 115.13 - Records to be furnished Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Records to be furnished Customs. 115.13 Section 115.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT... CONVENTIONS Administration § 115.13 Records to be furnished Customs. Each Certifying Authority shall...

  6. Cleaning up the customer satisfaction waste dump

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, C.; Katz, G.M.

    1994-11-01

    Most electric utilities have been measuring Customer Satisfaction for several years now with the explicit goal of inducing their employees to improve their handling of customers. While many companies experienced early improvements, the scores have now leveled off. Increasingly, utilities are finding that their Customer Satisfaction Measurement system has reverted to little more than a {open_quotes}report card,{close_quotes} with no clear connection to business practice or processes. Even more alarming is the fact that many companies are now questioning the value of this complicated and expensive effort. This phenomenon is not unique to the electric utility industry -- it is happening in almost every industry in America. What companies really need is a way to tie customer satisfaction to business practices. To accomplish this, the Southern Company, along with several other utilities, are using the Voice of the Customer Process, which came out of the Japanese auto industry. It combines Customer Satisfaction Measurement with Quality Function Deployment (QFD) in order to guide the company into linking specific customer wants and needs to explicit performance measures and business process improvement efforts.

  7. Analysing Customer Opinions with Text Mining Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli, Domenico

    2009-08-01

    Knowing what the customer thinks of a particular product/service helps top management to introduce improvements in processes and products, thus differentiating the company from their competitors and gain competitive advantages. The customers, with their preferences, determine the success or failure of a company. In order to know opinions of the customers we can use technologies available from the web 2.0 (blog, wiki, forums, chat, social networking, social commerce). From these web sites, useful information must be extracted, for strategic purposes, using techniques of sentiment analysis or opinion mining.

  8. 75 FR 64710 - Public Roundtable on Individual Customer Collateral Protection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... COMMISSION Public Roundtable on Individual Customer Collateral Protection AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading... discussion at which invited participants will discuss certain issues related to individual customer... SegBankruptcy@CFTC.gov . (all e- mails should reference ``Dodd-Frank Individual Customer...

  9. Retaining and attracting large customers in a competitive market

    SciTech Connect

    Solger, S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes marketing and customer satisfaction in the electric power industry and the experiences of Wal-Mart stores. Customer service, reliability, working relationships, and customer knowledge are discussed.

  10. Apparel Merchandising Students Learn Customer Service Strategies while Conducting Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulins, V, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Apparel merchandising students participated in a cooperative research project in which they observed customer service techniques by posing as customers in retail stores. The project taught research processes, collaboration, and principles of customer service. (SK)

  11. Modeling Functional Motions of Biological Systems by Customized Natural Moves.

    PubMed

    Demharter, Samuel; Knapp, Bernhard; Deane, Charlotte M; Minary, Peter

    2016-08-23

    Simulating the functional motions of biomolecular systems requires large computational resources. We introduce a computationally inexpensive protocol for the systematic testing of hypotheses regarding the dynamic behavior of proteins and nucleic acids. The protocol is based on natural move Monte Carlo, a highly efficient conformational sampling method with built-in customization capabilities that allows researchers to design and perform a large number of simulations to investigate functional motions in biological systems. We demonstrate the use of this protocol on both a protein and a DNA case study. Firstly, we investigate the plasticity of a class II major histocompatibility complex in the absence of a bound peptide. Secondly, we study the effects of the epigenetic mark 5-hydroxymethyl on cytosine on the structure of the Dickerson-Drew dodecamer. We show how our customized natural moves protocol can be used to investigate causal relationships of functional motions in biological systems. PMID:27558715

  12. 2001 FEMP customer survey summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Nicholas P.; Reed, John H.; Riggert, Jeff; Oh, Andrew; Jordan, Gretchen

    2002-04-01

    The study was targeted to collect information from the average FEMP customer. As a result, the respondents in this survey represent 27 different federal agencies and a group of private contractors who have contracts with one or more federal agencies

  13. Custom molded thermal MRg-FUS phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eames, Matthew D. C.; Snell, John W.; Hananel, Arik; Kassell, Neal F.

    2012-11-01

    This article describes a method for creating custom-molded thermal phantoms for use with MR-guided focused ultrasound systems. The method is defined here for intracranial applications, though it may be modified for other anatomical targets.

  14. Customer Churn Prediction for Broadband Internet Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, B. Q.; Kechadi, M.-T.; Buckley, B.

    Although churn prediction has been an area of research in the voice branch of telecommunications services, more focused studies on the huge growth area of Broadband Internet services are limited. Therefore, this paper presents a new set of features for broadband Internet customer churn prediction, based on Henley segments, the broadband usage, dial types, the spend of dial-up, line-information, bill and payment information, account information. Then the four prediction techniques (Logistic Regressions, Decision Trees, Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks and Support Vector Machines) are applied in customer churn, based on the new features. Finally, the evaluation of new features and a comparative analysis of the predictors are made for broadband customer churn prediction. The experimental results show that the new features with these four modelling techniques are efficient for customer churn prediction in the broadband service field.

  15. Customer Loyalty in Virtual Environments: An Empirical Study in e-Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yu; Lee, Gin-Yuan; Ho, Yung-Ching

    2009-08-01

    The advent of e-commerce has increased the importance of consumer financing operations. Internet banking helps banks to develop relationship marketing, thus improve customer loyalty. This study proposes a research framework to examine the relationships among e-service quality, customer satisfaction, customer trust and e-loyalty in e-bank in Taiwan. Data are collected through a survey using a structured questionnaire. The 442 valid respondents who have experience with e-bank are analyzed by partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) method. The managerial implication is e-bank must focus on e-service quality to increase customer satisfaction and trust for obtaining the e-loyalty.

  16. Customer Aggregation: An Opportunity for Green Power?

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, E.; Bird, L.

    2001-02-26

    We undertook research into the experience of aggregation groups to determine whether customer aggregation offers an opportunity to bring green power choices to more customers. The objectives of this report, therefore, are to (1) identify the different types of aggregation that are occurring today, (2) learn whether aggregation offers an opportunity to advance sales of green power, and (3) share these concepts and approaches with potential aggregators and green power advocates.

  17. Comprehensive Family Services and customer satisfaction outcomes.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Ruth A; Jones, Blake L; Miller, Viola P; Custer, Melba; Critchfield, Becky

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive Family Services (CFS) is a strengths-based and partnership-oriented approach to casework implemented through multiple initiatives. This study examines the relationship between the practice of CFS and satisfaction of clients, foster parents, and community partners. CFS indicators are paired with statewide customer satisfaction survey results. CFS practices are associated with significantly higher customer satisfaction that improved over time for all groups. Although causality cannot be determined, the relationship is consistent, robust, and meaningful. PMID:17039825

  18. The right stuff ... meeting your customer needs.

    PubMed

    Rubin, P; Carrington, S

    1999-11-01

    Meeting (and exceeding) your customers' needs is a requirement for competing in the current business world. New tools and techniques must be employed to deal with the rapidly changing global environment. This article describes the success of a global supply chain integration project for a division of a large multinational corporation. A state-of-the-art ERP software package was implemented in conjunction with major process changes to improve the organization's ability to promise and deliver product to their customers. PMID:10623132

  19. Custom Multiwell Plate Design for Rapid Assembly of Photopatterned Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Naveed; Schober, Joseph; Hill, Lindsay; Zustiak, Silviya P

    2016-06-01

    The extracellular matrix provides both mechanical support and biochemical cues that influence cellular behavior. Matrix stiffness, in particular, has been found to regulate cellular morphology, motility, proliferation, differentiation, and drug responses among other behaviors. Thus, biomaterial platforms that exhibit wide range of stiffness and are available in a semi high-throughput format such as a multiwell plate would be useful for elucidating cell-substrate relationships. Polyacrylamide (PA) gels have been widely used as cell platforms since they span a range of stiffness between 0.3 and 300 kPa in Young's modulus, which encompasses all soft tissues. However, PA gels are time consuming and labor intensive to prepare, and are not amenable to a multiwell plate format. In this study, we present a novel custom multiwell plate design that allows for a one-step stiffness assay assembly that reduces preparation time and labor intensity by several fold. Gel stiffness is controlled by ultraviolet light intensity and exposure time to achieve a wide stiffness range from a single gel precursor solution. The geometry of the gels is defined by a custom photomask and gel thickness is controlled by spacers. A multiwell plate upper structure is designed similar to a regular multiwell plate such that a gel fits in each well and cells and media are added on top. The upper structure design allows for adequate gas exchange and minimum evaporation. Comparison between cell behaviors seeded in the custom and a standard multiwell plate demonstrated the suitability of the design as a cell culture platform. In summary, we describe and validate a novel custom design for an easy and rapid assembly of photopolymerizable PA-based stiffness assay. PMID:27059131

  20. Modeling the customer in electronic commerce.

    PubMed

    Helander, M G; Khalid, H M

    2000-12-01

    This paper reviews interface design of web pages for e-commerce. Different tasks in e-commerce are contrasted. A systems model is used to illustrate the information flow between three subsystems in e-commerce: store environment, customer, and web technology. A customer makes several decisions: to enter the store, to navigate, to purchase, to pay, and to keep the merchandize. This artificial environment must be designed so that it can support customer decision-making. To retain customers it must be pleasing and fun, and create a task with natural flow. Customers have different needs, competence and motivation, which affect decision-making. It may therefore be important to customize the design of the e-store environment. Future ergonomics research will have to investigate perceptual aspects, such as presentation of merchandize, and cognitive issues, such as product search and navigation, as well as decision making while considering various economic parameters. Five theories on e-commerce research are presented. PMID:11132045

  1. Extend{trademark} customization -- Experiences and issues

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.Y.

    1997-12-09

    Extend{trademark} simulation software is a dynamic modeling package developed by Imagine That Incorporated. The Technology Modeling and Analysis group (TSA-7) at Los Alamos National Laboratory has used Extend extensively over the past few years as one of various tools employed to perform simulation modeling and analysis. Development efforts over much of this period have made Extend a more effective and efficient tool through block customization. TSA-7 has taken advantage of the built-in capability in Extend to allow users to create new or modify existing functional blocks from which simulation models are constructed. As a result, Extend is much more effective and efficient for the group`s applications. This paper summarizes block customization and simulation model development that markedly improved the utilization of the Extend software package. The material covered herein includes some background information on Extend, which is necessary for understanding the balance of the paper. Following the background, the paper addresses Extend block customization efforts, including advantages and disadvantages to customizing, and the impact customization has had on Extend modeling efforts in TSA-7. Brief descriptions of many customized blocks developed by the author are presented in the appendix.

  2. 78 FR 48456 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... permits of certain customs brokers are being cancelled without prejudice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION... following customs broker licenses are cancelled without prejudice. ] Last/company name First name License...

  3. 17 CFR 22.16 - Disclosures to Cleared Swaps Customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) of this section, relating to use of Cleared Swaps Customer Collateral, transfer, neutralization of... use of Cleared Swaps Customer Collateral, transfer, neutralization of the risks, or liquidation...

  4. 17 CFR 22.16 - Disclosures to customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... this section, relating to use of Cleared Swaps Customer Collateral, transfer, neutralization of the... Cleared Swaps Customer Collateral, transfer, neutralization of the risks, or liquidation of Cleared...

  5. 17 CFR 22.16 - Disclosures to Cleared Swaps Customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) of this section, relating to use of Cleared Swaps Customer Collateral, transfer, neutralization of... use of Cleared Swaps Customer Collateral, transfer, neutralization of the risks, or liquidation...

  6. Links among high-performance work environment, service quality, and customer satisfaction: an extension to the healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Dennis J; Harmon, Joel; Behson, Scott J

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare managers must deliver high-quality patient services that generate highly satisfied and loyal customers. In this article, we examine how a high-involvement approach to the work environment of healthcare employees may lead to exceptional service quality, satisfied patients, and ultimately to loyal customers. Specifically, we investigate the chain of events through which high-performance work systems (HPWS) and customer orientation influence employee and customer perceptions of service quality and patient satisfaction in a national sample of 113 Veterans Health Administration ambulatory care centers. We present a conceptual model for linking work environment to customer satisfaction and test this model using structural equations modeling. The results suggest that (1) HPWS is linked to employee perceptions of their ability to deliver high-quality customer service, both directly and through their perceptions of customer orientation; (2) employee perceptions of customer service are linked to customer perceptions of high-quality service; and (3) perceived service quality is linked with customer satisfaction. Theoretical and practical implications of our findings, including suggestions of how healthcare managers can implement changes to their work environments, are discussed.

  7. Delivering customer value: The application of quality function deployment to demand-side management. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.S.; Leone, R.A.

    1992-02-01

    Quality function deployment (QFD) is a planning and communication tool used widely by manufacturing industries to translate customer needs into appropriate technical requirements for product development and manufacture. QFD provides a forum within which the often disparate functional activities of a company -- marketing, engineering, manufacturing -- can work closely together toward both customer-focused and technical aims. This report provides guidance in applying QFD to demand-side management (DSM) program design and implementation. The single most salient feature of QFD, in fact its primary goal, is to incorporate the ``voice of the customer`` (in QFD parlance) into the design process. QFD always begins with customer`s needs (e.g., budgetary concerns, comfort, convenience, etc.). Information about these needs is then linked to the product and service characteristics upon which customers base purchase and utilization decisions (e.g., electricity price level and structure, supply reliability, equipment efficiency and quality, and installation effectiveness). The ways customer needs relate to product/service characteristics are delineated in what is called the ``House of Value.`` This particular depiction of QFD is based on a 1988 Harvard Business Review article entitled ``The House of Quality.``

  8. Customization and design of directed self-assembly using hybrid prepatterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Joy; Doerk, Gregory S.; Rettner, Charles T.; Singh, Gurpreet; Tjio, Melia; Truong, Hoa; Arellano, Noel; Balakrishnan, Srinivasan; Brink, Markus; Tsai, Hsinyu; Liu, Chi-Chun; Guillorn, Michael; Sanders, Daniel P.

    2015-03-01

    Diminishing error tolerance renders the customization of patterns created through directed self-assembly (DSA) extremely challenging at tighter pitch. A self-aligned customization scheme can be achieved using a hybrid prepattern comprising both organic and inorganic regions that serves as a guiding prepattern to direct the self-assembly of the block copolymers as well as a cut mask pattern for the DSA arrays aligned to it. In this paper, chemoepitaxy-based self-aligned customization is demonstrated using two types of organic-inorganic prepatterns. CHEETAH prepattern for "CHemoepitaxy Etch Trim using a self-Aligned Hardmask" of preferential hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ, inorganic resist), non-preferential organic underlayer is fabricated using electron beam lithography. Customized trench or hole arrays can be achieved through co-transfer of DSA-formed arrays and CHEETAH prepattern. Herein, we also introduce a tone-reversed version called reverse-CHEETAH (or rCHEETAH) in which customized line segments can be achieved through co-transfer of DSA-formed arrays formed on a prepattern wherein the inorganic HSQ regions are nonpreferential and the organic regions are PMMA preferential. Examples of two-dimensional self-aligned customization including 25nm pitch fin structures and an 8-bar "IBM" illustrate the versatility of this customization scheme using rCHEETAH.

  9. An Empirical Study of the Volkswagen Crisis in China: Customers' Information Processing and Behavioral Intentions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiuchang; Zhao, Ming; Wang, Fei; Cheng, Peng; Zhao, Dingtao

    2016-01-01

    Product-harm crises usually lead to product recalls, which may cause consumers concern about the product quality and safety. This study systematically examines customers' immediate responses to the Volkswagen product recall crisis in China. Particular attention was given to customers' responses to the risk information influencing their behavioral intentions. By combining the protective action decision model and the heuristic-systematic model, we constructed a hypothetical model to explore this issue. A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect data involving 467 participants drawn from the customers of Volkswagen. We used structural equation modeling to explore the model. The results show that customers' product knowledge plays an important role in their responses to the crisis. Having more knowledge would make them perceive a lower risk, but they might need even more information, making them more likely to seek and process information, and subsequently increasing their positive behavioral intentions toward the firm (that is pro-firm behavioral intentions). Risk perception increased customers' information needs, information seeking, and information processing but decreased their pro-firm behavioral intentions. In addition to promoting information seeking, information needed to also facilitate customers' systematic processing and thus increase their behavioral intentions to take corrective action. Customers' behavioral intentions were also spurred by systematic processing, but failed to be predicted by information seeking. In summary, theoretical and practical implications and suggestions for further research are also discussed. PMID:26178313

  10. Custom software development for use in a clinical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Sinard, John H.; Gershkovich, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In-house software development for use in a clinical laboratory is a controversial issue. Many of the objections raised are based on outdated software development practices, an exaggeration of the risks involved, and an underestimation of the benefits that can be realized. Buy versus build analyses typically do not consider total costs of ownership, and unfortunately decisions are often made by people who are not directly affected by the workflow obstacles or benefits that result from those decisions. We have been developing custom software for clinical use for over a decade, and this article presents our perspective on this practice. A complete analysis of the decision to develop or purchase must ultimately examine how the end result will mesh with the departmental workflow, and custom-developed solutions typically can have the greater positive impact on efficiency and productivity, substantially altering the decision balance sheet. Involving the end-users in preparation of the functional specifications is crucial to the success of the process. A large development team is not needed, and even a single programmer can develop significant solutions. Many of the risks associated with custom development can be mitigated by a well-structured development process, use of open-source tools, and embracing an agile development philosophy. In-house solutions have the significant advantage of being adaptable to changing departmental needs, contributing to efficient and higher quality patient care. PMID:23372985

  11. Customer Care Management. Customer Care Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Jennifer; Hayter, Roy

    These teacher's materials are intended to support trainers as they conduct a 1-day course on each of the following topics regarding the hotel and catering industry in Great Britain: the customer perspective, customer service standards, and quality control. The first section explains how to use the materials. The instructions for conducting each…

  12. The Impact of IT Capability on Employee Capability, Customer Value, Customer Satisfaction, and Business Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chae, Ho-Chang

    2009-01-01

    This study empirically examines the impact of IT capability on firms' performance and evaluates whether firms' IT capabilities play a role in improving employee capability, customer value, customer satisfaction, and ultimately business performance. The results were based on comparing the business performance of the IT leader companies with that of…

  13. The Student-Customer Orientation Questionnaire (SCOQ): Application of Customer Metaphor to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koris, Riina; Nokelainen, Petri

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to study Bayesian dependency modelling (BDM) to validate the model of educational experiences and the student-customer orientation questionnaire (SCOQ), and to identify the categories of educatonal experience in which students expect a higher educational institutions (HEI) to be student-customer oriented.…

  14. How Does Target Know so Much about Its Customers? Utilizing Customer Analytics to Make Marketing Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Hope B.; Craciun, Georgiana; Powell, Allison M.

    2014-01-01

    Every time shoppers make a purchase at a store or browse a Web site, customer behavior is tracked, analyzed, and perhaps shared with other businesses. Target Corporation is a leader in analyzing vast amounts of data to identify buying patterns, improve customer satisfaction, predict future trends, select promotional strategies, and increase…

  15. 19 CFR 142.26 - Delinquent payment of Customs bills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Delinquent payment of Customs bills. 142.26... Delinquent payment of Customs bills. The following procedures shall be followed if an importer is substantially or habitually delinquent in the payment of Customs bills: (a) Notice. The importer shall...

  16. 19 CFR 142.14 - Delinquent payment of Customs bills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Delinquent payment of Customs bills. 142.14... of Customs bills. The following procedure shall be followed if an importer is substantially or habitually delinquent in the payment of Customs bills: (a) Notice. The importer shall be advised in...

  17. 19 CFR 142.26 - Delinquent payment of Customs bills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Delinquent payment of Customs bills. 142.26... Delinquent payment of Customs bills. The following procedures shall be followed if an importer is substantially or habitually delinquent in the payment of Customs bills: (a) Notice. The importer shall...

  18. 19 CFR 142.26 - Delinquent payment of Customs bills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Delinquent payment of Customs bills. 142.26... Delinquent payment of Customs bills. The following procedures shall be followed if an importer is substantially or habitually delinquent in the payment of Customs bills: (a) Notice. The importer shall...

  19. 19 CFR 142.14 - Delinquent payment of Customs bills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Delinquent payment of Customs bills. 142.14... of Customs bills. The following procedure shall be followed if an importer is substantially or habitually delinquent in the payment of Customs bills: (a) Notice. The importer shall be advised in...

  20. 19 CFR 142.26 - Delinquent payment of Customs bills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Delinquent payment of Customs bills. 142.26... Delinquent payment of Customs bills. The following procedures shall be followed if an importer is substantially or habitually delinquent in the payment of Customs bills: (a) Notice. The importer shall...

  1. 19 CFR 142.14 - Delinquent payment of Customs bills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Delinquent payment of Customs bills. 142.14... of Customs bills. The following procedure shall be followed if an importer is substantially or habitually delinquent in the payment of Customs bills: (a) Notice. The importer shall be advised in...

  2. 19 CFR 142.26 - Delinquent payment of Customs bills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Delinquent payment of Customs bills. 142.26... Delinquent payment of Customs bills. The following procedures shall be followed if an importer is substantially or habitually delinquent in the payment of Customs bills: (a) Notice. The importer shall...

  3. 19 CFR 142.14 - Delinquent payment of Customs bills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Delinquent payment of Customs bills. 142.14... of Customs bills. The following procedure shall be followed if an importer is substantially or habitually delinquent in the payment of Customs bills: (a) Notice. The importer shall be advised in...

  4. 19 CFR 142.14 - Delinquent payment of Customs bills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Delinquent payment of Customs bills. 142.14... of Customs bills. The following procedure shall be followed if an importer is substantially or habitually delinquent in the payment of Customs bills: (a) Notice. The importer shall be advised in...

  5. 77 FR 55487 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Voluntary Customer Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities; Voluntary Customer Survey AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-Day notice.... Customs and Border Protection (CBP) of the Department of Homeland Security will be submitting...

  6. 19 CFR 145.2 - Mail subject to Customs examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mail subject to Customs examination. 145.2 Section 145.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MAIL IMPORTATIONS General Provisions § 145.2 Mail subject to...

  7. 77 FR 43609 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  8. 27 CFR 28.286 - Receipt in customs bonded warehouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Receipt in customs bonded... in Customs Bonded Warehouse § 28.286 Receipt in customs bonded warehouse. On receipt of the distilled spirits or wine and the related TTB Form 5100.11 or 5110.30 as the case may be, the customs officer...

  9. 27 CFR 478.117 - Function outside a customs territory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Function outside a customs... Importation § 478.117 Function outside a customs territory. In the insular possessions of the United States outside customs territory, the functions performed by U.S. Customs officers under this subpart within...

  10. 27 CFR 24.92 - Products in customs custody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Products in customs... Wine Or Spirits on Wine Premises § 24.92 Products in customs custody. Products in customs custody may... products in customs custody are kept separate from wine and spirits on bonded wine premises. (Sec. 201,...

  11. 19 CFR 191.44 - Destruction under Customs supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Destruction under Customs supervision. 191.44 Section 191.44 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Rejected Merchandise § 191.44 Destruction under...

  12. 19 CFR 115.17 - Appeal to Commissioner of Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Appeal to Commissioner of Customs. 115.17 Section 115.17 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CARGO CONTAINER AND ROAD VEHICLE CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO INTERNATIONAL...

  13. 19 CFR 177.13 - Inconsistent customs decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inconsistent customs decisions. 177.13 Section 177.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ADMINISTRATIVE RULINGS General Ruling Procedure § 177.13 Inconsistent...

  14. 19 CFR 191.25 - Destruction under Customs supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Destruction under Customs supervision. 191.25 Section 191.25 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Manufacturing Drawback § 191.25 Destruction under...

  15. 19 CFR 146.51 - Customs control of merchandise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs control of merchandise. 146.51 Section 146.51 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES Handling of Merchandise in a Zone § 146.51...

  16. 77 FR 74201 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... September 27, 1995 (60 FR 49971). Section 1893 of the Tax Reform Act of 1986 (Pub. L. 99-514) provides that... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2013 AGENCY: U.S. Customs... provides notice to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that is assessed for each permit held by...

  17. 16 CFR 240.10 - Availability to all competing customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... available” to all customers. Therefore, the failure of any customer to participate in the program does not... manufacturer's customers are too small this offer is not useable in a practical sense by them. The manufacturer... semi-weekly, weekly, or other newspapers or media that may be used by small retail customers. Such...

  18. 16 CFR 240.10 - Availability to all competing customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... available” to all customers. Therefore, the failure of any customer to participate in the program does not... manufacturer's customers are too small this offer is not useable in a practical sense by them. The manufacturer... semi-weekly, weekly, or other newspapers or media that may be used by small retail customers. Such...

  19. 19 CFR 151.54 - Testing by Customs laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testing by Customs laboratory. 151.54 Section 151... Other Metal-Bearing Materials § 151.54 Testing by Customs laboratory. Samples taken in accordance with § 151.52 shall be promptly forwarded to the appropriate Customs laboratory for testing in...

  20. 19 CFR 151.54 - Testing by Customs laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testing by Customs laboratory. 151.54 Section 151... Other Metal-Bearing Materials § 151.54 Testing by Customs laboratory. Samples taken in accordance with § 151.52 shall be promptly forwarded to the appropriate Customs laboratory for testing in...

  1. 19 CFR 151.54 - Testing by Customs laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testing by Customs laboratory. 151.54 Section 151... Other Metal-Bearing Materials § 151.54 Testing by Customs laboratory. Samples taken in accordance with § 151.52 shall be promptly forwarded to the appropriate Customs laboratory for testing in...

  2. 19 CFR 151.54 - Testing by Customs laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing by Customs laboratory. 151.54 Section 151... Other Metal-Bearing Materials § 151.54 Testing by Customs laboratory. Samples taken in accordance with § 151.52 shall be promptly forwarded to the appropriate Customs laboratory for testing in...

  3. 19 CFR 151.54 - Testing by Customs laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing by Customs laboratory. 151.54 Section 151... Other Metal-Bearing Materials § 151.54 Testing by Customs laboratory. Samples taken in accordance with § 151.52 shall be promptly forwarded to the appropriate Customs laboratory for testing in...

  4. 76 FR 65741 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... Districts'' published in the Federal Register on September 27, 1995 (60 FR 49971). Section 1893 of the Tax... SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2012 AGENCY: Customs and Border... to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that is assessed for each permit held by a...

  5. 12 CFR 349.16 - Customer dispute resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... may enter into any agreement or understanding with a retail forex customer in which the customer... retail forex customer that the customer intends to submit a claim to arbitration, the FDIC-supervised... or counterclaims. (e) Counterclaims. A procedure for the settlement of a retail forex...

  6. 12 CFR 349.16 - Customer dispute resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... may enter into any agreement or understanding with a retail forex customer in which the customer... retail forex customer that the customer intends to submit a claim to arbitration, the FDIC-supervised... or counterclaims. (e) Counterclaims. A procedure for the settlement of a retail forex...

  7. 12 CFR 349.16 - Customer dispute resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... may enter into any agreement or understanding with a retail forex customer in which the customer... retail forex customer that the customer intends to submit a claim to arbitration, the FDIC-supervised... or counterclaims. (e) Counterclaims. A procedure for the settlement of a retail forex...

  8. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92 Section 3055.92 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL SERVICE PERFORMANCE AND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys....

  9. 39 CFR 3055.90 - Reporting of customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting of customer satisfaction. 3055.90... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.90 Reporting of customer satisfaction. For... report, unless a more frequent filing is specifically indicated, addressing customer...

  10. 26 CFR 801.4 - Customer satisfaction measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customer satisfaction measures. 801.4 Section... REVENUE SERVICE § 801.4 Customer satisfaction measures. The customer satisfaction goals and... may be employed to gather data regarding customer satisfaction. Information to measure...

  11. 26 CFR 801.4 - Customer satisfaction measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Customer satisfaction measures. 801.4 Section... REVENUE SERVICE § 801.4 Customer satisfaction measures. The customer satisfaction goals and... may be employed to gather data regarding customer satisfaction. Information to measure...

  12. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. (a... instrument including: (1) A description of the customer type targeted by the survey; (2) The number...

  13. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. (a... instrument including: (1) A description of the customer type targeted by the survey; (2) The number...

  14. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. (a... instrument including: (1) A description of the customer type targeted by the survey; (2) The number...

  15. 76 FR 1626 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ..., Assistant Commissioner, Office of International Trade. BILLING CODE 9111-14-P ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2011 AGENCY: Customs and... Reform Act of 1986. DATES: Payment of the 2011 Customs Broker User Fee is due March 18, 2011. FOR...

  16. 20 CFR 663.715 - What is customized training?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What is customized training? 663.715 Section... (OJT) and Customized Training § 663.715 What is customized training? Customized training is training: (a) That is designed to meet the special requirements of an employer (including a group of...

  17. 7 CFR 1212.32 - United States Customs Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false United States Customs Service. 1212.32 Section 1212... § 1212.32 United States Customs Service. “United States Customs Service” or “Customs” means the United States Customs and Border Protection, an agency of the Department of Homeland Security. Honey Packers...

  18. 75 FR 27563 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Voluntary Customer Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Voluntary Customer... Voluntary Customer Survey. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of... following information collection: Title: Voluntary Customer Survey. OMB Number: Will be assigned...

  19. 12 CFR 13.4 - Recommendations to customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recommendations to customers. 13.4 Section 13.4... PRACTICES § 13.4 Recommendations to customers. In recommending to a customer the purchase, sale or exchange... reasonable grounds for believing that the recommendation is suitable for the customer upon the basis of...

  20. 78 FR 77140 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... ] Brokerage, Cartage and Lighterage Districts'' published in the Federal Register on September 27, 1995 (60 FR... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2014 AGENCY: U.S. Customs..., 2014. U.S. Customs and Border Protection announces this date of payment for 2014 in accordance with...

  1. 7 CFR 1767.29 - Customer service and informational expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Customer service and informational expenses. 1767.29... System of Accounts § 1767.29 Customer service and informational expenses. The customer service and informational expense accounts identified in this section shall be used by all RUS borrowers. Customer...

  2. Which Way Do You Want To Serve Your Customers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Dinesh K.; Jambheykar, Ashok

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the need to focus on customer service in libraries. Topics include motivating factors, including the value of library services as judged by the users; attributes of customer service; categories of customer service; identifying users; and questions to ask library staff to help evaluate their customer service. (LRW)

  3. DTS: Building custom, intelligent schedulers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansson, Othar; Mayer, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    DTS is a decision-theoretic scheduler, built on top of a flexible toolkit -- this paper focuses on how the toolkit might be reused in future NASA mission schedulers. The toolkit includes a user-customizable scheduling interface, and a 'Just-For-You' optimization engine. The customizable interface is built on two metaphors: objects and dynamic graphs. Objects help to structure problem specifications and related data, while dynamic graphs simplify the specification of graphical schedule editors (such as Gantt charts). The interface can be used with any 'back-end' scheduler, through dynamically-loaded code, interprocess communication, or a shared database. The 'Just-For-You' optimization engine includes user-specific utility functions, automatically compiled heuristic evaluations, and a postprocessing facility for enforcing scheduling policies. The optimization engine is based on BPS, the Bayesian Problem-Solver (1,2), which introduced a similar approach to solving single-agent and adversarial graph search problems.

  4. Linking service climate and customer perceptions of service quality: test of a causal model.

    PubMed

    Schneider, B; White, S S; Paul, M C

    1998-04-01

    A set of foundation issues that support employee work and service quality is conceptualized as a necessary but not sufficient cause of a climate for service, which in turn is proposed to be reflected in customer experiences. Climate for service rests on the foundation issues, but in addition it requires policies and practices that focus attention directly on service quality. Data were collected at multiple points in time from employees and customers of 134 branches of a bank and analyzed via structural equation modeling. Results indicated that the model in which the foundation issues yielded a climate for service, and climate for service in turn led to customer perceptions of service quality, fit the data well. However, subsequent cross-lagged analyses revealed the presence of a reciprocal effect for climate and customer perceptions. Implications of these results for theory and research are offered.

  5. Linking service climate and customer perceptions of service quality: test of a causal model.

    PubMed

    Schneider, B; White, S S; Paul, M C

    1998-04-01

    A set of foundation issues that support employee work and service quality is conceptualized as a necessary but not sufficient cause of a climate for service, which in turn is proposed to be reflected in customer experiences. Climate for service rests on the foundation issues, but in addition it requires policies and practices that focus attention directly on service quality. Data were collected at multiple points in time from employees and customers of 134 branches of a bank and analyzed via structural equation modeling. Results indicated that the model in which the foundation issues yielded a climate for service, and climate for service in turn led to customer perceptions of service quality, fit the data well. However, subsequent cross-lagged analyses revealed the presence of a reciprocal effect for climate and customer perceptions. Implications of these results for theory and research are offered. PMID:9577232

  6. Custom impression trays. Part II: Removal forces.

    PubMed

    Dixon, D L; Breeding, L C; Moseley, J P

    1994-03-01

    When choosing a material for making custom impression trays, it is important to understand the forces to which the tray will be subjected during removal of the completed impression from the oral cavity. Such forces have not been recorded in the dental literature. The purpose of Part II of this three-part series was to record these forces in vitro, using two different tray-removal methods. A polymethyl methacrylate custom tray was used during this study. Results from this investigation indicated that it is easier to remove a completed impression, made with a custom tray, by a single point of anterior force application (224 N) than by force application evenly around the tray (514 N). The recorded force values from this investigation will be used in Part III of this series.

  7. Customization in prescribing for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Volpe-Vartanian, Joanna; Merrick, Elizabeth L; Horgan, Constance M; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Frank, Richard G; Lee, Sue

    2012-06-01

    For many disorders, patient heterogeneity requires physicians to customize their treatment to each patient's needs. We test for the existence of customization in physicians' prescribing for bipolar disorder, using data from a naturalistic clinical effectiveness trial of bipolar disorder treatment (STEP-BD), which did not constrain physician prescribing. Multinomial logit is used to model the physician's choice among five combinations of drug classes. We find that our observed measure of the patient's clinical status played only a limited role in the choice among drug class combinations, even for conditions such as mania that are expected to affect class choice. However, treatment of a patient with given characteristics differed widely depending on which physician was seen. The explanatory power of the model was low. There was variation within each physician's prescribing, but the results do not suggest a high degree of customization in physicians' prescribing, based on our measure of clinical status.

  8. Healthy option preferences of rural restaurant customers.

    PubMed

    Nothwehr, Faryle; Snetselaar, Linda; Dawson, Jeffrey D; Hradek, Christine; Sepulveda, Marisol

    2010-11-01

    In preparation for an intervention study in three rural Iowa restaurants, 250 customers were surveyed regarding their interest in dietary change, perceptions of the restaurant, and interest in healthy options. Customers were ages 18 to 88, with a mean age of 52, and 53% were women. Most agreed that the restaurant offers healthy meals. Options customers stated they were most likely to order if available included meat that is baked or broiled, whole-wheat bread, fresh fruit or steamed vegetables, and regular salad dressing on the side. They were least interested in low-fat sour cream, low-fat salad dressing, low-fat milk, low-calorie dessert, and holding high-fat ingredients. Women were more likely to indicate interest in healthy options than were men. Interest in several options was also positively associated with age. Increasing the healthy options in restaurants may be especially effective in changing the dietary intake of women and older adults.

  9. Customer satisfaction in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Kelly

    2004-02-01

    Patient satisfaction is not merely a "smile and be nice" set of behaviors. It is a philosophy that is founded in the concept that the patient's experience of care is important and ultimately translates into their actual response to care. The improved response to care that patients exhibit makes patient satisfaction important from a clinical vantage point. That point alone is enough to justify implementation of and commitment to a customer satisfaction program. There are, however, other compelling reasons also. Customer satisfaction has profound ramifications for the financial status of the institution and for its professional reputation in the community. The caregivers who participate in a system of good customer satisfaction experience fewer malpractice suits than their counterparts. And they enjoy a work environment that is more stable and pleasant than other institutions. The implementation of a meaningful customer service program is a huge task. It is a fundamental culture change that requires vision, long-term commitment, and constant surveillance. The single most critical factor in the successful implementation of a program that produces all the gains that it promises is leadership. Leadership must set the stage, create the atmosphere,demand that staff meet expectations, reward success, provide an example,and shape the new culture. Without strong, clear leadership, any customer service initiative will be simply a hospital-wide exercise, and those staff members who harbor a cynical viewpoint will be proved right in the end.One major difference between a successful customer service initiative and an unsuccessful one is the level of sincerity the hospital and its staff have about the care they express for their patients. If the whole process is merely an exercise to improve scores, the success will be limited and without deep roots. If the push is to establish an atmosphere of genuine care and interest for patients, however, the results are more meaningful

  10. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  11. Custom Machines Advance Composite Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Here is a brief list of materials that NASA will not be using to construct spacecraft: wood, adobe, fiberglass, bone. While it might be obvious why these materials would not make for safe space travel, they do share a common characteristic with materials that may well be the future foundation of spacecraft design: They all are composites. Formed of two or more unlike materials - such as cellulose and lignin in the case of wood, or glass fibers and plastic resin in the case of fiberglass-composites provide enhanced mechanical and physical properties through the combination of their constituent materials. For this reason, composites are used in everything from buildings, bathtubs, and countertops to boats, racecars, and sports equipment. NASA continually works to develop new materials to enable future space missions - lighter, less expensive materials that can still withstand the extreme demands of space travel. Composites such as carbon fiber materials offer promising solutions in this regard, providing strength and stiffness comparable to metals like aluminum but with less weight, allowing for benefits like better fuel efficiency and simpler propulsion system design. Composites can also be made fatigue tolerant and thermally stable - useful in space where temperatures can swing hundreds of degrees. NASA has recently explored the use of composites for aerospace applications through projects like the Composite Crew Module (CCM), a composite-constructed version of the aluminum-lithium Multipurpose Crew Capsule. The CCM was designed to give NASA engineers a chance to gain valuable experience developing and testing composite aerospace structures.

  12. 19 CFR 122.30 - Other Customs laws and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other Customs laws and regulations. 122.30 Section 122.30 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Private Aircraft § 122.30 Other Customs laws and regulations. Sections 122.2 and 122.161 apply to...

  13. 29 CFR 779.340 - Out-of-State customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Out-of-State customers. 779.340 Section 779.340 Labor... State § 779.340 Out-of-State customers. Whether the sale or service is made to an out-of-State customer is a question of fact. In order for a customer to be considered an out-of-State customer,...

  14. Setting new standards for customer advocacy.

    PubMed

    McDonald, L

    1993-01-01

    Dell Computer Corporation pioneered the direct marketing of personal computers in 1984 and became the first company in the PC industry to offer manufacturer-direct technical support. According to surveys of corporate buyers, the company provides the best after-sale service and support of any computer maker. Here's how Dell has institutionalized the delivery of customer satisfaction. PMID:10123419

  15. Minority Barbers Screen Customers for Hypertension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepe, Margaret V.

    1989-01-01

    Offering hypertension screening within the Black community in a convenient, nonthreatening environment can aid in reduction of morbidity and mortality attributable to high blood pressure in Black men. This article describes a successful pilot program which used volunteer barbers to perform on-site hypertension screening for their customers. (IAH)

  16. Are Students Customers? Perceptions of Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomas, Laurie

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the notion of the student as a customer in a university, focusing on the perceptions of academic staff. Changes in the higher education sector in recent years have significantly reduced the differences between universities and other types of organisations and it has been argued that students have become "consumers" of higher…

  17. Creating the Customer-Obsessed Web Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Jamie

    2002-01-01

    Managing a company's knowledge requires a different set of skills than are typically found in a corporate Web team. Chief among these is a "customer-obsessed" philosophy. The job of taking content, tools, and data and providing a platform that makes it meaningful is an inevitable next step for Web teams in the age of the new intranet. (AEF)

  18. New tool gauges customer view of reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, M.M.; Robinson, P.J.

    1982-11-01

    Customers' perception and preference regarding the level of electric-system reliability they are willing to accept and pay for are examined in a landmark study sponsored by the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corp. Advanced statistical and behavioral techniques are used to predict the impact of policy changes without the hazard of experimenting in the real world. 2 figures.

  19. US Geological Survey customers speak out

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillespie, S.; Snyder, G.

    1995-01-01

    Provides results of a customer survey carried out in 1994 by the US Geological Survey. Uses of cartographic products are classified, as are application areas, accuracy satisfaction, media, Digital Line Graph requirements in update, and frequency of product use. USGS responses and plans for the future are noted. -M.Blakemore

  20. The benefits of using customized procedure packs.

    PubMed

    Baines, R; Colquhoun, G; Jones, N; Bateman, R

    2001-01-01

    Discrete item purchasing is the traditional approach for hospitals to obtain consumable supplies for theatre procedures. Although most items are relatively low cost, the management and co-ordination of the supply chain, raising orders, controlling stock, picking and delivering to each operating theatre can be complex and costly. Customized procedure packs provide a solution. PMID:11892113

  1. Windchill-201 - Custom Soft-Type Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Corey; LaPha, Steven

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will explain Windchill soft-types-what they are, how they work, and how to construct custom ones, configured specifically for your system. The process and particulars of creating and implementing a WTDocument soft-type will be discussed, and the interaction between soft-types and Windchill objects will be shown.

  2. 32 CFR 637.6 - Customs investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.6 Customs investigations. (a... to the military police and investigated by CID or the military police, as appropriate. (b) Military police will receipt for all seized or confiscated U.S. Government property and contraband shipped by...

  3. 32 CFR 637.6 - Customs investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.6 Customs investigations. (a... to the military police and investigated by CID or the military police, as appropriate. (b) Military police will receipt for all seized or confiscated U.S. Government property and contraband shipped by...

  4. 32 CFR 637.6 - Customs investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.6 Customs investigations. (a... to the military police and investigated by CID or the military police, as appropriate. (b) Military police will receipt for all seized or confiscated U.S. Government property and contraband shipped by...

  5. 32 CFR 637.6 - Customs investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.6 Customs investigations. (a... to the military police and investigated by CID or the military police, as appropriate. (b) Military police will receipt for all seized or confiscated U.S. Government property and contraband shipped by...

  6. 32 CFR 637.6 - Customs investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.6 Customs investigations. (a... to the military police and investigated by CID or the military police, as appropriate. (b) Military police will receipt for all seized or confiscated U.S. Government property and contraband shipped by...

  7. 42 CFR 414.224 - Customized items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customized items. 414.224 Section 414.224 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for Durable Medical...

  8. NRMRL/TTSD CUSTOMER SATISFACTION FOCUS GROUP

    EPA Science Inventory

    TTB uses a variety of technology transfer products and tools to communicate risk and information about technologies and research. TTB has begun a project to use EPA's generic Customer Satisfaction Survey Information Collection Request (ICR) to determine satisfaction with their pr...

  9. Customer service and today's hospital security professional.

    PubMed

    Knox, Thomas J

    2004-01-01

    Customer service, benchmarking, and budget control have supplanted enforcement as the essential parts of hospital security operations, according to the author. In the article he emphasizes and illustrates the need for security satisfaction surveys and benchmarking to enable the budget process to go smoothly.

  10. Comprehensive Family Services and Customer Satisfaction Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Ruth A.; Jones, Blake L.; Miller, Viola P.; Custer, Melba; Critchfield, Becky

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive Family Services (CFS) is a strengths-based and partnership-oriented approach to casework implemented through multiple initiatives. This study examines the relationship between the practice of CFS and satisfaction of clients, foster parents, and community partners. CFS indicators are paired with statewide customer satisfaction survey…

  11. Maximize Performance Impact: Create Partnerships with Customers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Judith; Ibanez, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how to improve organizational performance by involving customers in partnerships. Relates experiences at the Center for Development and Disability at the University of New Mexico, serving people with developmental disabilities, which helped realize their mission, helped staff cross from theory to application, and increased relevancy and…

  12. Are Students Customers? TQM and Marketing Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagle, Lynne; Brennan, Ross

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to evaluate the arguments for and against the proposition that students in higher education are "customers" and should be treated as such. Design/methodology/approach: A critical review of the relevant literature from the domains of total quality management and marketing. Findings: The debate is polarised, with advocates…

  13. Custom cranioplasty using stereolithography and acrylic.

    PubMed

    D'Urso, P S; Earwaker, W J; Barker, T M; Redmond, M J; Thompson, R G; Effeney, D J; Tomlinson, F H

    2000-04-01

    Numerous methods of cranioplasty have been described. Customization and prefabrication have been reported to reduce operating time and improve cosmesis. An original technique for the manufacture of customized cranioplastic implants has been developed and tested in 30 patients.Thirty patients requiring cranioplasties were selected. Data acquired from computed tomography (CT) were used to manufacture exact plastic replicas (biomodels) of craniotomy defects and master cranioplastic implants using the rapid prototyping technology of stereolithography (SL). The three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques of mirroring and interpolation were used to extrapolate on existing anatomy to design the master implants. The master implants were hand finished to fit the defect in the corresponding cranial biomodel exactly and were then used to create a cavity mould. The mould was used to cast thermally polymerised custom acrylic implants. The surgeons reported that the customized implants reduced operating time, afforded excellent cosmesis and were cost effective. The patients reported that the opportunity to see the biomodel and implant preoperatively improved their understanding of the procedure. Two complications were noted, one infection and one implant required significant trimming. The simultaneous manufacture of the master implant (male) and biomodel (female) components from SL allowed custom accurate implants to be manufactured. Disadvantages identified were the time required for computer manipulations of the CT data (up to 2 h), difficulty in assessing the accuracy of the computer generated master as a 3D rendering, the potential for SL parts to warp, manufacturing time (minimum 2 days) and the cost of approximately $1300 US per case ($1000 for the SL biomodel and $300 for the acrylic casting). PMID:10738323

  14. The customer-centered innovation map.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, Lance A; Ulwick, Anthony W

    2008-05-01

    We all know that people "hire" products and services to get a job done. Surgeons hire scalpels to dissect soft tissue. Janitors hire soap dispensers and paper towels to remove grime from their hands. To find ways to innovate, it's critical to deconstruct the job the customer is trying to get done from beginning to end, to gain a complete view of all the points at which a customer might desire more help from a product or service. A methodology called job mapping helps companies analyze the biggest drawbacks of the products and services customers currently use and discover opportunities for innovation. It involves breaking down the task the customer wants to accomplish into the eight universal steps of a job: (1) defining the objectives, (2) locating the necessary inputs, (3) preparing the physical environment, (4) confirming that everything is ready, (5) executing the task, (6) monitoring its progress, (7) making modifications as necessary, and (8) concluding the job. Job mapping differs substantively from process mapping in that the goal is to identify what customers are trying to get done at every step, not what they are doing currently. For example, when an anesthesiologist checks a monitor during a surgical procedure, the action taken is just a means to the end. Detecting a change in patient vital signs is the job the doctor is trying to get done. Within each of the discrete steps lie multiple opportunities for making the job simpler, easier, or faster. By mapping out every step of the job and locating those opportunities, companies can discover new ways to differentiate their offerings.

  15. The customer-centered innovation map.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, Lance A; Ulwick, Anthony W

    2008-05-01

    We all know that people "hire" products and services to get a job done. Surgeons hire scalpels to dissect soft tissue. Janitors hire soap dispensers and paper towels to remove grime from their hands. To find ways to innovate, it's critical to deconstruct the job the customer is trying to get done from beginning to end, to gain a complete view of all the points at which a customer might desire more help from a product or service. A methodology called job mapping helps companies analyze the biggest drawbacks of the products and services customers currently use and discover opportunities for innovation. It involves breaking down the task the customer wants to accomplish into the eight universal steps of a job: (1) defining the objectives, (2) locating the necessary inputs, (3) preparing the physical environment, (4) confirming that everything is ready, (5) executing the task, (6) monitoring its progress, (7) making modifications as necessary, and (8) concluding the job. Job mapping differs substantively from process mapping in that the goal is to identify what customers are trying to get done at every step, not what they are doing currently. For example, when an anesthesiologist checks a monitor during a surgical procedure, the action taken is just a means to the end. Detecting a change in patient vital signs is the job the doctor is trying to get done. Within each of the discrete steps lie multiple opportunities for making the job simpler, easier, or faster. By mapping out every step of the job and locating those opportunities, companies can discover new ways to differentiate their offerings. PMID:18543812

  16. See your brands through your customers' eyes.

    PubMed

    Lederer, C; Hill, S

    2001-06-01

    Subaru markets an L.L. Bean Outback station wagon. Dell stamps Microsoft and Intel logos on its computers. Such inter-weaving of different companies' brands is now commonplace. But one of the central tools of brand management-portfolio mapping--has not kept pace with changes in the marketplace. Most conventional brand maps include only those brands owned by a company, arranged along organizational lines with little regard for how the brands influence customer perceptions. In this article, the authors present a new mapping tool--the brand portfolio molecule--that reveals the way brands appear to customers. The brand portfolio molecule includes all the brands that factor into a consumer's decision to buy, whether or not the company owns them. The first step in creating a brand portfolio molecule is to determine which brands should or should not be included. The second step is to classify each brand by asking five key questions: 1) How important is this brand to customers' purchase decisions about the brand you're mapping? 2) Is its influence positive or negative? 3) What market position does this brand occupy relative to the other brands in the portfolio? 4) How does this brand connect to the other brands in the portfolio? 5) How much control do you have over this brand? The last step is to map the molecule using a 3-D modeling program or by hand with pen and paper. Individual brands take the form of atoms, and they're clustered in ways that reflect how customers see them. The usefulness of the tool lies in its ability to show the many forces that influence a customer's buying decision--and to provide a powerful new way to think about brand strategy. PMID:11408973

  17. Expanding Functionality of Commercial Optical Coherence Tomography Systems by Integrating a Custom Endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Welge, Weston A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a useful imaging modality for detecting and monitoring diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and other tubular structures. The non-destructiveness of OCT enables time-serial studies in animal models. While turnkey commercial research OCT systems are plenty, researchers often require custom imaging probes. We describe the integration of a custom endoscope with a commercial swept-source OCT system and generalize this description to any imaging probe and OCT system. A numerical dispersion compensation method is also described. Example images demonstrate that OCT can visualize the mouse colon crypt structure and detect adenoma in vivo. PMID:26418811

  18. Delivering customer value: The application of quality function deployment to demand-side management

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.S.; Leone, R.A. )

    1992-02-01

    Quality function deployment (QFD) is a planning and communication tool used widely by manufacturing industries to translate customer needs into appropriate technical requirements for product development and manufacture. QFD provides a forum within which the often disparate functional activities of a company -- marketing, engineering, manufacturing -- can work closely together toward both customer-focused and technical aims. This report provides guidance in applying QFD to demand-side management (DSM) program design and implementation. The single most salient feature of QFD, in fact its primary goal, is to incorporate the voice of the customer'' (in QFD parlance) into the design process. QFD always begins with customer's needs (e.g., budgetary concerns, comfort, convenience, etc.). Information about these needs is then linked to the product and service characteristics upon which customers base purchase and utilization decisions (e.g., electricity price level and structure, supply reliability, equipment efficiency and quality, and installation effectiveness). The ways customer needs relate to product/service characteristics are delineated in what is called the House of Value.'' This particular depiction of QFD is based on a 1988 Harvard Business Review article entitled The House of Quality.''

  19. The Economic Value of PV and Net Metering to Residential Customers in California

    SciTech Connect

    Darghouth, Naim; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2010-05-17

    In this paper, we analyze the bill savings from PV for residential customers of the California's two largest electric utilities, under existing net metering tariffs as well as under several alternative compensation mechanisms. We find that economic value of PV to the customer is dependent on the structure of the underlying retail electricity rate and can vary quite significantly from one customer to another. In addition, we find that the value of the bill savings from PV generally declines with PV penetration level, as increased PV generation tends to offset lower-priced usage. Customers in our sample from both utilities are significantly better off with net metering than with a feed-in tariff where all PV generation is compensated at long-run avoided generation supply costs. Other compensation schemeswhich allow customers to displace their consumption with PV generation within each hour or each month, and are also based on the avoided costs, yield similar value to the customer as net metering.

  20. Customized Clinical Practice Guidelines for Management of Adult Cataract in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhaleh; Javadi, Mohammad Ali; Daftarian, Narsis; Safi, Sare; Nejat, Farhad; Shirvani, Armin; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Shahraz, Saeid; Ziaei, Hossein; Moein, Hamidreza; Motlagh, Behzad Fallahi; Feizi, Sepehr; Foroutan, Alireza; Hashemi, Hassan; Hashemian, Seyed Javad; Jabbarvand, Mahmoud; Jafarinasab, Mohammad Reza; Karimian, Farid; Mohammad-Rabei, Hossein; Mohammadpour, Mehrdad; Nassiri, Nader; Panahi-Bazaz, Mahmoodreza; Rohani, Mohammad Reza; Sedaghat, Mohammad Reza; Sheibani, Kourosh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To customize clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for cataract management in the Iranian population. Methods: First, four CPGs (American Academy of Ophthalmology 2006 and 2011, Royal College of Ophthalmologists 2010, and Canadian Ophthalmological Society 2008) were selected from a number of available CPGs in the literature for cataract management. All recommendations of these guidelines, together with their references, were studied. Each recommendation was summarized in 4 tables. The first table showed the recommendation itself in clinical question components format along with its level of evidence. The second table contained structured abstracts of supporting articles related to the clinical question with their levels of evidence. The third table included the customized recommendation of the internal group respecting its clinical advantage, cost, and complications. In the fourth table, the internal group their recommendations from 1 to 9 based on the customizing capability of the recommendation (applicability, acceptability, external validity). Finally, customized recommendations were sent one month prior to a consensus session to faculty members of all universities across the country asking for their comments on recommendations. Results: The agreed recommendations were accepted as conclusive while those with no agreement were discussed at the consensus session. Finally, all customized recommendations were codified as 80 recommendations along with their sources and levels of evidence for the Iranian population. Conclusion: Customization of CPGs for management of adult cataract for the Iranian population seems to be useful for standardization of referral, diagnosis and treatment of patients. PMID:27051491

  1. Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market Potential:Integrating Price and Customer Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-06-01

    ABSTRACT=Demand response (DR) is increasingly recognized asan essential ingredient to well-functioning electricity markets. DRmarket potential studies can answer questions about the amount of DRavailable in a given area, from which market segments. Several recent DRmarket potential studies have been conducted, most adapting techniquesused to estimate energy-efficiency (EE) potential. In this scoping study,we: reviewed and categorized seven recent DR market potential studies;recommended a methodology for estimating DR market potential for large,non-residential utility customers that uses price elasticities to accountfor behavior and prices; compiled participation rates and elasticityvalues from six DR options offered to large customers in recent years,and demonstrated our recommended methodology with large customer marketpotential scenarios at an illustrative Northeastern utility. We recommendan elasticity approach for large-customer DR options that rely oncusto!

  2. Brands, bundles and customer retention: The new utility juggling act

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, M.G.

    1997-11-01

    As customer choice comes to more and more states, enabling consumers to buy natural gas from marketers other than their gas utility, utilities are wrestling with customer retention: How do they persuade customers to choose to stay utility customers rather than selecting someone else to be their gas supplier? This grappling promises only to become more intense, as soon-to-be-deregulated electric utilities begin dealing with customer choice and customer retention issues of their own. American Gas explores some of the most recent initiatives in the industry.

  3. Linking organizational resources and work engagement to employee performance and customer loyalty: the mediation of service climate.

    PubMed

    Salanova, Marisa; Agut, Sonia; Peiró, José María

    2005-11-01

    This study examined the mediating role of service climate in the prediction of employee performance and customer loyalty. Contact employees (N=342) from 114 service units (58 hotel front desks and 56 restaurants) provided information about organizational resources, engagement, and service climate. Furthermore, customers (N=1,140) from these units provided information on employee performance and customer loyalty. Structural equation modeling analyses were consistent with a full mediation model in which organizational resources and work engagement predict service climate, which in turn predicts employee performance and then customer loyalty. Further analyses revealed a potential reciprocal effect between service climate and customer loyalty. Implications of the study are discussed, together with limitations and suggestions for future research. PMID:16316275

  4. Linking organizational resources and work engagement to employee performance and customer loyalty: the mediation of service climate.

    PubMed

    Salanova, Marisa; Agut, Sonia; Peiró, José María

    2005-11-01

    This study examined the mediating role of service climate in the prediction of employee performance and customer loyalty. Contact employees (N=342) from 114 service units (58 hotel front desks and 56 restaurants) provided information about organizational resources, engagement, and service climate. Furthermore, customers (N=1,140) from these units provided information on employee performance and customer loyalty. Structural equation modeling analyses were consistent with a full mediation model in which organizational resources and work engagement predict service climate, which in turn predicts employee performance and then customer loyalty. Further analyses revealed a potential reciprocal effect between service climate and customer loyalty. Implications of the study are discussed, together with limitations and suggestions for future research.

  5. Remote power -- Integrated, customer oriented solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D.; Twidell, M.; Patel, J.; Teofilo, F.; Soin, R.

    1994-12-31

    Throughout its history, BP Solar has focused strongly on the production of integrated power solutions to it`s customers, using photovoltaics as the central, but not unique, technology. This paper discusses the customer driven development of two new generation hybrid power systems, one AC the other DC. Both involve the combination of renewable energy with a conventional power source in a fully integrated system, as well as providing remote electronic system access, advanced data and event logging, and comprehensive computer graphic analysis software. The first is a DC system providing power to telecommunication authorities in the Asian-Pacific region, the second is generating abundant high quality AC power for Australian domestic users.

  6. Technique for making a customized shade guide.

    PubMed

    Askinas, S W; Kaiser, D A

    1979-08-01

    A technique has been presented for making a custom shade guide that provides a direct visual means for conveying color information to the laboratory technician. The technique consists of applying pigment directly to acrylic resin denture teeth using colored drawing pencils. This technique was originated by Dr. Royal Norman of Omaha, Nebraska. One of the authors (S. W. A.) first saw Dr. Norman present it to the USAF Area Dental Laboratory Workshop, Westover AFB, Mass., in 1969.

  7. NASA Customer Data and Operations System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Madeline J.; Stallings, William H.

    1991-01-01

    In addition to the currently provided NASA services such as Communications and Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System services, the NASA's Customer Data and Operations System (CDOS) will provide the following services to the user: Data Delivery Service, Data Archive Service, and CDOS Operations Management Service. This paper describes these services in detail and presents respective block diagrams. The CDOS services will support a variety of multipurpose missions simultaneously with centralized and common hardware and software data-driven systems.

  8. Custom synthesis of autoinducers and their analogues.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Jun; Suga, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) system is a unique target for the development of a new class of drugs that potentially control pathogenicity and attenuate virulence. Thus, it has been of significant interest to discover small organic molecules that modulate QS circuits by competing with the signaling molecules, or so-called autoinducers (AIs), for binding to QS proteins. In this chapter, we summarize synthetic methodology for custom QS agonists and antagonists against the Lux system in Gram-negative bacteria.

  9. 12 CFR 368.4 - Recommendations to customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... POLICY GOVERNMENT SECURITIES SALES PRACTICES § 368.4 Recommendations to customers. In recommending to a customer the purchase, sale or exchange of a government security, a bank that is a government...

  10. 12 CFR 368.4 - Recommendations to customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... POLICY GOVERNMENT SECURITIES SALES PRACTICES § 368.4 Recommendations to customers. In recommending to a customer the purchase, sale or exchange of a government security, a bank that is a government...

  11. 12 CFR 368.4 - Recommendations to customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... POLICY GOVERNMENT SECURITIES SALES PRACTICES § 368.4 Recommendations to customers. In recommending to a customer the purchase, sale or exchange of a government security, a bank that is a government...

  12. 12 CFR 368.4 - Recommendations to customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... POLICY GOVERNMENT SECURITIES SALES PRACTICES § 368.4 Recommendations to customers. In recommending to a customer the purchase, sale or exchange of a government security, a bank that is a government...

  13. 75 FR 75691 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ...: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs and... permits are revoked with prejudice. License Name No. Issuing port Foreign Cargo Customs Brokers,...

  14. 76 FR 44032 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ...: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs and... permits are cancelled without prejudice. License Issuing port Dollar Customs House Brokerage, 28045...

  15. 77 FR 5819 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ...: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 USC 1641) and the U.S. Customs and... permits are cancelled without prejudice. Name License No. Issuing port Neutral Customs Brokers,...

  16. Mechanisms linking employee affective delivery and customer behavioral intentions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wei-Chi; Huang, Yin-Mei

    2002-10-01

    Past empirical evidence has indicated that employee affective delivery can influence customer reactions (e.g., customer satisfaction, service quality evaluation). This study extends previous research by empirically examining mediating processes underlying the relationship between employee affective delivery and customer behavioral intentions. Data were collected from 352 employee-customer pairs in 169 retail shoe stores in Taiwan. Results showed that the influence of employee affective delivery on customers' willingness to return to the store and pass positive comments to friends was indirect through the mediating processes of customer in-store positive moods and perceived friendliness. The study also indicated that employee affective delivery influences customers' time spent in store, which, in turn, influences customer behavioral intentions. PMID:12395825

  17. SVX Sequence Crate Custom J1 Backplane

    SciTech Connect

    Utes, M.; /Fermilab

    1997-10-29

    The Custom J1 Backplane is a full length (21 slot) user specified custom 3U backplane to be used in the J1 position. Slot spacing is identical to that used for VME (0.8-inch), and each backplane shall fit into a standard Eurocard VME style crate. The purpose of the Custom J1 Backplane is to: (1) Provide +5 volt power to slots 1 through 21; (2) Provide -5.2 volt power to slots 1 through 21; (3) Provide five bits of geographic addressing to slots 2 through 21. Slot 2 will have all five bits pulled low; slot 21 will have the value 10100. See Appendix A; (4) Route a differential 1553 signal from a triaxial bulkhead connector to slots 2 through 11. This differential signal is bussed as a daisy chain. A 75 ohm resistor to ground shall be located near the last destination slot for each of these two signals; (5) Route a second differential 1553 signal from a triaxial bulkhead connector to slots 12 through 21. This differential signal is bussed as a daisy chain. A 75 ohm resistor to ground shall be located near the last destination slot for each of these two signals; (6) Route two NRZ signals and two Clock signals from slot 1 to each of slots 2 through 21. These are individual signals, not bussed.

  18. Using linear algebra for protein structural comparison and classification

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we describe a novel methodology to extract semantic characteristics from protein structures using linear algebra in order to compose structural signature vectors which may be used efficiently to compare and classify protein structures into fold families. These signatures are built from the pattern of hydrophobic intrachain interactions using Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) techniques. Considering proteins as documents and contacts as terms, we have built a retrieval system which is able to find conserved contacts in samples of myoglobin fold family and to retrieve these proteins among proteins of varied folds with precision of up to 80%. The classifier is a web tool available at our laboratory website. Users can search for similar chains from a specific PDB, view and compare their contact maps and browse their structures using a JMol plug-in. PMID:21637532

  19. Using linear algebra for protein structural comparison and classification.

    PubMed

    Gomide, Janaína; Melo-Minardi, Raquel; Dos Santos, Marcos Augusto; Neshich, Goran; Meira, Wagner; Lopes, Júlio César; Santoro, Marcelo

    2009-07-01

    In this article, we describe a novel methodology to extract semantic characteristics from protein structures using linear algebra in order to compose structural signature vectors which may be used efficiently to compare and classify protein structures into fold families. These signatures are built from the pattern of hydrophobic intrachain interactions using Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) techniques. Considering proteins as documents and contacts as terms, we have built a retrieval system which is able to find conserved contacts in samples of myoglobin fold family and to retrieve these proteins among proteins of varied folds with precision of up to 80%. The classifier is a web tool available at our laboratory website. Users can search for similar chains from a specific PDB, view and compare their contact maps and browse their structures using a JMol plug-in.

  20. History and Status of the CIS Customs Union

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, T.M.; Erickson, S.A.

    1999-08-31

    This report explores the history of the CIS Customs Union and the major obstacles the Union faces in its implementation. Investigation of the Customs Union is necessary as its implementation could effect the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Program. Russian Customs contends that radiation detectors should not be installed along the Customs Union members borders of as the borders will be dissolved when the Union is implemented.

  1. How to get the customer service your practice deserves.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    What is good customer service, and how can office managers and others who deal with medical supply distributors get the customer service they deserve? This article covers the basics of good customer service, including examples of companies known for putting the customer first-Nordstrom, Disney, Johnson &Johnson, and VaxServe. Helpful tips on what to look for in a distributor include personalized service, cost considerations, dedication, knowledge, experience, helpfulness, openness, reliability, and compatibility.

  2. Custom Turnkey Time and Frequency Systems: A structured, expandable approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, David F.

    1995-01-01

    Radiocode Clocks Ltd. have developed a Turnkey Time and Frequency Generation and Distribution, System strategy based upon a bus of three, 'core' signals from which any Time code, Pulse rate or Frequency can be produced. The heart of the system is a ruggedized 19 inch, 3U Single Eurocard chassis constructed from machined 10mm aluminum alloy plate and designed to meet stringent Military, Security and Telecommunications specifications. The chassis is fitted with an advanced multilayer backplane with separate ground planes for analog and digital signals ensuring no degradation of low noise frequency references in the proximity of high speed digital pulse transmissions. The system has been designed to be used in three possible configurations: 1) As a stand alone generation and distribution instrument; 2) As a primary distribution unit in a turnkey Time and Frequency system; and 3) As a secondary distribution unit at a remote location from the Turnkey Time and Frequency System providing regeneration of core signals and correction for transmission delays. When configured as a secondary distribution unit the system will continue to provide usable outputs when one, two or even all three of the 'core' signals are lost. The instrument's placement within a system as a possible single point of system failure has required the development of very high reliability translator, synthesizer, phase locked loop and distribution modules together with a comprehensive alarm and monitoring strategy.

  3. Educational Technology Services, Customer Services Team. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruhn, Bill; Keys, Terry; Bates, Pat; Cheasty, Diane; Christian, Marilyn; Cunningham, Bob; Ferguson, Bianca; Lewis, Millie; Mancuso, Ellen; Ryther, Dick; Weidel, Pam

    The report describes the evaluations of the current practices of Educational Technology Services (ETS) at Monroe Community College (New York) by the Customer Service Team. ETS provides all aspects of technology support to the College. The "customers" of ETS include students, faculty and staff. With the goal of developing a Customer Services Plan,…

  4. 14 CFR 1260.63 - Customs clearance and visas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Customs clearance and visas. 1260.63 Section 1260.63 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.63 Customs clearance and visas. Customs Clearance and Visas...

  5. 27 CFR 24.92 - Products in customs custody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Products in customs custody. 24.92 Section 24.92 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Wine Or Spirits on Wine Premises § 24.92 Products in customs custody. Products in customs custody...

  6. 27 CFR 24.92 - Products in customs custody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Products in customs custody. 24.92 Section 24.92 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Wine Or Spirits on Wine Premises § 24.92 Products in customs custody. Products in customs custody...

  7. 31 CFR 401.4 - Duties of Bureau of Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duties of Bureau of Customs. 401.4... TRANSPORT COUNTERFEIT COINS, OBLIGATIONS, SECURITIES, AND PARAPHERNALIA § 401.4 Duties of Bureau of Customs... director of customs pursuant to the said act of August 9, 1939, and the regulations in this part,...

  8. 27 CFR 26.199d - Customs inspection and release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs inspection and... Shipment of Bulk Distilled Spirits From Puerto Rico, Without Payment of Tax, for Transfer From Customs Custody to Internal Revenue Bond § 26.199d Customs inspection and release. On receipt of a...

  9. 27 CFR 40.236 - Release from customs custody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Release from customs... on Tobacco Products § 40.236 Release from customs custody. The release of tobacco products from customs custody, in bond, for transfer to the premises of a tobacco products factory, shall be...

  10. 27 CFR 40.452 - Release from customs custody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Release from customs... § 40.452 Release from customs custody. Cigarette papers and tubes which were made in the United States, exported, and subsequently returned to the United States, may be removed from customs custody for...

  11. Preintervention Analysis and Improvement of Customer Greeting in a Restaurant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Therrien, Kelly; Wilder, David A.; Rodriguez, Manuel; Wine, Byron

    2005-01-01

    We examined customer greeting by employees at one location of a sandwich restaurant chain. First, a preintervention analysis was conducted to determine the conditions under which greeting a customer within 3 s of his or her entry into the restaurant did and did not occur. Results suggested that an appropriate customer greeting was most likely to…

  12. 76 FR 65207 - U.S. Customs and Border Protection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice....

  13. 12 CFR 48.16 - Customer dispute resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... procedures. No national bank may enter into any agreement or understanding with a retail forex customer in... clause or clauses. (3) The agreement advises the retail forex customer that, at such time as the customer... connection with the dispute resolution, unless it is determined in the proceeding that the retail...

  14. 12 CFR 48.16 - Customer dispute resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... procedures. No national bank may enter into any agreement or understanding with a retail forex customer in... clause or clauses. (3) The agreement advises the retail forex customer that, at such time as the customer... connection with the dispute resolution, unless it is determined in the proceeding that the retail...

  15. 12 CFR 48.16 - Customer dispute resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... procedures. No national bank may enter into any agreement or understanding with a retail forex customer in... clause or clauses. (3) The agreement advises the retail forex customer that, at such time as the customer... connection with the dispute resolution, unless it is determined in the proceeding that the retail...

  16. 32 CFR 700.860 - Customs and immigration inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Customs and immigration inspections. 700.860... Commanding Officer Commanding Officers Afloat § 700.860 Customs and immigration inspections. (a) The... a customs officer or immigration officer of the United States to make on board the ship or...

  17. 32 CFR 700.860 - Customs and immigration inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Customs and immigration inspections. 700.860... Commanding Officer Commanding Officers Afloat § 700.860 Customs and immigration inspections. (a) The... a customs officer or immigration officer of the United States to make on board the ship or...

  18. 32 CFR 700.860 - Customs and immigration inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Customs and immigration inspections. 700.860... Commanding Officer Commanding Officers Afloat § 700.860 Customs and immigration inspections. (a) The... a customs officer or immigration officer of the United States to make on board the ship or...

  19. 32 CFR 700.860 - Customs and immigration inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Customs and immigration inspections. 700.860... Commanding Officer Commanding Officers Afloat § 700.860 Customs and immigration inspections. (a) The... a customs officer or immigration officer of the United States to make on board the ship or...

  20. 32 CFR 700.860 - Customs and immigration inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Customs and immigration inspections. 700.860... Commanding Officer Commanding Officers Afloat § 700.860 Customs and immigration inspections. (a) The... a customs officer or immigration officer of the United States to make on board the ship or...

  1. 76 FR 41993 - Customs and Border Protection Officer Retirement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... and 842 RIN 3206-AL69 Customs and Border Protection Officer Retirement AGENCY: Office of Personnel..., to reflect changes in the retirement benefits available to customs and border protection officers... annuity benefits for customs and border protection officers employed by the United States Department...

  2. 17 CFR 1.25 - Investment of customer funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... financial interest in customers' segregated funds; provided, however, that such investments, transfers of... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Investment of customer funds... REGULATIONS UNDER THE COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Customers' Money, Securities, and Property § 1.25 Investment...

  3. Understanding the Role of Online Reviews on Customers' Risk Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Customer reviews play an important role in today's online shopping environment. Research into customer reviews has largely focused on the predictive effect of review characteristics on variables such as product sales. However, relatively little attention has been directed towards understanding how reviews impact a customer's decision to purchase a…

  4. 16 CFR 240.13 - Customer's and third party liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... liability. (a) Customer's liability: Sections 2 (d) and (e) apply to sellers and not to customers. However... brokers, perform in-store services for their grocery retailer customers, such as stocking of shelves...” rate and a lower “local” rate. A retailer places an advertisement with the newspaper at the local...

  5. 17 CFR 1.25 - Investment of customer funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Investment of customer funds... REGULATIONS UNDER THE COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Customers' Money, Securities, and Property § 1.25 Investment of customer funds. (a) Permitted investments. (1) Subject to the terms and conditions set forth in...

  6. Setting Up a Customer Network to Review Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bist, Gary; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes setting up a customer review network, using computer networks and fax machines, to collect customer feedback on documentation during the stages of designing and writing the information. Describes the electronic feedback from one customer in particular and how it was analyzed and used to modify the information before releasing it. (SR)

  7. 32 CFR 811.5 - Customers exempt from fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Customers exempt from fees. 811.5 Section 811.5..., DISSEMINATION, AND SALE OF VISUAL INFORMATION MATERIALS § 811.5 Customers exempt from fees. Title III of the 1968 Intergovernmental Cooperation Act (42 U.S.C. 4201, 4231, and 4233) exempts some customers...

  8. 47 CFR 76.980 - Charges for customer changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Charges for customer changes. 76.980 Section 76... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation § 76.980 Charges for customer changes. (a... charge for customer changes in service tiers effected solely by coded entry on a computer terminal or...

  9. 17 CFR 31.15 - Reporting to leverage customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... customers. 31.15 Section 31.15 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION LEVERAGE TRANSACTIONS § 31.15 Reporting to leverage customers. Each leverage transaction merchant shall furnish in writing directly to each leverage customer: (a) Promptly upon the repurchase,...

  10. 16 CFR 240.5 - Definition of competing customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definition of competing customers. 240.5... ADVERTISING ALLOWANCES AND OTHER MERCHANDISING PAYMENTS AND SERVICES § 240.5 Definition of competing customers. Competing customers are all businesses that compete in the resale of the seller's products of like grade...

  11. 18 CFR 157.218 - Changes in customer name.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Changes in customer... Act for Certain Transactions and Abandonment § 157.218 Changes in customer name. (a) Automatic... reflect the change in the name of an existing customer, if the certificate holder has filed any...

  12. 17 CFR 403.2 - Hypothecation of customer securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hypothecation of customer... UNDER SECTION 15C OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 PROTECTION OF CUSTOMER SECURITIES AND BALANCES § 403.2 Hypothecation of customer securities. Every registered government securities broker or...

  13. 14 CFR 212.8 - Protection of customers' payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protection of customers' payments. 212.8... customers' payments. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, no certificated air carrier or... payable in advance by customers for the subject charter trips shall be accepted by the carrier. (e)...

  14. 16 CFR 240.12 - Checking customer's use of payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Checking customer's use of payments. 240.12... ADVERTISING ALLOWANCES AND OTHER MERCHANDISING PAYMENTS AND SERVICES § 240.12 Checking customer's use of... are furnished and that the seller is not overpaying for them. The customer should expend the...

  15. 75 FR 47607 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Voluntary Customer Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... agencies. This proposed information collection was previously published in the Federal Register (75 FR... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Voluntary Customer... accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Voluntary Customer Survey. This is a new collection...

  16. 16 CFR 314.3 - Standards for safeguarding customer information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standards for safeguarding customer... OF CONGRESS STANDARDS FOR SAFEGUARDING CUSTOMER INFORMATION § 314.3 Standards for safeguarding customer information. (a) Information security program. You shall develop, implement, and maintain...

  17. 15 CFR 752.7 - Direct shipment to customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Direct shipment to customers. 752.7... COMPREHENSIVE LICENSE § 752.7 Direct shipment to customers. (a) General authorization. (1) Upon request by a... directly to the requesting consignee's customer in either: (i) The requesting consignee's country; or...

  18. 49 CFR 192.353 - Customer meters and regulators: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Customer meters and regulators: Location. 192.353... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.353 Customer meters and regulators: Location. (a) Each meter and...

  19. 49 CFR 192.353 - Customer meters and regulators: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Customer meters and regulators: Location. 192.353... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.353 Customer meters and regulators: Location. (a) Each meter and...

  20. 49 CFR 192.353 - Customer meters and regulators: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Customer meters and regulators: Location. 192.353... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.353 Customer meters and regulators: Location. (a) Each meter and...

  1. 49 CFR 192.353 - Customer meters and regulators: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Customer meters and regulators: Location. 192.353... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.353 Customer meters and regulators: Location. (a) Each meter and...

  2. 47 CFR 76.1602 - Customer service-general information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer service-general information. 76.1602... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1602 Customer service—general information. (a) A cable franchise authority may enforce the customer service standards set forth in paragraph (b) of...

  3. 49 CFR 192.353 - Customer meters and regulators: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.353 Customer meters and regulators: Location. (a) Each meter and service... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer meters and regulators: Location....

  4. 47 CFR 76.309 - Customer service obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer service obligations. 76.309 Section 76... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE General Operating Requirements § 76.309 Customer service obligations. (a) A cable franchise authority may enforce the customer service standards set forth in...

  5. 39 CFR 501.18 - Customer information and authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Customer information and authorization. 501.18... Service to authorize a customer to use a Postage Evidencing System. Postal Service receipt and acceptance... Products (Postage Evidencing Systems). (b) The Postal Service may refuse to issue a customer...

  6. 76 FR 24339 - Streamlining Service Delivery and Improving Customer Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Delivery and Improving Customer Service By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and... this end, Executive Order 12862 (Setting Customer Service Standards), issued on September 11, 1993... customers, establish service standards and track performance against those standards, and benchmark...

  7. 49 CFR 192.357 - Customer meters and regulators: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.357 Customer meters and regulators: Installation. (a... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer meters and regulators: Installation....

  8. 49 CFR 192.359 - Customer meter installations: Operating pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.359 Customer meter installations: Operating pressure... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer meter installations: Operating...

  9. A customized finite element analysis software for windmill blades

    SciTech Connect

    Kill, N.; Tsai, S.W.

    1995-09-01

    Analysis and design of windmill blades can be made user friendly when sophisticated software is customized for a particular boundary-value problem. Specific example of how this is accomplished will be illustrated using a commercial software package. Material and orientation of composite materials can be easily defined. Blade geometry can be imported from CAD files. Several meshing options can be easily selected. Linear analysis models for strength and deformation, vibration and buckling can be calculated. Post processing of element strength or safety factor within each ply can be graphically displayed. It is the intent of the customized software that minimum training is required before users become proficient. This is accomplished through extensive use of menus, dialogue boxes and other graphic options. Relying primarily on a mouse, key strokes are kept to a minimum which enhances the retention of training. Other user oriented features are being introduced to further speed up the operation of the Software. It is believed that with simplified user interface that training that lasts several days can be significantly reduced. Many more engineers will be attracted to modern design to achieve the structural performance and cost effectiveness inherent with composite materials.

  10. A Brand Loyalty Model Utilizing Team Identification and Customer Satisfaction in the Licensed Sports Product Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Soonhwan; Shin, Hongbum; Park, Jung-Jun; Kwon, Oh-Ryun

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among the attitudinal brand loyalty variables (i.e., cognitive, affective, and conative components), team identification, and customer satisfaction by developing a structural equation model, based on Oliver's (1997) attitudinal brand loyalty model. The results of this study confirmed…

  11. Mechanical characterization of a customized decellularized scaffold for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, W S; Duffy, G P; Murphy, B P

    2012-04-01

    Several challenges persist when attempting to utilize decellularized tissue as a scaffold for vascular tissue engineering. Namely: poor cell infiltration/migration, excessive culture times associated with repopulating the scaffolds, and the achievement of a quiescent medial layer. In an attempt to create an optimum vascular scaffold, we customized the properties of decellularized porcine carotid arteries by: (i) creating cavities within the medial layer to allow direct injection of cells, and (ii) controlling the amount of collagen digestion to increase the porosity. Histological examination of our customized scaffold revealed a highly porous tissue structure containing consistent medial cavities running longitudinally through the porous scaffold wall. Mechanical testing of the customized scaffold showed that our minimal localized disruption to the ECM does not have a detrimental effect on the bulk mechanical response of the tissue. The results demonstrate that an increased stiffness and reduced distensibility occurs after decellularization when compared to the native tissue, however post scaffold customization we can revert the scaffold tensile properties back to that of the native tissue. This most noteworthy result occurs in the elastin dominant phase of the tensile response of the scaffold, indicating that no disruption has occurred to the elastin network by our decellularization and customization techniques. Additionally, the bulk seeding potential of the customized scaffold was demonstrated by direct injection of human smooth muscle cells through the medial cavities. The optimum cell dispersion was observed in the highest porosity scaffold, with large cell numbers retained within the medial layer after 24 h static culture. In summary, this study presents a novel customized decellularized vascular scaffold that has the capability of bulk seeding the media, and in tandem to this method, the porosity of the scaffold has been increased without compromising the

  12. A Simulation Model for Measuring Customer Satisfaction through Employee Satisfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zondiros, Dimitris; Konstantopoulos, Nikolaos; Tomaras, Petros

    2007-12-01

    Customer satisfaction is defined as a measure of how a firm's product or service performs compared to customer's expectations. It has long been a subject of research due to its importance for measuring marketing and business performance. A lot of models have been developed for its measurement. This paper propose a simulation model using employee satisfaction as one of the most important factors leading to customer satisfaction (the others being expectations and disconfirmation of expectations). Data obtained from a two-year survey in customers of banks in Greece were used. The application of three approaches regarding employee satisfaction resulted in greater customer satisfaction when there is serious effort to keep employees satisfied.

  13. Mining Customer Change Model Based on Swarm Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Peng; Zhu, Yunlong

    Understanding and adapting to changes of customer behavior is an important aspect of surviving in a continuously changing market environment for a modern company. The concept of customer change model mining is introduced and its process is analyzed in this paper. A customer change model mining method based on swarm intelligence is presented, and the strategies of pheromone updating and items searching are given. Finally, an examination on two customer datasets of a telecom company illuminates that this method can achieve customer change model efficiently.

  14. The utility and its customer: A complex relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Covelli, L.; Williams, M.V.

    1994-11-01

    Developing methods of tracking customer satisfaction for utilities presents major problems since the customer reacts to the utility on many different levels. The more obvious are in relation to the product (energy) and the services the company provides. More recently there has been talk of the {open_quotes}brand{close_quotes} elements of the company-customer relationship. Ontario Hydro (OH) has developed a method utilizing four separate domains for measuring and tracking customer satisfaction: product, service, competitiveness, and institutional relationships. Ontario Hydro conducted a survey of over 1200 residential customers. The respondents received a detailed in-person survey of their estimation of the importance of specific aspects of customer service and their view of Ontario Hydro`s performance on those same issues. The data yielded 28 factors covered a large variety of separate concerns: customer service, and treatment of customers to export policy. OH concluded that the utility`s relationship with its customer is more complex than the susual customer-vendor interaction. A utility not only provides a product and a service, it has a institutional personality and provides an absolutely necessary product under an exclusive franchise and executes government policy as a regulated monopoly. It was found that customers are sensitive to all of these attributes.

  15. Preintervention analysis and improvement of customer greeting in a restaurant.

    PubMed

    Therrien, Kelly; Wilder, David A; Rodriguez, Manuel; Wine, Byron

    2005-01-01

    We examined customer greeting by employees at one location of a sandwich restaurant chain. First, a preintervention analysis was conducted to determine the conditions under which greeting a customer within 3 s of his or her entry into the restaurant did and did not occur. Results suggested that an appropriate customer greeting was most likely to occur when a door chime was used to indicate that a customer had entered the store and when the store manager was present behind the service counter. Next, a performance improvement intervention, which consisted of the combination of the use of a door chime and manager presence, was evaluated. Results showed that during baseline, a mean of 6% of customers were greeted; during intervention a mean of 63% of customers were greeted. The addition of manager-delivered verbal and graphic group feedback resulted in 100% of customers being greeted across two consecutive sessions.

  16. Improving Customer Satisfaction in an R and D Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Anita; Liou, Y. H. Andrew

    1998-01-01

    Satisfying customer needs is critical to the sustained competitive advantage of service suppliers. It is therefore important to understand the types of customer needs which, if fulfilled or exceeded, add value and contribute to overall customer satisfaction. This study identifies the needs of various research and development (R&D) customers who contract for engineering and design support services. The Quality Function Deployment (QFD) process was used to organize and translate each customer need into performance measures that, if implemented, can improve customer satisfaction. This study also provides specific performance measures that will more accurately guide the efforts of the engineering supplier. These organizations can either implement the QFD methodology presented herein or extract a few performance measures that are specific to the quality dimensions in need of improvement. Listening to 'what' customers talk about is a good first start.

  17. Formulation of custom sized LX-15 granules

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, T.W.

    1980-04-01

    LX-15 is a booster explosive formulation consisting of 95% HNS I and 5% Kel F-800 developed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The purpose of this effort was to develop formulation techniques for the production of custom size granules that are amenable for processing in automatic weighing equipment. This report details processes whereby 0.4 and 1.5 kg size batches are produced, meeting those requirements. Efforts to date have found that granule size is dependent on batch/vessel size, water-to-solvent ratio and the degree of vessel agitation.

  18. Courtesy in caring. The patient as customer.

    PubMed

    DeBaca, V

    1990-01-01

    If you were paying $500 a night for a hotel room,. would you be happy if you were told you would be sharing it with a stranger? While such a question cannot be literally asked about a hospital experience, metaphorically it can be--and is--asked every time a patient enters a hospital. The idea of patient-as-consumer is not longer just another trendy concept but an integral part of the way many hospitals do business, and it's the hospital manager's responsibility to ensure the customer's satisfaction. PMID:10105899

  19. 3D modeling, custom implants and its future perspectives in craniofacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Custom implants for the reconstruction of craniofacial defects have gained importance due to better performance over their generic counterparts. This is due to the precise adaptation to the region of implantation, reduced surgical times and better cosmesis. Application of 3D modeling in craniofacial surgery is changing the way surgeons are planning surgeries and graphic designers are designing custom implants. Advances in manufacturing processes and ushering of additive manufacturing for direct production of implants has eliminated the constraints of shape, size and internal structure and mechanical properties making it possible for the fabrication of implants that conform to the physical and mechanical requirements of the region of implantation. This article will review recent trends in 3D modeling and custom implants in craniofacial reconstruction. PMID:24987592

  20. Psychosocial risk factors among telephone service workers: a study of the interaction between customer and worker.

    PubMed

    Scarone, Mireya; Cedillo, Leonor A

    2007-01-01

    Many activities in the telephone industry involve interaction with customers, including both traditional (for example, client assistance) and emerging services (product sales). Interaction with customers has been reported to cause stress in workers. The study was initiated as a consequence of changes in dialing of long-distance numbers. The main sources of stress among workers in Traffic and Customer Services Departments were analyzed, together with the resulting psychological distress and other health symptoms. Information was gathered through semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire containing the Spanish version of the Job Content Questionnaire, as well as psychological strain and health symptoms items. Questions developed specifically for this study concerned emotional demands, client interactions, and mechanisms used to deal with violent or unpleasant interactions. Workers received valuable information from the study that empowered them to demand improved working conditions. PMID:17434865

  1. Frontorbital Fibrous Dysplasia Resection and Reconstruction With Custom Polyetherlatone Alloplast.

    PubMed

    Nahumi, Nadav; Shohet, Michael R; Bederson, Joshua B; Elahi, Ebrahim

    2015-11-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign, pathological development of bone. Craniofacial bones are the most commonly involved and can potentially cause visual disturbance, proptosis, orbital dystopia, and facial deformity. This case involves a 13-year-old girl with significant proptosis (20 mm left, 17.5 mm right) and downward displacement of the left globe (1.5 mm) due to fibrous dysplasia. Reconstruction was performed with computed tomography-derived and 3D printed custom polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implantation. PEEK is a nonabsorbable, nonporous thermoplastic polymer notable for its ability to be modified intraoperatively and ideal imaging properties postoperatively. Never, to our knowledge, has PEEK been used for primary reconstruction of the frontal orbital region in fibrous dysplasia in a child. The lesion was successfully repaired with excellent aesthetic and no apparent damage to neurovascular or ocular structures. PMID:26594985

  2. Support for Diagnosis of Custom Computer Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molock, Dwaine S.

    2008-01-01

    The Coldfire SDN Diagnostics software is a flexible means of exercising, testing, and debugging custom computer hardware. The software is a set of routines that, collectively, serve as a common software interface through which one can gain access to various parts of the hardware under test and/or cause the hardware to perform various functions. The routines can be used to construct tests to exercise, and verify the operation of, various processors and hardware interfaces. More specifically, the software can be used to gain access to memory, to execute timer delays, to configure interrupts, and configure processor cache, floating-point, and direct-memory-access units. The software is designed to be used on diverse NASA projects, and can be customized for use with different processors and interfaces. The routines are supported, regardless of the architecture of a processor that one seeks to diagnose. The present version of the software is configured for Coldfire processors on the Subsystem Data Node processor boards of the Solar Dynamics Observatory. There is also support for the software with respect to Mongoose V, RAD750, and PPC405 processors or their equivalents.

  3. Computer Model Used to Help Customize Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, Laurel J.; Veris, Jenise

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Radhakrishnan, a researcher at the NASA Glenn Research Center, in collaboration with biomedical researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, is developing computational models of human physiology that quantitate metabolism and its regulation, in both healthy and pathological states. These models can help predict the effects of stresses or interventions, such as drug therapies, and contribute to the development of customized medicine. Customized medical treatment protocols can give more comprehensive evaluations and lead to more specific and effective treatments for patients, reducing treatment time and cost. Commercial applications of this research may help the pharmaceutical industry identify therapeutic needs and predict drug-drug interactions. Researchers will be able to study human metabolic reactions to particular treatments while in different environments as well as establish more definite blood metabolite concentration ranges in normal and pathological states. These computational models may help NASA provide the background for developing strategies to monitor and safeguard the health of astronauts and civilians in space stations and colonies. They may also help to develop countermeasures that ameliorate the effects of both acute and chronic space exposure.

  4. Store manager performance and satisfaction: effects on store employee performance and satisfaction, store customer satisfaction, and store customer spending growth.

    PubMed

    Netemeyer, Richard G; Maxham, James G; Lichtenstein, Donald R

    2010-05-01

    Based on emotional contagion theory and the value-profit chain literatures, the present study posits a number of hypotheses that show how managers in the small store, small number of employees retail context may affect store employees, customers, and potentially store performance. With data from 306 store managers, 1,615 store customer-contact employees, and 57,656 customers of a single retail chain, the authors examined relationships among store manager job satisfaction and job performance, store customer-contact employee job satisfaction and job performance, customer satisfaction with the retailer, and a customer-spending-based store performance metric (customer spending growth over a 2-year period). Via path analysis, several hypothesized direct and interaction relations among these constructs are supported. The results suggest implications for academic researchers and retail managers. PMID:20476831

  5. Store manager performance and satisfaction: effects on store employee performance and satisfaction, store customer satisfaction, and store customer spending growth.

    PubMed

    Netemeyer, Richard G; Maxham, James G; Lichtenstein, Donald R

    2010-05-01

    Based on emotional contagion theory and the value-profit chain literatures, the present study posits a number of hypotheses that show how managers in the small store, small number of employees retail context may affect store employees, customers, and potentially store performance. With data from 306 store managers, 1,615 store customer-contact employees, and 57,656 customers of a single retail chain, the authors examined relationships among store manager job satisfaction and job performance, store customer-contact employee job satisfaction and job performance, customer satisfaction with the retailer, and a customer-spending-based store performance metric (customer spending growth over a 2-year period). Via path analysis, several hypothesized direct and interaction relations among these constructs are supported. The results suggest implications for academic researchers and retail managers.

  6. 77 FR 36568 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request: Generic Customer Satisfaction Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request: Generic Customer Satisfaction... information: Title of Proposal: Generic--Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB Control Number, if applicable... our customers. HUD will conduct various customer satisfaction surveys to gather feedback and...

  7. The Customer Flow Toolkit: A Framework for Designing High Quality Customer Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Association of Training and Employment Professionals, Albany.

    This document presents a toolkit to assist staff involved in the design and development of New York's one-stop system. Section 1 describes the preplanning issues to be addressed and the intended outcomes that serve as the framework for creation of the customer flow toolkit. Section 2 outlines the following strategies to assist in designing local…

  8. 47 CFR 64.5105 - Use of customer proprietary network information without customer approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS RULES RELATING TO COMMON CARRIERS TRS Customer... approval. (a) A TRS provider may use, disclose, or permit access to CPNI for the purpose of providing or lawfully marketing service offerings among the categories of service (i.e., type of TRS) for which the...

  9. 47 CFR 64.5105 - Use of customer proprietary network information without customer approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS RULES RELATING TO COMMON CARRIERS TRS Customer... approval. (a) A TRS provider may use, disclose, or permit access to CPNI for the purpose of providing or lawfully marketing service offerings among the categories of service (i.e., type of TRS) for which the...

  10. Beyond Customer Satisfaction: Reexamining Customer Loyalty to Evaluate Continuing Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Jeff E.; Howell, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides questionnaire items and a theoretical model of factors predictive of customer loyalty for use by administrators to determine ways to increase repeat purchasing in their continuing education programs. Prior studies in the literature are discussed followed by results of applying the model at one institution and a discussion of…

  11. Early warning system for potential churners among mortgage customers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irpan, Hamidah Muhd; Aidid, Sharifah Sakinah Syed Hassan; Mohmad, Sarahiza; Ibrahim, Noorazilah

    2014-07-01

    Retaining existing customer is a major task for many companies because cost to acquire new customers is higher than retaining existing customers. For mortgage business in Bank X, customer relationship management plays a big role to understand their customers' profile and churners so that suitable action can be done to retain their potential churners. Objectives of this study are (1) understanding their customers' profile and churners, (2) modeling potential churners using neural network model and (3) to deploy the model to identify potential churners. Data was divided into two parts: sampling (67,470 cases) and scoring (4,488 cases). Analysis was done using SAS Enterprise Miner. Dependent variable is churner/non churner while independent variables are balance and amount of loan, interest rate offered installment amount, loan performance, months in arrear, vintage, tenure, age, race and gender. Potential churners were identified as Malays, followed by Indian, other races and Chinese. Nonperforming loan and male customers tend to churn compared to performing loan and female customers. Younger customers with small loan amount, balance and monthly instalment, higher interest rate, have many months in arrears, longer vintage and tenure have higher tendency to churn from Bank X. Hence, Bank X should focus on the potential churners for their campaign to minimize the expenses of retaining existing customers by doing an effective campaign with high successful rate.

  12. Do it right this time: the role of employee service recovery performance in customer-perceived justice and customer loyalty after service failures.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hui

    2007-03-01

    Integrating justice and customer service literatures, this research examines the role of customer service employees' behaviors of handling customer complaints, or service recovery performance (SRP), in conveying a just image of service organizations and achieving desirable customer outcomes. Results from a field study and a laboratory study demonstrate that the dimensions of SRP--making an apology, problem solving, being courteous, and prompt handling--positively influenced customer satisfaction and then customer repurchase intent through the mediation of customer-perceived justice. In addition, service failure severity and repeated failures reduced the positive impact of some dimensions of SRP on customer satisfaction, and customer-perceived justice again mediated these moderated effects.

  13. 22 CFR 127.4 - Authority of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Authority of U.S. Immigration and Customs.... Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers. (a) U.S. Immigration and... subchapter or by exemption. (b) U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and...

  14. 22 CFR 127.4 - Authority of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Authority of U.S. Immigration and Customs.... Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers. (a) U.S. Immigration and.... (b) U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers have...

  15. 22 CFR 127.4 - Authority of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Authority of U.S. Immigration and Customs.... Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers. (a) U.S. Immigration and.... (b) U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers have...

  16. 22 CFR 127.4 - Authority of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Authority of U.S. Immigration and Customs.... Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers. (a) U.S. Immigration and.... (b) U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers have...

  17. 22 CFR 127.4 - Authority of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Authority of U.S. Immigration and Customs.... Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers. (a) U.S. Immigration and... subchapter or by exemption. (b) U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and...

  18. 19 CFR 4.101 - Prohibitions against Customs officers and employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prohibitions against Customs officers and employees. 4.101 Section 4.101 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... against Customs officers and employees. No Customs officer or employee shall: (a) Own, in whole or in...

  19. 19 CFR 191.184 - Merchandise transferred from continuous Customs custody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Merchandise transferred from continuous Customs custody. 191.184 Section 191.184 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... From Customs Territory § 191.184 Merchandise transferred from continuous Customs custody. (a)...

  20. 17 CFR 1.36 - Record of securities and property received from customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... from customers or retail forex customers in lieu of money to margin, purchase, guarantee, or secure the commodity interests of such customers or retail forex customers. Such record shall show separately for each customer or retail forex customer: A description of the securities or property received; the name...